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Sample records for cell nuclei

  1. Thermal instability of cell nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmt, Enrico; Kießling, Tobias R.; Stange, Roland; Fritsch, Anatol W.; Zink, Mareike; Käs, Josef A.

    2014-07-01

    DNA is known to be a mechanically and thermally stable structure. In its double stranded form it is densely packed within the cell nucleus and is thermo-resistant up to 70\\:^\\circ {\\rm{C}}. In contrast, we found a sudden loss of cell nuclei integrity at relatively moderate temperatures ranging from 45 to 55\\:^\\circ {\\rm{C}}. In our study, suspended cells held in an optical double beam trap were heated under controlled conditions while monitoring the nuclear shape. At specific critical temperatures, an irreversible sudden shape transition of the nuclei was observed. These temperature induced transitions differ in abundance and intensity for various normal and cancerous epithelial breast cells, which clearly characterizes different cell types. Our results show that temperatures slightly higher than physiological conditions are able to induce instabilities of nuclear structures, eventually leading to cell death. This is a surprising finding since recent thermorheological cell studies have shown that cells have a lower viscosity and are thus more deformable upon temperature increase. Since the nucleus is tightly coupled to the outer cell shape via the cytoskeleton, the force propagation of nuclear reshaping to the cell membrane was investigated in combination with the application of cytoskeletal drugs.

  2. Release of cell-free ice nuclei by Erwinia herbicola.

    OpenAIRE

    Phelps, P; Giddings, T. H.; Prochoda, M; Fall, R

    1986-01-01

    Several ice-nucleating bacterial strains, including Erwinia herbicola, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas syringae isolates, were examined for their ability to shed ice nuclei into the growth medium. Only E. herbicola isolates shed cell-free ice nuclei active at -2 to -10 degrees C. These cell-free nuclei exhibited a freezing spectrum similar to that of ice nuclei found on whole cells, both above and below -5 degrees C. Partially purified cell-free nuclei were examined by density gradie...

  3. Mapping eGFP Oligomer Mobility in Living Cell Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Dross; Corentin Spriet; Monika Zwerger; Gabriele Müller; Waldemar Waldeck; Jörg Langowski

    2009-01-01

    Movement of particles in cell nuclei can be affected by viscosity, directed flows, active transport, or the presence of obstacles such as the chromatin network. Here we investigate whether the mobility of small fluorescent proteins is affected by the chromatin density. Diffusion of inert fluorescent proteins was studied in living cell nuclei using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) with a two-color confocal scanning detection system. We first present experiments exposing FCS-specific...

  4. nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkov N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the effects of quadrupole-octupole deformations on the energy and magnetic properties of high-K isomeric states in even-even heavy and superheavy nuclei. The neutron two-quasiparticle (2qp isomeric energies and magnetic dipole moments are calculated within a deformed shell model with the Bardeen-Cooper- Schrieffer (BCS pairing interaction over a wide range of quadrupole and octupole deformations. We found that in most cases the magnetic moments exhibit a pronounced sensitivity to the octupole deformation, while the 2qp energies indicate regions of nuclei in which the presence of high-K isomeric states may be associated with the presence of octupole softness or even with octupole deformation. In the present work we also examine the influence of the BCS pairing strength on the energy of the blocked isomer configuration. We show that the formation of 2qp energy minima in the space of quadrupole-octupole and eventually higher multipolarity deformations is a subtle effect depending on nuclear pairing correlations.

  5. Chromatin factors affecting DNA repair in mammalian cell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are investigating chromatin factors that participate in the incision step of DNA repair in eukaryotic cells. Localization of repair activity within nuclei, the stability and extractability of activity, the specificity for recognizing damage in chromatin or purified DNA as substrates are of interest in this investigation of human cells, CHO cells, and their radiation sensitive mutants. We have developed procedures that provide nuclei in which their DNA behaves as a collection of circular molecules. The integrity of the DNA in human nuclei can be maintained during incubation in appropriate buffers for as long as 60 minutes. When cells or nuclei are exposed to uv light prior to incubation, incisions presumably associated with DNA repair can be demonstrated. Incision activity is stable to prior extraction of nuclei with 0.6 M NaCl, which removes many nonhistone proteins. Our studies are consistent with an hypothesis that factors responsible for initiating DNA repair are localized in the nuclear matrix. 18 references, 3 figures

  6. HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düringer, Caroline; Hamiche, Ali; Gustafsson, Lotta; Kimura, Hiroshi; Svanborg, Catharina

    2003-10-24

    HAMLET is a folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin in an active complex with oleic acid. HAMLET selectively enters tumor cells, accumulates in their nuclei and induces apoptosis-like cell death. This study examined the interactions of HAMLET with nuclear constituents and identified histones as targets. HAMLET was found to bind histone H3 strongly and to lesser extent histones H4 and H2B. The specificity of these interactions was confirmed using BIAcore technology and chromatin assembly assays. In vivo in tumor cells, HAMLET co-localized with histones and perturbed the chromatin structure; HAMLET was found associated with chromatin in an insoluble nuclear fraction resistant to salt extraction. In vitro, HAMLET bound strongly to histones and impaired their deposition on DNA. We conclude that HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei and propose that this interaction locks the cells into the death pathway by irreversibly disrupting chromatin organization.

  7. Mapping eGFP Oligomer Mobility in Living Cell Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwerger, Monika; Müller, Gabriele; Waldeck, Waldemar; Langowski, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Movement of particles in cell nuclei can be affected by viscosity, directed flows, active transport, or the presence of obstacles such as the chromatin network. Here we investigate whether the mobility of small fluorescent proteins is affected by the chromatin density. Diffusion of inert fluorescent proteins was studied in living cell nuclei using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) with a two-color confocal scanning detection system. We first present experiments exposing FCS-specific artifacts encountered in live cell studies as well as strategies to prevent them, in particular those arising from the choice of the fluorophore used for calibration of the focal volume, as well as temperature and acquisition conditions used for fluorescence fluctuation measurements. After defining the best acquisition conditions, we show for various human cell lines that the mobility of GFP varies significantly within the cell nucleus, but does not correlate with chromatin density. The intranuclear diffusional mobility strongly depends on protein size: in a series of GFP-oligomers, used as free inert fluorescent tracers, the diffusion coefficient decreased from the monomer to the tetramer much more than expected for molecules free in aqueous solution. Still, the entire intranuclear chromatin network is freely accessible for small proteins up to the size of eGFP-tetramers, regardless of the chromatin density or cell line. Even the densest chromatin regions do not exclude free eGFP-monomers or multimers. PMID:19347038

  8. Mapping eGFP oligomer mobility in living cell nuclei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Dross

    Full Text Available Movement of particles in cell nuclei can be affected by viscosity, directed flows, active transport, or the presence of obstacles such as the chromatin network. Here we investigate whether the mobility of small fluorescent proteins is affected by the chromatin density. Diffusion of inert fluorescent proteins was studied in living cell nuclei using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS with a two-color confocal scanning detection system. We first present experiments exposing FCS-specific artifacts encountered in live cell studies as well as strategies to prevent them, in particular those arising from the choice of the fluorophore used for calibration of the focal volume, as well as temperature and acquisition conditions used for fluorescence fluctuation measurements. After defining the best acquisition conditions, we show for various human cell lines that the mobility of GFP varies significantly within the cell nucleus, but does not correlate with chromatin density. The intranuclear diffusional mobility strongly depends on protein size: in a series of GFP-oligomers, used as free inert fluorescent tracers, the diffusion coefficient decreased from the monomer to the tetramer much more than expected for molecules free in aqueous solution. Still, the entire intranuclear chromatin network is freely accessible for small proteins up to the size of eGFP-tetramers, regardless of the chromatin density or cell line. Even the densest chromatin regions do not exclude free eGFP-monomers or multimers.

  9. Appearance of differentiated cells derived from polar body nuclei in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

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    Hiroki eSakai

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn Bombyx mori, polar body nuclei are observed until 9h after egg lying, however, the fate of polar body nuclei remains unclear. To examine the fate of polar body nuclei, we employed a mutation of serosal cell pigmentation, pink-eyed white egg (pe. The heterozygous pe/+pe females produced black serosal cells in white eggs, while pe/pe females did not produce black serosal cells in white eggs. These results suggest that the appearance of black serosal cells in white eggs depends on the genotype (pe/ +pe of the mother. Because the polar body nuclei had +pe genes in the white eggs laid by a pe/ +pe female, polar body nuclei participate in development and differentiate into functional cell (serosal cells. Analyses of serosal cells pigmentation indicated that approximately 30% of the eggs contained polar-body-nucleus-derived cells. These results demonstrate that polar-body-nucleus-derived cells appeared at a high frequency under natural conditions. Approximately 80% of polar-body-nucleus-derived cells appeared near the anterior pole and the dorsal side, which is opposite to where embryogenesis occurs. The number of cells derived from the polar body nuclei was very low. Approximately 26 % of these eggs contained only one black serosal cell. PCR-based analysis revealed that the polar-body-nucleus-derived cells disappeared in late embryonic stages (stage 25. Overall, polar-body-nuclei-derived cells were unlikely to contribute to embryos.

  10. Filopodia-like actin cables position nuclei in association with perinuclear actin in Drosophila nurse cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelsmann, Sven; Ylänne, Jari; Brown, Nicholas H

    2013-09-30

    Controlling the position of the nucleus is vital for a number of cellular processes from yeast to humans. In Drosophila nurse cells, nuclear positioning is crucial during dumping, when nurse cells contract and expel their contents into the oocyte. We provide evidence that in nurse cells, continuous filopodia-like actin cables, growing from the plasma membrane and extending to the nucleus, achieve nuclear positioning. These actin cables move nuclei away from ring canals. When nurse cells contract, actin cables associate laterally with the nuclei, in some cases inducing nuclear turning so that actin cables become partially wound around the nuclei. Our data suggest that a perinuclear actin meshwork connects actin cables to nuclei via actin-crosslinking proteins such as the filamin Cheerio. We provide a revised model for how actin structures position nuclei in nurse cells, employing evolutionary conserved machinery.

  11. ''Tailed'' nuclei are a possible cell marker of radiational effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study of peripheral blood smears from irradiated patients (liquidators of consequences of the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Plant accident) has shown nuclei of some lymphocytes to have a protrusion into the cytoplasm. Such abnormal nuclei are called ''tailed'' nuclei (TN). The mean frequency of appearance of lymphocytes with TN in the group of irradiated patients (n=136) amounted to 0.59%, whereas in the group of healthy donors (n=50), 0.15% (the difference between the groups is statistically significant). The correlation coefficient between the indicators ''frequency of lymphocytes with NT'' and ''frequency of lymphocytes with dicentric chromosomes'' was 0.73 (n=47, p<0.001). By the method of bicolour FISH there was revealed localization of the near-centromere (not more than two signals) and telomere (not more than one signal) regions in the nuclear ''tails''. Abnormalities of the TN type in lymphocytes are likely to result from breakdowns of chromosomal bridges formed by dicentric chromosomes. (author)

  12. Observation of DNA and protein distributions in mammalian cell nuclei using STXM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohigashi, Takuji; Ito, Atsushi; Shinohara, Kunio; Tone, Shigenobu; Kado, Masataka; Inagaki, Yuichi; Wang, Yu-Fu; Kosugi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    A whole A549 cell and isolated nuclei of HeLa S3 cells in the apoptotic process were investigated by using a scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) in the UVSOR Synchrotron (Okazaki, Japan). Near edge X-ray absorption fine structures (NEXAFS) of DNA and histone in the N K-edge region were measured as reference and their distribution in the nuclei was determined by using these reference spectra. The four stages of the apoptosis were successfully distinguished.

  13. Identification of cardiomyocyte nuclei and assessment of ploidy for the analysis of cell turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assays to quantify myocardial renewal rely on the accurate identification of cardiomyocyte nuclei. We previously 14C birth dated human cardiomyocytes based on the nuclear localization of cTroponins T and I. A recent report by Kajstura et al. suggested that cTroponin I is only localized to the nucleus in a senescent subpopulation of cardiomyocytes, implying that 14C birth dating of cTroponin T and I positive cell populations underestimates cardiomyocyte renewal in humans. We show here that the isolation of cell nuclei from the heart by flow cytometry with antibodies against cardiac Troponins T and I, as well as pericentriolar material 1 (PCM-1), allows for isolation of close to all cardiomyocyte nuclei, based on ploidy and marker expression. We also present a reassessment of cardiomyocyte ploidy, which has important implications for the analysis of cell turnover, and iododeoxyuridine (IdU) incorporation data. These data provide the foundation for reliable analysis of cardiomyocyte turnover in humans.

  14. Studies on the Developmental Potentiality of Cultured Cell Nuclei of Fish

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    Hongxi Chen, Yonglan Yi, Minrong Chen, Xingqi Yang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available By means of the serial nuclear transplantation technique, the authors obtained a nuclear transplant fish from subcultured cell originated from the blastula cells of the crucian carp (Carassius auratus Linnaeus. This nuclear transplant fish survived for three years, but its sexual glands were undifferentiated. The authors have also obtained a sexually mature adult fish from short-term cultured kidney cell nucleus of an adult crucian carp. Results of the experiment implied that the subcultured cell nuclei of fish blastula cells and the specialized somatic cell nuclei of adult fish still retained their developmental totipotency, and thus, it indicated that there is a possibility of fish somatic cell breeding through the use of nuclear transplantation.

  15. Glioma grading using cell nuclei morphologic features in digital pathology images

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    Reza, Syed M. S.; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2016-03-01

    This work proposes a computationally efficient cell nuclei morphologic feature analysis technique to characterize the brain gliomas in tissue slide images. In this work, our contributions are two-fold: 1) obtain an optimized cell nuclei segmentation method based on the pros and cons of the existing techniques in literature, 2) extract representative features by k-mean clustering of nuclei morphologic features to include area, perimeter, eccentricity, and major axis length. This clustering based representative feature extraction avoids shortcomings of extensive tile [1] [2] and nuclear score [3] based methods for brain glioma grading in pathology images. Multilayer perceptron (MLP) is used to classify extracted features into two tumor types: glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and low grade glioma (LGG). Quantitative scores such as precision, recall, and accuracy are obtained using 66 clinical patients' images from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) [4] dataset. On an average ~94% accuracy from 10 fold crossvalidation confirms the efficacy of the proposed method.

  16. Biological activity assays of cell-free reassembled nuclei——Injecting cell-free reassembled nuclei into unfertilized eggs can induce the eggs to cleave and reconstitute asters,and the injected nuclei undergo cell cycle changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张传茂; 曲健; 梁金华; 翟中和

    1995-01-01

    Nucleus may reassemble spontaneously in cell-free mixture of HeLa metaphase chromosomes,Xenopus egg extracts and ATP-regenerating system,and the nucleus shows some biological activities.It isfound that,after being injected into unfertilized mature eggs,the cell-free reassembled nuclei can cause theeggs to cleave and reconstitute asters in their cytoplasm,and the injected nuclei undergo changes in response tocell cycle regulators stored in the eggs,and that reinjecting cytostatic factors(CSF)into the eggs can stabilizethe eggs in mitotic phase,cause the nuclei disassembly and chromatin condensation to chromosomes.

  17. Filopodia-like actin cables position nuclei in association with perinuclear actin in Drosophila nurse cells

    OpenAIRE

    Huelsmann, Sven; Ylänne, Jari; Brown, Nicholas H

    2013-01-01

    Summary Controlling the position of the nucleus is vital for a number of cellular processes from yeast to humans. In Drosophila nurse cells, nuclear positioning is crucial during dumping, when nurse cells contract and expel their contents into the oocyte. We provide evidence that in nurse cells, continuous filopodia-like actin cables, growing from the plasma membrane and extending to the nucleus, achieve nuclear positioning. These actin cables move nuclei away from ring canals. When nurse cel...

  18. Fluorescent Magnesium Nanocomplex in Protein Scaffold for Cell Nuclei Imaging Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, Alok [Ahmedabad Univ. (India); Tripathi, Apritam [Ahmedabad Univ. (India); Purohit, Rahul [Ahmedabad Univ. (India); Singh, Sanjay [Ahmedabad Univ. (India); Nandasiri, Manjula I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Karakoti, Ajay S. [Ahmedabad Univ. (India); Singh, Surinder P. [National Physical Lab., New Delhi (India); Shanker, Rishi [Ahmedabad Univ. (India)

    2015-10-27

    Here in, we report a facile strategy for the synthesis of water-soluble ultra-fine blue emitting fluorescent Magnesium nanoparticles-protein complex (MgNC). This MgNC is demonstrated to exhibit excellent photo stability and biocompatibility. It was also observed that MgNC stain cell nuclei with high specifcity.

  19. Cytophotometric investigation of DNA and RNA content in nuclei of active Strasburger cells in Pinus nigra var. austriaca (Hoess) Badoux.

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    Sauter, J J; Ulrich, H

    1977-01-01

    The nuclei of active, sieve cell-associated Strasburger cells in the secondary phloem of Pinus nigra var. austriaca (Hoess) Badoux have been studied for their structure and DNA and RNA content. No difference in size compared to those of ordinary ray cells was found. The nuclear surface is often increased by an ameboid or lobed shape. The amount of highly decondensed chromatin is greatly increased. Cytophotometric measurements of DNA content of both Feulgen and gallocyanine chromalum-stained nuclei showed normal DNA levels and proved absence of endomitotic polyploidization. RNA content, however, was significantly increased as compared to nuclei of young Strasburger cells and of ordinary ray parenchyma cells. PMID:24420510

  20. Embryonic stem cells generated by nuclear transfer of human somatic nuclei into rabbit oocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING CHEN; QING ZHANG YANG; DA YUAN CHEN; MIN KANG WANG; JIN SONG LI; SHAO LIANG HUANG; XIANG YIN KONG; YAO ZHOU SHI; ZHI QIANG WANG; JIA HUI XIA; ZHI GAO LONG; ZHI XU HE; ZHI GANG XUE; WEN XIANG DING; HUI ZHEN SHENG; AILIAN LIU; KAI WANG; WEN WEI MAO; JIAN XIN CHU; YONG LU; ZHENG FU FANG; YING TANG SHI

    2003-01-01

    To solve the problem of immune incompatibility, nuclear transplantation has been envisaged as a means to produce cells or tissues for human autologous transplantation. Here we have derived embryonic stem cells by the transfer of human somatic nuclei into rabbit oocytes. The number of blastocysts that developed from the fused nuclear transfer was comparable among nuclear donors at ages of 5, 42, 52 and 60 years, and nuclear transfer (NT) embryonic stem cells (ntES cells) were subsequently derived from each of the four age groups. These results suggest that human somatic nuclei can form ntES cells independent of the age of the donor. The derived ntES cells are human based on karyotype, isogenicity, in situ hybridization, PGR and immunocytochemistry with probes that distinguish between the various species. The ntES cells maintain the capability of sustained growth in an undifferentiated state, and form embryoid bodies, which, on further induction, give rise to cell types such as neuron and muscle, as well as mixed cell populations that express markers representative of all three germ layers. Thus, ntES cells derived from human somatic cells by NT to rabbit eggs retain phenotypes similar to those of conventional human ES cells, including the ability to undergo multilineage cellular differentiation.

  1. Cell nuclei attributed relational graphs for efficient representation and classification of gastric cancer in digital histopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Harshita; Zerbe, Norman; Heim, Daniel; Wienert, Stephan; Lohmann, Sebastian; Hellwich, Olaf; Hufnagl, Peter

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a novel graph-based method for efficient representation and subsequent classification in histological whole slide images of gastric cancer. Her2/neu immunohistochemically stained and haematoxylin and eosin stained histological sections of gastric carcinoma are digitized. Immunohistochemical staining is used in practice by pathologists to determine extent of malignancy, however, it is laborious to visually discriminate the corresponding malignancy levels in the more commonly used haematoxylin and eosin stain, and this study attempts to solve this problem using a computer-based method. Cell nuclei are first isolated at high magnification using an automatic cell nuclei segmentation strategy, followed by construction of cell nuclei attributed relational graphs of the tissue regions. These graphs represent tissue architecture comprehensively, as they contain information about cell nuclei morphology as vertex attributes, along with knowledge of neighborhood in the form of edge linking and edge attributes. Global graph characteristics are derived and ensemble learning is used to discriminate between three types of malignancy levels, namely, non-tumor, Her2/neu positive tumor and Her2/neu negative tumor. Performance is compared with state of the art methods including four texture feature groups (Haralick, Gabor, Local Binary Patterns and Varma Zisserman features), color and intensity features, and Voronoi diagram and Delaunay triangulation. Texture, color and intensity information is also combined with graph-based knowledge, followed by correlation analysis. Quantitative assessment is performed using two cross validation strategies. On investigating the experimental results, it can be concluded that the proposed method provides a promising way for computer-based analysis of histopathological images of gastric cancer.

  2. 60Co-γ-irradiation of dried DNA and isolated cell nuclei of chicken erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work low molecular products, which resulted from γ-irradiation of dried DNA, were isolated and quantitatively determined. Unchanged nucleic bases were released. The irradiation was successful in a vacuum as well as in oxygen. In the case of the drily irradiated DNA, the base release made up 30% of the total strand breaks. The release of DNA bases was also first studied in cell nuclei of eucaryotic cells, the erythrocyte nuclei of chicken blood. The second part of this work dealt with the isolation and identification of radiation induced changes in the 2-dioxyribose unit of DNA. In the third part it was investigated, whether as a result of γ-irradiation of DNA malonic dialdehyde was formed. It could be shown that neither malonic aldehyde nor basic propenal were formed, but instead products, which were still bound to the DNA and formed a chromophore with 2-thio barbituric acid. In this work the direct irradiation effect was investigated in DNA systems as well as in erythrocyte nuclei. By the isolation of low molecular irradiation products this work offers a contribution to the understanding of the irradiation chemistry in an eucaryotic cell, in which the direct effect on the DNA and the resulting radiation damage were given a deciding role for genetic information. (orig./MG)

  3. ENHANCEMENT OF NIH3T3 CELL PROLIFERATION BY EXPRESSING MACROPHAGE COLONY STIMULATING FACTOR IN NUCLEI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹震宇; 吴克复; 李戈; 林永敏; 张斌; 郑国光

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of nuclear M-CSF on the process of tumorigenesis. Methods: Functional part of M-CSF cDNA was inserted into an eukaryotic expression plasmid pCMV/myc/nuc, which can add three NLS to the C-terminal of the expressed protein and direct the protein into the cell nuclei. The constructed plasmid was transferred into NIH3T3 cells and the cell clones were selected by G-418 selection. Cell clones stable expressing target protein were identified by RT-PCR, ABC immunohistochemistry assay and Western blot. Cell growth kinetics analyses through growth curves, cell doubling time, MTT test and anti-sense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASODN) inhibiting cell growth test were performed to identify cells proliferation potential. Results: The transfected cells showed elevated proliferation potential over the control cells. Conclusion: Abnormal appearance of M-CSF in nucleus could enhance cell proliferation, which suggests that cytokine isoforms within cell nucleus might play transcription factor-like role.

  4. Germ cell mutagenesis in medaka fish after exposures to high-energy cosmic ray nuclei: A human model

    OpenAIRE

    Shimada, Atsuko; Shima, Akihiro; Nojima, Kumie; Seino, Yo; Setlow, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    Astronauts beyond the Earth's orbit are exposed to high-energy cosmic-ray nuclei with high values of linear energy transfer (LET), resulting in much more biological damage than from x-rays or γ-rays and may result in mutations and cancer induction. The relative biological effectiveness of these nuclei depends on the LET, rising to as high as ≈50 at LET values of ≈100-200 keV/μm. An endpoint of concern is germ cell mutations passed on to offspring, arising from exposure to these nuclei. A vert...

  5. Differential effects of growth temperature on ice nuclei active at different temperatures that are produced by cells of Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurian-Sherman, D; Lindow, S E

    1995-04-01

    The temperature at which ice-nucleating bacteria are grown causes differences of 100- to 10,000-fold in the fraction of cells that nucleate ice at a given temperature (ice nucleation frequency). Ice nucleation frequencies of cells of Pseudomonas syringae grown at temperatures that ranged from 9 to 33 degrees C were examined in order to more accurately characterize physiological effects on ice nuclei active at temperatures of from about -2 to -10 degrees C, the temperature range for this phenotype. Large differences in ice nucleation frequency occurred at all but the lowest assay temperatures in cells of P. syringae grown in the temperature range of 15 to 33 degrees C. These differences in ice nucleation frequency may be attributed, at least in part, to post-translational factors. Because other studies have indicated that ice nuclei active at the lowest assay temperatures may reflect the amount of ice nucleation protein produced, while higher nucleation temperatures reflect aggregates of this ice nucleation protein, data was normalized to the frequency of ice nuclei active at the lowest ice nucleation temperatures (which also correspond to the most abundant nuclei). This was done in order to develop a baseline of comparison for cells grown at different temperatures that more clearly shows possible post-translational effects such as aggregation of the nucleation protein. After this normalization was performed, and in contrast to the results noted above, the number of ice nuclei in cells grown at 9, 15, and 20 degrees C that were active at different assay temperatures was very similar. Differences in ice nucleation frequency that occurred over all assay temperatures in cells grown between 9 and 20 degrees C may be attributed to differences in the total number of nuclei present in the population of cells. The large effects of growth temperature on nucleation frequency have important implications for estimating numbers of ice nucleating bacteria in environmental samples

  6. Germ cell mutagenesis in medaka fish after exposures to high-energy cosmic ray nuclei: A human model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Atsuko; Shima, Akihiro; Nojima, Kumie; Seino, Yo; Setlow, Richard B.

    2005-04-01

    Astronauts beyond the Earth's orbit are exposed to high-energy cosmic-ray nuclei with high values of linear energy transfer (LET), resulting in much more biological damage than from x-rays or -rays and may result in mutations and cancer induction. The relative biological effectiveness of these nuclei depends on the LET, rising to as high as 50 at LET values of 100-200 keV/µm. An endpoint of concern is germ cell mutations passed on to offspring, arising from exposure to these nuclei. A vertebrate model for germ cell mutation is Medaka fish (Oryzias latipes). We exposed wild type males to doses of 1 GeV per nucleon Fe nuclei or to 290 MeV per nucleon C nuclei. They were mated to females with recessive mutations at five-color loci. The transparent embryos from >100 days of mating (representing exposed sperm, spermatids, or spermatogonia) were observed so as to detect dominant lethal mutations and total color mutations, even though the embryos might not hatch. The relative number of mutant embryos as a function of dose were compared with those induced by -rays. The relative biological effectiveness values for dominant lethal mutations and total color mutations for exposed sperm and spermatids were 1.3-2.1 for exposure to C nuclei and 1.5-3.0 for exposure to Fe nuclei. (The spermatogonial data were uncertain.) These low values, and the negligible number of viable mutations, compared with those for mutations in somatic cells and for neoplastic transformation, indicate that germ cell mutations arising from exposures to cosmic ray nuclei are not a significant hazard to astronauts. astronaut hazards | linear energy transfer | relative biological effect

  7. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in both nuclei and mitochondria and regulates cancer cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) localizes in nuclei and binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. → mtTFA contains two putative nuclear localization signals (NLS) in the HMG-boxes. → Overexpression of mtTFA enhances the growth of cancer cells, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibits their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). → Knockdown of mtTFA expression induces p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) is one of the high mobility group protein family and is required for both transcription from and maintenance of mitochondrial genomes. However, the roles of mtTFA have not been extensively studied in cancer cells. Here, we firstly reported the nuclear localization of mtTFA. The proportion of nuclear-localized mtTFA varied among different cancer cells. Some mtTFA binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. DNA microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that mtTFA can regulate the expression of nuclear genes. Overexpression of mtTFA enhanced the growth of cancer cell lines, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibited their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). Knockdown of mtTFA expression induced p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. These results imply that mtTFA functions in both nuclei and mitochondria to promote cell growth.

  8. Nuclear Transfer of Embryonic Cell Nuclei to Non-enucleated Eggs in Zebrafish, Danio rerio

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    Manabu Hattori, Hisashi Hashimoto, Ekaterina Bubenshchikova, Yuko Wakamatsu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously established a novel method for nuclear transfer in medaka (Oryzias latipes using non-enucleated, diploidized eggs as recipients for adult somatic cell nuclei. Here we report the first attempt to apply this method to another fish species. To examine suitability of using non-enucleated eggs as recipients for nuclear transfer in the zebrafish (Danio rerio, we transferred blastula cell nuclei from a wild-type donor strain to non-enucleated, unfertilized eggs from a golden recipient strain. As a result, 31 of 184 (16.8% operated eggs developed normally and reached the adult stage. Twenty-eight (15.2% of these transplants showed wild-type phenotype and the remaining three (1.6% were golden. Except for one individual that exhibited diploid/tetraploid mosaicism, all of the wild-type nuclear transplants were either triploid or diploid. While all of 19 triploid transplants were infertile, a total of six transplants (21.4% were fertile (five of the eight diploid transplants and one transplant exhibiting ploidy mosaicism. Except for one diploid individual, all of the fertile transplants transferred both the wild-type golden gene allele (slc24a5 as well as the phenotype, the wild-type body color, to their F1 and F2 progeny in a typical Mendelian fashion. PCR analysis of slc24a5 suggested that triploidy originated from a fused nucleus in the diploid donor and haploid recipient nuclei, and that the sole origin of diploidy was the diploid donor nucleus. The results of the present study demonstrated the suitability of using non-enucleated eggs as recipients for nuclear transfer experiments in zebrafish.

  9. An Entropy-Based Automated Cell Nuclei Segmentation and Quantification: Application in Analysis of Wound Healing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Oswal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The segmentation and quantification of cell nuclei are two very significant tasks in the analysis of histological images. Accurate results of cell nuclei segmentation are often adapted to a variety of applications such as the detection of cancerous cell nuclei and the observation of overlapping cellular events occurring during wound healing process in the human body. In this paper, an automated entropy-based thresholding system for segmentation and quantification of cell nuclei from histologically stained images has been presented. The proposed translational computation system aims to integrate clinical insight and computational analysis by identifying and segmenting objects of interest within histological images. Objects of interest and background regions are automatically distinguished by dynamically determining 3 optimal threshold values for the 3 color components of an input image. The threshold values are determined by means of entropy computations that are based on probability distributions of the color intensities of pixels and the spatial similarity of pixel intensities within neighborhoods. The effectiveness of the proposed system was tested over 21 histologically stained images containing approximately 1800 cell nuclei, and the overall performance of the algorithm was found to be promising, with high accuracy and precision values.

  10. Neutron capture nuclei-containing carbon nanoparticles for destruction of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kuo Chu; Lai, Po Dong; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Wang, Pei-Jen; Yuan, Chiun-Jye

    2010-11-01

    HeLa cells were incubated with neutron capture nuclei (boron-10 and gadolinium)-containing carbon nanoparticles, followed by irradiation of slow thermal neutron beam. Under a neutron flux of 6 x 10(11) n/cm(2) (or 10 min irradiation at a neutron flux of 1 x 10(9) n/cm(2) s), the percentages of acute cell death at 8 h after irradiation are 52, 55, and 28% for HeLa cells fed with BCo@CNPs, GdCo@CNPs, and Co@CNPs, respectively. The proliferation capability of the survived HeLa cells was also found to be significantly suppressed. At 48 h after neutron irradiation, the cell viability further decreases to 35 +/- 5% as compared to the control set receiving the same amount of neutron irradiation dose but in the absence of carbon nanoparticles. This work demonstrates "proof-of-concept" examples of neutron capture therapy using (10)B-, (157)Gd-, and (59)Co-containing carbon nanoparticles for effective destruction of cancer cells. It will also be reported the preparation and surface functionalization of boron or gadolinium doped core-shell cobalt/carbon nanoparticles (BCo@CNPs, GdCo@CNPs and Co@CNPs) using a modified DC pulsed arc discharge method, and their characterization by various spectroscopic measurements, including TEM, XRD, SQUID, FT-IR, etc. Tumor cell targeting ability was introduced by surface modification of these carbon nanoparticles with folate moieties.

  11. Structural components of the nuclear body in nuclei of Allium cepa cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear bodies have long been noted in interphase nuclei of plant cells,but their structural component,origin and function are still unclear by now.The present work showed in onion cells the nuclear bodies appeared as a spherical structure about 0.3 to 0.8 μm in diameter.They possibly were formed in nucleolus and subsequently released,and entered into nucleoplasm.Observation through cytochemical staining method at the ultrastructural level confirmed that nuclear bodies consisted of ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) and silver-stainable proteins.Immunocytochemical results revealed that nuclear bodies contained no DNA and ribosomal gene transcription factor (UBF).Based on these data,we suggested that nuclear bodies are not related to the ribosome or other gene transcription activities,instead they may act as subnuclear structures for RNPs transport from nucleolus to cytoplasm,and may also be involved in splicing of pre-mRNAs.

  12. Single Molecule Localization Microscopy of Mammalian Cell Nuclei on the Nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Aleksander; Xing, Jun; Birk, Udo J; Cremer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear texture analysis is a well-established method of cellular pathology. It is hampered, however, by the limits of conventional light microscopy (ca. 200 nm). These limits have been overcome by a variety of super-resolution approaches. An especially promising approach to chromatin texture analysis is single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) as it provides the highest resolution using fluorescent based methods. At the present state of the art, using fixed whole cell samples and standard DNA dyes, a structural resolution of chromatin in the 50-100 nm range is obtained using SMLM. We highlight how the combination of localization microscopy with standard fluorophores opens the avenue to a plethora of studies including the spatial distribution of DNA and associated proteins in eukaryotic cell nuclei with the potential to elucidate the functional organization of chromatin. These views are based on our experience as well as on recently published research in this field. PMID:27446198

  13. Morphology of Nurse Cell Nuclei Induced by Meloidodera floridensis: A Graphics Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundo-Ocampo, M; Greene, M; Flaxman, M; Baldwin, J G

    1993-12-01

    The highly irregular distribution of nuclear material in the host nurse cell induced by Meloidodera floridensis has made it difficult to interpret the number of nuclei from two-dimensional micrographs alone. The primary goal of this investigation was to determine the distribution of nuclear material from a three-dimensional solid surface model of the nurse cell nucleus. This model demonstrated the continuity of nuclear material as a single highly irregular nucleus. Custom computer graphics programs were written to accept digitized tracings of nuclear material. From these digitized tracings, a wireframe or polygonalized mesh model was generated. The model was shaded, colored, rotated, and analyzed. This technique provides controlled transparency of the model to display nucleoli within the nucleus. Photographs of the computer screen, color printouts, and video recordings were used to record final results. These refined computer graphic tools have a range of applications in nematode host-parasite relationships, ontogeny, and morphology.

  14. Single Molecule Localization Microscopy of Mammalian Cell Nuclei on the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Aleksander; Xing, Jun; Birk, Udo J.; Cremer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear texture analysis is a well-established method of cellular pathology. It is hampered, however, by the limits of conventional light microscopy (ca. 200 nm). These limits have been overcome by a variety of super-resolution approaches. An especially promising approach to chromatin texture analysis is single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) as it provides the highest resolution using fluorescent based methods. At the present state of the art, using fixed whole cell samples and standard DNA dyes, a structural resolution of chromatin in the 50–100 nm range is obtained using SMLM. We highlight how the combination of localization microscopy with standard fluorophores opens the avenue to a plethora of studies including the spatial distribution of DNA and associated proteins in eukaryotic cell nuclei with the potential to elucidate the functional organization of chromatin. These views are based on our experience as well as on recently published research in this field. PMID:27446198

  15. Necrotic and apoptotic cells serve as nuclei for calcification on osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Masanao; Ogino, Tetsuya; Kobuchi, Hirotsugu; Ohmoto, Naoko; Aoyama, Eriko; Oka, Takashi; Nakanishi, Tohru; Inoue, Keiji; Sasaki, Junzo

    2014-01-01

    A close relationship between cell death and pathological calcification has recently been reported, such as vascular calcification in atherosclerosis. However, the roles of cell death in calcification by osteoblast lineage have not been elucidated in detail. In this study, we investigated whether cell death is involved in the calcification on osteoblastic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) under osteogenic culture in vitro. Apoptosis and necrosis occurred in an osteogenic culture of hMSC, and cell death preceded calcification. The generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species, chromatin condensation and fragmentation, and caspase-3 activation increased in this culture. A pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) and anti-oxidants (Tiron and n-acetylcysteine) inhibited osteogenic culture-induced cell death and calcification. Furthermore, calcification was significantly promoted by the addition of necrotic dead cells or its membrane fraction. Spontaneously dead cells by osteogenic culture and exogenously added necrotic cells were surrounded by calcium deposits. Induction of localized cell death by photodynamic treatment in the osteogenic culture resulted in co-localized calcification. These findings show that necrotic and apoptotic cell deaths were induced in an osteogenic culture of hMSC and indicated that both necrotic and apoptotic cells of osteoblast lineage served as nuclei for calcification on osteoblastic differentiation of hMSC in vitro.

  16. Basic dyes in the staining of DNA-phosphate groups and DNA-aldehyde molecules in cell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel method is presented for the staining of cell nuclei with aqueous solutions of Janus blue, methylene blue, and Janus red in tissue sections from which RNA has been extracted selectively with cold phosphoric acid. Not only this, DNA-aldehyde molecules can also be stained when tissue sections from which RNA has been extracted are then hydrolysed in 6 N hydrochloric acid at 300C for 15 min followed by staining with Janus blue, methylene blue, and Janus red. Following staining with any of these dyes, sections can be dried between folds of filter paper and then treated with n-butanol or passed through grades of ethanol, cleared in xylene and mounted. Staining with Janus blue has been considered to be metachromatic, particularly in the sections of the rectum in which glycogen stains blue-black and the nuclei purplish. An aqueous solution of methylene blue does also stain glycogen blue with similar colour of the nuclei while with Janus red both the nuclei as well as glycogen stain red. The in situ absorption spectra of the nuclei stained with the dyes mentioned, after selective extraction of RNA, reveal peaks of maximum absorption at 560-570 nm (Janus blue), at 600 and 640 nm (methylene blue), and at 530 nm (Janus red). Those of nuclei stained for DNA-aldehyde molecules are at 560 nm (Janus blue), at 600 and 630 nm (methylene blue), and at 520 nm (Janus red). Possible significance of these findings has been discussed. (orig.)

  17. Induction of Apoptosis in Purified Nuclei from Tobacco-Suspension Cells by Cytochrome b6/f Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张贵友; 李萍; 朱瑞宇; 田瑞华; 戴尧仁

    2004-01-01

    An apoptotic cell-free system containing cytosol and nuclei from normally cultured tobacco suspension cells was used to show that a spinach chloroplast preparation can induce apoptosis in nuclei,evidenced by DNA electrophoresis and fluorescence microscopy observations.Further study showed that the chloroplast preparation or its pellet (thylakoid membrane) after hypoosmotic or supersonic treatment still exhibited the apoptosis-inducing activity,but the supernatant had no effect,which indicates that the apoptosis-inducing effector in the chloroplast preparation is water-insoluble.The induction of apoptosis by chloroplast preparation could be attenuated by Ac-DEVD-CHO,the specific inhibitor of Caspase-3,implying involvement of a Caspase-3-like protease during the process.Furthermore,extensive apoptosis in nuclei was induced by cytochrome b6/f on the thylakoid membrane,indicating that this important cytochrome complex may have an important role in the chloroplast-related apoptotic pathway.

  18. Development of a resonant laser ionization gas cell for high-energy, short-lived nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Sonoda, T; Tomita, H; Sakamoto, C; Takatsuka, T; Furukawa, T; Iimura, H; Ito, Y; Kubo, T; Matsuo, Y; Mita, H; Naimi, S; Nakamura, S; Noto, T; Schury, P; Shinozuka, T; Wakui, T; Miyatake, H; Jeong, S; Ishiyama, H; Watanabe, Y X; Hirayama, Y; Okada, K; Takamine, A

    2012-01-01

    A new laser ion source configuration based on resonant photoionization in a gas cell has been developed at RIBF RIKEN. This system is intended for the future PArasitic RI-beam production by Laser Ion-Source (PALIS) project which will be installed at RIKEN's fragment separator, BigRIPS. A novel implementation of differential pumping, in combination with a sextupole ion beam guide (SPIG), has been developed. A few small scroll pumps create a pressure difference from 1000 hPa - 10^-3 Pa within a geometry drastically miniaturized compared to conventional systems. This system can utilize a large exit hole for fast evacuation times, minimizing the decay loss for short-lived nuclei during extraction from a buffer gas cell, while sufficient gas cell pressure is maintained for stopping high energy RI-beams. In spite of the motion in a dense pressure gradient, the photo-ionized ions inside the gas cell are ejected with an assisting force gas jet and successfully transported to a high-vacuum region via SPIG followed by ...

  19. The correlation between uptake of methyl green and Feulgen staining intensity of cell nuclei. An image analysis study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H; Schulte, E; Hoyer, P E

    1989-01-01

    Paraffin sections of rat tissue fixed in either formaldehyde solution (3.6% w/v) or in Carnoy's fluid were stained using standardized Methyl Green-Pyronin procedures with the dyes used either simultaneously or in sequence. The sections were evaluated for the uptake of the two dyes by cell nuclei...... methods seem to be of less value....

  20. Multiparametric analysis, sorting, and transcriptional profiling of plant protoplasts and nuclei according to cell type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, David W; Janda, Jaroslav; Lambert, Georgina M

    2011-01-01

    Flow cytometry has been employed for the analysis of higher plants for approximately the last 30 years. For the angiosperms, ∼500,000 species, itself a daunting number, parametric measurements enabled through the use of flow cytometers started with basic descriptors of the individual cells and their contents, and have both inspired the development of novel cytometric methods that subsequently have been applied to organisms within other kingdoms of life, and adopted cytometric methods devised for other species, particularly mammals. Higher plants offer unique challenges in terms of flow cytometric analysis, notably the facts that their organs and tissues are complex three-dimensional assemblies of different cell types, and that their individual cells are, in general, larger than those of mammals.This chapter provides an overview of the general types of parametric measurement that have been applied to plants, and provides detailed methods for selected examples based on the plant model Arabidopsis thaliana. These illustrate the use of flow cytometry for the analysis of protoplasts and nuclear DNA contents (genome size and the cell cycle). These are further integrated with measurements focusing on specific cell types, based on transgenic expression of Fluorescent Proteins (FPs), and on analysis of the spectrum of transcripts found within protoplasts and nuclei. These measurements were chosen in particular to illustrate, respectively, the issues encountered in the flow analysis and sorting of large biological cells, typified by protoplasts; how to handle flow analyses under conditions that require processing of large numbers of samples in which the individual samples contain only a very small minority of objects of interest; and how to deal with exceptionally small amounts of RNA within the sorted samples.

  1. Phage T4 endonuclease V stimulates DNA repair replication in isolated nuclei from ultraviolet-irradiated human cells, including xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The repair mode of DNA replication has been demonstrated in isolated nuclei from uv-irradiated human cells. Nuclei are incubated in a mixture containing [3H]thymidine triphosphate and bromodeoxyuridine triphosphate in a 1:5 ratio. The 3H at the density of parental DNA in alkaline CsCl density gradients is then a measure of repair. In nuclei prepared from WI38 cells 30 min after irradiation, repair replication is uv-dependent and proceeds at approximately the in vivo rate for 5 min. Repair replication is reduced in irradiated nuclei or in nuclei prepared immediately after irradiation. It is Mg2+-dependent and stimulated by added ATP and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates. No repair replication is observed in nuclei from xeroderma pigmentosum (complementation group A) cells. However, upon addition of coliphage T4 endonuclease V, which specifically nicks DNA containing pyrimidine dimers, repair replication is observed in nuclei from irradiated xeroderma pigmentosum cells and is stimulated in WI38 nuclei. The reaction then persists for an hour and is dependent upon added ATP and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates. The repair label is in stretches of roughly 35 nucleotides, as it is in intact cells. Added pancreatic DNase does not promote uv-dependent repair synthesis. Our results support the view that xeroderma pigmentosum (group A) cells are defective in the incision step of the DNA excision repair pathway, and demonstrate the utility of this system for probing DNA repair mechanisms

  2. Methods to isolate a large amount of generative cells, sperm cells and vegetative nuclei from tomato pollen for omics analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong eLu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of sperm cells from microspores involves a set of finely regulated molecular and cellular events and the coordination of these events. The mechanisms underlying these events and their interconnections remain a major challenge. Systems analysis of genome-wide molecular networks and functional modules with high-throughput omics approaches is crucial for understanding the mechanisms; however, this study is hindered because of the difficulty in isolating a large amount of cells of different types, especially generative cells (GCs, from the pollen. Here, we optimized the conditions of tomato pollen germination and pollen tube growth to allow for long-term growth of pollen tubes in vitro with sperm cells (SCs generated in the tube. Using this culture system, we developed methods for isolating GCs, SCs and vegetative-cell nuclei (VN from just-germinated tomato pollen grains and growing pollen tubes and their purification by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. The purity and viability of isolated GCs and SCs were confirmed by microscopy examination and fluorescein diacetate staining, respectively, and the integrity of VN was confirmed by propidium iodide staining. We could obtain about 1.5 million GCs and 2.0 million SCs each from 180 mg initiated pollen grains, and 10 million VN from 270 mg initiated pollen grains germinated in vitro in each experiment. These methods provide the necessary preconditions for systematic biology studies of SC development and differentiation in higher plants.

  3. Three-Dimensional, Live-Cell Imaging of Chromatin Dynamics in Plant Nuclei Using Chromatin Tagging Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Takeshi; Matsunaga, Sachihiro

    2016-01-01

    In plants, chromatin dynamics spatiotemporally change in response to various environmental stimuli. However, little is known about chromatin dynamics in the nuclei of plants. Here, we introduce a three-dimensional, live-cell imaging method that can monitor chromatin dynamics in nuclei via a chromatin tagging system that can visualize specific genomic loci in living plant cells. The chromatin tagging system is based on a bacterial operator/repressor system in which the repressor is fused to fluorescent proteins. A recent refinement of promoters for the system solved the problem of gene silencing and abnormal pairing frequencies between operators. Using this system, we can detect the spatiotemporal dynamics of two homologous loci as two fluorescent signals within a nucleus and monitor the distance between homologous loci. These live-cell imaging methods will provide new insights into genome organization, development processes, and subnuclear responses to environmental stimuli in plants. PMID:27557696

  4. Nuquantus: Machine learning software for the characterization and quantification of cell nuclei in complex immunofluorescent tissue images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Polina; Honnorat, Nicolas; Varol, Erdem; Wallner, Markus; Trappanese, Danielle M.; Sharp, Thomas E.; Starosta, Timothy; Duran, Jason M.; Koller, Sarah; Davatzikos, Christos; Houser, Steven R.

    2016-03-01

    Determination of fundamental mechanisms of disease often hinges on histopathology visualization and quantitative image analysis. Currently, the analysis of multi-channel fluorescence tissue images is primarily achieved by manual measurements of tissue cellular content and sub-cellular compartments. Since the current manual methodology for image analysis is a tedious and subjective approach, there is clearly a need for an automated analytical technique to process large-scale image datasets. Here, we introduce Nuquantus (Nuclei quantification utility software) - a novel machine learning-based analytical method, which identifies, quantifies and classifies nuclei based on cells of interest in composite fluorescent tissue images, in which cell borders are not visible. Nuquantus is an adaptive framework that learns the morphological attributes of intact tissue in the presence of anatomical variability and pathological processes. Nuquantus allowed us to robustly perform quantitative image analysis on remodeling cardiac tissue after myocardial infarction. Nuquantus reliably classifies cardiomyocyte versus non-cardiomyocyte nuclei and detects cell proliferation, as well as cell death in different cell classes. Broadly, Nuquantus provides innovative computerized methodology to analyze complex tissue images that significantly facilitates image analysis and minimizes human bias.

  5. How nuclei of Giardia pass through cell differentiation: semi-open mitosis followed by nuclear interconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiráková, Klára; Kulda, Jaroslav; Nohýnková, Eva

    2012-05-01

    Differentiation into infectious cysts (encystation) and multiplication of pathogenic trophozoites after hatching from the cyst (excystation) are fundamental processes in the life cycle of the human intestinal parasite Giardia intestinalis. During encystation, a bi-nucleated trophozoite transforms to a dormant tetra-nucleated cyst enveloped by a protective cyst wall. Nuclear division during encystation is not followed by cytokinesis. In contrast to the well-studied mechanism of cyst wall formation, information on nuclei behavior is incomplete and basic cytological data are lacking. Here we present evidence that (1) the nuclei divide by semi-open mitosis during early encystment; (2) the daughter nuclei coming from different parent nuclei are always arranged in pairs; (3) in both pairs, the nuclei are interconnected via bridges formed by fusion of their nuclear envelopes; (4) each interconnected nuclear pair is associated with one basal body tetrad of the undivided diplomonad mastigont; and (5) the interconnection between nuclei persists through the cyst stage being a characteristic feature of encysted Giardia. Based on the presented results, a model of nuclei behavior during Giardia differentiation is proposed.

  6. Isolation of Plant Nuclei at Defined Cell Cycle Stages Using EdU Labeling and Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, Emily E; Concia, Lorenzo; Brooks, Ashley M; Markham, Emily A; Lee, Tae-Jin; Allen, George C; Thompson, William F; Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda

    2016-01-01

    5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) is a nucleoside analog of thymidine that can be rapidly incorporated into replicating DNA in vivo and, subsequently, detected by using "click" chemistry to couple its terminal alkyne group to fluorescent azides such as Alexa Fluor 488. Recently, EdU incorporation followed by coupling with a fluorophore has been used to visualize newly synthesized DNA in a wide range of plant species. One particularly useful application is in flow cytometry, where two-parameter sorting can be employed to analyze different phases of the cell cycle, as defined both by total DNA content and the amount of EdU pulse-labeled DNA. This approach allows analysis of the cell cycle without the need for synchronous cell populations, which can be difficult to obtain in many plant systems. The approach presented here, which was developed for fixed, EdU-labeled nuclei, can be used to prepare analytical profiles as well as to make highly purified preparations of G1, S, or G2/M phase nuclei for molecular or biochemical analysis. We present protocols for EdU pulse labeling, tissue fixation and harvesting, nuclei preparation, and flow sorting. Although developed for Arabidopsis suspension cells and maize root tips, these protocols should be modifiable to many other plant systems. PMID:26659955

  7. [Determination of the relative RNA-content of liver cell nuclei with gallocyanin-chromealum-staining (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzelides, K; Korek, G; Voss, K

    1981-01-01

    The relative RNA-content of liver cell nuclei from histological slides of rat liver was determined by automatical microscope picture analysis. The slides were stained with Gallocyanin-Chromealum. Extinction measurements are made before and after perchloracid extraction of RNA for the same slide. The changes of extinction measurements caused by the changes of slide thickness and of tissue inhomogeneity could be lowered using this method. PMID:6177185

  8. Rapid and Semi-Automated Extraction of Neuronal Cell Bodies and Nuclei from Electron Microscopy Image Stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Paul S.; Morehead, Michael; Doretto, Gianfranco; Chen, Peter; Berg, Stuart; Plaza, Stephen; Spirou, George

    2016-01-01

    Connectomics—the study of how neurons wire together in the brain—is at the forefront of modern neuroscience research. However, many connectomics studies are limited by the time and precision needed to correctly segment large volumes of electron microscopy (EM) image data. We present here a semi-automated segmentation pipeline using freely available software that can significantly decrease segmentation time for extracting both nuclei and cell bodies from EM image volumes. PMID:27259933

  9. Release of cell-free ice nuclei from Halomonas elongata expressing the ice nucleation gene inaZ of Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegos, G; Vargas, C; Perysinakis, A; Koukkou, A I; Christogianni, A; Nieto, J J; Ventosa, A; Drainas, C

    2000-11-01

    Release of ice nuclei in the growth medium of recombinant Halomonas elongata cells expressing the inaZ gene of Pseudomonas syringae was studied in an attempt to produce cell-free active ice nuclei for biotechnological applications. Cell-free ice nuclei were not retained by cellulose acetate filters of 0.2 microm pore size. Highest activity of cell-free ice nuclei was obtained when cells were grown in low salinity (0.5-5% NaCl, w/v). Freezing temperature threshold, estimated to be below -7 degrees C indicating class C nuclei, was not affected by medium salinity. Their density, as estimated by Percoll density centrifugation, was 1.018 +/- 0.002 gml(-1) and they were found to be free of lipids. Ice nuclei are released in the growth medium of recombinant H. elongata cells probably because of inefficient anchoring of the ice-nucleation protein aggregates in the outer membrane. The ice+ recombinant H. elongata cells could be useful for future use as a source of active cell-free ice nucleation protein. PMID:11119152

  10. Sexual Differences in Cell Loss during the Post-Hatch Development of Song Control Nuclei in the Bengalese Finch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XiaoNing Chen

    Full Text Available Birdsongs and the regions of their brain that control song exhibit obvious sexual differences. However, the mechanisms underlying these sexual dimorphisms remain unknown. To address this issue, we first examined apoptotic cells labeled with caspase-3 or TUNEL in Bengalese finch song control nuclei - the robust nucleus of the archopallium (RA, the lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium (LMAN, the high vocal center (HVC and Area X from post-hatch day (P 15 to 120. Next, we investigated the expression dynamics of pro-apoptotic (Bid, Bad and Bax and anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL genes in the aforementioned nuclei. Our results revealed that the female RA at P45 exhibited marked cell apoptosis, confirmed by low densities of Bcl-xL and Bcl-2. Both the male and female LMAN exhibited apoptotic peaks at P35 and P45, respectively, and the observed cell loss was more extensive in males. A corresponding sharp decrease in the density of Bcl-2 after P35 was observed in both sexes, and a greater density of Bid was noted at P45 in males. In addition, we observed that RA volume and the total number of BDNF-expressing cells decreased significantly after unilateral lesion of the LMAN or HVC (two areas that innervate the RA and that greater numbers of RA-projecting cells were immunoreactive for BDNF in the LMAN than in the HVC. We reasoned that a decrease in the amount of BDNF transported via HVC afferent fibers might result in an increase in cell apoptosis in the female RA. Our data indicate that cell apoptosis resulting from different pro- and anti-apoptotic agents is involved in generating the differences between male and female song control nuclei.

  11. OPIOID PRECURSOR PROTEIN ISOFORM IS TARGETED TO THE CELL NUCLEI IN THE HUMAN BRAIN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kononenko, Olga; Bazov, Igor; Watanabe, Hiroyuki;

    2016-01-01

    isolated from human striatum using fluorescence-activated nuclei sorting, and by immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy in the human caudate nucleus. These results along with the presence of putative NLS in other neuropeptide precursors raise questions of the nuclear localization is a general...

  12. Improved and robust detection of cell nuclei from four dimensional fluorescence images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Khayrul Bashar

    Full Text Available Segmentation-free direct methods are quite efficient for automated nuclei extraction from high dimensional images. A few such methods do exist but most of them do not ensure algorithmic robustness to parameter and noise variations. In this research, we propose a method based on multiscale adaptive filtering for efficient and robust detection of nuclei centroids from four dimensional (4D fluorescence images. A temporal feedback mechanism is employed between the enhancement and the initial detection steps of a typical direct method. We estimate the minimum and maximum nuclei diameters from the previous frame and feed back them as filter lengths for multiscale enhancement of the current frame. A radial intensity-gradient function is optimized at positions of initial centroids to estimate all nuclei diameters. This procedure continues for processing subsequent images in the sequence. Above mechanism thus ensures proper enhancement by automated estimation of major parameters. This brings robustness and safeguards the system against additive noises and effects from wrong parameters. Later, the method and its single-scale variant are simplified for further reduction of parameters. The proposed method is then extended for nuclei volume segmentation. The same optimization technique is applied to final centroid positions of the enhanced image and the estimated diameters are projected onto the binary candidate regions to segment nuclei volumes.Our method is finally integrated with a simple sequential tracking approach to establish nuclear trajectories in the 4D space. Experimental evaluations with five image-sequences (each having 271 3D sequential images corresponding to five different mouse embryos show promising performances of our methods in terms of nuclear detection, segmentation, and tracking. A detail analysis with a sub-sequence of 101 3D images from an embryo reveals that the proposed method can improve the nuclei detection accuracy by 9% over

  13. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) immunoreactivity in non-neuronal cells within the raphe nuclei and subventricular region of the brainstem of the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torterolo, Pablo; Lagos, Patricia; Sampogna, Sharon; Chase, Michael H

    2008-05-19

    Neurons that utilize melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) as a neuromodulator are localized within the postero-lateral hypothalamus and zona incerta. These neurons project diffusely throughout the central nervous system and have been implicated in critical physiological processes such as energy homeostasis and sleep. In the present report, we examined the distribution of MCH immunoreactivity in the brainstem of the cat. In addition to MCH+ axons, we found MCH-immunoreactive cells that have not been previously described either in the midbrain raphe nuclei or in the periaqueductal and periventricular areas. These MCH+ cells constituted: 1. ependymal cells that lined the fourth ventricle and aqueduct, 2. ependymal cells with long basal processes that projected deeply into the subventricular (subaqueductal) parenchyma, and, 3. cells in subventricular regions and the midbrain raphe nuclei. The MCH+ cells in the midbrain raphe nuclei were closely related to neuronal processes of serotonergic neurons. Utilizing Neu-N and GFAP immunohistochemistry we determined that the preceding MCH+ cells were neither neurons nor astrocytes. However, we found that vimentin, an intermediate-filament protein that is used as a marker for tanycytes, was specifically co-localized with MCH in these cells. We conclude that MCH is present in tanycytes whose processes innervate the midbrain raphe nuclei and adjacent subependymal regions. Because tanycytes are specialized cells that transport substances from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to neural parenchyma, we suggest that MCH is absorbed from the CSF by tanycytes and subsequently liberate to act upon neurons of brainstem nuclei. PMID:18410908

  14. Localization of the Arabidopsis Senescence- and Cell Death-Associated BFN1 Nuclease: From the ER to Fragmented Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarit Farage-Barhom; Shaul Burd; Lilian Sonego; Ana Mett; Eduard Belausov; David Gidoni; Amnon Lers

    2011-01-01

    Plant senescence- or PCD-associated nucleases share significant homology with nucleases from different organisms.However,knowledge of their function is limited.Intracellular localization of the Arabidopsis senescenceand PCD-associated nuclease BFN1 was investigated.Analysis of BFN1-GFP localization in transiently transformed tobacco protoplasts revealed initial localization in filamentous structures spread throughout the cytoplasm,which then clustered around the nuclei as the protoplasts senesced.These filamentous structures were identified as being of ER origin.In BFN1GFP-transgenic Arabidopsis plants,similar localization of BFN1-GFP was observed in young leaves,that is,in filamentous structures that reorganized around the nuclei only in senescing cells.In late senescence,BFN1-GFP was localized with fragmented nuclei in membrane-wrapped vesicles.BFN1's postulated function as a nucleic acid-degrading enzyme in senescence and PCD is supported by its localization pattern.Our results suggest the existence of a dedicated compartment mediating nucleic acid degradation in senescence and PCD processes.

  15. Difference of the Nuclear Green Light Intensity between Papillary Carcinoma Cells Showing Clear Nuclei and Non-neoplastic Follicular Epithelia in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyekyung; Baek, Tae Hwa; Park, Meeja; Lee, Seung Yun; Son, Hyun Jin; Kang, Dong Wook; Kim, Joo Heon; Kim, Soo Young

    2016-01-01

    Background There is subjective disagreement regarding nuclear clearing in papillary thyroid carcinoma. In this study, using digital instruments, we were able to quantify many ambiguous pathologic features and use numeric data to express our findings. Methods We examined 30 papillary thyroid carcinomas. For each case, we selected representative cancer cells showing clear nuclei and surrounding non-neoplastic follicular epithelial cells and evaluated objective values of green light intensity (GLI) for quantitative analysis of nuclear clearing in papillary thyroid carcinoma. Results From 16,274 GLI values from 600 cancer cell nuclei and 13,752 GLI values from 596 non-neoplastic follicular epithelial nuclei, we found a high correlation of 94.9% between GLI and clear nuclei. GLI between the cancer group showing clear nuclei and non-neoplastic follicular epithelia was statistically significant. The overall average level of GLI in the cancer group was over two times higher than the non-neoplastic group despite a wide range of GLI. On a polygonal line graph, there was a fluctuating unique difference between both the cancer and non-neoplastic groups in each patient, which was comparable to the microscopic findings. Conclusions Nuclear GLI could be a useful factor for discriminating between carcinoma cells showing clear nuclei and non-neoplastic follicular epithelia in papillary thyroid carcinoma. PMID:27550048

  16. Reduction of exportin 6 activity leads to actin accumulation via failure of RanGTP restoration and NTF2 sequestration in the nuclei of senescent cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously reported that G-actin accumulation in nuclei is a universal phenomenon of cellular senescence. By employing primary culture of human diploid fibroblast (HDF) and stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS), we explored whether the failure of actin export to cytoplasm is responsible for actin accumulation in nuclei of senescent cells. Expression of exportin 6 (Exp6) and small G-protein, Ran, was significantly reduced in the replicative senescence, but not yet in SIPS, whereas nuclear import of actin by cofilin was already increased in SIPS. After treatment of young HDF cells with H2O2, rapid reduction of nuclear RanGTP was observed along with cytoplasmic increase of RanGDP. Furthermore, significantly reduced interaction of Exp6 with RanGTP was found by GST-Exp6 pull-down analysis. Failure of RanGTP restoration was accompanied with inhibition of ATP synthesis and NTF2 sequestration in the nuclei along with accordant change of senescence morphology. Indeed, knockdown of Exp6 expression significantly increased actin molecule in the nuclei of young HDF cells. Therefore, actin accumulation in nuclei of senescent cells is most likely due to the failure of RanGTP restoration with ATP deficiency and NTF2 accumulation in nuclei, which result in the decrease of actin export via Exp6 inactivation, in addition to actin import by cofilin activation.

  17. Spectrin-like proteins in plant nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, de N.C.A.; Ketelaar, T.; Blumenthal, S.S.D.; Emons, A.M.C.; Schel, J.H.N.

    2000-01-01

    We analysed the presence and localization of spectrin-like proteins in nuclei of various plant tissues, using several anti-erythrocyte spectrin antibodies on isolated pea nuclei and nuclei in cells. Western blots of extracted purified pea nuclei show a cross-reactive pair of bands at 220–240 kDa, ty

  18. Phospho-ERK1/2 levels in cancer cell nuclei predict responsiveness to radiochemotherapy of rectal adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Susanne; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Pedersen, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    Locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma is treated with radiochemotherapy (RCT) before surgery. The response to RCT is heterogeneous and consensus regarding reliable predictors is lacking. Since the ERK pathway is implicated in radioprotection, we examined pretreatment biopsies from 52 patients...... by immunohistochemistry for phosphorylated ERK (pERK). Immunostaining for pERK was considerably enhanced by use of alkaline demasking. Nuclear staining occurred in both cancer cells and stromal cells. Blind-coded sections were scored by 2 independent investigators. In patients showing no residual tumor after RCT (TRG1......), staining for pERK in cancer, but not stromal, cell nuclei was significantly weaker than in patients showing a poor RCT response (TRG1 vs TRG4: p = 0.0001). Nuclear staining for pERK predicted poor responders, as illustrated by receiver operating characteristic curves with an area under curve of 0.86 (p = 0...

  19. Two parametric cell cycle analyses of plant cell suspension cultures with fragile, isolated nuclei to investigate heterogeneity in growth of batch cultivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Christiane; Hegner, Richard; Helbig, Karsten; Bartels, Kristin; Bley, Thomas; Weber, Jost

    2016-06-01

    Plant cell suspensions are frequently considered to be heterogeneous with respect to growth in terms of progression of the cells through the cell cycle and biomass accumulation. Thus, segregated data of fractions in different cycle phases during cultivation is needed to develop robust production processes. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and BrdU-antibodies or 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) click-it chemistry are frequently used to acquire such information. However, their use requires centrifugation steps that cannot be readily applied to sensitive cells, particularly if nuclei have to be extracted from the protective cellular milieu and envelopes for DNA analysis. Therefore, we have established a BrdU-Hoechst stain quenching protocol for analyzing nuclei directly isolated from delicate plant cell suspension cultures. After adding BrdU to test Harpagophytum procumbens cell suspension cultures the cell cycle distribution could be adequately resolved using its incorporation for the following 72 h (after which BrdU slowed biomass accumulation). Despite this limitation, the protocol allows resolution of the cell cycle distribution of cultures that cannot be analyzed using commonly applied methods due to the cells' fragility. The presented protocol enabled analysis of cycling heterogeneities in H. procumbens batch cultivations, and thus should facilitate process control of secondary metabolite production from fragile plant in vitro cultures. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1244-1250. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26614913

  20. Modulation of Higher Order Chromatin Conformation in Mammalian Cell Nuclei Can Be Mediated by Polyamines and Divalent Cations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwat Visvanathan

    Full Text Available The organisation of the large volume of mammalian genomic DNA within cell nuclei requires mechanisms to regulate chromatin compaction involving the reversible formation of higher order structures. The compaction state of chromatin varies between interphase and mitosis and is also subject to rapid and reversible change upon ATP depletion/repletion. In this study we have investigated mechanisms that may be involved in promoting the hyper-condensation of chromatin when ATP levels are depleted by treating cells with sodium azide and 2-deoxyglucose. Chromatin conformation was analysed in both live and permeabilised HeLa cells using FLIM-FRET, high resolution fluorescence microscopy and by electron spectroscopic imaging microscopy. We show that chromatin compaction following ATP depletion is not caused by loss of transcription activity and that it can occur at a similar level in both interphase and mitotic cells. Analysis of both live and permeabilised HeLa cells shows that chromatin conformation within nuclei is strongly influenced by the levels of divalent cations, including calcium and magnesium. While ATP depletion results in an increase in the level of unbound calcium, chromatin condensation still occurs even in the presence of a calcium chelator. Chromatin compaction is shown to be strongly affected by small changes in the levels of polyamines, including spermine and spermidine. The data are consistent with a model in which the increased intracellular pool of polyamines and divalent cations, resulting from depletion of ATP, bind to DNA and contribute to the large scale hyper-compaction of chromatin by a charge neutralisation mechanism.

  1. β-catenin accumulation in nuclei of hepatocellular carcinoma cells up-regulates glutathione-s-transferase M3 mRNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Sang Li; Min Liu; Yoshihiro Nakata; He-Bin Tang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To identify the differentially over-expressed genes associated with β-catenin accumulation in nuclei of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells.METHODS: Differentially expressed genes were identified in radiation-induced B6C3 F1 mouse HCC cells by mRNA differential display, Northern blot and RT-PCR,respectively. Total glutathione-s-transferase (GST) activity was measured by GST activity assay and β-catenin localization was detected with immunostaining in radiation-induced mouse HCC cells and in HepG2 cell lines.RESULTS: Two up-regulated genes, glutamine synthetase and glutathione-s-transferase M3 (GSTM3), were identified in radiation-induced mouse HCC cells. Influence of β-catenin accumulation in nuclei of HCC cells on upregulation of GSTM3 mRNA was investigated. The nearby upstream domain of GSTM3 contained the β-catenin/Tcf-Lef consensus binding site sequences [5'-(A/T)(A/T)CAAAG-3'], and the total GST activity ratio was considerably higher in B6C3F1 mouse HCC cells with β-cateninaccumulation in nuclei of HCC cells than in those withoutβ-catenin accumulation (0.353 ± 0.117 vs 0.071 ± 0.064,P < 0.001). The TWS119 (a distinct GSK-3β inhibitor)-induced total GST activity was significantly higher in HepG2 cells with β-catenin accumulation than in those withoutβ-catenin accumulation in nuclei of HCC cells. Additionally,the GSTM3 mRNA level was significantly higher at 24 h than at 12 h in TWS119-treated HepG2 cells.CONCLUSION: β-catenin accumulation increases GST activity in nuclei of HCC cells, and GSTM3 may be a novel target gene of the β-catenin/Tcf-Lef complex.

  2. Interactive algorithms for rapid enumeration of hybridization signals in individual whole-cell nuclei inside intact-tissue specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockett, Stephen J.; Thompson, Curtis T.; Mullikin, James C.; Sudar, Damir; Khavari, R.; Hyun, William; Pinkel, Daniel; Gray, Joe W.

    1995-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is useful for analyzing specific nucleic acid sequences in individual cells. Its application to tissue sections has been limited however because of the difficulties of performing the hybridization and analysis in sections that are thick enough to contain intact nuclei. Recent improvements in FISH permit hybridization with chromosome-specific, centromeric probes throughout 20 micrometers formalin fixed, paraffin- embedded sections, which do contain many intact nuclei. This paper describes software to facilitate analysis of these 3D hybridizations. We have developed two algorithms for analyzing 3D, confocal images of thick sections. One displays 2D, maximum-intensity, projection images through the original 3D image at different angles. When projections are viewed sequentially, the 3D image appears semi-transparent and rotates. The second algorithm allows interactive enumeration of FISH signals. Each signal is marked by the analyst. Then, for each pair of marked signals, a 2D slice image along the line connecting both marked signals and parallel to the z (depth) axis is displayed. From this slice, the analyst decides if the signals are in the same or different nuclei, or if the signals should be rejected because they are in a nucleus truncated by the upper or lower surface of the section. After consideration of all pairs of signals, the algorithm produces a map of the tissue section showing the numbers of signals in each of the intact nucleus. The algorithms enable analysis of small, premalignant and early malignant lesions and infiltrative lesions that cannot be analyzed by other molecular techniques and permit the direct correlation of FISH information with histology/cytology.

  3. Non-destructive Analysis of the Nuclei of Transgenic Living Cells Using Laser Tweezers and Near-infrared Raman Spectroscopic Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Tang; Ronald J. Newton; Chang-An Xie; Yong-Qing Li; Nicki Whitley

    2005-01-01

    Transgenic cell lines of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) were analyzed by a compact laser-tweezers-Raman-spectroscopy (LTRS) system in this investigation. A low power diode laser at 785 nm was used for both laser optical trapping of single transgenic cells and excitation for near-infrared Raman spectroscopy of the nuclei of synchronized cells, which were treated as single organic particles, at the S-phase of the cell cycle. Transgenic living cells with gfp and uidA genes were used as biological samples to test this LTRS technique. As expected, different Raman spectra were observed from the tested biological samples. This technique provides a high sensitivity and enables real-time spectroscopic measurements of transgenic cell lines. It could be a valuable tool for the study of the fundamental cell and molecular biological process by trapping single nucleus and by providing a wealth of molecular information about the nuclei of cells.

  4. Inhibition of ribonucleic acid efflux from isolated SV40-3T3 cell nuclei by 3'-deoxyadenosine (cordycepin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, P S; McCaldin, B

    1979-05-15

    The effect of 3'-deoxyadenosine (cordycepin) on mRNA efflux from isolated SV40-3T3 cell nuclei has been studied and compared with its effect on the nucleoside triphosphatase activity in the isolated nuclear envelope. Inhibition of mRNA efflux occurs rapidly, but is dependent on the presence of ATP. Half-maximal inhibition occurs with 40 microM-cordycepin. The effect is not simulated by 2'-deoxyadenosine or by actinomycin D, and adenosine provides a substantial degree of protection against it. Cordycepin does not directly inhibit the nucleoside triphosphatase. The stimulation of this enzyme by poly(A) is not affected unless the poly(A) and cordycepin are incubated together with nuclear lysate in the presence of ATP; in this case the stimulation is significantly reduced. Possible interpretations of these results and their relevance for understanding the system in vivo for nucleo-cytoplasmic messenger transport are discussed.

  5. Evaluation of the areas of neuronal cell bodies and nuclei in the myenteric plexus of the duodenum of adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIRANDA-NETO MARCILÍO H.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the areas of cell body and nucleus profiles of the myenteric neurons in the antimesenteric and intermediate regions of the duodenum of adult rats. Five male rats were used. The duodenum was removed and dissected to whole-mount preparations, which were stained by the Giemsa technique. The areas of cell body and nucleus profiles of 100 neurons, 50 from each region, of each animal, were assessed with image analyser. Based on the global mean±SD of the areas of cell body profiles, neurons were labelled as small, medium or large. It was observed that the neurons did not differ significantly in size or incidence between the antimesenteric and intermediate regions. However, the nuclei of the small and medium neurons were significantly smaller in the latter region. It is discussed that the smaller nuclear size could be related to the cell bodies being slightly smaller on this region and to a possible smaller biosynthetic activity which would influence nuclear size.

  6. Retinal afferents synapse with relay cells targeting the middle temporal area in the pulvinar and lateral geniculate nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E Warner

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Considerable debate continues regarding thalamic inputs to the middle temporal area (MT of the visual cortex that bypass the primary visual cortex (V1 and the role they might have in the residual visual capability following a lesion of V1. Two specific retinothalamic projections to area MT have been speculated to relay through the medial portion of the inferior pulvinar nucleus (PIm and the koniocellular layers of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN. Although a number of studies have demonstrated retinal inputs to regions of the thalamus where relays to area MT have been observed, the relationship between the retinal terminals and area MT relay cells has not been established. Here we examined direct retino-recipient regions of the marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus pulvinar nucleus and the LGN following binocular injections of anterograde tracer, as well as area MT relay cells in these nuclei by injection of retrograde tracer into area MT. Retinal afferents were shown to synapse with area MT relay cells as demonstrated by colocalization with the presynaptic vesicle membrane protein synaptophysin. We also established the presence of direct synapes of retinal afferents on area MT relay cells within the PIm, as well as the koniocellular K1 and K3 layers of the LGN, thereby corroborating the existence of two disynaptic pathways from the retina to area MT that bypass V1.

  7. Developmental potential of human oocytes reconstructed by transferring somatic cell nuclei into polyspermic zygote cytoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The generation of patient-specific nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells holds huge promise in modern regenerative medicine and cell-based drug discovery. Since human in vivo matured oocytes are not readily available, human therapeutic cloning is developing slowly. Here, we investigated for the first time whether human polyspermic zygotes could support preimplantation development of cloned embryos. Our results showed that polyspermic zygotes could be used as recipients for human somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The preimplantation developmental potential of SCNT embryos from polyspermic zygotes was limited to the 8-cell stage. Since ES cell lines can be derived from single blastomeres, these results may have important significance for human ES cells derived by SCNT. In addition, confocal images demonstrated that all of the SCNT embryos that failed to cleave showed abnormal microtubule organization. The results of the present study suggest that polyspermic human zygotes could be used as a potential source of recipient cytoplasm for SCNT.

  8. Developmental potential of human oocytes reconstructed by transferring somatic cell nuclei into polyspermic zygote cytoplasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yong; Chen, Xinjie; Luo, Yumei; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Shaoying; Huang, Yulin [Institute of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College, Duobao Road 63, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Sun, Xiaofang, E-mail: xiaofangsun@hotmail.com [Institute of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College, Duobao Road 63, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2009-04-24

    The generation of patient-specific nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells holds huge promise in modern regenerative medicine and cell-based drug discovery. Since human in vivo matured oocytes are not readily available, human therapeutic cloning is developing slowly. Here, we investigated for the first time whether human polyspermic zygotes could support preimplantation development of cloned embryos. Our results showed that polyspermic zygotes could be used as recipients for human somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The preimplantation developmental potential of SCNT embryos from polyspermic zygotes was limited to the 8-cell stage. Since ES cell lines can be derived from single blastomeres, these results may have important significance for human ES cells derived by SCNT. In addition, confocal images demonstrated that all of the SCNT embryos that failed to cleave showed abnormal microtubule organization. The results of the present study suggest that polyspermic human zygotes could be used as a potential source of recipient cytoplasm for SCNT.

  9. Interferometric measurements of dry mass content in nuclei and cytoplasm in the life cycle of antheridial filaments cells of Chara vulgaris L. in their successive developmental stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Kuran

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Interferometric measurements of the nucleus and cytoplasm dry mass during interphase in the successive stages of development of antheridial filaments of Chara vulgaris demonstrated that the dry mass and surface area of cell nuclei double in size in each of the successive generations of the filaments, whereas neither the surface nor the dry mass of the cytoplasm increase in such proportion in the same period. In the successive stages of development of the antheridial filaments the dry mass and surface area of the nuclei and cytoplasm gradually diminish.

  10. Probing the compressibility of tumor cell nuclei by combined atomic force-confocal microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krause, M.; Riet, J. te; Wolf, K. van der

    2013-01-01

    The cell nucleus is the largest and stiffest organelle rendering it the limiting compartment during migration of invasive tumor cells through dense connective tissue. We here describe a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)-confocal microscopy approach for measurement of bulk nuclear stiffness toge

  11. Magic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    4 nuclei of Nickel-48 have been produced in the GANIL accelerator. This nucleus is made up of 28 protons and 20 neutrons, it has at least 10 neutrons less than natural nickel but it is doubly magic: both protons and neutrons are distributed on full shells. It appears as if being doubly magic could compensate for the instability due to the shortage of neutrons. (A.C.)

  12. Automated detection of retinal cell nuclei in 3D micro-CT images of zebrafish using support vector machine classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yifu; Tavolara, Thomas; Cheng, Keith

    2016-03-01

    Our group is developing a method to examine biological specimens in cellular detail using synchrotron microCT. The method can acquire 3D images of tissue at micrometer-scale resolutions, allowing for individual cell types to be visualized in the context of the entire specimen. For model organism research, this tool will enable the rapid characterization of tissue architecture and cellular morphology from every organ system. This characterization is critical for proposed and ongoing "phenome" projects that aim to phenotype whole-organism mutants and diseased tissues from different organisms including humans. With the envisioned collection of hundreds to thousands of images for a phenome project, it is important to develop quantitative image analysis tools for the automated scoring of organism phenotypes across organ systems. Here we present a first step towards that goal, demonstrating the use of support vector machines (SVM) in detecting retinal cell nuclei in 3D images of wild-type zebrafish. In addition, we apply the SVM classifier on a mutant zebrafish to examine whether SVMs can be used to capture phenotypic differences in these images. The longterm goal of this work is to allow cellular and tissue morphology to be characterized quantitatively for many organ systems, at the level of the whole-organism.

  13. Co-localisation studies of Arabidopsis SR splicing factors reveal different types of speckles in plant cell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SR proteins are multidomain splicing factors which are important for spliceosome assembly and for regulation of alternative splicing. In mammalian nuclei these proteins localise to speckles from where they are recruited to transcription sites. By using fluorescent protein fusion technology and different experimental approaches it has been shown that Arabidopsis SR proteins, in addition to diffuse nucleoplasmic staining, localise into an irregular nucleoplasmic network resembling speckles in mammalian cells. As Arabidopsis SR proteins fall into seven conserved sub-families we investigated co-localisation of members of the different sub-families in transiently transformed tobacco protoplast. Here we demonstrate the new finding that members of different SR protein sub-families localise into distinct populations of nuclear speckles with no, partial or complete co-localisation. This is particularly interesting as we also show that these proteins do interact in a yeast two-hybrid assay as well as in pull-down and in co-immunopreciptiation assays. Our data raise the interesting possibility that SR proteins are partitioned into distinct populations of nuclear speckles to allow a more specific recruitment to the transcription/pre-mRNA processing sites of particular genes depending on cell type and developmental stage

  14. The effects of accelerated heavy nuclei of neon and argon on mammalian cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survival of human T-1 kidney cells in high-energy neon (400MeV/nucleon) and argon (500MeV/nucleon) beams has been studied at the Berkeley Bevalac. Cells were plated in monolayers on glass and studied at different residual-range values. The survival curves depend on LET and on particle velocity. The effectiveness of the beams increases as the range decreases, except for argon beams with very low range values, where the effectiveness decreases again. The 'oxygen effect' is high at high particle energies (2.6 for neon and 2.4 for argon); it decreases to values between 1.1 and 1.3 near the Bragg peak. (author)

  15. Characterization of biological ice nuclei from a lichen.

    OpenAIRE

    Kieft, T. L.; Ruscetti, T

    1990-01-01

    Biological ice nuclei (active at approximately -4 degrees C) were extracted from cells of the lichen Rhizoplaca chrysoleuca by sonication. Sensitivity to proteases, guanidine hydrochloride, and urea showed these nuclei to be proteinaceous. The nuclei were relatively heat stable, active from pH 1.5 to 12, and active without lipids, thereby demonstrating significant differences from bacterial ice nuclei.

  16. Moringa oleifera Lam. seed extract prevents fat diet induced oxidative stress in mice and protects liver cell-nuclei from hydroxyl radical mediated damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nilanjan; Ganguli, Debdutta; Dey, Sanjit

    2015-12-01

    High fat diet (HFD) prompts metabolic pattern inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in mitochondria thereby triggering multitude of chronic disorders in human. Antioxidants from plant sources may be an imperative remedy against this disorder. However, it requires scientific validation. In this study, we explored if (i) Moringa oleifera seed extract (MoSE) can neutralize ROS generated in HFD fed mice; (ii) protect cell-nuclei damage developed by Fenton reaction in vitro. Swiss mice were fed with HFD to develop oxidative stress model (HFD group). Other groups were control, seed extract alone treated, and MoSE simultaneously (HS) treated. Treatment period was of 15 days. Antioxidant enzymes with tissue nitrite content (TNC) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were estimated from liver homogenate. HS group showed significantly higher (P group. Further, TNC and LPO decreased significantly (P group compared to HFD fed group. MoSE also protected hepatocytes nuclei from the hydroxyl radicals generated by Fenton reaction. MoSE was found to be polyphenol rich with potent reducing power, free radicals and hydroxyl radicals scavenging activity. Thus, MoSE exhibited robust antioxidant prospective to neutralize ROS developed in HFD fed mice and also protected the nuclei damage from hydroxyl radicals. Hence, it can be used as herbal medication against HFD induced ROS mediated disorders.

  17. Effect of 17β-estradiol and flavonoids on the regulation of expression of newly identified oestrogen responsive genes in a rat raphe nuclei-derived cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Dena A M; Jähne, Maria; Weigt, Carmen; Kretzschmar, Georg; Vollmer, Günter

    2012-10-01

    Due to the health risks attributed to perimenopausal hormone therapy, phytoestrogens such as flavonoids are receiving widespread attention to help alleviate menopausal symptoms, including hormone-driven mood disorders. Based on our previous reporter gene study regarding their transactivational activity in raphe nuclei cells from a brain region involved in regulation of mood disturbances, we herein study their effects on the regulation of expression of 17β-estradiol (E2)-regulated genes. DNA microarray was used to globally assess E2-induced gene expression in RNDA cells, a rat raphe nuclei-derived cellular model expressing oestrogen receptor β. Out of 212 regulated genes, six were selected for verification and as endpoints for the effect of flavonoids on the regulation of mRNA expression in proliferating as well as differentiating RNDA cells. Under proliferative conditions, E2 up-regulated mRNA expression of Cml-5, Sox-18 and Krt-19. Similar effects were observed in response to 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN), genistein (GEN), daidzein (DAI) and equol (EQ). In line with E2, mRNA expression of Nefm and Zdhhc-2 was down-regulated following 8-PN, GEN, DAI, EQ and naringenin treatment. No regulation was observed on Slc6a4 mRNA expression in response to E2 or the flavonoids in proliferating RNDA cells. When cells were shifted to conditions promoting differentiation, changes in cell morphology, in mRNA expression levels and in responsiveness towards E2 and the tested flavonoids were noticed. These expression studies additionally highlighted some of the genes as markers for RNDA cellular differentiation. RNDA cells should prove useful to elucidate molecular and cellular mechanisms of exogenous oestrogen receptor ligands with neural cell populations. PMID:22213181

  18. Moringa oleifera Lam. seed extract prevents fat diet induced oxidative stress in mice and protects liver cell-nuclei from hydroxyl radical mediated damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nilanjan; Ganguli, Debdutta; Dey, Sanjit

    2015-12-01

    High fat diet (HFD) prompts metabolic pattern inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in mitochondria thereby triggering multitude of chronic disorders in human. Antioxidants from plant sources may be an imperative remedy against this disorder. However, it requires scientific validation. In this study, we explored if (i) Moringa oleifera seed extract (MoSE) can neutralize ROS generated in HFD fed mice; (ii) protect cell-nuclei damage developed by Fenton reaction in vitro. Swiss mice were fed with HFD to develop oxidative stress model (HFD group). Other groups were control, seed extract alone treated, and MoSE simultaneously (HS) treated. Treatment period was of 15 days. Antioxidant enzymes with tissue nitrite content (TNC) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were estimated from liver homogenate. HS group showed significantly higher (P antioxidant power (FRAP) compared to only HFD fed group. Further, TNC and LPO decreased significantly (P antioxidant prospective to neutralize ROS developed in HFD fed mice and also protected the nuclei damage from hydroxyl radicals. Hence, it can be used as herbal medication against HFD induced ROS mediated disorders. PMID:26742324

  19. 3D reconstruction of VZV infected cell nuclei and PML nuclear cages by serial section array scanning electron microscopy and electron tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Reichelt

    Full Text Available Varicella-zoster virus (VZV is a human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella (chickenpox and herpes zoster (shingles. Like all herpesviruses, the VZV DNA genome is replicated in the nucleus and packaged into nucleocapsids that must egress across the nuclear membrane for incorporation into virus particles in the cytoplasm. Our recent work showed that VZV nucleocapsids are sequestered in nuclear cages formed from promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML in vitro and in human dorsal root ganglia and skin xenografts in vivo. We sought a method to determine the three-dimensional (3D distribution of nucleocapsids in the nuclei of herpesvirus-infected cells as well as the 3D shape, volume and ultrastructure of these unique PML subnuclear domains. Here we report the development of a novel 3D imaging and reconstruction strategy that we term Serial Section Array-Scanning Electron Microscopy (SSA-SEM and its application to the analysis of VZV-infected cells and these nuclear PML cages. We show that SSA-SEM permits large volume imaging and 3D reconstruction at a resolution sufficient to localize, count and distinguish different types of VZV nucleocapsids and to visualize complete PML cages. This method allowed a quantitative determination of how many nucleocapsids can be sequestered within individual PML cages (sequestration capacity, what proportion of nucleocapsids are entrapped in single nuclei (sequestration efficiency and revealed the ultrastructural detail of the PML cages. More than 98% of all nucleocapsids in reconstructed nuclear volumes were contained in PML cages and single PML cages sequestered up to 2,780 nucleocapsids, which were shown by electron tomography to be embedded and cross-linked by an filamentous electron-dense meshwork within these unique subnuclear domains. This SSA-SEM analysis extends our recent characterization of PML cages and provides a proof of concept for this new strategy to investigate events during virion assembly at the

  20. 76 FR 63702 - In the Matter of the Designation of Conspiracy of Fire Nuclei, aka Conspiracy of the Nuclei of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Matter of the Designation of Conspiracy of Fire Nuclei, aka Conspiracy of the Nuclei of Fire, aka Conspiracy of Cells of Fire, aka Synomosia of Pyrinon Tis Fotias, aka Thessaloniki-Athens Fire Nuclei Conspiracy, as a Specially Designated Global Terrorist Pursuant to Section 1(b) of Executive Order 13224,...

  1. Stress induced by premature chromatin condensation triggers chromosome shattering and chromothripsis at DNA sites still replicating in micronuclei or multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzoudi, Georgia I; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karachristou, Ioanna; Pantelias, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Combination of next-generation DNA sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and bioinformatics has revealed the striking phenomenon of chromothripsis, described as complex genomic rearrangements acquired in a single catastrophic event affecting one or a few chromosomes. Via an unproven mechanism, it is postulated that mechanical stress causes chromosome shattering into small lengths of DNA, which are then randomly reassembled by DNA repair machinery. Chromothripsis is currently examined as an alternative mechanism of oncogenesis, in contrast to the present paradigm that considers a stepwise development of cancer. While evidence for the mechanism(s) underlying chromosome shattering during cancer development remains elusive, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain chromothripsis, including ionizing radiation, DNA replication stress, breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, micronuclei formation and premature chromosome compaction. In the present work, we provide experimental evidence on the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis and on how chromosomes can get locally shattered in a single catastrophic event. Considering the dynamic nature of chromatin nucleoprotein complex, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding, we first show that chromatin condensation at repairing or replicating DNA sites induces the mechanical stress needed for chromosome shattering to ensue. Premature chromosome condensation is then used to visualize the dynamic nature of interphase chromatin and demonstrate that such mechanical stress and chromosome shattering can also occur in chromosomes within micronuclei or asynchronous multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis. Following an aberrant mitosis, chromosomes could find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time so that they may undergo massive DNA breakage and rearrangement in a single catastrophic event. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that premature chromosome

  2. Use antibodies to DNA for detection of X-ray impairments of DNA in nuclei of brain stem cells of irradiated animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using antibodies to DNA, impairments of DNA in nuclei of brain stem cells were studied in white male-rats at early stages after X-ray irradiation. Irradiation doses were 25.8, 103.2, 154.8, 206.4 and 258 m Coul/kg. Only at 258 m Coul/kg dose the complete repair of immunofluorescent cells percentage up to the level of intact animals was observed 1h after irradiation. The complete repair at 103.2 m Coul/kg dose occured 3h after the irradiation. The lethal doses (206.4 - 258 m Coul/kg) caused such DNA impairments which were not reduced even 3h after the irradiation of the animals. Thus, it is shown that the immunological method can be useful for studying DNA structural impairments in the range of 25.8-258 m Coul/kg doses. The method permits to test DNA radiation damages without its extraction from the cell

  3. Modeling of the topology of energy deposits created by ionizing radiation on a nano-metric scale in cell nuclei in relation to radiation-induced early events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiations are known to induce critical damages on biological matter and especially on DNA. Among these damages, DNA double strand breaks (DSB) are considered as key precursor of lethal effects of ionizing radiations. Understand and predict how DNA double and simple strand breaks are created by ionizing radiation and repaired in cell nucleus is nowadays a major challenge in radiobiology research. This work presents the results on the simulation of the DNA double strand breaks produced from the energy deposited by the irradiation at the intracellular level. At the nano-metric scale, the only method to accurately simulate the topological details of energy deposited on the biological matter is the use of Monte Carlo codes. In this work, we used the Geant4 Monte Carlo code and, in particular, the low energy electromagnetic package extensions, referred as Geant4-DNA processes.In order to evaluate DNA radio-induced damages, the first objective of this work consisted in implementing a detailed geometry of the DNA on the Monte Carlo simulations. Two types of cell nuclei, representing a fibroblast and an endothelium, were described in order to evaluate the influence of the DNA density on the topology of the energy deposits contributing to strand breaks. Indeed, the implemented geometry allows the selection of energy transfer points that can lead to strand breaks because they are located on the backbone. Then, these energy transfer points were analysed with a clustering algorithm in order to reveal groups of aggregates and to study their location and complexity. In this work, only the physical interactions of ionizing radiations are simulated. Thus, it is not possible to achieve an absolute number of strand breaks as the creation and transportation of radical species which could lead to indirect DNA damages is not included. Nevertheless, the aim of this work was to evaluate the relative dependence of direct DNA damages with the DNA density, radiation quality, cell

  4. Importin β1 mediates nuclear factor-κB signal transduction into the nuclei of myeloma cells and affects their proliferation and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenqing; Li, Rong; He, Jie; Du, Juan; Hou, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell neoplasm that is currently incurable. The activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signalling plays a crucial role in the immortalisation of MM cells. As the most important transcription factor of the canonical NF-κB pathway, the p50/p65 heterodimer requires transportation into the nucleus for its successful signal transduction. Importin β1 is the key transport receptor that mediates p50/p65 nuclear import. Currently, it remains unclear whether the regulation of importin β1 function affects the biological behaviour of MM cells. In the present study, we investigated the changes in p65 translocation and the proliferation and apoptosis of MM cells after treatment with small interfering RNA (siRNA) or an importin β1 inhibitor. The underlying mechanisms were also investigated. We found importin β1 over-expression and the excessive nuclear transport of p65 in myeloma cells. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and Western blot analysis results indicated that p65 nuclear transport was blocked after inhibiting importin β1 expression with siRNA and the importin β1-specific inhibitor importazole (IPZ). Importantly, electronic mobility shift assay results also verified that p65 nuclear transport was dramatically reduced. Moreover, the expression of the NF-κB signalling target genes involved in MM cell apoptosis, such as BCL-2, c-IAP1 and XIAP, were markedly reduced, as demonstrated by the RT-PCR results. Furthermore, the proliferation of MM cells was inhibited, as demonstrated by MTT assay results, and the MM cell apoptosis rate was higher, as demonstrated by the annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double-staining assay results. Additionally, the percentage of S phase cells in the myeloma cell lines treated with IPZ was dramatically reduced. In conclusion, our results clearly show that importin β1 mediates the translocation of NF-κB into the nuclei of myeloma cells, thereby regulating proliferation and blocking apoptosis, which

  5. Nuclei in high forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of 1991 Joliot-Curie Summer School is to review the most advances in the understanding of the nuclei physics after the considerable progress in gamma spectroscopy. It covers the following topics: Highly and super-deformed nuclei, nuclear structures, mean-field approach and beyond, fission isomers, nuclear excitations with long lifetime and metal clusters

  6. Nucleons in nuclei, however

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topics presented at the 1989 Joliot-Curie Lectures are reported. Two main subjects were retained: a simplified description of the N-body motion of particles in the quasi-particle configuration; study of the dynamics of nuclear components which are not described by nucleons in their ground state. The following themes were presented: quasiparticles and the Green functions, relativistic aspects of the quasiparticle concept, the dimensions of nucleons in the nuclei and the EMC effect, quarks and gluons in the nuclei, the delta in the nuclei, the strangeness, quasiparticles far from the Fermi sea, diffusion of electrons, stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis

  7. Hot nuclei and fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is made of the present status concerning the production of nuclei above 5 MeV temperature. Considerable progress has been made recently on the understanding of the formation and the fate of such hot nuclei. It appears that the nucleus seems more stable against temperature than predicted by static calculations. However, the occurrence of multifragment production at high excitation energies is now well established. The various experimental features of the fragmentation process are discussed. (author) 59 refs., 12 figs

  8. Strain differences in pH-sensitive K+ channel-expressing cells in chemosensory and nonchemosensory brain stem nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Martino, Paul F.; Olesiak, S.; Batuuka, D.; Riley, D; Neumueller, S.; Forster, H. V.; Hodges, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    The ventilatory CO2 chemoreflex is inherently low in inbred Brown Norway (BN) rats compared with other strains, including inbred Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. Since the brain stem expression of various pH-sensitive ion channels may be determinants of the CO2 chemoreflex, we tested the hypothesis that there would be fewer pH-sensitive K+ channel-expressing cells in BN relative to SS rats within brain stem sites associated with respiratory chemoreception, such as the nucleus tractus solitarius...

  9. Observation of nuclei reassembled from demembranated Xenopus sperm nuclei and analysis of their lamina components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QUJIAN; CHUANMAOZHANG; 等

    1994-01-01

    A cell-free preparation obtained from extracts of activated Xenopus laevis eggs induced chromatin decondensation and nuclear formation from demembranated Xenopus sperm nuclei.Electron microscopy revealed that the reassembled nucleus had a double-layered nuclear memblane,nuclear pore complexes,and decondensed chromatin etc.Indirect immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated the presence of lamina in newly assembled nuclei.Western-blotting results showed that lamin LII was present in egg extracts and in lamina of the reassembled nuclei which were previously reported to contain only egg derived lamin LIII.

  10. Physics of Unstable Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoa, Dao Tien; Egelhof, Peter; Gales, Sydney; Giai, Nguyen Van; Motobayashi, Tohru

    2008-04-01

    Studies at the RIKEN RI beam factory / T. Motobayashi -- Dilute nuclear states / M. Freer -- Studies of exotic systems using transfer reactions at GANIL / D. Beaumel et al. -- First results from the Magnex large-acceptance spectrometer / A. Cunsolo et al. -- The ICHOR project and spin-isospin physics with unstable beams / H. Sakai -- Structure and low-lying states of the [symbol]He exotic nucleus via direct reactions on proton / V. Lapoux et al. -- Shell gap below [symbol]Sn based on the excited states in [symbol]Cd and [symbol]In / M. Górska -- Heavy neutron-rich nuclei produced in the fragmentation of a [symbol]Pb beam / Zs. Podolyák et al. -- Breakup and incomplete fusion in reactions of weakly-bound nuclei / D.J. Hinde et al. -- Excited states of [symbol]B and [symbol]He and their cluster aspect / Y. Kanada-En'yo et al. -- Nuclear reactions with weakly-bound systems: the treatment of the continuum / C. H. Dasso, A. Vitturi -- Dynamic evolution of three-body decaying resonances / A. S. Jensen et al. -- Prerainbow oscillations in [symbol]He scattering from the Hoyle state of [symbol]C and alpha particle condensation / S. Ohkubo, Y. Hirabayashi -- Angular dispersion behavior in heavy ion elastic scattering / Q. Wang et al. -- Microscopic optical potential in relativistic approach / Z.Yu. Ma et al. -- Exotic nuclei studied in direct reactions at low momentum transfer - recent results and future perspectives at fair / P. Egelhof -- Isotopic temperatures and symmetry energy in spectator fragmentation / M. De Napoli et al. -- Multi-channel algebraic scattering theory and the structure of exotic compound nuclei / K. Amos et al. -- Results for the first feasibility study for the EXL project at the experimental storage ring at GSI / N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki et al. -- Coulomb excitation of ISOLDE neutron-rich beams along the Z = 28 chain / P. Van Duppen -- The gamma decay of the pygmy resonance far from stability and the GDR at finite temperature / G. Benzoni et al

  11. Response of hot nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broglia, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The dipole giant resonance is reviewed, as it is the only vibration which has been experimentally identified in the decay of hot nuclei. The mechanism of exciting the resonance and the mode of the resonance are described. The methods used to calculate the vibrations from the shell model are discussed, including the Hartree-Fock approximation and random phase approximation. Nuclei formed by compound nuclear reactions, which possess high excitation energy and angular momentum, are considered. It is argued that the stability of the dipole may be used to advantage in the study of other properties of nuclei at high excitation. It is also considered possible that the discussion of the dipole giant resonance may be extended to the gamma decay of the isovector quadrupole vibration. 26 refs., 18 figs. (LEW)

  12. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains seven separate records on kinematic separation and mass analysis of heavy recoiling nuclei, dynamical effects prior to heavy ion fusion, VACTIV-DELPHI graphical dialog based program for the analysis of gamma-ray spectra, irradiation of nuclear emulsions in relativistic beams of 6He and3H nuclei, optical and structural investigations of PLZT x/65/35 (x = 4, 8 %) ferroelectric ceramics irradiated by a high-current pulsed electron beam, the oscillating charge and first evidence for neutrinoless double beta decay

  13. Rotational motion in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear structure theories are reviewed concerned with nuclei rotational motion. The development of the deformed nucleus model facilitated a discovery of rotational spectra of nuclei. Comprehensive verification of the rotational scheme and a successful classification of corresponding spectra stimulated investigations of the rotational movement dynamics. Values of nuclear moments of inertia proved to fall between two marginal values corresponding to rotation of a solid and hydrodynamic pattern of an unrotating flow, respectively. The discovery of governing role of the deformation and a degree of a symmetry violence for determining rotational degrees of freedon is pointed out to pave the way for generalization of the rotational spectra

  14. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains seven separate records on physics from extra dimensions, new physics in the new millennium with GENIUS: double beta decay, dark matter, solar neutrinos, the (μ-, e+) conversion in nuclei mediated by light Majorana neutrinos, exotic muon-to-positron conversion in nuclei: partial transition sum evaluation by using shell model, solar neutrino problem accounting for self consistent magnetohydrodynamics solution for solar magnetic fields, first neutrino observations from the Sudbury neutrino observatory and status report on BOREXINO and results of the muon-background measurements at CERN

  15. Anharmonic vibrations in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Fallot, M; Andrés, M V; Catara, F; Lanza, E G; Scarpaci, J A; Chomaz, Ph.

    2003-01-01

    In this letter, we show that the non-linearitites of large amplitude motions in atomic nuclei induce giant quadrupole and monopole vibrations. As a consequence, the main source of anharmonicity is the coupling with configurations including one of these two giant resonances on top of any state. Two-phonon energies are often lowered by one or two MeV because of the large matrix elements with such three phonon configurations. These effects are studied in two nuclei, 40Ca and 208Pb.

  16. Optical Tweezing Nuclei in the Cellular Blastoderm of Drosophila Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoetz, Eva-Maria; Chaikin, Paul M.; Wieschaus, Eric F.

    2004-03-01

    Optical tweezers are used to manipulate nuclei in the syncytial blastoderm of Drosophila embryos. Our aim is to move a nucleus in a living embryo and study the reactions of its nearest neighbors to this displacement. Effects on the surrounding nuclei may allow us to test models in which actin-microtubule networks connect individual nuclei and keep them in place. In our experiments we use video analysis to follow individual nuclei using GFP-labeled histone protein. In a first approach, we were able to move nuclei in embryonic homogenates suspended in oil. Although the squashing destroys the cell, mitotic nuclear divisions continue, implying that the cytoskeleton, which connects the nuclei to the cortex, is still functioning. We will present studies of nuclear interactions in these squashes and in intact syncytial blastoderms.

  17. Fissibility of compound nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Iwata, Yoritaka

    2012-01-01

    Collisions between $^{248}$Cm and $^{48}$Ca are systematically investigated by time-dependent density functional calculations with evaporation prescription. Depending on the incident energy and impact parameter, fusion, deep-inelastic and fission events are expected to appear. In this paper, a microscopic method of calculating the fissibility of compound nuclei is presented.

  18. Elusive active galactic nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maiolino, R; Comastri, A; Gilli, R; Nagar, NM; Bianchi, S; Boker, T; Colbert, E; Krabbe, A; Marconi, A; Matt, G; Salvati, M

    2003-01-01

    A fraction of active galactic nuclei do not show the classical Seyfert-type signatures in their optical spectra, i.e. they are optically 'elusive'. X-ray observations are an optimal tool to identify this class of objects. We combine new Chandra observations with archival X-ray data in order to obtai

  19. Octupole collectivity in nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, P. A.

    2016-07-01

    The experimental and theoretical evidence for octupole collectivity in nuclei is reviewed. Recent theoretical advances, covering a wide spectrum from mean-field theory to algebraic and cluster approaches, are discussed. The status of experimental data on the behaviour of energy levels and electric dipole and electric octupole transition moments is reviewed. Finally, an outlook is given on future prospects for this field.

  20. Triaxiality in superheavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, triaxial degree of freedom is explicitly utilized in calculating alpha decay lifetimes. The synthesis of superheavy nuclei with Z = 114-116 and 118 were detected by their decaying alpha chains with terminating spontaneous fission events. The lifetime of alpha decay chains measured are to be compared with the values evaluated theoretically

  1. Electroweak interactions in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topics include: introduction to electroweak theory; the Weinberg-Salam theory for leptons; the Weinberg-Salam theory for hadrons-the GIM mechanism; electron scattering as a probe of the electroweak interaction (observation of PV, the weak interaction for nucleons, and parity violation in atoms); and time reversed invariance and electric dipole moments of nucleons, nuclei, and atoms. 52 references

  2. Interactions on Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyer, Paul

    1995-01-01

    I review hard photon initiated processes on nuclei. The space-time development of the DIS reaction as viewed in the target rest frame qualitatively describes the nuclear shadowing of quark and gluon distributions, although it may be difficult to understand the very weak $Q^2$ dependence of the low $x$ data. The current jet hadron energy distribution at large $\

  3. Multiscale modeling of cellular epigenetic states: stochasticity in molecular networks, chromatin folding in cell nuclei, and tissue pattern formation of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie; Cao, Youfang; Gürsoy, Gamze; Naveed, Hammad; Terebus, Anna; Zhao, Jieling

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequences provide the overall genetic blueprint of cells, but cells possessing the same genome can exhibit diverse phenotypes. There is a multitude of mechanisms controlling cellular epigenetic states and that dictate the behavior of cells. Among these, networks of interacting molecules, often under stochastic control, depending on the specific wirings of molecular components and the physiological conditions, can have a different landscape of cellular states. In addition, chromosome folding in three-dimensional space provides another important control mechanism for selective activation and repression of gene expression. Fully differentiated cells with different properties grow, divide, and interact through mechanical forces and communicate through signal transduction, resulting in the formation of complex tissue patterns. Developing quantitative models to study these multi-scale phenomena and to identify opportunities for improving human health requires development of theoretical models, algorithms, and computational tools. Here we review recent progress made in these important directions. PMID:27480462

  4. Energetic Nuclei, Superdensity and Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldin, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    High-energy, relativistic nuclei were first observed in cosmic rays. Studing these nuclei has provided an opportunity for analyzing the composition of cosmic rays and for experimentally verifying principles governing the behavior of nuclear matter at high and super-high temperatures. Medical research using accelerated nuclei is suggested.…

  5. Bubble nuclei; Noyaux Bulles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legoll, F. [Service de Physique Theorique, CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1998-07-22

    For nuclei with very high electrical charge, the Coulomb field is expected to drive the protons away from the centre to the surface of the nucleus. Such a nucleus would be no more compact but look like a bubble. The goal of this work is to confirm this idea. We are interested in only the ground state of spherical nuclei. We use the Skyrme potential with the Sly4 parametrization to calculate the mean-field Hamiltonian. Paring correlations are described by a surface-active delta paring interaction. In its ground state the nucleus {sup A=900} X{sub Z=274} is shown to be a bubble. Another stable state is found with a little higher energy: it is also a bubble. (author) 11 refs., 18 figs., 33 tabs.

  6. Symmetries in Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Van Isacker, P

    2010-01-01

    The use of dynamical symmetries or spectrum generating algebras for the solution of the nuclear many-body problem is reviewed. General notions of symmetry and dynamical symmetry in quantum mechanics are introduced and illustrated with simple examples such as the SO(4) symmetry of the hydrogen atom and the isospin symmetry in nuclei. Two nuclear models, the shell model and the interacting boson model, are reviewed with particular emphasis on their use of group-theoretical techniques.

  7. Photoabsorption in nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Effenberger, M.; Mosel, U.

    1997-01-01

    We calculate the total photoabsorption cross section and cross sections for inclusive pion and eta photoproduction in nuclei in the energy range from 300 MeV to 1 GeV within the framework of a semi-classical BUU transport model. Besides medium modifications like Fermi motion and Pauli blocking we focus on the collision broadening of the involved resonances. The resonance contributions to the elementary cross section are fixed by fits to partial wave amplitudes of pion photoproduction. The cro...

  8. On Quasibound N* Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Kelkar, N G; Moskal, P

    2015-01-01

    The possibility for the existence of unstable bound states of the S11 nucleon resonance N$^*$(1535) and nuclei is investigated. These quasibound states are speculated to be closely related to the existence of the quasibound states of the eta mesons and nuclei. Within a simple model for the N N$^*$ interaction involving a pion and eta meson exchange, N$^*$-nucleus potentials for N*-$^3$He and N*-$^{24}$Mg are evaluated and found to be of a Woods-Saxon like form which supports two to three bound states. In case of N*-$^3$He, one state bound by only a few keV and another by 4 MeV is found. The results are however quite sensitive to the N N$^*$ $\\pi$ and N N$^*$ $\\eta$ vertex parameters. A rough estimate of the width of these states, based on the mean free path of the exchanged mesons in the nuclei leads to very broad states with $\\Gamma \\sim$ 80 and 110 MeV for N*-$^3$He and N*-$^{24}$Mg respectively.

  9. Structures of exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discoveries of many different types of nuclear shape coexistence are being found at both low and high excitation energies throughout the periodic table, as documented in recent reviews. Many new types of shape coexistence have been observed at low excitation energies, for examples bands on more than four different overlapping and coexisting shapes are observed in 185Au, and competing triaxial and prolate shapes in 71Se and 176Pt. Discrete states in super-deformed bands with deformations β 2 ∼ 0.4-0.6, coexisting with other shapes, have been seen to high spin up to 60ℎ in 152Dy, 132Ce and 135Nd. Super-deformed nuclei with N and Z both around 38 and around Z = 38, N ≥ 60. These data led to the discovery of new shell gaps and magic numbers of 38 for N and Z and 60 for N but now for deformed shapes. Marked differences in structure are observed at spins of 6 to 20 in nuclei in this region, which differ by only two protons; for example, 68Ge and 70Se. The differences are thought to be related to the competing shell gaps in these nuclei

  10. Dynamic Chirality in Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirality has recently been proposed as a novel feature of rotating nuclei [1]. Because the chiral symmetry is dichotomic, its spontaneous breaking by the axial angular momentum vector leads to doublets of closely lying rotational bands of the same parity. To investigate nuclear chirality, next to establish the existence of almost degenerate rotational bands, it is necessary to measure also other observables and compare them to the model predictions. The crucial test for the suggested nuclei as candidates to express chirality is based on precise lifetime measurements. Two lifetime experiments and theoretical approaches for the description of the experimental results will be presented. Lifetimes of exited states in 134Pr were measured [2,3] by means of the recoil distance Doppler-shift and Doppler-shift attenuation techniques. The branching ratios and the electric or magnetic character of the transitions were also investigated [3]. The experiments were performed at IReS, Strasbourg, using the EUROBALL IV spectrometer, in conjunction with the inner bismuth germanate ball and the Cologne coincidence plunger apparatus. Exited states in 134Pr were populated in the fusion-evaporation reaction 119Sn(19F, 4n)134Pr. The possible chiral interpretation of twin bands was investigated in the two-quasiparticle triaxial rotor [1] and interacting boson-fermion-fermion models [4]. Both theoretical approaches can describe the level-scheme of 134Pr. The analysis of the wave functions has shown that the possibility for the angular momenta of the proton, neutron, and core to find themselves in the favorable, almost orthogonal geometry, is present but is far from being dominant [3,5]. The structure is characterized by large β and γ fluctuations. The existence of doublets of bands in 134Pr can be attributed to weak chirality dominated by shape fluctuations. In a second experiment branching ratios and lifetimes in 136Pm were measured by means of the recoil distance Doppler-shift and

  11. Active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Blandford, RD; Woltjer, L

    1990-01-01

    Starting with this volume, the Lecture Notes of the renowned Advanced Courses of the Swiss Society for Astrophysics and Astronomy will be published annually. In each course, three extensive lectures given by leading experts in their respective fields cover different and essential aspects of the subject. The 20th course, held at Les Diablerets in April 1990, dealt with current research on active galactic nuclei; it represents the most up-to-date views on the subject, presented with particular regard for clarity. The previous courses considered a wide variety of subjects, beginning with ""Theory

  12. Active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, Volker

    2012-01-01

    This AGN textbook includes phenomena based on new results in the X-Ray domain from new telescopes such as Chandra and XMM Newton not mentioned in any other book. Furthermore, it considers also the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope with its revolutionary advances of unprecedented sensitivity, field of view and all-sky monitoring. Those and other new developments as well as simulations of AGN merging events and formations, enabled through latest super-computing capabilities. The book gives an overview on the current knowledge of the Active Galacitc Nuclei phenomenon. The spectral energy d

  13. Photoabsorption on nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Effenberger, M.; Hombach, A; Teis, S.; Mosel, U.

    1996-01-01

    We calculate the total photoabsorption cross section on nuclei in the energy range from 300 MeV to 1 GeV within the framework of a semi-classical phase space model. Besides medium modifications like Fermi motion and Pauli blocking we focus on the collision broadening of the involved resonances. The resonance contributions to the elementary cross section are fixed by fits to partial wave amplitudes of pion photoproduction. The cross sections for $N \\, R \\to N \\, N$, needed for the calculation ...

  14. Low-Luminosity Seyfert Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, L C; Sargent, W L W; Ho, Luis C.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Sargent, Wallace L. W.

    1996-01-01

    We describe a new sample of Seyfert nuclei discovered during the course of an optical spectroscopic survey of nearby galaxies. The majority of the objects, many recognized for the first time, have luminosities much lower than those of classical Seyferts and populate the faint end of the AGN luminosity function. A significant fraction of the nuclei emit broad H-alpha emission qualitatively similar to the broad lines seen in classical Seyfert 1 nuclei and QSOs.

  15. Electron scattering for exotic nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Toshimi Suda

    2014-11-01

    A brand-new electron scattering facility, the SCRIT Electron Scattering Facility, will soon start its operation at RIKEN RI Beam Factory, Japan. This is the world’s first electron scattering facility dedicated to the structure studies of short-lived nuclei. The goal of this facility is to determine the charge density distributions of short-lived exotic nuclei by elastic electron scattering. The first collision between electrons and exotic nuclei will be observed in the year 2014.

  16. Elusive Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Maiolino, R; Gilli, R; Nagar, N M; Bianchi, S; Böker, T; Colbert, E; Krabbe, A; Marconi, A; Matt, G; Salvati, M

    2003-01-01

    A fraction of active galactic nuclei do not show the classical Seyfert-type signatures in their optical spectra, i.e. they are optically "elusive". X-ray observations are an optimal tool to identify this class of objects. We combine new Chandra observations with archival X-ray data in order to obtain a first estimate of the fraction of elusive AGN in local galaxies and to constrain their nature. Our results suggest that elusive AGN have a local density comparable to or even higher than optically classified Seyfert nuclei. Most elusive AGN are heavily absorbed in the X-rays, with gas column densities exceeding 10^24 cm^-2, suggesting that their peculiar nature is associated with obscuration. It is likely that in elusive AGN, the nuclear UV source is completely embedded and the ionizing photons cannot escape, which prevents the formation of a classical Narrow Line Region. Elusive AGN may contribute significantly to the 30 keV bump of the X-ray background.

  17. The role of nuclei, polyribosomes and cytosol factors in the onset of the acute-phase reaction in the liver cell.

    OpenAIRE

    Piccoletti, R.; Aletti, M. G.; Cajone, F.; Bernelli-Zazzera, A.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclei isolated from livers of turpentine-treated rats show an increased RNA synthesis, reaching a maximum at 10 h after treatment. The stimulation affects both alpha-amanitin-resistant and alpha-amanitin-sensitive activities, suggesting that pre-ribosomal and pre-messenger RNA formation are activated at the same time and to the same extent. The amount of ribosomal RNA, which is still normal 10 h after treatment, increases significantly at 24 h, but the increase is limited to the bound riboso...

  18. The interstitial nuclei of the human anterior hypothalamus: an investigation of sexual variation in volume and cell size, number and density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byne, W; Lasco, M S; Kemether, E; Shinwari, A; Edgar, M A; Morgello, S; Jones, L B; Tobet, S

    2000-02-21

    The four interstitial nuclei of the anterior hypothalamus (INAH) have been considered as candidate human nuclei for homology with the much studied sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area of the rat. Assessment of the INAH for sexual dimorphism has produced discrepant results. This study reports the first systematic examination of all four INAH in the human for sexual variation in volume, neuronal number and neuronal size. Serial Nissl-stained coronal sections through the medial preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus were examined from 18 males and 20 females who died between the ages of 17 and 65 without evidence of hypothalamic pathology or infection with the human immunodeficiency virus. A computer-assisted image-analysis system and commercial stereology software package were employed to assess total volume, neuronal number and mean neuronal size for each INAH. INAH3 occupied a significantly greater volume and contained significantly more neurons in males than in females. No sex differences in volume were detected for any of the other INAH. No sexual variation in neuronal size or packing density was observed in any nucleus. The present data corroborate two previous reports of sexual dimorphism of INAH3 but provide no support for previous reports of sexual variation in other INAH.

  19. Gluon density in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ayala, A P; Levin, E M

    1996-01-01

    In this talk we present our detail study ( theory and numbers) [1] on the shadowing corrections to the gluon structure functions for nuclei. Starting from rather contraversial information on the nucleon structure function which is originated by the recent HERA data, we develop the Glauber approach for the gluon density in a nucleus based on Mueller formula [2] and estimate the value of the shadowing corrections in this case. Than we calculate the first corrections to the Glauber approach and show that these corrections are big. Based on this practical observation we suggest the new evolution equation which takes into account the shadowing corrections and solve it. We hope to convince you that the new evolution equation gives a good theoretical tool to treat the shadowing corrections for the gluons density in a nucleus and, therefore, it is able to provide the theoretically reliable initial conditions for the time evolution of the nucleus - nucleus cascade.

  20. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains nine separate records on the transport of the evanescent electron beam in the vacuum section with plasma disks, determination of ΔΓs from analysis of untagged decays Bs0→J/ψφ by using the method of angular moments, investigation of light nucleus clustering in relativistic multifragmentation processes, secondary fragments of relativistic 22Ne at 4.1 A · GeV/c nuclei in nuclear emulsion, extrapolation of experimental data of accelerated radiation aging to the operation condition of dipole magnet electrical insulation at low dose rates, automatic quality control system of the installed straws into TRT wheels, a new method of fast simulation for a hadron calorimeter response, empirical evidence for relation between threshold effects and neutron strength function as well as on what information can be derived when no events are registered

  1. Pulsars: Gigantic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Renxin

    2011-01-01

    What is the real nature of pulsars? This is essentially a question of the fundamental strong interaction between quarks at low-energy scale and hence of the non-perturbative quantum chromo-dynamics, the solution of which would certainly be meaningful for us to understand one of the seven millennium prize problems (i.e., "Yang-Mills Theory") named by the Clay Mathematical Institute. After a historical note, it is argued here that a pulsar is very similar to an extremely big nucleus, but is a little bit different from the {\\em gigantic nucleus} speculated 80 years ago by L. Landau. The paper demonstrates the similarity between pulsars and gigantic nuclei from both points of view: the different manifestations of compact stars and the general behavior of the strong interaction.

  2. Clusters in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Christian

    Following the pioneering discovery of alpha clustering and of molecular resonances, the field of nuclear clustering is today one of those domains of heavy-ion nuclear physics that faces the greatest challenges, yet also contains the greatest opportunities. After many summer schools and workshops, in particular over the last decade, the community of nuclear molecular physicists has decided to collaborate in producing a comprehensive collection of lectures and tutorial reviews covering the field. This third volume follows the successful Lect. Notes Phys. 818 (Vol. 1) and 848 (Vol. 2), and comprises six extensive lectures covering the following topics:  - Gamma Rays and Molecular Structure - Faddeev Equation Approach for Three Cluster Nuclear Reactions - Tomography of the Cluster Structure of Light Nuclei Via Relativistic Dissociation - Clustering Effects Within the Dinuclear Model : From Light to Hyper-heavy Molecules in Dynamical Mean-field Approach - Clusterization in Ternary Fission - Clusters in Light N...

  3. Electron scattering off nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two recently developed aspects related to the scattering of electrons off nuclei are presented. On the one hand, a model is introduced which emphasizes the relativistic aspects of the problem in the impulse approximation, by demanding strict maintenance of the algebra of the Poincare group. On the other hand, the second model aims at a more sophisticated description of the nuclear response in the case of collective excitations. Basically, it utilizes the RPA formalism with a new development which enables a more careful treatment of the states in the continuum as is the case for the giant resonances. Applications of both models to the description of elastic scattering, inelastic scattering to discrete levels, giant resonances and the quasi-elastic region are discussed. (Author)

  4. Exotic nuclei in supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this talk I discuss properties of hot stellar matter at sub-nuclear densities which is formed in supernova explosions. I emphasize that thermodynamic conditions in this case are rather similar to those created in the laboratory by intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions. Theoretical methods developed for the interpretation of multi-fragment final states in such reactions can be used also for description of the stellar matter. I present main steps of the statistical approach to the equation of state and nuclear composition, dealing with an ensemble of nuclear species instead of one “average” nucleus. Finally some results of this approach are presented. The emphasis is put on possible formation of heavy and superheavy nuclei. (author)

  5. Clusters in Light Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, C; Zafra, A Sanchez i; Thummerer, S; Azaiez, F; Bednarczyk, P; Courtin, S; Curien, D; Dorvaux, O; Goasduff, A; ~Lebhertz, D; Nourreddine, A; ~Rousseau, M; Salsac, M -D; von Oertzen, W; Gebauer, B; Wheldon, C; Kokalova, Tz; Efimov, G; Zherebchevsky, V; Schulz, Ch; Bohlen, H G; Kamanin, D; de Angelis, G; Gadea, A; Lenzi, S; Napoli, D R; Szilner, S; Milin, M; Catford, W N; Jenkins, D G; Royer, G

    2010-01-01

    A great deal of research work has been undertaken in the alpha-clustering study since the pioneering discovery, half a century ago, of 12C+12C molecular resonances. Our knowledge of the field of the physics of nuclear molecules has increased considerably and nuclear clustering remains one of the most fruitful domains of nuclear physics, facing some of the greatest challenges and opportunities in the years ahead. In this work, the occurence of "exotic" shapes in light N=Z alpha-like nuclei is investigated. Various approaches of superdeformed and hyperdeformed bands associated with quasimolecular resonant structures are presented. Results on clustering aspects are also discussed for light neutron-rich Oxygen isotopes.

  6. Collective excitations in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, Ph. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular, the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of this collective motions is a very good tool to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article is to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. We have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. Understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actuality in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular, the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure of nuclei close to their ground states. Moreover, some collective states appear to be very robust against the onset of chaos. This is the case of the hot giant dipole built on top of a hot nucleus which seems to survive up to rather high temperatures. Their sudden disappearance is still a subject of controversy. It may be that the mean-field and the associated collective states are playing a crucial role also in catastrophic processes such as the phase-transitions. Indeed, when the system is diluted the collective vibrations may become unstable and it seems that these unstable modes provide a natural explanation to the self organization of the system in drops. Finally, considering the diversity of the different structures of exotic nuclei one may expect new vibration types. All these studies are showing the diversity of the collective motions of strongly correlated quantum systems such as the nucleus but many open questions remain to be solved. (authors) 304 refs., 53 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Calciumreleasing activity induced by nuclei of mouse fertilized early embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    At fertilization, repetitive transient rises of intracellular calcium concentration occur in all mammals studied so far. It has been shown that calcium rises could be induced when mouse fertilized 1-, 2-cell nuclei were transplanted into unfertilized eggs and that the reconstituted embryo could be activated. However, whether the capability of inducing calcium rises occurs in all stages of mammalian embryos remains unknown. In this study, by using the nuclear transplantation technique and measurement of intracellular calcium rises in living cells, we showed that only the nuclei from mouse fertilized 1-cell and 2-cell embryos, neither the nuclei from 4-, 8-cell and ethanol activated parthenogenetic embryos nor 2 or 3 nuclei of electrofused 4-cell stage syncytium, have calcium-releasing activity when they were transferred into unfertilized mature oocytes. Our results indicate that the calcium-releasing activity in nuclei of 1-, 2-cell embryos is produced during fertilization and exists at the special stage of fertilized early embryos. These suggested that the capacity of inducing calcium release activity in fertilized early embryos is important for normal embryonic development.

  8. Cavitation inception from bubble nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Knud Aage

    2015-01-01

    The tensile strength of ordinary water such as tap water or seawater is typically well below 1 bar. It is governed by cavitation nuclei in the water, not by the tensile strength of the water itself, which is extremely high. Different models of the nuclei have been suggested over the years......, and experimental investigations of bubbles and cavitation inception have been presented. These results suggest that cavitation nuclei in equilibrium are gaseous voids in the water, stabilized by a skin which allows diffusion balance between gas inside the void and gas in solution in the surrounding liquid....... The cavitation nuclei may be free gas bubbles in the bulk of water, or interfacial gaseous voids located on the surface of particles in the water, or on bounding walls. The tensile strength of these nuclei depends not only on the water quality but also on the pressure-time history of the water. A recent model...

  9. Quarks in Few Body Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holt Roy J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron scattering at very high Bjorken x from hadrons provides an excellent test of models, has an important role in high energy physics, and from nuclei, provides a window into short range correlations. Light nuclei have a key role because of the relatively well-known nuclear structure. The development of a novel tritium target for Jefferson Lab has led to renewed interest in the mass three system. For example, deep inelastic scattering experiments in the light nuclei provide a powerful means to determine the neutron structure function. The isospin dependence of electron scattering from mass-3 nuclei provide information on short range correlations in nuclei. The program using the new tritium target will be presented along with a summary of other experiments aimed at revealing the large-x structure of the nucleon.

  10. Osteoclast nuclei of myeloma patients show chromosome translocations specific for the myeloma cell clone: a new type of cancer-host partnership?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin Andersen, Thomas; Boissy, Patrice; Sondergaard, T E;

    2007-01-01

    A major clinical manifestation of bone cancers is bone destruction. It is widely accepted that this destruction is not caused by the malignant cells themselves, but by osteoclasts, multinucleated cells of monocytic origin that are considered to be the only cells able to degrade bone. The present ...... participate directly. The possibility that malignant cells corrupt host cells by the transfer of malignant DNA may have been underestimated to date in cancer research....

  11. Collective excitations in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, Ph

    1997-12-31

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of these collective motions is a very good to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article was to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. In particular we have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. The understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actually in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure if nuclei close to their ground states. (author) 270 refs.

  12. Antibaryons bound in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Mishustin, I N; Buervenich, T J; Stöcker, H; Greiner, W

    2005-01-01

    We study the possibility of producing a new kind of nuclear systems which in addition to ordinary nucleons contain a few antibaryons (antiproton, antilambda, etc.). The properties of such systems are described within the relativistic mean-field model by employing G-parity transformed interactions for antibaryons. Calculations are first done for infinite systems and then for finite nuclei from He to Pb. It is demonstrated that the presence of a real antibaryon leads to a strong rearrangement of a target nucleus resulting in a significant increase of its binding energy and local compression. Noticeable effects remain even after the antibaryon coupling constants are reduced by factor 3-4 compared to G-parity motivated values. We have performed detailed calculations of the antibaryon annihilation rates in the nuclear environment by applying a kinetic approach. It is shown that due to significant reduction of the reaction Q-values, the in-medium annihilation rates should be strongly suppressed leading to relativel...

  13. Spectroscopy of heavy fissionable nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Tandel

    2015-09-01

    Structural studies of heavy nuclei are quite challenging due to increased competition from fission, particularly at high spins. Nuclei in the actinide region exhibit a variety of interesting phenomena. Recent advances in instrumentation and analysis techniques have made feasible sensitive measurements of nuclei populated with quite low cross-sections. These include isomers and rotational band structures in isotopes of Pu ( = 94) to Rf ( = 104), and octupole correlations in the Th ( = 90) region. The obtained experimental data have provided insights on various aspects like moments of inertia and nucleon alignments at high spins, quasiparticle energies and evolution of quadrupole and octupole collectivity, among others. An overview of some of these results is presented.

  14. Quantitative Morphometic Analysis of Cell Nuclei and Change of ER and PR Expression in Breast Carcinoma%乳腺癌ER、PR抗原表达与细胞核形态定量变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗小芬; 王睿; 曹幼甫

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究乳腺癌雌激素受体(ER)、孕激素受体(PR)表达与细胞核变化的关系,探讨其临床应用价值.方法 选择苏州市中医院病理科2002年以来42例乳腺癌标本,总结其ER和PR表达,并作细胞核形态定量图像分析;同时与20例良性病变对比.结果 乳腺癌细胞核等圆直径、面积及边缘周长,均较良性对照组为大,差别有统计学意义(P<0.01).ER+/PR-病例细胞核形态定量与ER+/PR+比较,差别有统计学意义(P<0.05);ER-PR-病例细胞核形态定量与ER+/PR+比较,差别有统计学意义(P<0.01).乳腺癌ER和PR可同时或分别失表达,PR失表达病例细胞核形态变量较大,尤其ER和PR同时失表达病例细胞核形态变量更大.结论 良、恶性乳腺病变细胞核形态定量差别显著,对鉴别诊断有实用价值.ER和PR的表达结合细胞核形态学测量结果对治疗和预后的评估有意义.%Objective To study the expression of hormone receptor and the nuclei morphometry in breast cancer. Methods Several morphometric parameters of cell nuclei were detected by means of a quantitative pathologic technique on 42 cases of breast cancer and 20 cases of benign lesions of the breast respectively. Immunohistochemical SP method was used to detect expression of estrogen receptor(ER) and progesterone receptor(PR) in breast cancer. Results The diameter of nuclei, the area of nuclei and the circumference in cases of breast cancer was found to be significantly larger than those in benign breast lesions( P <0. 01 ). Nuclei morphometry in cases of ER +/PR + was significantly different from that in cases of ER +/PR-( P < 0.05 ) and ER -/PR- (P <0.01 ) in breast cancer respectively. The morphometric data in ER +/PR - cases of breast cancer were larger than those in ER -/PR + eases of breast cancer, and largest values were observed in ER -/PR - cases of breast cancer. Conclusion It was of application for morphometry analysis to distinguish benign breast

  15. Pseudospin Dynamical Symetry in Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ginocchio, Joseph N

    2014-01-01

    Pseudospin symmetry has been useful in understanding atomic nuclei. We review the arguments that this symmetry is a relativistic symmetry. The condition for this symmetry is that the sum of the vector and scalar potentials in the Dirac Hamiltonian is a constant. We give the generators of pseudospin symmetry. We review some of the predictions that follow from this insight into the relativistic origins of pseudospin symmetry. Since in nuclei the sum of the scalar and vector potentials is not zero but is small, we discuss preliminary investigations into the conditions on the potentials to produce partial dynamic pseudospin symmetry. Finally we show that approximate pseudospin symmetry in nuclei predicts approximate spin symmetry in anti-nucleon scattering from nuclei.

  16. Physics with loosely bound nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chhanda Samanta

    2001-08-01

    The essential aspect of contemporary physics is to understand properties of nucleonic matter that constitutes the world around us. Over the years research in nuclear physics has provided strong guidance in understanding the basic principles of nuclear interactions. But, the scenario of nuclear physics changed drastically as the new generation of accelerators started providing more and more rare isotopes, which are away from the line of stability. These weakly bound nuclei are found to exhibit new forms of nuclear matter and unprecedented exotic behaviour. The low breakup thresholds of these rare nuclei are posing new challenges to both theory and experiments. Fortunately, nature has provided a few loosely bound stable nuclei that have been studied thoroughly for decades. Attempts are being made to find a consistent picture for the unstable nuclei starting from their stable counterparts. Some significant differences in the structure and reaction mechanisms are found.

  17. Particles and nuclei in PANIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PANIC is the triennal International Conference on Particles and Nuclei, and judging from the latest PANIC, held in Kyoto from 20-24 April there is no need for panic yet. Faced with two pictures – one of nuclei described in nucleon and meson terms, and another of nucleons containing quarks and gluons – physicists are intrigued to know what new insights from the quark level can tell us about nuclear physics, or vice versa

  18. Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks produced in histone-depleted tumor cell nuclei measured using the neutral comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Removal of histones and other nuclear proteins greatly enhances the sensitivity of mammalian cells to DNA damage by ionizing radiation. We examined the possibility that the ease of dissociation of histones, or the association of other nuclear proteins with DNA, may differ between radioresistant and sensitive human tumor cells. Cells embedded in agarose were exposed to increasing salt concentrations prior to irradiation and examination using a microscopic gel electrophoresis method, the neutral comet assay. Induction of double-strand breaks increased by a factor of about 20 when cells of four human tumor cell line HT144 melanoma, HT29 adenocarcinoma, DU145 prostate carcinoma and U87 glioma, were exposed to 2 M NaCl; however, no correlation with radiosensitivity was apparent. While a significant number of histone and non-histone proteins are present after extraction with 1.2 M NaCL, these proteins apparently have only a minor influence on radiosensitivity. However, if they are allowed to remain with DNA during electrophoresis, about 15 times more strand breaks are required to produce a similar amount of DNA migration in both DU145 and HT144 cells. These results suggest that the association between proteins and DNA within the nucleus, as probed by extraction with sodium chloride, does not help to explain differences in intrinsic radiosensitivity among cells of these diverse tumor cell lines. 33 refs., 11 figs

  19. From heavy nuclei to super-heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existence of super-heavy nuclei has been predicted nearly fifty years ago. Due to the strong coulomb repulsion, the stabilisation of these nuclei is possible only through shell effects. The reasons for this fragile stability, as well as the theoretical predictions concerning the position of the island of stability are presented in the first part of this lecture. In the second part, experiments and experimental techniques which have been used to synthesize or search for super-heavy elements are described. Spectroscopic studies performed in very heavy elements are presented in the following section. We close this lecture with techniques that are currently being developed in order to reach the superheavy island and to study the structure of very-heavy nuclei. (author)

  20. Projections of individual Purkinje cells of identified zones in the ventral nodulus to the vestibular and cerebellar nuclei in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, D R; De Zeeuw, C I; DiGiorgi, P L; Simpson, J I

    1994-11-15

    The projections of Purkinje cells from zones in the ventral nodulus of pigmented rabbits were studied with the use of extracellularly injected biocytin as an anterograde tracer. The zones were physiologically identified according to the complex spike modulation of Purkinje cells in response to optokinetic stimulation. Purkinje cells in the most medial zone do not respond to optokinetic stimulation; they project to the fastigial nucleus, the perifastigial white matter, the periinterposed white matter, and the medial vestibular nucleus. In the adjacent zone, Purkinje cells respond best to optokinetic stimulation about the vertical axis; they project to the periinterposed white matter and the medial vestibular nucleus. Purkinje cells in the next zone respond best to optokinetic stimulation about an axis approximately perpendicular to the ipsilateral anterior canal; they project to the periinterposed white matter, dorsal group y, the superior vestibular nucleus, and the medial vestibular nucleus. In the most lateral zone, Purkinje cells respond best to optokinetic stimulation about the vertical axis; they project to the periinterposed white matter, dorsal group y, and the medial vestibular nucleus. The majority of axons gave off collaterals and innervated more than one nucleus. Often, three or four different areas received terminals from a single Purkinje cell axon. The zonal projection pattern of the ventral nodulus is compared to that of the flocculus, which, with respect to the visual climbing fiber afferents, has similar zones.

  1. Enumeration of islets by nuclei counting and light microscopic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisania, Anna; Papas, Klearchos K; Powers, Daryl E; Rappel, Michael J; Omer, Abdulkadir; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Weir, Gordon C; Colton, Clark K

    2010-11-01

    Islet enumeration in impure preparations by conventional dithizone staining and visual counting is inaccurate and operator dependent. We examined nuclei counting for measuring the total number of cells in islet preparations, and we combined it with morphological analysis by light microscopy (LM) for estimating the volume fraction of islets in impure preparations. Cells and islets were disrupted with lysis solution and shear, and accuracy of counting successively diluted nuclei suspensions was verified with (1) visual counting in a hemocytometer after staining with crystal violet, and automatic counting by (2) aperture electrical resistance measurement and (3) flow cytometer measurement after staining with 7-aminoactinomycin-D. DNA content averaged 6.5 and 6.9 pg of DNA per cell for rat and human islets, respectively, in agreement with literature estimates. With pure rat islet preparations, precision improved with increasing counts, and samples with about ≥160 islets provided a coefficient of variation of about 6%. Aliquots of human islet preparations were processed for LM analysis by stereological point counting. Total nuclei counts and islet volume fraction from LM analysis were combined to obtain the number of islet equivalents (IEs). Total number of IE by the standard method of dithizone staining/manual counting was overestimated by about 90% compared with LM/nuclei counting for 12 freshly isolated human islet research preparations. Nuclei counting combined with islet volume fraction measurements from LM is a novel method for achieving accurate islet enumeration. PMID:20697375

  2. Cavitation inception from bubble nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørch, K A

    2015-10-01

    The tensile strength of ordinary water such as tap water or seawater is typically well below 1 bar. It is governed by cavitation nuclei in the water, not by the tensile strength of the water itself, which is extremely high. Different models of the nuclei have been suggested over the years, and experimental investigations of bubbles and cavitation inception have been presented. These results suggest that cavitation nuclei in equilibrium are gaseous voids in the water, stabilized by a skin which allows diffusion balance between gas inside the void and gas in solution in the surrounding liquid. The cavitation nuclei may be free gas bubbles in the bulk of water, or interfacial gaseous voids located on the surface of particles in the water, or on bounding walls. The tensile strength of these nuclei depends not only on the water quality but also on the pressure-time history of the water. A recent model and associated experiments throw new light on the effects of transient pressures on the tensile strength of water, which may be notably reduced or increased by such pressure changes. PMID:26442138

  3. Individual cells in the raphe nuclei of the medulla oblongata in rat that contain immunoreactivities for both serotonin and enkephalin project to the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millhorn, D E; Hökfelt, T; Verhofstad, A A; Terenius, L

    1989-01-01

    The ventral medulla oblongata of rats was analyzed with a double-labelling immunofluorescence technique using guinea pig antibodies directed against serotonin (5-HT) and rabbit antisera directed against enkephalin (ENK). Numerous cells in the region of nucleus raphe obscurus, nucleus raphe pallidus and nucleus raphe magnus showed immunostaining for either 5-HT or ENK. A substantial number of cells showed positive immunostaining for both 5-HT and ENK. 5-HT/ENK double-labelled cells were most frequently encountered in an area that extended from the rostral aspect of the inferior olivary nucleus to the pontomedullary border. This region corresponds anatomically to nucleus raphe magnus/nucleus paragigantocellularis. In addition, a number of the 5-HT/ENK-containing cells were retrogradely labelled with Fluoro-Gold dye that had been injected into the thoracic spinal cord several days prior to perfusion. Schematic drawings showing the anatomical distribution of 5-HT/ENK colocalization are provided. PMID:2744110

  4. Theoretical models for exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagawa, Hiroyuki [RIKEN Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan); University of Aizu, Center for Mathematics and Physics, Fukushima (Japan); Hagino, Kouichi [Tohoku University, Department of Physics, Sendai (Japan); Tohoku University, Research Center for Electron Photon Science, Sendai (Japan); National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    We review various theoretical models which have been used to study the properties of the ground state and excited states of nuclei close to and beyond the neutron and proton drip lines. The validity and limitations of these models are discussed with applications to recent experimental findings such as di-neutron correlations in Borromian nuclei, the soft dipole excitations, direct two-neutron and two-proton decays, and odd-even staggerings of reaction cross sections. The role of isoscalar spin-triplet pairing interaction is also pointed out in the low-lying energy spectra as well as the spin- and isospin-dependent decay rates for N = Z and N = Z + 2 nuclei with mass A < 60. A characteristic feature of the Coulomb energy displacement of the Borromian nucleus {sup 11}Li is discussed in connection to the energies of isobaric analogue states (IAS) of T = 5/2 multiples in the A = 11 systems. (orig.)

  5. International Symposium on Exotic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Sobolev, Yu G; EXON-2014

    2015-01-01

    The production and the properties of nuclei in extreme conditions, such as high isospin, temperature, angular momenta, large deformations etc., have become the subject of detailed investigations in all scientific centers. The main topics discussed at the Symposium were: Synthesis and Properties of Exotic Nuclei; Superheavy Elements; Rare Processes, Nuclear Reactions, Fission and Decays; Experimental Facilities and Scientific Projects. This book provides a comprehensive overview of the newest results of the investigations in the main scientific centers such as GSI (Darmstadt, Germany), GANIL (Caen, France), RIKEN (Wako-shi, Japan), MSU (Michigan, USA), and JINR (Dubna, Russia).

  6. PDFs from nucleons to nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Accardi, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    I review recent progress in the extraction of unpolarized parton distributions in the proton and in nuclei from a unified point of view that highlights how the interplay between high energy particle physics and lower energy nuclear physics can be of mutual benefit to either field. Areas of overlap range from the search for physics beyond the standard model at the LHC, to the study of the non perturbative structure of nucleons and the emergence of nuclei from quark and gluon degrees of freedom, to the interaction of colored probes in a cold nuclear medium.

  7. Octupole shapes in heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical calculations and measurements show the presence of strong octupole correlations in thecyround states and low-lying states of odd-mass and odd-odd nuclei in the RaPa region. Evidence for octupole correlations is provided by the observation of parity doublets and reductions in M1 matrix elements, decoupling parameters, and Coriolis matrix elements Involving high-j states. Enhancement of E1 transition rates has also been observed for some of the octupole deformed nuclei. The most convincing argument for octupole deformation is provided by the similarities of the reduced alpha decay rates to the two members of parity doublets

  8. Neutron scattering on deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of neutron elastic and inelastic differential cross sections around 14 MeV for 9Be, C, 181Ta, 232Th, 238U and 239Pu have been analyzed using a coupled channel (CC) formalism for deformed nuclei and phenomenological global optical model potentials (OMP). For the actinide targets these results are compared with the predictions of a semi-microscopic calculation using Jeukenne, Lejeune and Mahaux (JLM) microscopic OMP and a deformed ground state nuclear density. The overall agreement between calculations and the measurements is reasonable good even for the very light nuclei, where the quality of the fits is better than those obtained with spherical OMP

  9. Spontaneous fission of superheavy nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R A Gherghescu; D N Poenaru

    2015-09-01

    The macroscopic–microscopic method is extended to calculate the deformation energy and penetrability for binary nuclear configurations typical for fission processes. The deformed two-centre shell model is used to obtain single-particle energy levels for the transition region of two partially overlapped daughter and emitted fragment nuclei. The macroscopic part is obtained using the Yukawa-plus-exponential potential. The microscopic shell and pairing corrections are obtained using the Strutinsky and BCS approaches and the cranking formulae yield the inertia tensor. Finally, the WKB method is used to calculate penetrabilities and spontaneous fission half-lives. Calculations are performed for the decay of 282,292120 nuclei.

  10. Gluons in nuclei and pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of connecting apparently different descriptions of quarks in nuclei has already been shown. The authors pursue the consequences of this 'duality' for flavour-singlet distributions. An interesting possibility is that nuclear pions may have unusual quark-gluon substructure. Indeed, pions in general could be relatively 'rich' in glue. (author)

  11. Fission dynamics of hot nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santanu Pal; Jhilam Sadhukhan

    2014-04-01

    Experimental evidence accumulated during the last two decades indicates that the fission of excited heavy nuclei involves a dissipative dynamical process. We shall briefly review the relevant dynamical model, namely the Langevin equations for fission. Statistical model predictions using the Kramers’ fission width will also be discussed.

  12. Generalized parton distributions of nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Guzey, V.

    2009-01-01

    We review recent theoretical results on generalized parton distributions (GPDs) of nuclei, emphasizing the following three roles of nuclear GPDs: (i) complementarity to free proton GPDs, (ii) the enhancement of traditional nuclear effects such as nuclear binding, EMC effect, nuclear shadowing, and (iii) an access to novel nuclear effects such as medium modifications of bound nucleons.

  13. Percolation and multifragmentation of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method to build the 'cold' nuclei as percolation clusters is suggested. Within the framework of definite assumptions of the character of nucleon-nucleon couplings breaking resulting from the nuclear reactions as description of the multifragmentation process in the hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus reactions at high energies is obtained. 19 refs.; 6 figs

  14. Chiral Electroweak Currents in Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Riska, D O

    2016-01-01

    The development of the chiral dynamics based description of nuclear electroweak currents is reviewed. Gerald E. (Gerry) Brown's role in basing theoretical nuclear physics on chiral Lagrangians is emphasized. Illustrative examples of the successful description of electroweak observables of light nuclei obtained from chiral effective field theory are presented.

  15. Static multipole deformations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physics of static multipole deformations in nuclei is reviewed. Nuclear static moments result from the delicate balance between the vibronic Jahn-Teller interaction (particle-vibration coupling) and the residual interaction (pairing force). Examples of various permanent nuclear deformations are discussed

  16. Nuclear astrophysics of light nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, Hans Otto Uldall

    2013-01-01

    A review of nuclear astrophysics of light nuclei using radioactive beams or techniques developed for radioactive beams is given. We discuss Big Bang nucleosynthesis, with special focus on the lithium problem, aspects of neutrino-physics, helium-burning and finally selected examples of studies...

  17. Partial Dynamical Symmetries in Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Leviatan, A

    2000-01-01

    Partial dynamical symmetries (PDS) are shown to be relevant to the interpretation of the $K=0_2$ band and to the occurrence of F-spin multiplets of ground and scissors bands in deformed nuclei. Hamiltonians with bosonic and fermionic PDS are presented.

  18. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions

  19. Magnetic shift of magic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shell effect of nuclei in strong magnetic fields associated with magnetars' is considered within the shell model. It is demonstrated that the magnetic field gives rise to a change of the phase in shell-oscillations of nuclear masses. The nuclear magic numbers of the iron region are shifted significantly towards smaller mass numbers. (author)

  20. Low energy + scattering on = nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swapan Das; Arun K Jain

    2003-11-01

    The data for the total cross-section of + scattering on various nuclei have been analysed in the Glauber multiple scattering theory. Energy-dependent +-nucleus optical potential is generated using the forward +-nucleon scattering amplitude and the nuclear density distribution. Along with this, the calculated total +-nucleus cross-sections using the effective +-nucleon cross-section inside the nucleus are also presented.

  1. Four-body correlations in heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The origin of four-body correlations in heavy nuclei is studied. It is found that the physical picture for this phenomenon can be different in heavy and light nuclei. An application to the /sup 208/Pb region is made

  2. Transmutations of atomic nuclei in hadron-nuclei nuclear collisions at GeV energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In hadron-nuclei nuclear collisions nuclei change their mass numbers A and the charge numbers Z. The mechanism of transmutation of a target nucleus was prompted experimentally and is described in this work. The information about the nuclei transmutation may be a basis for elaboration of the method of nuclei changes in beams of hadrons from accelerators

  3. Nuclear pore ion channel activity in live syncytial nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Jose Omar

    2002-05-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are important nanochannels for the control of gene activity and expression. Most of our knowledge of NPC function has been derived from isolated nuclei and permeabilized cells in cell lysates/extracts. Since recent patch-clamp work has challenged the dogma that NPCs are freely permeable to small particles, a preparation of isolated living nuclei in their native liquid environment was sought and found: the syncytial nuclei in the water of the coconut Cocos nucifera. These nuclei have all properties of NPC-mediated macromolecular transport (MMT) and express foreign green fluorescent protein (GFP) plasmids. They display chromatin movement, are created by particle aggregation or by division, can grow by throwing filaments to catch material, etc. This study shows, for the first time, that living NPCs engaged in MMT do not transport physiological ions - a phenomenon that explains observations of nucleocytoplasmic ion gradients. Since coconuts are inexpensive (less than US$1/nut per litre), this robust preparation may contribute to our understanding of NPCs and cell nucleus and to the development of biotechnologies for the production of DNA, RNA and proteins.

  4. PNA-COMBO-FISH: From combinatorial probe design in silico to vitality compatible, specific labelling of gene targets in cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Patrick; Rößler, Jens; Schwarz-Finsterle, Jutta; Schmitt, Eberhard; Hausmann, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Recently, advantages concerning targeting specificity of PCR constructed oligonucleotide FISH probes in contrast to established FISH probes, e.g. BAC clones, have been demonstrated. These techniques, however, are still using labelling protocols with DNA denaturing steps applying harsh heat treatment with or without further denaturing chemical agents. COMBO-FISH (COMBinatorial Oligonucleotide FISH) allows the design of specific oligonucleotide probe combinations in silico. Thus, being independent from primer libraries or PCR laboratory conditions, the probe sequences extracted by computer sequence data base search can also be synthesized as single stranded PNA-probes (Peptide Nucleic Acid probes). Gene targets can be specifically labelled with at least about 20 PNA-probes obtaining visibly background free specimens. By using appropriately designed triplex forming oligonucleotides, the denaturing procedures can completely be omitted. These results reveal a significant step towards oligonucleotide-FISH maintaining the 3d-nanostructure and even the viability of the cell target. The method is demonstrated with the detection of Her2/neu and GRB7 genes, which are indicators in breast cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27237093

  5. PNA-COMBO-FISH: From combinatorial probe design in silico to vitality compatible, specific labelling of gene targets in cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Patrick; Rößler, Jens; Schwarz-Finsterle, Jutta; Schmitt, Eberhard; Hausmann, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Recently, advantages concerning targeting specificity of PCR constructed oligonucleotide FISH probes in contrast to established FISH probes, e.g. BAC clones, have been demonstrated. These techniques, however, are still using labelling protocols with DNA denaturing steps applying harsh heat treatment with or without further denaturing chemical agents. COMBO-FISH (COMBinatorial Oligonucleotide FISH) allows the design of specific oligonucleotide probe combinations in silico. Thus, being independent from primer libraries or PCR laboratory conditions, the probe sequences extracted by computer sequence data base search can also be synthesized as single stranded PNA-probes (Peptide Nucleic Acid probes). Gene targets can be specifically labelled with at least about 20 PNA-probes obtaining visibly background free specimens. By using appropriately designed triplex forming oligonucleotides, the denaturing procedures can completely be omitted. These results reveal a significant step towards oligonucleotide-FISH maintaining the 3d-nanostructure and even the viability of the cell target. The method is demonstrated with the detection of Her2/neu and GRB7 genes, which are indicators in breast cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  6. Phonon operators in deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the description of the excited states in deformed nuclei new phonon operators are introduced, which depend on the sign of the angular momentum projection onto the symmetry axis of a deformed nucleus. In the calculations with new phonons the Pauli principle is correctly taken into account in the two-phonon components of the wave functions. There is a difference in comparison with the calculation with phonons independent of the sign of the angular momentum projection. The new phonons should be used in deformed nuclei if the Pauli principle is consistently taken into account and in the calculations with the excited state wave functions having the components with more than one phonon operator

  7. Scissors Mode in Gd Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu C.Y.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Spectra of γ rays following neutron capture at isolated resonances of 6 stable Gd isotopes were measured with highly segmented BaF2 detector DANCE at the Los Alamos LANSCE spallation neutron source. The main emphasis was put on studying the γ-cascade decay of neutron resonances to get unique information on photon strength. An analysis of the accumulated γ-ray spectra within the extreme statistical model leads to an inescapable conclusion that scissors mode resonances are built not only on the ground-state, but also on excited levels in all product nuclei studied. The results on summed B(M1↑ strength and energy of the scissors mode are compared with systematics of scissors mode parameters for the ground-state transitions deduced from nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements. A specific feature of our experiments is the investigation of scissors mode of odd nuclei, for which the nuclear resonance fluorescence provides only limited information.

  8. Scissors Mode in Gd Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, J.; Baramsai, B.; Becker, J. A.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Parker, W.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, G. J.; Walker, C. L.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Wu, C. Y.

    2012-02-01

    Spectra of γ rays following neutron capture at isolated resonances of 6 stable Gd isotopes were measured with highly segmented BaF2 detector DANCE at the Los Alamos LANSCE spallation neutron source. The main emphasis was put on studying the γ-cascade decay of neutron resonances to get unique information on photon strength. An analysis of the accumulated γ-ray spectra within the extreme statistical model leads to an inescapable conclusion that scissors mode resonances are built not only on the ground-state, but also on excited levels in all product nuclei studied. The results on summed B(M1)↑ strength and energy of the scissors mode are compared with systematics of scissors mode parameters for the ground-state transitions deduced from nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements. A specific feature of our experiments is the investigation of scissors mode of odd nuclei, for which the nuclear resonance fluorescence provides only limited information.

  9. Evolution of active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Merloni, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    [Abriged] Supermassive black holes (SMBH) lurk in the nuclei of most massive galaxies, perhaps in all of them. The tight observed scaling relations between SMBH masses and structural properties of their host spheroids likely indicate that the processes fostering the growth of both components are physically linked, despite the many orders of magnitude difference in their physical size. This chapter discusses how we constrain the evolution of SMBH, probed by their actively growing phases, when they shine as active galactic nuclei (AGN) with luminosities often in excess of that of the entire stellar population of their host galaxies. Following loosely the chronological developments of the field, we begin by discussing early evolutionary studies, when AGN represented beacons of light probing the most distant reaches of the universe and were used as tracers of the large scale structure. This early study turned into AGN "Demography", once it was realized that the strong evolution (in luminosity, number density) of ...

  10. Cooper pairs in atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe recent efforts to study Cooper pairs in atomic nuclei. We consider a self-consistent Hartree Fock mean field for the even Sm isotopes and compare results based on three treatments of pairing correlations: a BCS treatment, a number-projected BCS treatment and an exact treatment using the Richardson Ansatz. Significant differences are seen in the pairing correlation energies. Furthermore, because it does not average over the properties of the fermion pairs, the Richardson solution permits a more meaningful definition of the Cooper wave function and of the fraction of pairs that are collective. Our results confirm that only a few pairs near the Fermi surface in realistic atomic nuclei are collective. (Author)

  11. Cooper pairs in atomic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittel, S. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, 19716 Delaware (United States); Dussel, G. G. [Departamento de Fisica J.J. Giambiagi, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Dukelsky, J.; Sarriguren, P. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-12-15

    We describe recent efforts to study Cooper pairs in atomic nuclei. We consider a self-consistent Hartree Fock mean field for the even Sm isotopes and compare results based on three treatments of pairing correlations: a BCS treatment, a number-projected BCS treatment and an exact treatment using the Richardson Ansatz. Significant differences are seen in the pairing correlation energies. Furthermore, because it does not average over the properties of the fermion pairs, the Richardson solution permits a more meaningful definition of the Cooper wave function and of the fraction of pairs that are collective. Our results confirm that only a few pairs near the Fermi surface in realistic atomic nuclei are collective. (Author)

  12. Multiple phonon excitation in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies of multiphonon excitations in nuclei are reviewed both from the theoretical and experimental points of view. The presence of giant resonances in nuclei is described in the framework of macroscopic and microscopic models and the relative merits of different probes to excite such states are illustrated. The existence of giant resonances built on excited states is stressed. An exhaustive description of the theoretical estimates of the properties of the multiphonon states is presented. The theory predicts that such multiple collective excitations should closely follow a harmonic pattern. Recent experimental results on the double giant dipole resonance using the (π+π-) double charge exchange reaction are shown. The status of the search for isoscalar multiphonon excitations by means of the strong nuclear potential produced by heavy ions is presented. Conclusions are drawn and new prospects are discussed. (authors) 293 refs., 67 figs., 8 tabs

  13. Relativistic description of deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author has shown that relativistic Hartree calculations using parameters that have been fit to the properties of nuclear matter can provide a good description of both spherical and axially deformed nuclei. The quantitative agreement with experiment is equivalent to that which was obtained in non-relativistic calculations using Skyrme interactions. The equilibrium deformation is strongly correlated with the size of the spin-orbit splitting, and that parameter sets which give roughly the correct value for this splitting provide the best agreement with the quadrupole moments in the s-d shell. Finally, for closed shell +/- 1 nuclei, it was shown that the self-consistent calculations are able to reproduce the experimental magnetic moments. This was not possible in relativistic calculations which include only the effects of the valence orbital

  14. Moessbauer effects on oriented nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard nuclear orientation methods (not sensitive to the polarization) do not give information on the sign of the magnetic moment. Mossbauer effect separates right-hand and left-hand circularly polarized components, thus its detection on oriented nuclei (T approximately 10 mK) gives the sign of the magnetic moment of oriented state. In this thesis we applied this method to study the 3/2- ground states of 191Pt and 193Os, which are in the prolate-oblate transition region, where assignement of experimental levels to theoretical states is often umbiguous. We show that for those nuclei the sign of the magnetic moment is the signature of the configuration, and its determination establishes the correspondance between experimental and theoretical levels

  15. Phonon operators for deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mathematical formalism with the phonon operators independent of the signature of the angular momentum projection turns out to be inadequate for describing excited states of deformed nuclei. New phonon operators are introduced which depend on the signature of the angular momentum projection on the symmetry axis of a deformed nucleus. It is shown that the calculations with the new phonons take correctly into account the Pauli principle in two-phonon components of wave functions. The results obtained differ from those given by the phonons independent of the signature of the angular momentum projection. The new phonons must be used in deformed nuclei at taking systematically the Pauli principle into account and in calculations involving wave functions of excited states having components with more than one-phonon operator

  16. Direct Reactions with Exotic Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss recent work on Coulomb dissociation and an effective-range theory of low-lying electromagnetic strength of halo nuclei. We propose to study Coulomb dissociation of a halo nucleus bound by a zero-range potential as a homework problem. We study the transition from stripping to bound and unbound states and point out in this context that the Trojan-Horse method is a suitable tool to investigate subthreshold resonances

  17. Triaxial rotation in atomic nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yong-Shou; GAO Zao-Chun

    2009-01-01

    The Projected Shell Model has been developed to include the spontaneously broken axial symmetry so that the rapidly rotating triaxial nuclei can be described microscopically. The theory provides an useful tool to gain an insight into how a triaxial nucleus rotates, a fundamental question in nuclear structure. We shall address some current interests that are strongly associated with the triaxial rotation. A feasible method to explore the problem has been suggested.

  18. An introduction to mesic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkin, Colin

    2016-01-01

    There is much speculation and a modest amount of evidence that certain mesons might form quasi-bound states with nuclei to produce really exotic states of matter. For this to be a practical possibility, the interaction between the meson and nucleons at low energies must be strong and attractive and the production rates "healthy". The conditions for this are surveyed for the light mesons. How this might lead to quasi-bound states is then discussed in a few typical cases.

  19. Neurotransmitters of the suprachiasmatic nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Reghunandanan, Vallath; Reghunandanan, Rajalaxmy

    2006-01-01

    There has been extensive research in the recent past looking into the molecular basis and mechanisms of the biological clock, situated in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. Neurotransmitters are a very important component of SCN function. Thorough knowledge of neurotransmitters is not only essential for the understanding of the clock but also for the successful manipulation of the clock with experimental chemicals and therapeutical drugs. This article reviews the c...

  20. Proton scattering from unstable nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y Blumenfeld; E Khan; F Maréchal; T Suomijärvi

    2001-08-01

    Recent improvements in the intensities and optical qualities of radioactive beams have made possible the study of elastic and inelastic proton scattering on unstable nuclei. The design and performances of an innovative silicon strip detector array devoted to such experiments are described. The quality of the data obtained are illustrated with recent results obtained at the GANIL facility for unstable oxygen, sulfur and argon isotopes. Methods to analyse the data using phenomenological and microscopic optical model potentials are discussed.

  1. Weak pion production from nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Singh; M Sajjad Athar; Shakeb Ahmad

    2006-04-01

    The charged current pion production induced by neutrinos in 12C, 16O and 56Fe nuclei has been studied. The calculations have been done for the coherent as well as the incoherent processes assuming dominance and takes into account the effect of Pauli blocking, Fermi motion and the renormalization of in the nuclear medium. The pion absorption effects have also been taken into account.

  2. Geometric symmetries in light nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Bijker, Roelof

    2016-01-01

    The algebraic cluster model is is applied to study cluster states in the nuclei 12C and 16O. The observed level sequences can be understood in terms of the underlying discrete symmetry that characterizes the geometrical configuration of the alpha-particles, i.e. an equilateral triangle for 12C, and a regular tetrahedron for 16O. The structure of rotational bands provides a fingerprint of the underlying geometrical configuration of alpha-particles.

  3. Direct Reactions with Exotic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Baur, G

    2005-01-01

    We discuss recent work on Coulomb dissociation and an effective-range theory of low-lying electromagnetic strength of halo nuclei. We propose to study Coulomb dissociation of a halo nucleus bound by a zero-range potential as a homework problem. We study the transition from stripping to bound and unbound states and point out in this context that the Trojan-Horse method is a suitable tool to investigate subthreshold resonances.

  4. PREFACE: Correlation Dynamics in Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Toshio; Otsuka, Takaharu; Ichimura, Munetake

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on `Correlation Dynamics in Nuclei' was held at the Sanjo Kaikan, the University of Tokyo, from the 31 January to 4 February 2005. This symposium was organized on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Configuration Mixing theory of Arima and Horie. The symposium was hosted by the University of Tokyo, and supported by the Inoue Foundation for Science, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss theoretical and experimental developments and future prospects in physics of correlation dynamics in nuclei, including topics such as effective interactions, shell model studies of configuration mixing and spin-isospin modes in nuclei. It was shown in many ways and angles that the Arima-Horie theory has been a starting point of a variety of developments of the studies in these fields over many decades. The developments have been enhanced by the expansion of computational capabilities and the progress in accelerators, detectors and radioactive beam facilities. We enjoyed 28 excellent and lively invited talks and 30 oral presentations in the symposium with about 90 participants. A special session was dedicated to celebrate the 80th birthday of Professor Igal Talmi, who made invaluable and pioneering works in the shell model theory. Finally, we would like to thank all the speakers and the participants as well as the other organizers for their contributions which made the symposium very successful.

  5. Clustered nuclei maintain autonomy and nucleocytoplasmic ratio control in a syncytium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundon, Samantha E R; Chang, Shyr-Shea; Kumar, Abhishek; Occhipinti, Patricia; Shroff, Hari; Roper, Marcus; Gladfelter, Amy S

    2016-07-01

    Nuclei in syncytia found in fungi, muscles, and tumors can behave independently despite cytoplasmic translation and the homogenizing potential of diffusion. We use a dynactin mutant strain of the multinucleate fungus Ashbya gossypii with highly clustered nuclei to assess the relative contributions of nucleus and cytoplasm to nuclear autonomy. Remarkably, clustered nuclei maintain cell cycle and transcriptional autonomy; therefore some sources of nuclear independence function even with minimal cytosol insulating nuclei. In both nuclear clusters and among evenly spaced nuclei, a nucleus' transcriptional activity dictates local cytoplasmic contents, as assessed by the localization of several cyclin mRNAs. Thus nuclear activity is a central determinant of the local cytoplasm in syncytia. Of note, we found that the number of nuclei per unit cytoplasm was identical in the mutant to that in wild-type cells, despite clustered nuclei. This work demonstrates that nuclei maintain autonomy at a submicrometer scale and simultaneously maintain a normal nucleocytoplasmic ratio across a syncytium up to the centimeter scale. PMID:27193301

  6. Exotic light nuclei and nuclei in the lead region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three methods are discussed for modifying, or renormalizing, a truncated nuclear hamiltonian such that the wave functions obtained by diagonalizing this modified or effective hamiltoniandescribe the nucleus as well as possible: deriving the hamiltonian directly from a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction between free nucleons; parametrizing the hamiltonian in terms of a number of parameters and determining these parameters from a least-squares fit of calculated properties to experimental data; approximating the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction between two nucleons in a nucleus by a simple analytic expression. An effective hamiltonian derived following the second method is applied in a theoretical study of exotic nuclei in the region of Z=2-9 and A=4-30 and the problem of the neutron halo in 11Li is discussed. Results of shell-model calculations of 20iPb and nuclei in its neighbourhood are presented in which an effective hamiltonian was employed derived with the last method. The quenching of M1 strength in 208Pb, and the spectroscopic factors measured in proton knock-out reactions could be described quite satisfactory. Finally, a method is presented for deriving the effective hamiltonian directly from the realistic NN interaction with algebraic techniques. (H.W.). 114 refs.; 34 figs.; 12 tabs.; schemes

  7. Immunolcocalization of actin in intact and DNA—and histone—depleted nuclei and chromosomes of allium cepa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANLIHONG; MIAOXING

    1998-01-01

    The presence of actin in eukaryotic nuclei and chromosomes,and especially in higher plant nuclei and chromosomes,has not been well established.We detected actin in meristematic cells of Allium cepa with indirect immunofluorescence technique and observed bright fluorescence in the intact nuclei and chromosomes,indicating that actin is present in the nuclei and chromosomes of the higher plant.We labeld sections of the meristematic cells of A.cepa with immunogold technique,gold parti cles were concentrated in condensed chromatin and nucleoli,confirming the results of the immunofluoresence observations.We traeated the nuclei and chromosomes of A.cepa with DNase I and 2M NaCl and obtained DNA-and histone-depleted nuclei and chromosomes.Indirect immunofluorescence tests showed that the DNA-and histonedepleted nuclei and chromosomes reacted positively with the anti-actin antibodies.These results demonstrate that the anti-actin antibodies.These results demonstrate that actin exists not only in intact nuclei and chromosomes,but also in DNA-and histone-depleted nuclei and chrmosomes of the plant.In addition,our immuno-fluorescence tests indicate that tropomyosin is present in the nuclei and chromosomes of A.cepa.

  8. Microscopic properties of superdeformed nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Lennart B

    1999-04-01

    Many high spin rotational bands in superdeformed nuclei have been found in the A 140 - 150 region, but so far no linking transitions to known normal-deformed states have been found in these nuclei. Therefore, configuration and spin assignments have to be based on indirect spectroscopic information. Identical bands were first discovered in this region of superdeformed states. At present, some identical bands have also been found at normal deformation, but such bands are more common at superdeformation. Recently lifetime measurements have given relative quadrupole moments with high accuracy. Spectroscopic quantities are calculated using the configuration constrained cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky model with the modified oscillator potential. In a statistical study the occurrence of identical bands is tested. Comparing superdeformed and normal deformed nuclei, the higher possibility for identical bands at superdeformation is understood from calculated reduced widths of the E{sub {gamma}} and J{sup (2)} distributions. The importance of high-N orbitals for identical bands is also discussed. Additivity of electric quadrupole moment contributions in the superdeformed A - 150 region is discussed with the nucleus {sup 152}Dy as a `core`. In analytic harmonic oscillator calculations, the effective electric quadrupole moment q{sub eff}, i.e. the change in the total quadrupole moment caused by the added particle, is expressed as a simple function of the single-particle mass, quadrupole moment q{sub {nu}}. Also in realistic calculations, simple relations between q{sub eff} and q{sub {nu}} can be used to estimate the total electric quadrupole moment, e.g. for the nucleus {sup 142}Sm, by adding the effect of 10 holes, to the total electric quadrupole moment of {sup 152}Dy. Furthermore, tools are given for estimating the quadrupole moment for possible configurations in the superdeformed A - 150 region. For the superdeformed region around {sup 143}Eu, configuration and spin assignments

  9. New Magicity of Light Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Samanta, C.; Adhikari, S

    2001-01-01

    A new mass formula capable of explaining the binding energies of almost all the known isotopes from Li to Bi is prescribed. In addition to identifying the new magic number at neutron number N=16 (Z=7-9), pseudo-magic numbers at N=14 (Z=7-10), Z=14 (N=13-19), and at N=6 (Z=3-8), the formula accounts for the loss of magicity for nuclei with N=8 (Z=4) and N=20 (Z=12-17). The redefinition of the neutron drip line resulting from this formula further allows us to predict the existence of 26O,31F, 3...

  10. Exotic nuclei and Yukawa's forces

    OpenAIRE

    Otsuka, Taka; Suzuki, Toshio; Utsuno, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    In this plenary talk, we will overview the evolution of the shell structure in stable and exotic nuclei as a new paradigm of nuclear structure physics. This shell evolution is primarily due to the tensor force. The robust mechanism and some examples will be presented. Such examples include the disappearance of existing magic numbers and the appearance of new ones. The nuclear magic numbers have been believed, since Mayer and Jensen, to be constants as 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, …This turned out to be ...

  11. Nuclei at the limits of particle stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties and synthesis of nuclei at the limits of particle stability are reviewed. Nuclear reactions were induced and studied by means of the 'exotic' nuclear beams, i.e. beams of radioactive drip-line nuclei. The beams are mostly generated in heavy-ion projectile fragmentation. The cases of both neutron-rich and proton-rich nuclei are discussed. (K.A.) 270 refs.; 13 figs.; 1 tab

  12. Pairing correlations in exotic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Sagawa, H

    2012-01-01

    The BCS and HFB theories which can accommodate the pairing correlations in the ground states of atomic nuclei are presented. As an application of the pairing theories, we investigate the spatial extension of weakly bound Ne and C isotopes by taking into account the pairing correlation with the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) method and a 3-body model, respectively. We show that the odd-even staggering in the reaction cross sections of $^{30,31,32}$Ne and $^{14,15,16}$C are successfully reproduced, and thus the staggering can be attributed to the unique role of pairing correlations in nuclei far from the stability line. A correlation between a one-neutron separation energy and the anti-halo effect is demonstrated for $s$- and p-waves using the HFB wave functions. We also propose effective density-dependent pairing interactions which reproduce both the neutron-neutron ($nn$) scattering length at zero density and the neutron pairing gap in uniform matter. Then, we apply these interactions to study pairing gaps in ...

  13. Selfconsistent calculations for hyperdeformed nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molique, H.; Dobaczewski, J.; Dudek, J.; Luo, W.D. [Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France)

    1996-12-31

    Properties of the hyperdeformed nuclei in the A {approximately} 170 mass range are re-examined using the self-consistent Hartree-Fock method with the SOP parametrization. A comparison with the previous predictions that were based on a non-selfconsistent approach is made. The existence of the {open_quotes}hyper-deformed shell closures{close_quotes} at the proton and neutron numbers Z=70 and N=100 and their very weak dependence on the rotational frequency is suggested; the corresponding single-particle energy gaps are predicted to play a role similar to that of the Z=66 and N=86 gaps in the super-deformed nuclei of the A {approximately} 150 mass range. Selfconsistent calculations suggest also that the A {approximately} 170 hyperdeformed structures have neglegible mass asymmetry in their shapes. Very importantly for the experimental studies, both the fission barriers and the {open_quotes}inner{close_quotes} barriers (that separate the hyperdeformed structures from those with smaller deformations) are predicted to be relatively high, up to the factor of {approximately}2 higher than the corresponding ones in the {sup 152}Dy superdeformed nucleus used as a reference.

  14. Review of metastable states in heavy nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracoulis, G. D.; Walker, P. M.; Kondev, F. G.

    2016-07-01

    The structure of nuclear isomeric states is reviewed in the context of their role in contemporary nuclear physics research. Emphasis is given to high-spin isomers in heavy nuclei, with A≳ 150 . The possibility to exploit isomers to study some of the most exotic nuclei is a recurring theme. In spherical nuclei, the role of octupole collectivity is discussed in detail, while in deformed nuclei the limitations of the K quantum number are addressed. Isomer targets and isomer beams are considered, along with applications related to energy storage, astrophysics, medicine, and experimental advances.

  15. Otolith-Canal Convergence In Vestibular Nuclei Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, J. David; Si, Xiao-Hong

    2002-01-01

    The current final report covers the period from June 1, 1999 to May 31, 2002. The primary objective of the investigation was to determine how information regarding head movements and head position relative to gravity is received and processed by central vestibular nuclei neurons in the brainstem. Specialized receptors in the vestibular labyrinths of the inner ear function to detect angular and linear accelerations of the head, with receptors located in the semicircular canals transducing rotational head movements and receptors located in the otolith organs transducing changes in head position relative to gravity or linear accelerations of the head. The information from these different receptors is then transmitted to central vestibular nuclei neurons which process the input signals, then project the appropriate output information to the eye, head, and body musculature motor neurons to control compensatory reflexes. Although a number of studies have reported on the responsiveness of vestibular nuclei neurons, it has not yet been possible to determine precisely how these cells combine the information from the different angular and linear acceleration receptors into a correct neural output signal. In the present project, rotational and linear motion stimuli were separately delivered while recording responses from vestibular nuclei neurons that were characterized according to direct input from the labyrinth and eye movement sensitivity. Responses from neurons receiving convergent input from the semicircular canals and otolith organs were quantified and compared to non-convergent neurons.

  16. Gamow-Teller decay of T = 1 nuclei to odd-odd N = Z nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisetskiy, A F [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, MSU, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Gelberg, A [Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Institute of Physical and Chemical Reasearch (RIKEN), Wako, 351-0198 (Japan); Brentano, P von [Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne, 50937 Cologne (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Transition strengths of Gamow-Teller decay of T{sub z} = {+-}1 nuclei to N = Z odd-odd nuclei have been calculated in a two-nucleon approximation for spherical and deformed nuclei. The results obtained for the latter are quite close to the values obtained by full-space shell-model calculations and to the experiment.

  17. Formation of $\\phi$ mesic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Yamagata-Sekihara, J; Vacas, M J Vicente; Hirenzaki, S

    2010-01-01

    We study the structure and formation of the $\\phi$ mesic nuclei to investigate the in-medium modification of the $\\phi$-meson spectral function at finite density. We consider (${\\bar p},\\phi$), ($\\gamma,p$) and ($\\pi^-,n$) reactions to produce a $\\phi$-meson inside the nucleus and evaluate the effects of its medium modifications to the reaction cross sections. We also estimate the consequences of the uncertainties of the ${\\bar K}$ selfenergy in medium to the $\\phi$-nucleus interaction. We find that it may be possible to see a peak structure in the reaction spectra for the strong attractive potential cases. On the other hand, for strong absorptive interaction cases with relatively weak attractions, it is very difficult to observe clear peaks and we may need to know the spectrum shape in a wide energy region to deduce the properties of $\\phi$.

  18. Inclusive breakup of Borromean nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Hussein, Mahir S; Frederico, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    We derive the inclusive breakup cross section of a three-fragment projectile nuclei, $a = b +x_1 + x_2$, in the spectator model. The resulting four-body cross section for observing $b$, is composed of the elastic breakup cross section which contains information about the correlation between the two participant fragments, and the inclusive non-elastic breakup cross section. This latter cross section is found to be a non-trivial four-body generalization of the Austern formula \\cite{Austern1987}, which is proportional to a matrix element of the form, $\\langle\\hat{\\rho}_{{x_1},{x_2}}\\left|\\left[W_{{x_1}} + W_{{x_2}} + W_{3B}\\right]\\right|\\hat{\\rho}_{{x_1}, {x_2}}\\rangle$. The new feature here is the three-body absorption, represented by the imaginary potential, $W_{3B}$. We analyze this type of absorption and supply ideas of how to calculate its contribution.

  19. CAVITATION NUCLEI: EXPERIMENTS AND THEORY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MфRCH K. A.

    2009-01-01

    The Swedish astrophysicist and Nobel Prize winner Hannes Alfvén said: Theories come and go ─ the experiment is here forever. Often a theory, which we set up to describe an observed physical phenomenon, suffers from the lack of knowledge of decisive parameters, and therefore at best the theory becomes insufficient. Contrary, the experiment always reveals nature itself, though at prevailing experimental conditions. With essential parameters being out of control and even maybe unidentified, apparently similar experiments may deviate way beyond our expectations. However, these discrepancies offer us a chance to reflect on the character of the unknown parameters. In this way non-concordant experimental results may hold the key to the development of better theories – and to new experiments for the testing of their validity. Cavitation and cavitation nuclei are phenomena of that character.

  20. Probing nuclei by stripping them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The towing mode appears in nucleus collisions in which forward moving particles with specific angular correlations are emitted. In fact some particles are extracted from the target and towed along for a short while by the projectile during the collision. This process was discovered at the GANIL accelerator in the nineties. These collisions are peripheral. A simulation has shown that the energy and angle features of the particles emitted depends on their initial quantum state inside the target nucleus just before their emission which means that towing mode can be used as a tool to study quantum states in nuclei and their correlations. Experimental results concerning the following reactions: 11Be + 48Ti and 6He + Pb are presented. (A.C.)

  1. Quasifree kaon photoproduction on nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Lee; T. MART; Cornelius Bennhold; Lester Wright

    2001-12-01

    Investigations of the quasifree reaction A({gamma}, K Y)B are presented in the distorted wave impulse approximation (DWIA). For this purpose, we present a revised tree-level model of elementary kaon photoproduction that incorporates hadronic form factors consistent with gauge invariance, uses SU(3) values for the Born couplings and uses resonances consistent with multi-channel analyses. The potential of exclusive quasifree kaon photoproduction on nuclei to reveal details of the hyperon-nucleus interaction is examined. Detailed predictions for the coincidence cross section, the photon asymmetry, and the hyperon polarization and their sensitivities to the ingredients of the model are obtained for all six production channels. Under selected kinematics these observables are found to be sensitive to the hyperon-nucleus final state interaction. Some polarization observables are found to be insensitive to distortion effects, making them ideal tools to search for possible medium modifications of the elementary amplitude.

  2. Membrane fluidity as a factor in production and stability of bacterial ice nuclei active at high subfreezing temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindow, S E

    1995-06-01

    Detailed measurements were made of the rate of appearance of bacterial ice nuclei upon cooling of suspensions of Pseudomonas syringae cells and the disappearance of ice nuclei upon warming of the cells before assay for ice nucleation activity. While no substantial change in numbers of ice nuclei active at either -5 or at -9 degrees C was observed in cells that were grown at temperatures lower than 24 degrees C and cooled to 21 degrees C before assay, large increases in -5 but not -9 degrees C ice nuclei were observed in cells grown at temperatures greater than 24 degrees C. Ice nucleation activity of cells subjected to a decrease in temperature before assay increased immediately upon temperature shift, but 8 to 12 min was required before maximum rates of increase in numbers of ice nuclei were observed. The rate of appearance of ice nuclei in cell suspensions incubated at relatively cold temperatures prior to assay was substantially less than those incubated at temperatures approaching 24 degrees C. Cells rapidly lost ice nucleation activity when warmed to above 27 degrees C before assay; the rate of loss of ice nuclei in cells grown at a given temperature increased rapidly as the temperature to which they were warmed before assay increased. Ice nuclei disappeared most rapidly when cells grown at low temperatures were warmed before assay, suggesting that ice nucleus stability was lower in highly fluid membranes. The logarithm of the half-life of ice nuclei in cells was directly related to the concentration of the membrane fluidizing agent, 2-phenethyl alcohol, in which they were suspended. PMID:7781327

  3. High-level expression of ice nuclei in Erwinia herbicola is induced by phosphate starvation and low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, A L; Fall, R

    1998-06-01

    In laboratory cultures of ice nucleation-active (Ice+) Erwinia herbicola isolates, it has been difficult to achieve high-level expression of ice nuclei, especially nuclei active at temperatures warmer than -5 degrees C (i.e., type 1 ice nuclei). Here we demonstrate that starvation for phosphate and exposure to low temperature triggers expression of ice nuclei in E. herbicola cultures. Starvation for nitrogen, sulfur, or iron was less effective. Under optimal conditions with two different strains, essentially all cells produced ice nuclei active at -10 degrees C or warmer, with an average of 22% containing type 1 ice nuclei within 1 h of a low-temperature shift. These conditions did not greatly enhance the shedding of ice nucleation-active membrane vesicles that are known to be produced by Ice+ E. herbicola isolates. These results support the theory that the Ice+ phenotype may allow nutrient-limited epiphytes to trigger freezing damage, releasing nutrients from host plants. PMID:9608750

  4. Positron production in collision of heavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Khriplovich, I B

    2016-01-01

    We consider the electromagnetic production of positron in collision of slow heavy nuclei, with the simultaneously produced electron captured by one of the nuclei. The cross-section of the discussed process exceeds essentially the cross-section of $e^+e^-$ production.

  5. Mean-field models and exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M.; Buervenich, T.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Rutz, K. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany)]|[Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Reinhard, P.G. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Erlangen (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    We discuss two widely used nuclear mean-field models, the relativistic mean-field model and the (nonrelativistic) Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model, and their capability to describe exotic nuclei. Test cases are superheavy nuclei and neutron-rich Sn isotopes. New information in this regime helps to fix hitherto loosely determined aspects of the models. (orig.)

  6. Etaprime interactions with nucleons and nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Bass, Steven D

    2015-01-01

    We summarise recent progress in theory and experiment towards understanding etaprime meson interactions with nucleons and nuclei. Highlights include the production mechanism of etaprime mesons in proton-proton collisions close to threshold, the etaprime effective mass shift in nuclei and the determination of the etaprime-nucleon scattering length in free space.

  7. RFP for the Comet Nuclei Tour (CONTOUR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Madsen, Peter Buch; Betto, Maurizio;

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the ASC Star Tracker (performance, functionality, requirements etc.) to The Johns Hopkins University - Applied Physics Laboratory for their Comet Nuclei TOUR (CONTOUR) Program.......This document describes the ASC Star Tracker (performance, functionality, requirements etc.) to The Johns Hopkins University - Applied Physics Laboratory for their Comet Nuclei TOUR (CONTOUR) Program....

  8. Variation of hadron masses in finite nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Saitô, K; Tsushima, K; Saito, Koichi; Thomas, Anthony W.; Tsushima, Kazuo

    1997-01-01

    Using a self-consistent, Hartree description for both infinite nuclear matter and finite nuclei based on a relativistic quark model (the quark-meson coupling model), we investigate the variation of the masses of the non-strange vector mesons, the hyperons and the nucleon in infinite nuclear matter and in finite nuclei.

  9. Decay of heavy and superheavy nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K P Santhosh

    2014-04-01

    We present here, an overview and progress of the theoretical works on the isomeric state decay, decay fine structure of even–even, even–odd, odd–even and odd–odd nuclei, a study on the feasibility of observing decay chains from the isotopes of the superheavy nuclei = 115 in the range 271 ≤ ≤ 294 and the isotopes of = 117 in the range 270 ≤ ≤ 301, within the Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN). The computed half-lives of the favoured and unfavoured decay of nuclei in the range 67 ≤ ≤ 91 from both the ground state and isomeric state, are in good agreement with the experimental data and the standard deviation of half-life is found to be 0.44. From the fine structure studies done on various ranges of nuclei, it is evident that, for nearly all the transitions, the theoretical values show good match with the experimental values. This reveals that CPPMDN is successful in explaining the fine structure of even–even, even–odd, odd–even and odd–odd nuclei. Our studies on the decay of the superheavy nuclei 271−294115 and 270−301117 predict 4 chains consistently from 284,285,286115 nuclei and 5 chains and 3 chains consistently from 288−291117 and 292117, respectively. We thus hope that these studies on 284−286115 and 288−292117 will be a guide to future experiments.

  10. Partial dynamical symmetry in deformed nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Leviatan, A

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the notion of partial dynamical symmetry in relation to nuclear spectroscopy. Explicit forms of Hamiltonians with partial SU(3) symmetry are presented in the framework of the interacting boson model of nuclei. An analysis of the resulting spectrum and electromagnetic transitions demonstrates the relevance of such partial symmetry to the spectroscopy of axially deformed nuclei.

  11. Energy Radiation of the Active Galactic Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Zhi-Ming; WANG Yong-Jiu

    2004-01-01

    In the Hellings-Nordtvedt theory, we obtain some expressions of energy radiation and mass defect effect for a kind of the active galactic nuclei, which is meaningful to calculating the energy radiation in the procession of forming this kind of celestial bodies. This calculation can give some interpretation for energy source of the jet from the active galactic nuclei.

  12. PECULIARITIES OF THE CEREBELLUM NUCLEI IN AGED PERSONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyian, D; Galata, D; Potapov, S; Gargin, V

    2016-04-01

    The study of the clinical anatomy and functional features of the cortex, subcortical and conductive pathways of the cerebellum is necessary for clinicians for elaboration rational surgical approaches to these formations, for determination the localization of pathological processes associated with these formations. Cerebellar nucleus neurons are crucial to the olivo-cerebellar circuit as they provide the sole output of the entire cerebellum. The relationship between mobility and cognition in aging is well established, but the relationship between mobility and the structure and function of the aging brain is relatively unknown. In connection with the above, the purpose of our study was detection of the morphological characteristics of the cerebellum nuclei in aged persons. Study was performed on 48 specimens of the cerebellum from people (24 male and 24 female), who died at the age from 75 to 99 years due to diseases, which were not related to the central nervous system damaging. Formalin-fixed human hemispheres were dissected with the Ludwig and Klingler fiber dissection technique under x6 to x40 magnifications of binocular microscope Olympus BX41 (Japan). The morphological features of the human cerebellar nuclei were established. Namely, on the series of sections of the cerebellum in the horizontal, frontal and sagittal planes, as well as on the macro-microscopic preparations of the cerebellar nuclei location, their relative position, shape, linear dimensions, weight and volume were described. The features of macro-microscopic and histological structure of the nuclei of the cerebellum were made own classification of the gyri and teeth of the dentate nucleus of the cerebellum was offered. Macro-microscopic dissection of persons died after 75 years old show no significant variability of linear dimensions of cerebellar nuclei with their specific location and options. Simultaneously, reliable reducing of cellular density was detected for Purkinje, granule and basket

  13. Induction of apoptosis in purified animal and plant nuclei by Xenopus egg extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANGZHENGFAN; SHANZHU; 等

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a cell-free system that can trigger the nuclei purified from mouse liver and suspensioncultured carrot cells to undergo apoptosis as defined by the formation of apoptotic bodies and nucleosomal DNA fragments.The effects of different divalent cations and cycloheximide on DNA cleavage in this system were assessed.The fact that nuclei of plant cells can be induced to undergo apoptosis in a cell-free animal system suggests that animals and plants share a common signal transduction pathway triggering in the initiation stage of apoptosis.

  14. Total Nuclear Reaction Cross Section Induced by Halo Nuclei and Stable Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Wen-Jun; JIANG Huan-Qing; LIU Jian-Ye; ZUO Wei; REN Zhong-Zhou; LEE Xi-Guo

    2003-01-01

    We develop a method for calculation of the total reaction cross sections induced by the halo nuclei and stable. nuclei. This approach is based on the Glauber theory, which is valid for nuclear reactions at high energies. It is extended for nuclear reactions at low energies and intermediate energies by including both the quantum correction and Coulomb correction under the assumption of the effective nuclear density distribution. The calculated results of the total reaction cross section induced by stable nuclei agree well with 30 experimental data within 10 percent accuracy. The comparison between the numerical results and 20 experimental data for the total nuclear reaction cross section induced by the neutron halo nuclei and the proton halo nuclei indicates a satisfactory agreement after considering the halo structure of these nuclei, which implies quite different mean fields for the nuclear reactions induced by halo nuclei and stable nuclei. The halo nucleon distributions and the root-mean-square radii of these nuclei can be extracted from the above comparison based on the improved Glauber model, which indicates clearly the halo structures of these nuclei. Especially,it is clear to see that the medium correction of the nucleon-nucleon collision has little effect on the total reaction cross sections induced by the halo nuclei due to the very weak binding and the very extended density distribution.

  15. Fusion probability in heavy nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tathagata; Nath, S.; Pal, Santanu

    2015-03-01

    Background: Fusion between two massive nuclei is a very complex process and is characterized by three stages: (a) capture inside the potential barrier, (b) formation of an equilibrated compound nucleus (CN), and (c) statistical decay of the CN leading to a cold evaporation residue (ER) or fission. The second stage is the least understood of the three and is the most crucial in predicting yield of superheavy elements (SHE) formed in complete fusion reactions. Purpose: A systematic study of average fusion probability, PCN> , is undertaken to obtain a better understanding of its dependence on various reaction parameters. The study may also help to clearly demarcate onset of non-CN fission (NCNF), which causes fusion probability, PCN, to deviate from unity. Method: ER excitation functions for 52 reactions leading to CN in the mass region 170-220, which are available in the literature, have been compared with statistical model (SM) calculations. Capture cross sections have been obtained from a coupled-channels code. In the SM, shell corrections in both the level density and the fission barrier have been included. PCN> for these reactions has been extracted by comparing experimental and theoretical ER excitation functions in the energy range ˜5 %-35% above the potential barrier, where known effects of nuclear structure are insignificant. Results: PCN> has been shown to vary with entrance channel mass asymmetry, η (or charge product, ZpZt ), as well as with fissility of the CN, χCN. No parameter has been found to be adequate as a single scaling variable to determine PCN> . Approximate boundaries have been obtained from where PCN> starts deviating from unity. Conclusions: This study quite clearly reveals the limits of applicability of the SM in interpreting experimental observables from fusion reactions involving two massive nuclei. Deviation of PCN> from unity marks the beginning of the domain of dynamical models of fusion. Availability of precise ER cross sections

  16. A new spin on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic rotation is a new phenomenon that is forcing physicists to rethink their understanding of what goes on inside the nucleus The rotation of quantum objects has a long and distinguished history in physics. In 1912 the Danish scientist Niels Bjerrum was the first to recognize that the rotation of molecules is quantized. In 1938 Edward Teller and John Wheeler observed similar features in the spectra of excited nuclei, and suggested that this was caused by the nucleus rotating. But a more complete explanation had to wait until 1951, when Aage Bohr (the son of Niels) pointed out that rotation was a consequence of the nucleus deforming from its spherical shape. We owe much of our current understanding of nuclear rotation to the work of Bohr and Ben Mottelson, who shared the 1975 Nobel Prize for Physics with James Rainwater for developing a model of the nucleus that combined the individual and collective motions of the neutrons and protons inside the nucleus. What makes it possible for a nucleus to rotate? Quantum mechanically, a perfect sphere cannot rotate because it appears the same when viewed from any direction and there is no point of reference against which its change in position can be detected. To see the rotation the spherical symmetry must be broken to allow an orientation in space to be defined. For example, a diatomic molecule, which has a dumbbell shape, can rotate about the two axes perpendicular to its axis of symmetry. A quantum mechanical treatment of a diatomic molecule leads to a very simple relationship between rotational energy, E, and angular momentum. This energy is found to be proportional to J(J + 1), where J is the angular momentum quantum number. The molecule also has a magnetic moment that is proportional to J. These concepts can be applied to the atomic nucleus. If the distribution of mass and/or charge inside the nucleus becomes non-spherical then the nucleus will be able to rotate. The rotation is termed ''collective'' because many

  17. Molecular outflows in starburst nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arpita; Nath, Biman B.; Sharma, Prateek; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations have detected molecular outflows in a few nearby starburst nuclei. We discuss the physical processes at work in such an environment in order to outline a scenario that can explain the observed parameters of the phenomenon, such as the molecular mass, speed and size of the outflows. We show that outflows triggered by OB associations, with NOB ≥ 105 (corresponding to a star formation rate (SFR)≥1 M⊙ yr-1 in the nuclear region), in a stratified disk with mid-plane density n0 ˜ 200-1000 cm-3 and scale height z0 ≥ 200(n0/102 cm-3)-3/5 pc, can form molecules in a cool dense and expanding shell. The associated molecular mass is ≥107 M⊙ at a distance of a few hundred pc, with a speed of several tens of km s-1. We show that a SFR surface density of 10 ≤ ΣSFR ≤ 50 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2 favours the production of molecular outflows, consistent with observed values.

  18. Molecular outflows in starburst nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Arpita; Sharma, Prateek; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations have detected molecular outflows in a few nearby starburst nuclei. We discuss the physical processes at work in such an environment in order to outline a scenario that can explain the observed parameters of the phenomenon, such as the molecular mass, speed and size of the outflows. We show that outflows triggered by OB associations, with $N_{OB}\\ge 10^5$ (corresponding to a star formation rate (SFR)$\\ge 1$ M$_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ in the nuclear region), in a stratified disk with mid-plane density $n_0\\sim 200\\hbox{--}1000$ cm$^{-3}$ and scale height $z_0\\ge 200 (n_0/10^2 \\, {\\rm cm}^{-3})^{-3/5}$ pc, can form molecules in a cool dense and expanding shell. The associated molecular mass is $\\ge 10^7$ M$_\\odot$ at a distance of a few hundred pc, with a speed of several tens of km s$^{-1}$. We show that a SFR surface density of $10 \\le \\Sigma_{SFR} \\le 50$ M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-2}$ favours the production of molecular outflows, consistent with observed values.

  19. Exotic nuclei far from the stability line

    CERN Document Server

    Hagino, K; Sagawa, H

    2012-01-01

    The recent availability of radioactive beams has opened up a new era in nuclear physics. The interactions and structure of exotic nuclei close to the drip lines have been studied extensively world wide, and it has been revealed that unstable nuclei, having weakly bound nucleons, exhibit characteristic features such as a halo structure and a soft dipole excitation. We here review the developments of the physics of unstable nuclei in the past few decades. The topics discussed in this Chapter include the halo and skin structures, the Coulomb breakup, the dineutron correlation, the pair transfer reactions, the two-nucleon radioactivity, the appearance of new magic numbers, and the pygmy dipole resonances.

  20. Properties of superheavy nuclei with Z = 124

    CERN Document Server

    Mehta, M S; Kumar, Bharat; Patra, S K

    2015-01-01

    We employ Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) model with NL3 parametrization to investigate the ground state properties of superheavy nucleus, Z = 124. The nuclei selected (from among complete isotopic series) for detailed investigation show that the nucleon density at the center is very low and therefore, these nuclei can be treated as semi-bubble nuclei. The considerable shell gap appears at neutron numbers N = 172, 184 and 198 showing the magicity corresponding to these numbers. The results are compared with the macro-microscopic Finite Range Droplet Model (FRDM) wherever possible.

  1. Coupled-cluster computations of atomic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, G; Hjorth-Jensen, M; Dean, D J

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, coupled-cluster theory has seen a renaissance in nuclear physics, with computations of neutron-rich and medium-mass nuclei. The method is efficient for nuclei with product-state references, and it describes many aspects of weakly bound and unbound nuclei. This report reviews the technical and conceptual developments of this method in nuclear physics, and the results of coupled-cluster calculations for nucleonic matter, and for exotic isotopes of helium, oxygen, calcium, and some of their neighbors.

  2. True ternary fission of superheavy nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Zagrebaev, V.I.; A. V. Karpov; Greiner, Walter

    2010-01-01

    We found that a true ternary fission with formation of a heavy third fragment (a new type of radioactivity) is quite possible for superheavy nuclei due to the strong shell effects leading to a three-body clusterization with the two doubly magic tin-like cores. The simplest way to discover this phenomenon in the decay of excited superheavy nuclei is a detection of two tin-like clusters with appropriate kinematics in low-energy collisions of medium mass nuclei with actinide targets. The three-b...

  3. Nuclei far from stability using exotic targets

    CERN Document Server

    Wilhelmy, J B; Brown, R E; Flynn, E R; Thomas, K E; Van der Plicht, J

    1981-01-01

    The meson factories have made possible high fluence medium energy proton beams that can be used for spallation reactions to produce macro quantities of unstable isotopes. Targets of over 10 g/cm/sup 2/ can be exposed to total fluence approaching 1 A-hour resulting in spallation yields in the 0.01-10 mg range for many isotopes of potential interest for nuclear structure studies. With the use of hot cell facilities, chemical processing can isolate the desired material and this coupled with subsequent isotope separation can result in usable quantities of material for nuclear target application. With offstable isotopes as target materials, conventional nuclear spectroscopy techniques can be employed to study nuclei far from stability. The irradiation and processing requirements for such an operation, along with the isotope production possibilities, are discussed. Also presented are initial experiments using a /sup 148/Gd (t/sub 1/2/=75a) target to perform the (p, t) reaction to establish levels in the proposed do...

  4. Activation of raphe nuclei triggers rapid and distinct effects on parallel olfactory bulb output channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Vikrant; Provost, Allison C; Agarwal, Prateek; Murthy, Venkatesh N

    2016-02-01

    The serotonergic raphe nuclei are involved in regulating brain states over timescales of minutes and hours. We examined more rapid effects of raphe activation on two classes of principal neurons in the mouse olfactory bulb, mitral and tufted cells, which send olfactory information to distinct targets. Brief stimulation of the raphe nuclei led to excitation of tufted cells at rest and potentiation of their odor responses. While mitral cells at rest were also excited by raphe activation, their odor responses were bidirectionally modulated, leading to improved pattern separation of odors. In vitro whole-cell recordings revealed that specific optogenetic activation of raphe axons affected bulbar neurons through dual release of serotonin and glutamate. Therefore, the raphe nuclei, in addition to their role in neuromodulation of brain states, are also involved in fast, sub-second top-down modulation similar to cortical feedback. This modulation can selectively and differentially sensitize or decorrelate distinct output channels. PMID:26752161

  5. Relativistic symmetry breaking in light kaonic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Rong-Yao; Xiang, Qian-Fei; Zhang, Dong-Rui; Wei, Si-Na

    2014-01-01

    As the experimental data from kaonic atoms and $K^{-}N$ scatterings imply that the $K^{-}$-nucleon interaction is strongly attractive at saturation density, there is a possibility to form $K^{-}$-nuclear bound states or kaonic nuclei. In this work, we investigate the ground-state properties of the light kaonic nuclei with the relativistic mean field theory. It is found that the strong attraction between $K^{-}$ and nucleons reshapes the scalar and vector meson fields, leading to the remarkable enhancement of the nuclear density in the interior of light kaonic nuclei and the manifest shift of the single-nucleon energy spectra and magic numbers therein. As a consequence, the pseudospin symmetry is shown to be violated together with enlarged spin-orbit splittings in these kaonic nuclei.

  6. Perspectives of production of superheavy nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Bezbakh, A. N.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Scheid, W.

    2016-07-01

    Possible ways of production of superheavies are discussed. Impact of nuclear structure on the production of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions is discussed. The proton shell closure at Z = 120 is discussed.

  7. GDR in Hot Nuclei: New Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, F.; Kmiecik, M.; Wieland, O.; Benzoni, G.; Bracco, A.; Brambilla, S.; Crespi, F.; Mason, P.; Moroni, A.; Million, B.; Leoni, S.; Maj, A.; Styczen, J.; Brekiesz, M.; Meczynski, W.; Zieblinski, M.; Gramegna, F.; Barlini, S.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Lanchais, A. L.; Mastinu, P. F.; Bruno, M.; D'Agostino, M.; Geraci, E.; Ordine, A.; Casini, G.; Chiari, M.

    2005-04-01

    The measured properties of the Giant Dipole Resonance in hot rotating nuclei are successfully described with the model of thermal fluctuations, even though there are still some open problems especially at very low (T 2.5MeV) temperatures and missing data in some mass regions. Recent experimental works have addressed more specific problems regarding the nuclear shape and its behaviour in very particular and delimited phase space regions. In this paper will be discussed new exclusive measurements of the GDR γ decay in heavy 216Rn nuclei (where the shape of nuclei surviving fission have been probed) and some preliminary data on the 132Ce nuclei at very high excitation energy.

  8. Understanding Nuclei in the upper sd - shell

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, M Saha; Ray, Sudatta; Kshetri, Ritesh; Sarkar, S

    2013-01-01

    Nuclei in the upper-$sd$ shell usually exhibit characteristics of spherical single particle excitations. In the recent years, employment of sophisticated techniques of gamma spectroscopy has led to observation of high spin states of several nuclei near A$\\simeq$ 40. In a few of them multiparticle, multihole rotational states coexist with states of single particle nature. We have studied a few nuclei in this mass region experimentally, using various campaigns of the Indian National Gamma Array setup. We have compared and combined our empirical observations with the large-scale shell model results to interpret the structure of these nuclei. Indication of population of states of large deformation has been found in our data. This gives us an opportunity to investigate the interplay of single particle and collective degrees of freedom in this mass region.

  9. Critical-Point Structure in Finite Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Leviatan, A

    2006-01-01

    Properties of quantum shape-phase transitions in finite nuclei are considered in the framework of the interacting boson model. Special emphasis is paid to the dynamics at the critical-point of a general first-order phase transition.

  10. Systematic study of shell gaps in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Mo, Qiuhong; Wang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The nucleon separation energies and shell gaps in nuclei over the whole nuclear chart are systematically studied with eight global nuclear mass models. For unmeasured neutron-rich and super-heavy regions, the uncertainty of the predictions from these different mass models is still large. The latest version (WS4) of the Weizs\\"acker-Skyrme mass formula, in which the isospin dependence of model parameters is introduced into the macroscopic-microscopic approach inspired by the Skyrme energy-density functional, is found to be the most accurate one in the descriptions of nuclear masses, separation energies and shell gaps. Based on the predicted shell gaps in nuclei, the possible magic numbers in super-heavy nuclei region are investigated. In addition to the shell closures at $N=184, Z=114$, the sub-shell closures at around $N=178, Z=120$ could also play a role for the stability of super-heavy nuclei.

  11. Quark Degrees of Freedom in Finite Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Tsushima, K; Thomas, A W; Tsushima, Kazuo; Saito, Koichi; Thomas, Anthony W.

    1996-01-01

    Properties of finite nuclei are investigated based on relativistic Hartree equations which have been derived from a relativistic quark model of the structure of bound nucleons. Nucleons are assumed to interact through the (self-consistent) exchange of scalar ($\\sigma$) and vector ($\\omega$ and and the rms charge radius in $^{40}$Ca. Calculated properties of static, closed-shell nuclei, as well as symmetric nuclear matter are compared with experimental data and with the results of Quantum Hadrodynamics (QHD).

  12. Physics with nuclei at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physics with nuclei at high energy is not reducible to a superposition of interactions involving individual nucleons; rather, qualitatively new phenomena show up. This is what one concludes from recent data on dilepton production off nuclei and on elastic proton-nucleus scattering. Furthermore, recent analyses of ion collisions at BNL and CERN reveal a number of non-conventional features. The relevant contributions to this Rencontre are summarized here. 37 refs., 16 figs

  13. Synthesis of superheavy nuclei: Obstacles and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrebaev, V. I.; Karpov, A. V.; Greiner, Walter

    2015-01-01

    There are only 3 methods for the production of heavy and superheavy (SH) nuclei, namely, fusion reactions, a sequence of neutron capture and beta(-) decay and multinucleon transfer reactions. Low values of the fusion cross sections and very short half-lives of nuclei with Zcold and hot fusion reactions remains unstudied yet. This gap could be filled in fusion reactions of 48Ca with available lighter isotopes of Pu, Am, and Cm. New neutron-enriched isotopes of SH elements may be produced with the use of a 48Ca beam if a 250Cm target would be prepared. In this case we get a real chance to reach the island of stability owing to a possible beta(+) decay of 291114 and 287112 nuclei formed in this reaction with a cross section of about 0.8 pb. A macroscopic amount of the long-living SH nuclei located at the island of stability may be produced by using the pulsed nuclear reactors of the next generation only if the neutron fluence per pulse will be increased by about three orders of magnitude. Multinucleon transfer processes look quite promising for the production and study of neutron-rich heavy nuclei located in upper part of the nuclear map not reachable by other reaction mechanisms. Reactions with actinide beams and targets are of special interest for synthesis of new neutron-enriched transfermium nuclei and not-yet-known nuclei with closed neutron shell N=126 having the largest impact on the astrophysical r-process. The estimated cross sections for the production of these nuclei allows one to plan such experiments at currently available accelerators.

  14. Realistic level density calculation for heavy nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerf, N. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay (France); Pichon, B. [Observatoire de Paris, Meudon (France); Rayet, M.; Arnould, M. [Institut d`Astronomie et d`Astrophysique, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    1994-12-31

    A microscopic calculation of the level density is performed, based on a combinatorial evaluation using a realistic single-particle level scheme. This calculation relies on a fast Monte Carlo algorithm, allowing to consider heavy nuclei (i.e., large shell model spaces) which could not be treated previously in combinatorial approaches. An exhaustive comparison of the predicted neutron s-wave resonance spacings with experimental data for a wide range of nuclei is presented.

  15. Masses of nuclei close to the dripline

    CERN Document Server

    Herfurth, F; Beck, D; Blaum, K; Bollen, G; Kellerbauer, A G; Kluge, H J; Lunney, M D; Rodríguez, D; Schwarz, S; Sikler, G; Weber, C

    2003-01-01

    Mass measurements of radioactive nuclides are one of the cornerstones of our understanding of the nucleus. The Penning trap spectrometer ISOLTRAP performs direct mass measurements far away from the valley of stability, as well as high-precision measurements of key nuclei to anchor long decay chains. Both schemes provide valuable information on the dripline itself and on nuclei in its close vicinity. (10 refs) .

  16. Relativistic symmetry breaking in light kaonic nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Rong-Yao; Jiang, Wei-Zhou; Xiang, Qian-Fei; Zhang, Dong-Rui; Wei, Si-Na

    2014-01-01

    As the experimental data from kaonic atoms and $K^{-}N$ scatterings imply that the $K^{-}$-nucleon interaction is strongly attractive at saturation density, there is a possibility to form $K^{-}$-nuclear bound states or kaonic nuclei. In this work, we investigate the ground-state properties of the light kaonic nuclei with the relativistic mean field theory. It is found that the strong attraction between $K^{-}$ and nucleons reshapes the scalar and vector meson fields, leading to the remarkabl...

  17. Effective Field Theory for Lattice Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Barnea, N.; Contessi, L.; Gazit, D.; Pederiva, F.; van Kolck, U.

    2013-01-01

    We show how nuclear effective field theory (EFT) and ab initio nuclear-structure methods can turn input from lattice quantum chromodynamics (LQCD) into predictions for the properties of nuclei. We argue that pionless EFT is the appropriate theory to describe the light nuclei obtained in recent LQCD simulations carried out at pion masses much heavier than the physical pion mass. We solve the EFT using the effective-interaction hyperspherical harmonics and auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo ...

  18. Synthesis of superheavy nuclei: Obstacles and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zagrebaev V.I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are only 3 methods for the production of heavy and superheavy (SH nuclei, namely, fusion reactions, a sequence of neutron capture and beta(- decay and multinucleon transfer reactions. Low values of the fusion cross sections and very short half-lives of nuclei with Z<120 put obstacles in synthesis of new elements. At the same time, an important area of SH isotopes located between those produced in the cold and hot fusion reactions remains unstudied yet. This gap could be filled in fusion reactions of 48Ca with available lighter isotopes of Pu, Am, and Cm. New neutron-enriched isotopes of SH elements may be produced with the use of a 48Ca beam if a 250Cm target would be prepared. In this case we get a real chance to reach the island of stability owing to a possible beta(+ decay of 291114 and 287112 nuclei formed in this reaction with a cross section of about 0.8 pb. A macroscopic amount of the long-living SH nuclei located at the island of stability may be produced by using the pulsed nuclear reactors of the next generation only if the neutron fluence per pulse will be increased by about three orders of magnitude. Multinucleon transfer processes look quite promising for the production and study of neutron-rich heavy nuclei located in upper part of the nuclear map not reachable by other reaction mechanisms. Reactions with actinide beams and targets are of special interest for synthesis of new neutron-enriched transfermium nuclei and not-yet-known nuclei with closed neutron shell N=126 having the largest impact on the astrophysical r-process. The estimated cross sections for the production of these nuclei allows one to plan such experiments at currently available accelerators.

  19. Binding energy and stability of heavy and superheavy nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Kolesnikov, N.N.

    2012-01-01

    Three different ways for description of binding energy of superheavy nuclei are discussed. First, one can consider superheavy nuclei as a part of a whole system of nuclei for which a global mass formula is found. Another way is the detailed local description of energy of superheavy nuclei taking into account the effects of shells and subshells. The third way of description, applied for nuclei in the region limited by principal magic numbers, is attached to the beta-stability line.

  20. Fast neutron inelastic scattering from nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for accurate values of inelastic scattering cross sections appears when the requests for neutron data for reactors and other applied purposes are considered. These requests are partly related to values for spherical nuclei, well studied over many years. These studies were extensively considered in two review papers presented, in 1976, at the International Conference on the Interactions of Neutrons with nuclei. Other requests are related to vibrational and rotational nuclei, and relevant studies have been recently performed. The quality of these investigations and the large number of recent results have lead to concentration on them as the topic of the present review. The constant improvements of the experimental techniques permits precise measurements of inelastic scattering cross sections to the first excited levels over a range of incident energies, such that different reactions mechanisms are predominant in different parts of that range of energies. Quadrupole, hexadecapole and octupole deformation parameters of the target nuclei can be deduced from the data using phenomenological models. The successful application of the analysis over the range of energies leads to the conclusion that reliable information on the shape of the nuclei has been derived. The validity of the various models, which include direct interaction and compound nucleus reaction mechanisms, is discussed in connection with analyses of recent experiments. (author)

  1. Alpha-cluster model of atomic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosin, Zbigniew; Kallunkathariyil, Jinesh [Jagiellonian University, M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Krakow (Poland); Blocki, Jan [NCBJ, Theoretical Physics Division (BP2), Swierk (Poland); Lukasik, Jerzy; Pawlowski, Piotr [IFJ PAN, Krakow (Poland)

    2016-05-15

    The description of a nuclear system in its ground state and at low excitations based on the equation of state (EoS) around normal density is presented. In the expansion of the EoS around the saturation point, additional spin polarization terms are taken into account. These terms, together with the standard symmetry term, are responsible for the appearance of the α-like clusters in the ground-state configurations of the N=Z even-even nuclei. At the nuclear surface these clusters can be identified as alpha particles. A correction for the surface effects is introduced for atomic nuclei. Taking into account an additional interaction between clusters the binding energies and sizes of the considered nuclei are very accurately described. The limits of the EoS parameters are established from the properties of the α, {sup 3}He and t particles. (orig.)

  2. Supermassive Black Holes in Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, L C

    1998-01-01

    I review the status of observational determinations of central masses in nearby galactic nuclei. Results from a variety of techniques are summarized, including ground-based and space-based optical spectroscopy, radio VLBI measurements of luminous water vapor masers, and variability monitoring studies of active galactic nuclei. I will also discuss recent X-ray observations that indicate relativistic motions arising from the accretion disks of active nuclei. The existing evidence suggests that supermassive black holes are an integral component of galactic structure, at least in elliptical and bulge-dominated galaxies. The black hole mass appears to be correlated with the mass of the spheroidal component of the host galaxy. This finding may have important implications for many astrophysical issues.

  3. Shape phase mixing in critical point nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Budaca, R

    2016-01-01

    Spectral properties of nuclei near the critical point of the quantum phase transition between spherical and axially symmetric shapes are studied in a hybrid collective model which combines the $\\gamma$-stable and $\\gamma$-rigid collective conditions through a rigidity parameter. The model in the lower and upper limits of the rigidity parameter recovers the X(5) and X(3) solutions respectively, while in the equally mixed case it corresponds to the X(4) critical point symmetry. Numerical applications of the model on nuclei from regions known for critical behavior reveal a sizable shape phase mixing and its evolution with neutron or proton numbers. The model also enables a better description of energy spectra and electromagnetic transitions for these nuclei.

  4. Static quadrupole moments in 120Te nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years the region in the vicinity of tin isotopes has been intensively investigated both from experimental and theoretical perspectives. In tellurium nuclei with two protons outside the major shell, the partial level schemes are dominated by the 1g7/2 orbit leading to 6+ isomers in the vicinity of N=82 shell closure. At low spin, the Te nuclei are considered to be one of the best examples of quadrupole vibrators. For any nuclei to be vibrational namely three criteria must be satisfied : (i) the R4/2 ratio is equal to 2, (ii) a nearly degenerate two-phonon triplet of 0+, 2+ and 4+ states (iii) collective electric quadrupole transitions between states differing by one phonon and strong hindrance of E2 transition between states differing by more than one phonon

  5. Acceleration of heavy nuclei in solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overabundance of heavy nuclei in solar cosmic rays of energy approximately less than 5 MeV/nucleon is explained by taking into account the pre-flare ionization states of these nuclei in the region where they are accelerated. A model is proposed which considers two-step accelerations associated with the initial development of solar flares. The first step is closely related to the triggering process of flares, while the second one starts with the development of the explosive phase. Further ionization of medium and heavy nuclei occurs through their interaction with keV electrons accelerated by the first-step acceleration. It is suggested that the role of these electrons is important in producing fully ionized atoms in the acceleration regions. (U.S.)

  6. Ab Initio Path to Heavy Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Binder, Sven; Calci, Angelo; Roth, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We present the first ab initio calculations of nuclear ground states up into the domain of heavy nuclei, spanning the range from 16-O to 132-Sn based on two- plus three-nucleon interactions derived within chiral effective field theory. We employ the similarity renormalization group for preparing the Hamiltonian and use coupled-cluster theory to solve the many-body problem for nuclei with closed sub-shells. Through an analysis of theoretical uncertainties resulting from various truncations in this framework, we identify and eliminate the technical hurdles that previously inhibited the step beyond medium-mass nuclei, allowing for reliable validations of nuclear Hamiltonians in the heavy regime. Following this path we show that chiral Hamiltonians qualitatively reproduce the systematics of nuclear ground-state energies up to the neutron-rich Sn isotopes.

  7. Triaxiality in 146,148Sm nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, attempts have been made to use the dynamic pairing plus quadrupole model to evaluate B(E2) values, B(E2) branching ratios, and low-lying energy levels for 146,148Sm nuclei, which are in poor agreement with experiment. Application of the boson expansion technique on 148Sm shows too much splitting and an incorrect order for the quintet states, while other properties have not been discussed. In the present work, 146,148Sm nuclei have been described using an asymmetric rotor model framework. The nonaxiality parameter γ has been evaluated using the energy ration E2+'/E6+. Remarkable success has been achieved in explaining the correct ordering of known low-lying energy levels, B(E2) values, and B(E2) branching ratios, which indicate that the so-called spherical nuclei may be treated as triaxial. (author). 8 refs., 9 tabs., 1 fig

  8. Nucleon localization in light and heavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, C L; Nazarewicz, W

    2016-01-01

    An electron localization measure was originally introduced to characterize chemical bond structures in molecules. Recently, a nucleon localization based on Hartree-Fock densities has been introduced to investigate $\\alpha$-cluster structures in light nuclei. Compared to the local nucleonic densities, the nucleon localization function has been shown to be an excellent indicator of shell effects and cluster correlations. Using the spatial nucleon localization measure, we investigate the cluster structures in deformed light nuclei and study the emergence of fragments in fissioning heavy nuclei. To illustrate basic concepts of nucleon localization, we employ the deformed harmonic oscillator model. Realistic calculations are carried out using self-consistent nuclear density functional theory with quantified energy density functionals optimized for fission studies. We study particle densities and spatial nucleon localization distributions for deformed cluster configurations of $^{8}$Be and $^{20}$Ne, and also along...

  9. New approaches to studies of exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New generations of 4π gamma-ray detectors, recoil mass spectrometers (RMS), and radioactive beam accelerators will open up many new areas of research, including present inaccessible in-beam and radioactive decay studies of exotic nuclei still farther off stability. The new generation RMS and radioactive beam developments at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility are presented. Current research and further prospects to probe the N -- Z line up to 100Sn are described. Superdeformation in A -- 70 to 190 nuclei is described in terms of its underlying physics of reinforcing proton and neutron shell gaps which lead to new superdeformed, doubly-magic nuclei. Recent results provide new insights into the coexistence of multiple nuclear shapes near the ground states

  10. Reflections on cavitation nuclei in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Knud Aage

    2007-01-01

    The origin of cavitation bubbles, cavitation nuclei, has been a subject of debate since the early years of cavitation research. This paper presents an analysis of a representative selection of experimental investigations of cavitation inception and the tensile strength of water. At atmospheric...... pressure, the possibility of stabilization of free gas bubbles by a skin has been documented, but only within a range of bubble sizes that makes them responsible for tensile strengths up to about 1.5 bar, and values reaching almost 300 bar have been measured. However, cavitation nuclei can also be harbored...

  11. Angular velocity: a new dimension in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, R.M.; Stephens, F.S.

    1984-08-09

    Nuclei can be studied from their ground states (approx.O(h/2..pi..)) up to angular momenta of order 100 (h/2..pi..), where they are literally pulled apart by centrifugal effects. This range of angular momenta can be viewed as resulting from cranking the nucleus around a rotation axis, where the critical variable is the cranking velocity. The calculated response of nuclei to such an imposed angular velocity corresponds well with recent observations, and includes a rich and varied interplay of collective and single-particle phenomena.

  12. Pairing schemes for HFB calculations of nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Duguet, T; Bonche, P

    2005-01-01

    Several pairing schemes currently used to describe superfluid nuclei through Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) calculations are briefly reviewed. We put a particular emphasis on the regularization recipes used in connection with zero-range forces and on the density dependence which usually complement their definition. Regarding the chosen regularization process, the goal is not only to identify the impact it may or may not have on pairing properties of nuclei through spherical 1D HFB calculations but also to assess its tractability for systematic axial 2D and 3D mean-field and beyond-mean-field calculations.

  13. Doubly magic properties in superheavy nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Ya-Wei; ZHU Jian-Yu

    2009-01-01

    A systematic study of global properties of superheavy nuclei in the framework of the Liquid Drop Model and the Strutinsky shell correction method is performed. The evolution equilibrium deformations, TRS graphs and α-decay energies are calculated using the TRS model. The analysis covers a wide range of even-even superheavy nuclei from Z = 102 to 122. Magic numbers and their observable influence occurring in this region have been investigated. Shell closures appear at proton number Z = 114 and at neutron number N = 184.

  14. Statistical properties of quantum spectra in nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Some aspects of quantum chaos in a finite system have been studied based on the analysis of statistical behavior of quantum spectra in nuclei.The experiment data show the transition from order to chaos with increasing excitation energy in spherical nuclei.The dependence of the order to chaos transition on nuclear deformation and nuclear rotating is described.The influence of pairing effect on the order to chaos transition is also discussed.Some important experiment phenomena in nuclear physics have been understood from the point of view of the interplay between order and chaos.

  15. Light nuclei from chiral EFT interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments in nuclear theory allow us to make a connection between quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and low-energy nuclear physics. First, chiral effective field theory (XEFT) provides a natural hierarchy to define two-nucleon (NN), three-nucleon (NNN), and even four-nucleon interactions. Second, ab-initio methods have been developed capable to test these interactions for light nuclei. In this contribution, we discuss ab-initio no-core shell-model (NCSM) calculations for s-shell and p-shell nuclei with NN and NNN interactions derived within XEFT. Presented at the 20th Few-Body Conference, Pisa, Italy, 10-14 September 2007. (author)

  16. Adiabatic fission barriers in superheavy nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Jachimowicz, P.; Kowal, M; Skalski, J.

    2016-01-01

    Using the microscopic-macroscopic model based on the deformed Woods-Saxon single-particle potential and the Yukawa-plus-exponential macroscopic energy we calculated static fission barriers $B_{f}$ for 1305 heavy and superheavy nuclei $98\\leq Z \\leq 126$, including even - even, odd - even, even - odd and odd - odd systems. For odd and odd-odd nuclei, adiabatic potential energy surfaces were calculated by a minimization over configurations with one blocked neutron or/and proton on a level from ...

  17. Physics of the continuum of borromean nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaagen, J.S.; Rogde, T. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Bergen (Norway); Danilin, B.V. [RRC The Kurchatov Inst., Kurchatov, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ershov, S.N. [JINR, Dubna, Moscow (Russian Federation); Thompson, I.J. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Zhukov, M.V. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology and Goeteborg Univ., Goeteborg (Sweden); RNBT Collaboration

    1998-06-01

    The continuum states of two-neutron halo nuclei are calculated in the method of hyperspherical harmonics. Using DWIA theory appropriate for dilute halo matter we have probed the structure of the low-lying {sup 6}He continuum via calculations of charge-exchange and inelastic scattering. (orig.)

  18. Photodisintegration of p-process nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, A.; Nair, C.; Erhard, M.; Bemmerer, D.; Beyer, R.; Junghans, A.; Kosev, K.; Rusev, G.; Schilling, K.D.; Schwengner, R. [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Grosse, E. [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The neutron deficient p-nuclei are shielded from the s- or r-process by stable isotopes. P-nuclei are likely to be formed in high temperature cosmic scenarios like exploding supernovae by photodisintegration reactions on heavy r- or s- seed nuclei. The lack of experimental information on energy-dependent cross sections especially for ({gamma},p) and ({gamma},{alpha}) reactions reduces the applicability of nucleosynthesis models. Using intense bremsstrahlung produced at the superconducting electron linear accelerator ELBE at Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf we investigated ({gamma},n), ({gamma},p) and ({gamma},{alpha}) reactions for the medium-mass p-nuclei {sup 92}Mo and {sup 144}Sm, as well as ({gamma},n) reactions for {sup 100}Mo and {sup 154}Sm by photo-activation. The lowest photoactivation yields have been measured in an underground laboratory. The photodisintegration of {sup 197}Au serves as a benchmark and it is compared to data measured previously with the positron annihilation technique.

  19. Distribution of vacuum charge near supercharged nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migdal, A.B.; Voskresenskii, D.N.; Popov, V.S.

    1976-08-05

    We obtain the distribution of the charge produced near supercritical nuclei (Ze/sup 2/..integral integral.. 1) as a result of the restructuring of the electron-positron vacuum. The calculation is carried out in the Thomas-Fermi approximation.

  20. Theory of electromagnetic reactions in light nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Tianrui; Bacca, Sonia; Hagen, Gaute

    2015-01-01

    We briefly review the theory for electromagnetic reactions in light nuclei based on the coupled-cluster formulation of the Lorentz integral transform method. Results on photodisintegration reactions of 22O and 40Ca are reported on and preliminary calculations on the Coulomb sum rule for 4He are discussed.

  1. Spectroscopic Studies of Exotic Nuclei at ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Experiment IS50 is designed to: a) Investigate the full range of the @b strength function of heavy (A~$>$~48)~K nuclei b)~Study the decay of isomeric states in n-deficient bromine nuclei (A~=~72 and 70). The heavy K isotopes appeared to have complex decay schemes, including feeding by the @b-decay of levels having open neutron channels (Beta decay energy Q(@b) exceeds neutron binding energy S^n); in addition, a large fraction of the delayed transitions populate excited levels in the daughter nuclei. The allowed @b-decay selects states in the daughter nucleus with wave functions having a large overlap with the initial state. Hence, the @b strength functions, deduced from these deca reveal simple structures correlated to the particle-hole excitation energies in the Ca nuclei. These results are valuable for the application of the shell-model calculations far from stability. The delayed neutron spectra are measured with a large area curved scintillator in coincidence either with high resolution Ge(Li) detectors, ...

  2. Test of Pseudospin Symmetry in Deformed Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ginocchio, J N; Meng, J; Zhou, S G; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2004-01-01

    Pseudospin symmetry is a relativistic symmetry of the Dirac Hamiltonian with scalar and vector mean fields equal and opposite in sign. This symmetry imposes constraints on the Dirac eigenfunctions. We examine extensively the Dirac eigenfunctions of realistic relativistic mean field calculations of deformed nuclei to determine if these eigenfunctions satisfy these pseudospin symmetry constraints.

  3. Magnetic Dipole Sum Rules for Odd Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ginocchio, J N

    1997-01-01

    Sum rules for the total- and scissors-mode M1 strength in odd-A nuclei are derived within the single-j interacting boson-fermion model. We discuss the physical content and geometric interpretation of these sum rules and apply them to ^{167}Er and ^{161}Dy. We find consistency with the former measurements but not with the latter.

  4. Nuclear mass systematics and exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of theoretical studies of nuclei for stability in checking and improving mass formulae is discussed. Several tests for existing mass formulae or systematics are considered. It is believed that most of the shortcomings found are due to shell effects not included in the formulae

  5. Closed shells at drip-line nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Werner, T. R.

    1994-01-01

    The shell structure of magic nuclei far from stability is discussed in terms of the self-consistent spherical Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory. In particular, the sensitivity of the shell-gap sizes and the two-neutron separation energies to the choice of particle-hole and particle-particle components of the effective interaction is investigated.

  6. Standard Model Masses and Models of Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Rivero, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    We note an intriguing coincidence in nuclear levels, that the subshells responsible for doubly magic numbers happen to bracket nuclei at the energies of the Standard Model bosons. This could show that these bosons actually contribute to the effective mesons of nuclear models.

  7. Energy Density Functional Approach to Superfluid Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Yongle; Bulgac, Aurel

    2002-01-01

    We show that within the framework of a simple local nuclear energy density functional (EDF), one can describe accurately the one-- and two--nucleon separation energies of semi--magic nuclei. While for the normal part of the EDF we use previously suggested parameterizations, for the superfluid part of the EDF we use the simplest possible local form compatible with known nuclear symmetries.

  8. Coherent dissociation of relativistic 12N nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissociation of relativistic 12N nuclei having a momentum of 2 GeV/c per nucleon and undergoing the most peripheral interactions in a track emulsion is studied. The picture of charged topology of product ensembles of relativistic fragments and special features of their angular distributions are presented

  9. Single nucleus genome sequencing reveals high similarity among nuclei of an endomycorrhizal fungus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, K.; Limpens, E.H.M.; Zhang, Z.; Ivanov, S.; Saunders, D.G.O.; Mu, D.; Pang, E.; Cao, H.; Cha, H.; Lin, T.; Zhou, Q.; Shang, Y.; Li, Y.; Sharma, T.C.; Velzen, van R.; Ruijter, de N.C.A.; Aanen, D.K.; Win, J.; Kamoun, S.; Bisseling, T.; Geurts, R.; Huang, S.W.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclei of arbuscular endomycorrhizal fungi have been described as highly diverse due to their asexual nature and absence of a single cell stage with only one nucleus. This has raised fundamental questions concerning speciation, selection and transmission of the genetic make-up to next generations. A

  10. Plant nuclei can contain extensive grooves and invaginations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collings, D. A.; Carter, C. N.; Rink, J. C.; Scott, A. C.; Wyatt, S. E.; Allen, N. S.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Plant cells can exhibit highly complex nuclear organization. Through dye-labeling experiments in untransformed onion epidermal and tobacco culture cells and through the expression of green fluorescent protein targeted to either the nucleus or the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope in these cells, we have visualized deep grooves and invaginations into the large nuclei of these cells. In onion, these structures, which are similar to invaginations seen in some animal cells, form tubular or planelike infoldings of the nuclear envelope. Both grooves and invaginations are stable structures, and both have cytoplasmic cores containing actin bundles that can support cytoplasmic streaming. In dividing tobacco cells, invaginations seem to form during cell division, possibly from strands of the endoplasmic reticulum trapped in the reforming nucleus. The substantial increase in nuclear surface area resulting from these grooves and invaginations, their apparent preference for association with nucleoli, and the presence in them of actin bundles that support vesicle motility suggest that the structures might function both in mRNA export from the nucleus and in protein import from the cytoplasm to the nucleus.

  11. Abdominal surgery activates nesfatin-1 immunoreactive brain nuclei in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Taché, Yvette

    2010-02-01

    Abdominal surgery-induced postoperative gastric ileus is well established to induce Fos expression in specific brain nuclei in rats within 2-h after surgery. However, the phenotype of activated neurons has not been thoroughly characterized. Nesfatin-1 was recently discovered in the rat hypothalamus as a new anorexigenic peptide that also inhibits gastric emptying and is widely distributed in rat brain autonomic nuclei suggesting an involvement in stress responses. Therefore, we investigated whether abdominal surgery activates nesfatin-1-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in the rat brain. Two hours after abdominal surgery with cecal palpation under short isoflurane anesthesia or anesthesia alone, rats were transcardially perfused and brains processed for double immunohistochemical labeling of Fos and nesfatin-1. Abdominal surgery, compared to anesthesia alone, induced Fos expression in neurons of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), paraventricular nucleus (PVN), locus coeruleus (LC), Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EW), rostral raphe pallidus (rRPa), nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and ventrolateral medulla (VLM). Double Fos/nesfatin-1 labeling showed that of the activated cells, 99% were nesfatin-1-immunoreactive in the SON, 91% in the LC, 82% in the rRPa, 74% in the EW and VLM, 71% in the anterior parvicellular PVN, 47% in the lateral magnocellular PVN, 41% in the medial magnocellular PVN, 14% in the NTS and 9% in the medial parvicellular PVN. These data established nesfatin-1 immunoreactive neurons in specific nuclei of the hypothalamus and brainstem as part of the neuronal response to abdominal surgery and suggest a possible implication of nesfatin-1 in the alterations of food intake and gastric transit associated with such a stressor. PMID:19944727

  12. Spectroscopic factors for two-proton radioactive nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chinmay Basu

    2004-11-01

    Spectroscopic factors for two-proton emitting nuclei are discussed in the framework of the BCS (Bardeen–Cooper–Schriefer) model. Calculations carried out for the two-proton unstable 45Fe, 48Ni and 54Zn nuclei are presented.

  13. Level density parameter for nuclei with few nucleons above magic number nuclei Z = 82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since nuclei with extreme neutron richness formed in collisions, or otherwise, or obtained as fission fragments, may be in an excited state, they require a thermodynamical approach in which both the spin degree of freedom and temperature effects have been incorporated. This is similar to the earlier works where these effects have been incorporated to reproduce microscopic fluctuations in high spin nuclei. This spin degree of freedom inherently involves deformation and structural or shape changes

  14. Fossilized nuclei and chromosomes reveal 180 million years of genomic stasis in royal ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomfleur, Benjamin; McLoughlin, Stephen; Vajda, Vivi

    2014-03-21

    Rapidly permineralized fossils can provide exceptional insights into the evolution of life over geological time. Here, we present an exquisitely preserved, calcified stem of a royal fern (Osmundaceae) from Early Jurassic lahar deposits of Sweden in which authigenic mineral precipitation from hydrothermal brines occurred so rapidly that it preserved cytoplasm, cytosol granules, nuclei, and even chromosomes in various stages of cell division. Morphometric parameters of interphase nuclei match those of extant Osmundaceae, indicating that the genome size of these reputed "living fossils" has remained unchanged over at least 180 million years-a paramount example of evolutionary stasis.

  15. Flux of cosmic ray heavy nuclei enders behind low shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Allkofer, O C

    1975-01-01

    The authors investigate the number of stopping nuclei per cm/sup 3/ tissue hour as a function of absorbing material thickness. Fragmentation probabilities of heavy nuclei were deduced from the measured attenuation of the heavy nuclei flux in the atmosphere. Comparison is made with the results of the Biostack I experiment on board Apollo 16. (11 refs).

  16. Investigating the spectral characteristics of backscattering from heterogeneous spheroidal nuclei using broadband finite-difference time-domain simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Guo-Shan; Sung, Kung-Bin

    2010-02-01

    Backscattered light spectra have been used to extract size distribution of cell nuclei in epithelial tissues for noninvasive detection of precancerous lesions. In existing experimental studies, size estimation is achieved by assuming nuclei as homogeneous spheres or spheroids and fitting the measured data with models based on Mie theory. However, the validity of simplifying nuclei as homogeneous spheres has not been thoroughly examined. In this study, we investigate the spectral characteristics of backscattering from models of spheroidal nuclei under plane wave illumination using three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. A modulated Gaussian pulse is used to obtain wavelength dependent scattering intensity with a single FDTD run. The simulated model of nuclei consists of a nucleolus and randomly distributed chromatin condensation in homogeneous cytoplasm and nucleoplasm. The results show that backscattering spectra from spheroidal nuclei have similar oscillating patterns to those from homogeneous spheres with the diameter equal to the projective length of the spheroidal nucleus along the propagation direction. The strength of backscattering is enhanced in heterogeneous spheroids as compared to homogeneous spheroids. The degree of which backscattering spectra of heterogeneous nuclei deviate from Mie theory is highly dependent on the distribution of chromatin/nucleolus but not sensitive to nucleolar size, refractive index fluctuation or chromatin density.

  17. Improved and Reproducible Flow Cytometry Methodology for Nuclei Isolation from Single Root Meristem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Cristina Ribeiro Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Root meristems have increasingly been target of cell cycle studies by flow cytometric DNA content quantification. Moreover, roots can be an alternative source of nuclear suspension when leaves become unfeasible and for chromosome analysis and sorting. In the present paper, a protocol for intact nuclei isolation from a single root meristem was developed. This proceeding was based on excision of the meristematic region using a prototypical slide, followed by short enzymatic digestion and mechanical isolation of nuclei during homogenization with a hand mixer. Such parameters were optimized for reaching better results. Satisfactory nuclei amounts were extracted and analyzed by flow cytometry, producing histograms with reduced background noise and CVs between 3.2 and 4.1%. This improved and reproducible technique was shown to be rapid, inexpensive, and simple for nuclear extraction from a single root tip, and can be adapted for other plants and purposes.

  18. Formation of cadherin-expressing brain nuclei in diencephalic alar plate divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, M S; Puelles, L; Redies, C

    2000-11-01

    During the formation of brain nuclei, the vertebrate neural tube is partitioned into distinct embryonic divisions. In this study, the expression of three members of the cadherin family of adhesion molecules (cadherin-6B, cadherin-7, and R-cadherin) was mapped to study the differentiation of gray matter in the division so that diencephalic alar plate of chicken embryos from embryonic day 3 (E3) to E10. At early stages of development (E3-E4), each cadherin is expressed in restricted regions of the diencephalic wall of the neural tube. The borders of some of the expression domains coincide with divisional boundaries. As the mantle layer is formed and increases in thickness from E4 to E8, morphologically discernible aggregates of cells appear that express the three cadherins differentially. These aggregates represent the anlagen of specific diencephalic brain nuclei, e.g., the lateroanterior nucleus, the ventral geniculate nucleus, the nucleus rotundus, the perirotundic area, the principal precommissural nucleus, and the lateral spiriform nucleus. Most of the cadherin-expressing diencephalic nuclei studied in this work apparently derive from a single embryonic division and remain there. The divisional boundaries are replaced gradually by the borders of cadherin-expressing brain nuclei. The current results support the idea that cadherins confer differential adhesiveness to developing structures of gray matter in the diencephalic alar plate. Moreover, they suggest that each cadherin plays a role in the formation of specific brain nuclei within the diencephalic divisions.

  19. Antiproton Induced Fission and Fragmentation of Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of slow antiprotons with nuclei results in a large highly localized energy deposition primarily on the nuclear surface. \\\\ \\\\ The study of antiproton induced fission and fragmentation processes is expected to yield new information on special nuclear matter states, unexplored fission modes, multifragmentation of nuclei, and intranuclear cascades.\\\\ \\\\ In order to investigate the antiproton-nucleus interaction and the processes following the antiproton annihilation at the nucleus, we propose the following experiments: \\item A)~Measurement of several fragments from fission and from multifragmentation in coincidence with particle spectra, especially neutrons and kaons. \\item B)~Precise spectra of $\\pi$, K, n, p, d and t with time-of-flight techniques. \\item C)~Installation of the Berlin 4$\\pi$ neutron detector with a 4$\\pi$ Si detector placed inside for fragments and charged particles. This yields neutron multiplicity distributions and consequently distributions of thermal excitation energies and...

  20. Effective Field Theory for Lattice Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnea, N.; Contessi, L.; Gazit, D.; Pederiva, F.; van Kolck, U.

    2015-02-01

    We show how nuclear effective field theory (EFT) and ab initio nuclear-structure methods can turn input from lattice quantum chromodynamics (LQCD) into predictions for the properties of nuclei. We argue that pionless EFT is the appropriate theory to describe the light nuclei obtained in LQCD simulations carried out at pion masses heavier than the physical pion mass. We solve the EFT using the effective-interaction hyperspherical harmonics and auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo methods. Fitting the three leading-order EFT parameters to the deuteron, dineutron, and triton LQCD energies at mπ≈800 MeV , we reproduce the corresponding alpha-particle binding and predict the binding energies of mass-5 and mass-6 ground states.

  1. Effective Field Theory for Lattice Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Barnea, N; Gazit, D; Pederiva, F; van Kolck, U

    2013-01-01

    We show how nuclear effective field theory (EFT) and ab initio nuclear-structure methods can turn input from lattice quantum chromodynamics (LQCD) into predictions for the properties of nuclei. We argue that pionless EFT is the appropriate theory to describe the light nuclei obtained in recent LQCD simulations carried out at pion masses much heavier than the physical pion mass. We solve the EFT using the effective-interaction hyperspherical harmonics and auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo methods. Fitting the three leading-order EFT parameters to the deuteron, dineutron and triton LQCD energies at $m_{\\pi}\\approx 800$ MeV, we reproduce the corresponding alpha-particle binding and predict the binding energies of mass-5 and 6 ground states.

  2. Heavy Nuclei Photofission at Intermediate Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Deppman, A; Guimaraes, V; Demekhina, N A; Karapetyan, G S

    2013-01-01

    In the present work the yields of fission fragments, from Bremsstrahlung induced fission of 232Th, 238U targets, were reproduced by CRISP model calculations, to which a multimodal fission option had been added. An extension of the calculation to the properties of the fission products is presented. Dividing the fissioning nuclei according to their fissionability, an approach which accounts for the contribution of symmetric and asymmetric fission is introduced. It allows to calculate the main parameters of the fission fragment charge distribution: the most probable charge for a given fission product mass chain and the width parameter. Furthermore, it reproduces the features of fragment mass distribution, and evaluates the fissility of fissioning nuclei in photon-induced fission. A comparison between the results of this calculation and experimental data is accomplished.

  3. Photoproduction of pi0-mesons from nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Krusche, B; Ahrens, J; Annand, J R M; Beck, R; Bloch, Felix; Fog, L S; Hornidge, D; Janssen, S; Kotulla, M; McGeorge, J C; MacGregor, I J D; Messchendorp, J; Metag, V; Mosel, U; Novotny, R; Owens, R O; Pfeiffer, M; Sanderson, R; Schadmand, S; Watts, D P

    2004-01-01

    Photoproduction of neutral pions from nuclei (carbon, calcium, niobium, lead) has been studied for incident photon energies from 200 MeV to 800 MeV with the TAPS detector using the Glasgow photon tagging spectrometer at the Mainz MAMI accelerator. Data were obtained for the inclusive photoproduction of neutral pions and the partial channels of quasifree single pi0, double pi0, and pi0pi+/- photoproduction. They have been analyzed in terms of the in-medium behavior of nucleon resonances and the pion - nucleus interaction. They are compared to earlier measurements from the deuteron and to the predictions of a Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) transport model for photon induced pion production from nuclei.

  4. Electron interactions with nuclei: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High energy is being conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This includes inclusive electron scattering, electroexcitation of the delta in nuclei, longitudinal and transverse response in the quasi-elastic region, the q2 dependence of 4He(e,e'p), deep inelastic scattering from nuclei, transverse and longitudinal response in the resonance region, nuclear physics at PEP and 1.6 GeV spectrometer properties. Additional high energy research on electron scattering on 3H and 3He and the nuclear structure of 205Tl and 206Pb are being conducted at MIT-Bates. Other activities are being carried out at Saclay and research and development for Monte Carlo studies of Hall A spectrometers for CEBAF is being conducted

  5. Collective properties of drip-line nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamamoto, I. [Univ. of Lund (Sweden); Sagawa, H. [Univ. of Aizu, Fukushima (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Performing the spherical Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations with Skyrme interactions and, then, using RPA solved in the coordinate space with the Green`s function method, the authors have studied the effect of the unique shell structure as well as the very low particle threshold on collective modes in drip line nuclei. In this method a proper strength function in the continuum is obtained, though the spreading width of collective modes is not included. They have examined also one-particle resonant states in the obtained HF potential. Unperturbed particle-hole (p-h) response functions are carefully studied, which contain all basic information on the exotic behaviour of the RPA strength function in drip line nuclei.

  6. Clustering in stable and exotic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, C

    2016-01-01

    Since the pioneering discovery of molecular resonances in the 12C+12C reaction more than half a century ago a great deal of research work has been undertaken in alpha clustering. Our knowledge on physics of nuclear molecules has increased considerably and nuclear clustering remains one of the most fruitful domains of nuclear physics, facing some of the greatest challenges and opportunities in the years ahead. The occurrence of "exotic" shapes and Bose-Einstein alpha condensates in light N=Z alpha-conjugate nuclei is investigated. Various approaches of the superdeformed and hyperdeformed bands associated with quasimolecular resonant structures are presented. Evolution of clustering from stability to the drip-lines is examined: clustering aspects are, in particular, discussed for light exotic nuclei with large neutron excess such as neutron-rich Oxygen isotopes with their complete spectroscopy.

  7. Heavy fragments emission from highly excited nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the intermediate energy domain, the high amount of excitation energy and angular momentum deposited in the nuclei allow the emission of fragments heavier than the usual evaporation particles to have a significant cross section. The study of the properties characterizing the production of these fragments could be a good way to investigate the mechanisms which contribute to formation of hot nuclei and the limits for linear momentum and excitation energy deposited in the nucleus, as well as possible deformations related to these high temperatures. These phenomena might depend much on the center of mass energies and angular momenta. In order to analyse these entrance channel effects3, we chose to study the following systems: Kr + C, Kr + Al, Kr + Ti at an incident energy of the Kr beam delivered by GANIL of 2216 MeV. 7 figs, 1 tab, 9 refs

  8. Population of rotational bands in superheavy nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonenko N.V.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Using the statistical approach, we study the population of ground-state rotational bands of superheavy nuclei produced in the fusion-evaporation reactions 208Pb(48Ca, 2n254No, 206Pb(48Ca, 2n252No, and 204Hg(48Ca, 2n250Fm. We calculate relative intensities of E2-transitions between the rotational states and entry spin distributions of the residual nuclei, evaporation residue cross sections, and excitation functions for these reactions. Fermi-gas model is used for the calculation of level density, and damping of shell effects both with excitation energy and angular momentum is taking into account. The results are in a good agreement with the experiment data.

  9. Gamma spectroscopy of neutron rich actinide nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkenbach, Benedikt; Geibel, Kerstin; Vogt, Andreas; Hess, Herbert; Reiter, Peter; Steinbach, Tim; Schneiders, David [Koeln Univ. (Germany). IKP; Collaboration: AGATA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Excited states in neutron-rich actinide Th and U nuclei were investigated after multi nucleon transfer reactions employing the AGATA demonstrator and PRISMA setup at LNL (INFN, Italy). A primary {sup 136}Xe beam of 1 GeV hitting a {sup 238}U target was used to produce the nuclei of interest. Beam-like reaction products of Xe- and Ba isotopes after neutron transfer were selected by the PRISMA spectrometer. The recoil like particles were registered by a MCP detector inside the scattering chamber. Coincident γ-rays from excited states in beam and target like particles were measured with the position sensitive AGATA HPGe detectors. Improved Doppler correction and quality of the γ-spectra is based on the novel γ-ray tracking technique which was successfully exploited. First results on the collective properties of various Th and U isotopes are discussed.

  10. Isospin Mixing In N $\\approx$ Z Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    Srnka, D; Versyck, S; Zakoucky, D

    2002-01-01

    Isospin mixing in N $\\approx$ Z nuclei region of the nuclear chart is an important phenomenon in nuclear physics which has recently gained theoretical and experimental interest. It also forms an important nuclear physics correction in the precise determination of the $ft$-values of superallowed 0$^+ \\rightarrow 0^+ \\beta$- transitions. The latter are used in precision tests of the weak interaction from nuclear $\\beta$- decay. We propose to experimentally measure isospin mixing into nuclear ground states in the N $\\approx$ Z region by determining the isospin forbidden Fermi-component in the Gamow-Teller dominated $J^{\\pi} \\rightarrow J^{\\pi} \\beta$- transitions through the observation of anisotropic positron emission from oriented nuclei. First measurements were carried out with $^{71}$As and are being analyzed now.

  11. Nuclei at HERA and heavy ion physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavin, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Strikman, M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Copies of 16 viewgraph sets from a workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, 17-18 November, 1995. Titles of talks: HERA: The Present; HERA: Potential with Nuclei; Review of Hadron-Lepton Nucleus Data; Fermilab E665: results in muon scattering; Interactions of Quarks and Gluons with Nuclear Matter; Rescattering in Nuclear Targets for Photoproduction and DIS; Structure Functions and Nuclear Effect at PHENIX; Probing Spin-Averaged and Spin-Dependent Parton Distributions Using the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR); Jet Quenching in eA, pA, AA; Nuclear Gluon Shadowing via Continuum Lepton Pairs; What can we learn from HERA with a colliding heavy ion beam? The limiting curve of leading particles at infinite A; Coherent Production of Vector Mesons off Light Nuclei in DIS; A Model of High Parton Densities in PQCD; Gluon Production for Weizaecker-Williams Field in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions; Summary Talk.

  12. Cumulative processes and quark distribution in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assuming existence of multiquark (mainly 12q) bags in nuclei the spectra of cumulative nucleons and mesons produced in high-energy particle-nucleus collisions are discussed. The exponential form of quark momentum distribution in 12q-bag (agreeing well with the experimental data on lepton-nucleus interactions at large q2) is shown to result in quasi-exponential distribution of cumulative particles over the light-cone variable αsub(B). The dependence of f(αsub(B); psub(perpendicular)) (where psub(perpendicular) is the transverse momentum of the bag) upon psub(perpendicular) is considered. The yields of cumulative resonances as well as effects related to the u- and d-quark distributions in N > Z nuclei being different are dicscussed

  13. Clustering effects induced by light nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, C

    2013-01-01

    Since the pioneering discovery, half a century ago, of 12C+12C molecular resonances, a great deal of research work has been undertaken in theSince the pioneering discovery, half a century ago, of 12C+12C molecular resonances, a great deal of research work has been undertaken in the alpha-clustering study. Our knowledge in the physics of nuclear molecules has increased considerably and nuclear clustering remains one of the most fruitful domains of nuclear physics, facing some of the greatest challenges and opportunities in the years ahead. In this work, the occurence of "exotic" shapes in light N=Z alpha-like nuclei is investigated. Various approaches of superdeformed and hyperdeformed bands associated with quasimolecular resonant structures are presented. Clustering aspects are also discussed for light nuclei with neutron excess through very recent results on neutron-rich Oxygen isotopes.

  14. Nuclear structure investigations on spherical nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: electron scattering studies on spherical nuclei; electron scattering from collective states in deformed nuclei; proton and pion scattering studies; 12C(e,e'p) and 16O(e,e'p); 12C(e,e'α) and 16O(e,e'α); studies at high q at Bates; measurements with rvec e at Bates; 12C(γ,p); future directions in giant resonance studies; proton knockout from 16O; quasielastic studies at Bates; triple coincidence studies of nuclear correlations; contributions to (e,e'2p) at KIKHEF; contributions to instrumentation at CEBAF; instrumentation development at UNH; the Bates large acceptance spectrometer toroid; shell model and core polarization calculations; and the relativistic nuclear model

  15. Simulation of nuclei morphologies for binary alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We study the critical nuclei morphologies of a binary alloy by the string method. The dynamic equation of the string, connecting the metastable phase (liquid) and stable phase (solid), is governed by Helmholtz free energy for the binary alloy system at a given temperature. The stationary string through the critical nucleus (saddle point) is obtained if the relaxation time of the string is su?ciently large. The critical nucleus radius and energy barrier to nucleation of a pure alloy with isotropic interface energy in two and three dimensions are calculated, which are consistent with the classical nucleation theory. The critical nuclei morphologies are sensitive to the anisotropy strength of interface energy and interface thickness of alloy in two and three dimensions. The critical nucleus and energy barrier to nucleation become smaller if the anisotropy strength of the interface energy is increased, which means that it is much easier to form a stable nucleus if the anisotropy of the interface energy is considered.

  16. 大鼠脾虚证与血清甲状腺激素及下丘脑、胸腺细胞核T3受体关系%RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SPLEEN-ASTHENIA SYNDROME AND SERUM THYROXIN,T3 RECEPTORS OF HYPOTHALAMUS CELLS & THYMUS T LYMPHOCYTE NUCLEI IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李刚; 夏天; 王宗仁; 张仲海

    2001-01-01

    目的:探讨脾虚证与血清甲状腺激素及下丘脑、胸腺细胞核T3受体的关系。方法:成年SD大鼠32只随机分为4组(每组8只):A组(正常组)、B组(脾虚组)、C组(治疗组)、D组(自复组)。采用放射配基分析法,测定各组大鼠血清T3、T4、FT3、FT4、γ-T3及下丘脑、胸腺细胞核T3受体的含量。结果:B、D组大鼠血清T3、T4、FT3、FT4含量均较A、C组低,有显著差异(P<0.05或P<0.01);各组间血清γ-T3含量无显著性差异;B、D组下丘脑、胸腺细胞核T3受体含量较A、C组低,有显著差异P<0.01)。结论:血清甲状腺激素及下丘脑、胸腺细胞核T3受体的水平降低,可导致甲状腺激素生物效应低下,经由神经内分泌免疫调节环路,削弱免疫功能,这可能是脾虚证的一种重要病机。%Objective:To study the relationship between Spleen-asthenia syndrome and serum thyroxin,T3 receptors of hypothalamus cells & thymus T lymphocyte nuclei in rats.Method:Rhubarb decoction was used to develop spleen-asthenia syndrome in SD adult rat.32 rats were averagely divided into four groups at random:Group A(control group),group B(spleen-asthenia group),group C(group treated with Sijunzi decoction),group D(spontaneous rehabilitation group).The radioimmunoassay was applied to measure serum thyroxin levels and the contents of T3 receptors of hypothalamus cells and thymus T lymphocyte nuclei of every rat.Result:The serum levels of T3,T4,FT3,FT4,the contents of T3 receptors of hypothalamus cells and thymus T lymphocyte nuclei in group B,D were lower than those in group A,C.The difference between them was significant.Serum level of γ-T3 in four groups had no significant difference.Conclusion:The decline of T3,T4,FT3,FT4 serum levels,and the contents of nuclear T3 receptors in hypothalamus cells & thymus T lymphocytes can influence the activity of thyroxin,then the immunity function will be impaired via

  17. Light nuclei production in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, K H; Wazir, Z; Khan, E U; Haseeb, Mahnaz Q; Ajaz, M

    2009-01-01

    Light nuclei production as a result of nuclear coalescence effect can give some signals on final state of Quark Gluon Plasma formation. We are studying the behavior of nuclear modification factor as a function of different variables using the simulated data coming from the FASTMC generator. This data is necessary to extract information on coalescence mechanism from experimental data on high energy nuclear-nuclear interactions.

  18. SEARCH FOR NUCLEI CONTAINING TWO STRANGE QUARKS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAY,M.

    1997-10-13

    This paper discusses a search for nuclei containing two strange quarks performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The goals and approach of experiment E885 are reviewed. Preliminary missing mass spectra for a subset of the data are presented, showing sensitivity for {Xi} hypernuclei and H particle searches. Existence of an angular correlation between pions in the sequential decay of {Lambda}{Lambda} hypernuclei is suggested on theoretical grounds.

  19. Search for nuclei containing two strange quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, M.

    1997-12-31

    This paper discusses a search for nuclei containing two strange quarks performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The goals and approach of experiment E885 are reviewed. Preliminary missing mass spectra for a subset of the data are presented, showing sensitivity for {Xi} hypernuclei and H particle searches. Existence of an angular correlation between pions in the sequential decay of {Lambda}{Lambda} hypernuclei is suggested on theoretical grounds.

  20. Pairing and specific heat in hot nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Gambacurta, Danilo; Lacroix, Denis; Sandulescu, Nicu

    2013-01-01

    The thermodynamics of pairing phase-transition in nuclei is studied in the canonical ensemble and treating the pairing correlations in a finite-temperature variation after projection BCS approach (FT-VAP). Due to the restoration of particle number conservation, the pairing gap and the specific heat calculated in the FT-VAP approach vary smoothly with the temperature, indicating a gradual transition from the superfluid to the normal phase, as expected in finite systems. We have checked that th...

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance of thermally oriented nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The more recent developments in the spectroscopy of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance on Oriented Nuclei (NMRON) are reviewed; both theoretical and experimental advances are summarised with applications to On-Line and Off-Line determination of magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole hyperfine parameters. Some emphasis is provided on solid state considerations with indications of where likely enhancements in technique will lead in conventional hyperfine studies. (orig.)

  2. Multifragmentation of hot and compressed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proper description of this phenomenon has to go beyond the conventional mean field approaches. One usually refer to the important many-body correlations as the fluctuations of the mean field. They become especially important when the density of the medium becomes small. Several theoretical approaches attempt to understand and describe the multifragmentation of nuclei. We present the main physical ideas which we have used to describe the onset of multifragmentation. We also present the most interesting results that we have obtained

  3. Fayans functional for deformed nuclei. Uranium region

    CERN Document Server

    Tolokonnikov, S V; Kortelainen, M; Lutostansky, Yu S; Saperstein, E E

    2015-01-01

    Fayans energy density functional (EDF) FaNDF^0 has been applied to the nuclei around uranium region. Ground state characteristics of the Th, U and Pu isotopic chains, up to the two-neutron drip line, are found and compared with predictions from several Skyrme EDFs. The two-neutron drip line is found for FaNDF^0, SLy4 and SkM^* EDFs for a set of elements with even proton number, from Pb up to Fm.

  4. On minor black holes in galactic nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    McKernan, Barry; Ford, K. E. Saavik; Yaqoob, Tahir; Winter, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    Small and intermediate mass black holes should be expected in galactic nuclei as a result of stellar evolution, minor mergers and gravitational dynamical friction. If these minor black holes accrete as X-ray binaries or ultra-luminous X-ray sources, and are associated with star formation, they could account for observations of many low luminosity AGN or LINERs. Accreting and inspiralling intermediate mass black holes could provide a crucial electromagnetic counterpart to strong gravitational ...

  5. Fission Barriers of Compound Superheavy Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Pei, J C; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Kerman, A. K.

    2009-01-01

    The dependence of fission barriers on the excitation energy of the compound nucleus impacts the survival probability of superheavy nuclei synthesized in heavy-ion fusion reactions. In this work, we investigate the isentropic fission barriers by means of the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory. The relationship between isothermal and isentropic descriptions is demonstrated. Calculations have been carried out for $^{264}$Fm, $^{272}$Ds, $^{278}$112, $^{292}$114, and $^{312}$124. F...

  6. Stability and Production of Superheavy Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Moller, Peter; Nix, J. Rayford

    1997-01-01

    Beyond uranium heavy elements rapidly become increasingly unstable with respect to spontaneous fission as the proton number Z increases, because of the disruptive effect of the long-range Coulomb force. However, in the region just beyond Z = 100 magic proton and neutron numbers and the associated shell structure enhances nuclear stability sufficiently to allow observation of additional nuclei. Some thirty years ago it was speculated that an island of spherical, relatively stable superheavy nu...

  7. Mean Field Studies of Exotic Nuclei}

    OpenAIRE

    Chinn, C. R.; Umar, A. S.; Vallières, M.; Strayer, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    {Full three dimensional static and dynamic mean field calculations using collocation basis splines with a Skyrme type Hamiltonian are described. This program is developed to address the difficult theoretical challenges offered by exotic nuclei. Ground state and deformation properties are calculated using static Hartree-Fock, Hartree-Fock+BCS and constrained Hartree-Fock models. Collective properties, such as reaction rates and resonances, are described using a new alternate method for evaluat...

  8. Green's function calculations of light nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, ZhongHao; Wu, Qiang; Xu, FuRong

    2016-09-01

    The influence of short-range correlations in nuclei was investigated with realistic nuclear force. The nucleon-nucleon interaction was renormalized with V lowk technique and applied to the Green's function calculations. The Dyson equation was reformulated with algebraic diagrammatic constructions. We also analyzed the binding energy of 4He, calculated with chiral potential and CD-Bonn potential. The properties of Green's function with realistic nuclear forces are also discussed.

  9. Nuclear moments of radioactive nuclei. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An unsuccessful attempt was made to study nuclear moments of radioactive nuclear using laser spectroscopy. Although preliminary tests had indicated a sensitivity sufficient to observe signals of fluxes less than one atom/s no resonance fluorescence was detected. Activity measurements showed several hundred nuclei per second were in the beam; therefore it was postulated that, due to the the reactivity of the 126Ba and sodium used, contaminants were the probable source of negative results. 3 refs., 2 figs

  10. Structure of residual interaction in spherical nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Kamchatnov, A. M.; Nosov, V. G.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of residual interaction between nucleons (quasiparticles) on shell oscillations of the masses of spherical nuclei is considered. The singularity of the ground state energy of the system in the vicinity of nucleon magic numbers is analyzed for various types of the dependence of residual interaction on orbital momentum of the quasiparticle. It is shown that only the perturbation band width of the Fermi distribution due to residual interaction which is proportional to the square of th...

  11. Spin-isospin resonances in nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fujiwara, M; Akimune, H; Daito, [No Value; Ejiri, H; Fujita, Y; Greenfield, MB; Harakeh, MN; Inomata, T; Janecke, J; Nakayama, S; Takemura, N; Tamii, A; Tanaka, M; Toyokawa, H; Yosoi, M

    1996-01-01

    Spin-isospin excitations in nuclei have been investigated via the (He-3,t) reaction at 450 MeV. The volume integrals of the effective interactions J(sigma tau) and J(tau) for the (He-3,t) reaction at 450 MeV have been empirically determined to be 172+/-17 MeV-fm(3) and 53+/-5 MeV-fm(3), respectively

  12. Electromagnetic interactions with nuclei and nucleons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, S.T.; Sealock, R.M.

    1990-11-10

    This report discusses the following topics: general LEGS work; photodisintegration of the deuteron; progress towards other experiments; LEGS instrumentation; major LEGS software projects; NaI detector system; nucleon detector system; waveshifting fibers; EGN prototype detector for CEBAF; photon beam facility at CEBAF; delta electroproduction in nuclei; quasielastic scattering and excitation of the Delta by {sup 4}He(e,e{prime}); and quasielastic scattering at high Q{sup 2}.

  13. Fourth nuclear theory workshop 'clusters in nuclei'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gathers the slides of 3 lectures: 1) the R-matrix method, 2) from realistic NN-interactions to cluster structures in nuclei - in this part the unitary correlation operator method (UCOM) is applied to 3 domains: the fermionic molecular dynamics, the Hartree-Fock approximation, and the no-core shell model -, and 3) the shell model point of view on cluster states

  14. Few-Body Models of Light Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershov, S. N.; Vaagen, J. S.; Zhukov, M. V.

    2015-06-01

    Experiments confirm a variety of cluster structures in many light nuclei. The observation of nuclear halos at drip-lines has accentuated the question of the degrees of freedom for bound and low-lying continuum states. In these cases the many-body dynamics of nuclear structure may be well approximated by few-body cluster models that often suggest conceptually simple approaches explaining successfully many features of light nuclei. Thus few-body cluster models have been successfully used for description of the nuclear structure of weakly bound halo nuclei and their emergent cluster degrees of freedom. They have attractive features supplying in a most transparent way the asymptotic behavior and continuum properties of weakly bound systems. Such models assume a separation in internal cluster (core) degrees of freedom and the relative motion of few-body constituents. Such separation is only an approximation, and low-lying states appear where the core cannot be considered as inert system and additional degrees of freedom connected to excited core states have to be taken into account. For fixed total angular momentum a coupling to excited core states having different spins involves additional partial waves into the consideration. This allows to account for some emergent (collective) core degrees of freedom and gives a more realistic description of nuclear properties. It is an analogue to increasing the number of shells within the framework of shell-model approaches. Some examples from recent nuclear structure exploration within few-body halo cluster models are presented.

  15. Adiabatic fission barriers in superheavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Jachimowicz, P; Skalski, J

    2016-01-01

    Using the microscopic-macroscopic model based on the deformed Woods-Saxon single-particle potential and the Yukawa-plus-exponential macroscopic energy we calculated static fission barriers $B_{f}$ for 1305 heavy and superheavy nuclei $98\\leq Z \\leq 126$, including even - even, odd - even, even - odd and odd - odd systems. For odd and odd-odd nuclei, adiabatic potential energy surfaces were calculated by a minimization over configurations with one blocked neutron or/and proton on a level from the 10-th below to the 10-th above the Fermi level. The parameters of the model that have been fixed previously by a fit to masses of even-even heavy nuclei were kept unchanged. A search for saddle points has been performed by the "Imaginary Water Flow" method on a basic five-dimensional deformation grid, including triaxiality. Two auxiliary grids were used for checking the effects of the mass asymmetry and hexadecapole non-axiallity. The ground states were found by energy minimization over configurations and deformations...

  16. Fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehm, K.E.; Jiang, C.L.; Esbensen, H. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Measurements of fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei {sup 78}Kr and {sup 100}Mo showed a different behavior at low energies, if compared to measurements with {sup 86}Kr and {sup 92}Mo. This points to a possible influence of nuclear structure on the fusion process. One way to characterize the structure of vibrational nuclei is via their restoring force parameters C{sub 2} which can be calculated from the energy of the lowest 2{sup +} state and the corresponding B(E2) value. A survey of the even-even nuclei between A = 28-150 shows strong variations in C{sub 2} values spanning two orders of magnitude. The lowest values for C{sub 2} are observed for {sup 78}Kr, {sup 104}Ru and {sup 124}Xe followed by {sup 74,76}Ge, {sup 74,76}Se, {sup 100}Mo and {sup 110}Pd. In order to learn more about the influence of {open_quotes}softness{close_quotes} on the sub-barrier fusion enhancement, we measured cross sections for evaporation residue production for the systems {sup 78}Kr + {sup 104}Ru and {sup 78}Kr + {sup 76}Ge with the gas-filled magnet technique. For both systems, fusion excitation functions involving the closed neutron shell nucleus {sup 86}Kr were measured previously. The data are presently being analyzed.

  17. Chromatin associations in Arabidopsis interphase nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veit eSchubert

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The arrangement of chromatin within interphase nuclei seems to be caused by topological constraints and related to gene expression depending on tissue and developmental stage. In yeast and animals it was found that homologous and heterologous chromatin association are required to realize faithful expression and DNA repair. To test whether such associations are present in plants we analysed Arabidopsis thaliana interphase nuclei by FISH using probes from different chromosomes. We found that chromatin fibre movement and variable associations, although in general relatively seldom, may occur between euchromatin segments along chromosomes, sometimes even over large distances. The combination of euchromatin segments bearing high or low co-expressing genes did not reveal different association frequencies probably due to adjacent genes of deviating expression patterns.Based on previous data and on FISH analyses presented here, we conclude that the global interphase chromatin organization in A. thaliana is relatively stable, due to the location of its ten centromeres at the nuclear periphery and of the telomeres mainly at the centrally localized nucleolus. Nevertheless, chromatin movement enables a flexible spatial genome arrangement in plant nuclei.

  18. Interaction of eta mesons with nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Kelkar, N G; Upadhyay, N J; Jain, B K

    2013-01-01

    Back in the mid eighties, a new branch of investigation which was related to the interaction of eta mesons with nuclei came into existence. It started with the theoretical prediction of possible exotic states of eta mesons and nuclei bound by the strong interaction and later developed into an extensive experimental program to search for such unstable states as well as understand the underlying interaction via eta meson producing reactions. The vast literature of experimental as well as theoretical works which studied various aspects of eta producing reactions such as the $\\pi ^+$ $n$ $\\to \\eta p$, $p d \\to ^3$He $\\eta$, $p \\,^6$Li $\\to ^7$Be $\\eta$ and $\\gamma ^3$He $\\to \\eta$ X, to name a few, had but one objective in mind: to understand the eta - nucleon ($\\eta N$) and hence the $\\eta$-nucleus interaction which could explain the production data and confirm the existence of some $\\eta$-mesic nuclei. In spite of these efforts, there remain uncertainties in the knowledge of the $\\eta N$ and hence the $\\eta$-nu...

  19. Electron and pion scattering off nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buss, O.; Mosel, U. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Giessen (Germany); Alvarez-Ruso, L. [Dept. de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Univ. de Valencia-CSIC (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    We present a treatment of pion and electron scattering off nuclei within the framework of a Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) transport model. In this approach we realize a full coupled channel treatment and include medium modifications such as mean-field potentials, Fermi motion and width modifications. We have applied the GiBUU model to the description of the double charge exchange (DCX) reaction of pions with different nuclear targets at incident kinetic energies of 120-180 MeV. The DCX process is highly sensitive to details of the interactions of pions with the nuclear medium and, therefore, represents a major benchmark for any model of pion scattering off nuclei at low and intermediate energies. We discuss the impact of surface effects and the dependence on the nuclear mass number. We have achieved a good quantitative agreement with the extensive data set obtained at LAMPF. Furthermore, we present a description of electron induced reactions, i.e. pion production, off nuclei. We consider the scattering of electrons off the bound nucleons in an impulse approximation and investigate medium modifications to exclusive particle production cross sections and compare our results to available data. (orig.)

  20. Electric monopole transitions from low energy excitations in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, J L; De Coster, C; Heyde, Kris L G

    1999-01-01

    Electric monopole (E0) properties are studied across the entire nuclear mass surface. Besides an introductory discussion of various model results (shell model, geometric vibrational and rotational models, algebraic models), we point out that many of the largest E0 transition strengths, $\\rho^2$(E0), are associated with shape mixing. We discuss in detail the manifestation of E0 transitions and present extensive data for~: single-closed shell nuclei, vibrational nuclei, well-deformed nuclei, nuclei that exhibit sudden ground-state changes, and nuclei that exhibit shape coexistence and intruder states. We also give attention to light nuclei, odd-A nuclei, and illustrate a suggested relation between $\\rho^2$(E0) and isotopic shifts.

  1. A Search for "Dwarf" Seyfert Nuclei; 4, Nuclei with Broad H-$\\alpha$ Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, L C; Sargent, W L W; Peng, C Y; Ho, Luis C.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Sargent, Wallace L. W.; Peng, Chien Y.

    1997-01-01

    We present the results of an optical spectroscopic survey designed to search for low-luminosity, "dwarf" Seyfert nuclei in a magnitude-limited sample of 486 bright, northern galaxies. Moderate-resolution spectra of exceptionally high quality were obtained in part to detect broad H-alpha emission, similar in character to, but much weaker than, the broad permitted lines that define type 1 Seyfert nuclei. One of the primary goals of the survey is to better quantify the faint end of the luminosity function of active galactic nuclei. This paper describes the subset of nuclei showing definite or probable evidence of broad H-alpha emission. We outline the procedures for determining the presence of this elusive spectral feature, steps for its quantitative measurement, and the associated systematic errors. Of the 211 emission-line galaxies classified as having Seyfert or LINER nuclei in our survey, the broad H-alpha line was detected with confidence in 34 objects, and with less certainty in another 12. Most of the det...

  2. Statistical properties of quantum spectra in nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Xizhen

    2001-01-01

    [1]Wu Xizhen,Sakata,F.,Zhuo Yizhong et al.,Dynamic realization of statistical state in finite systems,Phys.ReV.C,1996,53:1233-1244.[2]Weidenmüller,H.A.,Statistical theory of nuclear reactions and the Gaussian Othogonal Ensemble,Annals of Physics,1984,158:120-141.[3]Hag,R.U.,Pandey,A.,Bohigas,O.,Fluctuation properties of nuclear energy levels:Do theory and experiment agree? Phys.Rev.Lett.,1982,48:1086-1089.[4]Wu Xizhen,Gu Jianzhong,Iwamoto,A.,Statistical properties of quasiparticle spectra in deformed nuclei,Phys.Rev.C,1999,59:215-220.[5]Garrett,J.D.,Robinson,J.Q.,Foglia,A.J.et al.,Nuclear level repulsion and order vs chaos,Phys.Lett.B,1997,392:24-29.[6]Bohigas,O.,Hag,R.U.,Pandy,A.,Fluctuation properties of nuclear energy levels and widths comparison of theory with experiment,in Nuclear Data for Science and Technology (ed.Bockhoff,K.H.),Dordrecht:Reidel,1983,809-813.[7]Heiss,W.D.,Nazmitdinov,R.G.,Radu,S.,Chaos in axially symmetric potentials with Octupole deformation,Phys.Rev.Lett.,1994,72:2351-2354.[8]Wu Xizhen,Gu Jianzhong,Zhuo Yizhong et al.,Possible understanding of hyperdeformed 144-146Ba nuclei appearing in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf,Phys.Rev.Lett.,1997,79:4542-4545.[9]Ter-Akopian,G.M.,Hamilton,J.H.,Oganessian,Y.T.et al.,New spontaneous fission mode for 252Cf:Indication of hyperdeformed 144,145,146Ba at scission,Phys.Rev.Lett.,1996,77:32-35.[10]Adamian,G.G.,Antonenko,N.V.,Ivanova,S.P.et al.,Problems in description of fusion of heavy nuclei in the two-center shell model approach,Nucl.Phys.A,1999,646:29-52.[11]Hofmann,H.,A quantal transport theory for nuclear collective motion:the metrits of a locally harmonic approximation method,Phys.Rep.,1997,284:139-380.[12]Gu Jianzhong,Wu Xizhen,Zhuo Yizhong,Quantum chaotic motion of a single particle in heavy nuclei,Nucl.Phys.A,1997,625:621-632.[13]Gu Jianzhong,Wu Xizhen,Zhuo Yizhong,The single-particle spectrum and its spacing and curvature distributions in

  3. Characterization of Acremonium and Isaria ice nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pummer, Bernhard G.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2014-05-01

    Until recently, the only known fungal ice nuclei (IN) were a few exponents of lichen mycobionts and Fusarium spp. [Kieft and Ruscetti 1990, Pouleur et al. 1992, Hasegawa et al. 1994, Tsumuki et al. 1995], as well as two strains of mold [Jayaweera and Flanagan 1982]. Other investigated species did not show any IN activity [Pouleur et al. 1992, Iannone et al. 2011, Pummer et al. 2013]. In the last few years, IN-activity has been discovered in some rust and smut fungi [Morris et al. 2013, Haga et al. 2013], Acremonium implicatum (Acr.) and Isaria farinosa (Isa.) [Huffman et al. 2013] and a handful of other airborne and soil fungi [unpublished data]. We started characterizing the IN of Acr. and Isa.: Like other non-bacterial biological IN, they can be easily separated from the cells in aqueous suspension, and keep their activity. The IN-active aqueous suspensions were processed by filtration (5 μm, 0.1 μm, 300 kDa, 100 kDa) and exposure to heat (60° C) or guanidinium chloride (6 M). The IN activity of the processed samples was measured by a freezing assay of droplets, as described by Pummer et al. [2013]. Via the Vali formula, we calculated the amount of IN per gram of mycelium, which is higher than 105 g-1. The initial freezing temperature was -4° C for Isaria and -8° C for Acremonium IN. Both were completely knocked out by 60° C or guanidinium chloride. The Acremonium IN are in a mass range between 100 and 300 kDa. The Isaria IN seem to be either a bit larger, or more attached to larger particles, since not all of them pass through the 300-kDa-filter. It is likely that both of these new IN are proteinaceous like the IN of Fusarium spp. and lichen mycobionts, which belong to the Ascomycota phylum. Since the Isaria IN show a high onset freezing temperature and are rather large for single molecules, they might be agglomerates. Haga D.I. et al. (2013) J. Geophys. Res.: Atm. 118, 7260-7272 Hasegawa Y. et al. (1994) Biosci. Biotech. Biochem. 58, 2273-2274 Huffman A

  4. From heavy nuclei to super-heavy nuclei; Des noyaux lourds aux super-lourds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theisen, Ch

    2003-01-01

    The existence of super-heavy nuclei has been predicted nearly fifty years ago. Due to the strong coulomb repulsion, the stabilisation of these nuclei is possible only through shell effects. The reasons for this fragile stability, as well as the theoretical predictions concerning the position of the island of stability are presented in the first part of this lecture. In the second part, experiments and experimental techniques which have been used to synthesize or search for super-heavy elements are described. Spectroscopic studies performed in very heavy elements are presented in the following section. We close this lecture with techniques that are currently being developed in order to reach the superheavy island and to study the structure of very-heavy nuclei. (author)

  5. Relativistic exotic nuclei as projectile beams. New perspectives of studies on the properties of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Examinations of the production cross-sections and the kinematics permitted refinement of model concepts of the peripheral reactions in exotic nuclei at energies from 100 to 1000 A MeV. Due to the strong selectivity and resolution achieved it was possible to discover a large number of novel isotopes at the fragment separator FRS, despite the relatively low projectile beam intensities of the SIS. The two twice magic nuclei found, Ni 78 and Sn 100, are particularly interesting, as they could not be measured so far with other experimental systems. Fission of relativistic uranium ions proved to be a particularly successful process yielding many medium-heavy, neutron-rich nuclei. Insight into the structure of light neutron halos could be improved. The superlarge spatial dimensions of the nuclear halos is discussed. (orig./CB)

  6. Recent topics of mesic atoms and mesic nuclei -- $\\phi$ mesic nuclei exist ?--

    CERN Document Server

    Yamagata-Sekihara, J; Cabrera, D; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2008-01-01

    We study $\\phi$-meson production in nuclei to investigate the in-medium modification of the $\\phi$-meson spectral function at finite density. We consider (${\\bar p},\\phi$), ($\\gamma,p$) and ($\\pi^-,n$) reactions to produce a $\\phi$-meson inside the nucleus and evaluate the effects of the medium modifications to reaction cross sections. The structures of the bound states, $\\phi$-mesic nuclei, are also studied. For strong absorptive interaction cases, we need to know the spectrum shape in a wide energy region to deduce the properties of $\\phi$.

  7. Nuclei at extreme conditions. A relativistic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanasjev, Anatoli [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2014-11-14

    The major goals of the current project were further development of covariant density functional theory (CDFT), better understanding of its features, its application to different nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics phenomena and training of graduate and undergraduate students. The investigations have proceeded in a number of directions which are discussed in detail in the part “Accomplishments” of this report. We have studied the role of isovector and isoscalar proton-neutron pairings in rotating nuclei; based on available experimental data it was concluded that there are no evidences for the existence of isoscalar proton-neutron pairing. Generalized theoretical approach has been developed for pycnonuclear reaction rates in the crust of neutron stars and interior of white dwarfs. Using this approach, extensive database for considerable number of pycnonuclear reactions involving stable and neutron-rich light nuclei has been created; it can be used in future for the study of various nuclear burning phenomena in different environments. Time-odd mean fields and their manifestations in terminating states, non-rotating and rotating nuclei have been studied in the framework of covariant density functional theory. Contrary to non-relativistic density functional theories these fields, which are important for a proper description of nuclear systems with broken time-reversal symmetry, are uniquely defined in the CDFT framework. Hyperdeformed nuclear shapes (with semi-axis ratio 2.5:1 and larger) have been studied in the Z = 40-58 part of nuclear chart. We strongly believe that such shapes could be studied experimentally in the future with full scale GRETA detector.

  8. Double-beta decay in deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of theoretical results for the double-beta decay and the double-electron capture in heavy deformed nuclei is presented. The ββ half life of 160Gd is evaluated using an extended version of the pseudo SU(3) model. While the 2ν mode is forbidden when the most probable occupations are considered, states with different occupation numbers can be mixed through the pairing interaction. The amount of this mixing is calculated using perturbation theory. The possibility of observing the ββ decay in 160Gd is discussed for both the 2ν and 0ν modes. (author)

  9. Experimental level densities of atomic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guttormsen, M.; Bello Garrote, F.L.; Eriksen, T.K.; Giacoppo, F.; Goergen, A.; Hagen, T.W.; Klintefjord, M.; Larsen, A.C.; Nyhus, H.T.; Renstroem, T.; Rose, S.J.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Tornyi, T.G.; Tveten, G.M. [University of Oslo, Department of Physics, Oslo (Norway); Aiche, M.; Ducasse, Q.; Jurado, B. [University of Bordeaux, CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 120, Gradignan (France); Bernstein, L.A.; Bleuel, D.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Byun, Y.; Voinov, A. [Ohio University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Athens, Ohio (United States); Gunsing, F. [CEA Saclay, DSM/Irfu/SPhN, Cedex (France); Lebois, L.; Leniau, B.; Wilson, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, Orsay Cedex (France); Wiedeking, M. [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West (South Africa)

    2015-12-15

    It is almost 80 years since Hans Bethe described the level density as a non-interacting gas of protons and neutrons. In all these years, experimental data were interpreted within this picture of a fermionic gas. However, the renewed interest of measuring level density using various techniques calls for a revision of this description. In particular, the wealth of nuclear level densities measured with the Oslo method favors the constant-temperature level density over the Fermi-gas picture. From the basis of experimental data, we demonstrate that nuclei exhibit a constant-temperature level density behavior for all mass regions and at least up to the neutron threshold. (orig.)

  10. Isovector excitations of N ≠ Z nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the method based on the tensor coupling of an appropriate family of isovector excitation operators to the parent isospin multiplet can be used, to advantage, for the correct treatment of the isospin degree of freedom in non isoscalar nuclei. This method is applicable to any isovector excitation operator and for parent states which need not to be of the closed subshells type. As an illustration we apply it to the study of the Gamow-Teller transition strength in 90Zr. (author)

  11. A new superfluid phase in atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of pairing and the dynamical α-type correlations on the structure of nuclear states is studied within the enlarged superfluid model (ESM). A comparison between ESM and different modern nuclear structure models such as: the quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model, interaction boson model, Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov, temperature dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov and Migdal's finite Fermi system model, is done for particular cases. New gap equations are obtained. The phase structure is enriched by a new superfluid phase - the so-called α-like superfluid phase-dominated by α-type correlations. New first and second order phase transitions are predicted. A first order phase transition between the α-like superfluid phase and the pairing superfluid phase seems to be observed in Sm region. New types of isomers, the so-called ''superfluid isomers'', with their bands of elementary excitations are predicted. One of them is observed in 152Sm. These isomers correspond to a second (local) minimum of the correlation energy versus pairing deformations, analogous to the fission or superdeformed (shape) isomers, which correspond to the second (local) minimum of the potential energy along the elongation degree of shape deformation. The superfluidities of neutron and proton systems in heavy nuclei region may be generated by one another. This fact leads to the explanation of the origin of the odd-even staggering of the charge radii of chains of isotopes of different nuclei. The fact that the magnitude of the α-decay reduced widths (γ2) of the neutron-defficient Pb isotopes is almost equal to the γ2 of the actinide α-decaying nuclei is due to the above mentioned induction of the neutron superfluidity into the proton system also. Such exotic data ESM can explain especially in the region of single magic nuclei. Within ESM we could find a natural microscopic description of the scissors mode that dominates the structure of the Kπ=1+ magnetic states. (author). 89 refs, 27 figs

  12. Enhanced subbarrier fusion for proton halo nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raj; Lay, J. A.; Vitturi, A.

    2014-02-01

    In this Brief Report we use a simple model to describe the dynamical effects of break-up processes in the subbarrier fusion involving weakly bound nuclei. We model two similar cases involving either a neutron or a proton halo nucleus, both schematically coupled to the break-up channels. We find that the decrease of the Coulomb barrier in the proton break-up channel leads, ceteris paribus, to a larger enhancement of the subbarrier fusion probabilities with respect to the neutron halo case.

  13. Enhanced subbarrier fusion for proton halo nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Raj; Vitturi, A

    2014-01-01

    In this short note we use a simple model to describe the dynamical effects of break-up processes in the subbarrier fusion involving weakly bound nuclei. We model two similar cases involving either a neutron or a proton halo nucleus, both schematically coupled to the break-up channels. We find that the decrease of the coulomb barrier in the proton break-up channel leads, ceteris paribus, to a larger enhancement of the subbarier fusion probabilities with respect to the neutron-halo case.

  14. Electromagnetic properties of nuclei at high spins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A photon emitted by an excited state is likely to carry away, at most, 1 or 2 h-bar of angular momentum. Therefore, a profusion of photons is needed to deexcite the rapidly rotating states of nuclei formed by heavy-ion reactions. The study of electromagnetic properties has become the primary source of information on nuclear structure at high spins and, also, at the warm temperatures present in the initial stage of the electromagnetic cascade process. The purpose of this paper is a review of the E1, M1, and E2 properties of such highly excited states. 42 refs., 5 figs

  15. Selected topics on Hadrons in Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Oset, E; Hernandez, E; Ramos, A; Magas, V K; Yamagata-Sekihara, J; Hirenzaki, S; Gamermann, D; Molina, R; Tolos, L; Roca, L

    2011-01-01

    In this talk we report on selected topics on hadrons in nuclei. The first topic is the renormalization of the width of the $\\Lambda(1520)$ in a nuclear medium. This is followed by a short update of the situation of the $\\omega$ in the medium. The investigation of the properties of $\\bar{K}$ in the nuclear medium from the study of the $(K_{flight},p)$ reaction is also addressed, as well as properties of X,Y,Z charmed and hidden charm resonances in a nuclear medium. Finally we address the novel issue of multimeson states.

  16. Inclusive inelastic electron scattering from nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Fomin, Nadia

    2007-01-01

    Inclusive electron scattering from nuclei at large x and $Q^2$ is the result of a reaction mechanism that includes both quasi--elastic scattering from nucleons and deep inelastic scattering from the quark constituents of the nucleons. Data in this regime can be used to study a wide variety of topics, including the extraction of nuclear momentum distributions, the influence of final state interactions and the approach to $y$-scaling, the strength of nucleon-nucleon correlations, and the approach to $x$- scaling, to name a few. Selected results from the recent experiment E02-019 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will be shown and their relevance discussed.

  17. Fission properties for r-process nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Erler, J.; Langanke, K; Loens, H. P.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2011-01-01

    We present a systematics of fission barriers and fission lifetimes for the whole landscape of super-heavy elements (SHE), i.e. nuclei with Z>100. The fission lifetimes are also compared with the alpha-decay half-lives. The survey is based on a self-consistent description in terms of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (SHF) approach. Results for various different SHF parameterizations are compared to explore the robustness of the predictions. The fission path is computed by quadrupole constrained SHF. Th...

  18. Coherent Pions From Neutrino Scattering Off Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Valverde, M; Hernandez, E; Nieves, J; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2010-01-01

    We describe a model for pion production off nucleons and coherent pions from nuclei induced by neutrinos in the 1 GeV energy regime. Besides the dominant Delta pole contribution, it takes into account the effect of background terms required by chiral symmetry. Moreover, the model uses a reduced nucleon-to-Delta resonance axial coupling, which leads to coherent pion production cross sections around a factor two smaller than most of the previous theoretical estimates. Nuclear effects like medium corrections on the Delta propagator and final pion distortion are included.

  19. Incoherent rho^0 electroproduction off nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Falter, T; Mosel, U

    2003-01-01

    In the present paper we investigate incoherent rho^0 electroproduction off complex nuclei. We derive a novel, simple expression for the incoherent electroproduction cross section in which one can clearly separate the final state interactions of the reaction products from the 'initial state interactions' of the photon that give rise to nuclear shadowing. In the special case of purely absorptive final state interactions we deduce from our expression the known Glauber result. A more realistic treatment of the final state interactions within a transport model is then used to compare our predictions with experimental data from the HERMES experiment.

  20. Synthesis and Properties of Superheavy Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of production and decay of excited compound nuclei leading to production of isotopes of trans actinide elements in the vicinity of closed deformed shells Z = 108, N = 162 is being considered. The implementation of experiments is described and data on synthesis of new isotopes 262104, 265,266 106 and 267 108 in hot fusion reactions is presented. The properties of the new nuclides point to a considerable increase of the periods of spontaneous fission predicted by the macro-microscopic theory. Prospects for using fusion reactions in synthesizing new elements are discussed.(author). 30 refs.; 9 figs.; 2 tabs

  1. Signature Inversion in Odd-odd Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Min-liang; ZHANG Yu-hu; ZHOU Xiao-hong; GUO Ying-xiang; LEI Xiang-guo; GUO Wen-tao

    2009-01-01

    Signature inversion in odd-odd nuclei is investigated by using a proton and a neutron coupling to the coherent state of the core.Two parameters are employed in the Hamiltonian to set the energy scales of rotation,neutron-proton coupling and their competition.Typical level staggering is extracted from the calculated level energies.The calculation can approximately reproduce experimental signature inversion.Signature inversion is attributed to the rotational motion and neutronproton residual interaction having reversed signature splitting rules.It is found signature inversion can appear at axially symmetric shape and high-K band.

  2. Shapes of non-rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study nuclear potential-energy surfaces, ground-state masses and shapes calculated by use of a Yukawa-plus-exponential macroscopic model and a folded-Yukawa single-particle potential for 4023 nuclei ranging from 16O to 279112. We discuss extensively the transition from spherical to deformed shapes and study the relation between shape changes and the mass corresponding to the ground-state minimum. The calculated values for the ground-state mass and shape show good agreement with experimental data throughout the periodic system, but some discrepancies remain that deserve further study. We also discuss the effect of deformation on Gamow-Teller #betta#-strength functions

  3. Propagation of heavy cosmic-ray nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques for modeling the propagation of heavy cosmic-ray nuclei, and the required atomic and nuclear data, are assembled in this paper. Emphasis is on understanding nuclear composition in the charge range 3< Z<83. Details of the application of ''matrix methods'' above a few hundred meV per nucleon, a new treatment of electron capture decay, and a new table of cosmic-ray-stable isotopes are presented. Computation of nuclear fragmentation cross sections, stopping power, and electron stripping and attachment are briefly reviewed

  4. Double giant dipole resonance in hot nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinausero, M.; Rizzi, V.; Viesti, G.; Fabris, D.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Nebbia, G.; Pesente, S.; Barbui, M.; Fioretto, E.; Prete, G.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Million, B.; Leoni, S.; Wieland, O.; Benzoni, G.; Brambilla, S.; Airoldi, A.; Maj, A.; Kmiecik, M

    2004-02-09

    Signals from Double Dipole Giant Resonances (DGDR) in hot nuclei have been searched in a {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence experiment using the HECTOR array at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro. The experimental single {gamma}-ray spectrum and the projection of the {gamma}-{gamma} matrix have been compared with a standard Monte Carlo Statistical Model code including only the single GDR excitation. These calculations have been used as background to determine the extra-yield associated with the DGDR de-excitation. Results have been compared with a previous experiment confirming the presence of the DGDR excitation in fusion-evaporation reactions.

  5. Effective field theory for deformed atomic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenbrock, T.; Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2016-05-01

    We present an effective field theory (EFT) for a model-independent description of deformed atomic nuclei. In leading order this approach recovers the well-known results from the collective model by Bohr and Mottelson. When higher-order corrections are computed, the EFT accounts for finer details such as the variation of the moment of inertia with the band head and the small magnitudes of interband E2 transitions. For rotational bands with a finite spin of the band head, the EFT is equivalent to the theory of a charged particle on the sphere subject to a magnetic monopole field.

  6. Effective field theory for deformed atomic nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Papenbrock, T.; Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    We present an effective field theory (EFT) for a model-independent description of deformed atomic nuclei. In leading order this approach recovers the well-known results from the collective model by Bohr and Mottelson. When higher-order corrections are computed, the EFT accounts for finer details such as the variation of the moment of inertia with the band head and the small magnitudes of interband $E2$ transitions. For rotational bands with a finite spin of the band head, the EFT is equivalen...

  7. Light nuclei from chiral EFT interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Navratil, P.; Gueorguiev, V. G.; Vary, J. P.; Ormand, W. E.; Nogga, A.; Quaglioni, S.

    2008-01-01

    Recent developments in nuclear theory allow us to make a connection between quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and low-energy nuclear physics. First, chiral effective field theory (chi EFT) provides a natural hierarchy to define two-nucleon (NN), three-nucleon (NNN), and even four-nucleon interactions. Second, ab-initio methods have been developed capable to test these interactions for light nuclei. In this contribution, we discuss ab-initio no-core shell-model (NCSM) calculations for s-shell and p...

  8. Superheavy nuclei – cold synthesis and structure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raj K Gupta

    2001-08-01

    The quantum mechanical fragmentation theory (QMFT), given for the cold synthesis of new and superheavy elements, is reviewed and the use of radioactive nuclear beams (RNB) and targets (RNT) is discussed. The QMFT is a complete theory of cold nuclear phenomena, namely, the cold fission, cold fusion and cluster radioactivity. Also, the structure calculations based on the axially deformed relativistic mean field (DRMF) approach are presented which predict new regions of spherical magicity, namely = 120 and = 172 or 184, for superheavy nuclei. This result is discussed in the light of recent experiments reporting the cold synthesis of = 118 element.

  9. Signatures for quark clustering in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, C.E. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Lassila, K.E. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    As a signature for the presence of quark clusters in nuclei, the authors suggest studying backward protons produced by electron scattering off deuterons and suggest a ratio that cancels out much of the detailed properties of deuterons or 6-quark clusters. The test may be viewed as a test that the short range part of the deuteron is still a 2-nucleon system. They make estimates to show how it fails in characteristic and significant ways if the two nucleons at short range coalesce into a kneaded 6-quark cluster.

  10. The Structure of Nuclei Far from Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zganjar, E.F.

    1999-02-25

    From among a number of important nuclear structure results that have emerged from our research program during the past few years, two stand out as being of extra significance. These are: (a) the identification of a diabatic coexisting structure in {sup 187}Au which arises solely from differences in proton occupation of adjacent oscillator shells, and (b) the realization of a method for estimating EO strength in nuclei and the resulting prediction that the de-excitation of superdeformed bands may proceed, in some cases, by strong EO transitions.

  11. Effective field theory for deformed atomic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Papenbrock, T

    2015-01-01

    We present an effective field theory (EFT) for a model-independent description of deformed atomic nuclei. In leading order this approach recovers the well-known results from the collective model by Bohr and Mottelson. When higher-order corrections are computed, the EFT accounts for finer details such as the variation of the moment of inertia with the band head and the small magnitudes of interband $E2$ transitions. For rotational bands with a finite spin of the band head, the EFT is equivalent to the theory of a charged particle on the sphere subject to a magnetic monopole field.

  12. Symmetry energy, unstable nuclei, and neutron star crusts

    CERN Document Server

    Iida, Kei

    2013-01-01

    Phenomenological approach to inhomogeneous nuclear matter is useful to describe fundamental properties of atomic nuclei and neutron star crusts in terms of the equation of state of uniform nuclear matter. We review a series of researches that we have developed by following this approach. We start with more than 200 equations of state that are consistent with empirical masses and charge radii of stable nuclei and then apply them to describe matter radii and masses of unstable nuclei, proton elastic scattering and total reaction cross sections off unstable nuclei, and nuclei in neutron star crusts including nuclear pasta. We finally discuss the possibility of constraining the density dependence of the symmetry energy from experiments on unstable nuclei and even observations of quasi-periodic oscillations in giant flares of soft gamma-ray repeaters.

  13. Symmetry energy, unstable nuclei and neutron star crusts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, Kei [Kochi University, Department of Natural Science, Kochi (Japan); RIKEN Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan); Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro [RIKEN Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan); Aichi Shukutoku University, Department of Human Informatics, Aichi (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    The phenomenological approach to inhomogeneous nuclear matter is useful to describe fundamental properties of atomic nuclei and neutron star crusts in terms of the equation of state of uniform nuclear matter. We review a series of researches that we have developed by following this approach. We start with more than 200 equations of state that are consistent with empirical masses and charge radii of stable nuclei and then apply them to describe matter radii and masses of unstable nuclei, proton elastic scattering and total reaction cross sections off unstable nuclei, and nuclei in neutron star crusts including nuclear pasta. We finally discuss the possibility of constraining the density dependence of the symmetry energy from experiments on unstable nuclei and even observations of quasi-periodic oscillations in giant flares of soft gamma-ray repeaters. (orig.)

  14. Precision measurement of the mass difference between light nuclei and anti-nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ahn, Sang Un; Aimo, Ilaria; Aiola, Salvatore; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto Perez, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Ball, Markus; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, Fernando; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Boettger, Stefan; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erhardt, Filip; Eschweiler, Dominic; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Fleck, Martin Gabriel; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harris, John William; Hartmann, Helvi; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hilden, Timo Eero; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Ionita, Costin; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyungtaik; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Kamal; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobayashi, Taiyo; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kohler, Markus Konrad; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kucheryaev, Yury; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Lokesh, Kumar; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Seongjoo; Legrand, Iosif; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera Renee; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martashvili, Irakli; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Mcdonald, Daniel; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Minervini, Lazzaro Manlio; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Nattrass, Christine; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nellen, Lukas; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okatan, Ali; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pajares Vales, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Pant, Divyash; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Paul, Biswarup; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Razazi, Vahedeh; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reicher, Martijn; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-Lucian; Rivetti, Angelo; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salgado Lopez, Carlos Alberto; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Santagati, Gianluca; Sarkar, Debojit; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schuster, Tim Robin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Seeder, Karin Soraya; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Seo, Jeewon; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shadura, Oksana; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Natasha; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Soegaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Zixuan; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Spacek, Michal; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Steinpreis, Matthew Donald; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Symons, Timothy; Szabo, Alexander; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Takahashi, Jun; Tanaka, Naoto; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarantola Peloni, Attilio; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-Gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Trogolo, Stefano; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Vargas Trevino, Aurora Diozcora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Veldhoen, Misha; Velure, Arild; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Watanabe, Daisuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yasnopolskiy, Stanislav; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaborowska, Anna; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correia Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zyzak, Maksym

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of the mass differences for systems bound by the strong force has reached a very high precision with protons and anti-protons. The extension of such measurement from (anti-)baryons to (anti-)nuclei allows one to probe any difference in the interactions between nucleons and anti-nucleons encoded in the (anti-)nuclei masses. This force is a remnant of the underlying strong interaction among quarks and gluons and can be described by effective theories, but cannot yet be directly derived from quantum chromodynamics. Here we report a measurement of the difference between the ratios of the mass and charge of deuterons (d) and anti-deuterons ($\\bar{d}$), and $^{3}{\\rm He}$ and $^3\\overline{\\rm He}$ nuclei carried out with the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) detector in Pb-Pb collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 2.76 TeV. Our direct measurement of the mass-over-charge differences confirm CPT invariance to an unprecedented precision in the sector of light nuclei. This funda...

  15. Efeito do número da passagem e do gênero das células doadoras de núcleo no desenvolvimento de bovinos produzidos por transferência nuclear Effect of culture time and gender of nuclei donor cells on bovine development produced by nuclear transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Krempel Fonseca Merighe

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se com este trabalho avaliar o efeito do número da passagem e do sexo das células doadoras de núcleo no desenvolvimento embrionário e fetal após transferência nuclear. Para isso, oócitos bovinos foram maturados, enucleados e reconstruídos com células somáticas de animal adulto. Após a fusão e ativação química, os zigotos reconstituídos foram cultivados em Charles Rosenkranz 2 (CR2 com monocamada de células da granulosa a 38,8ºC em atmosfera umidificada a 5% de CO2 em ar, durante sete dias, e transferidos para receptoras sincronizadas. As taxas de clivagem e desenvolvimento a blastocisto de embriões reconstruídos com células cultivadas por tempo maior foram inferiores às obtidas com os demais tempos de cultivo. Além disso, os blastocistos produzidos não resultaram no desenvolvimento de uma gestação a termo. Embora a taxa de clivagem em embriões fêmeas tenha sido maior, o número de embriões que atingiram o estádio de blastocisto foi maior nos embriões machos. No período gestacional, fêmeas apresentaram maior taxa de aborto entre 90 e 120 dias de gestação. Esses resultados indicam que células doadoras de núcleos cultivados por longos períodos dificultam a produção de blastocistos e aumentam as chances de perdas durante a gestação. Embriões clonados machos têm maior competência para se desenvolver a blastocisto e resultam em menor taxa de perda gestacional.The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of culture time and sex of nuclei donor cells on embryo and fetal development after nuclear transfer. Thus, bovine oocytes were matured, enucleated and reconstructed with somatic cells from an adult animal. After fusion and chemical activation, the reconstituted zygotes were cultured in Charles Rosenkranz 2 (CR2 on a granular monolayer cell at 38.8ºC in a humidified atmosphere 5% CO2 in air for seven days, and transferred to synchronized receptors. Cleavage rates and development to

  16. Import of DNA into mammalian nuclei by proteins originating from a plant pathogenic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemienowicz, A; Görlich, D; Lanka, E; Hohn, B; Rossi, L

    1999-03-30

    Import of DNA into mammalian nuclei is generally inefficient. Therefore, one of the current challenges in human gene therapy is the development of efficient DNA delivery systems. Here we tested whether bacterial proteins could be used to target DNA to mammalian cells. Agrobacterium tumefaciens, a plant pathogen, efficiently transfers DNA as a nucleoprotein complex to plant cells. Agrobacterium-mediated T-DNA transfer to plant cells is the only known example for interkingdom DNA transfer and is widely used for plant transformation. Agrobacterium virulence proteins VirD2 and VirE2 perform important functions in this process. We reconstituted complexes consisting of the bacterial virulence proteins VirD2, VirE2, and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in vitro. These complexes were tested for import into HeLa cell nuclei. Import of ssDNA required both VirD2 and VirE2 proteins. A VirD2 mutant lacking its C-terminal nuclear localization signal was deficient in import of the ssDNA-protein complexes into nuclei. Import of VirD2-ssDNA-VirE2 complexes was fast and efficient, and was shown to depended on importin alpha, Ran, and an energy source. We report here that the bacterium-derived and plant-adapted protein-DNA complex, made in vitro, can be efficiently imported into mammalian nuclei following the classical importin-dependent nuclear import pathway. This demonstrates the potential of our approach to enhance gene transfer to animal cells. PMID:10097105

  17. Structure of collective modes in transitional and deformed nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Caprio, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    The collective structure of atomic nuclei intermediate between spherical and quadrupole deformed structure presents challenges to theoretical understanding. However, models have recently been proposed in terms of potentials which are soft with respect to the quadrupole deformation variable beta. To test these models, information is needed on low-spin states of transitional nuclei. The present work involves measurement of electromagnetic decay properties of low-spin states for nuclei in the A=...

  18. Collisions of Small Nuclei in the Thermal Model

    CERN Document Server

    Cleymans, J; Oeschler, H; Redlich, K; Sharma, N

    2016-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the expectations of the thermal model for particle production in collisions of small nuclei. The maxima observed in particle ratios of strange particles to pions as a function of beam energy in heavy ion collisions, are reduced when considering smaller nuclei. Of particular interest is the $\\Lambda/\\pi^+$ ratio shows the strongest maximum which survives even in collisions of small nuclei.

  19. Exotic modes of excitation in atomic nuclei far from stability

    OpenAIRE

    Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.; Khan, E.; Colo, G.

    2007-01-01

    We review recent studies of the evolution of collective excitations in atomic nuclei far from the valley of $\\beta$-stability. Collective degrees of freedom govern essential aspects of nuclear structure, and for several decades the study of collective modes such as rotations and vibrations has played a vital role in our understanding of complex properties of nuclei. The multipole response of unstable nuclei and the possible occurrence of new exotic modes of excitation in weakly-bound nuclear ...

  20. Systematics of light nuclei in a relativistic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of relativistic mean field calculations for non-spherical nuclei are presented and discussed. The need for non-linear scalar meson self-couplings in order to describe the properties of s-d shell nuclei is emphasized along with the importance of self-consistency in calculations of magnetic moments of odd-mass nuclei. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Production of light nuclei in the thermal and coalescence models

    CERN Document Server

    Mrowczynski, Stanislaw

    2016-01-01

    The thermal model properly describes the yield of light nuclei in relativistic heavy-ion collisions even so the loosely bound sizable nuclei cannot exist in the dense and hot hadron gas. Within the coalescence model, light nuclei are formed at the latest stage of nuclear collisions due to final state interactions. After discussing the models, we derive simple analytic formulas showing that the thermal and coalescence model predictions are quantitatively close to each other.

  2. Stellar transits in active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Béky, Bence

    2012-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBH) are typically surrounded by a dense stellar population in galactic nuclei. Stars crossing the line of site in active galactic nuclei (AGN) produce a characteristic transit lightcurve, just like extrasolar planets do when they transit their host star. We examine the possibility of finding such AGN transits in deep optical, UV, and X-ray surveys. We calculate transit lightcurves using the Novikov--Thorne thin accretion disk model, including general relatistic effects. Based on the expected properties of stellar cusps, we find that around 10^6 solar mass SMBHs, transits of red giants are most common for stars on close orbits with transit durations of a few weeks and orbital periods of a few years. We find that detecting AGN transits requires repeated observations of thousands of low mass AGNs to 1% photometric accuracy in optical, or ~ 10% in UV bands or soft X-ray. It may be possible to identify stellar transits in the Pan-STARRS and LSST optical and the eROSITA X-ray surveys. Su...

  3. Stellar Transits in Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béky, Bence; Kocsis, Bence

    2013-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are typically surrounded by a dense stellar population in galactic nuclei. Stars crossing the line of site in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) produce a characteristic transit light curve, just like extrasolar planets do when they transit their host star. We examine the possibility of finding such AGN transits in deep optical, UV, and X-ray surveys. We calculate transit light curves using the Novikov-Thorne thin accretion disk model, including general relativistic effects. Based on the expected properties of stellar cusps, we find that around 106 solar mass SMBHs, transits of red giants are most common for stars on close orbits with transit durations of a few weeks and orbital periods of a few years. We find that detecting AGN transits requires repeated observations of thousands of low-mass AGNs to 1% photometric accuracy in optical, or ~10% in UV bands or soft X-ray. It may be possible to identify stellar transits in the Pan-STARRS and LSST optical and the eROSITA X-ray surveys. Such observations could be used to constrain black hole mass, spin, inclination, and accretion rate. Transit rates and durations could give valuable information on the circumnuclear stellar clusters as well. Transit light curves could be used to image accretion disks with unprecedented resolution, allowing us to resolve the SMBH silhouette in distant AGNs.

  4. A quark structure of hadrons and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this review we look into the recent understanding of mesons, baryons and nuclei as few quark bound states within the framework of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, we have reviewed our understanding of the nature of confining interaction, the spin - dependence of colour forces and the role of non-perturbative effects in the study of quark forces in the potential model approach. We also give a comparative study of results obtained by several potential models with reference to the experimental data. We find that although the Lorentz nature of confinement and the nature of spin-dependent colour forces have been better understood now, only a partial understanding of these problems are obtained so far. Our study reveals that properties of baryons could be explained by the same potential model which successfully describe the mesons. However, the nuclei require chiral symmetry and non-perturbative methods for their description. We also discuss the relation between constituent, current and dynamical quark masses. We conclude that QCD motivated approaches have shown much success in explaining many results on hadronic and nuclear data. (author). 212 refs, 14 tabs

  5. Studies of nuclei using radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 12 month period from May 1988 to July 1989 represents the first full year of our 18 month pilot program in nuclear structure research. In this period, research was initiated to develop a capability for radioactive secondary beams at Argonne National Laboratory using the Atlas and the new Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA), which is currently under construction. Two major new detector facilities are currently in the final stages of design and testing. The Large-Area, Scintillator Telescope (LAST) detector is fully operational and will be shipped to Argonne National Laboratory in August for fit-tests and in-beam calibrations. The first segments of a new sixteen-segment neutron multiplicity detector have been built and tested. The remaining segments are currently being constructed. Research was continued in the areas of (1) Coulomb excitation studies of rare earth and actinide nuclei; (2) In-beam, gamma-ray spectroscopy of nuclei in the mass 100 region, and (3) Advanced detector design. Several journal articles and abstracts were published or submitted for publication in the reporting period, and others are currently in preparation. Three graduate students participated in the program, one from the University of Florida and two from the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden

  6. Experiments with stored relativistic exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beams of relativistic exotic nuclei were produced, separated and investigated with the combination of the fragment separator FRS and the storage ring ESR. The following experiments are presented: (1) Direct mass measurements of relativistic nickel and bismuth projectile fragments were performed using Schottky spectrometry. Applying electron cooling, the relative velocity spread of the circulating secondary nuclear beams of low intensity was reduced to below 10-6. The achieved mass resolving power of m/Δm = 6.5 . 105 (FWHM) in recent measurements represents an improvement by a factor of two compared to our previous experiments. The previously unknown masses of more than 100 proton-rich isotopes have been measured in the range of 54 ≤ Z ≤ 84. The results are compared with mass models and estimated values based on extrapolations of experimental values. (2) Exotic nuclei with half-lives shorter than the time required for electron cooling can be investigated by time-of-flight measurements with the ESR being operated in the isochronous mode. This novel experimental technique has been successfully applied in a first measurement with nickel fragments. A mass resolving power of m/Δm = 1.5 . 105 (FWHM) was achieved in this mode of operation. (3) Nuclear half-lives of stored and cooled bare projectile fragments have been measured to study the influence of the ionic charge state on the beta-decay probability. (orig.)

  7. Spectroscopy of very heavy nuclei with a view to study super-heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the recent years, the spectroscopic study of single particle orbitals of very heavy elements (VHE) has become possible with the development of increasingly efficient experimental setups. This allows us, through nuclear deformation, to access with these deformed nuclei to orbitals situated around the Fermi level in the spherical superheavy elements (SHE) and learn more about the nuclear structure of these nuclei. The aim of this work is the spectroscopic studies of heavy and very heavy elements. Because of the experimental difficulties associated with the fusion reactions in the VHE region, a detailed optimization studies is essential. Simulation of energy loss and angular straggling of these nuclei due to the interaction in the target and to neutron's evaporation was carried out and allowed us to optimize the angular acceptance of the separators according to the target thickness. An extensive survey and exploration in the VHE region was also conducted on the basis of cross section's systematics in the literature and simulations carried out using the statistical code Hivap. In this framework, the possible extension of the range of validity of a set of Hivap parameters was investigated. This work has enabled us to prepare a list of experiments of interest for the production of very heavy nuclei. In this thesis, our work was concentrated on the spectroscopy of the nuclei No256 et Rf256 for which two experimental proposals were accepted. The octupole deformations predicted in the actinides region is studied in another part of this thesis, a part witch is dedicated to the gamma spectroscopy of Pa223. The data from a new experiment carried out using the Jurogam-Ritu-Great setup are analysed and compared to previous results. They confirm the octupole deformed shape in this nucleus. (author)

  8. Study of nuclear level densities for exotic nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nasri Nasrabadi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear level density (NLD is one of the properties of nuclei with widespread applications in astrophysics and nuclear medicine. Since there has been little experimental and theoretical research on the study of nuclei which are far from stability line, studying NLD for these nuclei is of crucial importance. Also, as NLD is an important input for nuclear research codes, hence studying the methods for calculation of this parameter is essential. Besides introducing various methods and models for calculating NLD for practical applications, we used exact spectra distribution (SPDM for determining NLD of two neutron and proton enriched exotic nuclei with the same mass number.

  9. Spherical and Deformed Shell Closures in Superheavy nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴哲英; 许甫荣; 赵恩广; 郑春开

    2003-01-01

    The structure of superheavy nuclei has been studied using the macroscopic-microscopic model. The macroscopic energy was calculated with the continuous medium model in which the energy is expressed as a function of nucleon densities. The deformations and structures of superheavy nuclei were systematically investigated. Calculations reproduce well the available data of experimental α-decay energies and half-lives. The investigation of singleparticle levels shows that the shell structure is deformation and isospin dependent. Potential-energy-surface calculations display that superheavy nuclei have in general harder shapes than the nuclei of other mass regions.

  10. PROJECTIONS OF DORSAL AND MEDIAN RAPHE NUCLEI TO DORSAL AND VENTRAL STRIATUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Hassanzadeh G. Behzadi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The ascending serotonergic projections are derived mainly from mesencephalic raphe nuclei. Topographical projections from mesencephalic raphe nuclei to the striatum were examined in the rat by the retrograde transport technique of HRP (horseradish peroxidase. In 29 rats stereotaxically injection of HRP enzyme were performed in dorsal and ventral parts of striatum separately. The extent of the injection sites and distribution of retrogradely labeled neuronal cell bodies were drawed on representative sections using a projection microscope. Following ipsilateral injection of HRP into the dorsal striatum, numerous labeled neurons were seen in rostral portion of dorsal raphe (DR nucleus. In the same level the cluster of labeled neurons were hevier through caudal parts of DR. A few neurons were also located in lateral wing of DR. More caudally some labeled neurons were found in lateral, medial line of DR. In median raphe nucleus (MnR the labeled neurons were scattered only in median portion of this nucleus. The ipsilateral injection of HRP into the ventral region of striatum resulted on labeling of numerous neurons in rostral, caudal and lateral portions of DR. Through the caudal extension of DR on 4th ventricle level, a large number of labeled neurons were distributed along the ventrocaudal parts of DR. In MnR, labeled neurons were observed only in median part of this nucleus. These findings suggest the mesencephalic raphe nuclei projections to caudo-putamen are topographically organized. In addition dorsal and median raphe nuclei have a stronger projection to the ventral striatum.

  11. Serotonergic modulation and its influence on signal processing at cellular level in deep cerebellar nuclei neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Meng-Larn

    2007-01-01

    Deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) neurons generate the final output of cerebellum and receive abundant modulatory serotonergic inputs from brainstem neurons. The aim of this present study was to elucidate the influence of serotonin on signal processing performed by DCN neurons. Since signal processing is determined by the interplay between intrinsic and synaptic properties, the impact of serotonin on intrinsic as well as synaptic properties was investigated. To this end whole-cell patch clamp reco...

  12. Nuclei as superposition of topological solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rational map approximation provides an opportunity to describe light nuclei as classical solitons with baryon number B > 1 in the framework of the Skyrme model. The rational map ansatz yields a possibility of factorization of S3 baryon charge into S1 and S2 parts, the phenomenology of the model being strongly affected by the chosen factorization. Moreover, in the fundamental representation superposition of two different soliton factorizations can be used as solution ansatz. The canonical quantization procedure applied to collective degrees of freedom of the classical soliton leads to anomalous breaking of the chiral symmetry and exponential falloff of the energy density of the soliton at large distance, without explicit symmetry breaking terms included. The evolution of the shape of electric form factor as a function of two different factorization soliton mix ratio is investigated. Numerical results are presented. (author)

  13. Parity nonconservation in /sup 19/F nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsener, K.; Gruebler, W.; Koenig, V.; Schmelzbach, P.A.; Ulbricht, J.; Vuaridel, B.; Singy, D.; Forstner, C.; Zhang, W.Z.

    1987-01-12

    The parity nonconserving asymmetry A/sub ..gamma../ in the decay of polarized /sup 19/F/sup */(110 keV) nuclei has been measured. A value of A/sub ..gamma../=-(6.83 +- 2.11) x 10/sup -5/ (total error) was found. Systematic errors are extensively investigated and found to be small. The absolute normalization is given by the /sup 19/F/sup */ polarization, which is found to be rho/sub F/=-0.52 +- 0.08 in a separate experiment, using a calibrated Compton polarimeter. The new result A/sub ..gamma../(/sup 19/F) is compared to earlier experiments and recent theoretical calculations. From an analysis including /sup 18/F and /sup 21/Ne results, constraints on the weak meson-nucleon coupling constants f/sub ..pi../ and h/sub rho//sup 0/ are deduced. Agreement with calculations based on the standard electroweak theory and QCD is found.

  14. Dynamical effects in fusion with exotic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Vo-Phuoc, K; Simpson, E C

    2016-01-01

    [Background] Reactions with stable beams have demonstrated a strong interplay between nuclear structure and fusion. Exotic beam facilities open new perspectives to understand the impact of neutron skin, large isospin, and weak binding energies on fusion. Microscopic theories of fusion are required to guide future experiments. [Purpose] To investigate new effects of exotic structures and dynamics in near-barrier fusion with exotic nuclei. [Method] Microscopic approaches based on the Hartree-Fock (HF) mean-field theory are used for studying fusion barriers in $^{40-54}$Ca+$^{116}$Sn reactions for even isotopes. Bare potential barriers are obtained assuming frozen HF ground-state densities. Dynamical effects on the barrier are accounted for in time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) calculations of the collisions. Vibrational couplings are studied in the coupled-channel framework and near-barrier nucleon transfer is investigated with TDHF calculations. [Results] The development of a neutron skin in exotic calcium iso...

  15. Thermodynamics of pairing transition in hot nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Lang; Zhao, Peng-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The pairing correlations in hot nuclei $^{162}$Dy are investigated in terms of the thermodynamical properties by covariant density functional theory. The heat capacities $C_V$ are evaluated in the canonical ensemble theory and the paring correlations are treated by a shell-model-like approach, in which the particle number is conserved exactly. A S-shaped heat capacity curve, which agrees qualitatively with the experimental data, has been obtained and analyzed in details. It is found that the one-pair-broken states play crucial roles in the appearance of the S shape of the heat capacity curve. Moreover, due to the effect of the particle-number conservation, the pairing gap varies smoothly with the temperature, which indicates a gradual transition from the superfluid to the normal state.

  16. Compressed Baryonic Matter: from Nuclei to Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Renxin

    2013-01-01

    Our world is wonderful because of the negligible baryonic part although unknown dark matter and dark energy dominate the Universe. Those nuclei in the daily life are forbidden to fuse by compression due to the Coulomb repulse, nevertheless, it is usually unexpected in extraterrestrial extreme-environments: the gravity in a core of massive evolved star is so strong that all the other forces (including the Coulomb one) could be neglected. Compressed baryonic matter is then produced after supernova, manifesting itself as pulsar-like stars observed. The study of this compressed baryonic matter can not only be meaningful in fundamental physics (e.g., the elementary color interaction at low-energy scale, testing gravity theories, detecting nano-Hertz background gravitational waves), but has also profound implications in engineering applications (including time standard and navigation), and additionally, is focused by Chinese advanced telescopes, either terrestrial or in space. Historically, in 1930s, L. Landau spec...

  17. Clusters in neutron-rich light nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelavić Malenica D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their high selectivity, transfer and sequential decay reactions are powerful tools for studies of both single particle (nucleon and cluster states in light nuclei. Their use is particularly simple for investigations of α-particle clustering (because α-particle has Jπ=0+, which simplifies spin and parity assignments to observed cluster states, but they are also easily applicable to other types of clustering. Recent results on clustering in neutron-rich isotopes of beryllium, boron and carbon obtained measuring the 10B+10B reactions (at 50 and 72 MeV are presented. The highly efficient and segmented detector systems used, built from 4 Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSD allowed detection of double and multiple coincidences and, in that way, studies of states populated in transfer reactions, as well as their sequential decay.

  18. Broad iron lines in Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Fabian, A C; Reynolds, C S; Young, A J

    2000-01-01

    An intrinsically narrow line emitted by an accretion disk around a black hole appears broadened and skewed as a result of the Doppler effect and gravitational redshift. The fluorescent iron line in the X-ray band at 6.4-6.9keV is the strongest such line and is seen in the X-ray spectrum of many active galactic nuclei and, in particular, Seyfert galaxies. It is an important diagnostic with which to study the geometry and other properties of the accretion flow very close to the central black hole. The broad iron line indicates the presence of a standard thin accretion disk in those objects, often seen at low inclination. The broad iron line has opened up strong gravitational effects around black holes to observational study with wide-reaching consequences for both astrophysics and physics.

  19. Viscosity: From air to hot nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nguyen Dinh Dang

    2014-11-01

    After a brief review of the history of viscosity from classical to quantal fluids, a discussion of how the shear viscosity of a finite hot nucleus is calculated directly from the width and energy of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) of the nucleus is given in this paper. The ratio / with s being the entropy volume density, is extracted from the experimental systematic of GDR in copper, tin and lead isotopes at finite temperature . These empirical results are compared with the results predicted by several independent models, as well as with almost model-independent estimations. Based on these results, it is concluded that the ratio / in medium and heavy nuclei decreases with increasing to reach (1.3−4)$×\\hbar/(4 k_B)$ at = 5 MeV, which is almost the same as that obtained for quark-gluon plasma at > 170 MeV.

  20. Halo exotic nuclei and Schroedingers's cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 'doorway' description of Ε1 transitions in the Coulomb excitation of 'halo'exotic nuclei is formulated. The 'doorway'is defined as that (normalizable, non-stationary) state which can be reached from the ground state through the action of the relevant transition operator. In this picture, the Coulomb excitation process naturally appears in the form of a non Breit-Wigner resonance production process, while the so called 'soft'and 'hard' dipole modes can be related to the non standard spectral distribution of the doorway in its host physical system. Coherence and decoherence effects involving the different spectral components in fast Coulomb excitation processes and photon inelastic scattering are briefly discussed. (author)

  1. Mean field and collisions in hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collisions between heavy nuclei produce nuclear matter of high density and excitation. Brueckner methods are used to calculate the momentum and temperature dependent mean field for nucleons propagating through nuclear matter during these collisions. The mean field is complex and the imaginary part is related to the ''two-body'' collision, while the real part relates to ''one-body'' collisions. A potential model for the N-N interactions is avoided by calculating the Reaction matrix directly from the T-matrix (i.e., N-N phase shifts) using a version of Brueckner theory previously published by the author. Results are presented for nuclear matter at normal and twice normal density and for temperatures up to 50 MeV. 23 refs., 7 figs

  2. Sequential binary decay of highly excited nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decay of highly excited nuclei is described as a sequence of binary processes involving emission of fragments in their ground, excited-bound and unbound states. Primary together with secondary decay products lead to the final mass distributions. Asymmetric mass splittings involving nucleon emission up to symmetric binary ones are treated according to a generalized Weisskopf evaporation formalism. This procedure is implemented in the Monte-Carlo multi-step statistical model code MECO (Multisequential Evaporation COde). We examine the evolution of the calculated final mass distributions in the decay of a light compound nucleus, as the initial excitation energy increases towards the limits of complete dissociation. Comparisons are made with the predictions of the transition-stage theory, as well as a consistent Weisskopf treatment in which the decay process is described by rate equations for the generation of different fragment species. (author)

  3. Comment on breakup densities of hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In [V.E. Viola et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004) 132701, D.S. Bracken et al., Phys. Rev. C 69 (2004) 034612] the observed decrease in spectral peak energies of IMFs emitted from hot nuclei was interpreted in terms of a breakup density that decreased with increasing excitation energy. Subsequently, Raduta et al. [Ad. Raduta et al., Phys. Lett. B 623 (2005) 43] performed MMM simulations that showed decreasing spectral peaks could be obtained at constant density. In this Letter we point out that this apparent inconsistency is due to a selective comparison of theory and data that overlooks the evolution of the fragment multiplicities as a function of excitation energy

  4. Eta-mesic nuclei: past, present, future

    CERN Document Server

    Haider, Q

    2015-01-01

    Eta-mesic nucleus or the quasibound nuclear state of an eta ($\\eta$) meson in a nucleus is caused by strong-interaction force alone. This new type of nuclear species, which extends the landscape of nuclear physics, has been extensively studied since its prediction in 1986. In this paper, we review and analyze in great detail the models of the fundamental $\\eta$--nucleon interaction leading to the formation of an $\\eta$--mesic nucleus, the methods used in calculating the properties of a bound $\\eta$, and the approaches employed in the interpretation of the pertinent experimental data. In view of the successful observation of the $\\eta$--mesic nucleus $^{25}$Mg$_{\\eta}$ and other promising experimental results, future direction in searching for more $\\eta$--mesic nuclei is suggested.

  5. Momentum distribution of N$^*$ in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Kelkar, N G

    2016-01-01

    Due to its dominance in the low energy eta-nucleon interaction, the S11 N$^*$(1535) resonance enters as an important ingredient in the analyses of experiments aimed at finding evidence for the existence of eta-mesic nuclei. The static properties of the resonance get modified inside the nucleus and its momentum distribution is used in deciding these properties as well as the kinematics in the analyses. Here we show that given the possibility for the existence of an N$^*$-$^3$He quasibound state, the relative momentum distribution of an N$^*$ and $^3$He inside such a $^4$He is narrower than that of neutron-$^3$He in $^4$He. Results for the N$^*$-$^{24}$Mg system are also presented. The present exploratory work could be useful in motivating searches of exotic N$^*$-nucleus quasibound states as well as in performing analyses of eta meson production data.

  6. Ground State Properties of Neutron Magic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Saxena, G

    2016-01-01

    A systematic study of the ground state properties of the entire chains of even even neutron magic nuclei represented by isotones of traditional neutron magic numbers N = 8, 20, 40, 50, 82 and 126 has been carried out using relativistic mean field (rmf) plus Bardeen Cooper Schrieffer (BCS) approach. Our present investigation includes deformation, binding energy, two proton separation energy, single particle energy, rms radii along with proton and neutron density profiles, etc. Several of these results are compared with the results calculated using non relativistic approach (Skyrme Hartree Fock method) along with available experimental data and indeed they are found with excellent agreement. In addition, the possible locations of the proton and neutron drip lines, the (Z,N) values for the new shell closures, disappearance of traditional shell closures as suggested by the detailed analyzes of results are also discussed in detail.

  7. Real and virtual pions in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis first part is concerned with physical pion interaction with deuton, studied in a three-body problem frame. The elastic cross-section in the energy range near the resonance (3-3), has been deduced taking in account the pion virtual absorption. The second part is concerned with virtual pion in nuclei. In particular the virtual pion cloud around the nucleus has been studied and the effective constant coupling pion-nucleus has been deduced. This one is strongly reduced by polorazation effects of the nuclear medium (essentially by virtual excitation of the Δ isobar), in relation to its value for free nucleon collection. In the frame of the same polarization model, the pion field inside the nucleus has been studied also. This field is lowered for small momentum transfer. It is increased for large momentum transfer. This last phenomenon corresponds to critical opalescence related to phase transition of pion condensation

  8. Active Galactic Nuclei Feedback and Clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biman B. Nath

    2011-12-01

    The Intracluster Medium (ICM) is believed to have been affected by feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and/or supernovae-driven winds. These sources are supposed to have injected entropy into the ICM gas. The recently determined universal pressure profile of the ICM gas has been used and after comparing with the entropy profile of the gas from gravitational effects of the dark matter halo, the additional entropy injected by non-gravitational sources, as a function of the total cluster mass is determined. The current observational data of red-shift evolution of cluster scaling relation is shown that allow models in which the entropy injection decreases at high red-shift.

  9. Cluster magnetic fields from active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Sutter, P M; Yang, H -Y

    2009-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) found at the centers of clusters of galaxies are a possible source for weak cluster-wide magnetic fields. To evaluate this scenario, we present 3D adaptive mesh refinement MHD simulations of a cool-core cluster that include injection of kinetic, thermal, and magnetic energy via an AGN-powered jet. Using the MHD solver in FLASH 2, we compare several sub-resolution approaches that link the estimated accretion rate as measured on the simulation mesh to the accretion rate onto the central black hole and the resulting feedback. We examine the effects of magnetized outflows on the accretion history of the black hole and discuss the ability of these models to magnetize the cluster medium.

  10. Magic ultramagnetized nuclei in explosive nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct evidence of the presence of 44Ti and content of the isotope in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A are obtained from the analysis of gamma-ray spectrum of the remnant. A significant excess of observational 44Ti volume on predictions of supernova models can be explained as the magnetization effect in the process of explosive nucleosynthesis. The formation of chemical elements is considered accounting for superstrong magnetic fields predicted for supernovae and neutron stars. Using the arguments of nuclear statistical equilibrium, a significant effect of magnetic field on the nuclear shell energy is demonstrated. The magnetic shift of the most tightly “bound” nuclei from the transition metals of iron series to titanium leads to an exponential increase in the portion of 44Ti and, accordingly to a significant excess of the yield of these products of nucleosynthesis.

  11. Power spectra of active galactic nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG TaiShan; WU YuXiang; LIU Yuan

    2009-01-01

    The power spectral densities (PSDs) for a sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are analyzed in both the frequency domain and the time domain. We find for each object that for broadband noise a character timescale-bifurcation timescale of Fourier and time-domain PSD exists in the 103-106 s range,below which the time-domain power spectrum is systematically higher than the corresponding Fourier spectrum. The relationship between bifurcation timescale, AGN mass and luminosity is studied. Compared with the fact that similar phenomena have been found for Galactic black hole candidates (GBHs)with bifurcation timescale ~0.1 s but not for accreting neutron stars, our finding indicates that AGNs and GBHs have common intrinsic nature in rapid X-ray variability with a character time parameter scaled with their masses.

  12. Power spectra of active galactic nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The power spectral densities(PSDs)for a sample of active galactic nuclei(AGNs)are analyzed in both the frequency domain and the time domain.We find for each object that for broadband noise a character timescale-bifurcation timescale of Fourier and time-domain PSD exists in the 10 3 -10 6 s range, below which the time-domain power spectrum is systematically higher than the corresponding Fourier spectrum.The relationship between bifurcation timescale,AGN mass and luminosity is studied.Compared with the fact that similar phenomena have been found for Galactic black hole candidates(GBHs) with bifurcation timescale~0.1 s but not for accreting neutron stars,our finding indicates that AGNs and GBHs have common intrinsic nature in rapid X-ray variability with a character time parameter scaled with their masses.

  13. Correlations of Active Galactic Nuclei with Microquasars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Yong-Chun; ZUO Xue-Qin; WANG Ding-Xiong

    2006-01-01

    Correlations of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with microquasars are discussed based on the coexistence of the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) and magnetic coupling (MC) processes (CEBZMC) in black hole (BH) accretion disk.The proportions of several quantities of BH systems for both AGNs and microquasars are derived by combining the observational data with CEBZMC. It is shown that the square of the magnetic field at the BH horizon is inversely proportional to the BH mass, while the accretion rate of the disk is proportional to the BH mass. In addition, the very steep emissivity indexes from the recent XMM-Newton observations of the nearby bright Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG-6-30-15 and the microquasars XTE J1650-500 are well fitted by considering the MC effects on the disk radiation. These results suggest strongly the correlations of A GNs with microquasars.

  14. Are cometary nuclei primordial rubble piles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    Whipple's icy conglomerate model for the cometary nucleus has had considerable sucess in explaining a variety of cometary phenomena such as gas production rates and nongravitational forces. However, as discussed here, both observational evidence and theoretical considerations suggest that the cometary nucleus may not be a well-consolidated single body, but may instead be a loosely bound agglomeration of smaller fragments, weakly bonded and subject to occasional or even frequent disruptive events. The proposed model is analogous to the 'rubble pile' model suggested for the larger main-belt asteroids, although the larger cometary fragments are expected to be primordial condensations rather than collisionally derived debris as in the asteroid case. The concept of cometary nuclei as primordial rubble piles is proposed as a modification of the basic Whipple model, not as a replacement for it.

  15. Feldspar minerals as efficient deposition ice nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Yakobi-Hancock

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dusts are well known to be efficient ice nuclei, where the source of this efficiency has typically been attributed to the presence of clay minerals such as illite and kaolinite. However, the ice nucleating abilities of the more minor mineralogical components have not been as extensively examined. As a result, the deposition ice nucleation abilities of 24 atmospherically-relevant mineral samples have been studied, using a continuous flow diffusion chamber at −40.0 ± 0.3 °C. The same particle size (200 nm and particle preparation procedure were used throughout. The ice nucleation behaviour of the pure minerals is compared to that of complex mixtures, such as Arizona Test Dust (ATD and Mojave Desert Dust (MDD, and to lead iodide, which has been previously proposed for cloud seeding. Lead iodide was the most efficient ice nucleus (IN, requiring a critical relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi of 122.0 ± 2.0% to activate 0.1% of the particles. MDD (RHi 126.3 ± 3.4% and ATD (RHi 129.5 ± 5.1% have lower but comparable activity. From a set of clay minerals (kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, non-clay minerals (e.g. hematite, magnetite, calcite, cerussite, quartz, and feldspar minerals (orthoclase, plagioclase present in the atmospheric dusts it was found that the feldspar minerals (particularly orthoclase, and not the clays, were the most efficient ice nuclei. Orthoclase and plagioclase were found to have critical RHi values of 127.1 ± 6.3% and 136.2 ± 1.3%, respectively. The presence of feldspars (specifically orthoclase may play a significant role in the IN behaviour of mineral dusts despite their lower percentage in composition relative to clay minerals.

  16. Deep inelastic collisions between very heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic survey of deep inelastic reactions was performed for colliding nuclei of masses between 80 and 240 amu. The application of large surface detectors and, particularly, of a position sensitive ionization chamber, has proved to be very effective and appropriate for this type of investigation. The Wilczynski diagrams describing the relative motion between the colliding objects shows a gradual trend as a function of growing masses of target and projectile where the trajectories lead the particles not toward negative scattering angles but increasingly into the direction around and above the grazing angle. This behavior is attributed to a delicate balance between Coulomb and nuclear forces. The energy dumping as a function of the mass transfer strength matches a general law between total kinetic energy loss and the variance of the proton number distribution. For the partly damped component this relation seems to hold independently from the choice of ingoing channel and bombarding energy. The dissipation of the kinetic energy does not depend only on the relative velocity of the impinging nuclei, and the simple friction model is not appropriate to describe these processes. The γ-multiplicity measurement displays a rapid increase as a function of scattering angle and total kinetic energy loss, which give new insights to the process and indicate the necessity of microscopic quantum mechanical calculations of the interaction. In the U-U collision large mass transfers are present which possibly populate with relatively large cross sections the transuranic elements. In the Pb-Pb reaction the mass transfer is more restricted. The decay probability by fission of the primary masses increases strongly for growing masses and excitation energies

  17. SO8 model of collectivity in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interacting boson model (IBM) has been very successful in giving a unified and simple description of the spectroscopic properties of a wide range of nuclei, from vibrational through rotational nuclei. The three basic assumptions of the model are that (1) the valence nucleons move about a doubly closed core, (2) the collective low-lying states are composed primarily of coherent pairs of neutrons and pairs of protons coupled to angular momentum zero and two and (3) these coherent pairs are approximated as bosons. Thus the IBM is an approximation to the nuclear shell model in which the number of degrees of freedom are reduced drastically. Once these assumptions are made, the effective Hamiltonian can then be written in terms of neutron monopole (angular momentum zero) and quadrupole (angular momentum two) bosons and proton monopole and quadrupole bosons. Since each nucleus will have a fixed number of nucleon pairs this boson Hamiltonian will conserve the number of bosons. Phemonologically, the Hamiltonian is assumed to be finite and to be a sum of a boson self-energy Hamiltonian plus pairwise interactions between bosons. However, the parameters of the boson Hamiltonian depend smoothly on the mass of the nucleus. The mass dependence of these parameters presumably arise because of two effects resulting from the approximations made. In this review we shall show how it is possible to have fermion Hamiltonians which have a class of collective eigenstates composed entirely of monopole and quadrupole pairs of fermions. Hence these models satisfy the assumptions (1) and (2) above but no boson approximation need be made. Thus the Pauli principle is kept in tact. Furthermore the fermion shell model states excluded in the IBM can be classified by the number of fermion pairs which are not coherent monopole of quadrupole pairs. Hence the mixing of these states into the low-lying spectrum can be calculated in a systematic and tractable manner

  18. Dynamical effects in fusion with exotic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo-Phuoc, K.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Reactions with stable beams have demonstrated strong interplay between nuclear structure and fusion. Exotic beam facilities open new perspectives to understand the impact of neutron skin, large isospin, and weak binding energies on fusion. Microscopic theories of fusion are required to guide future experiments. Purpose: To investigate new effects of exotic structures and dynamics in near-barrier fusion with exotic nuclei. Method: Microscopic approaches based on the Hartree-Fock (HF) mean-field theory are used for studying fusion barriers in -54Ca40+116Sn reactions for even isotopes. Bare potential barriers are obtained assuming frozen HF ground-state densities. Dynamical effects on the barrier are accounted for in time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) calculations of the collisions. Vibrational couplings are studied in the coupled-channel framework and near-barrier nucleon transfer is investigated with TDHF calculations. Results: The development of a neutron skin in exotic calcium isotopes strongly lowers the bare potential barrier. However, this static effect is not apparent when dynamical effects are included. On the contrary, a fusion hindrance is observed in TDHF calculations with the most neutron-rich calcium isotopes which cannot be explained by vibrational couplings. Transfer reactions are also important in these systems due to charge equilibration processes. Conclusions: Despite its impact on the bare potential, the neutron skin is not seen as playing an important role in the fusion dynamics. However, the charge transfer with exotic projectiles could lead to an increase of the Coulomb repulsion between the fragments, suppressing fusion. The effects of transfer and dissipative mechanisms on fusion with exotic nuclei deserve further studies.

  19. Unobscured Type 2 Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yong; Rieke, George H.; Smith, Paul; Rigby, Jane; Hines, Dean; Donley, Jennifer; Schmidt, Gary; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.

    2010-05-01

    Type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with intrinsically weak broad emission lines (BELs) would be exceptions to the unified model. After examining a number of proposed candidates critically, we find that the sample is contaminated significantly by objects with BELs of strengths indicating that they actually contain intermediate-type AGNs, plus a few Compton-thick sources as revealed by extremely low ratios of X-ray to nuclear IR luminosities. We develop quantitative metrics that show two (NGC 3147 and NGC 4594) of the remaining candidates to have BELs 2-3 orders of magnitude weaker than those of typical type 1 AGNs. Several more galaxies remain as candidates to have anomalously weak BELs, but this status cannot be confirmed with the existing information. Although the parent sample is poorly defined, the two confirmed objects are well under 1% of its total number of members, showing that the absence of a BEL is possible, but very uncommon in AGN. We evaluate these two objects in detail using multi-wavelength measurements including new IR data obtained with Spitzer and ground-based optical spectropolarimeteric observations. They have little X-ray extinction with N H < ~1021 cm-2. Their IR spectra show strong silicate emission (NGC 4594) or weak aromatic features on a generally power-law continuum with a suggestion of silicates in emission (NGC 3147). No polarized BEL is detected in NGC 3147. These results indicate that the two unobscured type 2 objects have circumnuclear tori that are approximately face-on. Combined with their X-ray and optical/UV properties, this behavior implies that we have an unobscured view of the nuclei and thus that they have intrinsically weak BELs. We compare their properties with those of the other less-extreme candidates. We then compare the distributions of bolometric luminosities and accretion rates of these objects with theoretical models that predict weak BELs.

  20. Quadrupole deformation and clusterization in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation of exotic nuclear shapes, e.g. superdeformed and hyperdeformed states (in which the atomic nucleus has a spheroidal shape with ratios of main axes of 2:1 and 3:1, respectively) is one of the most interesting topics in recent nuclear structure studies. The appearance of exotic cluster configurations (or exotic cluster decay) is another issue of utmost interest. The combination of these two problems brings us to an exciting question: what is the interrelation of these two phenomena, i.e. what are the possible clusterizations of nuclear states with exotic shape. Recently we have addressed this question from the angle of both the binary and the ternary clusterizations. We apply methods which can be generalised for more complicated multicluster-configurations in a straightforward way. The basic concept of this work is that when we describe the composition of an atomic nucleus from smaller nuclei (clusters) then we take into account both of the two complementary natural laws, which govern this kind of phenomenon: the energy-minimum principle and the Pauli-exclusion principle. The crucial role of these two rules are obvious: energetically unfavoured systems are not likely to appear, and when the building blocks are fermions, like the nucleons of the atomic nuclei, then they follow the exclusion principle. However, the exact role, or relative importance of these two aspects of clusterization among di rent circumstances are not completely understood yet; the present work is meant to be a contribution to this task. Much attention has been paid to the energetic preference of various cluster-configurations of a nucleus. The methods applied along this line are partly or completely empirical ones, using information of the experimental data. Furthermore, most of these works concentrate on the simplest, i.e. binary clusterizations, especially, when the energetic calculation involves (in addition to the experimental binding energies) intercluster potentials, like

  1. LINERs as Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, L C

    1998-01-01

    Many nearby galaxies contain optical signatures of nuclear activity in the form of LINER nuclei. LINERs may be the weakest and most common manifestation of the quasar phenomenon. The physical origin of this class of objects, however, has been ambiguous. I draw upon a number of recent observations to argue that a significant fraction of LINERs are low-luminosity active galactic nuclei.

  2. Isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in hot and rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the role of thermal shape fluctuations on isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance (ISGOR) in hot and rotating nuclei. Our results show that the GQR energies strongly reflect the shape transition in hot and rotating nuclei despite the smoothing effect of thermal fluctuation. (author)

  3. Origin of light nuclei in near earth orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Derome, L

    2001-01-01

    The possible sources of light nuclei populations observed recently below the geomagnetic cutoff by the AMS experiment are discussed in terms of nuclear processes: fragmentation of the incoming flux of cosmic helium on atmospheric nuclei, and nuclear coalescence from proton and helium induced reactions. Results of simulations for deuterium, tritium, helium 3 and 4, are presented.

  4. HOT SUPERHEAVY NUCLEI SEEN WITH THE GDR GAMMA-DECAY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAJ, A; TVETER, TS; GAARDHOJE, JJ; HERSKIND, B; SLETTEN, G; RAMSOY, T; ATAC, A; KORTEN, W; BRACCO, A; CAMERA, F; MATTIUZZI, M; MILLION, B; PIGNANELLI, M; BACELAR, J; BUDA, A; PLOEG, HVD; KROLAS, W; NIFENECKER, H; SCHUSSLER, F; PINSTON, JA; MENTHE, A; PAUL, P; HOFMAN, DJ; DIOSZEGI, [No Value; SCHADMAND, S

    1995-01-01

    The GDR gamma decay of highly excited (272)Hs and (269)Ns nuclei and their evaporation daughters was studied in coincidence with fission fragments. A difference technique was used to isolate the pre-fission component. Strong dipole collectivity was observed. The lifetime of the hot superheavy nuclei

  5. Oriented collisions for cold synthesis of superheavy nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Raj K Gupta; Balasubramaniam, M.; Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, Narinder

    2003-01-01

    The conditions of optimum orientations (lowest barrier and largest interaction radius) for deformed colliding nuclei are introduced in "cold" fusion of superheavy nuclei. Also, the role of (octupole and) hexadecupole deformations is studied. We have used the proximity potential and applied our method to Ca-induced reactions.

  6. Shell evolution: A paradigm of structure of exotic nuclei?

    OpenAIRE

    Otsuka, Taka

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of shell structure and magic numbers of exotic nuclei are discussed with a rather pedagogical introduction. A major origin of the shell evolution is shown to be the spin-isospin dependent central part of the nucleon-nucleon interaction in nuclei. The importance and robustness of this mechanism ...

  7. Study of nuclei' excitation in the charge exchange reactions (Draft)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carried out experimental and theoretical studies show, that in the nuclear charge exchange reactions there is an unique ability for study both properties and behavior of the delta-isobar in the excited nuclear environment. However for theoretical analysis of these reactions it is necessary have experimental data on nuclei charge exchange on free nucleons. It is offered the experiment of measurement dependence of inclusive cross section of the tritium nuclei charge exchange in 3He nuclei on hydrogen from transferred energy. This reaction is isotopically dependent on 3He nuclei in tritons charge exchange reaction on neutrons. Aim of proposed experiment is checking of a hypothesis believability about the delta-isobar excitation in flying nucleus, and measurement of the process intensity. Peculiarity of this experiment is application of relativistic tritons beams formed from accelerated fragments of 4He nuclei. Experimental facility presents of combination of two one-arm spectrometers: first one - time-flying spectrometer for measurement tritium nuclei impulse in beam to target with accuracy 0.3 % for 6 GeV/s and identification of tritium nuclei, the second one - magnetic spectrometer for identification and measurement of 3He nuclei impulse forming in the result of the charge exchange reaction

  8. A Search for "Dwarf" Seyfert Nuclei. VI. Properties of Emission-Line Nuclei in Nearby Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, L C; Sargent, W L W; Ho, Luis C.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Sargent, Wallace L. W.

    2003-01-01

    We use the database from Paper III to quantify the global and nuclear properties of emission-line nuclei in the Palomar spectroscopic survey of nearby galaxies. We show that the host galaxies of Seyferts, LINERs, and transition objects share remarkably similar large-scale properties and local environments. The distinguishing traits emerge on nuclear scales. Compared with LINERs, Seyfert nuclei are an order of magnitude more luminous and exhibit higher electron densities and internal extinction. We suggest that Seyfert galaxies possess characteristically more gas-rich circumnuclear regions, and hence a more abundant fuel reservoir and plausibly higher accretion rates. The differences between the ionization state of the narrow emission-line regions of Seyferts and LINERs can be partly explained by the differences in their nebular properties. Transition-type objects are consistent with being composite (LINER/\\hii) systems. With very few exceptions, the stellar population within the central few hundred parsecs of...

  9. Decay of Hot Nuclei at Low Spins Produced by Antiproton-Annihilation in Heavy Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS208 \\\\ \\\\ The objective of the experiment is to study (i) the thermal excitation energy distribution of antiproton-induced reactions in heavy nuclei and (ii) the decay properties of hot nuclei at low spins via evaporation, multifragmentation and fission as a function of excitation energy. The experimental set-up consists of 4-$\\pi$ detectors: the Berlin Neutron Ball~(BNB) which is a spherical shell of gadolinium-loaded scintillator liquid with an inner and outer diameter of 40 and 160~cm, respectively. This detector counts the number of evaporated neutrons in each reaction. Inside BNB there is a 4-$\\pi$ silicon ball~(BSIB) with a diameter of 20~cm consisting of 162 detectors which measure energy and multiplicity of all emitted charged nuclear particles. The particles are identified via time of flight, energy and pulse shape correlations.

  10. Symmetries in atomic nuclei from isospin to supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Alejandro; Van Isacker, Pieter

    2009-01-01

    Symmetries in Atomic Nuclei aims to present an overview of recent applications of symmetry to the description of atomic nuclei. Special care is given to a pedagogical introduction of symmetry concepts using simple examples. After a historical overview of the applications of symmetry in nuclear physics, progress in the field during the last decade is reviewed. Special emphasis is put on the introduction of neutron-proton and boson-fermion degrees of freedom. Their combination leads to a supersymmetric description of pairs and quartets of nuclei. Both theoretical aspects and experimental signatures of dynamical (super)symmetries are carefully discussed. Case studies show how these symmetries are displayed by real atomic nuclei which have been studied experimentally using state-of-the art spectroscopy. Symmetries in Atomic Nuclei focuses on nuclear structure physics and has been written by active investigators in the field, but its scope is wider and is intended for final-year or post-graduate students and resea...

  11. Density Functional Theory studies of cluster states in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ebran, J P; Niksic, T; Vretenar, D

    2014-01-01

    The framework of nuclear energy density functionals is applied to a study of the formation and evolution of cluster states in nuclei. The relativistic functional DD-ME2 is used in triaxial and reflection-asymmetric relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov calculations of relatively light $N = Z$ and neutron-rich nuclei. The role of deformation and degeneracy of single-nucleon states in the formation of clusters is analysed, and interesting cluster structures are predicted in excited configurations of Be, C, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar and Ca $N = Z$ nuclei. Cluster phenomena in neutron-rich nuclei are discussed, and it is shown that in neutron-rich Be and C nuclei cluster states occur as a result of molecular bonding of $\\alpha$-particles by the excess neutrons, and also that proton covalent bonding can occur in $^{10}$C.

  12. A new spin-oriented nuclei facility: POLAREX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etilé A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the On-Line Nuclear Orientation method, POLAREX (POLARization of EXotic nuclei is a new facility allowing to study the anisotropic decay of spin-oriented nuclei. Based on the combination of on-line implantation of radioactive nuclei with Low Temperature Nuclear Orientation technique and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, POLAREX allows to measure nuclear electromagnetic moments and ground-state spins, in the aim to get information about the wave function composition of the nuclear state. Polarized nuclei can also be used to study fundamental interactions involving nuclear β-decay asymmetries. The POLAREX infrastructure will be installed at Accélérateur Linéaire auprés du Tandem d’Orsay in order to study neutron-rich nuclei, some of which have not been studied yet. Will be presented here, all the possibilities of this new facility and a non exhaustive scientific program.

  13. A new spin-oriented nuclei facility: POLAREX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the On-Line Nuclear Orientation method, POLAREX (Polarization of Exotic nuclei) is a new facility allowing to study the anisotropic decay of spin-oriented nuclei. Based on the combination of on-line implantation of radioactive nuclei with Low Temperature Nuclear Orientation technique and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, POLAREX allows the measurement of nuclear electromagnetic moments and ground-state spins, in the aim to get information about the wave function composition of the nuclear state. Polarized nuclei can also be used to study fundamental interactions involving nuclear β-decay asymmetries. The POLAREX infrastructure will be installed at the linear accelerator in Orsay in order to study neutron-rich nuclei, some of which have not been studied yet. Will be presented here, all the possibilities of this new facility and a non exhaustive scientific program. The first experiment will be the nuclear magnetic moment measurement of 125Sb as final commissioning

  14. Quadrupole moments of odd-odd near-magic nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achakovskiy O.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ground state quadrupole moments of odd-odd near-double-magic nuclei are calculated in the approximation of non-interacting odd neutron and odd proton. Under such a simple approximation the problem is reduced to the calculations of quadrupole moments of corresponding odd-even nuclei. These calculations are performed within the self-consistent Theory of Finite Fermi Systems based on the Energy Density Functional by Fayans et al. with the known DF3-a parameters. A reasonable agreement with the available experimental data is obtained for odd-odd nuclei and odd near-magic nuclei investigated. The self-consistent approach under consideration allowed us to predict the unknown quadrupole moments of odd-even and odd-odd nuclei near the double-magic 56,78Ni, 100,132Sn nuclides.

  15. Unstable nuclei in dissociation of light stable and radioactive nuclei in nuclear track emulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Artemenkov, D A; Zarubin, P I

    2016-01-01

    A role of the unstable nuclei ${}^{6}$Be, ${}^{8}$Be and ${}^{9}$B in the dissociation of relativistic nuclei ${}^{7,9}$Be, ${}^{10}$B and ${}^{10,11}$C is under study on the basis of nuclear track emulsion exposed to secondary beams of the JINR Nuclotron. Contribution of the configuration ${}^{6}$Be + $\\mit{n}$ to the ${}^{7}$Be nucleus structure is 8 $\\pm$ 1% which is near the value for the configuration ${}^{6}$Li + $\\mit{p}$. Distributions over the opening angle of $\\alpha$-particle pairs indicate to a simultaneous presence of virtual ${}^{8}$Be$_{g.s.}$ and ${}^{8}$Be$_{2^+}$ states in the ground states of the ${}^{9}$Be and ${}^{10}$C nuclei. The core ${}^{9}$B is manifested in the {${}^{10}$C} nucleus with a probability of 30 $\\pm$ 4%. Selection of the ${}^{10}$C "white" stars accompanied by ${}^{8}$Be$_{g.s.}$ (${}^{9}$B) leads to appearance in the excitation energy distribution of 2$\\alpha$2$\\mit{p}$ "quartets" of the distinct peak with a maximum at 4.1 $\\pm$ 0.3 MeV. ${}^{8}$Be$_{g.s.}$ decays are p...

  16. Filtering, reconstruction, and measurement of the geometry of nuclei from hippocampal neurons based on confocal microscopy data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queisser, Gillian; Wittmann, Malte; Bading, Hilmar; Wittum, Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    The cell nucleus is often considered a spherical structure. However, the visualization of proteins associated with the nuclear envelope in rat hippocampal neurons indicates that the geometry of nuclei is far more complex. The shape of cell nuclei is likely to influence the nucleo-cytoplasmic exchange of macromolecules and ions, in particular calcium, a key regulator of neuronal gene expression. We developed a tool to retrieve the 3-D view of cell nuclei from laser scanning confocal microscopy data. By applying an inertia-based filter, based on a special structure detection mechanism, the signal-to-noise ratio of the image is enhanced, the signal is smoothed, gaps in the membrane are closed, while at the same time the geometric properties, such as diameters of the membrane, are preserved. After segmentation of the image data, the microscopy data are sufficiently processed to extract surface information of the membrane by creating an isosurface with a marching tetrahedra algorithm combined with a modified Dijkstra graph-search algorithm. All methods are tested on artificial data, as well as on real data, which are recorded with a laser scanning confocal microscope. Significant advantages of the inertia-based filter can be observed when comparing it to other state of the art nonlinear diffusion filters. An additional program is written to calculate surface and volume of cell nuclei. These results represent the first step toward establishing a geometry-based model of the-dynamics of cytoplasmic and nuclear calcium. PMID:18315367

  17. A unified nucleosynthetic site for the production of heavy isotopes and p-nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ouyed, Amir; Leahy, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Current r-process models under-produce A130 nuclei, and spallation fragments these isotopes into A<130 nuclei and all 35 p-nuclei. Our model is universal in relation to a star's age, metallicity, and chemistry.

  18. Simulating collisions of thick nuclei in the color glass condensate framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Daniil; Ipp, Andreas; Müller, David

    2016-07-01

    We present our work on the simulation of the early stages of heavy-ion collisions with finite longitudinal thickness in the laboratory frame in 3 +1 dimensions. In particular we study the effects of nuclear thickness on the production of a glasma state in the McLerran-Venugopalan model within the color glass condensate framework. A finite thickness enables us to describe nuclei at lower energies, but forces us to abandon boost invariance. As a consequence, random classical color sources within the nuclei have to be included in the simulation, which is achieved by using the colored particle-in-cell method. We show that the description in the laboratory frame agrees with boost-invariant approaches as a limiting case. Furthermore we investigate collisions beyond boost invariance, in particular the pressure anisotropy in the glasma.

  19. Simulating collisions of thick nuclei in the color glass condensate framework

    CERN Document Server

    Gelfand, Daniil; Müller, David

    2016-01-01

    We present our work on the simulation of the early stages of heavy-ion collisions with finite longitudinal thickness in the laboratory frame in 3+1 dimensions. In particular we study the effects of nuclear thickness on the production of a glasma state in the McLerran-Venugopalan model within the color glass condensate framework. A finite thickness enables us to describe nuclei at lower energies, but forces us to abandon boost-invariance. As a consequence, random classical color sources within the nuclei have to be included in the simulation, which is achieved by using the colored particle-in-cell (CPIC) method. We show that the description in the laboratory frame agrees with boost-invariant approaches as a limiting case. Furthermore we investigate collisions beyond boost-invariance, in particular the pressure anisotropy in the glasma.

  20. Origin of the p-Nuclei in Explosive Nucleosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Rauscher, T

    2010-01-01

    A number of naturally occurring, proton-rich nuclides (the p-nuclei) cannot be made in the s- and r-process. It has been found that massive stars can produce p-nuclei through photodisintegration of pre-existing intermediate and heavy nuclei. This so-called gamma-process requires sufficiently high temperatures and occurs in pre-explosive or explosive O/Ne burning, depending on the mass of the star. Although the gamma-process has been successful in producing a large range of p-nuclei, two mass regions remain problematic, A<110 and 150nuclei are severely underproduced. The origin of the problems is yet to be identified. A large number of unstable nuclei with only theoretically predicted reaction rates are included in the reaction network and thus the nuclear input may involve uncertainties. Deficiencies in charged-particle optical potentials at gamma-process temperatures have been found for nuclei at stability. On the other hand, the gamma-process conditions (temperature prof...

  1. Investigating the spectral characteristics of backscattering from heterogeneous spherical nuclei using broadband finite-difference time-domain simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Guo-Shan; Sung, Kung-Bin

    2010-01-01

    Reflectance spectra measured from epithelial tissue have been used to extract size distribution and refractive index of cell nuclei for noninvasive detection of precancerous changes. Despite many in vitro and in vivo experimental results, the underlying mechanism of sizing nuclei based on modeling nuclei as homogeneous spheres and fitting the measured data with Mie theory has not been fully explored. We describe the implementation of a three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation tool using a Gaussian pulse as the light source to investigate the wavelength-dependent characteristics of backscattered light from a nuclear model consisting of a nucleolus and clumps of chromatin embedded in homogeneous nucleoplasm. The results show that small-sized heterogeneities within the nuclei generate about five times higher backscattering than homogeneous spheres. More interestingly, backscattering spectra from heterogeneous spherical nuclei show periodic oscillations similar to those from homogeneous spheres, leading to high accuracy of estimating the nuclear diameter by comparison with Mie theory. In addition to the application in light scattering spectroscopy, the reported FDTD method could be adapted to study the relations between measured spectral data and nuclear structures in other optical imaging and spectroscopic techniques for in vivo diagnosis.

  2. Quasiparticle-phonon interaction in non-magic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general microscopic approach to describe properties of excited states in non-magic nuclei is formulated. It is based on the consistent use of the Green function method in Fermi systems with Cooper pairing. The main attention is paid to even-even nuclei, but for odd nuclei with pairing some important relations are obtained too. The quasiparticle-phonon interaction which is introduced acts also in the particle-particle channel and gives a quasiparticle-phonon contribution to pairing. When applied to the theory of giant multipole resonances, the approach includes all known sources of resonance width, i.e. QRPA configurations (which correspond to Landau damping in magic nuclei), the single-particle continuum (escape width) and more complex configurations (spreading width). The use of the Green function method makes it possible to include consistently the ground-state correlations induced by the more complex configurations. In the approximation of the collective phonon creation amplitude squared, which is considered in detail here, these are the ground-state correlations caused by two-quasiparticle-phonon configurations; effects of these correlations have been found earlier to be noticeable for magic nuclei. Such a unified approach will give a reasonable description of the giant resonances' integral characteristics including their widths and of some more delicate properties like fine structure and decay characteristics. Physical arguments and earlier results of a similar approach for magic nuclei allow to use the known parameters of the Landau-Migdal non-separable interaction for all non-magic nuclei (except the light ones). This means that the theory developed is suitable for realistic predictions of the properties of unknown nuclei including unstable ones. The inclusion of the single-particle continuum allows to consider also nuclei with separation energy near zero. (orig.)

  3. Launching of Active Galactic Nuclei Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    As black holes accrete gas, they often produce relativistic, collimated outflows, or jets. Jets are expected to form in the vicinity of a black hole, making them powerful probes of strong-field gravity. However, how jet properties (e.g., jet power) connect to those of the accretion flow (e.g., mass accretion rate) and the black hole (e.g., black hole spin) remains an area of active research. This is because what determines a crucial parameter that controls jet properties—the strength of large-scale magnetic flux threading the black hole—remains largely unknown. First-principles computer simulations show that due to this, even if black hole spin and mass accretion rate are held constant, the simulated jet powers span a wide range, with no clear winner. This limits our ability to use jets as a quantitative diagnostic tool of accreting black holes. Recent advances in computer simulations demonstrated that accretion disks can accumulate large-scale magnetic flux on the black hole, until the magnetic flux becomes so strong that it obstructs gas infall and leads to a magnetically-arrested disk (MAD). Recent evidence suggests that central black holes in jetted active galactic nuclei and tidal disruptions are surrounded by MADs. Since in MADs both the black hole magnetic flux and the jet power are at their maximum, well-defined values, this opens up a new vista in the measurements of black hole masses and spins and quantitative tests of accretion and jet theory.

  4. Electromagnetic Studies of Mesons, Nucleons, and Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Oliver K.

    2013-08-20

    Professor Baker was a faculty member at Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia, and, jointly, a Staff Physicist at Jefferson Lab in nearby Newport News from September 1989 to July 2006. The Department of Energy (DOE) funded the grant DE-FG02-97ER41035 Electromagnetic Studies of Mesons, Nucleons, and Nuclei, while Baker was in this joint appointment. Baker sent a closeout report on these activities to Hampton University’s Sponsored Research Office some years ago, shortly after joining Yale University in 2006. In the period around 2001, the research grant with Baker as the Principal Investigator (PI) was put under the supervision of Professor Liguang Tang at Hampton University. Baker continued to pursue the research while in this join appointment, however the administrative responsibilities with the DOE and with Hampton University rested with Professor Tang after 2001, to my recollection. What is written in this document is from Baker’s memory of the research activities, which he has not pursued since joining the Yale University faculty.

  5. Dielectronic Recombination In Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukic, D. V.; Schnell, M.; Savin, D. W.; Altun, Z.; Badnell, N.; Brandau, C.; Schmidt, E. W.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Sprenger, F.; Lestinsky, M.; Wolf, A.

    2006-01-01

    XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) show rich spectra of X-ray absorption lines. These observations have detected a broad unresolved transition array (UTA) between approx. 15-17 A. This is attributed to inner-shell photoexcitation of M-shell iron ions. Modeling these UTA features is currently limited by uncertainties in the low-temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) data for M-shell iron. In order to resolve this issue, and to provide reliable iron M-shell DR data for plasma modeling, we are carrying out a series of laboratory measurements using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) at the Max-Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Currently, laboratory measurements of low temperature DR can only be performed at storage rings. We use the DR data obtained at TSR, to calculate rate coefficients for plasma modeling and to benchmark theoretical DR calculations. Here we report our recent experimental results for DR of Fe XIV forming Fe XIII.

  6. Warm absorbers in active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, C S; Reynolds, C S; Fabian, A C

    1995-01-01

    Recent {\\it ASCA} observations confirm the presence of X-ray absorption due to partially ionized gas in many Seyfert 1 galaxies; the so-called warm absorber. Constraints on the location of the warm material are presented with the conclusion that this material lies at radii coincident with, or just outside, the broad-line region. The stability of this warm material to isobaric perturbations under the assumptions of thermal and photoionization equilibrium is also studied. It is shown that there is a remarkably small range of ionization parameter, \\xi, for which the warm absorber state is stable. The robustness of this result to changes in the shape of the primary continuum, the assumed density and optical depth is investigated. Given the constraints on the location and the stability properties of the material, several models for the environments of Seyfert nuclei are discussed. These attempt to explain the presence of significant amounts of partially ionized material. In particular, various models of the broad-...

  7. Transitions between compound states of spherical nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wigner's statistical matrices are used to study the average reduced g widths and their dispersion for g transitions from a compound state c to another state f, with a lower excitation energy but of arbitrary complexity, for spherical nuclei. It is found that the Porter--Thomas distribution holds for the g widths for all cases of practical interest. In g transitions between compound states c and c' with E/sub g/< or =2 MeV, the most important transitions are M1 transitions involving the major many-quasiparticle components of state c and E1 transitions involving the minor components of state c. It is shown that the strength functions predicted by the various theories for M1 and E1 transitions between compound states with E/sub g/< or =2 MeV are similar. Preference is assigned to the M1-transition version because of experimental results on (n,ga) reactions with thermal and resonance neutrons

  8. Isospin symmetry breaking in sd shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the thesis, we develop a microscopic approach to describe the isospin-symmetry breaking effects in sd-shell nuclei. The work is performed within the nuclear shell model. A realistic isospin-conserving Hamiltonian is perfected by a charge-dependent part consisting of the Coulomb interaction and Yukawa-type meson exchange potentials to model charge-dependent forces of nuclear origin. The extended database of the experimental isobaric mass multiplet equation coefficients was compiled during the thesis work and has been used in a fit of the Hamiltonian parameters. The constructed Hamiltonian provides an accurate theoretical description of the isospin mixing nuclear states. A specific behaviour of the IMME (Isobaric Multiplet Mass Equation) coefficients have been revealed. We present two important applications: (i) calculations of isospin-forbidden proton emission amplitudes, which is often of interest for nuclear astrophysics, and (ii) calculation on corrections to nuclear Fermi beta decay, which is crucial for the tests of fundamental symmetries of the weak interaction. (author)

  9. Warped circumbinary disks in active galactic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study a warping instability of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating disk surrounding binary supermassive black holes on a circular orbit. Such a circumbinary disk is subject to not only tidal torques due to the binary gravitational potential but also radiative torques due to radiation emitted from an accretion disk around each black hole. We find that a circumbinary disk initially aligned with the binary orbital plane is unstable to radiation-driven warping beyond the marginally stable warping radius, which is sensitive to both the ratio of vertical to horizontal shear viscosities and the mass-to-energy conversion efficiency. As expected, the tidal torques give no contribution to the growth of warping modes but tend to align the circumbinary disk with the orbital plane. Since the tidal torques can suppress the warping modes in the inner part of circumbinary disk, the circumbinary disk starts to be warped at radii larger than the marginally stable warping radius. If the warping radius is of the order of 0.1 pc, a resultant semi-major axis is estimated to be of the order of 10–2 pc to 10–4 pc for 107 M☉ black hole. We also discuss the possibility that the central objects of observed warped maser disks in active galactic nuclei are binary supermassive black holes with a triple disk: two accretion disks around the individual black holes and one circumbinary disk surrounding them.

  10. Pairing and specific heat in hot nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Gambacurta, Danilo; Sandulescu, Nicu

    2013-01-01

    The thermodynamics of pairing phase-transition in nuclei is studied in the canonical ensemble and treating the pairing correlations in a finite-temperature variation after projection BCS approach (FT-VAP). Due to the restoration of particle number conservation, the pairing gap and the specific heat calculated in the FT-VAP approach vary smoothly with the temperature, indicating a gradual transition from the superfluid to the normal phase, as expected in finite systems. We have checked that the predictions of the FT-VAP approach are very accurate when compared to the results obtained by an exact diagonalization of the pairing Hamiltonian. The influence of pairing correlations on specific heat is analysed for the isotopes $^{161,162}$Dy and $^{171,172}$Yb. It is shown that the FT-VAP approach, applied with a level density provided by mean field calculations and supplemented, at high energies, by the level density of the back-shifted Fermi gas model, can approximate reasonably well the main properties of specifi...

  11. Giant dipole resonance in hot rotating nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, D. R.; Dinh Dang, N.; Datar, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    Over the last several decades, extensive experimental and theoretical work has been done on the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in excited nuclei covering a wide range of temperature ( T), angular momentum ( J) and nuclear mass. A reasonable stability of the GDR centroid energy and an increase of the GDR width with T (in the range ˜ 1 - 3 MeV) and J are the two well-established results. Some experiments have indicated the saturation of the GDR width at high T . The gradual disappearance of the GDR vibration at much higher T has been observed. Experiments on the Jacobi transition and the GDR built on superdeformed shapes at high rotational frequencies have been reported in a few cases. Theoretical calculations on the damping of the collective dipole vibration, characterised by the GDR width, have been carried out within various models such as the thermal shape fluctuation model and the phonon damping model. These models offer different interpretations of the variation of the GDR width with T and J and have met with varying degrees of success in explaining the experimental data. In this review, the present experimental and theoretical status in this field will be discussed along with the future outlook. The interesting phenomenon of the pre-equilibrium GDR excitation in nuclear reactions will be briefly addressed.

  12. Giant dipole resonance in hot rotating nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarty, D.R. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Nuclear Physics Division, Mumbai (India); Dinh Dang, N. [RIKEN, Nishina Centre for Accelerator-based Science, Saitama (Japan); VINATOM, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technique, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Datar, V.M. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, INO Cell, Mumbai (India)

    2016-05-15

    Over the last several decades, extensive experimental and theoretical work has been done on the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in excited nuclei covering a wide range of temperature (T), angular momentum (J) and nuclear mass. A reasonable stability of the GDR centroid energy and an increase of the GDR width with T (in the range∝1-3 MeV) and J are the two well-established results. Some experiments have indicated the saturation of the GDR width at high T. The gradual disappearance of the GDR vibration at much higher T has been observed. Experiments on the Jacobi transition and the GDR built on superdeformed shapes at high rotational frequencies have been reported in a few cases. Theoretical calculations on the damping of the collective dipole vibration, characterised by the GDR width, have been carried out within various models such as the thermal shape fluctuation model and the phonon damping model. These models offer different interpretations of the variation of the GDR width with T and J and have met with varying degrees of success in explaining the experimental data. In this review, the present experimental and theoretical status in this field is discussed along with the future outlook. The interesting phenomenon of the pre-equilibrium GDR excitation in nuclear reactions is briefly addressed. (orig.)

  13. A New Thermodynamics from Nuclei to Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter H.E. Gross

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Equilibrium statistics of Hamiltonian systems is correctly described by the microcanonical ensemble. Classically this is the manifold of all points in the N-body phase space with the given total energy. Due to Boltzmann's principle, eS=tr(δ(E-H, its geometrical size is related to the entropy S(E,N,.... This definition does not invoke any information theory, no thermodynamic limit, no extensivity, and no homogeneity assumption, as are needed in conventional (canonical thermo-statistics. Therefore, it describes the equilibrium statistics of extensive as well of non-extensive systems. Due to this fact it is the fundamental definition of any classical equilibrium statistics. It can address nuclei and astrophysical objects as well. All kind of phase transitions can be distinguished sharply and uniquely for even small systems. It is further shown that the second law is a natural consequence of the statistical nature of thermodynamics which describes all systems with the same -- redundant -- set of few control parameters simultaneously. It has nothing to do with the thermodynamic limit. It even works in systems which are by far than any thermodynamic "limit".

  14. Wobbling excitations in strongly deformed Hf nuclei?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two Gammasphere experiments have been performed in order to establish the possible triaxial nature of strongly deformed (SD) bands in 174Hf. A lifetime measurement, using the Doppler-shift attenuation method, confirmed the large deformation of the four previously observed bands in this nucleus with transition quadrupole moments ranging from 12.6 to 13.8 b. These values are significantly larger than those predicted for triaxial minima by ultimate cranker (UC) calculations. A thin-target, high-statistics experiment was also carried out to search for linking transitions between the SD bands. No such transitions, which represent an experimental signature for wobbling modes, were observed. Four additional SD bands were found in 174Hf together with a single SD band in 173Hf. These results indicate that the strongly deformed sequences of N∼102 Hf isotopes behave differently than the triaxial strongly deformed (TSD) bands found in Lu nuclei near N=92. The interpretation of these bands in terms of possible stable triaxial deformation is confronted with the experimental findings and UC predictions

  15. Quasi periodic oscillations in active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, W.; Fabian, A.; Markevičiutė, J.; Parker, M.; Middleton, M.; Kara, E.

    2016-05-01

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) are coherent peaks of variability power observed in the X-ray power spectra (PSDs) of stellar mass X-ray binaries (XRBs). A scale invariance of the accretion process implies they should be present in the active galactic nuclei. The first robust detection was a ∼ 1 h periodicity in the Seyfert galaxy RE J1034+396 from a ∼ 90 ks XMM-Newton observation; however, subsequent observations failed to detect the QPO in the 0.3-10.0 keV band. In this talk we present the recent detection of the ∼ 1 h periodicity in the 1.0-4.0 keV band of 4 further low-flux/spectrally-harder observations of RE J1034+396 (see Alston et al. 2014). We also present recent work on the discovery of a QPO in the Seyfert galaxy, MS 2254.9-3712, which again is only detected in energy bands associated with the primary power-law continuum emission (Alston et al. 2015). We conclude these features are most likely analogous to the high-frequency QPOs observed in XRBs. In both sources, we also see evidence for X-ray reverberation at the QPO frequency, where soft X-ray bands and Iron Kα emission lag the primary X-ray continuum. These time delays may provide another diagnostic for understanding the underlying QPO mechanism observed in accreting black holes.

  16. Efimov effect in 2-neutron halo nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indranil Mazumdar

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of our theoretical investigations in search of Efimov states in light 2-neutron halo nuclei. The calculations have been carried out within a three-body formalism, assuming a compact core and two valence neutrons forming the halo. The calculations provide strong evidence for the occurrence of at least two Efimov states in 20C nucleus. These excited states move into the continuum as the two-body (core-neutron) binding energy is increased and show up as asymmetric resonances in the elastic scattering cross-section of the n- 19C system. The Fano mechanism is invoked to explain the asymmetry. The calculations have been extended to 38Mg, 32Ne and a hypothetical case of a very heavy core ( = 100) with two valence neutrons. In all these cases the Efimov states show up as resonances as the two-body energy is increased. However, in sharp contrast, the Efimov states, for a system of three equal masses, show up as virtual states beyond a certain value of the two-body interaction.

  17. Test of Symmetries with Neutrons and Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Precision experiments at low energies probing weak interaction are a very promising and complementary tool for investigating the structure of the electro-weak sector of the standard model, and for searching for new phenomena revealing signs for an underlaying new symmetry. With the advent of new technologies in particle trapping and production of beams for exotic nuclei as well as ultracold neutrons, we expect one or two orders of magnitude gain in precision. This corresponds to the progress expected by new high luminosity B-factories or the LHC. Domains studied are $\\beta$-decays where decay correlations, partial or total decay rates may reveal the nature of the left-right structure of the interaction and the investigation of discrete symmetries. Here the search for a finite electric dipole moment which, due to its CP-violating nature were sensational by itself, could shed light on the structure of the vacuum at very small distances. Last but not least ideas of a mirror world can be extended to the sector of...

  18. New aspects of the neutron capture in light nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengoni, A. [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Several neutron capture cross sections of light nuclei (A {<=} 40) for neutron energies up to the MeV region have been recently calculated. Examples are (target nuclei): {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, {sup 16}O and {sup 10}Be. The results of these calculations will be shown together with a comparison with the most recent experimental data. In the case of n + {sup 10}Be case, the cross section of the inverse process (Coulomb dissociation of {sup 11}Be) is considered and compared with the measurement. A discussion on the relevant nuclear structure information required for the evaluation of nuclear data of light nuclei is given. (author)

  19. Relativistic Mean Field Study on Halo Structures of Mirror Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yu-Jie; LI Yan-Song; LIU Zu-Hua; ZHOU Hong-Yu

    2009-01-01

    Halo structures of some light mirror nuclei are investigated with the relativistic mean field (RMF) theory.The calculations show that the dispersion of the valence proton is larger than that of the valence neutron in its mirror nucleus,the difference between the root-mean-square (rms) radius of the valence nucleon in each pair of mirror nuclei becomes smailer with the increase of the mass number A,and all the ratios of the rms radius of the valence nucleon to that of the matter in each pair o~ mirror nuclei decrease almost linearly with the increase of the mass number A.

  20. Cluster radioactivity of Z=125 super heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For atomic numbers larger than 121 cluster decay and spontaneous fission may compete with α decay. Hence there is a need to make reliable calculations for the cluster decay half-lives of superheavy nuclei to predict the possible isotopes super heavy nuclei. So, in the present work, we have studied the decay of clusters such as 8Be, 10Be, 12C, 14C, 16C, 18O, 20O, 22Ne, 24Ne, 25Ne, 26Ne, 28Mg, 30Mg, 32Si, 34Si, 36Si, 40S, 48Ca, 50Ca and 52Ti from the super heavy nuclei Z=125

  1. Precision mass measurements of radioactive nuclei at JYFLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Rahaman, S; Eronen, T; Hager, U; Hakala, J; Jokinen, A; Kankainen, A; Moore, I D; Pentillä, H; Rinta-Antila, S; Rissanen, J; Saastamoinen, A; Sonoda, T; Weber, C; Äystö, J

    2007-01-01

    The Penning trap mass spectrometer JYFLTRAP was used to measure the atomic masses of radioactive nuclei with an uncertainty better than 10 keV. The atomic masses of the neutron-deficient nuclei around the N = Z line were measured to improve the understanding of the rp-process path and the SbSnTe cycle. Furthermore, the masses of the neutron-rich gallium (Z = 31) to palladium (Z = 46) nuclei have been measured. The physics impacts on the nuclear structure and the r-process paths are reviewed. A better understanding of the nuclear deformation is presented by studying the pairing energy around A = 100.

  2. Jacobi shape transition and hyperdeformation in rapidly rotating warm nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Jacobi shape transition from noncollective oblate to hyperdeformed collective prolate or triaxial shape in nuclei is analogous to the Jacobi shape instability occurring in gravitating rotating stars. This happens at a very high spin where pairing has vanished. Thermal fluctuations do not come into play because of near zero temperature in warm nuclei. Further, Jacobian instability occurs before fission instability in light and medium mass nuclei. In the present work, the theoretical approach of Nilsson-Strutinsky extended method for high spin have been followed

  3. Relativistic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock theory for finite nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Shihang; Liang, Haozhao; Meng, Jie; Ring, Peter; Zhang, Shuangquan

    2016-01-01

    Starting with a bare nucleon-nucleon interaction, for the first time the full relativistic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock equations are solved for finite nuclei in a Dirac-Woods-Saxon basis. No free parameters are introduced to calculate the ground-state properties of finite nuclei. The nucleus $^{16}$O is investigated as an example. The resulting ground-state properties, such as binding energy and charge radius, are considerably improved as compared with the non-relativistic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock results and much closer to the experimental data. This opens the door for \\emph{ab initio} covariant investigations of heavy nuclei.

  4. Direct Reactions with Exotic Nuclei, Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Baur, G

    2006-01-01

    Intermediate energy Coulomb excitation and dissociation is a useful tool for nuclear structure and astrophysics studies. Low-lying strength in nuclei far from stability was discovered by this method. The effective range theory for low-lying strength in one-neutron halo nuclei is summarized and extended to two-neutron halo nuclei. This is of special interest in view of recent rather accurate experimental results on the low-lying electric dipole strength in $^{11}$Li. Another indirect approach to nuclear astrophysics is the Trojan horse method. It is pointed out that it is a suitable tool to investigate subthreshold resonances.

  5. Studies of heavy-ion reactions and transuranic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systematics of heavy-ion-induced fission are reviewed. Rotation-induced nuclear deformation is shown to have little effect on most probable energies of evaporation α-particles. Comparative studies of neutron emission from Gd compound nuclei are continued, aiming to assess the influence of superdeformations on nuclear decay patterns. Measurements of mass and energy flow in damped reactions were analyzed in terms of a one-body transport model, predicting negligible correlations between bass asymmetry and excitation energy division. Monte Carlo simulations attribute reported correlations to experimental asymmetries. A measurement of neutrons emitted from correlated damped fragments from the 165Ho+56Fe reaction, employing a dual neutron multiplicity meter demonstrates non-equilibrium energy sharing in damped reactions. A simulation code for neutron emission in damped reactions was developed and an existing efficiency code was significantly modified for experiments with modular detectors and intermediate bombarding energies. Techniques of neutron multiplicity measurements at these energies are discussed. The multiplicity of non-equilibrium neutrons in damped 139La+40Ar reactions at 10 and 15 MeV/u was discovered to scale with the radial kinetic energy. A CAMAC event-handler module for neutron multiplicity meters was developed and used in experiments. A preliminary search for neutron production in a palladium/heavy-water electrolytic cell turned out negative

  6. Detection of chromosome aneuploidy in breast lesions with fluorescence in situ hybridization: Comparison of whole nuclei to thin tissue sections and correlation with flow cytometric DNA analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visscher, D.W.; Wallis, T.; Ritchie, C.A. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    We compared flow-cytometric DNA histogram pattern to counts of 4 fluorescent-labelled centromeric probes (chromosomes 1, 7, 8, and 17) in whole nuclei (WN) and in nuclei from formalin-fixed deparaffinized thin tissue section (TS) in 25 breast lesions. In benign lesions, signal gains (i.e., trisomic nuclei) were never observed in greater than 10% of nuclei from either WN or TS preparations. Loss of signal in benign breast lesions, however, varied considerably (0-43%) between individual case and between chromosome probes. The mean incidence of signal loss in WN of benign lesions ranged from 8.9% (chromosome 7) to 14.4 % (chromosome 1) of nuclei. These signal loss frequencies exceeded those of benign lymphoid control cells. In three benign lesions, signal loss in WN (with one probe) was observed in at least 25% of nuclei. Signal losses in benign TS, on average, were 50-150% greater than in matched WN preparations (chromosome 1: 21.7%, chromosome 7: 21.5%). Malignant lesions generally, but not always, displayed fewer monosomic nuclei and more trisomic nuclei in compared to TS, compatible with a slicing (i.e., nuclear truncation) artifact. Signal counts in carcinomas correlated well with flow cytometric DNA index; however, they were also characterized by evidence of genetic instability, manifest as signal gains in a subset of nuclei (10-25%) with individual probes in diploid range cases, as well as intratumoral heterogeneity, reflected as discrepancies in probe counts between WN and TS samples. We conclude that signal losses with centromeric probes are largely, but not entirely, explained by nuclear slicing. The minimum signal loss threshold for establishment of monosomy using interphase cytogenetics is thus unclear, even in WN. Signal gains indicative of trisomy, in contrast, are reliably associated with malignancy and may reflect gross DNA aneuploidy as well as genetic instability. 10 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. Association of DNA with nuclear matrix in in vitro assembled nuclei induced by rDNA from Tetrahymena shanghaiensis in Xenopus egg extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENYING; BOZHANG; 等

    1997-01-01

    The nuclei assembled from exogenous DNA or chromatin in egg extracts resemble their in vivo counterparts in many aspects.However,the distribution pattern of DNA in these nuclei remains unknown.We introduced rDNA from the macronuclei of Tetrahymena into Xenopus cellfree extracts to examine the association of specific DNA sequences with nuclear matrix(NM) in the nuclei assembled in vitro.Our previous works showed the 5'NTS(nontranscription sequences) of the rDNA specifically bind to the NM system in the macronuclei.We show now the rDNA could induce chromatin assembly and nuclear formation in Xenopus cell-free system.When we extracted the NM system and compared the binding affinity of different regions of rDNA with the NM system,we found that the 5'NTS still hold their binding affinity with insoluble structure of the assembled nuclei in the estracts of Xenopus eggs.

  8. The quest for novel modes of excitation in exotic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Paar, N

    2010-01-01

    This article provides an insight into several open problems in the quest for novel modes of excitation in nuclei with isospin asymmetry, deformation and finite temperature characteristic in stellar environment. Major unsolved problems include the nature of pygmy dipole resonances, the quest for various multipole and spin-isospin excitations both in neutron-rich and proton drip-line nuclei mainly driven by loosely bound nucleons, excitations in unstable deformed nuclei and evolution of their properties with the shape phase transition. Exotic modes of excitation in nuclei at finite temperatures characteristic for supernova evolution present open problems with possible impact in modeling astrophysically relevant weak interaction rates. All these issues challenge self-consistent many body theory frameworks at the frontiers of on-going research, including nuclear energy density functionals, both phenomenological and constrained by the strong interaction physics of QCD, models based on low-momentum two-nucleon inte...

  9. Deformed $sd$-shell nuclei from first principles

    CERN Document Server

    Jansen, G R; Hagen, G; Navrátil, P

    2015-01-01

    We extend the ab initio coupled-cluster effective interaction (CCEI) method to deformed open-shell nuclei with protons and neutrons in the valence space, and compute binding energies and excited states of isotopes of neon and magnesium. We employ a nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon interaction from chiral effective field theory evolved to a lower cutoff via a similarity renormalization group transformation. We find good agreement with experiment for binding energies and spectra, while charge radii of neon isotopes are underestimated. For the deformed nuclei $^{20}$Ne and $^{24}$Mg we reproduce rotational bands and electric quadrupole transitions within uncertainties estimated from an effective field theory for deformed nuclei, thereby demonstrating that collective phenomena in $sd$-shell nuclei emerge from complex ab initio calculations.

  10. Elastic and inelastic scattering of polarized deuterons by complex nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of recent developments in the field of polarized deuteron elastic and inelstic scattering by complex nuclei, A>or=12, is presented. Significant results deduced from the theoretical analyses of the data are pointed out

  11. Special conference Women in nuclei, WIN SNUS 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On October 6, 2005, the 16. Annual general meeting of the Slovak Nuclear Society (SNUS) was carried out. During the general meeting of the SNUS the Special conference Women in nuclei was executed. Thirteen scientific lectures were presented

  12. Structure of proton-rich nuclei of astrophysical interest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeckl, E. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    Recent experimental data concerning proton-rich nuclei between A=20 and A=100 are presented and discussed with respect to their relevance to the astrophysical rp process and to the calibration of solar neutrino detectors. (orig.)

  13. Scissors mode of Gd nuclei studied from resonance neutron capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, J.; Baramsai, B.; Becker, J. A.; Bečvár, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Haight, R. C.; Heil, M.; Jandel, M.; Käppeler, F.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Parker, W.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Valenta, S.; Vieira, D. J.; Walker, C. L.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Wu, C. Y.

    2012-10-01

    Spectra of γ rays following the neutron capture at isolated resonances of stable Gd nuclei weremeasured. The objectives were to get new information on photon strength of 153,155-159Gd with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors-mode vibration. An analysis of the data obtained clearly indicates that the scissors mode is coupled not only to the ground state, but also to all excited levels of the nuclei studied. The specificity of our approach ensures unbiasedness in estimating the sumed scissors-mode strength ΣB(M1)↑, even for odd product nuclei, for which conventional nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements yield only limited information. Our analysis indicates that for these nuclei the sum ΣB(M1)↑ increases with A and for 157,159Gd it is significantly higher compared to 156,158Gd.

  14. Studies of pear-shaped nuclei using accelerated radioactive beams

    CERN Document Server

    Gaffney, L P; Scheck, M; Hayes, A B; Wenander, F; Albers, M; Bastin, B; Bauer, C; Blazhev, A; Bonig, S; Bree, N; Cederkall, J; Chupp, T; Cline, D; Cocolios, T E; Davinson, T; DeWitte, H; Diriken, J; Grahn, T; Herzan, A; Huyse, M; Jenkins, D G; Joss, D T; Kesteloot, N; Konki, J; Kowalczyk, M; Kroll, Th; Kwan, E; Lutter, R; Moschner, K; Napiorkowski, P; Pakarinen, J; Pfeiffer, M; Radeck, D; Reiter, P; Reynders, K; Rigby, S V; Robledo, L M; Rudigier, M; Sambi, S; Seidlitz, M; Siebeck, B; Stora, T; Thoele, P; Van Duppen, P; Vermeulen, M J; von Schmid, M; Voulot, D; Warr, N; Wimmer, K; Wrzosek-Lipska, K; Wu, C Y; Zielinska, M

    2013-01-01

    There is strong circumstantial evidence that certain heavy, unstable atomic nuclei are ‘octupole deformed’, that is, distorted into a pear shape. This contrasts with the more prevalent rugby-ball shape of nuclei with reflection-symmetric, quadrupole deformations. The elusive octupole deformed nuclei are of importance for nuclear structure theory, and also in searches for physics beyond the standard model; any measurable electric-dipole moment (a signature of the latter) is expected to be amplified in such nuclei. Here we determine electric octupole transition strengths (a direct measure of octupole correlations) for short-lived isotopes of radon and radium. Coulomb excitation experiments were performed using accelerated beams of heavy, radioactive ions. Our data on and $^{224}$Ra show clear evidence for stronger octupole deformation in the latter. The results enable discrimination between differing theoretical approaches to octupole correlations, and help to constrain suitable candidates for experimental...

  15. The effective stiffness of nuclei near magic numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper trys to explain the rapid increase in the apparent size of the rubidium isotope nuclei around the magic number N = 50. Droplet and deformation models are used to evaluate the measured data. 6 refs., 4 figs

  16. Magnetic moments of odd-odd spherical nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Achakovskiy, O I; Saperstein, E E; Tolokonnikov, S V

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic moments of more than one hundred odd-odd spherical nuclei in ground and excited states are calculated within the self-consistent TFFS based on the EDF method by Fayans {\\it et al}. We limit ourselves to nuclei with a neutron and a proton particle (hole) added to the magic or semimagic core. A simple model of no interaction between the odd nucleons is used. In most the cases we analyzed, a good agreement with the experimental data is obtained. Several cases are considered where this simple model does not work and it is necessary to go beyond. The unknown values of magnetic moments of many unstable odd and odd-odd nuclei are predicted including sixty values for excited odd-odd nuclei.

  17. Photoproduction of Pseudoscalar Mesons off Nuclei at Forward Angles

    CERN Document Server

    Gevorkyan, S; Gan, L; Larin, I; Khandaker, M

    2009-01-01

    With the advent of new photon tagging facilities and novel experimental technologies it has become possible to perform photoproduction cross section measurements of pseudoscalar mesons on nuclei with a percent level accuracy. The extraction of the radiative decay widths from these measurements at forward angles is done by the Primakoff method, which requires theoretical treatment of all processes participating in these reactions at the same percent level. In this work we review the theoretical approach to meson photoproduction amplitudes in the electromagnetic and strong fields of nuclei at forward direction. The most updated description of these processes are presented based on the Glauber theory of multiple scattering. In particular, the effects of final state interactions, corrections for light nuclei, and photon shadowing in nuclei are discussed.

  18. Shell structure in superdeformed nuclei at high rotational frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Properties of the shell structure in superdeformed nuclei at high rotational frequencies are discussed. Moreover, stability of the high spin compound nucleus with respect to the fission and the emission of light particles is investigated. (author)

  19. Description of deformed nuclei in the sdg boson model

    OpenAIRE

    S. C. Li; Kuyucak, S.

    1996-01-01

    We present a study of deformed nuclei in the framework of the sdg interacting boson model utilizing both numerical diagonalization and analytical $1/N$ expansion techniques. The focus is on description of high-spin states which have recently become computationally accessible through the use of computer algebra in the $1/N$ expansion formalism. A systematic study is made of high-spin states in rare-earth and actinide nuclei.

  20. Separation and spectroscopic study of exotic nuclei at GANIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new isotopic separation method is presented. It allows the studies of radioactive atomic nuclei produced in high energy heavy ions collisions. Two experiments were performed at the GANIL facilities (Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds, Caen). They are analysed on the fields of the experimental resolution and of the spectroscopic results. Measurements of beta decay half lives and gamma spectra are brought for sixteen neutron rich nuclei at the frontier of the experimental knowledge

  1. A study of strange-, charmed, and beauty nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analyses is made of the bound states of nuclei in the strange-, charm-, and beauty sector using a spin-dependent Gaussian two-body interaction in the microscopic formalism. Coulomb corrections are also included for the charmed nuclei. Our simple model is in reasonable agreement with other existing theoretical and experimental results and it predicts many new bound states. (author). 21 refs, 2 figs, 10 tabs

  2. The structure of rotational bands in alpha-cluster nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijker Roelof

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, I discuss an algebraic treatment of alpha-cluster nuclei based on the introduction of a spectrum generating algebra for the relative motion of the alpha-clusters. Particular attention is paid to the discrete symmetry of the geometric arrangement of the α-particles, and the consequences for the structure of the rotational bands in the 12C and 16O nuclei.

  3. Description of deformed nuclei in the sdg boson model

    CERN Document Server

    Li, S C

    1996-01-01

    We present a study of deformed nuclei in the framework of the sdg interacting boson model utilizing both numerical diagonalization and analytical 1/N expansion techniques. The focus is on description of high-spin states which have recently become computationally accessible through the use of computer algebra in the 1/N expansion formalism. A systematic study is made of high-spin states in rare-earth and actinide nuclei.

  4. Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Zhao-Qing; Jin, Gen-Ming; Li, Jun-Qing; Scheid, Werner

    2007-01-01

    Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respective...

  5. Quantum Phase Transitions in Odd-Mass Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Leviatan, A; Iachello, F

    2011-01-01

    Quantum shape-phase transitions in odd-even nuclei are investigated in the framework of the interacting boson-fermion model. Classical and quantum analysis show that the presence of the odd fermion strongly influences the location and nature of the phase transition, especially near the critical point. Experimental evidence for the occurrence of spherical to axially-deformed transitions in odd-proton nuclei Pm, Eu and Tb (Z=61, 63, 65) is presented.

  6. Laser spectroscopy of atomic beams of short-lived nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A possibility of performing laser-nuclear-spectroscopic experiments at qualitatively new level aimed to solve the second-glass current problem and to search T-non invariant effects in the beta-decay of atomic nuclei is discussed. The question of the increase in efficiency of the experiments, aimed to study the main characteristics of nuclei, far from the beta-stability, by means of the laser spectroscopy methods is considered. 147 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  7. Quadrupole moments of odd-odd near-magic nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Achakovskiy O.; Voitenkov D.; Kamerdzhiev S.; Tolokonnikov S.

    2012-01-01

    Ground state quadrupole moments of odd-odd near double magic nuclei are calculated in the approximation of no interaction between odd particles. Under such a simple approximation, the problem is reduced to the calculations of quadrupole moments of corresponding odd-even nuclei. These calculations are performed within the self-consistent Theory of Finite Fermi Systems based on the Energy Density Functional by Fayans et al. with the known DF3-a parameters. A reasonable agreement with the availa...

  8. Shells Evolution and Core Excitations in Semi-Magic Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Nowacki, F.

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in Large Shell Model calculations allow now to treat extended valence spaces and more complete descriptions of (semi-)magic nuclei can be achieved with inclusion of core excitations. The interplay between shell evolution and core excitations in semi-magic nuclei will be illustrated for tin isotopic chains in the framework of Large Shell Model calculations. pn and nn monopole relative influence will be traced back on Effective Single Particle Energies and B(E2)'s.

  9. A self-consistent study of triaxial black hole nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Ming Yan

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional shapes of elliptical galaxies has not advanced much since the time of Edwin Hubble. Elliptical galaxies are still classified according to their luminosity distributions and the isophotal contour shapes of their two-dimensional images projected on the sky. Their intrinsic shapes could be oblate, prolate, or fully triaxial, since all such shapes produce perfectly elliptical contours on projection. One way to constrain the possible 3D shapes of elliptical galaxies is to attempt to construct self-consistent dynamical models with various shapes. In this study, models were constructed of the central regions (“nuclei”) of elliptical galaxies. Observed nuclei have a power-law dependence of stellar density on radius, and universally contain a single supermassive black hole at their center, with mass ˜106 109 M⊙ . At low energies in such nuclei, the motion was found to be essentially regular, i.e. non-chaotic; the gravitational potential can be considered as a perturbation to the integrable Keplerian potential. At higher energies, where the enclosed stellar mass is a few times the black hole mass, the black hole renders those orbits that come close to the black hole stochastic. This transition to global stochasticity is rapid and occurs at lower energies in more elongated nuclei. The self-consistency of triaxial models of black hole nuclei was demonstrated by using Schwarzschild's method to construct self-consistent orbital superpositions representing nuclei with different shapes. N-body integrations of Monte-Carlo realizations of the Schwarzschild solutions showed that some of these nuclei are stable; nearly prolate nuclei were found to be unstable, and they evolve rapidly to axisymmetric shapes. The possibility that nuclei may be triaxial in shape complicates the interpretation of stellar kinematical data from the centers of galaxies and may alter the inferred interaction rates between stars and supermassive black holes.

  10. Phonon effects on the double mass differences in magic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saperstein, E. E.; Baldo, M.; Gnezdilov, N. V.; Tolokonnikov, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    Odd-even double mass differences (DMDs) of magic nuclei are found within an approach starting from the free N N interaction, accounting for particle-phonon coupling (PC) effects. We consider three PC effects: the phonon-induced effective interaction, the renormalization of the "ends" due to the pole PC contribution to the nucleon mass operator, and the change of the single-particle energies. The perturbation theory in gL2, where gL is the vertex of the creation of the L -multipole phonon, is used for PC calculations. PC corrections to single-particle energies are found with an approximate accounting for the tadpole diagram. Results for magic Ca,4840, Ni,7856, Sn,132100, and 208Pb nuclei are presented. For the lighter part of this set of nuclei, from 40Ca to 56Ni, the cases divide approximately in half, between those where the PC corrections to DMD values are in good agreement with the data and the ones with the opposite result. In the major part of the cases of worsening description of DMD, a poor applicability of the perturbation theory for the induced interaction is the most probable reason of the phenomenon. For intermediate nuclei, 78Ni and 100Sn, there are no sufficiently accurate data on masses of nuclei necessary for finding DMD values. Finally, for heavier nuclei, 132Sn and 208Pb, PC corrections always result in better agreement with experiment.

  11. Quantitative analysis of vascular network of oculogyric nerve nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sladojević Igor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nuclei of oculogyric nerves (principal oculomotor nucleus, trochlear nucleus and abducens nucleus are densely vascularized brain­stem structures. The aim of this study was to determine quantitative characteristics of the vascular network of these nuclei. Material and methods. The study was done on 30 adult brainstems, both male and female, without diagnosed neurological disturbances. Three-millimetrethick stratums were taken in transversal plane and cut in 0.3 micrometer semi-serial sections stained with Mallory method. The images of studied nuclei were taken with „Leica” DM 1000 microscope and „Leica” EC3 digital camera under 400x magnification, and analyzed by ImageJ software with A 100 grid. The statistical analysis was performed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software with 5% level of significance. Results. A statistically significant difference was found in the volume and surface density between principal oculomotor nucleus and trochlear nucleus, and between trochlear nucleus and abducens nucleus. No difference was found in the length density. Discussion. The results of this research match the results of studies on characteristics of vascular network of oculogyric nerve nuclei, while the comparison of vascular networks of these nuclei, substantia nigra, vestibulocochlear nuclei and precentral gyrus illustrates differences in quantitative characteristics of blood vessels in these structures. Conclusion. Blood vessels of principal oculomotor nucleus and abducens nucleus have similar dimensions and approximately the same arborization pattern, while vessels of trochlear nucleus have significantly smaller dimensions and density.

  12. Relative nuclei abundance inside the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Oscar

    2012-07-01

    The Sileye3/Alteino experiment was first operational on-board the International Space Station, ISS, 27 April 2002. From 2006 through 2009 it was activated for long duration measurements of relative particle abundance as part of the ESA ALTCRISS project. Measuring the relative abundance of different nuclei species inside the ISS gives important clues as to how the known cosmic ray spectrum outside the space station changes when traversing the hull, i.e. giving indications as to how the hadronic interactions in the hull gives rise to changes in the expected radiation environment for the astronauts, which is of great interest for risk assessments for future long duration deep space missions. In our work the relative abundance for nuclei species with energies above ≃ 60 MeV/n and 5 ≤ Z ≤ 26 are presented for different places and detector orientations inside the ISS, also with and without shielding of the detector. What can be seen when comparing with the relative abundance of nuclei in the cosmic rays, is a significant difference in abundance for odd Z nuclei, whereas even numbered are in better agreement. Odd Z nuclei are much more abundant inside the ISS. This is an update from our previous report with increased statistics and with relative abundance on more nuclei.

  13. Acetylcholinesterase in central vocal control nuclei of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Monika Sadananda

    2004-06-01

    The distribution of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the central vocal control nuclei of the zebra finch was studied using enzyme histochemistry. AChE fibres and cells are intensely labelled in the forebrain nucleus area X, strongly labelled in high vocal centre (HVC) perikarya, and moderately to lightly labelled in the somata and neuropil of vocal control nuclei robust nucleus of arcopallium (RA), medial magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium (MMAN) and lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium (LMAN). The identified sites of cholinergic and/or cholinoceptive neurons are similar to the cholinergic presence in vocal control regions of other songbirds such as the song sparrow, starling and another genus of the zebra finch (Poephila guttata), and to a certain extent in parallel vocal control regions in vocalizing birds such as the budgerigar. AChE presence in the vocal control system suggests innervation by either afferent projecting cholinergic systems and/or local circuit cholinergic neurons. Co-occurrence with choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) indicates efferent cholinergic projections. The cholinergic presence in parts of the zebra finch vocal control system, such as the area X, that is also intricately wired with parts of the basal ganglia, the descending fibre tracts and brain stem nuclei could underlie this circuitry’s involvement in sensory processing and motor control of song.

  14. Single nucleus genome sequencing reveals high similarity among nuclei of an endomycorrhizal fungus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclei of arbuscular endomycorrhizal fungi have been described as highly diverse due to their asexual nature and absence of a single cell stage with only one nucleus. This has raised fundamental questions concerning speciation, selection and transmission of the genetic make-up to next generations. Although this concept has become textbook knowledge, it is only based on studying a few loci, including 45S rDNA. To provide a more comprehensive insight into the genetic makeup of arbuscular endomycorrhizal fungi, we applied de novo genome sequencing of individual nuclei of Rhizophagus irregularis. This revealed a surprisingly low level of polymorphism between nuclei. In contrast, within a nucleus, the 45S rDNA repeat unit turned out to be highly diverged. This finding demystifies a long-lasting hypothesis on the complex genetic makeup of arbuscular endomycorrhizal fungi. Subsequent genome assembly resulted in the first draft reference genome sequence of an arbuscular endomycorrhizal fungus. Its length is 141 Mbps, representing over 27,000 protein-coding gene models. We used the genomic sequence to reinvestigate the phylogenetic relationships of Rhizophagus irregularis with other fungal phyla. This unambiguously demonstrated that Glomeromycota are more closely related to Mucoromycotina than to its postulated sister Dikarya.

  15. Morphogenesis and morphology of the brain stem nuclei of Cetacea. II. The nuclei of the accessory, vagal and glossopharyngeal nerves in baleen whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, J; Osen, K K

    1984-01-01

    The development and final structure of the IXth, Xth and XIth cranial nerve nuclei are studied in ironhematoxylin -, thionin - and protargol -stained serial sections of about 50 baleen whale fetuses (blue whale, Balaenoptera musculus, and fin whale, Balaenoptera physalus ) and one adult fin whale. The nucleus ambiguus is composed of three subdivisions, oral, intermediate and caudal, the last mentioned being contiguous caudally with the dorsal motor Xth nucleus. The oral division develops as three parallel cell columns which merge into a well circumscribed solitary structure with a rostrally expanded "head". It is composed of medium-sized multipolar neurons in a myelin-poor neuropil. In the fin whale a minor group of larger cells is found medial to the "head". In both species a peculiar small-celled nucleus rich in capillaries is found ventral to the "head". The intermediate division initially contains a lateral cell column and a medial region of scattered cells. The lateral column persists throughout life, while the medial field develops into three columns only one of which remains distinct in mature individuals. The cells are larger than in the oral division with the largest cells in the medial column. The two columns are surrounded by a field of scattered neurons which continues without a sharp border into the caudal division which is composed of scattered cells throughout. In its rostral half the cells are of the same multipolar type as in the intermediate division while caudally they appear flattened in the horizontal plane. The dorsal motor Xth nucleus develops as three longitudinal columns. In the fetal brain these are cytologically distinct due to different proportions of small, medium-sized and larger multipolar neurons. The spindle-shaped ventromedial column extends the entire length of the nucleus. It is composed mostly of small to medium-sized cells which caudal to the obex are elongated parallel with the neuroaxis . The dorsolateral and ventrolateral

  16. Dual-Utility of Digital Holography & Epi-Fluorescence to Localize Cellular Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldrake, Eric

    Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) and Epi-Fluorescence have been combined for biological imaging. DHM is a non-invasive phase contrast microscopy technique that provides quantitative information such as the variations in refractive index and physical height. 3D physical height and refractive index profiles are imaged for HEK293 and CHO cells. These values and profiles are compared with known values for the sample gathered from literature and other microscopy techniques, including Scanning Electron Microscopy. The measured CHO cellular length is (15.31 +/- 2.60) microm. Localization of cellular nuclei is performed using the Epi-Fluorescence setup and the DNA specific fluorophore DAPI. The fluorescence intensity profile was imaged, where nuclei shape, size, and localization are compared using an A.1 Zeiss Fluorescence Microscope. The CHO cells are comparable with apoptotic cells, where the measured nucleus length is (10.91 +/- 2.27) microm. DHM and Epi-Fluorescence are combined to analyze the physical heights of the cell as well as localize its nucleus. The combination of these techniques are greatly advantageous to understand cellular functions and variability.

  17. Photoproduction of vector messons off nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossov, M.

    1994-04-01

    Vector mesons play an important role in photonuclear reactions because they carry the same quantum numbers as the incident photon. It has recently been suggested by G.E. Brown and M. Rho that the mass of vector mesons could decrease with increasing baryon density. This phenomenon would provide a physical observable for chiral symmetry ({xi}{sup S}) restoration at high baryon density, an essential non-perturbative phenomenon associated with the structure of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). According to the constituent quark model the difference between the mass of the valence quark m{sub v} and the mass of the current quark m{sub c} is expected to be proportional to the mean vacuum value of the quark condensate: m{sub v}-m{sub c} {proportional_to} ({psi}{psi}){sub v}. The mass difference appears because of chiral symmetry breaking {xi}{sup SB}. QCD sum rule calculations show that the value of this difference is about 300 MeV for all quarks. If the mean vacuum value differs from that for the hadron density in nuclei, then the constituent quark mass should be renormalized as follows: m{sub v}{sup l}=m{sub c} + ({psi}{psi})n/({psi}{psi})v {center_dot}300MeV, where the indices n correspond to nuclear matter and v to vacuum. The same conclusion was reached in a nuclear matter model based on quark degrees of freedom. Using the symmetry properties of QCD in an effective Lagrangian theory, Brown and Rho have found a scaling law for the vector meson masses at finite baryon density: M{sub N}{sup n}/M{sub N}{sup v}=M{sub V}{sup n}/M{sub V}{sup v}=f{sub {pi}}{sup n}/f{sub {pi}}{sup v}, where f{sub {pi}} is the {pi} {r_arrow}{mu}{nu} decay constant playing the role of an order parameter for the chiral symmetry restoration. At nuclear density the value of f{sub {pi}} was found to be 15-20% smaller than in vacuum. In contrast to the constituent quark model, it was found that M{sup n}/M=({sub n}/{sub v}){sup 1/3}.

  18. DNA and Flavonoids Leach out from Active Nuclei of Taxus and Tsuga after Extreme Climate Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Feucht

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Severe over-stresses of climate caused dramatic changes in the intracellular distribution of the flavonoids. This was studied in needles from the current year’s growth of the following species and varieties: Tsuga canadensis, Taxus baccata, T. aurea, T. repens, T. nana, and T. compacta. The mode of steady changes in flavonoids was evaluated by microscopic techniques. Most of the flavonoids stain visibly yellow by themselves. The colorless flavanol subgroup can be stained blue by the DMACA reagent. In mid-summer 2013, outstanding high temperatures and intense photo-oxidative irradiation caused in a free-standing tree of Taxus baccata dramatic heat damage in a limited number of cells of the palisade layers. In these cells, the cytoplasm was burned brown. However, the nucleus maintained its healthy “blue” colored appearance which apparently was a result of antioxidant barrier effects by these flavanols. In late May 2014, excessive rainfall greatly affected all study trees. Collectively, in all study trees, a limited number of the mesophyll nuclei from the needless grown in 2013 and 2014 became overly turgid, enlarged in size and the flavanols leached outward through the damaged nuclear membranes. This diffusive stress event was followed one to three days later by a similar efflux of DNA. Such a complete dissolution of the nuclei in young tissues was the most spectacular phenomenon of the present study. As a common feature, leaching of both flavanols and DNA was markedly enhanced with increasing size and age of the cells. There is evidence that signalling flavonoids are sensitized to provide in nuclei and cytoplasm multiple mutual protective mechanisms. However, this well-orchestrated flavonoid system is broken down by extreme climate events.

  19. DNA and Flavonoids Leach out from Active Nuclei of Taxus and Tsuga after Extreme Climate Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feucht, Walter; Schmid, Markus; Treutter, Dieter

    2015-09-21

    Severe over-stresses of climate caused dramatic changes in the intracellular distribution of the flavonoids. This was studied in needles from the current year's growth of the following species and varieties: Tsuga canadensis, Taxus baccata, T. aurea, T. repens, T. nana, and T. compacta. The mode of steady changes in flavonoids was evaluated by microscopic techniques. Most of the flavonoids stain visibly yellow by themselves. The colorless flavanol subgroup can be stained blue by the DMACA reagent. In mid-summer 2013, outstanding high temperatures and intense photo-oxidative irradiation caused in a free-standing tree of Taxus baccata dramatic heat damage in a limited number of cells of the palisade layers. In these cells, the cytoplasm was burned brown. However, the nucleus maintained its healthy "blue" colored appearance which apparently was a result of antioxidant barrier effects by these flavanols. In late May 2014, excessive rainfall greatly affected all study trees. Collectively, in all study trees, a limited number of the mesophyll nuclei from the needless grown in 2013 and 2014 became overly turgid, enlarged in size and the flavanols leached outward through the damaged nuclear membranes. This diffusive stress event was followed one to three days later by a similar efflux of DNA. Such a complete dissolution of the nuclei in young tissues was the most spectacular phenomenon of the present study. As a common feature, leaching of both flavanols and DNA was markedly enhanced with increasing size and age of the cells. There is evidence that signalling flavonoids are sensitized to provide in nuclei and cytoplasm multiple mutual protective mechanisms. However, this well-orchestrated flavonoid system is broken down by extreme climate events.

  20. Nucleosomal organization of chromatin in sperm nuclei of the bivalve mollusc Aulacomya ater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, C; Ruiz, S

    1991-03-13

    The sperm nuclei of Aulacomya ater, family Mitylidae, contain three proteins (X, Aa5 and Aa6) which are specific to this cell type coexisting with a set of five somatic-type histones. Information about the chromatin structure resulting from this kind of association is scarce. Therefore, we have probed the structure of this sperm chromatin through digestion with micrococcal nuclease in combination with salt fractionation. The data obtained have allowed us to propose a nucleosomal arrangement for this chromatin. However, two types of nucleosomes would be present in agreement with their protein components. PMID:1861676

  1. Distribution of Vesicular Glutamate Transporter 2 and Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors in the Auditory Ganglion and Cochlear Nuclei of Pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, M R; Atoji, Y

    2016-02-01

    Glutamate is a principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the auditory system. Our previous studies revealed localization of glutamate receptor mRNAs in the pigeon cochlear nuclei, suggesting the existence of glutamatergic input from the auditory nerve to the brainstem. This study demonstrated localization of mRNAs for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2) and ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA, kainate and NMDA) in the auditory ganglion (AG) and cochlear nuclei (magnocellular, angular and laminar nuclei). VGluT2 mRNA was intensely expressed in AG and intensely or moderately in the cochlear nuclei. The AG and cochlear nuclei showed intense-to-moderate mRNA signals for GluA2, GluA3, GluA4, GluK4 and GluN1. These results suggest that the pigeon AG neurons receives glutamatergic input from hair cells and in turn projects to the magnocellular and angular nuclei. Glutamate may play a pivotal role in the excitatory synapse transmission in the peripheral auditory pathway of birds.

  2. Determination of suspendable ice nuclei from various pollen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felgitsch, Laura; Pummer, Bernhard; Grothe, Hinrich

    2014-05-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important process in cloud glaciation. On the one hand, ice clouds increase the albedo (Mishchenko et al. 1996), leading to a cooling effect, and on the other hand tend to a faster precipitation (Lohmann 2002) and therefore reduce the total cloud albedo, which has a direct influence on the climate and weather. However, many processes involved are still not entirely understood and only poorly described which makes it difficult to forecast these effects for climate modelling. Therefore detailed laboratory studies are inherently necessary. Only recently, Pummer et al. (2012) have shown that pollen emitted from trees originating from the Northern timberline carry active ice nuclei, which are suspendable macromolecules. So far little is known about the structures and functionalities of these molecules. Here we present several analytical strategies we use to separate the responsible species (via solid phase extraction with different columns like C18 and PH) and solve the structure including different forms of mass spectrometry (MS) like the intact cell MS and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MS, which give access to the molecules in question. For identification, the surface molecules are compared with those washed out from pores and from pollen that burst due to osmotic pressure. Lohmann U.; 'A Glaciation Indirect Aerosol Effect Caused by Soot Aerosols; J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 24 No.4; pp 11-1 - 11-4; 2002 Mishchenko M.I., Rossow W.B., Macke A., Lacis A. A.; Sensitivity of Cirrus Cloud Albedo, Bidirectional Reflectance and Optical Thickness Retrieval Accuracy to Ice Particle Shape, J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 101, No D12; pp. 16,973 - 16,985; 1996 Pummer B., Bauer H., Bernardi J., Bleicher S., Grothe H.; Suspendable Macromolecules are Responsible for Ice Nucleation Activity of Birch and Conifer Pollen; Atmos. Chem. Phys.; 12; pp. 2541 - 2550;

  3. Search for Nuclei in Heavy Ion Collisions at Ultrarelativistic Energies

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We would like to know if nuclei are still present after a collision of two heavy ions at ultrarelativistic energies. If one can detect some of them at large angle ($>$10-15|0) they very likely come from a multifragmentation of the excited target spectators. Such a multifragmentation in several nuclei has been in proton induced reactions at Fermilab and it was interpreted as a gas-liquid phase transition in nuclei matter near the critical point. With heavy ions the energy deposited in the target spectators will be much higher than in the case of protons and a different mechanism should be involved if nuclei are still observed. \\\\ \\\\ We propose to detect nuclei using 1-2 silicon telescopes and a 1-2mg/cm|2 Au target bombarded by an |1|6O or |3|2S beam at 226 GeV/u. The set-up will be installed in a small cube located just before the NA38 experiment and should not perturb it.\\\\ \\\\ Data from |1|6O incident on Au have been taken last year. The experiment is presently taking data with |3|2S ions.

  4. Deformed structure in N = 50 medium mass nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of neutron rich nuclei at the drip-line and around closed shells gained momentum with recent advancements of experimental techniques using radioactive ion beams and fission fragment. Fission from fast particles has become an important tool and it has been the richest source of neutron-rich intermediate-mass nuclei. Fission of Uranium and neighbouring nuclei produce two neutron-rich fragments of unequal A ∼ 90 and 140, (besides a few neutrons). As the two fragments proceed to the point of separation they become quite deformed. It is thus essential to study the shapes and microscopic structures of these neutron-rich fragments in ground and excited configurations. In this work, the structures and shapes of 86Kr and 88Sr nuclei have been investigated using angular momentum projected Hartree-Fock (PHF) model. To study the possible structure of the ground band and excited deformed bands for closed shell nuclei, the potential energy surface in HF calculations is analyzed for various mass-quadrupole moments

  5. Fission barrier in even-even superheavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the ground state properties of even-even superheavy nuclei (Z=112-120) are studied. The work has given emphasis on the role of deformation on the structure of superheavy nuclei. The problem of superdeformed ground state, their deformation energy curves and the potential energy surface of these nuclei is addressed. Both the nonrelativistic Skyrme-Hartree-Fock SHF and the deformed Relativistic Mean Field RMF models have been used in a constrained calculation. The systematic investigations of fission barriers in even-even superheavy nuclei with charge number Z=112-120 within relativistic mean field theory including the triaxial shapes and octupole shapes with axial symmetry. The improved version of NL3 parameter set (NL3), standard NL3, SkI4 and SLy4 parameter sets are used for the calculations. The pairing correlations are treated using the BCS approximation using the seniority pairing forces adjusted to empirical values of the gap parameters. The investigations for potential energy surface (PES), and the deformation energy curves for several isotopes with charge number Z=112, 114, 116, 118 and 120 nuclei obtained with the NL3 parameterization of the RMF Lagrangian is presented. The results will be for the case of axial solution with reflection symmetry, triaxial solutions with reflection symmetry, and octupole deformation solutions with axial symmetry

  6. A doorway to Borromean halo nuclei: the Samba configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Yamashita, M T; Hussein, M S

    2005-01-01

    We exploit the possibility of new configurations in three-body halo nuclei - Samba type - (the neutron-core form a bound system) as a doorway to Borromean systems. The nuclei $^{12}$Be, $^{15}$B, $^{23}$N and $^{27}$F are of such nature, in particular $^{23}$N with a half-life of 37.7 s and a halo radius of 6.36 fm is an excellent example of Samba-halo configuration. The fusion below the barrier of the Samba halo nuclei with heavy targets could reveal the so far elusive enhancement and a dominance of one-neutron over two-neutron transfers, in contrast to what was found recently for the Borromean halo nucleus $^6$He + $^{238}$U.

  7. Microscopic description of neutron emission rates in compound nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The neutron emission rates in thermal excited nuclei are conventionally described by statistical models with a phenomenological level density parameter that depends on excitation energies, deformations and mass regions. In the microscopic view of hot nuclei, the neutron emission rates can be determined by the external neutron gas densities without any free parameters. Therefore the microscopic description of thermal neutron emissions is desirable that can impact several understandings such as survival probabilities of superheavy compound nuclei and neutron emissivity in reactors. To describe the neutron emission rates microscopically, the external thermal neutron gases are self-consistently obtained based on the Finite-Temperature Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (FT-HFB) approach. The results are compared with the statistical model to explore the connections between the FT-HFB approach and the statistical model. The Skyrme FT-HFB equation is solved by HFB-AX in deformed coordinate spaces. Based on the FT-HFB approach...

  8. Proton-Neutron Pairs in Heavy Deformed Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Bonatsos, Dennis; Martinou, Andriana

    2015-01-01

    The microscopic justification of the emergence of SU(3) symmetry in heavy nuclei remains an interesting problem. In the past, the pseudo-SU(3) approach has been used, with considerable success. Recent results seem to suggest that the key for understanding the emergence of SU(3) symmetry lies in the properties of the proton-neutron interaction, namely in the formation of (S=1, T=0) p-n pairs in heavy nuclei, especially when the numbers of valence protons and valence neutrons are nearly equal. Although this idea has been around for many years, since the introduction of the Federman-Pittel mechanism, it is only recently that information about the p-n interaction could be obtained from nuclear masses, which become available from modern facilities. Based on this information, a new coupling scheme for heavy deformed nuclei has been suggested and is under development.

  9. Production mechanism of superheavy nuclei in massive fusion reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Zhao-Qing; JIN Gen-Ming; LI Jun-Qing; Werner Scheid

    2009-01-01

    Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a set of microscopically derived master equations numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively.Fusion-fission reactions and evaporation residue excitation functions of synthesizing superheavy nuclei (SHN) are investigated systematically and compared them with available experimental data. The possible factors that affecting the production cross sections of SHN are discussed in this workshop.

  10. Scissors mode of Gd nuclei measured, with the DANCE detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, J.; Bečvář, F.; Krtička, M.; Valenta, S.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Walker, C. L.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Becker, J. A.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Parker, W.; Wu, C. Y.

    2013-05-01

    Spectra of γ-rays following the neutron capture at isolated resonances of stable Gd nuclei were measured with the DANCE detector. The objectives were to obtain new information on the photon strength of 153,155-159Gd with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors-mode vibration. An analysis of the data obtained clearly indicates that the scissors mode is built not only on the ground state, but also on all excited levels of the nuclei studied. Our approach allows estimating the summed scissors-mode strength \\sum B(M1)\\!\\!\\uparrow even for odd product nuclei for which conventional nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements yield only limited information. Our data indicate that for 157,159Gd the strength \\sum B(M1)\\!\\!\\uparrow is significantly higher compared to 156,158Gd.

  11. Inelastic neutrino scattering off hot nuclei in supernova environments

    CERN Document Server

    Dzhioev, Alan A; Wambach, J; Ponomarev, V Yu

    2014-01-01

    We study inelastic neutrino scattering off hot nuclei for temperatures relevant under supernova conditions. The method we use is based on the quasiparticle random phase approximation extended to finite temperatures within the thermo field dynamics (TQRPA). The method allows a transparent treatment of upward and downward transitions in hot nuclei, avoiding the application of Brink's hypothesis. For the sample nuclei $^{56}$Fe and $^{82}$Ge we perform a detailed analysis of thermal effects on the strength distributions of allowed Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions which dominate the scattering process at low neutrino energies. For $^{56}$Fe and $^{82}$Ge the finite temperature cross-sections are calculated by taking into account the contribution of allowed and forbidden transitions. The observed enhancement of the cross-section at low neutrino energies is explained by considering thermal effects on the GT strength. For $^{56}$Fe we compare the calculated cross-sections to those obtained earlier from a hybrid approac...

  12. Scissors mode of Gd nuclei measured, with the DANCE detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectra of γ-rays following the neutron capture at isolated resonances of stable Gd nuclei were measured with the DANCE detector. The objectives were to obtain new information on the photon strength of 153,155−159Gd with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors-mode vibration. An analysis of the data obtained clearly indicates that the scissors mode is built not only on the ground state, but also on all excited levels of the nuclei studied. Our approach allows estimating the summed scissors-mode strength ΣB(M1) ↑ even for odd product nuclei for which conventional nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements yield only limited information. Our data indicate that for 157,159Gd the strength ΣB(M1) ↑ is significantly higher compared to 156,158Gd. (paper)

  13. NN Correlations and Relativistic Hartree Fock in Finite Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Fritz, R

    1993-01-01

    Two different approximation schemes for the self-consistent solution of the relativistic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock equation for finite nuclei are discussed using realistic One-Boson-Exchange potentials. In a first scheme, the effects of correlations are deduced from a study of nuclear matter and parameterized in terms of an effective $\\sigma$, $\\omega$ and $\\pi$ exchange. Employing this effective interaction relativistic Hartree-Fock equations are solved for finite nuclei \\osi , \\caf\\ and \\cafe . In the second approach the effect of correlations are treated in the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation directly for the finite nuclei, but the modifications of the Dirac spinors in the medium are derived from nuclear matter assuming a local-density approximation. Both approaches yield rather similar results for binding energies and radii in fair agreement with experimental data. The importance of the density dependent correlation effects is demonstrated and different ingredients to the spin-orbit splitting in the she...

  14. IBs in normal deformed odd-A nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotational bands of nuclei are known to display several puzzling features, and many of them are still very poorly understood. We expect the band structure of each nucleus to be unique. It is, therefore, very unusual that two nuclei should have identical bands (IBs). Many examples of IBs in odd-A normal deformed nuclei were pointed out for the first time by A.K. Jain. Later on, many examples of IBs in the rare-earth region and the actinide region were also pointed out. An excellent review of the IBs and the various explanations may be found. IBs in high-K 3 qp rotational bands based on same band head spin have been found and analyzed on the basis of TAC model

  15. Structure functions of the nucleon and nuclei in neutrino reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of parton distribution functions in nuclei is important for calculating nuclear corrections in oscillation experiments, from which detailed information should be extracted on neutrino properties. First, nuclear parton distributions are discussed for explaining high-energy nuclear reaction data. Possible nuclear modification is explained for valence-quark and antiquark distributions. It is rather difficult to determine gluon distributions in nuclei. Next, reversing the topic, we discuss structure functions which could be investigated by neutrino reactions. Determination of polarized parton distributions in the nucleon is discussed in polarized neutrino reactions. In addition, neutrino reactions should be important for finding nuclear modification of valence-quark distributions at small x if structure function ratios F3A/F3D are measured for various nuclei

  16. Beta decay rates of neutron-rich nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marketin, Tomislav; Huther, Lutz; Petković, Jelena; Paar, Nils; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Heavy element nucleosynthesis models involve various properties of thousands of nuclei in order to simulate the intricate details of the process. By necessity, as most of these nuclei cannot be studied in a controlled environment, these models must rely on the nuclear structure models for input. Of all the properties, the beta-decay half-lives are one of the most important ones due to their direct impact on the resulting abundance distributions. In this study we present the results of a large-scale calculation based on the relativistic nuclear energy density functional, where both the allowed and the first-forbidden transitions are studied in more than 5000 neutron-rich nuclei. Aside from the astrophysical applications, the results of this calculation can also be employed in the modeling of the electron and antineutrino spectra from nuclear reactors.

  17. Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing; Li, Jun-Qing; Scheid, Werner

    2007-01-01

    Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118 and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

  18. Origin of Unexpected Isotopic Trends in Synthesis of Superheavy Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zu-Hua; BAO Jing-Dong

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the dependence of the yield of superheavy nuclei with Z = 110, 112, 114 on the neutron excess of the projectile nucleus with a two-parameter Smoluchowski equation. It is confirmed that in some cases, the cold fusion reactions with less neutron excess are more favourable than those with more neutron excess. In order to probe the origin of these unexpected isotopic trends, we also investigate the probabilities of capture, fusion and survival in the cold fusion reactions in detail. It is found that the maximal ER cross sections of the superheavy nuclei exponentially increase as a function of Bf - Sn with Bf being the fission barrier and Sn being the neutron separation energy. Although the probabilities of capture and fusion have some influences, the unexpected isotopic trends mainly due to the dependence of the ER cross sections on the Bf - Sn value. Therefore, the reactions with larger Bf - Sn values should be more favourable for synthesis of superheavy nuclei.

  19. High spin rotations of nuclei with the harmonic oscillator potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations of the nuclear properties at high angular momentum have been performed recently. They are based on the liquid drop model of a nucleus and/or on the assumption of the single particle shell structure of the nucleonic motion. The calculations are usually complicated and involve long computer codes. In this article we shall discuss general trends in fast rotating nuclei in the approximation of the harmonic oscillator potential. We shall see that using the Bohr Mottelson simplified version of the rigorous solution of Valatin one can perform a rather simple analysis of the rotational bands, structure of the yrast line, moments of inertia etc. in the rotating nucleus. While the precision fit to experimental data in actual nuclei is not the purpose of this paper, one can still hope to reach some general understanding within the model of the simple relations resulting in nuclei at high spin. (author)

  20. Semi-microscopic model of pairing in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Pankratov, S S; Baldo, M; Lombardo, U; Saperstein, E E

    2011-01-01

    A semi-microscopic model for nucleon pairing in nuclei is presented starting from the ab intio BCS gap equation with Argonne v18 force and the self-consistent Energy Density Functional Method basis characterized with the bare nucleon mass. The BCS theory is formulated in terms of the model space S0 with the effective pairing interaction calculated from the first principles in the subsidiary space S0. This effective interaction is supplemented with a small phenomenological addendum containing one phenomenological parameter universal for all medium and heavy atomic nuclei. We consider the latter as a phenomenological way to take into account both the many-body corrections to the BCS theory and the effective mass effects. For protons, the Coulomb interaction is introduced directly. Calculations made for several isotopic and isotonic chains of semi-magic nuclei confirm the validity of the model. The role of the self-consistent basis is stressed.