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Sample records for cell natural antibody

  1. Natural antibodies sustain differentiation and maturation of human dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Donkova-Petrini, Vladimira; Carbonneil, Cédric; Misra, Namita; Lepelletier, Yves; Delignat, Sandrine; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Oksenhendler, Eric; Lévy, Yves; Debré, Marianne; Kazatchkine, Michel D.; Hermine, Olivier; Kaveri, Srini V.

    2004-01-01

    The differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) is governed by various signals in the microenvironment. Monocytes and DCs circulate in peripheral blood, which contains high levels of natural antibodies (NAbs). NAbs are germ-line-encoded and occur in the absence of deliberate immunization or microbial aggression. To assess the importance of NAbs in the milieu on DC development, we examined the status of DCs in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia, a disease characterized by pa...

  2. Serological survey of normal humans for natural antibody to cell surface antigens of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, A N; Taormina, M C; Ikeda, H; Watanabe, T; Oettgen, H F; Old, L J

    1980-01-01

    Sera of 106 normal adult men were tested for antibodies reacting with cell surface antigens of three established lines of cultured malignant melanoma. Positive reactions with a protein A assay for IgG antibodies were extremely rare (1-2%). The frequency of positive reactions with assays for IgM antibodies was higher: 5-15% in immune adherence assays and 55-82% in anti-C3 mixed hemadsorption assays. After low-titered sera and sera reacting with fetal calf serum components, conventional alloantigens, and widely distributed class 3 antigens were excluded, sera from seven individuals (one with IgG antibody and six with IgM antibodies) were selected for detailed analysis. The serum containing the IgG antibody came from a healthy 65-year-old Caucasian man; titers of antibody in his serum ranged from < 1/10 to 1/40,000 in tests with different melanoma cell lines. This IgG antibody identifies a differentiation antigen of melanocytes, provisionally designated Mel 1, that distinguishes two classes of melanomas: 22 melanoma cell lines typed Mel 1+ and 17 types Mel 1-. Mel 1 is expressed by fetal fibroblasts but not adult fibroblasts and can be found on a proportion of cultured epithelial cancer cell lines (5 out of 23) but not on glioma or B-cell lines. The melanoma antigens detected by the naturally occurring IgM antibodies are serologically unrelated to Mel 1 but, like Mel 1, appear to be differentiation antigens that distinguish subsets of melanoma. These IgM antibodies detect antigens that are identical or closely related to the AH antigen, a melanoma surface antigen that was initially defined by autologous antibody in a patient with melanoma. In view of the immunogenicity of both Mel 1 and the AH antigens in humans and their occurrence on more than 50% of melanomas, it remains to be seen whether antibody to these antigens can be elicited by specific vaccination of seronegative melanoma patients and whether this will have an influence on the clinical course of the disease

  3. Normal human serum contains a natural IgM antibody cytotoxic for human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollert, M W; David, K; Schmitt, C; Hauenschild, A; Bredehorst, R; Erttmann, R; Vogel, C W

    1996-04-30

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is characterized by the second highest spontaneous regression of any human malignant disorder, a phenomenon that remains to be elucidated. In this study, a survey of 94 normal human adult sera revealed a considerable natural humoral cytotoxicity against human NB cell lines in approximately one-third of the tested sera of both genders. Specific cell killing by these sera was in the range of 40% to 95%. Serum cytotoxicity was dependent on an intact classical pathway of complement. By several lines of evidence, IgM antibodies were identified as the cytotoxic factor in the sera. Further analyses revealed that a 260-kDa protein was recognized by natural IgM of cytotoxic sera in Western blots of NB cell extracts. The antigen was expressed on the surface of seven human NB cell lines but not on human melanoma or other control tumor cell lines derived from kidney, pancreas, colon, bone, skeletal muscle, lymphatic system, and bone marrow. Furthermore, no reactivity was observed with normal human fibroblasts, melanocytes, and epidermal keratinocytes. The antigen was expressed in vivo as detected by immunohistochemistry in both the tumor of a NB patient and NB tumors established in nude rats from human NB cell lines. Most interestingly, the IgM anti-NB antibody was absent from the sera of 11 human NB patients with active disease. The anti-NB IgM also could not be detected in tumor tissue obtained from a NB patient. Collectively, our data suggest the existence of a natural humoral immunological tumor defense mechanism, which could account for the in vivo phenomenon of spontaneous NB tumor regression. PMID:8633097

  4. Regulation of IL-2 induced proliferation and cytotoxicity in human natural killer cells by monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural killer (NK) activity is mediated by a subpopulation of cells termed large granular lymphocytes (LGL), which exhibit cytotoxic activity against a variety of tumor targets. LGL express OKT8, OKT9, OKT10, OKT11, 3G8 (FcγR), OKM1, NKH1. The addition of recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2), increases cytotoxicity, induces IFN-γ production and leads to LGL proliferation. Since monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) represent highly specific probes to analyze possible surface molecules, they have studied the role of various MoAbs in the regulation of cytotoxicity, proliferation, and secretory function of purified LGL. LGL were isolated from nonadherent human peripheral blood leukocytes on discontinuous Percoll density gradients, followed by 290C E-rosette depletion of contaminating T cells. These preparations were ≥ 85% LGL and contained ≥ 5% OKT3+ cells. Using a limiting dilution assay, purified LGL were incubated with rIL-2 and the MoAbs (10 μg/ml) for 7 days. These cells were tested for cytotoxicity against K562 in a 51Cr- release assay, and for proliferation as determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation. Results indicate that the OKT9 antibody inhibited both the cytotoxicity and proliferation. MoAb against LGl markers (OKT11, OKT8, OKM1, 3G8, and NKH1) had no effect on cytotoxicity or proliferation. Unlike the T cell receptor complex (with OKT3), the surface molecules examined do not regulate LGL lysis or proliferation

  5. Targeting natural killer cell reactivity by employing antibody to NKp46: implications for type 1 diabetes.

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    Rami Yossef

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells belong to the innate lymphoid cells. Their cytotoxic activity is regulated by the delicate balance between activating and inhibitory signals. NKp46 is a member of the primary activating receptors of NK cells. We previously reported that the NKp46 receptor is involved in the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D. Subsequently, we hypothesized that blocking this receptor could prevent or hinder disease development. To address this goal, we developed monoclonal antibodies for murine NKp46. One mAb, named NCR1.15, recognizes the mouse homologue protein of NKp46, named Ncr1, and was able to down-regulate the surface expression of NKp46 on primary murine NK cells following antibody injection in vivo. Additionally, NCR1.15 treatments were able to down-regulate cytotoxic activity mediated by NKp46, but not by other NK receptors. To test our primary assumption, we examined T1D development in two models, non-obese diabetic mice and low-dose streptozotocin. Our results show a significantly lower incidence of diabetic mice in the NCR1.15-treated group compared to control groups. This study directly demonstrates the involvement of NKp46 in T1D development and suggests a novel treatment strategy for early insulitis.

  6. Natural Killer (NK- and T-Cell Engaging Antibody-Derived Therapeutics

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    Christoph Stein

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Unmodified antibodies (abs have been successful in the treatment of hematologic malignancies, but less so for the treatment of solid tumors. They trigger anti-tumor effects through their Fc-domains, and one way to improve their efficacy is to optimize their interaction with the effectors through Fc-engineering. Another way to empower abs is the design of bispecific abs and related fusion proteins allowing a narrower choice of effector cells. Here we review frequently chosen classes of effector cells, as well as common trigger molecules. Natural Killer (NK- and T-cells are the most investigated populations in therapeutical approaches with bispecific agents until now. Catumaxomab, the first bispecific ab to receive drug approval, targets the tumor antigen Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM and recruits T-cells via a binding site for the cell surface protein CD3. The next generation of recombinant ab-derivatives replaces the broadly reactive Fc-domain by a binding domain for a single selected trigger. Blinatumomab is the first clinically successful member of this class, targeting cancer cells via CD19 and engaging T-cells by CD3. Other investigators have developed related recombinant fusion proteins to recruit effectors, such as NK-cells and macrophages. The first such agents currently in preclinical and clinical development will be discussed.

  7. Malignant monoblasts can function as effector cells in natural killer cell and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, P; Hokland, M; Ellegaard, J

    1981-01-01

    This is the first report describing natural killer (NK) and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of malignant monoblasts. Pure acute monoblastic leukemia was diagnosed in bone marrow aspirations from two patients by use of conventional cytochemical methods as well as multiple immunologic...... modulation was seen in ADCC. These findings are discussed in the light of our present knowledge of lymphoid NK cells. Udgivelsesdato: 1981-May...

  8. Anti-NeuGcGM3 reactivity: a possible role of natural antibodies and B-1 cells in tumor immunosurveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Zhurbenko, Nely; Rabade-Chediak, Maura; Martinez, Darel; Griñan, Tania; Hernandez, Ana Maria

    2015-12-01

    While not naturally expressed in normal human tissues, N-glycolylated (NeuGc) gangliosides are overexpressed in several tumors and have immunosuppressive capacity, which contributes to cancer progression. Naturally occurring antibodies against NeuGcGM3 exist in healthy donors that specifically recognize and kill tumor cells expressing the antigen by complement-dependent and -independent mechanisms, the latter resembling an oncotic necrosis-type of cell death. Both the levels of anti-NeuGcGM3 antibodies in the sera of healthy donors and the percentage of donors with these natural antibodies decrease with age. Our work has shown that anti-NeuGcGM3 antibodies are not detected in the sera of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, compared to age- and sex-matched healthy donors, which have anti-NeuGcGM3. Interestingly, the level of serum total IgM, but not IgG, was significantly lower in cancer patients than in healthy donors. Screening of immortalized mouse splenic and peritoneal-derived hybridomas showed that peritoneal B-1 cells secrete anti-NeuGcGM3 with tumor cytotoxic capacity. Defects in the natural surveillance against tumor antigens could increase the risk of elderly donors developing cancer and affect the capacity of cancer patients to effectively fight against tumor cells. PMID:26214505

  9. N-Acetyl-D-glucosamine-coated polyamidoamine dendrimer modulates antibody formation via natural killer cell activation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huliková, Katarína; Benson, Veronika; Svoboda, Jan; Šíma, Petr; Fišerová, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 6 (2009), s. 792-799. ISSN 1567-5769 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/06/0477; GA AV ČR IAA500200509; GA AV ČR IAA500200620 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : GlcNAc(8) * antibody formation * NK cells Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.214, year: 2009

  10. Potential for Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity for Control of Human Cytomegalovirus

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    Rebecca J. Aicheler

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is an important pathogen that infects the majority of the population worldwide, yet, currently, there is no licensed vaccine. Despite HCMV encoding at least seven Natural Killer (NK cell evasion genes, NK cells remain critical for the control of infection in vivo. Classically Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC is mediated by CD16, which is found on the surface of the NK cell in a complex with FcεRI-γ chains and/or CD3ζ chains. Ninety percent of NK cells express the Fc receptor CD16; thus, they have the potential to initiate ADCC. HCMV has a profound effect on the NK cell repertoire, such that up to 10-fold expansions of NKG2C+ cells can be seen in HCMV seropositive individuals. These NKG2C+ cells are reported to be FcεRI-γ deficient and possess variable levels of CD16+, yet have striking ADCC functions. A subset of HCMV cell surface proteins will induce robust antibody responses that could render cells susceptible to ADCC. We will consider how the strong anti-HCMV function of NKG2C+ FcεRI-γ-deficient NK cells could potentially be harnessed in the clinic to treat patients suffering from HCMV disease and in the development of an efficacious HCMV vaccine.

  11. Inositol trisphosphate is generated by a rat natural killer cell tumor in response to target cells or to crosslinked monoclonal antibody OX-34: possible signaling role for the OX-34 determinant during activation by target cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Seaman, W E; Eriksson, E; Dobrow, R; Imboden, J B

    1987-01-01

    RNK-16 cells, rat leukemia cells with features of natural killer (NK) cells, were adapted for growth in vitro and used to examine the mechanism of NK-cell activation. Contact of RNK-16 cells with tumor cells (YAC-1) that are lysed by NK cells, but not with resistant tumor cells (EL-4, K562), led to an increase in inositol trisphosphate (InsP3), a Ca2+-mobilizing messenger. A similar increase in InsP3 could be elicited in RNK-16 cells by monoclonal antibody OX-34, when the antibody was crossli...

  12. Recombinant shark natural antibodies to thyroglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluter, Samuel F; Jensen, Ingvill; Ramsland, Paul A; Marchalonis, John J

    2005-01-01

    As cartilaginous fish are the vertebrates most distal from man to produce antibodies, fundamental information regarding conservation and variation of the antigen binding site should be gained by comparing the properties of antibodies directed against the same antigen from the two species. Since monoclonal cell lines cannot be generated using shark B cells, we isolated antigen binding recombinant single chain Fv antibodies (scFv) comprising of the complete variable regions from shark light and heavy chains. Thyroglobulin was used as the selecting antigen as both sharks and humans express natural antibodies to mammalian thyroglobulin in the absence of purposeful immunization. We report that recombinant sandbar shark (Carcharhinus plumbeus) scFvs that bind bovine thyroglobulin consist of heavy chain variable regions (VH) homologous to those of the human VHIII subset and light chain variable regions (VL) homologous to those of the human Vlambda6 subgroup. The homology within the frameworks is sufficient to enable the building of three-dimensional models of the shark VH/VL structure using established human structures as templates. In natural antibodies of both species, the major variability lies in the third complementarity determining region (CDR3) of both VH and VL. PMID:15954089

  13. Natural killer cell cytotoxicity of breast cancer targets is enhanced by two distinct mechanisms of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against LFA-3 and HER2/neu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, S; Burns, L J; Repka, T; Miller, J S

    1999-10-01

    Treatment of advanced breast cancer with autologous stem cell transplantation is limited by a high probability of disease relapse. In clinical trials, interleukin 2 (IL-2) alone can expand natural killer (NK) cells in vivo and increase their cytotoxic activity against breast cancer cell lines, but this increase is modest. Understanding the mechanisms that mediate NK cell lysis of breast cancer targets may lead to improvements of current immunotherapy strategies. NK cells from normal donors or patients receiving subcutaneous IL-2 were tested in cytotoxicity assays against five breast cancer cell lines. The role of adhesion molecules and antibodies that interact through Fc receptors on NK cells was explored. NK cell lysis of breast cancer targets is variable and is partially dependent on recognition through ICAM-1 and CD18. While blocking CD2 slightly decreased cytotoxicity, contrary to expectations, an antibody against CD58 (the ligand for CD2), failed to block killing and instead mediated an increased cytotoxicity that correlated with target density of CD58. The CD58 antibody-enhanced killing was dependent not only on FcRgammaIII but also on CD2 and ICAM-1/CD18. To further elucidate the mechanism of this CD58 antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), another antibody was tested. Trastuzumab (Herceptin), a humanized antibody against HER2/neu, mediated potent ADCC against all the HER2/neu positive breast cancer targets. Unlike CD58 antibody-mediated ADCC, Herceptin ADCC was minimally affected by blocking antibodies to CD2 or ICAM-1/CD18, which suggests a different mechanism of action. This study shows that multiple mechanisms are involved in NK cell lysis of breast cancer targets, that none of the targets are inherently resistant to killing, and that two distinct mechanisms of ADCC can target immunotherapy to breast cancer cells. PMID:10517495

  14. Synthetic Antibodies for Reversible Cell Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing Zhou

    2011-12-01

    functional structure and cell recognition capability of antibodies, but also possess specific features that natural antibodies do not possess. This study has opened a new avenue for developing synthetic antibodies and has also advanced the understanding of the functionality of multivalent nanomaterials. This novel synthetic antibody holds great potential for various biological and biomedical applications such as cell separation.

  15. Autologous antibodies that bind neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yujing; Sholler, Giselle S; Shukla, Girja S; Pero, Stephanie C; Carman, Chelsea L; Zhao, Ping; Krag, David N

    2015-11-01

    Antibody therapy of neuroblastoma is promising and our goal is to derive antibodies from patients with neuroblastoma for developing new therapeutic antibodies. The feasibility of using residual bone marrow obtained for clinical indications as a source of tumor cells and a source of antibodies was assessed. From marrow samples, neuroblastoma cells were recovered, grown in cell culture and also implanted into mice to create xenografts. Mononuclear cells from the marrow were used as a source to generate phage display antibody libraries and also hybridomas. Growth of neuroblastoma patient cells was possible both in vitro and as xenografts. Antibodies from the phage libraries and from the monoclonal hybridomas bound autologous neuroblastoma cells with some selectivity. It appears feasible to recover neuroblastoma cells from residual marrow specimens and to generate human antibodies that bind autologous neuroblastoma cells. Expansion of this approach is underway to collect more specimens, optimize methods to generate antibodies, and to evaluate the bioactivity of neuroblastoma-binding antibodies. PMID:26210205

  16. Long-term preservation of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of natural killer cells amplified in vitro from the peripheral blood of breast cancer patients after chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clémenceau, Béatrice; Gallot, Géraldine; Vivien, Régine; Gaschet, Joëlle; Campone, Mario; Vié, Henri

    2006-01-01

    Twenty percent of breast cancer adenocarcinomas overexpress the oncogene c-erb-2 that is recognized by the humanized anti-Her2/neu monoclonal antibody Herceptin. Results from clinical studies suggest that antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is involved in the clinical response of Herceptin-treated patients. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the possibility of amplifying in vitro the CD3-/CD16+ natural killer (NK) cell subset that mediates ADCC from breast cancer patients after chemotherapy. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from six breast cancer patients taken 2 months after chemotherapy completion were co-cultured with an autologous irradiated Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) in the presence of interleukin-2 (IL-2) for 4-6 weeks. These LCL + IL2 activated cultures (ACs) were tested for ADCC potential, and their CD3/CD16 NK proportion was quantified. Among the ACs, the proportion of CD3-/CD16+ NK cells increased up to 64% over the first 2 weeks of culture and the ACs continued to expand for 1 month thereafter. Control and patient ACs displayed ADCC activity (tested in the presence of Rituximab against the autologous LCL to take into account any possible effect of inhibitory NK receptors) as well as against the MCF-7(Her2/neu) breast cancer cell line in the presence of Herceptin. This ADCC activity was maintained during the entire culture period. In conclusion, chemotherapy in breast cancer patients does not obviate the possibility of amplifying in vitro the NK cell subset that mediates ADCC. Consequently, adoptive transfer of lymphocytes mediating ADCC can be considered using this protocol to test its benefit in patients under Herceptin treatment. PMID:16365600

  17. Natural antibodies in paracoccidioidomycosis Anticorpos naturais na paracoccidioidomicose

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    Carmelinda S. Unterkircher

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent attention has been focused on the natural antibodies as a component of natural immunity and as integral part of the idiotypic network. However, their functional role in different infections has rarely been studied. This work was undertaken to investigate the presence of natural antibodies in paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM. In addition, we analyzed anti-P. brasiliensis antibodies and their distribution in IgG subclasses in order to acquire better knowledge about the humoral immune response in this mycosis. Our findings show that the natural antibody response is not very much increased in PCM when compared with other parasite infections and this response is restricted to a few specificities, suggesting that P. brasiliensis moderately triggers CD5+ B cells. The anti-actin antibody was the main antibody specificity found in PCM. Specific antibodies to P. brasiliensis were mainly found in the IgG1 subclass in chronic patients of PCM.Recente atenção tem sido dada aos anticorpos naturais como componentes da imunidade natural e como parte integrante da rede idiotípica. Todavia, seu papel funcional em diferentes infecções tem, raramente, sido estudado. O objetivo deste trabalho foi investigar a presença de anticorpos naturais na paracoccidioidomicose (PCM. Em adição, analisamos os anticorpos específicos anti-P. brasiliensis e sua distribuição em subclasses a fim de adquirir mais conhecimento sobre a resposta imune humoral nesta micose. Nossos achados mostram que a resposta de anticorpos naturais não é acentuada na PCM quando comparada com outras infecções por parasitas e, é restrita a poucas especificidades, sugerindo que o P. brasiliensis estimula moderadamente as células B CD5+. O anticorpo anti-actina foi a principal especificidade encontrada na PCM. Os anticorpos especificos para P. brasiliensis, nos pacientes crônicos, eram, principalmente, da subclasse IgG1.

  18. Natural killer T (NKT)–B-cell interactions promote prolonged antibody responses and long-term memory to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharides

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Li; Deng, Shenglou; Reboulet, Rachel; Mathew, Rebecca; Teyton, Luc; Savage, Paul B.; Bendelac, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies directed against microbial polysaccharides are a critical component of protective immune responses and vaccines. We used nanoparticles coexpressing pneumococcal capsular polysaccharides and a cell wall lipid antigen analog to model NKT–B-cell interactions. Our study demonstrated CD1d-restricted cognate interactions, isotype switch, affinity maturation, and long-term memory, despite the apparent failure of NKT cells to differentiate into follicular helper cells. The findings demonst...

  19. Natural Antibodies as Rheostats for Susceptibility to Chronic Diseases in the Aged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, Thomas L

    2016-01-01

    Natural antibodies are spontaneously produced in the absence of infection or immunization, and are both anti-microbial and autoreactive. Autoreactive natural antibodies can bind noxious molecules, such as those involved in clinical situations of atherosclerosis (oxLDL), malignancy (NGcGM3), and neurodegeneration (amyloid, tau) and can affect the fate of their targets or the cells bearing them to maintain homeostasis. Clinically relevant natural antibodies have been shown to decline with advancing age in those few situations where measurements have been made. Consistent with this, human B-1 cells that are thought to be responsible for generating natural antibodies also decline with advancing age. These findings together suggest that an age-related decline in amount or efficacy of homeostatic natural antibodies is associated with relative loss of protection against molecules involved in several diseases whose incidence rises in the older age population, and that those individuals experiencing greatest loss are at greatest risk. In this view, natural antibodies act as rheostats for susceptibility to several age-related diseases. These considerations suggest that administration of natural antibodies, or of factors that maintain B-1 cells and/or enhance production of natural antibodies by B-1 cells, may serve to counteract the onset or progression of age-related chronic illness. PMID:27092140

  20. Augmentation of natural killer cell and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in BALB/c mice by sulforaphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate from broccoli through enhanced production of cytokines IL-2 and IFN-gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thejass, P; Kuttan, G

    2006-01-01

    Effect of sulforaphane on cell-mediated immune (CMI) response was studied in normal as well as Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing BALB/c mice. Administration of sulforaphane significantly enhanced natural killer (NK) cell activity in both normal as well as tumor-bearing animals, and the activity was observed earlier than in tumor-bearing control animals. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) also was enhanced significantly in both normal as well as tumor-bearing animals after sulforaphane administration compared with untreated control tumor-bearing animals. An early antibody-dependent complement-mediated cytotoxicity (ACC) also was observed in sulforaphane-treated normal and tumor-bearing animals. Administration of sulforaphane significantly enhanced the production of Interleukin-2 and Interferon-gamma in normal as well as tumor-bearing animals. In addition, sulforaphane significantly enhanced the proliferation of splenocytes, bone marrow cells, and thymocytes by stimulating the mitogenic potential of various mitogens such as concanavalin A, phytohaemagglutinin, poke weed mitogen, and lipopolysaccharide. PMID:16997793

  1. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

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    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Identification Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Alloantibody Identification; Antibody ID, RBC; RBC Ab ID Formal name: Red ...

  2. Cell-Free Synthesis Meets Antibody Production: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlitt Stech

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineered antibodies are key players in therapy, diagnostics and research. In addition to full size immunoglobulin gamma (IgG molecules, smaller formats of recombinant antibodies, such as single-chain variable fragments (scFv and antigen binding fragments (Fab, have emerged as promising alternatives since they possess different advantageous properties. Cell-based production technologies of antibodies and antibody fragments are well-established, allowing researchers to design and manufacture highly specific molecular recognition tools. However, as these technologies are accompanied by the drawbacks of being rather time-consuming and cost-intensive, efficient and powerful cell-free protein synthesis systems have been developed over the last decade as alternatives. So far, prokaryotic cell-free systems have been the focus of interest. Recently, eukaryotic in vitro translation systems have enriched the antibody production pipeline, as these systems are able to mimic the natural pathway of antibody synthesis in eukaryotic cells. This review aims to overview and summarize the advances made in the production of antibodies and antibody fragments in cell-free systems.

  3. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  4. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  5. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  6. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  7. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated

  8. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated

  9. Evaluation of the potential immunotoxicity of 3-monochloro-1,2-propanediol in Balb/c mice I. Effect on antibody forming cell, mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation, splenic subset, and natural killer cell activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3-Monochloro-1,2-propanediol (MCPD) is a well-known by-product of acid-hydrolyzed soy sauce during its manufacturing process. MCPD has been reported genotoxic in vitro, and reproductive toxicity and carcinogenicity in rats. However, no previous studies have investigated MCPD-induced alterations in the immune system. In the present study, MCPD was administered by gavage for 14 days at 0, 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg per day to female Balb/c mice. The antibody-mediated immune response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) was assessed using the antibody-forming cell (AFC) assay, and splenic cell phenotypes were quantified by flow cytometry. Hematological and histopathological changes were assessed. Mitogen-stimulated spleen lymphocyte proliferation and natural killer (NK) cell activity were evaluated. The T-lymphocyte blastogenesis by concanavalin A (Con A) or anti-CD3 and B-lymphocyte blastogenesis by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were not significantly changed. There were no significant changes in the hematological and histopathological findings of MCPD-treated mice. However, the significant decrease in thymus weight was observed in 100 mg dose group, even though that did not change body weight gain. The cellularities of spleen and thymus were significantly reduced in high-dose group. Exposure to high dose of MCPD decreased the AFC response to SRBC in mice. There was a significant decrease in NK cell activity of mice treated with high dose of MCPD. These results indicate that MCPD could modulate the immune function in Balb/c mice

  10. Notch-RBP-J-independent marginal zone B cell development in IgH transgenic mice with VH derived from a natural polyreactive antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Zhang

    Full Text Available Both the B cell antigen receptor (BCR signaling and Notch signaling pathway play important roles in marginal zone (MZ B cell development; however, if and how these two signaling pathways engage in crosstalk with each other remain unclear. In the present study, IgH transgenic mice (TgV(H3B4 were crossed with mice with Notch downstream transcription factor RBP-J floxed alleles (RBP-J(f/f and Mx-Cre transgene. Subsequently, MZ B cell development was analyzed in 3B4/Cre/RBP-J(f/f mice that expressed the transgenic 3B4 IgH and exhibited a deficiency in Notch signaling in B cells upon poly (I:C injection. We observed that MZ B cell numbers were severely reduced, but still detectable in 3B4/Cre/RBP-J(f/f mice, in contrast to increased numbers of MZ B cells in TgV(H3B4 mice and almost no MZ B cells in Cre/RBP-J(f/f mice. The majority of the MZ B cells in the 3B4/Cre/RBP-J(f/f mice had the same antigen specificity with that of 3B4 antibody, indicating that a particular BCR specificity might direct MZ B cell development in the absence of Notch signaling. The number of MZ B precursor (MZP cells was reduced sharply in 3B4/Cre/RBP-J(f/f mice, and the number of transitional stage 1 and transitional stage 2 cells did not change that much, indicating that the interaction between BCR and Notch signaling likely occurred during the T2-MZP stage. Based on the transgenic mouse model, our data indicate that MZ B cells with certain BCR specificity can develop in a Notch-RBP-J independent manner.

  11. Notch-RBP-J-independent marginal zone B cell development in IgH transgenic mice with VH derived from a natural polyreactive antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuo; Zhou, Lanhua; Yang, Xinwei; Wang, Yaochun; Zhang, Ping; Hou, Lihong; Hu, Xinbin; Xing, Ying; Liu, Yufeng; Li, Wei; Han, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Both the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling and Notch signaling pathway play important roles in marginal zone (MZ) B cell development; however, if and how these two signaling pathways engage in crosstalk with each other remain unclear. In the present study, IgH transgenic mice (TgV(H)3B4) were crossed with mice with Notch downstream transcription factor RBP-J floxed alleles (RBP-J(f/f)) and Mx-Cre transgene. Subsequently, MZ B cell development was analyzed in 3B4/Cre/RBP-J(f/f) mice that expressed the transgenic 3B4 IgH and exhibited a deficiency in Notch signaling in B cells upon poly (I:C) injection. We observed that MZ B cell numbers were severely reduced, but still detectable in 3B4/Cre/RBP-J(f/f) mice, in contrast to increased numbers of MZ B cells in TgV(H)3B4 mice and almost no MZ B cells in Cre/RBP-J(f/f) mice. The majority of the MZ B cells in the 3B4/Cre/RBP-J(f/f) mice had the same antigen specificity with that of 3B4 antibody, indicating that a particular BCR specificity might direct MZ B cell development in the absence of Notch signaling. The number of MZ B precursor (MZP) cells was reduced sharply in 3B4/Cre/RBP-J(f/f) mice, and the number of transitional stage 1 and transitional stage 2 cells did not change that much, indicating that the interaction between BCR and Notch signaling likely occurred during the T2-MZP stage. Based on the transgenic mouse model, our data indicate that MZ B cells with certain BCR specificity can develop in a Notch-RBP-J independent manner. PMID:22719978

  12. Natural hidden antibodies reacting with DNA or cardiolipin bind to thymocytes and evoke their death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamulaeva, I A; Lekakh, I V; Kiseleva, V I; Gabai, V L; Saenko, A S; Shevchenko, A S; Poverenny, A M

    1997-08-18

    Both free and hidden natural antibodies to DNA or cardiolipin were obtained from immunoglobulins of a normal donor. The free antibodies reacting with DNA or cardiolipin were isolated by means of affinity chromatography. Antibodies occurring in an hidden state were disengaged from the depleted immunoglobulins by ion-exchange chromatography and were then affinity-isolated on DNA or cardiolipin sorbents. We used flow cytometry to study the ability of free and hidden antibodies to bind to rat thymocytes. Simultaneously, plasma membrane integrity was tested by propidium iodide (PI) exclusion. The hidden antibodies reacted with 65.2 +/- 10.9% of the thymocytes and caused a fast plasma membrane disruption. Cells (28.7 +/- 7.1%) were stained with PI after incubation with the hidden antibodies for 1 h. The free antibodies bound to a very small fraction of the thymocytes and did not evoke death as compared to control without antibodies. The possible reason for the observed effects is difference in reactivity of the free and hidden antibodies to phospholipids. While free antibodies reacted preferentially with phosphotidylcholine, hidden antibodies reacted with cardiolipin and phosphotidylserine. PMID:9280287

  13. Naturally acquired antibodies against Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veschi, Josir Laine A; Bruzzone, Octavio A; Losada-Eaton, Daniela M; Dutra, Iveraldo S; Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E

    2008-09-15

    Clostridium perfringens type D-producing epsilon toxin is a common cause of death in sheep and goats worldwide. Although anti-epsilon toxin serum antibodies have been detected in healthy non-vaccinated sheep, the information regarding naturally acquired antibodies in ruminants is scanty. The objective of the present report was to characterize the development of naturally acquired antibodies against C. perfringens epsilon toxin in goats. The levels of anti-epsilon toxin antibodies in blood serum of goat kids from two different herds were examined continuously for 14 months. Goats were not vaccinated against any clostridial disease and received heterologous colostrums from cows that were not vaccinated against any clostridial disease. During the survey one of these flocks suffered an unexpectedly severe C. perfringens type D enterotoxemia outbreak. The results showed that natural acquired antibodies against C. perfringens epsilon toxin can appear as early as 6 weeks in young goats and increase with the age without evidence of clinical disease. The enterotoxemia outbreak was coincident with a significant increase in the level of anti-epsilon toxin antibodies. PMID:18538416

  14. Antibody Discovery via Multiplexed Single Cell Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Harriman, William D.; Collarini, Ellen J.; Sperinde, Gizette V.; Strandh, Magnus; Fatholahi, Marjan M.; Dutta, April; Lee, Yunji; Mettler, Shelley E.; Keyt, Bruce A.; Ellsworth, Stote L.; Kauvar, Lawrence M.

    2008-01-01

    The secreted immunoglobulin footprint of single hybridoma cells, containing ~10 fg of antibody purified in situ, has been probed for 9 properties concurrently by use of detection labels comprising 280 nm combinatorially colored fluorescent latex beads functionalized with proteins. Specificity of each individual hybridoma cell’s product has thereby been assessed in a primary screen. Varying the density of antigen on beads to modulate the avidity of the interaction between bead and secreted ant...

  15. Consumption of purple sweet potato leaves modulates human immune response: T-lymphocyte functions, lytic activity of natural killer cell and antibody production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chiao-Ming Chen; Sing-Chung Li; Ya-Ling Lin; Ching-Yun Hsu; Ming-Jer Shieh; Jen-Fang Liu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the immunological effects of physiological doses of purple sweet potato leaves (PSPL).METHODS: The randomized crossover study (two periods,each lasting for 2 wk) involved 16 healthy non-smoking adults of normal weight. The 6-wk study consisted of a run-in (wk 1) PSPL diet (daily consumption of 200 g PSPL) or a control diet (low polyphenols, with the amount of carotenoids adjusted to the same level as that of PSPL) (wk 2-3), washout diet (wk 4), and switched diet (wk 5-6). Fasting blood was collected weekly in the morning. T-lymphocyte function was assessed via the proliferation and secretion of immunoreactive cytokines.Salivary IgA secretion and the specific cytotoxic activities of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells were determined.RESULTS: The plasma β-carotene level increased with time in both groups, while the plasma polyphenol level decreased in the control group, and no significant difference was detected between the two groups.Although plasma polyphenol levels did not significantly increase in the PSPL group at the end of the study, they were significantly elevated in urine. PSPL consumption produced a significant increase in proliferation responsiveness of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and their secretion of immunoreactive IL-2 and IL-4. As well, lytic activity in NK cells was elevated in a time-dependent fashion. Salivary TgA secretion significantly decreased in control group after 2 wk, and returned to baseline following dietary switch to PSPL.CONCLUSION: Consumption of PSPL modulates various immune functions including increased proliferation responsiveness of PBMC, secretion of cytokines IL-2 and IL-4, and the lytic activity of NK cells. The responsible determinants of PSPL remain to be elucidated, as does the biological significance of the present observations.

  16. Antibodies to human fetal erythroid cells from a nonimmune phage antibody library

    OpenAIRE

    Huie, Michael A.; Cheung, Mei-Chi; Muench, Marcus O.; Becerril, Baltazar; Kan, Yuet W.; Marks, James D.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to isolate fetal nucleated red blood cells (NRBCs) from the maternal circulation makes possible prenatal genetic analysis without the need for diagnostic procedures that are invasive for the fetus. Such isolation requires antibodies specific to fetal NRBCs. To generate a panel of antibodies to antigens present on fetal NRBCs, a new type of nonimmune phage antibody library was generated in which multiple copies of antibody fragments are displayed on each pha...

  17. [Inhibition of adenovirus reproduction in cell culture by specific antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povnytsia, O Iu; Nosach, L M; Zhovnovata, V L; Zahorodnia, S D; Vantsak, N P; Tokarchuk, L V; Polishchuk, O M; Diachenko, N S

    2009-01-01

    The capacity of specific antibodies to inhibit the reproduction of homo- and heterologous adenoviruses in Hela cell added to culture medium after virus adsorption was studied. The inhibiting effect of polyclonal antivirus and monospecific antihexone antibodies to homo- and heterologous adenoviruses was shown. The effect was more expressed when using antibodies to homologous antibodies. The intensity of inhibition depended on antibodies concentration in the medium and infecting dose of the virus. Essential reduction of the quantity of infected cells and a decrease of the titer of adenovirus synthesized in the presence of homo- and heterologous antibodies was shown but adenovirus reproduction was not inhibited completely. PMID:19663330

  18. Cell adhesion molecules: detection with univalent second antibody

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Identification of cell surface molecules that play a role in cell-cell adhesion (here called cell adhesion molecules) has been achieved by demonstrating the inhibitory effect of univalent antibodies that bind these molecules in an in vitro assay of cell-cell adhesion. A more convenient reagent, intact (divalent) antibody, has been avoided because it might agglutinate the cells rather than blocking cell-cell adhesion. In this report, we show that intact rabbit immunoglobulin directed against c...

  19. Intratumoral delivery of CpG-conjugated anti-MUC1 antibody enhances NK cell anti-tumor activity

    OpenAIRE

    Schettini, Jorge; Kidiyoor, Amritha; Besmer, Dahlia M; Tinder, Teresa L; Roy, Lopamudra Das; Lustgarten, Joseph; Gendler, Sandra J.; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against tumor-associated antigens are useful anticancer agents. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is one of the major mechanisms responsible for initiating natural killer cell (NK)-mediated killing of tumors. However, the regulation of ADCC via NK cells is poorly understood. We have investigated the cytolytic activity of NK cells against pancreatic cancer cells that were coated with an antibody directed against the human tumor antigen, Mucin-1 design...

  20. Development of antibodies to human embryonic stem cell antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Stanley Marisa; Rao Mahendra S; Olson Judith M; Cai Jingli; Taylor Eva; Ni Hsiao-Tzu

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Using antibodies to specific protein antigens is the method of choice to assign and identify cell lineage through simultaneous analysis of surface molecules and intracellular markers. Embryonic stem cell research can be benefited from using antibodies specific to transcriptional factors/markers that contribute to the "stemness" phenotype or critical for cell lineage. Results In this report, we have developed and validated antibodies (either monoclonal or polyclonal) specif...

  1. Cell-Free Synthesis Meets Antibody Production: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Marlitt Stech; Stefan Kubick

    2015-01-01

    Engineered antibodies are key players in therapy, diagnostics and research. In addition to full size immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) molecules, smaller formats of recombinant antibodies, such as single-chain variable fragments (scFv) and antigen binding fragments (Fab), have emerged as promising alternatives since they possess different advantageous properties. Cell-based production technologies of antibodies and antibody fragments are well-established, allowing researchers to design and manufactu...

  2. B cells contribute to MS pathogenesis through antibody-dependent and antibody-independent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson HL

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Heather L Wilson1,21Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Center, 2Department of Biochemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, CanadaAbstract: For many years, central dogma defined multiple sclerosis (MS as a T cell-driven autoimmune disorder; however, over the past decade there has been a burgeoning recognition that B cells contribute to the pathogenesis of certain MS disease subtypes. B cells may contribute to MS pathogenesis through production of autoantibodies (or antibodies directed at foreign bodies, which unfortunately cross-react with self-antigens, through promotion of T cell activation via antigen presentation, or through production of cytokines. This review highlights evidence for antibody-dependent and antibody-independent B cell involvement in MS pathogenesis.Keywords: autoantibodies, antibody targets, clinically isolated MS, primary progressive MS, secondary progressive MS, relapsing and remitting MS, T cells, T regulatory cells

  3. Immunoglobulins, antibody repertoire and B cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J E; Zhao, Y; Sinkora, M; Wertz, N; Kacskovics, I

    2009-03-01

    Swine share with most placental mammals the same five antibody isotypes and same two light chain types. Loci encoding lambda, kappa and Ig heavy chains appear to be organized as they are in other mammals. Swine differ from rodents and primates, but are similar to rabbits in using a single VH family (VH3) to encode their variable heavy chain domain, but not the family used by cattle, another artiodactyl. Distinct from other hoofed mammals and rodents, Ckappa:Clambda usage resembles the 1:1 ratio seen in primates. Since IgG subclasses diversified after speciation, same name subclass homologs do not exist among swine and other mammals unless very closely related. Swine possess six putative IgG subclasses that appear to have diversified by gene duplication and exon shuffle while retaining motifs that can bind to FcgammaRs, FcRn, C1q, protein A and protein G. The epithelial chorial placenta of swine and the precosial nature of their offspring have made piglets excellent models for studies on fetal antibody repertoire development and on the postnatal role of gut colonization, maternal colostrum and neonatal infection on the development of adaptive immunity during the "critical window" of immunological development. This chapter traces the study of the humoral immune system of this species through its various eras of discovery and compiles the results in tables and figures that should be a useful reference for educators and investigators. PMID:18804488

  4. Atypical and classical memory B cells produce Plasmodium falciparum neutralizing antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muellenbeck, Matthias F; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Amulic, Borko;

    2013-01-01

    . We show at the single cell level that natural Pf infection induces the development of classical memory B cells (CM) and atypical memory B cells (AtM) that produce broadly neutralizing antibodies against blood stage Pf parasites. CM and AtM contribute to anti-Pf serum IgG production, but only AtM show...

  5. Langerhans' cells, veiled cells, and interdigitating cells in the mouse recognized by a monoclonal antibody

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    An mAb, NLDC-145, is described that specifically reacts with a group of nonlymphoid dendritic cells including Langerhans cells (LC), veiled cells (VC), and interdigitating cells (IDC). The antibody does not react with precursor cells in bone marrow and blood. Macrophages are not stained by the antibody, but a subpopulation of Ia+ peritoneal exudate cells is recognized. Possible relationships of the various nonlymphoid dendritic cell (NLDC) types are discussed.

  6. Transfusion management of patients with red blood cell antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bujandrić Nevenka B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Red blood cell antibodies may cause a positive result of pre-transfusion blood compatibility testing (crossmatch test. It can be a problem to provide suitable blood units for patients with clinically significant antibodies to high-frequency antigens as well as for those with multiple alloantibody specificities. This study was aimed at identifying transfused patients in the population of South-Backa who had developed clinically significant red blood cell alloantibodies. Material and methods. We analyzed the records of crossmatch results and antibody screening performed at the Blood Transfusion Institute of Vojvodina during 2012. Results. Antibodies were found in 103 patients: A 63 patients with single antibodies: 1 16 with antibodies of unknown specificity (3 autoantibodies, 13 alloantibodies; 2 39 with clinically significant antibodies (23 from Rh system (2 anti-C, 2 anti-D, 12 anti-E, 7 anti-c, 4 anti-K, 3 anti-Fya, 7 anti-Jka, 2 anti-S; 3 8 with usually not significant antibodies (6 anti-M, 1 anti-A1, 1 anti- Cw; B 40 patients developed multiple antibodies: 1 all patients had at least one clinically significant antibody from various blood group system (44 Rh, 13 Kell, 7 Kidd, 7 MNSs (S, s; 2 3 patients had usually not significant antibodies (1 Lewis, 2 Lutheran; 3 3 patients occasionally had clinically significant antibody (3 anti- Yta; 4 3 patients had antibodies of unknown specificity (2 autoantibodies, 1alloantibody. Antibodies detected in the majority of patients (65-63.1% had a specificity of Rh and/or the Kell system. Conclusions. The main goal of pre-transfusion blood compatibility testing is to detect clinically significant antibodies. The provision of antigen negative blood units for those patients is a special challenge for blood establishments. Database with a sufficient number of typed blood donors can help to resolve this problem.

  7. Fingerprinting of Natural Product by Eastern Blotting Using Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We succeeded in developing the fingerprint of natural product by eastern blotting using monoclonal antibodies. After developing and separating them on a TLC plate, solasodine glycosides are oxidized by NaIO4 and reacted with a protein to give conjugates which are recognized with anti-solamargine monoclonal antibody (MAb. Anti-solamargine MAb having wide cross-reactivity can stain and detect all solasodine glycosides by fingerprint. Different sensitivity between solamargine and solasonine was observed. The detection limit was 1.6 ng of solasonine. The hydrolysed products of solamargine were determined by fingerprint of eastern blotting compared to their Rf values depending on the sugar number. Fingerprint by eastern blotting using anti-ginsenoside Rb1 MAb distinguished the formula containing ginseng prescribed in traditional Chinese medicine. By double-staining of ginsenosides it is possible to suggest that the staining color shows the pharmacological activity, such as the purple bands indicate ginsenosides having stimulation activity, and the blue color indicated compound like ginsenosides possessed the depression affect for the central nervous system (CNS, respectively.

  8. Nature-inspired design of motif-specific antibody scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Koerber, James T.; Thomsen, Nathan D.; Hannigan, Brett T.; DeGrado, William F.; Wells, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant changes in post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as phosphorylation underlie a majority of human diseases. However, detection and quantification of PTMs for diagnostic or biomarker applications often requires monoclonal PTM-specific antibodies, which are challenging to generate using traditional antibody-generation platforms. Here we outline a general strategy for producing synthetic PTM-specific antibodies by engineering a motif-specific ‘hot spot’ into an antibody scaffold. ...

  9. Natural and man-made V-gene repertoires for antibody discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, William J J; Almagro, Juan C

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies are the fastest-growing segment of the biologics market. The success of antibody-based drugs resides in their exquisite specificity, high potency, stability, solubility, safety, and relatively inexpensive manufacturing process in comparison with other biologics. We outline here the structural studies and fundamental principles that define how antibodies interact with diverse targets. We also describe the antibody repertoires and affinity maturation mechanisms of humans, mice, and chickens, plus the use of novel single-domain antibodies in camelids and sharks. These species all utilize diverse evolutionary solutions to generate specific and high affinity antibodies and illustrate the plasticity of natural antibody repertoires. In addition, we discuss the multiple variations of man-made antibody repertoires designed and validated in the last two decades, which have served as tools to explore how the size, diversity, and composition of a repertoire impact the antibody discovery process. PMID:23162556

  10. T-cell detection with monoclonal antibody T101 kits.

    OpenAIRE

    Pollack, S M; Cimino, E F; Robbins, D S; Hoffman, P M

    1986-01-01

    A solid-phase immunoadsorption procedure (Quantigen T&B cell kit; Bio-Rad Laboratories, Richmond, Calif.) employing monoclonal antibody T101 detected mean percentages of peripheral blood T cells comparable to those obtained by rosetting with sheep erythrocytes, while lower values were obtained with an indirect immunofluorescence procedure (Cytotag T&B cell kit; Hybritech, Inc., San Diego, Calif.) employing the same antibody. Therefore, T101 binding appears to be more easily detected by solid-...

  11. [Continuous perfusion culture hybridoma cells for production of monoclonal antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Li; Li, Ling; Feng, Qiang; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Zhi-Nan

    2002-05-01

    Hybridoma cells were cultured by continuous perfusion in Fibra-Cel of 5L packed-bed bioreactor for 22 days in low serum or serum-free media. The corresponded amino acids were fed and serum concentration was decreased by analyzing glucose concentration, oxygen uptake rate, secretary antibody amount and amino acids concentration in culture supernatant. Comparing with continuous perfusion culture that amino acids were not fed, antibody amount of production was increased about 2-3 times. The inoculated cell density was 2.5 x 10(5) cells/mL, while the final cell density was 8.79 x 10(8) cells/mL. Antibody production was reached 295 mg/L/d at average level, and the highest level was reached 532 mg/L/d. These results provided a primary mode of enlarge culture for monoclonal antibody industralization. PMID:12192875

  12. Cell-targeting antibodies in immunity to Ebola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaljohn, Alan; Lewis, George K

    2016-06-01

    As the 2014-15 Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa evolved from emergency to lesson, developers of both vaccines and therapeutic antibodies were left with the puzzlement of what kinds of anti-Ebola antibodies are predictably desirable in treating the afflicted, and what antibodies might account for the specific and lasting protection elicited by the more effective vaccines. The facile answer in virology is that neutralizing antibody (NAb) is desired and required. However, with Ebola and other filoviruses (as with many prior viral examples), there are multiple discordances in which neutralizing antibodies fail to protect animals, and others in which antibody-mediated protection is observed in the absence of measured virus neutralization. Explanation presumably resides in the protective role of antibodies that bind and functionally 'target' virus-infected cells, here called 'cell-targeting antibody', or CTAb. To be clear, many NAbs are also CTAbs, and in the case of Ebola the great majority of NAbs are likely CTAbs. Isotype, glycosylation, and other features of CTAbs are likely crucial in their capacity to mediate protection. Overall, results and analysis invite an increasingly complex view of antibody-mediated immunity to enveloped viruses. PMID:27005312

  13. ANTIBODIES DEFINING RAT ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS - RECA-1, A PAN-ENDOTHELIAL CELL-SPECIFIC MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DUIJVESTIJN, AM; VANGOOR, H; KLATTER, F; MAJOOR, GD; VANBUSSEL, E; VRIESMAN, PJCV

    1992-01-01

    We have been searching for antibodies reactive with rat endothelial cells. Two monoclonal antibodies (mAb), named RECA-1 and RECA-2 were produced and tested in immunoperoxidase staining on frozen sections of various rat tissues. Staining patterns were compared to those obtained with the mAbs OX-2, O

  14. In vitro affinity maturation of a natural human antibody overcomes a barrier to in vivo affinity maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Fouts, Ashley E; Stengel, Katharina; Luan, Peng; Dillon, Michael; Liang, Wei-Ching; Feierbach, Becket; Kelley, Robert F; Hötzel, Isidro

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies isolated from human donors are increasingly being developed for anti-infective therapeutics. These antibodies undergo affinity maturation in vivo, minimizing the need for engineering of therapeutic leads for affinity. However, the affinities required for some therapeutic applications may be higher than the affinities of the leads obtained, requiring further affinity maturation in vitro. To improve the neutralization potency of natural human antibody MSL-109 targeting human cytomegalovirus (CMV), we affinity matured the antibody against the gH/gL glycoprotein complex. A phage display library where most of the six complementary-determining regions (CDRs) were allowed to vary in only one amino acid residue at a time was used to scan for mutations that improve binding affinity. A T55R mutation and multiple mutations in position 53 of the heavy chain were identified that, when present individually or in combination, resulted in higher apparent affinities to gH/gL and improved CMV neutralization potency of Fab fragments expressed in bacterial cells. Three of these mutations in position 53 introduced glycosylation sites in heavy chain CDR 2 (CDR H2) that impaired binding of antibodies expressed in mammalian cells. One high affinity (KD < 10 pM) variant was identified that combined the D53N and T55R mutations while avoiding glycosylation of CDR H2. However, all the amino acid substitutions identified by phage display that improved binding affinity without introducing glycosylation sites required between two and four simultaneous nucleotide mutations to avoid glycosylation. These results indicate that the natural human antibody MSL-109 is close to a local affinity optimum. We show that affinity maturation by phage display can be used to identify and bypass barriers to in vivo affinity maturation of antibodies imposed by glycosylation and codon usage. These constraints may be relatively prevalent in human antibodies due to the codon usage and the amino acid

  15. Host defence against C. albicans infections in IgH transgenic mice with V(H) derived from a natural anti-keratin antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Fu, Meng; An, Jin-Gang; Xing, Ying; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Yao-Chun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Tian, Rong; Su, Wen-Jing; Guan, Hai-Hong; Wang, Gang; Gao, Tian-Wen; Han, Hua; Liu, Yu-Feng

    2007-02-01

    Fungal infections have been increasing and life-threatening in recent years, but host immune responses, especially the humoral immunity, to fungi have not been fully understood. In the present study, we report that natural antibodies from unimmunized mice bind to Candida albicans. We established a monoclonal natural antibody, 3B4, which recognized a surface antigen located at germ tubes of C. albicans. The 3B4 antibody protected mice from C. albicans-induced death in passive immunization, by mechanisms involving suppressing germ tube formation and modulating phagocytosis. Interestingly, 3B4 also bound to a self-antigen keratin. To further study the generation and anti-C. albicans activities of natural antibodies in vivo, we constructed a mu chain transgenic mouse (TgV(H)3B4) using the V(H) gene from 3B4. TgV(H)3B4 had elevated serum anti-keratin/C. albicans IgM, and were resistant to C. albicans infections. Analyses of B cell development showed that in TgV(H)3B4, B cells secreting the anti-keratin/C. albicans antibodies were enriched in the B1 B cell compartment. Our findings reveal an important role of keratin-reactive natural antibodies in anti-C. albicans immune responses, and suggest that keratin may function in selecting B cells into the B1 B cell compartment, where natural antibodies are made to fight fungal infections. PMID:16925788

  16. Adhesion between peptides/antibodies and breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, J.; Paetzell, E.; Bogorad, A.; Soboyejo, W. O.

    2010-06-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to measure the adhesion forces between the receptors on breast cancer cells specific to human luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) peptides and antibodies specific to the EphA2 receptor. The adhesion forces between LHRH-coated AFM tips and human MDA-MB-231 cells (breast cancer cells) were shown to be about five times greater than those between LHRH-coated AFM tips and normal Hs578Bst breast cells. Similarly, those between EphA2 antibody-coated AFM tips and breast cancer cells were over five times greater than those between EphA2 antibody-coated AFM tips and normal breast cells. The results suggest that AFM can be used for the detection of breast cancer cells in biopsies. The implications of the results are also discussed for the early detection and localized treatment of cancer.

  17. Anti-B cell antibody therapies for inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Jayne, David R W

    2014-01-01

    Several monoclonal antibodies targeting B cells have been tested as therapeutics for inflammatory rheumatic diseases. We review important observations from randomized clinical trials regarding the efficacy and safety of anti-B cell antibody-based therapies for rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus...... erythematosus, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, and primary Sjögren's syndrome. For some anti-B cell agents, clinical benefits have been convincingly demonstrated, while other B cell-targeted therapies failed to improve outcomes when added to standard......-of-care treatment or were associated with increased rates of adverse events. Although the risk-benefit balance seems to be acceptable for currently licensed anti-B cell agents, additional studies are required to fully assess the safety of treatment regimens involving prolonged interference with B cell counts and...

  18. Modeling bispecific monoclonal antibody interaction with two cell membrane targets indicates the importance of surface diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengers, Bram G; McGinty, Sean; Nouri, Fatma Z; Argungu, Maryam; Hawkins, Emma; Hadji, Aymen; Weber, Andrew; Taylor, Adam; Sepp, Armin

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a mathematical framework for describing a bispecific monoclonal antibody interaction with two independent membrane-bound targets that are expressed on the same cell surface. The bispecific antibody in solution binds either of the two targets first, and then cross-links with the second one while on the cell surface, subject to rate-limiting lateral diffusion step within the lifetime of the monovalently engaged antibody-antigen complex. At experimental densities, only a small fraction of the free targets is expected to lie within the reach of the antibody binding sites at any time. Using ordinary differential equation and Monte Carlo simulation-based models, we validated this approach against an independently published anti-CD4/CD70 DuetMab experimental data set. As a result of dimensional reduction, the cell surface reaction is expected to be so rapid that, in agreement with the experimental data, no monovalently bound bispecific antibody binary complexes accumulate until cross-linking is complete. The dissociation of the bispecific antibody from the ternary cross-linked complex is expected to be significantly slower than that from either of the monovalently bound variants. We estimate that the effective affinity of the bivalently bound bispecific antibody is enhanced for about 4 orders of magnitude over that of the monovalently bound species. This avidity enhancement allows for the highly specific binding of anti-CD4/CD70 DuetMab to the cells that are positive for both target antigens over those that express only one or the other We suggest that the lateral diffusion of target antigens in the cell membrane also plays a key role in the avidity effect of natural antibodies and other bivalent ligands in their interactions with their respective cell surface receptors. PMID:27097222

  19. Efficacy of Wnt-1 monoclonal antibody in sarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarcomas are one of the most refractory diseases among malignant tumors. More effective therapies based on an increased understanding of the molecular biology of sarcomas are needed as current forms of therapy remain inadequate. Recently, it has been reported that Wnt-1/β-catenin signaling inhibits apoptosis in several cancers. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of a monoclonal anti-Wnt-1 antibody in sarcoma cells. We treated cell lines A-204, SJSA-1, and fresh primary cultures of lung metastasis of sarcoma with a monoclonal anti-Wnt-1 antibody. Wnt-1 siRNA treatment was carried out in A-204. We assessed cell death using Crystal Violet staining. Apoptosis induction was estimated by flow cytometry analysis (Annexin V and PI staining). Cell signaling changes were determined by western blotting analysis. We detected Wnt-1 expression in all tissue samples and cell lines. Significant apoptosis induction was found in monoclonal anti-Wnt-1 antibody treated cells compared to control monoclonal antibody treated cells (p < 0.02). Similarly, we observed increased apoptosis in Wnt-1 siRNA treated cells. Blockade of Wnt-1 signaling in both experiments was confirmed by analyzing intracellular levels of Dishevelled-3 and of cytosolic β-catenin. Furthermore, the monoclonal anti-Wnt-1 antibody also induced cell death in fresh primary cultures of metastatic sarcoma in which Wnt-1 signaling was active. Our results indicate that Wnt-1 blockade by either monoclonal antibody or siRNA induces cell death in sarcoma cells. These data suggest that Wnt-1 may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of a subset of sarcoma cells in which Wnt-1/β-catenin signaling is active

  20. Detailed analyses of antibodies recognizing mitochondrial antigens suggest similar or identical mechanism for production of natural antibodies and natural autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czömpöly, Tamás; Olasz, Katalin; Nyárády, Zoltán; Simon, Diána; Bovári, Judit; Németh, Péter

    2008-06-01

    Because of their endosymbiotic evolutionary origin, proteins compartmentalized into mitochondria represent an interesting transition from prokaryotic foreign to essential self molecules. We investigated the presence of naturally occurring antibodies (nAbs) recognizing mitochondrial inner membrane enzymes. Epitope mapping analysis of a mitochondrial inner membrane enzyme, citrate synthase (CS) by synthetic overlapping peptides and phage display libraries using sera from healthy individuals and from patients having systemic autoimmune disease revealed CS recognizing nAbs with IgM isotype. We analyzed cross-reactive epitopes on human CS, bacterial CS, and various standard autoantigens. We have found that the fine epitope pattern on CS is different under physiological and pathological conditions. Moreover sera affinity purified on CS cross reacts with nucleosome antigen, which cross-reactivity could be mapped to a short epitope on human CS. These data indicate that in theory, nAbs "specific" for a given self antigen could fulfill the function of participating in innate defense mechanisms and at the same time recognize a target antigen in a systemic autoimmune disease. Thus, at the level of recognized epitopes there is a possible link between the innate like part and the adaptive-autoimmune arm of the humoral immune system. PMID:18558363

  1. Natural killer cell mediated cytotoxic responses in the Tasmanian devil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gabriella K; Kreiss, Alexandre; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the world's largest marsupial carnivore, is under threat of extinction following the emergence of an infectious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is spread between Tasmanian devils during biting. The disease is consistently fatal and devils succumb without developing a protective immune response. The aim of this study was to determine if Tasmanian devils were capable of forming cytotoxic antitumour responses and develop antibodies against DFTD cells and foreign tumour cells. The two Tasmanian devils immunised with irradiated DFTD cells did not form cytotoxic or humoral responses against DFTD cells, even after multiple immunisations. However, following immunisation with xenogenic K562 cells, devils did produce cytotoxic responses and antibodies against this foreign tumour cell line. The cytotoxicity appeared to occur through the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in an antibody dependent manner. Classical NK cell responses, such as innate killing of DFTD and foreign cancer cells, were not observed. Cells with an NK-like phenotype comprised approximately 4 percent of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results of this study suggest that Tasmanian devils have NK cells with functional cytotoxic pathways. Although devil NK cells do not directly recognise DFTD cancer cells, the development of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity presents a potential pathway to induce cytotoxic responses against the disease. These findings have positive implications for future DFTD vaccine research. PMID:21957452

  2. Antibody penetration into living cells. V. Interference between two fc gamma receptor-mediated functions: antibody penetration and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llerena, J M; Ruíz-Argüelles, A; Alarcón-Segovia, D; Llorente, L; Díaz-Jouanen, E

    1981-01-01

    The same Fc gamma receptor appears to be shared for two important phenomena: antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody penetration into living cells. ADCC is inhibited through interaction with the Fc gamma receptor during the antibody penetration process, indicating that both mechanisms may modulate each other in vitro. PMID:6972908

  3. Antibody and B cell responses to Plasmodium sporozoites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna N Dups

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies are capable of blocking infection of the liver by Plasmodium sporozoites. Accordingly the induction of anti-sporozoite antibodies is a major aim of various vaccine approaches to malaria. In recent years our knowledge of the specificity and quantities of antibodies required for protection has been greatly expanded by clinical trials of various whole sporozoite and subunit vaccines. Moreover, the development of humanized mouse models and transgenic parasites have also aided our ability to assess the specificity of antibodies and their ability to block infection. Nonetheless, considerable gaps remain in our knowledge - in particular in understanding what antigens are recognized by infection blocking antibodies and in knowing how we can induce robust, long-lived antibody responses. Maintaining high levels of circulating antibodies is likely to be of primary importance, as antibodies must block infection in the short time it takes for sporozoites to reach the liver from the skin. It is clear that a better understanding of the development of protective B cell-mediated immunity will aid the development and refinement of malaria vaccines.

  4. Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  5. HIV-Specific Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC) -Mediating Antibodies Decline while NK Cell Function Increases during Antiretroviral Therapy (ART)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov Jensen, Sanne; Fomsgaard, Anders; Borggren, Marie; Tingstedt, Jeanette Linnea; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte; Rasmussen, Line Dahlerup; Pedersen, Court; Karlsson, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Understanding alterations in HIV-specific immune responses during antiretroviral therapy (ART), such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is important in the development of novel strategies to control HIV-1 infection. This study included 53 HIV-1 positive individuals. We evaluated...... the ability of effector cells and antibodies to mediate ADCC separately and in combination using the ADCC-PanToxiLux assay. The ability of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to mediate ADCC was significantly higher in individuals who had been treated with ART before seroconversion......, compared to the individuals initiating ART at a low CD4+ T cell count (<350 cells/μl blood) and the ART-naïve individuals. The frequency of CD16 expressing natural killer (NK) cells correlated with both the duration of ART and Granzyme B (GzB) activity. In contrast, the plasma titer of antibodies mediating...

  6. Neutralizing antibodies derived from the B cells of 1918 influenza pandemic survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaocong; Tsibane, Tshidi; McGraw, Patricia A; House, Frances S; Keefer, Christopher J; Hicar, Mark D; Tumpey, Terrence M; Pappas, Claudia; Perrone, Lucy A; Martinez, Osvaldo; Stevens, James; Wilson, Ian A; Aguilar, Patricia V; Altschuler, Eric L; Basler, Christopher F; Crowe, James E

    2008-09-25

    Investigation of the human antibody response to influenza virus infection has been largely limited to serology, with relatively little analysis at the molecular level. The 1918 H1N1 influenza virus pandemic was the most severe of the modern era. Recent work has recovered the gene sequences of this unusual strain, so that the 1918 pandemic virus could be reconstituted to display its unique virulence phenotypes. However, little is known about adaptive immunity to this virus. We took advantage of the 1918 virus sequencing and the resultant production of recombinant 1918 haemagglutinin (HA) protein antigen to characterize at the clonal level neutralizing antibodies induced by natural exposure of survivors to the 1918 pandemic virus. Here we show that of the 32 individuals tested that were born in or before 1915, each showed seroreactivity with the 1918 virus, nearly 90 years after the pandemic. Seven of the eight donor samples tested had circulating B cells that secreted antibodies that bound the 1918 HA. We isolated B cells from subjects and generated five monoclonal antibodies that showed potent neutralizing activity against 1918 virus from three separate donors. These antibodies also cross-reacted with the genetically similar HA of a 1930 swine H1N1 influenza strain, but did not cross-react with HAs of more contemporary human influenza viruses. The antibody genes had an unusually high degree of somatic mutation. The antibodies bound to the 1918 HA protein with high affinity, had exceptional virus-neutralizing potency and protected mice from lethal infection. Isolation of viruses that escaped inhibition suggested that the antibodies recognize classical antigenic sites on the HA surface. Thus, these studies demonstrate that survivors of the 1918 influenza pandemic possess highly functional, virus-neutralizing antibodies to this uniquely virulent virus, and that humans can sustain circulating B memory cells to viruses for many decades after exposure-well into the tenth

  7. A Neutralizing Antibody Assay Based on a Reporter of Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuling; Li, Jia J; Kim, Hyun Jun; Liu, Xu; Liu, Weiyi; Akhgar, Ahmad; Bowen, Michael A; Spitz, Susan; Jiang, Xu-Rong; Roskos, Lorin K; White, Wendy I

    2015-11-01

    Benralizumab is a humanized anti-IL5 receptor α (IL5Rα) monoclonal antibody (mAb) with enhanced (afucosylation) antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) function. An ADCC reporter cell-based neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay was developed and characterized to detect NAb against benralizumab in human serum to support the clinical development of benralizumab. The optimal ratio of target cells to effector cells was 3:1. Neither parental benralizumab (fucosylated) nor benralizumab Fab resulted in ADCC activity, confirming the requirement for ADCC activity in the NAb assay. The serum tolerance of the cells was determined to be 2.5%. The cut point derived from normal and asthma serum samples was comparable. The effective range of benralizumab was determined, and 35 ng/mL [80% maximal effective concentration (EC80)] was chosen as the standard concentration to run in the assessment of NAb. An affinity purified goat anti-benralizumab polyclonal idiotype antibody preparation was shown to have NAb since it inhibited ADCC activity in a dose-dependent fashion. The low endogenous concentrations of IL5 and soluble IL5 receptor (sIL5R) did not demonstrate to interfere with the assay. The estimated assay sensitivities at the cut point were 1.02 and 1.10 μg/mL as determined by the surrogate neutralizing goat polyclonal and mouse monoclonal anti-drug antibody (ADA) controls, respectively. The assay can detect NAb (at 2.5 μg/mL) in the presence of 0.78 μg/mL benralizumab. The assay was not susceptible to non-specific matrix effects. This study provides an approach and feasibility of developing an ADCC cell-based NAb assay to support biopharmaceuticals with an ADCC function. PMID:26205082

  8. Transfusion management of patients with red blood cell antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Bujandrić Nevenka B.; Grujić Jasmina N.; Krga-Milanović Mirjana M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Red blood cell antibodies may cause a positive result of pre-transfusion blood compatibility testing (crossmatch test). It can be a problem to provide suitable blood units for patients with clinically significant antibodies to high-frequency antigens as well as for those with multiple alloantibody specificities. This study was aimed at identifying transfused patients in the population of South-Backa who had developed clinically significant red...

  9. Multifactorial aspects of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Kapur

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on diseases of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction via FcγRs on phagocytes, in particular regarding platelets in fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and red blood cells (RBC) in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). Di

  10. Natural anti-oxLDL IgM monoclonal antibody in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuyang Feng; Ruifen Xu; Yan Gao; Haokao Gao; Zheng He; Haichang Wang

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore the role and the possible molecular mechanisms of natural anti-oxLDL IgM monoclonal antibody played and involved in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Methods Natural anti-oxLDL IgM monoclonal antibody 3A6 was generated by using standard hybridoma production techniques. Influence of 3A6 on formation of foam cells was observed by Oil Red O staining and affinity of Na125I-conjugated oxLDL on the naive and LPS-activated macrophages. After LPS stimulation on macrophages, anti-TLR4 neutralizing mAb, p38MAPK specific inhibitor SB203580, NF-kB specific inhibitor PDTC or RNAi targeting Fcα/μ receptor (Fcamr) were applied, respectively. Results Natural anti-oxLDL IgM monoclonal antibody 3 A6 were found specifically inhibit the binding of CuoxLDL to naive macrophages but not the binding of CuoxLDL to LPS-activated macrophages. It also promoted the formation of CuoxLDL-mediated foam macrophages. 3A6 F(ab')2 or pre-incubation with un-related IgM inhibited the binding of 3A6/CuoxLDL complex to LPS-activated macrophages. LPS up-regulated the expression of Fcamr in macrophages in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was attenuated by treatment with anti-TLR4. LPS induced the phosphorylation of p38MAPK and translocation of NF-kB p65, contributing to the up-regulated expression of Fcα/μ receptor in macrophages. Conclusions Natural anti-oxLDL IgM monoclonal antibody 3A6 specifically inhibited the binding of CuoxLDL to naive macrophages in vitro. However, LPS, through the Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 receptor, activated the p38MAPK and NF-kB pathways and up-regulated the expression of Fcα/μ receptor in macrophages, which promoted the binding of 3A6/CuoxLDL complex to macrophages through binding with Fc fragments and the formation of foam macrophages. Therefore, our findings provide a new explanation why bacterial infection deteriorates the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  11. Single-domain antibodies that compete with the natural ligand fibroblast growth factor block the internalization of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Recombinant antibodies for FGFR1 were isolated from a llama naive library in VHH format. → These antibodies compete with the natural ligand FGF-2 for the same epitope on FGFR1. → The antibody competition inhibits the FGF-2-dependent internalization of FGFR1. -- Abstract: Single-domain antibodies in VHH format specific for fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) were isolated from a phage-display llama naive library. In particular, phage elution in the presence of the natural receptor ligand fibroblast growth factor (FGF) allowed for the identification of recombinant antibodies that compete with FGF for the same region on the receptor surface. These antibodies posses a relatively low affinity for FGFR1 and were never identified when unspecific elution conditions favoring highly affine binders were applied to panning procedures. Two populations of competitive antibodies were identified that labeled specifically the receptor-expressing cells in immunofluorescence and recognize distinct epitopes. Antibodies from both populations effectively prevented FGF-dependent internalization and nuclear accumulation of the receptor in cultured cells. This achievement indicates that these antibodies have a capacity to modulate the receptor physiology and, therefore, constitute powerful reagents for basic research and a potential lead for therapeutic applications.

  12. Isolation of human monoclonal antibodies from peripheral blood B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinghe; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Longo, Nancy S; Laub, Leo; Lin, Chien-Li; Turk, Ellen; Kang, Byong H; Migueles, Stephen A; Bailer, Robert T; Mascola, John R; Connors, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Isolation of monoclonal antibodies is an important technique for understanding the specificities and characteristics of antibodies that underlie the humoral immune response to a given antigen. Here we describe a technique for isolating monoclonal antibodies from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The protocol includes strategies for the isolation of switch-memory B cells from peripheral blood, the culture of B cells, the removal of the supernatant for screening and the lysis of B cells in preparation for immunoglobulin heavy-chain and light-chain amplification and cloning. We have observed that the addition of cytokines IL-2, IL-21 and irradiated 3T3-msCD40L feeder cells can successfully stimulate switch-memory B cells to produce high concentrations of IgG in the supernatant. The supernatant may then be screened by appropriate assays for binding or for other functions. This protocol can be completed in 2 weeks. It is adaptable to use in other species and enables the efficient isolation of antibodies with a desired functional characteristic without prior knowledge of specificity. PMID:24030440

  13. Natural killer cells in psoriasis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tobin, A M

    2012-02-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most common immune-mediated disorders. There is evidence that it is mediated by Th1 and, more recently, Th17 cells. The cytokine pattern, particularly the dominance of TNF-alpha, implicates the innate immune system in psoriasis pathogenesis. Of the many components of the innate immune system known to be involved in psoriatic lesions, natural killer and natural killer T cells appear to have a unique role. We review the evidence supporting a role for natural killer cells in psoriasis.

  14. Chlorophylls - natural solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Jantschi, Lorentz; Balan, Mugur C; Sestras, Radu E

    2011-01-01

    A molecular modeling study was conducted on a series of six natural occurring chlorophylls. Quantum chemistry calculated orbital energies were used to estimate frequency of transitions between occupied molecular orbital and unoccupied molecular orbital energy levels of chlorophyll molecules in vivo conditions in standard (ASTMG173) environmental conditions. Obtained results are in good agreement with energies necessary to fix the Magnesium atom by chlorophyll molecules and with occurrence of chlorophylls in living vegetal organisms.

  15. Semiquantitative determination of circulating islet cell surface antibodies in diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Circulating pancreatic islet cell antibodies have been demonstrated in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes (IDD). The islet cell surface antibodies (ICSA) were determined by an indirect immunofluorescence test using a suspension of viable islet cells, and similar cytoplasmic antibodies which require the use of group O human pancreas were also found in the serum of some patients. A strong association exists between the presence of islet cell antibodies and the onset of insulin-dependent diabetes. The quantitative determination of circulating ICSA using 125I-protein A, which binds to IgG attached to the islet cell surface, was essentially as described by Lernmark et al. In the present study, we determined the circulating ICSA in diabetes, especially in IDD. The ICSA were estimated in various sera from both indirect immunofluorescence and 125I-protein A. Controls bound 125I-protein A. Sera from 4 IDD patients with circulating ICSA demonstrated by immunofluorescence showed >3,000 cpm 125I-protein A binding activity, and that from 5 patients without ICSA bound <2,000 cpm. Sera from newly-diagnosed diabetics who had severe hyperglycemia showed <2,000 cpm, with or without ICSA. (author)

  16. Naturally occurring anti-band-3 antibodies and complement together mediate phagocytosis of oxidatively stressed human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of erythrocytes with the thiol-specific oxidant azodicarboxylic acid bis(dimethylamide) (diamide) enhances their phagocytosis by adherent monocytes. Phagocytosis of diamide-treated erythrocytes required that the cells were opsonized with whole serum, since complement inactivation abolished phagocytosis. Opsonization with whole serum containing 20-100 times the physiological concentration of naturally occurring anti-band-3- antibodies enhanced phagocytosis of diamide-treated erythrocytes. High inputs of anti-band-3 also restored phagocytosis of erythrocytes that had been incubated with complement-inactivated serum. Elevated concentrations of anti-spectrin antibodies were ineffective in whole and complement-inactivated serum. Specific recognition of diamide-treated erythrocytes by anti-band-3 antibodies may be due to generation of anti-band-3 reactive protein oligomers on intact diamide-treated erythrocytes. Generation of such oligomers was dose-dependent with respect to diamide. Bound anti-band-3 alone was not sufficient to mediate phagocytosis. It resulted in deposition of complement component C3b on the cells through activation of the alternative complement pathway in amounts exceeding that of bound antibodies by two orders of magnitude. Thus, anti-band-3 and complement together mediate phagocytosis of oxidatively stressed erythrocytes, which simulate senescent erythrocytes with respect to bound antibody and complement

  17. Natural anti-lymphoma activity in C57BL/6 mice: time course of appearance and nature of cytotoxic antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of the appearance of natural antibodies in C57BL/6 mice, measured by a complement-dependent cytotoxicity test against syngeneic radiation leukemia virus-induced lymphoma, was performed. Activity could be detected in sera from 5- to 14 month-old animals. This activity could be attributed mainly to IgM antibodies until the age of 10 months, whereas an increasing level of IgG-like antibodies was demonstrated in sera from 12-month-old mice. (Auth.)

  18. Multifactorial aspects of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction

    OpenAIRE

    Schoot, van der, B.H.; Vidarsson, G.; Kapur, R.

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on diseases of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction via FcγRs on phagocytes, in particular regarding platelets in fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and red blood cells (RBC) in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). Diagnostically, for HDFN laboratory tests are in place in order to predict risk for severe fetal RBC destruction and thereby initiate appropriate treatments. This test is sensitive, but has relativel...

  19. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) toward human O+ red cells coated with anti-D antibody: comparison between lymphocyte and monocyte ADCC activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Sunada,Mitsutoshi; Suzuki, Shinya; Ota, Zensuke

    1985-01-01

    We investigated the antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of lymphocytes and monocytes toward human O+ red cells coated with anti-D antibody using a 51Cr release assay. Lysis of sensitized red cells by lymphocytes occurred rapidly, but monocyte-mediated lysis occurred slowly. This difference might be due to postphagocytic 51Cr release by monocytes. ADCC of lymphocytes increased in proportion to the effector cell number, but large amounts of antibodies were required. In contrast...

  20. Detection of antibodies to single-stranded DNA in naturally acquired and experimentally induced viral hepatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive ''Farr'' assay, utilizing 125I-labelled DNA was developed for detecting antibody to single-stranded DNA (anti-ssDNA). The test was shown to be specific and as sensitive as assays using 14C-labelled DNA, for the detection of antibody in patients with connective tissue diseases. Groups of sera from patients with naturally acquired viral hepatitis and experimentally infected chimpanzees were tested for anti-ssDNA by the 125I assay and by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP). No consistent pattern was observed with either technique, indicating the elevated levels of this antibody are not as reliable markers of parenchymal liver damage as had been previously suggested

  1. Seroprevalence of unexpected red blood cell antibodies among pregnant women in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eipl, K; Nakabiito, C; Bwogi, K; Motevalli, M; Roots, A; Blagg, L; Jackson, J B

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a population-based, cross-sectional study among pregnant women in Kampala, Uganda, to determine ABO and D blood types and to determine the percentage who have unexpected red blood cell (RBC) antibodies and their specificities. De-identified blood samples from routine testing of 1001 pregnant women at the Mulago Hospital antenatal clinics in Kampala were typed for ABO and D and screened for the presence of unexpected RBC antibodies with confirmation and subsequent antibody identification. Of the 1001 blood samples tested, 48.9 percent, 26.4 percent, 21.0 percent, and 3.8 percent tested positive for blood groups 0, A, B, and AB, respectively. Of these samples, 23 (2.3%)were negative forD, and 55 (5.5%) showed initial reactivity with at least one screening RBC. The RBC antibody screen was repeated on these 55 samples, and antibody identification was performed at the Johns Hopkins Hospital Blood Bank in Baltimore, Maryland. Twenty-one of the 55 samples were confirmed to have evidence of agglutination. Nine of the 21 samples demonstrated the presence of clinically significant RBC antibodies with anti-S being the most common, 8 samples demonstrated the presence of benign or naturally occurring antibodies, and 4 had only inconclusive reactivity. This study revealed a relatively high frequency of D and a low frequency of demonstrable clinically significant alloantibodies that may cause hemolytic disease of the newborn or hemolytic transfusion reactions among pregnant women in Kampala, with anti-S being the most frequent antibody specificity. PMID:23421539

  2. Integrin receptors on tumor cells facilitate NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikeeva, Nadia; Steblyanko, Maria; Fayngerts, Svetlana; Kopylova, Natalya; Marshall, Deborah J; Powers, Gordon D; Sato, Takami; Campbell, Kerry S; Sykulev, Yuri

    2014-08-01

    NK cells that mediate ADCC play an important role in tumor-specific immunity. We have examined factors limiting specific lysis of tumor cells by CD16.NK-92 cells induced by CNTO 95LF antibodies recognizing αV integrins that are overexpressed on many tumor cells. Although all tested tumor cells were killed by CD16.NK-92 effectors in the presence of the antibodies, the killing of target cells with a low level of ICAM-1 expression revealed a dramatic decrease in their specific lysis at high antibody concentration, revealing a dose limiting effect. A similar effect was also observed with primary human NK cells. The effect was erased after IFN-γ treatment of tumor cells resulting in upregulation of ICAM-1. Furthermore, killing of the same tumor cells induced by Herceptin antibody was significantly impaired in the presence of CNTO 95Ala-Ala antibody variant that blocks αV integrins but is incapable of binding to CD16. These data suggest that αV integrins on tumor cells could compensate for the loss of ICAM-1 molecules, thereby facilitating ADCC by NK cells. Thus, NK cells could exercise cytolytic activity against ICAM-1 deficient tumor cells in the absence of proinflammatory cytokines, emphasizing the importance of NK cells in tumor-specific immunity at early stages of cancer. PMID:24810893

  3. Target cell specific antibody-based photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Lauren T.; Mitsunaga, Makoto; Kakareka, John W.; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2011-03-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), localized monochromatic light is used to activate targeted photosensitizers (PS) to induce cellular damage through the generation of cytotoxic species such as singlet oxygen. While first-generation PS passively targeted malignancies, a variety of targeting mechanisms have since been studied, including specifically activatable agents. Antibody internalization has previously been employed as a fluorescence activation system and could potentially enable similar activation of PS. TAMRA, Rhodamine-B and Rhodamine-6G were conjugated to trastuzumab (brand name Herceptin), a humanized monoclonal antibody with specificity for the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), to create quenched PS (Tra-TAM, Tra-RhoB, and Tra-Rho6G). Specific PDT with Tra-TAM and Tra-Rho6G, which formed covalently bound H-dimers, was demonstrated in HER2+ cells: Minimal cell death (SDS-PAGE).

  4. A novel antibody discovery platform identifies anti-influenza A broadly neutralizing antibodies from human memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiaodong; Chen, Yan; Varkey, Reena; Kallewaard, Nicole; Koksal, Adem C; Zhu, Qing; Wu, Herren; Chowdhury, Partha S; Dall'Acqua, William F

    2016-07-01

    Monoclonal antibody isolation directly from circulating human B cells is a powerful tool to delineate humoral responses to pathological conditions and discover antibody therapeutics. We have developed a platform aimed at improving the efficiencies of B cell selection and V gene recovery. Here, memory B cells are activated and amplified using Epstein-Barr virus infection, co-cultured with CHO-muCD40L cells, and then assessed by functional screenings. An in vitro transcription and translation (IVTT) approach was used to analyze variable (V) genes recovered from each B cell sample and identify the relevant heavy/light chain pair(s). We achieved efficient amplification and activation of memory B cells, and eliminated the need to: 1) seed B cells at clonal level (≤1 cell/well) or perform limited dilution cloning; 2) immortalize B cells; or 3) assemble V genes into an IgG expression vector to confirm the relevant heavy/light chain pairing. Cross-reactive antibodies targeting a conserved epitope on influenza A hemagglutinin were successfully isolated from a healthy donor. In-depth analysis of the isolated antibodies suggested their potential uses as anti-influenza A antibody therapeutics and uncovered a distinct affinity maturation pathway. Importantly, our results showed that cognate heavy/light chain pairings contributed to both the expression level and binding abilities of our newly isolated VH1-69 family, influenza A neutralizing antibodies, contrasting with previous observations that light chains do not significantly contribute to the function of this group of antibodies. Our results further suggest the potential use of the IVTT as a powerful antibody developability assessment tool. PMID:27049174

  5. Integrin Receptors on Tumor Cells Facilitate NK cell-mediated Antibody-dependent Cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Anikeeva, Nadia; Steblyanko, Maria; Fayngerts, Svetlana; Kopylova, Natalya; Marshall, Deborah J.; Powers, Gordon D.; Sato, Takami; Campbell, Kerry S.; Sykulev, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    NK cells that mediate ADCC play an important role in tumor-specific immunity. We have examined factors limiting specific lysis of tumor cells by CD16.NK-92 cells induced by CNTO 95LF antibodies recognizing αV integrins that are overexpressed on many tumor cells. Although all tested tumor cells were killed by CD16.NK-92 effectors in the presence of the antibodies, the killing of target cells with a low level of ICAM-1 expression revealed a dramatic decrease in their specific lysis at high anti...

  6. A flow cytometry-based workflow for detection and quantification of anti-plasmodial antibodies in vaccinated and naturally exposed individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajua, Anthony; Engleitner, Thomas; Esen, Meral; Theisen, Michael; Issifou, Saadou; Mordmüller, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Antibodies play a central role in naturally acquired immunity against Plasmodium falciparum. Current assays to detect anti-plasmodial antibodies against native antigens within their cellular context are prone to bias and cannot be automated, although they provide important...... information about natural exposure and vaccine immunogenicity. A novel, cytometry-based workflow for the quantitative detection of anti-plasmodial antibodies in human serum is presented. METHODS: Fixed red blood cells (RBCs), infected with late stages of P. falciparum were utilized to detect malaria......-specific antibodies by flow cytometry with subsequent automated data analysis. Available methods for data-driven analysis of cytometry data were assessed and a new overlap subtraction algorithm (OSA) based on open source software was developed. The complete workflow was evaluated using sera from two GMZ2 malaria...

  7. Engineering cholesterol-based fibers for antibody immobilization and cell capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Celine

    In 2015, the United States is expected to have nearly 600,000 deaths attributed to cancer. Of these 600,000 deaths, 90% will be a direct result of cancer metastasis, the spread of cancer throughout the body. During cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are shed from primary tumors and migrate through bodily fluids, establishing secondary cancer sites. As cancer metastasis is incredibly lethal, there is a growing emphasis on developing "liquid biopsies" that can screen peripheral blood, search for and identify CTCs. One popular method for capturing CTCs is the use of a detection platform with antibodies specifically suited to recognize and capture cancer cells. These antibodies are immobilized onto the platform and can then bind and capture cells of interest. However, current means to immobilize antibodies often leave them with drastically reduced function. The antibodies are left poorly suited for cell capture, resulting in low cell capture efficiencies. This body of work investigates the use of lipid-based fibers to immobilize proteins in a way that retains protein function, ultimately leading to increased cell capture efficiencies. The resulting increased efficiencies are thought to arise from the retained three-dimensional structure of the protein as well as having a complete coating of the material surface with antibodies that are capable of interacting with their antigens. It is possible to electrospin cholesterol-based fibers that are similar in design to the natural cell membrane, providing proteins a more natural setting during immobilization. Such fibers have been produced from cholesterol-based cholesteryl succinyl silane (CSS). These fibers have previously illustrated a keen aptitude for retaining protein function and increasing cell capture. Herein the work focuses on three key concepts. First, a model is developed to understand the immobilization mechanism used by electrospun CSS fibers. The antibody immobilization and cell capturing

  8. Comparisons of the effect of naturally acquired maternal pertussis antibodies and antenatal vaccination induced maternal tetanus antibodies on infant's antibody secreting lymphocyte responses and circulating plasma antibody levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shaikh Meshbahuddin; Alam, Jahangir; Afsar, Nure Alam; Huda, Nazmul; Kabir, Yearul; Qadri, Firdausi; Raqib, Rubhana; Stephensen, Charles B

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the effects of trans-placental tetanus toxoid (TT) and pertussis (PT) antibodies on an infant's response to vaccination in the context of antenatal immunization with tetanus but not with pertussis. 38 mothers received a single dose of TT vaccine during pregnancy. Infants received tetanus and pertussis vaccines at 6, 10 and 14 wk of age. TT and PT anti-IgG secretion by infant lymphocytes was measured at 15 wk. Plasma antibodies were measured at 6 wk (pre-vaccination), 15 wk and 1 y of age. Prior to vaccination, TT and PT antibody were detected in 94.6% and 15.2% of infants. At 15 wk anti-TT-IgG and anti-PT-IgG in plasma was increased by 7-9 fold over pre-vaccination levels, while at 1 y plasma anti-TT-IgG was decreased by approximately 5-fold from the peak and had returned to near the pre-vaccination level. At 1 y plasma anti-PT-IgG was decreased by 2-fold 1 yfrom the 15 wk level. However, 89.5% and 82.3% of infants at 1 y had protective levels of anti-TT and anti-PT IgG, respectively. Pre-vaccination plasma IgG levels were associated with lower vaccine-specific IgG secretion by infant lymphocytes at 15 wk (p < 0.10). This apparent inhibition was seen for anti-TT-IgG at both 15 wk (p < 0.05) and t 1 y (p < 0.10) of age. In summary, we report an apparent inhibitory effect of passively derived maternal antibody on an infants' own antibody response to the same vaccine. However, since the cut-off values for protective titers are low, infants had protective antibody levels throughout infancy. PMID:27176823

  9. Rapid isolation of antibody from a synthetic human antibody library by repeated fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Sun Yim

    Full Text Available Antibodies and their derivatives are the most important agents in therapeutics and diagnostics. Even after the significant progress in the technology for antibody screening from huge libraries, it takes a long time to isolate an antibody, which prevents a prompt action against the spread of a disease. Here, we report a new strategy for isolating desired antibodies from a combinatorial library in one day by repeated fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. First, we constructed a library of synthetic human antibody in which single-chain variable fragment (scFv was expressed in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. After labeling the cells with fluorescent antigen probes, the highly fluorescent cells were sorted by using a high-speed cell sorter, and these cells were reused without regeneration in the next round of sorting. After repeating this sorting, the positive clones were completely enriched in several hours. Thus, we screened the library against three viral antigens, including the H1N1 influenza virus, Hepatitis B virus, and Foot-and-mouth disease virus. Finally, the potential antibody candidates, which show K(D values between 10 and 100 nM against the target antigens, could be successfully isolated even though the library was relatively small (∼ 10(6. These results show that repeated FACS screening without regeneration of the sorted cells can be a powerful method when a rapid response to a spreading disease is required.

  10. Effects of first-line chemotherapy on natural killer cells in adult T-cell leukemia–lymphoma and peripheral T-cell lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ogura, Michinori; Ishida, Takashi; Tsukasaki, Kunihiro; Takahashi, Takeshi; Utsunomiya, Atae

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Natural killer (NK) cells are well known to be the most important effector cells mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) which is an important mechanism of action of antibody drugs. We evaluated the effects of chemotherapy on the cell number and activity of NK cells from patients who received the vincristine–cyclophosphamide–doxorubicin–prednisone (VCAP), doxorubicin–ranimustine–prednisone (AMP), and vindesine–etoposide–carboplatin–prednisone (VECP) (mLSG15) or mLSG1...

  11. DNA-templated antibody conjugation for targeted drug delivery to cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Tianqiang

    2016-01-01

    state to get a good pharmacological performance. Recombinant antibody engineering with non-natural amino acids, or enzyme-mediated conjugation approaches (transglutaminase, Sortase A or endoglycosidase) have been reported for producing homogeneous antibody conjugates. However, these methods require......-templated organic synthesis due to the wide existence of the 3-histidine cluster in most wild-type proteins. In this thesis, three projects that relate to targeted drug delivery to cancer cells based on the DTPC method is described. The first project was a delivery system which uses transferrin as the targeting...... ligand and saporin (ribosome inactivating protein) as the warhead to achieve enhanced cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of saporin to transferrin receptor overexpressed cancer cell line. The transferrin-saporin conjugate complex are formed by linking the site-selective DNA-transferrin conjugates with mono...

  12. Natural killer cells in leukemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to relate a reduced natural killer (NK) cell function to leukemogenesis, NK cells in the spleen and peritoneal exudate cells, with and without stimulation by Corynebacterium parvum, were tested in mice of various strains after split dose irradiation and after leukemogenic treatment with butyl- and methylnitrosourea. The investigations included also mice submitted to non-leukemogenic irradiation (1 x 1.5 and 1 x 4.5 Gy) and mice submitted to an additional treatment with hydrocortisone, which delays leukemia development after methylnitrosourea. There was, indeed, a NK-cell depression, but no major differences were seen between mice prone to leukemia development and those after cytotoxic, but nonleukemogenic, treatment. (author)

  13. Antibody-free magnetic cell sorting of genetically modified primary human CD4+ T cells by one-step streptavidin affinity purification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Matheson

    Full Text Available Existing methods for phenotypic selection of genetically modified mammalian cells suffer disadvantages of time, cost and scalability and, where antibodies are used to bind exogenous cell surface markers for magnetic selection, typically yield cells coated with antibody-antigen complexes and beads. To overcome these limitations we have developed a method termed Antibody-Free Magnetic Cell Sorting in which the 38 amino acid Streptavidin Binding Peptide (SBP is displayed at the cell surface by the truncated Low Affinity Nerve Growth Receptor (LNGFRF and used as an affinity tag for one-step selection with streptavidin-conjugated magnetic beads. Cells are released through competition with the naturally occurring vitamin biotin, free of either beads or antibody-antigen complexes and ready for culture or use in downstream applications. Antibody-Free Magnetic Cell Sorting is a rapid, cost-effective, scalable method of magnetic selection applicable to either viral transduction or transient transfection of cell lines or primary cells. We have optimised the system for enrichment of primary human CD4+ T cells expressing shRNAs and exogenous genes of interest to purities of >99%, and used it to isolate cells following Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing.

  14. Antibody-Free Magnetic Cell Sorting of Genetically Modified Primary Human CD4+ T Cells by One-Step Streptavidin Affinity Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Nicholas J.; Peden, Andrew A.; Lehner, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Existing methods for phenotypic selection of genetically modified mammalian cells suffer disadvantages of time, cost and scalability and, where antibodies are used to bind exogenous cell surface markers for magnetic selection, typically yield cells coated with antibody-antigen complexes and beads. To overcome these limitations we have developed a method termed Antibody-Free Magnetic Cell Sorting in which the 38 amino acid Streptavidin Binding Peptide (SBP) is displayed at the cell surface by the truncated Low Affinity Nerve Growth Receptor (LNGFRF) and used as an affinity tag for one-step selection with streptavidin-conjugated magnetic beads. Cells are released through competition with the naturally occurring vitamin biotin, free of either beads or antibody-antigen complexes and ready for culture or use in downstream applications. Antibody-Free Magnetic Cell Sorting is a rapid, cost-effective, scalable method of magnetic selection applicable to either viral transduction or transient transfection of cell lines or primary cells. We have optimised the system for enrichment of primary human CD4+ T cells expressing shRNAs and exogenous genes of interest to purities of >99%, and used it to isolate cells following Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 genome editing. PMID:25360777

  15. Neutralizing antibodies are unable to inhibit direct viral cell-to-cell spread of human cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Christian L; Lamorte, Louie; Sepulveda, Eliud; Lorenz, Ivo C; Gauthier, Annick; Franti, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Infection with human cytomegalovirus (CMV) during pregnancy is the most common cause of congenital disorders, and can lead to severe life-long disabilities with associated high cost of care. Since there is no vaccine or effective treatment, current efforts are focused on identifying potent neutralizing antibodies. A panel of CMV monoclonal antibodies identified from patent applications, was synthesized and expressed in order to reproduce data from the literature showing that anti-glycoprotein B antibodies neutralized virus entry into all cell types and that anti-pentameric complex antibodies are highly potent in preventing virus entry into epithelial cells. It had not been established whether antibodies could prevent subsequent rounds of infection that are mediated primarily by direct cell-to-cell transmission. A thorough validation of a plaque reduction assay to monitor cell-to-cell spread led to the conclusion that neutralizing antibodies do not significantly inhibit plaque formation or reduce plaque size when they are added post-infection. PMID:23849792

  16. Changes in the repertoire of natural antibodies caused by immunization with bacterial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shilova, N V; Navakouski, M J; Huflejt, M; Kuehn, A; Grunow, R; Blixt, Klas Ola; Bovin, N V

    2011-01-01

    The repertoire of natural anti-glycan antibodies in naïve chickens and in chickens immunized with bacteria Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and Francisella tularensis as well as with peptides from an outer membrane protein of B. pseudomallei was studied. A relatively restricted...

  17. Detection and specificity of antibodies secreted by spleen cells in mice immunized with Streptococcus mutans.

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, M. W.; Czerkinsky, C; Moldoveanu, Z

    1986-01-01

    Immune responses of mice to Streptococcus mutans serotype c were analyzed by means of the enzyme-linked immunospot assay to determine the predominant specificities of the antibodies developed. In general, the numbers of splenic antibody-secreting cells correlated with serum antibody levels. A low dose (10(8) CFU) of killed whole cells injected twice intraperitoneally induced antibodies mainly against surface protein antigen I/II. A higher dose (10(9) CFU) given two to six times also resulted ...

  18. Antibody deficiency associated with gold treatment: natural history and management in 22 patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Snowden, N; Dietch, D M; Teh, L.S.; Hilton, R C; Haeney, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a clinical and immunological study of patients with rheumatoid arthritis who develop subnormal serum immunoglobulins on gold treatment; to clarify the nature of the defect in antibody production and determine the natural history of this adverse reaction; to use this information to suggest guidelines for the detection, investigation, and management of this complication. METHODS: 22 patients who developed subnormal levels of one or more immunoglobulin isotypes while receiv...

  19. Delivery of anticancer drugs and antibodies into cells using ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junru; Pepe, Jason; Rincon, Mercedes

    2005-04-01

    It has been shown experimentally in cell suspensions that pulsed ultrasound (2.0 MHz) could be used to deliver an anti-cancer drug (Adriamycin hydrochloride) into Jurkat lymphocytes and antibodies (goat anti rabbit IgG and anti mouse IgD) into human peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMC) cells and Jurkat lymphocytes assisted by encapsulated microbubbles (Optison). When Adriamycin hydrochloride (ADR) was delivered, the delivery efficiency reached 4.80% and control baseline (no ultrasound and no ADR) was 0.17%. When anti-rabbit IgD was delivered, the efficiencies were 34.90% (control baseline was 1.33%) and 32.50% (control baseline was 1.66%) respectively for Jurkat cells and PBMC. When goat anti rabbit IgG was delivered, the efficiencies were 78.60% (control baseline was 1.60%) and 57.50% (control baseline was 11.30%) respectively for Jurkat cells and PBMC.

  20. MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODIES TO HUMAN EMBRYONAL CARCINOMA-CELLS - ANTIGENIC RELATIONSHIPS OF GERM-CELL TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEWIT, TFR; WILSON, L; VANDENELSEN, PJ; THIELEN, F; BREKHOFF, D; OOSTERHUIS, JW; PERA, MF; STERN, PL

    1991-01-01

    Fifteen monoclonal antibodies (mAb) that show specificity for human embryonal carcinoma cells are described. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with Tera-2 embryonal carcinoma cells, and hybridomas were isolated and tested versus a set of human developmental tumor cell lines. The antigens exhibit relativel

  1. How antibodies alter the cell entry pathway of dengue virus particles in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Nunez, Nilda V.; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; van de Pol, Denise P.I.; Sjollema, Klaas A.; Flipse, Jacky; van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus (DENV) infection plays an important role in the exacerbation of DENV-induced disease. To understand how antibodies influence the fate of DENV particles, we explored the cell entry pathway of DENV in the absence and presence of antibodies in macrophage-like P388D1 cells. Recent studies unraveled that both mature and immature DENV particles contribute to ADE, hence, both particles were studied. We observed that antibody-opsonized DENV enters P388D1 cells through a different pathway than non-opsonized DENV. Antibody-mediated DENV entry was dependent on FcγRs, pH, Eps15, dynamin, actin, PI3K, Rab5, and Rab7. In the absence of antibodies, DENV cell entry was FcγR, PI3K, and Rab5-independent. Live-cell imaging of fluorescently-labeled particles revealed that actin-mediated membrane protrusions facilitate virus uptake. In fact, actin protrusions were found to actively search and capture antibody-bound virus particles distantly located from the cell body, a phenomenon that is not observed in the absence of antibodies. Overall, similar results were seen for antibody-opsonized standard and antibody-bound immature DENV preparations, indicating that the maturation status of the virus does not control the entry pathway. Collectively, our findings suggest that antibodies alter the cell entry pathway of DENV and trigger a novel mechanism of initial virus-cell contact. PMID:27385443

  2. High level transient production of recombinant antibodies and antibody fusion proteins in HEK293 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jäger, Volker; Büssow, Konrad; Wagner, Andreas; Weber, Susanne; Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background The demand of monospecific high affinity binding reagents, particularly monoclonal antibodies, has been steadily increasing over the last years. Enhanced throughput of antibody generation has been addressed by optimizing in vitro selection using phage display which moved the major bottleneck to the production and purification of recombinant antibodies in an end-user friendly format. Single chain (sc)Fv antibody fragments require additional tags for detection and are not as suitable...

  3. Isolation of additional monoclonal antibodies directed against cell surface antigens of Myxococcus xanthus cells undergoing submerged development.

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, J.S.; Dworkin, M

    1988-01-01

    Thirteen additional monoclonal antibodies directed against cell surface antigens of Myxococcus xanthus cells undergoing submerged development were isolated and partially characterized. As measured by quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, 10 of these antibodies recognized antigens common to both vegetatively growing cells and cells undergoing submerged development; 3 antibodies recognized antigens specific to developing cells. Five antigens were revealed as single bands on Western bl...

  4. Correlated effects of selection for immunity in White Leghorn chicken lines on natural antibodies and specific antibody responses to KLH and M. butyricum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourichon David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of selection for three general immune response traits on primary antibody responses (Ab to Mycobacterium butyricum or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH was studied in four experimental lines of White Leghorn chicken. Birds underwent 12 generations of selection for one of three different general immune criteria; high antibody response to Newcastle disease virus 3 weeks after vaccination (ND3, high cell-mediated immune response, using the wing web response to phytohemglutinin (PHA and high phagocytic activity, measured as carbone clearance (CC. Line ND3-L was selected on ND3, line PHA-L was selected on PHA, and line CC-L on CC, but all lines were measured for all three traits. The fourth line was a contemporary random bred control maintained throughout the selection experiment. Principal component analysis was used to distinguish clusters based on the overall set of immune measures. Results In the KLH immunised group, no differences were present between lines for natural antibodies binding to KLH and LPS, and, lines ND3-L and PHA-L had higher titers to LTA and anti-Gal titers measured before the immunisation protocol. The measure of ND3 was correlated positively with LPS titers measured post KLH immunisation and with the difference between LPS titers measured at day 0 and 7 post immunisation. In the M. butyricum immunised group, Line ND3-L showed significantly higher specific antibody response to M. butyricum, and this result agrees well with the hypothesis that the Th-1 pathway was expected to be selected for in this line. Conclusion This study has shown that the two different antigens KLH and M. butyricum gave rise to different responses in the set of selected lines, and that the response was only enhanced for the antigen associated with the same response mechanism as that for the trait (ND3, PHA or CC for which the line was selected. Interactions between innate and acquired immunity have been observed mainly for the

  5. Staining of Langerhans cells with monoclonal antibodies to macrophages and lymphoid cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Haines, K A; Flotte, T. J.; Springer, T A; Gigli, I; Thorbecke, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    Langerhans cells are Ia-bearing antigen-presenting cells in the epidermis that share many functions with macrophages. We have used monoclonal antibodies to the macrophage antigens, Mac-2 and-3, Ia antigen, Fc fragment receptor and the common leukocyte antigen CLA to compare the cell surface antigens of these cells with those of interdigitating and follicular dendritic cells and of macrophages in lymphoid tissues. Immunoperoxidase staining was carried out with epidermal sheets from BALB/c mice...

  6. TIM-1 signaling in B cells regulates antibody production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → TIM-1 is highly expressed on anti-IgM + anti-CD40-stimulated B cells. → Anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and Ig production on activated B cell in vitro. → TIM-1 signaling regulates Ab production by response to TI-2 and TD antigens in vivo. -- Abstract: Members of the T cell Ig and mucin (TIM) family have recently been implicated in the control of T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study, we found TIM-1 expression on anti-IgM- or anti-CD40-stimulated splenic B cells, which was further up-regulated by the combination of anti-IgM and anti-CD40 Abs. On the other hand, TIM-1 ligand was constitutively expressed on B cells and inducible on anti-CD3+ anti-CD28-stimulated CD4+ T cells. In vitro stimulation of activated B cells by anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and expression of a plasma cell marker syndecan-1 (CD138). We further examined the effect of TIM-1 signaling on antibody production in vitro and in vivo. Higher levels of IgG2b and IgG3 secretion were detected in the culture supernatants of the anti-TIM-1-stimulated B cells as compared with the control IgG-stimulated B cells. When immunized with T-independent antigen TNP-Ficoll, TNP-specific IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG3 Abs were slightly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice. When immunized with T-dependent antigen OVA, serum levels of OVA-specific IgG2b, IgG3, and IgE Abs were significantly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice as compared with the control IgG-treated mice. These results suggest that TIM-1 signaling in B cells augments antibody production by enhancing B cell proliferation and differentiation.

  7. Immunosuppressive T-cell antibody induction for heart transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, Luit; Møller, Christian H; Gustafsson, Finn;

    2013-01-01

    Heart transplantation has become a valuable and well-accepted treatment option for end-stage heart failure. Rejection of the transplanted heart by the recipient's body is a risk to the success of the procedure, and life-long immunosuppression is necessary to avoid this. Clear evidence is required...... to identify the best, safest and most effective immunosuppressive treatment strategy for heart transplant recipients. To date, there is no consensus on the use of immunosuppressive antibodies against T-cells for induction after heart transplantation....

  8. Fully human antagonistic antibodies against CCR4 potently inhibit cell signaling and chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs B Hagemann

    Full Text Available CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4 represents a potentially important target for cancer immunotherapy due to its expression on tumor infiltrating immune cells including regulatory T cells (Tregs and on tumor cells in several cancer types and its role in metastasis.Using phage display, human antibody library, affinity maturation and a cell-based antibody selection strategy, the antibody variants against human CCR4 were generated. These antibodies effectively competed with ligand binding, were able to block ligand-induced signaling and cell migration, and demonstrated efficient killing of CCR4-positive tumor cells via ADCC and phagocytosis. In a mouse model of human T-cell lymphoma, significant survival benefit was demonstrated for animals treated with the newly selected anti-CCR4 antibodies.For the first time, successful generation of anti- G-protein coupled chemokine receptor (GPCR antibodies using human non-immune library and phage display on GPCR-expressing cells was demonstrated. The generated anti-CCR4 antibodies possess a dual mode of action (inhibition of ligand-induced signaling and antibody-directed tumor cell killing. The data demonstrate that the anti-tumor activity in vivo is mediated, at least in part, through Fc-receptor dependent effector mechanisms, such as ADCC and phagocytosis. Anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 antibodies inhibiting receptor signaling have potential as immunomodulatory antibodies for cancer.

  9. Detection of antibodies to single-stranded DNA in naturally acquired and experimentally induced viral hepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gust, I.D.; Feinstone, S.M.; Purcell, R.H.; Alter, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    A sensitive ''Farr'' assay, utilizing /sup 125/I-labelled DNA was developed for detecting antibody to single-stranded DNA (anti-ssDNA). The test was shown to be specific and as sensitive as assays using /sup 14/C-labelled DNA, for the detection of antibody in patients with connective tissue diseases. Groups of sera from patients with naturally acquired viral hepatitis and experimentally infected chimpanzees were tested for anti-ssDNA by the /sup 125/I assay and by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP). No consistent pattern was observed with either technique, indicating the elevated levels of this antibody are not as reliable markers of parenchymal liver damage as had been previously suggested.

  10. Cell line profiling to improve monoclonal antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sohye; Ren, Da; Xiao, Gang; Daris, Kristi; Buck, Lynette; Enyenihi, Atim A; Zubarev, Roman; Bondarenko, Pavel V; Deshpande, Rohini

    2014-04-01

    Mammalian cell culture performance is influenced by both intrinsic (genetic) and extrinsic (media and process) factors. In this study, intrinsic capacity of various monoclonal antibody-producing Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines was compared by exposing them to the same culture condition. Microarray-based transcriptomics and LC-MS/MS shotgun proteomics technologies were utilized to obtain expression landscape of different cell lines. Specific transcripts and proteins correlating with productivity, growth rate and cell size have been identified. The proteomics analysis results showed a strong correlation between the intracellular protein expression levels of the recombinant DHFR and productivity. In contrast, neither the light chain nor the heavy chain of the recombinant monoclonal antibody showed correlation to productivity. Other top ranked proteins which demonstrated positive correlation to productivity included the adaptor protein complex subunits AP3D1and AP2B2, DNA repair protein DDB1 and the ER translocation complex component, SRPR. The subunits of molecular chaperone T-complex protein 1 and the regulator of mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism MTHFD2 showed negative correlation to productivity. The transcriptomics analysis has identified the regulators of calcium signaling, Tmem20 and Rcan1, as the top ranked genes displaying positive and negative correlation to productivity, respectively. For the second part of the study, the principal component analysis (PCA) was generated to view the underlying global structure of the expression data. A clear division and expression polarity was observed between the two distinct clusters of cell lines, independent of link to productivity or any other traits examined. The primary component of the PCA generated from either transcriptomics or proteomics data displayed a strong correlation to cell size and doubling time, while none of the main principal components showed correlation to productivity. Our findings suggest

  11. Polyclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies mimicking the small cell lung carcinoma antigen cluster-5A interact with a panel of antibodies and induce specific immune response in animals.

    OpenAIRE

    Zwicky, C.; Stahel, R A; Jaksche, H.; Waibel, R.; Lehmann, H. P.; Loibner, H

    1991-01-01

    Polyclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies (ab2) were generated by immunising goats with the murine IgG2a monoclonal antibody SWA20 which recognises the SCLC antigen cluster-5A, a tumour-associated sialoglycoprotein. Ab2 was shown to bind specifically to antibody SWA20, but not to isotype matched control antibodies. Pre-incubation with ab2 completely inhibited target cell binding of antibody SWA20 and of four other antibodies to cluster-5A antigen, while no effect was seen with antibodies to cluste...

  12. Naturally-occurring antisperm antibodies in men: interference with fertility and implications for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francavilla, F; Romano, R; Santucci, R; La Verghetta, G; D'Abrizio, P; Francavilla, S

    1999-02-01

    Naturally-occurring antisperm antibodies in men are a relative cause of infertility, being the fertility impairment related with the degree of sperm autoimmunization. The impairment of sperm penetration through the cervical mucus represents the best established mechanism of the antibody interference with fertility. Another mechanism may involve complement-mediated sperm injury and opsonizing effect through the female genital tract. Finally, sperm-bound antibodies can interfere with sperm functions involved in the fertilization process, mainly in the sperm-zona pellucida interaction. While some mechanisms of the antibody-interference with fertility depend only on the degree of sperm autoimmunization (e.g., inhibition of cervical mucus penetration), other mechanisms (e.g., interference with gametes interaction) could or could not occur depending on the relevance in the fertilization process of the specific antigen(s) recognized by antisperm antibodies, which are policlonal in nature. Intrauterine insemination is an effective treatment when sperm autoimmunization is low or moderate, mainly if combined with corticosteroid treatment and superovulated cycles. On the contrary, its effectiveness in cases of high degree of sperm autoimmunization is controversial. The resort to "high tech" procedures is mandatory when other less invasive approaches have failed or they may also be chosen as a first-choice method in cases of high degree of sperm autoimmunization. Since in most reports the fertilization rate with in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET) was significantly lower in the presence of sperm-bound antibodies than in the case of other indications, the likelihood of fertilization is higher with intracytoplasmatic sperm injection (ICSI), where the reported fertilization rates are similar to those in other indications, or even higher. PMID:9924142

  13. Production of Antibodies against Multipass Membrane Proteins Expressed in Human Tumor Cells Using Dendritic Cell Immunization

    OpenAIRE

    Takahiko Tamura; Joe Chiba

    2009-01-01

    Antibody mediated therapeutic strategies against human malignant tumors have been widely authorized and clinically applied to cancer patients. In order to develop methods to generate antibodies reactive to the extracellular domains of multipass plasma membrane proteins specifically expressed in malignant tumors, we examined the use of dendritic cells (DCs) for immunization. DCs were transduced with genes encoding the human six transmembrane epithelial antigen of prostate 1 (STEAP1), STEAP4, a...

  14. High-throughput pseudovirion-based neutralization assay for analysis of natural and vaccine-induced antibodies against human papillomaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sehr

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive, automated, purely add-on, high-throughput pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (HT-PBNA with excellent repeatability and run-to-run reproducibility was developed for human papillomavirus types (HPV 16, 18, 31, 45, 52, 58 and bovine papillomavirus type 1. Preparation of 384 well assay plates with serially diluted sera and the actual cell-based assay are separated in time, therefore batches of up to one hundred assay plates can be processed sequentially. A mean coefficient of variation (CV of 13% was obtained for anti-HPV 16 and HPV 18 titers for a standard serum tested in a total of 58 repeats on individual plates in seven independent runs. Natural antibody response was analyzed in 35 sera from patients with HPV 16 DNA positive cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2+ lesions. The new HT-PBNA is based on Gaussia luciferase with increased sensitivity compared to the previously described manual PBNA (manPBNA based on secreted alkaline phosphatase as reporter. Titers obtained with HT-PBNA were generally higher than titers obtained with the manPBNA. A good linear correlation (R(2 = 0.7 was found between HT-PBNA titers and anti-HPV 16 L1 antibody-levels determined by a Luminex bead-based GST-capture assay for these 35 sera and a Kappa-value of 0.72, with only 3 discordant sera in the low titer range. In addition to natural low titer antibody responses the high sensitivity of the HT-PBNA also allows detection of cross-neutralizing antibodies induced by commercial HPV L1-vaccines and experimental L2-vaccines. When analyzing the WHO international standards for HPV 16 and 18 we determined an analytical sensitivity of 0.864 and 1.105 mIU, respectively.

  15. Effects of Supplementation of Various Medium Components on Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Cultures Producing Recombinant Antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Do Yun; Lee, Joon Chul; Chang, Ho Nam; Oh, Duk Jae

    2005-01-01

    Thirteen vitamins, twenty amino acids, hormones, inorganic salts, and other chemical agents, which constitute typical serum-free media, were evaluated for the development of fortified medium to enhance cell growth and productivity of recombinant antibody in the cultures of the recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells. Two different rCHO cell lines, rCHO-A producing recombinant antibodies against the human platelet and rCHO-B secreting recombinant antibodies against the S surface antigen...

  16. Method of rapid production of hybridomas expressing monoclonal antibodies on the cell surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Richard B.; Laterza, Vince

    2006-12-12

    The present invention relates to genetically altered hybridomas, myelomas and B cells. The invention also relates to utilizing genetically altered hybridomas, myelomas and B cells in methods of making monoclonal antibodies. The present invention also provides populations of hybridomas and B cells that can be utilized to make a monoclonal antibody of interest.

  17. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  18. Antibody-Dependent NK Cell Activation Is Associated with Late Kidney Allograft Dysfunction and the Complement-Independent Alloreactive Potential of Donor-Specific Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legris, Tristan; Picard, Christophe; Todorova, Dilyana; Lyonnet, Luc; Laporte, Cathy; Dumoulin, Chloé; Nicolino-Brunet, Corinne; Daniel, Laurent; Loundou, Anderson; Morange, Sophie; Bataille, Stanislas; Vacher-Coponat, Henri; Moal, Valérie; Berland, Yvon; Dignat-George, Francoise; Burtey, Stéphane; Paul, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney transplantation remains the best treatment for end-stage renal failure, it is limited by chronic humoral aggression of the graft vasculature by donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). The complement-independent mechanisms that lead to the antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) of kidney allografts remain poorly understood. Increasing lines of evidence have revealed the relevance of natural killer (NK) cells as innate immune effectors of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), but few studies have investigated their alloreactive potential in the context of solid organ transplantation. Our study aimed to investigate the potential contribution of the antibody-dependent alloreactive function of NK cells to kidney graft dysfunction. We first conducted an observational study to investigate whether the cytotoxic function of NK cells is associated with chronic allograft dysfunction. The NK-Cellular Humoral Activation Test (NK-CHAT) was designed to evaluate the recipient and antibody-dependent reactivity of NK cells against allogeneic target cells. The release of CD107a/Lamp1(+) cytotoxic granules, resulting from the recognition of rituximab-coated B cells by NK cells, was analyzed in 148 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs, mean graft duration: 6.2 years). Enhanced ADCC responsiveness was associated with reduced graft function and identified as an independent risk factor predicting a decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate over a 1-year period (hazard ratio: 2.83). In a second approach, we used the NK-CHAT to reveal the cytotoxic potential of circulating alloantibodies in vitro. The level of CD16 engagement resulting from the in vitro recognition of serum-coated allogeneic B cells or splenic cells was further identified as a specific marker of DSA-induced ADCC. The NK-CHAT scoring of sera obtained from 40 patients at the time of transplant biopsy was associated with ABMR diagnosis. Our findings indicate that despite the administration of

  19. Chimeric mouse-human IgG1 antibody that can mediate lysis of cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chimeric mouse-human antibody has been created that recognizes an antigen found on the surface of cells from many carcinomas. Immunoglobulin constant (C) domains of the mouse monoclonal antibody L6, C/sub γ2a/ and C/sub kappa/, were substituted by the human C/sub γ1/ and C/sub kappa/ by recombining cDNA modules encoding variable or C domains. The cDNA constructs were transfected into lymphoid cells for antibody production. The chimeric antibody and mouse L6 antibody bound to carcinoma cells with equal affinity and mediated complement-dependent cytolysis. In the presence of human effector cells, the chimeric antibody gave antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity at 100 times lower concentration than that needed for the mouse L6 antibody. The assay for lysis was carried out with 51Cr-labeled target calls. The chimeric antibody, but not the mouse L6 antibody, is effective against a melanoma line expressing small amounts of the L6 antigen. The findings point to the usefulness of the chimeric antibody approach for obtaining agents with strong antitumor activity for possible therapeutic use in man

  20. Standardization of natural mycolic acid antigen composition and production for use in biomarker antibody detection to diagnose active tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndlandla, F L; Ejoh, V; Stoltz, A C; Naicker, B; Cromarty, A D; van Wyngaardt, S; Khati, M; Rotherham, L S; Lemmer, Y; Niebuhr, J; Baumeister, C R; Al Dulayymi, J R; Swai, H; Baird, M S; Verschoor, J A

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is characterized by the abundance of species specific, antigenic cell wall lipids called mycolic acids. These wax-like molecules all share an identical, amphiphilic mycolic motif, but have different functional groups in a long hydrophobic hydrocarbon mero-chain that divide them into three main classes: alpha-, keto- and methoxy-mycolic acids. Whereas alpha-mycolic acids constitutively maintain an abundance of around 50%, the ratio of methoxy- to keto-mycolic acid types may vary depending on, among other things, the growth stage of M. tuberculosis. In human patients, antibodies to mycolic acids have shown potential as diagnostic serum biomarkers for active TB. Variations in mycolic acid composition affect the antigenic properties and can potentially compromise the precision of detection of anti-mycolic acids antibodies in patient sera to natural mixtures. We demonstrate this here with combinations of synthetic mycolic acid antigens, tested against TB patient and control sera. Combinations of methoxy- and α-mycolic acids are more antigenic than combinations of keto- and α-mycolic acids, showing the former to give a more sensitive test for TB biomarker antibodies. Natural mixtures of mycolic acids isolated from mature cultures of M. tuberculosis H37Rv give the same sensitivity as that with synthetic methoxy- and α-mycolic acids in combination, in a surface plasmon resonance inhibition biosensor test. To ensure that the antigenic activity of isolates of natural mycolic acids is reproducible, we cultured M. tuberculosis H37Rv on Middlebrook 7H10 solid agar plates to stationary growth phase in a standardized, optimal way. The proportions of mycolic acid classes in various batches of the isolates prepared from these cultures were compared to a commercially available natural mycolic acid isolate. LC-MS/MS and NMR data for quantitation of mycolic acids class compositions show that the variation in batches

  1. Antibody to Hepatitis B Core Antigen Levels in the Natural History of Chronic Hepatitis B

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Wei; Song, Liu-Wei; Fang, Yu-Qing; Xiao-feng WU; Liu, Dan-Yang; Xu, Chun; Wang, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Wen; Lv, Dong-Xia; Li, Jun; Deng, Yong-Qiong; Wang, Yan; Huo, Na; Yu, Min; Xi, Hong-Li

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have revealed antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) levels as a predictor of treatment response in hepatitis B early antigen (HBeAg)-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients in both interferon and nucleos(t)ide analog therapy cohorts. However, there is no information about anti-HBc levels in the natural history of CHB. This study aimed to define anti-HBc levels of different phases in the natural history of CHB. Two hundred eleven treatment-naive CHB pati...

  2. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity: a new era in cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekaran N

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Narendiran Rajasekaran,1,* Cariad Chester,1,* Atsushi Yonezawa,1,2 Xing Zhao,1,3 Holbrook E Kohrt1 1Division of Oncology, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA; 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan; 3Tissue Engineering and Stem Cells Research Center, Department of Immunology, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou Province, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The therapeutic efficacy of some anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs depends on the capacity of the mAb to recognize the tumor-associated antigen and induce cytotoxicity via a network of immune effector cells. This process of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC against tumor cells is triggered by the interaction of the fragment crystallizable (Fc portion of the mAb with the Fc receptors on effector cells like natural killer cells, macrophages, γδ T cells, and dendritic cells. By augmenting ADCC, the antitumor activity of mAbs can be significantly increased. Currently, identifying and developing therapeutic agents that enhance ADCC is a growing area of research. Combining existing tumor-targeting mAbs and ADCC-promoting agents that stimulate effector cells will translate to greater clinical responses. In this review, we discuss strategies for enhancing ADCC and emphasize the potential of combination treatments that include US Food and Drug Administration-approved mAbs and immunostimulatory therapeutics. Keywords: ADCC, NK cell, reovirus, TLR, CD137

  3. Lineage tracing of human B cells reveals the in vivo landscape of human antibody class switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horns, Felix; Vollmers, Christopher; Croote, Derek; Mackey, Sally F; Swan, Gary E; Dekker, Cornelia L; Davis, Mark M; Quake, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Antibody class switching is a feature of the adaptive immune system which enables diversification of the effector properties of antibodies. Even though class switching is essential for mounting a protective response to pathogens, the in vivo patterns and lineage characteristics of antibody class switching have remained uncharacterized in living humans. Here we comprehensively measured the landscape of antibody class switching in human adult twins using antibody repertoire sequencing. The map identifies how antibodies of every class are created and delineates a two-tiered hierarchy of class switch pathways. Using somatic hypermutations as a molecular clock, we discovered that closely related B cells often switch to the same class, but lose coherence as somatic mutations accumulate. Such correlations between closely related cells exist when purified B cells class switch in vitro, suggesting that class switch recombination is directed toward specific isotypes by a cell-autonomous imprinted state. PMID:27481325

  4. Microselection - Affinity Selecting Antibodies against a Single Rare Cell in a Heterogeneous Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Draeby; Agerholm, Inge Errebo; Christensen, Britta; Kølvraa, Steen; Kristensen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    antibodies. Here we have generated a microselection method allowing antibody selection, by phage display, targeting a single cell in a heterogeneous population. One K562 cell (female origin) was positioned on glass-slide among millions of lymphocytes from male donor, identifying the K562 cell by FISH (XX......). Several single cell selections were performed on such individual slides. The phage particles bound to the target cell is protected by a minute disc, while inactivating all remaining phage by UV-irradiation; leaving only the phage bound to the target cell viable. We hereby retrieved up to eight antibodies...

  5. Radionuclide imaging of primary renal-cell carcinoma by I-131-labeled antitumor antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A goat antibody against human renal-cell carcinoma reacted on immunofluorescence with renal-cell carcinomas from 20 patients, but not with normal adult human tissues, including kidney. After i.v. administration the I-131-linked antibody showed preferential tumor localization in six of seven patients with primary renal carcinoma. Labeled antitumor antibodies may have the specificity for tumor imaging that current radiopharmaceuticals lack

  6. Natural or vaccine-induced antibody as a predictor of immunity in the face of natural challenge with influenza viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, J.R.; Grilli, E. A.

    1989-01-01

    A study of influenza in residential schools provided the opportunity to assess the significance of antibody as a predictor of immunity. Five hundred and fifty-six pupils from 8 schools were included in the investigations, and the outcome for these children in 27 naturally occurring outbreaks of influenza was analysed. The outbreaks comprised 5 caused by strains of influenza A H3N2, 10 caused by strains of influenza A H1N1, and 12 caused by strains of influenza B. On 8 occasions a second outbr...

  7. Antibody-protein A conjugated quantum dots for multiplexed imaging of surface receptors in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Takashi; Tiwari, Dhermendra K; Tanaka, Shin-Ichi; Inouye, Yasushi; Yoshizawa, Keiko; Watanabe, Tomonobu M

    2010-11-01

    To use quantum dots (QDs) as fluorescent probes for receptor imaging, QD surface should be modified with biomolecules such as antibodies, peptides, carbohydrates, and small-molecule ligands for receptors. Among these QDs, antibody conjugated QDs are the most promising fluorescent probes. There are many kinds of coupling reactions that can be used for preparing antibody conjugated QDs. Most of the antibody coupling reactions, however, are non-selective and time-consuming. In this paper, we report a facile method for preparing antibody conjugated QDs for surface receptor imaging. We used ProteinA as an adaptor protein for binding of antibody to QDs. By using ProteinA conjugated QDs, various types of antibodies are easily attached to the surface of the QDs via non-covalent binding between the F(c) (fragment crystallization) region of antibody and ProteinA. To show the utility of ProteinA conjugated QDs, HER2 (anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) in KPL-4 human breast cancer cells were stained by using anti-HER2 antibody conjugated ProteinA-QDs. In addition, multiplexed imaging of HER2 and CXCR4 (chemokine receptor) in the KPL-4 cells was performed. The result showed that CXCR4 receptors coexist with HER2 receptors in the membrane surface of KPL-4 cells. ProteinA mediated antibody conjugation to QDs is very useful to prepare fluorescent probes for multiplexed imaging of surface receptors in living cells. PMID:20835432

  8. Method and cell lines for the production of monoclonal antibodies to human glycophorin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigbee, W.L.; Fong, S.S.N.; Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.

    Cloned mouse hybridoma cell lines have been established which continuously produce antibodies that differentiate between the M and N forms of human glycophorin A. These antibodies have potential application as human blood group reagents, as markers for terminally differentiated erythroid cells and as immunofluorescent labels of somatically variant human erythrocytes.

  9. Quantification of antibody production of individual hybridoma cells by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojanovic, I.; Velden, van der T.J.G.; Mulder, H.W.; Schasfoort, R.B.M.; Terstappen, L.W.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) is most frequently used for the label-free measurement of biomolecular interactions. Here we explore the potential of SPRi to measure antibody production of individual hybridoma cells. As a model system, cells from a hybridoma, producing monoclonal antibodies

  10. Targeting CD47-SIRPα interactions for potentiating therapeutic antibody-mediated tumor cell destruction by phagocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, X.W.

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the role of CD47-SIRPα interactions in therapeutic antibody-dependent tumor cell destruction by human phagocytes and also explore the killing mechanism(s) by which human phagocytes, and in particular human neutrophils, mediate therapeutic antibody-dependent cytotoxicity towards cancer cells.

  11. Intratumoral delivery of CpG-conjugated anti-MUC1 antibody enhances NK cell anti-tumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schettini, Jorge; Kidiyoor, Amritha; Besmer, Dahlia M; Tinder, Teresa L; Roy, Lopamudra Das; Lustgarten, Joseph; Gendler, Sandra J; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2012-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against tumor-associated antigens are useful anticancer agents. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is one of the major mechanisms responsible for initiating natural killer cell (NK)-mediated killing of tumors. However, the regulation of ADCC via NK cells is poorly understood. We have investigated the cytolytic activity of NK cells against pancreatic cancer cells that were coated with an antibody directed against the human tumor antigen, Mucin-1 designated HMFG-2, either alone or conjugated to CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG ODN). Conjugated antibodies were tested for their ability to elicit ADCC in vitro and in vivo against pancreatic cancer cells. NK cells cultured in the presence of immobilized CpG ODN, HMFG-2 Ab, or CpG ODN-conjugated HMFG-2 Ab were able to up-regulate perforin similarly. Interestingly, a significant higher ADCC was observed when CpG ODN-conjugated HMFG-2-coated tumor cells were co-cultured with NK cells compared to unconjugated HMFG-2 Ab or CpG ODN alone. Moreover, MyD88-deficient NK cells can perform ADCC in vitro. Furthermore, intratumoral injections of CpG ODN-conjugated HMFG-2 induced a significant reduction in tumor burden in vivo in an established model of pancreatic tumor in nude mice compared to CpG ODN or the HMFG-2 alone. Depletion of macrophages or NK cells before treatment confirmed that both cells were required for the anti-tumor response in vivo. Results also suggest that CpG ODN and HMFG-2 Ab could be sensed by NK cells on the mAb-coated tumor cells triggering enhanced ADCC in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22543528

  12. Production in vitro of antibodies directed against alloantigen-specific recognition sites on T cells and on lymphocytotoxic HLA antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, D P; Blajchman, M A; Joseph, S; Roberge, B; Smith, E K; Ludwin, D

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the mechanism of immunological unresponsiveness in a recipient (P.S.) with a long-term functioning renal allograft. P.S., whose HLA type is A1, A30; B14, B18; DR1, w8; DRw52; DQw1 and in whose serum we had earlier demonstrated the presence of antiidiotypic antibodies, received a kidney from a cadaver donor of HLA type A1, A10, B8 in March, 1970. Peripheral blood B lymphocytes from the patient were transformed with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and by the cluster-picking technique a B cell line was propagated with continuous production of antibodies. Antiidiotypic antibodies with two distinct biological functions were demonstrable; one specifically inhibiting the lymphocytotoxic activity of anti-HLA-B8, B5, and DR3 reference typing sera, and the other specifically inhibiting proliferative responses in MLC of the recipient's lymphocytes and of third party cells sharing B14, DR1, DQw1 with the patient against stimulator cells carrying B8, DR3 antigens. Immunodepletion experiments demonstrated that the inhibitory activity was associated with the IgM fraction. Absorption experiments suggested that different antibodies may be responsible for the inhibition of lymphocytotoxic activity of anti-HLA sera and of the proliferative responses in MLC. Antiidiotypic antibodies have been postulated to be important in maintaining allograft tolerance in vivo, thereby enhancing renal allograft survival. The availability of such antibodies in large quantities, produced in vitro, could provide antisera for the immunochemical characterization of specific idiotypic receptors on immunoglobulins and T lymphocytes. PMID:2970351

  13. Lactobacilli Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    bacteria on regulatory functions of NK-cells. Here, we have investigated how human gut flora-derived non-pathogenic lactobacilli affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human peripheral blood NK cells upon bacterial stimulation. CD3-CD56+ NK cells were isolated from...... buffy coats by negative isolation using non-NK lineage specific antibodies and magnetic beads. NK cells were incubated with 10 microg/ml UV-inactivated bacteria for four days. Proliferation was assessed by incorporation of radioactive thymidine into NK cell DNA and cytokine concentrations were...... determined by ELISA. Co-incubation of NK cells and a Lactobacillus acidophilus strain caused increased proliferation of the NK cells and induced IFN-gamma production. The proliferative response was further enhanced in the presence of autologous monocytes, probably because cytokines, secreted by monocytes...

  14. Serological analysis of cell surface antigens of null cell acute lymphocytic leukemia by mouse monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, R; Tanimoto, M; Takahashi, T.; Ogata, S; Nishida, K; Namikawa, R.; Nishizuka, Y; Ota, K.

    1982-01-01

    Nine antigens systems were defined. Two were related to HLA-A,B,C and to Ia-like antigens; the others could be grouped into three categories. (i) NL-22, NL-1: NL-22 antibody reacted with leukemia cells from 12 to 16 cases of null cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (null-ALL) but not with any other type of leukemia tested or with lymphoid cells of various origins. Among cultured cell lines tested, one (NALM-6) of three null-ALL cell lines was positive, the others were negative. Absorption analysi...

  15. Enhanced clearance of HIV-1-infected cells by broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ching-Lan; Murakowski, Dariusz K; Bournazos, Stylianos; Schoofs, Till; Sarkar, Debolina; Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Horwitz, Joshua A; Nogueira, Lilian; Golijanin, Jovana; Gazumyan, Anna; Ravetch, Jeffrey V; Caskey, Marina; Chakraborty, Arup K; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2016-05-20

    Antiretroviral drugs and antibodies limit HIV-1 infection by interfering with the viral life cycle. In addition, antibodies also have the potential to guide host immune effector cells to kill HIV-1-infected cells. Examination of the kinetics of HIV-1 suppression in infected individuals by passively administered 3BNC117, a broadly neutralizing antibody, suggested that the effects of the antibody are not limited to free viral clearance and blocking new infection but also include acceleration of infected cell clearance. Consistent with these observations, we find that broadly neutralizing antibodies can target CD4(+) T cells infected with patient viruses and can decrease their in vivo half-lives by a mechanism that requires Fcγ receptor engagement in a humanized mouse model. The results indicate that passive immunotherapy can accelerate elimination of HIV-1-infected cells. PMID:27199430

  16. Antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies isolated from B cells expressing constitutively active STAT5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenc A Scheeren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fully human monoclonal antibodies directed against specific pathogens have a high therapeutic potential, but are difficult to generate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Memory B cells were immortalized by expressing an inducible active mutant of the transcription factor Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (STAT5. Active STAT5 inhibits the differentiation of B cells while increasing their replicative life span. We obtained cloned B cell lines, which produced antibodies in the presence of interleukin 21 after turning off STAT5. We used this method to obtain monoclonal antibodies against the model antigen tetanus toxin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Here we describe a novel and relatively simple method of immortalizing antigen-specific human B cells for isolation of human monoclonal antibodies. These results show that STAT5 overexpression can be employed to isolate antigen specific antibodies from human memory B cells.

  17. Mimicking the germinal center reaction in hybridoma cells to isolate temperature-selective anti-PEG antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Yu-Cheng; Al-Qaisi, Talal S; Tung, Hsin-Yi; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Chuang, Kuo-Hsiang; Chen, Bing-Mae; Roffler, Steve R.

    2014-01-01

    Modification of antibody class and binding properties typically requires cloning of antibody genes, antibody library construction, phage or yeast display and recombinant antibody expression. Here, we describe an alternative “cloning-free” approach to generate antibodies with altered antigen-binding and heavy chain isotype by mimicking the germinal center reaction in antibody-secreting hybridoma cells. This was accomplished by lentiviral transduction and controllable expression of activation-i...

  18. Rapid antibody responses by low-dose, single-step, dendritic cell-targeted immunization

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hui; Griffiths, Michelle N.; Burton, Dennis R; Ghazal, Peter

    2000-01-01

    We have compared the kinetics of antibody responses in conventional and dendritic cell-targeted immunization by using a model antigen in mice. Targeting was achieved by linking the reporter antigen (polyclonal goat anti-hamster antibody) to N418, a hamster mAb that binds to the CD11c molecule on the surface of murine dendritic cells. Intradermal injection of submicrogram quantities of goat anti-hamster antibody complexed to mAb N418 elicited goat antibody-specific serum IgG in mice. Antigen-s...

  19. A new cell line for high throughput HIV-specific antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and cell-to-cell virus transmission studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, Chiara; Flinko, Robin; Lewis, George K.

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (Wren et al., 2013) is important in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. Namely, ADCC is induced during natural HIV-1 infection or in HIV-1 vaccine studies, the latter demonstrated by the RV144 vaccine trial. To expedite the assessment of ADCC in studies of HIV, we have developed a high throughput assay. We have optimized the rapid fluorometric antibody-mediated cytotoxicity assay (RFADCC) by transfecting the EGFP-CEM-NKr cell line to constitutively express SNAP-tagged CCR5. This cell line can then serve as a source of HIV-specific targets when coated with monomeric gp120, spinoculated with inactivated intact virions, infected by cell-free viral diffusion or infected by cell-to-cell transmission of virus. The optimized strategy has two significant advantages over the original RFADCC method: First, the preparation of detectable target cells is less labor intensive and faster as it does not rely on multiple staining and washing steps for target cells. Second, because the target cell markers GFP and SNAP are constitutively expressed, the assay provides highly reproducible data. These strengths make the optimized RFADCC assay suitable not only for studies of HIV-1 specific cytotoxicity but also for studies of cell–cell transmission of virus. In conclusion, this assay provides a new generation T cell line that can expedite large clinical studies as well as research studies in humans or non-human primates. PMID:26969387

  20. Rapid Quantification of the Toxic Alga Prymnesium parvum in Natural Samples by Use of a Specific Monoclonal Antibody and Solid-Phase Cytometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, N. J.; Bacchieri, R.; Hansen, Gert; Tomas, C.; Lebaron, P.; Moreau, H.

    2006-01-01

    alga Prymnesium parvum in natural samples, using a specific monoclonal antibody and indirect immunofluorescence. The immunoglobulin G antibody 16E4 exhibited narrow specificity in that it recognized several P. parvum strains and a Prymnesium nemamethecum strain but it did not cross-react with P. parvum...... strains from Scandinavia or any other algal strains, including species of the closely related genus Chrysochromulina. Prymnesium sp. cells labeled with 16E4 were readily detected by the solid-phase cytometer because of the large fluorescence signal and the signal/noise ratio. Immunofluorescence detection...... lower counts. Immunofluorescence labeling and analysis with the solid-phase cytometer of fixed natural samples from a bloom of P. parvum occurring in Lake Colorado in Texas gave cell counts that were close to those obtained by the traditional method of counting using light microscopy. These results show...

  1. Of natural bodies and antibodies: Parents' vaccine refusal and the dichotomies of natural and artificial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Jennifer A

    2016-05-01

    Despite eliminating incidences of many diseases in the United States, parents are increasingly rejecting vaccines for their children. This article examines the reasons parents offer for doing so. It argues that parents construct a dichotomy between the natural and the artificial, in which vaccines come to be seen as unnecessary, ineffective, and potentially dangerous. Using qualitative data from interviews and observations, this article shows first, how parents view their children's bodies, particularly from experiences of birth and with infants, as naturally perfect and in need of protection. Second, parents see vaccines as an artificial intervention that enters the body unnaturally, through injection. Third, parents perceive immunity occurring from illness to be natural and superior and immunity derived from vaccines as inferior and potentially dangerous. Finally, parents highlight the ways their own natural living serves to enhance their children's immunity rendering vaccines unnecessary. Taken together, this dichotomy allows parents to justify rejection of vaccines as a form of protecting children's health. These findings expose perceptions of science, technology, health, and the meanings of the body in ways that can inform public health efforts. PMID:27082021

  2. Improved antibody production in Chinese hamster ovary cells by ATF4 overexpression

    OpenAIRE

    Haredy, Ahmad M.; Nishizawa, Akitoshi; Honda, Kohsuke; Ohya, Tomoshi; Ohtake, Hisao; Omasa, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    To improve antibody production in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, the humanized antibody-producing CHO DP-12-SF cell line was transfected with the gene encoding activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), a central factor in the unfolded protein response. Overexpression of ATF4 significantly enhanced the production of antibody in the CHO DP-12-SF cell line. The specific IgG production rate of in the ATF4-overexpressing CHO-ATF4-16 cells was approximately 2.4 times that of the parental host c...

  3. Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity to Hemagglutinin of Influenza A Viruses After Influenza Vaccination in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Weimin; Liu, Feng; Wilson, Jason R.; Holiday, Crystal; Li, Zhu-Nan; Bai, Yaohui; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Stevens, James; York, Ian A.; Levine, Min Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Detection of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) to influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA) antigens by conventional serological assays is currently the main immune correlate of protection for influenza vaccines However, current prepandemic avian influenza vaccines are poorly immunogenic in inducing nAbs despite considerable protection conferred. Recent studies show that Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) to HA antigens are readily detectable in the sera of healthy individuals and patients with influenza infection. Methods. Virus neutralization and ADCC activities of serum samples from individuals who received either seasonal or a stock-piled H5N1 avian influenza vaccine were evaluated by hemagglutination inhibition assay, microneutralization assay, and an improved ADCC natural killer (NK) cell activation assay. Results. Immunization with inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine led to strong expansion of both nAbs and ADCC-mediating antibodies (adccAbs) to H3 antigen of the vaccine virus in 24 postvaccination human sera. In sharp contrast, 18 individuals vaccinated with the adjuvanted H5N1 avian influenza vaccine mounted H5-specific antibodies with strong ADCC activities despite moderate virus neutralization capacity. Strength of HA-specific ADCC activities is largely associated with the titers of HA-binding antibodies and not with the fine antigenic specificity of anti-HA nAbs. Conclusions. Detection of both nAbs and adccAbs may better reflect protective capacity of HA-specific antibodies induced by avian influenza vaccines.

  4. Cytotoxic activity against human neuroblastoma and melanoma cells mediated by IgM antibodies derived from peripheral blood of healthy donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarapu, Satish Kumar; Mamidi, Srinivas; Plöger, Frank; Dill, Othmar; Blixt, Ola; Kirschfink, Michael; Schwartz-Albiez, Reinhard

    2016-06-15

    A small percentage of healthy donors identified in the Western population carry antibodies in their peripheral blood which convey cytotoxic activity against certain human melanoma and neuroblastoma cell lines. We measured the cytotoxic activity of sera and plasmas from healthy donors on the human neuroblastoma cell line Kelly and various melanoma cell lines. Antibodies of IgM isotype, presumably belonging to the class of naturally occurring antibodies, exerted cytotoxic activity in a complement-dependent fashion. Apart from complement-dependent tumor cell lysis, we observed C3 opsonization in all tumor cell lines upon treatment with cytotoxic plasmas. Cell lines tested primarily expressed membrane complement regulatory proteins (mCRP) CD46, CD55 and CD59 to various extents. Blocking of mCRPs by monoclonal antibodies enhanced cell lysis and opsonization, though some melanoma cells remained resistant to complement attack. Epitopes recognized by cytotoxic antibodies were represented by gangliosides such as GD2 and GD3, as evidenced by cellular sialidase pretreatment and enhanced expression of distinct gangliosides. It remains to be clarified why only a small fraction of healthy persons carry these antitumor cytotoxic antibodies. PMID:26830059

  5. Antibody to a molecular marker of cell position inhibits synapse formation in retina.

    OpenAIRE

    Trisler, D.; Bekenstein, J; Daniels, M P

    1986-01-01

    A topographic gradient of TOP molecules in retina can be used to identify neuron position. Antibody to TOP from hybridoma cells that were injected into in vivo embryo eyes diffused into the retina and bound in a topographic gradient of [antibody.TOP] ([Ab.TOP]) complexes. Synapse formation in retina was inhibited in the presence of anti-TOP antibody. This suggests that TOP is involved in synapse formation and that recognition of position by neurons is necessary for normal synapse formation.

  6. Generation of Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies from Immunised Mice and Rabbits via Flow Cytometry and Sorting of Antigen-Specific IgG+ Memory B Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale O Starkie

    Full Text Available Single B cell screening strategies, which avoid both hybridoma fusion and combinatorial display, have emerged as important technologies for efficiently sampling the natural antibody repertoire of immunized animals and humans. Having access to a range of methods to interrogate different B cell subsets provides an attractive option to ensure large and diverse panels of high quality antibody are produced. The generation of multiple antibodies and having the ability to find rare B cell clones producing IgG with unique and desirable characteristics facilitates the identification of fit-for-purpose molecules that can be developed into therapeutic agents or research reagents. Here, we describe a multi-parameter flow cytometry single-cell sorting technique for the generation of antigen-specific recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single IgG+ memory B cells. Both mouse splenocytes and rabbit PBMC from immunised animals were used as a source of B cells. Reagents staining both B cells and other unwanted cell types enabled efficient identification of class-switched IgG+ memory B cells. Concurrent staining with antigen labelled separately with two spectrally-distinct fluorophores enabled antigen-specific B cells to be identified, i.e. those which bind to both antigen conjugates (double-positive. These cells were then typically sorted at one cell per well using FACS directly into a 96-well plate containing reverse transcriptase reaction mix. Following production of cDNA, PCR was performed to amplify cognate heavy and light chain variable region genes and generate transcriptionally-active PCR (TAP fragments. These linear expression cassettes were then used directly in a mammalian cell transfection to generate recombinant antibody for further testing. We were able to successfully generate antigen-specific recombinant antibodies from both the rabbit and mouse IgG+ memory B cell subset within one week. This included the generation of an anti-TNFR2 blocking

  7. Selection of apoptotic cell specific human antibodies from adult bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Grönwall

    Full Text Available Autoreactive antibodies that recognize neo-determinants on apoptotic cells in mice have been proposed to have protective, homeostatic and immunoregulatory properties, although our knowledge about the equivalent antibodies in humans has been much more limited. In the current study, human monoclonal antibodies with binding specificity for apoptotic cells were isolated from the bone marrow of healthy adults using phage display technology. These antibodies were shown to recognize phosphorylcholine (PC-associated neo-determinants. Interestingly, three of the four identified apoptotic cell-specific antibody clones were encoded by VH3 region rearrangements with germline or nearly germline configuration without evidence of somatic hypermutation. Importantly, the different identified antibody clones had diverse heavy chain CDR3 and deduced binding surfaces as suggested by structure modeling. This may suggest a potentially great heterogeneity in human antibodies recognizing PC-related epitopes on apoptotic cells. To re-construct the postulated structural format of the parental anti-PC antibody, the dominant clone was also expressed as a recombinant human polymeric IgM, which revealed a substantially increased binding reactivity, with dose-dependent and antigen-inhibitable binding of apoptotic cells. Our findings may have implication for improved prognostic testing and therapeutic interventions in human inflammatory disease.

  8. Natural killer cell activity during measles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, D E; Ward, B J; Jauregui, E; Johnson, R T; Vaisberg, A

    1990-01-01

    Natural killer cells are postulated to play an important role in host anti-viral defences. We measured natural killer cell activity in 30 individuals with acute measles (73 +/- 21 lytic units (LU)/10(7) cells) and 16 individuals with other infectious diseases (149 +/- 95 LU) and found it reduced compared with values for adults (375 +/- 70 LU; P less than 0.001) or children (300 +/- 73 LU, P less than 0.01) without infection. Reduced natural killer cell activity was found in measles patients with (84 +/- 30 LU) and without (55 +/- 18 LU) complications and was present for at least 3 weeks after the onset of the rash. Activity was increased by in vitro exposure of cells to interleukin-2. Depressed natural killer cell activity parallels in time the suppression of other parameters of cell-mediated immunity that occurs during measles. PMID:1696863

  9. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections. PMID:27077876

  10. Targeting HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers to B Cells by Using APRIL Improves Antibody Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Melchers M; Bontjer I; Tong T; Chung NP; Klasse PJ; Eggink D; Montefiori DC; Gentile M; Cerutti A; Olson WC; Berkhout B; Binley JM; Moore JP; Sanders RW

    2012-01-01

    An HIV-1 vaccine remains elusive, in part because various factors limit the quantity and quality of the antibodies raised against the viral envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). We hypothesized that targeting Env vaccines directly to B cells, by fusing them to molecules that bind and activate these cells, would improve Env-specific antibody responses. Therefore, we fused trimeric Env gp140 to A PRoliferation-Inducing Ligand (APRIL), B-cell Activating Factor (BAFF), and CD40 Ligand (CD40L). The...

  11. Microassay using radioiodinated protein A from Staphylococcus aureus for antibodies bound to cell surface antigens of adherent tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new microassay which utilizes radioiodinated staphylococcal protein A (SpA) to detect antibodies bound to cell surface antigens (CSA) was developed for monolayers of viable cultured tumor cells. Optimal detection of bound antibodies occurred at 37degC with incubation periods of one hour each for antiserum and 131I-SpA. Labelling target cells with 125I-iododeoxyuridine facilitated expression of results relative to tumor cell number or protein concentration. Quantitation of antibody depended on CSA (tumor cells) and 131I-SpA being in excess of antibody; under these conditions, 0.25 ng of cell surface bound antibody could be detected readily. Initial studies utilized cultured human neuroblastoma and lung adenocarcinoma cells and human and rabbit antisera. Some antibodies in human serum which bound to CSA were removed by absorption with glutaraldehyde-insolubilized fetal calf serum (FSC) suggesting that FCS or FCS-like determinants can be CSA. Rabbit antisera, after extensive absorption, bound to cultured neuroblastoma and lung adenocarcinoma cells in a cell type specific pattern. These experiments demonstrated the value of this assay in quantitating anti-CSA antibodies and in serological analysis of tumor CSA

  12. Deficient natural killer cell function in preeclampsia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural killer cell activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes was measured against K-562 target cells with a 4-hour 51Cr release assay in 15 primigravid women with preeclamptic symptoms. Nineteen primigravid women with an uncomplicated pregnancy and 18 nonpregnant women served as controls. The natural killer cell activity of preeclamptic women was observed to be significantly lower than that of both control groups. Natural killer cells in preeclamptic women responded normally to augmentation caused by interferon. These findings give further evidence for the participation of the maternal immune system in this pregnancy disorder

  13. Deficient natural killer cell function in preeclampsia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alanen, A.; Lassila, O.

    1982-11-01

    Natural killer cell activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes was measured against K-562 target cells with a 4-hour /sup 51/Cr release assay in 15 primigravid women with preeclamptic symptoms. Nineteen primigravid women with an uncomplicated pregnancy and 18 nonpregnant women served as controls. The natural killer cell activity of preeclamptic women was observed to be significantly lower than that of both control groups. Natural killer cells in preeclamptic women responded normally to augmentation caused by interferon. These findings give further evidence for the participation of the maternal immune system in this pregnancy disorder.

  14. Risk factors for the presence of non-rhesus D red blood cell antibodies in pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Koelewijn; T.G.M. Vrijkotte; M. de Haas; C.E. van der Schoot; G.J. Bonsel

    2009-01-01

    To identify risk factors for the presence of non-rhesus D (RhD) red blood cell (RBC) antibodies in pregnancy. To generate evidence for subgroup RBC antibody screening and for primary prevention by extended matching of transfusions in women < 45 years. Case-control study. Nationwide evaluation of scr

  15. A rapid method for the detection of antibodies to cell surface antigens: a solid phase radioimmunoassay using cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell membranes isolated from murine lymphocytes or ascites tumors bind tightly to the surface of flexible plastic microtiter plates in the absence of additional proteins. This allows the detection of membrane associated molecules by specific antibodies and thus forms the basis for a rapid and sensitive radioimmunoassay for antibodies to membrane-bound components. The assay compares favourably with a variety of methods currently used to detect antibodies to cell surface antigens. The assay detects a variety of well characterized murine cell surface antigens (H-2, I-A, T-200, Thy-1.2, Ig). The level of antibody binding to membranes on plates correlates well with antigen density on intact cells. A modification of the assay involving competition between cross-reacting antibodies allows detection and resolution of closely spaced antigenic determinants. (Auth.)

  16. Differentiation between monoclonal antibody - defined antigens on a human osteogenic sarcoma cell line (791-T) and Tumor-localizing properties of the anti-791T/36 antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two monoclonal antibodies (anti-791T/36 and anti-791T/48) prepared against an osteogenic sarcoma cell line (791T) following xenogeneic immunization, reacted against the immunizing tumor, but not against normal cells from the tumor-donor, using an indirect 125I-protein A binding assay. Both antibodies cross-reacted with a small number of other osteogenic sarcomas and a few unrelated cell lines from an extensive panel, but the specificity of these cross-reactions was different. Both antibodies were labelled with 125I to detect direct binding to target cells, and the specificity of their reactivity was essentially identical to that observed in the indirect assay. Direct binding of each labelled antibody was inhibited by pretreating target cells with its unlabelled counterpart, but the two antibodies could not inhibit each other. The binding of anti-791T/36 was also not inhibited by pretreating the target cells with sera from the 791-T-tumor donor, which were shown to contain antibody reacting with the autochthonous tumor. It is concluded that 791T has two distinct tumor-associated antigens recognized by the monoclonal antibodies, and furthermore that at least one of these antigens is independent of those recognized by the patient from which the tumor cell line was derived. The efficacy of anti-791T/36 antibody labelled with radioactive iodine was demonstrated for localizing tumor deposits growing in immunodeprived mice. (author)

  17. Naturally acquired antibody responses to recombinant Pfs230 and Pfs48/45 transmission blocking vaccine candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sophie; Grignard, Lynn; Nebie, Issa;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Pfs48/45 and Pfs230 are Plasmodium falciparum sexual stage proteins and promising malaria transmission-blocking vaccine candidates. Antibody responses against these proteins may be naturally acquired and target antigens may be under selective pressure. This has consequences for the...... future evaluation of vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy in populations naturally exposed to malaria. METHODS: We determined naturally acquired antibody responses to the recombinant proteins Pfs48/45-10C and Pfs230-230CMB in children from three malaria endemic settings in Ghana, Tanzania and Burkina Faso...... region. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude there are naturally acquired antibody responses to both vaccine candidates which have functional relevance by reducing the transmissibility of infected individuals. We identified genetic polymorphisms, in pfs48/45 which exhibited geographical specificity....

  18. Construction and selection of the natural immune Fab antibody phage display library from patients with colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Ping Wu; Bing Xiao; Tian-Mo Wan; Ya-Li Zhang; Zhen-Shu Zhang; Dian-Yuan Zhou; Zhuo-Sheng Lai; Chun-Fang Gao

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To construct the natural immune Fab antibody phage display libraries of colorectal cancer and to select antibodies related with colorectal cancer. METHODS: Extract total RNA from tissue of local cancer metastasis lymph nodes of patients with colorectal cancer.RT-PCR was used to amplify the heavy chain Fd and light chain к and the amplification products were inserted successively into the vector pComb3 to construct the human libraries of Fab antibodies. They were then panned by phage display technology. By means of Dot immunoblotting and ELISA, the libraries were identified and the Fab phage antibodies binding with antigens of colorectal cancer were selected. RESULTS: The amplified fragments of Fd and к gained by RT-PCR were about 650bp. Fd and к PCR products were subsequently inserted into the vector pComb3, resulting in a recombination rate of 40% and the volume of Fab phage display library reached 1.48 x 106. The libraries were enriched about 120-fold by 3 cycles of adsorption-elution- multiplication (panning). Dot immunoblotting showed Fab expressions on the phage libraries and ELISA showed 5clones of Fab phage antibodies which had binding activities with antigens of colorectal cancer. CONCLUSION: The natural immune Fab antibody phage display libraries of colorectal cancer were constructed. They could be used to select the relative antibodies of colorectal cancer.

  19. C-C chemokine receptor-7 mediated endocytosis of antibody cargoes into intact cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FrançoisMarceau

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The C-C chemokine receptor-7 (CCR7 is a G protein coupled receptor that has a role in leukocyte homing, but that is also expressed in aggressive tumor cells. Preclinical research supports that CCR7 is a valid target in oncology. In view of the increasing availability of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies that carry cytotoxic cargoes, we studied the feasibility of forcing intact cells to internalize known monoclonal antibodies by exploiting the cycle of endocytosis and recycling triggered by the CCR7 agonist CCL19. Firstly, an anti-CCR7 antibody (CD197; clone 150503 labeled surface recombinant CCR7 expressed in intact HEK 293a cells and the fluorescent antibody was internalized following CCL19 treatment. Secondly, a recombinant myc-tagged CCL19 construction was exploited along the anti-myc monoclonal antibody 4A6. The myc-tagged ligand was produced as a conditioned medium of transfected HEK 293a cells that contained the equivalent of 430 ng/ml of immunoreactive CCL19 (average value, ELISA determination. CCL19-myc, but not authentic CCL19, carried the fluorophore-labeled antibody 4A6 into other recipient cells that expressed recombinant CCR7 (microscopy, cytofluorometry. The immune complexes were apparent in endosomal structures, colocalized well with the small GTPase Rab5 and progressed toward Rab7-positive endosomes. A dominant negative form of Rab5 (GDP-locked inhibited this endocytosis. Further, endosomes in CCL19-myc- or CCL19-stimulated cells were positive for β-arrestin2, but rarely for β-arrestin1. Following treatment with CCL19-myc and the 4A6 antibody, the melanoma cell line A375 that expresses endogenous CCR7 was specifically stained using a secondary peroxidase-conjugated antibody. Agonist-stimulated CCR7 can transport antibody-based cargoes, with possible therapeutic applications in oncology.

  20. Access of protective antiviral antibody to neuronal tissues requires CD4 T-cell help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Norifumi; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-05-26

    Circulating antibodies can access most tissues to mediate surveillance and elimination of invading pathogens. Immunoprivileged tissues such as the brain and the peripheral nervous system are shielded from plasma proteins by the blood-brain barrier and blood-nerve barrier, respectively. Yet, circulating antibodies must somehow gain access to these tissues to mediate their antimicrobial functions. Here we examine the mechanism by which antibodies gain access to neuronal tissues to control infection. Using a mouse model of genital herpes infection, we demonstrate that both antibodies and CD4 T cells are required to protect the host after immunization at a distal site. We show that memory CD4 T cells migrate to the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord in response to infection with herpes simplex virus type 2. Once inside these neuronal tissues, CD4 T cells secrete interferon-γ and mediate local increase in vascular permeability, enabling antibody access for viral control. A similar requirement for CD4 T cells for antibody access to the brain is observed after intranasal challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus. Our results reveal a previously unappreciated role of CD4 T cells in mobilizing antibodies to the peripheral sites of infection where they help to limit viral spread. PMID:27225131

  1. CD133 antibody conjugation to decellularized human heart valves intended for circulating cell capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossler, John D; Min Ju, Young; Williams, J Koudy; Goldstein, Steven; Hamlin, James; Lee, Sang Jin; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2015-09-01

    The long term efficacy of tissue based heart valve grafts may be limited by progressive degeneration characterized by immune mediated inflammation and calcification. To avoid this degeneration, decellularized heart valves with functionalized surfaces capable of rapid in vivo endothelialization have been developed. The aim of this study is to examine the capacity of CD133 antibody-conjugated valve tissue to capture circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Decellularized human pulmonary valve tissue was conjugated with CD133 antibody at varying concentrations and exposed to CD133 expressing NTERA-2 cl.D1 (NT2) cells in a microflow chamber. The amount of CD133 antibody conjugated on the valve tissue surface and the number of NT2 cells captured in the presence of shear stress was measured. Both the amount of CD133 antibody conjugated to the valve leaflet surface and the number of adherent NT2 cells increased as the concentration of CD133 antibody present in the surface immobilization procedure increased. The data presented in this study support the hypothesis that the rate of CD133(+) cell adhesion in the presence of shear stress to decellularized heart valve tissue functionalized by CD133 antibody conjugation increases as the quantity of CD133 antibody conjugated to the tissue surface increases. PMID:26333364

  2. Monoclonal antibodies to cell surface antigens of human melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have worked with three human melanoma antigens which have been defined by monoclonal mouse antibodies: p97, a glycoprotein that is structurally related to transferrin, a proteoglycan, and a GD3 ganglioside that is slightly different from the GD3 of normal brain. All three antigens can be detected in frozen sections of melanoma, using immunohistological techniques. Antibodies and Fab fragments, specific for either p97 or the proteoglycan antigen, have been radiolabelled with 131I and successfully used for tumor imaging, and Phase I therapeutic trails are underway, using 131I-labelled Fab fragments, specific for p97 or the proteoglycan antigen, to localize a potentially therapeutic dose of radiation into tumors. It may be feasible to use the same monoclonal antibodies, or antibody fragments, as carriers of neutron capturers, such as boron, for possible use in tumor therapy. The initial experiments on this are best carried out by using nude mice (or rats) carrying human melanoma xenografts

  3. Docking of B-cell epitope antigen to specific hepatitis B antibody

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Rajkannan; E J Padma Malar

    2007-09-01

    The interaction of pres1 region of hepatitis B virus B-cell epitope antigen with specific hepatitis B neutralizing monoclonal antibody was examined by docking study. We modelled the 3D complex structure of B-cell epitope antigen residues CTTPAQGNSMFPSCCCTKPTDGNCY by homology modelling and docked it with the crystal structure of monoclonal antibody specific for the pres1 region of the hepatitis B virus. At the optimized docked conformation, the interactions between the amino acids of antigen and antibody were examined. It is found that the docked complex is stabilized by 59.3 kcal/mol. The stability of the docked antigen-antibody complex is due to hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions. The amino acids of the antigen and antibody responsible for the interaction were identified.

  4. Identifying bottlenecks in transient and stable production of recombinant monoclonal-antibody sequence variants in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mason, Megan; Sweeney, Bernadette; Cain, Katharine; Stephens, Paul; Sharfstein, Susan T.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing demand for antibody-based therapeutics has emphasized the need for technologies to improve recombinant antibody titers from mammalian cell lines. Moreover, as antibody therapeutics address an increasing spectrum of indications, interest has increased in antibody engineering to improve affinity and biological activity. However, the cellular mechanisms that dictate expression and the relationships between antibody sequence and expression level remain poorly understood. Fundamenta...

  5. A Spectrum of Monoclonal Antibodies Reactive with Human Mammary Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colcher, D.; Horan Hand, P.; Nuti, M.; Schlom, J.

    1981-05-01

    Splenic lymphocytes of mice, immunized with membrane-enriched fractions of metastatic human mammary carcinoma tissues, were fused with the NS-1 non-immunoglobulin-secreting murine myeloma cell line. This resulted in the generation of hybridoma cultures secreting immunoglobulins reactive in solid-phase radioimmunoassays with extracts of metastatic mammary carcinoma cells from involved livers, but not with extracts of apparently normal human liver. As a result of further screening of immunoglobulin reactivities and double cloning of cultures, 11 monoclonal antibodies were chosen that demonstrated reactivities with human mammary tumor cells and not with apparently normal human tissues. These monoclonal antibodies could be placed into at least five major groups on the basis of their differential binding to the surface of various live human mammary tumor cells in culture, to extracts of mammary tumor tissues, or to tissue sections of mammary tumor cells studied by the immunoperoxidase technique. Whereas a spectrum of reactivities to mammary tumors was observed with the 11 monoclonal antibodies, no reactivity was observed to apparently normal cells of the following human tissues: breast, lymph node, lung, skin, testis, kidney, thymus, bone marrow, spleen, uterus, thyroid, intestine, liver, bladder, tonsils, stomach, prostate, and salivary gland. Several of the antibodies also demonstrated a ``pancarcinoma'' reactivity, showing binding to selected non-breast carcinomas. None of the monoclonal antibodies showed binding to purified ferritin or carcinoembryonic antigen. Monoclonal antibodies of all five major groups, however, demonstrated binding to human metastatic mammary carcinoma cells both in axillary lymph nodes and at distal sites.

  6. Tissue detection of natural killer cells in colorectal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patsouris Efstratios S

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural killer (NK cells represent a first line of defence against a developing cancer; however, their exact role in colorectal cancer remains undetermined. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of CD16 and CD57 [immunohistochemical markers of natural NK cells] in colorectal adenocarcinoma. Methods Presence of NK cells was investigated in 82 colorectal adenocarcinomas. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed, using 2 monoclonal antibodies (anti-Fc Gamma Receptor II, CD16 and an equivalent to Leu-7, specific for CD-57. The number of immunopositive cells (% was evaluated by image analysis. The cases were characterized according to: patient gender and age, tumor location, size, grade, bowel wall invasion, lymph node metastases and Dukes' stage. Results NK cells were detected in 79/82 cases at the primary tumor site, 27/33 metastatic lymph nodes and 3/4 hepatic metastases; they were detected in levels similar to those reported in the literature, but their presence was not correlated to the clinical or pathological characteristics of the series, except for a negative association with the patients' age (p = 0.031. Conclusions Our data do not support an association of NK cell tissue presence with clinical or pathological variables of colorectal adenocarcinoma, except for a negative association with the patients' age; this might possibly be attributed to decreased adhesion molecule expression in older ages.

  7. Daratumumab-mediated lysis of primary multiple myeloma cells is enhanced in combination with the human anti-KIR antibody IPH2102 and lenalidomide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhof, Inger S.; van Bueren, Jeroen J. Lammerts; van Kessel, Berris; Andre, Pascale; Morel, Yannis; Lokhorst, Henk M.; van de Donk, Niels W.C.J.; Parren, Paul W.H.I.; Mutis, Tuna

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent treatment improvements, multiple myeloma remains an incurable disease. Since antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity is an important effector mechanism of daratumumab, we explored the possibility of improving daratumumab-mediated cell-mediated cytotoxicity by blocking natural killer cell inhibitory receptors with the human monoclonal anti-KIR antibody IPH2102, next to activation of natural killer cells with the immune modulatory drug lenalidomide. In 4-hour antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays, IPH2102 did not induce lysis of multiple myeloma cell lines, but it did significantly augment daratumumab-induced myeloma cell lysis. Also in an ex vivo setting, IPH2102 synergistically improved daratumumab-dependent lysis of primary myeloma cells in bone marrow mononuclear cells (n=21), especially in patients carrying the FcγRIIIa-158F allele or the FcγRIIa-131R allele, who bind IgG1 with lower affinity than patients carrying the FcγRIIIa-158V allele or the FcγRIIa-131H allele. Finally, a further synergistically improved myeloma cell lysis with the daratumumab-IPH2102 combination was observed by adding lenalidomide, which suggests that more effective treatment strategies can be designed for multiple myeloma by combining daratumumab with agents that independently modulate natural killer cell function. PMID:25510242

  8. Application of Mass Cytometry (CyTOF) for Functional and Phenotypic Analysis of Natural Killer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Alexander W; Strauss-Albee, Dara M; Blish, Catherine A

    2016-01-01

    Mass cytometry is a novel platform for high-dimensional phenotypic and functional analysis of single cells. This system uses elemental metal isotopes conjugated to monoclonal antibodies to evaluate up to 42 parameters simultaneously on individual cells with minimal overlap between channels. The platform can be customized for analysis of both phenotypic and functional markers. Here, we will describe methods to stain, collect, and analyze intracellular functional markers and surface phenotypic markers on natural killer cells. PMID:27177653

  9. CEACAM1 induces B-cell survival and is essential for protective antiviral antibody production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Honke, Nadine; Shaabani, Namir; Pandyra, Aleksandra A.; Seifert, Marc; Pozdeev, Vitaly; Xu, Haifeng C.; Sharma, Piyush; Baldin, Fabian; Marquardsen, Florian; Merches, Katja; Lang, Elisabeth; Kirschning, Carsten; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Florian; Dittmer, Ulf; Küppers, Ralf; Recher, Mike; Hardt, Cornelia; Scheffrahn, Inka; Beauchemin, Nicole; Göthert, Joachim R.; Singer, Bernhard B.; Lang, Philipp A.; Lang, Karl S.

    2015-01-01

    B cells are essential for antiviral immune defence because they produce neutralizing antibodies, present antigen and maintain the lymphoid architecture. Here we show that intrinsic signalling of CEACAM1 is essential for generating efficient B-cell responses. Although CEACAM1 exerts limited influence on the proliferation of B cells, expression of CEACAM1 induces survival of proliferating B cells via the BTK/Syk/NF-κB-axis. The absence of this signalling cascade in naive Ceacam1−/− mice limits the survival of B cells. During systemic infection with cytopathic vesicular stomatitis virus, Ceacam1−/− mice can barely induce neutralizing antibody responses and die early after infection. We find, therefore, that CEACAM1 is a crucial regulator of B-cell survival, influencing B-cell numbers and protective antiviral antibody responses. PMID:25692415

  10. CEACAM1 induces B-cell survival and is essential for protective antiviral antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Honke, Nadine; Shaabani, Namir; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Seifert, Marc; Pozdeev, Vitaly; Xu, Haifeng C; Sharma, Piyush; Baldin, Fabian; Marquardsen, Florian; Merches, Katja; Lang, Elisabeth; Kirschning, Carsten; Westendorf, Astrid M; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Florian; Dittmer, Ulf; Küppers, Ralf; Recher, Mike; Hardt, Cornelia; Scheffrahn, Inka; Beauchemin, Nicole; Göthert, Joachim R; Singer, Bernhard B; Lang, Philipp A; Lang, Karl S

    2015-01-01

    B cells are essential for antiviral immune defence because they produce neutralizing antibodies, present antigen and maintain the lymphoid architecture. Here we show that intrinsic signalling of CEACAM1 is essential for generating efficient B-cell responses. Although CEACAM1 exerts limited influence on the proliferation of B cells, expression of CEACAM1 induces survival of proliferating B cells via the BTK/Syk/NF-κB-axis. The absence of this signalling cascade in naive Ceacam1(-/-) mice limits the survival of B cells. During systemic infection with cytopathic vesicular stomatitis virus, Ceacam1(-/-) mice can barely induce neutralizing antibody responses and die early after infection. We find, therefore, that CEACAM1 is a crucial regulator of B-cell survival, influencing B-cell numbers and protective antiviral antibody responses. PMID:25692415

  11. Studies on multiple thyroid cell membrane-directed antibodies in Graves' disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Zakarija, M; Garcia, A.; McKenzie, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G was obtained from the serum of a woman who had given birth to three children with a delayed onset of hyperthyroidism; the clinical events were due to the coexistence of thyroid-stimulating antibody (TSAb) and an inhibitor of TSAb in the maternal serum. The current studies explore the possible existence of additional thyroid membrane-directed antibodies. Human thyroid slices, cells in monolayer culture, and functioning rat thyroid cells (FRTL5), with measurement of cyclic AMP ...

  12. SERUM ANTIBODIES TO WHOLE-CELL AND RECOMBINANT ANTIGENS OF BORRELIA BURGDORFERI IN COTTONTAIL RABBITS

    OpenAIRE

    Magnarelli, Louis A.; Norris, Steven J; Fikrig, Erol

    2012-01-01

    Archived serum samples, from 95 eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) captured in New York, New York, USA and Millbrook, New York, USA, during 1985–86, were analyzed in solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for total and class-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibodies to whole-cell or recombinant antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. Using a polyvalent conjugate, rabbit sera contained antibodies to whole-cell and recombinant antigens (protein [p]35, p37...

  13. Rare Association of Anti-Hu Antibody Positive Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndrome and Transitional Cell Bladder Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    S. Lukacs; Szabo, N; Woodhams, S

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis (PEM) and subacute sensory neuronopathy (SSN) are remote effects of cancer, usually associated with small-cell lung carcinoma and positive anti-Hu antibody. We describe the rare association of bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) with anti-Hu antibody positivity resulting in this paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. Patient. A 76-year-old female presented with bilateral muscle weakness and paraesthesia of the upper and lower limbs in a leng...

  14. Effect of anti-carbohydrate antibodies on HIV infection in a monocytic cell line (U937)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Clausen, H; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt; Nielsen, Jens Ole

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against carbohydrate epitopes of gp120 have recently been found to inhibit HIV infection of lymphocytes in vitro thereby opening new possibilities for vaccine considerations. Antibody-dependent enhancement of infection has however come increasingly into focus. This...... study therefore investigated the neutralization of HIV in a monocytic cell line (U937) using mAbs against these carbohydrate gp120-epitopes. While antibodies against one of the epitopes (AI) neutralized infection of U937 cells despite binding to the Fc-receptor, one mAb against the sialosyl-Tn epitope...

  15. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-graft-polypropylene membranes containing adsorbed antibody for cell separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Aiko; Itayagoshi, Midori; Hagiwara, Taeko; Yamaguchi, Manae; Kanamori, Toshiyuki; Shinbo, Toshio; Wang, Pi-Chao

    2005-04-01

    We developed a novel selective cell-separation method based on using a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-graft-polypropylene (PNIPAAm-g-PP) membrane containing adsorbed monoclonal antibody specific to the target cell. This membrane was prepared by plasma-induced polymerization and soaking in an antibody solution at 37 degrees C. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) has a thermoresponsive phase transition: at 32 degrees C water-insoluble (hydrophobic) and water-soluble (hydrophilic) states interconvert. Adsorption of antibody onto PNIPAAm-g-PP membrane at 37 degrees C and its desorption at 4 degrees C was verified by fluorescence-microscopy of the PNIPAAm-g-PP membrane after soaking it in fluorescein-conjugated goat anti-mouse IgG in phosphate-buffered saline. PNIPAAm-g-PP membranes containing adsorbed anti-mouse CD80 monoclonal antibody preferentially captured mouse-CD80 transfected cells at 37 degrees C compared with membranes lacking antibody or containing anti-mouse CD86 monoclonal antibody. Detachment of captured cells from PNIPAAm-g-PP membranes was facilitated by washing at 4 degrees C because of the thermoresponsive phase transition of PNIPAAm. With this method, mouse CD80- or mouse CD86-transfected cells were enriched from a 1:1 cell suspension to 72% or 66%, simply and with high yield. PMID:15475058

  16. Monocytes and the 38kDa-antigen of mycobacterium tuberculosis modulate natural killer cell activity and their cytolysis directed against ovarian cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite strong efforts to improve clinical outcome of ovarian cancer patients by conventional and targeted immuno-based therapies, the prognosis of advanced ovarian cancer is still poor. Natural killer (NK) cells mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), release immunostimulatory cytokines and thus function as potent anti-tumour effector cells. However, tumour cells developed mechanisms to escape from an effective immune response. So highly immunogenic substances, like the 38 kDa-preparation of M. tuberculosis, PstS-1, are explored for their potential to enhance cancer-targeted immune responses. In this study we examined the modulation of different NK cell functions by accessory monocytes and PstS-1. We focussed on NK cell activation as well as natural and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity directed against epidermal-growth-factor-receptor (EGFR)-positive ovarian cancer cell lines. Activation, cytokine release and cytotoxicity of NK cells stimulated by monocytes and PstS-1 were determined by FACS-analysis, ELISA, Bioplex assay and quantitative polymerase-chain reaction (qPCR). Transwell assays were used to discriminate cell-cell contact-dependent from contact-independent mechanisms. Five ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780, IGROV-1, OVCAR-3, OVCAR-4 and SKOV-3) with different EGFR-expression were used as target cells for natural and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity assays. Cetuximab (anti-EGFR-antibody) was used for ADCC studies. Our data show that monocytes effectively enhance activation as well natural and antibody-dependent cytolytic activity of NK cells. PstS-1 directly stimulated monocytes and further activated monocyte-NK-co-cultures. However, PstS-1 did not directly influence purified NK cells and did also not affect natural and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity directed against EGFR-positive ovarian cancer cells, even in presence of monocytes. Direct cell-cell contact between NK cells and monocytes was required for NK

  17. Effects of in vitro asbestos exposure on natural killer and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were exposed in vitro to asbestos fibers. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity and natural killer (NK) activity were examined by a chromium-51 release assay. There was a statistically significant enhancement of ADCC and NK activity by chrysotile and crocidolite fibers when cultured together with PBL for a period of 42 hr in medium containing a concentration of at least 2.5% fetal calf serum. Isolation of large granular lymphocytes to measure NK activity, however, showed the opposite effect when exposed to asbestos fibers. Their results indicated that asbestos fibers can directly affect lymphoid cytotoxic responses in vitro and may provide clues to immunopathogenic mechanisms for the occurrence of neoplasms in vivo

  18. Efficient method to optimize antibodies using avian leukosis virus display and eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Changming; Pike, Gennett M; Rinkoski, Tommy A; Correia, Cristina; Kaufmann, Scott H; Federspiel, Mark J

    2015-08-11

    Antibody-based therapeutics have now had success in the clinic. The affinity and specificity of the antibody for the target ligand determines the specificity of therapeutic delivery and off-target side effects. The discovery and optimization of high-affinity antibodies to important therapeutic targets could be significantly improved by the availability of a robust, eukaryotic display technology comparable to phage display that would overcome the protein translation limitations of microorganisms. The use of eukaryotic cells would improve the diversity of the displayed antibodies that can be screened and optimized as well as more seamlessly transition into a large-scale mammalian expression system for clinical production. In this study, we demonstrate that the replication and polypeptide display characteristics of a eukaryotic retrovirus, avian leukosis virus (ALV), offers a robust, eukaryotic version of bacteriophage display. The binding affinity of a model single-chain Fv antibody was optimized by using ALV display, improving affinity >2,000-fold, from micromolar to picomolar levels. We believe ALV display provides an extension to antibody display on microorganisms and offers virus and cell display platforms in a eukaryotic expression system. ALV display should enable an improvement in the diversity of properly processed and functional antibody variants that can be screened and affinity-optimized to improve promising antibody candidates. PMID:26216971

  19. Dendritic cells loaded with apoptotic antibody-coated tumor cells provide protective immunity against B-cell lymphoma in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franki, Suzanne N; Steward, Kristopher K; Betting, David J; Kafi, Kamran; Yamada, Reiko E; Timmerman, John M

    2008-02-01

    The in vitro priming of tumor-specific T cells by dendritic cells (DCs) phagocytosing killed tumor cells can be augmented in the presence of antitumor monoclonal antibody (mAb). We investigated whether DCs phagocytosing killed lymphoma cells coated with tumor-specific antibody could elicit antitumor immunity in vivo. Irradiated murine 38C13 lymphoma cells were cocultured with bone marrow-derived DCs in the presence or absence of tumor-specific mAb. Mice vaccinated with DCs cocultured with mAb-coated tumor cells were protected from tumor challenge (60% long-term survival), whereas DCs loaded with tumor cells alone were much less effective. The opsonized whole tumor cell-DC vaccine elicited significantly better tumor protection than a traditional lymphoma idiotype (Id) protein vaccine, and in combination with chemotherapy could eradicate preexisting tumor. Moreover, the DC vaccine protected animals from both wild-type and Id-negative variant tumor cells, indicating that Id is not a major target of the induced tumor immunity. Protection was critically dependent upon CD8(+) T cells, with lesser contribution by CD4(+) T cells. Importantly, opsonized whole tumor cell-DC vaccination did not result in tissue-specific autoimmunity. Since opsonized whole tumor cell-DC and Id vaccines appear to target distinct tumor antigens, optimal antilymphoma immunity might be achieved by combining these approaches. PMID:17993615

  20. AAV Natural Infection Induces Broad Cross-Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Multiple AAV Serotypes in Chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James M

    2016-06-01

    Cross-sectional studies of primates have revealed that natural neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses to adeno-associated viruses (AAV) span multiple serotypes. This differs from the phenotype of the NAb response to an AAV vector delivered to seronegative nonhuman primates that is typically restricted to the administered AAV serotype. To better understand the mechanism by which natural AAV infections result in broad NAb responses, we conducted a longitudinal study spanning 10 years in which we evaluated serum-circulating AAV NAb levels in captive-housed chimpanzees. In a cohort of 25 chimpanzees we identified 3 distinct groups of animals: those that never seroconverted to AAV (naïve), those that were persistently seropositive (chronic), and those that seroconverted during the 10-year period (acute). For the chronic group we found a broad seroresponse characterized by NAbs reacting to multiple AAV serotypes. A similar cross-neutralization pattern of NAbs was observed in the acute group. These data support our hypothesis that a single natural infection with AAV induces a broadly cross-reactive NAb response to multiple AAV serotypes. PMID:27314914

  1. Anti-idiotypic antibodies that protect cells against the action of diphtheria toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolf, J.M.; Gaudin, H.M.; Tirrell, S.M.; MacDonald, A.B.; Eidels, L.

    1989-03-01

    An anti-idiotypic serum prepared against the combining site (idiotype) of specific anti-diphtheria toxoid antibodies was characterized with respect to its interaction with highly diphtheria toxin-sensitive Vero cells. Although the anti-idiotypic serum protected Vero cells against the cytotoxic action of diphtheria toxin, it did not prevent the binding of /sup 125/I-labeled diphtheria toxin to the cells but did inhibit the internalization and degradation of /sup 125/I-labeled toxin. This anti-idiotypic serum immunoprecipitated a cell-surface protein from radiolabeled Vero cells with an apparent Mr of approximately 15,000. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the anti-idiotypic serum contains antibodies that carry an internal image of an internalization site on the toxin and that a cell-surface protein involved in toxin internalization possesses a complementary site recognized by both the toxin and the anti-idiotypic antibodies.

  2. Comprehensive Identification of Immunodominant Proteins of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis Using Antibodies in the Sera from Naturally Infected Hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal Wareth

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a debilitating zoonotic disease that affects humans and animals. The diagnosis of brucellosis is challenging, as accurate species level identification is not possible with any of the currently available serology-based diagnostic methods. The present study aimed at identifying Brucella (B. species-specific proteins from the closely related species B. abortus and B. melitensis using sera collected from naturally infected host species. Unlike earlier reported investigations with either laboratory-grown species or vaccine strains, in the present study, field strains were utilized for analysis. The label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of the naturally isolated strains of these two closely related species revealed 402 differentially expressed proteins, among which 63 and 103 proteins were found exclusively in the whole cell extracts of B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains, respectively. The sera from four different naturally infected host species, i.e., cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat were applied to identify the immune-binding protein spots present in the whole protein extracts from the isolated B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains and resolved on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Comprehensive analysis revealed that 25 proteins of B. abortus and 20 proteins of B. melitensis were distinctly immunoreactive. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate/malate dehydrogenase from B. abortus, amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein from B. melitensis and fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase from both species were reactive with the sera of all the tested naturally infected host species. The identified proteins could be used for the design of serological assays capable of detecting pan-Brucella, B. abortus- and B. melitensis-specific antibodies.

  3. Comprehensive Identification of Immunodominant Proteins of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis Using Antibodies in the Sera from Naturally Infected Hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wareth, Gamal; Eravci, Murat; Weise, Christoph; Roesler, Uwe; Melzer, Falk; Sprague, Lisa D.; Neubauer, Heinrich; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a debilitating zoonotic disease that affects humans and animals. The diagnosis of brucellosis is challenging, as accurate species level identification is not possible with any of the currently available serology-based diagnostic methods. The present study aimed at identifying Brucella (B.) species-specific proteins from the closely related species B. abortus and B. melitensis using sera collected from naturally infected host species. Unlike earlier reported investigations with either laboratory-grown species or vaccine strains, in the present study, field strains were utilized for analysis. The label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of the naturally isolated strains of these two closely related species revealed 402 differentially expressed proteins, among which 63 and 103 proteins were found exclusively in the whole cell extracts of B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains, respectively. The sera from four different naturally infected host species, i.e., cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat were applied to identify the immune-binding protein spots present in the whole protein extracts from the isolated B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains and resolved on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Comprehensive analysis revealed that 25 proteins of B. abortus and 20 proteins of B. melitensis were distinctly immunoreactive. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate/malate dehydrogenase from B. abortus, amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein from B. melitensis and fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase from both species were reactive with the sera of all the tested naturally infected host species. The identified proteins could be used for the design of serological assays capable of detecting pan-Brucella, B. abortus- and B. melitensis-specific antibodies. PMID:27144565

  4. Comprehensive Identification of Immunodominant Proteins of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis Using Antibodies in the Sera from Naturally Infected Hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wareth, Gamal; Eravci, Murat; Weise, Christoph; Roesler, Uwe; Melzer, Falk; Sprague, Lisa D; Neubauer, Heinrich; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a debilitating zoonotic disease that affects humans and animals. The diagnosis of brucellosis is challenging, as accurate species level identification is not possible with any of the currently available serology-based diagnostic methods. The present study aimed at identifying Brucella (B.) species-specific proteins from the closely related species B. abortus and B. melitensis using sera collected from naturally infected host species. Unlike earlier reported investigations with either laboratory-grown species or vaccine strains, in the present study, field strains were utilized for analysis. The label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of the naturally isolated strains of these two closely related species revealed 402 differentially expressed proteins, among which 63 and 103 proteins were found exclusively in the whole cell extracts of B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains, respectively. The sera from four different naturally infected host species, i.e., cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat were applied to identify the immune-binding protein spots present in the whole protein extracts from the isolated B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains and resolved on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Comprehensive analysis revealed that 25 proteins of B. abortus and 20 proteins of B. melitensis were distinctly immunoreactive. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate/malate dehydrogenase from B. abortus, amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein from B. melitensis and fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase from both species were reactive with the sera of all the tested naturally infected host species. The identified proteins could be used for the design of serological assays capable of detecting pan-Brucella, B. abortus- and B. melitensis-specific antibodies. PMID:27144565

  5. B7h-expressing dendritic cells and plasma B cells mediate distinct outcomes of ICOS costimulation in T cell-dependent antibody responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larimore Kevin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ICOS-B7h costimulatory receptor-ligand pair is required for germinal center formation, the production of isotype-switched antibodies, and antibody affinity maturation in response to T cell-dependent antigens. However, the potentially distinct roles of regulated B7h expression on B cells and dendritic cells in T cell-dependent antibody responses have not been defined. Results We generated transgenic mice with lineage-restricted B7h expression to assess the cell-type specific roles of B7h expression on B cells and dendritic cells in regulating T cell-dependent antibody responses. Our results show that endogenous B7h expression is reduced on B cells after activation in vitro and is also reduced in vivo on antibody-secreting plasma B cells in comparison to both naïve and germinal center B cells from which they are derived. Increasing the level of B7h expression on activated and plasma B cells in B-B7hTg mice led to an increase in the number of antibody-secreting plasma cells generated after immunization and a corresponding increase in the concentration of antigen-specific high affinity serum IgG antibodies of all isotypes, without affecting the number of responding germinal center B cells. In contrast, ICOS costimulation mediated by dendritic cells in DC-B7hTg mice contributed to germinal center formation and selectively increased IgG2a production without affecting the overall magnitude of antibody responses. Conclusions Using transgenic mice with lineage-restricted B7h expression, we have revealed distinct roles of ICOS costimulation mediated by dendritic cells and B cells in the regulation of T cell-dependent antibody responses.

  6. Red Blood Cell Antibodies in Hematology/Oncology Patients: Interpretation of Immunohematologic Tests and Clinical Significance of Detected Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Tormey, Christopher A

    2016-06-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a cornerstone of the management of patients with hematology/oncology disorders. However, a potentially deleterious consequence of transfusion is the development of alloantibodies against blood group antigens present on RBCs. Such alloantibodies can be an obstacle in providing compatible units for transfusion. Providers in this arena must fully understand the testing performed by blood banks, as well as the consequences of detected antibodies. This article reviews immunohematologic tests, describes how autoimmune hemolytic anemia is classified by autoantibodies; outlines RBC alloimmunization rates, and presents strategies to prevent/mitigate the impact of RBC alloimmunization. PMID:27113001

  7. Development of novel monoclonal antibodies that define differentiation stages of human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Kortesidis, Angela; Zannettino, Andrew C W;

    2011-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are currently being introduced for cell therapy, yet, antibodies specific for native and differentiated MSCs are required for their identification prior to clinical use. Herein, high quality antibodies against MSC surface proteins were developed by immunizing...... differentiation. Interestingly, undifferentiated cells revealed a sole cytoplasmic distribution pattern of Collagen VI, which however changed to an extracellular matrix appearance upon osteogenic- and adipogenic differentiation. In relation to this, we found that STRO-1(+/-)/Collagen VI(-) sorted hMSC contained...... fewer differentiated alkaline phosphatase(+) cells compared to STRO-1(+/-)/Collagen VI(+) hMSC, suggesting that Collagen VI on the cell membrane exclusively defines differentiated MSCs. In conclusion, we have generated a panel of high quality antibodies to be used for characterization of MSCs, and in...

  8. Lineage tracing of human B cells reveals the in vivo landscape of human antibody class switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horns, Felix; Vollmers, Christopher; Croote, Derek; Mackey, Sally F; Swan, Gary E; Dekker, Cornelia L; Davis, Mark M; Quake, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Antibody class switching is a feature of the adaptive immune system which enables diversification of the effector properties of antibodies. Even though class switching is essential for mounting a protective response to pathogens, the in vivo patterns and lineage characteristics of antibody class switching have remained uncharacterized in living humans. Here we comprehensively measured the landscape of antibody class switching in human adult twins using antibody repertoire sequencing. The map identifies how antibodies of every class are created and delineates a two-tiered hierarchy of class switch pathways. Using somatic hypermutations as a molecular clock, we discovered that closely related B cells often switch to the same class, but lose coherence as somatic mutations accumulate. Such correlations between closely related cells exist when purified B cells class switch in vitro, suggesting that class switch recombination is directed toward specific isotypes by a cell-autonomous imprinted state. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16578.001 PMID:27481325

  9. A Recombinant Bispecific CD20×CD95 Antibody With Superior Activity Against Normal and Malignant B-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalivaiko, Kristina; Hofmann, Martin; Kober, Karina; Teichweyde, Nadine; Krammer, Peter H; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Jung, Gundram

    2016-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed to the B-cell-specific CD20-antigen are successfully used for the treatment of lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. Here, we compare the anti-B-cell activity of three different antibodies directed to CD20: (i) a chimeric, monospecific antibody, (ii) an Fc-optimized variant thereof, and (iii) a bispecific CD20×CD95-antibody in a newly developed recombinant format, termed Fabsc. The bispecific antibody specifically triggers the CD95 death receptor on malignant, as well as activated, normal B-cells. We found that the capability of this antibody to suppress the growth of malignant B-cells in vitro and in vivo and to specifically deplete normal, activated B-cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures was superior to that of the Fc-optimized monospecific antibody. This antibody in turn was more effective than its nonoptimized variant. Moreover, the bispecific antibody was the only reagent capable of significantly suppressing antibody production in vitro. Our findings imply that the bispecific CD20×CD95-antibody might become a new, prototypical reagent for the treatment of B-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. PMID:26581163

  10. RA8, A human anti-CD25 antibody against human treg cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, Robyn; Flanagan, Meg; Miller, Keith D.; Nien, Yu-Chih; Hu, Peisheng; Gray, Dixon; Khawli, Leslie A.; Epstein, Alan L.

    2007-06-01

    Although anti-CD25 antibodies exist for clinical use in patients, there is a need for the development of a human Treg antibody that will abrogate the immunosuppressive function of this small but critical T cell subtype. Based upon mounting evidence that the level of Treg cells in the tumor microenvironment correlates with clinical prognosis and stage in man, it appears that Treg cells play an important role in the tumor's ability to overcome host immune responses. In mice, the rat anti-mouse CD25 antibody PC61 causes depletion of CD25-bearing Treg cells both peripherally in lymphatic tissues and in the tumor microenvironment, without inducing symptoms of autoimmunity. A similar antibody, though with the ability to delete Treg cells specifically, would be an important new tool for reversing tumor escape associated with Treg immunosuppression in man. To begin to generate such a reagent, we now describe the development of a human anti-CD25 antibody using a novel yeast display library. The target antigen CD25-Fc was constructed and used for five rounds of selection using a non-immune yeast display library that contained as many as 109 single chain variable fragments (scFv). Two unique clones with low KD values (RA4 and RA8) were then selected to construct fully human anti-CD25 antibodies (IgG1/kappa) for stable expression. One antibody, RA8, showed excellent binding to human CD25+ cell lines and to human Treg cells and appears to be an excellent candidate for the generation of a human reagent that may be used in man for the immunotherapy of cancer.

  11. Synergistic cytotoxic effects of antibodies directed against different cell surface determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three antibody populations were raised in rabbits against surface antigens on guinea-pig L2C leukaemic lymphocytes: against idiotypic determinants on the lambda chain of the surface immunoglobulin, against C region determinants on the lambda chain, and against the surface antigens recognised by conventional anti-lymphocyte sera. Complement and K-cell cytotoxicities effected by the antibodies on L2C cells were studied in vitro. In both cytotoxic systems mixtures of the antibodies revealed synergy, in that the titres of the mixtures exceeded predicted additive titres of their components. The synergy was greater when the mixed antibodies were directed to determinants on the same molecule rather than to determinants on different molecules. (author)

  12. Anti-S100A4 antibody suppresses metastasis formation by blocking stroma cell invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Grum-Schwensen, Birgitte; Beck, Mette K;

    2012-01-01

    microenvironment, making it an attractive target for anti-cancer therapy. In this study, we produced a function-blocking anti-S100A4 monoclonal antibody with metastasis-suppressing activity. Antibody treatment significantly reduced metastatic burden in the lungs of experimental animals by blocking the recruitment......The small Ca-binding protein, S100A4, has a well-established metastasis-promoting activity. Moreover, its expression is tightly correlated with poor prognosis in patients with numerous types of cancer. Mechanistically, the extracellular S100A4 drives metastasis by affecting the tumor...... of T cells to the site of the primary tumor. In vitro studies demonstrated that this antibody efficiently reduced the invasion of T cells in a fibroblast monolayer. Moreover, it was capable of suppressing the invasive growth of human and mouse fibroblasts. We presume therefore that the antibody...

  13. Indirect 125I-labeled protein A assay for monoclonal antibodies to cell surface antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assay for detection of monoclonal hybridoma antibodies against cell surface antigens is described. Samples of spent medium from the hybridoma cultures are incubated in microtest wells with cells, either as adherent monolayers or in suspension. Antibodies bound to surface antigens are detected by successive incubations with rabbit anti-immunoglobulin serum and 125I-labeled protein A from Staphylococcus aureus, followed by autoradiography of the microtest plate or scintillation counting of the individual wells. Particular advantages of this assay for screening hybridomas are: (1) commercially available reagents are used, (2) antibodies of any species and of any immunoglobulin class or subclass can be detected, and (3) large numbers of samples can be screened rapidly and inexpensively. The assay has been used to select hybridomas producing monoclonal antibodies to surface antigens of human melanomas and mouse sarcomas. (Auth.)

  14. Glycoproteins of coated pits, cell junctions, and the entire cell surface revealed by monoclonal antibodies and immunoelectron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Topographical descriptions of three major plasma membrane glycoproteins of murine 3T3 cells were obtained by immunoelectron microscopy with monoclonal antibodies. A glycoprotein of Mr 80,000 was distributed throughout the total cell surface. A second of Mr 90,000 was concentrated in coated pits, and a third of Mr 100,000 was localized at cell junctions.

  15. A monoclonal antibody (OPT1 to T cells which is available for paraffin-embedded materials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukuzono,Hiroshi

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available A monoclonal antibody (MAb, OPT1, reactive with T cells in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections, has been identified through immunization with activated T cells from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL. The antibody is an IgG1 antibody as demonstrated by the Ouchterlony technique. By cytofluorometric analysis, almost all CD3+ lymphocytes and only a few CD20+ lymphocytes of peripheral blood expressed the OPT1 antigen. Nonhematolymphoid cell lines were negative for OPT1 by the immunoperoxidase staining using acetone-fixed cell lines. On the contrary, peripheral T cells, cells of two T cell lines out of four and a part of the cells of one B cell line out of two were positive for OPT1. The immunoperoxidase staining of paraffin-embedded tissue sections revealed that most of lymphocytes in T cell areas of lymph nodes expressed OPT1 antigen. Some lymphocytes in both cortex and medulla of the thymus and erythroid precursors of the bone marrow were OPT1+. In the malignant lymphoma series, approximately 90% of T cell lymphomas and 6% of B cell lymphomas reacted with OPT1. None of the Reed-Sternberg cells nor Hodgkin cells in Hodgkin's disease were positive. Consequently, OPT1 may be useful for the diagnosis and study of malignant lymphomas and other related lesions.

  16. Effective Binding of a Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Antibody to Ebola Virus Infected Cells and Purified Virions

    OpenAIRE

    Dowall, S. D.; Graham, V A; Corbin-Lickfett, K; C. Empig; Schlunegger, K.; Bruce, C B; Easterbrook, L.; Hewson, R.

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus is responsible for causing severe hemorrhagic fevers, with case fatality rates of up to 90%. Currently, no antiviral or vaccine is licensed against Ebola virus. A phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody (PGN401, bavituximab) has previously been shown to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Here, we demonstrate that PGN401 specifically binds to Ebola virus and recognizes infected cells. Our study provides the first evidence of phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody reactivity again...

  17. Differences in the composition of the human antibody repertoire by B cell subsets in the blood

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Szymanska eMroczek; Ippolito, Gregory C.; Tobias eRogosch; Kam Hon eHoi; Tracy A Hwangpo; Marsha G Brand; Yingxin eZhuang; Cun Ren eLiu; Schneider, David A; Michael eZemlin; Brown, Elizabeth E.; George eGeorgiou; Schroeder, Harry W.

    2014-01-01

    The vast initial diversity of the antibody repertoire is generated centrally by means of a complex series of V (D) J gene rearrangement events, variation in the site of gene segment joining, and TdT catalyzed N- region addition. Although the diversity is great, close inspection has revealed distinct and unique characteristics in the antibody repertoires expressed by different B cell developmental subsets. In order to illustrate our approach to repertoire analysis, we present an in-depth com...

  18. Differences in the Composition of the Human Antibody Repertoire by B Cell Subsets in the Blood

    OpenAIRE

    Mroczek, Eva Szymanska; Ippolito, Gregory C.; Rogosch, Tobias; Hoi, Kam Hon; Tracy A Hwangpo; Marsha G Brand; Zhuang, Yingxin; Liu, Cun Ren; Schneider, David A; Zemlin, Michael; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Georgiou, George; Schroeder, Harry W.

    2014-01-01

    The vast initial diversity of the antibody repertoire is generated centrally by means of a complex series of V(D)J gene rearrangement events, variation in the site of gene segment joining, and TdT catalyzed N-region addition. Although the diversity is great, close inspection has revealed distinct and unique characteristics in the antibody repertoires expressed by different B cell developmental subsets. In order to illustrate our approach to repertoire analysis, we present an in-depth comparis...

  19. Guidelines to cell engineering for monoclonal antibody production

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, A.; Rodrigues, E; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently used for many diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The high demand for these biopharmaceuticals has led to the development of large-scale manufacturing processes, with productivity improvements being mainly achieved by optimization of bioreactor systems. However, more recently, the early steps of production, previous to bioreactor culture, have been presented as alternative areas where productivity enhancements can be achieved. Thus, ...

  20. Xenohybridization of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cells for the production of human monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiebout, R F; Stricker, E A; Oosterhof, F; van Heemstra, D J; Zeijlemaker, W P

    1985-12-01

    Transformation of human B lymphocytes, obtained from hyperimmune donors with Epstein-Barr virus, yields polyclonal cell populations in which a minority of cells produce IgG antibodies of predetermined specificity, whereas the majority of cells produce 'non-specific' immunoglobulin (mainly of the IgM class). Such lymphoblastoid cell lines can be easily propagated in high-density cultures. Because cloning at 1 cell per well is not possible, stabilization of lymphoblastoid cell lines by limiting dilution is not feasible and most newly established lines cease to produce specific antibody within a few weeks. Xenohybrids, resulting from fusion of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cells with NS1 mouse plasmacytoma cells, can be cloned at 1 cell per well. Stable xenohybridoma subclones, producing antibody of the desired specificity, can be isolated after a series of limiting dilutions. In a model system, we have studied the efficiency of xenohybridization of human lymphoblastoid cells. Using this system, we have constructed IgG anti-tetanus-toxoid- and IgG anti-HBsAg-producing cell lines. Next, we investigated whether transformation with Epstein-Barr virus is essential in such a two-step procedure or whether a polyclonal stimulator, such as pokeweed mitogen, could also be used. It was found that antibody-producing xenohybrids can be obtained after stimulation with pokeweed mitogen. However, this latter system is subject to more variations and lacks the advantage of pre-selection of antibody-producing cells as compared to xenohybridization after transformation. PMID:3003887

  1. Antibody-Free Magnetic Cell Sorting of Genetically Modified Primary Human CD4+ T Cells by One-Step Streptavidin Affinity Purification

    OpenAIRE

    Matheson, Nicholas J.; Peden, Andrew A.; Lehner, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Existing methods for phenotypic selection of genetically modified mammalian cells suffer disadvantages of time, cost and scalability and, where antibodies are used to bind exogenous cell surface markers for magnetic selection, typically yield cells coated with antibody-antigen complexes and beads. To overcome these limitations we have developed a method termed Antibody-Free Magnetic Cell Sorting in which the 38 amino acid Streptavidin Binding Peptide (SBP) is displayed at the cell surface by ...

  2. A novel monoclonal antibody of human stem cell factor inhibits umbilical cord blood stem cell ex vivo expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stem cell factor (SCF activates hematopoietic stem cell (HSC self-renewal and is being used to stimulate the ex vivo expansion of HSCs. The mechanism by which SCF supports expansion of HSCs remains poorly understood. In cord blood ex vivo expansion assays, a newly produced anti-SCF monoclonal antibody (clone 23C8 was found to significantly inhibit the expansion of CD34+ cells. This antibody appears to bind directly to a part of SCF that is critical for biological activity toward expansion of CD34+ cells, which is located in the first 104 amino acids from the NH2-terminus.

  3. Tetravalent anti-CD20/CD3 bispecific antibody for the treatment of B cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chia-Yen; Chen, Gregory J; Tai, Pei-Han; Yang, Yu-Chen; Hsu, Yu-Shen; Chang, Mingi; Hsu, Chuan-Lung

    2016-05-13

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) are second generation antibodies for therapeutic application in immunotherapy. One of the major strategies of the bsAb platform is the recruitment of immune effector T cells by incorporating an anti-CD3 domain. A bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE), with one end having an affinity for CD3 and the other end with affinity for CD19, has been approved in the US and Europe for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, due to their small size and lack of Fc region, these single-chain variable fragment (scFv) bsAbs have short half-lives in vivo. Additionally, poor solubility, structural instability, and low production yields have also become major challenges in the bulk production process. To overcome these challenges, we have engineered a tetravalent bsAb with bivalent binding specificity for the CD20 and CD3 antigen in an immunoglobulin G (IgG) format. The fusion of the anti-CD3 scFvs to the CD20 antibody via a linker-hinge domain (LHD) results in improved antibody stabilization and properties. Here we demonstrate this antibody's highly efficient cancer cell elimination in a dose-dependent manner in a CD20-expressing B lymphoblastoid cell line in vitro. Our data suggest the potential clinical application of this bsAb for the treatment of CD20-expressing B cell malignancies. PMID:27040766

  4. Activity and Phenotype of Natural Killer Cells in Peptide Transporter (TAP)-deficient Patients (Type I Bare Lymphocyte Syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmer, Jacques; Donato, Lionel; Hanau, Daniel; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Tongio, Marie-Marthe; Moretta, Alessandro; Salle, Henri de la

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we describe the function and phenotype of natural killer (NK) lymphocytes from HLA class I–deficient patients. These cells are, as has been previously reported, unable to lyse HLA class I− K562 cells, but are able to perform antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), although with lower efficiency as compared to NK cells from normal individuals. Transporter associated to antigen processing (TAP)− NK cells proliferate when cultured in the presence of lymphoblastoid B cells ...

  5. Affinity isolation of antigen-specific circulating B cells for generation of phage display-derived human monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditzel, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    A method is described for affinity isolation of antigen-specific circulating B cells of interest for subsequent generation of immune antibody phage display libraries. This approach should overcome the problem of low yields of monoclonal antibodies of interest in the libraries generated from...... the frequency of antibody phage particles of interest in the library and allow for efficient isolation monoclonal antibodies with the predefined specificity....

  6. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity of antibodies reactive with HIV-induced cell surface antigens in HIV-carrying haemophiliacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sera obtained from HIV positive and from uninfected hemophiliacs and from healthy subjects were investigated for the presence of lymphocytotoxic antibodies. Using the 51Cr-release test, HIV-positive hemophiliacs were found to produce serum antibodies exerting a complement-dependent cytotoxic effect on HIV-infected T4 cells. The antibodies were reactive mainly when HIV-infected target cells were stimulated with concanavalin A. The results of complement-dependent antibody cytotoxicity and indirect membrane immunofluorescence tests suggest that envelope antigen(s) of HIV may be the target(s) for cytotoxic antibodies. (author)

  7. Application of a human osteogenic sarcoma cell culture for detection of human cytomegalovirus antibody by immunofluorescence tests.

    OpenAIRE

    Furukawa, T; Herold, R; Zolnick, P; Plotkin, S A

    1981-01-01

    A human osteogenic sarcoma cell culture is useful in the immunofluorescence serological test for detecting human cytomegalovirus antibody. These sarcoma cells are chronically infected with human cytomegalovirus and provide a constant number of immunofluorescence-positive cells.

  8. Metabolic requirements for hormone-induced resistance to antibody-complement mediated killing of tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Line-1 guinea pig hepatoma cells are susceptible to killing by anti-Forssman IgM antibody plus guinea pig complement (GPC). When these tumor cells are incubated with insulin, epinephrine, hydrocortisone, or prednisolone, the cells show a marked reduction in their susceptibility to antibody-C-mediated killing. If the ability of the cells to synthesize DNA, RNA, and protein is impaired by pretreatment with metabolic inhibitors, x-irradiation, or culture in nutrient-deficient media, the hormones are no longer effective in rendering the cells resistant to killing. If only DNA synthesis is impaired, but not RNA and protein synthesis, the hormones are effective. The inability of cells inhibited in their macromolecular synthesis to be rendered resistant to killing after hormone treatment is not due to an inability of the cells to bind hormone

  9. Quantitative determination of islet cell surface antibodies using 125I-protein A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantitative method to measure islet cell surface antibodies in human patients has been developed using 125I-protein A. Isolated, dispersed, viable rat islet cells prepared by collagenase digestion were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde to allow storage for up to 7 wk at 4 degrees C. Human sera, heat inactivated and adsorbed with rat liver and kidney powder (100 mg/ml), were incubated with the fixed cells (50 x 10(3)) for 60 min at 37 degrees C. Thereafter the cells were washed and exposed to 5 x 10(5) cpm 125I-protein A, which binds to IgG attached to the cell surface. Assay precision (14%) and reproducibility (16%) were established by repeated analysis of pooled sera from healthy individuals and IDDM patients using pooled batches of islet cells. Using this method, islet cell surface antibodies were detected in 35% of insulin-dependent diabetic patients

  10. Effects of Monoclonal Antibody Cetuximab on Proliferation of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen CHEN

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab has been used widely in non-small cell lung cancer patients. The aim of this study is to explore the effect of lung cancer cells (A549, H460, H1299, SPC-A-1 which were treated by cetuximab in vitro. Methods We studied the effects of increasing concentrations of cetuximab (1 nmol/L-625 nmol/L in four human lung cancer cell lines (A549, SPC-A-1, H460, H1229. CCK8 measured the inhibition of cell proliferation in each group. A549, SPC-A-1 were marked by PI and the statuses of apoptosis were observed. Western blot were used to detect the proliferation-related signaling protein and apoptosis-related protein in A549. Results The treatment with cetuximab resulted in the effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis in a time- and dosedependent manner. The expression of activated key enzymes (p-AKT, p-EGFR, p-MAPK in EGFR signaling transduction pathway were down-regulated more obviously. Conclusion Cetuximab is an effective targeted drug in the treatment of lung cancer cell lines, tissues, most likely to contribute to the inhibition of key enzymes in EGFR signaling transduction pathway.

  11. The use of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for cell labeling in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have evaluated the potential of in vivo cell surface labeling using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) directed against their surface antigens. Two MoAbs, a specific antibody (anti-Thy-1 OX7) and a nonspecific control antibody (anti-CEA) were coupled with DTPA, labeled with /sup 111/In and evaluated against rat thymocytes, marrow cells, and lymphoma cells (all known to be Thy-1 positive) both in vitro and in vivo. Enumeration of the cells which bound the radiolabeled MoAb was done by detecting the antibody on the cell surface with a Fl-F(ab')/sub 2/ goat anti-mouse IgG and analyzing fluorescence (F1) in a flow cytometer (FACS). The thymocytes, which could be labeled in whole blood, showed a labeling efficiency of 80-100%. The labeling, which could be inhibited by cold antibody, was stable up to 72 hours and did not interfere with either cell viability or functional integrity. Following IV injection of the MoAbs in normal rats, there was very good visualization of the bone marrow not seen with the control. Analysis of the marrow cells on the FACS showed that at two hours over 60% of the marrow cells were specifically labeled as against 2% for the control. Within 15 minutes of injecting /sup 111/In-OX7 into rats with lymphoma, 70% of the activity in blood was bound to circulating lymphoma cells. The ability to stably label, rapidly target, and image specific cell populations in vivo has wide ranging diagnostic and therapeutic implications

  12. Natural Killer cells and liver fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eFasbender

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 40 years since the discovery of Natural Killer (NK cells it has been well established that these innate lymphocytes are important for early and effective immune responses against transformed cells and infections with different pathogens. In addition to these classical functions of NK cells, we now know that they are part of a larger family of innate lymphoid cells and that they can even mediate memory-like responses. Additionally, tissue resident NK cells with distinct phenotypical and functional characteristics have been identified. Here we focus on the phenotype of different NK cell subpopulations that can be found in the liver and summarize the current knowledge about the functional role of these cells with a special emphasis on liver fibrosis. NK cell cytotoxicity can contribute to liver damage in different forms of liver disease. However, NK cells can limit liver fibrosis by killing hepatic stellate cell-derived myofibroblasts, which play a key role in this pathogenic process. Therefore, liver NK cells need to be tightly regulated in order to balance these beneficial and pathological effects.

  13. Specific antibodies modulate the interactions of adenovirus type 5 with dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) is able to induce an efficient CD8+ T lymphocyte (CTL) response against a transgene product, a property thought to be linked to its ability to transduce dendritic cells (DCs). Little, however, is known about the capacity of Ad5 to interact with DCs in the presence of specific antibodies, although most people test positive for antibodies directed against Ad5. In the present study, we found that in the presence of Ad5 antibodies, a large fraction of Ad5 binds very efficiently to DCs, and that this binding is FcγRII/FcγRIII dependent. Nevertheless, in the presence of high levels of antibodies against the whole virion, Ad5 entry was inhibited. Increased binding led to increased entry in DCs in the presence of fiber-specific antibodies or in the presence of low amounts of a whole antiserum raised against whole virions, showing that the relative concentration of antibodies directed against fiber and penton base plays a major role in entry efficacy. Nevertheless, mice previously immunized with virions or purified fiber developed a lower transgene-specific CD8+ T cell response than naive mice, although their serum appeared to increase virus entry into DCs in vitro

  14. Structural analysis of B-cell epitopes in antibody:protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kringelum, Jens Vindahl; Nielsen, Morten; Padkjær, Søren Berg; Lund, Ole

    developed a novel framework for comparing and superimposing B-cell epitopes and applied it on a dataset of 107 non-similar antigen:antibody structures extracted from the PDB database. With the presented framework, we were able to describe the general B-cell epitope as a flat, oblong, oval shaped volume......The binding of antigens to antibodies is one of the key events in an immune response against foreign molecules and is a critical element of several biomedical applications including vaccines and immunotherapeutics. For development of such applications, the identification of antibody binding sites...... (B-cell epitopes) is essential. However experimental epitope mapping is highly cost-intensive and computer-aided methods do in general have moderate performance. One major reason for this moderate performance is an incomplete understanding of what characterizes an epitope. To fill this gap, we here...

  15. Radioimmunotherapy of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma. The interaction of radiation and antibody with lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whilst many patients with indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) can achieve clinical remissions to first-line chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, most will relapse. Current treatment options for relapsing patients are limited since most patients become resistant to repeated chemotherapy. Death usually occurs within 10 years of diagnosis. Overall, these disappointing results have not changed significantly in a quarter of a century and clearly advocate the urgent priority to research into potential new therapeutic approaches into this diverse and increasingly prevalent group of human tumours. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is currently under investigation as a new approach for the treatment of this disease. In this form of treatment, radionuclide-labeled monoclonal antibodies are able to deliver selective systemic irradiation by recognising tumour-associated antigens. The use of RIT with radiolabeled anti-CD20 antibodies in patients with recurrent B-cell lymphoma has resulted in extremely high rates of durable complete remissions. The optimal approach and mechanisms of action of successful RIT remain however largely unknown. The work described in this thesis has focused on clarifying some of the important determinants and mechanisms of effective RIT of syngeneic B-cell lymphoma, both in vivo and in vitro. A successful animal model of RIT in B cell lymphomas was established by initially generating a panel of antibodies against mouse B cell antigens. The in vitro characteristics of these antibodies have been compared with their subsequent performance, in biodistribution studies and RIT in vivo. For the first time in an in vivo model the relative contributions of antibody and irradiation are described. Some antibodies including anti-MHC Class II were shown to be effective delivery vehicles of low doses of Iodine-131. These antibodies, which appear to be inactive delivery vehicles can cure animals with low burdens of tumour. However antibodies such as anti-idiotype and anti-CD40

  16. Antibody-independent control of gamma-herpesvirus latency via B cell induction of anti-viral T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly B McClellan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available B cells can use antibody-dependent mechanisms to control latent viral infections. It is unknown whether this represents the sole function of B cells during chronic viral infection. We report here that hen egg lysozyme (HEL-specific B cells can contribute to the control of murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 (gammaHV68 latency without producing anti-viral antibody. HEL-specific B cells normalized defects in T cell numbers and proliferation observed in B cell-/- mice during the early phase of gammaHV68 latency. HEL-specific B cells also reversed defects in CD8 and CD4 T cell cytokine production observed in B cell-/- mice, generating CD8 and CD4 T cells necessary for control of latency. Furthermore, HEL-specific B cells were able to present virally encoded antigen to CD8 T cells. Therefore, B cells have antibody independent functions, including antigen presentation, that are important for control of gamma-herpesvirus latency. Exploitation of this property of B cells may allow enhanced vaccine responses to chronic virus infection.

  17. Genetically Encoded Azide Containing Amino Acid in Mammalian Cells Enables Site-Specific Antibody-Drug Conjugates Using Click Cycloaddition Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBrunt, Michael P; Shanebeck, Kurt; Caldwell, Zachary; Johnson, Jeffrey; Thompson, Pamela; Martin, Thomas; Dong, Huifang; Li, Gary; Xu, Hengyu; D'Hooge, Francois; Masterson, Luke; Bariola, Pauline; Tiberghien, Arnaud; Ezeadi, Ebele; Williams, David G; Hartley, John A; Howard, Philip W; Grabstein, Kenneth H; Bowen, Michael A; Marelli, Marcello

    2015-11-18

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) have emerged as potent antitumor drugs that provide increased efficacy, specificity, and tolerability over chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer. ADCs generated by targeting cysteines and lysines on the antibody have shown efficacy, but these products are heterogeneous, and instability may limit their dosing. Here, a novel technology is described that enables site-specific conjugation of toxins to antibodies using chemistry to produce homogeneous, potent, and highly stable conjugates. We have developed a cell-based mammalian expression system capable of site-specific integration of a non-natural amino acid containing an azide moiety. The azide group enables click cycloaddition chemistry that generates a stable heterocyclic triazole linkage. Antibodies to Her2/neu were expressed to contain N6-((2-azidoethoxy)carbonyl)-l-lysine at four different positions. Each site allowed over 95% conjugation efficacy with the toxins auristatin F or a pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) dimer to generate ADCs with a drug to antibody ratio of >1.9. The ADCs were potent and specific in in vitro cytotoxicity assays. An anti Her2/neu conjugate demonstrated stability in vivo and a PBD containing ADC showed potent efficacy in a mouse tumor xenograph model. This technology was extended to generate fully functional ADCs with four toxins per antibody. The high stability of the azide-alkyne linkage, combined with the site-specific nature of the expression system, provides a means for the generation of ADCs with optimized pharmacokinetic, biological, and biophysical properties. PMID:26332743

  18. Memory B cell antibodies to HIV-1 gp140 cloned from individuals infected with clade A and B viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Mouquet

    Full Text Available Understanding the antibody response to HIV-1 in humans that show broad neutralizing serologic activity is a crucial step in trying to reproduce such responses by vaccination. Investigating antibodies with cross clade reactivity is particularly important as these antibodies may target conserved epitopes on the HIV envelope gp160 protein. To this end we have used a clade B YU-2 gp140 trimeric antigen and single-cell antibody cloning methods to obtain 189 new anti-gp140 antibodies representing 51 independent B cell clones from the IgG memory B cells of 3 patients infected with HIV-1 clade A or B viruses and exhibiting broad neutralizing serologic activity. Our results support previous findings showing a diverse antibody response to HIV gp140 envelope protein, characterized by differentially expanded B-cell clones producing highly hypermutated antibodies with heterogenous gp140-specificity and neutralizing activity. In addition to their high-affinity binding to the HIV spike, the vast majority of the new anti-gp140 antibodies are also polyreactive. Although none of the new antibodies are as broad or potent as VRC01 or PG9, two clonally-related antibodies isolated from a clade A HIV-1 infected donor, directed against the gp120 variable loop 3, rank in the top 5% of the neutralizers identified in our large collection of 185 unique gp140-specific antibodies in terms of breadth and potency.

  19. Celiac anti-type 2 transglutaminase antibodies induce phosphoproteome modification in intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetana Paolella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is an inflammatory condition of the small intestine that affects genetically predisposed individuals after dietary wheat gliadin ingestion. Type 2-transglutaminase (TG2 activity seems to be responsible for a strong autoimmune response in celiac disease, TG2 being the main autoantigen. Several studies support the concept that celiac anti-TG2 antibodies may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our recent findings on the ability of anti-TG2 antibodies to induce a rapid intracellular mobilization of calcium ions, as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, suggest that they potentially act as signaling molecules. In line with this concept, we have investigated whether anti-TG2 antibodies can induce phosphoproteome modification in an intestinal epithelial cell line. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied phosphoproteome modification in Caco-2 cells treated with recombinant celiac anti-TG2 antibodies. We performed a two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by specific staining of phosphoproteins and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially phosphorylated proteins. Of 14 identified proteins (excluding two uncharacterized proteins, three were hypophosphorylated and nine were hyperphosphorylated. Bioinformatics analyses confirmed the presence of phosphorylation sites in all the identified proteins and highlighted their involvement in several fundamental biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, cell stress response, cytoskeletal organization and apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: Identification of differentially phosphorylated proteins downstream of TG2-antibody stimulation suggests that in Caco-2 cells these antibodies perturb cell homeostasis by behaving as signaling molecules. We hypothesize that anti-TG2 autoantibodies may destabilize the integrity of the intestinal mucosa in celiac individuals, thus contributing to celiac disease establishment and progression. Since several proteins here

  20. Models for Natural Killer Cell Repertoire Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramit Mehr

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells lyse only cells that do not express sufficient levels of self class I MHC molecules. Inhibition of lysis is mediated by inhibitory receptors expressed by NK cells, such as the murine Ly49 receptors, that bind to MHC class I molecules. Since inhibitory receptor genes and MHC class I genes are located on different chromosomes, and are hence not automatically co-inherited, NK cells apparently adapt to the MHC environment during their development. Two models have been proposed to account for this “education” process of NK cells. The two-step selection model postulates that developing NK cells initiate the stable expression of a random set of Ly49 genes, and then undergo two selection steps, one for cells that express a sufficient number of self-MHC receptors, and one against cells that express too many inhibitory receptors. The sequential model postulates that a cell keeps initiating the stable expression of additional inhibitory receptors until a sufficient expression level of self-MHC specific receptors is reached, and the cell matures. In this study we implement both models in computer simulations, and compare simulation results to experimental data, in order to evaluate the relative plausibility of the two models.

  1. Ebola virus-like particles produced in insect cells exhibit dendritic cell stimulating activity and induce neutralizing antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recombinant baculoviruses (rBV) expressing Ebola virus VP40 (rBV-VP40) or GP (rBV-GP) proteins were generated. Infection of Sf9 insect cells by rBV-VP40 led to assembly and budding of filamentous particles from the cell surface as shown by electron microscopy. Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) were produced by coinfection of Sf9 cells with rBV-VP40 and rBV-GP, and incorporation of Ebola GP into VLPs was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. Recombinant baculovirus infection of insect cells yielded high levels of VLPs, which were shown to stimulate cytokine secretion from human dendritic cells similar to VLPs produced in mammalian cells. The immunogenicity of Ebola VLPs produced in insect cells was evaluated by immunization of mice. Analysis of antibody responses showed that most of the GP-specific antibodies were of the IgG2a subtype, while no significant level of IgG1 subtype antibodies specific for GP was induced, indicating the induction of a Th1-biased immune response. Furthermore, sera from Ebola VLP immunized mice were able to block infection by Ebola GP pseudotyped HIV virus in a single round infection assay, indicating that a neutralizing antibody against the Ebola GP protein was induced. These results show that production of Ebola VLPs in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses represents a promising approach for vaccine development against Ebola virus infection

  2. A combination of an anti-SLAMF6 antibody and ibrutinib efficiently abrogates expansion of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, Burcu; Halibozek, Peter J; Chen, Shih-Shih; O'Keeffe, Michael S; Arnason, Jon; Avigan, David; Gattei, Valter; Bhan, Atul; Cen, Osman; Longnecker, Richard; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Wang, Ninghai; Engel, Pablo; Terhorst, Cox

    2016-05-01

    The signaling lymphocyte activation molecule family [SLAMF] of cell surface receptors partakes in both the development of several immunocyte lineages and innate and adaptive immune responses in humans and mice. For instance, the homophilic molecule SLAMF6 (CD352) is in part involved in natural killer T cell development, but also modulates T follicular helper cell and germinal B cell interactions. Here we report that upon transplantation of a well-defined aggressive murine B220+CD5+ Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) cell clone, TCL1-192, into SCID mice one injection of a monoclonal antibody directed against SLAMF6 (αSlamf6) abrogates tumor progression in the spleen, bone marrow and blood. Similarly, progression of a murine B cell lymphoma, LMP2A/λMyc, was also eliminated by αSlamf6. But, surprisingly, αSLAMF6 neither eliminated TCL1-192 nor LMP2A/λMyc cells, which resided in the peritoneal cavity or omentum. This appeared to be dependent upon the tumor environment, which affected the frequency of sub-populations of the TCL1-192 clone or the inability of peritoneal macrophages to induce Antibody Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC). However, co-administering αSlamf6 with the Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) inhibitor, ibrutinib, synergized to efficiently eliminate the tumor cells in the spleen, bone marrow, liver and the peritoneal cavity. Because an anti-human SLAMF6 mAb efficiently killed human CLL cells in vitro and in vivo, we propose that a combination of αSlamf6 with ibrutinib should be considered as a novel therapeutic approach for CLL and other B cell tumors. PMID:27029059

  3. Preparation of monoclonal antibody against apoptosis-associated antigens of hepatoma cells by subtractive immunization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-Jun Yang; Wen-Liang Wang

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the expression of the apoptosis-associatedmolecules in human primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)cells, and prepare the monoclonal antibodies (mAb) againstthe apoptosis-associated antigens of HCC cells.METHODS: Human HCC cell line HCC-9204 cells wereinduced apoptosis with 60 mL.L-1 ethanol for 6 h and theirmorphological changes were observed by transmissionelectron microscope. The cell DNA fragmentations weredetected by Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediateddUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and the cell DNAcontents by flow cytometry. Ten mice were immunized withethanol-induced apoptotic HCC-9204 cells with the methodof subtractive immunization, while the other 10 mice usedas the control were immunized by the routine procedures.The tail blood of all the mice were prepared after the lastimmunization, and the produced antibodies were determinedby the immunocytochemical ABC staining. The splenic cellsof the mice whose tail blood sera-HCC-9204 cells serumreactions were most different between the apoptotic andthe non-apoptotic were prepared and fused with the mousemyeloma cell line SP2/0 cells. The positive antibodies wereselected by ELISA assay. The fusion rates of hybridoma cellsand the producing rates of antibodies were calculated. Thefused cells that secreted candidate objective antibody werecloned continually with the of limited dilution method, andthen selected and analyzed further by theimmunocytochemical ABC staining. The chromosomes of thecloned hybridoma cells that secreted objective mAb and themAb immunoglobulin (Ig) subtype of the prepared mAb werealso determined. The molecular mass of the mAb associatedantigen was analyzed by Western blot assay.RESULTS: HCC-9204 cells treated with 60 mL.L-1 ethanolfor 6 h, manifested obvious apoptotic morphological changes,the majority of the cells were TUNEL-positive, and the sub-G1 apoptotic peak was evident. There were 2 mice in theexperimental group whose tail blood serum reacted

  4. Immunological characterization of proteins detected by phosphotyrosine antibodies in cells transformed by Rous sarcoma virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Linder, M E; Burr, J G

    1988-01-01

    Phosphotyrosine antibodies were used to identify tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-transformed chicken embryo fibroblasts. A large number of tyrosine phosphoproteins were detected. A similar set of proteins was observed in RSV-transformed murine cells. An 85,000-dalton protein, however, was present in transformed avian cells but missing in transformed murine cells. Neither the 85,000-dalton protein nor any of the other tyrosine phosphoproteins appeared to be viral s...

  5. Serum antibodies to whole-cell and recombinant antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi in cottontail rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnarelli, Louis A; Norris, Steven J; Fikrig, Erol

    2012-01-01

    Archived serum samples, from 95 eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) captured in New York, New York, USA and Millbrook, New York, USA, during 1985-86, were analyzed in solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for total and class-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibodies to whole-cell or recombinant antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. Using a polyvalent conjugate, rabbit sera contained antibodies to whole-cell and recombinant antigens (protein [p]35, p37, or VlsE) during different seasons, but there was no reactivity to outer surface protein (Osp)A or OspB. Seventy-six of the 102 sera (75%) analyzed were reactive with one or more of the antigens; 61 of the positive samples (80%) reacted to whole-cell antigens, followed by results for the p35 (58%, 44/76), VlsE (43%, 33/76), and p37 (29%, 22/ 76) antigens. Fifty-eight sera (76%) contained antibodies to the VlsE or p35 antigens with or without reactivity to whole-cell antigens. High antibody titers (≥1:2,560) recorded for 52 sera indicate robust antibody production. In analyses for IgM antibodies in an ELISA containing whole-cell antigens, there were 30 positive sera; titers ranged from 1:160 to 1:640. There was minimal cross-reactivity when rabbit antisera to Treponema pallidum or four serovars of Leptospira interrogans were screened against B. burgdorferi antigens. Based on more-specific results, VlsE and p35 antigens appear to be useful markers for detecting possible B. burgdorferi infections. PMID:22247369

  6. Dendritic cell and macrophage staining by monoclonal antibodies in tissue sections and epidermal sheets.

    OpenAIRE

    Flotte, T. J.; Springer, T A; Thorbecke, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    Mouse tissue sections were stained by monoclonal antibodies to macrophage antigens (Mac-1 (M1/70), Mac-2 (M3/38), Mac-3 (M3/84) with the use of immunoperoxidase. Mac-1 was located diffusely in the cytoplasm of round cells in a high percentage of alveolar macrophages, resident peritoneal and bone marrow cells, in splenic red pulp, and in rare perivascular cells in the thymus. Mac-1 was absent in epithelial cells and Langerhans cells. Mac-2 was strongly positive in many dendritic cells in the t...

  7. A monoclonal antibody (8H3) that binds to rat T lineage cells and augments in vitro proliferative responses

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody, designated 8H3, recognizes a cell surface antigen expressed exclusively on rat T lineage cells. 8H3 antibody immunoprecipitated 180-, 120-, and 90-kD components from rat thymocytes as well as splenic T cells under nonreducing conditions. 8H3 antibody specifically inhibited the binding of thymocytes to fibronectin. Furthermore, binding of rat thymocytes to immobilized synthetic peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro-Cys-BSA was inhibited by 8H3 antibody as was Gly-Arg-Gl...

  8. Human herpesvirus-6 enhances natural killer cell cytotoxicity via IL-15.

    OpenAIRE

    Flamand, L.; Stefanescu, I.(Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, 60439, USA); Menezes, J.

    1996-01-01

    The marked tropism of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) for natural killer (NK) cells and T lymphocytes has led us to investigate the effect of HHV-6 on cellular cytotoxicity. We describe here how HHV-6 infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) leads to upregulation of their NK cell cytotoxicity. The induction of NK cell activity by HHV-6 was abrogated by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to IL-15 but not by mAbs to other cytokines (IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, TNF-beta, IL-2, IL-12) su...

  9. Polyanhydride Nanovaccines Induce Germinal Center B Cell Formation and Sustained Serum Antibody Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela Ramirez, Julia E; Tygrett, Lorraine T; Hao, Jihua; Habte, Habtom H; Cho, Michael W; Greenspan, Neil S; Waldschmidt, Thomas J; Narasimhan, Balaji

    2016-06-01

    Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticle-based subunit vaccines have shown promising characteristics by enhancing antigen presentation and inducing protective immune responses when compared with soluble protein. Specifically, polyanhydride nanoparticle-based vaccines (i.e., nanovaccines) have been shown to successfully encapsulate and release antigens, activate B and T cells, and induce both antibody- and cell-mediated immunity towards a variety of immunogens. One of the characteristics of strong thymus-dependent antibody responses is the formation of germinal centers (GC) and the generation of GC B cells, which is part of the T helper cell driven cellular response. In order to further understand the role of nanovaccines in the induction of antigen-specific immune responses, their ability to induce germinal center B cell formation and isotype switching and the effects thereof on serum antibody responses were investigated in these studies. Polyanhydride nanovaccines based on 1,6-bis(p-carboxyphenoxy)hexane and 1,8-bis(p-carboxyphenoxy)-3,6-dioxaoctane were used to subcutaneously administer a viral antigen. GC B cell formation and serum antibody responses induced by the nanovaccines were compared to that induced by alum-based vaccine formulations. It was demonstrated that a single dose of polyanhydride nanovaccines resulted in the formation of robust GCs and serum antibody in comparison to that induced by the alum-based formulation. This was attributed to the sustained release of antigen provided by the nanovaccines. When administered in a multiple dose regimen, the highest post-immunization titer and GC B cell number was enhanced, and the immune response induced by the nanovaccines was further sustained. These studies provide foundational information on the mechanism of action of polyanhydride nanovaccines. PMID:27319223

  10. Antibody against the insulin receptor causes disappearance of insulin receptors in 3T3-L1 cells: a possible explanation of antibody-induced insulin resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Grunfeld, C.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of a rabbit antibody induced against the rat insulin receptor (RAR) was tested using cultured 3T3-L1 fat cells. As previously seen with antibodies against the insulin receptor from patients with the type B syndrome of insulin resistance and acanthosis nigricans, RAR acutely mimicked the action of insulin by stimulating deoxyglucose uptake. After prolonged exposure of 3T3-L1 cells to RAR, insulinomimetic activity was lost and the cells became resistant to the action of insulin. This...

  11. Short communication: Relationship between natural antibodies and postpartum uterine health in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, V S; Bicalho, M L S; Gilbert, R O; Bicalho, R C

    2014-12-01

    Postpartum uterine diseases of dairy cows compromise animal welfare and may result in early removal from the herd or impaired reproductive performance. The relationship between poor immune status around calving and uterine diseases is well established; however, that between natural antibodies (NAb) and uterine health has not yet been studied. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association of circulating NAb levels around parturition with puerperal metritis, clinical endometritis, and the intrauterine presence of the Escherichia coli virulence factor FimH. One hundred six pregnant heifers were enrolled; NAb in serum samples collected at 30 ± 3 d prepartum and at 2 ± 1 and 35 ± 3 d in milk (DIM) were measured by ELISA. Puerperal metritis was defined as the presence of fetid, watery, red-brown uterine discharge and rectal temperature >39.5°C at 6 ± 1 DIM. Clinical endometritis was defined as presence of pus in the uterine lavage sample collected at 35 ± 3 DIM. The intrauterine presence of the fimH gene at 2 ± 1 DIM was evaluated by PCR. The overall optical density (wavelength of 650 nm) of ELISA-detected serum NAb was lower for cows diagnosed with puerperal metritis than for cows that did not have puerperal metritis. Additionally, cows diagnosed with clinical endometritis tended to have lower levels of NAb than did cows without clinical endometritis. Finally, FimH-positive cows had lower overall levels of serum NAb compared with FimH-negative cows. In conclusion, NAb detected in serum around parturition was associated with uterine health of dairy cows. PMID:25262191

  12. Characterization of host lymphoid cells in antibody-facilitated bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have produced stable murine antibody-facilitated (AF) chimeras by the simultaneous injection of P1 bone marrow cells and anti-P2 monoclonal antibody into normal (unirradiated) adult (P1 X P2)F1 recipients. These AF chimeras are healthy, long-lived, and exhibit no overt signs of graft-versus-host disease. They are immunocompetent and tolerant of host, P2-encoded alloantigens. Donor cell engraftment and takeover, monitored by glucosephosphate isomerase isozyme patterns, is usually complete (greater than 95%) in the peripheral blood, bone marrow, and hemopoietic stem cell compartments of long-term (greater than 3 months posttransplantation) AF chimeras. The authors report here, however, that splenic, lymph node, and thymic leukocytes of AF chimeras represent donor/host chimeric populations. Spleen cell populations of AF chimeras exhibit substantial chimera-to-chimera variation in the preponderant residual host cell type(s) present. Interpretations of the implications of these findings are discussed

  13. Automated harvesting and 2-step purification of unclarified mammalian cell-culture broths containing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holenstein, Fabian; Eriksson, Christer; Erlandsson, Ioana; Norrman, Nils; Simon, Jill; Danielsson, Åke; Milicov, Adriana; Schindler, Patrick; Schlaeppi, Jean-Marc

    2015-10-30

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies represent one of the fastest growing segments in the pharmaceutical market. The growth of the segment has necessitated development of new efficient and cost saving platforms for the preparation and analysis of early candidates for faster and better antibody selection and characterization. We report on a new integrated platform for automated harvesting of whole unclarified cell-culture broths, followed by in-line tandem affinity-capture, pH neutralization and size-exclusion chromatography of recombinant antibodies expressed transiently in mammalian human embryonic kidney 293T-cells at the 1-L scale. The system consists of two bench-top chromatography instruments connected to a central unit with eight disposable filtration devices used for loading and filtering the cell cultures. The staggered parallel multi-step configuration of the system allows unattended processing of eight samples in less than 24h. The system was validated with a random panel of 45 whole-cell culture broths containing recombinant antibodies in the early profiling phase. The results showed that the overall performances of the preparative automated system were higher compared to the conventional downstream process including manual harvesting and purification. The mean recovery of purified material from the culture-broth was 66.7%, representing a 20% increase compared to that of the manual process. Moreover, the automated process reduced by 3-fold the amount of residual aggregates in the purified antibody fractions, indicating that the automated system allows the cost-efficient and timely preparation of antibodies in the 20-200mg range, and covers the requirements for early in vitro and in vivo profiling and formulation of these drug candidates. PMID:26431859

  14. Proteomic differences in recombinant CHO cells producing two similar antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommeregger, Wolfgang; Mayrhofer, Patrick; Steinfellner, Willibald; Reinhart, David; Henry, Michael; Clynes, Martin; Meleady, Paula; Kunert, Renate

    2016-09-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most commonly used mammalian hosts for the production of biopharmaceuticals. To overcome unfavorable features of CHO cells, a lot of effort is put into cell engineering to improve phenotype. "Omics" studies investigating elevated growth rate and specific productivities as well as extracellular stimulus have already revealed many interesting engineering targets. However, it remains largely unknown how physicochemical properties of the recombinant product itself influence the host cell. In this study, we used quantitative label-free LC-MS proteomic analyses to investigate product-specific proteome differences in CHO cells producing two similar antibody fragments. We established recombinant CHO cells producing the two antibodies, 3D6 and 2F5, both as single-chain Fv-Fc homodimeric antibody fragments (scFv-Fc). We applied three different vector strategies for transgene delivery (i.e., plasmid, bacterial artificial chromosome, recombinase-mediated cassette exchange), selected two best performing clones from transgene variants and transgene delivery methods and investigated three consecutively passaged cell samples by label-free proteomic analysis. LC-MS-MS profiles were compared in several sample combinations to gain insights into different aspects of proteomic changes caused by overexpression of two different heterologous proteins. This study suggests that not only the levels of specific product secretion but the product itself has a large impact on the proteome of the cell. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1902-1912. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26913574

  15. Fractalkine expression induces endothelial progenitor cell lysis by natural killer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilyana Todorova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circulating CD34(+ cells, a population that includes endothelial progenitors, participate in the maintenance of endothelial integrity. Better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate their survival is crucial to improve their regenerative activity in cardiovascular and renal diseases. Chemokine-receptor cross talk is critical in regulating cell homeostasis. We hypothesized that cell surface expression of the chemokine fractalkine (FKN could target progenitor cell injury by Natural Killer (NK cells, thereby limiting their availability for vascular repair. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that CD34(+-derived Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFC can express FKN in response to TNF-α and IFN-γ inflammatory cytokines and that FKN expression by ECFC stimulates NK cell adhesion, NK cell-mediated ECFC lysis and microparticles release in vitro. The specific involvement of membrane FKN in these processes was demonstrated using FKN-transfected ECFC and anti-FKN blocking antibody. FKN expression was also evidenced on circulating CD34(+ progenitor cells and was detected at higher frequency in kidney transplant recipients, when compared to healthy controls. The proportion of CD34(+ cells expressing FKN was identified as an independent variable inversely correlated to CD34(+ progenitor cell count. We further showed that treatment of CD34(+ circulating cells isolated from adult blood donors with transplant serum or TNF-α/IFN-γ can induce FKN expression. CONCLUSIONS: Our data highlights a novel mechanism by which FKN expression on CD34(+ progenitor cells may target their NK cell mediated killing and participate to their immune depletion in transplant recipients. Considering the numerous diseased contexts shown to promote FKN expression, our data identify FKN as a hallmark of altered progenitor cell homeostasis with potential implications in better evaluation of vascular repair in patients.

  16. Naturally enveloped AAV vectors for shielding neutralizing antibodies and robust gene delivery in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    György, Bence; Fitzpatrick, Zachary; Crommentuijn, Matheus HW; Mu, Dakai; Maguire, Casey A

    2014-01-01

    Recently adeno-associated virus (AAV) became the first clinically approved gene therapy product in the western world. To develop AAV for future clinical application in a widespread patient base, particularly in therapies which require intravenous (i.v.) administration of vector, the virus must be able to evade pre-existing antibodies to the wild type virus. Here we demonstrate that in mice, AAV vectors associated with extracellular vesicles (EVs) can evade human anti-AAV neutralizing antibodi...

  17. Mechanisms of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity: the use of effector cells from chronic granulomatous disease patients as investigative probes.

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, P.; Simone, C B; Henkart, P A; Fauci, A S

    1980-01-01

    The present study characterized the antibody-dependent cellular cytoxicity (ADCC) of leukocyte effector cells (neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes) from normal subjects and from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients. CGD phagocytic cells (neutrophils and monocytes) had depressed ADCC activity against antibody-coated human erythrocyte (HRBC) targets in suspension cultures indicative of abnormal intracellular postphagocytic killing. However, when phagocytosis was prevented by using a...

  18. NK cell depletion and recovery in SCID mice treated with anti-NK1.1 antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Jerzy Kawiak; Danuta Wasilewska; Grazyna Hoser; Joanna Kulesza

    2006-01-01

    The anti-NK1.1 antibody produced by PK136 hybridoma cell line administered subcutaneously to SCID mice effectively decreased the level of peripheral blood NK cells and weight of the spleen for 3-4 days. The antibody treatment did not harm the general state of the animal, and may be practically applied in xenograft experiments.

  19. NK cell depletion and recovery in SCID mice treated with anti-NK1.1 antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Kawiak

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The anti-NK1.1 antibody produced by PK136 hybridoma cell line administered subcutaneously to SCID mice effectively decreased the level of peripheral blood NK cells and weight of the spleen for 3-4 days. The antibody treatment did not harm the general state of the animal, and may be practically applied in xenograft experiments.

  20. Rare Association of Anti-Hu Antibody Positive Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndrome and Transitional Cell Bladder Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lukacs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis (PEM and subacute sensory neuronopathy (SSN are remote effects of cancer, usually associated with small-cell lung carcinoma and positive anti-Hu antibody. We describe the rare association of bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC with anti-Hu antibody positivity resulting in this paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. Patient. A 76-year-old female presented with bilateral muscle weakness and paraesthesia of the upper and lower limbs in a length-dependent “glove and stocking” distribution. Central nervous system symptoms included cognitive problems, personality change, and truncal ataxia. Case notes and the literature were reviewed. Result. Autoantibody screening was positive for anti-Hu antibody (recently renamed antineuronal nuclear antibody 1, ANNA-1. The diagnosis of PEM and SSN was supported by MRI and lumbar puncture results. A superficial bladder TCC was demonstrated on CT and subsequently confirmed on histology. No other primary neoplasm was found on full-body imaging. The neurological symptoms were considered to be an antibody-mediated paraneoplastic neurological syndrome and improved after resection of the tumour. Discussion. The association of anti-Hu positive paraneoplastic neurological syndrome and TCC has not been described in the literature previously. We emphasize the need for detailed clinical examination and the importance of a multidisciplinary thought process and encourage further awareness of this rare association.

  1. Lactic Acid Bacteria Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    antigen presenting cells and T-cells. Bacteria translocating across the gastrointestinal mucosa are presumed to gain access to NK cell compartments, as consumption of certain strains of lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxic activity. On-going research in our lab aims at...... describing strain-dependent effects of lactic acid bacteria on regulatory functions of NK-cells. Here, we have investigated how human gut flora-derived non-pathogenic lactic acid bacteria affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human peripheral blood NK cells upon...... bacterial stimulation. Methods: CD3-CD56+ NK cells were isolated from buffy coats by negative isolation using a lineage specific antibody cocktail and magnetic beads binding the labelling antibodies on non-NK cells. NK cells were incubated either with 10 microg/ml UV-inactivated lactic acid bacteria or 10...

  2. A bacterial signal peptidase enhances processing of a recombinant single chain antibody fragment in insect cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ailor, E; Pathmanathan, J; Jongbloed, JDH; Betenbaugh, MJ

    1999-01-01

    The production of an antibody single chain fragment (scFv) in insect cells was accompanied by the formation of an insoluble intracellular precursor even with the inclusion of the bee melittin signal peptide. The presence of the precursor polypeptide suggests a limitation in the processing of the sig

  3. Erratum: Colorectal Cancer Cell Surface Protein Profiling Using an Antibody Microarray and Fluorescence Multiplexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The author's email has been corrected in the publication of Colorectal Cancer Cell Surface Protein Profiling Using an Antibody Microarray and Fluorescence Multiplexing. There was an error with the author, Jerry Zhou's, email. The author's email has been updated to: j.zhou@uws.edu.au from: jzho7551@mail.usyd.edu.au. PMID:26167960

  4. Seroprevalence of measles and natural rubella antibodies among children in Bangui, Central African Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daba Régis

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Passively acquired maternal antibodies are necessary to protect infants against circulating measles virus until they reach the eligible age of vaccination. Likewise, high levels of population immunity must be achieved and maintained to reduce measles virus transmission. This study was undertaken to (1 assess the presence of maternally acquired measles-specific IgG antibodies among infants less than 9 months of age in Bangui, Central African Republic and (2 determine the immune status of vaccination-age children and the concordance with reported vaccination status. A secondary objective was to describe the presence of rubella-specific IgG antibody in the study population. Methods Vaccination history and blood samples were collected from 395 children using blotting paper. Samples were analyzed for the presence of measles-specific IgG antibodies using commercial ELISA kits. Results Measles-specific IgG antibodies were detected in 51.3% of vaccinated children and 27.6% of non-vaccinated children. Maternally derived measles IgG antibodies were present in only 14.8% of infants aged 0-3 months and were absent in all infants aged 4-8 months. The presence of IgG-specific measles antibodies varied among children of vaccination age, from 57.3% for children aged 9 months to 5 years, to 50.6% for children aged 6-9 years and 45.6% for chidren aged 10 years and above. The overall prevalence of rubella-specific IgG was 55.4%, with a high prevalence (87.4% among children over 10 years of age. Conclusion The findings suggest that despite efforts to accelerate measles control by giving a second dose of measles vaccine, a large number of children remain susceptible to measles virus. Further research is required to determine the geographic extent of immunity gaps and the factors that influence immunity to measles virus in the Central African Republic.

  5. A single-domain antibody-linked Fab bispecific antibody Her2-S-Fab has potent cytotoxicity against Her2-expressing tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aifen; Xing, Jieyu; Li, Li; Zhou, Changhua; Dong, Bin; He, Ping; Li, Qing; Wang, Zhong

    2016-12-01

    Her2, which is frequently overexpressed in breast cancer, is one of the most studied tumor-associated antigens for cancer therapy. Anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab, has achieved significant clinical benefits in metastatic breast cancer. In this study, we describe a novel bispecific antibody Her2-S-Fab targeting Her2 by linking a single domain anti-CD16 VHH to the trastuzumab Fab. The Her2-S-Fab antibody can be efficiently expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, and drive potent cancer cell killing in HER2-overexpressing cancer cells. In xenograft model, the Her2-S-Fab suppresses tumor growth in the presence of human immune cells. Our results suggest that the bispecific Her2-S-Fab may provide a valid alternative to Her2 positive cancer therapy. PMID:27112931

  6. Interleukin-2 enhances the natural killer cell response to Herceptin-coated Her2/neu-positive breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, W E; Parihar, R; Lindemann, M J; Personeni, N; Dierksheide, J; Meropol, N J; Baselga, J; Caligiuri, M A

    2001-10-01

    The Her2/neu (c-erbB-2) oncogene encodes a 185-kDa protein tyrosine kinase which is overexpressed in 20% of breast adenocarcinomas and is recognized by a humanized anti-Her2/neu monoclonal antibody (mAb) (rhu4D5 or Herceptin). Natural killer (NK) cells are capable of mediating antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) against antibody-coated targets via their expression of a low-affinity receptor for IgG (FcgammaRIII or CD16). NK cells can be expanded in cancer patients via the administration of low-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) and become potent cytotoxic effectors following exposure to high doses of IL-2. We tested IL-2-activated NK cells against Her2/neu+ (MCF-7Her2/neu) and Her2/neu- (MDA-468) breast cancer cell lines in a 4-h 51Cr-release cytotoxicity assay in the presence or absence of rhu4D5 mAb (effector : target ratio = 10 : 1). Specific lysis of rhu4D5-coated MCF-7Her2/neu and MDA-468 target cells by IL-2-activated NK cells was 35% and 3%, respectively (p cells was inhibited by 80 % when NK cells were pre-treated with an anti-Fc receptor antibody prior to use in the cytotoxicity assay. Enhanced ADCC of MCF-7Her2/neu target cells was seen when the effector cells consisted of mononuclear cells obtained from a patient demonstrating significant expansion of NK cells secondary to therapy with low-dose IL-2. Serum from patients receiving infusions of rhu4D5 mAb could substitute for exogenous antibody in the ADCC assay. NK cells activated by rhu4D5-coated tumor cells in the presence of IL-2 also produced large amounts of IFN-gamma with concomitant up-regulation of cell-surface activation markers CD25 and CD69. These results lend support to the concurrent use of rhu4D5 mAb and IL-2 therapy in patients with cancers that express the Her2/neu oncogene. PMID:11592078

  7. Monoclonal antibodies against goldfish (Carassius auratus) immunoglobulin: application to the quantification of immunoglobulin and antibody-secreting cells by ELISPOT and seric immunoglobulin and antibody levels by ELISA in carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwicki, A K; Vergnet, C; Charlemagne, J; Dunier, M

    1994-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised against heavy and light chains of goldfish immunoglobulin (Ig) were characterized by a Western blot technique. A complete cross-reactivity was observed between carp and goldfish Ig. These mAbs were used for the quantification of carp Ig and anti-Yersinia ruckeri antibodies by ELISA. An ELISPOT assay was also developed in carp to quantify Ig-secreting cells (ISC) and antibody-secreting cells (ASC). The number of ASC was maximum on day 18 post-vaccination and decreased to the basal level on day 28. The antibody levels in sera were maximum on day 18 and slowly decreased until day 28. PMID:7951348

  8. Cumulative Doses of T-Cell Depleting Antibody and Cancer Risk after Kidney Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jenny H. C.; Wong, Germaine; Chapman, Jeremy R.; Lim, Wai H.

    2015-01-01

    T-cell depleting antibody is associated with an increased risk of cancer after kidney transplantation, but a dose-dependent relationship has not been established. This study aimed to determine the association between cumulative doses of T-cell depleting antibody and the risk of cancer after kidney transplantation. Using data from the Australian and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry between 1997–2012, we assessed the risk of incident cancer and cumulative doses of T-cell depleting antibody using adjusted Cox regression models. Of the 503 kidney transplant recipients with 2835 person-years of follow-up, 276 (55%), 209 (41%) and 18 (4%) patients received T-cell depleting antibody for induction, rejection or induction and rejection respectively. The overall cancer incidence rate was 1,118 cancers per 100,000 patient-years, with 975, 1093 and 1377 cancers per 100,000 patient-years among those who had received 1–5 doses, 6–10 doses and >10 doses, respectively. There was no association between cumulative doses of T cell depleting antibody and risk of incident cancer (1–5: referent, 6–10: adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.19, 95%CI 0.48–2.95, >10: HR 1.42, 95%CI 0.50–4.02, p = 0.801). This lack of association is contradictory to our hypothesis and is likely attributed to the low event rates resulting in insufficient power to detect significant differences. PMID:26555791

  9. Gamma-aminobutyric-acid-B receptor antibodies in limbic encephalitis with small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Qin Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Encephalitis associated with antibodies to gamma-aminobutyric-acid B (GABA-B is a subgroup of autoimmune synaptic encephalitis with typical features of limbic encephalitis and small cell lung cancer (SCLC. We report a case of anti-GABA-B receptor encephalitis in a 57-year-old man who presented with seizures, memory loss, and abnormal behavior. He developed partially neurological responses to immunotherapy, but refused comprehensive tumor screening. The symptoms were aggravated again 4 months later. Workup showed antibodies to GABA-B receptors and tumor screening revealed SCLC. It highlights the importance of early screening of underlying tumor and anti-tumor treatment in paraneoplastic cases.

  10. Endothelial cell activation by antiphospholipid antibodies is modulated by Krüppel-like transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Kristi L.; Hamik, Anne; Jain, Mukesh K.; McCrae, Keith R

    2011-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by thrombosis and/or recurrent pregnancy loss in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (APLAs). The majority of APLAs are directed against phospholipid-binding proteins, particularly β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI). Anti-β2GPI antibodies activate endothelial cells in a β2GPI-dependent manner through a pathway that involves NF-κB. Krüppel-like factors (KLFs) play a critical role in regulating the endothelial response to inflammatory stimuli. We hypoth...

  11. Near-infrared emitting fluorescent nanocrystals-labeled natural killer cells as a platform technology for the optical imaging of immunotherapeutic cells-based cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes the development of near-infrared optical imaging technology for the monitoring of immunotherapeutic cell-based cancer therapy using natural killer (NK) cells labeled with fluorescent nanocrystals. Although NK cell-based immunotherapeutic strategies have drawn interest as potent preclinical or clinical methods of cancer therapy, there are few reports documenting the molecular imaging of NK cell-based cancer therapy, primarily due to the difficulty of labeling of NK cells with imaging probes. Human natural killer cells (NK92MI) were labeled with anti-human CD56 antibody-coated quantum dots (QD705) for fluorescence imaging. FACS analysis showed that the NK92MI cells labeled with anti-human CD56 antibody-coated QD705 have no effect on the cell viability. The effect of anti-human CD56 antibody-coated QD705 labeling on the NK92MI cell function was investigated by measuring interferon gamma (IFN- γ) production and cytolytic activity. Finally, the NK92MI cells labeled with anti-human CD56 antibody-coated QD705 showed a therapeutic effect similar to that of unlabeled NK92MI cells. Images of intratumorally injected NK92MI cells labeled with anti-human CD56 antibody-coated could be acquired using near-infrared optical imaging both in vivo and in vitro. This result demonstrates that the immunotherapeutic cells labeled with fluorescent nanocrystals can be a versatile platform for the effective tracking of injected therapeutic cells using optical imaging technology, which is very important in cell-based cancer therapies.

  12. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to cell wall antigens of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    OpenAIRE

    Ste-Marie, L; Sénéchal, S; Boushira, M; Garzon, S.; Strykowski, H; Pedneault, L; de Repentigny, L

    1990-01-01

    Two murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Aspergillus fumigatus were produced and characterized. Splenocytes from cell wall-immunized BALB/c mice were fused with SP2/0 myeloma cells. The hybridomas were screened with a cold alkali (CA) extract of mycelium containing protein, mannose, and galactose, and two MAbs of the immunoglobulin M class were purified from ascites fluid. MAbs 1 and 40 were characterized by double immunodiffusion against CA antigen, indirect enzyme immunoassay with ma...

  13. Polyclonal antibody production and expression of CREG protein in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaling HAN; Haiwei LIU; Jian KANG; Xiaozeng WANG; Ye HU; Lianyou ZHAO; Shaohua LI

    2005-01-01

    Objectives The cellular repressor of E1A-activated genes (CREG), a novel gene, was recently found to play a role in inhibiting cell growth and promoting cell differentiation. The purpose of this study was to obtain antibody against CREG protein and to study the expression of CREG protein in human internal thoracic artery cells (HITASY) which express different patterns of differentiation markers after serum withdrawal. Methods The open reading frame of CREG gene sequence was amplified by PCR and cloned into the pGEX-4T-1 vector. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-CREG fusion protein was expressed in E. Coli BL21 and purified from inclusion bodies by Sephacryl S-200 chromatography. Rabbits were immunized with the purified GST-CREG protein. Western blot examined with immunohistochemistry staining and the protein expression level was analyzed by Western blot in HITASY cells after serum removal. Results It was confirmed by using endonuclease digesting and DNA sequencing that the PCR product of CREG was correctly inserted into the vector. The GST-CREG protein was purified with gel filtration chromatography. Polyclonal antibody against GST-CREG was obtained from rabbits. CREG protein immunohistochemistry staining displayed a perinuclear distribution in the cytoplasm of HITASY cells. Results from Western blot suggested that comparing with the untreated cells upregulation of CREG polyclonal antibody against CREG was comfirmed. Using this antibody, the changes of CREG protein expression was observed in the process of phenotypic modulation of HITASY cells. These results provide basic understanding on the relationship of CREG gene with the cell phenotypic conversion.

  14. Characterization of antibody-mediated inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion to epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Sexton, M; Reen, D J

    1992-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system was developed and used to study adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to human epithelial cells and the abilities of specific antibodies to inhibit this process. Human buccal epithelial cells coated onto microtiter plates were incubated with P. aeruginosa suspensions, and adherent bacteria were detected by using anti-P. aeruginosa serum and a horseradish peroxidase-conjugated secondary antiserum. Adhesion, quantitated as an increase in A405, varied lin...

  15. Human colonic goblet cells. Demonstration of distinct subpopulations defined by mucin-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Podolsky, D K; Fournier, D A; Lynch, K E

    1986-01-01

    We studied glycoprotein content of human colonic goblet cells, using a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against purified human colonic mucin (HCM). Using indirect immunofluorescence (IIF), we found that 17 of 23 anti-HCM MAbs stained some or all goblet cells of normal human colonic mucosa. We observed a variety of cellular staining patterns, including (a) diffuse (homogeneous) staining of intracellular mucin, (b) speckled (inhomogeneous) staining of mucin droplets, (c) periphe...

  16. Sensitivity of immunofluorescence with monoclonal antibodies for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis inclusions in cell culture.

    OpenAIRE

    Stephens, R S; Kuo, C C; Tam, M R

    1982-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies which recognize the species-specific major outer membrane protein antigen of Chlamydia trachomatis were used for immunofluorescence staining of chlamydial inclusions in cell culture. A total of 115 clinical specimens were inoculated onto replicate HeLa 229 cell monolayers and assayed for chlamydial inclusions by immunofluorescence staining and Giemsa staining. Of the isolates, 38 were detected by immunofluorescence staining on passage 1 and 1 was detected on passage 2; 2...

  17. Targeting of a plasma cell line with a conjugate containing xanthine oxidase and the monoclonal antibody 62B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazzari, P L; Battelli, M G; Abbondanza, A; Dinota, A; Rizzi, S; Gobbi, M; Stirpe, F

    1989-07-01

    We report on the preparation of an antibody-conjugated enzyme consisting of xanthine oxidase, a free-radical-producing enzyme, linked to the 62B1 monoclonal antibody, which recognizes the last steps of differentiation of B cell lineage (plasma cell and hairy cells). The conjugate specifically kills target cells, retaining both enzymic and immunological properties, without any damage to normal myeloid clonogenic efficiency. The model is suitable for ex vivo bone marrow purging in multiple myeloma patients. PMID:2787552

  18. The anti-canine distemper virus activities of ex vivo-expanded canine natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Yun; Shin, Dong-Jun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Lee, Je-Jung; Suh, Guk-Hyun; Cho, Duck; Kim, Sang-Ki

    2015-04-17

    Natural killer (NK) cells play critical roles in induction of antiviral effects against various viruses of humans and animals. However, few data on NK cell activities during canine distemper virus (CDV) infections are available. Recently, we established a culture system allowing activation and expansion of canine non-B, non-T, large granular NK lymphocytes from PBMCs of normal dogs. In the present study, we explored the ability of such expanded NK cells to inhibit CDV infection in vitro. Cultured CD3-CD5-CD21- NK cells produced large amounts of IFN-γ, exhibited highly upregulated expression of mRNAs encoding NK-cell-associated receptors, and demonstrated strong natural killing activity against canine tumor cells. Although the expanded NK cells were dose-dependently cytotoxic to both normal and CDV-infected Vero cells, CDV infection rendered Vero cells more susceptible to NK cells. Pretreatment with anti-CDV serum from hyperimmunized dogs enhanced the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of NK cells against CDV-infected Vero cells. The culture supernatants of NK cells, added before or after infection, dose-dependently inhibited both CDV replication and development of CDV-induced cytopathic effects (CPEs) in Vero cells. Anti-IFN-γ antibody neutralized the inhibitory effects of NK cell culture supernatants on CDV replication and CPE induction in Vero cells. Such results emphasize the potential significance of NK cells in controlling CDV infection, and indicate that NK cells may play roles both during CDV infection and in combating such infections, under certain conditions. PMID:25680810

  19. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis: radioresistant IgE antibody-forming cells in infected rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Nippostrongylus brasiliensis-infected rats, anti-N. brasiliensis IgE antibody production was observed at 20 weeks postinfection, long after the worms, as a source of antigen, had been expelled. The persistent IgE production was not abrogated after whole body irradiation (800 R) administered at 12 or 20 weeks, suggesting the participation of radioresistant IgE-forming cells. Help of T cells and recruitment of B memory cells in the irradiated rats seems to be ruled out by the findings that the irradiation completely inhibited the initiation of anti-N. brasiliensis IgE production in rats shortly after the infection with N. brasiliensis or after primary and secondary immunization with N. brasiliensis-antigen. Moreover, clearance of anti-N. brasiliensis IgE antibody from circulation did not seem to be crucially affected by the irradiation. The radioresistant cells forming anti-N. brasiliensis IgE were most productive in mesenteric lymph nodes as compared to other lymph nodes. The recognition of antigens fractionated by chromatography on Sephadex G-200 was the same for IgE-forming cells from rats 12 weeks after infection as for those from 3 weeks after infection. Based on these results, one of the mechanisms of persistent elevation of IgE antibody in the host infected with helminth parasites might be explained by the participation of radioresistant IgE-forming cells

  20. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis: radioresistant IgE antibody-forming cells in infected rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, N.; Kobayashi, A.

    1989-02-01

    In Nippostrongylus brasiliensis-infected rats, anti-N. brasiliensis IgE antibody production was observed at 20 weeks postinfection, long after the worms, as a source of antigen, had been expelled. The persistent IgE production was not abrogated after whole body irradiation (800 R) administered at 12 or 20 weeks, suggesting the participation of radioresistant IgE-forming cells. Help of T cells and recruitment of B memory cells in the irradiated rats seems to be ruled out by the findings that the irradiation completely inhibited the initiation of anti-N. brasiliensis IgE production in rats shortly after the infection with N. brasiliensis or after primary and secondary immunization with N. brasiliensis-antigen. Moreover, clearance of anti-N. brasiliensis IgE antibody from circulation did not seem to be crucially affected by the irradiation. The radioresistant cells forming anti-N. brasiliensis IgE were most productive in mesenteric lymph nodes as compared to other lymph nodes. The recognition of antigens fractionated by chromatography on Sephadex G-200 was the same for IgE-forming cells from rats 12 weeks after infection as for those from 3 weeks after infection. Based on these results, one of the mechanisms of persistent elevation of IgE antibody in the host infected with helminth parasites might be explained by the participation of radioresistant IgE-forming cells.

  1. Molecular mechanisms whereby immunomodulatory drugs activate natural killer cells: clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Toshiaki; Hideshima, Teru; Akiyama, Masaharu; Podar, Klaus; Yasui, Hiroshi; Raje, Noopur; Kumar, Shaji; Chauhan, Dharminder; Treon, Steven P; Richardson, Paul; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2005-01-01

    Thalidomide and immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), which target multiple myeloma (MM) cells and the bone marrow microenvironment, can overcome drug resistance. These agents also have immunomodulatory effects. Specifically, we have reported that thalidomide increased serum interleukin-2 (IL-2) levels and natural killer (NK) cell numbers in the peripheral blood of responding MM patients. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms whereby IMiDs augment NK cell cytotoxicity. NK cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultured with IMiDs were examined in the presence or absence of anti-IL-2 antibody, ciclosporin A or depletion of CD56-positive cells. IMiDs-induced signalling pathways, triggering IL-2 transcription in T cells, were also delineated. IMiDs facilitated the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells-2 and activator protein-1 via activation of phosphoinositide-3 kinase signalling, with resultant IL-2 secretion. IMiDs enhanced both NK cell cytotoxicity and ADCC induced by triggering IL-2 production from T cells. These studies defined the mechanisms whereby IMiDs trigger NK cell-mediated tumour-cell lysis, further supporting their therapeutic use in MM. PMID:15638853

  2. Induction of ICOS+CXCR3+CXCR5+ TH Cells Correlates with Antibody Responses to Influenza Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentebibel, Salah-Eddine; Lopez, Santiago; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Schmitt, Nathalie; Mueller, Cynthia; Harrod, Carson; Flano, Emilio; Mejias, Asuncion; Albrecht, Randy A.; Blankenship, Derek; Xu, Hui; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Garcia-Sastre, Adolfo; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Ramilo, Octavio; Ueno, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal influenza vaccine protects 60 to 90% of healthy young adults from influenza infection. The immunological events that lead to the induction of protective antibody responses remain poorly understood in humans. We identified the type of CD4+ T cells associated with protective antibody responses after seasonal influenza vaccinations. The administration of trivalent split-virus influenza vaccines induced a temporary increase of CD4+ T cells expressing ICOS, which peaked at day 7, as did plasmablasts. The induction of ICOS was largely restricted to CD4+ T cells co-expressing the chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CXCR5, a subpopulation of circulating memory T follicular helper cells. Up to 60% of these ICOS+CXCR3+CXCR5+CD4+ T cells were specific for influenza antigens and expressed interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-10, IL-21, and interferon-γ upon antigen stimulation. The increase of ICOS+CXCR3+CXCR5+CD4+ T cells in blood correlated with the increase of preexisting antibody titers, but not with the induction of primary antibody responses. Consistently, purified ICOS+CXCR3+CXCR5+CD4+ T cells efficiently induced memory B cells, but not naïve B cells, to differentiate into plasma cells that produce influenza-specific antibodies ex vivo. Thus, the emergence of blood ICOS+CXCR3+CXCR5+CD4+ T cells correlates with the development of protective antibody responses generated by memory B cells upon seasonal influenza vaccination. PMID:23486778

  3. REAL-Select: full-length antibody display and library screening by surface capture on yeast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Rhiel

    Full Text Available We describe a novel approach named REAL-Select for the non-covalent display of IgG-molecules on the surface of yeast cells for the purpose of antibody engineering and selection. It relies on the capture of secreted native full-length antibodies on the cell surface via binding to an externally immobilized ZZ domain, which tightly binds antibody Fc. It is beneficial for high-throughput screening of yeast-displayed IgG-libraries during antibody discovery and development. In a model experiment, antibody-displaying yeast cells were isolated from a 1:1,000,000 mixture with control cells confirming the maintenance of genotype-phenotype linkage. Antibodies with improved binding characteristics were obtained by affinity maturation using REAL-Select, demonstrating the ability of this system to display antibodies in their native form and to detect subtle changes in affinity by flow cytometry. The biotinylation of the cell surface followed by functionalization with a streptavidin-ZZ fusion protein is an approach that is independent of the genetic background of the antibody-producing host and therefore can be expected to be compatible with other eukaryotic expression hosts such as P. pastoris or mammalian cells.

  4. CEACAM1 induces B-cell survival and is essential for protective antiviral antibody production

    OpenAIRE

    Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Honke, Nadine; Shaabani, Namir; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Seifert, Marc; Pozdeev, Vitaly; Xu, Haifeng C.; Sharma, Piyush; Baldin, Fabian; Marquardsen, Florian; Merches, Katja; Lang, Elisabeth; Kirschning, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    B cells are essential for antiviral immune defence because they produce neutralizing antibodies, present antigen and maintain the lymphoid architecture. Here we show that intrinsic signalling of CEACAM1 is essential for generating efficient B-cell responses. Although CEACAM1 exerts limited influence on the proliferation of B cells, expression of CEACAM1 induces survival of proliferating B cells via the BTK/Syk/NF-κB-axis. The absence of this signalling cascade in naive Ceacam1 −/− mice limits...

  5. Enhancement of Antibody Titre and Development of Additional Red Cell Alloantibodies Following Intrauterine Transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Anju; Sonker, Atul; Chaudhary, Rajendra

    2016-03-01

    Intrauterine blood transfusion is the mainstay of managing foetuses with severe anemia. It may however result in fetomaternal hemorrhage, which in cases of Rh isoimmunisation may increase the severity of the disease by enhancing the maternal immunological response to fetal antigens. This study was conducted to determine the frequency, specificity and origin of additional red cell antibodies which developed after IUT. The change in the titre of allo anti-D following IUT was also determined. Antibody detection and titration was done on the blood samples of all the patients before and after intrauterine blood transfusion to check for the development of additional antibody and change in the titre of existing anti-D. Severe anemia was found in 17 (58.6 %) fetuses who received a total of 42 ultrasound-guided IUTs. Development of antibodies additional to anti-D in maternal serum was seen in 5 (29.4 %) cases. The specificity of additional alloantibodies was anti-C in four cases whereas it was anti-E in one case. Four fold or greater increase in existing allo-anti D titre was seen in 6 (35.3 %) cases after IUT. Enhancement of maternal sensitisation leading to an increase in maternal antibody titre is particularly seen after the first IUT. Matching of the donor RBCs particularly for Rh antigens might prevent the induction of additional alloantibodies against these antigens. IUT as a treatment modality should be given judiciously and only when the need is inevitable. PMID:26855513

  6. Short communication: Relationship between the level of bovine leukemia virus antibody and provirus in blood and milk of cows from a naturally infected herd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Juan P; Porta, Natalia G; Gutierrez, Geronimo; Politzki, Romina P; Álvarez, Irene; Galarza, Roxana; Abdala, Alejandro; Calvinho, Luis; Trono, Karina G

    2016-07-01

    We explored the relationship between the level of bovine leukemia virus antibodies and provirus load during natural infection. For that purpose, a set of 50 blood and milk paired samples were analyzed for the presence of bovine leukemia virus provirus and antibodies. Additionally, provirus load and antibody titers were measured and the relationship between these variables was investigated. Bovine leukemia provirus was detected in 59% of milk samples and a negative correlation was observed between the level of milk provirus load and milk antibody titers. By the consumption of raw milk, calves might be exposed to bovine leukemia virus favoring the perinatal transmission of this disease. PMID:27132093

  7. Production of the recombinant single chain anti-B cell lymphoma antibody and evaluation of immunoreactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recombinant ScFv lym-1 was produced, using pET vector system for large scale production. ScFv lym-1 gene inserted pET-22b (+) vector, was expressed in E. coli BL-21 strain. ScFv lym-1 antibody extracted from periplasm, was purified with His-Taq column. To evaluated immunoreactivity with Raji cell, ScFv lym-1 was labeled with I-125 and I-125 ScFv lym-1 was purified with desalting column. Raji cell was injected into the C57BR/cdJ SCID mice. Gamma camera imaging were taken time point at 1, 8, 24 and 48 hr with 8 mm pinhole collimator. An active scFv lym-1 could be produced in E. coli with soluble from using pET vector system. Immunoreactivity and affinity constant of lgG lym-1 were 54% and 1.83 x 109 M-1, respectively, and those of scFv lym-1 were 53.7% and 1.46 x 109 M-1, respectively. Biodistribution of I-125 scFv lym-1 antibody showed faster clearance in blood, spleen, kidney and than I-125 lgG lym-1 antibody. Gamma camera image of I-125 scFv lym-1 antibody showed faster clearance and tumor targeting liver than I-125 lgG lym-1 antibody. In vitro properties of scFv lym-1 were similar to those of lgG lym-1. ScFv lym-1 showed faster blood clearance than lgG lym-1. These results suggest that scFv lym-1 antibody can be useful for tumor imaging agent

  8. Interaction of anti-phospholipid antibodies with late endosomes of human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galve-de Rochemonteix, B; Kobayashi, T; Rosnoblet, C; Lindsay, M; Parton, R G; Reber, G; de Maistre, E; Wahl, D; Kruithof, E K; Gruenberg, J; de Moerloose, P

    2000-02-01

    Anti-phospholipid antibodies (APLAs) are associated with thrombosis and/or recurrent pregnancy loss. APLAs bind to anionic phospholipids directly or indirectly via a cofactor such as beta(2)-glycoprotein 1 (beta(2)GPI). The lipid target of APLA is not yet established. Recently, we observed that APLAs in vitro can bind lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA). The internal membranes of late endosomes are enriched in this phospholipid. The current study was undertaken to determine to what extent binding of APLA to LBPA is correlated with binding to cardiolipin and to beta(2)GPI and to determine whether patient antibodies interact with late endosomes of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and thus modify the intracellular trafficking of proteins. Binding of patient immunoglobulin G (n=37) to LBPA was correlated significantly with binding to cardiolipin. Although LBPA binding was correlated to a lesser extent with beta(2)GPI binding, we observed that beta(2)GPI binds with high affinity to LBPA. Immunofluorescence studies showed that late endosomes of HUVECs contain LBPA. Patient but not control antibodies recognized late endosomes, but not cardiolipin-rich mitochondria, even when we used antibodies that were immunopurified on cardiolipin. Incubation of HUVECs with patient plasma samples immunoreactive toward LBPA resulted in an accumulation of the antibodies in late endosomes and led to a redistribution of the insulinlike growth factor 2/mannose-6-phosphate receptor from the Golgi apparatus to late endosomes. Our results suggest that LBPA is an important lipid target of APLA in HUVECs. These antibodies are internalized by the cells and accumulate in late endosomes. By modifying the intracellular trafficking of proteins, APLA could contribute to several of the proposed pathogenic mechanisms leading to the antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:10669657

  9. Preparing unbiased T cell receptor and antibody cDNA libraries for the deep next generation sequencing profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilgar Z Mamedov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput sequencing has the power to reveal the nature of adaptive immunity as represented by the full complexity of T cell receptor (TCR and antibody (IG repertoires, but is at present severely compromised by the quantitative bias, bottlenecks, and accumulated errors that inevitably occur in the course of library preparation and sequencing. Here we report an optimized protocol for the unbiased preparation of TCR and IG cDNA libraries for high-throughput sequencing, starting from thousands or millions of live cells in an investigated sample. Critical points to control are revealed, along with tips that allow researchers to minimize quantitative bias, accumulated errors, and cross-sample contamination at each stage, and to enhance the subsequent bioinformatic analysis. The protocol is simple, reliable, and can be performed in 1–2 days.

  10. Red blood cell antibodies in pregnancy and their clinical consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordvall, Maria; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Hegaard, Hanne Kristine;

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to determine clinical consequences of various specificities for the infant/fetus. The population was patients referred between 1998 and 2005 to the tertiary center because of detected red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization. Altogether 455 infants were delivered by 390 alloimmunized...

  11. Identification of internalizing human single chain antibodies targeting brain tumor sphere cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Bidlingmaier, Scott; Hashizume, Rintaro; James, C. David; Berger, Mitchel S.; Liu, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumor and there is no curative treatment to date. Resistance to conventional therapies and tumor recurrence pose major challenges to treatment and management of this disease, and therefore new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. Previous studies by other investigators have shown that a subpopulation of GBM cells can grow as neurosphere-like cells when cultured in restrictive media, and exhibit enhanced tumor initiating ability and resistance to therapy. We report here the identification of internalizing human single chain antibodies (scFvs) targeting GBM tumor sphere cells. We selected a large naive phage antibody display library on the glycosylation-dependent CD133 epitope-positive subpopulation of GBM cells grown as tumor spheres and identified internalizing scFvs that target tumor sphere cells broadly, as well as scFvs that target the CD133 positive subpopulation. These scFvs were found to be efficiently internalized by GBM tumor sphere cells. One scFv GC4 inhibited self-renewal of GBM tumor sphere cells in vitro. We have further developed a full-length human IgG1 based on this scFv and found that it potently inhibits proliferation of GBM tumor sphere cells and GBM cells grown in regular non-selective media. Taken together, these results show that internalizing human scFvs targeting brain tumor sphere cells can be readily identified from a phage antibody display library, which could be useful for further development of novel therapies that target subpopulations of GBM cells to combat recurrence and resistance to treatment. PMID:20587664

  12. Intratumoral but not systemic delivery of CpG oligodeoxynucleotide augments the efficacy of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody therapy against B cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betting, David J; Yamada, Reiko E; Kafi, Kamran; Said, Jonathan; van Rooijen, Nico; Timmerman, John M

    2009-01-01

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab (Rituxan) has become a mainstay in the treatment of B cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The mechanisms of action for rituximab include antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), complement-dependent cytotoxicity, and apoptosis induction. Combination of anti-CD20 antibodies with immunostimulatory agents may improve their efficacy via enhancement of one or more of these mechanisms. Toll-like receptor 9 agonist CpG oligodeoxynucleotides administered systemically have been studied in clinical trials with and without rituximab. However, recent data suggest that intratumoral (IT) delivery of CpG has advantages in the treatment of tumors. Using a syngeneic murine B cell lymphoma line expressing human CD20, we found that IT, but not systemically administered CpG significantly improved the efficacy of rituximab against 7-day established tumors. Rituximab plus IT CpG could eradicate tumors from 42% of mice, whereas systemically administered CpG, with or without rituximab, did not achieve tumor eradication. Both natural killer cells and complement participated in the cure of tumors by rituximab plus IT CpG, apparently by increasing tumor cell sensitivity to complement and ADCC lysis, and by augmenting the cytotoxicity of ADCC effectors. No role for T cells in mediating tumor eradication was demonstrated in this model. These results suggest that previous clinical trials in B cell lymphoma combining systemic administration of CpG with rituximab may have employed suboptimal routes of CpG delivery. Future trials combining IT CpG with anti-CD20 antibodies or the antibody-mediated targeting of CpG directly to the sites of B cell lymphoma may thus be warranted. PMID:19483647

  13. Rabbit antibodies to the cell wall polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae fail to protect mice from lethal challenge with encapsulated pneumococci.

    OpenAIRE

    Szu, S C; Schneerson, R; Robbins, J B

    1986-01-01

    A conjugate, composed of the cell wall polysaccharide (C polysaccharide) of Streptococcus pneumoniae and bovine serum albumin (BSA), was prepared with the bifunctional agent N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)-propionate. Analysis with monoclonal antibodies provided evidence that the phosphocholine (PC) moiety of the C polysaccharide was retained during the conjugation procedure. The C polysaccharide-BSA conjugate elicited antibodies to C polysaccharide in rabbits; no PC-specific antibodies we...

  14. Localization of the catalytic subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent. Protein kinase in cultured cells using a specific antibody

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    We developed a specific antibody to the catalytic subunit (C-subunit) of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase and used it to localize C- subunit in cultured cells. C-subunit antigen was purified from bovine cardiac muscle and cross-linked to hemocyanin with glutaraldehyde. Immunized goat serum showed a low titer of antibody after boosting; it was enriched 100-fold by affinity chromatography on catalytic subunit- Sepharose. The antibody immunoprecipitated C-subunit from type I and type II holoe...

  15. Role of group 3 innate lymphoid cells in antibody production

    OpenAIRE

    Magri, Giuliana; Cerutti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) constitute a heterogeneous family of effector lymphocytes of the innate immune system that mediate lymphoid organogenesis, tissue repair, immunity and inflammation. The initial view that ILCs exert their protective functions solely during the innate phase of an immune response has been recently challenged by evidence indicating that ILCs shape adaptive immunity by establishing both contactdependent and contact-independent interactions with multiple ...

  16. A 125I-protein A-binding assay detecting antibodies to cell surface antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 125I-protein A-binding assay detecting antibodies to cell surface antigens on human blood cells was developed and evaluated using sera from multitransfused nonleukemic patients sensitized against HLA antigens. The binding assay was found to be reproducible and more sensitive than conventional HLA testing. Seven patients with acute myelogenous leukemia and two patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia successfully treated by chemotherapy were than investigated. Sera from seven of the patients studied in partial or complete remission demonstrated significant binding to autochthonous leukemic cells obtained from bone marrow or peripheral blood. In two cases sera taken during the leukemic stage demonstrated the most pronounced binding to the patients' own leukemic cells. Sera from four patients with demonstrable significant binding to autochthonous leukemic cells failed to bind to autochthonous remission cells when both types of target cells were tested in parallel. Differences in serum concentrations of IgG, IgA, and IgM were not the cause of the demonstrated increased binding of leukemic sera to autochthonous target cells. We propose that the 125I-protein A-binding assay presented in this paper detects antibodies reacting selectively with acute leukemia cells. (orig.)

  17. Expression of Receptors for Tetanus Toxin and Monoclonal Antibody A2B5 by Pancreatic Islet Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbarth, G. S.; Shimizu, K.; Bowring, M. A.; Wells, S.

    1982-08-01

    Studies of the reaction of antibody A2B5 and tetanus toxin with pancreatic islet cells, islet cell tumors, and other human amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation (APUD) tumors are described. By indirect immunofluorescence, antibody A2B5 and tetanus toxin were shown to specifically bind to the plasma membrane of human, rat, chicken, and mouse islet cells. The binding of antibody A2B5 to the cell surface of living islet cells has allowed isolation of these cells from a suspension of pancreatic cells by using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. In studies designed to determine whether tetanus toxin and antibody A2B5 bound to the same surface antigen, A2B5 and tetanus toxin did not compete for binding to normal islet cells, a human islet cell tumor, or a rat islet cell tumor. In addition to binding to islet cell tumors, antibody A2B5 reacts with frozen sections, isolated cells, and cell lines of neural, neural crest, and APUD origin.

  18. T cell-independent type I antibody response against B cell epitopes expressed repetitively on recombinant virus particles

    OpenAIRE

    Fehr, Thomas; Skrastina, Dace; Pumpens, Paul; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant viral or virus-like particles offer new tools for vaccine development. This study investigated hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) capsids and RNA phage Qβ coats as carriers of a foreign epitope to induce antibody responses in mice. HBcAg capsids were shown to induce T cell-independent (TI) antibodies. We found that these particles behave as antigen-specific TI type 1 (TI-1) Ag comparable to other rigidly structured viruses. When a 5-aa long epitope of the pre-S1 domain of hepatitis ...

  19. Cellular cooperation during in vivo anti-hapten antibody responses. I. The effect of cell number on the response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular interactions in adoptive secondary anti-hapten antibody responses to the hapten 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP) have been studied. It was shown that DNP-specific B cells must interact with carrier specific helper T cells to give optimal responses. Independent titration of B cell and helper cell activity in adoptive anti-DNP antibody responses gave the following results: Doubling the number of transferred B cells approximately doubled the subsequent antibody response. Doubling the number of helper cells leads to nearly 4 times as much anti-DNP antibody, measured 7 days after boosting (''premium effect''). This marked effect of helper cell number on the antibody response is thought to be due primarily to the interaction of two populations of carrier-specific cells in the helper effect, or to the interaction of two activities of a single population of helper cells, namely clone activation and clone expansion. Only a very small proportion of the premium effect given by helper cells could be attributed to increases in antibody affinity. (U.S.)

  20. Study on the Radioiodination of Sheep Anti-myeloma Polyclonal Antibodies for the Determination of in-vitro Cytotoxic Effect on Myeloma Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work aims to study the effect of radiolabeled anti-myeloma polyclonal antibodies on the growth and viability of myeloma cells in-vitro. Two Sheep were immunized by myeloma cells (SP2/OR) as antigen. Productions of Sheep anti-myeloma polyclonal antibodies followed by radioiodination using different oxidizing agents were carried out. Labeled and unlabeled antibodies were incubated with myeloma cells. Growth and viability of myeloma cells were investigated before and after addition of antibodies. The results show significant reduction in growth and viability of myeloma cells by using labeled antibodies. This technique of treatment can be used in radio-immunotherapy of myeloma cell

  1. Antibody-Conjugated Paramagnetic Nanobeads: Kinetics of Bead-Cell Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Waseem

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Specific labelling of target cell surfaces using antibody-conjugated paramagnetic nanobeads is essential for efficient magnetic cell separation. However, studies examining parameters determining the kinetics of bead-cell binding are scarce. The present study determines the binding rates for specific and unspecific binding of 150 nm paramagnetic nanobeads to highly purified target and non-target cells. Beads bound to cells were enumerated spectrophotometrically. Results show that the initial bead-cell binding rate and saturation levels depend on initial bead concentration and fit curves of the form A(1 − exp(−kt. Unspecific binding within conventional experimental time-spans (up to 60 min was not detectable photometrically. For CD3-positive cells, the probability of specific binding was found to be around 80 times larger than that of unspecific binding.

  2. Rational development of high-affinity T-cell receptor-like antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Wadle, Andreas; Hombach, Anja; Shenderov, Eugene; Held, Gerhard; Fischer, Eliane; Kleber, Sascha; Nuber, Natko; Stenner-Liewen, Frank; Bauer, Stefan; McMichael, Andrew; Knuth, Alexander; Abken, Hinrich; Hombach, Andreas A; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Jones, E Yvonne; Renner, Christoph

    2009-04-01

    T-cell interaction with a target cell is a key event in the adaptive immune response and primarily driven by T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of peptide-MHC (pMHC) complexes. TCR avidity for a given pMHC is determined by number of MHC molecules, availability of coreceptors, and TCR affinity for MHC or peptide, respectively, with peptide recognition being the most important factor to confer target specificity. Here we present high-resolution crystal structures of 2 Fab antibodies in complex with the immunodominant NY-ESO-1(157-165) peptide analogue (SLLMWITQV) presented by HLA-A*0201 and compare them with a TCR recognizing the same pMHC. Binding to the central methionine-tryptophan peptide motif and orientation of binding were almost identical for Fabs and TCR. As the MW "peg" dominates the contacts between Fab and peptide, we estimated the contributions of individual amino acids between the Fab and peptide to provide the rational basis for a peptide-focused second-generation, high-affinity antibody library. The final Fab candidate achieved better peptide binding by 2 light-chain mutations, giving a 20-fold affinity improvement to 2-4 nM, exceeding the affinity of the TCR by 1,000-fold. The high-affinity Fab when grafted as recombinant TCR on T cells conferred specific killing of HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1(157-165) target cells. In summary, we prove that affinity maturation of antibodies mimicking a TCR is possible and provide a strategy for engineering high-affinity antibodies that can be used in targeting specific pMHC complexes for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:19307587

  3. Monoclonal antibodies against ROR1 induce apoptosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmanesh, A H; Hojjat-Farsangi, M; Khan, A S; Jeddi-Tehrani, M; Akhondi, M M; Bayat, A A; Ghods, R; Mahmoudi, A-R; Hadavi, R; Österborg, A; Shokri, F; Rabbani, H; Mellstedt, H

    2012-06-01

    ROR1 is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) recently identified to be overexpressed at the gene and protein levels in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against RTKs have been successfully applied for therapy of solid tumors. We generated five MAbs against the Ig (n = 1), cysteine-rich (CRD) (n = 2) and kringle (KNG) (n = 2) domains, respectively, of the extracellular part of ROR1. All CLL patients (n = 20) expressed ROR1 on the surface of the leukemic cells. A significantly higher frequency of ROR1 expression was found in patients with progressive versus non-progressive disease, and in those with unmutated versus mutated IgVH genes. All five MAbs alone induced apoptosis in the absence of complement or added effector cells (Annexin-V and MTT, as well as cleavage of poly-(ADP ribose)-polymerase, caspase-8 and caspase-9) of CLL cells but not of normal B cells. Most effective were MAbs against CRD and KNG, significantly superior to rituximab (P < 0.005). Cross-linking of anti-ROR1 MAbs using the F(ab')(2) fragments of anti-Fc antibodies significantly augmented apoptosis. Two of the MAbs induced complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) similar to that of rituximab and one anti-ROR1 MAb (KNG) (IgG1) showed killing activity by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The identified ROR1 epitopes may provide a basis for generating human ROR1 MAbs for therapy. PMID:22289919

  4. Enhancement of monoclonal antibody production in CHO cells by exposure to He–Ne laser radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Ghaleb, Rana; Naciri, Mariam; Al-Majmaie, Rasoul; Maki, Amel; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the effectiveness of laser biostimulation in small-scale cultures in vitro. We investigated the response of recombinant CHO cells, which are used for the production of monoclonal antibody, to low level laser radiation. The cells were irradiated using a 632.8 nm He–Ne laser in a continuous wave mode at different energy doses. We incubated the irradiated cells in small batch cultures and assessed their proliferation and productivity at various time intervals. Compared to untre...

  5. Neural stem cells harvested from live brains by antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, C N P; Tsui, Y P; Ho, A S L; Shum, D K Y; Chan, Y S; Wu, C T; Li, H W; Tsang, S C Edman; Yung, K K L

    2013-11-18

    It stems from the magnetism: The extraction of stem/progenitor cells from the brain of live animals is possible using antibodies conjugated to magnetic nanoparticles (Ab-MNPs). The Ab-MNPs are introduced to a rat's brain with a superfine micro-syringe. The stem cells attach to the Ab-MNPs and are magnetically isolated and removed. They can develop into neurospheres and differentiate into different types of cells outside the subject body. The rat remains alive and healthy. PMID:24108547

  6. Benchmarking of commercially available CHO cell culture media for antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, David; Damjanovic, Lukas; Kaisermayer, Christian; Kunert, Renate

    2015-06-01

    In this study, eight commercially available, chemically defined Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture media from different vendors were evaluated in batch culture using an IgG-producing CHO DG44 cell line as a model. Medium adaptation revealed that the occurrence of even small aggregates might be a good indicator of cell growth performance in subsequent high cell density cultures. Batch experiments confirmed that the culture medium has a significant impact on bioprocess performance, but high amino acid concentrations alone were not sufficient to ensure superior cell growth and high antibody production. However, some key amino acids that were limiting in most media could be identified. Unbalanced glucose and amino acids led to high cell-specific lactate and ammonium production rates. In some media, persistently high glucose concentrations probably induced the suppression of respiration and oxidative phosphorylation, known as Crabtree effect, which resulted in high cell-specific glycolysis rates along with a continuous and high lactate production. In additional experiments, two of the eight basal media were supplemented with feeds from two different manufacturers in six combinations, in order to understand the combined impact of media and feeds on cell metabolism in a CHO fed-batch process. Cell growth, nutrient consumption and metabolite production rates, antibody production, and IgG quality were evaluated in detail. Concentrated feed supplements boosted cell concentrations almost threefold and antibody titers up to sevenfold. Depending on the fed-batch strategy, fourfold higher peak cell concentrations and eightfold increased IgG titers (up to 5.8 g/L) were achieved. The glycolytic flux was remarkably similar among the fed-batches; however, substantially different specific lactate production rates were observed in the different media and feed combinations. Further analysis revealed that in addition to the feed additives, the basal medium can make a considerable

  7. Enhanced neutralization potency of botulinum neurotoxin antibodies using a red blood cell-targeting fusion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad P Adekar

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT potently inhibits cholinergic signaling at the neuromuscular junction. The ideal countermeasures for BoNT exposure are monoclonal antibodies or BoNT antisera, which form BoNT-containing immune complexes that are rapidly cleared from the general circulation. Clearance of opsonized toxins may involve complement receptor-mediated immunoadherence to red blood cells (RBC in primates or to platelets in rodents. Methods of enhancing immunoadherence of BoNT-specific antibodies may increase their potency in vivo. We designed a novel fusion protein (FP to link biotinylated molecules to glycophorin A (GPA on the RBC surface. The FP consists of an scFv specific for murine GPA fused to streptavidin. FP:mAb:BoNT complexes bound specifically to the RBC surface in vitro. In a mouse model of BoNT neutralization, the FP increased the potency of single and double antibody combinations in BoNT neutralization. A combination of two antibodies with the FP gave complete neutralization of 5,000 LD50 BoNT in mice. Neutralization in vivo was dependent on biotinylation of both antibodies and correlated with a reduction of plasma BoNT levels. In a post-exposure model of intoxication, FP:mAb complexes gave complete protection from a lethal BoNT/A1 dose when administered within 2 hours of toxin exposure. In a pre-exposure prophylaxis model, mice were fully protected for 72 hours following administration of the FP:mAb complex. These results demonstrate that RBC-targeted immunoadherence through the FP is a potent enhancer of BoNT neutralization by antibodies in vivo.

  8. Mammalian Cell Culture Clarification: A Case Study Using Chimeric Anti-CEA Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali Abol Hassan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular expression of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs in mammalian cell culture provides both opportunities and restrictions for the design of robust harvest and clarification operations. With advances in cell culture media and cell lines, it is now possible to achieve high titers of over 5 g/l for mAbs. However, Mammalian cells are sensitive to breakage due to shear stress that can result in release of proteases and other host cell proteins (HCPs which eventually affects product stability and purity. There is larger number of mAbs undergoing clinical development and it has placed significant importance on platform technologies of process development. Generally, Centrifugation and microfiltration are the primary harvest techniques used in the industry and depth filtration is also used as a step operation on clarification. This study compares the unit operations; centrifugation, microfiltration and depth filtration for maximum recovery of monoclonal antibodies. The results have shown that the depth filtration as more suitable operation for mammalian cell culture clarification since it gives 96% recovery of mAbs in comparison to centrifugation and microfiltration. ABSTRAK: Pengungkapan luar sel dari antibodi monoklon (monoclonal antibodies ((mAbs dalam kultur sel mamalia memberi ruang dan batasan terhadap reka bentuk penuaian yang cekap dan penerangan operasi. Dengan kemajuan dalam media sel kultur dan cell lines (produk yang berupa sel kekal yang digunakan untuk tujuan kajian biologi, kini adalah berkemungkinan untuk memperolehi titer tinggi melebihi 5g/l untuk mAbs [2]. Walaupun begitu, sel mamalia sensitif terhadap retakan disebabkan tegasan ricih yang menyebabkan pengeluaran protease dan hos sel protein yang lain, (host cell proteins (HCPs akhirnya mempengaruhi kestabilan dan keaslian produk. Terdapat mAbs dalam jumlah besar yang masih menjalani pembangunan klinikal dan sesungguhnya ini penting sebagai satu landasan teknologi dalam

  9. CpG-A and B oligodeoxynucleotides enhance the efficacy of antibody therapy by activating different effector cell populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.H. van Ojik; L. Bevaart; C.E. Dahle; A. Bakker (Annie); M.J.H. Jansen (Marco); M.J. van Vugt; J.G. van de Winkel; G.J. Weiner

    2003-01-01

    textabstractImmunostimulatory CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) can enhance the therapeutic effect of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) by enhancing antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Distinct classes of CpG ODNs have been found recently to stimulate different effector

  10. Antibody-independent control of gamma-herpesvirus latency via B cell induction of anti-viral T cell responses.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly B McClellan; Shivaprakash Gangappa; Speck, Samuel H.; Herbert W Virgin

    2006-01-01

    Synopsis B cells can control virus infection by making specific antibodies that bind to virus and infected cells. However, it is unknown whether B cells perform other anti-viral functions to protect the host during infection. The authors addressed this question by infecting mice with murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (γHV68), a relative of Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's sarcoma associated virus, which establishes lifelong latent infection in mice. Mice lacking B cells (B cell−/−) failed to control lat...

  11. A recombinant antibody with the antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex-restricted specificity of T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Stryhn, A; Hansen, B E; Fugger, L; Engberg, J; Buus, S

    1996-01-01

    lead to novel approaches in immunotherapy. However, it has proven difficult to generate antibodies with the specificity of T cells by conventional hybridoma techniques. Here we report that the phage display technology is a feasible alternative to generate antibodies recognizing specific, predetermined......Specific recognition of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule complexes by the T-cell receptor is a key reaction in the specific immune response. Antibodies against peptide/MHC complexes would therefore be valuable tools in studying MHC function and T-cell recognition and might...

  12. Thymus cells in myasthenia gravis selectively enhance production of anti-acetylcholine-receptor antibody by autologous blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the role of the thymus in 16 patients with myasthenia gravis without thymoma by studying the production of anti-acetylcholine-receptor antibody by thymic and blood lymphocytes cultured alone or together. In 10 responders (with the highest receptor-antibody titers in their plasma), cultured thymic cells spontaneously produced measurable receptor antibody. Receptor-antibody production by autologous blood lymphocytes was enhanced by the addition of responder's thymic cells, irradiated to abrogate antibody production and suppression (P<0.01). This enhancement was greater and more consistent than that by pokeweed mitogen; it depended on viable thymic cells, appeared to be selective for receptor antibody, and correlated with the ratio of thymic helper (OKT4-positive or OKT4+) to suppressor (OKT8+) T cells (P<0.01). These results suggest that myasthenic thymus contains cell-bound acetylcholine-receptor-like material or specific T cells (or both) that can aid receptor-antibody production. This may be relevant to the benefits of thymectomy in myasthenia and to the breakdown in self-tolerance in this and other autoimmune diseases

  13. Thymus cells in myasthenia gravis selectively enhance production of anti-acetylcholine-receptor antibody by autologous blood lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newsom-Davis, J.; Willcox, N.; Calder, L.

    1981-11-26

    We investigated the role of the thymus in 16 patients with myasthenia gravis without thymoma by studying the production of anti-acetylcholine-receptor antibody by thymic and blood lymphocytes cultured alone or together. In 10 responders (with the highest receptor-antibody titers in their plasma), cultured thymic cells spontaneously produced measurable receptor antibody. Receptor-antibody production by autologous blood lymphocytes was enhanced by the addition of responder's thymic cells, irradiated to abrogate antibody production and suppression (P<0.01). This enhancement was greater and more consistent than that by pokeweed mitogen; it depended on viable thymic cells, appeared to be selective for receptor antibody, and correlated with the ratio of thymic helper (OKT4-positive or OKT4+) to suppressor (OKT8+) T cells (P<0.01). These results suggest that myasthenic thymus contains cell-bound acetylcholine-receptor-like material or specific T cells (or both) that can aid receptor-antibody production. This may be relevant to the benefits of thymectomy in myasthenia and to the breakdown in self-tolerance in this and other autoimmune diseases.

  14. Determination of Mother Centriole Maturation in CPAP-Depleted Cells Using the Ninein Antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Miseon; Rhee, Kunsoo

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations in centrosomal protein genes have been identified in a number of genetic diseases in brain development, including microcephaly. Centrosomal P4.1-associated protein (CPAP) is one of the causal genes implicated in primary microcephaly. We previously proposed that CPAP is essential for mother centriole maturation during mitosis. Methods We immunostained CPAP-depleted cells using the ninein antibody, which selectively detects subdistal appendages in mature mother centrioles. ...

  15. Anti-Erythropoietin Antibody Associated Pure Red Cell Aplasia Resolved after Liver Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Hung, Annie K.; Jennifer Guy; Behler, Caroline M.; Lee, Eugene E.

    2015-01-01

    Patients undergoing antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C often develop anemia secondary to ribavirin and interferon. Recombinant erythropoietin has been used to improve anemia associated with antiviral therapy and to minimize dose reductions, which are associated with decreased rates of sustained virologic response. A rare potential side effect of recombinant erythropoietin is anti-erythropoietin antibody associated pure red cell aplasia. In chronic kidney disease patients with this enti...

  16. The mouse B cell repertoire : antibody specificities and immunoglobulin (sub) class distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Hooijkaas, Herbert

    1985-01-01

    textabstractThe total number of different immunoglobulin (I g) molecules that the immune system produces is often called the antibody specificity repertoire orB cell repertoire (Chapter 1). This repertoire can be subdivided into three categories: the potential, the available and the actual repertoires. The potential repertoire is determined by the number, structure and mechanisms of expression of the germl ine genes encoding lg molecules plus the possible somatic variants derived from them an...

  17. Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis inclusions in Mccoy cell cultures with fluorescein-conjugated monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Stamm, W. E.; Tam, M; Koester, M; Cles, L

    1983-01-01

    We compared two methods for identification of Chlamydia trachomatis inclusions in McCoy cell monolayers: conventional iodine staining and immunofluorescence staining with monoclonal antibodies against the species-specific major outer membrane protein antigen of C. trachomatis. Among 878 urethral and cervical specimens tested in parallel, the immunofluorescence method detected eightfold more inclusions per monolayer, identified a higher proportion of positive specimens on first passage (98 ver...

  18. Natural Products That Target Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moselhy, Jim; Srinivasan, Sowmyalakshmi; Ankem, Murali K; Damodaran, Chendil

    2015-11-01

    The cancer stem cell model suggests that tumor initiation is governed by a small subset of distinct cells with stem-like character termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs possess properties of self-renewal and intrinsic survival mechanisms that contribute to resistance of tumors to most chemotherapeutic drugs. The failure to eradicate CSCs during the course of therapy is postulated to be the driving force for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Recent studies have focused on understanding the unique phenotypic properties of CSCs from various tumor types, as well as the signaling pathways that underlie self-renewal and drug resistance. Natural products (NPs) such as those derived from botanicals and food sources may modulate vital signaling pathways involved in the maintenance of CSC phenotype. The Wingless/Integrated (WNT), Hedgehog, Notch and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways have all been associated with quiescence and self-renewal of CSCs, as well as execution of CSC function including differentiation, multidrug resistance and metastasis. Recent studies evaluating NPs against CSC support the epidemiological evidence linking plant-based diets with reduced malignancy rates. This review covers the key aspects of NPs as modulators of CSC fate. PMID:26503998

  19. Anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody Fc variants differentially impact regulatory T cells and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, David J; Pellerin, Alex F; Collette, Brian P; Kannan, Arun K; Peng, Liaomin; Datta, Abhishek; Wipke, Brian T; Fontenot, Jason D

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a critical regulator of immune homeostasis through its non-redundant role in regulatory T (Treg) cell biology. There is major interest in therapeutic modulation of the IL-2 pathway to promote immune activation in the context of tumour immunotherapy or to enhance immune suppression in the context of transplantation, autoimmunity and inflammatory diseases. Antibody-mediated targeting of the high-affinity IL-2 receptor α chain (IL-2Rα or CD25) offers a direct mechanism to target IL-2 biology and is being actively explored in the clinic. In mouse models, the rat anti-mouse CD25 clone PC61 has been used extensively to investigate the biology of IL-2 and Treg cells; however, there has been controversy and conflicting data on the exact in vivo mechanistic function of PC61. Engineering antibodies to alter Fc/Fc receptor interactions can significantly alter their in vivo function. In this study, we re-engineered the heavy chain constant region of an anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody to generate variants with highly divergent Fc effector function. Using these anti-CD25 Fc variants in multiple mouse models, we investigated the in vivo impact of CD25 blockade versus depletion of CD25(+) Treg cells on immune homeostasis. We report that immune homeostasis can be maintained during CD25 blockade but aberrant T-cell activation prevails when CD25(+) Treg cells are actively depleted. These results clarify the impact of PC61 on Treg cell biology and reveal an important distinction between CD25 blockade and depletion of CD25(+) Treg cells. These findings should inform therapeutic manipulation of the IL-2 pathway by targeting the high-affinity IL-2R. PMID:27012310

  20. Metabolic analysis of antibody producing Chinese hamster ovary cell culture under different stresses conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badsha, Md Bahadur; Kurata, Hiroyuki; Onitsuka, Masayoshi; Oga, Takushi; Omasa, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are commonly used as the host cell lines concerning their ability to produce therapeutic proteins with complex post-translational modifications. In this study, we have investigated the time course extra- and intracellular metabolome data of the CHO-K1 cell line, under a control and stress conditions. The addition of NaCl and trehalose greatly suppressed cell growth, where the maximum viable cell density of NaCl and trehalose cultures were 2.2-fold and 2.8-fold less than that of a control culture. Contrariwise, the antibody production of both the NaCl and trehalose cultures was sustained for a longer time to surpass that of the control culture. The NaCl and trehalose cultures showed relatively similar dynamics of cell growth, antibody production, and substrate/product concentrations, while they indicated different dynamics from the control culture. The principal component analysis of extra- and intracellular metabolome dynamics indicated that their dynamic behaviors were consistent with biological functions. The qualitative pattern matching classification and hierarchical clustering analyses for the intracellular metabolome identified the metabolite clusters whose dynamic behaviors depend on NaCl and trehalose. The volcano plot revealed several reporter metabolites whose dynamics greatly change between in the NaCl and trehalose cultures. The elastic net identified some critical, intracellular metabolites that are distinct between the NaCl and trehalose. While a relatively small number of intracellular metabolites related to the cell growth, glucose, glutamine, lactate and ammonium ion concentrations, the mechanism of antibody production was suggested to be very complicated or not to be explained by elastic net regression analysis. PMID:26803706

  1. Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin-Zorman, Sarah; Loiseau, Pascale; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) is a curative treatment for a wide variety of hematological diseases. In 30% of the cases, a geno-identical donor is available. Any other situation displays some level of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) incompatibility between donor and recipient. Deleterious effects of anti-HLA immunization have long been recognized in solid organ transplant recipients. More recently, anti-HLA immunization was shown to increase the risk of primary graft failure (PGF), a severe complication of AHSCT that occurs in 3–4% of matched unrelated donor transplantation and up to 15% in cord blood transplantation and T-cell depleted haplo-identical stem cell transplantation. Rates of PGF in patients with DSA were reported to be between 24 and 83% with the highest rates in haplo-identical and cord blood transplantation recipients. This led to the recommendation of anti-HLA antibody screening to detect donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in recipients prior to AHSCT. In this review, we highlight the role of anti-HLA antibodies in AHSCT and the mechanisms that may lead to PGF in patients with DSA, and discuss current issues in the field.

  2. Role of interleukin in human natural killer cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human NK cells, defined by the antibody B73.1, can be induced to proliferate in vitro in the presence of an IL-2 containing conditioned medium (CM) and an irradiated lymphoblastoid line, Daudi. Proliferating NK cells maintain phenotypic and functional characteristics of resting NK cells while newly expressing surface activation antigens (HLA-DR, transferrin receptor, and IL-2 receptor recognized by anti-TAC antibody). A goat anti-IL-2 antiserum and the anti-TAC monoclonal antibody completely block 3H-TdR incorporation in NK cells stimulated with CM alone or with irradiated Daudi cells. Inhibition is also observed when the antibodies are added up to day 4 of culture, indicating that IL-2 is required for both initiation and maintenance of proliferation. Human recombinant IL-2, either alone or with irradiated lymphoblastoid cells, replaces the CM in initiating 3H-TdR incorporation. In limiting dilution analysis the frequency of B73.1 (+) cells responding to rIL-2 is approximately 1/2000 and it is increased ten to thirty fold with the addition of irradiated Daudi cells to the cultures. Cultures stimulated with rIL-2 in the presence of colchicine, show a significant proportion of B73.1 + cells entering cycle each day during the first 3 days. These data show that a significant proportion of resting NK cells are capable of responding to IL-2 and that this response can occur over a period of several days after initiation of cultures

  3. Trichinella pseudospiralis larvae express natural killer (NK) cell-associated asialo-GM1 antigen and stimulate pulmonary NK activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Niederkorn, J. Y.; Stewart, G L; Ghazizadeh, S; Mayhew, E.; Ross, J; Fischer, B.

    1988-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell function was evaluated in mice infected with either Trichinella pseudospiralis or T. spiralis larvae. T. pseudospiralis-infected mice consistently demonstrated augmented pulmonary NK cell-mediated clearance of YAC-1 tumor cells in vivo but failed to display enhanced splenic NK cell-mediated lysis of the same tumor cells in vitro. Attempts to alter NK cell function in vivo by the injection of anti-asialo-GM1 antibody resulted in anaphylaxis and death of the hosts infec...

  4. Antibody detection in tear samples as a surrogate to monitor host immunity against papillomavirus infections in vaccinated and naturally infected hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendle, Sarah; Balogh, Karla; Bywaters, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring serum antibodies against natural infections or after immunizations has been a standard clinical diagnostic procedure. However, collecting blood samples requires trained personnel, and may cause discomfort and increase the risk of complications. In this study, we investigated whether tear samples could serve as a surrogate for serum samples to measure specific antibodies. A widely used preclinical cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV)/rabbit model has been a surrogate model for high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infections. New Zealand white rabbits, either naturally infected with CRPV or immunized with two clinically available HPV vaccines (Gardasil and Cervarix), were examined for antibody generation in both tear and serum samples. We demonstrated that antibodies were detectable in tears from both naturally infected as well as vaccinated animals. Overall, the antibody levels in tears were ~10-fold lower than those from the corresponding serum samples, but background noise was lower in tear samples. The isotypes of antibodies in tears were predominantly IgA and IgG. These findings showed clearly that tears could be a surrogate for serum samples for monitoring antibody responses. As collecting tears causes no discomfort and poses no risk to patients, it represents a novel and promising method for monitoring future HPV epidemiological studies as well as for use in clinical practice. PMID:24903329

  5. A heterodimer of a VHH (variable domains of camelid heavy chain-only) antibody that inhibits anthrax toxin cell binding linked to a VHH antibody that blocks oligomer formation is highly protective in an anthrax spore challenge model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Leysath, Clinton E; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Vrentas, Catherine; Crown, Devorah; Leppla, Stephen H; Shoemaker, Charles B

    2015-03-01

    Anthrax disease is caused by a toxin consisting of protective antigen (PA), lethal factor, and edema factor. Antibodies against PA have been shown to be protective against the disease. Variable domains of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies (VHHs) with affinity for PA were obtained from immunized alpacas and screened for anthrax neutralizing activity in macrophage toxicity assays. Two classes of neutralizing VHHs were identified recognizing distinct, non-overlapping epitopes. One class recognizes domain 4 of PA at a well characterized neutralizing site through which PA binds to its cellular receptor. A second neutralizing VHH (JKH-C7) recognizes a novel epitope. This antibody inhibits conversion of the PA oligomer from "pre-pore" to its SDS and heat-resistant "pore" conformation while not preventing cleavage of full-length 83-kDa PA (PA83) by cell surface proteases to its oligomer-competent 63-kDa form (PA63). The antibody prevents endocytosis of the cell surface-generated PA63 subunit but not preformed PA63 oligomers formed in solution. JKH-C7 and the receptor-blocking VHH class (JIK-B8) were expressed as a heterodimeric VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA2-PA). This VNA displayed improved neutralizing potency in cell assays and protected mice from anthrax toxin challenge with much better efficacy than the separate component VHHs. The VNA protected virtually all mice when separately administered at a 1:1 ratio to toxin and protected mice against Bacillus anthracis spore infection. Thus, our studies show the potential of VNAs as anthrax therapeutics. Due to their simple and stable nature, VNAs should be amenable to genetic delivery or administration via respiratory routes. PMID:25564615

  6. In ovo injection of anti-chicken CD25 monoclonal antibodies depletes CD4+CD25+ T cells in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasundaram, Revathi; Selvaraj, Ramesh K

    2013-01-01

    The CD4(+)CD25(+) cells have T regulatory cell properties in chickens. This study investigated the effect of in ovo injection of anti-chicken CD25 monoclonal antibodies (0.5 mg/egg) on CD4(+)CD25(+) cell depletion and on amounts of interleukin-2 mRNA and interferon-γ mRNA in CD4(+)CD25(-) cells posthatch. Anti-chicken CD25 or PBS (control) was injected into 16-d-old embryos. Chicks hatched from eggs injected with anti-chicken CD25 antibodies had a lower CD4(+)CD25(+) cell percentage in the blood until 25 d posthatch. The anti-chicken CD25 antibody injection nearly depleted CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in the blood until 16 d posthatch. At 30 d posthatch, the CD4(+)CD25(+) cell percentage in the anti-CD25-antibody-injected group was comparable with the percentage in the control group. At 16 d posthatch, the anti-chicken CD25 antibody injection decreased CD4(+)CD25(+) cell percentages in the thymus, spleen, and cecal tonsils. Chickens hatched from anti-CD25-antibody-injected eggs had approximately 25% of CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in the cecal tonsils and thymus compared with those in the cecal tonsils and thymus of the control group. The CD4(+)CD25(-) cells from the spleen and cecal tonsils of chicks hatched from anti-chicken-CD25-injected eggs had higher amounts of interferon-γ and interleukin-2 mRNA than CD4(+)CD25(-) cells from the control group. It could be concluded that injecting anti-chicken CD25 antibodies in ovo at 16 d of incubation nearly depleted the CD4(+)CD25(+) cells until 25 d posthatch. PMID:23243240

  7. Triiodothyronine improves the primary antibody response to sheep red blood cells in severely undernourished weanling mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three experiments were conducted in which weanling mice were fed a nutritionally complete diet either ad libitum or in restricted quantities such that they lost about 30% of their initial weight over a 14-day period. In Experiments 1 and 2, half the animals from each group received dietary triiodothyronine (T3) supplements. In Experiment 3, food-intake-restricted mice were fed graded levels of potassium iodide. Malnutrition reduced the number of nucleated cells per spleen, the number of splenic IgG plaque-forming cells (PFC) per 106 cells, and the serum antibody titers against sheep red blood cells as determined by radioimmunoassay. T3 supplements increased antibody titers, the number of nucleated cells per spleen, and both IgM and IgG PFC per 106 spleen cells in malnourished mice, but had no effect on well-nourished mice. The beneficial effect of T3 was not a result of improved protein, energy, or iodine status in the malnourished mice

  8. SPECIFIC UPTAKE OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY-CONJUGATED METHOTREXATE BY HUMAN LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIC B CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Zhenping; Yang Chunzheng; Tarunendu Ghose; Jaroslav Kralovec

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To analysis the uptake of free MTX and MTX conjugated to tumor specific monoclonal antibody by target and non-target cells. Methods: The folate antagonist methotrexate (MTX) was conjugated to two monoclonal antibodies (Mab) directed against human chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), Dal B01 and Dal B02, by an active ester method. Both conjugates were more cytotoxic toward the target tumor cell line D10-1than to the non-target cell line MOLT-3, and Dal B02-MTX conjugate was more inhibitory to D10-1 cells than free MTX in a 6 h pulse exposure assay. Results: Drug uptake studies revealed that D10-1 cells took up much more Dal B01 and Dal B02-conjugated MTX than free MTX. The amounts of drug taken up by D10-1 cells incubated with Dal B01 and Dal B02-conjugated MTX were always 3 to 5-fold higher than that taken up by MOLT-3 cells, although the latter took up more drug when incubated with free MTX. Furthermore, tumor cells incubated with Dal B01 or Dal B02-conjugated MTX retained much larger amounts of drug for a prolonged period of time than those incubated with free MTX.Conclusion: The enhanced specific cytotoxicity of Dal B01 and Dal B02-MTX conjugates toward target tumor cells is therefore likely due to (Ⅰ) delivery of larger amounts of MTX to target cells when the drug is conjugated to Mab;(ii) longer retention of Mab-conjugated MTX by target cells; and (iii) slow, prolonged release of MTX from the surface-bound or endocytosed conjugates, rendering them into a sustained release dosage form.

  9. A high-yielding, generic fed-batch process for recombinant antibody production of GS-engineered cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Li; Zhao, Liang; Sun, Yating;

    2009-01-01

    An animal component-free and chemically defined fed-batch process for GS-engineered cell lines producing recombinant antibodies has been developed. The fed-batch process relied on supplying sufficient nutrients to match their consumption, simultaneously minimizing the accumulation of byproducts....... Compared to batch cultures, the fed-batch technology generated the magnitude of the increase in cell yields (5 fold) and final antibody concentrations (4-8 fold). The majority of the increase in final antibody concentration was functions of the increased cell density and the prolonged culture time. This...... generic and high-yielding fed-batch process would shorten development time, and ensure process stability, thereby facilitating the manufacture of therapeutic antibodies by GS-engineered cell lines....

  10. Ibrutinib interferes with the cell-mediated anti-tumor activities of therapeutic CD20 antibodies: implications for combination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da Roit, F.; Engelberts, P. J.; Taylor, R. P.;

    2015-01-01

    The novel Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib and phosphatidyl-4-5-biphosphate 3-kinase-delta inhibitor idelalisib are promising drugs for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, either alone or in combination with anti-CD20 antibodies. We investigated...... the possible positive or negative impact of these drugs on all known mechanisms of action of both type I and type II anti-CD20 antibodies. Pretreatment with ibrutinib for 1 hour did not increase direct cell death of cell lines or chronic lymphocytic leukemia samples mediated by anti-CD20 antibodies....... Pre-treatment with ibrutinib did not inhibit complement activation or complement-mediated lysis. In contrast, ibrutinib strongly inhibited all cell-mediated mechanisms induced by anti-CD20 antibodies rituximab, ofatumumab or obinutuzumab, either in purified systems or whole blood assays. Activation of...

  11. A Cell-Based Internalization and Degradation Assay with an Activatable Fluorescence-Quencher Probe as a Tool for Functional Antibody Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Liu, Peter Corbett; Shen, Yang; Snavely, Marshall D; Hiraga, Kaori

    2015-08-01

    For the development of therapeutically potent anti-cancer antibody drugs, it is often important to identify antibodies that internalize into cells efficiently, rather than just binding to antigens on the cell surface. Such antibodies can mediate receptor endocytosis, resulting in receptor downregulation on the cell surface and potentially inhibiting receptor function and tumor growth. Also, efficient antibody internalization is a prerequisite for the delivery of cytotoxic drugs into target cells and is critical for the development of antibody-drug conjugates. Here we describe a novel activatable fluorescence-quencher pair to quantify the extent of antibody internalization and degradation in the target cells. In this assay, candidate antibodies were labeled with a fluorescent dye and a quencher. Fluorescence is inhibited outside and on the surface of cells, but activated upon endocytosis and degradation of the antibody. This assay enabled the development of a process for rapid characterization of candidate antibodies potentially in a high-throughput format. By employing an activatable secondary antibody, primary antibodies in purified form or in culture supernatants can be screened for internalization and degradation. Because purification of candidate antibodies is not required, this method represents a direct functional screen to identify antibodies that internalize efficiently early in the discovery process. PMID:26024945

  12. Tumor targeting of humanized fragment antibody secreted from transgenic rice cell suspension culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Shin-Young; Lee, Tae-Sup; Kim, Ju; Jung, Jae-Ho; Choi, Chang-Woon; Kim, Tae-Geum; Kwon, Tae-Ho; Jang, Yong-Suk; Yang, Moon-Sik

    The tumor-associated glycoprotein 72 (TAG 72) has been shown to be expressed in the majority of human adenocarcinomas. In an effort to develop a technique for the safe and inexpensive production of large quantities of anti-TAG 72 humanized antibody fragments (hzAb) as a future source of clinical......-grade proteins, we developed a transgenic rice cell suspension culture system. The in vivo assembly and secretion of hzAb were achieved in a transgenic rice cell culture under the control of the rice alpha amylase 3D (RAmy 3D) expression system, and the biological activities of plant-derived hzAb were determined...

  13. Persistence of Yellow Fever vaccine-induced antibodies after cord blood stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelino-Silva, Vivian Iida; Freire, Marcos da Silva; Rocha, Vanderson; Rodrigues, Celso Arrais; Novis, Yana Sarkis; Sabino, Ester C; Kallas, Esper Georges

    2016-04-01

    We report the case of a cord blood haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipient who was vaccinated for Yellow Fever (YF) 7 days before initiating chemotherapy and had persistent YF antibodies more than 3 years after vaccination. Since the stem cell donor was never exposed to wild YF or to the YF vaccine, and our patient was not exposed to YF or revaccinated, this finding strongly suggests the persistence of recipient immunity. We briefly discuss potential consequences of incomplete elimination of recipient's leukocytes following existing haematopoietic cancer treatments. PMID:26618995

  14. Photocleavable DNA barcode-antibody conjugates allow sensitive and multiplexed protein analysis in single cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agasti, Sarit S.; Liong, Monty; Peterson, Vanessa M.; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcoding is an attractive technology as it allows sensitive and multiplexed target analysis. However, DNA barcoding of cellular proteins remains challenging, primarily because barcode amplification and readout techniques are often incompatible with the cellular microenvironment. Here, we describe the development and validation of a photocleavable DNA barcode-antibody conjugate method for rapid, quantitative and multiplexed detection of proteins in single live cells. Following target binding, this method allows DNA barcodes to be photoreleased in solution, enabling easy isolation, amplification and readout. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate sensitive and multiplexed detection of protein biomarkers in a variety of cancer cells. PMID:23092113

  15. Cleavage efficient 2A peptides for high level monoclonal antibody expression in CHO cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chng, Jake; Wang, Tianhua; Nian, Rui; Lau, Ally; Hoi, Kong Meng; Ho, Steven CL; Gagnon, Peter; Bi, Xuezhi; Yang, Yuansheng

    2015-01-01

    Linking the heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) genes required for monoclonal antibodies (mAb) production on a single cassette using 2A peptides allows control of LC and HC ratio and reduces non-expressing cells. Four 2A peptides derived from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (F2A), equine rhinitis A virus (E2A), porcine teschovirus-1 (P2A) and Thosea asigna virus (T2A), respectively, were compared for expression of 3 biosimilar IgG1 mAbs in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. HC and LC ...

  16. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies against Vegetative Cells of Bacillus cereus

    OpenAIRE

    Charni, Nadine; Perissol, Claude; Le Petit, Jean; Rugani, Nathalie

    2000-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Bacillus cereus were produced. The MAbs (8D3 and 9B7) were selected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for their reactivity with B. cereus vegetative cells. They reacted with B. cereus vegetative cells while failing to recognize B. cereus spores. Immunoblotting revealed that MAb 8D3 recognized a 22-kDa antigen, while MAb 9B7 recognized two antigens with molecular masses of approximately 58 and 62 kDa. The use of MAbs 8D3 and 9B7 in combination to dev...

  17. A trade-off between natural and acquired antibody production in a reptile: implications for long-term resistance to disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska C. Sandmeier

    2012-08-01

    Vertebrate immune systems are understood to be complex and dynamic, with trade-offs among different physiological components (e.g., innate and adaptive immunity within individuals and among taxonomic lineages. Desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii immunised with ovalbumin (OVA showed a clear trade-off between levels of natural antibodies (NAbs; innate immune function and the production of acquired antibodies (adaptive immune function. Once initiated, acquired antibody responses included a long-term elevation in antibodies persisting for more than one year. The occurrence of either (a high levels of NAbs or (b long-term elevations of acquired antibodies in individual tortoises suggests that long-term humoral resistance to pathogens may be especially important in this species, as well as in other vertebrates with slow metabolic rates, concomitantly slow primary adaptive immune responses, and long life-spans.

  18. Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of bacteriophage lambda-mediated gene transfer in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sapinoro, Ramil; Volcy, Ketna; Shanaka, W.W.; Rodrigo, I.; Schlesinger, Jacob J.; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Lambda phage vectors mediate gene transfer in cultured mammalian cells and in live mice, and in vivo phage-mediated gene expression is increased when mice are pre-immunized with bacteriophage lambda. We now show that, like eukaryotic viruses, bacteriophage vectors are subject to Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of infection in mammalian cells. Antibody-dependent enhancement of phage gene transfer required FcγRI, but not its associated γ chain, and was not supported by othe...

  19. Localization of betav tubulin in the cochlea and cultured cells with a novel monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Asok; Jensen-Smith, Heather; Lazzell, Anna; Prasad, Veena; Elguezabal, Gerardo; Hallworth, Richard; Ludueña, Richard F

    2008-06-01

    Tubulin, the dimeric structural protein of microtubules, is a heterodimer of alpha and beta subunits; both alpha and beta exist as numerous isotypes encoded by different genes. In vertebrates the sequence differences among the beta(I), beta(II), beta(III), beta(IV) and beta(V) isotypes are highly conserved in evolution, implying that the isotypes may have functional significance. Isotype-specific monoclonal antibodies have been useful in determining the cellular and sub-cellular distributions and possible functions of the beta(I), beta(II), beta(III), and beta(IV) isotypes; however, little is known about the beta(V) isotype. We here report the creation and purification of a monoclonal antibody (SHM.12G11) specific for beta(V). The antibody was designed to be specific for the C-terminal sequence EEEINE, which is unique to rodent and chicken beta(V). The antibody was found to bind specifically to the C-terminal peptide EEEINE, and does not cross-react with the carboxy-termini of either alpha-tubulin or the other beta-tubulin isotypes. However, the antibody also binds to the peptide EEEVNE, but not to the peptide EEEIDG, corresponding respectively to the C-terminal peptides of bovine and human beta(V). Immunofluorescence analysis indicates that beta(V) is found in microtubules of both the interphase network and the mitotic spindle. In gerbils, beta(V) also occurs in the cochlea where it is found largely in the specialized cells that are unique in containing bundled microtubules with 15 protofilaments. PMID:18412253

  20. Anti-ganglioside antibody-induced tumor cell death by loss of membrane integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque-Navarro, Lourdes; Chakrabandhu, Krittalak; de León, Joel; Rodríguez, Sandra; Toledo, Carlos; Carr, Adriana; de Acosta, Cristina Mateo; Hueber, Anne-Odile; Pérez, Rolando

    2008-07-01

    Gangliosides have been involved in multiple cellular processes such as growth, differentiation and adhesion, and more recently as regulators of cell death signaling pathways. Some of these molecules can be considered as tumor-associated antigens, in particular, N-glycolyl sialic acid-containing gangliosides, which are promising candidates for cancer-targeted therapy because of their low expression in normal human tissues. In this study, we provided the molecular and cellular characterization of a novel cell death mechanism induced by the anti-NGcGM3 14F7 monoclonal antibody (mAb) in L1210 murine tumor cell line but not in mouse normal cells (B and CD4(+) T lymphocytes) that expressed the antigen. Impairment of ganglioside synthesis in tumor cells abrogated the 14F7 mAb cytotoxic effect; however, exogenous reincorporation of the ganglioside did not restore tumor cell sensitivity to 14F7 mAb-induced cytotoxicity. 14F7 F(ab')(2) but not Fab fragments retained the cytotoxic capacity of the whole mAb. By contrary, other mAb, which recognizes N-glycolylated gangliosides, did not show any cytotoxic effect. These mAbs showed quite different capacities to bind NGcGM3-positive cell lines measured by binding inhibition experiments. Interestingly, this complement-independent cell death mechanism did not resemble apoptosis, because no DNA fragmentation, caspase activation, or Fas mediation were observed. However, NGcGM3 ganglioside-mediated 14F7 mAb-induced cell death was accompanied by cellular swelling, membrane lesion formation, and cytoskeleton activation, suggesting an oncosis-like phenomenon. This novel mechanism of cell death lets us to support further therapeutic approaches using NGcGM3 as a molecular target for antibody-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:18645013

  1. Human monoclonal antibody directed against an envelope glycoprotein of human T-cell leukemia virus type I.

    OpenAIRE

    Matsushita, S; Robert-Guroff, M; Trepel, J. (Jane); Cossman, J; Mitsuya, H; Broder, S

    1986-01-01

    We report the production and characterization of a human monoclonal antibody reactive against the major envelope glycoprotein of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I), a virus linked to the etiology of adult T-cell leukemia. We exposed lymph-node cells derived from a patient with adult T-cell leukemia to the Epstein-Barr virus in vitro and obtained a B-cell clone (designated 0.5 alpha) by a limiting dilution technique. The secreted product of 0.5 alpha is a monoclonal antibody (also des...

  2. scFv-based “grababody” as a general strategy to improve recruitment of immune effector cells to antibody-targeted tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Zheng; Fu, Ting; Nagai, Yasuhiro; Lam, Lian; Yee, Marla; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Hongtao

    2013-01-01

    Recruitment of immune cells to tumor cells targeted by a therapeutic antibody can heighten the antitumor efficacy of the antibody. For example, p185her2/neu-targeting antibodies not only downregulate the p185her2/neu kinase (ERBB2) but also trigger complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) through the antibody Fc region. Here we describe a generalized strategy to improve immune cell recruitment to targeted cancer cells, using a modified scFv a...

  3. Therapeutic potential and challenges of Natural killer cells in treatment of solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eGras Navarro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are innate lymphoid cells that hold tremendous potential for effective immunotherapy for a broad range of cancers. Due to the mode of NK cell killing requiring one–to-one target engagement and site directed release of cytolytic granules, the therapeutic potential of NK cells has been most extensively explored in hematological malignancies. However, their ability to precisely kill antibody coated cells, cancer stem cells (CSCs and genotoxically altered cells, while maintaining tolerance to healthy cells makes them appealing therapeutic effectors for all cancer forms, including metastases. Due to their release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, NK cells may potently reverse the anti-inflammatory tumor microenvironment (TME and augment adaptive immune responses by promoting differentiation, activation and/ or recruitment of accessory immune cells to sites of malignancy. Nevertheless, integrated and coordinated mechanisms of subversion of NK cell activity against the tumor and its microenvironment exist. Although our understanding of the receptor ligand interactions that regulate NK cell functionality has evolved remarkably, the diversity of ligands and receptors is complex, as is their mechanistic foundations in regulating NK cell function. In this article, we review the literature and highlight how the TME manipulates the NK cell phenotypes, genotypes and tropism to evade tumor recognition and elimination. We discuss counter strategies that may be adopted to augment the efficacy of NK cell anti-tumor surveillance, the clinical trials that have been undertaken so far in solid malignancies, critically weighing the challenges and opportunities with this approach.

  4. Synthetic B-Cell Epitopes Eliciting Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies: Strategies for Future Dengue Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Babu; Poh, Chit Laa; Kirk, Kristin; McBride, William John Hannan; Aaskov, John; Grollo, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a major public health threat worldwide. A key element in protection from dengue fever is the neutralising antibody response. Anti-dengue IgG purified from DENV-2 infected human sera showed reactivity against several peptides when evaluated by ELISA and epitope extraction techniques. A multi-step computational approach predicted six antigenic regions within the E protein of DENV-2 that concur with the 6 epitopes identified by the combined ELISA and epitope extraction approach. The selected peptides representing B-cell epitopes were attached to a known dengue T-helper epitope and evaluated for their vaccine potency. Immunization of mice revealed two novel synthetic vaccine constructs that elicited good humoral immune responses and produced cross-reactive neutralising antibodies against DENV-1, 2 and 3. The findings indicate new directions for epitope mapping and contribute towards the future development of multi-epitope based synthetic peptide vaccine. PMID:27223692

  5. Synthetic B-Cell Epitopes Eliciting Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies: Strategies for Future Dengue Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Ramanathan

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a major public health threat worldwide. A key element in protection from dengue fever is the neutralising antibody response. Anti-dengue IgG purified from DENV-2 infected human sera showed reactivity against several peptides when evaluated by ELISA and epitope extraction techniques. A multi-step computational approach predicted six antigenic regions within the E protein of DENV-2 that concur with the 6 epitopes identified by the combined ELISA and epitope extraction approach. The selected peptides representing B-cell epitopes were attached to a known dengue T-helper epitope and evaluated for their vaccine potency. Immunization of mice revealed two novel synthetic vaccine constructs that elicited good humoral immune responses and produced cross-reactive neutralising antibodies against DENV-1, 2 and 3. The findings indicate new directions for epitope mapping and contribute towards the future development of multi-epitope based synthetic peptide vaccine.

  6. Antibodies to the core proteins of Nairobi sheep disease virus/Ganjam virus reveal details of the distribution of the proteins in infected cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasecka, Lidia; Bin-Tarif, Abdelghani; Bridgen, Anne; Juleff, Nicholas; Waters, Ryan A; Baron, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV; also called Ganjam virus in India) is a bunyavirus of the genus Nairovirus. It causes a haemorrhagic gastroenteritis in sheep and goats with mortality up to 90%. The virus is closely related to the human pathogen Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV). Little is currently known about the biology of NSDV. We have generated specific antibodies against the virus nucleocapsid protein (N) and polymerase (L) and used these to characterise NSDV in infected cells and to study its distribution during infection in a natural host. Due to its large size and the presence of a papain-like protease (the OTU-like domain) it has been suggested that the L protein of nairoviruses undergoes an autoproteolytic cleavage into polymerase and one or more accessory proteins. Specific antibodies which recognise either the N-terminus or the C-terminus of the NSDV L protein showed no evidence of L protein cleavage in NSDV-infected cells. Using the specific anti-N and anti-L antibodies, it was found that these viral proteins do not fully colocalise in infected cells; the N protein accumulated near the Golgi at early stages of infection while the L protein was distributed throughout the cytoplasm, further supporting the multifunctional nature of the L protein. These antibodies also allowed us to gain information about the organs and cell types targeted by the virus in vivo. We could detect NSDV in cryosections prepared from various tissues collected post-mortem from experimentally inoculated animals; the virus was found in the mucosal lining of the small and large intestine, in the lungs, and in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), where NSDV appeared to target monocytes and/or macrophages. PMID:25905707

  7. Investigations into the use of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for selective cell labeling in whole blood: Progress report, January 1986-December 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques to effectively labeling blood cell specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), with In-111 using bifunctional chelating agents such as the cyclic or mixed anhydride of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid have been developed. Conditions for the optimal labeling of blood cells are reported. The specificity (Kd values) of In-111 labeled MAbs for the cell specific antigens are reported. In-111-MAb labeled canine platelets were used to image vascular thrombi. Under the best experimental conditions approximately 70% of the radiolabeled MAbs get incorporated into isolated blood cells. However, only about 35% of the added MAb-associated radioactivity would incorporate into the desired type of blood cells in whole blood. The chemical nature of the radioactivity that does not bind to the cells was investigated. 9 figs., 6 tabs

  8. Cell Wall Growth and Modulation Dynamics in a Model Unicellular Green Alga—Penium margaritaceum: Live Cell Labeling with Monoclonal Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Domozych, David S; Hannah Brechka; Alicia Britton; Marc Toso

    2011-01-01

    Penium margaritaceum is a unicellular charophycean green alga that possesses cell wall polymers similar to those of land plants. Several wall macromolecules of this alga are recognized by monoclonal antibodies specific for wall polymer epitopes of land plants. Immunofluorescence protocols using these antibodies may be employed to label specific cell wall constituents of live cells. Fluorescent labeling persists for several days, and this attribute allows for tracing of wall epitopes in both l...

  9. A radioimmunoassay that sandwiches human interleukin-2 between radiolabeled monoclonal antibody and the receptor on a hematopoietic cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two monoclonal antibodies were raised against human interleukin-2 (IL-2) produced by E. coli harboring recombinant complemental DNA. Both antibodies did not neutralize its activity, nor did they inhibit the binding of IL-2 to the receptor on target cells. Taking advantage of the ability of monoclonal antibodies to detect IL-2 that had bound to the receptor, a radioimmunoassay was developed that sandwiched IL-2 between the radiolabeled monoclonal antibody and the receptor on a hematopoietic cell line infected with human T cell leukemia virus Type I. The assay has the advantage of detecting only IL-2 with the ability to bind to the receptor, and display a linear dose-response relationship over concentrations ranging from 5 to 100 ng/ml. (Auth.)

  10. Prospective Evaluation of Cetuximab-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Predicts Treatment Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Anna Maria; Ottaiano, Alessandro; Romano, Carmela; Nasti, Guglielmo; Nappi, Anna; De Divitiis, Chiara; Napolitano, Maria; Zanotta, Serena; Casaretti, Rossana; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Avallone, Antonio; Califano, Daniela; Iaffaioli, Rosario Vincenzo; Scala, Stefania

    2016-04-01

    Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody to the EGFR that induces antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) through Fcγ receptors on immune cells. Although SNPs in genes encoding Fcγ receptors are functionally relevant to cetuximab-mediated ADCC in colorectal cancer, a direct correlation betweenin vitroADCC and clinical response to cetuximab is not defined. We therefore enrolled 96 consecutive metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients at diagnosis in a study that assessed FcγR status and cetuximab-mediated ADCC. Patients carrying the FcγRIIaHalleles 131H/Hand 131H/Rhad significantly higher ADCC compared with patients with the 131R/Ralleles (P= 0.013). Patients carrying FcγRIIIa genotypes with theValleles 158V/Vand 158V/Fdisplayed higher ADCC compared with patients carrying the 158F/Fgenotype (P= 0.001). Progression-free survival of patients with an FcγRIIIa 158Vallele was significantly longer compared with patients carrying 158F/F(P= 0.05), whereas no significant difference was observed for overall survival. Twenty-eight of 50 mCRC patients with wild-type KRAS received cetuximab. The average ADCC-mediated killing was 30% of assay targets for patients who experienced cetuximab complete or partial response, 21% in patients with stable disease and 9% in patients with progressive disease. To characterize basal natural killer (NK) activity, cytotoxicity was evaluated in 39 of 96 mCRC patients. Patients who responded to first-line treatment had higher NK-cell cytotoxicity. Thus, although limited to this cohort of patients,in vitrocetuximab-mediated ADCC correlated with FcγR polymorphisms and predicted cetuximab responsiveness.Cancer Immunol Res; 4(4); 366-74. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26817995

  11. Expression of HSV-1 ICP0 Antigen Peptide in Prokaryotic Cells and Preparation of Specific Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    As an immediate-early protein of herpes simplex virus, infected-cell polypeptide 0 (ICP0) exhibits complicated interactions with host cells, and its regulatory function on gene expression is of great importance. Since the ICP0 encoding sequence contains many rare codons which are absent in E.coli, and ICP0 is highly unstable in prokaryotic cells, expression of entire ICP0 in prokaryotic cells has never been reported. In order to further investigate the function of ICP0, a recombinant plasmid was constructed by subcloning a cDNA fragment encoding an amino-terminal of 105 residues of the ICP0 protein into pGEX-5x-1 vector. The resulting GST-105 fusion antigen peptide was expressed with high efficiency in E.coli. Antibodies prepared after the immunization of mice with purified fusion protein can recognize not only the denatured ICP0 protein, but also the native ICP0 protein with normal biological conformation.

  12. FDC-B1: a new monoclonal antibody directed against bovine follicular dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mélot, F; Defaweux, V; Jolois, O; Collard, A; Robert, B; Heinen, E; Antoine, N

    2004-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are a unique population of accessory cells located in the light zone of the germinal centres of lymphoid follicles. Their involvement in the generation of humoral immune responses implies a potential role for these cells in many disorders. Indeed, in prion diseases, FDCs seem to be the major sites of extraneuronal cellular prion protein expression and the principal sites of the infectious agent accumulation in lymphoid organs. The identification of FDC is useful for the analysis of their distribution in reactive lymphoid tissue as well as in pathological conditions. The production and characterisation of a new mouse monoclonal antibody directed against bovine follicular dendritic cells (FDC-B1) is reported. The antigen detected by FDC-B1 is expressed exclusively on the surface of FDCs in ruminant lymphoid organs. The antigen has an approximate molecular weight of 28 kDa. PMID:14700533

  13. NCR1+ cells in dogs show phenotypic characteristics of natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grøndahl-Rosado, Christine; Bønsdorff, Tina B; Brun-Hansen, Hege C; Storset, Anne K

    2015-03-01

    No specific markers for natural killer (NK) cells in dogs have currently been described. NCR1 (NKp46, CD355) has been considered a pan species NK cell marker and is expressed on most or all NK cells in all species investigated except for the pig which has both a NCR1(+) and a NCR1(-) population. In this study peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 14 healthy dogs, 37 dogs with a clinical diagnosis, including a dog diagnosed with LGL leukemia, and tissue samples from 8 dogs were evaluated for NCR1(+) expression by a cross reacting anti bovine NCR1 antibody. CD3(-)NCR1(+) cells were found in the blood of 93 % of healthy dogs and comprised up to 2.5 % of lymphocytes in PBMC. In a selection of healthy dogs, sampling and immunophenotyping were repeated throughout a period of 1 year revealing a substantial variation in the percentage of CD3(-)NCR1(+) over time. Dogs allocated to 8 disease groups had comparable amounts of CD3(-)NCR1(+) cells in PBMC to the healthy individuals. All organs examined including liver, spleen and lymph nodes contained CD3(-)NCR1(+) cells. Circulating CD3(-)NCR1(+) cells were further characterized as CD56(-)GranzymeB(+)CD8(-). A CD3(+)NCR1(+) population was observed in PBMC in 79 % of the healthy dogs examined representing at the most 4.8 % of the lymphocyte population. In canine samples examined for CD56 expression, CD56(+) cells were all CD3(+) and NCR1(-). To our knowledge, this is the first examination of NCR1 expression in the dog. The study shows that this NK cell associated receptor is expressed both on populations of CD3(+) and CD3(-) blood lymphocytes in dogs and the receptor is found on a CD3(+) GranzymeB(+) CD8(+) leukemia. Our results support that CD56 is expressed only on CD3(+) cells in dogs and shows that NCR1 defines a different CD3(+) lymphocyte population than CD56(+)CD3(+) cells in this species. CD3(-)NCR1(+) cells may represent canine NK cells. PMID:25434421

  14. Tumor-specific cytotoxic t cells are crucial for efficacy of immunomodulatory antibodies in patients with lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G.J.V. Aerts (Joachim); J.P.J.J. Hegmans (Joost)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThere is growing evidence that activation of the immune system may be an effective treatment for patients with either small cell lung cancer or non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Immunomodulatory antibodies directed against cytotoxic T cell-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4/CD152) and progra

  15. A role for plasma cell targeting agents in immune tolerance induction in autoimmune disease and antibody responses to therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, A S; Pariser, A R; Diamond, B; Yao, L; Turka, L A; Lacana, E; Kishnani, P S

    2016-04-01

    Antibody responses to life saving therapeutic protein products, such as enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) in the setting of lysosomal storage diseases, have nullified product efficacy and caused clinical deterioration and death despite treatment with immune-suppressive therapies. Moreover, in some autoimmune diseases, pathology is mediated by a robust antibody response to endogenous proteins such as is the case in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, mediated by antibodies to Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF). In this work, we make the case that in such settings, when the antibody response is high titered, sustained, and refractory to immune suppressive treatments, the antibody response is mediated by long-lived plasma cells which are relatively unperturbed by immune suppressants including rituximab. However, long-lived plasma cells can be targeted by proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib. Recent reports of successful reversal of antibody responses with bortezomib in the settings of ERT and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) argue that the safety and efficacy of such plasma cell targeting agents should be evaluated in larger scale clinical trials to delineate the risks and benefits of such therapies in the settings of antibody-mediated adverse effects to therapeutic proteins and autoantibody mediated pathology. PMID:26928739

  16. B lymphocytes as natural antigen-presenting cells (APC) of their own Ig receptor determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors use Igk-lb allotype-specific rat T cell proliferation(Pr) in vitro as a model of natural Ig determinants B cell presentation in Ig-specific T-B cell interactions. As shown before Igk-lb-specific responsiveness of AUG(RT-l/sup c/, Igk-la) and WAG (RT-l, Igk-la) rats is controlled by dominant Ir gene, linked to RT-l/sup c/. Only IgG(Igk-lb)-pulsed splenic APC of AUG(responder) but not WAG(non-responder) origin induce specific F1 (WAGxAUG) T cell Pr. The same restriction was observed if purified B cells from Igk-l congeneic AUG-lb and WAG-lb rats were used as APC. B cell presentation was found to be sensitive to high irradiation dose(2000 rad). Anti-RT-l monoclonal antibody inhibition studies suggested RT-lB(I-A) molecule as a main restricting element of Igk-lb T cell recognition. B cell and splenic APC presentation of Igk-lb allotype was not inhibited by poly- and monoclonal anti-Igk-lb antibodies. Allelic exclusion of Igk-lb presentation by B cells from heterozygous F1 (WAG-lbx AUG) rats was demonstrated by panning with antiallotypic reagents. Important, that irradiated anti-Igk-lb T cells induce specific Pr of normal Igk-lb-positive B cells. The data demonstrate MHC-restricted B cell presentation of their own receptor determinants, distinct from serologically-defined epitopes. T cell recognition of these determinants induce specific Pr of Ig-recognizing T cells and Ig-presenting B lymphocytes

  17. The use of ELISA to detect antibodies to Brucella abortus in naturally infected cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An indirect ELISA using the immunodominant antigen, smooth lipopolysaccharide (SLPS) of Brucella abortus, was used to detect antibodies in a statistically selected dairy cattle population from the Sabana of Bogota (Colombia). Based on the FAO/IAEA Brucella ELISA kit, the test was standardized in terms of plates, reagents and reference sera. Quality control for routine testing was also established. Calculation of the appropriate cut-off optical density (O.D) value for negativity was made after discriminant analysis and examination of the frequency of the sera distributed as positive or negative. The sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA for diagnosis of Brucella infection were compared to the complement fixation (CF) test results and were 94.8% and 96.0% respectively. The use of ELISA for monitoring bovine populations undergoing an eradication of brucellosis is recommended. The application of an ELISA using B. bovis outer membrane proteins (OMP) as antigen is discussed. (author). 38 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs

  18. Early postnatal B cell ontogeny and antibody repertoire maturation in the opossum, Monodelphis domestica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Wang

    Full Text Available Marsupials are a lineage of mammals noted for giving birth to highly altricial young, which complete much of their "fetal" development externally attached to a teat. Postnatal B cell ontogeny and diversity was investigated in a model marsupial species, the gray short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica. The results support the initiation of B cell development late in gestation and progressing into the first two weeks of postnatal life. Transcription of CD79a and CD79b was detected in embryonic tissue prior to birth, while immunoglobulin heavy chain locus transcription was not detected until the first postnatal 24 hours. Transcription of the Ig light chains was not detected until postnatal day 7 at the earliest. The predicted timing of the earliest appearance of mature B cells and completion of gene rearrangements is consistent with previous analyses on the timing of endogenous antibody responses in newborn marsupials. The diversity of early B cell IgH chains is limited, as has been seen in fetal humans and mice, but lacks bias in the gene segments used to encode the variable domains. Newborn light chain diversity is, from the start, comparable to that of the adult, consistent with an earlier hypothesis that light chains contribute extensively to antibody diversity in this species.

  19. Differences in the composition of the human antibody repertoire by B cell subsets in the blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Szymanska eMroczek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The vast initial diversity of the antibody repertoire is generated centrally by means of a complex series of V (D J gene rearrangement events, variation in the site of gene segment joining, and TdT catalyzed N- region addition. Although the diversity is great, close inspection has revealed distinct and unique characteristics in the antibody repertoires expressed by different B cell developmental subsets. In order to illustrate our approach to repertoire analysis, we present an in-depth comparison of V (D J gene usage, hydrophobicity, length, DH reading frame, and amino acid usage between heavy chain repertoires expressed by immature, transitional, mature, memory IgD+, memory IgD-, and plasmacytes isolated from the blood of a single individual. Our results support the view that in both human and mouse the H chain repertoires expressed by individual, developmental B cell subsets appear to differ in sequence content. Sequencing of unsorted B cells from the blood is thus likely to yield an incomplete or compressed view of what is actually happening in the immune response of the individual. Our findings support the view that studies designed to correlate repertoire expression with diseases of immune function will likely require deep sequencing of B cells sorted by subset.

  20. Gluten-specific antibodies of celiac disease gut plasma cells recognize long proteolytic fragments that typically harbor T-cell epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dørum, Siri; Steinsbø, Øyvind; Bergseng, Elin; Arntzen, Magnus Ø; de Souza, Gustavo A; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify proteolytic fragments of gluten proteins recognized by recombinant IgG1 monoclonal antibodies generated from single IgA plasma cells of celiac disease lesions. Peptides bound by monoclonal antibodies in complex gut-enzyme digests of gluten treated with the deamidating enzyme transglutaminase 2, were identified by mass spectrometry after antibody pull-down with protein G beads. The antibody bound peptides were long deamidated peptide fragments that contained the substrate recognition sequence of transglutaminase 2. Characteristically, the fragments contained epitopes with the sequence QPEQPFP and variants thereof in multiple copies, and they typically also harbored many different gluten T-cell epitopes. In the pull-down setting where antibodies were immobilized on a solid phase, peptide fragments with multivalent display of epitopes were targeted. This scenario resembles the situation of the B-cell receptor on the surface of B cells. Conceivably, B cells of celiac disease patients select gluten epitopes that are repeated multiple times in long peptide fragments generated by gut digestive enzymes. As the fragments also contain many different T-cell epitopes, this will lead to generation of strong antibody responses by effective presentation of several distinct T-cell epitopes and establishment of T-cell help to B cells. PMID:27146306

  1. Gluten-specific antibodies of celiac disease gut plasma cells recognize long proteolytic fragments that typically harbor T-cell epitopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dørum, Siri; Steinsbø, Øyvind; Bergseng, Elin; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.; de Souza, Gustavo A.; Sollid, Ludvig M.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify proteolytic fragments of gluten proteins recognized by recombinant IgG1 monoclonal antibodies generated from single IgA plasma cells of celiac disease lesions. Peptides bound by monoclonal antibodies in complex gut-enzyme digests of gluten treated with the deamidating enzyme transglutaminase 2, were identified by mass spectrometry after antibody pull-down with protein G beads. The antibody bound peptides were long deamidated peptide fragments that contained the substrate recognition sequence of transglutaminase 2. Characteristically, the fragments contained epitopes with the sequence QPEQPFP and variants thereof in multiple copies, and they typically also harbored many different gluten T-cell epitopes. In the pull-down setting where antibodies were immobilized on a solid phase, peptide fragments with multivalent display of epitopes were targeted. This scenario resembles the situation of the B-cell receptor on the surface of B cells. Conceivably, B cells of celiac disease patients select gluten epitopes that are repeated multiple times in long peptide fragments generated by gut digestive enzymes. As the fragments also contain many different T-cell epitopes, this will lead to generation of strong antibody responses by effective presentation of several distinct T-cell epitopes and establishment of T-cell help to B cells. PMID:27146306

  2. γδ T Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity with CD19 Antibodies Assessed by an Impedance-Based Label-Free Real-Time Cytotoxicity Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Seidel, Ursula Jördis Eva; Vogt, Fabian; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Jung, Gundram; Handgretinger, Rupert; Lang, Peter

    2014-01-01

    γδ T cells are not MHC restricted, elicit cytotoxicity against various malignancies, are present in early post-transplant phases in novel stem cell transplantation strategies and have been shown to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). These features make γδ T cells promising effector cells for antibody-based immunotherapy in pediatric patients with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). To evaluate combination of human γδ T cells wi...

  3. Approaches to systems biology. Four methods to study single-cell gene expression, cell motility, antibody reactivity, and respiratory metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagedorn, Peter

    To understand how complex systems, such as cells, function, comprehensive Measurements of their constituent parts must be made. This can be achieved by combining methods that are each optimized to measure specific parts of the system. Four such methods,each covering a different area, are presented......: Transcript profiling of one cell type extracted from a complex tissue containing several cell types; observation and recording of cell motility; measurement of antibody reactivities using microarrays; and invivo measurement of free and bound NADH in mitochondria. Detailed statistical analysis of the data...... from such measurements allows models of the system to be developed and tested. For each of the methods, such analysis and modelling approaches have beenapplied and are presented: Differentially regulated genes are identified and classified according to function; cell-specfic motility models are...

  4. Anti-galactose antibodies do not bind to normal human red cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors investigated the possibility that senescent cell IgG might have an anti-galactose (anti-gal) specificity as suggested by others. Anti-gal was isolated from normal human serum with α melibiose-agarose. The assays used were hemagglutination, rosetting, phagocytosis, and 125I protein A binding assay, immunoblotting, and glycine/HCL, pH 2.3, versus sugar elutions. Results revealed binding of anti-gal to rabbit but not human RBC. Immunoblotting of anti-gal revealed labeling of approx.29 bands in rabbit red cell membranes and no labeling of autologous human red cell membranes. The authors attempted to inhibit binding of anti-gal with various sugars. Melibiose caused enhancement rather than inhibition of agglutination when used at concentrations reported by previous investigators to cause inhibition. Neither α melibiose or galactose caused inhibition of phagocytosis of senescent cells. Senescent cell IgG was not displaced from freshly isolated old red cells by incubation with melibiose or galactose as determined by an 125I protein A binding assay. The authors were also unable to elute IgG from stored red cells with galactose. The authors conclude that senescent cell IgG does not have an anti-galactose specificity. The authors were unable to demonstrate an anti-gal antibody to normal human red cells

  5. Simple Method To Prepare Oligonucleotide-Conjugated Antibodies and Its Application in Multiplex Protein Detection in Single Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Haibiao; Holcomb, Ilona; Ooi, Aik; Wang, Xiaohui; Majonis, Daniel; Unger, Marc A; Ramakrishnan, Ramesh

    2016-01-20

    The diversity of nucleic acid sequences enables genomics studies in a highly multiplexed format. Since multiplex protein detection is still a challenge, it would be useful to use genomics tools for this purpose. This can be accomplished by conjugating specific oligonucleotides to antibodies. Upon binding of the oligonucleotide-conjugated antibodies to their targets, the protein levels can be converted to oligonucleotide levels. In this report we describe a simple method for preparing oligonucleotide-conjugated antibodies and discuss this method's application in oligonucleotide extension reaction (OER) for multiplex protein detection. Conjugation is based on strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (the Cu-free click reaction), in which the antibody is activated with a dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO) moiety and subsequently linked covalently with an azide-modified oligonucleotide. In the functional test, the reaction conditions and purification processes were optimized to achieve maximum yield and best performance. The OER assay employs a pair of antibody binders (two antibodies, each conjugated with its own oligonucleotide) developed for each protein target. The two oligonucleotides contain unique six-base complementary regions at their 3' prime ends to allow annealing and extension by DNA synthesis enzymes to form a DNA template. Following preamplification, the DNA template is detected by qPCR. Distinct oligonucleotide sequences are assigned to different antibody binders to enable multiplex protein detection. When tested using recombinant proteins, some antibody binders, such as those specific to CSTB, MET, EpCAM, and CASP3, had dynamic ranges of 5-6 logs. The antibody binders were also used in a multiplexed format in OER assays, and the binders successfully detected their protein targets in cell lysates, and in single cells in combination with the C1 system. This click reaction-based antibody conjugation procedure is cost-effective, needs minimal hands-on time, and

  6. Complement and Antibody-mediated Enhancement of Red Blood Cell Invasion and Growth of Malaria Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biryukov, Sergei; Angov, Evelina; Landmesser, Mary E; Spring, Michele D; Ockenhouse, Christian F; Stoute, José A

    2016-07-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is a deadly pathogen. The invasion of red blood cells (RBCs) by merozoites is a target for vaccine development. Although anti-merozoite antibodies can block invasion in vitro, there is no efficacy in vivo. To explain this discrepancy we hypothesized that complement activation could enhance RBC invasion by binding to the complement receptor 1 (CR1). Here we show that a monoclonal antibody directed against the merozoite and human polyclonal IgG from merozoite vaccine recipients enhanced RBC invasion in a complement-dependent manner and that soluble CR1 inhibited this enhancement. Sialic acid-independent strains, that presumably are able to bind to CR1 via a native ligand, showed less complement-dependent enhancement of RBC invasion than sialic acid-dependent strains that do not utilize native CR1 ligands. Confocal fluorescent microscopy revealed that complement-dependent invasion resulted in aggregation of CR1 at the RBC surface in contact with the merozoite. Finally, total anti-P. berghei IgG enhanced parasite growth and C3 deficiency decreased parasite growth in mice. These results demonstrate, contrary to current views, that complement activation in conjunction with antibodies can paradoxically aid parasites invade RBCs and should be considered in future design and testing of merozoite vaccines. PMID:27333049

  7. Amino acid consumption in naïve and recombinant CHO cell cultures: producers of a monoclonal antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Carrillo-Cocom, L. M.; Genel-Rey, T.; Araíz-Hernández, D.; López-Pacheco, F.; López-Meza, J.; Rocha-Pizaña, M. R.; Ramírez-Medrano, A.; Alvarez, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Most commercial media for mammalian cell culture are designed to satisfy the amino acid requirements for cell growth, but not necessarily those for recombinant protein production. In this study, we analyze the amino acid consumption pattern in naïve and recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultures. The recombinant model we chose was a CHO-S cell line engineered to produce a monoclonal antibody. We report the cell concentration, product concentration, and amino acid concentration prof...

  8. A robust high throughput platform to generate functional recombinant monoclonal antibodies using rabbit B cells from peripheral blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Seeber

    Full Text Available We have developed a robust platform to generate and functionally characterize rabbit-derived antibodies using B cells from peripheral blood. The rapid high throughput procedure generates a diverse set of antibodies, yet requires only few animals to be immunized without the need to sacrifice them. The workflow includes (i the identification and isolation of single B cells from rabbit blood expressing IgG antibodies, (ii an elaborate short term B-cell cultivation to produce sufficient monoclonal antigen specific IgG for comprehensive phenotype screens, (iii the isolation of VH and VL coding regions via PCR from B-cell clones producing antigen specific and functional antibodies followed by the sequence determination, and (iv the recombinant expression and purification of IgG antibodies. The fully integrated and to a large degree automated platform (demonstrated in this paper using IL1RL1 immunized rabbits yielded clonal and very diverse IL1RL1-specific and functional IL1RL1-inhibiting rabbit antibodies. These functional IgGs from individual animals were obtained at a short time range after immunization and could be identified already during primary screening, thus substantially lowering the workload for the subsequent B-cell PCR workflow. Early availability of sequence information permits one to select early-on function- and sequence-diverse antibodies for further characterization. In summary, this powerful technology platform has proven to be an efficient and robust method for the rapid generation of antigen specific and functional monoclonal rabbit antibodies without sacrificing the immunized animal.

  9. Conditional expression of full-length humanized anti-prion protein antibodies in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Daniel A; Heinig, Lars; Ramljak, Sanja; Krueger, Astrid; Schulte, Reiner; Wrede, Arne; Stuke, Andreas W

    2010-12-01

    Because of their high antigen specificity and metabolic stability, genetically engineered human monoclonal antibodies are on the way to becoming one of the most promising medical diagnostics and therapeutics. In order to establish an in vitro system capable of producing such biosimilar antibodies, we used human constant chain sequences to design the novel human antibody expressing vector cassette pMAB-ABX. A bidirectional tetracycline (tet)-controllable promotor was used for harmonized expression of immunoglobulin type G (IgG) heavy and light chains. As an example we used anti-prion protein (anti-PrP) IgGs. Therefore, the variable heavy (V(H)) and light chain (V(L)) sequences of anti-PrP antibodies, previously generated in our laboratory by DNA immunization of prion protein knock-out mice, were isolated from murine hybridoma cell lines and inserted into pMAB-ABX vector. After transfection of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, a number of stable antibody producing cell clones were selected. One cell line (pMAB-ABX-13F10/3B5) stably expressing the recombinant humanized antibody (rechuAb) 13F10/3B5 was selected for detailed characterization by Western blot, immunofluorescence, and flow cytometric analyses. The full-length recombinant humanized IgG antibody showed a high level of expression in the cytoplasm. In conclusion, the new cell system described here is a suitable tool to produce functional intact full-length humanized IgG antibodies. PMID:21087094

  10. The role of natural killer cells in the early period of infection in murine cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.D. Laurenti

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the role of natural killer (NK cells during the early period of Leishmania infection, BALB/c mice were selectively and permanently depleted of NK cells by injection with 90Sr and subsequently infected with Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis (HSJD-1 strain. 90Sr is known to selectively deplete NK cells, leaving an intact T- and B-cell compartment and preserving the ability to produce both interferon alpha and IL-2. This method of depletion has advantages when compared with depletion using anti-NK cell monoclonal antibodies because the effect is permanent and neither activates complement nor provokes massive cell death. In the present study, after one month of treatment with 90Sr, the depletion of NK cells was shown by a more than ten-fold reduction in the cytotoxic activity of these cells: 2 x 106 spleen cells from NK-depleted animals were required to reach the same specific lysis of target cells effected by 0.15 x 106 spleen cells from normal control animals. The histopathology of the skin lesion at 7 days after Leishmania infection showed more parasites in the NK cell-depleted group. This observation further strengthens a direct role of NK cells during the early period of Leishmania infection.

  11. Mapping the stem cell state: eight novel human embryonic stem and embryonal carcinoma cell antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wright, A; Andrews, N; Bardsley, K;

    2011-01-01

    ', yet it appears that this categorization may be an oversimplification, because a number of sub-states appear to exist within this state. To increase the resolution of the undifferentiated state, we have generated eight novel monoclonal antibodies, all capable of recognizing undifferentiated human ES...

  12. A solid-phase radioimmunoassay to detect antibodies produced by hybridomas to antigens derived from human melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay to detect antibodies that react with antigens derived from human melanoma cells is described. A soluble preparation derived from Nonidet P-40 lysates of tissue-cultured melanoma cells was dried on the surfaces of wells of polyvinyl chloride microtiter plates and fixed with 0.02% glutaraldehyde. Antibody preparations were added and incubated for 18 h at 40C. The wells were washed and bound antibodies were detected using radioactive Staphyloccoccal protein A (125I-SpA). Optimal conditions are described for all the steps employed. Concentrations of antigen selected, the amount of 125I-SpA employed and the duration of incubation of antibodies with antigen were found to be critical. The assay was sensitive and reproducible, and lent itself to the simultaneous evaluation of many individual antibody samples in a short period of time. The assay was particularly valuable for rapid screening of hybridoma supernatants for antibodies to antigens derived from melanoma cells and from a panel of other tumor and normal cells. (orig.)

  13. HLA Class II Antibody Activation of Endothelial Cells Promotes Th17 and Disrupts Regulatory T Lymphocyte Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, J; Taflin, C; Cross, A R; Robledo-Sarmiento, M; Mariotto, E; Savenay, A; Carmagnat, M; Suberbielle, C; Charron, D; Haziot, A; Glotz, D; Mooney, N

    2016-05-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most successful treatment option for patients with end-stage renal disease, and chronic antibody-mediated rejection is the principal cause of allograft loss. Predictive factors for chronic rejection include high levels of HLA alloantibodies (particularly HLA class II) and activation of graft endothelial cells (ECs). The mechanistic basis for this association is unresolved. We used an experimental model of HLA-DR antibody stimulation of microvascular ECs to examine the mechanisms underlying the association between HLA class II antibodies, EC activation and allograft damage. Activation of ECs with the F(Ab')2 fragment of HLA-DR antibody led to phosphorylation of Akt, ERK and MEK and increased IL-6 production by ECs cocultured with allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in an Akt-dependent manner. We previously showed that HLA-DR-expressing ECs induce polarization of Th17 and FoxP3(bright) regulatory T cell (Treg) subsets. Preactivation of ECs with anti-HLA-DR antibody redirected EC allogenicity toward a proinflammatory response by decreasing amplification of functional Treg and by further increasing IL-6-dependent Th17 expansion. Alloimmunized patient serum containing relevant HLA-DR alloantibodies selectively bound and increased EC secretion of IL-6 in cocultures with PBMCs. These data contribute to understanding of potential mechanisms of antibody-mediated endothelial damage independent of complement activation and FcR-expressing effector cells. PMID:26614587

  14. A new Purkinje cell antibody (anti-Ca associated with subacute cerebellar ataxia: immunological characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horn Sigrun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a newly discovered serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF reactivity to Purkinje cells (PCs associated with subacute inflammatory cerebellar ataxia. The patient, a previously healthy 33-year-old lady, presented with severe limb and gait ataxia, dysarthria, and diplopia two weeks after she had recovered from a common cold. Immunohistochemical studies on mouse, rat, and monkey brain sections revealed binding of a high-titer (up to 1:10,000 IgG antibody to the cerebellar molecular layer, Purkinje cell (PC layer, and white matter. The antibody is highly specific for PCs and binds to the cytoplasm as well as to the inner side of the membrane of PC somata, dendrites and axons. It is produced by B cell clones within the CNS, belongs to the IgG1 subclass, and activates complement in vitro. Western blotting of primate cerebellum extract revealed binding of CSF and serum IgG to an 80-97 kDa protein. Extensive control studies were performed to rule out a broad panel of previously described paraneoplastic and non-paraneoplastic antibodies known to be associated with cerebellar ataxia. Screening of >9000 human full length proteins by means of a protein array and additional confirmatory experiments revealed Rho GTPase activating protein 26 (ARHGAP26, GRAF, oligophrenin-1-like protein as the target antigen. Preadsorption of the patient's serum with human ARHGAP26 but not preadsorption with other proteins resulted in complete loss of PC staining. Our findings suggest a role of autoimmunity against ARHGAP26 in the pathogenesis of subacute inflammatory cerebellar ataxia, and extend the panel of diagnostic markers for this devastating disease.

  15. Women's attitude towards prenatal screening for red blood cell antibodies, other than RhD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Schoot CE

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since July 1998 all Dutch women (± 200,000/y are screened for red cell antibodies, other than anti-RhesusD (RhD in the first trimester of pregnancy, to facilitate timely treatment of pregnancies at risk for hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN. Evidence for benefits, consequences and costs of screening for non-RhD antibodies is still under discussion. The screening program was evaluated in a nation-wide study. As a part of this evaluation study we investigated, according to the sixth criterium of Wilson and Jüngner, the acceptance by pregnant women of the screening program for non-RhD antibodies. Methods Controlled longitudinal survey, including a prenatal and a postnatal measurement by structured questionnaires. Main outcome measures: information satisfaction, anxiety during the screening process (a.o. STAI state inventory and specific questionnaire modules, overall attitude on the screening program. Univariate analysis was followed by standard multivariate analysis to identify significant predictors of the outcome measures. Participants: 233 pregnant women, distributed over five groups, according to the screening result. Results Satisfaction about the provided information was moderate in all groups. All screen- positive groups desired more supportive information. Anxiety increased in screen- positives during the screening process, but decreased to basic levels postnatally. All groups showed a strongly positive balance between perceived utility and burden of the screening program, independent on test results or background characteristics. Conclusion Women highly accept the non-RhD antibody screening program. However, satisfaction about provided information is moderate. Oral and written information should be provided by obstetric care workers themselves, especially to screen-positive women.

  16. Lactobacilli Modulate Natural Killer Cell Responses In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    of certain lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxicity. Here, we investigated how human gut flora-derived lactobacilli affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human NK cells upon bacterial stimulation. CD3-CD56+ NK cells were...... isolated from buffy coats by negative isolation using non-NK lineage specific antibodies and magnetic beads. NK cells were incubated with 10 microg/ml UV-inactivated bacteria or 10 microg/ml phytohemagglutinin (PHA) for four days. Proliferation was assessed by incorporation of radioactive thymidine into NK...... cell DNA. The IFN-gamma concentration was measured by ELISA. Incubation of NK cells with a Lactobacillus acidophilus strain increased the proliferation of the NK cells and induced IFN-gamma production, both to levels comparable to PHA stimulation. The proliferative response was further enhanced with...

  17. Invariant natural killer T cells in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: killer choice for natural suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, P; Bassiri, H; Patel, N P; Nichols, K E; Das, R

    2016-05-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKTs) are innate-like lipid-reactive T lymphocytes that express an invariant T-cell receptor (TCR). Following engagement of the iTCR, iNKTs rapidly secrete copious amounts of Th1 and Th2 cytokines and promote the functions of several immune cells including NK, T, B and dendritic cells. Accordingly, iNKTs bridge the innate and adaptive immune responses and modulate susceptibility to autoimmunity, infection, allergy and cancer. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is one of the most effective treatments for patients with hematologic malignancies. However, the beneficial graft versus leukemia (GvL) effect mediated by the conventional T cells contained within the allograft is often hampered by the concurrent occurrence of graft versus host disease (GvHD). Thus, developing strategies that can dissociate GvHD from GvL remain clinically challenging. Several preclinical and clinical studies demonstrate that iNKTs significantly attenuate GvHD without abrogating the GvL effect. Besides preserving the GvL activity of the donor graft, iNKTs themselves exert antitumor immune responses via direct and indirect mechanisms. Herein, we review the various mechanisms by which iNKTs provide antitumor immunity and discuss their roles in GvHD suppression. We also highlight the opportunities and obstacles in manipulating iNKTs for use in the cellular therapy of hematologic malignancies. PMID:26878658

  18. Wildtype p53-specific Antibody and T-Cell Responses in Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Stryhn, Anette; Justesen, Sune;

    2011-01-01

    Mutation in the p53 gene based on single amino acid substitutions is a frequent event in human cancer. Accumulated mutant p53 protein is released to antigen presenting cells of the immune system and anti-p53 immune responses even against wt p53 is induced and observed in a number of human cancer...... patients. Detection of antibodies against wt p53 protein has been used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker and discovery of new T-cell epitopes has enabled design of cancer vaccination protocols with promising results. Here, we identified wt p53-specific antibodies in various cancer patients and...... identified a broad range of responses against wt p53 protein and 15-mer peptides using a novel print array technology. Likewise, using bioinformatic tools in silico, we identified CD8 T-cell specificity or reactivity against HLA-A*02:01 binding peptides wt p53(65-73), wt p53(187-197), and wt p53(264-272) in...

  19. Detecting Proteins in Highly Autofluorescent Cells Using Quantum Dot Antibody Conjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M. Orcutt

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We have applied quantum dot (Qdot antibody conjugates as a biomolecular probe for cellular proteins important in biogeochemical cycling in the sea. Conventional immunological methods have been hampered by the strong autofluorescence found in cyanobacteria cells. Qdot conjugates provide an ideal alternative for studies that require long-term imaging of cells such as detection of low abundance cellular antigens by fluorescence microscopy. The advantage of Qdot labeled probes over conventional immunological methods is the photostability of the probe. Phycoerythrin bleaches in cyanobacterial cells under prolonged UV or blue light excitation, which means that the semiconducting nanocrystal probe, the Qdot, can yield a strong fluorescent signal without interference from cellular pigments.

  20. Asymmetries in Chickens from Lines Selected and Relaxed for High or Low Antibody Titers to Sheep Red Blood Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Yunjie; Siegel, P B

    2015-01-01

    Wattle length, width, and area were measured to classify bilateral asymmetries in four lines of chickens. The lines were the S26 generation of White Leghorns selected for high (HAS) or low (LAS) response to sheep red blood cells and sublines in which selection had been relaxed for three generations (high antibody relaxed [HAR] and low antibody relaxed [LAR]). Antibody titers (AB) were greater for HAS than for HAR with both greater than for LAS and LAR which while different for males did not d...

  1. Changes in Leukocyte Subsets And Anti-dsDNA Antibody Levels After B Cell Depletion Therapy in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Lazarus, M. N.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical response to B cell depletion therapy (BCDT) is highly variable in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Reductions in anti-dsDNA antibody levels also vary. It has been shown that early relapse is more likely if anti-dsDNA antibody levels remain high after BCDT. The cellular factors that determine how anti-dsDNA antibodies are produced and whether they are likely to fall after BCDT have not been clarified. This thesis describes two different immunological processes that mi...

  2. Monoclonal Antibodies against Small Molecule Natural Products and Their Applications, Eastern Blotting and Knockout Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Shoyama

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available To determine the hapten number in hapten-carrier protein conjugate matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI tof mass spectrometry was applied. Highly specific anti-ginsenoside Rb1 and Rg1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs were prepared. Ginsenosides were developed on thin layer chromatography (TLC plates which were covered by a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF membrane resulting in blotting. The membrane was treated with NaIO4 solution to release the aldehyde group on the sugar moiety of the ginsenosides. By treatment of the membrane with a protein solution the ginsenoside-protein conjugation as a Schiff-base occurred, which can function to fix it to the PVDF membrane. A part of the ginsenoside aglycone was reacted with anti-ginsenoside Rb1 MAb, secondary MAb conjugated with enzyme and finally a substrate was added, resulting in a specific and highly sensitive staining that we named Eastern blotting. Furthermore, it makes one-step isolation of ginsenoside Rb1 possible using an immuno-affinity column conjugated with anti-ginsenoside Rb1 MAb. Furthermore, immunoaffinity concentration was carried out allowing high sensitivity analysis of lower concentrations of ginsenoside Rb1 so that several unknown bands could be structurally determined.

  3. The characterization and purification of DNA binding proteins present within herpes simplex virus infected cells using monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies against herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA binding proteins (DBP) have been produced. Five HSV DBP have been characterized according to molecular weight, affinity for DNA, kinetic class and localization within the infected cell. By preparing an immunoadsorbent column from antibody TI8, its specific DBP was purified to apparent homogeneity. The purified DBP retained the ability to bind to DNA. (Author)

  4. Inhibition of the Production of Anti-OspA Borreliacidal Antibody with T Cells from Hamsters Vaccinated against Borrelia burgdorferi

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Jani R.; Du Chateau, Brian K.; Munson, Erik L.; Callister, Steven M.; Schell, Ronald F.

    1998-01-01

    The serious morbidity associated with Lyme borreliosis has focused considerable effort on the development of a comprehensive vaccine for protection against infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. Induction of borreliacidal antibody by vaccination or infection has been shown to correlate with protection of humans and animals against infection with the Lyme spirochete. In this report, we showed that high levels of borreliacidal antibody (titer of 1,280) were produced in vitro when T and B cells fr...

  5. Target-selective homologous recombination cloning for high-throughput generation of monoclonal antibodies from single plasma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Isobe Masaharu; Yoshioka Megumi; Kurosawa Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Molecular cloning of functional immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells is one of the most promising technologies for the rapid development of monoclonal antibody drugs. However, the proper insertion of PCR-amplified immunoglobulin genes into expression vectors remains an obstacle to the high-throughput production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. Results We developed a single-step cloning method, target-selective homologous recombination (TS-HR), in which PCR-am...

  6. Comparison of four enzyme immunoassays for detection of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 2 antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Gallo, D; Yeh, E T; Moore, E S; Hanson, C V

    1996-01-01

    Four licensed enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kits for the measurement of antibody to human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV) type 1, one from Organon Teknika Corp. (OTC), one from Cambridge Biotech Corp. (CBC), and two from Abbott Laboratories (the 1993 modification [Abb 93] and the 2.0 version licensed in 1995 [Abb 95]), were evaluated for sensitivity and specificity in the detection of HTLV type 2 antibody, and the results were compared with those previously obtained with earlier kit versions. The...

  7. Macrophage-specific RAM11 monoclonal antibody cross-reacts with basal cells of stratified squamous epithelia.

    OpenAIRE

    Tadeusz Cichocki; Joanna Zarzecka; Alicja Furgal-Borzych; Jan A. Litwin; Grzegorz J. Lis

    2007-01-01

    RAM11 is a mouse monoclonal anti-rabbit macrophage antibody recognizing connective tissue and vascular (atheromatous tissue) macrophages. This study demonstrates a cross-reaction of RAM11 with an unknown antigen in rabbit normal epithelial cells. Formalin-fixed, paraffin sections of the New Zealand White rabbit normal skin, oral mucosa, esophagus, small intestine and lung were immunostained with RAM11 antibody followed by goat anti-mouse Cy-3-conjugated antiglobulin. RAM11-positive immunofluo...

  8. Resolution of acute malarial infections by T cell-dependent non-antibody-mediated mechanisms of immunity.

    OpenAIRE

    Cavacini, L A; Parke, L A; Weidanz, W P

    1990-01-01

    While it is generally accepted that acute blood stage malarial infections are resolved through the actions of protective antibodies, we observed that resistance to acute infection with Plasmodium chabaudi adami was mediated by T cell-dependent cellular immune mechanisms independent of antibody. We now report that acute blood stage infections caused by three additional murine hemoprotozoan parasites, Plasmodium vinckei petteri, Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi, and Babesia microti, appear to be co...

  9. Specific antibody-receptor interactions trigger InlAB-independent uptake of listeria monocytogenes into tumor cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hotz Christian

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specific cell targeting is an important, yet unsolved problem in bacteria-based therapeutic applications, like tumor or gene therapy. Here, we describe the construction of a novel, internalin A and B (InlAB-deficient Listeria monocytogenes strain (Lm-spa+, which expresses protein A of Staphylococcus aureus (SPA and anchors SPA in the correct orientation on the bacterial cell surface. Results This listerial strain efficiently binds antibodies allowing specific interaction of the bacterium with the target recognized by the antibody. Binding of Trastuzumab (Herceptin® or Cetuximab (Erbitux® to Lm-spa+, two clinically approved monoclonal antibodies directed against HER2/neu and EGFR/HER1, respectively, triggers InlAB-independent internalization into non-phagocytic cancer cell lines overexpressing the respective receptors. Internalization, subsequent escape into the host cell cytosol and intracellular replication of these bacteria are as efficient as of the corresponding InlAB-positive, SPA-negative parental strain. This specific antibody/receptor-mediated internalization of Lm-spa+ is shown in the murine 4T1 tumor cell line, the isogenic 4T1-HER2 cell line as well as the human cancer cell lines SK-BR-3 and SK-OV-3. Importantly, this targeting approach is applicable in a xenograft mouse tumor model after crosslinking the antibody to SPA on the listerial cell surface. Conclusions Binding of receptor-specific antibodies to SPA-expressing L. monocytogenes may represent a promising approach to target L. monocytogenes to host cells expressing specific receptors triggering internalization.

  10. γδ T cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity with CD19 antibodies assessed by an impedance-based label-free real-time cytotoxicity assay

    OpenAIRE

    Ursula Jördis Eva Seidel; Fabian eVogt; Ludger eGrosse-Hovest; Gundram eJung; Rupert eHandgretinger; Peter eLang

    2014-01-01

    γδ T cells are not MHC restricted, elicit cytotoxicity against various malignancies, are present in early post-transplant phases in novel stem cell transplantation (SCT) strategies and have been shown to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). These features make γδ T cells promising effector cells for antibody-based immunotherapy in pediatric patients with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). To evaluate combination of human γδ T ce...

  11. Quality and quantity of TFH cells are critical for broad antibody development in SHIVAD8 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takuya; Lynch, Rebecca M; Gautam, Rajeev; Matus-Nicodemos, Rodrigo; Schmidt, Stephen D; Boswell, Kristin L; Darko, Sam; Wong, Patrick; Sheng, Zizhang; Petrovas, Constantinos; McDermott, Adrian B; Seder, Robert A; Keele, Brandon F; Shapiro, Lawrence; Douek, Daniel C; Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Mascola, John R; Martin, Malcolm A; Koup, Richard A

    2015-07-29

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) protect against HIV-1 infection, yet how they are generated during chronic infection remains unclear. It is known that T follicular helper (TFH) cells are needed to promote affinity maturation of B cells during an immune response; however, the role of TFH during HIV-1 infection is undefined within lymph node germinal centers (GCs). We use nonhuman primates to investigate the relationship in the early stage of chronic SHIVAD8 (simian-human immunodeficiency virus AD8) infection between envelope (Env)-specific TFH cells, Env-specific B cells, virus, and the generation of bNAbs during later infection. We found that both the frequency and quality of Env-specific TFH cells were associated with an expansion of Env-specific immunoglobulin G-positive GC B cells and broader neutralization across HIV clades. We also found a correlation between breadth of neutralization and the degree of somatic hypermutation in Env-specific memory B cells. Finally, we observed high viral loads and greater diversity of Env sequences in rhesus macaques that developed cross-reactive neutralization as compared to those that did not. These studies highlight the importance of boosting high-quality TFH populations as part of a robust vaccine regimen aimed at eliciting bNabs. PMID:26223303

  12. [Effect of thalassemia panel reactive antibody on proliferation and apoptosis of cord blood CD34(+) cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xing-Ge; Lu, Xue-Liang; Xu, Lü-Hong; Fang, Jian-Pei

    2012-02-01

    The study was purposed to explore the effect of panel reactive antibody (PRA) serum from patients with β-thalassemia on proliferation and apoptosis of the CD34(+)cells from cord blood and its mechanism. CD34(+) cells of umbilical cord blood were incubated with different sera and complement respectively. After incubation, the samples were centrifuged and the supernatants were collected for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) detection, and the CD34(+) cells were harvested and measured for the apoptosis by flow cytometry with Annexin V/PI. The intracellular DNA synthesis were also quantified by [(3)H]TdR incorporation using liquid scintillation counter. The results showed that concentration of LDH in PRA positive groups was higher as compared with control group, and the DNA synthesis of CD34(+) cells in PRA positive groups were inhibited. There were no differences in the percentage of cell apoptosis and necrosis among different groups. It is concluded that thalassemic serum PRA impairs the cell membrane, inhibits the DNA synthesis, which can be increased by addition of the complement, but PRA had no significant effect on apoptosis of CD34(+) cells. PMID:22391181

  13. Microarray-based MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry enables monitoring of monoclonal antibody production in batch and perfusion cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhoff, Robert F; Karst, Daniel J; Steinebach, Fabian; Kopp, Marie R G; Schmidt, Gregor W; Stettler, Alexander; Krismer, Jasmin; Soos, Miroslav; Pabst, Martin; Hierlemann, Andreas; Morbidelli, Massimo; Zenobi, Renato

    2016-07-15

    Cell culture process monitoring in monoclonal antibody (mAb) production is essential for efficient process development and process optimization. Currently employed online, at line and offline methods for monitoring productivity as well as process reproducibility have their individual strengths and limitations. Here, we describe a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS)-based on a microarray for mass spectrometry (MAMS) technology to rapidly monitor a broad panel of analytes, including metabolites and proteins directly from the unpurified cell supernatant or from host cell culture lysates. The antibody titer is determined from the intact antibody mass spectra signal intensity relative to an internal protein standard spiked into the supernatant. The method allows a semi-quantitative determination of light and heavy chains. Intracellular mass profiles for metabolites and proteins can be used to track cellular growth and cell productivity. PMID:26707204

  14. Macrophage-specific RAM11 monoclonal antibody cross-reacts with basal cells of stratified squamous epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Cichocki

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available RAM11 is a mouse monoclonal anti-rabbit macrophage antibody recognizing connective tissue and vascular (atheromatous tissue macrophages. This study demonstrates a cross-reaction of RAM11 with an unknown antigen in rabbit normal epithelial cells. Formalin-fixed, paraffin sections of the New Zealand White rabbit normal skin, oral mucosa, esophagus, small intestine and lung were immunostained with RAM11 antibody followed by goat anti-mouse Cy-3-conjugated antiglobulin. RAM11-positive immunofluorescence was observed in basal layer cells of stratified squamous epithelia (skin, oral mucosa, esophagus. No RAM11 immunostaining was found in any cells of simple (intestinal, bronchial epithelia. These findings show that basal cells of stratified squamous keratinized and non-keratinized epithelia of the rabbit express an antigenic epitope which is common with that of macrophage antigen recognized by RAM11 monoclonal antibody.

  15. Macrophage-specific RAM11 monoclonal antibody cross-reacts with basal cells of stratified squamous epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, Grzegorz J; Litwin, Jan A; Furgal-Borzych, Alicja; Zarzecka, Joanna; Cichocki, Tadeusz

    2007-01-01

    RAM11 is a mouse monoclonal anti-rabbit macrophage antibody recognizing connective tissue and vascular (atheromatous tissue) macrophages. This study demonstrates a cross-reaction of RAM11 with an unknown antigen in rabbit normal epithelial cells. Formalin-fixed, paraffin sections of the New Zealand White rabbit normal skin, oral mucosa, esophagus, small intestine and lung were immunostained with RAM11 antibody followed by goat anti-mouse Cy-3-conjugated antiglobulin. RAM11-positive immunofluorescence was observed in basal layer cells of stratified squamous epithelia (skin, oral mucosa, esophagus). No RAM11 immunostaining was found in any cells of simple (intestinal, bronchial) epithelia. These findings show that basal cells of stratified squamous keratinized and non-keratinized epithelia of the rabbit express an antigenic epitope which is common with that of macrophage antigen recognized by RAM11 monoclonal antibody. PMID:17951172

  16. Haemolytic complement activity, C3 and FactorB consumption in serum from chickens divergently selected for antibody responses to sheep red blood cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parmentier, H.K.; Baelmans, R.; Nieuwland, M.G.B.; Dorny, P.; Demey, F.

    2002-01-01

    Antibody responses, serum complement haemolytic activity, and complement component C3 and Factor B consumption were studied in chickens divergently selected for high and low antibody responses to sheep red blood cells, and in a randombred control line. Significantly higher total and IgG antibody res

  17. Natural Helper cells derive from lymphoid progenitors1

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Qi; Saenz, Steven A.; Zlotoff, Daniel A.; Artis, David; Bhandoola, Avinash

    2011-01-01

    Natural Helper (NH) cells are recently discovered innate immune cells that confer protective type 2 immunity during helminth infection and mediate influenza induced airway hypersensitivity. Little is known about the ontogeny of NH cells. We now report NH cells derive from bone marrow lymphoid progenitors. Using RAG-1Cre/ROSA26YFP mice, we show that the majority of NH cells are marked with a history of RAG-1 expression, implying lymphoid developmental origin. The development of NH cells depend...

  18. Polyfunctionality of natural killer cell in healthy donors

    OpenAIRE

    Yupanun WUTTI-IN; Preeyanat VONGCHAN; Thananchai, Hathairat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Natural killer (NK) cells are important guards of the innate immune system, which act by performing as primary effector cells in viral infections. NK cell function is regulated by the engagement of activating and/or inhibitory receptors on individual NK cell surfaces. Subsequent to activation, the release of preformed cytolytic granules or cytokines occurs. Recently, the polyfunctionality of NK cells has been described as a potent NK cell subset that mediates antiviral response in...

  19. Generation of human scFvs antibodies recognizing a prion protein epitope expressed on the surface of human lymphoblastoid cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imperiale Valentina

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A hallmark of prion disease is the transformation of normal cellular prion protein (PrPc into an infectious disease-associated isoform, (PrPsc. Anti-prion protein monoclonal antibodies are invaluable for structure-function studies of PrP molecules. Furthermore recent in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that anti-PrP monoclonal antibodies can prevent the incorporation of PrPc into propagating prions. In the present article, we show two new human phage antibodies, isolated on recombinant hamster prion protein (rHaPrP. Results We adopted an antibody phage display strategy to isolate specific human antibodies directed towards rHaPrP which has been used as a bait for panning the synthetic ETH-2 antibody phage library. Two phage antibodies clones named MA3.B4 and MA3.G3 were isolated and characterized under genetic biochemical and immunocytochemical aspects. The clones were found to recognize the prion protein in ELISA studies. In flow-cytometry studies, these human single chain Fragment variable (scFv phage-antibodies show a well defined pattern of reactivity on human lymphoblastoid and myeloid cells. Conclusion Sequence analysis of the gene encoding for the antibody fragments and antigen recognition patterns determined by flow-cytometry analysis indicate that the isolated scFvs recognize novel epitopes in the PrPc molecule. These new anti PrPc human antibodies are unique reagents for prion protein detection and may represent a biologic platform to develop new reagents to treat PrPsc associated disease.

  20. Analysis by Flow Cytometry of B-Cell Activation and Antibody Responses Induced by Toll-Like Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pone, Egest J

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed in B lymphocytes and contribute to B-cell activation, antibody responses, and their maturation. TLR stimulation of mouse B cells induces class switch DNA recombination (CSR) to isotypes specified by cytokines, and also induces formation of IgM(+) as well as class-switched plasma cells. B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling, while on its own inducing limited B-cell proliferation and no CSR, can enhance CSR driven by TLRs. Particular synergistic or antagonistic interactions among TLR pathways, BCR, and cytokine signaling can have important consequences for B-cell activation, CSR, and plasma cell formation. This chapter outlines protocols for the induction and analysis of B-cell activation and antibody production by TLRs with or without other stimuli. PMID:26803633

  1. Comparison of multiple assays for detecting human antibodies directed against antigens on normal and malignant tissue culture cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four separate assays of human antibody reactivity to four separate normal and malignant human tissue culture cells lines from two patients have been evaluated using a single highly-reactive allogeneic serum. The visual end-point cytolysis assay and the chromium-51 release assay were equally sensitive in measuring complement mediated antibody cytotoxicity and both were far more sensitive than a trypan blue dye exclusion assay. The assay of antibody reactivity by hemadsorption technique was about 10 times more sensitive than any of the cytotoxicity assays. This latter assay measures only IgG antibody however. These assays showed that cell lines from different patients may differ greatly in 'reactivity' to an allogeneic serum and emphasized the importance of utilizing tumor and normal cells from the same patient when using tissue culture cells to search for tumor specific reactivity. These observations emphasize the importance of utilizing multiple assays against paired normal and malignant cells from the same patient to be certain of the specificity and magnitude of the measured antibody

  2. Cells of the J774 macrophage cell line are primed for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity following exposure to γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activation of macrophages (M phi) for host defense against tumor cells follows a sequence of priming events followed by an initiating stimulus that results in production and release of cytotoxic molecules that mediate target cell killing. The authors have developed a model to study specific macrophage cytotoxicity in vitro utilizing a cultured murine M phi cell line, J774. Specific cytotoxicity of cultured human gastrointestinal tumor cells is achieved in the presence of murine IgG2a monoclonal antibody (mAb) 17-1-A. The ability of these cells to mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) is greatly enhanced following gamma-irradiation. ADCC can be demonstrated at mAb 17-1-A concentrations greater than or equal to 1 microgram/ml and effector/target cell ratios greater than or equal to 2. Exposure to doses greater than or equal to 10 Gy of gamma-irradiation increases ADCC threefold. Varying the duration from J774 M phi exposure to γ-irradiation until addition of antibody-coated target cells showed that the primed state for ADCC is stable for at least 8 days but approximately 24 hr is required for complete development of the primed state. mAb-dependent target cell death begins 8 hr after addition of mAb and labeled target cells to primed effector cells and is complete by 24 hr. Incubation of unirradiated J774 M phi effector cells with recombinant murine interferon-γ (rmIFN-γ) also results in enhanced ADCC, but the extent of target cell killing achieved is less than that following priming by γ-irradiation. Concomitant priming of γ-irradiated J774 M phi with rmIFN-γ increases the extent of ADCC. Further study of irradiated J774 cells may elucidate the molecular pathways utilized by M phi for achieving and maintaining the primed state for ADCC

  3. Cells of the J774 macrophage cell line are primed for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity following exposure to. gamma. -irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerst, R.; Werberig, K. (University of Rochester Medical Center, New York (USA))

    1991-09-01

    Activation of macrophages (M phi) for host defense against tumor cells follows a sequence of priming events followed by an initiating stimulus that results in production and release of cytotoxic molecules that mediate target cell killing. The authors have developed a model to study specific macrophage cytotoxicity in vitro utilizing a cultured murine M phi cell line, J774. Specific cytotoxicity of cultured human gastrointestinal tumor cells is achieved in the presence of murine IgG2a monoclonal antibody (mAb) 17-1-A. The ability of these cells to mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) is greatly enhanced following gamma-irradiation. ADCC can be demonstrated at mAb 17-1-A concentrations greater than or equal to 1 microgram/ml and effector/target cell ratios greater than or equal to 2. Exposure to doses greater than or equal to 10 Gy of gamma-irradiation increases ADCC threefold. Varying the duration from J774 M phi exposure to {gamma}-irradiation until addition of antibody-coated target cells showed that the primed state for ADCC is stable for at least 8 days but approximately 24 hr is required for complete development of the primed state. mAb-dependent target cell death begins 8 hr after addition of mAb and labeled target cells to primed effector cells and is complete by 24 hr. Incubation of unirradiated J774 M phi effector cells with recombinant murine interferon-{gamma} (rmIFN-{gamma}) also results in enhanced ADCC, but the extent of target cell killing achieved is less than that following priming by {gamma}-irradiation. Concomitant priming of {gamma}-irradiated J774 M phi with rmIFN-{gamma} increases the extent of ADCC. Further study of irradiated J774 cells may elucidate the molecular pathways utilized by M phi for achieving and maintaining the primed state for ADCC.

  4. A novel monoclonal anti-CD81 antibody produced by genetic immunization efficiently inhibits Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Fofana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a challenge to prevent and treat because of the rapid development of drug resistance and escape. Viral entry is required for initiation, spread, and maintenance of infection, making it an attractive target for antiviral strategies. METHODS: Using genetic immunization, we produced four monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against the HCV host entry factor CD81. The effects of antibodies on inhibition of HCV infection and dissemination were analyzed in HCV permissive human liver cell lines. RESULTS: The anti-CD81 mAbs efficiently inhibited infection by HCV of different genotypes as well as a HCV escape variant selected during liver transplantation and re-infecting the liver graft. Kinetic studies indicated that anti-CD81 mAbs target a post-binding step during HCV entry. In addition to inhibiting cell-free HCV infection, one antibody was also able to block neutralizing antibody-resistant HCV cell-cell transmission and viral dissemination without displaying any detectable toxicity. CONCLUSION: A novel anti-CD81 mAb generated by genetic immunization efficiently blocks HCV spread and dissemination. This antibody will be useful to further unravel the role of virus-host interactions during HCV entry and cell-cell transmission. Furthermore, this antibody may be of interest for the development of antivirals for prevention and treatment of HCV infection.

  5. Reactions of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of camels with monoclonal antibodies against ruminant leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar-Waron, H; Yagil, R; Brenner, J; Paz, R; Partosh, N; Van Creveld, C; Lubashevsky, E; Trainin, Z

    2003-03-01

    The particular immune system of the camel has been but little investigated. In this work circulating camel peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were studied by flow cytometry. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised against ruminant leukocytes were used for the detection of cell surface antigens. Monoclonals to T-cell markers, CD4 (CACT138A) and CD8 (CACT80C), exhibited no reactivity towards camel PBMC in contrast to their reactivity to PBMC of other ruminant species and those of cattle in particular. A relatively high percentage (29.1+/-8.9%) of camel PBMC reacted with a non-immunoglobulin cell surface marker, B-B2, comparable to the reactivity of bovine PBMC. The B-B7 cell marker revealed 22.4+/-10.0% of reactive camel PBMC while the CD45 leukocyte common antigen was identified only on 19.4+/-3.1% of camel PBMC as compared to 74.7+/-4.9% for bovine PBMC. IgM (PIg45A) was detected on 9.1+/-1.4% of camel PBMC and on 46.6+/-19.5% of the bovine PBMC. Double fluorescent labeling with two B-cell markers and an anti-ruminant lambda light-chain mAb revealed 7-9% of cells bearing both B and lambda L-chain markers. Light chain reactivity was also assessed using an anti-goat F(ab')(2) antiserum. The values obtained, 14.3+/-5.8% for the camel and 47.8+/-2.7% for the cattle, are close to the values observed for surface IgM. These data suggest that camels, like other ruminants, possess L-chain bearing cells of the B-cell lineage. However, in the camel, Igs are different in that in addition to regular four chain Igs, about 65% of them possess two heavy chain Igs devoid of light chains. Because different sets of V(H) gene segments are used by four and two chain Igs, it is possible that there might be two lineages of B-cells each secreting a different form of antibodies. PMID:12493494

  6. Amino acid and glucose metabolism in fed-batch CHO cell culture affects antibody production and glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Yuzhou; Jimenez Del Val, Ioscani; Müller, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    Fed-batch Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture is the most commonly used process for IgG production in the biopharmaceutical industry. Amino acid and glucose consumption, cell growth, metabolism, antibody titer, and N-glycosylation patterns are always the major concerns during upstream proces...

  7. A murine monoclonal antibody (VM-1) against human basal cells inhibits the growth of human keratinocytes in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oseroff, A R; Pfendt, E A; DiCicco, L; Morhenn, V B

    1985-04-01

    Using epidermal cells from psoriatic plaques as the immunogen, an IgG1 murine monoclonal antibody, VM-1, has been produced which stains basal keratinocytes on frozen sections of skin obtained from normal individuals and from psoriatic plaques. In some areas of both normal and psoriatic epidermis, the cell layer immediately above the basal cells is also stained. Cells in the external root sheath of the hair follicles also bind VM-1. The antibody binding site is trypsin-resistant, and is not blocked by bullous pemphigoid serum. If dispersed epidermal cells are preincubated with VM-1 for 1 h or more before plating, the majority of the cells do not attach and spread out on a collagen-coated Petri dish surface or on a fibroblast feeder layer. When added to attached, preconfluent cultures of keratinocytes, VM-1 inhibits growth and alters cell morphology. The growth inhibition is specific for keratinocytes, and viability studies show that it is not due to an immediate toxic effect of the antibody. The VM-1-induced inhibition of keratinocyte growth is not reversed by soy bean or lima bean trypsin inhibitors added at the time of cell plating or at the time of addition of antibody. PMID:3981036

  8. Cell Surface Glycoprotein of Reactive Stromal Fibroblasts as a Potential Antibody Target in Human Epithelial Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garin-Chesa, Pilar; Old, Lloyd J.; Rettig, Wolfgang J.

    1990-09-01

    The F19 antigen is a cell surface glycoprotein (M_r, 95,000) of human sarcomas and proliferating, cultured fibroblasts that is absent from resting fibroblasts in normal adult tissues. Normal and malignant epithelial cells are also F19^-. The present immunohistochemical study describes induction of F19 in the reactive mesenchyme of epithelial tumors. F19^+ fibroblasts were found in primary and metastatic carcinomas, including colorectal (18 of 18 cases studied), breast (14/14), ovarian (21/21), bladder (9/10), and lung carcinomas (13/13). In contrast, the stroma of benign colorectal adenomas, fibrocystic disease and fibroadenomas of breast, benign prostate hyperplasia, in situ bladder carcinomas, and benign ovarian tumors showed no or only moderate numbers of F19^+ fibroblasts. Analysis of dermal incision wounds revealed that F19 is strongly induced during scar formation. Comparison of F19 with the extracellular matrix protein tenascin, a putative marker of tumor mesenchyme, showed a cellular staining pattern for F19 vs. the extracellular matrix pattern for tenascin and widespread expression of tenascin in F19^- normal tissues and benign tumors. Our results suggest that the F19^+ phenotype correlates with specialized fibroblast functions in wound healing and malignant tumor growth. Because of its abundance in tumor mesenchyme, F19 may serve as a target for antibodies labeled with radioisotopes or toxic agents, or inflammatogenic antibodies, in carcinoma patients.

  9. Frequencies and Specificities of “Enzyme-Only” Detected Erythrocyte Alloantibodies in Patients Hospitalized in Austria: Is an Enzyme Test Required for Routine Red Blood Cell Antibody Screening?

    OpenAIRE

    Dietmar Enko; Claudia Habres; Franz Wallner; Barbara Mayr; Gabriele Halwachs-Baumann

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequencies and specificities of “enzyme-only” detected red blood cell (RBC) alloantibodies in the routine antibody screening and antibody identification in patients hospitalized in Austria. Routine blood samples of 2420 patients were investigated. The antibody screening was performed with a 3-cell panel in the low-ionic strength saline- (LISS-) indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) and with an enzyme-pretreated (papain) 3-cell panel fully automated on th...

  10. Human Monoclonal Islet Cell Antibodies From a Patient with Insulin- Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Reveal Glutamate Decarboxylase as the Target Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Wiltrud; Endl, Josef; Eiermann, Thomas H.; Brandt, Michael; Kientsch-Engel, Rosemarie; Thivolet, Charles; Jungfer, Herbert; Scherbaum, Werner A.

    1992-09-01

    The autoimmune phenomena associated with destruction of the β cell in pancreatic islets and development of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (IDDM) include circulating islet cell antibodies. We have immortalized peripheral blood lymphocytes from prediabetic individuals and patients with newly diagnosed IDDM by Epstein-Barr virus transformation. IgG-positive cells were selected by anti-human IgG-coupled magnetic beads and expanded in cell culture. Supernatants were screened for cytoplasmic islet cell antibodies using the conventional indirect immunofluorescence test on cryostat sections of human pancreas. Six islet cell-specific B-cell lines, originating from a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM, could be stabilized on a monoclonal level. All six monoclonal islet cell antibodies (MICA 1-6) were of the IgG class. None of the MICA reacted with human thyroid, adrenal gland, anterior pituitary, liver, lung, stomach, and intestine tissues but all six reacted with pancreatic islets of different mammalian species and, in addition, with neurons of rat cerebellar cortex. MICA 1-6 were shown to recognize four distinct antigenic epitopes in islets. Islet cell antibody-positive diabetic sera but not normal human sera blocked the binding of the monoclonal antibodies to their target epitopes. Immunoprecipitation of 35S-labeled human islet cell extracts revealed that a protein of identical size to the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15) was a target of all MICA. Furthermore, antigen immunotrapped by the MICA from brain homogenates showed glutamate decarboxylase enzyme activity. MICA 1-6 therefore reveal glutamate decarboxylase as the predominant target antigen of cytoplasmic islet cell autoantibodies in a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM.

  11. Antibody and T cell responses to Fusobacterium nucleatum and Treponema denticola in health and chronic periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Shin

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the T cell response to the members of oral flora are poorly understood. We characterized the antibody and T cell responses to FadA and Td92, adhesins from Fusobacterium nucleatum, an oral commensal, and Treponema denticola, a periodontal pathogen, respectively. Peripheral blood and saliva were obtained from healthy individuals and patients with untreated chronic periodontitis (CP, n = 11 paris and after successful treatment of the disease (n = 9. The levels of antigen-specific antibody were measured by ELISA. In plasma, IgG1 was the most abundant isotype of Ab for both Ags, followed by IgA and then IgG4. The levels of FadA-specific salivary IgA (sIgA were higher than Td92-specific sIgA and the FadA-specific IgA levels observed in plasma. However, the periodontal health status of the individuals did not affect the levels of FadA- or Td92-specific antibody. Even healthy individuals contained FadA- and Td92-specific CD4(+ T cells, as determined by the detection of intracytoplasmic CD154 after short-term in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs with the antigens. Patients with CP tended to possess increased numbers of FadA- and Td92-specific CD4(+ T cells but reduced numbers of Td92-specific Foxp3(+CD4(+ Tregs than the healthy subjects. Both FadA and Td92 induced the production of IFNγ and IL-10 but inhibited the secretion of IL-4 by PBMCs. In conclusion, F. nucleatum induced Th3 (sIgA- and Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1-dominant immune responses, whereas T. denticola induced a Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1-dominant response. This IFNγ-dominant cytokine response was impaired in CP patients, and the Td92-induced IFNγ levels were negatively associated with periodontal destruction in patients. These findings may provide new insights into the homeostatic interaction between the immune system and oral bacteria and the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

  12. Natural killer cell activity during premedication, anaesthesia and surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, E; Mickley, H; Grunnet, N

    1983-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was measured against K-562 target cells in a 51Cr release assay in eight patients undergoing total hip replacement surgery. Eight consecutive blood samples were taken from each patient. A significant increase of NK cell...... days. The findings of this study indicate that premedication, anaesthesia and surgery cause a rapid and transient increase in NK cell activity, followed by a decline in activity postoperatively. The transient increase in activity may be explained by mobilization of natural killer cells from extravasal...

  13. Bispecific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontermann, Roland E; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) combine specificities of two antibodies and simultaneously address different antigens or epitopes. BsAbs with 'two-target' functionality can interfere with multiple surface receptors or ligands associated, for example with cancer, proliferation or inflammatory processes. BsAbs can also place targets into close proximity, either to support protein complex formation on one cell, or to trigger contacts between cells. Examples of 'forced-connection' functionalities are bsAbs that support protein complexation in the clotting cascade, or tumor-targeted immune cell recruiters and/or activators. Following years of research and development (R&D), the first bsAb was approved in 2009. Another bsAb entered the market in December 2014 and several more are in clinical trials. Here, we describe the potentials of bsAbs to become the next wave of antibody-based therapies, focusing on molecules in clinical development. PMID:25728220

  14. Naturally acquired antibodies to Bacillus anthracis protective antigen in vultures of southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C.B. Turnbull

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available TURNBULLP, P.C.B. DIEKMANNM,M., KILIAN, J.W., VERSFELDW, W.,DE VOS, V., ARNTZENL, L.,WOLTER, K., BARTELS, P. & KOTZE, A. 2008.N aturally acquired antibodies to Bacillusa nthracisp rotective antigeni n vultureso f southern Africa. Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research, T5:95-102 Sera from 19 wild caught vultures in northern Namibia and 15 (12 wild caught and three captive bred but with minimal histories in North West Province, South Africa, were examined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbenats say( ELISAf or antibodiesto the Bacillus anthracis toxin protective antigen (PA. As assessed from the baseline established with a control group of ten captive reared vultures with well-documented histories, elevated titres were found in 12 of the 19 (63% wild caught Namibian birds as compared with none of the 15 South African ones. There was a highly significant difference between the Namibian group as a hole and the other groups (P < 0.001 and no significant difference between the South African and control groups (P > 0.05. Numbers in the Namibian group were too small to determine any significances in species-, sex- or age-related differences within the raw data showing elevated titres in four out of six Cape Vultures, Gyps coprotheress, six out of ten Whitebacked Vultures, Gyps africanus, and one out of three Lappet-faced Vultures, Aegypiust racheliotus, or in five of six males versus three of seven females, and ten of 15 adults versus one of four juveniles. The results are in line with the available data on the incidence of anthrax in northern Namibia and South Africa and the likely contact of the vultures tested with anthrax carcasses. lt is not known whether elevated titre indicates infection per se in vultures or absorption of incompletely digested epitopes of the toxin or both. The results are discussed in relation to distances travelled by vultures as determined by new tracking techniques, how serology can reveal anthrax activity in an area and

  15. Detection of lymphocystis disease virus infection to flounder gill cells in vitro by monoclonal antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Flounder gill (FG) cells were used to isolate lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV) and two monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) (1A8 and 3G3) against LCDV were used to trace LCDV infection to FG cells. FG monolayer cells was inoculated with LCDV supernatant, obtained from lymphocystis cells of diseased flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus. LCDV infection was detected with Mabs employing immunocytochemical assay (ICA) and indirect immunofluorescence assay test (ⅡFAT) technique. Detected by ⅡFAT, they were specific for LCDV. The results of experimental infection illustrated that FG cells was sensitive to LCDV, and showed virus-infection positive detected by ICA. Cytopathic effect (CPE) occurred 1-2 days post inoculation (PI), and half tissue culture infection dosage (TCID50) of virus supernatant was 22.57 per 40μl. Tracing by ⅡFAT showed that LCDV positive signal first appeared at the cell membrane immediately PI, and then in cytoplasm at 24h PI, it reached the strongest positive at 48-72 h PI, and began to decrease at 96h PI.

  16. Radioimmunoimaging in human transitional cell carcinoma xenografted nude mice with monoclonal antibody L4B4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monoclonal antibody L4B4 against transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) was prepared and radioimmunoimaging (RII) was studied in nude mice bearing human TCC using L4B4. L4B4 was identified in vitro by immunohistochemistry. Radioimmunoimaging was performed in human transitional cell carcinoma xenografted nude mice. Immunohistochemistry study showed that L4B4 had high specificity for TCC (23/24), compared to that for other malignant tumors (2/24) and benign tumors (0/7). RII study showed that xenografted tumor was demonstrated clearly on the 3rd and 5th day after injection of 125I labeled L4B4. The T/NT was greater than 4 on the 5th day. The results indicated that L4B4 might be useful in the study of TCC and is worthy to do further investigation

  17. Anti-oxidative therapy with oral dapsone improved HCV antibody positive annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, K; Maruyama, R; Katayama, I; Nishioka, K

    1997-05-01

    A 72-year-old fisherman who was positive for the HCV antibody developed an annular, erythematous, infiltrated lesions on sun-exposed areas. The lesions were diagnosed as annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma both clinically and histologically. Topical corticosteroid and cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen for several months failed to improve the lesions. We then started dapsone, a known anti-oxidant, at 50 mg/day. A month later, the margins of the erythematous lesions faded, and the infiltration gradually decreased. No recurrence has been observed for one year after the start of the therapy. Anti-oxidative therapy appears to be effective for annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma and could be an alternate therapy for refractory granulomatous disease. PMID:9198323

  18. AirLab: a cloud-based platform to manage and share antibody-based single-cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catena, Raúl; Özcan, Alaz; Jacobs, Andrea; Chevrier, Stephane; Bodenmiller, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell analysis technologies are essential tools in research and clinical diagnostics. These methods include flow cytometry, mass cytometry, and other microfluidics-based technologies. Most laboratories that employ these methods maintain large repositories of antibodies. These ever-growing collections of antibodies, their multiple conjugates, and the large amounts of data generated in assays using specific antibodies and conditions makes a dedicated software solution necessary. We have developed AirLab, a cloud-based tool with web and mobile interfaces, for the organization of these data. AirLab streamlines the processes of antibody purchase, organization, and storage, antibody panel creation, results logging, and antibody validation data sharing and distribution. Furthermore, AirLab enables inventory of other laboratory stocks, such as primers or clinical samples, through user-controlled customization. Thus, AirLab is a mobile-powered and flexible tool that harnesses the capabilities of mobile tools and cloud-based technology to facilitate inventory and sharing of antibody and sample collections and associated validation data. PMID:27356760

  19. Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibits HLA Class I Antibody-Dependent Endothelial Cell Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Zilian

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is a key limiting factor for long-term graft survival in solid organ transplantation. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I (HLA I antibodies (Abs play a major role in the pathogenesis of AMR via their interactions with HLA molecules on vascular endothelial cells (ECs. The antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase (HO-1 has anti-inflammatory functions in the endothelium. As complement-independent effects of HLA I Abs can activate ECs, it was the goal of the current study to investigate the role of HO-1 on activation of human ECs by HLA I Abs. In cell cultures of various primary human macro- and microvascular ECs treatment with monoclonal pan- and allele-specific HLA I Abs up-regulated the expression of inducible proinflammatory adhesion molecules and chemokines (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [VCAM-1], intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 [ICAM-1], interleukin-8 [IL-8] and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 [MCP-1]. Pharmacological induction of HO-1 with cobalt-protoporphyrin IX reduced, whereas inhibition of HO-1 with either zinc-protoporphyrin IX or siRNA-mediated knockdown increased HLA I Ab-dependent up-regulation of VCAM-1. Treatment with two carbon monoxide (CO-releasing molecules, which liberate the gaseous HO product CO, blocked HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation. Finally, in an in vitro adhesion assay exposure of ECs to HLA I Abs led to increased monocyte binding, which was counteracted by up-regulation of HO-1. In conclusion, HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation is modulated by endothelial HO-1 and targeted induction of this enzyme may be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of AMR in solid organ transplantation.

  20. Transplantation and innate immunity: the lesson of natural killer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moretta Lorenzo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Natural killer cells have been demonstrated to play a major role in mediating an anti-leukemia effect in patients given a T-cell depleted allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from an HLA-haploidentical family donor. In particular, donor-derived natural killer cells, which are alloreactive (i.e. KIR/HLA mismatched towards recipient cells, significantly contribute to the eradication of leukemia blasts escaping the preparative regimen to transplantation. A recent study on high-risk pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia refractory to chemotherapy further highlighted the importance of donors with alloreactive natural killer cells in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, as it demonstrated that these cells can emerge starting from the fourth-fifth month after the allograft and persist for many months. This study represents a major breakthrough in the cure of otherwise fatal leukemias, providing information on the best criteria for choosing the optimal donor.

  1. Antibody Reactivity of B Cells in Lupus Patients with Increased Disease Activity and ARID3a Expression

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    Julie M. Ward

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Earlier studies showed that the DNA-binding protein, Bright/ARID3a bound to a subset of human and mouse immunoglobulin heavy chain promoters where it enhanced expression. Indeed, mice with transgenic expression of ARID3a in all B lymphocytes have expanded MZ B cells and produce anti-nuclear antibodies (ANAs. Consistent with our findings in mice, we observed that human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients had expanded numbers of peripheral blood ARID3a+ B cells that were associated with increased disease activity (p = 0.0038. We hypothesized that ARID3a+ naïve B cells would eventually produce autoantibodies, explaining associations between ARID3a expression and disease activity in lupus. Unlike healthy controls, ARID3a was expressed in the naïve B cell population in SLE patients, and we hypothesized that these might represent expansions of autoreactive cells. Therefore, monoclonal antibodies were generated from single-sorted naïve B cells derived from patients with normal (ARID3aN and high (ARID3aH numbers of ARID3a+ B cells. We found that ARID3a expression did not correlate with autoantibody expression. Furthermore, measures of antigen specificities of autoreactive antibodies did not reveal skewing toward particular proteins. These data suggest that the association of increased disease activity in SLE with numbers of ARID3a+ B lymphocytes may be mediated by an antibody-independent mechanism.

  2. Evaluation of the effects of dexamethasone-induced stress on levels of natural antibodies in immunized laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, Stefano; Rossetti, Michele; Tomaso, Francesco Di; Caputo, Anna Rocchina

    2016-09-01

    Natural antibodies (NAb) are an important humoral component of innate immunity, playing a pivotal role as first line of defence against pathogens even without prior antigen-specific activation or antigen-driven selection. The levels of NAb in plasma of young laying hens were explored in more detail and identified 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl bovine serum albumin (TNP-BSA), as the non-self antigen showing the highest levels of IgΥ- and IgM-NAb. Subsequently, the relation between specific antibody (SpAb) levels and NAb levels, and the effect of dexamethasone (DEX)-induced stress on the acquired Ab response and on NAb levels were examined. According to obtained results, the affinity of NAb and SpAb, measured using the thiocyanate elution method, resulted higher in SpAb than in NAb. After stress induction, IgM-NAb and SpAb levels showed a transient decrease, whereas the levels of IgΥ-NAb were not changed. Moreover, statistical analysis showed positive correlations between IgΥ- and IgM-NAb levels and between IgM-NAb and SpAb levels that are lost as stress has been induced, whereas no correlation was observed between IgΥ-NAb and SpAb levels, neither before nor after the DEX-administration. This indicates that IgM-NAb assessment could be a valid tool to estimate the potential of the acquired Ab response and that the dexamethasone-induced stress condition causes depression of IgM-NAb levels and the acquired Ab response, but it has no evaluable effects on IgΥ-NAb levels. PMID:27436442

  3. Using the local immune response from the natural buffalo host to generate an antibody fragment library that binds the early larval stages of Schistosoma japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, Christopher G; Driguez, Patrick; McWilliam, Hamish E G; Ilag, Leodevico L; Gladman, Simon; Li, Yuesheng; Piedrafita, David; McManus, Donald P; Meeusen, Els N T; de Veer, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Antibodies isolated from the local draining inguinal lymph node of field exposed-water buffaloes following challenge with Schistosoma japonicum cercariae showed high reactivity towards S. japonicum antigen preparations and bound specifically to formaldehyde-fixed S. japonicum schistosomules. Using this specific local immune response we produced a series of single-chain antibody Fv domain libraries from the same lymph nodes. Removal of phage that cross reacted with epitopes on adult parasites yielded a single-chain antibody Fv domain-phage library that specifically bound to whole formaldehyde-fixed and live S. japonicum schistosomules. DNA sequencing indicated clear enrichment of the single-chain antibody Fv domain library for buffalo B-cell complementarity determining regions post-selection for schistosomule binding. This study also revealed that long heavy chain complementarity determining regions appear to be an important factor when selecting for antibody binding fragments against schistosomule proteins. The selected single-chain antibody Fv domain-phage were used to probe a schistosome-specific protein microarray, which resulted in the recognition of many proteins expressed across all schistosome life-cycle stages. Following absorption to adult worms, the single-chain antibody Fv domain-phage library showed significantly reduced binding to most proteins, whilst two proteins (NCBI GenBank accession numbers AY915878 and AY815196) showed increased binding. We have thus developed a unique set of host derived single-chain antibody Fv domains comprising buffalo B-cell variable regions that specifically bind to early S. japonicum life-stages. PMID:26116907

  4. Optimization of heavy chain and light chain signal peptides for high level expression of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Haryadi

    Full Text Available Translocation of a nascent protein from the cytosol into the ER mediated by its signal peptide is a critical step in protein secretion. The aim of this work was to develop a platform technology to optimize the signal peptides for high level production of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells. A database of signal peptides from a large number of human immunoglobulin (Ig heavy chain (HC and kappa light chain (LC was generated. Most of the HC signal peptides contain 19 amino acids which can be divided into three domains and the LC signal peptides contain 22 amino acids. The signal peptides were then clustered according to sequence similarity. Based on the clustering, 8 HC and 2 LC signal peptides were analyzed for their impacts on the production of 5-top selling antibody therapeutics, namely, Herceptin, Avastin, Remicade, Rituxan, and Humira. The best HC and LC signal peptides for producing these 5 antibodies were identified. The optimized signal peptides for Rituxan is 2-fold better compared to its native signal peptides which are available in the public database. Substitution of a single amino acid in the optimized HC signal peptide for Avastin reduced its production significantly. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed that all optimized signal peptides are accurately removed in the mature antibodies. The results presented in this report are particularly important for the production of these 5 antibodies as biosimilar drugs. They also have the potential to be the best signal peptides for the production of new antibodies in CHO cells.

  5. Optimization of heavy chain and light chain signal peptides for high level expression of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryadi, Ryan; Ho, Steven; Kok, Yee Jiun; Pu, Helen X; Zheng, Lu; Pereira, Natasha A; Li, Bin; Bi, Xuezhi; Goh, Lin-Tang; Yang, Yuansheng; Song, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of a nascent protein from the cytosol into the ER mediated by its signal peptide is a critical step in protein secretion. The aim of this work was to develop a platform technology to optimize the signal peptides for high level production of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells. A database of signal peptides from a large number of human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain (HC) and kappa light chain (LC) was generated. Most of the HC signal peptides contain 19 amino acids which can be divided into three domains and the LC signal peptides contain 22 amino acids. The signal peptides were then clustered according to sequence similarity. Based on the clustering, 8 HC and 2 LC signal peptides were analyzed for their impacts on the production of 5-top selling antibody therapeutics, namely, Herceptin, Avastin, Remicade, Rituxan, and Humira. The best HC and LC signal peptides for producing these 5 antibodies were identified. The optimized signal peptides for Rituxan is 2-fold better compared to its native signal peptides which are available in the public database. Substitution of a single amino acid in the optimized HC signal peptide for Avastin reduced its production significantly. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed that all optimized signal peptides are accurately removed in the mature antibodies. The results presented in this report are particularly important for the production of these 5 antibodies as biosimilar drugs. They also have the potential to be the best signal peptides for the production of new antibodies in CHO cells. PMID:25706993

  6. Immunoproteomics of Brucella abortus reveals differential antibody profiles between S19-vaccinated and naturally infected cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajuaba, Ana C A M; Silva, Deise A O; Almeida, Karine C; Cunha-Junior, Jair P; Pirovani, Carlos P; Camillo, Luciana R; Mineo, José R

    2012-03-01

    Brucella abortus is a Gram-negative intracellular bacterium that causes infectious abortion in food-producing animals and chronic infection in humans. This study aimed to characterize a B. abortus S19 antigen preparation obtained by Triton X-114 (TX-114) extraction through immunoproteomics to differentiate infected from vaccinated cattle. Three groups of bovine sera were studied: GI, 30 naturally infected cows; GII, 30 S19-vaccinated heifers; and GIII, 30 nonvaccinated seronegative cows. One-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional electrophoretic profiles of TX-114 hydrophilic phase antigen revealed a broad spectrum of polypeptides (10-79 kDa). 1D immunoblot showed widespread seroreactivity profile in GI compared with restricted profile in GII. Three antigenic components (10, 12, 17 kDa) were recognized exclusively by GI sera, representing potential markers of infection and excluding vaccinal response. The proteomic characterization revealed 56 protein spots, 27 of which were antigenic spots showing differential seroreactivity profile between GI and GII, especially polypeptides abortus S19 proteins (Invasion protein B, Sod, Dps, Ndk, and Bfr), which were related with antigenicity in naturally infected cattle. In conclusion, immunoproteomics of this new antigen preparation enabled the characterization of proteins that could be used as tools to develop sensitive and specific immunoassays for serodiagnosis of bovine brucellosis, with emphasis on differentiation between S19 vaccinated and infected cattle. PMID:22539433

  7. Radioimmunotherapy of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma. The interaction of radiation and antibody with lymphoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illidge, T.M

    1999-06-01

    Whilst many patients with indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) can achieve clinical remissions to first-line chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, most will relapse. Current treatment options for relapsing patients are limited since most patients become resistant to repeated chemotherapy. Death usually occurs within 10 years of diagnosis. Overall, these disappointing results have not changed significantly in a quarter of a century and clearly advocate the urgent priority to research into potential new therapeutic approaches into this diverse and increasingly prevalent group of human tumours. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is currently under investigation as a new approach for the treatment of this disease. In this form of treatment, radionuclide-labeled monoclonal antibodies are able to deliver selective systemic irradiation by recognising tumour-associated antigens. The use of RIT with radiolabeled anti-CD20 antibodies in patients with recurrent B-cell lymphoma has resulted in extremely high rates of durable complete remissions. The optimal approach and mechanisms of action of successful RIT remain however largely unknown. The work described in this thesis has focused on clarifying some of the important determinants and mechanisms of effective RIT of syngeneic B-cell lymphoma, both in vivo and in vitro. A successful animal model of RIT in B cell lymphomas was established by initially generating a panel of antibodies against mouse B cell antigens. The in vitro characteristics of these antibodies have been compared with their subsequent performance, in biodistribution studies and RIT in vivo. For the first time in an in vivo model the relative contributions of antibody and irradiation are described. Some antibodies including anti-MHC Class II were shown to be effective delivery vehicles of low doses of Iodine-131. These antibodies, which appear to be inactive delivery vehicles can cure animals with low burdens of tumour. However antibodies such as anti-idiotype and anti

  8. [A pregnant woman with irregular erythrocyte antibodies for whom no compatible packed red blood cells were available].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, J G; Overbeeke, M A M; de Rijke, Y B; Duvekot, J J

    2005-11-19

    A 45-year-old woman underwent a Caesarean section at a gestational age of over 32 weeks. Screening for irregular erythrocyte antibodies in the transfusion laboratory yielded a positive result. It appeared that the patient had for several years been known to have antibodies against At(a), a high-frequency antigen that may cause severe transfusion reactions when incompatible packed cells are administered. No autologous donated blood was available and the only compatible At(a)-negative unit of packed cells in the Blood Bank of the Council of Europe was damaged during the thawing process. A cell saver was therefore used during the Caesarean section, and family members were summoned for donation. This case report illustrates the necessity of a transfusion plan for pregnant women with (rare) irregular antibodies. PMID:16355577

  9. T cell regulation of the thymus-independent antibody response to trinitrophenylated-Brucella abortus (TNP-BA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanay, A.; Strober, S.

    1985-06-01

    The authors have previously observed a reduction of the T cell-dependent primary antibody response to dinitrophenylated keyhole limpet hemocyanin, and an enhancement of the T cell-independent response to trinitrophenylated Brucella abortus (TNP-BA) in BALB/c mice after treatment with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI). To elucidate the relative contribution of T and B cells to the enhanced T cell-independent antibody responses after TLI, a syngeneic primary adoptive transfer system was utilized whereby irradiated hosts were reconstituted with unfractionated spleen cells or a combination of purified T and B cells from TLI-treated and untreated control mice. Antibody responses of purified splenic B cells from TLI-treated BALB/c mice (TLI/B) to TNP-BA were enhanced 10-fold as compared with those of unfractionated (UF) spleen cells or B cells from normal (NL) BALB/c mice (NL/UF and NL/B, respectively). Splenic T cells from normal animals (NL/T) suppressed the anti-TNP-BA response of TLI/B by more than 100-fold. NL/T neither suppressed nor enhanced the response of NL/B. On the other hand, T cells from TLI-treated mice (TLI/T) enhanced by 100-fold the anti-TNP-BA response of NL/B, but neither suppressed nor enhanced the response of TLI/B. Thus, T cells can regulate the T cell-independent antibody response to TNP-BA. However, experimental manipulation of the T and B cell populations is needed to demonstrate the regulatory functions.

  10. γ-Synuclein antibodies have neuroprotective potential on neuroretinal cells via proteins of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Wilding

    Full Text Available The family of synuclein proteins (α, β and γ are related to neurodegenerative disease e.g. Parkinson disease and Morbus Alzheimer. Additionally, a connection between γ-synuclein and glaucoma, a neurodegenerative disease characterized by a progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells, which finally leads to blindness, exists. The reason for the development of glaucoma is still unknown. Recent studies evaluating the participation of immunological components, demonstrate complex changed antibody reactivities in glaucoma patients in comparison to healthy people, showing not only up-regulations (e.g. alpha-fodrin antibody but also down-regulations (e.g. γ-synuclein antibody of antibodies in glaucoma patients. Up-regulated antibodies could be auto-aggressive, but the role of down-regulated antibodies is still unclear. Previous studies show a significant influence of the serum and the antibodies of glaucoma patients on protein expression profiles of neuroretinal cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of γ-synuclein antibody on the viability and reactive oxygen species levels of a neuroretinal cell line (RGC-5 as well as their interaction with cellular proteins. We found a protective effect of γ-synuclein antibody resulting in an increased viability (up to 15% and decreased reactive oxygen species levels (up to -12% of glutamate and oxidative stressed RGC-5. These can be traced back to anti-apoptotic altered protein expressions in the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway indicated by mass spectrometry and validated by microarray analysis such as active caspase 3, bcl-2 associated-x-protein, S100A4, voltage-dependent anion channel, extracellular-signal-regulated-kinase (down-regulated and baculoviral IAP repeat-containing protein 6, phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated-kinase (up-regulated. These changed protein expression are triggered by the γ-synuclein antibody internalization of RGC-5 we could see in immunohistochemical

  11. γ-Synuclein antibodies have neuroprotective potential on neuroretinal cells via proteins of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, Corina; Bell, Katharina; Beck, Sabine; Funke, Sebastian; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Grus, Franz H

    2014-01-01

    The family of synuclein proteins (α, β and γ) are related to neurodegenerative disease e.g. Parkinson disease and Morbus Alzheimer. Additionally, a connection between γ-synuclein and glaucoma, a neurodegenerative disease characterized by a progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells, which finally leads to blindness, exists. The reason for the development of glaucoma is still unknown. Recent studies evaluating the participation of immunological components, demonstrate complex changed antibody reactivities in glaucoma patients in comparison to healthy people, showing not only up-regulations (e.g. alpha-fodrin antibody) but also down-regulations (e.g. γ-synuclein antibody) of antibodies in glaucoma patients. Up-regulated antibodies could be auto-aggressive, but the role of down-regulated antibodies is still unclear. Previous studies show a significant influence of the serum and the antibodies of glaucoma patients on protein expression profiles of neuroretinal cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of γ-synuclein antibody on the viability and reactive oxygen species levels of a neuroretinal cell line (RGC-5) as well as their interaction with cellular proteins. We found a protective effect of γ-synuclein antibody resulting in an increased viability (up to 15%) and decreased reactive oxygen species levels (up to -12%) of glutamate and oxidative stressed RGC-5. These can be traced back to anti-apoptotic altered protein expressions in the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway indicated by mass spectrometry and validated by microarray analysis such as active caspase 3, bcl-2 associated-x-protein, S100A4, voltage-dependent anion channel, extracellular-signal-regulated-kinase (down-regulated) and baculoviral IAP repeat-containing protein 6, phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated-kinase (up-regulated). These changed protein expression are triggered by the γ-synuclein antibody internalization of RGC-5 we could see in immunohistochemical stainings

  12. Detection of pulmonary metastases in a patient with synovial cell sarcoma using In-111 labeled monoclonal antibody 19-24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 35-year-old man was diagnosed in 1984 as having a synovial cell sarcoma of his right wrist without evidence of metastatic spread. The patient underwent regional hyperthermic chemoperfusion, wide-field excision, post-operative radiation therapy and systemic adjuvant chemotherapy. In 1986 and in 1987, because of new lesions found on chest radiographs, the patient underwent bilateral staging thoracotomies with resection of pulmonary metastases, followed by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Later in 1987, a chest radiograph showed a large left hilar mass and multiple bilateral pulmonary nodules. Computerized tomography of the chest demonstrated a left hilar mass and two nodules in the right lower lung, raising the possibility of recurrent pulmonary metastatic cancer. As a diagnostic procedure, In-111 labeled monoclonal antibody (Mab) 19-24, produced against a human malignant fibrous histiocytoma, was infused intravenously, and 48-hour images revealed focal areas of increased uptake corresponding to the lesions seen on CT. At surgery, the lesions were confirmed to be synovial cell sarcoma. Imaging with Mabs specific for sarcoma may be particularly useful in sarcoma patients in whom there is clinical uncertainty regarding the nature of pulmonary lesions. In this case, the Mab was useful in distinguishing tumor deposits from postsurgical scarring and helped to guide subsequent surgery and treatment

  13. Detection of pulmonary metastases in a patient with synovial cell sarcoma using In-111 labeled monoclonal antibody 19-24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, J.E.; Blend, M.J.; Bekerman, C.; Das Gupta, T.K.; Greager, J.A. (Michael Reese Hospital and Medical Center, Chicago, IL (USA))

    1990-04-01

    A 35-year-old man was diagnosed in 1984 as having a synovial cell sarcoma of his right wrist without evidence of metastatic spread. The patient underwent regional hyperthermic chemoperfusion, wide-field excision, post-operative radiation therapy and systemic adjuvant chemotherapy. In 1986 and in 1987, because of new lesions found on chest radiographs, the patient underwent bilateral staging thoracotomies with resection of pulmonary metastases, followed by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Later in 1987, a chest radiograph showed a large left hilar mass and multiple bilateral pulmonary nodules. Computerized tomography of the chest demonstrated a left hilar mass and two nodules in the right lower lung, raising the possibility of recurrent pulmonary metastatic cancer. As a diagnostic procedure, In-111 labeled monoclonal antibody (Mab) 19-24, produced against a human malignant fibrous histiocytoma, was infused intravenously, and 48-hour images revealed focal areas of increased uptake corresponding to the lesions seen on CT. At surgery, the lesions were confirmed to be synovial cell sarcoma. Imaging with Mabs specific for sarcoma may be particularly useful in sarcoma patients in whom there is clinical uncertainty regarding the nature of pulmonary lesions. In this case, the Mab was useful in distinguishing tumor deposits from postsurgical scarring and helped to guide subsequent surgery and treatment.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies and coupling reagents to cell membrane proteins for leukocyte labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current gamma-emitting agents for tagging leukocytes, In-111 oxine or tropolone, label all cell types indiscriminantly, and nuclear localization in lymphocytes results in radiation damage. Coupling reagents and murine monoclonal antibodies (Mab) specific for cell surface antigens of human leukocytes were tried as cell labeling agents to avoid nuclear localization. 10/sup 8/ mixed human leukocytes in Hepes buffer were added to tubes coated with 5 mg of dry cyclic dianhydride of DTPA for 15 minutes at room temperature. After washing, 0.1 ml of In-111 Cl in ACD (pH 6.8) was added. After 30 minutes, a cell labeling yield of 23% was obtained. Washing the cells in an elutriation centrifuge showed that this label was irreversible. Mab for cell surface antigens of human granulocytes were labeled with 300 μCi of I-125 using the Iodobead technic and unbound activity was removed by gel column chromatography. 1-10 μg were added to 10/sup 8/ mixed leukocytes in 0.5 ml plasma or saline for 1 hr. With Mab anti-leu M4 (clone G7 E11), an IgM, the cell labeling yield was 21%, irreversible, and specific for granulocytes. With anti-human leukocyte Mab NEI-042 (clone 9.4), and IgG2a, and anti-granulocyte Mab MAS-065 (clone FMCl1) an IgG1, the cell labeling was relatively unstable. Labeling of leukocyte subpopulations with Mab is feasible, and the binding of multivalent IgM is stronger than that of other immunoglobulins. DTPA cyclic anhydride is firmly bound to cell membranes, but the labeling is non-specific

  15. Endothelial cells' activation and apoptosis induced by a subset of antibodies against human cytomegalovirus: relevance to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Lunardi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We have previously shown in patients with atherosclerosis that antibodies directed against the hCMV-derived proteins US28 and UL122 are able to induce endothelial cell damage and apoptosis of non-stressed endothelial cells through cross-rection with normally expressed surface molecules. Our aim was to dissect the molecular basis of such interaction and to investigate mechanisms linking innate immunity to atherosclerosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analysed the gene expression profiles in endothelial cells stimulated with antibodies affinity-purified against either the UL122 or the US28 peptides using the microarray technology. Microarray results were validated by quantitative PCR and by detection of proteins in the medium. Supernatant of endothelial cells incubated with antibodies was analysed also for the presence of Heat Shock Protein (HSP60 and was used to assess stimulation of Toll-Like Receptor-4 (TLR4. Antibodies against UL122 and US28 induced the expression of genes encoding for adhesion molecules, chemokines, growth factors and molecules involved in the apoptotis process together with other genes known to be involved in the initiation and progression of the atherosclerotic process. HSP60 was released in the medium of cells incubated with anti-US28 antibodies and was able to engage TLR4. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Antibodies directed against hCMV modulate the expression of genes coding for molecules involved in activation and apoptosis of endothelial cells, processes known to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Moreover, endothelial cells exposed to such antibodies express HSP60 on the cell surface and release HSP60 in the medium able to activate TLR4. These data confirm that antibodies directed against hCMV-derived proteins US28 and UL122 purified from patients with coronary artery disease induce endothelial cell

  16. "Unconventional" Neutralizing Activity of Antibodies Against HIV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies are recognized to be one of the essential elements of the adaptive immune response that must be induced by an effective vaccine against HIV. However, only a limited number of antibodies have been identified to neutralize a broad range of primary isolates of HIV-1 and attempts to induce such antibodies by immunization were unsuccessful. The difficulties to generate such antibodies are mainly due to intrinsic properties of HIV-1 envelope spikes, such as high sequence diversity, heavy glycosylation, and inducible and transient nature of certain epitopes. In vitro neutralizing antibodies are identified using "conventional" neutralization assay which uses phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human PBMCs as target cells. Thus, in essence the assay evaluates HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells. Recently, several laboratories including us demonstrated that some monoclonal antibodies and HIV-1-specific polyclonal IgG purified from patient sera, although they do not have neutralizing activity when tested by the "conventional" neutralization assay, do exhibit potent and broad neutralizing activity in "unconventional" ways. The neutralizing activity of these antibodies and IgG fractions is acquired through post-translational modifications, through opsonization of virus particles into macrophages and immature dendritic cells (iDCs), or through expression of antibodies on the surface of HIV-1-susceptible cells. This review will focus on recent findings of this area and point out their potential applications in the development of preventive strategies against HIV.

  17. Oral Delivery of a Novel Recombinant Streptococcus mitis Vector Elicits Robust Vaccine Antigen-Specific Oral Mucosal and Systemic Antibody Responses and T Cell Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Xie

    Full Text Available The pioneer human oral commensal bacterium Streptococcus mitis has unique biologic features that make it an attractive mucosal vaccine or therapeutic delivery vector. S. mitis is safe as a natural persistent colonizer of the mouth, throat and nasopharynx and the oral commensal bacterium is capable of inducing mucosal antibody responses. A recombinant S. mitis (rS. mitis that stably expresses HIV envelope protein was generated and tested in the germ-free mouse model to evaluate the potential usefulness of this vector as a mucosal vaccine against HIV. Oral vaccination led to the efficient and persistent bacterial colonization of the mouth and the induction of both salivary and systemic antibody responses. Interestingly, persistently colonized animals developed antigen-specific systemic T cell tolerance. Based on these findings we propose the use of rS. mitis vaccine vector for the induction of mucosal antibodies that will prevent the penetration of the mucosa by pathogens such as HIV. Moreover, the first demonstration of rS. mitis having the ability to elicit T cell tolerance suggest the potential use of rS. mitis as an immunotherapeutic vector to treat inflammatory, allergic and autoimmune diseases.

  18. Natural killer cells in non-hematopoietic malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Desbois, Mélanie; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Locher, Clara; Zitvogel, Laurence; Chaput, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to the innate immune system and were initially described functionallywise by their spontaneous cytotoxic potential against transformed or virus-infected cells. A delicate balance between activating and inhibiting receptors regulates NK cell tolerance. A better understanding of tissue resident NK cells, of NK cell maturation stages and migration patterns has evolved allowing a thoughtful evaluation of their modus operandi. While evidence has been brought up for...

  19. Nivolumab, an Anti-Programmed Cell Death-1 Antibody, Induces Fulminant Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Yuka; Ogawa, Osamu; Oyama, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1), an immunoreceptor, is located on T cells and pro-B cells and interacts with its ligands to inhibit T cell activation and proliferation, thereby promoting immunological self-tolerance. Nivolumab, an anti-PD1 antibody, blocks PD-1 and can restore anticancer immune responses by abrogating PD-1 pathway-mediated T-cell inhibition. Autoimmune adverse events are expected with PD-1 therapy. Fulminant type 1 diabetes is the subtype of type 1 diabetes. The clinical feature is the extremely rapid progression of hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis. Here we describe a 66-year-old woman with advanced melanoma who was treated with nivolumab. After 4 months and six doses of the medicine, the patient was admitted to the hospital with complaints of nausea and vomiting. The laboratory data showed ketonuria, hyperglycemia (531 mg/dl), high anion gap metabolic acidosis, HbA1c (7.3%), and absence of insulin-secreting capacity. These data are compatible with the criteria of fulminant type 1 diabetes. The patient was diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis because of fulminant type 1 diabetes. The findings of this case indicated that nivolumab can cause fulminant type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis due to fulminant type 1 diabetes is potentially fatal condition. Thus, diabetic ketoacidosis due to fulminant type 1 diabetes should be considered in the differential diagnosis when patients treated with nivolumab complain of gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:27297738

  20. Phenotypic studies of natural killer cell subsets in human transporter associated with antigen processing deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Zimmer

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood natural killer (NK cells from patients with transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP deficiency are hyporesponsive. The mechanism of this defect is unknown, but the phenotype of TAP-deficient NK cells is almost normal. However, we noticed a high percentage of CD56(bright cells among total NK cells from two patients. We further investigated TAP-deficient NK cells in these patients and compared them to NK cells from two other TAP-deficient patients with no clinical symptoms and to individuals with chronic inflammatory diseases other than TAP deficiency (chronic lung diseases or vasculitis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from venous blood were stained with fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies and the phenotype of NK cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, (51Chromium release assays were performed to assess the cytotoxic activity of NK cells. In the symptomatic patients, CD56(bright NK cells represented 28% and 45%, respectively, of all NK cells (higher than in healthy donors. The patients also displayed a higher percentage of CD56(dimCD16(- NK cells than controls. Interestingly, this unusual NK cell subtype distribution was not found in the two asymptomatic TAP-deficient cases, but was instead present in several of the other patients. Over-expression of the inhibitory receptor CD94/NKG2A by TAP-deficient NK cells was confirmed and extended to the inhibitory receptor ILT2 (CD85j. These inhibitory receptors were not involved in regulating the cytotoxicity of TAP-deficient NK cells. We conclude that expansion of the CD56(bright NK cell subtype in peripheral blood is not a hallmark of TAP deficiency, but can be found in other diseases as well. This might reflect a reaction of the immune system to pathologic conditions. It could be interesting to investigate the relative distribution of NK cell subsets in various respiratory and autoimmune diseases.

  1. The strong in vivo anti-tumor effect of the UIC2 monoclonal antibody is the combined result of Pgp inhibition and antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Szalóki

    Full Text Available P-glycoprotein (Pgp extrudes a large variety of chemotherapeutic drugs from the cells, causing multidrug resistance (MDR. The UIC2 monoclonal antibody recognizes human Pgp and inhibits its drug transport activity. However, this inhibition is partial, since UIC2 binds only to 10-40% of cell surface Pgps, while the rest becomes accessible to this antibody only in the presence of certain substrates or modulators (e.g. cyclosporine A (CsA. The combined addition of UIC2 and 10 times lower concentrations of CsA than what is necessary for Pgp inhibition when the modulator is applied alone, decreased the EC50 of doxorubicin (DOX in KB-V1 (Pgp+ cells in vitro almost to the level of KB-3-1 (Pgp- cells. At the same time, UIC2 alone did not affect the EC50 value of DOX significantly. In xenotransplanted severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mice co-treated with DOX, UIC2 and CsA, the average weight of Pgp+ tumors was only ∼10% of the untreated control and in 52% of these animals we could not detect tumors at all, while DOX treatment alone did not decrease the weight of Pgp+ tumors. These data were confirmed by visualizing the tumors in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET based on their increased 18FDG accumulation. Unexpectedly, UIC2+DOX treatment also decreased the size of tumors compared to the DOX only treated animals, as opposed to the results of our in vitro cytotoxicity assays, suggesting that immunological factors are also involved in the antitumor effect of in vivo UIC2 treatment. Since UIC2 binding itself did not affect the viability of Pgp expressing cells, but it triggered in vitro cell killing by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, it is concluded that the impressive in vivo anti-tumor effect of the DOX-UIC2-CsA treatment is the combined result of Pgp inhibition and antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC.

  2. The strong in vivo anti-tumor effect of the UIC2 monoclonal antibody is the combined result of Pgp inhibition and antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalóki, Gábor; Krasznai, Zoárd T; Tóth, Ágnes; Vízkeleti, Laura; Szöllősi, Attila G; Trencsényi, György; Lajtos, Imre; Juhász, István; Krasznai, Zoltán; Márián, Teréz; Balázs, Margit; Szabó, Gábor; Goda, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) extrudes a large variety of chemotherapeutic drugs from the cells, causing multidrug resistance (MDR). The UIC2 monoclonal antibody recognizes human Pgp and inhibits its drug transport activity. However, this inhibition is partial, since UIC2 binds only to 10-40% of cell surface Pgps, while the rest becomes accessible to this antibody only in the presence of certain substrates or modulators (e.g. cyclosporine A (CsA)). The combined addition of UIC2 and 10 times lower concentrations of CsA than what is necessary for Pgp inhibition when the modulator is applied alone, decreased the EC50 of doxorubicin (DOX) in KB-V1 (Pgp+) cells in vitro almost to the level of KB-3-1 (Pgp-) cells. At the same time, UIC2 alone did not affect the EC50 value of DOX significantly. In xenotransplanted severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice co-treated with DOX, UIC2 and CsA, the average weight of Pgp+ tumors was only ∼10% of the untreated control and in 52% of these animals we could not detect tumors at all, while DOX treatment alone did not decrease the weight of Pgp+ tumors. These data were confirmed by visualizing the tumors in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET) based on their increased 18FDG accumulation. Unexpectedly, UIC2+DOX treatment also decreased the size of tumors compared to the DOX only treated animals, as opposed to the results of our in vitro cytotoxicity assays, suggesting that immunological factors are also involved in the antitumor effect of in vivo UIC2 treatment. Since UIC2 binding itself did not affect the viability of Pgp expressing cells, but it triggered in vitro cell killing by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), it is concluded that the impressive in vivo anti-tumor effect of the DOX-UIC2-CsA treatment is the combined result of Pgp inhibition and antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). PMID:25238617

  3. Antibodies and Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanack, Katja; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Listek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are universal binding molecules with a high specificity for their target and are indispensable tools in research, diagnostics and therapy. The biotechnological generation of monoclonal antibodies was enabled by the hybridoma technology published in 1975 by Köhler and Milstein. Today monoclonal antibodies are used in a variety of applications as flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting, immunoassays or therapeutic approaches. First step of the generation process is the immunization of the organism with appropriate antigen. After a positive immune response the spleen cells are isolated and fused with myeloma cells in order to generate stable, long-living antibody-producing cell lines - hybridoma cells. In the subsequent identification step the culture supernatants of all hybridoma cells are screened weekly for the production of the antibody of interest. Hybridoma cells producing the antibody of interest are cloned by limited dilution till a monoclonal hybridoma is found. This is a very time-consuming and laborious process and therefore different selection strategies were developed since 1975 in order to facilitate the generation of monoclonal antibodies. Apart from common automation of pipetting processes and ELISA testing there are some promising approaches to select the right monoclonal antibody very early in the process to reduce time and effort of the generation. In this chapter different selection strategies for antibody-producing hybridoma cells are presented and analysed regarding to their benefits compared to conventional limited dilution technology. PMID:27236550

  4. Understanding Transcriptional Enhancement in Monoclonal Antibody-Producing Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Sarah E.

    With the demand for monoclonal antibody (mAB) therapeutics continually increasing, the need to better understand what makes a high productivity clone has gained substantial interest. Monoclonal antibody producing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with different productivities were provided by a biopharmaceutical company for investigation. Gene copy numbers, mRNA levels, and mAb productivities were previously determined for two low producing clones and their amplified progeny. These results showed an increase in mRNA copy number in amplified clones, which correlated to the observed increases in specific productivity of these clones. The presence of multiple copies of mRNA per one copy of DNA in the higher productivity clones has been coined as transcriptional enhancement. The methylation status of the CMV promoter as well as transcription factor/promoter interactions were evaluated to determine the cause of transcriptional enhancement. Methylation analysis via bisulfite sequencing revealed no significant difference in overall methylation status of the CMV promoter. These data did, however, reveal the possibility of differential interactions of transcription factors between the high and low productivity cell clones. This finding was further supported by chromatin immunoprecipitations previously performed in the lab, as well as literature studies. Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) binding proteins were constructed and utilized to selectively immunoprecipitate the CMV promoter along with its associated transcription factors in the different CHO cell clones. Cells were transfected with the TALE proteins, harvested and subjected to a ChIP-like procedure. Results obtained from the TALE ChIP demonstrated the lack of binding of the protein to the promoter and the need to redesign the TALE. Overall, results obtained from this study were unable to give a clear indication as to the causes of transcriptional enhancement in the amplified CHO cell clones. Further

  5. IL-15 transpresentation promotes both human T-cell reconstitution and T-cell-dependent antibody responses in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.D. Huntington; N.L. Alves; N. Legrand; A. Lim; H. Strick-Marchand; J.J. Mention; A. Plet; K. Weijer; Y. Jacques; P.D. Becker; C. Guzman; P. Soussan; D. Kremsdorf; H. Spits; J.P. Di Santo

    2011-01-01

    Cytokine immunotherapies targeting T lymphocytes are attractive clinical interventions against viruses and tumors. In the mouse, the homeostasis of memory alpha/beta CD8(+) T cells and natural killer (NK) cells is significantly improved with increased IL-15 bioavailability. In contrast, the role of

  6. Structural evidence for evolution of shark Ig new antigen receptor variable domain antibodies from a cell-surface receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Streltsov, V. A.; Varghese, J N; Carmichael, J A; Irving, R A; Hudson, P.J.; Nuttall, S D

    2004-01-01

    The Ig new antigen receptors (IgNARs) are single-domain antibodies found in the serum of sharks. Here, we report 2.2- and 2.8-Å structures of the type 2 IgNAR variable domains 12Y-1 and 12Y-2. Structural features include, first, an Ig superfamily topology transitional between cell adhesion molecules, antibodies, and T cell receptors; and, second, a vestigial complementarity-determining region 2 at the “bottom” of the molecule, apparently discontinuous from the antigen-binding paratope and sim...

  7. Inhibition of Neisseria gonorrhoeae attachment to HeLa cells with monoclonal antibody directed against a protein II.

    OpenAIRE

    Sugasawara, R J; Cannon, J G; Black, W J; Nachamkin, I; Sweet, R L; Brooks, G F

    1983-01-01

    This study showed that a protein II (PII) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 appeared to act as a mediator of attachment to HeLa cells. Two colony variants of FA1090 were selected. Both gonococcal variants were nonpiliated, but one contained a PII and the other did not. A monoclonal antibody (1090-10.1), which was directed against the PII, inhibited the apparent PII-mediated attachment to HeLa cells. Antibodies produced from clone 1035-4, which had no PII specificity, did not inhibit the attachm...

  8. Quantification of natural populations of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus and Herbaspirillum spp. In sugar cane (Saccharum spp. Using differente polyclonal antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Gracinda da Silva-Froufe

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The species Gluconacetobacterdiazotrophicus, Herbaspirillum seropedicae and H. rubrisubalbicans are endophytic N2-fixing [diazotrophic] bacteria which colonise not only roots, but also the aerial tissue of sugar cane. However, the technique most commonly used to quantify the populations of these microbes in plants is by culturing serial dilutions of macerates of plant tissues in N free semi-solid media which are only semi-selective for the species/genera [the Most Probable Number (MPN Technique] and each culture must be further subjected to several tests to identify the isolates at the species level. The use of species-specific polyclonal antibodies with the indirect ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay can be an alternative which is rapid and specific to quantify these populations of bacteria. This study was performed to investigate the viability of adapting the indirect ELISA technique to quantify individually the populations of these three species of diazotroph within the root and shoot tissues of sugarcane. The results showed that species-specific polyclonal antibodies could be obtained by purifying sera in protein-A columns which removed non-specific immuno-globulins. It was possible to quantify the three bacterial species in the Brazilian sugarcane variety SP 70-1143 in numbers above 10(5 cells per g fresh weight in roots, rhizomes and leaves. The numbers of the different bacterial species evaluated using the ELISA technique were found to be higher than when the same populations were evaluated using the MPN technique, reaching 1400 times greater for G. diazotrophicus and 225 times greater for Herbaspirillum spp. These results constitute the first quantification of Herbaspirillum using immunological techniques.

  9. Depressed natural killer cell activity in acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, K; Pedersen, B K; Theander, T G;

    1987-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity against K562 target cells was measured in patients within 24 h of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and regularly thereafter for 6 weeks. NK cell activity was suppressed on days 1, 3, and 7 (P less than 0.01), day 14 (P less than 0.05) and at 6 weeks (P = 0...

  10. Clinical value of imaging using antibody to alpha fetoprotein in germ cell tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germ cell tumours (GCT) producing alpha fetoprotein (aFP) can be imaged by external scintigraphy after intraveneous administration of radiolabelled antibody directed against aFP. Antibody imaging (AI) by this method was used in an attempt to guide surgical resection of deposits of drug-resistant or recurrent GCT. 30 patients with GCT and raised aFP in whom site of tumour was not known were investigated by AI and conventional imaging methods. All but one were heavily pretreated. Where tumour appeared localised, resection was attempted. Tumour was found in all sites positive by both AI and conventional imaging. AI produced false-positive results in one of 30 patients and false-negative results in 9 patients. Computerised tomography was false-positive in one case and false-negative in three. In these patients, AI gave true-negative and true-positive results, respectively. Of 11 patients with positive AI in whom resection was attempted, 6 achieved sustained complete response with up to 5 years follow-up. We conclude AI and conventional imaging methods to be complementary in selection for surgery of patients with drug-resistant or recurrent GCT. (orig.)

  11. Host cell protein impurities in chromatographic polishing steps for monoclonal antibody purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Nicholas E; Valente, Kristin N; Lee, Kelvin H; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2016-06-01

    Downstream purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is normally performed using a platform process that is empirically tuned to optimize impurity removal for each new product. A more fundamental understanding of impurities and the product itself would provide insights into the rational design of efficient downstream processes. This work examines the chromatographic properties of Chinese hamster ovary host cell protein (HCP) impurities in non-affinity chromatographic resins commonly used in polishing steps for monoclonal antibody purification: ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and multimodal. Using proteomic analysis, the specific HCP impurities that elute close to mAb products are identified for these resins at typical downstream processing conditions. Additionally, the interactions of HCP impurities with mAb products are profiled to determine the total extent of product association and the specific HCP species that form associative complexes under conditions encountered in polishing columns. Product association and co-elution were both identified as viable mechanisms of HCP retention for the non-affinity resins tested here. A relatively large sub-population of HCP impurities was found to co-elute or associate with mAbs in each polishing column, but only a small population of HCPs-including lipoprotein lipase, chrondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4, nidogen-1, and SPARC-were identified as difficult to remove across an entire downstream mAb process. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1260-1272. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26550778

  12. In vitro characterization of an iodine-125 labeled anti-epidermal growth factor receptor murine monoclonal antibody (MAB-425) in human high grade glioma cells: Binding, uptake, transport and localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine intracellular accumulation and possible nuclear translocation of 125I-labeled murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) 425 in human high grade glioma cells following internalization of this antibody, a prerequisite for the induction of radiotoxic effects. Four human high grade glioma cell lines known to express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) and a colorectal carcinoma cell line with negligible EGF-R expression were incubated for various time periods with a saturating concentration of 125I-MAb 425. No measurable intranuclear uptake of radioactivity was detected within an incubation period of less than 6 hr. After an incubation of 24-28 hr, only 0.5-2% of the internalized radioactivity was detected in the nuclear fraction. It may be possible to inhibit 125I-MAb 425 degradation with the addition of chloroquine. Overall, the data indicate that the major portion of the 125I-MAb 425 is degraded following internalization. Inhibition of lysosomal activity results in a significant increase in intracellular, but more importantly, intranuclear accumulation of 125I-MAb 425. Since radioactivity is released from the glioma cells following 125I-MAb 425 internalization, discontinuous gel electrophoresis was performed to determine the nature of the released cell products. The cell supernatants were examined at 0, 24 and 48 hr post incubation to determine the nature of any cell-associated radioactivity released from the cell surface or interior. A protein band corresponding to a molecular weight of 167 kDa was detected in all cell supernatants. Parallel electrophoretic gels were processed for autoradiographic studies in order to indicate corresponding radioactive components. In addition, immunostaining by Western blot with peroxidase-labeled goat anti-mouse antibody was performed to confirm the antibody nature of the protein bands

  13. In vitro characterization of an iodine-125 labeled anti-epidermal growth factor receptor murine monoclonal antibody (MAB-425) in human high grade glioma cells: Binding, uptake, transport and localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emrich, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine intracellular accumulation and possible nuclear translocation of [sup 125]I-labeled murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) 425 in human high grade glioma cells following internalization of this antibody, a prerequisite for the induction of radiotoxic effects. Four human high grade glioma cell lines known to express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) and a colorectal carcinoma cell line with negligible EGF-R expression were incubated for various time periods with a saturating concentration of [sup 125]I-MAb 425. No measurable intranuclear uptake of radioactivity was detected within an incubation period of less than 6 hr. After an incubation of 24-28 hr, only 0.5-2% of the internalized radioactivity was detected in the nuclear fraction. It may be possible to inhibit [sup 125]I-MAb 425 degradation with the addition of chloroquine. Overall, the data indicate that the major portion of the [sup 125]I-MAb 425 is degraded following internalization. Inhibition of lysosomal activity results in a significant increase in intracellular, but more importantly, intranuclear accumulation of [sup 125]I-MAb 425. Since radioactivity is released from the glioma cells following [sup 125]I-MAb 425 internalization, discontinuous gel electrophoresis was performed to determine the nature of the released cell products. The cell supernatants were examined at 0, 24 and 48 hr post incubation to determine the nature of any cell-associated radioactivity released from the cell surface or interior. A protein band corresponding to a molecular weight of 167 kDa was detected in all cell supernatants. Parallel electrophoretic gels were processed for autoradiographic studies in order to indicate corresponding radioactive components. In addition, immunostaining by Western blot with peroxidase-labeled goat anti-mouse antibody was performed to confirm the antibody nature of the protein bands.

  14. Toll-like receptor activation enhances cell-mediated immunity induced by an antibody vaccine targeting human dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Marc A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previously, we have successfully targeted the mannose receptor (MR expressed on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs using a fully human MR-specific antibody, B11, as a vehicle to deliver whole protein tumor antigens such as the human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (hCGβ. Since MRs play a role in bridging innate immunity with adaptive immunity we have explored several toll-like receptor (TLR-specific ligands that may synergize with MR targeting and be applicable as adjuvants in the clinic. We demonstrate that antigen-specific helper and cytolytic T cells from both healthy donors and cancer patients were effectively primed with B11-hCGβ-treated autologous DCs when a combination of one or several TLR ligands is used. Specifically, concomitant signaling of DCs via TLR3 with dsRNA (poly I:C and DC TLR 7/8 with Resiquimod (R-848, respectively, elicited efficient antigen presentation-mediated by MR-targeting. We demonstrate that MR and TLRs contribute towards maturation and activation of DCs by a mechanism that may be driven by a combination of adjuvant and antibody vaccines that specifically deliver antigenic targets to DCs.

  15. Virus-Specific Antibody, in the Absence of T Cells, Mediates Demyelination in Mice Infected with a Neurotropic Coronavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Taeg S.; Perlman, Stanley

    2005-01-01

    Mice infected with mouse hepatitis virus strain JHM develop an inflammatory demyelinating disease in the central nervous system with many similarities to human multiple sclerosis. The mouse disease is primarily immune-mediated because demyelination is not detected in JHM-infected mice lacking T or B cells but does occur after transfer of JHM-specific T cells. Although less is known about the ability of antibodies to mediate demyelination, the presence of oligoclonally expanded B cells and hig...

  16. Therapeutic potential of highly cytotoxic natural killer cells for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, Kousaku; Kamiya, Takahiro; Shiraishi, Kensuke; Kua, Ley-Fang; Shabbir, Asim; So, Jimmy; Yong, Wei-Peng; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Yoshimoto, Yuya; Nakano, Takashi; Fujii, Hideki; Campana, Dario; Kono, Koji

    2014-09-15

    To develop more effective therapies for patients with advanced gastric cancer, we examined the potential of ex vivo expanded natural killer (NK) cells. We assessed the expression of ligands for NK Group 2 Member D (NKG2D, an important NK activation molecule) in primary tumors from 102 patients with gastric cancer by immunohistochemistry and determined their prognostic value. We then examined the in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity of NK cells from healthy donors and patients with gastric cancer. The cytotoxicity of resting and of interleukin (IL)-2-activated NK cells was compared to that of NK cells expanded for 7 days by coculture with the K562-mb15-4.1BBL cell line. As a result, the expression of NKG2D ligands in primary tumors was correlated with favorable presenting features and outcomes, suggesting that gastric cancer may be sensitive to NK cell cytotoxicity. Although resting NK cells showed minimal cytotoxicity against gastric cancer cells, K562-mb15-4.1BBL-expanded NK cells were highly cytotoxic and significantly more powerful than IL-2-activated NK cells. Cytotoxicity was correlated with NKG2D ligand expression and could be modulated by mitogen-activated protein kinase and AKT-PI3 kinase inhibitors. The cytotoxicity of expanded NK cells against HER2-positive gastric cancer cells could be increased by Herceptin and further augmented by Lapatinib. Finally, expanded NK cells exhibited strong antitumor activity in immunodeficient mice engrafted with a gastric cancer cell line. In conclusion, gastric cancer tumors express NKG2D ligands and are highly susceptible to killing by NK cells stimulated by K562-mb15-4.1BBL. These results provide a strong rationale for clinical testing of these NK cells in patients and suggest their use to augment the effects of antibody therapy. PMID:24615495

  17. Monkeypox Virus Infection of Rhesus Macaques Induces Massive Expansion of Natural Killer Cells but Suppresses Natural Killer Cell Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Haifeng; Josleyn, Nicole; Janosko, Krisztina; Skinner, Jeff; Reeves, R. Keith; Cohen, Melanie; Jett, Catherine; Johnson, Reed; Blaney, Joseph E.; Bollinger, Laura; Jennings, Gerald; Jahrling, Peter B

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play critical roles in innate immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive immune responses against viral infection. However, the response of NK cells to monkeypox virus (MPXV) infection is not well characterized. In this intravenous challenge study of MPXV infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), we analyzed blood and lymph node NK cell changes in absolute cell numbers, cell proliferation, chemokine receptor expression, and cellular functions. Our results show...

  18. Factors associated with persistence of red blood cell antibodies in woman after pregnancies complicated by fetal alloimmune haemolytic disease treated with intrauterine transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verduin, Esther P; Brand, Anneke; van de Watering, Leo M G; Claas, Frans H J; Oepkes, Dick; Lopriore, Enrico; Doxiadis, Ilias I N; Schonewille, Henk

    2015-02-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) antibodies can persist for decades or decrease quickly to undetectable levels. Antibody persistence has not been systematically studied. Women whose children are treated with intrauterine transfusions (IUT) for haemolytic disease of the fetus (HDFN) often produce additional antibodies, which can be evoked by the intrauterine transfusion or by fetomaternal haemorrhage during the procedure. Factors associated with persistence of both the antibodies responsible for HDFN and additional antibodies were studied in 260 women whose children were treated with IUT between 1988 and 2008. They possessed 499 (205 anti-D and 294 non-D) antibodies after the last IUT. After a median follow-up of 8·7 years, all 260 antibodies primarily responsible for HDFN had persisted. Additional antibodies directed against antigens of the children persisted in 70·6%, and in 32·3% if they were not child-specific (P < 0·001). Antibodies induced by irradiated IUT persisted in only 7·1%. Multivariate analyses showed that non-HDFN antibody persistence was dependent on the antibody titre and specificity. In conclusion, persistence of antibodies mainly depends on antibody strength and specificity. Difference between fetal or non-fetal immunogens suggests maintenance of antigenic stimulation possibly by long-term fetomaternal chimerism. PMID:25244566

  19. Naturally occurring autologous anti-idiotypic antibodies. Participation in immune complex formation in selective IgA deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    50% of individuals of selective IgA deficiency have high serum titers of antibody to bovine proteins, and high levels of circulating immune complexes that contain bovine antigens. Because in animal studies, immunization with antigen-antibody complexes is a very effective means of producing anti-idiotypic antibodies, we sought such autoantibodies in two sera known to have large amounts of anticasein. After IgG isolation and two-stage affinity chromatography, IgG-like material (molecular weight...

  20. Antibody-free isolation of rare cancer cells from blood based on 3D lateral dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, I-Fang; Huang, Wei-Lun; Chen, Tzu-Ying; Liu, Chien-Wei; Lin, Yu-De; Su, Wu-Chou

    2015-07-21

    We present an antibody-free approach for the high-purity and high-throughput dielectrophoretic (DEP) isolation of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) from blood in a microfluidic chip. A hydrodynamic sheath flow is designed upstream in the chip to direct the suspension samples to the channel side walls, thus providing a queue to allow DEP-induced lateral displacements. High-throughput continuous cancer cell sorting (maximum flow rate: ~2.4 mL h(-1), linear velocity: ~4 mm s(-1)) is achieved with a sustained 3D lateral DEP (LDEP) particle force normal to the continuous through-flow. This design allows the continuous fractionation of micro/nanosized particles into different downstream subchannels based on the differences in their different critical negative DEP strengths/mobilities. The main advantage of this separation strategy is that increasing the channel length can effectively increase the throughput proportionally. The effective separation of rare cancer cells (<0.001%) from diluted human blood in a handheld chip is demonstrated. An enrichment factor of 10(5) and a recovery rate of ~85% from a 0.001% cancer cell sample are achieved at an optimal flow rate of 20 μL min(-1) passing through a 6 cm long LDEP channel with an appropriate voltage at a frequency of 10 kHz. A higher throughput of 2.4 mL h(-1) is also achieved with a 13 cm long metal-based microchannel. PMID:26085231

  1. Kinetics of antibody-induced modulation of respiratory syncytial virus antigens in a human epithelial cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Garcia Beatriz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding of viral-specific antibodies to cell-surface antigens usually results in down modulation of the antigen through redistribution of antigens into patches that subsequently may be internalized by endocytosis or may form caps that can be expelled to the extracellular space. Here, by use of confocal-laser-scanning microscopy we investigated the kinetics of the modulation of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV antigen by RSV-specific IgG. RSV-infected human epithelial cells (HEp-2 were incubated with anti-RSV polyclonal IgG and, at various incubation times, the RSV-cell-surface-antigen-antibody complexes (RSV Ag-Abs and intracellular viral proteins were detected by indirect immunoflourescence. Results Interaction of anti-RSV polyclonal IgG with RSV HEp-2 infected cells induced relocalization and aggregation of viral glycoproteins in the plasma membrane formed patches that subsequently produced caps or were internalized through clathrin-mediated endocytosis participation. Moreover, the concentration of cell surface RSV Ag-Abs and intracellular viral proteins showed a time dependent cyclic variation and that anti-RSV IgG protected HEp-2 cells from viral-induced death. Conclusion The results from this study indicate that interaction between RSV cell surface proteins and specific viral antibodies alter the expression of viral antigens expressed on the cells surface and intracellular viral proteins; furthermore, interfere with viral induced destruction of the cell.

  2. Tumor cell-selective apoptosis induction through targeting of KV10.1 via bifunctional TRAIL antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardo Luis A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The search for strategies to target ion channels for therapeutic applications has become of increasing interest. Especially, the potassium channel KV10.1 (Ether-á-go-go is attractive as target since this surface protein is virtually not detected in normal tissue outside the central nervous system, but is expressed in approximately 70% of tumors from different origins. Methods We designed a single-chain antibody against an extracellular region of KV10.1 (scFv62 and fused it to the human soluble TRAIL. The KV10.1-specific scFv62 antibody -TRAIL fusion protein was expressed in CHO-K1 cells, purified by chromatography and tested for biological activity. Results Prostate cancer cells, either positive or negative for KV10.1 were treated with the purified construct. After sensitization with cytotoxic drugs, scFv62-TRAIL induced apoptosis only in KV10.1-positive cancer cells, but not in non-tumor cells, nor in tumor cells lacking KV10.1 expression. In co-cultures with KV10.1-positive cancer cells the fusion protein also induced apoptosis in bystander KV10.1-negative cancer cells, while normal prostate epithelial cells were not affected when present as bystander. Conclusions KV10.1 represents a novel therapeutic target for cancer. We could design a strategy that selectively kills tumor cells based on a KV10.1-specific antibody.

  3. Construction of a human antibody domain (VH) library

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Weizao; Zhu, Zhongyu; Xiao, Xiaodong; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2009-01-01

    Highly diverse antibody (Fab or scFv) libraries have become vital sources to select antibodies with high affinity and novel properties. Combinatorial strategies provide efficient ways of creating antibody libraries containing a large number of individual clones. These strategies include the reassembly of naturally occurring genes encoding the heavy and light chains from either immune or nonimmune B-cell sources, or introduction of synthetic diversity to either the framework regions (FRs) or t...

  4. Characterisation of CD4 T cells in healthy and diseased koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) using cell-type-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangar, Chandan; Armitage, Charles W; Timms, Peter; Corcoran, Lynn M; Beagley, Kenneth W

    2016-07-01

    The koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) is an arboreal herbivorous marsupial that is an Australian icon. Koalas in many parts of Australia are under multiple threats including habitat destruction, dog attacks, vehicular accidents, and infectious diseases such as Chlamydia spp. and the koala retrovirus (KoRV), which may contribute to the incidence of lymphoma and leukaemia in this species. Due to a lack of koala-specific immune reagents and assays there is currently no way to adequately analyse the immune response in healthy, diseased or vaccinated animals. This paper reports the production and characterisation of the first anti-koala CD4 monoclonal antibody (mAb). The koala CD4 gene was identified and used to develop recombinant proteins for mAb production. Fluorochrome-conjugated anti-CD4 mAb was used to measure the levels of CD4(+) lymphocytes collected from koala spleens (41.1%, range 20-45.1%) lymph nodes (36.3%, range 19-55.9%) and peripheral blood (23.8%, range 17.3-35%) by flow cytometry. Biotin-conjugated anti-CD4 mAb was used for western blot to determine an approximate size of 52 kDa for the koala CD4 molecule and used in immunohistochemistry to identify CD4(+) cells in the paracortical region and germinal centres of spleen and lymph nodes. Using the anti-CD4 mab we showed that CD4 cells from vaccinated, but not control, koalas proliferated following in vitro stimulation with UV-inactivated Chlamydia pecorum and recombinant chlamydial antigens. Since CD4(+) T cells have been shown to play a pivotal role in clearing chlamydial infection in both human and mouse infections, using this novel antibody will help determine the role CD4(+) T cells play in protection against chlamydial infection in koalas and also enhance our knowledge of how KoRV affects the koala immune system. PMID:26905635

  5. Induction of antigen-specific antibody response in human pheripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro by a dog kidney cell vaccine against rabies virus (DKCV).

    OpenAIRE

    Uytdehaag, Fons; Osterhaus, Ab; Loggen, H.G.; Bakker, Roland; Van Asten, Jack; Kreeftenberg, J.G.; Marel, P.; Steenis, Bert

    1983-01-01

    textabstractIn the present report an in vitro method for obtaining a secondary human antibody response to a dog kidney cell vaccine against rabies virus (DKCV) is described. Cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from normal rabies-immune and nonimmune donors were stimulated in vitro by DKCV. The production of virus-specific antibody in supernatant fluids was monitored by ELISA. Antibody was produced by lymphocytes from rabies-immune individuals, whereas those of nonimmune subjects co...

  6. EB66 cell line, a duck embryonic stem cell-derived substrate for the industrial production of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies with enhanced ADCC activity

    OpenAIRE

    Olivier, Stéphane; Jacoby, Marine; Brillon, Cédric; Bouletreau, Sylvana; Mollet, Thomas; Nerriere, Olivier; Angel, Audrey; Danet, Sévérine; Souttou, Boussad; Guehenneux, Fabienne; Gauthier, Laurent; Berthomé, Mathilde; Vié, Henri; Beltraminelli, Nicola; Mehtali, Majid

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. The increasing demand for mAb manufacturing and the associated high production costs call for the pharmaceutical industry to improve its current production processes or develop more efficient alternative production platforms. The experimental control of IgG fucosylation to enhance antibody dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity constitutes one of the promising strategies to improve the efficacy of m...

  7. Approach to a case of multiple irregular red cell antibodies in a liver transplant recipient: Need for developing competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi C Dara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplant procedure acts as a challenge for transfusion services in terms of specialized blood components, serologic problems, and immunologic effects of transfusion. Red cell alloimmunization in patients awaiting a liver transplant complicate the process by undue delay or unavailability of compatible red blood cell units. Compatible blood units can be provided by well-equipped immunohematology laboratory, which has expertise in resolving these serological problems. This report illustrates resolution of a case with multiple alloantibodies using standard techniques, particularly rare antisera. Our case re-emphasizes the need for universal antibody screening in all patients as part of pretransfusion testing, which helps to identify atypical antibodies and plan for appropriate transfusion support well in time. We recommend that the centers, especially the ones that perform complex procedures like solid organ transplants and hematological transplants should have the necessary immunohematological reagents including rare antisera to resolve complex cases of multiple antibodies as illustrated in this case.

  8. Uterine Natural Killer Cells: Their Choices, Their Missions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhong Zhang; B Anne Croy; Zhigang Tian

    2005-01-01

    Uterine natural killer (uNK) cells, sharing many characters with peripheral blood natural killer (pNK) cells, are a major uterine lymphocyte population at early gestational stages during normal pregnancy in placental mammals.The functions of uNK cells include cytokine production and cytotoxcity that are regulated by signals through activating and inhibitory receptors. UNK cells differ from pNK cells however and contribute to the structural changes that accompany the differentiation of the maternal-fetal interface. Immunological mechanisms must provide a balanced environment for uNK cell proliferation, differentiation and activation through intricate signaling pathways. An improved knowledge of mechanisms regulating uNK cells development and the cytokine network at the maternal-fetal interface of mice and humans might be useful to harness the power of these cells for maintenance of pregnancy. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(2):123-129.

  9. Intracellular distribution of TM4SF1 and internalization of TM4SF1-antibody complex in vascular endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transmembrane-4 L-six family member-1 (TM4SF1) is a small plasma membrane-associated glycoprotein that is highly and selectively expressed on the plasma membranes of tumor cells, cultured endothelial cells, and, in vivo, on tumor-associated endothelium. Immunofluorescence microscopy also demonstrated TM4SF1 in cytoplasm and, tentatively, within nuclei. With monoclonal antibody 8G4, and the finer resolution afforded by immuno-nanogold transmission electron microscopy, we now demonstrate TM4SF1 in uncoated cytoplasmic vesicles, nuclear pores and nucleoplasm. Because of its prominent surface location on tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelium, TM4SF1 has potential as a dual therapeutic target using an antibody drug conjugate (ADC) approach. For ADC to be successful, antibodies reacting with cell surface antigens must be internalized for delivery of associated toxins to intracellular targets. We now report that 8G4 is efficiently taken up into cultured endothelial cells by uncoated vesicles in a dynamin-dependent, clathrin-independent manner. It is then transported along microtubules through the cytoplasm and passes through nuclear pores into the nucleus. These findings validate TM4SF1 as an attractive candidate for cancer therapy with antibody-bound toxins that have the capacity to react with either cytoplasmic or nuclear targets in tumor cells or tumor-associated vascular endothelium. - Highlights: • Anti-TM4SF1 antibody 8G4 was efficiently taken up by cultured endothelial cells. • TM4SF1–8G4 internalization is dynamin-dependent but clathrin-independent. • TM4SF1–8G4 complexes internalize along microtubules to reach the perinuclear region. • Internalized TM4SF1–8G4 complexes pass through nuclear pores into the nucleus. • TM4SF1 is an attractive candidate for ADC cancer therapy

  10. Intracellular distribution of TM4SF1 and internalization of TM4SF1-antibody complex in vascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciuto, Tracey E.; Merley, Anne; Lin, Chi-Iou [Center for Vascular Biology Research and Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School (United States); Richardson, Douglas [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University (United States); Liu, Yu [Department of Pharmacology, Shanxi Medical University, Xinjiannanlu 56, Shanxi Province, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Li, Dan; Dvorak, Ann M. [Center for Vascular Biology Research and Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School (United States); Dvorak, Harold F., E-mail: hdvorak@bidmc.harvard.edu [Center for Vascular Biology Research and Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School (United States); Jaminet, Shou-Ching S., E-mail: sjaminet@bidmc.harvard.edu [Center for Vascular Biology Research and Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School (United States)

    2015-09-25

    Transmembrane-4 L-six family member-1 (TM4SF1) is a small plasma membrane-associated glycoprotein that is highly and selectively expressed on the plasma membranes of tumor cells, cultured endothelial cells, and, in vivo, on tumor-associated endothelium. Immunofluorescence microscopy also demonstrated TM4SF1 in cytoplasm and, tentatively, within nuclei. With monoclonal antibody 8G4, and the finer resolution afforded by immuno-nanogold transmission electron microscopy, we now demonstrate TM4SF1 in uncoated cytoplasmic vesicles, nuclear pores and nucleoplasm. Because of its prominent surface location on tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelium, TM4SF1 has potential as a dual therapeutic target using an antibody drug conjugate (ADC) approach. For ADC to be successful, antibodies reacting with cell surface antigens must be internalized for delivery of associated toxins to intracellular targets. We now report that 8G4 is efficiently taken up into cultured endothelial cells by uncoated vesicles in a dynamin-dependent, clathrin-independent manner. It is then transported along microtubules through the cytoplasm and passes through nuclear pores into the nucleus. These findings validate TM4SF1 as an attractive candidate for cancer therapy with antibody-bound toxins that have the capacity to react with either cytoplasmic or nuclear targets in tumor cells or tumor-associated vascular endothelium. - Highlights: • Anti-TM4SF1 antibody 8G4 was efficiently taken up by cultured endothelial cells. • TM4SF1–8G4 internalization is dynamin-dependent but clathrin-independent. • TM4SF1–8G4 complexes internalize along microtubules to reach the perinuclear region. • Internalized TM4SF1–8G4 complexes pass through nuclear pores into the nucleus. • TM4SF1 is an attractive candidate for ADC cancer therapy.

  11. Natural killer cells in baboons and humans subjected to total lymphoid irradiation and subsequent renal transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the functional ability and numbers of natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood of the chacma baboon and humans which were subjected to varying doses of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and subsequent renal transplantation. NK cell activity was determined by measuring the amount of 51Cr release from K562 target cells when placed in contact with baboon or human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The anti-human antibody Leu11b was shown to cross-react with determinants on baboon effector cells. Concomitant measurements of large granular lymphocytes (LGL) were also made. Normal values for NK cell activity Leu11b+ cells and LGL in the baboon were 73.4+-39.6 Vmax units, 6.8+-3.8% and 6.0+-3.2% respectively. After TLI, NK cell activity was elevated 3 to 4 fold of pre-TLI values and remained at these supranormal levels. The effects of surgery caused a transient depression of activity. Normal values for NK cell activity, Leu11b+ cells and LGL in humans were 280+-212 Vmax units, 6.7+-2.5% and 7.6+-2.5% respectively. A significant depression of NK cell activity was observed in renal allograft patients receiving combination doses of immunosuppressive drugs. Those patients that received tolerogenic doses of TLI prior to transplant followed by immunosuppressive drug regimens had a significant and persistent elevation of NK cell activity. Baboons and humans showed no relationship between NK cell function and Leu11b+ cells or LGL. The latter two parameters did not significantly change in response to TLI or transplantation. It was concluded that TLI gives rise to activated NK cells which results in elevated function unrelated to cell numbers. This dissertation has demonstrated that one advantage of TLI lies in the selective suppression of immunity - while graft tolerance is easily induced

  12. Gene Expression Driven by a Strong Viral Promoter in MVA Increases Vaccination Efficiency by Enhancing Antibody Responses and Unmasking CD8+ T Cell Epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo D. Becker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Viral vectors are promising tools for vaccination strategies and immunotherapies. However, CD8+ T cell responses against pathogen-derived epitopes are usually limited to dominant epitopes and antibody responses to recombinant encoded antigens (Ags are mostly weak. We have previously demonstrated that the timing of viral Ag expression in infected professional Ag-presenting cells strongly shapes the epitope immunodominance hierarchy. T cells recognizing determinants derived from late viral proteins have a clear disadvantage to proliferate during secondary responses. In this work we evaluate the effect of overexpressing the recombinant Ag using the modified vaccinia virus early/late promoter H5 (mPH5. Although the Ag-expression from the natural promoter 7.5 (P7.5 and the mPH5 seemed similar, detailed analysis showed that mPH5 not only induces higher expression levels than P7.5 during early phase of infection, but also Ag turnover is enhanced. The strong overexpression during the early phase leads to broader CD8 T cell responses, while preserving the priming efficiency of stable Ags. Moreover, the increase in Ag-secretion favors the induction of strong antibody responses. Our findings provide the rationale to develop new strategies for fine-tuning the responses elicited by recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara by using selected promoters to improve the performance of this viral vector.

  13. The Variable Presentation and Natural History of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Brandser, Eric; Robinson, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is not a well defined or predictable disease. Instead, it is a spectrum of disorders of unknown etiology that vary widely in presentation and natural history, but have in common the proliferation of histiocytic cells and infiltration of these cells into normal tissues. Although the lesions of Langerhans cell histiocytosis consist primarily of histiocytes, eosinophils are a prominent feature in some lesions. Lesions may develop in any tissue, but bone, skin and ly...

  14. Role of inositol phospholipid signaling in natural killer cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Gumbleton, Matthew; Kerr, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important for host defense against malignancy and infection. At a cellular level NK cells are activated when signals from activating receptors exceed signaling from inhibitory receptors. At a molecular level NK cells undergo an education process to both prevent autoimmunity and acquire lytic capacity. Mouse models have shown important roles for inositol phospholipid signaling in lymphocytes. NK cells from mice with deletion in different members of the inositol ph...

  15. STAT4-associated natural killer cell tolerance following liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Jamil, K M; Hydes, T.J.; Cheent, K.S.; Cassidy, S A; Traherne, J. A.; Jayaraman, J.; Trowsdale, J.; Alexander, G J; Little, A M; McFarlane, H.; Heneghan, M. A.; Purbhoo, M.A.; Khakoo, S I

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Natural killer (NK) cells are important mediators of liver inflammation in chronic liver disease. The aim of this study was to investigate why liver transplants (LTs) are not rejected by NK cells in the absence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching, and to identify a tolerogenic NK cell phenotype. Design: Phenotypic and functional analyses on NK cells from 54 LT recipients were performed, and comparisons made with healthy controls. Further investigation was performed using ...

  16. Neutrophil depletion impairs natural killer cell maturation, function, and homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Jaeger, B. N.; Donadieu, J.; Cognet, C.; Bernat, C.; Ordonez-Rueda, D.; Barlogis, V.; Mahlaoui, N.; Fenis, A.; Narni-Mancinelli, E.; Beaupain, B.; Bellanne-Chantelot, C.; Bajenoff, M.; Malissen, B.; Malissen, M; Vivier, E.

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are bone marrow (BM)–derived granular lymphocytes involved in immune defense against microbial infections and tumors. In an N-ethyl N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis strategy, we identified a mouse mutant with impaired NK cell reactivity both in vitro and in vivo. Dissection of this phenotype showed that mature neutrophils were required both in the BM and in the periphery for proper NK cell development. In mice lacking neutrophils, NK cells displayed hyperproliferation...

  17. Cell proliferation-associated nuclear antigen defined by antibody Ki-67: a new kind of cell cycle-maintaining proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A decade of studies on the human nuclear antigen defined by monoclonal antibody Ki-67 (the 'Ki-67 proteins') has made it abundantly clear that this structure is strictly associated with human cell proliferation and the expression of this protein can be used to access the growth fraction of a given cell population. Until recently the Ki-67 protein was described as a nonhistone protein that is highly susceptible to protease treatment. We have isolated and sequenced cDNAs encoding for this antigen and found two isoforms of the full length cDNA of 11.5 and 12.5 kb, respectively, sequence and structure of which are thus far unique. The gene encoding the Ki-67 protein is organized in 15 exons and is localized on chromosome 10. The center of this gene is formed by an extraordinary 6845 bp exon containing 16 successively repeated homologous segments of 366 bp ('Ki-67 repeats'), each containing a highly conserved new motif of 66 bp ('Ki-67 motif'). The deduced peptide sequence of this central exon possesses 10 ProGluSerThr (PEST) motifs which are associated with high turnover proteins such as other cell cycle-related proteins, oncogenes and transcription factors, etc. Like the latter proteins the Ki-67 antigen plays a pivotal role in maintaining cell proliferation because Ki-67 protein antisense oligonucleotides significantly inhibit 3H-thymidine incorporation in permanent human tumor cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. (author). 30 refs, 2 figs

  18. Monoclonal antibody sandwich immunoassay detection of coproantigen to evaluate the efficacy of treatment in natural ovine fasciolosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Considerable effort has been expended on research into a reliable method to assess the efficacy of chemotherapy in Fasciola hepatica infection. The most widely used method is egg counting and immunological test but none of them provide an accurate evaluation of drug's efficacy under field condition. The monoclonal antibody-based sandwich immunoassay (mAb Sandwich ELISA) was used to evaluate the effectiveness of triclabendazole treatment by the detection of coproantigens in Fasciola hepatica naturally infected sheep. Twelve sheep (2 to 5 years of age) were separated into two groups. The first group (three sheep) remained untreated; the other group (nine sheep) was treated with a single dose of 5% triclabendazole at 10 mg kg-1 of body weight. All but one of the treated groups had negative optical density values (OD492) after two weeks of treatment, while seven sheep intermittently shed eggs during the course of the study. In all but one of the treated sheep, no F. hepatica infection; the one positive ELISA in 5th week after treatment according to the mAb Sandwich, had done fluke in the liver. The results of the parasitological examinations, as well as OD492 values obtained by the mAb Sandwich ELISA for the detection on coproantigens are described. The findings at necropsy, of the treated group in comparison to the untreated group are shown. The mAb Sandwich ELISA could be a useful and accurate method with which to monitor the efficacy of flukicides in F. hepatica natural infections. (author)

  19. Prospective isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from human bone marrow using novel antibodies directed against Sushi domain containing 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasubramaniyan, Kavitha; Harichandan, Abhishek; Schumann, Susanne; Sobiesiak, Malgorzata; Lengerke, Claudia; Maurer, Andreas; Kalbacher, Hubert; Bühring, Hans-Jörg

    2013-07-01

    Several strategies have been developed to facilitate the prospective isolation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (BM-MSCs) based on the selective expression or absence of surface markers. Recently, we described the monoclonal antibodies W3D5 and W5C5, which selectively react with BM-MSCs, but not with hematopoietic cells. Both antibodies showed an identical reactivity pattern, indicating that they may recognize the same molecule. To identify the cognate antigen, cultured MSCs were sorted for cells expressing either very high levels of W5C5/W3D5 antigen or for cells which were negative for this antigen. Further processing of these cells for microarray analysis revealed a 20-fold enrichment of the type 1 integral membrane protein Sushi domain containing 2 (SUSD2) in the in W5C5(+) subset. To confirm the identity of the W5C5/W3D5 antigen to SUSD2, HEK293 cells were transfected with the full-length coding sequence of human SUSD2 followed by reactivity analysis of W5C5 and W3D5 antibodies with the transfected line. Flow cytometric analysis showed that both antibodies selectively recognized HEK293/huSUSD2 cells, but not the parental cell line. In line with this, SUSD2 siRNA treatment of SUSD2(+) WERI-RB-1 retinoblastoma cells reduced the expression levels of W3D5 and W5C5 antigens to ~39% and 37%, respectively. Finally, FACSorting and colony assays revealed that only SUSD2(+), but not SUSD2(-) BM cells give rise to colony-forming units-fibroblasts and are able to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. In conclusion, we identified SUSD2 as a novel and specific marker for the prospective isolation of BM-MSCs. PMID:23406305

  20. Control of Toll-like receptor-mediated T cell-independent type 1 antibody responses by the inducible nuclear protein IκB-ζ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanihara-Tatsuzawa, Fumito; Miura, Hanae; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Isagawa, Takayuki; Okuma, Atsushi; Manabe, Ichiro; MaruYama, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Antibody responses have been classified as being either T cell-dependent or T cell-independent (TI). TI antibody responses are further classified as being either type 1 (TI-1) or type 2 (TI-2), depending on their requirement for B cell-mediated antigen receptor signaling. Although the mechanistic basis of antibody responses has been studied extensively, it remains unclear whether different antibody responses share similarities in their transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that mice deficient in IκB-ζ, specifically in their B cells, have impaired TI-1 antibody responses but normal T cell-dependent and TI-2 antibody responses. The absence of IκB-ζ in B cells also impaired proliferation triggered by Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation, plasma cell differentiation, and class switch recombination (CSR). Mechanistically, IκB-ζ-deficient B cells could not induce TLR-mediated induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a class-switch DNA recombinase. Retroviral transduction of AID in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells restored CSR activity. Furthermore, acetylation of histone H3 in the vicinity of the transcription start site of the gene that encodes AID was reduced in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells relative to IκB-ζ-expressing B cells. These results indicate that IκB-ζ regulates TLR-mediated CSR by inducing AID. Moreover, IκB-ζ defines differences in the transcriptional regulation of different antibody responses. PMID:25124037

  1. NK-cell-dependent killing of colon carcinoma cells is mediated by natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs) and stimulated by parvovirus infection of target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigating how the immune system functions during malignancies is crucial to developing novel therapeutic strategies. Natural killer (NK) cells, an important component of the innate immune system, play a vital role in immune defense against tumors and virus-infected cells. The poor survival rate in colon cancer makes it particularly important to develop novel therapeutic strategies. Oncolytic viruses, in addition to lysing tumor cells, may have the potential to augment antitumor immune responses. In the present study, we investigate the role of NK cells and how parvovirus H-1PV can modulate NK-cell mediated immune responses against colon carcinoma. Human NK cells were isolated from the blood of healthy donors. The cytotoxicity and antibody-mediated inhibition of NK cells were measured in chromium release assays. Phenotypic assessment of colon cancer and dendritic cells was done by FACS. The statistical significance of the results was calculated with Student’s t test (*p <0.05; **, p < 0.01; ***, p < 0.001). We show that IL-2-activated human NK cells can effectively kill colon carcinoma cells. Killing of colon carcinoma cells by NK cells was further enhanced upon infection of the former cells with parvovirus H-1PV. H-1PV has potent oncolytic activity against various tumors, yet its direct killing effect on colon carcinoma cells is limited. The cytotoxicity of NK cells towards colon carcinoma cells, both mock- and H-1PV-infected, was found to be mostly mediated by a combination of natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs), namely NKp30, 44, and 46. Colon carcinoma cells displayed low to moderate expression of NK cell ligands, and this expression was modulated upon H-1PV infection. Lysates of H-1PV-infected colon carcinoma cells were found to increase MHC class II expression on dendritic cells. Altogether, these data suggest that IL-2-activated NK cells actively kill colon carcinoma cells and that this killing is mediated by several natural cytotoxicity receptors

  2. Rapid assessment of antibody-induced ricin neutralization by employing a novel functional cell-based assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Yoav; Alcalay, Ron; Sabo, Tamar; Noy-Porat, Tal; Epstein, Eyal; Kronman, Chanoch; Mazor, Ohad

    2015-09-01

    Ricin is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known against which there is no available antidote. Currently, the most promising countermeasures against the toxin are based on neutralizing antibodies elicited by active vaccination or administered passively. A cell-based assay is widely applied for the primary screening and evaluation of anti-ricin antibodies, yet such assays are usually time-consuming (18-72 h). Here, we report of a novel assay to monitor ricin activity, based on HeLa cells that stably express the rapidly-degraded ubiquitin-luciferase (Ub-FL, half-life of 2 min). Ricin-induced arrest of protein synthesis could be quantified within 3 to 6h post intoxication (IC90 of 300 and 100 ng/ml, respectively). Furthermore, by stabilizing the intracellular levels of Ub-FL in the last hour of the assay, a 3-fold increase in the assay sensitivity was attained. We applied this assay to monitor the efficacy of a ricin holotoxin-based vaccine by measuring the formation of neutralizing antibodies throughout the immunization course. The potency of anti-ricin monoclonal antibodies (directed to either subunit of the toxin) could also be easily and accurately measured in this assay format. Owing to its simplicity, this assay may be implemented for high-throughput screening of ricin-neutralizing antibodies and for identification of small-molecule inhibitors of the toxin, as well as other ribosome-inactivating toxins. PMID:26003675

  3. The future of CD20 monoclonal antibody therapy in B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuczman, Myron S; Gregory, Stephanie A

    2010-06-01

    Limitations of therapeutic options for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) have necessitated the development of novel treatments/strategies. Rituximab (chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody [mAb]) considerably improved therapeutic outcomes for patients with B-cell malignancies, particularly when combined with chemotherapy; outcomes, however, are limited by rituximab resistance or reduced response upon re-treatment. Novel anti-CD20 mAbs are in development that may enhance mAb therapy. Ofatumumab (human anti-CD20 mAb) induces highly potent cell lysis, including in cells with low CD20 expression, and is the most clinically advanced new anti-CD20 mAb. Positive phase III interim data for ofatumumab in fludarabine-refractory CLL that is also refractory to alemtuzumab or less suitable for alemtuzumab due to bulky (>5 cm) lymphadenopathy has led to FDA approval of this agent in this population. Preclinical and early clinical assessment of other novel anti-CD20 mAbs include: ocrelizumab, veltuzumab, GA101, AME-133v, and PRO131921; data suggest potential for improved efficacy over rituximab that will require substantiation in large-scale clinical trials. New treatment strategies and novel anti-CD20 mAbs have the potential to enhance long-term outcomes for CLL and NHL. PMID:20367564

  4. Mammalian Cell Culture Process for Monoclonal Antibody Production: Nonlinear Modelling and Parameter Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Selişteanu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs are at present one of the fastest growing products of pharmaceutical industry, with widespread applications in biochemistry, biology, and medicine. The operation of mAbs production processes is predominantly based on empirical knowledge, the improvements being achieved by using trial-and-error experiments and precedent practices. The nonlinearity of these processes and the absence of suitable instrumentation require an enhanced modelling effort and modern kinetic parameter estimation strategies. The present work is dedicated to nonlinear dynamic modelling and parameter estimation for a mammalian cell culture process used for mAb production. By using a dynamical model of such kind of processes, an optimization-based technique for estimation of kinetic parameters in the model of mammalian cell culture process is developed. The estimation is achieved as a result of minimizing an error function by a particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm. The proposed estimation approach is analyzed in this work by using a particular model of mammalian cell culture, as a case study, but is generic for this class of bioprocesses. The presented case study shows that the proposed parameter estimation technique provides a more accurate simulation of the experimentally observed process behaviour than reported in previous studies.

  5. Mammalian cell culture process for monoclonal antibody production: nonlinear modelling and parameter estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selişteanu, Dan; Șendrescu, Dorin; Georgeanu, Vlad; Roman, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are at present one of the fastest growing products of pharmaceutical industry, with widespread applications in biochemistry, biology, and medicine. The operation of mAbs production processes is predominantly based on empirical knowledge, the improvements being achieved by using trial-and-error experiments and precedent practices. The nonlinearity of these processes and the absence of suitable instrumentation require an enhanced modelling effort and modern kinetic parameter estimation strategies. The present work is dedicated to nonlinear dynamic modelling and parameter estimation for a mammalian cell culture process used for mAb production. By using a dynamical model of such kind of processes, an optimization-based technique for estimation of kinetic parameters in the model of mammalian cell culture process is developed. The estimation is achieved as a result of minimizing an error function by a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. The proposed estimation approach is analyzed in this work by using a particular model of mammalian cell culture, as a case study, but is generic for this class of bioprocesses. The presented case study shows that the proposed parameter estimation technique provides a more accurate simulation of the experimentally observed process behaviour than reported in previous studies. PMID:25685797

  6. Detection of Staphylococci aureus cells with single domain antibody functionalized Raman nanoparobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Li-Lin; Tanha, Jamshid; Ryan, Shannon; Veres, Teodor

    2007-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy has demonstrated to be an effective tool in the detection and classification of pathogenic microorganisms. The technique is, however, limited by the inherently low cross-section of the Raman scattering process. Among the many enhanced Raman processes, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technique provides the highest sensitivity and can be easily adapted in the bio-sensing applications such as DNA hybridization and protein binding events. In this study, we report the targeted detection of the pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, with novel single domain antibody (sdAb) conjugated SERS nanoprobes. A sdAb specific to protein A of S. aureus cells was conjugated to silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP). Bacteria recognition was achieved through specific binding of the sdAb (conjugated to SERS nanoprobe) to protein A. Binding rendered the nanoparticle-labeled S. aureus cells SERS active. As a result, S. aureus cells could be detected rapidly and with excellent sensitivity by monitoring the SERS vibrational signatures. This work demonstrates that the SERS imaging technique offers excellent sensitivity with a detection limit of a single bacterium.

  7. Study of the diagnosis and treatment of renal cell carcinoma using monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the potential applications of monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) in the diagnosis and treatment of human cancer is the use in the specific detection of cancer sites and the selective destruction of cancer cells. Fetal kidney was used as an immunogen to develop Mab A6H, which is highly reactive to 16/16 renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell lines and to 16/19 human RCC specimens. RCC xenografts as small as 40 mg have been imaged clearly in radioimmunoscintigraphy studies using A6H labeled with iodine-131. In Mab-targeted radiotherapy studies, 2 doses of 100-150 uCi 131I-labeled A6H or an 131 I-labeled A6H-C5H cocktail caused tumor regression or tumor growth arrest in >80% of treated mice, while no such effect was observed in mice treated with 131I-labeled control Mab or unlabeled A6H. Internal radiation dosimetry, which was calculated by computer analysis of sequential radioimmunoscintigraphy, showed that A6H delivered approximately 35 rad/uCi of the injected dose to RCC xenografts. When the radiation dose to the tumor was 3000 rad resulted in tumor regression or growth arrest in >85% of mice. A clinical trial using 131I-labeled A6H in the diagnosis and treatment of RCC is now underway at our institution

  8. Peptidoglycan-linked protein A promotes T cell-dependent antibody expansion during Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Missiakas, Dominique M; Schneewind, Olaf

    2016-05-17

    A hallmark of Staphylococcus aureus disease in humans is persistent infections without development of protective immune responses. Infected patients generate VH3 plasmablast expansions and increased VH3 idiotype Ig; however, the mechanisms for staphylococcal modification of immune responses are not known. We report here that S. aureus-infected mice generate VH3 antibody expansions via a mechanism requiring MHC-restricted antigen presentation to CD4(+) T cells and staphylococcal protein A (SpA), a cell wall-anchored surface molecule that binds Fcγ and VH3 variant heavy chains of Ig. VH3 expansion occurred with peptidoglycan-linked SpA from the bacterial envelope but not with recombinant SpA, and optimally required five tandem repeats of its Ig-binding domains. Signaling via receptor-interacting serine/threonine protein kinase 2 (RIPK2) was essential for implementing peptidoglycan-linked SpA superantigen activity. VH3 clan IgG from S. aureus-infected or SpA-treated animals was not pathogen-specific, suggesting that SpA cross-linking of VH3 idiotype B-cell receptors and activation via attached peptidoglycan are the determinants of staphylococcal escape from adaptive immune responses. PMID:27140614

  9. Quiescent cells: A natural way to resist chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchón, S. A.; Condat, C. A.

    2011-10-01

    Most chemotherapeutic treatments use drugs that target proliferating cancer cells. Therefore, they do not affect quiescent cells which are naturally resistant. Surviving cancer cells can reactivate their cell cycles in the intervals between doses, becoming proliferative again and thus restarting tumor growth. In this work, we present a mathematical model to study the impact of quiescent cells on chemotherapy effectiveness. Our simulations show that, although tumor growth is delayed after the beginning of each dose, the resistance of quiescent cells is enough to reactivate it due to accelerated repopulation, eventually causing therapy failure even in the absence of acquired resistance.

  10. Long-term Continuous Production of Monoclonal Antibody by Hybridoma Cells Immobilized in a Fibrous-Bed Bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Hui; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2004-01-01

    The kinetics and long-term stability of continuous production of monoclonal antibody IgG2b by hybridoma HD-24 cells immobilized in a fibrous-bed bioreactor (FBB) were studied for a period of ∼8 months. The cells were immobilized in the fibrous bed by surface attachment of cells and entrapment of large cell clumps in the void space of the fibrous matrix. A high viable cell density of 1.01 × 108/ml was attained in the bioreactor, which was about 63 times higher than those in conventional T-flas...

  11. Effects of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab on lens epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun JH

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Jong Hwa Jun,1 Wern-Joo Sohn,2 Youngkyun Lee,2 Jae-Young Kim21Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University, 2Department of Oral Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, IHBR, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, South KoreaAbstract: The molecular and cellular effects of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab on lens epithelial cells (LECs were examined using both an immortalized human lens epithelial cell line and a porcine capsular bag model. After treatment with various concentrations of bevacizumab, cell viability and proliferation patterns were evaluated using the water-soluble tetrazolium salt assay and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The scratch assay and Western blot analysis were employed to validate the cell migration pattern and altered expression levels of signaling molecules related to the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT. Application of bevacizumab induced a range of altered cellular events in a concentration-dependent manner. A 0.1–2 mg/mL concentration demonstrated dose-dependent increase in proliferation and viability of LECs. However, 4 mg/mL decreased cell proliferation and viability. Cell migrations displayed dose-dependent retardation from 0.1 mg/mL bevacizumab treatment. Transforming growth factor-β2 expression was markedly increased in a dose-dependent manner, and α-smooth muscle actin, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and vimentin expression levels showed dose-dependent changes in a B3 cell line. Microscopic observation of porcine capsular bag revealed changes in cellular morphology and a decline in cell density compared to the control after 2 mg/mL treatment. The central aspect of posterior capsule showed delayed confluence, and the factors related to EMT revealed similar expression patterns to those identified in the cell line. Based on these results, bevacizumab modulates the proliferation

  12. Combination of two anti-CD5 monoclonal antibodies synergistically induces complement-dependent cytotoxicity of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Josephine L; Koefoed, Klaus; Geisler, Christian;

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) has been improved by introduction of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that exert their effect through secondary effector mechanisms. CLL cells are characterized by expression of CD5 and CD23 along with CD19 and CD20, hence anti-CD5 Abs that engage ...

  13. A cell sorter with modified bamboo charcoal for the efficient selection of specific antibody-producing hybridomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Chen; Ni, Mei-Hui; Chang, Yu-Chung; Yeh, Hsiu-Lun; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2010-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been proven useful in research and clinical applications. However, the generation of mAbs by conventional hybridoma technology is time-, cost- and labor-consuming. Here we developed a simplified procedure for efficient generation and selection of antibody-producing hybridomas within 1 h, using a particular cell sorter design, a cytoflow reactor-based cell sorter (CBCS) which consists mainly of the "cytoflow reactor" that comprises two components, a reaction chamber and a glass tubing for air and medium exchange by gravity, and the "sorting material", human EGFR-conjugated bamboo charcoal, for specific B-cell enrichment. The high surface area and porous structure of bamboo charcoal greatly increased cell density and protein production. Moreover, from Raman, FT-IR spectroscopy and IFA analysis, the carboxylation and immobilization of bamboo charcoal can be introduced easily by nitric acid treatment and conjugated handily with human EGFR using EDC/NHS. Other evidences, such as IFA, showed that the specific hybridomas generated in this study could secrete specific anti-human EGFR antibodies. Our design allows the production of mAbs while avoiding time-consuming steps, such as large numbers of limiting dilutions and screening assays, and demonstrates that the CBCS could be a powerful tool for monoclonal antibody production. PMID:20708791

  14. A partner monoclonal antibody to Moab 730 kills 100% of DU145 and PC3 androgen-independent cancer cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hemant Kumar Vyas; Rahul Pal; Nirmal K Lohiya; G P Talwar

    2009-12-01

    A number of therapeutic options are available for patients with prostate carcinoma till the time that the tumour is hormone dependent. However, no fully effective therapy is available for the treatment of androgen-independent prostate carcinomas. Antibodies directed at epitopes unique to or overexpressed on the cancer cells could be of therapeutic utility. A monoclonal antibody (Moab) 2C4 has been generated, which binds with cells of two androgenindependent prostate cancers, DU145 and PC3, and does not bind to peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) of healthy donors. This antibody, along with the previously developed Moab 730, kills 100% of both DU145 and PC3 cells in the presence of complement and does not have a deleterious effect on PBLs of healthy males. The anti-tumour action of the two antibodies prevents the establishment of DU145 cell tumour in nude mice in vivo. Moab 2C4 in combination with 730 has potential for use as therapy for androgen-independent cancers.

  15. PHASE-I STUDY OF INTRAVENOUSLY APPLIED BISPECIFIC ANTIBODY IN RENAL-CELL CANCER-PATIENTS RECEIVING SUBCUTANEOUS INTERLEUKIN-2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KROESEN, BJ; SLEIJFER, DT; JANSSEN, RAJ; VANDERGRAAF, WTA; THE, TH; DELEIJ, L; MULDER, NH

    1994-01-01

    In a phase I trial the toxicity and immunomodulatory effects of combined treatment with intravenous (i.v.) bispecific monoclonal antibody BIS-1 and subcutaneous (s.c.) interleukin 2 (IL-2) was studied in renal cell cancer patients. BIS-1 combines a specificity against CD3 on T lymphocytes with a spe

  16. Natural Dyes as Photosensitizers for Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hatem S. El-Ghamri; Sofyan A. Taya; Taher M. El-Agez; Amal M. Al-Kahlout; Naji Al Dahoudi; Monzir S. Abdel-Latif

    2015-01-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were assembled using Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles as a photoelectrode and natural dyes extracted from eight natural plants as photosensitizers. The structural properties of the synthesized ZnO nanoparticles were studied using XRD, SEM and TEM characterizations. Photovoltaic parameters such as short circuit current density Jsc, open circuit voltage Voc, fill factor FF, and overall conversion efficiency η for the fabricated cells were determined under 100 mW...

  17. Distribution of natural killer cell receptors in HIV infected individuals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Yong-jun; SHANG Hong; ZHANG Zi-ning; DIAO Ying-ying; GENG Wen-qing; DAI Di; LIU Jing; WANG Ya-nan; ZHANG Min; HAN Xiao-xu

    2007-01-01

    @@ Natural killer (NK) cells are bone marrow derived,large granular lymphocytes, comprising approximately 10% to 20% of the mononuclear cell fraction in normal peripheral blood. They form a part of the first line defense mechanism against tumoural and viral spreading.1-4 Unlike T and B cells, NK cells do not require gene rearrangement for assembly of their receptor genes; rather, NK cells discriminate potential target cells based on the levels of self major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ⅰ expression on such cells.5,6 There are two kinds of NK cell receptors.2,7,8 Inhibitory receptors recognize MHC class Ⅰ molecules and deliver a downregulatory signal that inactivates the lyric machinery of NK cells. Stimulatory receptors expressed by NK cells deliver an activation signal.

  18. Detection of humoral antibodies to Renibacterium salmoninarum in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and Atlantic salmon Salmo salar challenged by immersion and in naturally infected populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, E; Ljungberg, O

    1998-06-19

    Humoral antibodies to heat-stable antigens of Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar challenged by immersion. A slow antibody response was found: 3% (1/30) was positive 4 wk after immersion and 72% (26/36) was positive after 8 wk. All 30 fish sampled after 4 wk were found to be infected, as determined by bacterial culture and/or the presence of soluble antigens in the kidney. At 6, 8 and 12 wk after immersion the proportion of positives indicated by ELISA was 58%. The Rs infection was detected by cultivation in 36% of sampled fish collected on the same occasion. Elevated antibody titres to Rs were detected in samples from both Atlantic salmon (59% in 1 farm) and from rainbow trout (20% in 1 of 5 sampled farms) in naturally exposed populations all of which classified positive for bacterial kidney disease (BKD). Elevated antibody titres were detected among sampled fish from populations of rainbow trout and salmon with clinical BKD. Samples collected from farm populations of rainbow trout, salmon and brown trout Salmo trutta, exposed to Rs but without clinical BKD, were negative in the ELISA, although Rs bacteria or soluble antigens were detected at the same sampling. The antibody ELISA method cannot be recommended for general fish health monitoring purposes, but may be a valuable tool for monitoring the disease progression during controlled experiments. PMID:9684315

  19. Harnessing T cells to fight cancer with BiTE(®) antibody constructs - past developments and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Matthias; Benjamin, Jonathan; Kischel, Roman; Stienen, Sabine; Zugmaier, Gerhard

    2016-03-01

    Bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE(®) ) antibody constructs represent a novel immunotherapy that bridges cytotoxic T cells to tumor cells, thereby inducing target cell-dependent polyclonal T-cell activation and proliferation, and leading to apoptosis of bound tumor cells. Anti-CD19 BiTE(®) blinatumomab has demonstrated clinical activity in Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-negative relapsed or refractory (r/r) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) eventually resulting in conditional approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2014. This drug is currently further developed in pediatric and Ph(+) r/r, as well as in minimal residual disease-positive ALL, and might also offer clinical benefit for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, especially for those with aggressive forms like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Another BiTE(®) antibody construct in hemato-oncology designated AMG 330 targets CD33 on acute myeloid leukemia blast cells. After showing promising ex vivo activity, this drug candidate has recently entered phase 1 clinical development, and has further indicated potential for combination with checkpoint inhibitors. In solid tumor indications, three BiTE(®) antibody constructs have been tested in phase 1 studies so far: anti-EpCAM BiTE(®) AMG 110, anti-CEA BiTE(®) MEDI-565/AMG 211, and anti-PSMA BiTE(®) BAY2010112/AMG 212. Pertinent questions comprise how to maximize BiTE(®) penetration and T-cell infiltration of the tumor while simultaneously minimizing any adverse events, which is currently explored by a continuous intravenous infusion approach. Thus, BiTE(®) antibody constructs will hopefully provide new treatment options for patients in several indications with high unmet medical need. PMID:26864113

  20. Anomalous expression of Thy1 (CD90) in B-cell lymphoma cells and proliferation inhibition by anti-Thy1 antibody treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiura, Yoshihito [Department of Biochemistry, Kochi University Medical School, Kohasu, Okocho, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Kotani, Norihiro, E-mail: kotani@kochi-u.ac.jp [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Kochi System Glycobiology Center, Kochi University Medical School, Kohasu, Okocho, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan); Yamashita, Ryusuke [Department of Biochemistry, Kochi University Medical School, Kohasu, Okocho, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Yamamoto, Harumi [Laboratory of Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Yoshida Shimo-Adachi, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kozutsumi, Yasunori [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Laboratory of Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Yoshida Shimo-Adachi, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Honke, Koichi [Department of Biochemistry, Kochi University Medical School, Kohasu, Okocho, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Kochi System Glycobiology Center, Kochi University Medical School, Kohasu, Okocho, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan)

    2010-05-28

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (Ab) rituximab is accepted to be an effective therapeutic Ab for malignant B-cell lymphoma; however, discovery of other cell surface antigens is required for the option of antibody medicine. Considering that many tumor-associated antigens are glycans, we have searched glycoconjugates for the candidate antigens that therapeutic Abs target. To this end, we first focused on the difference in the glycogenes expression in terms of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of a Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, Akata. Using DNA array, flow cytometry and Western blotting, we found that Thy1 was highly expressed in EBV-positive Akata cells. Subsequently, Thy1 was found to be expressed in other B-cell lymphoma cell lines: BJAB, MutuI, and MutuIII, irrespective of EBV infection. Treatment of these cells with an anti-Thy1 monoclonal antibody inhibited proliferation more strongly than the therapeutic Ab rituximab. The B-cell lymphoma cell lines were classified based on the extent of the proliferation inhibition, which was not correlated with the expression level of Thy1. It is suggested that stable residence of receptor tyrosine kinases in lipid rafts sustains cell growth in B-cell lymphoma cells.

  1. Regulation of Natural Killer Cell Function by STAT3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas eCacalano

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells, key members of a distinct hempatopoietic lineage, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs, are critical effectors that mediate cytotoxicity toward tumor and virally-infected cells but also regulate inflammation, antigen presentation and the adaptive immune response. It has been shown that NK cells can regulate the development and activation of many other components of the immune response such as dendritic cells, which in turn, modulate the function of NK cells in multiple synergistic feed back loops driven by cell-cell contact and the secretion of cytokines and chemokines that control effector function and migration of cells to sites of immune activation. The Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT-3 is involved in driving almost all of the pathways that control NK cytolytic activity as well as the reciprocal regulatory interactions between NK cells and other components of the immune system. In the context of tumor immunology, NK cells are a first line of defense that eliminates pre-cancerous and transformed cells early in the process of carcinogenesis, through a mechanism of immune surveillance. Even after tumors become established, NK cells are critical components of anti-cancer immunity: dysfunctional NK cells are often found in the peripheral blood of cancer patients and the lack of NK cells in the tumor microenvironment often correlates with poor prognosis. The pathways and soluble factors activated in tumor-associated NK cells, cancer cells, and regulatory myeloid cells which determine the outcome of cancer immunity are all critically regulated by STAT3. Using the tumor microenvironment as a paradigm, we present here an overview of the research that has revealed fundamental mechanisms through which STAT3 regulates all aspects of natural killer cell biology, including NK development, activation, target cell killing, and fine tuning of the innate and adaptive immune responses.

  2. Suppression of unprimed T and B cells in antibody responses by irradiation-resistant and plastic-adherent suppressor cells in Toxoplasma gondii-infected mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the acute phase of Toxoplasma infection, the function of both helper T and B cells was suppressed in primary antibody responses to dinitrophenol (DNP)-conjugated protein antigens. During the course of infection, the suppressive effect on T cells seems to continue longer than that on B cells, since suppression in responses to sheep erythrocytes, a T-dependent antigen, persisted longer than those to DNP-Ficoll, a T-independent antigen. Plastic-adherent cells from the spleens of Toxoplasma-infected and X-irradiated (400 rads) mice had strong suppressor activity in primary anti-sheep erythrocyte antibody responses of normal mouse spleen cells in vitro. These data suggest that the activation of irradiation-resistant and plastic-adherent suppressor cells causes the suppression of both T and B cells in Toxoplasma-infected mice

  3. Intestinal commensal bacteria promote T cell hyporesponsiveness and down-regulate the serum antibody responses induced by dietary antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Masato; Hosono, Akira; Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Kihara-Fujioka, Miran; Hachimura, Satoshi; Itoh, Kikuji; Hirayama, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Kyoko; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2010-08-16

    Colonization of the gut by commensal bacteria modulates the induction of oral tolerance and allergy. However, how these intestinal bacteria modulate antigen-specific T cell responses induced by oral antigens remains unclear. In order to investigate this, we used germ-free (GF) ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cell receptor transgenic (OVA23-3) mice. Conventional (CV) or GF mice were administered an OVA-containing diet. Cytokine production by CD4(+) cells from spleen (SP), mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and Peyer's patches (PP) was evaluated by ELISA, as was the peripheral antibody titer. T cell phenotype was assessed by flow cytometry. CD4(+) cells from the SP and MLN of CV and GF mice fed an OVA diet for 3 weeks produced significantly less IL-2 than the corresponding cells from mice receiving a control diet, suggesting that oral tolerance could be induced at the T cell level in the systemic and intestinal immune systems of both bacterial condition of mice. However, we also observed that the T cell hyporesponsiveness induced by dietary antigen was delayed in the systemic immune tissues and was weaker in the intestinal immune tissues of the GF mice. Intestinal MLN and PP CD4(+) T cells from these animals also produced lower levels of IL-10, had less activated/memory type CD45RB(low) cells, and expressed lower levels of CTLA-4 but not Foxp3 compared to their CV counterparts. Furthermore, GF mice produced higher serum levels of OVA-specific antibodies than CV animals. CD40L expression by SP CD4(+) cells from GF mice fed OVA was higher than that of CV mice. These results suggest that intestinal commensal bacteria promote T cell hyporesponsiveness and down-regulate serum antibody responses induced by dietary antigens through modulation of the intestinal and systemic T cell phenotype. PMID:20621647

  4. Antibody and T-cell responses associated with experimental human malaria infection or vaccination show limited relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Karen M; Okitsu, Shinji; Porter, David W; Duncan, Christopher; Amacker, Mario; Pluschke, Gerd; Cavanagh, David R; Hill, Adrian V S; Todryk, Stephen M

    2015-05-01

    This study examined specific antibody and T-cell responses associated with experimental malaria infection or malaria vaccination, in malaria-naive human volunteers within phase I/IIa vaccine trials, with a view to investigating inter-relationships between these types of response. Malaria infection was via five bites of Plasmodium falciparum-infected mosquitoes, with individuals reaching patent infection by 11-12 days, having harboured four or five blood-stage cycles before drug clearance. Infection elicited a robust antibody response against merozoite surface protein-119 , correlating with parasite load. Classical class switching was seen from an early IgM to an IgG1-dominant response of increasing affinity. Malaria-specific T-cell responses were detected in the form of interferon-γ and interleukin-4 (IL-4) ELIspot, but their magnitude did not correlate with the magnitude of antibody or its avidity, or with parasite load. Different individuals who were immunized with a virosome vaccine comprising influenza antigens combined with P. falciparum antigens, demonstrated pre-existing interferon-γ, IL-2 and IL-5 ELIspot responses against the influenza antigens, and showed boosting of anti-influenza T-cell responses only for IL-5. The large IgG1-dominated anti-parasite responses showed limited correlation with T-cell responses for magnitude or avidity, both parameters being only negatively correlated for IL-5 secretion versus anti-apical membrane antigen-1 antibody titres. Overall, these findings suggest that cognate T-cell responses across a range of magnitudes contribute towards driving potentially effective antibody responses in infection-induced and vaccine-induced immunity against malaria, and their existence during immunization is beneficial, but magnitudes are mostly not inter-related. PMID:25471322

  5. Natural killer cells: Biology, functions and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojvodić Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Natural Killer cells (NK cells represent the subset of peripheral lymphocytes that play critical role in the innate immune response to virus-infected and tumor transformed cells. Lysis of NK sensitive target cells could be mediated independently of antigen stimulation and without requirement of peptide presentation by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules. NK cell activity and functions are controlled by a considerable number of cell surface receptors, which exist in both inhibitory and activating isoforms. There are several groups of NK cell surface receptors: 1 killer immunoglobulin like receptors-KIR, 2 C-type lectin receptors,3natural citotoxicity receptors-NCR and 4 Toll-like receptors-TLR. Functions of NK receptors. Defining the biology of NK cell surface receptors has contributed to the concept of the manner how NK cells selectively recognize and lyse tumor and virally infected cells while sparing normal cells. Further, identification of NK receptor ligands and their expression on the normal and transformed cells has led to the development of clinical approaches to manipulating receptor/ligand interactions that showed clinical benefit. NK cells are the first lymphocyte subset that reconstitute the peripheral blood following allogeneic HSCT and multiple roles for alloreactive donor NK cells have been demonstrated, in diminishing Graft vs. Host Disease (GvHD through selective killing recipient dendritic cells, prevention of graft rejection by killing recipient T cells and participation in Graft vs. Leukaemia (GvL effect through destruction of residual host tumor cells. Conclusion. Besides their role in HSCT, NK cell receptors have an important clinical relevance that reflects from the fact that they play a crucial role in the development of some diseases as well as in possibilities of managing all NK receptors through selective expansion and usage of NK cells in cancer immunotherapy.

  6. Characterization of a natural mouse monoclonal antibody recognizing epitopes shared by oxidized low-density lipoprotein and chaperonin 60 of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunguang; Kankaanpää, Jari; Kummu, Outi; Turunen, S Pauliina; Akhi, Ramin; Bergmann, Ulrich; Pussinen, Pirkko; Remes, Anne M; Hörkkö, Sohvi

    2016-06-01

    Natural antibodies are predominantly antibodies of the IgM isotype present in the circulation of all vertebrates that have not been previously exposed to exogenous antigens. They are often directed against highly conserved epitopes and bind to ligands of varying chemical composition with low affinity. In this study we cloned and characterized a natural mouse monoclonal IgM antibody selected by binding to malondialdehyde acetaldehyde epitopes on low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Interestingly, the IgM antibody cross-reacted with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) bacteria, a key pathogenic microbe in periodontitis reported to be associated with risk factor for atherosclerosis, thus being named as Aa_Mab. It is more intriguing that the binding molecule of Aa to Aa_Mab IgM was found to be Aa chaperonin 60 or HSP60, a member of heat-shock protein family, behaving not only as a chaperone for correct protein folding but also as a powerful virulence factor of the bacteria for inducing bone resorption and as a putative pathogenic factor in atherosclerosis. The findings will highlight the question of whether molecular mimicry between pathogen components and oxidized LDL could lead to atheroprotective immune activity, and also would be of great importance in potential application of immune response-based preventive and therapeutic strategies against atherosclerosis and periodontal disease. PMID:26786003

  7. Stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Lund, O; Lund, O S; Hansen, J E

    1999-01-01

    In order to study the stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in antibody excess and under equilibrium conditions, we exploited the ability of HIV-1 to generate mixed oligomers when different env genes are...... coexpressed. By the coexpression of Env glycoproteins that either can or cannot bind a neutralizing MAb in an env transcomplementation assay, virions were generated in which the proportion of MAb binding sites could be regulated. As the proportion of MAb binding sites in Env chimeric virus increased, MAb...

  8. Effect of using heat-inactivated serum with the Abbott human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III antibody test.

    OpenAIRE

    Jungkind, D. L.; DiRenzo, S A; Young, S J

    1986-01-01

    The Abbott enzyme immunoassay (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Ill.) for human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) antibody was evaluated to determine the effect of using heat-inactivated (56 degrees C for 30 min) serum as the sample. Each of 58 nonreactive serum samples gave a higher A492 value when tested after heat inactivation. Ten of the samples became reactive after heating. Heat-inactivated serum should not be used in the current Abbott HTLV-III antibody test, because thi...

  9. Ibrutinib interferes with the cell-mediated anti-tumor activities of therapeutic CD20 antibodies: implications for combination therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Roit, Fabio Da; Patrick J Engelberts; Taylor, Ronald P.; Breij, Esther C.W.; Gritti, Giuseppe; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Introna, Martino; Parren, Paul W H I; Beurskens, Frank J; Golay, Josée

    2015-01-01

    The novel Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib and phosphatidyl-4-5-biphosphate 3-kinase-δ inhibitor idelalisib are promising drugs for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, either alone or in combination with anti-CD20 antibodies. We investigated the possible positive or negative impact of these drugs on all known mechanisms of action of both type I and type II anti-CD20 antibodies. Pretreatment with ibrutinib for 1 hour did not increase direct ...

  10. Stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Lund, O; Lund, O S; Hansen, J E

    1999-01-01

    In order to study the stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in antibody excess and under equilibrium conditions, we exploited the ability of HIV-1 to generate mixed oligomers when different env genes are...... data could not exclude the existence of a threshold for neutralization. However, results from MAb neutralization of chimeric virus containing wild-type Env and Env defective in CD4 binding was readily explained by a model of incremental MAb neutralization. In summary, the data indicate that MAb...

  11. Intracellular location of Bartonella henselae cocultivated with Vero cells and used for an indirect fluorescent-antibody test.

    OpenAIRE

    Zbinden, R.; Höchli, M; Nadal, D

    1995-01-01

    Bartonella henselae, the major causative agent of cat scratch disease, was cocultivated with Vero cells on chamber slides and visualized by indirect immunofluorescence by using a patient serum containing specific antibodies. Confocal microscopy localized the granular B. henselae-specific fluorescence mainly around the nuclei of Vero cells. By transmission electron microscopy, these granules were identified as clusters of multiple intracellular organisms. Fixed slides with the monolayers of Ve...

  12. Long-Lived Antibody and B Cell Memory Responses to the Human Malaria Parasites, Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax

    OpenAIRE

    Wipasa, J; Suphavilai, C; Okell, LC; Cook, J; Corran, PH; Thaikla, K; Liewsaree, W; Riley, EM; Hafalla, JC

    2010-01-01

    Author Summary It is widely perceived that immunity to malaria is short-lived, rendering people susceptible to repeated malaria infections. However, there have been very few studies on “memory” responses, how the human immune system recognizes previously encountered malaria parasites. In particular, very little is known about the durability of malaria-specific B cells and antibodies. The aim of this study was to investigate the induction and maintenance of B cell memory responses to malaria p...

  13. Defective Natural Killer cell antiviral capacity in paediatric HBV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ida Louise; Laura J., Pallett; Winther, Thilde Nordmann;

    2015-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells exhibit dysregulated effector function in adult chronic HBV infection (CHB), which may contribute to virus persistence. The role of NK cells in children infected perinatally with HBV is less studied. Access to a unique cohort enabled the cross-sectional evaluation of NK...

  14. Specifically modified Env immunogens activate B-cell precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Andrew T; Gray, Matthew D; Dosenovic, Pia; Gitlin, Alexander D; Freund, Natalia T; Petersen, John; Correnti, Colin; Johnsen, William; Kegel, Robert; Stuart, Andrew B; Glenn, Jolene; Seaman, Michael S; Schief, William R; Strong, Roland K; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2016-01-01

    VRC01-class broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies protect animals from experimental infection and could contribute to an effective vaccine response. Their predicted germline forms (gl) bind Env inefficiently, which may explain why they are not elicited by HIV-1 Env-immunization. Here we show that an optimized Env immunogen can engage multiple glVRC01-class antibodies. Furthermore, this immunogen activates naive B cells expressing the human germline heavy chain of 3BNC60, paired with endogenous mouse light chains in vivo. To address whether it activates B cells expressing the fully humanized gl3BNC60 B-cell receptor (BCR), we immunized mice carrying both the heavy and light chains of gl3BNC60. B cells expressing this BCR display an autoreactive phenotype and fail to respond efficiently to soluble forms of the optimized immunogen, unless it is highly multimerized. Thus, specifically designed Env immunogens can activate naive B cells expressing human BCRs corresponding to precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies even when the B cells display an autoreactive phenotype. PMID:26907590

  15. Radon measurement of natural gas using alpha scintillation cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to their sensitivity and ease of use, alpha-scintillation cells are being increasingly utilized for measurements of radon (222Rn) in natural gas. Laboratory studies showed an average increase of 7.3% in the measurement efficiency of alpha-scintillation cells when filled with less-dense natural gas rather than regular air. A theoretical calculation comparing the atomic weight and density of air to that of natural gas suggests a 6–7% increase in the detection efficiency when measuring radon in the cells. A correction is also applicable when the sampling location and measurement laboratory are at different elevations. These corrections to the measurement efficiency need to be considered in order to derive accurate concentrations of radon in natural gas

  16. γδ T cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity with CD19 antibodies assessed by an impedance-based label-free real-time cytotoxicity assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Jördis Eva Seidel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available γδ T cells are not MHC restricted, elicit cytotoxicity against various malignancies, are present in early post-transplant phases in novel stem cell transplantation (SCT strategies and have been shown to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. These features make γδ T cells promising effector cells for antibody-based immunotherapy in pediatric patients with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. To evaluate combination of human γδ T cells with CD19 antibodies for immunotherapy of B-lineage ALL, γδ T cells were expanded after a GMP-compliant protocol and ADCC of both primary and expanded γδ T cells with an Fc optimized CD19 antibody (4G7SDIE and a bispecific antibody with the specificities CD19 and CD16 (N19-C16 was evaluated in CD107a degranulation assays and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS. CD107a, TNF-α and IFN-γ expression of primary γδ T cells were significantly increased and correlated with CD16-expression of γδ T cells. γδ T cells highly expressed CD107a after expansion and no further increased expression by 4G7SDIE and N19-C16 was measured. Cytotoxicity of purified expanded γδ T cells targeting CD19-expressing cells was assessed in both europium-TDA release and in an impedance-based label-free method (using the xCELLigence system measuring γδ T cell lysis in real-time. Albeit in the 2 h end-point europium-TDA release assay no increased lysis was observed, in real-time xCELLigence assays both significant antibody-independent cytotoxicity and ADCC of γδ T cells were observed. The xCELLigence system outperformed the end-point europium-TDA release assay in sensitivity and allows drawing of conclusions to lysis kinetics of γδ T cells over prolonged periods of time periods. Combination of CD19 antibodies with primary as well as expanded γδ T cells exhibits an promising approach, which may enhance clinical outcome of patients with pediatric B-lineage ALL and

  17. γδ T Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity with CD19 Antibodies Assessed by an Impedance-Based Label-Free Real-Time Cytotoxicity Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Ursula Jördis Eva; Vogt, Fabian; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Jung, Gundram; Handgretinger, Rupert; Lang, Peter

    2014-01-01

    γδ T cells are not MHC restricted, elicit cytotoxicity against various malignancies, are present in early post-transplant phases in novel stem cell transplantation strategies and have been shown to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). These features make γδ T cells promising effector cells for antibody-based immunotherapy in pediatric patients with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). To evaluate combination of human γδ T cells with CD19 antibodies for immunotherapy of B-lineage ALL, γδ T cells were expanded after a GMP-compliant protocol and ADCC of both primary and expanded γδ T cells with an Fc-optimized CD19 antibody (4G7SDIE) and a bi-specific antibody with the specificities CD19 and CD16 (N19-C16) was evaluated in CD107a-degranulation assays and intracellular cytokine staining. CD107a, TNFα, and IFNγ expression of primary γδ T cells were significantly increased and correlated with CD16-expression of γδ T cells. γδ T cells highly expressed CD107a after expansion and no further increased expression by 4G7SDIE and N19-C16 was measured. Cytotoxicity of purified expanded γδ T cells targeting CD19-expressing cells was assessed in both europium-TDA release and in an impedance-based label-free method (using the xCELLigence system) measuring γδ T cell lysis in real-time. Albeit in the 2 h end-point europium-TDA release assay no increased lysis was observed, in real-time xCELLigence assays both significant antibody-independent cytotoxicity and ADCC of γδ T cells were observed. The xCELLigence system outperformed the end-point europium-TDA release assay in sensitivity and allows drawing of conclusions to lysis kinetics of γδ T cells over prolonged periods of time periods. Combination of CD19 antibodies with primary as well as expanded γδ T cells exhibits a promising approach, which may enhance clinical outcome of patients with pediatric B-lineage ALL and requires clinical

  18. ICOS+PD-1+CXCR3+ T follicular helper cells contribute to the generation of high-avidity antibodies following influenza vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentebibel, Salah-Eddine; Khurana, Surender; Schmitt, Nathalie; Kurup, Parvathi; Mueller, Cynthia; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Palucka, A. Karolina; Albrecht, Randy A.; Garcia-Sastre, Adolfo; Golding, Hana; Ueno, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    The immune mechanism leading to the generation of protective antibody responses following influenza trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV) vaccinations remains largely uncharacterized. We recently reported that TIV vaccination induced a transient increase of circulating ICOS+PD-1+CXCR3+ T follicular helper (cTfh) cells in blood, which positively correlated with the induction of protective antibody responses measured at day 28. However, whether and how these T cells directly contribute to antibody response remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the changes after TIV vaccination in the amount and the avidity of the polyclonal antibodies specific for the HA1 subunit of the pandemic H1N1 virus, and analyzed the correlation with the increase of ICOS+PD-1+CXCR3+ cTfh cells. We found that both the amount and the avidity of specific antibodies rapidly increased during the first 7 days after TIV. Importantly, the increase of ICOS+PD-1+CXCR3+ cTfh cells strongly correlated with the increase in the avidity of antibodies, particularly in subjects who did not have high affinity antibodies at baseline. We propose that ICOS+PD-1+CXCR3+ Tfh cells directly contribute to the generation of high-avidity antibodies after TIV vaccinations by selectively interacting with high affinity B cells at extrafollicular sites. PMID:27231124

  19. Analysis of T-cell-dependent and -independent antigens of Rickettsia conorii with monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, H M; Walker, D H; Wang, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies from euthymic mice and two monoclonal antibodies from athymic mice were directed against antigens of Rickettsia conorii, as shown by both indirect immunofluorescence and an enzyme immunoassay. There was extensive cross-reactivity with other spotted fever group rickettsiae. Euthymic monoclonal antibodies 3-2 and 9-2 (immunoglobulin G2a [IgG2a]) and 27-10 (IgG1) distinctly outlined the acetone-fixed rickettsial surface, as determined by indirect immunofluorescence; on...

  20. Natural and Induced T Regulatory Cells in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Adeegbe, Dennis O.; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    CD4+Foxp3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells control many facets of immune responses ranging from autoimmune diseases, to inflammatory conditions, and cancer in an attempt to maintain immune homeostasis. Natural Treg (nTreg) cells develop in the thymus and constitute a critical arm of active mechanisms of peripheral tolerance particularly to self antigens. A growing body of knowledge now supports the existence of induced Treg (iTreg) cells which may derive from a population of conventional CD4+ T cel...