WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell migration analysis

  1. Automated migration analysis based on cell texture: method & reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chittenden Thomas W

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper, we present and validate a way to measure automatically the extent of cell migration based on automated examination of a series of digital photographs. It was designed specifically to identify the impact of Second Hand Smoke (SHS on endothelial cell migration but has broader applications. The analysis has two stages: (1 preprocessing of image texture, and (2 migration analysis. Results The output is a graphic overlay that indicates the front lines of cell migration superimposed on each original image, with automated reporting of the distance traversed vs. time. Expert preference compares to manual placement of leading edge shows complete equivalence of automated vs. manual leading edge definition for cell migration measurement. Conclusion Our method is indistinguishable from careful manual determinations of cell front lines, with the advantages of full automation, objectivity, and speed.

  2. Analysis of primary cilia in directional cell migration in fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Veland, Iben; Schwab, Albrecht;

    2013-01-01

    Early studies of migrating fibroblasts showed that primary cilia orient in front of the nucleus and point toward the leading edge. Recent work has shown that primary cilia coordinate a series of signaling pathways critical to fibroblast cell migration during development and in wound healing. In p...

  3. Border Cell Migration: A Model System for Live Imaging and Genetic Analysis of Collective Cell Movement

    OpenAIRE

    M Prasad; Wang, X; He, L.; Cai, D.; Montell, DJ

    2015-01-01

    © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Border cell migration in the Drosophila ovary has emerged as a genetically tractable model for studying collective cell movement. Over many years border cell migration was exclusively studied in fixed samples due to the inability to culture stage 9 egg chambers in vitro. Although culturing late-stage egg chambers was long feasible, stage 9 egg chambers survived only briefl y outside the female body. We identifi ed culture conditions that suppo...

  4. In-chip fabrication of free-form 3D constructs for directed cell migration analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mark Holm; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Hansen, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    Free-form constructs with three-dimensional (3D) microporosity were fabricated by two-photon polymerization inside the closed microchannel of an injection-molded, commercially available polymer chip for analysis of directed cell migration. Acrylate constructs were produced as woodpile topologies...... with a range of pore sizes from 5 × 5 μm to 15 × 15 μm and prefilled with fibrillar collagen. Dendritic cells seeded into the polymer chip in a concentration gradient of the chemoattractant CCL21 efficiently negotiated the microporous maze structure for pore sizes of 8 × 8 μm or larger. The cells...

  5. Comparative analysis of dynamic cell viability, migration and invasion assessments by novel real-time technology and classic endpoint assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridha Limame

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell viability and motility comprise ubiquitous mechanisms involved in a variety of (pathobiological processes including cancer. We report a technical comparative analysis of the novel impedance-based xCELLigence Real-Time Cell Analysis detection platform, with conventional label-based endpoint methods, hereby indicating performance characteristics and correlating dynamic observations of cell proliferation, cytotoxicity, migration and invasion on cancer cells in highly standardized experimental conditions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Dynamic high-resolution assessments of proliferation, cytotoxicity and migration were performed using xCELLigence technology on the MDA-MB-231 (breast cancer and A549 (lung cancer cell lines. Proliferation kinetics were compared with the Sulforhodamine B (SRB assay in a series of four cell concentrations, yielding fair to good correlations (Spearman's Rho 0.688 to 0.964. Cytotoxic action by paclitaxel (0-100 nM correlated well with SRB (Rho>0.95 with similar IC(50 values. Reference cell migration experiments were performed using Transwell plates and correlated by pixel area calculation of crystal violet-stained membranes (Rho 0.90 and optical density (OD measurement of extracted dye (Rho>0.95. Invasion was observed on MDA-MB-231 cells alone using Matrigel-coated Transwells as standard reference method and correlated by OD reading for two Matrigel densities (Rho>0.95. Variance component analysis revealed increased variances associated with impedance-based detection of migration and invasion, potentially caused by the sensitive nature of this method. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The xCELLigence RTCA technology provides an accurate platform for non-invasive detection of cell viability and motility. The strong correlations with conventional methods imply a similar observation of cell behavior and interchangeability with other systems, illustrated by the highly correlating kinetic invasion profiles on

  6. Migration of Cells in a Social Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Søren; Tay, Savas; Johnston, Darius M.;

    2013-01-01

    cells on the individual remains poorly understood. Previous work on isolated cells has revealed a stereotypical migratory behavior, however many aspects of the migration characteristics of cells in populations remained unknown exactly because of this lack of characterization of neighbour-cell influence......In multicellular organisms and complex ecosystems, cells migrate in a social context. While this is essential for the basic processes of life such as embryonic development, wound healing and unregulated migration furthermore is implicated in diseases such as cancer, the influence of neighboring....... We quantified1 the migration of thousands of individual cells in their population context using time-lapse microscopy, microfluidic cell culture and automated image analysis, and discovered a much richer dynamics in the social context, with significant variations in directionality, displacement and...

  7. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  8. Stem cell migration after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survival rate of irradiated rodents could be significantly improved by shielding only the small parts of hemopoietic tissues during the course of irradiation. The populations of circulating stem cells in adult organisms are considered to be of some importance for the homeostasis between the many sites of blood cell formation and for the necessary flexibility of hemopoietic response in the face of fluctuating demands. Pluripotent stem cells are migrating through peripheral blood as has been shown for several mammalian species. Under steady state conditions, the exchange of stem cells between the different sites of blood cell formation appears to be restricted. Their presence in blood and the fact that they are in balance with the extravascular stem cell pool may well be of significance for the surveilance of the integrity of local stem cell populations. Any decrease of stem cell population in blood below a critical size results in the rapid immigration of circulating stem cells in order to restore local stem cell pool size. Blood stem cells are involved in the regeneration after whole-body irradiation if the stem cell population in bone marrows is reduced to less than 10% of the normal state. In the animals subjected to partial-body irradiation, the circulating stem cells appear to be the only source for the repopulation of the heavily irradiated, aplastic sites of hemopoietic organs. (Yamashita, S.)

  9. Transplantation stimulates interstitial cell migration in hydra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujisawa, T.; David, C.N.; Bosch, T.C. (National Institute of Genetics, Shizuoka (Japan))

    1990-04-01

    Migration of interstitial cells and nerve cell precursors was analyzed in Hydra magnipapillata and Hydra vulgaris (formerly Hydra attenuata). Axial grafts were made between ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled donor and unlabeled host tissue. Migration of labeled cells into the unlabeled half was followed for 4 days. The results indicate that the rate of migration was initially high and then slowed on Days 2-4. Regrafting fresh donor tissue on Days 2-4 maintained high levels of migration. Thus, migration appears to be stimulated by the grafting procedure itself.

  10. Transplantation stimulates interstitial cell migration in hydra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migration of interstitial cells and nerve cell precursors was analyzed in Hydra magnipapillata and Hydra vulgaris (formerly Hydra attenuata). Axial grafts were made between [3H]thymidine-labeled donor and unlabeled host tissue. Migration of labeled cells into the unlabeled half was followed for 4 days. The results indicate that the rate of migration was initially high and then slowed on Days 2-4. Regrafting fresh donor tissue on Days 2-4 maintained high levels of migration. Thus, migration appears to be stimulated by the grafting procedure itself

  11. Migration of cells in a social context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Søren; Tay, Savas; Johnston, Darius M;

    2013-01-01

    In multicellular organisms and complex ecosystems, cells migrate in a social context. Whereas this is essential for the basic processes of life, the influence of neighboring cells on the individual remains poorly understood. Previous work on isolated cells has observed a stereotypical migratory b...... and pseudopod collapse following collisions. The model demonstrates how aspects of complex biology can be explained by simple rules of physics and constitutes a rapid test bed for future studies of collective migration of individual cells....

  12. Lobbying expenditures on migration: a descriptive analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Facchini, Giovanni; Mayda, Anna Maria; Mishra, Prachi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we carry out a descriptive analysis of lobbying expenditures on migration in the US between 1998 and 2005. While PAC contributions and lobbying are in general positively correlated, our results suggest that this is not the case when it comes to lobbying on migration. As a result, any analysis of the role of lobbying in migration should not focus on PAC contributions alone. Comparing lobbying on migration and trade, we find that substantially more resources are spent on the latte...

  13. The interplay of cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesion in collective cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chenlu; Chowdhury, Sagar; Driscoll, Meghan; Parent, Carole A.; Gupta, S.K.; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Collective cell migration often involves notable cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesions and highly coordinated motion of touching cells. We focus on the interplay between cell–substrate adhesion and cell–cell adhesion. We show that the loss of cell-surface contact does not significantly alter the dynamic pattern of protrusions and retractions of fast migrating amoeboid cells (Dictyostelium discoideum), but significantly changes their ability to adhere to other cells. Analysis of the dynamics ...

  14. Expression of aquaporin-1 in SMMC-7221 liver carcinoma cells promotes cell migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yongming; FENG Xuechao; YANG Hong; MA Tonghui

    2006-01-01

    Migration of tumor cells is a crucial step in tumor invasion and metastasis. Here we provide evidence that aquaporin expression is involved in tumor cell migration. RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis demonstrated the AQP1 protein expression on the plasma membrane of SMMC-7221 human hepatoma cells. SMMC-7221 cell clones with high (SMMC-7221hPf) and low (SMMC-7221/Pf) water permeability were identified by functional assays with corresponding high and low AQP1 expression. Cell migration rate was remarkably higher in SMMC-7221hPf cells than SMMC-7221/Pf cells, assessed by Boyden chamber and wound healing assays, whereas cell growth and adhesion were not different. Adenovirus-mediated AQP1 expression in SMMC-7221/Pf cells increased their water permeability and migration rate. These results provide the first evidence that aquaporin-mediated membrane water permeability enhances tumor cell migration and may be associated with tumor invasion and metastasis.

  15. Entropy measures of collective cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, Ariadne; Parrinello, Simona; Faisal, Aldo

    2015-03-01

    Collective cell migration is a critical process during tissue formation and repair. To this end there is a need to develop tools to quantitatively measure the dynamics of collective cell migration obtained from microscopy data. Drawing on statistical physics we use entropy of velocity fields derived from dense optic flow to quantitatively measure collective migration. Using peripheral nerve repair after injury as experimental system, we study how Schwann cells, guided by fibroblasts, migrate in cord-like structures across the cut, paving a highway for neurons. This process of emergence of organised behaviour is key for successful repair, yet the emergence of leader cells and transition from a random to ordered state is not understood. We find fibroblasts induce correlated directionality in migrating Schwann cells as measured by a decrease in the entropy of motion vector. We show our method is robust with respect to image resolution in time and space, giving a principled assessment of how various molecular mechanisms affect macroscopic features of collective cell migration. Finally, the generality of our method allows us to process both simulated cell movement and microscopic data, enabling principled fitting and comparison of in silico to in vitro. ICCS, Imperial College London & MRC Clinical Sciences Centre.

  16. Comparative analysis of the role of small G proteins in cell migration and cell death: Cytoprotective and promigratory effects of RalA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small G protein superfamily consists of more than 150 members, and is classified into six families: the Ras, Rho, Rab, Arf, Ran, and RGK families. They regulate a wide variety of cell functions such as cell proliferation/differentiation, cytoskeletal reorganization, vesicle trafficking, nucleocytoplasmic transport and microtubule organization. The small G proteins have also been shown to regulate cell death/survival and cell shape. In this study, we compared the role of representative members of the six families of small G proteins in cell migration and cell death/survival, two cellular phenotypes that are associated with inflammation, tumorigenesis, and metastasis. Our results show that small G proteins of the six families differentially regulate cell death and cell cycle distribution. In particular, our results indicate that Rho family of small G proteins is antiapoptotic. Ras, Rho, and Ran families promoted cell migration. There was no significant correlation between the cell death- and cell migration-regulating activities of the small G proteins. Nevertheless, RalA was not only cytoprotective against multiple chemotherapeutic drugs, but also promigratory inducing stress fiber formation, which was accompanied by the activation of Akt and Erk pathways. Our study provides a framework for further systematic investigation of small G proteins in the perspectives of cell death/survival and motility in inflammation and cancer.

  17. Identification Analysis of Eukaryotic Expression Plasmid Rap2a and Its Effect on the Migration of Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxia WU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Rap2a, a member of the small GTPase superfamily, plays a critical role in regulating the function of integrin and cell adhesion, thereby controlling cell motility and cell/matrix interactions. However, the function of Rap2a in carcinogenesis is still poorly understood. To clone Rap2a cDNA, which belongs to human Ras-related small G protein superfamily, we constructed its eukaryotic expression vector and determined its expression in lung cancer cells. The aim of this study is to explore the role of Rap2a in carcinogenesis. Methods The levels of endogenous Rap2a protein in lung cancer cells were measured by Western blot. Total RNA of human osteosarcoma cells U2OS was extracted and reverse-transcribed into cDNA by RT-PCR. Then, Rap2a gene was amplified by PCR and inserted into pcDNA3.1(+. The reconstructed plasmid was identified by restricted enzyme digestion and sequencing. pcDNA3.1(+-Rap2a was transfected into H1299 and A549 cells, the expression of Rap2a was detected by Western blot. In addition, the migratory abilities of lung cancer cells were evaluated by Transwell assay. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP2 enzyme activity was evaluated by gelatin zymography. Results Rap2a is significantly upregulated in lung cancer cells. The results of enzyme digestion and sequencing showed that the coding sequence of pcDNA3.1(+-Rap2a was right and was inserted into the vector correctly. The results of Western blot showed that H1299 and A549 cells were transfected successfully. Transwell assay indicated that the ectopic expression of Rap2a promotes lung cancer cells migration. Correspondly, enzyme activity of MMP2 also increased. Conclusion Eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1(+-Rap2a was constructed successfully. Rap2a could be expressed in lung cancer cells efficiently and promotes lung cancer cell migration.

  18. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M; Clarke, Frank M; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration. PMID:26760912

  19. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneet Bhatia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1 in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1 expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration.

  20. Cell Migration from Baby to Mother

    OpenAIRE

    Dawe, Gavin S.; Tan, Xiao Wei; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Fetal cells migrate into the mother during pregnancy. Fetomaternal transfer probably occurs in all pregnancies and in humans the fetal cells can persist for decades. Microchimeric fetal cells are found in various maternal tissues and organs including blood, bone marrow, skin and liver. In mice, fetal cells have also been found in the brain. The fetal cells also appear to target sites of injury. Fetomaternal microchimerism may have important implications for the immune status of women, influen...

  1. A computational model of amoeboid cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Fong Yin; Koon, Yen Ling; Chiam, Keng-Hwee

    2013-10-01

    We present a two-dimensional computational model of amoeboid cell migration characterised by cell shape changes due to the formation and extension of protrusions known as blebs. Using this model, we numerically study the deformation of the cell membrane during blebbing, as well as the effects of obstacles, such as protein fibres in the extracellular matrix, on the motion of the blebbing cell. The model is established in the framework of Stokes flow. Cell membrane deformation is coupled to membrane tension, membrane bending, membrane-cortex adhesion and cortical activities via the intracellular and extracellular fluid field described by the Stokes equation. By assuming that actin monomers move at constant speed towards the membrane and polymerise when they approach the membrane, our model shows that the cell movement in unconfined space can be sustained. We also study how a migrating cell interacts with obstacles hydrodynamically, allowing us to model cell migration in confined environments and to investigate the effects of confinement on the cell migration speed. Our model can be used to further study how tumour cells move through the extracellular matrix during cancer metastasis. PMID:23342988

  2. Engineered Models of Confined Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Colin D; Hung, Wei-Chien; Wirtz, Denis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-07-11

    Cells in the body are physically confined by neighboring cells, tissues, and the extracellular matrix. Although physical confinement modulates intracellular signaling and the underlying mechanisms of cell migration, it is difficult to study in vivo. Furthermore, traditional two-dimensional cell migration assays do not recapitulate the complex topographies found in the body. Therefore, a number of experimental in vitro models that confine and impose forces on cells in well-defined microenvironments have been engineered. We describe the design and use of microfluidic microchannel devices, grooved substrates, micropatterned lines, vertical confinement devices, patterned hydrogels, and micropipette aspiration assays for studying cell responses to confinement. Use of these devices has enabled the delineation of changes in cytoskeletal reorganization, cell-substrate adhesions, intracellular signaling, nuclear shape, and gene expression that result from physical confinement. These assays and the physiologically relevant signaling pathways that have been elucidated are beginning to have a translational and clinical impact. PMID:27420571

  3. Collective cell migration: guidance principles and hierarchies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeger, Anna; Wolf, Katarina; Zegers, Mirjam M; Friedl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Collective cell migration results from the establishment and maintenance of collective polarization, mechanocoupling, and cytoskeletal kinetics. The guidance of collective cell migration depends on a reciprocal process between cell-intrinsic multicellular organization with leader-follower cell behavior and results in mechanosensory integration of extracellular guidance cues. Important guidance mechanisms include chemotaxis, haptotaxis, durotaxis, and strain-induced mechanosensing to move cell groups along interfaces and paths of least resistance. Additional guidance mechanisms steering cell groups during specialized conditions comprise electrotaxis and passive drift. To form higher-order cell and tissue structures during morphogenesis and cancer invasion, these guidance principles act in parallel and are integrated for collective adaptation to and shaping of varying tissue environments. We review mechanochemical and electrical inputs and multiparameter signal integration underlying collective guidance, decision making, and outcome. PMID:26137890

  4. Migration of cells in a social context

    OpenAIRE

    Vedel, Søren; Tay, Savaş; Johnston, Darius M.; Bruus, Henrik; Quake, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    In multicellular organisms and complex ecosystems, cells migrate in a social context. Whereas this is essential for the basic processes of life, the influence of neighboring cells on the individual remains poorly understood. Previous work on isolated cells has observed a stereotypical migratory behavior characterized by short-time directional persistence with long-time random movement. We discovered a much richer dynamic in the social context, with significant variations in directionality, di...

  5. A dynamic real time in vivo and static ex vivo analysis of granulomonocytic cell migration in the collagen-induced arthritis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Byrne

    Full Text Available Neutrophilic granulocytes and monocytes (granulomonocytic cells; GMC drive the inflammatory process at the earliest stages of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The migratory behavior and functional properties of GMC within the synovial tissue are, however, only incompletely characterized. Here we have analyzed GMC in the murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA model of RA using multi-photon real time in vivo microscopy together with ex vivo analysis of GMC in tissue sections.GMC were abundant as soon as clinical arthritis was apparent. GMC were motile and migrated randomly through the synovial tissue. In addition, we observed the frequent formation of cell clusters consisting of both neutrophilic granulocytes and monocytes that actively contributed to the inflammatory process of arthritis. Treatment of animals with a single dose of prednisolone reduced the mean velocity of cell migration and diminished the overall immigration of GMC.In summary, our study shows that the combined application of real time in vivo microscopy together with elaborate static post-mortem analysis of GMC enables the description of dynamic migratory characteristics of GMC together with their precise location in a complex anatomical environment. Moreover, this approach is sensitive enough to detect subtle therapeutic effects within a very short period of time.

  6. Plasticity of cell migration: a multiscale tuning model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedl, P.H.A.; Wolf, K. van der

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration underlies tissue formation, maintenance, and regeneration as well as pathological conditions such as cancer invasion. Structural and molecular determinants of both tissue environment and cell behavior define whether cells migrate individually (through amoeboid or mesenchymal modes) or

  7. T cell migration, search strategies and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krummel, Matthew F; Bartumeus, Frederic; Gérard, Audrey

    2016-03-01

    T cell migration is essential for T cell responses; it allows for the detection of cognate antigen at the surface of antigen-presenting cells and for interactions with other cells involved in the immune response. Although appearing random, growing evidence suggests that T cell motility patterns are strategic and governed by mechanisms that are optimized for both the activation stage of the cell and for environment-specific cues. In this Opinion article, we discuss how the combined effects of T cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic forces influence T cell motility patterns in the context of highly complex tissues that are filled with other cells involved in parallel motility. In particular, we examine how insights from 'search theory' can be used to describe T cell movement across an 'exploitation-exploration trade-off' in the context of activation versus effector function and lymph nodes versus peripheral tissues. PMID:26852928

  8. SKIN DENDRITIC CELLS: ACTIVATION, MATURATION AND MIGRATION

    OpenAIRE

    Eaton, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Langerhans’ cells (LC) are the dendritic cells (DC) of the epidermis and, as sentinels of the immune system, act as a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune responses. When LC, and other DC, recognise an antigen or pathogen they mature and are stimulated to migrate to the lymph nodes, where they orchestrate immune responses. Pathogen derived toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, and chemical allergens, are recognised as being potentially harmful and stimulate LC to mobilise and mature. Cyt...

  9. Nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Toro, Raquel; Chèvre, Raphael; Rodríguez, Cristina; Ordóñez, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Andrés, Vicente; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading death cause. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells participate in atherogenesis, but it is unclear whether other mesenchymal cells contribute to this process. Bone marrow (BM) nestin(+) cells cooperate with endothelial cells in directing monocyte egress to bloodstream in response to infections. However, it remains unknown whether nestin(+) cells regulate inflammatory cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Here, we show that nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration during chronic inflammation. In Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice fed with high-fat diet, BM nestin(+) cells regulate the egress of inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils. In the aorta, nestin(+) stromal cells increase ∼30 times and contribute to the atheroma plaque. Mcp1 deletion in nestin(+) cells-but not in endothelial cells only- increases circulating inflammatory cells, but decreases their aortic infiltration, delaying atheroma plaque formation and aortic valve calcification. Therefore, nestin expression marks cells that regulate inflammatory cell migration during atherosclerosis. PMID:27586429

  10. Spatial Autocorrelation Analysis of Migration and Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Sokal, R R; Jacquez, G M; Wooten, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    We test various assumptions necessary for the interpretation of spatial autocorrelation analysis of gene frequency surfaces, using simulations of Wright's isolation-by-distance model with migration or selection superimposed. Increasing neighborhood size enhances spatial autocorrelation, which is reduced again for the largest neighborhood sizes. Spatial correlograms are independent of the mean gene frequency of the surface. Migration affects surfaces and correlograms when immigrant gene freque...

  11. Optimal chemotaxis in animal cell intermittent migration

    CERN Document Server

    Romanczuk, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    Animal cells can sense chemical gradients without moving, and are faced with the challenge of migrating towards a target despite noisy information on the target position. Here we discuss optimal search strategies for a chaser that moves by switching between two phases of motion ("run" and "tumble"), reorienting itself towards the target during tumble phases, and performing a persistent random walk during run phases. We show that the chaser average run time can be adjusted to minimize the target catching time or the spatial dispersion of the chasers. We obtain analytical results for the catching time and for the spatial dispersion in the limits of small and large ratios of run time to tumble time, and scaling laws for the optimal run times. Our findings have implications for optimal chemotactic strategies in animal cell migration.

  12. Correction of Migration Through Resolution Cell in ISAR Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANGZhenglin; XINGMengdao; BAOZheng

    2004-01-01

    For ISAR imaging-radar, after the translation motion compensated, the target can be changed to turntable and the R-D (Range-Doppler) algorithm usually adopted is based on small target flying steadily, with the assumption that all of the scatterers are not migrated through their range cells. But for maneuvering target this assumption is not satisfied, as the Doppler frequency is time varying. Actually, to obtain the cross-range resolution of dozens of centimeters for the large-scale or medium targets, especially for S or L wave band, with wave length so short, MTRC (the Migration through resolution cell)would occur on both fringes of the ISAR imaging. The Doppler migration is basically caused by nonuniform rotation of several parts of the target, so that the Doppler frequency of each scatterer is time varying, which can be accumulated coherently by the method of time-frequency analysis in order to get instant range-Doppler image. In this paper, the reason that causes migration through resolution cell is discussed, and a compensating algorithm is proposed. The method of time-frequency analysis to every range cell of scattererer is applied to estimate its instant frequency after range compressing and MTRC correcting,so that the quadratic term can be adjusted. Simulated data and real data prove that this method is effective.

  13. Glucocorticoid receptor beta increases migration of human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeth, Lucien; Nwaneri, Assumpta C; Grabnar, Maria; Demeter, Jonathan; Nestor-Kalinoski, Andrea; Hinds, Terry D

    2016-05-10

    Bladder cancer is observed worldwide having been associated with a host of environmental and lifestyle risk factors. Recent investigations on anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid signaling point to a pathway that may impact bladder cancer. Here we show an inverse effect on the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) isoform signaling that may lead to bladder cancer. We found similar GRα expression levels in the transitional uroepithelial cancer cell lines T24 and UMUC-3. However, the T24 cells showed a significant (p < 0.05) increased expression of GRβ compared to UMUC-3, which also correlated with higher migration rates. Knockdown of GRβ in the T24 cells resulted in a decreased migration rate. Mutational analysis of the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of human GRβ revealed that miR144 might positively regulate expression. Indeed, overexpression of miR144 increased GRβ by 3.8 fold. In addition, miR144 and GRβ were upregulated during migration. We used a peptide nucleic acid conjugated to a cell penetrating-peptide (Sweet-P) to block the binding site for miR144 in the 3'UTR of GRβ. Sweet-P effectively prevented miR144 actions and decreased GRβ expression, as well as the migration of the T24 human bladder cancer cells. Therefore, GRβ may have a significant role in bladder cancer, and possibly serve as a therapeutic target for the disease. PMID:27036026

  14. Analysis of in vitro lymphocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration by fluorescent-beads-based flow cytometric cell counting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molema, Ingrid; Mesander, G; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Helfrich, Wijnand; Meijer, D.K F; de Leij, Lou

    1998-01-01

    In this report, we describe a new and simple method for flow cytometric quantitation of lymphocyte numbers in lymphocute-endothelial adhesion/transendothelial migration assays. The method exploits fluorescent flow cytometer alignment beads as a counting reference. Known amounts of beads are added to

  15. The front and rear of collective cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Roberto; Etienne-Manneville, Sandrine

    2016-02-01

    Collective cell migration has a key role during morphogenesis and during wound healing and tissue renewal in the adult, and it is involved in cancer spreading. In addition to displaying a coordinated migratory behaviour, collectively migrating cells move more efficiently than if they migrated separately, which indicates that a cellular interplay occurs during collective cell migration. In recent years, evidence has accumulated confirming the importance of such intercellular communication and exploring the molecular mechanisms involved. These mechanisms are based both on direct physical interactions, which coordinate the cellular responses, and on the collective cell behaviour that generates an optimal environment for efficient directed migration. The recent studies have described how leader cells at the front of cell groups drive migration and have highlighted the importance of follower cells and cell-cell communication, both between followers and between follower and leader cells, to improve the efficiency of collective movement. PMID:26726037

  16. Primary Cilia, Signaling Networks and Cell Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veland, Iben Rønn

    controls directional cell migration as a physiological response. The ciliary pocket is a membrane invagination with elevated activity of clathrin-dependent endocytosis (CDE). In paper I, we show that the primary cilium regulates TGF-β signaling and the ciliary pocket is a compartment for CDE......-dependent regulation of signal transduction. Upon ligand-binding and activation in the cilium, TGFβ receptors accumulate and are internalized at the ciliary base together with Smad2/3 transcription factors that are phosphorylated here and translocated to the nucleus for target gene expression. These processes depend...... migration. A number of central Wnt components localize to the fibroblast primary cilium, including the Wnt5a-receptor, Fzd3, and Dvl proteins. Inversin-deficient MEFs have an elevated expression of canonical Wnt-associated genes and proteins, in addition to dysregulation of components in non-canonical Wnt...

  17. Alignment of cell division axes in directed epithelial cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell division is an essential dynamic event in tissue remodeling during wound healing, cancer and embryogenesis. In collective migration, tensile stresses affect cell shape and polarity, hence, the orientation of the cell division axis is expected to depend on cellular flow patterns. Here, we study the degree of orientation of cell division axes in migrating and resting epithelial cell sheets. We use microstructured channels to create a defined scenario of directed cell invasion and compare this situation to resting but proliferating cell monolayers. In experiments, we find a strong alignment of the axis due to directed flow while resting sheets show very weak global order, but local flow gradients still correlate strongly with the cell division axis. We compare experimental results with a previously published mesoscopic particle based simulation model. Most of the observed effects are reproduced by the simulations. (paper)

  18. Flow-Driven Cell Migration under External Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yizeng; Mori, Yoichiro; Sun, Sean X.

    2015-12-01

    Electric fields influence many aspects of cell physiology, including various forms of cell migration. Many cells are sensitive to electric fields, and they can migrate toward a cathode or an anode, depending on the cell type. In this Letter, we examine an actomyosin-independent mode of cell migration under electrical fields. Our theory considers a one-dimensional cell with water and ionic fluxes at the cell boundary. Water fluxes through the membrane are governed by the osmotic pressure difference across the cell membrane. Fluxes of cations and anions across the cell membrane are determined by the properties of the ion channels as well as the external electric field. Results show that without actin polymerization and myosin contraction, electric fields can also drive cell migration, even when the cell is not polarized. The direction of migration with respect to the electric field direction is influenced by the properties of ion channels, and are cell-type dependent.

  19. Carbon Ion Irradiation Inhibits Glioma Cell Migration Through Downregulation of Integrin Expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of carbon ion irradiation on glioma cell migration. Methods and Materials: U87 and Ln229 glioma cells were irradiated with photons and carbon ions. Migration was analyzed 24 h after irradiation. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis was performed in order to quantify surface expression of integrins. Results: Single photon doses of 2 Gy and 10 Gy enhanced ανβ3 and ανβ5 integrin expression and caused tumor cell hypermigration on both vitronectin (Vn) and fibronectin (Fn). Compared to integrin expression in unirradiated cells, carbon ion irradiation caused decreased integrin expression and inhibited cell migration on both Vn and Fn. Conclusion: Photon radiotherapy (RT) enhances the risk of tumor cell migration and subsequently promotes locoregional spread via photon induction of integrin expression. In contrast to photon RT, carbon ion RT causes decreased integrin expression and suppresses glioma cell migration on both Vn and Fn, thus promising improved local control.

  20. Silencing of directional migration in roundabout4 knockdown endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts David D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Roundabouts are axon guidance molecules that have recently been identified to play a role in vascular guidance as well. In this study, we have investigated gene knockdown analysis of endothelial Robos, in particular roundabout 4 (robo4, the predominant Robo in endothelial cells using small interfering RNA technology in vitro. Results Robo1 and Robo4 knockdown cells display distinct activity in endothelial cell migration assay. The knockdown of robo4 abrogated the chemotactic response of endothelial cells to serum but enhanced a chemokinetic response to Slit2, while robo1 knockdown cells do not display chemotactic response to serum or VEGF. Robo4 knockdown endothelial cells unexpectedly show up regulation of Rho GTPases. Zebrafish Robo4 rescues both Rho GTPase homeostasis and serum reduced chemotaxis in robo4 knockdown cells. Robo1 and Robo4 interact and share molecules such as Slit2, Mena and Vilse, a Cdc42-GAP. In addition, this study mechanistically implicates IRSp53 in the signaling nexus between activated Cdc42 and Mena, both of which have previously been shown to be involved with Robo4 signaling in endothelial cells. Conclusion This study identifies specific components of the Robo signaling apparatus that work together to guide directional migration of endothelial cells.

  1. Differential migration and proliferation of geometrical ensembles of cell clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Girish; Chen, Bo; Co, Carlos C.; Ho, Chia-Chi, E-mail: hocc@email.uc.edu

    2011-06-10

    Differential cell migration and growth drives the organization of specific tissue forms and plays a critical role in embryonic development, tissue morphogenesis, and tumor invasion. Localized gradients of soluble factors and extracellular matrix have been shown to modulate cell migration and proliferation. Here we show that in addition to these factors, initial tissue geometry can feedback to generate differential proliferation, cell polarity, and migration patterns. We apply layer by layer polyelectrolyte assembly to confine multicellular organization and subsequently release cells to demonstrate the spatial patterns of cell migration and growth. The cell shapes, spreading areas, and cell-cell contacts are influenced strongly by the confining geometry. Cells within geometric ensembles are morphologically polarized. Symmetry breaking was observed for cells on the circular pattern and cells migrate toward the corners and in the direction parallel to the longest dimension of the geometric shapes. This migration pattern is disrupted when actomyosin based tension was inhibited. Cells near the edge or corner of geometric shapes proliferate while cells within do not. Regions of higher rate of cell migration corresponded to regions of concentrated growth. These findings demonstrate that multicellular organization can result in spatial patterns of migration and proliferation.

  2. A Galvanotaxis Assay for Analysis of Neural Precursor Cell Migration Kinetics in an Externally Applied Direct Current Electric Field

    OpenAIRE

    Babona-Pilipos, Robart; Popovic, Milos R.; Morshead, Cindi M.

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of neural stem and progenitor cells (collectively termed neural precursor cells) (NPCs) in the adult mammalian brain has led to a body of research aimed at utilizing the multipotent and proliferative properties of these cells for the development of neuroregenerative strategies. A critical step for the success of such strategies is the mobilization of NPCs toward a lesion site following exogenous transplantation or to enhance the response of the endogenous precursors that are fou...

  3. IN VITRO ANALYSIS OF MIGRATION ACTIVITY OF ENCEPHALYTOGENIC T CEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Nosov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in an adoptive transfer model is caused by injecting animal with activated T cells specific for a CNS antigen, e.g., basic myelin protein. Development of autimmune inflammation in such a model is connected with changed functional stateof encephalytogenic (EG T cells in the coure of disease progression, as reflected by changes in their activation, proliferation and motility levels. Present work describes an original technique allowing for in vitro analysis of encephalytogenic T cell motility, and studying effects of certain compomemts of extracellular matrix upon migration and functional activities of EG T cells.

  4. How inhibitory cues can both constrain and promote cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronner, Marianne E

    2016-06-01

    Collective cell migration is a common feature in both embryogenesis and metastasis. By coupling studies of neural crest migration in vivo and in vitro with mathematical modeling, Szabó et al. (2016, J. Cell Biol., http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201602083) demonstrate that the proteoglycan versican forms a physical boundary that constrains neural crest cells to discrete streams, in turn facilitating their migration. PMID:27269064

  5. On the theory of cell migration: durotaxis and chemotaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Íñiguez, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental element in a variety of physiological and pathological processes. Alteration of its regulatory mechanisms leads to loss of adhesion and increased motility, critical steps in the initial stages of metastasis. Consequently, cell migration has become the focus of intensive experimental and theoretical studies; however the understanding many of its mechanisms remains elusive. Cell migration is the result of a periodic sequence of protrusion, adhesion remodeling and...

  6. Lutein Inhibits the Migration of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells via Cytosolic and Mitochondrial Akt Pathways (Lutein Inhibits RPE Cells Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chieh Su

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available During the course of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells will de-differentiate, proliferate, and migrate onto the surfaces of the sensory retina. Several studies have shown that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF can induce migration of RPE cells via an Akt-related pathway. In this study, the effect of lutein on PDGF-BB-induced RPE cells migration was examined using transwell migration assays and Western blot analyses. We found that both phosphorylation of Akt and mitochondrial translocation of Akt in RPE cells induced by PDGF-BB stimulation were suppressed by lutein. Furthermore, the increased migration observed in RPE cells with overexpressed mitochondrial Akt could also be suppressed by lutein. Our results demonstrate that lutein can inhibit PDGF-BB induced RPE cells migration through the inhibition of both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Akt activation.

  7. Extravillous trophoblast cells-derived exosomes promote Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos eSalomon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs migration is a critical process during human uterine spiral artery (SpA remodeling and a successful pregnancy. Extravillous trophoblast cells (EVT interact with VSMC and enhance their migration, however, the mechanisms by which EVT remodel SpA remain to be fully elucidated. We hypothesize that exosomes released from EVT promote VSMC migration.Methods: JEG-3 and HTR-8/SVneo cell lines were used as models for EVT. Cells were cultured at 37 0C and humidified under an atmosphere of 5% CO2-balanced N2 to obtain 8% O2. Cell-conditioned media were collected and exosomes (exo-JEG-3 and exo- HTR-8/SVneo isolated by differential and buoyant density centrifugation. The effects of exo-EVT on VSMC migration were established using a real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™. Exosomal proteins where identified by mass spectrometry and submitted to bioinformatic pathway analysis (Ingenuity software .Results: HTR-8/SVneo cells were significantly more (~30% invasive than JEG-3 cells. HTR-8/SVneo cells released 2.6-fold more exosomes (6.39 x 108 ± 2.5 x108 particles/106 cells compared to JEG-3 (2.86 x 108 ± 0.78 x108 particles/106 cells. VSMC migration was significantly increased in the presence of exo-JEG-3 and exo-HTR-8/SVneo compared to control (-exosomes (21.83 ± 0.49 h and 15.57 ± 0.32, respectively, versus control 25.09 ± 0.58 h, p<0.05. Sonication completely abolished the effect of exosomes on VSMC migration. Finally, mass spectrometry analysis identified unique exosomal proteins for each EVT cell line-derived exosomes.Conclusion: The data obtained in this study are consistent with the hypothesis that the release, content and bioactivity of exosomes derived from EVT-like cell lines is cell origin-dependent and differentially regulates VSMC migration. Thus, an EVT exosomal signaling pathway may contribute to SpA remodeling by promoting the migration of VSMC out of the vessel walls.

  8. Leader Cells Define Directionality of Trunk, but Not Cranial, Neural Crest Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jo; Gauert, Anton; Briones Montecinos, Luis; Fanlo, Lucía; Alhashem, Zainalabdeen Mohmammed; Assar, Rodrigo; Marti, Elisa; Kabla, Alexandre; Härtel, Steffen; Linker, Claudia

    2016-05-31

    Collective cell migration is fundamental for life and a hallmark of cancer. Neural crest (NC) cells migrate collectively, but the mechanisms governing this process remain controversial. Previous analyses in Xenopus indicate that cranial NC (CNC) cells are a homogeneous population relying on cell-cell interactions for directional migration, while chick embryo analyses suggest a heterogeneous population with leader cells instructing directionality. Our data in chick and zebrafish embryos show that CNC cells do not require leader cells for migration and all cells present similar migratory capacities. In contrast, laser ablation of trunk NC (TNC) cells shows that leader cells direct movement and cell-cell contacts are required for migration. Moreover, leader and follower identities are acquired before the initiation of migration and remain fixed thereafter. Thus, two distinct mechanisms establish the directionality of CNC cells and TNC cells. This implies the existence of multiple molecular mechanisms for collective cell migration. PMID:27210753

  9. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J.

    2016-09-01

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration.

  10. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J

    2016-09-14

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration. PMID:27406341

  11. Cancer cell migration:when red light switched to green

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seth J Corey; Jindan Yu

    2011-01-01

    @@ The doctrine of 'the golden mean'of the Confucian certainly applies at the molecular level to cell growth and migration.It is critically important for tissue architec-ture and homeostasis that cells stop prolifera-tion when reaching appropriate density and halt migration in a direction to avoid collision with others.

  12. Osteoactivin Promotes Migration of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosarena, Oneida A; Dela Cadena, Raul A; Denny, Michael F; Bryant, Evan; Barr, Eric W; Thorpe, Ryan; Safadi, Fayez F

    2016-08-01

    Nearly 50% of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) die of metastases or locoregional recurrence. Metastasis is mediated by cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Osteoactivin (OA) overexpression plays a role in metastases in several malignancies. The aims were to determine how integrin interactions modulate OA-induced OSCC cell migration; and to investigate OA effects on cell survival and proliferation. We confirmed OA mRNA and protein overexpression in OSCC cell lines. We assessed OA's interactions with integrins using adhesion inhibition assays, fluorescent immunocytochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation. We investigated OA-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and cell survival. Integrin inhibition effects on OA-mediated cell migration were determined. We assessed effects of OA knock-down on cell migration and proliferation. OA is overexpressed in OSCC cell lines, and serves as a migration-promoting adhesion molecule. OA co-localized with integrin subunits, and co-immunoprecipitated with the subunits. Integrin blocking antibodies, especially those directed against the β1 subunit, inhibited cell adhesion (P = 0.03 for SCC15 cells). Adhesion to OA activated MAPKs in UMSCC14a cells and OA treatment promoted survival of SCC15 cells. Integrin-neutralizing antibodies enhanced cell migration with OA in the extracellular matrix. OA knock-down resulted in decreased proliferation of SCC15 and SCC25 cells, but did not inhibit cell migration. OA in the extracellular matrix promotes OSCC cell adhesion and migration, and may be a novel target in the prevention of HNSCC spread. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1761-1770, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26636434

  13. Collagen attachment to the substrate controls cell clustering through migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell clustering and scattering play important roles in cancer progression and tissue engineering. While the extracellular matrix (ECM) is known to control cell clustering, much of the quantitative work has focused on the analysis of clustering between cells with strong cell–cell junctions. Much less is known about how the ECM regulates cells with weak cell–cell contact. Clustering characteristics were quantified in rat adenocarcinoma cells, which form clusters on physically adsorbed collagen substrates, but not on covalently attached collagen substrates. Covalently attaching collagen inhibited desorption of collagen from the surface. While changes in proliferation rate could not explain differences seen in the clustering, changes in cell motility could. Cells plated under conditions that resulted in more clustering had a lower persistence time and slower migration rate than those under conditions that resulted in less clustering. Understanding how the ECM regulates clustering will not only impact the fundamental understanding of cancer progression, but also will guide the design of tissue engineered constructs that allow for the clustering or dissemination of cells throughout the construct. (paper)

  14. Collective cell migration drives morphogenesis of the kidney nephron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Vasilyev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue organization in epithelial organs is achieved during development by the combined processes of cell differentiation and morphogenetic cell movements. In the kidney, the nephron is the functional organ unit. Each nephron is an epithelial tubule that is subdivided into discrete segments with specific transport functions. Little is known about how nephron segments are defined or how segments acquire their distinctive morphology and cell shape. Using live, in vivo cell imaging of the forming zebrafish pronephric nephron, we found that the migration of fully differentiated epithelial cells accounts for both the final position of nephron segment boundaries and the characteristic convolution of the proximal tubule. Pronephric cells maintain adherens junctions and polarized apical brush border membranes while they migrate collectively. Individual tubule cells exhibit basal membrane protrusions in the direction of movement and appear to establish transient, phosphorylated Focal Adhesion Kinase-positive adhesions to the basement membrane. Cell migration continued in the presence of camptothecin, indicating that cell division does not drive migration. Lengthening of the nephron was, however, accompanied by an increase in tubule cell number, specifically in the most distal, ret1-positive nephron segment. The initiation of cell migration coincided with the onset of fluid flow in the pronephros. Complete blockade of pronephric fluid flow prevented cell migration and proximal nephron convolution. Selective blockade of proximal, filtration-driven fluid flow shifted the position of tubule convolution distally and revealed a role for cilia-driven fluid flow in persistent migration of distal nephron cells. We conclude that nephron morphogenesis is driven by fluid flow-dependent, collective epithelial cell migration within the confines of the tubule basement membrane. Our results establish intimate links between nephron function, fluid flow, and morphogenesis.

  15. Single cell migration dynamics mediated by geometric confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Hou, Ruixia; Xiao, Peng; Xing, Rubo; Chen, Tao; Han, Yanchun; Ren, Penggang; Fu, Jun

    2016-09-01

    The migration dynamics of cells plays a key role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Previous studies mostly focus on regulating stem cell fate and phenotype by biophysical cues. In contrast, less is known about how the geometric cues mediate the migration dynamics of cells. Here, we fabricate graphene oxide (GO) microstripes on cell non-adhesive PEG substrate by using micromolding in capillary (MIMIC) method. Such micropatterns with alternating cell adhesion and cell resistance enable an effective control of selective adhesion and migration of single cells. The sharp contrast in cell adhesion minimizes the invasion of cells into the PEG patterns, and thereby strongly confines the cells on GO microstripes. As a result, the cells are forced to adapt highly polarized, elongated, and oriented geometry to fit the patterns. A series of pattern widths have been fabricated to modulate the extent of cell deformation and polarization. Under strong confinement, the cytoskeleton contractility, intracellular traction, and actin filament elongation are highly promoted, which result in enhanced cell migration along the patterns. This work provides an important insight into developing combinatorial graphene-based patterns for the control of cell migration dynamics, which is of great significance for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:27137805

  16. EMPIRICAL-NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF HEADCUT MIGRATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Headcut migration is studied by using empirical and numerical modeling approaches. Empirical formulas for the headcut migration are established using available measurement data, which consider not only the flow strength but also the properties of soil. Numerical model for the headcut migration is proposed. The influences of dynamic pressure gradient, downward flow, and bed slope on sediment entrainment are considered. The local erosion patterns and migration speeds of headcut calculated by the numerical model agree reasonably well with observed data.

  17. Migration Flows: Measurement, Analysis and Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willekens, F.J.; White, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter is an introduction to the study of migration flows. It starts with a review of major definition and measurement issues. Comparative studies of migration are particularly difficult because different countries define migration differently and measurement methods are not harmonized. Insigh

  18. CXCR7 is induced by hypoxia and mediates glioma cell migration towards SDF-1α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastomas, the most common and malignant brain tumors of the central nervous system, exhibit high invasive capacity, which hinders effective therapy. Therefore, intense efforts aimed at improved therapeutics are ongoing to delineate the molecular mechanisms governing glioma cell migration and invasion. In order to perform the studies, we employed optimal cell culture methods and hypoxic conditions, lentivirus-mediated knockdown of protein expression, Western Blot analysis, migration assays and immunoprecipitation. We determined statistical significance by unpaired t-test. In this report, we show that U87MG, LN229 and LN308 glioma cells express CXCR7 and that exposure to hypoxia upregulates CXCR7 protein expression in these cell lines. CXCR7-expressing U87MG, LN229 and LN308 glioma cells migrated towards stromal-derived factor (SDF)-1α/CXCL12 in hypoxic conditions in the Boyden chamber assays. While shRNA-mediated knockdown of CXCR7 expression did not affect the migration of any of the three cell lines in normoxic conditions, we observed a reduction in the migration of LN229 and LN308, but not U87MG, glioma cells towards SDF-1α in hypoxic conditions. In addition, knockdown of CXCR7 expression in LN229 and LN308 glioma cells decreased levels of SDF-1α-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt. Inhibiting CXCR4 in LN229 and LN308 glioma cells that were knocked down for CXCR7 did not further reduce migration towards SDF-1α in hypoxic conditions and did not affect the levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and Akt. Analysis of immunoprecipitated CXCR4 from LN229 and LN308 glioma cells revealed co-precipitated CXCR7. Taken together, our findings indicate that both CXCR4 and CXCR7 mediate glioma cell migration towards SDF-1α in hypoxic conditions and support the development of therapeutic agents targeting these receptors

  19. Exploration of molecular pathways mediating electric field-directed Schwann cell migration by RNA-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Li; Li, Yongchao; Knapp, Jennifer; Smith, Peter

    2015-07-01

    In peripheral nervous systems, Schwann cells wrap around axons of motor and sensory neurons to form the myelin sheath. Following spinal cord injury, Schwann cells regenerate and migrate to the lesion and are involved in the spinal cord regeneration process. Transplantation of Schwann cells into injured neural tissue results in enhanced spinal axonal regeneration. Effective directional migration of Schwann cells is critical in the neural regeneration process. In this study, we report that Schwann cells migrate anodally in an applied electric field (EF). The directedness and displacement of anodal migration increased significantly when the strength of the EF increased from 50 mV/mm to 200 mV/mm. The EF did not significantly affect the cell migration speed. To explore the genes and signaling pathways that regulate cell migration in EFs, we performed a comparative analysis of differential gene expression between cells stimulated with an EF (100 mV/mm) and those without using next-generation RNA sequencing, verified by RT-qPCR. Based on the cut-off criteria (FC > 1.2, q < 0.05), we identified 1,045 up-regulated and 1,636 down-regulated genes in control cells versus EF-stimulated cells. A Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis found that compared to the control group, 21 pathways are down-regulated, while 10 pathways are up-regulated. Differentially expressed genes participate in multiple cellular signaling pathways involved in the regulation of cell migration, including pathways of regulation of actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, and PI3K-Akt. PMID:25557037

  20. Dynamic Cell Adhesion and Migration on Nanoscale Grooved Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, E.; Riet, te J.; Domanski, M.; Luttge, R.; Figdor, C.G.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to init

  1. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, E.; Riet, J. te; Domanski, M.; Luttge, R.; Figdor, C.G.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to init

  2. Olfactory ensheathing cells form the microenvironment of migrating GnRH-1 neurons during mouse development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Sarah; Kolasa, Elise; Tillet, Yves; Duittoz, Anne; Vaudin, Pascal

    2013-04-01

    During development, GnRH-1 neurons differentiate extracerebraly from the nasal placode and migrate from the vomeronasal organ to the forebrain along vomeronasal and terminal nerves. Numerous studies have described the influence of different molecules on the migration of GnRH-1 neurons, however, the role of microenvironment cells remains poorly understood. This study used GFAP-GFP transgenic mice to detect glial cells at early developmental stages. Using nasal explant cultures, the comigration of glial cells with GnRH-1 neurons was clearly demonstrated. This in vitro approach showed that glial cells began migrating from the explants before GnRH-1 neurons. They remained ahead of the GnRH-1 migratory front and stopped migrating after the GnRH-1 neurons. The association of these glial cells with the axons combined with gene expression analysis of GFAP-GFP sorted cells enabled them to be identified as olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC). Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the presence of multiple glial cell-type markers showing several OEC subpopulations surrounding GnRH-1 neurons. Moreover, these OEC expressed genes whose products are involved in the migration of GnRH-1 neurons, such as Nelf and Semaphorin 4. In situ data confirmed that the majority of the GnRH-1 neurons were associated with glial cells along the vomeronasal axons in nasal septum and terminal nerves in the nasal forebrain junction as early as E12.5. Overall, these data demonstrate an OEC microenvironment for migrating GnRH-1 neurons during mouse development. The fact that this glial cell type precedes GnRH-1 neurons and encodes for molecules involved in their nasal migration suggests that it participates in the GnRH-1 system ontogenesis. PMID:23404564

  3. Alk1 controls arterial endothelial cell migration in lumenized vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, Elizabeth R; Menon, Prahlad G; Roman, Beth L

    2016-07-15

    Heterozygous loss of the arterial-specific TGFβ type I receptor, activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1; ACVRL1), causes hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). HHT is characterized by development of fragile, direct connections between arteries and veins, or arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). However, how decreased ALK1 signaling leads to AVMs is unknown. To understand the cellular mis-steps that cause AVMs, we assessed endothelial cell behavior in alk1-deficient zebrafish embryos, which develop cranial AVMs. Our data demonstrate that alk1 loss has no effect on arterial endothelial cell proliferation but alters arterial endothelial cell migration within lumenized vessels. In wild-type embryos, alk1-positive cranial arterial endothelial cells generally migrate towards the heart, against the direction of blood flow, with some cells incorporating into endocardium. In alk1-deficient embryos, migration against flow is dampened and migration in the direction of flow is enhanced. Altered migration results in decreased endothelial cell number in arterial segments proximal to the heart and increased endothelial cell number in arterial segments distal to the heart. We speculate that the consequent increase in distal arterial caliber and hemodynamic load precipitates the flow-dependent development of downstream AVMs. PMID:27287800

  4. The sweet spot: how GAGs help chemokines guide migrating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monneau, Yoan; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues

    2016-06-01

    Glycosaminoglycans are polysaccharides that occur both at the cell surface and within extracellular matrices. Through their ability to bind to a large array of proteins, almost 500 of which have been identified to date, including most chemokines, these molecules regulate key biologic processes at the cell-tissue interface. To do so, glycosaminoglycans can provide scaffolds to ensure that proteins mediating specific functions will be presented at the correct site and time and can also directly contribute to biologic activities or signaling processes. The binding of chemokines to glycosaminoglycans, which, at the biochemical level, has been mostly studied using heparin, has traditionally been thought of as a mechanism for maintaining haptotactic gradients within tissues along which cells can migrate directionally. Many aspects of chemokine-glycosaminoglycan interactions, however, also suggest that the formation of these complexes could serve additional purposes that go well beyond a simple immobilization process. In addition, progress in glycobiology has revealed that glycosaminoglycan structures, in term of length, sulfation, and epimerization pattern, are specific for cell, tissue, and developmental stage. Glycosaminoglycan regulation and glycosaminoglycan diversity, which cannot be replicated using heparin, thus suggests that these molecules may fine-tune the immune response by selectively recruiting specific chemokines to cell surfaces. In this context, the aim of the present text is to review the chemokine-glycosaminoglycan complexes described to date and provide a critical analysis of the tools, molecules, and strategies that can be used to structurally and functionally investigate the formation of these complexes. PMID:26701132

  5. Uronyl 2-O sulfotransferase potentiates Fgf2-induced cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolovska, Katerina; Spillmann, Dorothe; Seidler, Daniela G

    2015-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (Fgf2) is involved in several biological functions. Fgf2 requires glycosaminoglycans, like chondroitin and dermatan sulfates (hereafter denoted CS/DS) as co-receptors. CS/DS are linear polysaccharides composed of repeating disaccharide units [-4GlcUAb1-3-GalNAc-b1-] and [-4IdoUAa1-3-GalNAc-b1-],which can be sulfated. Uronyl 2-O-sulfotransferase (Ust)introduces sulfation at the C2 of IdoUA and GlcUA resulting inover-sulfated units. Here, we investigated the role of Ust-mediated CS/DS 2-O sulfation in Fgf2-induced cell migration. We found that CHO-K1 cells overexpressing Ust contain significantly more CS/DS2-O sulfated units, whereas Ust knockdown abolished CS/DS 2-O sulfation. These structural differences in CS/DS resulted in altered Fgf2 binding and increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (also known as MAPK3 and MAPK1, respectively). As a functional consequence of CS/DS 2-O sulfation and altered Fgf2 binding, cell migration and paxillin activation were increased. Inhibition of sulfation, knockdown of Ust and inhibition of FgfR resulted in reduced migration. Similarly, in 3T3 cells Fgf2 treatment increased migration, which was abolished by Ust knockdown. The proteoglycan controlling the CHO migration was syndecan 1. Knockdown of Sdc1 in CHO-K1 cells overexpressing Ust abolished cell migration.We conclude that the presence of distinctly sulfated CS/DS can tune the Fgf2 effect on cell migration. PMID:25480151

  6. Impact of Mesenchymal Stem Cell secreted PAI-1 on colon cancer cell migration and proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Niamh M. [Discipline of Surgery, School of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Joyce, Myles R. [Department of Colorectal Surgery, University College Hospital, Galway (Ireland); Murphy, J. Mary; Barry, Frank P.; O’Brien, Timothy [Regenerative Medicine Institute, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Kerin, Michael J. [Discipline of Surgery, School of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Dwyer, Roisin M., E-mail: roisin.dwyer@nuigalway.ie [Discipline of Surgery, School of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •MSCs were directly co-cultured with colorectal cancer (CRC) cells on 3D scaffolds. •MSCs influence CRC protein/gene expression, proliferation and migration. •We report a significant functional role of MSC-secreted PAI-1 in colon cancer. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal Stem Cells are known to engraft and integrate into the architecture of colorectal tumours, with little known regarding their fate following engraftment. This study aimed to investigate mediators of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) and colon cancer cell (CCC) interactions. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and colon cancer cells (HT29 and HCT-116) were cultured individually or in co-culture on 3-dimensional scaffolds. Conditioned media containing all secreted factors was harvested at day 1, 3 and 7. Chemokine secretion and expression were analyzed by Chemi-array, ELISA (Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1)) and RQ-PCR. Colon cancer cell migration and proliferation in response to recombinant PAI-1, MSCs and MSCs + antibody to PAI-1 was analyzed using Transwell inserts and an MTS proliferation assay respectively. Chemi-array revealed secretion of a wide range of factors by each cell population, including PAI-1and MIF. ELISA analysis revealed Mesenchymal Stem Cells to secrete the highest levels of PAI-1 (MSC mean 10.6 ng/mL, CCC mean 1.01 ng/mL), while colon cancer cells were the principal source of MIF. MSC-secreted PAI-1 stimulated significant migration of both CCC lines, with an antibody to the chemokine shown to block this effect (67–88% blocking,). A cell-line dependant effect on CCC proliferation was shown for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-secreted PAI-1 with HCT-116 cells showing decreased proliferation at all concentrations, and HT29 cells showing increased proliferation in the presence of higher PAI-1 levels. This is the first study to identify PAI-1 as an important mediator of Mesenchymal Stem Cell/colon cancer cell interactions and highlights the

  7. Impact of Mesenchymal Stem Cell secreted PAI-1 on colon cancer cell migration and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •MSCs were directly co-cultured with colorectal cancer (CRC) cells on 3D scaffolds. •MSCs influence CRC protein/gene expression, proliferation and migration. •We report a significant functional role of MSC-secreted PAI-1 in colon cancer. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal Stem Cells are known to engraft and integrate into the architecture of colorectal tumours, with little known regarding their fate following engraftment. This study aimed to investigate mediators of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) and colon cancer cell (CCC) interactions. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and colon cancer cells (HT29 and HCT-116) were cultured individually or in co-culture on 3-dimensional scaffolds. Conditioned media containing all secreted factors was harvested at day 1, 3 and 7. Chemokine secretion and expression were analyzed by Chemi-array, ELISA (Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1)) and RQ-PCR. Colon cancer cell migration and proliferation in response to recombinant PAI-1, MSCs and MSCs + antibody to PAI-1 was analyzed using Transwell inserts and an MTS proliferation assay respectively. Chemi-array revealed secretion of a wide range of factors by each cell population, including PAI-1and MIF. ELISA analysis revealed Mesenchymal Stem Cells to secrete the highest levels of PAI-1 (MSC mean 10.6 ng/mL, CCC mean 1.01 ng/mL), while colon cancer cells were the principal source of MIF. MSC-secreted PAI-1 stimulated significant migration of both CCC lines, with an antibody to the chemokine shown to block this effect (67–88% blocking,). A cell-line dependant effect on CCC proliferation was shown for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-secreted PAI-1 with HCT-116 cells showing decreased proliferation at all concentrations, and HT29 cells showing increased proliferation in the presence of higher PAI-1 levels. This is the first study to identify PAI-1 as an important mediator of Mesenchymal Stem Cell/colon cancer cell interactions and highlights the

  8. The candidate tumor suppressor gene ECRG4 inhibits cancer cells migration and invasion in esophageal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu ShihHsin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The esophageal cancer related gene 4 (ECRG4 was initially identified and cloned in our laboratory from human normal esophageal epithelium (GenBank accession no.AF325503. ECRG4 was a new tumor suppressor gene in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC associated with prognosis. In this study, we investigated the novel tumor-suppressing function of ECRG4 in cancer cell migration, invasion, adhesion and cell cycle regulation in ESCC. Methods Transwell and Boyden chamber experiments were utilized to examined the effects of ECRG4 expression on ESCC cells migration, invasion and adhesion. And flow cytometric analysis was used to observe the impact of ECRG4 expression on cell cycle regulation. Finally, the expression levels of cell cycle regulating proteins p53 and p21 in human ESCC cells transfected with ECRG4 gene were evaluated by Western blotting. Results The restoration of ECRG4 expression in ESCC cells inhibited cancer cells migration and invasion (P P > 0.05. Furthermore, ECRG4 could cause cell cycle G1 phase arrest in ESCC (P Conclusion ECRG4 is a candidate tumor suppressor gene which suppressed tumor cells migration and invasion without affecting cell adhesion ability in ESCC. Furthermore, ECRG4 might cause cell cycle G1 phase block possibly through inducing the increased expression of p53 and p21 proteins in ESCC.

  9. Dkk-1 Inhibits Intestinal Epithelial Cell Migration by Attenuating Directional Polarization of Leading Edge Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Stefan; Capaldo, Christopher T.; Samarin, Stanislav; Nava, Porfirio; Neumaier, Irmgard; Skerra, Arne; Sacks, David B; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2009-01-01

    Wnt signaling pathways regulate proliferation, motility, and survival in a variety of human cell types. Dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1) is a secreted Wnt antagonist that has been proposed to regulate tissue homeostasis in the intestine. In this report, we show that Dkk-1 is secreted by intestinal epithelial cells after wounding and that it inhibits cell migration by attenuating the directional orientation of migrating epithelial cells. Dkk-1 exposure induced mislocalized activation of Cdc42 in migrating c...

  10. Molecular mechanisms underlying progesterone-enhanced breast cancer cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Chen; Lee, Wen-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone (P4) was demonstrated to inhibit migration in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), but to enhance migration in T47D breast cancer cells. To investigate the mechanism responsible for this switch in P4 action, we examined the signaling pathway responsible for the P4-induced migration enhancement in breast cancer cell lines, T47D and MCF-7. Here, we demonstrated that P4 activated the cSrc/AKT signaling pathway, subsequently inducing RSK1 activation, which in turn increased phosphorylation of p27 at T198 and formation of the p27pT198-RhoA complex in the cytosol, thereby preventing RhoA degradation, and eventually enhanced migration in T47D cells. These findings were confirmed in the P4-treated MCF-7. Comparing the P4-induced molecular events in between breast cancer cells and VSMCs, we found that P4 increased p27 phosphorylation at T198 in breast cancer cells through RSK1 activation, while P4 increased p27 phosphorlation at Ser10 in VSMCs through KIS activation. P27pT198 formed the complex with RhoA and prevented RhoA degradation in T47D cells, whereas p-p27Ser10 formed the complex with RhoA and caused RhoA degradation in VSMCs. The results of this study highlight the molecular mechanism underlying P4-enhanced breast cancer cell migration, and suggest that RSK1 activation is responsible for the P4-induced migration enhancement in breast cancer cells. PMID:27510838

  11. Multidisciplinary approaches to understanding collective cell migration in developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Linus J; Kulesa, Paul M; McLennan, Rebecca; Baker, Ruth E; Maini, Philip K

    2016-06-01

    Mathematical models are becoming increasingly integrated with experimental efforts in the study of biological systems. Collective cell migration in developmental biology is a particularly fruitful application area for the development of theoretical models to predict the behaviour of complex multicellular systems with many interacting parts. In this context, mathematical models provide a tool to assess the consistency of experimental observations with testable mechanistic hypotheses. In this review, we showcase examples from recent years of multidisciplinary investigations of neural crest cell migration. The neural crest model system has been used to study how collective migration of cell populations is shaped by cell-cell interactions, cell-environmental interactions and heterogeneity between cells. The wide range of emergent behaviours exhibited by neural crest cells in different embryonal locations and in different organisms helps us chart out the spectrum of collective cell migration. At the same time, this diversity in migratory characteristics highlights the need to reconcile or unify the array of currently hypothesized mechanisms through the next generation of experimental data and generalized theoretical descriptions. PMID:27278647

  12. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration

    OpenAIRE

    Maneet Bhatia; Kelly L. McGrath; Giovanna Di Trapani; Pornpimol Charoentong; Fenil Shah; Mallory M. King; Clarke, Frank M.; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient ...

  13. Junctional communication is induced in migrating capillary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, M S; Spray, D C; Chanson, M; Montesano, R; Orci, L; Meda, P

    1989-12-01

    Using an in vitro model in which a confluent monolayer of capillary endothelial cells is mechanically wounded, gap junction-mediated intercellular communication has been studied by loading the cells with the fluorescent dye, Lucifer Yellow. Approximately 40-50% of the cells in a nonwounded confluent monolayer were coupled in groups of four to five cells (basal level). Basal levels of communication were also observed in sparse and preconfluent cultures, but were reduced in postconfluent monolayers. 30 min after wounding, coupling was markedly reduced between cells lining the wound. Communication at the wound was partially reestablished by 2 h, exceeded basal levels after 6 h and reached a maximum after 24 h, at which stage approximately 90% of the cells were coupled in groups of six to seven cells. When the wound had closed (after 8 d), the increase in communication was no longer observed. Induction of wound-associated communication was unaffected by exposure of the cells to the DNA synthesis inhibitor mitomycin C, but was prevented by the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. The induction of wound-associated communication was also inhibited when migration was prevented by placing the cells immediately after wounding at 22 degrees C or after exposure to cytochalasin D, suggesting that the increase in communication is dependent on cells migrating into the wound area. In contrast, migration was not prevented when coupling was blocked by exposure of the cells to retinoic acid, although this agent did disrupt the characteristic sheet-like pattern of migration typically seen during endothelial repair. These results suggest that junctional communication may play an important role in wound repair, possibly by coordinating capillary endothelial cell migration. PMID:2592412

  14. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Lamers

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to initiate and increase cell locomotion and coverage with cells, and thus achieve an enhanced wound healing response around an implantable material. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate how MC3T3-E1 osteoblast initial adhesion and directional migration are influenced by nanogrooves with pitches ranging from 150 nm up to 1000 nm. In this study, we used a multi-patterned substrate with five different groove patterns and a smooth area with either a concentric or radial orientation. Initial cell adhesion measurements after 10 s were performed using atomic force spectroscopy-assisted single-cell force spectroscopy, and demonstrated that nascent cell adhesion was highly induced by a 600 nm pitch and reduced by a 150 nm pitch. Addition of RGD peptide significantly reduced adhesion, indicating that integrins and cell adhesive proteins (e.g. fibronectin or vitronectin are key factors in specific cell adhesion on nanogrooved substrates. Also, cell migration was highly dependent on the groove pitch; the highest directional migration parallel to the grooves was observed on a 600 nm pitch, whereas a 150 nm pitch restrained directional cell migration. From this study, we conclude that grooves with a pitch of 600 nm may be favourable to enhance fast wound closure, thereby promoting tissue regeneration.

  15. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, N. R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  16. Phase-field model for collective cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najem, Sara; Grant, Martin

    2016-05-01

    We construct a phase-field model for collective cell migration based on a Ginzburg-Landau free-energy formulation. We model adhesion, surface tension, repulsion, coattraction, and polarization, enabling us to follow the cells' morphologies and the effect of their membranes fluctuations on collective motion. We were able to measure the tissue surface tension as a function of the individual cell cortical tension and adhesion and identify a density threshold for cell-sheet formation.

  17. Molecular mechanisms underlying adhesion and migration of hematopoietic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sahin, Aysegul Ocal; Buitenhuis, Miranda

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the most powerful treatment modality for a large number of hematopoietic malignancies, including leukemia. Successful hematopoietic recovery after transplantation depends on homing of hematopoietic stem cells to the bone marrow and subsequent lodging of those cells in specific niches in the bone marrow. Migration of hematopoietic stem cells to the bone marrow is a highly regulated process that requires correct regulation of the expression and activit...

  18. Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein 7 Mediates Glioma Cell Growth and Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jiang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP-7 is the only member of the IGFBP superfamily that binds strongly to insulin, suggesting that IGFBP-7 may have different functions from other IGFBPs. Unlike other IGFBPs, the expression and functions of IGFBP-7 in glioma tumors have not been reported. Using cDNA microarray analysis, we found that expression of IGFBP-7 correlated with the grade of glioma tumors and the overall patient survival. This finding was further validated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. We used RNAi to examine the role of IGFBP-7 in glioma cells, inhibiting IGFBP-7 expression by short interfering RNA transfection. Cell proliferation was suppressed after IGFBP-7 expression was inhibited for 5 days, and glioma cell growth was stimulated consistently by the addition of recombinant IGFBP-7 protein. Moreover, glioma cell migration was attenuated by IGFBP-7 depletion but enhanced by IGFBP-7 overexpression and addition. Overexpression of AKT1 in IGFBP-7-overxpressed cells attenuated the IGFBP-7-promoted migration and further enhanced inhibition of IGFBP-7 depletion on the migration. Phosphorylation of AKT and Erk1/2 was also inversely regulated by IGFBP-7 expression. These two factors together suggest that IGFBP-7 can regulate glioma cell migration through the AKT-ERK pathway, thereby playing an important role in glioma growth and migration.

  19. Anticancer effect of arsenite on cell migration, cell cycle and apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    HORIBE, YOHEI; ADACHI, SEIJI; YASUDA, ICHIRO; YAMAUCHI, TAKAHIRO; KAWAGUCHI, JUNJI; KOZAWA, OSAMU; SHIMIZU, MASAHITO; MORIWAKI, HISATAKA

    2016-01-01

    The standard treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy, but its clinical outcome remains unsatisfactory. Therefore, the development of novel treatments for this malignancy is urgently required. In the present study, the anticancer effect of arsenite on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced migration, cell cycle and apoptosis was investigated in pancreatic cancer cells (AsPC-1 and BxPC-3), and compared with the effect on normal pancreatic epithelial (PE) cells. In the cell migration assay, arsenite clearly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced cell migration in AsPC-1 cells, but not in BxPC-3 or PE cells. Arsenite also caused cell apoptosis in AsPC-1 cells, but not in BxPC-3 or PE cells. In AsPC-1 cells, the levels of cyclin D1 and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein decreased following treatment with arsenite, but this was not observed in BxPC-3 cells. To further examine the differences between these two cell lines, the effect of arsenite on upstream p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt was investigated. PDGF-BB caused phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAPK and Akt in both cell lines. Pretreatment with arsenite significantly suppressed PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of Akt, but not of p44/p42 MAPK in AsPC-1 cells. By contrast, arsenite did not affect these molecules in BxPC-3 cells. Since the inhibition of the Akt signaling pathway markedly reduced PDGF-BB-induced migration in AsPC-1 cells, the present results strongly suggest that arsenite inhibits PDGF-BB-induced migration by suppressing the Akt signaling pathway in AsPC-1 cells. Therefore, arsenite may be a useful tool for the treatment of patients with certain types of pancreatic cancer, without causing adverse effects on normal pancreatic cells.

  20. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing. PMID:27105673

  1. High glucose-mediated oxidative stress impairs cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo L Lamers

    Full Text Available Deficient wound healing in diabetic patients is very frequent, but the cellular and molecular causes are poorly defined. In this study, we evaluate the hypothesis that high glucose concentrations inhibit cell migration. Using CHO.K1 cells, NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, mouse embryonic fibroblasts and primary skin fibroblasts from control and diabetic rats cultured in 5 mM D-glucose (low glucose, LG, 25 mM D-glucose (high glucose, HG or 25 mM L-glucose medium (osmotic control--OC, we analyzed the migration speed, protrusion stability, cell polarity, adhesion maturation and the activity of the small Rho GTPase Rac1. We also analyzed the effects of reactive oxygen species by incubating cells with the antioxidant N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC. We observed that HG conditions inhibited cell migration when compared to LG or OC. This inhibition resulted from impaired cell polarity, protrusion destabilization and inhibition of adhesion maturation. Conversely, Rac1 activity, which promotes protrusion and blocks adhesion maturation, was increased in HG conditions, thus providing a mechanistic basis for the HG phenotype. Most of the HG effects were partially or completely rescued by treatment with NAC. These findings demonstrate that HG impairs cell migration due to an increase in oxidative stress that causes polarity loss, deficient adhesion and protrusion. These alterations arise, in large part, from increased Rac1 activity and may contribute to the poor wound healing observed in diabetic patients.

  2. Collisions of deformable cells lead to collective migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranson, Igor; Löber, Jakob; Ziebert, Falko

    2015-03-01

    Collective migration of eukaryotic cells plays a fundamental role in tissue growth, wound healing and immune response. The motion, arising spontaneously or in response to chemical and mechanical stimuli, is also important for understanding life-threatening pathologies, such as cancer and metastasis formation. We present a phase-field model to describe the movement of many self-organized, interacting cells. The model takes into account the main mechanisms of cell motility - actomyosin dynamics, as well as substrate-mediated and cell-cell adhesion. It predicts that collective cell migration emerges spontaneously as a result of inelastic collisions between neighboring cells: collisions lead to a mutual alignment of the cell velocities and to the formation of coherently-moving multi-cellular clusters. Small cell-to-cell adhesion, in turn, reduces the propensity for large-scale collective migration, while higher adhesion leads to the formation of moving bands. Our study provides valuable insight into biological processes associated with collective cell motility. J. L. acknowledges funding from the German Science Foundation (DFG) within the GRK 1558. F. Z. acknowledges funding from the German Science Foundation (DFG) via Project ZI 1232/2-1. I. S. A. was supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of.

  3. Subventricular zone cell migration: lessons from quantitative 2-photon microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel eJames

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblasts born in the adult subventricular zone (SVZ migrate long distances in the rostral migratory stream (RMS to the olfactory bulbs where they integrate into circuitry as functional interneurons. As very little was known about the dynamic parameters of SVZ neuroblast migration, we used two-photon time-lapse microscopy to analyze migration in acute slices. This involved analyzing 3-dimensional stacks of images over time and uncovered several novel aspects of SVZ migration: chains remain stable, cells can be immotile for extensive periods, morphology does not necessarily correlate with motility, neuroblasts exhibit local exploratory motility, dorsoventral migration occurs throughout the striatal SVZ and neuroblasts turn at distinctive angles. We investigated these novel findings in the SVZ and RMS from the population to the single cell level. In this review we also discuss some technical considerations when setting up a two-photon microscopic imaging system. Throughout the review we identify several unsolved questions about SVZ neuroblast migration that might be addressed with current or emerging techniques.

  4. On-Chip Quantitative Measurement of Mechanical Stresses During Cell Migration with Emulsion Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molino, D.; Quignard, S.; Gruget, C.; Pincet, F.; Chen, Y.; Piel, M.; Fattaccioli, J.

    2016-07-01

    The ability of immune cells to migrate within narrow and crowded spaces is a critical feature involved in various physiological processes from immune response to metastasis. Several in-vitro techniques have been developed so far to study the behaviour of migrating cells, the most recent being based on the fabrication of microchannels within which cells move. To address the question of the mechanical stress a cell is able to produce during the encounter of an obstacle while migrating, we developed a hybrid microchip made of parallel PDMS channels in which oil droplets are sparsely distributed and serve as deformable obstacles. We thus show that cells strongly deform droplets while passing them. Then, we show that the microdevice can be used to study the influence of drugs on migration at the population level. Finally, we describe a quantitative analysis method of the droplet deformation that allows measuring in real-time the mechanical stress exerted by a single cell. The method presented herein thus constitutes a powerful analytical tool for cell migration studies under confinement.

  5. CD133 promotes gallbladder carcinoma cell migration through activating Akt phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Jiaojiao; Ai, Zhilong

    2016-01-01

    Gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) is the fifth most common malignancy of gastrointestinal tract. The prognosis of gallbladder carcinoma is extremely terrible partially due to metastasis. However, the mechanisms underlying gallbladder carcinoma metastasis remain largely unknown. CD133 is a widely used cancer stem cell marker including in gallbladder carcinoma. Here, we found that CD133 was highly expressed in gallbladder carcinoma as compared to normal tissues. CD133 was located in the invasive areas in gallbladder carcinoma. Down-regulation expression of CD133 inhibited migration and invasion of gallbladder carcinoma cell without obviously reducing cell proliferation. Mechanism analysis revealed that down-regulation expression of CD133 inhibited Akt phosphorylation and increased PTEN protein level. The inhibitory effect of CD133 down-regulation on gallbladder carcinoma cell migration could be rescued by Akt activation. Consistent with this, addition of Akt inhibitor Wortmannin markedly inhibited the migration ability of CD133-overexpressing cells. Thus, down-regulation of CD133 inhibits migration of gallbladder carcinoma cells through reducing Akt phosphorylation. These findings explore the fundamental biological aspect of CD133 in gallbladder carcinoma progression, providing insights into gallbladder carcinoma cell migration. PMID:26910892

  6. On-Chip Quantitative Measurement of Mechanical Stresses During Cell Migration with Emulsion Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molino, D.; Quignard, S.; Gruget, C.; Pincet, F.; Chen, Y.; Piel, M.; Fattaccioli, J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of immune cells to migrate within narrow and crowded spaces is a critical feature involved in various physiological processes from immune response to metastasis. Several in-vitro techniques have been developed so far to study the behaviour of migrating cells, the most recent being based on the fabrication of microchannels within which cells move. To address the question of the mechanical stress a cell is able to produce during the encounter of an obstacle while migrating, we developed a hybrid microchip made of parallel PDMS channels in which oil droplets are sparsely distributed and serve as deformable obstacles. We thus show that cells strongly deform droplets while passing them. Then, we show that the microdevice can be used to study the influence of drugs on migration at the population level. Finally, we describe a quantitative analysis method of the droplet deformation that allows measuring in real-time the mechanical stress exerted by a single cell. The method presented herein thus constitutes a powerful analytical tool for cell migration studies under confinement. PMID:27373558

  7. Running with neighbors: coordinating cell migration and cell-cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Caitlin; Nelson, W James

    2015-10-01

    Coordinated movement of large groups of cells is required for many biological processes, such as gastrulation and wound healing. During collective cell migration, cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesions must be integrated so that cells maintain strong interactions with neighboring cells and the underlying substratum. Initiation and maintenance of cadherin adhesions at cell-cell junctions and integrin-based cell-ECM adhesions require integration of mechanical cues, dynamic regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, and input from specific signaling cascades, including Rho family GTPases. Here, we summarize recent advances made in understanding the interplay between these pathways at cadherin-based and integrin-based adhesions during collective cell migration and highlight outstanding questions that remain in the field. PMID:26201843

  8. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells migrate in afferent skin lymph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Florentina; Pascale, Florentia; Contreras, Vanessa; Bonneau, Michel; Courbet, Alexandre; Chilmonczyk, Stefan; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Epardaud, Mathieu; Eparaud, Mathieu; Niborski, Violeta; Riffault, Sabine; Balazuc, Anne-Marie; Foulon, Eliane; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Riteau, Beatrice; Hope, Jayne; Bertho, Nicolas; Charley, Bernard; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2008-05-01

    Conventional dendritic cells enter lymph nodes by migrating from peripheral tissues via the lymphatic route, whereas plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), also called IFN-producing cells (IPC), are described to gain nodes from blood via the high endothelial venules. We demonstrate here that IPC/pDC migrate in the afferent lymph of two large mammals. In sheep, injection of type A CpG oligodinucleotide (ODN) induced lymph cells to produce type I IFN. Furthermore, low-density lymph cells collected at steady state produced type I IFN after stimulation with type A CpG ODN and enveloped viruses. Sheep lymph IPC were found within a minor B(neg)CD11c(neg) subset expressing CD45RB. They presented a plasmacytoid morphology, expressed high levels of TLR-7, TLR-9, and IFN regulatory factor 7 mRNA, induced IFN-gamma production in allogeneic CD4(pos) T cells, and differentiated into dendritic cell-like cells under viral stimulation, thus fulfilling criteria of bona fide pDC. In mini-pig, a CD4(pos)SIRP(pos) subset in afferent lymph cells, corresponding to pDC homologs, produced type I IFN after type A CpG-ODN triggering. Thus, pDC can link innate and acquired immunity by migrating from tissue to draining node via lymph, similarly to conventional dendritic cells. PMID:18424716

  9. Electrolytic cell stack with molten electrolyte migration control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, H. Russell; Guthrie, Robin J.; Katz, Murray

    1988-08-02

    An electrolytic cell stack includes inactive electrolyte reservoirs at the upper and lower end portions thereof. The reservoirs are separated from the stack of the complete cells by impermeable, electrically conductive separators. Reservoirs at the negative end are initially low in electrolyte and the reservoirs at the positive end are high in electrolyte fill. During stack operation electrolyte migration from the positive to the negative end will be offset by the inactive reservoir capacity. In combination with the inactive reservoirs, a sealing member of high porosity and low electrolyte retention is employed to limit the electrolyte migration rate.

  10. Cell migration in the developing rodent olfactory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huilgol, Dhananjay; Tole, Shubha

    2016-07-01

    The components of the nervous system are assembled in development by the process of cell migration. Although the principles of cell migration are conserved throughout the brain, different subsystems may predominantly utilize specific migratory mechanisms, or may display unusual features during migration. Examining these subsystems offers not only the potential for insights into the development of the system, but may also help in understanding disorders arising from aberrant cell migration. The olfactory system is an ancient sensory circuit that is essential for the survival and reproduction of a species. The organization of this circuit displays many evolutionarily conserved features in vertebrates, including molecular mechanisms and complex migratory pathways. In this review, we describe the elaborate migrations that populate each component of the olfactory system in rodents and compare them with those described in the well-studied neocortex. Understanding how the components of the olfactory system are assembled will not only shed light on the etiology of olfactory and sexual disorders, but will also offer insights into how conserved migratory mechanisms may have shaped the evolution of the brain. PMID:26994098

  11. Lung-Derived Factors Mediate Breast Cancer Cell Migration through CD44 Receptor-Ligand Interactions in a Novel Ex Vivo System for Analysis of Organ-Specific Soluble Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny E. Chu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer preferentially metastasizes to lung, lymph node, liver, bone, and brain. However, it is unclear whether properties of cancer cells, properties of organmicroenvironments, or a combination of both is responsible for this observed organ tropism. We hypothesized that breast cancer cells exhibit distinctive migration/growth patterns in organ microenvironments that mirror common clinical sites of breast cancer metastasis and that receptor-ligand interactions between breast cancer cells and soluble organ-derived factors mediate this behavior. Using an ex vivo model system composed of organ-conditionedmedia (CM, human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231,MDA-MB-468, SUM149, and SUM159 displayed cell line—specific and organ-specific patterns of migration/proliferation that corresponded to their in vivo metastatic behavior. Notably, exposure to lung-CM increased migration of all cell lines and increased proliferation in two of four lines (P < .05. Several cluster of differentiation (CD 44 ligands including osteopontin (OPN and L-selectin (SELL were identified in lung-CM by protein arrays. Immunodepletion of SELL decreased migration of MDA-MB-231 cells, whereas depletion of OPN decreased both migration and proliferation. Pretreatment of cells with a CD44-blocking antibody abrogated migration effects (P < .05. “Stemlike” breast cancer cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase and CD44 (ALDHhiCD44+ responded in a distinct chemotacticmanner toward organ-CM, preferentially migrating toward lung-CM through CD44 receptor-ligand interactions (P < .05. In contrast, organ-specific changes in migration were not observed for ALDHlowCD44- cells. Our data suggest that interactions between CD44+ breast cancer cells and soluble factors present in the lung microenvironment may play an important role in determining organotropic metastatic behavior.

  12. Myosin IIA deficient cells migrate efficiently despite reduced traction forces at cell periphery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa H. Jorrisch

    2013-02-01

    Cell motility is a cornerstone of embryogenesis, tissue remodeling and repair, and cancer cell invasion. It is generally thought that migrating cells grab and exert traction force onto the extracellular matrix in order to pull the cell body forward. While previous studies have shown that myosin II deficient cells migrate efficiently, whether these cells exert traction forces during cell migration in the absence of the major contractile machinery is currently unknown. Using an array of micron-sized pillars as a force sensor and shRNA specific to each myosin II isoform (A and B, we analyzed how myosin IIA and IIB individually regulate cell migration and traction force generation. Myosin IIA and IIB localized preferentially to the leading edge where traction force was greatest, and the trailing edge, respectively. When individual myosin II isoforms were depleted by shRNA, myosin IIA deficient cells lost actin stress fibers and focal adhesions, whereas myosin IIB deficient cells maintained similar actin organization and focal adhesions as wild-type cells. Interestingly, myosin IIA deficient cells migrated faster than wild-type or myosin IIB deficient cells on both a rigid surface and a pillar array, yet myosin IIA deficient cells exerted significantly less traction force at the leading edge than wild-type or myosin IIB deficient cells. These results suggest that, in the absence of myosin IIA mediated force-generating machinery, cells move with minimal traction forces at the cell periphery, thus demonstrating the remarkable ability of cells to adapt and migrate.

  13. Numerical Analysis of Hip Implant Migration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kytýř, Daniel; Jírová, Jitka; Jíra, J.; Micka, Michal

    Dublin : Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, 2007 - (Prendergast, P.), s. 173-174 ISBN 0-9548583-1-X. [Finite Element Modelling in Biomechanics and Mechanobiology. Dublin (IE), 26.08.2007-28.08.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : migration * hemiarthroplasty * computer tomography Subject RIV: FI - Traumatology, Orthopedics

  14. Ratchetaxis: Long-Range Directed Cell Migration by Local Cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, David; Comelles, Jordi; Piel, Matthieu; Voituriez, Raphaël; Riveline, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Directed cell migration is usually thought to depend on the presence of long-range gradients of either chemoattractants or physical properties such as stiffness or adhesion. However, in vivo, chemical or mechanical gradients have not systematically been observed. Here we review recent in vitro experiments, which show that other types of spatial guidance cues can bias cell motility. Introducing local geometrical or mechanical anisotropy in the cell environment, such as adhesive/topographical microratchets or tilted micropillars, show that local and periodic external cues can direct cell motion. Together with modeling, these experiments suggest that cell motility can be viewed as a stochastic phenomenon, which can be biased by various types of local cues, leading to directional migration. PMID:26615123

  15. China ASON Network Migration Scenarios and Their Quantitative Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoying Zhang; Soichiro Araki; Itaru Nishioka; Yoshihiko Suemura

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes two migration scenarios from China rin g networks to ASON mesh networks . In our quantitative analysis with ASON/GMPLS simulator, a subnetwork protection scheme achieved best balanced performance in resource utilization and restoration time.

  16. China ASON Network Migration Scenarios and Their Quantitative Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soichiro; Araki; Itaru; Nishioka; Yoshihiko; Suemura

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes two migration scenarios from China ring networks to ASON mesh networks. In our quantitative analysis with ASON/GMPLS simulator, a subnetwork protection scheme achieved best balanced performance in resource utilization and restoration time.

  17. Reciprocal control of cell proliferation and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Donatis Alina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In adult tissue the quiescent state of a single cell is maintained by the steady state conditions of its own microenvironment for what concern both cell-cell as well as cell-ECM interaction and soluble factors concentration. Physiological or pathological conditions can alter this quiescent state through an imbalance of both soluble and insoluble factors that can trigger a cellular phenotypic response. The kind of cellular response depends by many factors but one of the most important is the concentration of soluble cytokines sensed by the target cell. In addition, due to the intrinsic plasticity of many cellular types, every single cell is able, in response to the same stimulus, to rapidly switch phenotype supporting minimal changes of microenviromental cytokines concentration. Wound healing is a typical condition in which epithelial, endothelial as well as mesenchymal cells are firstly subjected to activation of their motility in order to repopulate the damaged region and then they show a strong proliferative response in order to successfully complete the wound repair process. This schema constitute the leitmotif of many other physiological or pathological conditions such as development vasculogenesis/angiogenesis as well as cancer outgrowth and metastasis. Our review focuses on the molecular mechanisms that control the starting and, eventually, the switching of cellular phenotypic outcome in response to changes in the symmetry of the extracellular environment.

  18. Quantification of hydrodynamic factors influencing cell lateral migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nix, Stephanie; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2015-11-01

    The study of the migration of blood cells perpendicular to the direction of blood flow, or lateral migration, is motivated by the differing behavior of the various types of blood cells. In vivo, red blood cells are observed to flow in the central region of the blood vessel, particularly in the microcirculation, while other types of cells in the blood, including white blood cells and platelets, are observed to flow disproportionately near the vessel wall. However, the specifics regarding the effect of hydrodynamic and biological factors are still unknown. Thus, in this study, we aim to quantify the effect of hydrodynamic factors on a cell model numerically using the boundary integral method. By using the boundary integral method, we can isolate the effect of a single hydrodynamic factor, such as a wall or given flow distribution, in an otherwise infinite flow. Then, we can use the obtained numerical results to develop a semi-analytical model describing the cell lateral migration dependent on only the flow geometry and the viscosity ratio between the cell and external fluid.

  19. Amyloid precursor protein regulates migration and metalloproteinase gene expression in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • APP knockdown reduced proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells. • APP knockdown reduced expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. • APP overexpression promoted LNCaP cell migration. • APP overexpression increased expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. - Abstract: Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a type I transmembrane protein, and one of its processed forms, β-amyloid, is considered to play a central role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. We previously showed that APP is a primary androgen-responsive gene in prostate cancer and that its increased expression is correlated with poor prognosis for patients with prostate cancer. APP has also been implicated in several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying the pro-proliferative effects of APP on cancers is still not well-understood. In the present study, we explored a pathophysiological role for APP in prostate cancer cells using siRNA targeting APP (siAPP). The proliferation and migration of LNCaP and DU145 prostate cancer cells were significantly suppressed by siAPP. Differentially expressed genes in siAPP-treated cells compared to control siRNA-treated cells were identified by microarray analysis. Notably, several metalloproteinase genes, such as ADAM10 and ADAM17, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes, such as VIM, and SNAI2, were downregulated in siAPP-treated cells as compared to control cells. The expression of these genes was upregulated in LNCaP cells stably expressing APP when compared with control cells. APP-overexpressing LNCaP cells exhibited enhanced migration in comparison to control cells. These results suggest that APP may contribute to the proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells by modulating the expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes

  20. Amyloid precursor protein regulates migration and metalloproteinase gene expression in prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko [Division of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-1241 (Japan); Inoue, Satoshi, E-mail: INOUE-GER@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-1241 (Japan); Department of Geriatric Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Department of Anti-Aging Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • APP knockdown reduced proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells. • APP knockdown reduced expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. • APP overexpression promoted LNCaP cell migration. • APP overexpression increased expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. - Abstract: Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a type I transmembrane protein, and one of its processed forms, β-amyloid, is considered to play a central role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. We previously showed that APP is a primary androgen-responsive gene in prostate cancer and that its increased expression is correlated with poor prognosis for patients with prostate cancer. APP has also been implicated in several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying the pro-proliferative effects of APP on cancers is still not well-understood. In the present study, we explored a pathophysiological role for APP in prostate cancer cells using siRNA targeting APP (siAPP). The proliferation and migration of LNCaP and DU145 prostate cancer cells were significantly suppressed by siAPP. Differentially expressed genes in siAPP-treated cells compared to control siRNA-treated cells were identified by microarray analysis. Notably, several metalloproteinase genes, such as ADAM10 and ADAM17, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes, such as VIM, and SNAI2, were downregulated in siAPP-treated cells as compared to control cells. The expression of these genes was upregulated in LNCaP cells stably expressing APP when compared with control cells. APP-overexpressing LNCaP cells exhibited enhanced migration in comparison to control cells. These results suggest that APP may contribute to the proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells by modulating the expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes.

  1. The Dynamics of Repeat Migration: A Markov Chain Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann, Klaus F.; Amelie F. Constant

    2003-01-01

    While the literature has established that there is substantial and highly selective return migration, the growing importance of repeat migration has been largely ignored. Using Markov chain analysis, this paper provides a modeling framework for repeated moves of migrants between the host and home countries. The Markov transition matrix between the states in two consecutive periods is parameterized and estimated using a logit specification and a large panel data with 14 waves. The analysis for...

  2. Tetrahydrocurcumin inhibits HT1080 cell migration and invasion via downregulation of MMPs and uPA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Supachai YODKEEREE; Spiridione GARBISA; Pomngarm LIMTRAKUL

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC) is an active metabolite of curcumin. It has been reported to have similar pharmacological activity to curcumin. The proteases that participate in extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation are involved in cancer cell metastasis. The present study investigates the effect of an ultimate metabolite of curcumin, THC, on the invasion and motility of highly-metastatic HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells. Methods: The effect of THC on HTI080 cell invasion and migration was determined using Boyden chamber assay. Cell-adhesion assay was used for examining the binding of cells to ECM molecules. Zymography assay was used to analyze the effect of THC on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) secretion from HT1080 cells. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2 and membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) proteins levels were analyzed by Western blotting. Results: Treatment with THC reduced HT1080 cell invasion and migration in a dose-dependent manner. THC also decreased the cell adhesion to Matrigel and laminin-coated plates. Analysis by zymography demonstrated that treatment with THC reduced the levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and uPA. THC also inhibited the levels of MT1-MMP and TIMP-2 proteins detected by Western blot analysis. Conclusion: Our findings revealed that THC reduced HT1080 cell invasion and migration. The inhibition of cancer cell invasion is associated with the downregulation of ECM degradation enzymes and the inhibition of cell adhesion to ECM proteins.

  3. Minimal model for spontaneous cell polarization and edge activity in oscillating, rotating and migrating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, Franck; Ambühl, Mark E.; Gabella, Chiara; Bornert, Alicia; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2016-04-01

    How cells break symmetry and organize activity at their edges to move directionally is a fundamental question in cell biology. Physical models of cell motility commonly incorporate gradients of regulatory proteins and/or feedback from the motion itself to describe the polarization of this edge activity. These approaches, however, fail to explain cell behaviour before the onset of polarization. We use polarizing and moving fish epidermal cells as a model system to bridge the gap between cell behaviours before and after polarization. Our analysis suggests a novel and simple principle of self-organizing cell activity, in which local cell-edge dynamics depends on the distance from the cell centre, but not on the orientation with respect to the front-back axis. We validate this principle with a stochastic model that faithfully reproduces a range of cell-migration behaviours. Our findings indicate that spontaneous polarization, persistent motion and cell shape are emergent properties of the local cell-edge dynamics controlled by the distance from the cell centre.

  4. Emerging role for nuclear rotation and orientation in cell migration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maninová, Miloslava; Iwanicki, M. P.; Vomastek, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2014), s. 42-48. ISSN 1933-6918 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/0614 Grant ostatní: Marie Cúrie EU FP7(BE) 231086 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : cell polarity * actin * migration * microtubules Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.505, year: 2014

  5. STRIPAK components determine mode of cancer cell migration and metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Chris D; Hooper, Steven; Tozluoglu, Melda;

    2015-01-01

    we demonstrate that co-localization of contractile activity and actin-plasma membrane linkage reduces cell speed on planar surfaces, but favours migration in confined environments similar to those observed in vivo. We further show that FAM40B mutations found in human tumours uncouple it from PP2A and...

  6. Manipulation of Neutrophil-Like HL-60 Cells for the Study of Directed Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Millius, Arthur; Weiner, Orion D

    2010-01-01

    Many cells undergo directed cell migration in response to external cues in a process known as chemotaxis. This ability is essential for many single-celled organisms to hunt and mate, the development of multicellular organisms, and the functioning of the immune system. Because of their relative ease of manipulation and their robust chemotactic abilities, the neutrophil-like cell line (HL-60) has been a powerful system to analyze directed cell migration. In this chapter, we describe the mainten...

  7. An automated cell-counting algorithm for fluorescently-stained cells in migration assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novielli Nicole M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A cell-counting algorithm, developed in Matlab®, was created to efficiently count migrated fluorescently-stained cells on membranes from migration assays. At each concentration of cells used (10,000, and 100,000 cells, images were acquired at 2.5 ×, 5 ×, and 10 × objective magnifications. Automated cell counts strongly correlated to manual counts (r2 = 0.99, P

  8. The Analysis of International Migration towards Economic Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdous Alam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study discusses the analysis of international migration towards economic growth in Bangladesh. International migration refers to the cross-border movement of people from a mother country to a location outside that mother country, with the purpose of taking up higher income employment, better living conditions, higher education get access to civic amenities and conducting a daily existence there for an extended period of time. The exports of labor, human capital, play a major role to minimize the poverty level in Bangladesh. In the last four decades, Bangladesh exports the huge number of labors abroad for economic growth through remittances. Remittances affect poverty eradication most directly by increasing the income of households which have a family member working abroad. Because income from remittances is usually larger than that which could have been earned by migrants they stayed at home. Approach: The aim of this study is to highlight the policy implications for the maximization of international migration and the analysis of economic growth in Bangladesh. The data for analysis is perceived from the secondary sources. The significant manipulations for acquired data are migration of employment and remittances for economic growth in Bangladesh. Results: Migration contributed for the development of macro and micro level in Bangladesh. Conclusion: There would be potential benefits to world's poor if more international attention were focused on integrating migration policy to within the larger global dialogue economic development and poverty reduction. Strong institutions and good policies will enhance the benefits of human capital migration for Bangladesh.

  9. Computational Analysis of mRNA Expression Profiles Identifies the ITG Family and PIK3R3 as Crucial Genes for Regulating Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhontip Klahan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is an aggressive type of breast cancer that does not express estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, and human epidermal growth factor receptor (Her2/neu. TNBC has worse clinical outcomes than other breast cancer subtypes. However, the key molecules and mechanisms of TNBC migration remain unclear. In this study, we compared two normalized microarray datasets from GEO database between Asian (GSE33926 and non-Asian populations (GSE46581 to determine the molecules and common pathways in TNBC migration. We demonstrated that 16 genes in non-Asian samples and 9 genes in Asian samples are related to TNBC migration. In addition, our analytic results showed that 4 genes, PIK3R3, ITGB1, ITGAL, and ITGA6, were involved in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. Our results indicated potential genes that link to TNBC migration. This study may help identify novel therapeutic targets for drug development in cancer therapy.

  10. Regulation of Glioma Cell Migration by Seri ne-Phosphorylated P3111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy S. McDonough

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available P311, an 8-kDa polypeptide, was previously shown to be highly expressed in invasive glioma cells. Here, we report the functional characteristics of P311 with regard to influencing glioma cell migration. P311 is constitutively serine-phosphorylated; decreased phosphorylation is observed in migration-activated glioma cells. The primary amino acid sequence of P311 indicates a putative serine phosphorylation site (S59 near the PEST domain. Site-directed mutagenesis of S59A retarded P311 degradation, induced glioma cell motility. In contrast, S59D mutation resulted in the rapid degradation of P311, reduced glioma cell migration. Coimmunoprecipitation coupled with matrixassisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis identified Filamin A as a binding partner of P311, immunofluorescence studies showed that both proteins colocalized at the cell periphery. Moreover, P311-induced cell migration was abrogated by inhibition of β1 integrin function using TACβ1A, a dominant-negative inhibitor of β1 integrin signaling, suggesting that P311 acts downstream of β1 signaling. Finally, overexpression of P311 or P311 S59A mutant protein activates Raci GTPase; small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of Raci suppresses P311-induced motility. Collectively, these results suggest a role for levels of P311 in regulating glioma motility, invasion through the reorganization of actin cytoskeleton at the cell periphery.

  11. ST13, a proliferation regulator, inhibits growth and migration of colorectal cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui BAI; Zhong SHI; Jia-wei ZHANG; Dan LI; Yong-liang ZHU; Shu ZHENG

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective:ST13,is the gene encoding the HSP70 interacting protein (HIP).Previous research has shown that ST13 mRNA and protein levels are down-regulated in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues.This study aims at the role of ST13 in the proliferation and migration of CRC cells.Methods:The transcript level of ST13 in different CRC cell lines was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR).ST13-overexpressed and ST13-knockdown CRC cells were constructed respectively by lentiviral transduction,followed by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay,plate colony formation,cell-cycle analysis,and migration assays to evaluate the influence of ST13 on proliferation and migration in vitro.Moreover,a mouse xenograft study was performed to test in vivo tumorigenicity of ST13-knockdown CRC cells.Results:Lentivirus-mediated overexpression of ST13 in CRC cells inhibited cell proliferation,colony formation,and cell migration in vitro.In contrast,down-regulation of ST13 by lentiviralbased short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference in CRC cells significantly increased cell proliferation and cloning efficiency in vitro.In addition,down-regulation of ST13 expression significantly increased the tumorigenicity of CRC cells in vivo.Conclusions:ST13 gene is a proliferation regulator that inhibits tumor growth in CRC and may affect cell migration.

  12. Curcumin suppresses migration and invasion of human endometrial carcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Qian; Gao, Qing; Chen, Kunlun; Wang, Yidong; Chen, Lijuan; Li, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, a widely used Chinese herbal medicine, has historically been used in anti-cancer therapies. However, the anti-metastatic effect and molecular mechanism of curcumin in endometrial carcinoma (EC) are still poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to detect the anti-metastatic effects of curcumin and the associated mechanism(s) in EC. Based on assays carried out in EC cell lines, it was observed that curcumin inhibited EC cell migration and invasion in vitro. Furthermore, follo...

  13. Cell Migration and Invasion Assays as Tools for Drug Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Hulkower, Keren I.; Herber, Renee L.

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration and invasion are processes that offer rich targets for intervention in key physiologic and pathologic phenomena such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. With the advent of high-throughput and high content imaging systems, there has been a movement towards the use of physiologically relevant cell-based assays earlier in the testing paradigm. This allows more effective identification of lead compounds and recognition of undesirable effects sooner in the drug discovery screeni...

  14. Migration of amoeba cells in an electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, Isabella; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2015-03-01

    Exogenous and endogenous electric fields play a role in cell physiology as a guiding mechanism for the orientation and migration of cells. Electrotaxis of living cells has been observed for several cell types, e.g. neurons, fibroblasts, leukocytes, neural crest cells, cancer cells. Dictyostelium discoideum (Dd), an intensively investigated chemotactic model organism, also exhibits a strong electrotactic behavior moving toward the cathode under the influence of electric fields. Here we report experiments on the effects of DC electric fields on the directional migration of Dd cells. We apply the electric field to cells seeded into microfluidic devices equipped with agar bridges to avoid any harmful effects of the electric field on the cells (ions formation, pH changes, etc.) and a constant flow to prevent the build-up of chemical gradient that elicits chemotaxis. Our results show that the cells linearly increase their speed over time when a constant electric field is applied for a prolonged duration (2 hours). This novel phenomenon cannot be attributed to mechanotaxis as the drag force of the electroosmotic flow is too small to produce shear forces that can reorient cells. It is independent of the cellular developmental stage and to our knowledge, it was not observed in chemotaxis. This work is supported by MaxSynBio project of the Max Planck Society.

  15. Nudt3 is an mRNA decapping enzyme that modulates cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudzien-Nogalska, Ewa; Jiao, Xinfu; Song, Man-Gen; Hart, Ronald P; Kiledjian, Megerditch

    2016-05-01

    Removal of the 5'-end 7-methylguanosine cap structure is a critical step in the highly regulated process of mRNA decay. The Nudix hydrolase, Dcp2, was identified as a first decapping enzyme and subsequently shown to preferentially modulate stability of only a subset of mRNAs. This observation led to the hypothesis that mammalian cells possess multiple decapping enzymes that may function in distinct pathways. Here we report Nudt3 is a Nudix protein that possesses mRNA decapping activity in cells and is a modulator of MCF-7 breast cancer cell migration. Reduction of Nudt3 protein levels in MCF-7 cells promotes increased cell migration and corresponding enhanced filopodia extensions. Importantly, this phenotype was reversed by complementation with wild type, but not catalytically inactive Nudt3 protein indicating Nudt3 decapping activity normally functions to control cell migration. Genome-wide analysis of Nudt3 compromised cells identified elevated levels of transcripts involved in cell motility including integrin β6, lipocalin-2, and fibronectin. The observed increase in mRNA abundance was dependent on Nudt3 decapping activity where integrin β6 and lipocalin-2 were modulated directly through mRNA stability, while fibronectin was indirectly controlled. Moreover, increased cell migration observed in Nudt3 knockdown cells was mediated through the extracellular integrin β6 and fibronectin protein nexus. We conclude that Nudt3 is an mRNA decapping enzyme that orchestrates expression of a subset of mRNAs to modulate cell migration and further substantiates the existence of multiple decapping enzymes functioning in distinct cellular pathways in mammals. PMID:26932476

  16. Intracellular pH gradients in migrating cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christine; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Schwab, Albrecht;

    2011-01-01

    might function as such unevenly distributed regulators as they modulate the interaction of focal adhesion proteins and components of the cytoskeleton in vitro. However, an intracellular pH (pH(i)) gradient reflecting a spatial asymmetry of protons has not been shown so far. One major regulator of p......Cell polarization along the axis of movement is required for migration. The localization of proteins and regulators of the migratory machinery to either the cell front or its rear results in a spatial asymmetry enabling cells to simultaneously coordinate cell protrusion and retraction. Protons...

  17. Cell Migration and Invasion Assays as Tools for Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren I. Hulkower

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration and invasion are processes that offer rich targets for intervention in key physiologic and pathologic phenomena such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. With the advent of high-throughput and high content imaging systems, there has been a movement towards the use of physiologically relevant cell-based assays earlier in the testing paradigm. This allows more effective identification of lead compounds and recognition of undesirable effects sooner in the drug discovery screening process. This article will review the effective use of several principle formats for studying cell motility: scratch assays, transmembrane assays, microfluidic devices and cell exclusion zone assays.

  18. Long form collapsin response mediator protein-1 promotes the migration and invasion of osteosarcoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    HOU, HUIGE; CHEN, LIN; ZHA, ZHENGANG; CAI, SHAOHUI; TAN, MINGHUI; GUO, GUOQING; LIU, NING; SHE, GUORONG; XUN, SONGWEI

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that long form collapsin response mediator protein-1 (LCRMP-1) promotes the metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer. Osteosarcoma (OS) is a human cancer with a high potential for metastasis. The present study aimed to investigate the role of LCRMP-1 in OS metastasis. The expression of LCRMP-1 in OS specimens and cell lines was evaluated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis. Furthermore, the migration and invasion of OS cells with LCRMP-1-knockdown was investigated to examine the role of LCRMP-1 in OS metastasis. In addition, the expression of N-cadherin and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which are involved in cell migration, was evaluated using RT-qPCR. Increased expression of LCRMP-1 was observed in the OS tissues and cell lines, accompanied by the enhanced migration and invasion of the OS cells. LCRMP-1-knockdown resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of N-cadherin and MMPs, as well as inhibition of the migration and invasion of the OS cells. Overexpression of LCRMP-1 promoted OS metastasis. Therefore, LCRMP-1 may be a promising target for the effective treatment of OS.

  19. CCDC-55 is required for larval development and distal tip cell migration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, Ismar; Ho, Richard; Cram, Erin J

    2012-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans distal tip cells (DTCs) are an in vivo model for the study of developmentally regulated cell migration. In this study, we characterize a novel role for CCDC-55, a conserved coiled-coil domain containing protein, in DTC migration and larval development in C. elegans. Although animals homozygous for a probable null allele, ccdc-55(ok2851), display an early larval arrest, RNAi depletion experiments allow the analysis of later phenotypes and suggest that CCDC-55 is needed within the DTC for migration to cease at the end of larval morphogenesis. The ccdc-55 gene is found in an operon with rnf-121 and rnf-5, E3 ubiquitin ligases that target cell migration genes such as the β-integrin PAT-3. Genetic interaction studies using RNAi depletion and the deletion alleles rnf-121(ok848) and rnf-5(tm794) indicate that CCDC-55 and the RNF genes act at least partially in parallel to promote termination of cell migration in the adult DTC. PMID:22285439

  20. Gliadin fragments promote migration of dendritic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chládková, Barbara; Kamanová, Jana; Palová-Jelínková, Lenka; Cinová, Jana; Šebo, Peter; Tučková, Ludmila

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2011), 938-948. ISSN 1582-1838 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/0414; GA ČR GD310/08/H077; GA ČR GA310/08/0447; GA AV ČR IAA500200801; GA AV ČR IAA500200914 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : celiac disease * gliadin * dendritic cell Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 4.125, year: 2011

  1. Reduced CTGF expression promotes cell growth, migration, and invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of CTGF varies in different types of cancer. The purpose of this study is to investigate the involvement of CTGF in tumor progression and prognosis of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: CTGF expression levels were examined in NPC tissues and cells, nasopharynx (NP tissues, and NP69 cells. The effects and molecular mechanisms of CTGF expression on cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and cell cycle were also explored. RESULTS: NPC cells exhibited decreased mRNA expression of CTGF compared to immortalized human nasopharyngeal epithelial cell line NP69. Similarly, CTGF was observed to be downregulated in NPC compared to normal tissues at mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, reduced CTGF was negatively associated with the progression of NPC. Knocking down CTGF expression enhanced the colony formation, cell migration, invasion, and G1/S cell cycle transition. Mechanistic analysis revealed that CTGF suppression activated FAK/PI3K/AKT and its downstream signals regulating the cell cycle, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and MMPs. Finally, DNA methylation microarray revealed a lack of hypermethylation at the CTGF promoter, suggesting other mechanisms are associated with suppression of CTGF in NPC. CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrates that reduced expression of CTGF promoted cell proliferation, migration, invasion and cell cycle progression through FAK/PI3K/AKT, EMT and MMP pathways in NPC.

  2. T-cell Migration, Search Strategies and Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krummel, Matthew F; Bartumeus, Frederic; Gérard, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    T cell migration is essential for T cell responses, allowing for detection of cognate antigen at the surface of an Antigen-Presenting Cell (APC) and for interactions with other cells involved in the immune response. Although appearing random, growing evidence supports that T cell motility patterns are strategic and governed by mechanisms that are optimized for both activation-stage and environment-specific attributes. In this Opinion Article, we will discuss how to understand the combined effects of T cell- intrinsic and -extrinsic forces upon these motility patterns when viewed in highly complex tissues filled with other cells involved in parallel motility. In particular, we will examine how insights from ‘search theory’ describe T cell movement across exploitation-exploration gradients, in the context of activation versus effector function and in the context of lymph nodes versus peripheral tissues. PMID:26852928

  3. Controlled Cell Growth and Cell Migration in Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica/Alginate Nanocomposite Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda Kehr, Nermin; Riehemann, Kristina

    2016-01-21

    Nanocomposite (NC) hydrogels with different periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) concentrations and a NC hydrogel bilayer with various PMO concentrations inside the layers of the hydrogel matrix are prepared. The effect of the PMO concentration on cell growth and migration of cells is reported. The cells migrate in the bilayer NC hydrogel towards higher PMO concentrations and from cell culture plates to NC hydrogel scaffolds. PMID:26648333

  4. Statistical analysis of the migration phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Alina - Andreea CRUCERU

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of economic conditions being devalued in Romania, more and more persons were forced to find a work place – be it temporary or permanent – outside of the country’s borders. This phenomenon of international migration has, as a main effect, the emergence of a special category of persons, respectively that of children left behind under the care of one of the parents or of other people. The situation of these minors is extremely difficult because, lacking the careful supervision of th...

  5. ANALYSIS ON THE PHENOMENON OF POPULATION'S MIGRATION IN ROMANIA

    OpenAIRE

    Nicoleta MATEOC-SÎRB; Teodor MATEOC; Camelia MĂNESCU; Ioan GRAD

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the authors analyze the migratory movement of population from Romania. Demographic dynamics of the last decade confirms that Romania's population declined. The demographic developments in Romania have mainly economic reasons (examples : migration, low birth rate, rural - urban migration). The comparative analysis of statistical data obtained in the population censuses of 2002 and 2011 shows that the most of the Romanian communities have lost population due to a negative natural ...

  6. Tetrandrine suppresses proliferation, induces apoptosis, and inhibits migration and invasion in human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrandrine (TET, a traditional Chinese medicine, exerts remarkable anticancer activity on various cancer cells. However, little is known about the effect of TET on human prostate cancer cells, and the mechanism of function of TET on prostate cancer has not yet been elucidated. To investigate the effects of TET on the suppression of proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and inhibition of migration and invasion in human prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and PC-3. Inhibition of growth was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and clone formation assay, and flow cytometry analysis was performed to detect the induction of apoptosis. Activation of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase, caspase-3, Akt, phospho-Akt, Bcl-2, and Bax was analyzed by Western blotting. Wound healing assay and transwell migration assay were used to evaluate the effect of TET on migration and invasion of cancer cells. TET inhibited the growth of DU145 and PC-3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Cell cloning was inhibited in the presence of TET in DU145 and PC-3 cells. TET suppressed the migration of DU145 and PC-3 cells. Transwell invasion assay showed that TET significantly weakened invasion capacity of DU145 and PC-3 cells. TET exhibited strong inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, and invasion of prostate cancer cells. In addition, TET induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner by activating the caspase cascade and inhibiting phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt signal pathway. The accumulating evidence suggests that TET could be a potential therapeutic candidate against prostate cancer in a clinical setting.

  7. Migration of Drosophila intestinal stem cells across organ boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Shigeo; Paul, Manash; Aghajanian, Patrick; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-05-01

    All components of the Drosophila intestinal tract, including the endodermal midgut and ectodermal hindgut/Malpighian tubules, maintain populations of dividing stem cells. In the midgut and hindgut, these stem cells originate from within larger populations of intestinal progenitors that proliferate during the larval stage and form the adult intestine during metamorphosis. The origin of stem cells found in the excretory Malpighian tubules ('renal stem cells') has not been established. In this paper, we investigate the migration patterns of intestinal progenitors that take place during metamorphosis. Our data demonstrate that a subset of adult midgut progenitors (AMPs) move posteriorly to form the adult ureters and, consecutively, the renal stem cells. Inhibiting cell migration by AMP-directed expression of a dominant-negative form of Rac1 protein results in the absence of stem cells in the Malpighian tubules. As the majority of the hindgut progenitor cells migrate posteriorly and differentiate into hindgut enterocytes, a group of the progenitor cells, unexpectedly, invades anteriorly into the midgut territory. Consequently, these progenitor cells differentiate into midgut enterocytes. The midgut determinant GATAe is required for the differentiation of midgut enterocytes derived from hindgut progenitors. Wingless signaling acts to balance the proportion of hindgut progenitors that differentiate as midgut versus hindgut enterocytes. Our findings indicate that a stable boundary between midgut and hindgut/Malpighian tubules is not established during early embryonic development; instead, pluripotent progenitor populations cross in between these organs in both directions, and are able to adopt the fate of the organ in which they come to reside. PMID:23571215

  8. Anandamide inhibits adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The endocannabinoid system regulates cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells. We reasoned that stimulation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors could induce a non-invasive phenotype in breast mtastatic cells. In a model of metastatic spreading in vivo, the metabolically stable anandamide analogue, 2-methyl-2'-F-anandamide (Met-F-AEA), significantly reduced the number and dimension of metastatic nodes, this effect being antagonized by the selective CB1 antagonist SR141716A. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly invasive human breast cancer cell line, and in TSA-E1 cells, a murine breast cancer cell line, Met-F-AEA inhibited adhesion and migration on type IV collagen in vitro without modifying integrin expression: both these effects were antagonized by SR141716A. In order to understand the molecular mechanism involved in these processes, we analyzed the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, two tyrosine kinases involved in migration and adhesion. In Met-F-AEA-treated cells, we observed a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of both FAK and Src, this effect being attenuated by SR141716A. We propose that CB1 receptor agonists inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis by modulating FAK phosphorylation, and that CB1 receptor activation might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow down the growth of breast carcinoma and to inhibit its metastatic diffusion in vivo

  9. Role of the Hemopexin domain of Matrix Metalloproteinases in Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Dufour, Antoine; Sampson, Nicole S.; Zucker, Stanley; Cao, Jian

    2008-01-01

    The biological functions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) extend beyond extracellular matrix degradation. Non-proteolytic activities of MMPs are just beginning to be understood. Herein, we evaluated the role of proMMPs in cell migration. Employing a Transwell chamber migration assay, we demonstrated that transfection of COS-1 cells with various proMMP cDNAs resulted in enhancement of cell migration. Latent MMP-2 and MMP-9 enhanced cell migration to a greater extent than latent MMP-1, -3, -...

  10. Nifedipine promotes the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Qing Guo

    Full Text Available Nifedipine is widely used as a calcium channel blocker (CCB to treat angina and hypertension,but it is controversial with respect the risk of stimulation of cancers. In this study, we demonstrated that nifedipine promoted the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells both invivo and invitro. However, verapamil, another calcium channel blocker, didn't exert the similar effects. Nifedipine and high concentration KCl failed to alter the [Ca2+]i in MDA-MB-231 cells, suggesting that such nifedipine effect was not related with calcium channel. Moreover, nifedipine decreased miRNA-524-5p, resulting in the up-regulation of brain protein I3 (BRI3. Erk pathway was consequently activated and led to the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Silencing BRI3 reversed the promoting effect of nifedipine on the breast cancer. In a summary, nifedipine stimulated the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells via the axis of miRNA-524-5p-BRI3-Erk pathway independently of its calcium channel-blocking activity. Our findings highlight that nifedipine but not verapamil is conducive for breast cancer growth and metastasis, urging that the caution should be taken in clinic to prescribe nifedipine to women who suffering both hypertension and breast cancer, and hypertension with a tendency in breast cancers.

  11. Molecular aspects of tumor cell migration and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Bozzuto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration and invasion are crucial steps in many physiological events. However, they are also implicated in the physiopathology of many diseases, such as cancer. To spread through the tissues, tumor cells use mechanisms that involve several molecular actors: adhesion receptor families, receptor tyrosine kinases, cytoskeleton proteins, adapter and signalling proteins interplay in a complex scenario. The balance of cellular signals for proliferation and survival responses also regulates migratory behaviours of tumor cells. To complicate the scene of crime drug resistance players can interfere thus worsening this delicate situation. The complete understanding of this molecular jungle is an impossible mission: some molecular aspects are reviewed in this paper.

  12. Retinoic acid reduces human neuroblastoma cell migration and invasiveness: effects on DCX, LIS1, neurofilaments-68 and vimentin expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuroblastoma is a severe pediatric tumor, histologically characterised by a variety of cellular phenotypes. One of the pharmacological approaches to neuroblastoma is the treatment with retinoic acid. The mechanism of action of retinoic acid is still unclear, and the development of resistance to this differentiating agent is a great therapy problem. Doublecortin, a microtubule-associated protein involved in neuronal migration, has recently been proposed as a molecular marker for the detection of minimal residual disease in human neuroblastoma. Nevertheless, no information is available on the expression of doublecortin in the different cell-types composing human neuroblastoma, its correlation with neuroblastoma cell motility and invasiveness, and the possible modulations exerted by retinoic acid treatment. We analysed by immunofluorescence and by Western blot analysis the presence of doublecortin, lissencephaly-1 (another protein involved in neuronal migration) and of two intermediate filaments proteins, vimentin and neurofilament-68, in SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cell line both in control conditions and under retinoic acid treatment. Migration and cell invasiveness studies were performed by wound scratch test and a modified microchemotaxis assay, respectively. Doublecortin is expressed in two cell subtypes considered to be the more aggressive and that show high migration capability and invasiveness. Vimentin expression is excluded by these cells, while lissencephaly-1 and neurofilaments-68 are immunodetected in all the cell subtypes of the SK-N-SH cell line. Treatment with retinoic acid reduces cell migration and invasiveness, down regulates doublecortin and lissencephaly-1 expression and up regulates neurofilament-68 expression. However, some cells that escape from retinoic acid action maintain migration capability and invasiveness and express doublecortin. a) Doublecortin is expressed in human neuroblastoma cells that show high motility and invasiveness; b

  13. Statistical analysis of the migration phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina - Andreea CRUCERU

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of economic conditions being devalued in Romania, more and more persons were forced to find a work place – be it temporary or permanent – outside of the country’s borders. This phenomenon of international migration has, as a main effect, the emergence of a special category of persons, respectively that of children left behind under the care of one of the parents or of other people. The situation of these minors is extremely difficult because, lacking the careful supervision of their evolution by their parents, they arefrequently confronted with problems of social adaptation, with learning difficulties and even with situations of willful breaking of legal norms.

  14. Angiotensin II facilitates breast cancer cell migration and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Rodrigues-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Breast cancer metastasis is a leading cause of death by malignancy in women worldwide. Efforts are being made to further characterize the rate-limiting steps of cancer metastasis, i.e. extravasation of circulating tumor cells and colonization of secondary organs. In this study, we investigated whether angiotensin II, a major vasoactive peptide both produced locally and released in the bloodstream, may trigger activating signals that contribute to cancer cell extravasation and metastasis. We used an experimental in vivo model of cancer metastasis in which bioluminescent breast tumor cells (D3H2LN were injected intra-cardiacally into nude mice in order to recapitulate the late and essential steps of metastatic dissemination. Real-time intravital imaging studies revealed that angiotensin II accelerates the formation of metastatic foci at secondary sites. Pre-treatment of cancer cells with the peptide increases the number of mice with metastases, as well as the number and size of metastases per mouse. In vitro, angiotensin II contributes to each sequential step of cancer metastasis by promoting cancer cell adhesion to endothelial cells, trans-endothelial migration and tumor cell migration across extracellular matrix. At the molecular level, a total of 102 genes differentially expressed following angiotensin II pre-treatment were identified by comparative DNA microarray. Angiotensin II regulates two groups of connected genes related to its precursor angiotensinogen. Among those, up-regulated MMP2/MMP9 and ICAM1 stand at the crossroad of a network of genes involved in cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Our data suggest that targeting angiotensin II production or action may represent a valuable therapeutic option to prevent metastatic progression of invasive breast tumors.

  15. Rho GTPases and regulation of cell migration and polarization in human corneal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Hou

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Epithelial cell migration is required for regeneration of tissues and can be defective in a number of ocular surface diseases. This study aimed to determine the expression pattern of Rho family small G-proteins in human corneal epithelial cells to test their requirement in directional cell migration. METHODS: Rho family small G-protein expression was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Dominant-inhibitory constructs encoding Rho proteins or Rho protein targeting small interfering RNA were transfected into human corneal epithelial large T antigen cells, and wound closure rate were evaluated by scratch wounding assay, and a complementary non-traumatic cell migration assay. Immunofluorescence staining was performed to study cell polarization and to assess Cdc42 downstream effector. RESULTS: Cdc42, Chp, Rac1, RhoA, TC10 and TCL were expressed in human corneal epithelial cells. Among them, Cdc42 and TCL were found to significantly affect cell migration in monolayer scratch assays. These results were confirmed through the use of validated siRNAs directed to Cdc42 and TCL. Scramble siRNA transfected cells had high percentage of polarized cells than Cdc42 or TCL siRNA transfected cells at the wound edge. We showed that the Cdc42-specific effector p21-activated kinase 4 localized predominantly to cell-cell junctions in cell monolayers, but failed to translocate to the leading edge in Cdc42 siRNA transfected cells after monolayer wounding. CONCLUSION: Rho proteins expressed in cultured human corneal epithelial cells, and Cdc42, TCL facilitate two-dimensional cell migration in-vitro. Although silencing of Cdc42 and TCL did not noticeably affect the appearance of cell adhesions at the leading edge, the slower migration of these cells indicates both GTP-binding proteins play important roles in promoting cell movement of human corneal epithelial cells.

  16. Capsaicin modulates proliferation, migration, and activation of hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitencourt, Shanna; Mesquita, Fernanda; Basso, Bruno; Schmid, Júlia; Ferreira, Gabriela; Rizzo, Lucas; Bauer, Moises; Bartrons, Ramon; Ventura, Francesc; Rosa, Jose Luis; Mannaerts, Inge; van Grunsven, Leo Adrianus; Oliveira, Jarbas

    2014-03-01

    Capsaicin, the active component of chili pepper, has been reported to have antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory effects on a variety of cell lines. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the effects of capsaicin during HSC activation and maintenance. Activated and freshly isolated HSCs were treated with capsaicin. Proliferation was measured by incorporation of EdU. Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were investigated using flow cytometry. The migratory response to chemotactic stimuli was evaluated by a modified Boyden chamber assay. Activation markers and inflammatory cytokines were determined by qPCR, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry. Our results show that capsaicin reduces HSC proliferation, migration, and expression of profibrogenic markers of activated and primary mouse HSCs. In conclusion, the present study shows that capsaicin modulates proliferation, migration, and activation of HSC in vitro. PMID:23955514

  17. Transcription factor 3 controls cell proliferation and migration in glioblastoma multiforme cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruiting; Li, Yinghui; Hu, Xin; Lian, Haiwei; Wang, Lei; Fu, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Transcription factor 3 (TCF3) is a member of the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) transcription factor family. Recent studies have demonstrated its potential carcinogenic properties. Here we show that TCF3 was upregulated in glioma tissues compared with normal brain tissues. This upregulation of the TCF3 gene probably has functional significance in brain-tumor progression. Our studies on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines show that knock-down of TCF3 induced apoptosis and inhibited cell migration. Further analysis revealed that down-regulation of TCF3 gene expression inhibits Akt and Erk1/2 activation, suggesting that the carcinogenic properties of TCF3 in GBM are partially mediated by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt and MAPK-Erk signaling pathways. Considered together, the results of this study demonstrate that high levels of TCF3 in gliomas potentially promote glioma development through the Akt and Erk pathways. PMID:27105323

  18. Directional cell migration, but not proliferation, drives hair placode morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahtiainen, Laura; Lefebvre, Sylvie; Lindfors, Päivi H; Renvoisé, Elodie; Shirokova, Vera; Vartiainen, Maria K; Thesleff, Irma; Mikkola, Marja L

    2014-03-10

    Epithelial reorganization involves coordinated changes in cell shapes and movements. This restructuring occurs during formation of placodes, ectodermal thickenings that initiate the morphogenesis of epithelial organs including hair, mammary gland, and tooth. Signaling pathways in ectodermal placode formation are well known, but the cellular mechanisms have remained ill defined. We established imaging methodology for live visualization of embryonic skin explants during the first wave of hair placode formation. We found that the vast majority of placodal cells were nonproliferative throughout morphogenesis. We show that cell compaction and centripetal migration are the main cellular mechanisms associated with hair placode morphogenesis and that inhibition of actin remodeling suppresses placode formation. Stimulation of both ectodysplasin/NF-κB and Wnt/β-catenin signaling increased cell motility and the number of cells committed to placodal fate. Thus, cell fate choices and morphogenetic events are controlled by the same molecular pathways, providing the framework for coordination of these two processes. PMID:24636260

  19. Insights into the Cell Shape Dynamics of Migrating Dictyostelium discoideum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Meghan; Homan, Tess; McCann, Colin; Parent, Carole; Fourkas, John; Losert, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    Dynamic cell shape is a highly visible manifestation of the interaction between the internal biochemical state of a cell and its external environment. We analyzed the dynamic cell shape of migrating cells using the model system Dictyostelium discoideum. Applying a snake algorithm to experimental movies, we extracted cell boundaries in each frame and followed local boundary motion over long time intervals. Using a local motion measure that corresponds to protrusive/retractive activity, we found that protrusions are intermittent and zig-zag, whereas retractions are more sustained and straight. Correlations of this local motion measure reveal that protrusions appear more localized than retractions. Using a local shape measure, curvature, we also found that small peaks in boundary curvature tend to originate at the front of cells and propagate backwards. We will review the possible cytoskeletal origin of these mechanical waves.

  20. AHNAK is highly expressed and plays a key role in cell migration and invasion in mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Hitomi; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Sugyo, Aya; Abe, Masaaki; Hino, Okio; Saga, Tsuneo

    2014-02-01

    The worldwide incidence of the highly aggressive tumor mesothelioma is expected to increase. Mesothelioma is classified into three main histological subtypes: epithelioid, sarcomatoid and biphasic. Although the pathological diagnostic markers for epithelioid are established, to date no adequate marker for sarcomatoid mesothelioma has been found. Thus, a reliable diagnostic marker of sarcomatoid mesothelioma is necessary. In this study, to identify an unknown protein with 120 kDa expressed only in the mesothelioma cell line 211H, we conducted proteomic analysis and found five candidate proteins. One such protein, AHNAK, was highly expressed in all seven mesothelioma cell lines (211H, H28, H226, H2052, H2452, MESO1 and MESO4), but not in the mesothelial cell line MeT-5A by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence staining. Furthermore, we confirmed high AHNAK expression not only in xenografts but also in human mesothelioma specimens including sarcomatoid, epithelioid and biphasic mesothelioma using immunohistochemical staining. These findings suggest that AHNAK has the potential to be a new marker for detecting mesothelioma. Since AHNAK is involved in cell migration and invasion in other metastatic tumor cells, we conducted migration and invasion assays in mesothelioma cell lines. The number of migrating cells in six of seven mesothelioma cell lines and the number of invading cells in all seven cell lines were significantly increased compared with those in MeT-5A. Knockdown of AHNAK significantly reduced the cell migration and invasion ability in all seven mesothelioma cell lines. These results support further clinical evaluation of the association of AHNAK and metastasis in mesothelioma. PMID:24253341

  1. Surface Modification of Intact Poly(dimethylsiloxane) for Cell Culture and Cell Migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li; LIU WenMing; WANG JinYi

    2009-01-01

    @@ Cell migration plays a crucial role in various biological processes including embryogenests,wound healing,immune response,and tissue development~([1]).Exploring and understanding the mechanisms and related factors underlying cell migration arc also very important for emerging areas of biotedmology which focus on cellular transplantation and the manufacture of artificial tissues,as well as for the development of new therapeutic strategies for controlling invasive tumor cells~([2]).

  2. Effects of Tumor Suppressor Gene TCF21 on the Proliferation, Migration and Apoptosis of A549 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song HU

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective TCF21, a newly discovered gene, exhibits tumor suppressor function in a variety of tumors. This study aims to observe the effects of TCF21 on the proliferation, apoptosis and migration of A549 human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells. Methods TCF21 was overexpressed in A549 cells via lentiviral transfection. Fluorescence-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were used to analyze the expression of the target gene. Transwell, proliferation assay, and flow cytometry were applied to detect the effect of TCF21 overexpression on the migration, proliferation, and apoptosis of A549 cells after transfection. Results The proliferation and migration of A549 cells were inhibited, and the apoptotic rate was increased by overexpressing TCF21. Conclusion The tumor suppressor gene, TCF21, significantly inhibits the proliferation and migration, as well as facilitates early apoptosis of A549 cells.

  3. Overexpression of engulfment and cell motility 1 promotes cell invasion and migration of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiarui; Liu, Guoqing; Miao, Xiongying; Hua, Songwen; Zhong, Dewu

    2011-05-01

    Engulfment and cell motility 1 (Elmo1) has been linked to the invasive phenotype of glioma cells. The use of Elmo1 inhibitors is currently being evaluated in hepato-cellular carcinoma (HCC), but the molecular mechanisms of their therapeutic effect have yet to be determined. Elmo1 expression in HCC tissue samples from 131 cases and in 5 HCC cell lines was determined by immunohistochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. To functionally characterize Elmo1 in HCC, Elmo1 expression in the HCCLM3 cell line was blocked by siRNA. Cell migration was measured by wound healing and transwell migration assays in vitro. Elmo1 overexpression was significantly correlated with cell invasion and the poor prognosis of HCC. Elmo1-siRNA-treated HCCLM3 cells demonstrated a reduction in cell migration. The present study demonstrated for the first time that the suppression of Elmo1 expression inhibits cell invasion in HCC. PMID:22977532

  4. CD155/PVR plays a key role in cell motility during tumor cell invasion and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Invasion is an important early step of cancer metastasis that is not well understood. Developing therapeutics to limit metastasis requires the identification and validation of candidate proteins necessary for invasion and migration. We developed a functional proteomic screen to identify mediators of tumor cell invasion. This screen couples Fluorophore Assisted Light Inactivation (FALI) to a scFv antibody library to systematically inactivate surface proteins expressed by human fibrosarcoma cells followed by a high-throughput assessment of transwell invasion. Using this screen, we have identified CD155 (the poliovirus receptor) as a mediator of tumor cell invasion through its role in migration. Knockdown of CD155 by FALI or by RNAi resulted in a significant decrease in transwell migration of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells towards a serum chemoattractant. CD155 was found to be highly expressed in multiple cancer cell lines and primary tumors including glioblastoma (GBM). Knockdown of CD155 also decreased migration of U87MG GBM cells. CD155 is recruited to the leading edge of migrating cells where it colocalizes with actin and αv-integrin, known mediators of motility and adhesion. Knockdown of CD155 also altered cellular morphology, resulting in cells that were larger and more elongated than controls when plated on a Matrigel substrate. These results implicate a role for CD155 in mediating tumor cell invasion and migration and suggest that CD155 may contribute to tumorigenesis

  5. Computational Analysis of mRNA Expression Profiles Identifies the ITG Family and PIK3R3 as Crucial Genes for Regulating Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Klahan, Sukhontip; Wu, Mei-Shin; Hsi, Edward; Huang, Chi-Cheng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2014-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive type of breast cancer that does not express estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor (Her2/neu). TNBC has worse clinical outcomes than other breast cancer subtypes. However, the key molecules and mechanisms of TNBC migration remain unclear. In this study, we compared two normalized microarray datasets from GEO database between Asian (GSE33926) and non-Asian populations (GSE46581) to det...

  6. Fibronectin Fiber Extension Decreases Cell Spreading and Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Brant; Buczek-Thomas, Jo Ann; Nugent, Matthew A; Smith, Michael L

    2016-08-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is present in a range of molecular conformations and intermolecular arrangements. Fibronectin (Fn) molecules that constitute fibers within the ECM can exist in a variety of conformations that result from both mechanical stress and chemical factors such as allosteric binding partners. The long-standing hypothesis that conformational changes regulate the binding of cells to Fn fibers has only been tested for mutated molecules of Fn and has yet to be fully evaluated with Fn fibers. Using time-lapse microscopy we examined how mechanical extension of single fibers of Fn affects the adhesion and migration of endothelial cells. Using this single fiber adhesion technique, we show that high levels of mechanical strain applied to Fn fibers decreases the rates of both cell spreading and cell migration. These data indicate a fundamental cellular response to mechanical strain in the ECM that might have important implications for understanding how cells are recruited during tissue development and repair. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1728-1736, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26621030

  7. Guidance of myogenic cell migration by oriented deposits of fibronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D C; Lawton, J; Dollenmeier, P; Ehrismann, R; Chiquet, M

    1983-02-01

    Fibronectin mediates myoblast-substratum attachment; one region of the molecule binds directly to the cell surface, while others bind to collagen, glycosaminoglycans, and other fibronectin molecules. There is evidence to suggest that fibronectin-containing extracellular matrices guide cell migration in vivo. We describe a method for producing regular deposits of fibronectin in vitro that can serve as a model system for studying cell-substrate interactions, cell orientation, and contact guidance. The novel culture substrate is prepared by allowing an aqueous solution of fibronectin and urea to dry in a culture dish and then washing away the urea crystals. Myogenic cells in vitro adhere to, align with, and migrate along, parallel streaks of fibronectin. This leads to the formation of myotubes that are long and thin, with little branching. Myogenic clones are highly elongated in the direction of the deposits, in contrast with the roughly circular clones seen in conventional cultures. Fibroblasts and limb bud mesenchymal cells align with fibronectin deposits, assuming a bipolar shape. PMID:6825944

  8. Involvement of regulatory volume decrease in the migration of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Wen MAO; Li Xin CHEN; Li Wei WANG; Tim JACOB; Xue Rong SUN; Hui LI; Lin Yan ZHU; Pan LI; Ping ZHONG; Si Huai NIE

    2005-01-01

    The transwell chamber migration assay and CCD digital camera imaging techniques were used to investigate the relationship between regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and cell migration in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells (CNE-2Z cells). Both migrated and non-migrated CNE-2Z cells, when swollen by 47% hypotonic solution, exhibited RVD which was inhibited by extracellular application of chloride channel blockers adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) and tamoxifen. However, RVD rate in migrated CNE-2Z cells was bigger than that of non-migrated cells and the sensitivity of migrated cells to NPPB and tamoxifen was higher than that of nonmigrated cells. ATP, NPPB and tamoxifen also inhibited migration of CNE-2Z cells. The inhibition of migration was positively correlated to the blockage of RVD, with a correlation coefficient (r) = 0.99, suggesting a functional relationship between RVD and cell migration. We conclude that RVD is involved in cell migration and RVD may play an important role in migratory process in CNE-2Z cells.

  9. Cu Migration in Polycrystalline CdTe Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Da [Arizona State University; Akis, Richard [Arizona State University; Brinkman, Daniel [Arizona State University; Sankin, Igor [First Solar; Fang, Tian [First Solar; Vasileska, Dragica [Arizona State University; Ringhofer, Christian [Arizona State University

    2014-03-12

    An impurity reaction-diffusion model is applied to Cu defects and related intrinsic defects in polycrystalline CdTe for a better understanding of Cu’s role in the cell level reliability of CdTe PV devices. The simulation yields transient Cu distributions in polycrystalline CdTe during solar cell processing and stressing. Preliminary results for Cu migration using available diffusivity and solubility data show that Cu accumulates near the back contact, a phenomena that is commonly observed in devices after back-contact processing or stress conditions.

  10. The disintegrin tzabcanin inhibits adhesion and migration in melanoma and lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saviola, Anthony J; Burns, Patrick D; Mukherjee, Ashis K; Mackessy, Stephen P

    2016-07-01

    Integrins play an essential role in cancer survival and invasion, and they have been major targets in drug development and design. Disintegrins are small (4-16kDa) viperid snake venom proteins that exhibit a canonical integrin-binding site (often RGD). These non-enzymatic proteins inhibit integrin-mediated cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions, making them potential candidates as therapeutics in cancer and numerous other human disorders. The present study examined the cytotoxic, anti-adhesion, and anti-migration effects of a recently characterized disintegrin, tzabcanin, towards melanoma (A-375) and lung (A-549) cancer cell lines. Tzabcanin inhibits adhesion of both cells lines to vitronectin and exhibited very weak cytotoxicity towards A-375 cells; however, it had no effect on cell viability of A-549 cells. Further, tzabcanin significantly inhibited migration of both cell lines in cell scratch/wound healing assays. Flow cytometric analysis indicates that both A-375 and A-549 cell lines express integrin αvβ3, a critical integrin in tumor motility and invasion, and a major receptor of the extracellular matrix protein vitronectin. Flow cytometric analysis also identified αvβ3 as a binding site of tzabcanin. These results suggest that tzabcanin may have utility in the development of anticancer therapies, or may be used as a biomarker to detect neoplasms that over-express integrin αvβ3. PMID:27060015

  11. From cell differentiation to cell collectives : Bacillus subtilis uses division of labor to migrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The organization of cells, emerging from cell-cell interactions, can give rise to collective properties. These properties are adaptive when together cells can face environmental challenges that they separately cannot. One particular challenge that is important for microorganisms is migration. In thi

  12. Effects of ovarian cancer G protein coupled receptor 1 on the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of human ovarian cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Juan; ZHANG Long

    2011-01-01

    Background OGR1 was found as a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and proton sensor. Our previous studies have found that OGR1 has inhibitory effect on the metastasis of prostate cancer. In order to investigate the roles of OGR1 gene in the biological activities of ovarian cancer, we studied the OGR1 effects on ovarian cancer cells, HEY cells.Methods OGR1 gene was transfected into HEY cell, in which endogenous expression is low. OGR1-overxepressed cells and vector-transfected cells were compared in different assays. Western blotting was employed to confirm the high expression level of OGR1. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay and cell doubling time assay. Cell migration assay (transwell assay) and cell adhesion assay were performed to determine the migration and adhesion potential of cells. Student's t test was employed for statistical analysis.Results Proliferation of OGR1-overexpressed cells was significantly reduced (P <0.01); cell migration was significantly inhibited in the OGR1-transfected cells (P <0.01); cell adhesion to extracellular matrix including fibronectin, vitronectin,collagen Ⅰ/Ⅳ was significantly increased (P <0.01).Conclusions OGR1 expression in human ovarian cancer cells significantly inhibited the cell proliferation and migration,but significantly enhanced cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. It indicated that OGR1 may be a tumor suppressor gene for ovarian cancer.

  13. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Morphology and Migration on Microtextured Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Brittany L.; Riley, Thomas R.; Platt, Christina J.; Brown, Justin L.

    2016-01-01

    The implant used in spinal fusion procedures is an essential component to achieving successful arthrodesis. At the cellular level, the implant impacts healing and fusion through a series of steps: first, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) need to adhere and proliferate to cover the implant; second, the MSCs must differentiate into osteoblasts; third, the osteoid matrix produced by the osteoblasts needs to generate new bone tissue, thoroughly integrating the implant with the vertebrate above and below. Previous research has demonstrated that microtextured titanium is advantageous over smooth titanium and PEEK implants for both promoting osteogenic differentiation and integrating with host bone tissue; however, no investigation to date has examined the early morphology and migration of MSCs on these surfaces. This study details cell spreading and morphology changes over 24 h, rate and directionality of migration 6–18 h post-seeding, differentiation markers at 10 days, and the long-term morphology of MSCs at 7 days, on microtextured, acid-etched titanium (endoskeleton), smooth titanium, and smooth PEEK surfaces. The results demonstrate that in all metrics, the two titanium surfaces outperformed the PEEK surface. Furthermore, the rough acid-etched titanium surface presented the most favorable overall results, demonstrating the random migration needed to efficiently cover a surface in addition to morphologies consistent with osteoblasts and preosteoblasts.

  14. Human omental-derived adipose stem cells increase ovarian cancer proliferation, migration, and chemoresistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Nowicka

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue contains a population of multipotent adipose stem cells (ASCs that form tumor stroma and can promote tumor progression. Given the high rate of ovarian cancer metastasis to the omental adipose, we hypothesized that omental-derived ASC may contribute to ovarian cancer growth and dissemination.We isolated ASCs from the omentum of three patients with ovarian cancer, with (O-ASC4, O-ASC5 and without (O-ASC1 omental metastasis. BM-MSCs, SQ-ASCs, O-ASCs were characterized with gene expression arrays and metabolic analysis. Stromal cells effects on ovarian cancer cells proliferation, chemoresistance and radiation resistance was evaluated using co-culture assays with luciferase-labeled human ovarian cancer cell lines. Transwell migration assays were performed with conditioned media from O-ASCs and control cell lines. SKOV3 cells were intraperitionally injected with or without O-ASC1 to track in-vivo engraftment.O-ASCs significantly promoted in vitro proliferation, migration chemotherapy and radiation response of ovarian cancer cell lines. O-ASC4 had more marked effects on migration and chemotherapy response on OVCA 429 and OVCA 433 cells than O-ASC1. Analysis of microarray data revealed that O-ASC4 and O-ASC5 have similar gene expression profiles, in contrast to O-ASC1, which was more similar to BM-MSCs and subcutaneous ASCs in hierarchical clustering. Human O-ASCs were detected in the stroma of human ovarian cancer murine xenografts but not uninvolved ovaries.ASCs derived from the human omentum can promote ovarian cancer proliferation, migration, chemoresistance and radiation resistance in-vitro. Furthermore, clinical O-ASCs isolates demonstrate heterogenous effects on ovarian cancer in-vitro.

  15. Sensitivity analysis of 3H migration in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify the sensitive parameters in numerical simulation of radionuclide migration, a global sensitivity analysis model based on Latin hypercube sampling and Spearman partial rank correlation analysis methods is built. Sensitivities of key parameters at different periods of time are calculated. Spatial and temporal differences of parameter sensitivity are analyzed. The analysis results agree well with physical laws. This provides a basis for further work to calibrate the parameters and analyze the uncertainty. (authors)

  16. Co-culture with Sertoli cells promotes proliferation and migration of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Co-culture of Sertoli cells (SCs) with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs). ► Presence of SCs dramatically increased proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. ► Presence of SCs stimulated expression of Mdm2, Akt, CDC2, Cyclin D, CXCR4, MAPKs. -- Abstract: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) have been recently used in transplant therapy. The proliferation and migration of MSCs are the determinants of the efficiency of MSC transplant therapy. Sertoli cells are a kind of “nurse” cells that support the development of sperm cells. Recent studies show that Sertoli cells promote proliferation of endothelial cells and neural stem cells in co-culture. We hypothesized that co-culture of UCMSCs with Sertoli cells may also promote proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. To examine this hypothesis, we isolated UCMSCs from human cords and Sertoli cells from mouse testes, and co-cultured them using a Transwell system. We found that UCMSCs exhibited strong proliferation ability and potential to differentiate to other cell lineages such as osteocytes and adipocytes. The presence of Sertoli cells in co-culture significantly enhanced the proliferation and migration potential of UCMSCs (P < 0.01). Moreover, these phenotypic changes were accompanied with upregulation of multiple genes involved in cell proliferation and migration including phospho-Akt, Mdm2, phospho-CDC2, Cyclin D1, Cyclin D3 as well as CXCR4, phospho-p44 MAPK and phospho-p38 MAPK. These findings indicate that Sertoli cells boost UCMSC proliferation and migration potential.

  17. Co-culture with Sertoli cells promotes proliferation and migration of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fenxi, E-mail: fxzhang0824@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Sanquan College, Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China); Hong, Yan; Liang, Wenmei [Department of Histology and Embryology, Guiyang Medical University, Guizhou 550004, People' s Republic of China (China); Ren, Tongming [Department of Anatomy, Sanquan College, Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China); Jing, Suhua [ICU Center, The Third Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China); Lin, Juntang [Stem Cell Center, Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-culture of Sertoli cells (SCs) with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of SCs dramatically increased proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of SCs stimulated expression of Mdm2, Akt, CDC2, Cyclin D, CXCR4, MAPKs. -- Abstract: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) have been recently used in transplant therapy. The proliferation and migration of MSCs are the determinants of the efficiency of MSC transplant therapy. Sertoli cells are a kind of 'nurse' cells that support the development of sperm cells. Recent studies show that Sertoli cells promote proliferation of endothelial cells and neural stem cells in co-culture. We hypothesized that co-culture of UCMSCs with Sertoli cells may also promote proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. To examine this hypothesis, we isolated UCMSCs from human cords and Sertoli cells from mouse testes, and co-cultured them using a Transwell system. We found that UCMSCs exhibited strong proliferation ability and potential to differentiate to other cell lineages such as osteocytes and adipocytes. The presence of Sertoli cells in co-culture significantly enhanced the proliferation and migration potential of UCMSCs (P < 0.01). Moreover, these phenotypic changes were accompanied with upregulation of multiple genes involved in cell proliferation and migration including phospho-Akt, Mdm2, phospho-CDC2, Cyclin D1, Cyclin D3 as well as CXCR4, phospho-p44 MAPK and phospho-p38 MAPK. These findings indicate that Sertoli cells boost UCMSC proliferation and migration potential.

  18. Directing cell migration and organization via nanocrater-patterned cell-repellent interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hojeong; Koo, Sangmo; Reese, Willie Mae; Loskill, Peter; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2015-09-01

    Although adhesive interactions between cells and nanostructured interfaces have been studied extensively, there is a paucity of data on how nanostructured interfaces repel cells by directing cell migration and cell-colony organization. Here, by using multiphoton ablation lithography to pattern surfaces with nanoscale craters of various aspect ratios and pitches, we show that the surfaces altered the cells’ focal-adhesion size and distribution, thus affecting cell morphology, migration and ultimately localization. We also show that nanocrater pitch can disrupt the formation of mature focal adhesions to favour the migration of cells towards higher-pitched regions, which present increased planar area for the formation of stable focal adhesions. Moreover, by designing surfaces with variable pitch but constant nanocrater dimensions, we were able to create circular and striped cellular patterns. Our surface-patterning approach, which does not involve chemical treatments and can be applied to various materials, represents a simple method to control cell behaviour on surfaces.

  19. Rapamycin promotes Schwann cell migration and nerve growth factor secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Liu; Haiwei Zhang; Kaiming Zhang; Xinyu Wang; Shipu Li; Yixia Yin

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin, similar to FK506, can promote neural regeneration in vitro. We assumed that the mechanisms of action of rapamycin and FK506 in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration were similar. This study compared the effects of different concentrations of rapamycin and FK506 on Sc hwann cells and investigated effects and mechanisms of rapamycin on improving peripheral nerve regeneration. Results demonstrated that the lowest rapamycin concentration (1.53 nmol/L) more signiifcantly promoted Schwann cell migration than the highest FK506 concentration (100μmol/L). Rapamycin promoted the secretion of nerve growth factors and upregulated growth-associated protein 43 expression in Schwann cells, but did not signiifcantly affect Schwann cell proliferation. Therefore, rapamycin has potential application in peripheral nerve regeneration therapy.

  20. Glioma Cell Migration on Three-dimensional Nanofiber Scaffolds Is Regulated by Substrate Topography and Abolished by Inhibition of STAT3 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula A. Agudelo-Garcia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of malignant gliomas is their ability to disperse through neural tissue, leading to long-term failure of all known therapies. Identifying new antimigratory targets could reduce glioma recurrence and improve therapeutic efficacy, but screens based on conventional migration assays are hampered by the limited ability of these assays to reproduce native cell motility. Here, we have analyzed the motility, gene expression, and sensitivity to migration inhibitors of glioma cells cultured on scaffolds formed by submicron-sized fibers (nanofibers mimicking the neural topography. Glioma cells cultured on aligned nanofiber scaffolds reproduced the elongated morphology of cells migrating in white matter tissue and were highly sensitive to myosin II inhibition but only moderately affected by stress fiber disruption. In contrast, the same cells displayed a flat morphology and opposite sensitivity to myosin II and actin inhibition when cultured on conventional tissue culture polystyrene. Gene expression analysis indicated a correlation between migration on aligned nanofibers and increased STAT3 signaling, a known driver of glioma progression. Accordingly, cell migration out of glioblastoma-derived neurospheres and tumor explants was reduced by STAT3 inhibitors at subtoxic concentrations. Remarkably, these inhibitors were ineffective when tested at the same concentrations in a conventional two-dimensional migration assay. We conclude that migration of glioma cells is regulated by topographical cues that affect cell adhesion and gene expression. Cell migration analysis using nanofiber scaffolds could be used to reproduce native mechanisms of migration and to identify antimigratory strategies not disclosed by other in vitro models.

  1. Neural crest migration: interplay between chemorepellents, chemoattractants, contact inhibition, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and collective cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theveneau, Eric; Mayor, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Neural crest (NC) cells are induced at the border of the neural plate and subsequently leave the neuroepithelium during a delamination phase. This delamination involves either a complete or partial epithelium-to-mesenchyme transition, which is directly followed by an extensive cell migration. During migration, NC cells are exposed to a wide variety of signals controlling their polarity and directionality, allowing them to colonize specific areas or preventing them from invading forbidden zones. For instance, NC cells are restricted to very precise pathways by the presence of inhibitory signals at the borders of each route, such as Semaphorins, Ephrins, and Slit/Robo. Although specific NC chemoattractants have been recently identified, there is evidence that repulsive interactions between the cells, in a process called contact inhibition of locomotion, is one of the major driving forces behind directional migration. Interestingly, in cellular and molecular terms, the invasive behavior of NC is similar to the invasion of cancer cells during metastasis. NC cells eventually settle in various places and make an immense contribution to the vertebrate body. They form the major constituents of the skull, the peripheral nervous system, and the pigment cells among others, which show the remarkable diversity and importance of this embryonic-stem cell like cell population. Consequently, several birth defects and craniofacial disorders, such as Treacher Collins syndrome, are due to improper NC cell migration. PMID:23801492

  2. Cancer cell-oriented migration of mesenchymal stem cells engineered with an anticancer gene (PTEN: an imaging demonstration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang ZS

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Zhuo-Shun Yang,1,* Xiang-Jun Tang,2,* Xing-Rong Guo,1 Dan-Dan Zou,1 Xu-Yong Sun,3 Jing-Bo Feng,1 Jie Luo,1 Long-Jun Dai,1,4 Garth L Warnock4 1Hubei Key Laboratory of Stem Cell Research, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Neurosurgery, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, People’s Republic of China; 3Guangxi Key Laboratory for Transplant Medicine, 303 Hospital of PLA, Nanning, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been considered to hold great potential as ideal carriers for the delivery of anticancer agents since the discovery of their tumor tropism. This study was performed to demonstrate the effects of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN engineering on MSCs’ capacity for cancer cell-oriented migration. Methods: MSCs were engineered with a PTEN-bearing plasmid and the expression was confirmed with Western blotting. A human glioma cell line (DBTRG was used as the target cell; DBTRG cell-oriented migration of MSCs was monitored with a micro speed photographic system. Results: The expression of transfected PTEN in MSCs was identified by immunoblotting analysis and confirmed with cell viability assessment of target cells. The DBTRG cell-oriented migration of PTEN-engineered MSCs was demonstrated by a real-time dynamic monitoring system, and a phagocytosis-like action of MSCs was also observed. Conclusion: MSCs maintained their capacity for cancer cell-directed migration after they were engineered with anticancer genes. This study provides the first direct evidence of MSCs’ tropism post-anticancer gene engineering. Keywords: gene therapy, mesenchymal stem cells, phosphatase and tensin homolog, cancer

  3. Ceramide 1-phosphate regulates cell migration and invasion of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Io-Guané; Ordoñez, Marta; Presa, Natalia; Gangoiti, Patricia; Gomez-Larrauri, Ana; Trueba, Miguel; Fox, Todd; Kester, Mark; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2016-02-15

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive and devastating disease characterized by invasiveness, rapid progression and profound resistance to treatment. Despite years of intense investigation, the prognosis of this type of cancer is poor and there is no efficacious treatment to overcome the disease. Using human PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 cells, we demonstrate that the bioactive sphingolipid ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) increases pancreatic cancer cell migration and invasion. Treatment of these cells with selective inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt1, or mammalian target of rapamycin 1 (mTOR1), or with specific siRNAs to silence the genes encoding these kinases, resulted in potent inhibition of C1P-induced cell migration and invasion. Likewise, the extracellularly regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1-2), and the small GTPase RhoA, which regulates cytoskeleton reorganization, were also found to be implicated in C1P-stimulated ROCK1-dependent cancer cell migration and invasion. In addition, pre-treatment of the cancer cells with pertussis toxin abrogated C1P-induced cell migration, suggesting the intervention of a Gi protein-coupled receptor in this process. Pancreatic cancer cells engineered to overexpress ceramide kinase (CerK), the enzyme responsible for C1P biosynthesis in mammalian cells, showed enhanced spontaneous cell migration that was potently blocked by treatment with the selective CerK inhibitor NVP-231, or by treatment with specific CerK siRNA. Moreover, overexpression of CerK with concomitant elevations in C1P enhanced migration of pancreatic cancer cells. Collectively, these data demonstrate that C1P is a key regulator of pancreatic cancer cell motility, and suggest that targeting CerK expression/activity and C1P may be relevant factors for controlling pancreatic cancer cell dissemination. PMID:26707801

  4. Security Analysis in the Migration to Cloud Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fernández-Medina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a new paradigm that combines several computing concepts and technologies of the Internet creating a platform for more agile and cost-effective business applications and IT infrastructure. The adoption of Cloud computing has been increasing for some time and the maturity of the market is steadily growing. Security is the question most consistently raised as consumers look to move their data and applications to the cloud. We justify the importance and motivation of security in the migration of legacy systems and we carry out an analysis of different approaches related to security in migration processes to cloud with the aim of finding the needs, concerns, requirements, aspects, opportunities and benefits of security in the migration process of legacy systems.

  5. ERK-dependent and -independent pathways trigger human neural progenitor cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besides differentiation and apoptosis, cell migration is a basic process in brain development in which neural cells migrate several centimeters within the developing brain before reaching their proper positions and forming the right connections. For identifying signaling events that control neural migration and are therefore potential targets of chemicals to disturb normal brain development, we developed a human neurosphere-based migration assay based on normal human neural progenitor (NHNP) cells, in which the distance is measured that cells wander over time. Applying this assay, we investigated the role of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in the regulation of NHNP cell migration. Exposure to model substances like ethanol or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) revealed a correlation between ERK1/2 activation and cell migration. The participation of phospho-(P-) ERK1/2 was confirmed by exposure of the cells to the MEK inhibitor PD98059, which directly prohibits ERK1/2 phosphorylation and inhibited cell migration. We identified protein kinase C (PKC) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as upstream signaling kinases governing ERK1/2 activation, thereby controlling NHNP cell migration. Additionally, treatments with src kinase inhibitors led to a diminished cell migration without affecting ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Based on these results, we postulate that migration of NHNP cells is controlled via ERK1/2-dependent and -independent pathways

  6. Tre1, a G protein-coupled receptor, directs transepithelial migration of Drosophila germ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhat S Kunwar

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In most organisms, germ cells are formed distant from the somatic part of the gonad and thus have to migrate along and through a variety of tissues to reach the gonad. Transepithelial migration through the posterior midgut (PMG is the first active step during Drosophila germ cell migration. Here we report the identification of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR, Tre1, that is essential for this migration step. Maternal tre1 RNA is localized to germ cells, and tre1 is required cell autonomously in germ cells. In tre1 mutant embryos, most germ cells do not exit the PMG. The few germ cells that do leave the midgut early migrate normally to the gonad, suggesting that this gene is specifically required for transepithelial migration and that mutant germ cells are still able to recognize other guidance cues. Additionally, inhibiting small Rho GTPases in germ cells affects transepithelial migration, suggesting that Tre1 signals through Rho1. We propose that Tre1 acts in a manner similar to chemokine receptors required during transepithelial migration of leukocytes, implying an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of transepithelial migration. Recently, the chemokine receptor CXCR4 was shown to direct migration in vertebrate germ cells. Thus, germ cells may more generally use GPCR signaling to navigate the embryo toward their target.

  7. Tre1, a G Protein-Coupled Receptor, Directs Transepithelial Migration of Drosophila Germ Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunwar Prabhat S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In most organisms, germ cells are formed distant from the somatic part of the gonad and thus have to migrate along and through a variety of tissues to reach the gonad. Transepithelial migration through the posterior midgut (PMG is the first active step during Drosophila germ cell migration. Here we report the identification of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR, Tre1, that is essential for this migration step. Maternal tre1 RNA is localized to germ cells, and tre1 is required cell autonomously in germ cells. In tre1 mutant embryos, most germ cells do not exit the PMG. The few germ cells that do leave the midgut early migrate normally to the gonad, suggesting that this gene is specifically required for transepithelial migration and that mutant germ cells are still able to recognize other guidance cues. Additionally, inhibiting small Rho GTPases in germ cells affects transepithelial migration, suggesting that Tre1 signals through Rho1. We propose that Tre1 acts in a manner similar to chemokine receptors required during transepithelial migration of leukocytes, implying an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of transepithelial migration. Recently, the chemokine receptor CXCR4 was shown to direct migration in vertebrate germ cells. Thus, germ cells may more generally use GPCR signaling to navigate the embryo toward their target.

  8. Role of laminin receptor in tumor cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Taraboletti, G; Sobel, M E;

    1987-01-01

    Polyclonal antisera were made against biochemically purified laminin receptor protein as well as against synthetic peptides deduced from a complementary DNA clone corresponding to the COOH-terminal end of the laminin receptor (U.M. Wewer et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 83: 7137-7141, 1986...... human carcinoma cells in vivo exhibited a marked cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for the receptor antigen. Together these findings indicate a specific role for the laminin receptor in laminin-mediated migration and that the ligand binding of the laminin receptor is encompassed in the COOH-terminal end of...

  9. On-Chip Quantitative Measurement of Mechanical Stresses During Cell Migration with Emulsion Droplets

    OpenAIRE

    Molino, D.; S. Quignard; Gruget, C.; Pincet, F.; Y. Chen; Piel, M.; Fattaccioli, J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of immune cells to migrate within narrow and crowded spaces is a critical feature involved in various physiological processes from immune response to metastasis. Several in-vitro techniques have been developed so far to study the behaviour of migrating cells, the most recent being based on the fabrication of microchannels within which cells move. To address the question of the mechanical stress a cell is able to produce during the encounter of an obstacle while migrating, we devel...

  10. Doxycycline inhibits leukemic cell migration via inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, CHUNHUAI; Xiang, Ru; ZHANG, XIANGZHONG; CHEN, YUNXIAN

    2015-01-01

    Doxycycline, a tetracycline-based antibiotic, has been reported to attenuate melanoma cell migration through inhibiting the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway. However, it remains to be elucidated whether doxycycline exerts this effect on leukemia cell migration. The present study aimed to examine the role of doxycycline in leukemia cell migration. The invasion capacities of the human leukemia cell lines KG1a (acute myelogenous leukemia) and K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia) were...

  11. Novel processed form of syndecan-1 shed from SCC-9 cells plays a role in cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragão, Annelize Z B; Belloni, Marília; Simabuco, Fernando M; Zanetti, Mariana R; Yokoo, Sami; Domingues, Romênia R; Kawahara, Rebeca; Pauletti, Bianca A; Gonçalves, Anderson; Agostini, Michelle; Graner, Edgard; Coletta, Ricardo D; Fox, Jay W; Paes Leme, Adriana F

    2012-01-01

    The extracellular milieu is comprised in part by products of cellular secretion and cell surface shedding. The presence of such molecules of the sheddome and secretome in the context of the extracellular milieu may have important clinical implications. In cancer they have been hypothesized to play a role in tumor growth and metastasis. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the sheddome/secretome from two cell lines could be correlated with their potential for tumor development. Two epithelial cell lines, HaCaT and SCC-9, were chosen based on their differing abilities to form tumors in animal models of tumorigenesis. These cell lines when stimulated with phorbol-ester (PMA) showed different characteristics as assessed by cell migration, adhesion and higher gelatinase activity. Proteomic analysis of the media from these treated cells identified interesting, functionally relevant differences in their sheddome/secretome. Among the shed proteins, soluble syndecan-1 was found only in media from stimulated tumorigenic cells (SCC-9) and its fragments were observed in higher amount in the stimulated tumorigenic cells than stimulated non-tumorigenic cells (HaCaT). The increase in soluble syndecan-1 was associated with a decrease in membrane-bound syndecan-1 of SCC-9 cells after PMA stimuli. To support a functional role for soluble syndecan-1 fragments we demonstrated that the synthetic syndecan-1 peptide was able to induce cell migration in both cell lines. Taken together, these results suggested that PMA stimulation alters the sheddome/secretome of the tumorigenic cell line SCC-9 and one such component, the syndecan-1 peptide identified in this study, was revealed to promote migration in these epithelial cell lines. PMID:22905270

  12. Arsenic sulfide inhibits cell migration and invasion of gastric cancer in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang L

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lian Zhang,1 Sungkyoung Kim,1 Wenping Ding,1 Yingying Tong,1 Xiuli Zhang,1 Minggui Pan,2 Siyu Chen1 1Department of Oncology, Xin Hua Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Oncology and Hematology, Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Santa Clara, CA, USA Background: We previously showed that arsenic sulfide (As4S4 induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in several human solid tumor cell lines, including those of gastric cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of As4S4 on the migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo.Methods: The human gastric cancer cell lines AGS and MGC803 were selected as in vitro models. Wound-healing migration assay and Transwell invasion assay were carried out to determine the effects of As4S4 on cell migration and invasion. The expressions of E-cadherin, β-catenin, Sp1, KLF4, and VEGF were measured by Western blotting analysis. The activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9 in MGC803 cells were demonstrated by zymography assay. A mouse xenograft model was established by inoculation with MGC803 cells, then intraperitoneal injected with As4S4 for 3 weeks and monitored for body weight and tumor changes. Finally, the inhibition rate of tumor growth was calculated, and the expression of proteins and genes associated with tumor invasion and metastasis in tumor tissues were measured by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and real-time polymerase chain reaction assay.Results: As4S4 significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of gastric cancer cell lines. The expression of E-cadherin and KLF4 was upregulated, while the expressions of β-catenin, VEGF, and Sp1 were downregulated following treatment with As4S4. Moreover, the protease activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were suppressed by As4S4 in MGC803 cells. Meanwhile, As4S4 effectively suppressed the abilities of tumor growth and

  13. Nuclide migration analysis in fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the results of PA studies considering heterogeneous fracture characteristics, for the purpose of contributing for the performance assessment of the natural barrier system PA in H12 report (The second progress report on research and development for the Geological Disposal of HLW in Japan). In this study, 3-D discrete fracture network model (DFN) and 1-D multiple pathways model is applied for 100 m scale of rock block. Although nuclide release rate calculated by DFN are widely distributed among the realizations, it is shown that several tens realizations are enough number to understand the stochastic characteristics of the nuclide release. From the data uncertainty analysis, there are no significant effects for the nuclide retardation in fracture geometry parameters such as fracture radius, density and etc. 1-D multiple pathways model is developed with focusing on the heterogeneity of the transmissivity, which has a large effect to the nuclide retardation effects. The nuclide release rate calculated by using 1-D multiple pathways model approximates to the results of DFN. This result also shows that the relatively large fractures/faults that connects disposal tunnel and downstream faults have an important role for performance assessment in natural barrier system. (author)

  14. A Nanoprinted Model of Interstitial Cancer Migration Reveals a Link between Cell Deformability and Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotakopoulou, Magdalini; Bergert, Martin; Taubenberger, Anna; Guck, Jochen; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ferrari, Aldo

    2016-07-26

    Metastatic progression of tumors requires the coordinated dissemination of cancerous cells through interstitial tissues and their replication in distant body locations. Despite their importance in cancer treatment decisions, key factors, such as cell shape adaptation and the role it plays in dense tissue invasion by cancerous cells, are not well understood. Here, we employ a 3D electrohydrodynamic nanoprinting technology to generate vertical arrays of topographical pores that mimic interstitial tissue resistance to the mesenchymal migration of cancerous cells, in order to determine the effect of nuclear size, cell deformability, and cell-to-substrate adhesion on tissue invasion efficiency. The high spatial and temporal resolution of our analysis demonstrates that the ability of cells to deform depends on the cell cycle phase, peaks immediately after mitosis, and is key to the invasion process. Increased pore penetration efficiency by cells in early G1 phase also coincided with their lower nuclear volume and higher cell deformability, compared with the later cell cycle stages. Furthermore, artificial decondensation of chromatin induced an increase in cell and nuclear deformability and improved pore penetration efficiency of cells in G1. Together, these results underline that along the cell cycle cells have different abilities to dynamically remodel their actin cytoskeleton and induce nuclear shape changes, which determines their pore penetration efficiency. Thus, our results support a mechanism in which cell proliferation and pore penetration are functionally linked to favor the interstitial dissemination of metastatic cells. PMID:27268411

  15. Dkk-1 Inhibits Intestinal Epithelial Cell Migration by Attenuating Directional Polarization of Leading Edge Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Stefan; Capaldo, Christopher T.; Samarin, Stanislav; Nava, Porfirio; Neumaier, Irmgard; Skerra, Arne; Sacks, David B.; Parkos, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Wnt signaling pathways regulate proliferation, motility, and survival in a variety of human cell types. Dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1) is a secreted Wnt antagonist that has been proposed to regulate tissue homeostasis in the intestine. In this report, we show that Dkk-1 is secreted by intestinal epithelial cells after wounding and that it inhibits cell migration by attenuating the directional orientation of migrating epithelial cells. Dkk-1 exposure induced mislocalized activation of Cdc42 in migrating cells, which coincided with a displacement of the polarity protein Par6 from the leading edge. Consequently, the relocation of the microtubule organizing center and the Golgi apparatus in the direction of migration was significantly and persistently inhibited in the presence of Dkk-1. Small interfering RNA-induced down-regulation of Dkk-1 confirmed that extracellular exposure to Dkk-1 was required for this effect. Together, these data demonstrate a novel role of Dkk-1 in the regulation of directional polarization of migrating intestinal epithelial cells, which contributes to the effect of Dkk-1 on wound closure in vivo. PMID:19776352

  16. Forward transport of proteins in the plasma membrane of migrating cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; She, Liang; Sui, Ya-nan; Yuan, Xiao-bing; Wen, Yunqing; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-12-18

    Directional flow of membrane components has been detected at the leading front of fibroblasts and the growth cone of neuronal processes, but whether there exists global directional flow of plasma membrane components over the entire migrating neuron remains largely unknown. By analyzing the trajectories of antibody-coated single quantum dots (QDs) bound to two membrane proteins, overexpressed myc-tagged synaptic vesicle-associated membrane protein VAMP2 and endogenous neurotrophin receptor TrkB, we found that these two proteins exhibited net forward transport, which is superimposed upon Brownian motion, in both leading and trailing processes of migrating cerebellar granule cells in culture. Furthermore, no net directional transport of membrane proteins was observed in nonmigrating cells with either growing or stalling leading processes. Analysis of the correlation of motion direction between two QDs on the same process in migrating neurons also showed a higher frequency of correlated forward than rearward movements. Such correlated QD movements were markedly reduced in the presence of myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin,suggesting the involvement of myosin II-dependent active transport processes. Thus, a net forward transport of plasma membrane proteins exists in the leading and trailing processes of migrating neurons, in line with the translocation of the soma. PMID:23213239

  17. Nuclear translocation of phosphorylated STAT3 regulates VEGF-A-induced lymphatic endothelial cell migration and tube formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okazaki, Hideki; Tokumaru, Sho; Hanakawa, Yasushi; Shiraishi, Ken; Shirakata, Yuji; Dai, Xiuju; Yang, Lijun; Tohyama, Mikiko; Hashimoto, Koji [Department of Dermatology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Toon, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan); Sayama, Koji, E-mail: sayama@m.ehime-u.ac.jp [Department of Dermatology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Toon, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan)

    2011-09-02

    Highlights: {yields} VEGF-A enhanced lymphatic endothelial cell migration and increased tube formation. {yields} VEGF-A treated lymphatic endothelial cell showed activation of STAT3. {yields} Dominant-negative STAT3 inhibited VEGF-A-induced lymphatic endothelial cell migration and tube formation. -- Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific growth factor that regulates endothelial functions, and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) are known to be important during VEGF receptor signaling. The aim of this study was to determine whether STAT3 regulates VEGF-induced lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) migration and tube formation. VEGF-A (33 ng/ml) enhanced LEC migration by 2-fold and increased tube length by 25% compared with the control, as analyzed using a Boyden chamber and Matrigel assay, respectively. Western blot analysis and immunostaining revealed that VEGF-A induced the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated STAT3 in LECs, and this translocation was blocked by the transfection of LECs with an adenovirus vector expressing a dominant-negative mutant of STAT3 (Ax-STAT3F). Transfection with Ax-STAT3F also almost completely inhibited VEGF-A-induced LEC migration and tube formation. These results indicate that STAT3 is essential for VEGF-A-induced LEC migration and tube formation and that STAT3 regulates LEC functions.

  18. Prostaglandins in Cancer Cell Adhesion, Migration, and Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Menter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostaglandins exert a profound influence over the adhesive, migratory, and invasive behavior of cells during the development and progression of cancer. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 (mPGES-1 are upregulated in inflammation and cancer. This results in the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, which binds to and activates G-protein-coupled prostaglandin E1-4 receptors (EP1-4. Selectively targeting the COX-2/mPGES-1/PGE2/EP1-4 axis of the prostaglandin pathway can reduce the adhesion, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis. Once stimulated by prostaglandins, cadherin adhesive connections between epithelial or endothelial cells are lost. This enables cells to invade through the underlying basement membrane and extracellular matrix (ECM. Interactions with the ECM are mediated by cell surface integrins by “outside-in signaling” through Src and focal adhesion kinase (FAK and/or “inside-out signaling” through talins and kindlins. Combining the use of COX-2/mPGES-1/PGE2/EP1-4 axis-targeted molecules with those targeting cell surface adhesion receptors or their downstream signaling molecules may enhance cancer therapy.

  19. Siegesbeckia orientalis Extract Inhibits TGFβ1-Induced Migration and Invasion of Endometrial Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chang Chang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Type II endometrial carcinoma typically exhibits aggressive metastasis and results in a poor prognosis. Siegesbeckia orientalis Linne is a traditional Chinese medicinal herb with several medicinal benefits, including the cytotoxicity against various cancers. This study investigates the inhibitory effects of S. orientalis ethanol extract (SOE on the migration and invasion of endometrial cancer cells, which were stimulated by transforming growth factor β (TGFβ. The inhibitory effects were evaluated by determining wound healing and performing the Boyden chamber assay. This study reveals that SOE can inhibit TGFβ1-induced cell wound healing, cell migration, and cell invasion in a dose-dependent manner in RL95-2 and HEC-1A endometrial cancer cells. SOE also reversed the TGFβ1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition, including the loss of the cell-cell junction and the lamellipodia-like structures. Western blot analysis revealed that SOE inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK1/2, and Akt, as well as the expression of MMP-9, MMP-2, and u-PA in RL95-2 cells dose-dependently. The results of this investigation suggest that SOE is a potential anti-metastatic agent against human endometrial tumors.

  20. Wash functions downstream of Rho1 GTPase in a subset of Drosophila immune cell developmental migrations

    OpenAIRE

    Verboon, Jeffrey M; Travis K Rahe; Rodriguez-Mesa, Evelyn; Parkhurst, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila immune cells, the hemocytes, undergo four stereotypical developmental migrations to populate the embryo, where they provide immune reconnoitering, as well as a number of non–immune-related functions necessary for proper embryogenesis. Here, we describe a role for Rho1 in one of these developmental migrations in which posteriorly located hemocytes migrate toward the head. This migration requires the interaction of Rho1 with its downstream effector Wash, a Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome fa...

  1. From cell differentiation to cell collectives: Bacillus subtilis uses division of labor to migrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi van Gestel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The organization of cells, emerging from cell-cell interactions, can give rise to collective properties. These properties are adaptive when together cells can face environmental challenges that they separately cannot. One particular challenge that is important for microorganisms is migration. In this study, we show how flagellum-independent migration is driven by the division of labor of two cell types that appear during Bacillus subtilis sliding motility. Cell collectives organize themselves into bundles (called "van Gogh bundles" of tightly aligned cell chains that form filamentous loops at the colony edge. We show, by time-course microscopy, that these loops migrate by pushing themselves away from the colony. The formation of van Gogh bundles depends critically on the synergistic interaction of surfactin-producing and matrix-producing cells. We propose that surfactin-producing cells reduce the friction between cells and their substrate, thereby facilitating matrix-producing cells to form bundles. The folding properties of these bundles determine the rate of colony expansion. Our study illustrates how the simple organization of cells within a community can yield a strong ecological advantage. This is a key factor underlying the diverse origins of multicellularity.

  2. Menthol increases human glioblastoma intracellular Ca2+, BK channel activity and cell migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartley Jeremy W

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study examined the effect of menthol, an agonist for transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8 ion channels, to increase intracellular Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i, in human glioblastoma cells (DBTRG cells, which resulted in activation of the large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ membrane ion channels (BK channels. Voltage ramps applied over 300 ms from -100 to 100 mV resulted in membrane currents with marked inwardly- and outwardly-rectifying components. Paxilline (2 μM abolished the outwardly-rectifying current. Outwardly-rectifying on-cell patch currents were increased markedly by menthol (100 μM added to the bath. The estimated on-cell conductance of these channels was 253 pS. Kinetic analysis showed that added menthol increased channel open probability and mean open frequency after 5 min. In a similar time course menthol increased [Ca2+]i, and this increase was abolished either by added paxilline, tetraethylammonium ion or by Ca2+-free external solution. Finally, menthol stimulated the rate of DBTRG cell migration into scratch wounds made in confluent cells, and this also was inhibited by paxilline or by tetraethylammonium ion. We conclude that menthol, a TRPM8 agonist, increases DBTRG cell [Ca2+]i that in turn activates membrane BK ion channels. Inhibition of BK channels by paxilline reverses menthol-stimulated increase of [Ca2+]i and of cell migration. Thus, BK channels function to maintain elevations in [Ca2+]i needed to sustain increases in DBTRG cell migration.

  3. Suppression of thymosin β10 increases cell migration and metastasis of cholangiocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thymosin β10 (Tβ10) expression is associated with malignant phenotypes in many cancers. However, the role and mechanisms of Tβ10 in liver fluke-associated cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the expression of Tβ10 in CCA tumor tissues and cell lines as well as molecular mechanisms of Tβ10 in tumor metastasis of CCA cell lines. Tβ10 expression was determined by real time RT-PCR or immunocytochemistry. Tβ10 silence or overexpression in CCA cells was achieved using gene delivery techniques. Cell migration was assessed using modified Boyden chamber and wound healing assay. The effect of silencing Tβ10 on CCA tumor metastasis was determined in nude mice. Phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and the expression of EGR1, Snail and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were studied. Ten pairs of CCA tissues (primary and metastatic tumors) and 5 CCA cell lines were studied. With real time RT-PCR and immunostaining analysis, Tβ10 was highly expressed in primary tumors of CCA; while it was relatively low in the metastatic tumors. Five CCA cell lines showed differential expression levels of Tβ10. Silence of Tβ10 significantly increased cell migration, invasion and wound healing of CCA cells in vitro; reversely, overexpression of Tβ10 reduced cell migration compared with control cells (P<0.05). In addition, silence of Tβ10 in CCA cells increased liver metastasis in a nude mouse model of CCA implantation into the spleen. Furthermore, silence of Tβ10 activated ERK1/2 and increased the expression of Snail and MMPs in CCA cell lines. Ras-GTPase inhibitor, FPT inhibitor III, effectively blocked Tβ10 silence-associated ERK1/2 activation, Snail expression and cell migration. Low expression of Tβ10 is associated with metastatic phenotype of CCA in vitro and in vivo, which may be mediated by the activation of Ras, ERK1/2 and upregulation of Snail and MMPs. This study suggests a new molecular pathway of CCA pathogenesis and a novel strategy to

  4. The secretory pathway calcium ATPase PMR-1/SPCA1 has essential roles in cell migration during Caenorhabditis elegans embryonic development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Praitis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining levels of calcium in the cytosol is important for many cellular events, including cell migration, where localized regions of high calcium are required to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics, contractility, and adhesion. Studies show inositol-trisphosphate receptors (IP3R and ryanodine receptors (RyR, which release calcium into the cytosol, are important regulators of cell migration. Similarly, proteins that return calcium to secretory stores are likely to be important for cell migration. The secretory protein calcium ATPase (SPCA is a Golgi-localized protein that transports calcium from the cytosol into secretory stores. SPCA has established roles in protein processing, metal homeostasis, and inositol-trisphosphate signaling. Defects in the human SPCA1/ATP2C1 gene cause Hailey-Hailey disease (MIM# 169600, a genodermatosis characterized by cutaneous blisters and fissures as well as keratinocyte cell adhesion defects. We have determined that PMR-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of SPCA1, plays an essential role in embryogenesis. Pmr-1 strains isolated from genetic screens show terminal phenotypes, such as ventral and anterior enclosure failures, body morphogenesis defects, and an unattached pharynx, which are caused by earlier defects during gastrulation. In Pmr-1 embryos, migration rates are significantly reduced for cells moving along the embryo surface, such as ventral neuroblasts, C-derived, and anterior-most blastomeres. Gene interaction experiments show changing the activity of itr-1/IP3R and unc-68/RyR modulates levels of embryonic lethality in Pmr-1 strains, indicating pmr-1 acts with these calcium channels to regulate cell migration. This analysis reveals novel genes involved in C. elegans cell migration, as well as a new role in cell migration for the highly conserved SPCA gene family.

  5. New strategy to control cell migration and metastasis regulated by CCN2/CTGF

    OpenAIRE

    Aguiar, Diego Pinheiro; de Farias, Gabriel Correa; de Sousa, Eduardo Branco; de Mattos Coelho-Aguiar, Juliana; Lobo, Julie Calixto; Casado, Priscila Ladeira; Duarte, Maria Eugênia Leite; Abreu, José Garcia Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)/CCN family member 2 (CCN2) is a CCN family member of matricellular signaling modulators. It has been shown that CCN2/CTGF mediates cell adhesion, aggregation and migration in a large variety of cell types, including vascular endothelial cells, fibroblasts, epithelial cells, aortic smooth muscle and also pluripotent stem cells. Others matricellular proteins are capable of interacting with CCN2/CTGF to mediate its function. Cell migration is a key feature ...

  6. Integrin-mediated cell migration is blocked by inhibitors of human neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Feng; Howlader, Md Amran; Cairo, Christopher W

    2016-09-01

    Integrins are critical receptors in cell migration and adhesion. A number of mechanisms are known to regulate the function of integrins, including phosphorylation, conformational change, and cytoskeletal anchoring. We investigated whether native neuraminidase (Neu, or sialidase) enzymes which modify glycolipids could play a role in regulating integrin-mediated cell migration. Using a scratch assay, we found that exogenously added Neu3 and Neu4 activity altered rates of cell migration. We observed that Neu4 increased the rate of migration in two cell lines (HeLa, A549); while Neu3 only increased migration in HeLa cells. A bacterial neuraminidase was able to increase the rate of migration in HeLa, but not in A549 cells. Treatment of cells with complex gangliosides (GM1, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b) resulted in decreased cell migration rates, while LacCer was able to increase rates of migration in both lines. Importantly, our results show that treatment of cells with inhibitors of native Neu enzymes had a dramatic effect on the rates of cell migration. The most potent compound tested targeted the human Neu4 isoenzyme, and was able to substantially reduce the rate of cell migration. We found that the lateral mobility of integrins was reduced by treatment of cells with Neu3, suggesting that Neu3 enzyme activity resulted in changes to integrin-co-receptor or integrin-cytoskeleton interactions. Finally, our results support the hypothesis that inhibitors of human Neu can be used to investigate mechanisms of cell migration and for the development of anti-adhesive therapies. PMID:27344026

  7. ESCRT III repairs nuclear envelope ruptures during cell migration to limit DNA damage and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, M; Gentili, M; de Belly, H; Thiam, H R; Vargas, P; Jimenez, A J; Lautenschlaeger, F; Voituriez, Raphaël; Lennon-Duménil, A M; Manel, N; Piel, M

    2016-04-15

    In eukaryotic cells, the nuclear envelope separates the genomic DNA from the cytoplasmic space and regulates protein trafficking between the two compartments. This barrier is only transiently dissolved during mitosis. Here, we found that it also opened at high frequency in migrating mammalian cells during interphase, which allowed nuclear proteins to leak out and cytoplasmic proteins to leak in. This transient opening was caused by nuclear deformation and was rapidly repaired in an ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport)-dependent manner. DNA double-strand breaks coincided with nuclear envelope opening events. As a consequence, survival of cells migrating through confining environments depended on efficient nuclear envelope and DNA repair machineries. Nuclear envelope opening in migrating leukocytes could have potentially important consequences for normal and pathological immune responses. PMID:27013426

  8. The RNA binding protein Larp1 regulates cell division, apoptosis and cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Carla; Abd Latip, Normala; Lam, Sarah-Jane; Carpenter, Lee; Sawicka, Kirsty; Tzolovsky, George; Gabra, Hani; Bushell, Martin; Glover, David M; Willis, Anne E; Blagden, Sarah P

    2010-09-01

    The RNA binding protein Larp1 was originally shown to be involved in spermatogenesis, embryogenesis and cell-cycle progression in Drosophila. Our data show that mammalian Larp1 is found in a complex with poly A binding protein and eukaryote initiation factor 4E and is associated with 60S and 80S ribosomal subunits. A reduction in Larp1 expression by siRNA inhibits global protein synthesis rates and results in mitotic arrest and delayed cell migration. Consistent with these data we show that Larp1 protein is present at the leading edge of migrating cells and interacts directly with cytoskeletal components. Taken together, these data suggest a role for Larp1 in facilitating the synthesis of proteins required for cellular remodelling and migration. PMID:20430826

  9. Silencing of VAMP3 inhibits cell migration and integrin-mediated adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors for cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. In cell migration, integrins are endocytosed from the plasma membrane or the cell surface, transported in vesicles and exocytosed actively at the cell front. In the present study, we examined the roles of VAMP3, a SNARE protein that mediates exocytosis, in cell migration and integrin trafficking. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced silencing of VAMP3 inhibited chemotactic cell migration by more than 60% without affecting cell proliferation. VAMP3 silencing reduced the levels of β1 integrin at the cell surface but had no effect on total cellular β1 integrin, indicating that VAMP3 is required for trafficking of β1 integrin to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, VAMP3 silencing diminished cell adhesion to laminin but not to fibronectin or collagen. Taken together, these data suggest that VAMP3-dependent integrin trafficking is crucial in cell migration and cell adhesion to laminin.

  10. Grhl3 induces human epithelial tumor cell migration and invasion via downregulation of E-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pan; Guo, Sijia; Tu, Zhenzhen; Di, Lijun; Zha, Xiaojun; Zhou, Haisheng; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-03-01

    Grainyhead genes are involved in wound healing and developmental neural tube closure. Metastasis is a multistep process during which cancer cells disseminate from the site of primary tumors and establish secondary tumors in distant organs. The adhesion protein E-cadherin plays an essential role in metastasis. In light of the high degree of similarity between the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurring in wound-healing processes and the EMT occurring during the acquisition of invasiveness in skin or breast cancer, we investigated the role of the Grainyhead genes in cancer invasion. Here, we show that there is an inverse relationship between Grainyhead-like 3 (Grhl3) and E-cadherin expression in some epithelial tumor cell lines. Overexpression of Grhl3 in the E-cadherin-positive epithelial tumor cell line, characterized by less invasiveness, generated a transcriptional blockage of the E-cadherin gene and promoted cell migration and cell invasion. Conversely, Grhl3 depletion inhibited cell migration and cell invasion and was associated with a gain of E-cadherin expression. To further explore the mechanism by which Grhl3 regulated E-cadherin expression, an E-cadherin promoter report analysis was performed and results showed that Grhl3 repressed E-cadherin gene expression by directly or indirectly binding to the E-boxes present in the proximal E-cadherin promoter. Taken together, our findings define a major role for Grhl3 in the induction of migration and invasion by the downregulation of E-cadherin in cancer cells. PMID:26837418

  11. PEG10 promotes human breast cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinran; Xiao, Ruijing; Tembo, Kingsley; Hao, Ling; Xiong, Meng; Pan, Shan; Yang, Xiangyong; Yuan, Wen; Xiong, Jie; Zhang, Qiuping

    2016-05-01

    Paternally expressed imprinted gene 10 (PEG10), derived from the Ty3/Gypsy family of retrotransposons, has been implicated as a genetic imprinted gene. Accumulating evidence suggests that PEG10 plays an important role in tumor growth in various cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma, lung cancer and prostate cancer. However, the correlation between PEG10 and breast cancer remains unclear. In the present study, we evaluated and characterized the role of PEG10 in human breast cancer proliferation, cell cycle, clone formation, migration and invasion. The expression level of PEG10 was significantly elevated in breast cancer tissues and associated with distant metastasis and poor clinical outcome. Gene set enrichment analysis indicated that high expression of PEG10 could enrich cell cycle-related processes in breast cancer tissues. Ectopic overexpression of PEG10 in breast cancer cells enhanced cell proliferation, cell cycle, clone formation along with migration and invasion. Cell-to-cell junction molecule E-cadherin was downregulated and matrix degradation proteases MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9 were up-regulated after PEG10 overexpression. Our results demonstrated that PEG10 is a crucial oncogene and has prognostic value for breast cancer, which could be applied in breast cancer diagnosis and targeting therapy in future. PMID:26934961

  12. Impaired SIRT1 promotes the migration of vascular smooth muscle cell-derived foam cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Jie; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xu; Pi, Yan; Long, Chun-Yan; Sun, Meng-Jiao; Chen, Xue; Gao, Chang-Yue; Li, Jing-Cheng; Zhang, Li-Li

    2016-07-01

    The formation of fat-laden foam cells, contributing to the fatty streaks of the plaques of atheroma, is the critical early process in atherosclerosis. The previous study demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contain a much larger burden of the excess cholesterol in comparison with monocyte-derived macrophages in human coronary atherosclerosis, as the main origin of foam cells. It is noteworthy that VSMC-derived foam cells are deposited in subintima but not media, where VSMCs normally deposit in. Therefore, migration from media to intima is an indispensable step for a VSMC to accrue neutral lipids and form foam cell. Whether this migration occurs paralleled with or prior to the formation of foam cell is still unclear. Herein, the present study was designed to test the VSMC migratory capability in the process of foam cell formation induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). In conclusion, we provide evidence that oxLDL induces the VSMC-derived foam cells formation with increased migration ability and MMP-9 expression, which were partly attributed to the impaired SIRT1 and enhanced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity. As activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) has been reported to have anti-atherosclerotic effects, we investigated its role in oxLDL-treated VSMC migration. It is found that activating TRPV1 by capsaicin inhibits VSMC foam cell formation and the accompanied migration through rescuing the SIRT1 and suppressing NF-κB signaling. The present study provides evidence that SIRT1 may be a promising intervention target of atherosclerosis, and raises the prospect of TRPV1 in prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:26883442

  13. Radionuclide migration analysis using a discrete fracture network model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes an approach for assessing the geosphere performance of nuclear waste disposal in fractured rock. In this approach, a three-dimensional heterogeneous channel-network model is constructed using a stochastic discrete fracture network (DFN) code. Radionuclide migration in the channel-network model is solved using the Laplace transform Galerkin finite element method, taking into account advection-dispersion in a fracture network, matrix diffusion, sorption in the rock matrix as well as radioactive chain decay. Preliminary radionuclide migration analysis was performed for fifty realizations of a synthetic block-scale DFN model. The total radionuclide release from all packages in the repository was estimated from the statistics of the results of fifty realizations under the hypothesis of ergodicity. The interpretation of the result of the three-dimensional network model by a combination of simpler one-dimensional parallel plate models is also discussed

  14. Microbial desalination cell with capacitive adsorption for ion migration control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrestal, Casey; Xu, Pei; Jenkins, Peter E; Ren, Zhiyong

    2012-09-01

    A new microbial desalination cell with capacitive adsorption capability (cMDC) was developed to solve the ion migration problem facing current MDC systems. Traditional MDCs remove salts by transferring ions to the anode and cathode chambers, which may prohibit wastewater beneficial reuse due to increased salinity. The cMDC uses adsorptive activated carbon cloth (ACC) as the electrodes and utilizes the formed capacitive double layers for electrochemical ion adsorption. The cMDC removed an average of 69.4% of the salt from the desalination chamber through electrode adsorption during one batch cycle, and it did not add salts to the anode or cathode chamber. It was estimated that 61-82.2mg of total dissolved solids (TDS) was adsorbed to 1g of ACC electrode. The cMDC provides a new approach for salt management, organic removal, and energy production. Further studies will be conducted to optimize reactor configuration and achieve in situ electrode regeneration. PMID:22784594

  15. A simple non-perturbing cell migration assay insensitive to proliferation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Honor L; Messner, Jacob; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2016-01-01

    Migration is a fundamental cellular behavior that plays an indispensable role in development and homeostasis, but can also contribute to pathology such as cancer metastasis. Due to its relevance to many aspects of human health, the ability to accurately measure cell migration is of broad interest, and numerous approaches have been developed. One of the most commonly employed approaches, because of its simplicity and throughput, is the exclusion zone assay in which cells are allowed to migrate into an initially cell-free region. A major drawback of this assay is that it relies on simply counting cells in the exclusion zone and therefore cannot distinguish the effects of proliferation from migration. We report here a simple modification to the exclusion zone migration assay that exclusively measures cell migration and is not affected by proliferation. This approach makes use of a lineage-tracing vital stain that is retained through cell generations and effectively reads out migration relative to the original, parental cell population. This modification is simple, robust, non-perturbing, and inexpensive. We validate the method in a panel of cell lines under conditions that inhibit or promote migration and demonstrate its use in normal and cancer cell lines as well as primary cells. PMID:27535324

  16. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 µg cm−2) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  17. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanyuan; Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Sun, Jianbo; Li, Xiang; Wang, Liying; Wu, Nianqiang; Rojanasakul, Yon; Liu, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 μg cm−2) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  18. Suppression of Human Liver Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion via the GABAA Receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the roles of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and to explore the potential of a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of HCC. The expression levels of GABA receptor subunit genes in various HCC cell lines and patients‘ tissues were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Transwell cell migration and invasion assays were carried out for functional analysis. The effects of GABA on liver cancer cell cytoskeletal were determined by immunofluorescence staining. And the effects of GABA on HCC metastasis in nude mice were evaluated using an in vivo orthotopic model of liver cancer. The mRNA level of GABA receptor subunits varied between the primary hepatocellular carcinoma tissue and the adjacent non-tumor liver tissue. GABA inhibited human liver cancer cell migration and invasion via the ionotropic GABAA receptor as a result of the induction of liver cancer cell cytoskeletal reorganization. Pretreatment with GABA also significantly reduced intrahepatic liver metastasis and primary tumor formation in vivo. These findings introduce a potential and novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer patients based on the modulation of the GABAergic system

  19. Dynamic actin polymerization on endosomes regulates integrin trafficking, cell adhesion and cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Duleh, Steve Niessen

    2012-01-01

    Activators of the Arp2/3 complex, termed nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs), are required for the proper spatial and temporal control of actin assembly in cells. Mammalian cells express several NPFs, each of which serve distinct functions in specific cellular processes, including N-WASP in phagocytosis and endocytosis, WAVE and JMY in cell migration, and WHAMM in ER-to-Golgi transport. Although another NPF termed WASH was recently identified, the cellular function and activity of this prot...

  20. PLACENTAL SECRETORY FACTORS INFLUENCE TO THP-1 CELLS PHENOTYPE AND THP-1 CELLS TRANSENDOTHELIAL MIGRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Stepanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Decidual and placental macrophage pools are renewed due to its transendothelial monocyte migration from peripheral blood. Tissue macrophages control placental development and provide fetomaternal immunological tolerance. Preeclamptic pregnancy is accompanied by increased monocyte migration to decidual tissue and local inflammatory events. Regulatory mechanisms of monocyte recruitment to placental and decidual tissues is still unclear. Therefore we investigated the influence soluble placental factors (SPFs during the first- and third-trimester normal pregnancy, as compared to effects of these factors in preeclamptic pregnancy. We studied biological actions of SPF upon transendothelial migration of monocyte-like THP-1 cells and their phenotypic pattern. Transendothelial migration of THP-1 cells was more intensive with firsttrimester SPFs from normal pregnancy, when compared with third-trimester samples, and it was accompanied by decreased CD11a expression. SPFs from pre-eclamptic pregnancy caused an increase in transendothelial migration of THP-1 cells, as compared to SPFs from normal pregnancies, being accompanied by increased CD11b expression. The present study was supported by grants ГК №  02.740.11.0711, НШ-3594.2010.7, МД-150.2011.7 and a grant from St.-Petersburg Goverment for young scientists.

  1. miRNA-135a promotes breast cancer cell migration and invasion by targeting HOXA10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    miRNAs are a group of small RNA molecules regulating target genes by inducing mRNA degradation or translational repression. Aberrant expression of miRNAs correlates with various cancers. Although miR-135a has been implicated in several other cancers, its role in breast cancer is unknown. HOXA10 however, is associated with multiple cancer types and was recently shown to induce p53 expression in breast cancer cells and reduce their invasive ability. Because HOXA10 is a confirmed miR-135a target in more than one tissue, we examined miR-135a levels in relation to breast cancer phenotypes to determine if miR-135a plays role in this cancer type. Expression levels of miR-135a in tissues and cells were determined by poly (A)-RT PCR. The effect of miR-135a on proliferation was evaluated by CCK8 assay, cell migration and invasion were evaluated by transwell migration and invasion assays, and target protein expression was determined by western blotting. GFP and luciferase reporter plasmids were constructed to confirm the action of miR-135a on downstream target genes including HOXA10. Results are reported as means ± S.D. and differences were tested for significance using 2-sided Student's t-test. Here we report that miR-135a was highly expressed in metastatic breast tumors. We found that the expression of miR-135a was required for the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells, but not their proliferation. HOXA10, which encodes a transcription factor required for embryonic development and is a metastasis suppressor in breast cancer, was shown to be a direct target of miR-135a in breast cancer cells. Our analysis showed that miR-135a suppressed the expression of HOXA10 both at the mRNA and protein level, and its ability to promote cellular migration and invasion was partially reversed by overexpression of HOXA10. In summary, our results indicate that miR-135a is an onco-miRNA that can promote breast cancer cell migration and invasion. HOXA10 is a target gene for mi

  2. The Pro-Fibrotic Factor IGFBP-5 Induces Lung Fibroblast and Mononuclear Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuoka, Hidekata; Yamaguchi, Yukie; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    We have previously shown that insulin-like growth factor–binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) is overexpressed in fibrotic lung tissues and that it induces production of extracellular matrix components such as collagen and fibronectin both in vitro and in vivo. We recently observed mononuclear cell infiltration in lung tissues of mice expressing IGFBP-5. We therefore examined the role of IGFBP-5 on the migration of immune cells. Migration assays demonstrated that IGFBP-5 induced migration of periphera...

  3. Computational modelling of multi-cell migration in a multi-signalling substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell migration is a vital process in many biological phenomena ranging from wound healing to tissue regeneration. Over the past few years, it has been proven that in addition to cell–cell and cell-substrate mechanical interactions (mechanotaxis), cells can be driven by thermal, chemical and/or electrical stimuli. A numerical model was recently presented by the authors to analyse single cell migration in a multi-signalling substrate. That work is here extended to include multi-cell migration due to cell–cell interaction in a multi-signalling substrate under different conditions. This model is based on balancing the forces that act on the cell population in the presence of different guiding cues. Several numerical experiments are presented to illustrate the effect of different stimuli on the trajectory and final location of the cell population within a 3D heterogeneous multi-signalling substrate. Our findings indicate that although multi-cell migration is relatively similar to single cell migration in some aspects, the associated behaviour is very different. For instance, cell–cell interaction may delay single cell migration towards effective cues while increasing the magnitude of the average net cell traction force as well as the local velocity. Besides, the random movement of a cell within a cell population is slightly greater than that of single cell migration. Moreover, higher electrical field strength causes the cell slug to flatten near the cathode. On the other hand, as with single cell migration, the existence of electrotaxis dominates mechanotaxis, moving the cells to the cathode or anode pole located at the free surface. The numerical results here obtained are qualitatively consistent with related experimental works. (paper)

  4. Cell-surface proteoglycan in sea urchin primary mesenchyme cell migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Early in the development of the sea urchin embryo, the primary mesenchyme cells (PMC) migrate along the basal lamina of the blastocoel. Migration is inhibited in L. pictus embryos cultured in sulfate-free seawater and in S. purpuratus embryos exposed to exogenous {beta}-D-xylosides. An in vitro assay was developed to test the migratory capacity of normal PMC on normal and treated blastocoelic matrix. Sulfate deprivation and exposure to exogenous xyloside render PMC nonmotile on either matrix. Materials removed from the surface of normal PMC by treatment with 1 M urea restored migratory ability to defective cells, whereas a similar preparation isolated from the surface of epithelial cells at the same stage did not. Migration also resumed when cells were removed from the xyloside or returned to normal seawater. The urea extract was partially purified and characterized by radiolabeling, gel electrophoresis, fluorography, ion exchange chromatography, and western blotting. The PMC synthesize a large chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan that is present in an active fraction isolated by chromatography. Chondroitinase ABC digestion of live cells blocked migration reversibly, further supporting the identification of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan as the active component in the urea extract. Much of the incorporated sulfate was distributed along the filopodia in {sup 35}SO{sub 4}-labelled PMC by autoradiography. The morphology of normal and treated S. purpuratus PMC was examined by scanning electron microscopy, and differences in spreading, particularly of the extensive filopodia present on the cells, was observed. A model for the role of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan in cell detachment during migration is proposed.

  5. Cell-surface proteoglycan in sea urchin primary mesenchyme cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early in the development of the sea urchin embryo, the primary mesenchyme cells (PMC) migrate along the basal lamina of the blastocoel. Migration is inhibited in L. pictus embryos cultured in sulfate-free seawater and in S. purpuratus embryos exposed to exogenous β-D-xylosides. An in vitro assay was developed to test the migratory capacity of normal PMC on normal and treated blastocoelic matrix. Sulfate deprivation and exposure to exogenous xyloside render PMC nonmotile on either matrix. Materials removed from the surface of normal PMC by treatment with 1 M urea restored migratory ability to defective cells, whereas a similar preparation isolated from the surface of epithelial cells at the same stage did not. Migration also resumed when cells were removed from the xyloside or returned to normal seawater. The urea extract was partially purified and characterized by radiolabeling, gel electrophoresis, fluorography, ion exchange chromatography, and western blotting. The PMC synthesize a large chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan that is present in an active fraction isolated by chromatography. Chondroitinase ABC digestion of live cells blocked migration reversibly, further supporting the identification of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan as the active component in the urea extract. Much of the incorporated sulfate was distributed along the filopodia in 35SO4-labelled PMC by autoradiography. The morphology of normal and treated S. purpuratus PMC was examined by scanning electron microscopy, and differences in spreading, particularly of the extensive filopodia present on the cells, was observed. A model for the role of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan in cell detachment during migration is proposed

  6. ANALYSIS ON THE PHENOMENON OF POPULATION'S MIGRATION IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta MATEOC-SÎRB

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors analyze the migratory movement of population from Romania. Demographic dynamics of the last decade confirms that Romania's population declined. The demographic developments in Romania have mainly economic reasons (examples : migration, low birth rate, rural - urban migration. The comparative analysis of statistical data obtained in the population censuses of 2002 and 2011 shows that the most of the Romanian communities have lost population due to a negative natural and migratory growth. Fron the situation of the absent population ( migrants at the time of the population census, between 2002 and 2011 is that the number of those who have left home for longer periods has increased exponentially. Most of those absents from their home at the time of the last population census were living abroad. Romania needs a realistic vision of economic and social development in the coming decades. In defining and naming a strategy for sustainable development, population is the central element and from this perspective one of the strategy component should be to stop the demographic skidding. Simultaneously with the decrease of the total population, Romania records a demographic aging trend. The causes are both negative natural growth ( low birth rate combined with high mortality and also the migration phenomena. Projections show that these trends will persist on the medium and long term.

  7. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  8. ELK3 Expression Correlates With Cell Migration, Invasion, and Membrane Type 1-Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression in MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Sun-Hee; Lee, Je-Yong; Yang, Kyung-Min; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2015-01-01

    ELK3 is a member of the Ets family of transcription factors. Its expression is associated with angiogenesis, vasculogenesis, and chondrogenesis. ELK3 inhibits endothelial migration and tube formation through the regulation of MT1-MMP transcription. This study assessed the function of ELK3 in breast cancer (BC) cells by comparing its expression between basal and luminal cells in silico and in vitro. In silico analysis showed that ELK3 expression was higher in the more aggressive basal BC cells than in luminal BC cells. Similarly, in vitro analysis showed that ELK3 mRNA and protein expression was higher in basal BC cells than in normal cells and luminal BC cells. To investigate whether ELK3 regulates basal cell migration or invasion, knockdown was achieved by siRNA in the basal BC cell line MDA-MB-231. Inhibition of ELK3 expression decreased cell migration and invasion and downregulated MT1-MMP, the expression of which is positively correlated with tumor cell invasion. In silico analysis revealed that ELK3 expression was associated with that of MT1-MMP in several BC cell lines (0.98 Pearson correlation coefficient). Though MT1-MMP expression was upregulated upon ELK3 nuclear translocation, ELK3 did not directly bind to the 1.3-kb promoter region of the MT1-MMP gene. These results suggest that ELK3 plays a positive role in the metastasis of BC cells by indirectly regulating MT1-MMP expression. PMID:26637400

  9. The subcellular localization of IGFBP5 affects its cell growth and migration functions in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahin Aysegul

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 5 (IGFBP5 has been shown to be associated with breast cancer metastasis in clinical marker studies. However, a major difficulty in understanding how IGFBP5 functions in this capacity is the paradoxical observation that ectopic overexpression of IGFBP5 in breast cancer cell lines results in suppressed cellular proliferation. In cancer tissues, IGFBP5 resides mainly in the cytoplasm; however, in transfected cells, IGFBP5 is mainly located in the nucleus. We hypothesized that subcellular localization of IGFBP5 affects its functions in host cells. Methods To test this hypothesis, we generated wild-type and mutant IGFBP5 expression constructs. The mutation occurs within the nuclear localization sequence (NLS of the protein and is generated by site-directed mutagenesis using the wild-type IGFBP5 expression construct as a template. Next, we transfected each expression construct into MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells to establish stable clones overexpressing either wild-type or mutant IGFBP5. Results Functional analysis revealed that cells overexpressing wild-type IGFBP5 had significantly lower cell growth rate and motility than the vector-transfected cells, whereas cells overexpressing mutant IGFBP5 demonstrated a significantly higher ability to proliferate and migrate. To illustrate the subcellular localization of the proteins, we generated wild-type and mutant IGFBP5-pDsRed fluorescence fusion constructs. Fluorescence microscopy imaging revealed that mutation of the NLS in IGFBP5 switched the accumulation of IGFBP5 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of the protein. Conclusion Together, these findings imply that the mutant form of IGFBP5 increases proliferation and motility of breast cancer cells and that mutation of the NLS in IGFBP5 results in localization of IGFBP5 in the cytoplasm, suggesting that subcellular localization of IGFBP5 affects its cell growth and migration functions in the

  10. Topotecan inhibits cancer cell migration by down-regulation of chemokine CC motif receptor 7 and matrix metalloproteinases

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Sen-sen; Sun, Li; Zhang, Yan-Kai; Zhao, Ren-ping; Liang, Wen-lu; Yuan, Sheng-Tao; Zhang, Lu-yong

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of topotecan (TPT) on cancer cell migration. Methods: Growth inhibition of TPT was analyzed by MTT assay, and cancer cell migration was measured by transwell double chamber assay. To verify the effect of TPT on the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7, quantitative PCR, semi-quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis were performed. The secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and gelatin zymo...

  11. Subcurative radiation significantly increases cell proliferation, invasion, and migration of primary glioblastoma multiforme in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adarsh Shankar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cell proliferation, infiltration, migration, and neovascularization are known causes of treatment resistance in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of radiation on the growth characteristics of primary human GBM developed in a nude rat. Primary GBM cells grown from explanted GBM tissues were implanted orthotopically in nude rats. Tumor growth was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging on day 77 (baseline after implantation. The rats underwent irradiation to a dose of 50 Gy delivered subcuratively on day 84 postimplantation (n = 8, or underwent no radiation (n = 8. Brain tissues were obtained on day 112 (nonirradiated or day 133 (irradiated. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine tumor cell proliferation (Ki-67 and to assess the expression of infiltration marker (matrix metalloproteinase-2, MMP-2 and cell migration marker (CD44. Tumor neovascularization was assessed by microvessel density using von-Willebrand factor (vWF staining. Magnetic resonance imaging showed well-developed, infiltrative tumors in 11 weeks postimplantation. The proportion of Ki-67-positive cells in tumors undergoing radiation was (71+/- 15% compared with (25 +/- 12% in the nonirradiated group (P = 0.02. The number of MMP-2-positive areas and proportion of CD44-positive cells were also high in tumors receiving radiation, indicating great invasion and infiltration. Microvessel density analysis did not show a significant difference between nonirradiated and irradiated tumors. Taken together, we found that subcurative radiation significantly increased proliferation, invasion, and migration of primary GBM. Our study provides insights into possible mechanisms of treatment resistance following radiation therapy for GBM.

  12. Epac1 increases migration of endothelial cells and melanoma cells via FGF2-mediated paracrine signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baljinnyam, Erdene; Umemura, Masanari; Chuang, Christine;

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) regulates endothelial and melanoma cell migration. The binding of FGF2 to its receptor requires N-sulfated heparan sulfate (HS) glycosamine. We have previously reported that Epac1, an exchange protein activated by cAMP, increases N-sulfation of HS in melanoma. Ther...

  13. Exosomal signaling during hypoxia mediates microvascular endothelial cell migration and vasculogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Salomon

    Full Text Available Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are critical processes in fetal circulation and placental vasculature development. Placental mesenchymal stem cells (pMSC are known to release paracrine factors (some of which are contained within exosomes that promote angiogenesis and cell migration. The aims of this study were: to determine the effects of oxygen tension on the release of exosomes from pMSC; and to establish the effects of pMSC-derived exosomes on the migration and angiogenic tube formation of placental microvascular endothelial cells (hPMEC. pMSC were isolated from placental villi (8-12 weeks of gestation, n = 6 and cultured under an atmosphere of 1%, 3% or 8% O2. Cell-conditioned media were collected and exosomes (exo-pMSC isolated by differential and buoyant density centrifugation. The dose effect (5-20 µg exosomal protein/ml of pMSC-derived exosomes on hPMEC migration and tube formation were established using a real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™. The exosome pellet was resuspended in PBS and protein content was established by mass spectrometry (MS. Protein function and canonical pathways were identified using the PANTHER program and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, respectively. Exo-pMSC were identified, by electron microscopy, as spherical vesicles, with a typical cup-shape and diameters around of 100 nm and positive for exosome markers: CD63, CD9 and CD81. Under hypoxic conditions (1% and 3% O2 exo-pMSC released increased by 3.3 and 6.7 folds, respectively, when compared to the controls (8% O2; p<0.01. Exo-pMSC increased hPMEC migration by 1.6 fold compared to the control (p<0.05 and increased hPMEC tube formation by 7.2 fold (p<0.05. MS analysis identified 390 different proteins involved in cytoskeleton organization, development, immunomodulatory, and cell-to-cell communication. The data obtained support the hypothesis that pMSC-derived exosomes may contribute to placental vascular adaptation to low oxygen tension under both

  14. Lipid raft association restricts CD44-ezrin interaction and promotion of breast cancer cell migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2012-12-01

    Cancer cell migration is an early event in metastasis, the main cause of breast cancer-related deaths. Cholesterol-enriched membrane domains called lipid rafts influence the function of many molecules, including the raft-associated protein CD44. We describe a novel mechanism whereby rafts regulate interactions between CD44 and its binding partner ezrin in migrating breast cancer cells. Specifically, in nonmigrating cells, CD44 and ezrin localized to different membranous compartments: CD44 predominantly in rafts, and ezrin in nonraft compartments. After the induction of migration (either nonspecific or CD44-driven), CD44 affiliation with lipid rafts was decreased. This was accompanied by increased coprecipitation of CD44 and active (threonine-phosphorylated) ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins in nonraft compartments and increased colocalization of CD44 with the nonraft protein, transferrin receptor. Pharmacological raft disruption using methyl-β-cyclodextrin also increased CD44-ezrin coprecipitation and colocalization, further suggesting that CD44 interacts with ezrin outside rafts during migration. Conversely, promoting CD44 retention inside lipid rafts by pharmacological inhibition of depalmitoylation virtually abolished CD44-ezrin interactions. However, transient single or double knockdown of flotillin-1 or caveolin-1 was not sufficient to increase cell migration over a short time course, suggesting complex crosstalk mechanisms. We propose a new model for CD44-dependent breast cancer cell migration, where CD44 must relocalize outside lipid rafts to drive cell migration. This could have implications for rafts as pharmacological targets to down-regulate cancer cell migration.

  15. Tectorigenin inhibits osteosarcoma cell migration through downregulation of matrix metalloproteinases in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu; Chen, Ya-Hong; Cheng, Zhi-Hua; Ou-Yang, Huo-Niu; Luo, Cong; Guo, Zhi-Lin

    2016-07-01

    Tectorigenin (Tec) is an effective component of the traditional Chinese medicine Belamcanda chinensis, which has been reported to exert beneficial effects in various types of cancer. However, the activity and mechanism of Tec in osteosarcoma (OS) have not been investigated to date. The aim of the present study was to examine the inhibitory effect of Tec on OS and its underlying mechanism of action. OS cells (Saos2 and U2OS) were treated with various concentrations of Tec for 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell proliferation was evaluated using an CCK-8 assay. Cell migration and invasion ability were measured using the Transwell assay. The expressions of MMP1, MMP2, MMP9, and cleaved caspase3 were measured using real-time PCR and/or western blot analysis. We found that Tec inhibited the proliferation of OS cells (Saos2 and U2OS) in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. In addition, Tec significantly inhibited migration and invasion in OS cells (Pchemotherapy against OS. PMID:26991068

  16. Orai1 and STIM1 are critical for cell migration and proliferation of clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Orai1 channel is highly expressed in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) tissues. • Orai1 and STIM1 constitute a native store-operated Ca2+ entry in ccRCC cells. • Orai1 and STIM1 promote cell migration and proliferation of ccRCC cells. - Abstract: The intracellular Ca2+ regulation has been implicated in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Notably, store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) is a major Ca2+ entry mechanism in non-excitable cells, being involved in cell proliferation and migration in several types of cancer. However, the expression and biological role of SOCE have not been investigated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Here, we demonstrate that Orai1 and STIM1, not Orai3, are crucial components of SOCE in the progression of ccRCC. The expression levels of Orai1 in tumor tissues were significantly higher than those in the adjacent normal parenchymal tissues. In addition, native SOCE was blunted by inhibiting SOCE or by silencing Orai1 and STIM1. Pharmacological blockade or knockdown of Orai1 or STIM1 also significantly inhibited RCC cell migration and proliferative capability. Taken together, Orai1 is highly expressed in ccRCC tissues illuminating that Orai1-mediated SOCE may play an important role in ccRCC development. Indeed, Orai1 and STIM1 constitute a native SOCE pathway in ccRCC by promoting cell proliferation and migration

  17. Exploration of molecular pathways mediating electric field-directed Schwann cell migration by RNA-Seq

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Li; Li, Yongchao; Knapp, Jennifer; Smith, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In peripheral nervous systems, Schwann cells wrap around axons of motor and sensory neurons to form the myelin sheath. Following spinal cord injury, Schwann cells regenerate and migrate to the lesion and are involved in the spinal cord regeneration process. Transplantation of Schwann cells into injured neural tissue results in enhanced spinal axonal regeneration. Effective directional migration of Schwann cells is critical in the neural regeneration process. In this study, we report that Schw...

  18. Directional Migration of MDA-MB-231 Cells Under Oxygen Concentration Gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahara, D; Yoshida, T; Enokida, Y; Takahashi, E

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the initial mechanism of hematogenous metastasis of cancer cells, we hypothesized that cancer cells migrate toward regions with higher oxygen concentration such as intratumor micro vessels along the oxygen concentration gradient. To produce gradients of oxygen concentration in vitro, we devised the gap cover glass (GCG). After placing a GCG onto cultured MDA-MB-231 cells (a metastatic breast cancer cell line), the migration of individual cells under the GCG was tracked up to 12 h at 3 % oxygen in the micro incubator. We quantified the migration of individual cells using forward migration index (FMI). The cell migration perpendicular to the oxygen gradients was random in the direction whereas FMIs of the cell located at 300, 500, 700, and 1500 μm from the oxygen inlet were positive (p < 0.05) indicating a unidirectional migration toward the oxygen inlet. Present results are consistent with our hypothesis that MDA-MB-231 cells migrate toward regions with higher oxygen concentration. PMID:27526134

  19. Subcurative radiation significantly increases cell proliferation, invasion, and migration of primary glioblastoma multiforme in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adarsh Shankar; Robert A. Knight; Stephen Brown; Ali S. Arbab; Sanath Kumar; Asm Iskander; Nadimpalli RS Varma; Branislava Janic; Ana deCarvalho; Tom Mikkelsen; Joseph A. Frank; Meser M. Ali

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cellproliferation, infiltration, migration, and neovascularization are known causes of treatment resistance in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of radiation on the growth characteristics of primary human GBM developed in a nude rat. Primary GBM cells grown from explanted GBM tissues were implanted orthotopically in nude rats. Tumor growth was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging on day 77 (baseline) after implantation. The rats underwent irradiation to a dose of 50 Gy delivered subcuratively on day 84 postimplantation (n= 8), or underwent no radiation (n= 8). Brain tissues were obtained on day 112 (nonirradiated) or day 133 (irradiated). Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine tumor cell proliferation (Ki-67) and to assess the expression of infiltration marker (matrix metalloproteinase-2, MMP-2) and cell migration marker (CD44). Tumor neovascularization was assessed by microvessel density using von-Willebrand factor (vWF) staining. Magnetic resonance imaging showed well-developed, infiltrative tumors in 11 weeks postimplantation. The proportion of Ki-67-positive cells in tumors undergoing radiation was (71 ± 15)%compared with (25 ± 12)%in the nonirradiated group (P=0.02). The number of MMP-2-positive areas and proportion of CD44-positive cells were also high in tumors receiving radiation, indicating great invasion and infiltration. Microvessel density analysis did not show a significant difference between nonirradiated and irradiated tumors. Taken together, we found that subcurative radiation significantly increased proliferation, invasion, and migration of primary GBM. Our study provides insights into possible mechanisms of treatment resistance fol owing radiation therapy for GBM.

  20. Cell migration or cytokinesis and proliferation? – Revisiting the “go or grow” hypothesis in cancer cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garay, Tamás; Juhász, Éva; Molnár, Eszter [2nd Department of Pathology, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Eisenbauer, Maria [Institute of Cancer Research and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Czirók, András [Department of Biological Physics, Eötvös University, Budapest (Hungary); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Dekan, Barbara; László, Viktória; Hoda, Mir Alireza [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Döme, Balázs [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); National Korányi Institute of TB and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Tímár, József [2nd Department of Pathology, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); MTA-SE Tumor Progression Research Group, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Klepetko, Walter [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Berger, Walter [Institute of Cancer Research and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Hegedűs, Balázs, E-mail: balazs.hegedus@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); MTA-SE Tumor Progression Research Group, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary)

    2013-12-10

    The mortality of patients with solid tumors is mostly due to metastasis that relies on the interplay between migration and proliferation. The “go or grow” hypothesis postulates that migration and proliferation spatiotemporally excludes each other. We evaluated this hypothesis on 35 cell lines (12 mesothelioma, 13 melanoma and 10 lung cancer) on both the individual cell and population levels. Following three-day-long videomicroscopy, migration, proliferation and cytokinesis-length were quantified. We found a significantly higher migration in mesothelioma cells compared to melanoma and lung cancer while tumor types did not differ in mean proliferation or duration of cytokinesis. Strikingly, we found in melanoma and lung cancer a significant positive correlation between mean proliferation and migration. Furthermore, non-dividing melanoma and lung cancer cells displayed slower migration. In contrast, in mesothelioma there were no such correlations. Interestingly, negative correlation was found between cytokinesis-length and migration in melanoma. FAK activation was higher in melanoma cells with high motility. We demonstrate that the cancer cells studied do not defer proliferation for migration. Of note, tumor cells from various organ systems may differently regulate migration and proliferation. Furthermore, our data is in line with the observation of pathologists that highly proliferative tumors are often highly invasive. - Highlights: • We investigated the “go or grow” hypothesis in human cancer cells in vitro. • Proliferation and migration positively correlate in melanoma and lung cancer cells. • Duration of cytokinesis and migration shows inverse correlation. • Increased FAK activation is present in highly motile melanoma cells.

  1. Substrate stiffness modulates lung cancer cell migration but not epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, V C; Higuita-Castro, N; Nana-Sinkam, P; Ghadiali, S N

    2016-05-01

    Biomechanical properties of the tumor microenvironment, including matrix/substrate stiffness, play a significant role in tumor evolution and metastasis. Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is a fundamental biological process that is associated with increased cancer cell migration and invasion. The goal of this study was to investigate (1) how substrate stiffness modulates the migration behaviors of lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549) and (2) if stiffness-induced changes in cell migration correlate with biochemical markers of EMT. Collagen-coated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates and an Ibidi migration assay were used to investigate how substrate stiffness alters the migration patterns of A549 cells. RT-PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to investigate how substrate stiffness alters biochemical markers of EMT, that is, E-cadherin and N-cadherin, and the phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins. Increases in substrate stiffness led to slower, more directional migration but did not alter the biochemical markers of EMT. Interestingly, growth factor (i.e., Transforming Growth Factor-β) stimulation resulted in similar levels of EMT regardless of substrate stiffness. We also observed decreased levels of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin on stiffer substrates which correlated with slower cell migration. These results indicate that substrate stiffness modulates lung cancer cell migration via focal adhesion signaling as opposed to EMT signaling. PMID:26779779

  2. Loss of expression of miR-335 is implicated in hepatic stellate cell migration and activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chao [Department of Gastroenterology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, No.415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China); Wu, Chao-Qun [Genetics Institute, Fudan University, No. 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhang, Zong-Qi [Department of Cardiology, No. 3 Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Medical school, No.280 Mohe Road, Shanghai 201900 (China); Yao, Ding-Kang; Zhu, Liang, E-mail: 15900611429@163.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, No.415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Activation and migration of resident stellate cells (HSCs) within the hepatic space of Disse play an important role in hepatic fibrosis, which accounts for the increased numbers of activated HSCs in areas of inflammation during hepatic fibrosis. Currently, microRNAs have been found to play essential roles in HSC differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, fat accumulation and collagen production. However, little is known about microRNA mediated HSC activation and migration. In this study, the miRNA expression profiles of quiescent HSCs, partially activated HSCs and fully activated HSCs were compared in pairs. Gene ontology (GO) and GO-Map network analysis indicated that the activation of HSCs was regulated by microRNAs. Among them miR-335 was confirmed to be significantly reduced during HSC activation by qRT-PCR, and restoring expression of miR-335 inhibited HSC migration and reduced {alpha}-SMA and collagen type I. Previous study revealed that tenascin-C (TNC), an extracellular matrix glycoprotein involved in cell migration, might be a target of miR-335. Therefore, we further studied the TNC expression in miR-335 over-expressed HSCs. Our data showed that exogenous TNC could enhance HSC migration in vitro and miR-335 restoration resulted in a significant inhibition of TNC expression. These results demonstrated that miR-335 restoration inhibited HSC migration, at least in part, via downregulating the TNC expression.

  3. Plexin-B1 silencing inhibits ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elevated Plexin-B1 expression has been found in diverse human cancers and in non-neoplastic tissues, and it mediates diverse biological and pathological activities. However, whether or not Plexin-B1 expression is involved in human ovarian tumors remains unclear. In the present study, Plexin-B1 expression was explored in benign and malignant human ovarian tumor tissues. In addition, the impact of Plexin-B1 expression on ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion were investigated in vitro. Plexin-B1 expression was analyzed in normal and benign ovarian tissues and serous ovarian tumors (both borderline and malignant) by immunohistochemical staining, as well as in four human ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780, C13*, SKOV3, and OV2008) by RT-PCR and western blot analyses. Furthermore, endogenous Plexin-B1 expression was suppressed by Plexin-B1 siRNA in SKOV3 cells, which overexpress Plexin-B1. Protein levels of Plexin-B1, AKT and AKTSer473 were examined by western blot analysis. Cell proliferation, migration and invasion were measured with MTT, wound healing and boyden chamber assays, respectively, and the cytoskeleton was monitored via F-actin staining. Expression levels of Plexin-B1 protein were significantly higher in serous ovarian carcinomas than in normal ovaries or benign ovarian neoplasms, and in the former, Plexin-B1 expression was positively correlated with lymphatic metastasis, and the membrane and cytoplasm of cancer cells stained positively. SKOV3 cells displayed the highest Plexin-B1 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels among the four tested human ovarian cancer cell lines and was selected as a cell model for further in vitro experiments. Plexin-B1 siRNA significantly suppressed phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473 in SKOV3 cells, but it did not alter total AKT expression. In addition, silencing of Plexin-B1 in SKOV3 cells inhibited cell migration and invasion and reorganized the cytoskeleton, whereas cell proliferation was not affected

  4. Exogenous Expression of N-Cadherin in Breast Cancer Cells Induces Cell Migration, Invasion, and Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Hazan, Rachel B.; Phillips, Greg R.; Qiao, Rui Fang; Norton, Larry; Aaronson, Stuart A.

    2000-01-01

    E- and N-cadherin are calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules that mediate cell–cell adhesion and also modulate cell migration and tumor invasiveness. The loss of E-cadherin–mediated adhesion has been shown to play an important role in the transition of epithelial tumors from a benign to an invasive state. However, recent evidence indicates that another member of the cadherin family, N-cadherin, is expressed in highly invasive tumor cell lines that lacked E-cadherin expression. These findin...

  5. Double path-integral migration velocity analysis: a real data example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Path-integral imaging forms an image with no knowledge of the velocity model by summing over the migrated images obtained for a set of migration velocity models. Double path-integral imaging migration extracts the stationary velocities, i.e. those velocities at which common-image gathers align horizontally, as a byproduct. An application of the technique to a real data set demonstrates that quantitative information about the time migration velocity model can be determined by double path-integral migration velocity analysis. Migrated images using interpolations with different regularizations of the extracted velocities prove the high quality of the resulting time-migration velocity information. The so-obtained velocity model can then be used as a starting model for subsequent velocity analysis tools like migration tomography or other tomographic methods

  6. Quantitative Analysis on Carbon Migration in Double-Glow Discharge Plasma Surface Alloying Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhen-xia; WANG Cong-zeng; ZHANG Wen-quan; SU Xue-kuan

    2004-01-01

    Carbon migration is of great significance in double-glow discharge plasma surface alloying process, but literature of quantitative analysis about carbon migration is relatively scarce. In this paper differential equations of the carbon and metal concentration distribution were established. By means of differential equations carbon migration was described and a numerical solution was acquired. The computational results fit the experiment results quite well.

  7. Co-regulation of cell polarization and migration by caveolar proteins PTRF/Cavin-1 and caveolin-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Hill

    Full Text Available Caveolin-1 and caveolae are differentially polarized in migrating cells in various models, and caveolin-1 expression has been shown to quantitatively modulate cell migration. PTRF/cavin-1 is a cytoplasmic protein now established to be also necessary for caveola formation. Here we tested the effect of PTRF expression on cell migration. Using fluorescence imaging, quantitative proteomics, and cell migration assays we show that PTRF/cavin-1 modulates cellular polarization, and the subcellular localization of Rac1 and caveolin-1 in migrating cells as well as PKCα caveola recruitment. PTRF/cavin-1 quantitatively reduced cell migration, and induced mesenchymal epithelial reversion. Similar to caveolin-1, the polarization of PTRF/cavin-1 was dependent on the migration mode. By selectively manipulating PTRF/cavin-1 and caveolin-1 expression (and therefore caveola formation in multiple cell systems, we unveil caveola-independent functions for both proteins in cell migration.

  8. Cdc42 is not essential for filopodium formation, directed migration, cell polarization, and mitosis in fibroblastoid cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czuchra, Aleksandra; Wu, Xunwei; Meyer, Hannelore;

    2005-01-01

    of Cdc42 did not affect filopodium or lamellipodium formation and had no significant influence on the speed of directed migration nor on mitosis. Cdc42-deficient cells displayed a more elongated cell shape and had a reduced area. Furthermore, directionality during migration and reorientation of the...

  9. Aquaporin 1 Facilitated Hepatocellular Carcinoma SMMC7221 Cell Migration Associated with Water Permeability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ai-li; LI Jiang; WANG Yan-qing; ZAKNROU Zohra; MA Tong-hui; LI Xiao-meng

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated the regulation of human aquaporin l(hAQPl) and the involvement of aquaporin l(AQPl) in the migration of human hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7221 cells using RNA intereference technology.Firstly, two short hairpin RNA(shRNA) constructs in PBSU6 vector were reconstructed and their knockdown effects were identified in SMMC-7221 cells. Next, the involvement of endogenous hAQPl in regulating the migration of SMMC-7221 cells was investigated via siRNA technology. HAQPl-shRNA can specifically inhibit AQPl dependent osmotic water permeability. Meanwhile the migration of SMMC-7221 cells was inhibited remarkably after silencing AQPl by performing transwell cell migration assay and in vitro wound healing assay. Furthermore, in the presence of an inhibitor HgCl2, the water permeability of the cell membrane was remarkably decreased, the expression of AQPl was upregulated after HgCl2 treatment and the cell movement was decreased at the moment. Increased AQPl cannot attenuate cell migration ability when cell membrane loses its water permeability function. This demonstrates that the cell migration was remarkably related to the transporting water function of cell membrane.

  10. Aptamers Binding to c-Met Inhibiting Tumor Cell Migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Piater

    Full Text Available The human receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met plays an important role in the control of critical cellular processes. Since c-Met is frequently over expressed or deregulated in human malignancies, blocking its activation is of special interest for therapy. In normal conditions, the c-Met receptor is activated by its bivalent ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF. Also bivalent antibodies can activate the receptor by cross linking, limiting therapeutic applications. We report the generation of the RNA aptamer CLN64 containing 2'-fluoro pyrimidine modifications by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX. CLN64 and a previously described single-stranded DNA (ssDNA aptamer CLN3 exhibited high specificities and affinities to recombinant and cellular expressed c-Met. Both aptamers effectively inhibited HGF-dependent c-Met activation, signaling and cell migration. We showed that these aptamers did not induce c-Met activation, revealing an advantage over bivalent therapeutic molecules. Both aptamers were shown to bind overlapping epitopes but only CLN3 competed with HGF binding to cMet. In addition to their therapeutic and diagnostic potential, CLN3 and CLN64 aptamers exhibit valuable tools to further understand the structural and functional basis for c-Met activation or inhibition by synthetic ligands and their interplay with HGF binding.

  11. Effect of trypsin on the migration of stem hemopoietic cells in local irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The administration of trypsin to mice induced short-term stimulation of the migration process of the stem hemopoietic cells accompanied by an increase of the pool of the migrating spleen colony forming units (CFUs) in healthy animals as well as in those exposed to local and subtotal irradiation. A conclusion was made on a definite radioresistance of the biological reactions controlling the process of CFUs migration

  12. Cardiac migration of endogenous mesenchymal stromal cells in patients with inflammatory cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Lucke, Caroline; Escher, Felicitas; Van Linthout, Sophie; Kühl, Uwe; Miteva, Kapka; Ringe, Jochen; Zobel, Thomas; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Tschöpe, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have immunomodulatory features. The aim of this study was to investigate the migration and homing potential of endogenous circulating MSC in virus negative inflammatory cardiomyopathy (CMi). Methods. In 29 patients with (n = 23) or without (n = 6) CMi undergoing endomyocardial biopsies (EMB), transcardiac gradients (TCGs) of circulating MSC were measured by flow cytometry from blood simultaneously sampled from aorta and coronary sinus. The presence of MSC in EMB, cardiac inflammation, and SDF-1α mRNA expression were detected via immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Results. MSC defined as CD45(-)CD34(-)CD11b(-)CD73(+)CD90(+) cells accounted for 0.010 [0.0025-0.048]%/peripheral mononuclear cell (PMNC) and as CD45(-)CD34(-)CD11b(-)CD73(+)CD105(+) cells for 0.019 [0.0026-0.067]%/PMNC, both with similar counts in patients with or without cardiac inflammation. There was a 29.9% (P TCG of circulating MSC and numbers of MSC (CD45(-)CD34(-)CD90(+)CD105(+)) in EMB (r = -0.73, P < 0.005). SDF-1α was the strongest predictor for increased MSC in EMB (P < 0.005, multivariate analysis). Conclusions. Endogenous MSC continuously migrate to the heart in patients with CMi triggered by cardiac inflammation. PMID:25814787

  13. The Exposure of Breast Cancer Cells to Fulvestrant and Tamoxifen Modulates Cell Migration Differently

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionysia Lymperatou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt that there are increased benefits of hormonal therapy to breast cancer patients; however, current evidence suggests that estrogen receptor (ER blockage using antiestrogens is associated with a small induction of invasiveness in vitro. The mechanism by which epithelial tumor cells escape from the primary tumor and colonize to a distant site is not entirely understood. This study investigates the effect of two selective antagonists of the ER, Fulvestrant (Fulv and Tamoxifen (Tam, on the invasive ability of breast cancer cells. We found that 17β-estradiol (E2 demonstrated a protective role regarding cell migration and invasion. Fulv did not alter this effect while Tam stimulated active cell migration according to an increase in Snail and a decrease in E-cadherin protein expression. Furthermore, both tested agents increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and enhanced invasive potential of breast cancer cells. These changes were in line with focal adhesion kinase (FAK rearrangement. Our data indicate that the anti-estrogens counteracted the protective role of E2 concerning migration and invasion since their effect was not limited to antiproliferative events. Although Fulv caused a less aggressive result compared to Tam, the benefits of hormonal therapy concerning invasion and metastasis yet remain to be investigated.

  14. Proteolytic Enzymes Clustered in Specialized Plasma-Membrane Domains Drive Endothelial Cells' Migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Salamone

    Full Text Available In vitro cultured endothelial cells forming a continuous monolayer establish stable cell-cell contacts and acquire a "resting" phenotype; on the other hand, when growing in sparse conditions these cells acquire a migratory phenotype and invade the empty area of the culture. Culturing cells in different conditions, we compared expression and clustering of proteolytic enzymes in cells having migratory versus stationary behavior. In order to observe resting and migrating cells in the same microscopic field, a continuous cell monolayer was wounded. Increased expression of proteolytic enzymes was evident in cell membranes of migrating cells especially at sprouting sites and in shed membrane vesicles. Gelatin zymography and western blotting analyses confirmed that in migrating cells, expression of membrane-bound and of vesicle-associated proteolytic enzymes are increased. The enzymes concerned include MMP-2, MMP-9, MT1-MMP, seprase, DPP4 (DiPeptidyl Peptidase 4 and uPA. Shed membrane vesicles were shown to exert degradative activity on ECM components and produce substrates facilitating cell migration. Vesicles shed by migrating cells degraded ECM components at an increased rate; as a result their effect on cell migration was amplified. Inhibiting either Matrix Metallo Proteases (MMPs or Serine Integral Membrane Peptidases (SIMPs caused a decrease in the stimulatory effect of vesicles, inhibiting the spontaneous migratory activity of cells; a similar result was also obtained when a monoclonal antibody acting on DPP4 was tested. We conclude that proteolytic enzymes have a synergistic stimulatory effect on cell migration and that their clustering probably facilitates the proteolytic activation cascades needed to produce maximal degradative activity on cell substrates during the angiogenic process.

  15. A role for PP1/NIPP1 in steering migration of human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Martin-Granados

    Full Text Available Electrical gradients are present in many developing and regenerating tissues and around tumours. Mimicking endogenous electric fields in vitro has profound effects on the behaviour of many cell types. Intriguingly, specific cell types migrate cathodally, others anodally and some polarise with their long axis perpendicular to the electric vector. These striking phenomena are likely to have in vivo relevance since one of the determining factors during cancer metastasis is the ability to switch between attractive and repulsive migration in response to extracellular guidance stimuli. We present evidence that the cervical cancer cell line HeLa migrates cathodally in a direct current electric field of physiological intensity, while the strongly metastatic prostate cancer cell line PC-3-M migrates anodally. Notably, genetic disruption of protein serine/threonine phosphatase-1 (PP1 and its regulator NIPP1 decrease directional migration in these cell lines. Conversely, the inducible expression of NIPP1 switched the directional response of HeLa cells from cathodal to slightly anodal in a PP1-dependent manner. Remarkably, induction of a hyperactive PP1/NIPP1 holoenzyme, further shifted directional migration towards the anode. We show that PP1 association with NIPP1 upregulates signalling by the GTPase Cdc42 and demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of Cdc42 in cells overexpressing NIPP1 recovered cathodal migration. Taken together, we provide the first evidence for regulation of directional cell migration by NIPP1. In addition, we identify PP1/NIPP1 as a novel molecular compass that controls directed cell migration via upregulation of Cdc42 signalling and suggest a way by which PP1/NIPP1 may contribute to the migratory properties of cancer cells.

  16. Chase-and-run between adjacent cell populations promotes directional collective migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theveneau, Eric; Steventon, Benjamin; Scarpa, Elena; Garcia, Simon; Trepat, Xavier; Streit, Andrea; Mayor, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Collective cell migration in morphogenesis and cancer progression often involves the coordination of multiple cell types. How reciprocal interactions between adjacent cell populations lead to new emergent behaviours remains unknown. Here we studied the interaction between Neural Crest (NC) cells, a highly migratory cell population, and placodal cells, an epithelial tissue that contributes to sensory organs. We found that NC cells “chase” placodal cells by chemotaxis, while placodal cells “run” when contacted by NC. Chemotaxis to Sdf1 underlies the chase, while repulsion involving PCP and N-Cadherin signalling is responsible for the run. This “chase-and-run” requires the generation of asymmetric forces, which depend on local inhibition of focal adhesions. The cell interactions described here are essential for correct NC migration and for segregation of placodes in vivo and are likely to represent a general mechanism of coordinated migration. PMID:23770678

  17. A new method to address unmet needs for extracting individual cell migration features from a large number of cells embedded in 3D volumes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Adanja

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In vitro cell observation has been widely used by biologists and pharmacologists for screening molecule-induced effects on cancer cells. Computer-assisted time-lapse microscopy enables automated live cell imaging in vitro, enabling cell behavior characterization through image analysis, in particular regarding cell migration. In this context, 3D cell assays in transparent matrix gels have been developed to provide more realistic in vitro 3D environments for monitoring cell migration (fundamentally different from cell motility behavior observed in 2D, which is related to the spread of cancer and metastases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this paper we propose an improved automated tracking method that is designed to robustly and individually follow a large number of unlabeled cells observed under phase-contrast microscopy in 3D gels. The method automatically detects and tracks individual cells across a sequence of acquired volumes, using a template matching filtering method that in turn allows for robust detection and mean-shift tracking. The robustness of the method results from detecting and managing the cases where two cell (mean-shift trackers converge to the same point. The resulting trajectories quantify cell migration through statistical analysis of 3D trajectory descriptors. We manually validated the method and observed efficient cell detection and a low tracking error rate (6%. We also applied the method in a real biological experiment where the pro-migratory effects of hyaluronic acid (HA were analyzed on brain cancer cells. Using collagen gels with increased HA proportions, we were able to evidence a dose-response effect on cell migration abilities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The developed method enables biomedical researchers to automatically and robustly quantify the pro- or anti-migratory effects of different experimental conditions on unlabeled cell cultures in a 3D environment.

  18. The Culture of Mexican Migration: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, William; Massey, Douglas S.

    2002-01-01

    Examines a Mexican "culture of migration," in which U.S. migration becomes an expectation for young people. Among approximately 7,000 secondary students surveyed in Zacatecas (Mexico), adolescents from families involved in U.S. migration were more likely to aspire to live and work in the United States, increasing the likelihood they would drop out…

  19. A role of ghrelin in canine mammary carcinoma cells proliferation, apoptosis and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majchrzak Kinga

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ghrelin is a natural ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R. They are often co-expressed in multiple human tumors and related cancer cell lines what can indicate that the ghrelin/GHS-R axis may have an important role in tumor growth and progression. However, a role of ghrelin in canine tumors remains unknown. Thus, the aim of our study was two-fold: (1 to assess expression of ghrelin and its receptor in canine mammary cancer and (2 to examine the effect of ghrelin on carcinoma cells proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion. The expression of ghrelin and its receptor in canine mammary cancer tissues and cell lines (isolated from primary tumors and their metastases was examined using Real-time qPCR and immunohistochemistry. For apoptosis analysis the Annexin V and propidium iodide dual staining was applied whereas cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay and BrdU incorporation test. The influence of ghrelin on cancer cells migration and invasion was assessed using Boyden chamber assays and wound healing assay. Results The highest expression of ghrelin was observed in metastatic cancers whereas the lowest expression of ghrelin receptor was detected in tumors of the 3rd grade of malignancy. Higher expression of ghrelin and its receptor was detected in cancer cell lines isolated from metastases than in cell lines isolated from primary tumors. In vitro experiments demonstrated that exposure to low doses of ghrelin stimulates cellular proliferation, inhibits apoptosis and promotes motility and invasion of canine mammary cancer cells. Growth hormone secretagogue receptor inhibitor ([D-Lys3]-GHRP6 as well as RNA interference enhances early apoptosis. Conclusion The presence of ghrelin and GHS-R in all of the examined canine mammary tumors may indicate their biological role in cancer growth and development. Our experiments conducted in vitro confirmed that ghrelin promotes cancer development and

  20. Ectopic cerebellar cell migration causes maldevelopment of Purkinje cells and abnormal motor behaviour in Cxcr4 null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guo-Jen; Edwards, Andrew; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Lee, Yi-Shin; Peng, Lei; Era, Takumi; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Tsai, Ching-Yen; Nishikawa, Shin-Ichi; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Chen, Shu-Jen; Flint, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    SDF-1/CXCR4 signalling plays an important role in neuronal cell migration and brain development. However, the impact of CXCR4 deficiency in the postnatal mouse brain is still poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the importance of CXCR4 on cerebellar development and motor behaviour by conditional inactivation of Cxcr4 in the central nervous system. We found CXCR4 plays a key role in cerebellar development. Its loss leads to defects in Purkinje cell dentritogenesis and axonal projection in vivo but not in cell culture. Transcriptome analysis revealed the most significantly affected pathways in the Cxcr4 deficient developing cerebellum are involved in extra cellular matrix receptor interactions and focal adhesion. Consistent with functional impairment of the cerebellum, Cxcr4 knockout mice have poor coordination and balance performance in skilled motor tests. Together, these results suggest ectopic the migration of granule cells impairs development of Purkinje cells, causes gross cerebellar anatomical disruption and leads to behavioural motor defects in Cxcr4 null mice. PMID:24516532

  1. Ectopic cerebellar cell migration causes maldevelopment of Purkinje cells and abnormal motor behaviour in Cxcr4 null mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Jen Huang

    Full Text Available SDF-1/CXCR4 signalling plays an important role in neuronal cell migration and brain development. However, the impact of CXCR4 deficiency in the postnatal mouse brain is still poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the importance of CXCR4 on cerebellar development and motor behaviour by conditional inactivation of Cxcr4 in the central nervous system. We found CXCR4 plays a key role in cerebellar development. Its loss leads to defects in Purkinje cell dentritogenesis and axonal projection in vivo but not in cell culture. Transcriptome analysis revealed the most significantly affected pathways in the Cxcr4 deficient developing cerebellum are involved in extra cellular matrix receptor interactions and focal adhesion. Consistent with functional impairment of the cerebellum, Cxcr4 knockout mice have poor coordination and balance performance in skilled motor tests. Together, these results suggest ectopic the migration of granule cells impairs development of Purkinje cells, causes gross cerebellar anatomical disruption and leads to behavioural motor defects in Cxcr4 null mice.

  2. Modulation of sulfated proteoglycan synthesis by bovine aortic endothelial cells during migration

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    The rates of 35S-sulfate incorporation into proteoglycan were compared in multi-scratch wounded and confluent cultures of bovine aortic endothelial cells to determine whether proteoglycan synthesis is altered as cells are stimulated to migrate and proliferate. Incorporation was found to be stimulated in a time-dependent manner, reaching maximal levels 44-50 h after wounding, as cells migrated into wounded areas of the culture dish. Quantitative autoradiography of 35S- sulfate-labeled single-s...

  3. In vivo knockdown of ErbB3 in mice inhibits Schwann cell precursor migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Tomohiro; Miyamoto, Yuki; Takada, Shuji; Tsumura, Hideki; Arai, Miyuki; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Tanoue, Akito; Yamauchi, Junji

    2014-09-26

    The myelin sheath insulates neuronal axons and markedly increases the nerve conduction velocity. In the peripheral nervous system (PNS), Schwann cell precursors migrate along embryonic neuronal axons to their final destinations, where they eventually wrap around individual axons to form the myelin sheath after birth. ErbB2 and ErbB3 tyrosine kinase receptors form a heterodimer and are extensively expressed in Schwann lineage cells. ErbB2/3 is thought to be one of the primary regulators controlling the entire Schwann cell development. ErbB3 is the bona fide Schwann cell receptor for the neuronal ligand neuregulin-1. Although ErbB2/3 is well known to regulate both Schwann cell precursor migration and myelination by Schwann cells in fishes, it still remains unclear whether in mammals, ErbB2/3 actually regulates Schwann cell precursor migration. Here, we show that knockdown of ErbB3 using a Schwann cell-specific promoter in mice causes delayed migration of Schwann cell precursors. In contrast, littermate control mice display normal migration. Similar results are seen in an in vitro migration assay using reaggregated Schwann cell precursors. Also, ErbB3 knockdown in mice reduces myelin thickness in sciatic nerves, consistent with the established role of ErbB3 in myelination. Thus, ErbB3 plays a key role in migration, as well as in myelination, in mouse Schwann lineage cells, presenting a genetically conservative role of ErbB3 in Schwann cell precursor migration. PMID:25204498

  4. Collective migration models: Dynamic monitoring of leader cells in migratory/invasive disease processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Zachary Steven

    Leader cells are a fundamental biological process that have only been investigated since the early 2000s. These cells have often been observed emerging at the edge of an artificial wound in 2D epithelial cell collective invasion, created with either a mechanical scrape from a pipette tip or from the removal of a plastic, physical blocker. During migration, the moving cells maintain cell-cell contacts, an important quality of collective migration; the leader cells originate from either the first or the second row, they increase in size compared to other cells, and they establish ruffled lamellipodia. Recent studies in 3D have also shown that cells emerging from an invading collective group that also exhibit leader-like properties. Exactly how leader cells influence and interact with follower cells as well as other cells types during collective migration, however, is another matter, and is a subject of intense investigation between many different labs and researchers. The majority of leader cell research to date has involved epithelial cells, but as collective migration is implicated in many different pathogenic diseases, such as cancer and wound healing, a better understanding of leader cells in many cell types and environments will allow significant improvement to therapies and treatments for a wide variety of disease processes. In fact, more recent studies on collective migration and invasion have broadened the field to include other cell types, including mesenchymal cancer cells and fibroblasts. However, the proper technology for picking out dynamic, single cells within a moving and changing cell population over time has severely limited previous investigation into leader cell formation and influence over other cells. In line with these previous studies, we not only bring new technology capable of dynamically monitoring leader cell formation, but we propose that leader cell behavior is more than just an epithelial process, and that it is a critical physiological

  5. WNT5A inhibits human dental papilla cell proliferation and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WNT proteins are a large family of cysteine-rich secreted molecules that are linked to both canonical and non-canonical signal pathways, and have been implicated in oncogenesis and tissue development. Canonical WNT proteins have been proven to play critical roles in tooth development, while little is known about the role of non-canonical WNT proteins such as WNT5A. In this study, WNT5A was localized to human dental papilla tissue and human dental papilla cells (HDPCs) cultured in vitro, using immunochemistry and RT-PCR. Recombinant adenovirus encoding full-length Wnt5a cDNA was constructed to investigate the biological role of WNT5A on HDPCs. The BrdU incorporation assay, the MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis showed that over-expression of Wnt5a strongly inhibited the proliferation of HDPCs in vitro. Wound healing and transwell migration assays indicated that over-expression of WNT5A reduced migration of HDPCs. In conclusion, our results showed that WNT5A negatively regulates both proliferation and migration of HDPCs, suggesting its important role in odontogenesis via controlling the HDPCs.

  6. WNT5A inhibits human dental papilla cell proliferation and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, L. [West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Ye, L.; Dong, G.; Ren, L.B.; Wang, C.L.; Xu, P. [West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Zhou, X.D., E-mail: pl_huaxi@yahoo.com.cn [West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    2009-12-18

    WNT proteins are a large family of cysteine-rich secreted molecules that are linked to both canonical and non-canonical signal pathways, and have been implicated in oncogenesis and tissue development. Canonical WNT proteins have been proven to play critical roles in tooth development, while little is known about the role of non-canonical WNT proteins such as WNT5A. In this study, WNT5A was localized to human dental papilla tissue and human dental papilla cells (HDPCs) cultured in vitro, using immunochemistry and RT-PCR. Recombinant adenovirus encoding full-length Wnt5a cDNA was constructed to investigate the biological role of WNT5A on HDPCs. The BrdU incorporation assay, the MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis showed that over-expression of Wnt5a strongly inhibited the proliferation of HDPCs in vitro. Wound healing and transwell migration assays indicated that over-expression of WNT5A reduced migration of HDPCs. In conclusion, our results showed that WNT5A negatively regulates both proliferation and migration of HDPCs, suggesting its important role in odontogenesis via controlling the HDPCs.

  7. Stable SET knockdown in breast cell carcinoma inhibits cell migration and invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We employed RNA interference to knockdown SET expression in breast cancer cells. • Knockdown of SET expression inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Knockdown of SET expression increases the activity and expression of PP2A. • Knockdown of SET expression decreases the expression of MMP-9. - Abstract: Breast cancer is the most malignant tumor for women, however, the mechanisms underlying this devastating disease remain unclear. SET is an endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and involved in many physiological and pathological processes. SET could promote the occurrence of tumor through inhibiting PP2A. In this study, we explore the role of SET in the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and ZR-75-30. The stable suppression of SET expression through lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was shown to inhibit the growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Knockdown of SET increases the activity and expression of PP2Ac and decrease the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). These data demonstrate that SET may be involved in the pathogenic processes of breast cancer, indicating that SET can serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer

  8. Stable SET knockdown in breast cell carcinoma inhibits cell migration and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jie [Department of Occupational Health and Occupational Medicine, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen (China); Yang, Xi-fei [Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen (China); Ren, Xiao-hu [Department of Occupational Health and Occupational Medicine, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen (China); Meng, Xiao-jing [Department of Occupational Health and Occupational Medicine, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Huang, Hai-yan [Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen (China); Zhao, Qiong-hui [Shenzhen Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, Shenzhen (China); Yuan, Jian-hui; Hong, Wen-xu; Xia, Bo; Huang, Xin-feng; Zhou, Li [Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen (China); Liu, Jian-jun, E-mail: bio-research@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen (China); Zou, Fei, E-mail: zoufei616@163.com [Department of Occupational Health and Occupational Medicine, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • We employed RNA interference to knockdown SET expression in breast cancer cells. • Knockdown of SET expression inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Knockdown of SET expression increases the activity and expression of PP2A. • Knockdown of SET expression decreases the expression of MMP-9. - Abstract: Breast cancer is the most malignant tumor for women, however, the mechanisms underlying this devastating disease remain unclear. SET is an endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and involved in many physiological and pathological processes. SET could promote the occurrence of tumor through inhibiting PP2A. In this study, we explore the role of SET in the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and ZR-75-30. The stable suppression of SET expression through lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was shown to inhibit the growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Knockdown of SET increases the activity and expression of PP2Ac and decrease the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). These data demonstrate that SET may be involved in the pathogenic processes of breast cancer, indicating that SET can serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  9. Cdc42-dependent leading edge coordination is essential for interstitial dendritic cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lammermann, Tim; Renkawitz, Jorg; Wu, Xunwei; Hirsch, Karin; Brakebusch, Cord; Sixt, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Mature dendritic cells (DCs) moving from the skin to the lymph node are a prototypic example of rapidly migrating amoeboid leukocytes. Interstitial DC migration is directionally guided by chemokines, but independent of specific adhesive interactions with the tissue as well as pericellular...

  10. Role of fibronectin in primary mesenchyme cell migration in the sea urchin

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    We studied the effect of fibronectin (FN) on the behavior of primary mesenchyme cells isolated from sea urchin mesenchyme blastulae in vitro using a time-lapse technique. The migration of isolated primary mesenchyme cells reconstituted in seawater and horse serum is dependent on the presence or absence of exogenous FN in the culture media. The cells in FN, 4 and 40 micrograms/ml, show a high percentage of migration and migrate long distances, whereas a higher concentration of FN at 400 microg...

  11. Applications of an improved quantitative in vitro assay for cell migration/invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A qualitative, in vitro assay of cell migration/invasion through basement membrane, a physiological barrier to normal and metastatic cells travelling to extravascular sites, has been developed. The method utilizes Indium-111-labeled cells and measures objectively (a) adherence to, (b) migration into and (c) migration through human amnion membrane. The assay was used successfully to measure human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) and alveolar macrophage migration. Addition of protease inhibitors to assays of PMNL migration provided information which suggested that the protease human leukocytic elastase, plays a role in PMNL migration through physicological membranes. No consistent evidence, however, was obtained to support a direct role for oxygen radicals. Migration of peripheral blood PMNLs and alveolar macrophages of smokers and non-smokers was compared. No difference was observed. The relative invasiveness of two clones and two sublines of a murine fibrosarcoma cell line was also evaluated by the amnion assay. Differences were minimal and the reliability of the assay with the tumor cells is still uncertain. The relative invasion rates of the fibrosarcoma cells into the amnion membrane, however, were compared to the following in vivo properties of the same clones and sublines, with several other clones: (a) invasion rates of subcutaneous tumors into adjacent muscle, (b) collagenolytic activities in tumor homogenates, (c) metastatic potential, and (d) tumor growth rate. No definite conclusions could be drawn. Significant correlations between the collagenolytic activities and invasiveness supported a need for further investigation in this area

  12. Modulation of p75 neurotrophin receptor under hypoxic conditions induces migration and invasion of C6 glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Chung; Luo, Sheng-Jie; Lin, Chun-Liang; Chang, Pey-Jium; Chen, Miao-Fen

    2015-01-01

    p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) has been reported to play important roles in various cancer types. However, the exact mechanism of tumorigenesis involving p75NTR is unknown. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the expression of p75NTR in malignant glioma and the impact on tumor cell migration and invasion. p75NTR and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression was down-regulated by short-hairpin RNA and up-regulated with expression vectors. By immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis, we found that p75NTR was expressed in both human and rat malignant gliomas. Knockdown of p75NTR increased the expression of vimentin, vascular endothelial growth factor, Matrix metalloproteinase 9, and TWIST, and enhanced the invasion and migration abilities assessed by transwell assay in the C6 tumor cells. Inverse expressions of p75NTR and HIF-1α were detected in glioma cell lines under hypoxic conditions, while increased HIF-1α significantly downregulated the expression of p75NTR, suggesting a HIF-1α-p75NTR-EMT pathway that may regulate glioma cells invasion and migration. Downregulation of p75NTR increased phosphorylation of Src, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin. Knockdown of p75NTR also dysregulated β-catenin-mediated cell junctions, and up-regulated the expressions of fibronectin and L1CAM in the cell-cell junctions, thus suggesting that p75NTR knockdown contributed to a more aggressive migration phenotype via FAK signaling pathway. Our studies suggested that modulation of p75NTR under hypoxic condition could enhance C6 cells migration and invasion by induction of EMT, and activation of the FAK pathway. The HIF-1α-p75NTR-EMT axis may play a central role in glioma tumorigenesis. PMID:25527128

  13. Computational models reveal a passive mechanism for cell migration in the crypt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara-Jane Dunn

    Full Text Available Cell migration in the intestinal crypt is essential for the regular renewal of the epithelium, and the continued upward movement of cells is a key characteristic of healthy crypt dynamics. However, the driving force behind this migration is unknown. Possibilities include mitotic pressure, active movement driven by motility cues, or negative pressure arising from cell loss at the crypt collar. It is possible that a combination of factors together coordinate migration. Here, three different computational models are used to provide insight into the mechanisms that underpin cell movement in the crypt, by examining the consequence of eliminating cell division on cell movement. Computational simulations agree with existing experimental results, confirming that migration can continue in the absence of mitosis. Importantly, however, simulations allow us to infer mechanisms that are sufficient to generate cell movement, which is not possible through experimental observation alone. The results produced by the three models agree and suggest that cell loss due to apoptosis and extrusion at the crypt collar relieves cell compression below, allowing cells to expand and move upwards. This finding suggests that future experiments should focus on the role of apoptosis and cell extrusion in controlling cell migration in the crypt.

  14. Adult subependymal neural precursors, but not differentiated cells, undergo rapid cathodal migration in the presence of direct current electric fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robart Babona-Pilipos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The existence of neural stem and progenitor cells (together termed neural precursor cells in the adult mammalian brain has sparked great interest in utilizing these cells for regenerative medicine strategies. Endogenous neural precursors within the adult forebrain subependyma can be activated following injury, resulting in their proliferation and migration toward lesion sites where they differentiate into neural cells. The administration of growth factors and immunomodulatory agents following injury augments this activation and has been shown to result in behavioural functional recovery following stroke. METHODS AND FINDINGS: With the goal of enhancing neural precursor migration to facilitate the repair process we report that externally applied direct current electric fields induce rapid and directed cathodal migration of pure populations of undifferentiated adult subependyma-derived neural precursors. Using time-lapse imaging microscopy in vitro we performed an extensive single-cell kinematic analysis demonstrating that this galvanotactic phenomenon is a feature of undifferentiated precursors, and not differentiated phenotypes. Moreover, we have shown that the migratory response of the neural precursors is a direct effect of the electric field and not due to chemotactic gradients. We also identified that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling plays a role in the galvanotactic response as blocking EGFR significantly attenuates the migratory behaviour. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest direct current electric fields may be implemented in endogenous repair paradigms to promote migration and tissue repair following neurotrauma.

  15. Inhibition of macrophage migration inhibitory factor decreases proliferation and cytokine expression in bladder cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of various inflammatory cytokines in maintaining tumor cell growth and viability is well established. Increased expression of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has previously been associated with various types of adenocarcinoma. MIF IHC was used to localize MIF in human bladder tissue. ELISA and Western blot analysis determined the synthesis and secretion of MIF by human bladder transitional cell carcinoma cells. The effects of MIF inhibitors (high molecular weight hyaluronate (HA), anti-MIF antibody or MIF anti-sense) on cell growth and cytokine expression were analyzed. Human bladder cancer cells (HT-1376) secrete detectable amounts of MIF protein. Treatment with HA, anti-MIF antibody and MIF anti-sense reduced HT-1376 cell proliferation, MIF protein secretion, MIF gene expression and secreted inflammatory cytokines. Our evidence suggests MIF interacts with the invariant chain, CD74 and the major cell surface receptor for HA, CD44. This study is the first to report MIF expression in the human bladder and these findings support a role for MIF in tumor cell proliferation. Since MIF participates in the inflammatory response and bladder cancer is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, these new findings suggest that neutralizing bladder tumor MIF may serve as a novel therapeutic treatment for bladder carcinoma

  16. Enhanced PKCδ and ERK signaling mediate cell migration of retinal pigment epithelial cells synergistically induced by HGF and EGF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jung Chen

    Full Text Available Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR are characterized by the development of epi-retinal membranes which may exert a tractional force on retina. A lot of inflammatory growth factors may disturb the local ocular cells such as retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells, causing them to migrate and proliferate in the vitreous cavity and ultimately forming the PVR membrane. In this study, the signal pathways mediating cell migration of RPE induced by growth factors were investigated. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, epidermal growth factor (EGF or heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF induced a greater extent of migration of RPE50 and ARPE19 cells, compared with other growth factors. According to inhibitor studies, migration of RPE cells induced by each growth factor was mediated by protein kinase C (PKC and ERK (MAPK. Moreover, HGF coupled with EGF or HB-EGF had synergistic effects on cell migration and enhanced activation of PKC and ERK, which were attributed to cross activation of growth factor receptors by heterogeneous ligands. Furthermore, using the shRNA technique, PKCδ was found to be the most important PKC isozyme involved. Finally, vitreous fluids from PVR and PDR patients with high concentration of HGF may induce RPE cell migration in PKCδ- and ERK- dependent manner. In conclusion, migration of RPE cells can be synergistically induced by HGF coupled with HB-EGF or EGF, which were mediated by enhanced PKCδ activation and ERK phosphorylation.

  17. Multiple scale model for cell migration in monolayers: Elastic mismatch between cells enhances motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Benoit; Bresler, Yony; Wirtz, Denis; Grant, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We propose a multiscale model for monolayer of motile cells that comprise normal and cancer cells. In the model, the two types of cells have identical properties except for their elasticity; cancer cells are softer and normal cells are stiffer. The goal is to isolate the role of elasticity mismatch on the migration potential of cancer cells in the absence of other contributions that are present in real cells. The methodology is based on a phase-field description where each cell is modeled as a highly-deformable self-propelled droplet. We simulated two types of nearly confluent monolayers. One contains a single cancer cell in a layer of normal cells and the other contains normal cells only. The simulation results demonstrate that elasticity mismatch alone is sufficient to increase the motility of the cancer cell significantly. Further, the trajectory of the cancer cell is decorated by several speed "bursts" where the cancer cell quickly relaxes from a largely deformed shape and consequently increases its translational motion. The increased motility and the amplitude and frequency of the bursts are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments. PMID:26134134

  18. In-vivo cell tracking to quantify endothelial cell migration during zebrafish angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Prahlad G.; Rochon, Elizabeth R.; Roman, Beth L.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism of endothelial cell migration as individual cells or collectively while remaining an integral component of a functional blood vessel has not been well characterized. In this study, our overarching goal is to define an image processing workflow to facilitate quantification of how endothelial cells within the first aortic arch and are proximal to the zebrafish heart behave in response to the onset of flow (i.e. onset of heart beating). Endothelial cell imaging was conducted at this developmental time-point i.e. ~24-28 hours post fertilization (hpf) when flow first begins, using 3D+time two-photon confocal microscopy of a live, wild-type, transgenic, zebrafish expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in endothelial cell nuclei. An image processing pipeline comprised of image signal enhancement, median filtering for speckle noise reduction, automated identification of the nuclei positions, extraction of the relative movement of nuclei between consecutive time instances, and finally tracking of nuclei, was designed for achieving the tracking of endothelial cell nuclei and the identification of their movement towards or away from the heart. Pilot results lead to a hypothesis that upon the onset of heart beat and blood flow, endothelial cells migrate collectively towards the heart (by 21.51+/-10.35 μm) in opposition to blood flow (i.e. subtending 142.170+/-21.170 with the flow direction).

  19. Subversion of Cell-Autonomous Immunity and Cell Migration by Legionella pneumophila Effectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Sylvia; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria trigger host defense and inflammatory processes, such as cytokine production, pyroptosis, and the chemotactic migration of immune cells toward the source of infection. However, a number of pathogens interfere with these immune functions by producing specific so-called “effector” proteins, which are delivered to host cells via dedicated secretion systems. Air-borne Legionella pneumophila bacteria trigger an acute and potential fatal inflammation in the lung termed Legionnaires’ disease. The opportunistic pathogen L. pneumophila is a natural parasite of free-living amoebae, but also replicates in alveolar macrophages and accidentally infects humans. The bacteria employ the intracellular multiplication/defective for organelle trafficking (Icm/Dot) type IV secretion system and as many as 300 different effector proteins to govern host–cell interactions and establish in phagocytes an intracellular replication niche, the Legionella-containing vacuole. Some Icm/Dot-translocated effector proteins target cell-autonomous immunity or cell migration, i.e., they interfere with (i) endocytic, secretory, or retrograde vesicle trafficking pathways, (ii) organelle or cell motility, (iii) the inflammasome and programed cell death, or (iv) the transcription factor NF-κB. Here, we review recent mechanistic insights into the subversion of cellular immune functions by L. pneumophila. PMID:26441958

  20. MiR-203 controls proliferation, migration and invasive potential of prostate cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viticchiè, Giuditta; Lena, Anna Maria; Latina, Alessia;

    2011-01-01

    cell lines compared to normal epithelial prostatic cells. Overexpression of miR-203 in brain or bone metastatic prostate cell lines (DU145 and PC3) is sufficient to induce a mesenchymal to epithelial transition with inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasiveness. We have identified CKAP2...

  1. Effect of epidermal growth factor on the migration of neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Faliang Duan; Guoping Yang; Junwu Wei; Jinglei Wu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Recently,researches on neural stem cells(NSCs)are focus on differentiation and migration of stem cells.How to regulate and control differentiation and migration of NSCs based on human wills is still a hot topic.OBJECTIVE:To investigate the effct of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the migration and proliferation of NSCs and analyze duration of the effect.DESIGN:Contrast study based on cells.SETFING:Department of Neurological Surgery,the First Hospital of Wuhan.MATERIALS:Healthy SD rats aged 13-14 embryonic days.EGF(Sigma Company).METHODS:The experiment was carried out in the Animal Laboratory of Experimental Center Affiliated to the First Hospital of Wuhan from October 2004 to July 2006.NSCs selected from embryonic striatum of rats with 13-14 embryonic days were cultured;7 days later,suspended neural sphere was used to make simple cell suspension and cultured once more.Then,DMEM-F12+20 μg/L EGF was added into culture medium;14 days latar.the rats were divided into experimental group and control group.Rats in the experimental group were cultured with the same medium mentioned above;however, rats in the control group were cultured with only DMEM-F12.Migration of cells was observed under microscope every day.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:NSCs migration in both experimental group and control group.RESULTS:Cell spheres in primary culture were NSCs.In addition,14 days later,proliferation of stem cells were observed remarkably in EGF culture.and size of cell sphere was about that of 100 cells.In exparimental group.proliferation of cell sphere was slow down on the 14th culture day,and apophysis was erupted to neighbor cell sphere.Moreover,NSCs migrated from big cell sphere to small cell sphere during 14-17 culture days.and then,cell migration was disappeared at 17 days after culture.In control group.cell migration was not observed.CONCLUSION:EGF can induce proliferation and migration of NSCs during a special time(14-17 days).However,NSCs do not immigrate over the

  2. Estrogen-dependent sushi domain containing 3 regulates cytoskeleton organization and migration in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, I; Todorović, V; Dubash, A D; Coon, J S; Parker, J B; Buranapramest, M; Huang, C C; Zhao, H; Green, K J; Bulun, S E

    2015-01-15

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the standard endocrine therapy for postmenopausal breast cancer; however, currently used biomarkers, such as, estrogen receptor-alpha/progesterone receptor (ERα/PR), predict only slightly more than half of the potential responders to AI treatment. To identify novel markers of AI responsiveness, a genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using primary breast tumor samples from 50 postmenopausal women who later developed metastatic breast cancer. Sushi domain containing 3 (SUSD3) is a significantly differentially expressed gene, with 3.38-fold higher mRNA levels in AI-responsive breast tumors vs non-responders (P<0.001). SUSD3 was highly expressed in ERα-positive breast tumors and treatment with estradiol increased SUSD3 expression in ERα-positive breast cancer cells. Treatment with an antiestrogen or ERα knockdown abolished basal and estradiol-dependent SUSD3 expression. Recruitment of ERα upstream of the transcription start site of SUSD3 was demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR. Flow cytometric analysis of SUSD3-knockdown cells revealed blunted estradiol effects on progression into S and M phases. SUSD3 was localized to the plasma membrane of breast cancer cells. SUSD3 knockdown decreased the appearance of actin-rich protrusions, stress fibers and large basal focal adhesions, while increasing the presence of cortical actin concomitant with a decrease in Rho and focal adhesion kinase activity. SUSD3-deficient cells demonstrated diminished cell spreading, cell-cell adhesion and motility. In conclusion, SUSD3 is a novel promoter of estrogen-dependent cell proliferation and regulator of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions and migration in breast cancer. It may serve as a novel predictor of response to endocrine therapy and potential therapeutic target. PMID:24413080

  3. E7080, a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor suppresses tumor cell migration and invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E7080 is an orally active multi-targeted kinase inhibitor whose targets include vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR), fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and platelet derived growth factor receptors (PDGFR). It has been shown to inhibit tumor angiogenesis by targeting endothelial cells. A number of the targets of E7080 are also expressed on tumor cells and here we have looked at the direct effects of E7080 on tumor cell behavior. Using a panel of human tumor cell lines we determined the effect of E7080 on cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Inhibition of FGFR and PDGFR signaling in the cells was measured. E7080 had little effect on tumor cell proliferation. However, it blocked migration and invasion at concentrations that inhibited FGFR and PDGFR signaling. Knock-down of PDGFR-β in U2OS osteosarcoma cells also inhibited cell migration which, could not be further inhibited in the presence of E7080. Furthermore, E7080 could not inhibit the migration of a PDGFR negative cell line. E7080 does not significantly affect tumor cell proliferation but can inhibit their migration and invasion at concentrations that both inhibit its known targets and are achievable clinically

  4. Effect of heavy ion on the activity of migration and invasion of malignant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim of present study was to clarify a role of p53 gene for ability of in vitro invasion and migration of malignant cells irradiated with carbon ions or X-rays. Three cell lines, which were produced by transfection of the plasmid encoding wild-, mutant- or deletion (neo)-type of p53 gene into human lung cancer H1299 cells (p53 deletion type), were used throughout the study. In vitro invasion and migration assay of cells were performed using a multiwell cell culture insert coated with MatrigelTM or fibronectin. Migration- and invasion-rates of cells irradiated with carbon-ions at 40 and 100 keV/μm decreased with increasing dose, showing a little dependence of p53 gene status. For all of three cell lines, the invasion-rates of cells irradiated at 1 and 2 Gy of X-rays increased as compared with that of non-irradiated cells. Migration of both deletion- and mutation-type cells were inhibited by exposure at 1-8 Gy of X-rays. The present results suggest that p53 gene status of cells may contribute to the ability of migration after X-ray irradiation. (author)

  5. Effect of chymotrypsin C and related proteins on pancreatic cancer cell migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haibo Wang; Wei Sha; Zhixue Liu; Cheng-Wu Chi

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a malignant cancer with a bigh mortality rate. The amount of chymotrypsin C in pancreatic cancer cells is only 20% of that found in normal cells.Chymotrypsin C has been reported to be involved in cancer cell apoptosis, but its effect on pancreatic cancer cell migration is unclear. We performed cell migration scratch assays and Transwell experiments, and found that cell migration ability was downregulated in pancreatic cancer Aspc-1 cells that overexpressed chymotrypsin C, whereas the cell migration ability was upregulated in Aspc-1 cells in which chymotrypsin C was suppressed. Two-dimensional fluorescence differential in gel electrophoresis/mass spectrometry method was used to identify the proteins that were differentially expressed in Aspc-1 cells that were transfected with plasmids to induce either overexpression or suppressed expression of chymotrypsin C. Among 26 identified differential proteins, cytokeratin 18 was most obviously correlated with chymotrypsin C expression. Cytokeratin 18 is expressed in developmental tissues in early stages of cancer,and is highly expressed in most carcinomas. We speculated that chymotrypsin C might regulate pancreatic cancer cell migration in relation to cytokeratin 18 expression.

  6. Derivatives of Dictyostelium differentiation-inducing factors inhibit lysophosphatidic acid–stimulated migration of murine osteosarcoma LM8 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteosarcoma is a common metastatic bone cancer that predominantly develops in children and adolescents. Metastatic osteosarcoma remains associated with a poor prognosis; therefore, more effective anti-metastatic drugs are needed. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), −2, and −3 are novel lead anti-tumor agents that were originally isolated from the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Here we investigated the effects of a panel of DIF derivatives on lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced migration of mouse osteosarcoma LM8 cells by using a Boyden chamber assay. Some DIF derivatives such as Br-DIF-1, DIF-3(+2), and Bu-DIF-3 (5–20 μM) dose-dependently suppressed LPA-induced cell migration with associated IC50 values of 5.5, 4.6, and 4.2 μM, respectively. On the other hand, the IC50 values of Br-DIF-1, DIF-3(+2), and Bu-DIF-3 versus cell proliferation were 18.5, 7.2, and 2.0 μM, respectively, in LM8 cells, and >20, 14.8, and 4.3 μM, respectively, in mouse 3T3-L1 fibroblasts (non-transformed). Together, our results demonstrate that Br-DIF-1 in particular may be a valuable tool for the analysis of cancer cell migration, and that DIF derivatives such as DIF-3(+2) and Bu-DIF-3 are promising lead anti-tumor agents for the development of therapies that suppress osteosarcoma cell proliferation, migration, and metastasis. - Highlights: • LPA induces cell migration (invasion) in murine osteosarcoma LM8 cells. • DIFs are novel lead anti-tumor agents found in Dictyostelium discoideum. • We examined the effects of DIF derivatives on LPA-induced LM8 cell migration in vitro. • Some of the DIF derivatives inhibited LPA-induced LM8 cell migration

  7. Derivatives of Dictyostelium differentiation-inducing factors inhibit lysophosphatidic acid–stimulated migration of murine osteosarcoma LM8 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubohara, Yuzuru, E-mail: ykuboha@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation (IMCR), Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Department of Health Science, Juntendo University Graduate School of Health and Sports Science, Inzai 270-1695 (Japan); Komachi, Mayumi [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation (IMCR), Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Homma, Yoshimi [Department of Biomolecular Science, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Fukushima 960-1295 (Japan); Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Oshima, Yoshiteru [Laboratory of Natural Product Chemistry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Aoba-yama, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    Osteosarcoma is a common metastatic bone cancer that predominantly develops in children and adolescents. Metastatic osteosarcoma remains associated with a poor prognosis; therefore, more effective anti-metastatic drugs are needed. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), −2, and −3 are novel lead anti-tumor agents that were originally isolated from the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Here we investigated the effects of a panel of DIF derivatives on lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced migration of mouse osteosarcoma LM8 cells by using a Boyden chamber assay. Some DIF derivatives such as Br-DIF-1, DIF-3(+2), and Bu-DIF-3 (5–20 μM) dose-dependently suppressed LPA-induced cell migration with associated IC{sub 50} values of 5.5, 4.6, and 4.2 μM, respectively. On the other hand, the IC{sub 50} values of Br-DIF-1, DIF-3(+2), and Bu-DIF-3 versus cell proliferation were 18.5, 7.2, and 2.0 μM, respectively, in LM8 cells, and >20, 14.8, and 4.3 μM, respectively, in mouse 3T3-L1 fibroblasts (non-transformed). Together, our results demonstrate that Br-DIF-1 in particular may be a valuable tool for the analysis of cancer cell migration, and that DIF derivatives such as DIF-3(+2) and Bu-DIF-3 are promising lead anti-tumor agents for the development of therapies that suppress osteosarcoma cell proliferation, migration, and metastasis. - Highlights: • LPA induces cell migration (invasion) in murine osteosarcoma LM8 cells. • DIFs are novel lead anti-tumor agents found in Dictyostelium discoideum. • We examined the effects of DIF derivatives on LPA-induced LM8 cell migration in vitro. • Some of the DIF derivatives inhibited LPA-induced LM8 cell migration.

  8. Tipping the balance: robustness of tip cell selection, migration and fusion in angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Bentley

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Vascular abnormalities contribute to many diseases such as cancer and diabetic retinopathy. In angiogenesis new blood vessels, headed by a migrating tip cell, sprout from pre-existing vessels in response to signals, e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Tip cells meet and fuse (anastomosis to form blood-flow supporting loops. Tip cell selection is achieved by Dll4-Notch mediated lateral inhibition resulting, under normal conditions, in an interleaved arrangement of tip and non-migrating stalk cells. Previously, we showed that the increased VEGF levels found in many diseases can cause the delayed negative feedback of lateral inhibition to produce abnormal oscillations of tip/stalk cell fates. Here we describe the development and implementation of a novel physics-based hierarchical agent model, tightly coupled to in vivo data, to explore the system dynamics as perpetual lateral inhibition combines with tip cell migration and fusion. We explore the tipping point between normal and abnormal sprouting as VEGF increases. A novel filopodia-adhesion driven migration mechanism is presented and validated against in vivo data. Due to the unique feature of ongoing lateral inhibition, 'stabilised' tip/stalk cell patterns show sensitivity to the formation of new cell-cell junctions during fusion: we predict cell fates can reverse. The fusing tip cells become inhibited and neighbouring stalk cells flip fate, recursively providing new tip cells. Junction size emerges as a key factor in establishing a stable tip/stalk pattern. Cell-cell junctions elongate as tip cells migrate, which is shown to provide positive feedback to lateral inhibition, causing it to be more susceptible to pathological oscillations. Importantly, down-regulation of the migratory pathway alone is shown to be sufficient to rescue the sprouting system from oscillation and restore stability. Thus we suggest the use of migration inhibitors as therapeutic agents for vascular

  9. FTSJ2, a heat shock-inducible mitochondrial protein, suppresses cell invasion and migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Lai

    Full Text Available Ribosomal RNA large subunit methyltransferase J (RrmJ, an Escherichia coli heat shock protein, is responsible for 2'-O-ribose methylation in 23S rRNA. In mammals, three close homologs of RrmJ have been identified and have been designated as FTSJ1, FTSJ2 and FTSJ3; however, little is known about these genes. In this study, we characterized the mammalian FTSJ2, which was the most related protein to RrmJ in a phylogenetic analysis that had similar amino acid sequence features and tertiary protein structures of RrmJ. FTSJ2 was first identified in this study as a nucleus encoded mitochondrial protein that preserves the heat shock protein character in mammals in which the mRNA expressions was increased in porcine lung tissues and A549 cells after heat shock treatment. In addition, a recent study in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC suggested that the FTSJ2 gene is located in a novel oncogenic locus. However, our results demonstrate that the expression of FTSJ2 mRNA was decreased in the more invasive subline (CL1-5 of the lung adenocarcinoma cells (CL1 compared with the less invasive subline (CL1-0, and overexpression of FTSJ2 resulted in the inhibition of cell invasion and migration in the rhabdomyosarcoma cell (TE671. In conclusion, our findings indicate that mammalian FTSJ2 is a mitochondrial ortholog of E. coli RrmJ and conserves the heat shock protein properties. Moreover, FTSJ2 possesses suppressive effects on the invasion and migration of cancer cells.

  10. Three-dimensional Cell Culture Devices for Cancer Migration and Drug Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liang

    Porous polymeric materials are widely used to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) environment for applications such as 3D cell culturing and tissue engineering. A series of comparative experiments on 3D cell cultures both in PLA porous scaffolds and alginate gels were conducted to create an in vitro tumor model. A novel 3D cell culture device based on porous polymeric material was developed to study cancer migration. Significant cell migration was observed through the porous channel within 1--2 weeks induced by 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS). A three-dimensional micro-scale perfusion-based two-chamber (3D-muPTC) tissue model system was developed to test the cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs by emulating liver metabolism effects in vitro. Hepatoma cells and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cancer cells were cultured in porous polymeric scaffolds in two separate chambers, representing the liver and tumor, respectively. The cytotoxic effect of temozolomide (TMZ) was first tested using this system. It was found that the GBM cells showed a much higher viability under the TMZ treatment with liver cells in the system, suggesting that the drug metabolism in liver is affecting the efficacy of the drug. The favorable metabolism effect of cytochrome P450 (CYP) was tested using a prodrug ifosfamide (IFO). Without the liver cells, IFO showed only slight toxicity to GBM cells. Moreover, it was shown that different expression levels of CYP 3A4, a major drug metabolizing enzyme, in liver cells caused significantly different levels of GBM cell viability. Simulation of the flow characteristics in the 3D-muPTC system was conducted using the finite-element analysis approach. The shear stress was predicted in the porous scaffolds under different flow rate conditions. The predicted shear stress effects agreed well with an experimental cell viability study. A low cost organic solvent free approach to fabricating tissue engineering scaffolds was developed by combining the twin-screw extrusion

  11. LSD1-mediated epigenetic modification contributes to ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanxia; Wan, Xiaolei; Wei, Ye; Liu, Xiuwen; Lai, Wensheng; Zhang, Liuping; Jin, Jie; Wu, Chaoyang; Shao, Qixiang; Shao, Genbao; Lin, Qiong

    2016-06-01

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) has been implicated in the process of tumor progression at various steps, but its role in epithelial-messenchymal transition (EMT) and the migration of ovarian cancer cells remains obscure. In this study, we demonstrated the effect of LSD1 on ovarian cancer cell migration and the regulatory role of LSD1 in the expression of EMT markers. Inhibition of LSD1 expression impaired the migration and invasion of HO8910 ovarian cancer cells. In contrast, overexpression of LSD1 enhanced the cell migration and invasion of HO8910 cells. Mechanistic analyses showed that LSD1 promoted cell migration through induction of N-cadherin, vimentin, MMP-2 and inhibition of E-cadherin. Furthermore, LSD1 interacted with the promoter of E-cadherin and demethylated histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) at this region, downregulated E-cadherin expression, and consequently enhanced ovarian cancer cell migration. These data indicate that LSD1 acts as an epigenetic regulator of EMT and contributes to the metastasis of ovarian cancer. PMID:27109588

  12. CLCA2, a target of the p53 family, negatively regulates cancer cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yasushi; Koyama, Ryota; Maruyama, Reo; Hirano, Takehiro; Tamura, Miyuki; Sugisaka, Jun; Suzuki, Hiromu; Idogawa, Masashi; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Tokino, Takashi

    2012-12-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 transcriptionally regulates a number of genes that are involved in cell-cycle inhibition, apoptosis and the maintenance of genetic stability. Recent studies suggest that p53 also contributes to the regulation of cell migration and invasion. Here, we show that human chloride channel accessory-2 (CLCA2) is a target gene of the p53 family (p53, p73 and p63). CLCA2 is induced by DNA damage in a p53-dependent manner. The p53 family proteins activate the CLCA2 promoter by binding directly to the conserved consensus p53-binding site present in the CLCA2 promoter. In terms of function, ectopic expression of CLCA2 inhibited cancer cell migration. In contrast, silencing CLCA2 with siRNA stimulated cancer cell migration and invasion. We also found that inactivation of CLCA2 enhanced the expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), as well as its promoter activation. A small-molecule FAK inhibitor reduced the effect of CLCA2 siRNA on cell migration and invasion, suggesting that CLCA2 inhibits cancer cell migration and invasion through suppression of the FAK signaling pathway. Furthermore, there was an inverse correlation between CLCA2 and FAK expression in 251 human breast cancer tissues. These results strongly suggest that CLCA2 is involved in the p53 tumor suppressor network and has a significant effect on cell migration and invasion. PMID:22990203

  13. A Computational Model of Cell Migration in Response to Biochemical Diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexter, Nicholas C [ORNL; Kruse, Kara L [ORNL; Nutaro, James J [ORNL; Ward, Richard C [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The Computational Sciences and Engineering Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is partnering with the University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine to design a computational model describing various factors related to the development of intimal hyperplasia (IH) in response to arterial injury. This research focuses on modeling the chemotactic and haptotactic processes that stimulate vascular smooth muscle cell migration into the intima. A hybrid discrete-continuous mathematical model of cell migration in response to biochemical diffusion was developed in C++. Chemoattractant diffusion is modeled as a continuous partial differential equation, whereas migration of the cells is modeled as a series of discrete events. Results obtained from the discrete state model for cell migration agree with those obtained from Boyden chamber experiments.

  14. Protein kinase C, focal adhesions and the regulation of cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh, Betina S; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John Robert

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix is a complex process involving protrusive activity driven by the actin cytoskeleton, engagement of specific receptors, followed by signaling and cytoskeletal organization. Thereafter, contractile and endocytic/recycling activities may facilitate migration and...

  15. Macroeconomic Consequences of Global Endogenous Migration: a General Equilibrium Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Borgy, Vladimir; Chojnicki, Xavier; Le Garrec, Gilles; Cyrille SCHWELLNUS

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the consequences of endogenous migration flows over the coming decades in a dynamic general equilibrium model of the world economy. Such an approach has two major benefits. First, it offers a global perspective on the economic consequences of international migration flows by taking into account effects on both the destination and the origin regions. Second, by allowing migration flows to be related to economic fundamentals, they are determined endogenously in the mod...

  16. A Multilevel Analysis of Young Adult Migration, 1980-1998

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ji-Youn

    2002-01-01

    The primary objective of this research was to investigate the propensity to migrate the destination choices of young adults, and the importance of individual, household, and community characteristics in these migration choices. Using cohort data from the National Longitudinal Survey ofYouth79 from 1980 to 1998, this study specifies the set of individual-, household-, and community-level of determinants on migrat ion and then incorporates these variables in multivariate analyses to test their ...

  17. Analysis of gross migration profiles in England and Wales: some developments in classification

    OpenAIRE

    I Bracken; Bates, J.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper we describe the development and application of two approaches to the analysis of age and sex specific interarea migration. The data relate to local authority areas in England and Wales. These approaches are developments of established migration profile-fitting and cluster analytic methods. The paper shows how these methods have been used to develop complementary classifications from which potentially valuable criteria for migration analysis can emerge. The work described is part...

  18. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma

  19. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takabe, Piia, E-mail: piia.takabe@uef.fi [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Biomedicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Bart, Geneviève [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Biomedicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Ropponen, Antti [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Biomedicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2015-09-10

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma.

  20. Revised analysis of in-migrating workers during site characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Deaf Smith Environmental Assessment's analysis of in-migrating workers and community service impacts was predicated on the assumption that a peak of approximately 480 workers would be needed on location to conduct site characterization activities. This analysis assumed that DOE's prime contractor(s) would have a limited staff in the area; the majority of the workers would be on site for the construction of the exploratory shaft and to conduct geologic and environmental studies. Since the time when the Environmental Assessment was prepared, the prime contractors [Battelle-ISSC and the Technical Field Service Contractor (TFSC)] were requested to move their offices to the site area. Therefore, many more administrative and technical workers would be expected to relocate in the Deaf Smith County regions. A change in the expected number of in-migrants could also change the expected nature of community service impacts. It is the purpose of this analysis to evaluate the site characterization workforce and thresholds for local community services. 22 refs., 24 tabs

  1. Migratory properties of cultured olfactory ensheathing cells by single-cell migration assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-hui Huang; Ying Wang; Li Cao; Zhi-da Su; Yan-ling Zhu; Yi-zhang Chen; Xiao-bing Yuan; Cheng He

    2008-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a unique type of glial cells that have axonal growth-promoting properties. OEC transplantation has emerged as a promising experimental therapy of axonal injuries and demyelinating diseases. However, some fundamental cellular properties of OECs remain unclear. In this study, we found that the distinct OEC subpopulations exhibited different migratory properties based on time-lapse imaging of single isolated cells, possibly due to their different cytoskeletal organizations. Moreover, OEC subpopulations displayed different attractive migratory responses to a gradient of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in single-cell migration assays. Finally, we found that OEC subpopulations transformed into each other spontaneously. Together, these results demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, that distinct OEC subpopulations display different migratory properties in vitro and provide new evidence to support the notion of OECs as a single cell type with malleable functional phenotypes.

  2. Cell Migration on Planar and Three-Dimensional Matrices: A Hydrogel-Based Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Vu, Lucas T.; Jain, Gaurav; Veres, Brandon D.; Rajagopalan, Padmavathy

    2014-01-01

    The migration of cells is a complex process that is dependent on the properties of the surrounding environment. In vivo, the extracellular environment is complex with a wide range of physical features, topographies, and protein compositions. There have been a number of approaches to design substrates that can recapitulate the complex architecture in vivo. Two-dimensional (2D) substrates have been widely used to study the effect of material properties on cell migration. However, such substrate...

  3. Tcf3 promotes cell migration and wound repair through regulation of lipocalin 2

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Qi; Ku, Amy T.; Nishino, Yudai; Howard, Jeffrey M.; Rao, Ajay S.; Shaver, Timothy M.; Garcia, Gloria E.; Le, Diep N.; Karlin, Kristen L; Westbrook, Thomas F.; Poli, Valeria; Nguyen, Hoang

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is an integral part of re-epithelialization during skin wound healing, a complex process involving molecular controls that are still largely unknown. Here we identify a novel role for Tcf3, an essential transcription factor regulating embryonic and adult skin stem cell functions, as a key effector of epidermal wound repair. We show that Tcf3 is upregulated in skin wounds and that Tcf3 overexpression accelerates keratinocyte migration and skin wound healing. We also identify Sta...

  4. Dock180 and ELMO1 proteins cooperate to promote evolutionarily conserved Rac-dependent cell migration.

    OpenAIRE

    Grimsley, C M; Kinchen, J M; Tosello-Trampont, A C; Brugnera, E.; Haney, L B; Lu, M; Chen, Q.; Klingele, D; Hengartner, M O; K.S.Ravichandran

    2004-01-01

    Cell migration is essential throughout embryonic and adult life. In numerous cell systems, the small GTPase Rac is required for lamellipodia formation at the leading edge and movement ability. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to Rac activation during migration are still unclear. Recently, a mammalian superfamily of proteins related to the prototype member Dock180 has been identified with homologues in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans. Here, we addressed the role of Dock180 and E...

  5. MiR-153 inhibits migration and invasion of human non-small-cell lung cancer by targeting ADAM19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Decreased miR-153 and up-regulated ADAM19 are correlated with NSCLC pathology. • MiR-153 inhibits the proliferation and migration and invasion of NSCLC cells in vitro. • ADAM19 is a direct target of miR-153. • ADAM19 is involved in miR-153-suppressed migration and invasion of NSCLC cells. - Abstract: MiR-153 was reported to be dysregulated in some human cancers. However, the function and mechanism of miR-153 in lung cancer cells remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-153 in human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using qRT-PCR, we demonstrated that miR-153 was significantly decreased in clinical NSCLC tissues and cell lines, and downregulation of miR-153 was significantly correlated with lymph node status. We further found that ectopic expression of miR-153 significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration and invasion of NSCLC cells in vitro, suggesting that miR-153 may be a novel tumor suppressor in NSCLC. Further integrated analysis revealed that ADAM19 is as a direct and functional target of miR-153. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR-153 directly targeted 3′UTR of ADAM19, and correlation analysis revealed an inverse correlation between miR-153 and ADAM19 mRNA levels in clinical NSCLC tissues. Knockdown of ADAM19 inhibited migration and invasion of NSCLC cells which was similar with effects of overexpression of miR-153, while overexpression of ADAM19 attenuated the function of miR-153 in NSCLC cells. Taken together, our results highlight the significance of miR-153 and ADAM19 in the development and progression of NSCLC

  6. MiR-153 inhibits migration and invasion of human non-small-cell lung cancer by targeting ADAM19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, Nianxi [Department of Oncology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Institute of Medical Sciences, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Shen, Liangfang [Department of Oncology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Wang, Jun; He, Dan [Institute of Medical Sciences, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Duan, Chaojun, E-mail: duancjxy@163.com [Department of Oncology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Institute of Medical Sciences, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Decreased miR-153 and up-regulated ADAM19 are correlated with NSCLC pathology. • MiR-153 inhibits the proliferation and migration and invasion of NSCLC cells in vitro. • ADAM19 is a direct target of miR-153. • ADAM19 is involved in miR-153-suppressed migration and invasion of NSCLC cells. - Abstract: MiR-153 was reported to be dysregulated in some human cancers. However, the function and mechanism of miR-153 in lung cancer cells remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-153 in human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using qRT-PCR, we demonstrated that miR-153 was significantly decreased in clinical NSCLC tissues and cell lines, and downregulation of miR-153 was significantly correlated with lymph node status. We further found that ectopic expression of miR-153 significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration and invasion of NSCLC cells in vitro, suggesting that miR-153 may be a novel tumor suppressor in NSCLC. Further integrated analysis revealed that ADAM19 is as a direct and functional target of miR-153. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR-153 directly targeted 3′UTR of ADAM19, and correlation analysis revealed an inverse correlation between miR-153 and ADAM19 mRNA levels in clinical NSCLC tissues. Knockdown of ADAM19 inhibited migration and invasion of NSCLC cells which was similar with effects of overexpression of miR-153, while overexpression of ADAM19 attenuated the function of miR-153 in NSCLC cells. Taken together, our results highlight the significance of miR-153 and ADAM19 in the development and progression of NSCLC.

  7. Specific Myosins Control Actin Organization, Cell Morphology, and Migration in Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna A. Makowska; Ruth E. Hughes; Kathryn J. White; Claire M. Wells; Michelle Peckham

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the myosin expression profile in prostate cancer cell lines and found that Myo1b, Myo9b, Myo10, and Myo18a were expressed at higher levels in cells with high metastatic potential. Moreover, Myo1b and Myo10 were expressed at higher levels in metastatic tumors. Using an siRNA-based approach, we found that knockdown of each myosin resulted in distinct phenotypes. Myo10 knockdown ablated filopodia and decreased 2D migration speed. Myo18a knockdown increased circumferential non-mus...

  8. Orai1 and STIM1 are critical for cell migration and proliferation of clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji-Hee [Department of Physiology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lkhagvadorj, Sayamaa; Lee, Mi-Ra [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Kyu-Hee [Department of Physiology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hyun Chul; Jung, Jae Hung [Department of Urology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Seung-Kuy, E-mail: skcha@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Physiology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, and Nuclear Receptor Research Consortium, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Minseob, E-mail: eomm@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-23

    Highlights: • Orai1 channel is highly expressed in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) tissues. • Orai1 and STIM1 constitute a native store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry in ccRCC cells. • Orai1 and STIM1 promote cell migration and proliferation of ccRCC cells. - Abstract: The intracellular Ca{sup 2+} regulation has been implicated in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Notably, store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) is a major Ca{sup 2+} entry mechanism in non-excitable cells, being involved in cell proliferation and migration in several types of cancer. However, the expression and biological role of SOCE have not been investigated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Here, we demonstrate that Orai1 and STIM1, not Orai3, are crucial components of SOCE in the progression of ccRCC. The expression levels of Orai1 in tumor tissues were significantly higher than those in the adjacent normal parenchymal tissues. In addition, native SOCE was blunted by inhibiting SOCE or by silencing Orai1 and STIM1. Pharmacological blockade or knockdown of Orai1 or STIM1 also significantly inhibited RCC cell migration and proliferative capability. Taken together, Orai1 is highly expressed in ccRCC tissues illuminating that Orai1-mediated SOCE may play an important role in ccRCC development. Indeed, Orai1 and STIM1 constitute a native SOCE pathway in ccRCC by promoting cell proliferation and migration.

  9. Three-dimensional numerical model of cell morphology during migration in multi-signaling substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Jamaleddin Mousavi

    Full Text Available Cell Migration associated with cell shape changes are of central importance in many biological processes ranging from morphogenesis to metastatic cancer cells. Cell movement is a result of cyclic changes of cell morphology due to effective forces on cell body, leading to periodic fluctuations of the cell length and cell membrane area. It is well-known that the cell can be guided by different effective stimuli such as mechanotaxis, thermotaxis, chemotaxis and/or electrotaxis. Regulation of intracellular mechanics and cell's physical interaction with its substrate rely on control of cell shape during cell migration. In this notion, it is essential to understand how each natural or external stimulus may affect the cell behavior. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D computational model is here developed to analyze a free mode of cell shape changes during migration in a multi-signaling micro-environment. This model is based on previous models that are presented by the same authors to study cell migration with a constant spherical cell shape in a multi-signaling substrates and mechanotaxis effect on cell morphology. Using the finite element discrete methodology, the cell is represented by a group of finite elements. The cell motion is modeled by equilibrium of effective forces on cell body such as traction, protrusion, electrostatic and drag forces, where the cell traction force is a function of the cell internal deformations. To study cell behavior in the presence of different stimuli, the model has been employed in different numerical cases. Our findings, which are qualitatively consistent with well-known related experimental observations, indicate that adding a new stimulus to the cell substrate pushes the cell to migrate more directionally in more elongated form towards the more effective stimuli. For instance, the presence of thermotaxis, chemotaxis and electrotaxis can further move the cell centroid towards the corresponding stimulus, respectively

  10. The Role of TG2 in Regulating S100A4-Mediated Mammary Tumour Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuo Wang; Martin Griffin

    2013-01-01

    The importance of S100A4, a Ca(2+)-binding protein, in mediating tumour cell migration, both intracellularly and extracellularly, is well documented. Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) a Ca(2+)-dependent protein crosslinking enzyme, has also been shown to enhance cell migration. Here by using the well characterised non-metastatic rat mammary R37 cells (transfected with empty vector) and highly metastatic KP1 cells (R37 cells transfected with S100A4), we demonstrate that inhibition of TG2 either by...

  11. Cardiac Migration of Endogenous Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Patients with Inflammatory Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Schmidt-Lucke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC have immunomodulatory features. The aim of this study was to investigate the migration and homing potential of endogenous circulating MSC in virus negative inflammatory cardiomyopathy (CMi. Methods. In 29 patients with n=23 or without n=6 CMi undergoing endomyocardial biopsies (EMB, transcardiac gradients (TCGs of circulating MSC were measured by flow cytometry from blood simultaneously sampled from aorta and coronary sinus. The presence of MSC in EMB, cardiac inflammation, and SDF-1α mRNA expression were detected via immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Results. MSC defined as CD45−CD34−CD11b−CD73+CD90+ cells accounted for 0.010 [0.0025–0.048]%/peripheral mononuclear cell (PMNC and as CD45−CD34−CD11b−CD73+CD105+ cells for 0.019 [0.0026–0.067]%/PMNC, both with similar counts in patients with or without cardiac inflammation. There was a 29.9% P<0.01 transcardiac reduction of circulating MSC in patients with CMi, correlating with the extent of cardiac inflammation (P<0.05, multivariate analysis. A strong correlation was found between the TCG of circulating MSC and numbers of MSC (CD45−CD34−CD90+CD105+ in EMB (r=-0.73, P<0.005. SDF-1α was the strongest predictor for increased MSC in EMB (P<0.005, multivariate analysis. Conclusions. Endogenous MSC continuously migrate to the heart in patients with CMi triggered by cardiac inflammation.

  12. The role of TG2 in regulating S100A4-mediated mammary tumour cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Wang

    Full Text Available The importance of S100A4, a Ca(2+-binding protein, in mediating tumour cell migration, both intracellularly and extracellularly, is well documented. Tissue transglutaminase (TG2 a Ca(2+-dependent protein crosslinking enzyme, has also been shown to enhance cell migration. Here by using the well characterised non-metastatic rat mammary R37 cells (transfected with empty vector and highly metastatic KP1 cells (R37 cells transfected with S100A4, we demonstrate that inhibition of TG2 either by TG2 inhibitors or transfection of cells with TG2 shRNA block S100A4-accelerated cell migration in the KP1cells and in R37 cells treated with exogenous S100A4. Cell migration was also blocked by the treatment with the non-cell permeabilizing TG2 inhibitor R294, in the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 (Clone 16, which has a high level of TG2 expression. Inhibition was paralleled by a decrease in S100A4 polymer formation. In vitro co-immunoprecipitation and Far Western blotting assays and cross-linking assays showed not only the direct interaction between TG2 and S100A4, but also confirmed S100A4 as a substrate for TG2. Using specific functional blocking antibodies, a targeting peptide and a recombinant protein as a competitive treatment, we revealed the involvement of syndecan-4 and α5β1 integrin co-signalling pathways linked by activation of PKCα in this TG2 and S100A4-mediated cell migration. We propose a mechanism for TG2-regulated S100A4-related mediated cell migration, which is dependent on TG2 crosslinking.

  13. Bm-TFF2, a toad trefoil factor, promotes cell migration, survival and wound healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yong [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yu, Guoyu [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Department of Biochemistry, Kunming Medical College, Kunming, Yunnan 650032 (China); Xiang, Yang [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wu, Jianbo [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223 (China); Jiang, Ping [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Lee, Wenhui [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223 (China); Zhang, Yun, E-mail: zhangy@mail.kiz.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650223 (China)

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} Bm-TFF2 binds to epithelial cells and induces cell migration and wound healing. {yields} Bm-TFF2 suppresses cell apoptosis. {yields} Bm-TFF2 has no effect on cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Toad skin is naked and continually confronted by various injurious factors. Constant skin renewal and repairs occur frequently. However, the mechanisms of the renewal and repair have not clearly elucidated. In our previous work, a trefoil factor (TFF), Bm-TFF2, has been purified from the Bombina maxima skin and characterized as a platelet agonist. The mRNA of TFFs in toad skin was up-regulated greatly during the metamorphosis, indicating a pivotal role of TFFs in amphibian skin. Here, we presented the effects of Bm-TFF2 on the cell migration, apoptosis and proliferation. Bm-TFF2 bound to epithelial cells and showed strong cell motility activity. At the concentrations of 1-100 nM, Bm-TFF2-induced migration of human epithelial AGS and HT-29 cells, and rat intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cell lines. The in vitro wound healing assay also verified the activity of Bm-TFF2. Bm-TFF2 could also inhibit cell apoptosis induced by ceramide and sodium butyrate. The cell migration-promoting activity was abolished by MEK1 inhibitors, U0126 and PD98059, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation is crucial for Bm-TFF2 to stimulate cell migration. Taken together, Bm-TFF2 promoted wound healing by stimulating cell migration via MAPK pathway and preventing cell apoptosis. The potent biological activity of Bm-TFF2 makes it a useful molecular tool for further studies of structure-function relationship of the related human TFFs.

  14. Bm-TFF2, a toad trefoil factor, promotes cell migration, survival and wound healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Bm-TFF2 binds to epithelial cells and induces cell migration and wound healing. → Bm-TFF2 suppresses cell apoptosis. → Bm-TFF2 has no effect on cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Toad skin is naked and continually confronted by various injurious factors. Constant skin renewal and repairs occur frequently. However, the mechanisms of the renewal and repair have not clearly elucidated. In our previous work, a trefoil factor (TFF), Bm-TFF2, has been purified from the Bombina maxima skin and characterized as a platelet agonist. The mRNA of TFFs in toad skin was up-regulated greatly during the metamorphosis, indicating a pivotal role of TFFs in amphibian skin. Here, we presented the effects of Bm-TFF2 on the cell migration, apoptosis and proliferation. Bm-TFF2 bound to epithelial cells and showed strong cell motility activity. At the concentrations of 1-100 nM, Bm-TFF2-induced migration of human epithelial AGS and HT-29 cells, and rat intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cell lines. The in vitro wound healing assay also verified the activity of Bm-TFF2. Bm-TFF2 could also inhibit cell apoptosis induced by ceramide and sodium butyrate. The cell migration-promoting activity was abolished by MEK1 inhibitors, U0126 and PD98059, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation is crucial for Bm-TFF2 to stimulate cell migration. Taken together, Bm-TFF2 promoted wound healing by stimulating cell migration via MAPK pathway and preventing cell apoptosis. The potent biological activity of Bm-TFF2 makes it a useful molecular tool for further studies of structure-function relationship of the related human TFFs.

  15. Angiogenin enhances cell migration by regulating stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saisai Wei

    Full Text Available Angiogenin (ANG acts on both vascular endothelial cells and cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we carried out a co-immunoprecipitation assay in HeLa cells and identified 14 potential ANG-interacting proteins. Among these proteins, β-actin, α-actinin 4, and non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 are stress fiber components and involved in cytoskeleton organization and movement, which prompted us to investigate the mechanism of action of ANG in cell migration. Upon confirmation of the interactions between ANG and the three proteins, further studies revealed that ANG co-localized with β-actin and α-actinin 4 at the leading edge of migrating cells. Down-regulation of ANG resulted in fewer but thicker stress fibers with less dynamics, which was associated with the enlargements of focal adhesions. The focal adhesion kinase activity and cell migration capacity were significantly decreased in ANG-deficient cells. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the existence of ANG in the cytoplasm optimizes stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion formation to accommodate cell migration. The finding that ANG promoted cancer cell migration might provide new clues for tumor metastasis research.

  16. Three-Dimensional Numerical Model of Cell Morphology during Migration in Multi-Signaling Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Seyed Jamaleddin; Hamdy Doweidar, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Cell Migration associated with cell shape changes are of central importance in many biological processes ranging from morphogenesis to metastatic cancer cells. Cell movement is a result of cyclic changes of cell morphology due to effective forces on cell body, leading to periodic fluctuations of the cell length and cell membrane area. It is well-known that the cell can be guided by different effective stimuli such as mechanotaxis, thermotaxis, chemotaxis and/or electrotaxis. Regulation of intracellular mechanics and cell’s physical interaction with its substrate rely on control of cell shape during cell migration. In this notion, it is essential to understand how each natural or external stimulus may affect the cell behavior. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D) computational model is here developed to analyze a free mode of cell shape changes during migration in a multi-signaling micro-environment. This model is based on previous models that are presented by the same authors to study cell migration with a constant spherical cell shape in a multi-signaling substrates and mechanotaxis effect on cell morphology. Using the finite element discrete methodology, the cell is represented by a group of finite elements. The cell motion is modeled by equilibrium of effective forces on cell body such as traction, protrusion, electrostatic and drag forces, where the cell traction force is a function of the cell internal deformations. To study cell behavior in the presence of different stimuli, the model has been employed in different numerical cases. Our findings, which are qualitatively consistent with well-known related experimental observations, indicate that adding a new stimulus to the cell substrate pushes the cell to migrate more directionally in more elongated form towards the more effective stimuli. For instance, the presence of thermotaxis, chemotaxis and electrotaxis can further move the cell centroid towards the corresponding stimulus, respectively, diminishing the

  17. Necrotic cells influence migration and invasion of glioblastoma via NF-κB/AP-1-mediated IL-8 regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, So-Hee; Park, Hyunju; Ahn, Young-Ho; Kim, Sewha; Cho, Min-Sun; Kang, Jihee Lee; Choi, Youn-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary intracranial tumor in adults and has poor prognosis. Diffuse infiltration into normal brain parenchyma, rapid growth, and the presence of necrosis are remarkable hallmarks of GBM. However, the effect of necrotic cells on GBM growth and metastasis is poorly understood at present. In this study, we examined the biological significance of necrotic tissues by exploring the molecular mechanisms underlying the signaling network between necrotic tissues and GBM cells. The migration and invasion of the GBM cell line CRT-MG was significantly enhanced by treatment with necrotic cells, as shown by assays for scratch wound healing and spheroid invasion. Incubation with necrotic cells induced IL-8 secretion in CRT-MG cells in a dose-dependent manner. In human GBM tissues, IL-8 positive cells were mainly distributed in the perinecrotic region, as seen in immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analysis. Necrotic cells induced NF-κB and AP-1 activation and their binding to the IL-8 promoter, leading to enhanced IL-8 production and secretion in GBM cells. Our data demonstrate that when GBM cells are exposed to and stimulated by necrotic cells, the migration and invasion of GBM cells are enhanced and facilitated via NF-κB/AP-1 mediated IL-8 upregulation. PMID:27076368

  18. A photoactivatable nanopatterned substrate for analyzing collective cell migration with precisely tuned cell-extracellular matrix ligand interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Shimizu

    Full Text Available Collective cell migration is involved in many biological and pathological processes. Various factors have been shown to regulate the decision to migrate collectively or individually, but the impact of cell-extracellular matrix (ECM interactions is still debated. Here, we developed a method for analyzing collective cell migration by precisely tuning the interactions between cells and ECM ligands. Gold nanoparticles are arrayed on a glass substrate with a defined nanometer spacing by block copolymer micellar nanolithography (BCML, and photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol (Mw  =  12 kDa, PEG12K and a cyclic RGD peptide, as an ECM ligand, are immobilized on this substrate. The remaining glass regions are passivated with PEG2K-silane to make cells interact with the surface via the nanoperiodically presented cyclic RGD ligands upon the photocleavage of PEG12K. On this nanostructured substrate, HeLa cells are first patterned in photo-illuminated regions, and cell migration is induced by a second photocleavage of the surrounding PEG12K. The HeLa cells gradually lose their cell-cell contacts and become disconnected on the nanopatterned substrate with 10-nm particles and 57-nm spacing, in contrast to their behavior on the homogenous substrate. Interestingly, the relationship between the observed migration collectivity and the cell-ECM ligand interactions is the opposite of that expected based on conventional soft matter models. It is likely that the reduced phosphorylation at tyrosine-861 of focal adhesion kinase (FAK on the nanopatterned surface is responsible for this unique migration behavior. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the presented method in understanding the process of determining collective and non-collective migration features in defined micro- and nano-environments and resolving the crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesions.

  19. SLUG promotes prostate cancer cell migration and invasion via CXCR4/CXCL12 axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uygur Berna

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SLUG is a zinc-finger transcription factor of the Snail/Slug zinc-finger family that plays a role in migration and invasion of tumor cells. Mechanisms by which SLUG promotes migration and invasion in prostate cancers remain elusive. Methods Expression level of CXCR4 and CXCL12 was examined by Western blot, RT-PCR, and qPCR analyses. Forced expression of SLUG was mediated by retroviruses, and SLUG and CXCL12 was downregulated by shRNAs-expressing lentiviruses. Migration and invasion of prostate cancer were measured by scratch-wound assay and invasion assay, respectively. Research We demonstrated that forced expression of SLUG elevated CXCR4 and CXCL12 expression in human prostate cancer cell lines PC3, DU145, 22RV1, and LNCaP; conversely, reduced expression of SLUG by shRNA downregulated CXCR4 and CXCL12 expression at RNA and protein levels in prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, ectopic expression of SLUG increased MMP9 expression and activity in PC3, 22RV1, and DU-145 cells, and SLUG knockdown by shRNA downregulated MMP9 expression. We showed that CXCL12 is required for SLUG-mediated MMP9 expression in prostate cancer cells. Moreover, we found that migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells was increased by ectopic expression of SLUG and decreased by SLUG knockdown. Notably, knockdown of CXCL12 by shRNA impaired SLUG-mediated migration and invasion in prostate cancer cells. Lastly, our data suggest that CXCL12 and SLUG regulate migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells independent of cell growth. Conclusion We provide the first compelling evidence that upregulation of autocrine CXCL12 is a major mechanism underlying SLUG-mediated migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells. Our findings suggest that CXCL12 is a therapeutic target for prostate cancer metastasis.

  20. Tangential migration of glutamatergic neurons and cortical patterning during development: Lessons from Cajal-Retzius cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Melissa; Pierani, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    Tangential migration is a mode of cell movement, which in the developing cerebral cortex, is defined by displacement parallel to the ventricular surface and orthogonal to the radial glial fibers. This mode of long-range migration is a strategy by which distinct neuronal classes generated from spatially and molecularly distinct origins can integrate to form appropriate neural circuits within the cortical plate. While it was previously believed that only GABAergic cortical interneurons migrate tangentially from their origins in the subpallial ganglionic eminences to integrate in the cortical plate, it is now known that transient populations of glutamatergic neurons also adopt this mode of migration. These include Cajal-Retzius cells (CRs), subplate neurons (SPs), and cortical plate transient neurons (CPTs), which have crucial roles in orchestrating the radial and tangential development of the embryonic cerebral cortex in a noncell-autonomous manner. While CRs have been extensively studied, it is only in the last decade that the molecular mechanisms governing their tangential migration have begun to be elucidated. To date, the mechanisms of SPs and CPTs tangential migration remain unknown. We therefore review the known signaling pathways, which regulate parameters of CRs migration including their motility, contact-redistribution and adhesion to the pial surface, and discuss this in the context of how CR migration may regulate their signaling activity in a spatial and temporal manner. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 847-881, 2016. PMID:26581033

  1. Laminin isoform-specific promotion of adhesion and migration of human bone marrow progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yu-Chen; Kortesmaa, Jarkko; Tryggvason, Karl; Persson, Jenny; Ekblom, Peter; Jacobsen, Sten-Eirik; Ekblom, Marja

    2003-02-01

    Laminins are alphabetagamma heterotrimeric extracellular proteins that regulate cellular functions by adhesion to integrin and nonintegrin receptors. Laminins containing alpha4 and alpha5 chains are expressed in bone marrow, but their interactions with hematopoietic progenitors are unknown. We studied human bone marrow cell adhesion to laminin-10/11 (alpha5beta1gamma1/alpha5beta2gamma1), laminin-8 (alpha4beta1gamma1), laminin-1 (alpha1beta1gamma1), and fibronectin. About 35% to 40% of CD34(+) and CD34(+)CD38(-) stem and progenitor cells adhered to laminin-10/11, and 45% to 50% adhered to fibronectin, whereas they adhered less to laminin-8 and laminin-1. Adhesion of CD34(+)CD38(-) cells to laminin-10/11 was maximal without integrin activation, whereas adhesion to other proteins was dependent on protein kinase C activation by 12-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Fluorescence-activated cell-sorting (FACS) analysis showed expression of integrin alpha6 chain on most CD34(+) and CD34(+)CD38(-) cells. Integrin alpha6 and beta1 chains were involved in binding of both cell fractions to laminin-10/11 and laminin-8. Laminin-10/11 was highly adhesive to lineage-committed myelomonocytic and erythroid progenitor cells and most lymphoid and myeloid cell lines studied, whereas laminin-8 was less adhesive. In functional assays, both laminin-8 and laminin-10/11 facilitated stromal-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha)-stimulated transmigration of CD34(+) cells, by an integrin alpha6 receptor-mediated mechanism. In conclusion, we demonstrate laminin isoform-specific adhesive interactions with human bone marrow stem, progenitor, and more differentiated cells. The cell-adhesive laminins affected migration of hematopoietic progenitors, suggesting a physiologic role for laminins during hematopoiesis. PMID:12393739

  2. Lactate stimulates migration of human cancer cells: possible consequences for the development of metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high lactate production is a common feature of the majority of malignant tumors. In several independent series of clinical studies we could show that a high lactate content in primary human carcinomas was correlated with a higher incidence of metastases and a reduced patient survival, compared to tumors with a lower lactate content. Since one of the early events in metastasis is the active movement of cancer cells out of the primary tumor site, we have investigated the effect of exogenous lactate on the migratory activity of human cancer cells in vitro. - A 48 well micro chemotaxis chamber was used to quantify the migration of SQ20B and PCI13 cells which were derived from human head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. The chamber consists of bottom and a top Lucite slide, separated by a gelatin covered polycarbonate membrane with pores of 8 μm, where cells eventually migrate through. - In summary, there was a time and concentration dependent unidirectional enhancement of cell migration. For example, cells were incubated in growth medium supplemented with 20 mM L-lactate. On the average, the rate of cell migration was significantly enhanced (p < 0.001) to 139 % for SQ20 and 136 % for PCI cells, compared to untreated control cells (100 %). No effects on cell migration were detected for culture media containing 20 mM D-lactate or 20 mM sodium chloride. These results suggest that an elevated lactate production may not only be an accompanying phenomenon of malignant transformation, but may also play an active part in tumor progression by enhancing cell migration and dissemination of potentially metastatic cells from primary lesions

  3. Mechano-sensing and cell migration: a 3D model approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell migration is essential for tissue development in different physiological and pathological conditions. It is a complex process orchestrated by chemistry, biological factors, microstructure and surrounding mechanical properties. Focusing on the mechanical interactions, cells do not only exert forces on the matrix that surrounds them, but they also sense and react to mechanical cues in a process called mechano-sensing. Here, we hypothesize the involvement of mechano-sensing in the regulation of directional cell migration through a three-dimensional (3D) matrix. For this purpose, we develop a 3D numerical model of individual cell migration, which incorporates the mechano-sensing process of the cell as the main mechanism regulating its movement. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that factors, such as substrate stiffness, boundary conditions and external forces, regulate specific and distinct cell movements

  4. Lumican Inhibits SNAIL-Induced Melanoma Cell Migration Specifically by Blocking MMP-14 Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiak, Marta; Boncela, Joanna; Perreau, Corinne; Karamanou, Konstantina; Chatron-Colliet, Aurore; Proult, Isabelle; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Chakravarti, Shukti; Maquart, François-Xavier; Kowalska, M. Anna; Wegrowski, Yanusz; Brézillon, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Lumican, a small leucine rich proteoglycan, inhibits MMP-14 activity and melanoma cell migration in vitro and in vivo. Snail triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transitions endowing epithelial cells with migratory and invasive properties during tumor progression. The aim of this work was to investigate lumican effects on MMP-14 activity and migration of Snail overexpressing B16F1 (Snail-B16F1) melanoma cells and HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. Lumican inhibits the Snail induced MMP-14 activity in B16F1 but not in HT-29 cells. In Snail-B16F1 cells, lumican inhibits migration, growth, and melanoma primary tumor development. A lumican-based strategy targeting Snail-induced MMP-14 activity might be useful for melanoma treatment. PMID:26930497

  5. Tuning cell migration: contractility as an integrator of intracellular signals from multiple cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeleau, Francois; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2016-01-01

    There has been immense progress in our understanding of the factors driving cell migration in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional microenvironments over the years. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that even though most cells share many of the same signaling molecules, they rarely respond in the same way to migration cues. To add to the complexity, cells are generally exposed to multiple cues simultaneously, in the form of growth factors and/or physical cues from the matrix. Understanding the mechanisms that modulate the intracellular signals triggered by multiple cues remains a challenge. Here, we will focus on the molecular mechanism involved in modulating cell migration, with a specific focus on how cell contractility can mediate the crosstalk between signaling initiated at cell-matrix adhesions and growth factor receptors. PMID:27508074

  6. Differential Effects of Coating Materials on Viability and Migration of Schwann Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvan Klein

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic nerve conduits have emerged as an alternative to guide axonal regeneration in peripheral nerve gap injuries. Migration of Schwann cells (SC from nerve stumps has been demonstrated as one essential factor for nerve regeneration in nerve defects. In this experiment, SC viability and migration were investigated for various materials to determine the optimal conditions for nerve regeneration. Cell viability and SC migration assays were conducted for collagen I, laminin, fibronectin, lysine and ornithine. The highest values for cell viability were detected for collagen I, whereas fibronectin was most stimulatory for SC migration. At this time, clinically approved conduits are based on single-material structures. In contrast, the results of this experiment suggest that material compounds such as collagen I in conjunction with fibronectin should be considered for optimal nerve healing.

  7. Effects of osthole on migration and invasion in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dapeng; Gu, Tianwei; Wang, Ting; Tang, Qingjiu; Ma, Changyan

    2010-01-01

    Osthole, a natural coumarin derivative, is extracted from the fruit of Cnidium monnieri Cusson. Breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers and the leading cause of death in women. Recent studies have shown that Osthole has anti-tumor activity. However, the effects of Osthole on the migration and invasion of cancer cells have not yet been reported. Here, we found that Osthole is effective in inhibiting the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells by wound healing and transwell assays. Luciferase and zymography assays revealed that Osthole effectively inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-2 promoter and enzyme activity, which might be one of the causes that lead to the inhibition of migration and invasion by Osthole. This is the first report on the inhibitory function of Osthole in migration and invasion in breast cancer cells. Our findings indicate a need for further evaluation of Osthole in breast cancer chemotherapy and chemoprevention. PMID:20622464

  8. The migration of human lens epithelial cells induced by UV-irradiation in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Yao; Guoxing Yuan; Yuan Liu; Yi Shen; Qin Jiang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is one of the important cataract risk factors. However, the pathogenesis is still poorly understood.The migration of human lens epithelial cells(HLECs) plays a crucial role in the remodeling of lens capsule and cataract formation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the mechanism of UV inducing cataractogenesis. Methods:The toxicity of UV-irradiation on HLECs was assessed by Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium(MTT) assay. The activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2(MMP-2) was observed by Gelatin zymography. The migration of HLECs was examined by Cell Track Motility. Results:UV-irradiation does great harm to HLECs, and may induce apoptosis in the cells when UV higher than 15 mj/cm2. UV significantly increased MMP-2 activity in a timedependent manner. In addition, the irradiation could induce the migration of HLECs. Conclusion:UV-irradiation could induce the migration of HLECs by increasing the activity of MMP-2.

  9. Migration of human dendritic cells induced by gliadin fragments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pecharová, Barbara; Jelínková, Lenka; Kamanová, Jana; Tučková, Ludmila

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 39, - (2009), s. 649-649. ISSN 0014-2980. [European Congress of Immunology /2./. 13.09.2009-16.09.2009, Berlin] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : gliadin fragments * celiac disease * migration Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  10. Chemokine CXCL16 Expression Suppresses Migration and Invasiveness and Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeying Fang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Increasing evidence argues that soluble CXCL16 promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of cancer cells in vitro. However, the role of transmembrane or cellular CXCL16 in cancer remains relatively unknown. In this study, we determine the function of cellular CXCL16 as tumor suppressor in breast cancer cells. Methods. Expression of cellular CXCL16 in breast cancer cell lines was determined at both RNA and protein levels. In vitro and in vivo studies that overexpressed or downregulated CXCL16 were conducted in breast cancer cells. Results. We report differential expression of cellular CXCL16 in breast cancer cell lines that was negatively correlated with cell invasiveness and migration. Overexpression of CXCL16 in MDA-MB-231 cells led to a decrease in cell invasion and migration and induced apoptosis of the cells; downregulation of CXCL16 in MCF-7 cells increased cell migration and invasiveness. Consistent with the in vitro data, CXCL16 overexpression inhibited tumorigenesis in vivo. Conclusions. Cellular CXCL16 suppresses invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells in vitro and inhibits tumorigenesis in vivo. Targeting of cellular CXCL16 expression is a potential therapeutic strategy for breast cancer.

  11. The SHIP2 interactor Myo1c is required for cell migration in 1321 N1 glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edimo, William's Elong; Ramos, Ana Raquel; Ghosh, Somadri; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Erneux, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    The phosphoinositide 5-phosphatases consist of several enzymes that have been shown to modulate cell migration and invasion. SHIP2, one family member, is known to interact with growth factor receptors and cytoskeletal proteins. In a human model of glioblastoma 1321 N1 cells, we recently identified Myo1c as a new interactor of SHIP2. This was shown in a complex of proteins also containing filamin A. We show here that SHIP2 localization at lamellipodia and ruffles is impaired in Myo1c depleted cells. In the absence of Myo1c, N1 cells tend to associate to form clusters. Cell migration is very much reduced in Myo1c depleted cells, concomitantly with a decrease in FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation, focal adhesion length and PI(4,5)P2 immunostaining. In N1 cells, Myo1c is thus important for lamellipodia formation to assemble a protein complex containing SHIP2 to facilitate cell migration. PMID:27246739

  12. BK K+ channel blockade inhibits radiation-induced migration/brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edalat, Lena; Stegen, Benjamin; Klumpp, Lukas; Haehl, Erik; Schilbach, Karin; Lukowski, Robert; Kühnle, Matthias; Bernhardt, Günther; Buschauer, Armin; Zips, Daniel; Ruth, Peter; Huber, Stephan M

    2016-03-22

    Infiltration of the brain by glioblastoma cells reportedly requires Ca2+ signals and BK K+ channels that program and drive glioblastoma cell migration, respectively. Ionizing radiation (IR) has been shown to induce expression of the chemokine SDF-1, to alter the Ca2+ signaling, and to stimulate cell migration of glioblastoma cells. Here, we quantified fractionated IR-induced migration/brain infiltration of human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic mouse model and analyzed the role of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling and BK channels. To this end, the radiation-induced migratory phenotypes of human T98G and far-red fluorescent U-87MG-Katushka glioblastoma cells were characterized by mRNA and protein expression, fura-2 Ca2+ imaging, BK patch-clamp recording and transfilter migration assay. In addition, U-87MG-Katushka cells were grown to solid glioblastomas in the right hemispheres of immunocompromised mice, fractionated irradiated (6 MV photons) with 5 × 0 or 5 × 2 Gy, and SDF-1, CXCR4, and BK protein expression by the tumor as well as glioblastoma brain infiltration was analyzed in dependence on BK channel targeting by systemic paxilline application concomitant to IR. As a result, IR stimulated SDF-1 signaling and induced migration of glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, paxilline blocked IR-induced migration in vivo. Collectively, our data demonstrate that fractionated IR of glioblastoma stimulates and BK K+ channel targeting mitigates migration and brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells in vivo. This suggests that BK channel targeting might represent a novel approach to overcome radiation-induced spreading of malignant brain tumors during radiotherapy. PMID:26893360

  13. Interleukin 23 Promotes Lung Adenocarcinoma A549 Cell Migration and Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen ZHANG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Interleukin 23 (IL-23 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that plays an important role in inflammatory disease and tumor microenvironment. The IL-23 receptor is expressed in colon, lung, and oral carcinomas. We performed this study to investigate whether IL-23 promotes directly carcinoma cell migration and invasion as well as further explore its mechanism. Methods The migration and invasion of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells induced by IL-23 were detected by a scratch test and Transwell experiment. MMP-9 expression of the mRNA and protein levels of A549 cells cultured with and without IL-23 was respectively detected by Real-time PCR and ELISA. The effect of IL-23 on A549 cells was further verified using anti-IL-23p19 neutralization antibody (Ab IL-23p19 to eliminate IL-23. Results IL-23 remarkably promoted A549 cell migration and invasion. MMP-9 expression in A549 cells was upregulated by IL-23 stimulation. In addition, the effect of IL-23 on the migration and invasion of A549, as well as the MMP-9 expression in A549 cells induced by IL-23, was eliminated by Ab IL-23p19. Conclusion IL-23 promotes the migration and invasion of A549 cells by inducing MMP-9 expression.

  14. Cell migration is another player of the minute virus of mice infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parvovirus minute virus of mice, prototype strain (MVMp), preferentially infects and kills cancer cells. This intrinsic MVMp oncotropism may depend in part on the early stages of MVMp infection. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the early events of MVMp infection in mouse LA9 fibroblasts and a highly invasive mouse mammary tumor cell line derived from polyomavirus middle T antigen-mediated transformation. Using a combination of fluorescence and electron microscopy, we found that various parameters of the cell migration process affect MVMp infection. We show that, after binding to the plasma membrane, MVMp particles rapidly cluster at the leading edge of migrating cells, which exhibit higher levels of MVMp uptake than non-motile cells. Moreover, promoting cell migration on a fibronectin matrix increased MVMp infection, and induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition allowed MVMp replication in non-permissive epithelial cells. Hence, we propose that cell migration influences the early stages of MVMp infection. - Highlights: • We document early steps of MVMp infection. • We report that a fibronectin matrix promotes MVMp infection. • We show that cellular migration plays a role in MVMp uptake. • We show that epithelial–mesenchymal transition allows MVMp replication

  15. Cell migration is another player of the minute virus of mice infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcin, Pierre O.; Panté, Nelly, E-mail: pante@zoology.ubc.ca

    2014-11-15

    The parvovirus minute virus of mice, prototype strain (MVMp), preferentially infects and kills cancer cells. This intrinsic MVMp oncotropism may depend in part on the early stages of MVMp infection. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the early events of MVMp infection in mouse LA9 fibroblasts and a highly invasive mouse mammary tumor cell line derived from polyomavirus middle T antigen-mediated transformation. Using a combination of fluorescence and electron microscopy, we found that various parameters of the cell migration process affect MVMp infection. We show that, after binding to the plasma membrane, MVMp particles rapidly cluster at the leading edge of migrating cells, which exhibit higher levels of MVMp uptake than non-motile cells. Moreover, promoting cell migration on a fibronectin matrix increased MVMp infection, and induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition allowed MVMp replication in non-permissive epithelial cells. Hence, we propose that cell migration influences the early stages of MVMp infection. - Highlights: • We document early steps of MVMp infection. • We report that a fibronectin matrix promotes MVMp infection. • We show that cellular migration plays a role in MVMp uptake. • We show that epithelial–mesenchymal transition allows MVMp replication.

  16. Novel migrating mouse neural crest cell assay system utilizing P0-Cre/EGFP fluorescent time-lapse imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawakami Minoru

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural crest cells (NCCs are embryonic, multipotent stem cells. Their long-range and precision-guided migration is one of their most striking characteristics. We previously reported that P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-lacZ double-transgenic mice showed significant lacZ expression in tissues derived from NCCs. Results In this study, by embedding a P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-EGFP embryo at E9.5 in collagen gel inside a culture glass slide, we were able to keep the embryo developing ex vivo for more than 24 hours; this development was with enough NCC fluorescent signal intensity to enable single-cell resolution analysis, with the accompanying NCC migration potential intact and with the appropriate NCC response to the extracellular signal maintained. By implantation of beads with absorbed platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA, we demonstrated that PDGF-AA acts as an NCC-attractant in embryos. We also performed assays with NCCs isolated from P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-EGFP embryos on culture plates. The neuromediator 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT has been known to regulate NCC migration. We newly demonstrated that dopamine, in addition to 5-HT, stimulated NCC migration in vitro. Two NCC populations, with different axial levels of origins, showed unique distribution patterns regarding migration velocity and different dose-response patterns to both 5-HT and dopamine. Conclusions Although avian species predominated over the other species in the NCC study, our novel system should enable us to use mice to assay many different aspects of NCCs in embryos or on culture plates, such as migration, division, differentiation, and apoptosis.

  17. EGR1 and the ERK-ERF axis drive mammary cell migration in response to EGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarcic, Gabi; Avraham, Roi; Pines, Gur; Amit, Ido; Shay, Tal; Lu, Yiling; Zwang, Yaara; Katz, Menachem; Ben-Chetrit, Nir; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Virgilio, Laura; Rechavi, Gideon; Mavrothalassitis, George; Mills, Gordon B; Domany, Eytan; Yarden, Yosef

    2012-04-01

    The signaling pathways that commit cells to migration are incompletely understood. We employed human mammary cells and two stimuli: epidermal growth factor (EGF), which induced cellular migration, and serum factors, which stimulated cell growth. In addition to strong activation of ERK by EGF, and AKT by serum, early transcription remarkably differed: while EGF induced early growth response-1 (EGR1), and this was required for migration, serum induced c-Fos and FosB to enhance proliferation. We demonstrate that induction of EGR1 involves ERK-mediated down-regulation of microRNA-191 and phosphorylation of the ETS2 repressor factor (ERF) repressor, which subsequently leaves the nucleus. Unexpectedly, knockdown of ERF inhibited migration, which implies migratory roles for exported ERF molecules. On the other hand, chromatin immunoprecipitation identified a subset of direct EGR1 targets, including EGR1 autostimulation and SERPINB2, whose transcription is essential for EGF-induced cell migration. In summary, EGR1 and the EGF-ERK-ERF axis emerge from our study as major drivers of growth factor-induced mammary cell migration. PMID:22198386

  18. Interleukin-1β mediates human airway epithelial cell migration via NF-κB

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Steven R.; Fischer, Bernard M.; Marroquin, Bertha A.; Stern, Randi

    2008-01-01

    Migration of airway epithelial cells (AEC) is a necessary component of airway mucosal repair after injury. The cytokine IL-1β, present in airway inflammation, has protean effects on constituent cells within the mucosa, but its effects on epithelial repair are not known. We examined migration in differentiated primary human AEC grown in air-liquid interface culture for up to 3 wk and in the 16HBE14o− cell line. Wounds were created by mechanical abrasion and followed to closure using digital microscopy. Concurrent treatment with IL-1β (≤10 ng/ml) significantly accelerated migration in primary differentiated cells and in the 16HBE14o− cell line but did not accelerate migration in primary differentiated AEC collected from asthmatic donors. IL-1β treatment did not augment phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinases normally activated by mechanical injury, such as heat shock protein 27, ERK1/2, and JNK, and did not elicit phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3. However, introduction of a silencing RNA to block expression of the p65 component of NF-κB blocked IL-1β-accelerated migration substantially. Our data demonstrate that IL-1β accelerates migration of normal, but not asthmatic, differentiated AEC by a mechanism that requires activation of the NF-κB signaling complex and suggests a trophic role for this cytokine in airway epithelial repair after injury. PMID:18849440

  19. miR-148b-3p promotes migration of Schwann cells by targeting cullin-associated and neddylation-dissociated 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Tian-mei; Zhao, Li-li; Wang, Jing; Li, Ping; Qin, Jing; Liu, Yi-sheng; Yu, Bin; Ding, Fei; Gu, Xiao-song; Zhou, Song-lin

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively adjust gene expression in multifarious biological processes. However, the regulatory effects of miRNAs on Schwann cells remain poorly understood. Previous microarray analysis results have shown that miRNA expression is altered following sciatic nerve transaction, thereby affecting proliferation and migration of Schwann cells. This study investigated whether miR-148b-3p could regulate migration of Schwann cells by directly targeting cullin-associated and neddylation-dissociated 1 (Cand1). Up-regulated expression of miR-148b-3p promoted Schwann cell migration, whereas silencing of miR-148b-3p inhibited Schwann cell migration in vitro. Further experiments confirmed that Cand1 was a direct target of miR-148b-3p, and Cand1 knockdown reversed suppression of the miR-148b-3p inhibitor on Schwann cell migration. These results suggested that miR-148b-3p promoted migration of Schwann cells by directly targeting Cand1 in vitro.

  20. MicroRNA-145 is downregulated in glial tumors and regulates glioma cell migration by targeting connective tissue growth factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Kyung Lee

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas (GBM, the most common and aggressive type of malignant glioma, are characterized by increased invasion into the surrounding brain tissues. Despite intensive therapeutic strategies, the median survival of GBM patients has remained dismal over the last decades. In this study we examined the expression of miR-145 in glial tumors and its function in glioma cells. Using TCGA analysis and real-time PCR we found that the expression of miR-145/143 cluster was downregulated in astrocytic tumors compared to normal brain specimens and in glioma cells and glioma stem cells (GSCs compared to normal astrocytes and neural stem cells. Moreover, the low expression of both miR-145 and miR-143 in GBM was correlated with poor patient prognosis. Transfection of glioma cells with miR-145 mimic or transduction with a lentivirus vector expressing pre-miR 145 significantly decreased the migration and invasion of glioma cells. We identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF as a novel target of miR-145 in glioma cells; transfection of the cells with this miRNA decreased the expression of CTGF as determined by Western blot analysis and the expression of its 3'-UTR fused to luciferase. Overexpression of a CTGF plasmid lacking the 3'-UTR and administration of recombinant CTGF protein abrogated the inhibitory effect of miR-145 on glioma cell migration. Similarly, we found that silencing of CTGF decreased the migration of glioma cells. CTGF silencing also decreased the expression of SPARC, phospho-FAK and FAK and overexpression of SPARC abrogated the inhibitory effect of CTGF silencing on cell migration. These results demonstrate that miR-145 is downregulated in glial tumors and its low expression in GBM predicts poor patient prognosis. In addition miR-145 regulates glioma cell migration by targeting CTGF which downregulates SPARC expression. Therefore, miR-145 is an attractive therapeutic target for anti-invasive treatment of astrocytic tumors.

  1. Expression of S1P metabolizing enzymes and receptors correlate with survival time and regulate cell migration in glioblastoma multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien-Möller, Sandra; Lange, Sandra; Holm, Tobias; Böhm, Andreas; Paland, Heiko; Küpper, Johannes; Herzog, Susann; Weitmann, Kerstin; Havemann, Christoph; Vogelgesang, Silke; Marx, Sascha; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Schroeder, Henry W.S.; Rauch, Bernhard H.

    2016-01-01

    A signaling molecule which is involved in proliferation and migration of malignant cells is the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). There are hints for a potential role of S1P signaling in malignant brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) which is characterized by a poor prognosis. Therefore, a comprehensive expression analysis of S1P receptors (S1P1-S1P5) and S1P metabolizing enzymes in human GBM (n = 117) compared to healthy brain (n = 10) was performed to evaluate their role for patient's survival. Furthermore, influence of S1P receptor inhibition on proliferation and migration were studied in LN18 GBM cells. Compared to control brain, mRNA levels of S1P1, S1P2, S1P3 and S1P generating sphingosine kinase-1 were elevated in GBM. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated an association between S1P1 and S1P2 with patient's survival times. In vitro, an inhibitory effect of the SphK inhibitor SKI-II on viability of LN18 cells was shown. S1P itself had no effect on viability but stimulated LN18 migration which was blocked by inhibition of S1P1 and S1P2. The participation of S1P1 and S1P2 in LN18 migration was further supported by siRNA-mediated silencing of these receptors. Immunoblots and inhibition experiments suggest an involvement of the PI3-kinase/AKT1 pathway in the chemotactic effect of S1P in LN18 cells. In summary, our data argue for a role of S1P signaling in proliferation and migration of GBM cells. Individual components of the S1P pathway represent prognostic factors for patients with GBM. Perspectively, a selective modulation of S1P receptor subtypes could represent a therapeutic approach for GBM patients and requires further evaluation. PMID:26887055

  2. Inhibition of Pim-1 attenuates the proliferation and migration in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Jie; Qi-Yi He; Bo-Tao Luo; Shao-Jiang Zheng; Yue-Qiong Kong; Han-Guo Jiang; Ru-Jia Li; Jun-Li Guo; Zhi-Hua Shen

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To explore the role of proto-oncogenePim-1 in the proliferation and migration of nasopharyngeal carcinoma(NPC) cells.Methods:Pim-1 expressions inNPC cell lines CNE1,CNE1-GL,CNE-2Z andC666-1 were examined byRT-PCR, western blotting and immunoflucesence, respectively.AfterCNE1,CNE1-GL andC666-1 cells were treated with different concentrations ofPim-1 special inhibitor, quercetagetin, the cell viability, colony formation rate and migration ability were analyzed.Results:Pim-1 expression was negative in well-differentiatedCNE1 cells, whereas expressed weakly positive in poor-differentiated CNE-2Z cells and strongly positive in undifferentiatedC666-1 cells.Interestingly,CNE1-GL cells that derived fromCNE1 transfected with anEpsteinBarr virus latent membrane protein-1 over-expression plasmid displayed stronger expression ofPim-1.Treatment ofCNE1-GL and C666-1 cells with quercetagetin significantly decreased the cell viability, colony formation rate and migration ability but not theCNE1 cells.Conclusions:These findings suggest thatPim-1 overexpression contributes toNPC proliferation and migration, and targetingPim-1 may be a potential treatment for anti-Pim-1-expressedNPCs.

  3. Over-expression of LSD1 promotes proliferation, migration and invasion in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tangfeng Lv

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1 has been identified and biochemically characterized in epigenetics, but the pathological roles of its dysfunction in lung cancer remain to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of LSD1 expression in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and to define its exact role in lung cancer proliferation, migration and invasion. METHODS: The protein levels of LSD1 in surgically resected samples from NSCLC patients were detected by immunohistochemistry or Western blotting. The mRNA levels of LSD1 were detected by qRT-PCR. The correlation of LSD1 expression with clinical characteristics and prognosis was determined by statistical analysis. Cell proliferation rate was assessed by MTS assay and immunofluorescence. Cell migration and invasion were detected by scratch test, matrigel assay and transwell invasion assay. RESULTS: LSD1 expression was higher in lung cancer tissue more than in normal lung tissue. Our results showed that over-expression of LSD1 protein were associated with shorter overall survival of NSCLC patients. LSD1 was localized mainly to the cancer cell nucleus. Interruption of LSD1 using siRNA or a chemical inhibitor, pargyline, suppressed proliferation, migration and invasion of A549, H460 and 293T cells. Meanwhile, over-expression of LSD1 enhanced cell growth. Finally, LSD1 was shown to regulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in lung cancer cells. CONCLUSIONS: Over-expression of LSD1 was associated with poor prognosis in NSCLC, and promoted tumor cell proliferation, migration and invasion. These results suggest that LSD1 is a tumor-promoting factor with promising therapeutic potential for NSCLC.

  4. Double targeting of Survivin and XIAP radiosensitizes 3D grown human colorectal tumor cells and decreases migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of single and double knockdown of the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAP) Survivin and X-linked IAP (XIAP) on three-dimensional (3D) clonogenic survival, migration capacity and underlying signaling pathways. Materials and methods: Colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-15, SW48, SW480, SW620) were subjected to siRNA-mediated single or Survivin/XIAP double knockdown followed by 3D colony forming assays, cell cycle analysis, Caspase activity assays, migration assays, matrigel transmigration assays and Western blotting (Survivin, XIAP, Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), p-FAK Y397, Akt1, p-Akt1 S473, Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), p-ERK1/2 T202/Y204, Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3β, p-GSK3β S9, nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65). Results: While basal cell survival was altered cell line-dependently, Survivin or XIAP single and Survivin/XIAP double knockdown enhanced cellular radiosensitivity of all tested cancer cell lines grown in 3D. Particularly double knockdown conditions revealed accumulation of cells in G2/M, increased subG1 fraction, elevated Caspase 3/7 activity, and reduced migration. Intracellular signaling showed dephosphorylation of FAK and Akt1 upon Survivin and/or Survivin/XIAP silencing. Conclusions: Our results strengthen the notion of Survivin and XIAP to act as radiation resistance factors and further indicate that these apoptosis-regulating proteins are also functioning in cell cycling and cell migration

  5. Computational model of cell positioning: directed and collective migration in the intestinal crypt epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Shek Yoon; Chiam, K.-H.; Lim, Chwee Teck; Matsudaira, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The epithelium of the intestinal crypt is a dynamic tissue undergoing constant regeneration through cell growth, cell division, cell differentiation and apoptosis. How the epithelial cells maintain correct positioning and how they migrate in a directed and collective fashion are still not well understood. In this paper, we developed a computational model to elucidate these processes. We show that differential adhesion between epithelial cells, caused by the differential activation of EphB receptors and ephrinB ligands along the crypt axis, is necessary to regulate cell positioning. Differential cell adhesion has been proposed previously to guide cell movement and cause cell sorting in biological tissues. The proliferative cells and the differentiated post-mitotic cells do not intermingle as long as differential adhesion is maintained. We also show that, without differential adhesion, Paneth cells are randomly distributed throughout the intestinal crypt. In addition, our model suggests that, with differential adhesion, cells migrate more rapidly as they approach the top of the intestinal crypt. Finally, by calculating the spatial correlation function of the cell velocities, we observe that differential adhesion results in the differentiated epithelial cells moving in a coordinated manner, where correlated velocities are maintained at large distances, suggesting that differential adhesion regulates coordinated migration of cells in tissues. PMID:20356873

  6. Targeting cell migration and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response with calmodulin antagonists: a clinically tested small molecule phenocopy of SEC62 gene silencing in human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor cells benefit from their ability to avoid apoptosis and invade other tissues. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein Sec62 is a key player in these processes. Sec62 is essential for cell migration and protects tumor cells against thapsigargin-induced ER stress, which are both linked to cytosolic Ca2+. SEC62 silencing leads to elevated cytosolic Ca2+ and increased ER Ca2+ leakage after thapsigargin treatment. Sec62 protein levels are significantly increased in different tumors, including prostate, lung and thyroid cancer. In lung cancer, the influence of Sec62 protein levels on patient survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. To elucidate the underlying pathophysiological functions of Sec62, Ca2+ imaging techniques, real-time cell analysis and cell migration assays were performed. The effects of treatment with the calmodulin antagonists, trifluoperazine (TFP) and ophiobolin A, on cellular Ca2+ homeostasis, cell growth and cell migration were compared with the effects of siRNA-mediated Sec62 depletion or the expression of a mutated SEC62 variant in vitro. Using Biacore analysis we examined the Ca2+-sensitive interaction of Sec62 with the Sec61 complex. Sec62 overproduction significantly correlated with reduced patient survival. Therefore, Sec62 is not only a predictive marker for this type of tumor, but also an interesting therapeutic target. The present study suggests a regulatory function for Sec62 in the major Ca2+ leakage channel in the ER, Sec61, by a direct and Ca2+-sensitive interaction. A Ca2+-binding motif in Sec62 is essential for its molecular function. Treatment of cells with calmodulin antagonists mimicked Sec62 depletion by inhibiting cell migration and rendering the cells sensitive to thapsigargin treatment. Targeting tumors that overproduce Sec62 with calmodulin antagonists in combination with targeted thapsigargin analogues may offer novel personalized therapeutic options

  7. Effect of γ-ray irradiation on migration of pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells and its mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effect of radiation on the migration of the pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell line, A549, and the mechanism involved in this process. Methods: Migration of A549 cells irradiated with 2 and 4 Gy doses of γ-ray was detected using wound healing assay. The level of STAT3 and phosphorylated STAT3 was detected by Western blot. The distribution of p-STAT3 (Y705) in A549 cells was examined by immunofluorescence staining. Finally, the secretion of IL-6 by cultured A549 cells was detected by ELISA. Results: The migration of A549 cells was significantly enhanced by γ-ray radiation at dose levels of either 2 or 4 Gy. Furthermore, radiation was found to activate the phosphorylation of STAT3 and promote the nucleus localization of STAT3. The result of ELISA showed that the secretion of IL-6 increased after 2 or 4 Gy doses of γ-ray. AG490, a special inhibitor of JAK-2, suppressed the radiation-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 and migration of A549 cells. Conclusion: Our results indicated that radiation results in the activation of JAK-2/STAT3 pathway, which triggers the migration of A549 cells. It is possible that the IL-6 is involved in the radiation-induced activation of JAK-2/STAT3 pathway. (authors)

  8. Predicted molecular signaling guiding photoreceptor cell migration following transplantation into damaged retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unachukwu, Uchenna John; Warren, Alice; Li, Ze; Mishra, Shawn; Zhou, Jing; Sauane, Moira; Lim, Hyungsik; Vazquez, Maribel; Redenti, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    To replace photoreceptors lost to disease or trauma and restore vision, laboratories around the world are investigating photoreceptor replacement strategies using subretinal transplantation of photoreceptor precursor cells (PPCs) and retinal progenitor cells (RPCs). Significant obstacles to advancement of photoreceptor cell-replacement include low migration rates of transplanted cells into host retina and an absence of data describing chemotactic signaling guiding migration of transplanted cells in the damaged retinal microenvironment. To elucidate chemotactic signaling guiding transplanted cell migration, bioinformatics modeling of PPC transplantation into light-damaged retina was performed. The bioinformatics modeling analyzed whole-genome expression data and matched PPC chemotactic cell-surface receptors to cognate ligands expressed in the light-damaged retinal microenvironment. A library of significantly predicted chemotactic ligand-receptor pairs, as well as downstream signaling networks was generated. PPC and RPC migration in microfluidic ligand gradients were analyzed using a highly predicted ligand-receptor pair, SDF-1α - CXCR4, and both PPCs and RPCs exhibited significant chemotaxis. This work present a systems level model and begins to elucidate molecular mechanisms involved in PPC and RPC migration within the damaged retinal microenvironment.

  9. The Migration of Cancer Cells in Gradually Varying Chemical Gradients and Mechanical Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smitha M. N. Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel approach to study cell migration under physical stresses by utilizing established growth factor chemotaxis. This was achieved by studying cell migration in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF chemoattraction in a gradually tapered space, imposing mechanical stresses. The device consisted of two 5-mm-diameter chambers connected by ten 600 µm-long and 10 µm-high tapered microchannels. The taper region gradually changes the width of the channel. The channels tapered from 20 µm to 5 µm over a transition length of 50 µm at a distance of 250 µm from one of the chambers. The chemoattractant drove cell migration into the narrow confines of the tapered channels, while the mechanical gradient clearly altered the migration of cells. Cells traversing the channels from the wider to narrow-end and vice versa were observed using time-lapsed imaging. Our results indicated that the impact of physical stress on cell migration patterns may be cell type specific.

  10. Berberine suppresses migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through down-regulation of chemokine receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Naghmeh Ahmadiankia; Hamid Kalalian Moghaddam; Mohammad Amir Mishan; Ahmad Reza Bahrami; Hojjat Naderi-Meshkin; Hamid Reza Bidkhori; Maryam Moghaddam; Seyed Jamal Aldin Mirfeyzi

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Berberine is one of the main alkaloids and it has been proven to have different pharmacological effects including inhibition of cell cycle and progression of apoptosis in various cancerous cells; however, its effects on cancer metastasis are not well known. Cancer cells obtain the ability to change their chemokine system and convert into metastatic cells. In this study, we examined the effect of berberine on breast cancer cell migration and its probable interaction with the chem...

  11. Syndecan-1 controls cell migration by activating Rap1 to regulate focal adhesion disassembly

    OpenAIRE

    Altemeier, William A.; Schlesinger, Saundra Y.; Buell, Catherine A.; Parks, William C.; Chen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    After injury, residual epithelial cells coordinate contextual clues from cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions to polarize and migrate over the wound bed. Protrusion formation, cell body translocation and rear retraction is a repetitive process that allows the cell to move across the substratum. Fundamental to this process is the assembly and disassembly of focal adhesions that facilitate cell adhesion and protrusion formation. Here, we identified syndecan-1 as a regulator of focal adhesion ...

  12. Computational model of cell positioning: directed and collective migration in the intestinal crypt epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Shek Yoon; Chiam, K.-H.; Lim, Chwee Teck; Matsudaira, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The epithelium of the intestinal crypt is a dynamic tissue undergoing constant regeneration through cell growth, cell division, cell differentiation and apoptosis. How the epithelial cells maintain correct positioning and how they migrate in a directed and collective fashion are still not well understood. In this paper, we developed a computational model to elucidate these processes. We show that differential adhesion between epithelial cells, caused by the differential activation of EphB rec...

  13. The Role of Lipid Rafts in Cancer Cell Adhesion and Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Murai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid rafts are cholesterol-enriched microdomains of the cell membrane and possess a highly dynamic nature. They have been involved in various cellular functions including the regulation of cell adhesion and membrane signaling through proteins within lipid rafts. The dynamic features of the cancer cell surface may modulate the malignant phenotype of cancer, including adhesion disorders and aggressive phenotypes of migration and invasion. Recently, it was demonstrated that lipid rafts play critical roles in cancer cell adhesion and migration. This article summarizes the important roles of lipid rafts in cancer cell adhesion and migration, with a focus on the current state of knowledge. This article will improve the understanding of cancer progression and lead to the development of novel targets for cancer therapy.

  14. Hypoxia impairs primordial germ cell migration in zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok Hong Lo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As a global environmental concern, hypoxia is known to be associated with many biological and physiological impairments in aquatic ecosystems. Previous studies have mainly focused on the effect of hypoxia in adult animals. However, the effect of hypoxia and the underlying mechanism of how hypoxia affects embryonic development of aquatic animals remain unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the current study, the effect of hypoxia on primordial germ cell (PGC migration in zebrafish embryos was investigated. Hypoxic embryos showed PGC migration defect as indicated by the presence of mis-migrated ectopic PGCs. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF signaling is required for embryonic germ line development. Using real-time PCR, we found that the mRNA expression levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP-1, an inhibitor of IGF bioactivity, were significantly increased in hypoxic embryos. Morpholino knockdown of IGFBP-1 rescued the PGC migration defect phenotype in hypoxic embryos, suggesting the role of IGFBP-1 in inducing PGC mis-migration. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides novel evidence that hypoxia disrupts PGC migration during embryonic development in fish. IGF signaling is shown to be one of the possible mechanisms for the causal link between hypoxia and PGC migration. We propose that hypoxia causes PGC migration defect by inhibiting IGF signaling through the induction of IGFBP-1.

  15. The Wnt pathway controls cell death engulfment, spindle orientation, and migration through CED-10/Rac.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Cabello

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Wnt signalling pathways have extremely diverse functions in animals, including induction of cell fates or tumours, guidance of cell movements during gastrulation, and the induction of cell polarity. Wnt can induce polar changes in cellular morphology by a remodelling of the cytoskeleton. However, how activation of the Frizzled receptor induces cytoskeleton rearrangement is not well understood. We show, by an in depth 4-D microscopy analysis, that the Caenorhabditis elegans Wnt pathway signals to CED-10/Rac via two separate branches to regulate modulation of the cytoskeleton in different cellular situations. Apoptotic cell clearance and migration of the distal tip cell require the MOM-5/Fz receptor, GSK-3 kinase, and APC/APR-1, which activate the CED-2/5/12 branch of the engulfment machinery. MOM-5 (Frizzled thus can function as an engulfment receptor in C. elegans. Our epistatic analyses also suggest that the two partially redundant signalling pathways defined earlier for engulfment may act in a single pathway in early embryos. By contrast, rearrangement of mitotic spindles requires the MOM-5/Fz receptor, GSK-3 kinase, and beta-catenins, but not the downstream factors LIT-1/NLK or POP-1/Tcf. Taken together, our results indicate that in multiple developmental processes, CED-10/Rac can link polar signals mediated by the Wnt pathway to rearrangements of the cytoskeleton.

  16. Pristimerin inhibits proliferation, migration and invasion, and induces apoptosis in HCT-116 colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Bashir A; Hassan, Hozeifa M; Guerram, Mounia; Hamdi, Aida M; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Jiang, Zhen-Zhou

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the world's most common cancers with a high mortality rate mainly due to metastasis. Our previous study showed that pristimerin had potent antitumor activities against human CRC cells. In the present study, we further evaluated pristimerin anti-tumor and anti-metastatic properties. MTT assay, Hoechst staining, Annexin V/PI double staining, reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurements were used to assess pristimerin cytotoxicity and apoptotic-inducing effects on HCT-116 cells. Wound healing assay and Transwell assay were used to estimate pristimerin anti-migration and anti-invasion activities on CRC cells. Meanwhile, HCT-116 xenograft model applied for investigating in vivo antitumor activities. Our results showed that pristimerin mediated in vitro HCT-116 cell death, through generation of intracellular ROS and apoptosis induction. Tumor volumes and weights measurements, pathological analysis and Tunnel assay proved that pristimerin inhibited in vivo HCT-116 xenografts growth. Pristimerin was also able to limit CRC invasion and metastasis. It caused downregulation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and its subsequent downstream p70S6K and E4-BP1 proteins. Collectively, pristimerin exerted both in vitro and in vivo cytotoxic and anti-metastatic effects on HCT-116 cells, suggesting that pristimerin has potential as a new anticancer drug for treatment of colon cancer. PMID:27044819

  17. Tumor suppressive microRNA-218 inhibits cancer cell migration and invasion through targeting laminin-332 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Takashi; Hanazawa, Toyoyuki; Nohata, Nijiro; Kikkawa, Naoko; Enokida, Hideki; Yoshino, Hirofumi; Yamasaki, Takeshi; Hidaka, Hideo; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Seki, Naohiko

    2012-11-01

    Recent our microRNA (miRNA) expression signature revealed that expression of microRNA-218 (miR-218) was reduced in cancer tissues, suggesting a candidate of tumor suppressor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the functional significance of miR-218 and its mediated moleculer pathways in HNSCC. Restoration of miR-218 in cancer cells led to significant inhibition of cell migration and invasion activities in HNSCC cell lines (FaDu and SAS). Genome-wide gene expression analysis of miR-218 transfectants and in silico database analysis showed that focal adhesion pathway was a promising candidate of miR-218 target pathways. The laminins are an important and biologically active part of the basal lamina, the function of that are various such as influencing cell differentiation, migration and adhesion as well as proliferation and cell survival. Interestingly, all components of laminin-332 (LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2) are listed on the candidate genes in focal adhesion pathway. Furthermore, we focused on LAMB3 which has a miR-218 target site and gene expression studies and luciferase reporter assays showed that LAMB3 was directly regulated by miR-218. Silencing study of LAMB3 demonstrated significant inhibition of cell migration and invasion. In clinical specimens with HNSCC, the expression levels of laminin-332 were significantly upregulated in cancer tissues compared to adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Our analysis data showed that tumor suppressive miR-218 contributes to cancer cell migration and invasion through regulating focal adhesion pathway, especially laminin-332. Tumor suppressive miRNA-mediated novel cancer pathways provide new insights into the potential mechanisms of HNSCC oncogenesis. PMID:23159910

  18. [Grape seed proanthocyanidins inhibits the invasion and migration of A549 lung cancer cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yehan; Ye, Xiufeng; Shi, Yao; Wang, Ke; Wan, Dan

    2016-02-01

    Objective To explore the effect of grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) on the invasion and migration of A549 lung cancer cells and the underlying mechanism. Methods Trypan blue dye exclusion assay was used to determine the cytotoxic effect of varying doses of GSPs on the BEAS-2B normal human pulmonary epithelial cells. After treated with 0, 10, 20, 40, 80 μg/mL GSP, the proliferation of A549 cells was detected by MTT assay; the invasion and migration of A549 cells were determined by Transwell(TM) assay and scratch wound assay, respectively. The levels of epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), E-cadherin, N-cadherin in A549 cells treated with GSPs were detected by Western blotting. Results (0-40) μg/mL GSPs had no significant toxic effect on BEAS-2B cells, while 80 μg/mL GSPs had significant cytotoxicity to BEAS-2B cells. The proliferation of A549 cells was significantly inhibited within limited dosage in a dose-dependent manner, and the abilities of invasion and migration of A549 cells were also inhibited. Western blotting showed that the expression of EGFR and N-cadherin decreased, while E-cadherin increased after GSPs treatment. Conclusion GSPs could inhibit the abilities of proliferation, invasion and migration of A549 cells, which might be related to the dow-regulation of EGFR and N-cadherin and the up-regulation of E-cadherin. PMID:26927375

  19. Cyclic strain-induced endothelial MMP-2: role in vascular smooth muscle cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a vital role in vasculature response to hemodynamic stimuli via the degradation of extracellular matrix substrates. In this study, we investigated the putative role of cyclic strain-induced endothelial MMP-2 (and MMP-9) expression and release in modulating bovine aortic smooth muscle cell (BASMC) migration in vitro. Equibiaxial cyclic strain of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) leads to elevation in cellular MMP-2 (and MMP-9) expression, activity, and secretion into conditioned media, events which were time- and force-dependent. Subsequent incubation of BASMCs with conditioned media from chronically strained BAECs (5%, 24 h) significantly reduces BASMC migration (38 ± 6%), an inhibitory effect which could be completely reversed by targeted siRNA 'knock-down' of MMP-2 (but not MMP-9) expression and activity in BAECs. Moreover, inhibition of strain-mediated MMP-2 expression in BAECs by protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) blockade with genistein (50 μM) was also found to completely reverse this inhibitory effect on BASMC migration. Finally, direct supplementation of recombinant MMP-2 into the BASMC migration assay was found to have no significant effect on migration. However, the effect on BASMC migration of MMP-2 siRNA transfection in BAECs could be reversed by supplementation of recombinant MMP-2 into BAEC media prior to (and for the duration of) strain. These findings reveal a potentially novel role for strain-induced endothelial MMP-2 in regulating vascular SMC migration

  20. Visfatin Mediates SCLC Cells Migration across Brain Endothelial Cells through Upregulation of CCL2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC is characterized as an aggressive tumor with brain metastasis. Although preventing SCLC metastasis to the brain is immensely important for survival, the molecular mechanisms of SCLC cells penetrating the blood–brain barrier (BBB are largely unknown. Recently, visfatin has been considered as a novel pro-inflammatory adipocytokine involved in various cancers. Herein, we present evidence that elevated levels of visfatin in the serum of SCLC patients were associated with brain metastasis, and visfain was increased in NCI-H446 cells, a SCLC cell line, during interacting with human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC. Using in vitro BBB model, we found that visfatin could promote NCI-H446 cells migration across HBMEC monolayer, while the effect was inhibited by knockdown of visfatin. Furthermore, our findings indicated that CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2 was involved in visfatin-mediated NCI-H446 cells transendothelial migtation. Results also showed that the upregulation of CCL2 in the co-culture system was reversed by blockade of visfatin. In particular, visfatin-induced CCL2 was attenuated by specific inhibitor of PI3K/Akt signaling in NCI-H446 cells. Taken together, we demonstrated that visfatin was a prospective target for SCLC metastasis to brain, and understanding the molecular mediators would lead to effective strategies for inhibition of SCLC brain metastasis.

  1. ANALYSIS OF POPULATION MIGRATION AS A CRIMINOGENIC FACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana MITRA-NIŢĂ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Migration is a voluntary movement of population from one geographic location to another. This movement can be of several types, depending on the cause determining the respective migration. Population movements or its mobility is not a new phenomenon but has deep roots in ancient history. We can even say that in the beginning man was migratory, nomadic and later it became steadfast, linked in some way to certain geographic locations. Population migration has multiple consequences, both positive and negative. Among the negative we can mention overpopulation or underpopulation of certain areas, heterogeneity of traditions and cultures of immigrants, inability of migratory population to adapt to the area they migrated to, not finding a job, marginalization, etc. All these are genuine and objective criminological factors that could actually cause committing crimes in the migratory population. We cannot and do not want to stop the mobility of people, but we can be careful to avoid harmful consequences caused by this phenomenon.

  2. Trade, Migration and Productivity: A Quantitative Analysis of China

    OpenAIRE

    Trevor Tombe; Xiaodong Zhu

    2015-01-01

    We study how misallocation due to goods- and labour-market frictions affect aggregate productivity in China. Combining unique data with a general equilibrium model of internal and international trade, and migration across regions and sectors, we quantify the magnitude and consequences of trade and migration costs. The costs were high in 2000, but declined afterward. The decline accounts for roughly two-fifths of aggregate labour productivity growth in China between 2000 and 2005. Reductions i...

  3. MiR-519d-3p suppresses invasion and migration of trophoblast cells via targeting MMP-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ding

    Full Text Available Our study was approved by the Medical Ethics Committee of Tang Du Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University and complied strictly with national ethical guidelines. Preeclampsia (PE is a specific clinical disorder characterized by gestational hypertension and proteinuria and is a leading cause of maternal and perinatal mortality worldwide. The miR-519d-3p is upregulated in the maternal plasma of patients with PE which indicates a possible association between this microRNA and the pathogenesis of PE. No studies to date have addressed the effect of miR-519d-3p on the invasion and migration of trophoblast cells. In our study, we found that miR-519d-3p expression was elevated in placental samples from patients with PE. In vitro, overexpression of miR-519d-3p significantly inhibited trophoblast cell migration and invasion, whereas transfection of a miR-519d-3p inhibitor enhanced trophoblast cell migration and invasion. Luciferase assays confirmed that matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 is a direct target of miR-519d-3p. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blot assays showed that overexpression of miR-519d-3p downregulated MMP-2 mRNA and protein expression. Knockdown of MMP-2 using a siRNA attenuated the increased trophoblast migration and invasion promoted by the miR-519d-3p inhibitor. In placentas from patients with PE or normal pregnancies, a negative correlation between the expression of MMP-2 and miR-519d-3p was observed using the Pearson correlation and linear regression analysis. Our present findings suggest that upregulation of miR-519d-3p may contribute to the development of PE by inhibiting trophoblast cell migration and invasion via targeting MMP-2; miR-519d-3p may represent a potential predictive and therapeutic target for PE.

  4. Sox10 controls migration of B16F10 melanoma cells through multiple regulatory target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikjoo Seong

    Full Text Available It is believed that the inherent differentiation program of melanocytes during embryogenesis predisposes melanoma cells to high frequency of metastasis. Sox10, a transcription factor expressed in neural crest stem cells and a subset of progeny lineages, plays a key role in the development of melanocytes. We show that B16F10 melanoma cells transfected with siRNAs specific for Sox10 display reduced migratory activity which in turn indicated that a subset of transcriptional regulatory target genes of Sox10 is likely to be involved in migration and metastasis of melanoma cells. We carried out a microarray-based gene expression profiling using a Sox10-specific siRNA to identify relevant regulatory targets and found that multiple genes including melanocortin-1 receptor (Mc1r partake in the regulation of migration. We provide evidences that the effect of Sox10 on migration is mediated in large part by Mitf, a transcription factor downstream to Sox10. Among the mouse melanoma cell lines examined, however, only B16F10 showed robust down-regulation of Sox10 and inhibition of cell migration indicating that further dissection of dosage effects and/or cell line-specific regulatory networks is necessary. The involvement of Mc1r in migration was studied in detail in vivo using a murine metastasis model. Specifically, B16F10 melanoma cells treated with a specific siRNA showed reduced tendency in metastasizing to and colonizing the lung after being injected in the tail vein. These data reveal a cadre of novel regulators and mediators involved in migration and metastasis of melanoma cells that represents potential targets of therapeutic intervention.

  5. Factors affecting directional migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to the injured spinal cord

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Peng; Pan, Su; Cheng, Jieping; Yang, Maoguang; Qi, Zhiping; Hou, Tingting; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 1B plays an important role in axon guidance and neuronal migration. In the present study, we sought to discover the mechanisms underlying microtubule-associated protein 1B mediation of axon guidance and neuronal migration. We exposed bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to okadaic acid or N-acetyl-D-erythro-sphingosine (an inhibitor and stimulator, respectively, of protein phosphatase 2A) for 24 hours. The expression of the phosphorylated form of type I microtubul...

  6. Advanced Glycation End-Products Enhance Lung Cancer Cell Invasion and Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Yin, Mei-Chin; Mong, Mei-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Effects of carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pentosidine, two advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), upon invasion and migration in A549 and Calu-6 cells, two non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines were examined. CML or pentosidine at 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 μmol/L were added into cells. Proliferation, invasion and migration were measured. CML or pentosidine at 4–16 μmol/L promoted invasion and migration in both cell lines, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and transforming growth factor-β1. CML or pentosidine at 2–16 μmol/L up-regulated the protein expression of AGE receptor, p47phox, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and fibronectin in test NSCLC cells. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 protein expression in A549 and Calu-6 cells was increased by CML or pentosidine at 4–16 μmol/L. These two AGEs at 2–16 μmol/L enhanced nuclear factor κ-B (NF-κ B) p65 protein expression and p38 phosphorylation in A549 cells. However, CML or pentosidine at 4–16 μmol/L up-regulated NF-κB p65 and p-p38 protein expression in Calu-6 cells. These findings suggest that CML and pentosidine, by promoting the invasion, migration and production of associated factors, benefit NSCLC metastasis. PMID:27517907

  7. AAMP Regulates Endothelial Cell Migration and Angiogenesis Through RhoA/Rho Kinase Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianjun; Qiu, Juhui; Zheng, Yiming; Zhang, Tao; Yin, Tieying; Xie, Xiang; Wang, Guixue

    2016-05-01

    Angiogenesis is a complicated process including endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation. AAMP plays a role in regulating cell migration of multiple cell types. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether AAMP regulates angiogenesis, and to clarify the role of AAMP in the VEGF-induced angiogenesis. We found that AAMP expressed in multiple cell types and mainly localized in cytoplasm and membrane in vascular endothelial cells. Using tube formation assay in vitro and aortic ring assay, siRNA-mediated knockdown and antibody blockade of AAMP impaired VEGF-induced endothelial cell tube formation and aortic ring angiogenic sprouting. Mechanistic studies showed that AAMP expression was significantly upregulated by VEGF in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Moreover, VEGF recruited AAMP to the cell membrane protrusions. AAMP regulates angiogenesis by mediating the spreading and migration of vascular endothelial cells. AAMP knock-down reduced VEGF-induced actin stress fibers and collagen gel contraction. Furthermore, we identified RhoA/Rho kinase signaling as an important factor that contributes to the action of AAMP in regulating endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis. Altogether, these data demonstrated the critical role of AAMP in angiogenesis and suggested blocking AAMP could serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:26350504

  8. TRPM7 is required for ovarian cancer cell growth, migration and invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Silence of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cells inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Silence of TRPM7 decreases phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 in ovarian cancer cells. • Silence of TRPM7 increases expression of filamentous actin and number of focal adhesions in ovarian cancer cells. - Abstract: Our previous study demonstrated that the melastatin-related transient receptor potential channel 7 (TRPM7) was highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and its overexpression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer patients. However, the function of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer is mostly unknown. In this study, we examined the roles of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We found that short hairpin RNA interference-mediated silence of TRPM7 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in multiple ovarian cancer cell lines. Mechanistic investigation revealed that silence of TRPM7 decreased phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 and increased filamentous actin and focal adhesion number in ovarian cancer cells. Thus, our results suggest that TRPM7 is required for proliferation, migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells through regulating multiple signaling transduction pathways and the formation of focal adhesions

  9. TRPM7 is required for ovarian cancer cell growth, migration and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Liao, Qian-jin [The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Zhang, Yi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China); Zhou, Hui; Luo, Chen-hui; Tang, Jie; Wang, Ying; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Min; Zhao, Xue-heng [The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Zhang, Qiong-yu [Department of Basic Medical Science, Yongzhou Vocational Technical College, Yong Zhou 425100 (China); Xiao, Ling, E-mail: lingxiaocsu@126.com [Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Changsha 410018 (China)

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Silence of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cells inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Silence of TRPM7 decreases phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 in ovarian cancer cells. • Silence of TRPM7 increases expression of filamentous actin and number of focal adhesions in ovarian cancer cells. - Abstract: Our previous study demonstrated that the melastatin-related transient receptor potential channel 7 (TRPM7) was highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and its overexpression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer patients. However, the function of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer is mostly unknown. In this study, we examined the roles of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We found that short hairpin RNA interference-mediated silence of TRPM7 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in multiple ovarian cancer cell lines. Mechanistic investigation revealed that silence of TRPM7 decreased phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 and increased filamentous actin and focal adhesion number in ovarian cancer cells. Thus, our results suggest that TRPM7 is required for proliferation, migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells through regulating multiple signaling transduction pathways and the formation of focal adhesions.

  10. ROLE OF MACROPHAGES IN REGULATION OF HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL MIGRATION IN BONE MARROW PERIPHERAL BLOOD SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. G. Yushkov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms by which HSCs mobilize into damaged organs are currently under scrutiny.Macrophage role in these processes is investigated. In this study, we performed a flow cytometry analysis ofCD117+CD38+ and CD117+CD90low HSCs quantity in murine peripheral blood and bone marrow after liverand kidney injury under stimulation of phagocyte mononuclear system by injection of tamerit. This study havedemonstrated increased levels of CD117+CD38+ HSCs in bone marrow after partial hepatectomy, along withtheir migration to peripheral blood in response to tamerit injection. We also demonstrated that peripheralblood CD117+CD38+ HSCs levels were elevated after kidney injury. After partial hepatectomy, nochangesof CD117+CD90low HSCs quantity in investigated tissues were detected. We observed increased number ofCD117+CD90low HSCs in murine blood following kidney injury. Thus, we observed different influence ofmacrophage stimulation on the quantity of CD117+CD38+ and CD117+CD90low cells. These data suggestthat HSCs mobilization from the bone marrow to peripheral blood depends, at least in part, on phagocytemononuclear system, and that macrophage stimulation is important for proliferation and migration of variousHSCs populations following liver and kidney injury.

  11. Long Non-Coding RNA HOTAIR Promotes Cell Migration and Invasion via Down-Regulation of RNA Binding Motif Protein 38 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaofeng Ding

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR exerts regulatory functions in various biological processes in cancer cells, such as proliferation, apoptosis, mobility, and invasion. We previously found that HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR is a negative prognostic factor and exhibits oncogenic activity in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role and molecular mechanism of HOTAIR in promoting HCC cell migration and invasion. Firstly, we profiled its gene expression pattern by microarray analysis of HOTAIR loss in Bel-7402 HCC cell line. The results showed that 129 genes were significantly down-regulated, while 167 genes were significantly up-regulated (fold change >2, p < 0.05. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that RNA binding proteins were involved in this biological process. HOTAIR suppression using RNAi strategy with HepG2 and Bel-7402 cells increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of RNA binding motif protein 38 (RBM38. Moreover, the expression levels of RBM38 in HCC specimens were significantly lower than paired adjacent noncancerous tissues. In addition, knockdown of HOTAIR resulted in a decrease of cell migration and invasion, which could be specifically rescued by down-regulation of RBM38. Taken together, HOTAIR could promote migration and invasion of HCC cells by inhibiting RBM38, which indicated critical roles of HOTAIR and RBM38 in HCC progression.

  12. Gβγ subunits inhibit Epac-induced melanoma cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently we reported that activation of Epac1, an exchange protein activated by cAMP, increases melanoma cell migration via Ca 2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). G-protein βγ subunits (Gβγ) are known to act as an independent signaling molecule upon activation of G-protein coupled receptor. However, the role of Gβγ in cell migration and Ca 2+ signaling in melanoma has not been well studied. Here we report that there is crosstalk of Ca 2+ signaling between Gβγ and Epac in melanoma, which plays a role in regulation of cell migration. SK-Mel-2 cells, a human metastatic melanoma cell line, were mainly used in this study. Intracellular Ca 2+ was measured with Fluo-4AM fluorescent dyes. Cell migration was examined using the Boyden chambers. The effect of Gβγ on Epac-induced cell migration was first examined. Epac-induced cell migration was inhibited by mSIRK, a Gβγ -activating peptide, but not its inactive analog, L9A, in SK-Mel-2 cells. Guanosine 5', α-β-methylene triphosphate (Gp(CH2)pp), a constitutively active GTP analogue that activates Gβγ, also inhibited Epac-induced cell migration. In addition, co-overexpression of β1 and γ2, which is the major combination of Gβγ, inhibited Epac1-induced cell migration. By contrast, when the C-terminus of β adrenergic receptor kinase (βARK-CT), an endogenous inhibitor for Gβγ, was overexpressed, mSIRK's inhibitory effect on Epac-induced cell migration was negated, suggesting the specificity of mSIRK for Gβγ. We next examined the effect of mSIRK on Epac-induced Ca 2+ response. When cells were pretreated with mSIRK, but not with L9A, 8-(4-Methoxyphenylthio)-2'-O-methyladenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-pMeOPT), an Epac-specific agonist, failed to increase Ca 2+ signal. Co-overexpression of β1 and γ2 subunits inhibited 8-pMeOPT-induced Ca 2+ elevation. Inhibition of Gβγ with βARK-CT or guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDPβS), a GDP analogue that

  13. Optimizing micropattern geometries for cell shape and migration with genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Philipp J; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2016-07-11

    Adhesive micropatterns have become a standard tool to control cell shape and function in cell culture. However, the variety of possible patterns is infinitely large and experiments often restrict themselves to established designs. Here we suggest a systematic method to establish novel micropatterns for desired functions using genetic algorithms. The evolutionary fitness of a certain pattern is computed using a cellular Potts model that describes cell behavior on micropattern. We first predict optimal patterns for a desired cell shape. We then optimize ratchet geometries to bias cell migration in a certain direction and find that asymmetric triangles are superior over the symmetric ones often used in experiments. Finally we design geometries which reverse the migration direction of cells when cell density increases due to cell division. PMID:27334659

  14. Saltatory formation, sliding and dissolution of ER–PM junctions in migrating cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dingsdale, Hayley; Okeke, Emmanuel; Awais, Muhammad; Haynes, Lee; Criddle, David N.; Sutton, Robert; Tepikin, Alexei V.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrated three novel forms of dynamic behaviour of junctions between the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) and the PM (plasma membrane) in migrating cancer cells: saltatory formation, long-distance sliding and dissolution. The individual ER–PM junctions formed near the leading edge of migrating cells (usually within 0.5 μm of polymerized actin and close to focal adhesions) and appeared suddenly without sliding from the interior of the cell. The long distance sliding and dissolution of ER–PM j...

  15. Stimulating the proliferation, migration and lamellipodia of Schwann cells using low-dose curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello Velasquez, J; Nazareth, L; Quinn, R J; Ekberg, J A K; St John, J A

    2016-06-01

    Transplantation of peripheral glia is being trialled for neural repair therapies, and identification of compounds that enhance the activity of glia is therefore of therapeutic interest. We have previously shown that curcumin potently stimulates the activity of olfactory glia. We have now examined the effect of curcumin on Schwann cell (SC) activities including proliferation, migration and the expression of protein markers. SCs were treated with control media and with different concentrations of curcumin (0.02-20μM). Cell proliferation was determined by MTS assay and migration changes were determined by single live cell migration tracking. We found that small doses of curcumin (40nM) dramatically increased the proliferation and migration in SCs within just one day. When compared with olfactory glia, curcumin stimulated SC proliferation more rapidly and at lower concentrations. Curcumin significantly increased the migration of SCs, and also increased the dynamic activity of lamellipodial waves which are essential for SC migration. Expression of the activated form of the MAP kinase p38 (p-p38) was significantly decreased in curcumin-treated SCs. These results show that curcumin's effects on SCs differ remarkably to its effects on olfactory glia, suggesting that subtypes of closely related glia can be differentially stimulated by curcumin. Overall these results demonstrate that the therapeutically beneficial activities of glia can be differentially enhanced by curcumin which could be used to improve outcomes of neural repair therapies. PMID:26955781

  16. The study of migration of bone mesenchymal stem cells transplanted in intervertebral discs of rabbits and expression of exogenous gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jintang Wang; Hong Zhang; Yingang Zhang; Xiaowei Zhang; Meng Li

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the survival and migration of bone mesenchymal stem cells transplantated in intervertebral disc of rabbits and expression of the exogenic genes. Methods: Thirty-two rabbits were used, A randomized block design was used and discs in the same rabbit were one block,the lumbar discs from L2-3 to L5-6 were randomly divided into blank group, saline group, cell transplantation group Ⅰ and cell transplantation group Ⅱ. The fluorescence microscopy was used to determine the fluorescence of the maker protein GFP and DNA-PCR was used to analyze the copies of DNA of neomycin-resistant gene at 1, 3, 6, months after transplantation. Results: There was fluorescence in cell transplantation group Ⅰ and Ⅱ and none in blank group, saline group at 1, 3, 6 months after transplantation. In cell transplantation groups,the fluorescent distribution was more scatter with time, but no significant difference between cell groups Ⅰ and Ⅱ. The test of neomycin resistant gene expressed in cell transplantation group Ⅰ and Ⅱ and quantitative analysis showed that there was no significant difference between the cell groups Ⅰ and Ⅱ (P>0.05). Conclusion: The transplanted bone mesenchymal stem cells can survive, migrate and the transfer genes can express efficiently, it suggests that the BMSC therapy may be effective to prevent and treat intervertebral disc degeneration.

  17. Engineering of silicon surfaces at the micro- and nanoscales for cell adhesion and migration control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Costa V

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Vicente Torres-Costa1, Gonzalo Martínez-Muñoz2, Vanessa Sánchez-Vaquero3, Álvaro Muñoz-Noval1, Laura González-Méndez3, Esther Punzón-Quijorna1,4, Darío Gallach-Pérez1, Miguel Manso-Silván1, Aurelio Climent-Font1,4, Josefa P García-Ruiz3, Raúl J Martín-Palma11Department of Applied Physics, 2Department of Computer Science, 3Department of Molecular Biology, 4Centre for Micro Analysis of Materials, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, SpainAbstract: The engineering of surface patterns is a powerful tool for analyzing cellular communication factors involved in the processes of adhesion, migration, and expansion, which can have a notable impact on therapeutic applications including tissue engineering. In this regard, the main objective of this research was to fabricate patterned and textured surfaces at micron- and nanoscale levels, respectively, with very different chemical and topographic characteristics to control cell–substrate interactions. For this task, one-dimensional (1-D and two-dimensional (2-D patterns combining silicon and nanostructured porous silicon were engineered by ion beam irradiation and subsequent electrochemical etch. The experimental results show that under the influence of chemical and morphological stimuli, human mesenchymal stem cells polarize and move directionally toward or away from the particular stimulus. Furthermore, a computational model was developed aiming at understanding cell behavior by reproducing the surface distribution and migration of human mesenchymal stem cells observed experimentally.Keywords: surface patterns, silicon, hMSCs, ion-beam patterning

  18. Effects of NVP-BEZ235 on the proliferation, migration, apoptosis and autophagy in HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Yu, Xiaofeng; Ma, Jianxia; Tong, Yili; Yao, Jianfeng

    2016-07-01

    The phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway plays a significant role in colorectal adenocarcinoma. NVP-BEZ235 (dactolisib) is a novel dual inhibitor of PI3K/mTOR. The effects of NVP-BEZ235 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma are still unclear. In the present study, we aimed to explore the proliferation, migration, apoptosis and autophagy in HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells were treated with NVP-BEZ235 (0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 3 µM) for 24 and 48 h, respectively. Cells were also treated with NVP-BEZ235 (0.1 µM), DDP (100, 300 and 1,000 µM), and NVP-BEZ235 (0.1 µM) combined with DDP (100, 300 and 1,000 µM) respectively, and cultured for 24 h after treatment. MTT assay was utilized to evaluate the effects of NVP-BEZ235 alone or NVP-BEZ235 combined with cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (DDP) on proliferation of HT-29 cells. Cell wound-scratch assay was used detect cell migration. In addition, expression of microtubule-associated proteins 1A/1B light chain 3B (MAP1LC3B and LC3B) in HT-29 cells was detected by immunofluorescence at 48 h after NVP-BEZ235 (1 µM) treatment. Expression of proteins involved in cell cycle and proliferation (p-Akt, p-mTOR and cyclin D1), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3), and autophagy (cleaved LC3B and Beclin-1) were detected by western blot analysis. NVP-BEZ235 inhibited the proliferation and migration of HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. NVP-BEZ235 decreased protein expression of p-Akt, p-mTOR and cyclin D1, and increased protein expression of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved LC3B and Beclin-1 as the concentrations and the incubation time of NVP-BEZ235 increased. In addition, NVP-BEZ235 and DDP had synergic effects in inhibiting cell proliferation and migration. The expression of protein involved in apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3) was higher in drug combination group compared to the NVP-BEZ235 single treatment group. NVP-BEZ235

  19. Nox4 and Duox1/2 Mediate Redox Activation of Mesenchymal Cell Migration by PDGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhova, Anna A.; Sagaradze, George D.; Albert, Eugene A.; Ageeva, Ludmila V.; Sharonov, George V.; Tkachuk, Vsevolod A.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) orchestrates wound healing and tissue regeneration by regulating recruitment of the precursor mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and fibroblasts. PDGF stimulates generation of hydrogen peroxide that is required for cell migration, but the sources and intracellular targets of H2O2 remain obscure. Here we demonstrate sustained live responses of H2O2 to PDGF and identify PKB/Akt, but not Erk1/2, as the target for redox regulation in cultured 3T3 fibroblasts and MSC. Apocynin, cell-permeable catalase and LY294002 inhibited PDGF-induced migration and mitotic activity of these cells indicating involvement of PI3-kinase pathway and H2O2. Real-time PCR revealed Nox4 and Duox1/2 as the potential sources of H2O2. Silencing of Duox1/2 in fibroblasts or Nox4 in MSC reduced PDGF-stimulated intracellular H2O2, PKB/Akt phosphorylation and migration, but had no such effect on Erk1/2. In contrast to PDGF, EGF failed to increase cytoplasmic H2O2, phosphorylation of PKB/Akt and migration of fibroblasts and MSC, confirming the critical impact of redox signaling. We conclude that PDGF-induced migration of mesenchymal cells requires Nox4 and Duox1/2 enzymes, which mediate redox-sensitive activation of PI3-kinase pathway and PKB/Akt. PMID:27110716

  20. The p38/MK2/Hsp25 pathway is required for BMP-2-induced cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Gamell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs have been shown to participate in the patterning and specification of several tissues and organs during development and to regulate cell growth, differentiation and migration in different cell types. BMP-mediated cell migration requires activation of the small GTPase Cdc42 and LIMK1 activities. In our earlier report we showed that activation of LIMK1 also requires the activation of PAKs through Cdc42 and PI3K. However, the requirement of additional signaling is not clearly known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Activation of p38 MAPK has been shown to be relevant for a number of BMP-2's physiological effects. We report here that BMP-2 regulation of cell migration and actin cytoskeleton remodelling are dependent on p38 activity. BMP-2 treatment of mesenchymal cells results in activation of the p38/MK2/Hsp25 signaling pathway downstream from the BMP receptors. Moreover, chemical inhibition of p38 signaling or genetic ablation of either p38α or MK2 blocks the ability to activate the downstream effectors of the pathway and abolishes BMP-2-induction of cell migration. These signaling effects on p38/MK2/Hsp25 do not require the activity of either Cdc42 or PAK, whereas p38/MK2 activities do not significantly modify the BMP-2-dependent activation of LIMK1, measured by either kinase activity or with an antibody raised against phospho-threonine 508 at its activation loop. Finally, phosphorylated Hsp25 colocalizes with the BMP receptor complexes in lamellipodia and overexpression of a phosphorylation mutant form of Hsp25 is able to abolish the migration of cells in response to BMP-2. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that Cdc42/PAK/LIMK1 and p38/MK2/Hsp25 pathways, acting in parallel and modulating specific actin regulatory proteins, play a critical role in integrating responses during BMP-induced actin reorganization and cell migration.

  1. Maspin Regulates Endothelial Cell Adhesion and Migration through an Integrin Signaling Pathway*

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Li; Zhang, Ming

    2010-01-01

    Maspin has been identified as a potent angiogenesis inhibitor. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for its anti-angiogenic property is unclear. In this study, we examined the effect of maspin on endothelial cell (EC) adhesion and migration in a cell culture system. We found that maspin was expressed in blood vessels ECs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Maspin significantly enhanced HUVEC cell adhesion to various matrix proteins. This effect was dependent on the ac...

  2. Rho-family GTPase Cdc42 controls migration of Langerhans cells in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luckashenak, Nancy; Wähe, Anna; Breit, Katharina;

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) of the skin represent the prototype migratory dendritic cell (DC) subtype. In the skin, they take up Ag, migrate to the draining lymph nodes, and contribute to Ag transport and immunity. Different depletion models for LCs have revealed contrasting roles and contri...

  3. Role of LPAR3, PKC and EGFR in LPA-induced cell migration in oral squamous carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is an aggressive neoplasm with serious morbidity and mortality, which typically spreads through local invasive growth. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is involved in a number of biological processes, and may have a role in cancer cell migration and invasiveness. LPA is present in most tissues and can activate cells through six different LPA receptors (LPAR1-6). Although LPA is predominantly promigratory, some of the receptors may have antimigratory effects in certain cells. The signalling mechanisms of LPA are not fully understood, and in oral carcinoma cells the specific receptors and pathways involved in LPA-stimulated migration are unknown. The oral carcinoma cell lines E10, SCC-9, and D2 were investigated. Cell migration was studied in a scratch wound assay, and invasion was demonstrated in organotypic three dimensional co-cultures. Protein and mRNA expression of LPA receptors was studied with Western blotting and qRT-PCR. Activation of signalling proteins was examined with Western blotting and isoelectric focusing, and signalling mechanisms were further explored using pharmacological agents and siRNA directed at specific receptors and pathways. LPA stimulated cell migration in the two oral carcinoma cell lines E10 and SCC-9, but was slightly inhibitory in D2. The receptor expression profile and the effects of specific pharmacological antagonist and agonists indicated that LPA-stimulated cell migration was mediated through LPAR3 in E10 and SCC-9. Furthermore, in both these cell lines, the stimulation by LPA was dependent on PKC activity. However, while LPA induced transactivation of EGFR and the stimulated migration was blocked by EGFR inhibitors in E10 cells, LPA did not induce EGFR transactivation in SCC-9 cells. In D2 cells, LPA induced EGFR transactivation, but this was associated with slowing of a very high inherent migration rate in these cells. The results demonstrate LPA-stimulated migration in oral carcinoma cells through LPAR3

  4. Calponin 2 Acts As an Effector of Noncanonical Wnt-Mediated Cell Polarization during Neural Crest Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Bärbel Ulmer; Cathrin Hagenlocher; Silke Schmalholz; Sabrina Kurz; Axel Schweickert; Ayelet Kohl; Lee Roth; Dalit Sela-Donenfeld; Martin Blum

    2013-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) migrate throughout the embryo to differentiate into cell types of all germ layers. Initial directed NCC emigration relies on planar cell polarity (PCP), which through the activity of the small GTPases RhoA and Rac governs the actin-driven formation of polarized cell protrusions. We found that the actin binding protein calponin 2 (Cnn2) was expressed in protrusions at the leading edge of migratory NCCs in chicks and frogs. Cnn2 knockdown resulted in NCC migration defe...

  5. Alterations in cell migration and cell viability of wounded human skin fibroblasts following visible red light exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Bola Sadashiva S.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2014-02-01

    The present study intended to examine the effect of visible red light on structural and cellular parameters on wounded skin fibroblast cells. To achieve the stated objective, uniform scratch was created on confluent monolayered human skin fibroblast cells, and were exposed to single dose of He-Ne laser (15 mm spot, 6.6808 mWcm-2) at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 Jcm-2 in the presence and absence of 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Beam profile measurements of the expanded laser beam were conducted to ensure the beam uniformity. The influence of laser dose on the change in temperature was recorded using sensitive temperature probe. Additionally, following laser exposure cell migration and cell survival were documented at different time intervals on wounded human skin fibroblast cells grown in vitro. Beam profile measurements indicated more or less uniform power distribution over the whole beam area. Temperature monitoring of sham irradiated control and laser treatment groups displayed negligible temperature change indicating the absence of thermal effect at the tested laser doses. In the absence of 10% FBS, single exposure of different laser doses failed to produce any significant effects on cell migration or cell survival. However, in the presence of serum single exposure of 5 J/cm2 on wounded skin fibroblasts significantly enhanced the cell migration (PLLLT acts by improving cell migration and cell proliferation to produce measurable changes in wounded fibroblast cells.

  6. Derivatives of Dictyostelium differentiation-inducing factors inhibit lysophosphatidic acid-stimulated migration of murine osteosarcoma LM8 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubohara, Yuzuru; Komachi, Mayumi; Homma, Yoshimi; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Oshima, Yoshiteru

    2015-08-01

    Osteosarcoma is a common metastatic bone cancer that predominantly develops in children and adolescents. Metastatic osteosarcoma remains associated with a poor prognosis; therefore, more effective anti-metastatic drugs are needed. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), -2, and -3 are novel lead anti-tumor agents that were originally isolated from the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Here we investigated the effects of a panel of DIF derivatives on lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced migration of mouse osteosarcoma LM8 cells by using a Boyden chamber assay. Some DIF derivatives such as Br-DIF-1, DIF-3(+2), and Bu-DIF-3 (5-20 μM) dose-dependently suppressed LPA-induced cell migration with associated IC50 values of 5.5, 4.6, and 4.2 μM, respectively. On the other hand, the IC50 values of Br-DIF-1, DIF-3(+2), and Bu-DIF-3 versus cell proliferation were 18.5, 7.2, and 2.0 μM, respectively, in LM8 cells, and >20, 14.8, and 4.3 μM, respectively, in mouse 3T3-L1 fibroblasts (non-transformed). Together, our results demonstrate that Br-DIF-1 in particular may be a valuable tool for the analysis of cancer cell migration, and that DIF derivatives such as DIF-3(+2) and Bu-DIF-3 are promising lead anti-tumor agents for the development of therapies that suppress osteosarcoma cell proliferation, migration, and metastasis. PMID:26056940

  7. Knockdown of SVCT2 impairs in-vitro cell attachment, migration and wound healing in bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnikumar Sangani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC adhesion and migration are fundamental to a number of pathophysiologic processes, including fracture and wound healing. Vitamin C is beneficial for bone formation, fracture repair and wound healing. However, the role of the vitamin C transporter in BMSC adhesion, migration and wound healing is not known. In this study, we knocked-down the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter, SVCT2, the only known transporter of vitamin C in BMSCs, and performed cell adhesion, migration, in-vitro scratch wound healing and F-actin re-arrangement studies. We also investigated the role of oxidative stress on the above processes. Our results demonstrate that both oxidative stress and down-regulation of SVCT2 decreased cell attachment and spreading. A trans-well cell migration assay showed that vitamin C helped in BMSC migration and that knockdown of SVCT2 decreased cell migration. In the in-vitro scratch wound healing studies, we established that oxidative stress dose-dependently impairs wound healing. Furthermore, the supplementation of vitamin C significantly rescued the BMSCs from oxidative stress and increased wound closing. The knockdown of SVCT2 in BMSCs strikingly decreased wound healing, and supplementing with vitamin C failed to rescue cells efficiently. The knockdown of SVCT2 and induction of oxidative stress in cells produced an alteration in cytoskeletal dynamics. Signaling studies showed that oxidative stress phosphorylated members of the MAP kinase family (p38 and that vitamin C inhibited their phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that both the SVCT2 transporter and oxidative stress play a vital role in BMSC attachment, migration and cytoskeletal re-arrangement. BMSC-based cell therapy and modulation of SVCT2 could lead to a novel therapeutic approach that enhances bone remodeling, fracture repair and wound healing in chronic disease conditions.

  8. Tubular Bridges for Bronchial Epithelial Cell Migration and Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Zani, Brett G.; Laura Indolfi; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biological processes from embryogenesis to tumorigenesis rely on the coordinated coalescence of cells and synchronized cell-to-cell communication. Intercellular signaling enables cell masses to communicate through endocrine pathways at a distance or by direct contact over shorter dimensions. Cellular bridges, the longest direct connections between cells, facilitate transfer of cellular signals and components over hundreds of microns in vitro and in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FIND...

  9. Silencing of LASP-1 influences zyxin localization, inhibits proliferation and reduces migration in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LIM and SH3 protein (LASP-1), initially identified from human breast cancer, is a specific focal adhesion protein involved in cell migration. LASP-1 is an actin binding protein, which also interacts with the proline-rich domains of zyxin, a scaffolding protein required for cell movement and gene transcription. In the present work, we analyzed the effect of LASP-1 on different human breast cancer cell lines. Transfection with LASP-1-specific siRNA resulted in a reduced protein level of LASP-1 in BT-20 and MCF-7 cell lines. The siRNA-treated cells were arrested in G2/M phase of cell cycle, and proliferation of the tumor cells was suppressed by 30-50% corresponding to around 50% of the cells being transfected successfully as seen by immunofluorescence. In addition, tumor cells showed a 50% reduced migration after siRNA treatment, while overexpression of LASP-1 in non-tumor PTK-2 cells, which do not express endogenous LASP-1, resulted in a significant increase in cell motility. LASP-1 silencing is accompanied with a reduced binding of the of LASP-1 binding partner zyxin to focal contacts without changes in actin stress fiber organization as observed in immunofluorescence experiments. The data provide evidence for an essential role of LASP-1 in tumor cell growth and migration, possibly by influencing the localization of zyxin

  10. Lipocalin-2-induced cytokine production enhances endometrial carcinoma cell survival and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Hsia Lin, Chi-Jr Liao, Ying-Chu Lee, Keng-Hsun Hu, Hsien-Wei Meng, Sin-Tak Chu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipocalin-2 (Lcn-2 is an acute-phase protein that has been implicated in diverse physiological processes in mice, including: apoptosis, ion transport, inflammation, cell survival, and tumorigenesis. This study characterized the biological activity of Lcn-2 in human endometrial carcinoma cells (RL95-2. Exposure of RL95-2 cells to Lcn-2 for >24 h reduced Lcn-2-induced cell apoptosis, changed the cell proliferation and up-regulated cytokine secretions, including: interleukin-8 (IL-8, inteleukin-6 (IL-6, monocyte chemotatic protein-1 (MCP-1 and growth-related oncogene (GRO. However, IL-8 mRNA and protein levels were dramatically increased in Lcn-2-treated RL95-2 cells. To determine the IL-8 effect on Lcn-2-treated RL95-2 cells was our major focus. Adding recombinant IL-8 (rIL-8 resulted in decreased caspase-3 activity in Lcn-2-treated cells, whereas the addition of IL-8 antibodies resulted in significantly increased caspase-3 activity and decreased cell migration. Data indicate that IL-8 plays a crucial role in the induction of cell migration. Interestingly, Lcn-2-induced cytokines, secretion from RL95-2 cells, could not show the potent cell migration ability with the exception of IL-8. We conclude that Lcn-2 triggered cytokine secretions to prevent RL95-2 cells from undergoing apoptosis and subsequently increased cell migration. We hypothesize that Lcn-2 increased cytokine secretion by RL95-2 cells, which in turn activated a cellular defense system. This study suggests that Lcn-2 may play a role in the human female reproductive system or in endometrial cancer.

  11. Trimethyltin intoxication induces the migration of ventricular/subventricular zone cells to the injured murine hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weig, Blair C; Richardson, Jason R; Lowndes, Herbert E; Reuhl, Kenneth R

    2016-05-01

    Following the postnatal decline of cell proliferation in the mammalian central nervous system, the adult brain retains progenitor cells with stem cell-like properties in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus. Brain injury can stimulate proliferation and redirect the migration pattern of SVZ precursor cells to the injury site. Sublethal exposure to the neurotoxicant trimethyltin (TMT) causes dose-dependent necrosis and apoptosis in the hippocampus dentate gyrus and increases SGZ stem cell proliferation to generate new granule cells. To determine whether SVZ cells also contribute to the repopulation of the TMT-damaged dentate gyrus, 6-8 week old male C3H mice were injected with the carbocyanine dye spDiI and bromodeoxyuridine (80mg/kg; ip.) to label ventricular cells prior to TMT exposure. The presence of labeled cells in hippocampus was determined 7 and 28days after TMT exposure. No significant change in the number of BrdU(+) and spDiI(+) cells was observed in the dentate gyrus 7days after TMT treatment. However, 28days after TMT treatment there was a 3-4 fold increase in the number of spDiI-labeled cells in the hippocampal hilus and dentate gyrus. Few spDiI(+) cells stained positive for the mature phenotypic markers NeuN or GFAP, suggesting they may represent undifferentiated cells. A small percentage of migrating cells were BrdU(+)/spDiI(+), indicating some newly produced, SVZ- derived precursors migrated to the hippocampus. Taken together, these data suggest that TMT-induced injury of the hippocampus can stimulate the migration of ventricular zone-derived cells to injured dentate gyrus. PMID:27045884

  12. TNFα Regulates Endothelial Progenitor Cell Migration via CADM1 and NF-kB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisco, Anthony R.; Hoffmann, Brian R.; Kaczorowski, Catherine C.; McDermott-Roe, Chris; Stodola, Timothy J.; Exner, Eric C.; Greene, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    Shortly after the discovery of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in 1997, many clinical trials were conducted using EPCs as a cellular based therapy with the goal of restoring damaged organ function by inducing growth of new blood vessels (angiogenesis). Results were disappointing, largely because the cellular and molecular mechanisms of EPC-induced angiogenesis were not clearly understood. Following injection, EPCs must migrate to the target tissue and engraft prior to induction of angiogenesis. In this study EPC migration was investigated in response to tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, to test the hypothesis that organ damage observed in ischemic diseases induces an inflammatory signal that is important for EPC homing. In this study, EPC migration and incorporation were modeled in vitro using a co-culture assay where TNFα treated EPCs were tracked while migrating towards vessel-like structures. It was found that TNFα treatment of EPCs increased migration and incorporation into vessel-like structures. Using a combination of genomic and proteomic approaches, NF-kB mediated upregulation of CADM1 was identified as a mechanism of TNFα induced migration. Inhibition of NF-kB or CADM1 significantly decreased migration of EPCs in vitro suggesting a role for TNFα signaling in EPC homing during tissue repair. PMID:26867147

  13. Insulin receptor substrate-1/2 mediates IL-4-induced migration of human airway epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Steven R.; Martin, Linda D.; Abe, Mark K.; Marroquin, Bertha A.; Stern, Randi; Fu, Xiaoying

    2009-01-01

    Migration of airway epithelial cells (AEC) is an integral component of airway mucosal repair after injury. The inflammatory cytokine IL-4, abundant in chronic inflammatory airways diseases such as asthma, stimulates overproduction of mucins and secretion of chemokines from AEC; these actions enhance persistent airway inflammation. The effect of IL-4 on AEC migration and repair after injury, however, is not known. We examined migration in primary human AEC differentiated in air-liquid interface culture for 3 wk. Wounds were created by mechanical abrasion and followed to closure using digital microscopy. Concurrent treatment with IL-4 up to 10 ng/ml accelerated migration significantly in fully differentiated AEC. As expected, IL-4 treatment induced phosphorylation of the IL-4 receptor-associated protein STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription)6, a transcription factor known to mediate several IL-4-induced AEC responses. Expressing a dominant negative STAT6 cDNA delivered by lentivirus infection, however, failed to block IL-4-stimulated migration. In contrast, decreasing expression of either insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 or IRS-2 using a silencing hairpin RNA blocked IL-4-stimulated AEC migration completely. These data demonstrate that IL-4 can accelerate migration of differentiated AEC after injury. This reparative response does not require STAT6 activation, but rather requires IRS-1 and/or IRS-2. PMID:19447894

  14. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 regulates differentiation onset and migration of trophoblast stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongmei; Hölz, Stefanie; Metzger, Eric; Pavlovic, Mihael; Jandausch, Anett; Jilg, Cordula; Galgoczy, Petra; Herz, Corinna; Moser, Markus; Metzger, Daniel; Günther, Thomas; Arnold, Sebastian J.; Schüle, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Propagation and differentiation of stem cell populations are tightly regulated to provide sufficient cell numbers for tissue formation while maintaining the stem cell pool. Embryonic parts of the mammalian placenta are generated from differentiating trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) invading the maternal decidua. Here we demonstrate that lysine-specific demethylase 1 (Lsd1) regulates differentiation onset of TSCs. Deletion of Lsd1 in mice results in the reduction of TSC number, diminished formation of trophectoderm tissues and early embryonic lethality. Lsd1-deficient TSCs display features of differentiation initiation, including alterations of cell morphology, and increased migration and invasion. We show that increased TSC motility is mediated by the premature expression of the transcription factor Ovol2 that is directly repressed by Lsd1 in undifferentiated cells. In summary, our data demonstrate that the epigenetic modifier Lsd1 functions as a gatekeeper for the differentiation onset of TSCs, whereby differentiation-associated cell migration is controlled by the transcription factor Ovol2.

  15. Cell-permeable p38 MAP kinase promotes migration of adult neural stem/progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanoue, Makoto; Morioka, Kazuhito; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Ohsawa, Keiko; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Tsuburaya, Kayo; Akasaka, Yoshikiyo; Mikami, Tetsuo; Ogata, Toru; Takamatsu, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) can migrate toward sites of injury, but the migration activity of NPCs is insufficient to regenerate damaged brain tissue. In this study, we showed that p38 MAP kinase (p38) is expressed in doublecortin-positive adult NPCs. Experiments using the p38 inhibitor SB203580 revealed that endogenous p38 participates in NPC migration. To enhance NPC migration, we generated a cell-permeable wild-type p38 protein (PTD-p38WT) in which the HIV protein transduction domain (PTD) was fused to the N-terminus of p38. Treatment with PTD-p38WT significantly promoted the random migration of adult NPCs without affecting cell survival or differentiation; this effect depended on the cell permeability and kinase activity of the fusion protein. These findings indicate that PTD-p38WT is a novel and useful tool for unraveling the roles of p38, and that this protein provides a reasonable approach for regenerating the injured brain by enhancing NPC migration. PMID:27067799

  16. NLRC5 regulates cell proliferation, migration and invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yun-Yun; He, Ying-Hua; Chen, Chen; Xu, Tao; Li, Lin; Ni, Ming-Ming; Meng, Xiao-Ming; Huang, Cheng; Li, Jun

    2016-06-28

    NLRC5, the largest member of nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) family, has been reported to regulate immune responses and is associated with chronic inflammatory diseases. However, the biological function of NLRC5 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has not yet been well demonstrated. In this study, the role of NLRC5 in hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation, migration and invasion capacities was evaluated by using MTT, flow cytometry, wound healing, transwell assay, and tumor formation assay in nude mice. Western blot analysis and qPCR assay were performed to assess NLRC5 interacting with the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that NLRC5 was highly expressed in HCC. Knockdown of NLRC5 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, migration, invasion and the tumor formation in nude mice, and arrested the cell cycle at G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, overexpression of NLRC5 promoted the proliferation, migration and invasion of HCC cells in vitro. Interestingly, we found that up-regulation of NLRC5 not only positively correlates with the increase of β-catenin but also coordinates the activation of downstream Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Thus, our findings suggest that NLRC5 may play an important role in progression of HCC and provide a potential therapeutic value in this tumor. PMID:26975630

  17. Drain tube migration into the anastomotic site of an esophagojejunostomy for gastric small cell carcinoma: short report

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Long-Wei; Lo Chiao; Lai Peng-Sheng; Lee Po-Chu

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Intraluminal migration of a drain through an anastomotic site is a rare complication of gastric surgery. Case Presentation We herein report the intraluminal migration of a drain placed after a lower esophagectomy and total gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y anastomosis for gastric small cell carcinoma. Persistent drainage was noted 1 month after surgery, and radiographic studies were consistent with drain tube migration. Endoscopy revealed the drain had migrated into the esophagoj...

  18. PDGFBB promotes PDGFRα-positive cell migration into artificial bone in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We examined effects of PDGFBB in PDGFRα positive cell migration in artificial bones. ► PDGFBB was not expressed in osteoblastic cells but was expressed in peripheral blood cells. ► PDGFBB promoted PDGFRα positive cell migration into artificial bones but not osteoblast proliferation. ► PDGFBB did not inhibit osteoblastogenesis. -- Abstract: Bone defects caused by traumatic bone loss or tumor dissection are now treated with auto- or allo-bone graft, and also occasionally by artificial bone transplantation, particularly in the case of large bone defects. However, artificial bones often exhibit poor affinity to host bones followed by bony union failure. Thus therapies combining artificial bones with growth factors have been sought. Here we report that platelet derived growth factor bb (PDGFBB) promotes a significant increase in migration of PDGF receptor α (PDGFRα)-positive mesenchymal stem cells/pre-osteoblastic cells into artificial bone in vivo. Growth factors such as transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) reportedly inhibit osteoblast differentiation; however, PDGFBB did not exhibit such inhibitory effects and in fact stimulated osteoblast differentiation in vitro, suggesting that combining artificial bones with PDGFBB treatment could promote host cell migration into artificial bones without inhibiting osteoblastogenesis.

  19. Displacement of p130Cas from focal adhesions links actomyosin contraction to cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiyama, Hiroaki; Hirata, Hiroaki; Loh, Xia Kun; Kanchi, Madhu Mathi; Fujita, Hideaki; Tan, Song Hui; Kawauchi, Keiko; Sawada, Yasuhiro

    2014-08-15

    Cell adhesion complexes provide platforms where cell-generated forces are transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins is crucial for cells to communicate with the extracellular environment. However, the mechanisms that transmit actin cytoskeletal motion to the extracellular environment to drive cell migration are poorly understood. We find that the movement of p130Cas (Cas, also known as BCAR1), a mechanosensor at focal adhesions, correlates with actin retrograde flow and depends upon actomyosin contraction and phosphorylation of the Cas substrate domain (CasSD). This indicates that CasSD phosphorylation underpins the physical link between Cas and the actin cytoskeleton. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments reveal that CasSD phosphorylation, as opposed to the association of Cas with Src, facilitates Cas displacement from adhesion complexes in migrating cells. Furthermore, the stabilization of Src-Cas binding and inhibition of myosin II, both of which sustain CasSD phosphorylation but mitigate Cas displacement from adhesion sites, retard cell migration. These results indicate that Cas promotes cell migration by linking actomyosin contractions to the adhesion complexes through a dynamic interaction with Src as well as through the phosphorylation-dependent association with the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:24928898

  20. In-Vivo Imaging of Cell Migration Using Contrast Enhanced MRI and SVM Based Post-Processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Weis

    Full Text Available The migration of cells within a living organism can be observed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in combination with iron oxide nanoparticles as an intracellular contrast agent. This method, however, suffers from low sensitivity and specificty. Here, we developed a quantitative non-invasive in-vivo cell localization method using contrast enhanced multiparametric MRI and support vector machines (SVM based post-processing. Imaging phantoms consisting of agarose with compartments containing different concentrations of cancer cells labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles were used to train and evaluate the SVM for cell localization. From the magnitude and phase data acquired with a series of T2*-weighted gradient-echo scans at different echo-times, we extracted features that are characteristic for the presence of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, in particular hyper- and hypointensities, relaxation rates, short-range phase perturbations, and perturbation dynamics. High detection quality was achieved by SVM analysis of the multiparametric feature-space. The in-vivo applicability was validated in animal studies. The SVM detected the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles in the imaging phantoms with high specificity and sensitivity with a detection limit of 30 labeled cells per mm3, corresponding to 19 μM of iron oxide. As proof-of-concept, we applied the method to follow the migration of labeled cancer cells injected in rats. The combination of iron oxide labeled cells, multiparametric MRI and a SVM based post processing provides high spatial resolution, specificity, and sensitivity, and is therefore suitable for non-invasive in-vivo cell detection and cell migration studies over prolonged time periods.

  1. FBXL5 targets cortactin for ubiquitination-mediated destruction to regulate gastric cancer cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Gang; Ding, Hong-Hua; Liu, Bin; Wu, Wei-Dong

    2014-09-01

    Cortactin, an actin-interacting protein, is implicated in cytoskeletal architecture and often amplified in several types of cancer including gastric adenocarcinomas. Downregulation of cortactin decreases cell migration and invasion. However, how to regulate cortactin in gastric cancer remains largely unknown. Here, we report that FBXL5 interacts with and targets cortactin for ubiquitylation and subsequent proteasomal degradation. Furthermore, we showed that FBXL5-induced cortactin degradation is mediated by extracellular regulated signal kinase (ERK). Serine phosphorylation sites mutant, cortactinS405A/S418A, prevent FBXL5-induced cortactin degradation. Moreover, CortactinS405A/S418A exhibited stronger effects in promoting gastric cancer cell migration when compared to wild-type cortactin. Taken together, our data suggested a novel molecular mechanism for the negative regulation of cortactin by FBXL5 in gastric cancer cells migration. PMID:24867096

  2. Design and Analysis of a Service Migration Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, Aamir; Olsen, Rasmus Løvenstein; Pedersen, Jens Myrup

    2013-01-01

    another device. For such a need, an architecture is proposed to design and develop applications that migrate from one device to another and resume its operation. A simple application was constructed based on the proposed framework. Experiments were carried out to demonstrate its applicability, and to......Users often use several heterogeneous devices such as mobile phones, PDAs, tablets, handheld devices, PC and laptops to carry out their tasks. These user devices foster a needs for tasks migration from one device to another device at runtime, making it easier for the user to continue his task on...

  3. Radioautographic study of the synthesis and migration of glycoproteins in the cells of the rat adrenal medulla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rats were injected intravenously with (3H) fucose to study the synthesis and migration of glycoproteins into adrenaline-storing and noradrenaline-storing cells of the adrenal medulla and to evaluate the fate of this radioactive sugar in both serum and adrenal-medulla at various time intervals. Radioactivity was decreased in serum by 50% between 5 and 20 min after the injection and by a hundred fold with 1 h. There was a sharp decrease in the radioactivity of the adrenal-medulla between 5 and 20 min after the injection and a slight, continuous decrease thereafter. The adrenal-medullae were fixed 5 min, 20 min, 1 h and 4 h after intravenous injection of [3H] fucose, and radiautographs were analysed quantitatively after development in Microdol X. Kinetic analysis showed that, in both cell types, glycoprotein synthesis is completed in the Golgi complex and glycoproteins migrate subsequently to the secretory granules and to the cell coat. This analysis also revealed that [3H] fucose moves much more rapidly in the Golgi complex of noradrenaline-storing cells than in that of adrenaline-storing cells and appears much earlier in the secretory granules of the former cell type

  4. Investigating migration inhibition and apoptotic effects of Fomitopsis pinicola chloroform extract on human colorectal cancer SW-480 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqin Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fomitopsis pinicola (Sw. Ex Fr.m Karst (FPK which belongs to the Basidiomycota fungal class is one of the most popular medical fungi in China. It has been used for many diseases: cancer, heart diseases, diabetes and so on. However, little study on the pro-apoptotic effect and migration inhibition of FPK chloroform extract (FPKc has been reported and the possible involved mechanism has not been illuminated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Chemical analysis was performed by HPLC which showed ergosterol (ES concentration was 105 µg/mg. MTT assay revealed that FPKc could selectively inhibit SW-480 cells viability with the IC50 of 190.28 µg/ml. Wound healing and transwell assay indicated that FPKc could inhibit the migration of SW-480 cells obviously, FPKc could also dramatically decreased the matrix metalloproteinases-2, 9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining, nuclear Hoechst 33342 staining and DNA fragmentation analysis revealed that FPKc and ES could induce SW-480 cells apoptosis. The apoptosis process closely involved in ROS accumulation and depletion of GSH, activation of caspase 3, poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP degradation. FPKc could also up-regulate P53 expression and thus lead to G1 phase arrest. When SW-480 cells were pretreated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC, the ROS generation, cell viability and apoptotic ratio were partially declined, which indicated that ROS was vertical in the pro-apoptosis process induced by FPKc. Moreover, in the whole process, ES which has been previously found in FPKc had the similar effect to FPKc. Thus we could conclude that ES, as one of the highest abundant components in FPKc, might also be one of the active constituents. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: FPKc could inhibit the migration of SW-480 cells, induce SW-480 cells G1 phase arrest and cause ROS-mediated apoptosis effect. And ES might be one of the effective constituents in the whole process.

  5. Effects of Garlic Oil on the Migration of Neutrophil-Like Cell Studied by Using a Chemotactic Gradient Labchip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Chen Shih

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have designed and fabricated a novel chemotactic gradient Labchip for studying cell migration quantitatively. Owing to the great potential of garlic and its preparations in developing antiinflammatory drugs, the aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of garlic oil on the locomotion of a neutrophil-like cell by measuring the dynamic features of cell migration including migration direction, average migration speed, chemotactic index (CI, and motility index (MI with the newly designed Labchip. We found that garlic oil treatment lowered the values of CI and MI and reduced the average speed of cell migration from 13 to 8 μm/min. The results indicate that garlic oil is a potential inhibitor for neutrophil-like cell migration and chemotactic responsiveness. By comparing with the effects of nocodazole and cytochalasin B, we also suggest that the antiinflammatory activity exhibited by garlic oil was mainly through inhibiting the assembly-disassembly processes of the cytoskeleton.

  6. Involvement of nitric oxide synthase in matrix metalloproteinase-9- and/or urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-mediated glioma cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Src tyrosine kinase activates inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and, in turn, nitric oxide production as a means to transduce cell migration. Src tyrosine kinase plays a key proximal role to control α9β1 signaling. Our recent studies have clearly demonstrated the role of α9β1 integrin in matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and/or urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR)-mediated glioma cell migration. In the present study, we evaluated the involvement of α9β1 integrin-iNOS pathway in MMP-9- and/or uPAR-mediated glioma cell migration. MMP-9 and uPAR shRNAs and overexpressing plasmids were used to downregulate and upregulate these molecules, respectively in U251 glioma cells and 5310 glioma xenograft cells. The effect of treatments on migration and invasion potential of these glioma cells were assessed by spheroid migration, wound healing, and Matrigel invasion assays. In order to attain the other objectives we also performed immunocytochemical, immunohistochemical, RT-PCR, Western blot and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the prominent association of iNOS with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Immunofluorescence analysis showed prominent expression of iNOS in glioma cells. MMP-9 and/or uPAR knockdown by respective shRNAs reduced iNOS expression in these glioma cells. RT-PCR analysis revealed elevated iNOS mRNA expression in either MMP-9 or uPAR overexpressed glioma cells. The migration potential of MMP-9- and/or uPAR-overexpressed U251 glioma cells was significantly inhibited after treatment with L-NAME, an inhibitor of iNOS. Similarly, a significant inhibition of the invasion potential of the control or MMP-9/uPAR-overexpressed glioma cells was noticed after L-NAME treatment. A prominent reduction of iNOS expression was observed in the tumor regions of nude mice brains, which were injected with 5310 glioma cells, after MMP-9 and/or uPAR knockdown. Protein expressions of cSrc, phosphoSrc and p

  7. NFAT5 promotes proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells in part through regulating AQP5 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Kai, E-mail: gk161@163.com [Department of Respiration, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Department of Respiration, 161th Hospital, PLA, Wuhan 430015 (China); Jin, Faguang, E-mail: jinfag@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Respiration, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China)

    2015-09-25

    The osmoregulated transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5(NFAT5), has been found to play important roles in the development of many kinds of human cancers, including breast cancer, colon carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma and melanoma. The aim of the present study was to determine whether NFAT5 is involved in the proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. We found that NFAT5 was upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of NFAT5 decreased proliferation and migration of the cells, accompanied by a significant reduction in the expression of AQP5. AQP5 was upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of AQP5 also inhibited proliferation and migration of the cells as knockdown of NFAT5 did. Moreover, overexpression of NFAT5 promoted proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells, accompanied by a significant increase in the expression of AQP5. These results indicate that NFAT5 plays important roles in proliferation and migration of human lung adenocarcinoma cells through regulating AQP5 expression, providing a new therapeutic option for lung adenocarcinoma therapy. - Highlights: • NFAT5 expression is higher in lung adenocarcinoma cells compared with normal cells. • NFAT5 knockdown decreases proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Knockdown of NFAT5 reduces AQP5 expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Overexpression of NFAT5 promotes proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Overexpression of NFAT5 increases AQP5 expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  8. NFAT5 promotes proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells in part through regulating AQP5 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The osmoregulated transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5(NFAT5), has been found to play important roles in the development of many kinds of human cancers, including breast cancer, colon carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma and melanoma. The aim of the present study was to determine whether NFAT5 is involved in the proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. We found that NFAT5 was upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of NFAT5 decreased proliferation and migration of the cells, accompanied by a significant reduction in the expression of AQP5. AQP5 was upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of AQP5 also inhibited proliferation and migration of the cells as knockdown of NFAT5 did. Moreover, overexpression of NFAT5 promoted proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells, accompanied by a significant increase in the expression of AQP5. These results indicate that NFAT5 plays important roles in proliferation and migration of human lung adenocarcinoma cells through regulating AQP5 expression, providing a new therapeutic option for lung adenocarcinoma therapy. - Highlights: • NFAT5 expression is higher in lung adenocarcinoma cells compared with normal cells. • NFAT5 knockdown decreases proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Knockdown of NFAT5 reduces AQP5 expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Overexpression of NFAT5 promotes proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Overexpression of NFAT5 increases AQP5 expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

  9. Cell surface syndecan-1 contributes to binding and function of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) on epithelial tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualon, Tobias; Lue, Hongqi; Groening, Sabine; Pruessmeyer, Jessica; Jahr, Holger; Denecke, Bernd; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Ludwig, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Surface expressed proteoglycans mediate the binding of cytokines and chemokines to the cell surface and promote migration of various tumor cell types including epithelial tumor cells. We here demonstrate that binding of the chemokine-like inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) to epithelial lung and breast tumor cell lines A549 and MDA-MB231 is sensitive to enzymatic digestion of heparan sulphate chains and competitive inhibition with heparin. Moreover, MIF interaction with heparin was confirmed by chromatography and a structural comparison indicated a possible heparin binding site. These results suggested that proteoglycans carrying heparan sulphate chains are involved in MIF binding. Using shRNA-mediated gene silencing, we identified syndecan-1 as the predominant proteoglycan required for the interaction with MIF. MIF binding was decreased by induction of proteolytic shedding of syndecan-1, which could be prevented by inhibition of the metalloproteinases involved in this process. Finally, MIF induced the chemotactic migration of A549 cells, wound closure and invasion into matrigel without affecting cell proliferation. These MIF-induced responses were abrogated by heparin or by silencing of syndecan-1. Thus, our study indicates that syndecan-1 on epithelial tumor cells promotes MIF binding and MIF-mediated cell migration. This may represent a relevant mechanism through which MIF enhances tumor cell motility and metastasis. PMID:26852939

  10. Cardiotoxin III Inhibits Proliferation and Migration of Oral Cancer Cells through MAPK and MMP Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yu Yen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiotoxin III (CTXIII, isolated from the snake venom of Formosan cobra Naja naja atra, has previously been found to induce apoptosis in many types of cancer. Early metastasis is typical for the progression of oral cancer. To modulate the cell migration behavior of oral cancer is one of the oral cancer therapies. In this study, the possible modulating effect of CTXIII on oral cancer migration is addressed. In the example of oral squamous carcinoma Ca9-22 cells, the cell viability was decreased by CTXIII treatment in a dose-responsive manner. In wound-healing assay, the cell migration of Ca9-22 cells was attenuated by CTXIII in a dose- and time-responsive manner. After CTXIII treatment, the MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein expressions were downregulated, and the phosphorylation of JNK and p38-MAPK was increased independent of ERK phosphorylation. In conclusion, CTXIII has antiproliferative and -migrating effects on oral cancer cells involving the p38-MAPK and MMP-2/-9 pathways.

  11. Effect of bortezomib on migration and invasion in cervical carcinoma HeLa cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong Shi; Guo-Bin Zhang; Shu-Wang Yin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of bortezomib on migration and invasion of cervical carcinoma HeLa cell and specific molecular mechanism. Methods:The effect of bortezomib on the viability of HeLa cell was measured by MTT assay. The effect of bortezomib on cell migration and invasion was measured by Transwell assay and invasion experiment respectively. The activation of Akt/mTOR signaling pathway and expression level of MMP2, MMP9 were assayed by western blot. Results:MTT assay indicated bortezomib (2.5μM, 5μM, 10μM) could inhibit HeLa cell viability, and the inhibitory rate was highest at 48 h. Transwell assay and invasion experiment results showed that bortezomib inhibited HeLa cell migration and invasion. Western blotting assays presented bortezomib could suppress the phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR, and down-regulate the expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Conclusions:These results suggested bortezomib could inhibit migration and invasion in cervical carcinoma HeLa cell, which might be related to Akt/mTOR signal pathway.

  12. Effect of bortezomib on migration and invasion in cervical carcinoma HeLa cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong; Shi; Guo-Bin; Zhang; Shu-Wang; Yin

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effect of bortezomib on migration and invasion of cervical carcinoma HeLa cell and specific molecular mechanism.Methods:The effect of bortezomib on the viability of HeLa cell was measured by MTT assay.The effect of bortezomib on cell migration and invasion was measured by Transwell assay and invasion experiment respectively.The activation of Akt/mTOR signaling pathway and expression level of MMP2,MMP9 were assayed by western blot.Results:MTT assay indicated bortezomib(2.5 μM.5 μM,10 μM)could inhibit HeLa cell viability,and the inhibitory rate was highest at 48 h.Transwell assay and invasion experiment results showed that bortezomib inhibited HeLa cell migration and invasion.Western blotting assays presented bortezomib could suppress the phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR.and down-regulate the expression of MMP2 and MMP9.Conclusions:These results suggested bortezomib could inhibit migration and invasion in cervical carcinoma HeLa cell,which might be related to Akt/mTOR signal pathway.

  13. Indomethacin Inhibits Cancer Cell Migration via Attenuation of Cellular Calcium Mobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Li Tsai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs were shown to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer recurrence and are widely used to modulate inflammatory responses. Indomethacin is an NSAID. Herein, we reported that indomethacin can suppress cancer cell migration through its influence on the focal complexes formation. Furthermore, endothelial growth factor (EGF-mediated Ca2+ influx was attenuated by indomethacin in a dose dependent manner. Our results identified a new mechanism of action for indomethacin: inhibition of calcium influx that is a key determinant of cancer cell migration.

  14. Modeled microgravity suppressed invasion and migration of human glioblastoma U87 cells through downregulating store-operated calcium entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor and is characterized with robust invasion and migration potential resulting in poor prognosis. Previous investigations have demonstrated that modeled microgravity (MMG) could decline the cell proliferation and attenuate the metastasis potential in several cell lines. In this study, we studied the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials of glioblastoma in human glioblastoma U87 cells. We found that MMG stimulation significantly attenuated the invasion and migration potentials, decreased thapsigargin (TG) induced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and downregulated the expression of Orai1 in U87 cells. Inhibition of SOCE by 2-APB or stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) downregulation both mimicked the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Furthermore, upregulation of Orai1 significantly weakened the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Therefore, these findings indicated that MMG stimulation inhibited the invasion and migration potentials of U87 cells by downregulating the expression of Orai1 and sequentially decreasing the SOCE, suggesting that MMG might be a new potential therapeutic strategy in glioblastoma treatment in the future. - Highlights: • Modeled microgravity (MMG) suppressed migration and invasion in U87 cells. • MMG downregulated the SOCE and the expression of Orai1. • SOCE inhibition mimicked the effects of MMG on migration and invasion potentials. • Restoration of SOCE diminished the effects of MMG on migration and invasion

  15. Modeled microgravity suppressed invasion and migration of human glioblastoma U87 cells through downregulating store-operated calcium entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Zi-xuan [Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Rao, Wei [Department of Neurosurgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Wang, Huan [Department of Dermatology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Wang, Nan-ding [Department of Cardiology, Xi' an Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Si, Jing-Wen; Zhao, Jiao; Li, Jun-chang [Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Wang, Zong-ren, E-mail: zongren@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China)

    2015-02-13

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor and is characterized with robust invasion and migration potential resulting in poor prognosis. Previous investigations have demonstrated that modeled microgravity (MMG) could decline the cell proliferation and attenuate the metastasis potential in several cell lines. In this study, we studied the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials of glioblastoma in human glioblastoma U87 cells. We found that MMG stimulation significantly attenuated the invasion and migration potentials, decreased thapsigargin (TG) induced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and downregulated the expression of Orai1 in U87 cells. Inhibition of SOCE by 2-APB or stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) downregulation both mimicked the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Furthermore, upregulation of Orai1 significantly weakened the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Therefore, these findings indicated that MMG stimulation inhibited the invasion and migration potentials of U87 cells by downregulating the expression of Orai1 and sequentially decreasing the SOCE, suggesting that MMG might be a new potential therapeutic strategy in glioblastoma treatment in the future. - Highlights: • Modeled microgravity (MMG) suppressed migration and invasion in U87 cells. • MMG downregulated the SOCE and the expression of Orai1. • SOCE inhibition mimicked the effects of MMG on migration and invasion potentials. • Restoration of SOCE diminished the effects of MMG on migration and invasion.

  16. A microfluidic-based genetic screen to identify microbial virulence factors that inhibit dendritic cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    McLaughlin, Laura M.; Xu, Hui; Carden, Sarah E.; Fisher, Samantha; Reyes, Monique; Heilshorn, Sarah C.; Monack, Denise M.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial pathogens are able to modulate host cells and evade the immune system by multiple mechanisms. For example, Salmonella injects effector proteins into host cells and evades the host immune system in part by inhibiting dendritic cell (DC) migration. The identification of microbial factors that modulate normal host functions should lead to the development of new classes of therapeutics that target these pathways. Current screening methods to identify either host or pathogen genes involv...

  17. Nitrosoureas Inhibit the Stathmin Mediated Migration and Invasion of Malignant Glioma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Xing-Jie; Choi, Yong; Sackett, Dan L.; Park, John K.

    2008-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary intrinsic brain tumors and are highly lethal. The widespread migration and invasion of neoplastic cells from the initial site of tumor formation into the surrounding brain render these lesions refractory to definitive surgical treatment. Stathmin, a microtubule destabilizing protein that mediates cell cycle progression, can also regulate directed cell movement. Nitrosoureas, traditionally viewed as DNA alkylating agents, can also covalently modify...

  18. The candidate tumor suppressor gene ECRG4 inhibits cancer cells migration and invasion in esophageal carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Lu ShihHsin; Li Xiaoyan; Zhang Chunpeng; Li Linwei; Zhou Yun

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The esophageal cancer related gene 4 (ECRG4) was initially identified and cloned in our laboratory from human normal esophageal epithelium (GenBank accession no.AF325503). ECRG4 was a new tumor suppressor gene in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) associated with prognosis. In this study, we investigated the novel tumor-suppressing function of ECRG4 in cancer cell migration, invasion, adhesion and cell cycle regulation in ESCC. Methods Transwell and Boyden chamber e...

  19. Conservation of Migration and Differentiation Circuits in Primordial Germ Cells Between Avian Species

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Tae Sub; Han, Jae Yong

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Germ cell differentiation in reverse-sexed reproductive organs and interspecies germ line chimeras provides insight into the mechanism of germ cell development and represents a useful tool for conservation of endangered birds. We investigated the migration and survival capacity of male chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) in female chicken embryos and in quail and Korean ring-necked pheasant embryos of both sexes. Interestingly, the PGCs were successfully reintroduced in all cases. F...

  20. DEX-1 and DYF-7 establish sensory dendrite length by anchoring dendritic tips during cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Heiman, Maxwell G.; Shaham, Shai

    2009-01-01

    Cells are devices whose structures delimit function. For example, in the nervous system, neuronal and glial shapes dictate paths of information flow. To understand how cells acquire their shapes, we examined the formation of a sense organ in C. elegans. Using time-lapse imaging, we found that sensory dendrites form by stationary anchoring of dendritic tips during cell-body migration. A genetic screen identified DEX-1 and DYF-7, extracellular proteins required for dendritic tip anchoring, whic...

  1. Opposing roles for RhoH GTPase during T-cell migration and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Christina M; Comrie, William A; Hyun, Young-Min; Chung, Hung-Li; Fedorchuk, Christine A; Lim, Kihong; Brakebusch, Cord; McGrath, James L; Waugh, Richard E; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin; Kim, Minsoo

    2012-01-01

    T cells spend the majority of their time perusing lymphoid organs in search of cognate antigen presented by antigen presenting cells (APCs) and then quickly recirculate through the bloodstream to another lymph node. Therefore, regulation of a T-cell response is dependent upon the ability of cells...... activation as well as prolonged T:APC conjugates. RT-PCR analyses of activated CD4(+) T cells and live images of T-cell migration and immunological synapse (IS) formation revealed that functions of RhoH took place primarily at the levels of transcription and intracellular distribution. Thus, we conclude that...

  2. Effect of S1P5 on proliferation and migration of human esophageal cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the sphingosine 1phosphate (S1P) receptor expression profile in human esophageal cancer cells and the effects of S1P5 on proliferation and migration of human esophageal cancer cells. METHODS: S1P receptor expression profile in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line Eca109 was detected by semiquantitative reverse trans cription polymerase chain reaction. Eca109 cells were stably transfected with S1P5EGFP or controlEGFP constructs. The relation between the responses of cell prol...

  3. Cellular bridges: Routes for intercellular communication and cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Zani, Brett G.; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2010-01-01

    Cell-to-cell communication is the basis of all biology in multicellular organisms, allowing evolution of complex forms and viability in dynamic environments. Though biochemical interactions occur over distances, physical continuity remains the most direct means of cellular interactions. Cellular bridging through thin cytoplasmic channels—plasmodesmata in plants and tunneling nanotubes in animals—creates direct routes for transfer of signals and components, even pathogens, between cells. Recen...

  4. Migration of Drosophila intestinal stem cells across organ boundaries

    OpenAIRE

    Takashima, Shigeo; Paul, Manash; Aghajanian, Patrick; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-01-01

    All components of the Drosophila intestinal tract, including the endodermal midgut and ectodermal hindgut/Malpighian tubules, maintain populations of dividing stem cells. In the midgut and hindgut, these stem cells originate from within larger populations of intestinal progenitors that proliferate during the larval stage and form the adult intestine during metamorphosis. The origin of stem cells found in the excretory Malpighian tubules (‘renal stem cells’) has not been established. In this p...

  5. Heparan Sulfate Inhibits Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Migration and Engraftment in Mucopolysaccharidosis I*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, H. Angharad; Holley, Rebecca J.; Langford-Smith, Kia J.; Wilkinson, Fiona L.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Wynn, Robert F.; Wraith, J. Edmond; Merry, Catherine L. R.; Bigger, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis I Hurler (MPSI-H) is a pediatric lysosomal storage disease caused by genetic deficiencies in IDUA, coding for α-l-iduronidase. Idua−/− mice share similar clinical pathology with patients, including the accumulation of the undegraded glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) heparan sulfate (HS), and dermatan sulfate (DS), progressive neurodegeneration, and dysostosis multiplex. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the most effective treatment for Hurler patients, but reduced intensity conditioning is a risk factor in transplantation, suggesting an underlying defect in hematopoietic cell engraftment. HS is a co-receptor in the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) migration to the bone marrow (BM), but the effect of HS alterations on HSPC migration, or the functional role of HS in MPSI-H are unknown. We demonstrate defective WT HSPC engraftment and migration in Idua−/− recipient BM, particularly under reduced intensity conditioning. Both intra- but especially extracellular Idua−/− BM HS was significantly increased and abnormally sulfated. Soluble heparinase-sensitive GAGs from Idua−/− BM and specifically 2-O-sulfated HS, elevated in Idua−/− BM, both inhibited CXCL12-mediated WT HSPC transwell migration, while DS had no effect. Thus we have shown that excess overly sulfated extracellular HS binds, and sequesters CXCL12, limiting hematopoietic migration and providing a potential mechanism for the limited scope of HSCT in Hurler disease. PMID:25359774

  6. ATP increases the migration of microglia across the brain endothelial cell monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Tomoji; Inagaki, Manato; Fujita, Yu; Kimoto, Takehiro; Tanabe-Fujimura, Chiaki; Zou, Kun; Liu, Junjun; Liu, Shuyu; Komano, Hiroto

    2016-04-01

    The cerebral microcapillary endothelium, known as the blood-brain barrier (BBB), acts as a barrier between the blood and the interstitial fluid of the brain. The BBB therefore controls the passage of nutrients into the central nervous system (CNS). Microglia show a specific affinity for migration into the CNS, and this migration appears to occur independently of BBB integrity. To study the migration of microglia across the BBB, we developed an in vitro co-culture system of mouse brain endothelial cells (MBECs) and Ra2 microglia using Transwell inserts. We first investigated the influence of microglia or ATP, a microglial chemotactic factor, on MBEC barrier integrity. The addition of microglia or ATP led to the disruption of the MBEC monolayer and significantly decreased barrier function as measured by trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS). Furthermore, ATP promoted the migration of microglia but not macrophages across the MBEC monolayer. An inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) decreased the transmigration of microglia in our system, indicating that MMPs play a role in microglial chemotaxis. We specifically identify a role for microglia-derived MMP-2. In conclusion, we offer evidence that microglia migration across the brain endothelial cell monolayer is increased in the presence of ATP in a manner that involves MMP secretion. PMID:26934979

  7. Live imaging of Drosophila gonad formation reveals roles for Six4 in regulating germline and somatic cell migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarman Andrew P

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Movement of cells, either as amoeboid individuals or in organised groups, is a key feature of organ formation. Both modes of migration occur during Drosophila embryonic gonad development, which therefore provides a paradigm for understanding the contribution of these processes to organ morphogenesis. Gonads of Drosophila are formed from three distinct cell types: primordial germ cells (PGCs, somatic gonadal precursors (SGPs, and in males, male-specific somatic gonadal precursors (msSGPs. These originate in distinct locations and migrate to associate in two intermingled clusters which then compact to form the spherical primitive gonads. PGC movements are well studied, but much less is known of the migratory events and other interactions undergone by their somatic partners. These appear to move in organised groups like, for example, lateral line cells in zebra fish or Drosophila ovarian border cells. Results We have used time-lapse fluorescence imaging to characterise gonadal cell behaviour in wild type and mutant embryos. We show that the homeodomain transcription factor Six4 is required for the migration of the PGCs and the msSGPs towards the SGPs. We have identified a likely cause of this in the case of PGCs as we have found that Six4 is required for expression of Hmgcr which codes for HMGCoA reductase and is necessary for attraction of PGCs by SGPs. Six4 affects msSGP migration by a different pathway as these move normally in Hmgcr mutant embryos. Additionally, embryos lacking fully functional Six4 show a novel phenotype in which the SGPs, which originate in distinct clusters, fail to coalesce to form unified gonads. Conclusion Our work establishes the Drosophila gonad as a model system for the analysis of coordinated cell migrations and morphogenesis using live imaging and demonstrates that Six4 is a key regulator of somatic cell function during gonadogenesis. Our data suggest that the initial association of SGP clusters

  8. Effect of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor α gene silencing on mouse gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUN, ZHONGWEI; MENG, YAN; LIU, GUOQIN; JIANG, YONGSHENG; MENG, QINGHUA; HU, SANYUAN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) gene co-silencing in mouse gastric cancer (GC) cells. Respectively, three pairs of liposome-encapsulated IL-1β and TNFα small interfering RNA (siRNA) were transfected into the mouse GC cell line MFC. The most effective siRNA, as identified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, was used for co-suppression of IL-1β and TNFα genes. The activities of cell proliferation, colony formation and migration were determined by the Cell Counting Kit 8 method, colony formation assay and Transwell assay, respectively. Protein array analysis was performed to identify the differentially expressed factors. The possible signaling pathways of the various factors targeting the genes were identified by pathway enrichment analysis using KOBAS 2.0. siRNA1 and siRNAc were the most effective interference sequences for IL-1β and TNFα, respectively. Following co-transfection of siRNA1 and siRNAc, the expression of IL-1β and TNFα was inhibited at the mRNA and protein levels, and the cell proliferation, colony forming and migration abilities were reduced (P<0.05). The expression of inflammatory factors, including chemokine ligand 5, cyclooxygenase-2, IL-6, transforming growth factor β, IL-17A, matrix metallopeptidase 9 and stromal cell-derived factor 1α were also inhibited (P<0.05). These factors are mainly involved in the rheumatoid arthritis pathway, the intestinal immune network for IgA production, the TNF signaling pathway and the inflammatory bowel disease pathway. IL-1β and TNFα gene silencing inhibits the proliferation and migration of MFC. The mechanisms may involve multiple inflammatory factors that participate in the signaling pathways of tumor tissue inflammation, the immune network and TNF. PMID:27073517

  9. Microenvironmental Control of High-Speed Interstitial T Cell Migration in the Lymph Node

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakai, Tomoya; Kinashi, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    T cells are highly concentrated in the lymph node (LN) paracortex, which serves an important role in triggering adoptive immune responses. Live imaging using two-photon laser scanning microscopy revealed vigorous and non-directional T cell migration within this area at average velocity of more than 10 μm/min. Active interstitial T cell movement is considered to be crucial for scanning large numbers of dendritic cells (DCs) to find rare cognate antigens. However, the mechanism by which T cells achieve such high-speed movement in a densely packed, dynamic tissue environment is not fully understood. Several new findings suggest that fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) and DCs control T cell movement in a multilateral manner. Chemokines and lysophosphatidic acid produced by FRCs cooperatively promote the migration, while DCs facilitate LFA-1-dependent motility via expression of ICAM-1. Furthermore, the highly dense and confined microenvironment likely plays a key role in anchorage-independent motility. We propose that T cells dynamically switch between two motility modes; anchorage-dependent and -independent manners. Unique tissue microenvironment and characteristic migration modality of T cells cooperatively generate high-speed interstitial movement in the LN.

  10. Downregulation of SOK1 promotes the migration of MCF-7 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → SOK1 is a member of GCK-III subfamily. It is activated by oxidative stress or chemical anoxia. → Barr's group have found that autophosphorylation of SOK1 is triggered by binding to the Golgi matrix protein GM130 and made the cells migration through dimeric adaptor protein 14-3-3. → But what we found is that downregulation of SOK1 promotes cell migration and leads to the upregulation of GM130 and Tyr861 of FAK in MCF-7 cells. -- Abstract: SOK1 is a member of the germinal center kinase (GCK-III) subfamily but little is known about it, particularly with respect to its role in signal transduction pathways relative to tumor metastasis. By stably transfecting SOK1 siRNA into the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line we found that SOK1 promotes the migration of MCF-7 cells, as determined using wound-healing and Boyden chamber assays. However, cell proliferation assays revealed that silencing SOK1 had no effect on cell growth relative to the normal cells. Silencing SOK1 also had an effect on the expression and phosphorylation status of a number of proteins in MCF-7 cells, including FAK and GM130, whereby a decrease in SOK1 led to an increase in the expression of these proteins.

  11. Nestin is a novel target for suppressing pancreatic cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yoko; Naito, Zenya; Kawahara, Kiyoko; Nakazawa, Nando; Korc, Murray

    2011-01-01

    Nestin, is a class VI intermediate filament (IF) that is expressed in 30% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cases, and its expression in PDAC positively correlates with peripancreatic invasion. An expression vector carrying a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting nestin was stably transfected into PANC-1 and PK-45H human pancreatic cancer cells, which express high nestin levels. Alterations in morphology and alignment of actin filaments and α-tubulin were examined by phase-contrast and immunocytochemistry. Effects on cell growth, migration in scratch and Boyden chamber assays, invasion, cell adhesion, and in vivo growth were determined. Differences in mRNA levels were examined by arrays. Nestin shRNA-transfected cells exhibited decreased nestin expression, a sheet-like appearance with tight cell-cell adhesion, increased expression of filamentous F-actin and E-cadherin, and attenuated migration and invasion, both of which were enhanced following nestin re-expression. Expression of α-tubulin, and in vitro cell growth and adhesion were not altered by nestin downregulation, whereas hepatic metastases were decreased. Thus, nestin plays important roles in pancreatic cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis by selectively modulating the expression of actin and cell adhesion molecules, and may therefore be a novel therapeutic target in PDAC. PMID:21258211

  12. Downregulation of SOK1 promotes the migration of MCF-7 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xu-Dong, E-mail: xudongchen305@hotmail.com [Key Lab of Molecular Medicine, Ministry of Education, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Cho, Chien-Yu [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan (China)

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} SOK1 is a member of GCK-III subfamily. It is activated by oxidative stress or chemical anoxia. {yields} Barr's group have found that autophosphorylation of SOK1 is triggered by binding to the Golgi matrix protein GM130 and made the cells migration through dimeric adaptor protein 14-3-3. {yields} But what we found is that downregulation of SOK1 promotes cell migration and leads to the upregulation of GM130 and Tyr861 of FAK in MCF-7 cells. -- Abstract: SOK1 is a member of the germinal center kinase (GCK-III) subfamily but little is known about it, particularly with respect to its role in signal transduction pathways relative to tumor metastasis. By stably transfecting SOK1 siRNA into the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line we found that SOK1 promotes the migration of MCF-7 cells, as determined using wound-healing and Boyden chamber assays. However, cell proliferation assays revealed that silencing SOK1 had no effect on cell growth relative to the normal cells. Silencing SOK1 also had an effect on the expression and phosphorylation status of a number of proteins in MCF-7 cells, including FAK and GM130, whereby a decrease in SOK1 led to an increase in the expression of these proteins.

  13. The Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Production and Cell Migration in Human Immune Cells: Implications for Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Lynne Shinto; Gail Marracci; Lauren Bumgarner; Vijayshree Yadav

    2011-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), compromised blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity contributes to inflammatory T cell migration into the central nervous system. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is associated with BBB disruption and subsequent T cell migration into the CNS. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the effects of omega-3 fatty acids on MMP-9 levels and T cell migration. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy controls were pretreated with two types of omega-3 fatty acids...

  14. Mallotus philippinensis bark extracts promote preferential migration of mesenchymal stem cells and improve wound healing in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumoto, Tadashi; Ozawa, Noriyasu; Inami, Yuta; Toyoshima, Misaki; Fujita, Kosuke; Zaiki, Kaori; Sahara, Shunya; Akita, Mariko; Kitamura, Keiko; Nakaoji, Koichi; Hamada, Kazuhiko; Tamai, Katsuto; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Maeda, Akito

    2014-02-15

    In the present study, we report the effects of the ethanol extract from Mallotus philippinensis bark (EMPB) on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) proliferation, migration, and wound healing in vitro and in a mouse model. Chemotaxis assays demonstrated that EMPB acted an MSC chemoattractant and that the main chemotactic activity of EMPB may be due to the effects of cinnamtannin B-1. Flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in EMPB-injected mice indicated that EMPB enhanced the mobilization of endogenous MSCs into blood circulation. Bioluminescent whole-animal imaging of luciferase-expressing MSCs revealed that EMPB augmented the homing of MSCs to wounds. In addition, the efficacy of EMPB on migration of MSCs was higher than that of other skin cell types, and EMPB treatment improved of wound healing in a diabetic mouse model. The histopathological characteristics demonstrated that the effects of EMPB treatment resembled MSC-induced tissue repair. Taken together, these results suggested that EMPB activated the mobilization and homing of MSCs to wounds and that enhancement of MSC migration may improve wound healing. PMID:24182990

  15. Identification of Novel Regulators of the JAK/STAT Signaling Pathway that Control Border Cell Migration in the Drosophila Ovary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadin, Afsoon; Starz-Gaiano, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    The Janus Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling pathway is an essential regulator of cell migration both in mammals and fruit flies. Cell migration is required for normal embryonic development and immune response but can also lead to detrimental outcomes, such as tumor metastasis. A cluster of cells termed “border cells” in the Drosophila ovary provides an excellent example of a collective cell migration, in which two different cell types coordinate their movements. Border cells arise within the follicular epithelium and are required to invade the neighboring cells and migrate to the oocyte to contribute to a fertilizable egg. Multiple components of the STAT signaling pathway are required during border cell specification and migration; however, the functions and identities of other potential regulators of the pathway during these processes are not yet known. To find new components of the pathway that govern cell invasiveness, we knocked down 48 predicted STAT modulators using RNAi expression in follicle cells, and assayed defective cell movement. We have shown that seven of these regulators are involved in either border cell specification or migration. Examination of the epistatic relationship between candidate genes and Stat92E reveals that the products of two genes, Protein tyrosine phosphatase 61F (Ptp61F) and brahma (brm), interact with Stat92E during both border cell specification and migration. PMID:27175018

  16. Control of the collective migration of enteric neural crest cells by the Complement anaphylatoxin C3a and N-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broders-Bondon, Florence; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Gazquez, Elodie; Heysch, Julie; Piel, Matthieu; Mayor, Roberto; Lambris, John D; Dufour, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing the adhesive and migratory behavior of enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs) during their collective migration within the developing mouse gut. We aimed to decipher the role of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a during this process, because this well-known immune system attractant has been implicated in cephalic NCC co-attraction, a process controlling directional migration. We used the conditional Ht-PA-cre transgenic mouse model allowing a specific ablation of the N-cadherin gene and the expression of a fluorescent reporter in migratory ENCCs without affecting the central nervous system. We performed time-lapse videomicroscopy of ENCCs from control and N-cadherin mutant gut explants cultured on fibronectin (FN) and micropatterned FN-stripes with C3a or C3aR antagonist, and studied cell migration behavior with the use of triangulation analysis to quantify cell dispersion. We performed ex vivo gut cultures with or without C3aR antagonist to determine the effect on ENCC behavior. Confocal microscopy was used to analyze the cell-matrix adhesion properties. We provide the first demonstration of the localization of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a and its receptor on ENCCs during their migration in the embryonic gut. C3aR receptor inhibition alters ENCC adhesion and migration, perturbing directionality and increasing cell dispersion both in vitro and ex vivo. N-cadherin-null ENCCs do not respond to C3a co-attraction. These findings indicate that C3a regulates cell migration in a N-cadherin-dependent process. Our results shed light on the role of C3a in regulating collective and directional cell migration, and in ganglia network organization during enteric nervous system ontogenesis. The detection of an immune system chemokine in ENCCs during ENS development may also shed light on new mechanisms for gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:27041467

  17. Tumorigenic fragments of APC cause dominant defects in directional cell migration in multiple model systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A. Nelson

    2012-11-01

    Nonsense mutations that result in the expression of truncated, N-terminal, fragments of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC tumour suppressor protein are found in most sporadic and some hereditary colorectal cancers. These mutations can cause tumorigenesis by eliminating β-catenin-binding sites from APC, which leads to upregulation of β-catenin and thereby results in the induction of oncogenes such as MYC. Here we show that, in three distinct experimental model systems, expression of an N-terminal fragment of APC (N-APC results in loss of directionality, but not speed, of cell motility independently of changes in β-catenin regulation. We developed a system to culture and fluorescently label live pieces of gut tissue to record high-resolution three-dimensional time-lapse movies of cells in situ. This revealed an unexpected complexity of normal gut cell migration, a key process in gut epithelial maintenance, with cells moving with spatial and temporal discontinuity. Quantitative comparison of gut tissue from wild-type mice and APC heterozygotes (APCMin/+; multiple intestinal neoplasia model demonstrated that cells in precancerous epithelia lack directional preference when moving along the crypt-villus axis. This effect was reproduced in diverse experimental systems: in developing chicken embryos, mesoderm cells expressing N-APC failed to migrate normally; in amoeboid Dictyostelium, which lack endogenous APC, expressing an N-APC fragment maintained cell motility, but the cells failed to perform directional chemotaxis; and multicellular Dictyostelium slug aggregates similarly failed to perform phototaxis. We propose that N-terminal fragments of APC represent a gain-of-function mutation that causes cells within tissue to fail to migrate directionally in response to relevant guidance cues. Consistent with this idea, crypts in histologically normal tissues of APCMin/+ intestines are overpopulated with cells, suggesting that a lack of migration might cause cell

  18. Comparative actions of progesterone, medroxyprogesterone acetate, drospirenone and nestorone on breast cancer cell migration and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitruk-Ware Regine

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Limited information is available on the effects of progestins on breast cancer progression and metastasis. Cell migration and invasion are central for these processes, and require dynamic cytoskeletal and cell membrane rearrangements for cell motility to be enacted. Methods We investigated the effects of progesterone (P, medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA, drospirenone (DRSP and nestorone (NES alone or with 17β-estradiol (E2 on T47-D breast cancer cell migration and invasion and we linked some of these actions to the regulation of the actin-regulatory protein, moesin and to cytoskeletal remodeling. Results Breast cancer cell horizontal migration and invasion of three-dimensional matrices are enhanced by all the progestins, but differences are found in terms of potency, with MPA being the most effective and DRSP being the least. This is related to the differential ability of the progestins to activate the actin-binding protein moesin, leading to distinct effects on actin cytoskeleton remodeling and on the formation of cell membrane structures that mediate cell movement. E2 also induces actin remodeling through moesin activation. However, the addition of some progestins partially offsets the action of estradiol on cell migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Conclusion These results imply that P, MPA, DRSP and NES alone or in combination with E2 enhance the ability of breast cancer cells to move in the surrounding environment. However, these progestins show different potencies and to some extent use distinct intracellular intermediates to drive moesin activation and actin remodeling. These findings support the concept that each progestin acts differently on breast cancer cells, which may have relevant clinical implications.

  19. A microfluidic-based genetic screen to identify microbial virulence factors that inhibit dendritic cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Laura M; Xu, Hui; Carden, Sarah E; Fisher, Samantha; Reyes, Monique; Heilshorn, Sarah C; Monack, Denise M

    2014-04-01

    Microbial pathogens are able to modulate host cells and evade the immune system by multiple mechanisms. For example, Salmonella injects effector proteins into host cells and evades the host immune system in part by inhibiting dendritic cell (DC) migration. The identification of microbial factors that modulate normal host functions should lead to the development of new classes of therapeutics that target these pathways. Current screening methods to identify either host or pathogen genes involved in modulating migration towards a chemical signal are limited because they do not employ stable, precisely controlled chemical gradients. Here, we develop a positive selection microfluidic-based genetic screen that allows us to identify Salmonella virulence factors that manipulate DC migration within stable, linear chemokine gradients. Our screen identified 7 Salmonella effectors (SseF, SifA, SspH2, SlrP, PipB2, SpiC and SseI) that inhibit DC chemotaxis toward CCL19. This method is widely applicable for identifying novel microbial factors that influence normal host cell chemotaxis as well as revealing new mammalian genes involved in directed cell migration. PMID:24599496

  20. FGF8 activates proliferation and migration in mouse post-natal oligodendrocyte progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Cruz-Martinez

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8 is a key molecular signal that is necessary for early embryonic development of the central nervous system, quickly disappearing past this point. It is known to be one of the primary morphogenetic signals required for cell fate and survival processes in structures such as the cerebellum, telencephalic and isthmic organizers, while its absence causes severe abnormalities in the nervous system and the embryo usually dies in early stages of development. In this work, we have observed a new possible therapeutic role for this factor in demyelinating disorders, such as leukodystrophy or multiple sclerosis. In vitro, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were cultured with differentiating medium and in the presence of FGF8. Differentiation and proliferation studies were performed by immunocytochemistry and PCR. Also, migration studies were performed in matrigel cultures, where oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were placed at a certain distance of a FGF8-soaked heparin bead. The results showed that both migration and proliferation was induced by FGF8. Furthermore, a similar effect was observed in an in vivo demyelinating mouse model, where oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were observed migrating towards the FGF8-soaked heparin beads where they were grafted. In conclusion, the results shown here demonstrate that FGF8 is a novel factor to induce oligodendrocyte progenitor cell activation, migration and proliferation in vitro, which can be extrapolated in vivo in demyelinated animal models.

  1. Tissue instruction for migration and retention of TRM cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Norifumi; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2015-09-01

    During infection, a subset of effector T cells seeds the lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues and gives rise to tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM). Recent findings have provided insight into the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying tissue instruction of TRM cell homing, as well as the programs involved in their retention and maintenance. We review these findings here, highlighting both common features and distinctions between CD4 TRM and CD8 TRM cells. In this context we examine the role of memory lymphocyte clusters (MLCs), and propose that the MLCs serve as an immediate response center consisting of TRM cells on standby, capable of detecting incoming pathogens and mounting robust local immune responses to contain and limit the spread of infectious agents. PMID:26282885

  2. Effects of Cx43 gene modification on the proliferation and migration of the human lung squamous carcinoma cell line NCI-H226.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, J-P; Wei, R

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the human lung squamous carcinoma cell line NCI-H226 was transfected with the recombinant plasmid pBudCE4.1_Cx43 to explore the role of the Cx43 gene in cell growth, cell cycle, and tumor migration. pBudCE4.1-Cx43 was transfected into human lung squamous carcinoma NCI-H226 cells using Lipofectamine TM2000. The mRNA and protein expressions of Cx43 in the transfected cells were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The cell-cell communication was detected using the scratch dye tracer method and the cell cycle was detected by flow cytometry. The CCK-8 proliferation, scratch healing, and cell invasion assays were performed to evaluate the effect of the Cx43 gene transfection on the proliferation, migration, and invasive abilities of NCI-H226 cells. Cx43 mRNA and protein expressions and the fluorescence intensity in the scratch healing test were significantly higher in the experimental group than those in the control and blank groups (P H226 cell proliferation (especially 72 h after incubation) and cell migration, respectively, in the experimental group, compared to the control and blank groups (P H226 cells in the experimental group (P H226, thereby inhibiting tumor cell proliferation. PMID:26535624

  3. Fibulin-2 is present in murine vascular lesions and is important for smooth muscle cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ström, A.; Olin, A. I.; Aspberg, A.;

    2006-01-01

    and is upregulated during SMC phenotypic modulation in cell culture. Moreover, treatments with peptides that block the interaction between versican and fibulin-2 inhibit SMC migration in vitro. Conclusions: Fibulin-2 can be produced by SMC as a response to injury and may participate in the ECM organisation......Objective: The vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) can affect smooth muscle cell (SMC) adhesion, migration and proliferation-events that are important during the atherosclerotic process. Fibulin-2 is a member of the ECM protein family of fibulins and has been found to cross-link versican....../hyaluronan complexes, an ECM network that has been suggested to be important during tissue repair. In this study we have analysed the presence of fibulin-2 in two different models of murine vascular lesions. We have also examined how the fibulin-2/versican network influences SMC migration. Methods: Presence of fibulin...

  4. Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) regulates polarized neutrophil transendothelial cell migration in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfin, Abigail; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Beyrau, Martina; Colom, Bartomeu; Caille, Dorothée; Diapouli, Frantzeska-Maria; Nash, Gerard B; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Albelda, Steven M.; Rainger, G Ed; Meda, Paolo; Imhof, Beat A.; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2011-01-01

    Neutrophil migration into inflamed tissues is a fundamental component of innate immunity. A decisive step in this process is the polarised migration of blood neutrophils through endothelial cells (ECs) lining the venular lumen (transendothelial cell migration; TEM) in a luminal to abluminal direction. Using real-time confocal imaging we report that neutrophils can exhibit disrupted polarised TEM (“hesitant” and “reverse”) in vivo. These events were noted in inflammation following ischemia-reperfusion injury, characterised by reduced expression of junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) from EC junctions, and were enhanced by EC JAM-C blockade or genetic deletion. The results identify JAM-C as a key regulator of polarised neutrophil TEM in vivo and suggest that reverse TEM neutrophils can contribute to dissemination of systemic inflammation. PMID:21706006

  5. Myeov (myeloma overexpressed gene) drives colon cancer cell migration and is regulated by PGE2

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lawlor, Garrett

    2010-06-22

    Abstract Introduction We have previously reported that Myeov (MYEloma OVerexpressed gene) expression is enhanced in colorectal cancer (CRC) and that it promotes CRC cell proliferation and invasion. The role of Myeov in CRC migration is unclear. ProstaglandinE2 (PGE 2) is a known factor in promoting CRC carcinogenesis. The role of PGE 2 in modulating Myeov expression has also not been defined. Aim To assess the role of Myeov expression in CRC cell migration and to evaluate the role of PGE 2 in Myeov bioactivity. Methods siRNA mediated Myeov knockdown was achieved in T84 CRC cells. Knockdown was assessed using quantitative real time PCR. The effect of knockdown on CRC cell migration was assessed using a scratch wound healing assay. Separately, T84 cells were treated with PGE 2 (0.00025 μ M, 0.1 μ M and 1 μ M) from 30 min to 3 hours and the effect on Myeov gene expression was assessed using real time PCR. Results Myeov knockdown resulted in a significant reduction in CRC cell migration, observable as early as 12 hours (P < 0.05) with a 39% reduction compared to control at 36 hours (p < 0.01). Myeov expression was enhanced after treatment with PGE 2, with the greatest effect seen at 60 mins for all 3 PGE 2 doses. This response was dose dependent with a 290%, 550% & 1,000% increase in Myeov expression for 0.00025 μ M, 0.1 μ M and 1 μ M PGE 2 respectively. Conclusion In addition to promoting CRC proliferation and invasion, our findings indicate that Myeov stimulates CRC cell migration, and its expression may be PGE 2 dependant.

  6. MYEOV (myeloma overexpressed gene) drives colon cancer cell migration and is regulated by PGE2.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lawlor, Garrett

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We have previously reported that Myeov (MYEloma OVerexpressed gene) expression is enhanced in colorectal cancer (CRC) and that it promotes CRC cell proliferation and invasion. The role of Myeov in CRC migration is unclear. ProstaglandinE2 (PGE 2) is a known factor in promoting CRC carcinogenesis. The role of PGE 2 in modulating Myeov expression has also not been defined. AIM: To assess the role of Myeov expression in CRC cell migration and to evaluate the role of PGE 2 in Myeov bioactivity. METHODS: siRNA mediated Myeov knockdown was achieved in T84 CRC cells. Knockdown was assessed using quantitative real time PCR. The effect of knockdown on CRC cell migration was assessed using a scratch wound healing assay. Separately, T84 cells were treated with PGE 2 (0.00025 micro M, 0.1 micro M and 1 micro M) from 30 min to 3 hours and the effect on Myeov gene expression was assessed using real time PCR. RESULTS: Myeov knockdown resulted in a significant reduction in CRC cell migration, observable as early as 12 hours (P < 0.05) with a 39% reduction compared to control at 36 hours (p < 0.01). Myeov expression was enhanced after treatment with PGE 2, with the greatest effect seen at 60 mins for all 3 PGE 2 doses. This response was dose dependent with a 290%, 550% & 1,000% increase in Myeov expression for 0.00025 micro M, 0.1 micro M and 1 micro M PGE 2 respectively. CONCLUSION: In addition to promoting CRC proliferation and invasion, our findings indicate that Myeov stimulates CRC cell migration, and its expression may be PGE 2 dependant.

  7. [Macrophages promote the migration of neural stem cells into mouse spinal cord injury site].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhijian; Zhu, Wen; Li, Haopeng; He, Xijing

    2016-09-01

    Objective To explore the role of macrophages in the migration of neural stem cells (NSCs) in vivo and in vitro . Methods NSCs with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were isolated from GFP transgenic mice and the immunofluorescence cytochemical staining of nestin was used to identify NSCs. After spinal cord injury was induced, the tissue level of macrophage chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) mRNA was detected using quantitative real time PCR. The migration of GFP-NSCs was investigated 1 week after GFP-NSCs were injected into both sides of the damaged area. The effect of macrophage on the migration of NSCs in vitro was tested by Transwell(TM) system and the content of MCP-1 was detected by ELISA. Results NSCs highly expressed nestin. Compared with the control group, the level of MCP-1 mRNA significantly increased in the spinal cord injury group. The NSCs which were injected into the spinal cord migrated into the center of the injured site where F4/80 was highly expressed. Macrophages significantly increased the number of migrating NSCs in vitro and the secretion of MCP-1. Conclusion Macrophages induce NSC migrating into the spinal cord injury site possibly through promoting the secretion of MCP-1. PMID:27609570

  8. Cathepsin L knockdown enhances curcumin-mediated inhibition of growth, migration, and invasion of glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Yao; Xiong, Yajie; Zhao, Yifan; Wang, Wenjuan; Han, Meilin; Wang, Long; Tan, Caihong; Liang, Zhongqin

    2016-09-01

    Curcumin can be used to prevent and treat cancer. However, its exact underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Cathepsin L, a lysosomal cysteine protease, is overexpressed in several cancer types. This study aimed to determine the role of cathepsin L in curcumin-mediated inhibition of growth, migration, and invasion of glioma cells. Results revealed that the activity of cathepsin L was enhanced in curcumin-treated glioma cells. Cathepsin L knockdown induced by RNA interference significantly promoted curcumin-induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest. The knockdown also inhibited the migration and invasion of glioma cells. Our results suggested that the inhibition of cathepsin L can enhance the sensitivity of glioma cells to curcumin. Therefore, cathepsin L may be a new target to enhance the efficacy of curcumin against cancers. PMID:27373979

  9. Monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4 regulate migration and invasion of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Su Chii; Nøhr-Nielsen, Asbjørn; Zeeberg, Katrine; Reshkin, Stephan Joel; Hoffmann, Else Kay; Novak, Ivana; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Novel treatments for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are severely needed. The aim of this work was to explore the roles of H-lactate monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1 and MCT4) in PDAC cell migration and invasiveness. METHODS: Monocarboxylate transporter expression......, localization, activity, and function were explored in human PDAC cells (MIAPaCa-2, Panc-1, BxPC-3, AsPC-1) and normal human pancreatic ductal epithelial (HPDE) cells, by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, lactate flux, migration, and invasion assays. RESULTS: MCT1 and...... MCT4 (messenger RNA, protein) were robustly expressed in all PDAC lines, localizing to the plasma membrane. Lactate influx capacity was highest in AsPC-1 cells and lowest in HPDE cells and was inhibited by the MCT inhibitor α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (4-CIN), MCT1/MCT2 inhibitor AR-C155858, or...

  10. Protein kinase D2 regulates migration and invasion of U87MG glioblastoma cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor, which, despite combined modality treatment, reoccurs and is invariably fatal for affected patients. Recently, a member of the serine/threonine protein kinase D (PRKD) family, PRKD2, was shown to be a potent mediator of glioblastoma growth. Here we studied the role of PRKD2 in U87MG glioblastoma cell migration and invasion in response to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an activator of PRKD2 and a GBM mitogen. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that random cell migration was significantly diminished in response to PRKD2 silencing. The pharmacological PRKD family inhibitor CRT0066101 decreased chemotactic migration and invasion across uncoated or matrigel-coated Transwell inserts. Silencing of PRKD2 attenuated migration and invasion of U87MG cells even more effectively. In terms of downstream signaling, CRT0066101 prevented PRKD2 autophosphorylation and inhibited p44/42 MAPK and to a smaller extent p54/46 JNK and p38 MAPK activation. PRKD2 silencing impaired activation of p44/42 MAPK and p54/46 JNK, downregulated nuclear c-Jun protein levels and decreased c-JunS73 phosphorylation without affecting the NFκB pathway. Finally, qPCR array analyses revealed that silencing of PRKD2 downregulates mRNA levels of integrin alpha-2 and -4 (ITGA2 and -4), plasminogen activator urokinase (PLAU), plasminogen activator urokinase receptor (PLAUR), and matrix metallopeptidase 1 (MMP1). Findings of the present study identify PRKD2 as a potential target to interfere with glioblastoma cell migration and invasion, two major determinants contributing to recurrence of glioblastoma after multimodality treatment. Highlights: • Sphingosine-1-phosphate induces glioma cell migration and invasion. • Part of the effects is mediated by protein kinase D2 (PRKD2) activation. • Inactivation of PRKD2 attenuates glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. • Both, RNAi and pharmacological inhibition of PRKD2 inhibits MAPK

  11. Protein kinase D2 regulates migration and invasion of U87MG glioblastoma cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhart, Eva; Damm, Sabine; Wintersperger, Andrea [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria); DeVaney, Trevor [Institute of Biophysics, Medical University of Graz (Austria); Zimmer, Andreas [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Karl-Franzens University, Graz (Austria); Raynham, Tony; Ireson, Christopher [Cancer Research Technology Ltd, London (United Kingdom); Sattler, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.sattler@medunigraz.at [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria)

    2013-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor, which, despite combined modality treatment, reoccurs and is invariably fatal for affected patients. Recently, a member of the serine/threonine protein kinase D (PRKD) family, PRKD2, was shown to be a potent mediator of glioblastoma growth. Here we studied the role of PRKD2 in U87MG glioblastoma cell migration and invasion in response to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an activator of PRKD2 and a GBM mitogen. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that random cell migration was significantly diminished in response to PRKD2 silencing. The pharmacological PRKD family inhibitor CRT0066101 decreased chemotactic migration and invasion across uncoated or matrigel-coated Transwell inserts. Silencing of PRKD2 attenuated migration and invasion of U87MG cells even more effectively. In terms of downstream signaling, CRT0066101 prevented PRKD2 autophosphorylation and inhibited p44/42 MAPK and to a smaller extent p54/46 JNK and p38 MAPK activation. PRKD2 silencing impaired activation of p44/42 MAPK and p54/46 JNK, downregulated nuclear c-Jun protein levels and decreased c-Jun{sup S73} phosphorylation without affecting the NFκB pathway. Finally, qPCR array analyses revealed that silencing of PRKD2 downregulates mRNA levels of integrin alpha-2 and -4 (ITGA2 and -4), plasminogen activator urokinase (PLAU), plasminogen activator urokinase receptor (PLAUR), and matrix metallopeptidase 1 (MMP1). Findings of the present study identify PRKD2 as a potential target to interfere with glioblastoma cell migration and invasion, two major determinants contributing to recurrence of glioblastoma after multimodality treatment. Highlights: • Sphingosine-1-phosphate induces glioma cell migration and invasion. • Part of the effects is mediated by protein kinase D2 (PRKD2) activation. • Inactivation of PRKD2 attenuates glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. • Both, RNAi and pharmacological inhibition of PRKD2 inhibits MAPK

  12. Conformational changes and translocation of tissue-transglutaminase to the plasma membranes: role in cancer cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue-transglutaminase (TG2), a dual function G-protein, plays key roles in cell differentiation and migration. In our previous studies we reported the mechanism of TG2-induced cell differentiation. In present study, we explored the mechanism of how TG2 may be involved in cell migration. To study the mechanism of TG2-mediated cell migration, we used neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) which do not express TG2, neuroblastoma cells expressing exogenous TG2 (SHYTG2), and pancreatic cancer cells which express high levels of endogenous TG2. Resveratrol, a natural compound previously shown to inhibit neuroblastoma and pancreatic cancer in the animal models, was utilized to investigate the role of TG2 in cancer cell migration. Immunofluorescence assays were employed to detect expression and intracellular localization of TG2, and calcium levels in the migrating cells. Native gel electrophoresis was performed to analyze resveratrol-induced cellular distribution and conformational states of TG2 in migrating cells. Data are presented as the mean and standard deviation of at least 3 independent experiments. Comparisons were made among groups using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey-Kramer ad hoc test. TG2 containing cells (SHYTG2 and pancreatic cancer cells) exhibit increased cell migration and invasion in collagen-coated and matrigel-coated transwell plate assays, respectively. Resveratrol (1 μM-10 μM) prevented migration of TG2-expressing cells. During the course of migration, resveratrol increased the immunoreactivity of TG2 without affecting the total TG2 protein level in migrating cells. In these cells, resveratrol increased calcium levels, and depletion of intracellular calcium by a calcium chelator, BAPTA, attenuated resveratrol-enhanced TG2 immunoreactivity. In native-polyacrylamide gels, we detected an additional TG2 protein band with slower migration in total cell lysates of resveratrol treated cells. This TG2 form is non-phosphorylated, exclusively present in plasma

  13. Directed cell migration in the presence of obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grima Ramon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemotactic movement is a common feature of many cells and microscopic organisms. In vivo, chemotactic cells have to follow a chemotactic gradient and simultaneously avoid the numerous obstacles present in their migratory path towards the chemotactic source. It is not clear how cells detect and avoid obstacles, in particular whether they need a specialized biological mechanism to do so. Results We propose that cells can sense the presence of obstacles and avoid them because obstacles interfere with the chemical field. We build a model to test this hypothesis and find that this naturally enables efficient at-a-distance sensing to be achieved with no need for a specific and active obstacle-sensing mechanism. We find that (i the efficiency of obstacle avoidance depends strongly on whether the chemotactic chemical reacts or remains unabsorbed at the obstacle surface. In particular, it is found that chemotactic cells generally avoid absorbing barriers much more easily than non-absorbing ones. (ii The typically low noise in a cell's motion hinders the ability to avoid obstacles. We also derive an expression estimating the typical distance traveled by chemotactic cells in a 3D random distribution of obstacles before capture; this is a measure of the distance over which chemotaxis is viable as a means of directing cells from one point to another in vivo. Conclusion Chemotactic cells, in many cases, can avoid obstacles by simply following the spatially perturbed chemical gradients around obstacles. It is thus unlikely that they have developed specialized mechanisms to cope with environments having low to moderate concentrations of obstacles.

  14. Silencing stem cell factor attenuates stemness and inhibits migration of cancer stem cells derived from Lewis lung carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Wang, JianTao; Li, Zhixi; Liu, YanYang; Jiang, Ming; Li, Yan; Cao, Dan; Zhao, Maoyuan; Wang, Feng; Luo, Feng

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) plays an important role in tumor growth and metastasis. However, the function of SCF in regulating stemness and migration of cancer stem cells (CSCs) remains largely undefined. Here, we report that non-adhesive culture system can enrich and expand CSCs derived from Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells and that the expression level of SCF in CSCs was higher than those in LLC cells. Silencing SCF via short hairpin (sh) RNA lentivirus transduction attenuated sphere formation and inhibited expressions of stemness genes, ALDH1, Sox2, and Oct4 of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, SCF-silenced CSCs inhibited the migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, with decreased expression of N-cadherin, Vimentin, and increased expression of E-cadherin in vitro and in vivo. Finally, SCF-short hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentivirus transduction suppressed tumorigenicity of CSCs. Taken together, our findings unraveled an important role of SCF in CSCs derived from LLC cells. SCF might serve as a novel target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:26666817

  15. Promoter Hypomethylation of Maspin Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Extravillous Trophoblast Cells during Placentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwei Shi

    Full Text Available Extravillous trophoblast (EVT cells invade the endometrium and the maternal spiral arterioles during the first trimester. Mammary Serine Protease Inhibitor (Maspin, SERPINB5 plays a putative role in regulating the invasive activity of cytotrophoblasts. The maspin gene is silenced in various cancers by an epigenetic mechanism that involves aberrant cytosine methylation. We investigated the effect of the methylation status of the maspin promoter on the maspin expression and the aggressiveness of EVT cells.Western blotting was used to detect the maspin protein expression in EVT cells upon hypoxia. The proliferative ability, the apoptosis rate and the migration and invasiveness were measured with Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, Flow Cytometry technology and Transwell methods. Subsequently, we treated cells with recombinant maspin protein. The methylation degree of maspin promoter region upon hypoxia/ decitabine was detected by bisulfite sequencing PCR and methylation-specific PCR. Finally, we explored the effects of decitabine on maspin protein expression and the aggressiveness of EVT cells.Hypoxia effectively increased maspin protein expression in EVT cells and significantly inhibited their aggressiveness. The addition of recombinant maspin protein inhibited this aggressiveness. Decitabine reduced the methylation in the maspin promoter region and effectively increased the maspin protein expression, which significantly weakened the migration and invasiveness of EVT cells.The methylation status of the maspin promoter is an important factor that affects the migration and invasion of EVT cells during early pregnancy. A decrease in the methylation status can inhibit the migration and invasion of EVT cells to affect placentation and can result in the ischemia and hypoxia of placenta.

  16. Performance Analysis of Software to Hardware Task Migration in Codesign

    CERN Document Server

    Sebai, Dorsaf; Bennour, Imed

    2010-01-01

    The complexity of multimedia applications in terms of intensity of computation and heterogeneity of treated data led the designers to embark them on multiprocessor systems on chip. The complexity of these systems on one hand and the expectations of the consumers on the other hand complicate the designers job to conceive and supply strong and successful systems in the shortest deadlines. They have to explore the different solutions of the design space and estimate their performances in order to deduce the solution that respects their design constraints. In this context, we propose the modeling of one of the design space possible solutions: the software to hardware task migration. This modeling exploits the synchronous dataflow graphs to take into account the different migration impacts and estimate their performances in terms of throughput.

  17. Inhibition of the proliferation and acceleration of migration of vascular endothelial cells by increased cysteine-rich motor neuron 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Yukiko; Morimoto, Mayuka [Department of Immunobiology, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Mukogawa Women' s University, 11-68 Koshien Kyuban-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8179 (Japan); Toda, Ken-ichi [Department of Dermatology, Kitano Hospital, The Tazuke Kofukai Nedical Institute, 2-4-20 Ohgimachi, Kita-ku, Osaka 530-8480 (Japan); Shinya, Tomohiro; Sato, Keizo [Department of Clinical Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University of Health and Welfare, Nobeoka, Miyazaki 882-8508 (Japan); Takahashi, Satoru, E-mail: imwalrus@mukogawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Immunobiology, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Mukogawa Women' s University, 11-68 Koshien Kyuban-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8179 (Japan); Institute for Biosciences, Mukogawa Women' s University, 11-68 Koshien Kyuban-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8179 (Japan)

    2015-07-03

    Cysteine-rich motor neuron 1 (CRIM1) is upregulated only in extracellular matrix gels by angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It then plays a critical role in the tube formation of endothelial cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of increased CRIM1 on other endothelial functions such as proliferation and migration. Knock down of CRIM1 had no effect on VEGF-induced proliferation or migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), indicating that basal CRIM1 is not involved in the proliferation or migration of endothelial cells. Stable CRIM1-overexpressing endothelial F-2 cells, termed CR1 and CR2, were constructed, because it was difficult to prepare monolayer HUVECs that expressed high levels of CRIM1. Proliferation was reduced and migration was accelerated in both CR1 and CR2 cells, compared with normal F-2 cells. Furthermore, the transient overexpression of CRIM1 resulted in decreased proliferation and increased migration of bovine aortic endothelial cells. In contrast, neither proliferation nor migration of COS-7 cells were changed by the overexpression of CRIM1. These results demonstrate that increased CRIM1 reduces the proliferation and accelerates the migration of endothelial cells. These CRIM1 effects might contribute to tube formation of endothelial cells. CRIM1 induced by angiogenic factors may serve as a regulator in endothelial cells to switch from proliferating cells to morphological differentiation. - Highlights: • CRIM1 was upregulated only in tubular endothelial cells, but not in monolayers. • Increased CRIM1 reduced the proliferation of endothelial cells. • Increased CRIM1 accelerated the migration of endothelial cells. • Increased CRIM1 had no effect on the proliferation or migration of COS-7 cells.

  18. Inhibition of the proliferation and acceleration of migration of vascular endothelial cells by increased cysteine-rich motor neuron 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cysteine-rich motor neuron 1 (CRIM1) is upregulated only in extracellular matrix gels by angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It then plays a critical role in the tube formation of endothelial cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of increased CRIM1 on other endothelial functions such as proliferation and migration. Knock down of CRIM1 had no effect on VEGF-induced proliferation or migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), indicating that basal CRIM1 is not involved in the proliferation or migration of endothelial cells. Stable CRIM1-overexpressing endothelial F-2 cells, termed CR1 and CR2, were constructed, because it was difficult to prepare monolayer HUVECs that expressed high levels of CRIM1. Proliferation was reduced and migration was accelerated in both CR1 and CR2 cells, compared with normal F-2 cells. Furthermore, the transient overexpression of CRIM1 resulted in decreased proliferation and increased migration of bovine aortic endothelial cells. In contrast, neither proliferation nor migration of COS-7 cells were changed by the overexpression of CRIM1. These results demonstrate that increased CRIM1 reduces the proliferation and accelerates the migration of endothelial cells. These CRIM1 effects might contribute to tube formation of endothelial cells. CRIM1 induced by angiogenic factors may serve as a regulator in endothelial cells to switch from proliferating cells to morphological differentiation. - Highlights: • CRIM1 was upregulated only in tubular endothelial cells, but not in monolayers. • Increased CRIM1 reduced the proliferation of endothelial cells. • Increased CRIM1 accelerated the migration of endothelial cells. • Increased CRIM1 had no effect on the proliferation or migration of COS-7 cells

  19. Individual attitudes towards skilled migration: an empirical analysis across countries

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Facchini; Anna Maria Mayda

    2009-01-01

    It is commonly argued that skilled immigration benefits the destination country through several channels. Yet, only a small group of countries reports to have policies in place aimed at increasing the intake of skilled immigrants. Why? In this paper we analyze the factors that affect a direct measure of individual attitudes towards skilled migration, focusing on two main channels: the labor market and the welfare state. We find that more educated natives are less likely to favor skilled immig...

  20. MicroRNAs let-7b/i suppress human glioma cell invasion and migration by targeting IKBKE directly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrated that IKBKE is overexpressed in human gliomas and that the downregulation of IKBKE markedly inhibits the proliferative and invasive abilities of glioma cells, which is consistent with the results reported by several different research groups. Therefore, IKBKE represents a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of glioma. In the present study, we verified that the microRNAs let-7b and let-7i target IKBKE through luciferase assays and found that let-7b/i mimics can knock down IKBKE and upregulate E-cadherin through western blot analysis. Moreover, the expression levels of let-7b/i were significantly lower in glioma cell lines than that in normal brain tissues, as determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Furthermore, let-7b/i inhibit the invasion and migration of glioma cells, as determined through wound healing and Transwell assays. The above-mentioned data suggest that let-7b/i inhibit the invasive ability of glioma cells by directly downregulating IKBKE and indirectly upregulating E-cadherin. - Highlights: • Let-7b and let-7i are downregulated in glioma cell lines. • IKBKE is a target gene of let-7b/i. • Let-7b/i inhibit the invasion and migration of glioma cells. • Let-7b/i upregulate E-cadherin by downregulating IKBKE

  1. MicroRNAs let-7b/i suppress human glioma cell invasion and migration by targeting IKBKE directly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Yuan; Hao, Shaobo [Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China); Laboratory of Neuro-Oncology, Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin 300052 (China); Key Laboratory of Neurotrauma, Variation and Regeneration, Ministry of Education and Tianjin Municipal Government (China); Ye, Minhua [Department of Neurosurgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi Province 330006 (China); Zhang, Anling [Laboratory of Neuro-Oncology, Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin 300052 (China); Key Laboratory of Neurotrauma, Variation and Regeneration, Ministry of Education and Tianjin Municipal Government (China); Nan, Yang [Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China); Wang, Guangxiu; Jia, Zhifan [Laboratory of Neuro-Oncology, Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin 300052 (China); Key Laboratory of Neurotrauma, Variation and Regeneration, Ministry of Education and Tianjin Municipal Government (China); Yu, Kai; Guo, Lianmei [Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China); Pu, Peiyu [Laboratory of Neuro-Oncology, Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin 300052 (China); Key Laboratory of Neurotrauma, Variation and Regeneration, Ministry of Education and Tianjin Municipal Government (China); Huang, Qiang, E-mail: huangqiang209@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China); Zhong, Yue, E-mail: zhongyue2457@sina.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China)

    2015-03-06

    We demonstrated that IKBKE is overexpressed in human gliomas and that the downregulation of IKBKE markedly inhibits the proliferative and invasive abilities of glioma cells, which is consistent with the results reported by several different research groups. Therefore, IKBKE represents a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of glioma. In the present study, we verified that the microRNAs let-7b and let-7i target IKBKE through luciferase assays and found that let-7b/i mimics can knock down IKBKE and upregulate E-cadherin through western blot analysis. Moreover, the expression levels of let-7b/i were significantly lower in glioma cell lines than that in normal brain tissues, as determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Furthermore, let-7b/i inhibit the invasion and migration of glioma cells, as determined through wound healing and Transwell assays. The above-mentioned data suggest that let-7b/i inhibit the invasive ability of glioma cells by directly downregulating IKBKE and indirectly upregulating E-cadherin. - Highlights: • Let-7b and let-7i are downregulated in glioma cell lines. • IKBKE is a target gene of let-7b/i. • Let-7b/i inhibit the invasion and migration of glioma cells. • Let-7b/i upregulate E-cadherin by downregulating IKBKE.

  2. Mechanism Suggests How HIV Protein Disrupts Immune Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Janardhan Ajit; Swigut Tomek; Hill Brian; Myers Michael P; Skowronski Jacek

    2004-01-01

    The infectious cycle of primate lentiviruses is intimately linked to interactions between cells of the immune system. Nef, a potent virulence factor, alters cellular environments to increase lentiviral replication in the host, yet the mechanisms underlying these effects have remained elusive. Since Nef likely functions as an adaptor protein, we exploited a proteomic approach to directly identify molecules that Nef targets to subvert the signaling machinery in T cells. We purified to near homo...

  3. Apoptotic cells are cleared by directional migration and elmo1- dependent macrophage engulfment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ham, Tjakko J; Kokel, David; Peterson, Randall T

    2012-05-01

    Apoptotic cell death is essential for development and tissue homeostasis. Failure to clear apoptotic cells can ultimately cause inflammation and autoimmunity. Apoptosis has primarily been studied by staining of fixed tissue sections, and a clear understanding of the behavior of apoptotic cells in living tissue has been elusive. Here, we use a newly developed technique to track apoptotic cells in real time as they emerge and are cleared from the zebrafish brain. We find that apoptotic cells are remarkably motile, frequently migrating several cell diameters to the periphery of living tissues. F-actin remodeling occurs in surrounding cells, but also within the apoptotic cells themselves, suggesting a cell-autonomous component of motility. During the first 2 days of development, engulfment is rare, and most apoptotic cells lyse at the brain periphery. By 3 days postfertilization, most cell corpses are rapidly engulfed by macrophages. This engulfment requires the guanine nucleotide exchange factor elmo1. In elmo1-deficient macrophages, engulfment is rare and may occur through macropinocytosis rather than directed engulfment. These findings suggest that clearance of apoptotic cells in living vertebrates is accomplished by the combined actions of apoptotic cell migration and elmo1-dependent macrophage engulfment. PMID:22503503

  4. Nitidine chloride inhibits ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion by suppressing MMP-2/9 production via the ERK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangxiu; Lin, Lin; Chen, Ying; Liu, Tianfeng; Liu, Ronghua; Wang, Zhongde; Mou, Kai; Xu, Jia; Li, Bo; Song, Haibo

    2016-04-01

    Nitidine chloride (NC) has been demonstrated to exert anti-tumor effects on various types of tumor. However, no studies have investigated the anti‑metastatic effect of NC on ovarian cancer cells, and the underlying mechanisms have not yet been clearly established. The present study aimed to determine the effect of NC on the migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells. Cell viability and proliferation of ovarian cancer cells were assessed by MTT assay. A scratch wound healing assay and Transwell assays were performed to detect migration and invasion of cells, respectively. The expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‑2 and 9 were detected at the mRNA and protein level following stimulation with NC. Subsequently, the expression of mitogen‑activated protein kinases was detected by western blot analysis. Finally, an inhibitor of extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) was applied to investigate the effect of NC on the expression of MMP‑2/9 as well as the migration and invasion of cells. It was found that NC suppressed the proliferation, migration and invasion of A2780 ovarian cancer cells. NC downregulated MMP‑2 and MMP‑9 in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner. In addition, NC was also able to downregulate phosphorylation of ERK. Furthermore, by applying an ERK inhibitor, U0126, the effect of NC on the expression of MMP-2/9 and inhibition of cell migration and invasion was verified. Taken together, these results demonstrated that NC inhibited the migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells via the ERK signaling pathway. PMID:26935265

  5. COPD promotes migration of A549 lung cancer cells: the role of chemokine CCL21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuźnar-Kamińska B

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Kuźnar-Kamińska,1 Justyna Mikuła-Pietrasik,2 Patrycja Sosińska,2 Krzysztof Książek,2 Halina Batura-Gabryel1 1Department of Pulmonology, Allergology and Respiratory Oncology, 2Department of Pathophysiology, Poznań University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, Poland Abstract: Patients with COPD develop lung cancer more frequently than healthy smokers. At the same time, molecular mediators promoting various aspects of cancer cell progression are still elusive. In this report, we examined whether COPD can be coupled with increased migration of non-small-cell lung cancer cells A549 and, if so, whether this effect may be related to altered production and activity of chemokines CCL21, CXCL5, and CXCL12. The study showed that the migration of A549 cells through the polycarbonate membrane and basement membrane extract toward a chemotactic gradient elicited by serum from patients with COPD was markedly higher as compared with serum from healthy donors. The concentration of CCL21 and CXCL12, but not CXCL5, in serum from patients with COPD was also increased. Experiments in which CCL21- and CXCL12-dependent signaling was blocked revealed that increased migration of the cancer cells upon treatment with serum from patients with COPD was mediated exclusively by CCL21. Collectively, our results indicate that COPD may contribute to the progression of lung cancer via CCL21-dependent intensification of cancer cell migration. Keywords: chemokines, COPD, lung cancer, migration

  6. TRAIL promotes membrane blebbing, detachment and migration of cells displaying a dysfunctional intrinsic pathway of apoptosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Somasekharan, S.P.; Koc, Michal; Morizot, A.; Micheau, O.; Sorensen, P.H.B.; Gaide, O.; Anděra, Ladislav; Martinou, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2013), s. 324-336. ISSN 1360-8185 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : TRAIL * membrane blebbing * ROCK1 * HCT116 Bax−/− * cancer cell migration * drug resistance * bortezomib * proteasome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.614, year: 2013

  7. Paxillin kinase linker (PKL) regulates Vav2 signaling during cell spreading and migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew C.; Machida, Kazuya; Mayer, Bruce J.; Turner, Christopher E.

    2013-01-01

    The Rho family of GTPases plays an important role in coordinating dynamic changes in the cell migration machinery after integrin engagement with the extracellular matrix. Rho GTPases are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and negatively regulated by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). However, the mechanisms by which GEFs and GAPs are spatially and temporally regulated are poorly understood. Here the activity of the proto-oncogene Vav2, a GEF for Rac1, RhoA, and Cdc42, is shown to be regulated by a phosphorylation-dependent interaction with the ArfGAP PKL (GIT2). PKL is required for Vav2 activation downstream of integrin engagement and epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation. In turn, Vav2 regulates the subsequent redistribution of PKL and the Rac1 GEF β-PIX to focal adhesions after EGF stimulation, suggesting a feedforward signaling loop that coordinates PKL-dependent Vav2 activation and PKL localization. Of interest, Vav2 is required for the efficient localization of PKL and β-PIX to the leading edge of migrating cells, and knockdown of Vav2 results in a decrease in directional persistence and polarization in migrating cells, suggesting a coordination between PKL/Vav2 signaling and PKL/β-PIX signaling during cell migration. PMID:23615439

  8. Skin irritants and contact sensitizers induce Langerhans cell migration and maturation at irritant concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J.J.L.; Lehé, C.L.; Hasegawa, H.; Elliott, G.R.; Das, P.K.

    2006-01-01

    Skin irritants and contact allergens reduce the number of Langerhans cells (LCs). It has been assumed that this reduction is due their migration to the draining lymph node (LN) for initiating immune sensitization in a host. Skin irritation, however, as opposed to contact allergy is not considered to

  9. BMP-2 induces versican and hyaluronan that contribute to post-EMT AV cushion cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Inai

    Full Text Available Distal outgrowth and maturation of mesenchymalized endocardial cushions are critical morphogenetic events during post-EMT atrioventricular (AV valvuloseptal morphogenesis. We explored the role of BMP-2 in the regulation of valvulogenic extracellular matrix (ECM components, versican and hyaluronan (HA, and cell migration during post-EMT AV cushion distal outgrowth/expansion. We observed intense staining of versican and HA in AV cushion mesenchyme from the early cushion expansion stage, Hamburger and Hamilton (HH stage-17 to the cushion maturation stage, HH stage-29 in the chick. Based on this expression pattern we examined the role of BMP-2 in regulating versican and HA using 3D AV cushion mesenchymal cell (CMC aggregate cultures on hydrated collagen gels. BMP-2 induced versican expression and HA deposition as well as mRNA expression of versican and Has2 by CMCs in a dose dependent manner. Noggin, an antagonist of BMP, abolished BMP-2-induced versican and HA as well as mRNA expression of versican and Has2. We further examined whether BMP-2-promoted cell migration was associated with expression of versican and HA. BMP-2- promoted cell migration was significantly impaired by treatments with versican siRNA and HA oligomer. In conclusion, we provide evidence that BMP-2 induces expression of versican and HA by AV CMCs and that these ECM components contribute to BMP-2-induced CMC migration, indicating critical roles for BMP-2 in distal outgrowth/expansion of mesenchymalized AV cushions.

  10. Insect Pupil Mechanisms. II. Pigment Migration in Retinula Cells of Butterflies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, D.G.; Numan, J.A.J.; Tinbergen, J.; Kuiper, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that the glow observable in dark adapted butterfly eyes is extinguished upon light adaptation by the action of migrating retinula cell pigment granules has been investigated. Experimental procedures applying optical methods to intact, living animals were similar to those used previous

  11. A composite hydrogel platform for the dissection of tumor cell migration at tissue interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rape, Andrew D; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most prevalent primary brain cancer, is characterized by diffuse infiltration of tumor cells into brain tissue, which severely complicates surgical resection and contributes to tumor recurrence. The most rapid mode of tissue infiltration occurs along blood vessels or white matter tracts, which represent topological interfaces thought to serve as "tracks" that speed cell migration. Despite this observation, the field lacks experimental paradigms that capture key features of these tissue interfaces and allow reductionist dissection of mechanisms of this interfacial motility. To address this need, we developed a culture system in which tumor cells are sandwiched between a fibronectin-coated ventral surface representing vascular basement membrane and a dorsal hyaluronic acid (HA) surface representing brain parenchyma. We find that inclusion of the dorsal HA surface induces formation of adhesive complexes and significantly slows cell migration relative to a free fibronectin-coated surface. This retardation is amplified by inclusion of integrin binding peptides in the dorsal layer and expression of CD44, suggesting that the dorsal surface slows migration through biochemically specific mechanisms rather than simple steric hindrance. Moreover, both the reduction in migration speed and assembly of dorsal adhesions depend on myosin activation and the stiffness of the ventral layer, implying that mechanochemical feedback directed by the ventral layer can influence adhesive signaling at the dorsal surface. PMID:25047626

  12. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that KATP channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K+ channels triggers K+ efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca2+entry through closing voltage-operated Ca2+ channels. Intracellular Ca2+ is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K+ efflux decreases Ca2+ influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a KATP channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective KATP channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt antagonize the proliferating and migrating effects of PDGF-BB on human ASMCs

  13. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping, E-mail: wpxie@njmu.edu.cn; Wang, Hong, E-mail: hongwang@njmu.edu.cn

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (K{sub ATP}) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that K{sub ATP} channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K{sup +} channels triggers K{sup +} efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca{sup 2+}entry through closing voltage-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K{sup +} efflux decreases Ca{sup 2+} influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a K{sub ATP} channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective K{sub ATP} channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt

  14. Restoration of Brain Acid Soluble Protein 1 Inhibits Proliferation and Migration of Thyroid Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Run-Sheng; Yu, Yue; Chen, Jun; Chen, Yue-Yu; Shen, Na; Qiu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brain acid soluble protein 1 (BASP1) is identified as a novel potential tumor suppressor in several cancers. However, its role in thyroid cancer has not been investigated yet. In the present study, the antitumor activities of BASP1 against the growth and migration of thyroid cancer cells were evaluated. Methods: BASP1 expression in thyroid cancer tissues and normal tissues were examined by immunohistochemical staining and the association between its expression and prognosis was analyzed. pcDNA-BASP1 carrying full length of BASP1 cDNA was constructed to restore the expression of BASP1 in thyroid cancer cell lines (BHT-101 and KMH-2). The cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo was evaluated by WST-1 assay and xenograft tumor models, respectively. Cell cycle distribution after transfection was analyzed using flow cytometry. Cell apoptosis after transfection was examined by annexin V/propidium iodide assay. The migration was examined using transwell assay. Results: BASP1 expression was abundant in normal tissues while it is significantly decreased in cancer tissues (P = 0.000). pcDNA-BASP1 restored the expression of BASP1 and significantly inhibited the growth of BHT-101 and KMH-2 cells as well as xenograft tumors in nude mice (P = 0.000). pcDNA-BASP1 induced G1 arrest and apoptosis in BHT-101 and KMH-2 cells. In addition, pcDNA-BASP1 significantly inhibited the cell migration. Conclusions: Downregulation of BASP1 expression may play a role in the tumorigenesis of thyroid cancer. Restoration of BASP1 expression exerted extensive antitumor activities against growth and migration of thyroid cancer cells, which suggested that BASP1 gene might act as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of thyroid cancer. PMID:27270539

  15. Topographical guidance of 3D tumor cell migration at an interface of collagen densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During cancer progression, metastatic cells leave the primary tumor and invade into the fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM) within the surrounding stroma. This ECM network is highly heterogeneous, and interest in understanding how this network can affect cell behavior has increased in the past several decades. However, replicating this heterogeneity has proven challenging. Here, we designed and utilized a method to create a well-defined interface between two distinct regions of high- and low-density collagen gels to mimic the heterogeneities in density found in the tumor stroma. We show that cells will invade preferentially from the high-density side into the low-density side. We also demonstrate that the net cell migration is a function of the density of the collagen in which the cells are embedded, and the difference in density between the two regions has minimal effect on cell net displacement and distance travelled. Our data further indicate that a low-to-high density interface promotes directional migration and induces formation of focal adhesion on the interface surface. Together, the current results demonstrate how ECM heterogeneities, in the form of interfacial boundaries, can affect cell migration. (paper)

  16. Effect of beta-escin sodium on endothelial cells proliferation, migration and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu-Hua; Xu, Bo; Liu, Jing-Tao; Cui, Jing-Rong

    2008-01-01

    beta-Escin, the major active compound in extracts of the horse chestnut Aesculus hippocastanum seed, has shown clinically significant activity in chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). Our previous studies had shown that beta-escin sodium inhibited angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and in aortic disk assay. In this study, we explored the direct effect of beta-escin sodium on proliferation, migration and apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and ECV304 cells. Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay showed that beta-escin sodium (10, 20, 40 microg/ml) inhibited endothelial cells (ECs) proliferation dose-dependently. beta-escin sodium also induced ECs apoptosis at 40 microg/ml. Cell migration was evaluated by an improved wound assay: barren spot assay. And the direct effect on cell motility excluding influence of cell proliferation was examined by High Content Screening (HCS, Cellomics) assay. The data indicated that beta-escin sodium suppressed ECs migration and cell motility. Western blot results suggested that beta-escin sodium acts on ECs possibly by increasing expression of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), and decreasing expression of PKC-alpha and activation of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). Our findings give the evidence that beta-escin sodium might have potential anti-angiogenic activity via its direct effects on ECs. PMID:18718875

  17. The palmitoylation state of PMP22 modulates epithelial cell morphology and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Zacharias

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available PMP22 (peripheral myelin protein 22, also known as GAS 3 (growth-arrest-specific protein 3, is a disease-linked tetraspan glycoprotein of peripheral nerve myelin and constituent of intercellular junctions in epithelia. To date, our knowledge of the post-translational modification of PMP22 is limited. Using the CSS-Palm 2.0 software we predicted that C85 (cysteine 85, a highly conserved amino acid located between the second and third transmembrane domains, is a potential site for palmitoylation. To test this, we mutated C85S (C85 to serine and established stable cells lines expressing the WT (wild-type or the C85S-PMP22. In Schwann and MDCK (Madin–Darby canine kidney cells mutating C85 blocked the palmitoylation of PMP22, which we monitored using 17-ODYA (17-octadecynoic acid. While palmitoylation was not necessary for processing the newly synthesized PMP22 through the secretory pathway, overexpression of C85S-PMP22 led to pronounced cell spreading and uneven monolayer thinning. To further investigate the functional significance of palmitoylated PMP22, we evaluated MDCK cell migration in a wound-healing assay. While WT-PMP22 expressing cells were resistant to migration, C85S cells displayed lamellipodial protrusions and migrated at a similar rate to vector control. These findings indicate that palmitoylation of PMP22 at C85 is critical for the role of the protein in modulating epithelial cell shape and motility.

  18. Leptin enhances ICAM-1 expression, induces migration and cytokine synthesis, and prolongs survival of human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzukawa, Maho; Koketsu, Rikiya; Baba, Shintaro; Igarashi, Sayaka; Nagase, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Masao; Matsutani, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Masafumi; Shoji, Shunsuke; Hebisawa, Akira; Ohta, Ken

    2015-10-15

    There is rising interest in how obesity affects respiratory diseases, since epidemiological findings indicate a strong relationship between the two conditions. Leptin is a potent adipokine produced mainly by adipocytes. It regulates energy storage and expenditure and also induces inflammation. Previous studies have shown that leptin is able to activate inflammatory cells such as lymphocytes and granulocytes, but little is known about its effect on lung structural cells. The present study investigated the effects of leptin on human airway epithelial cells by using human primary airway epithelial cells and a human airway epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B. Flow cytometry showed enhanced ICAM-1 expression by both of those cells in response to leptin, and that effect was abrogated by dexamethasone or NF-κB inhibitor. Flow cytometry and quantitative PCR showed that airway epithelial cells expressed leptin receptor (Ob-R), whose expression level was downregulated by leptin itself. Multiplex cytokine analysis demonstrated enhanced production of CCL11, G-CSF, VEGF, and IL-6 by BEAS-2B cells stimulated with leptin. Furthermore, transfection of Ob-R small interference RNA decreased the effect of leptin on CCL11 production as assessed by quantitative PCR. Finally, leptin induced migration of primary airway epithelial cells toward leptin, suppressed BEAS-2B apoptosis induced with TNF-α and IFN-γ, and enhanced proliferation of primary airway epithelial cells. In summary, leptin was able to directly activate human airway epithelial cells by binding to Ob-R and by NF-κB activation, resulting in upregulation of ICAM-1 expression, induction of CCL11, VEGF, G-CSF, and IL-6 synthesis, induction of migration, inhibition of apoptosis, and enhancement of proliferation. PMID:26276826

  19. Migration paths of cells different origins in the embryonic human heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voloshin N. A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hearts of human embryos were investigated using immunohistochemical method with antibodies to neurofilaments from 4 to 8 week of prenatal development. It was found that the embryonic human heart there are NF-positive cells, which occupy its territory by two mechanisms: through the migration of intercellular spaces and on the mechanism immersion out of heart cavity. In the second case neurofilaments-positive cells through the endothelium of blood vessels or endocardium immersion into the myocardium or mesenchymal areas. Mesenchyme in the heart contain neurofilamentpositive cells, migrating here from both mechanisms. Similar cells have been found by us in the liver of human embryo, beginning at 5 weeks of prenatal development.

  20. SRPK2 promotes the growth and migration of the colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Wu, Hai-Feng; Shen, Wei; Xu, Dong-Yan; Ruan, Ting-Yan; Tao, Guo-Qing; Lu, Pei-Hua

    2016-07-15

    Colon cancer is one of the major causes of cancer-related death in the world. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying this malignancy will facilitate the diagnosis and treatment. Serine-arginine protein kinase 2 (SRPK2) has been reported to be upregulated in several cancer types. However, its expression and functions in colon cancer remains unknown. In this study, it was found that the expression of SRPK2 was up-regulated in the clinical colon cancer samples. Overexpression of SRPK2 promoted the growth and migration of colon cancer cells, while knocking down the expression of SRPK2 inhibited the growth, migration and tumorigenecity of colon cancer cells. Molecular mechanism studies revealed that SRPK2 activated ERK signaling in colon cancer cells. Taken together, our study demonstrated the tumor promoting roles of SRPK2 in colon cancer cells and SRPK2 might be a promising therapeutic target for colon cancer. PMID:27041240

  1. Baicalein inhibits the migration and invasive properties of human hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavonoids have been demonstrated to exert health benefits in humans. We investigated whether the flavonoid baicalein would inhibit the adhesion, migration, invasion, and growth of human hepatoma cell lines, and we also investigated its mechanism of action. The separate effects of baicalein and baicalin on the viability of HA22T/VGH and SK-Hep1 cells were investigated for 24 h. To evaluate their invasive properties, cells were incubated on matrigel-coated transwell membranes in the presence or absence of baicalein. We examined the effect of baicalein on the adhesion of cells, on the activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), protein kinase C (PKC), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and on tumor growth in vivo. We observed that baicalein suppresses hepatoma cell growth by 55%, baicalein-treated cells showed lower levels of migration than untreated cells, and cell invasion was significantly reduced to 28%. Incubation of hepatoma cells with baicalein also significantly inhibited cell adhesion to matrigel, collagen I, and gelatin-coated substrate. Baicalein also decreased the gelatinolytic activities of the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2, MMP-9, and uPA, decreased p50 and p65 nuclear translocation, and decreased phosphorylated I-kappa-B (IKB)-β. In addition, baicalein reduced the phosphorylation levels of PKCα and p38 proteins, which regulate invasion in poorly differentiated hepatoma cells. Finally, when SK-Hep1 cells were grown as xenografts in nude mice, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of baicalein induced a significant dose-dependent decrease in tumor growth. These results demonstrate the anticancer properties of baicalein, which include the inhibition of adhesion, invasion, migration, and proliferation of human hepatoma cells in vivo. - Highlight: → Baicalein inhibits several essential steps in the onset of metastasis.

  2. 1-integrin and MT1-MMP promote tumor cell migration in 2D but not in 3D fibronectin microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corall, Silke; Haraszti, Tamas; Bartoschik, Tanja; Spatz, Joachim Pius; Ludwig, Thomas; Cavalcanti-Adam, Elisabetta Ada

    2014-03-01

    Cell migration is a crucial event for physiological processes, such as embryonic development and wound healing, as well as for pathological processes, such as cancer dissemination and metastasis formation. Cancer cell migration is a result of the concerted action of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), expressed by cancer cells to degrade the surrounding matrix, and integrins, the transmembrane receptors responsible for cell binding to matrix proteins. While it is known that cell-microenvironment interactions are essential for migration, the role of the physical state of such interactions remains still unclear. In this study we investigated human fibrosarcoma cell migration in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) fibronectin (FN) microenvironments. By using antibody blocking approach and cell-binding site mutation, we determined that -integrin is the main mediator of fibrosarcoma cell migration in 2D FN, whereas in 3D fibrillar FN, the binding of - and -integrins is not necessary for cell movement in the fibrillar network. Furthermore, while the general inhibition of MMPs with GM6001 has no effect on cell migration in both 2D and 3D FN matrices, we observed opposing effect after targeted silencing of a membrane-bound MMP, namely MT1-MMP. In 2D fibronectin, silencing of MT1-MMP results in decreased migration speed and loss of directionality, whereas in 3D FN matrices, cell migration speed is increased and integrin-mediated signaling for actin dynamics is promoted. Our results suggest that the fibrillar nature of the matrix governs the migratory behavior of fibrosarcoma cells. Therefore, to hinder migration and dissemination of diseased cells, matrix molecules should be directly targeted, rather than specific subtypes of receptors at the cell membrane.

  3. Migration of 99mTC-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) labeled immature and mature dendritic cells in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate migration of technetium-99 m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (99mTc-HMPAO) labeled immature and mature dendritic cells (DC) in the mouse. DC were collected from bone marrow (BM) of tibiae and femurs of mice. Immature and mature CD from BM cells were radiolabeled with 99mTc-HMPAO. To evaluate the functional and phenotypic changes of DC from radiolabeling, the allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis were performed before and after labeling with 99mTc-HMPAO. Migration of intravenously injected DC (iv-DC) was assessed by serial gamma camera images of mice with or without subcutaneous tumor. Percent injected dose per gram (%ID/g) was calculated in lungs, liver, spleen, kidneys, and tumor through dissection of each mice after 24 hours of injection. Labeling efficiency of immature and mature DC were 60.4 ± 5.4% and 61.8 ± 6.7%, respectively. Iv-DC initially appeared in the lungs, then redistributed mainly to liver and spleen. Migration of mature DC to spleen was significantly higher than that of immature DC (38.3 ± 4.0% vs 32.2 ± 4.1% in control group, 40.4 ± 4.1% vs 35.9 ± 3.8% in tumor group; ρ 99mTc-HMPAO labeled immature and mature DC. Migration of mature DC to spleen and tumor was higher than that of immature DC when they were i.v. injected

  4. The atypical cadherin Celsr1 functions non-cell autonomously to block rostral migration of facial branchiomotor neurons in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasco, Derrick M; Pike, Whitney; Qu, Yibo; Reustle, Lindsay; Misra, Kamana; Di Bonito, Maria; Studer, Michele; Fritzsch, Bernd; Goffinet, André M; Tissir, Fadel; Chandrasekhar, Anand

    2016-09-01

    The caudal migration of facial branchiomotor (FBM) neurons from rhombomere (r) 4 to r6 in the hindbrain is an excellent model to study neuronal migration mechanisms. Although several Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) components are required for FBM neuron migration, only Celsr1, an atypical cadherin, regulates the direction of migration in mice. In Celsr1 mutants, a subset of FBM neurons migrates rostrally instead of caudally. Interestingly, Celsr1 is not expressed in the migrating FBM neurons, but rather in the adjacent floor plate and adjoining ventricular zone