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Sample records for cell migration analysis

  1. Automated migration analysis based on cell texture: method & reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chittenden Thomas W

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper, we present and validate a way to measure automatically the extent of cell migration based on automated examination of a series of digital photographs. It was designed specifically to identify the impact of Second Hand Smoke (SHS on endothelial cell migration but has broader applications. The analysis has two stages: (1 preprocessing of image texture, and (2 migration analysis. Results The output is a graphic overlay that indicates the front lines of cell migration superimposed on each original image, with automated reporting of the distance traversed vs. time. Expert preference compares to manual placement of leading edge shows complete equivalence of automated vs. manual leading edge definition for cell migration measurement. Conclusion Our method is indistinguishable from careful manual determinations of cell front lines, with the advantages of full automation, objectivity, and speed.

  2. Analysis of primary cilia in directional cell migration in fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Veland, Iben; Schwab, Albrecht;

    2013-01-01

    Early studies of migrating fibroblasts showed that primary cilia orient in front of the nucleus and point toward the leading edge. Recent work has shown that primary cilia coordinate a series of signaling pathways critical to fibroblast cell migration during development and in wound healing. In p...

  3. A Simple Force-Motion Relation for Migrating Cells Revealed by Multipole Analysis of Traction Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Tanimoto, Hirokazu; Sano, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    For biophysical understanding of cell motility, the relationship between mechanical force and cell migration must be uncovered, but it remains elusive. Since cells migrate at small scale in dissipative circumstances, the inertia force is negligible and all forces should cancel out. This implies that one must quantify the spatial pattern of the force instead of just the summation to elucidate the force-motion relation. Here, we introduced multipole analysis to quantify the traction stress dyna...

  4. Border cell migration: A model system for live imaging and genetic analysis of collective cell movement

    OpenAIRE

    Prasad, M; Wang, X; He, L.(Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA); Cai, D; Montell, DJ

    2015-01-01

    © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Border cell migration in the Drosophila ovary has emerged as a genetically tractable model for studying collective cell movement. Over many years border cell migration was exclusively studied in fixed samples due to the inability to culture stage 9 egg chambers in vitro. Although culturing late-stage egg chambers was long feasible, stage 9 egg chambers survived only briefl y outside the female body. We identifi ed culture conditions that suppo...

  5. In-chip fabrication of free-form 3D constructs for directed cell migration analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mark Holm; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Hansen, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    with a range of pore sizes from 5 × 5 μm to 15 × 15 μm and prefilled with fibrillar collagen. Dendritic cells seeded into the polymer chip in a concentration gradient of the chemoattractant CCL21 efficiently negotiated the microporous maze structure for pore sizes of 8 × 8 μm or larger. The cells migrating...

  6. Comparative analysis of dynamic cell viability, migration and invasion assessments by novel real-time technology and classic endpoint assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridha Limame

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell viability and motility comprise ubiquitous mechanisms involved in a variety of (pathobiological processes including cancer. We report a technical comparative analysis of the novel impedance-based xCELLigence Real-Time Cell Analysis detection platform, with conventional label-based endpoint methods, hereby indicating performance characteristics and correlating dynamic observations of cell proliferation, cytotoxicity, migration and invasion on cancer cells in highly standardized experimental conditions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Dynamic high-resolution assessments of proliferation, cytotoxicity and migration were performed using xCELLigence technology on the MDA-MB-231 (breast cancer and A549 (lung cancer cell lines. Proliferation kinetics were compared with the Sulforhodamine B (SRB assay in a series of four cell concentrations, yielding fair to good correlations (Spearman's Rho 0.688 to 0.964. Cytotoxic action by paclitaxel (0-100 nM correlated well with SRB (Rho>0.95 with similar IC(50 values. Reference cell migration experiments were performed using Transwell plates and correlated by pixel area calculation of crystal violet-stained membranes (Rho 0.90 and optical density (OD measurement of extracted dye (Rho>0.95. Invasion was observed on MDA-MB-231 cells alone using Matrigel-coated Transwells as standard reference method and correlated by OD reading for two Matrigel densities (Rho>0.95. Variance component analysis revealed increased variances associated with impedance-based detection of migration and invasion, potentially caused by the sensitive nature of this method. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The xCELLigence RTCA technology provides an accurate platform for non-invasive detection of cell viability and motility. The strong correlations with conventional methods imply a similar observation of cell behavior and interchangeability with other systems, illustrated by the highly correlating kinetic invasion profiles on

  7. Migration of Cells in a Social Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Søren; Tay, Savas; Johnston, Darius M.;

    2013-01-01

    In multicellular organisms and complex ecosystems, cells migrate in a social context. While this is essential for the basic processes of life such as embryonic development, wound healing and unregulated migration furthermore is implicated in diseases such as cancer, the influence of neighboring....... We quantified1 the migration of thousands of individual cells in their population context using time-lapse microscopy, microfluidic cell culture and automated image analysis, and discovered a much richer dynamics in the social context, with significant variations in directionality, displacement...

  8. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  9. Taking Aim at Moving Targets in Computational Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzzo, Paola; Van Troys, Marleen; Ampe, Christophe; Martens, Lennart

    2016-02-01

    Cell migration is central to the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Fundamental understanding of cell migration can, for example, direct novel therapeutic strategies to control invasive tumor cells. However, the study of cell migration yields an overabundance of experimental data that require demanding processing and analysis for results extraction. Computational methods and tools have therefore become essential in the quantification and modeling of cell migration data. We review computational approaches for the key tasks in the quantification of in vitro cell migration: image pre-processing, motion estimation and feature extraction. Moreover, we summarize the current state-of-the-art for in silico modeling of cell migration. Finally, we provide a list of available software tools for cell migration to assist researchers in choosing the most appropriate solution for their needs.

  10. Stem cell migration after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survival rate of irradiated rodents could be significantly improved by shielding only the small parts of hemopoietic tissues during the course of irradiation. The populations of circulating stem cells in adult organisms are considered to be of some importance for the homeostasis between the many sites of blood cell formation and for the necessary flexibility of hemopoietic response in the face of fluctuating demands. Pluripotent stem cells are migrating through peripheral blood as has been shown for several mammalian species. Under steady state conditions, the exchange of stem cells between the different sites of blood cell formation appears to be restricted. Their presence in blood and the fact that they are in balance with the extravascular stem cell pool may well be of significance for the surveilance of the integrity of local stem cell populations. Any decrease of stem cell population in blood below a critical size results in the rapid immigration of circulating stem cells in order to restore local stem cell pool size. Blood stem cells are involved in the regeneration after whole-body irradiation if the stem cell population in bone marrows is reduced to less than 10% of the normal state. In the animals subjected to partial-body irradiation, the circulating stem cells appear to be the only source for the repopulation of the heavily irradiated, aplastic sites of hemopoietic organs. (Yamashita, S.)

  11. Time-lapse analysis reveals different modes of primordial germ cell migration in the medaka Oryzias latipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Hiromi; Aoki, Yumiko; Nakamura, Shuhei; Ebe, Youko; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Tanaka, Minoru

    2006-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that medaka primordial germ cells (PGC) are first distinguishable by olvas expression during late gastrulation, and that they migrate to the gonadal region through the lateral plate mesoderm. Here, we demonstrate that medaka nanos expression marks the germ line at early gastrulation stage. By marking the germ line with green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to the nanos 3' untranslated region, we were able to visualize the behavior of PGC using time-lapse imaging. We show that there are three distinct modes of PGC migration that function at different stages of development. At early gastrulation stage, PGC actively migrate towards the marginal zone, a process that requires the function of a chemokine receptor, CXCR4. However, at late gastrulation stage, PGC change the mode and direction of their movement, as they are carried towards the midline along with somatic cells undergoing convergent movements. After aligning bilaterally, PGC actively migrate to the posterior end of the lateral plate mesoderm. This posterior movement depends on the activity of both HMGCoAR and a ligand of CXCR4, SDF-1a. These results demonstrate that PGC undergo different modes of migration to reach the prospective gonadal region of the embryo.

  12. The interplay of cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesion in collective cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chenlu; Chowdhury, Sagar; Driscoll, Meghan; Parent, Carole A.; Gupta, S.K.; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Collective cell migration often involves notable cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesions and highly coordinated motion of touching cells. We focus on the interplay between cell–substrate adhesion and cell–cell adhesion. We show that the loss of cell-surface contact does not significantly alter the dynamic pattern of protrusions and retractions of fast migrating amoeboid cells (Dictyostelium discoideum), but significantly changes their ability to adhere to other cells. Analysis of the dynamics ...

  13. Rho GTPases in collective cell migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, M.M.; Friedl, P.

    2014-01-01

    The family of Rho GTPases are intracellular signal transducers that link cell surface signals to multiple intracellular responses. They are best known for their role in regulating actin dynamics required for cell migration, but in addition control cell-cell adhesion, polarization, vesicle traffickin

  14. Expression of aquaporin-1 in SMMC-7221 liver carcinoma cells promotes cell migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yongming; FENG Xuechao; YANG Hong; MA Tonghui

    2006-01-01

    Migration of tumor cells is a crucial step in tumor invasion and metastasis. Here we provide evidence that aquaporin expression is involved in tumor cell migration. RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis demonstrated the AQP1 protein expression on the plasma membrane of SMMC-7221 human hepatoma cells. SMMC-7221 cell clones with high (SMMC-7221hPf) and low (SMMC-7221/Pf) water permeability were identified by functional assays with corresponding high and low AQP1 expression. Cell migration rate was remarkably higher in SMMC-7221hPf cells than SMMC-7221/Pf cells, assessed by Boyden chamber and wound healing assays, whereas cell growth and adhesion were not different. Adenovirus-mediated AQP1 expression in SMMC-7221/Pf cells increased their water permeability and migration rate. These results provide the first evidence that aquaporin-mediated membrane water permeability enhances tumor cell migration and may be associated with tumor invasion and metastasis.

  15. Proteomic analysis of the human cyclin-dependent kinase family reveals a novel CDK5 complex involved in cell growth and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuangbing; Li, Xu; Gong, Zihua; Wang, Wenqi; Li, Yujing; Nair, Binoj Chandrasekharan; Piao, Hailong; Yang, Kunyu; Wu, Gang; Chen, Junjie

    2014-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are the catalytic subunits of a family of mammalian heterodimeric serine/threonine kinases that play critical roles in the control of cell-cycle progression, transcription, and neuronal functions. However, the functions, substrates, and regulation of many CDKs are poorly understood. To systematically investigate these features of CDKs, we conducted a proteomic analysis of the CDK family and identified their associated protein complexes in two different cell lines using a modified SAINT (Significance Analysis of INTeractome) method. The mass spectrometry data were deposited to ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000593 and DOI 10.6019/PXD000593. We identified 753 high-confidence candidate interaction proteins (HCIPs) in HEK293T cells and 352 HCIPs in MCF10A cells. We subsequently focused on a neuron-specific CDK, CDK5, and uncovered two novel CDK5-binding partners, KIAA0528 and fibroblast growth factor (acidic) intracellular binding protein (FIBP), in non-neuronal cells. We showed that these three proteins form a stable complex, with KIAA0528 and FIBP being required for the assembly and stability of the complex. Furthermore, CDK5-, KIAA0528-, or FIBP-depleted breast cancer cells displayed impaired proliferation and decreased migration, suggesting that this complex is required for cell growth and migration in non-neural cells. Our study uncovers new aspects of CDK functions, which provide direction for further investigation of these critical protein kinases. PMID:25096995

  16. Comparative analysis of the role of small G proteins in cell migration and cell death: Cytoprotective and promigratory effects of RalA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small G protein superfamily consists of more than 150 members, and is classified into six families: the Ras, Rho, Rab, Arf, Ran, and RGK families. They regulate a wide variety of cell functions such as cell proliferation/differentiation, cytoskeletal reorganization, vesicle trafficking, nucleocytoplasmic transport and microtubule organization. The small G proteins have also been shown to regulate cell death/survival and cell shape. In this study, we compared the role of representative members of the six families of small G proteins in cell migration and cell death/survival, two cellular phenotypes that are associated with inflammation, tumorigenesis, and metastasis. Our results show that small G proteins of the six families differentially regulate cell death and cell cycle distribution. In particular, our results indicate that Rho family of small G proteins is antiapoptotic. Ras, Rho, and Ran families promoted cell migration. There was no significant correlation between the cell death- and cell migration-regulating activities of the small G proteins. Nevertheless, RalA was not only cytoprotective against multiple chemotherapeutic drugs, but also promigratory inducing stress fiber formation, which was accompanied by the activation of Akt and Erk pathways. Our study provides a framework for further systematic investigation of small G proteins in the perspectives of cell death/survival and motility in inflammation and cancer.

  17. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneet Bhatia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1 in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1 expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration.

  18. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M; Clarke, Frank M; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration.

  19. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M; Clarke, Frank M; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration. PMID:26760912

  20. Chemistry and biology of the compounds that modulate cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Etsu; Imoto, Masaya

    2016-03-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental step for embryonic development, wound repair, immune responses, and tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Extensive studies have attempted to reveal the molecular mechanisms behind cell migration; however, they remain largely unclear. Bioactive compounds that modulate cell migration show promise as not only extremely powerful tools for studying the mechanisms behind cell migration but also as drug seeds for chemotherapy against tumor metastasis. Therefore, we have screened cell migration inhibitors and analyzed their mechanisms for the inhibition of cell migration. In this mini-review, we introduce our chemical and biological studies of three cell migration inhibitors: moverastin, UTKO1, and BU-4664L.

  1. Cell Migration from Baby to Mother

    OpenAIRE

    Dawe, Gavin S.; Tan, Xiao Wei; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Fetal cells migrate into the mother during pregnancy. Fetomaternal transfer probably occurs in all pregnancies and in humans the fetal cells can persist for decades. Microchimeric fetal cells are found in various maternal tissues and organs including blood, bone marrow, skin and liver. In mice, fetal cells have also been found in the brain. The fetal cells also appear to target sites of injury. Fetomaternal microchimerism may have important implications for the immune status of women, influen...

  2. A high-throughput three-dimensional cell migration assay for toxicity screening with mobile device-based macroscopic image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, David M.; Chen, Jianbo; Sing, David; Gage, Jacob A.; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Raphael, Robert M.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Killian, T. C.; Tseng, Hubert; Souza, Glauco R.

    2013-10-01

    There is a growing demand for in vitro assays for toxicity screening in three-dimensional (3D) environments. In this study, 3D cell culture using magnetic levitation was used to create an assay in which cells were patterned into 3D rings that close over time. The rate of closure was determined from time-lapse images taken with a mobile device and related to drug concentration. Rings of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and tracheal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were tested with ibuprofen and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Ring closure correlated with the viability and migration of cells in two dimensions (2D). Images taken using a mobile device were similar in analysis to images taken with a microscope. Ring closure may serve as a promising label-free and quantitative assay for high-throughput in vivo toxicity in 3D cultures.

  3. Engineered Models of Confined Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Colin D; Hung, Wei-Chien; Wirtz, Denis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-07-11

    Cells in the body are physically confined by neighboring cells, tissues, and the extracellular matrix. Although physical confinement modulates intracellular signaling and the underlying mechanisms of cell migration, it is difficult to study in vivo. Furthermore, traditional two-dimensional cell migration assays do not recapitulate the complex topographies found in the body. Therefore, a number of experimental in vitro models that confine and impose forces on cells in well-defined microenvironments have been engineered. We describe the design and use of microfluidic microchannel devices, grooved substrates, micropatterned lines, vertical confinement devices, patterned hydrogels, and micropipette aspiration assays for studying cell responses to confinement. Use of these devices has enabled the delineation of changes in cytoskeletal reorganization, cell-substrate adhesions, intracellular signaling, nuclear shape, and gene expression that result from physical confinement. These assays and the physiologically relevant signaling pathways that have been elucidated are beginning to have a translational and clinical impact. PMID:27420571

  4. Collective cell migration: guidance principles and hierarchies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeger, Anna; Wolf, Katarina; Zegers, Mirjam M; Friedl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Collective cell migration results from the establishment and maintenance of collective polarization, mechanocoupling, and cytoskeletal kinetics. The guidance of collective cell migration depends on a reciprocal process between cell-intrinsic multicellular organization with leader-follower cell behavior and results in mechanosensory integration of extracellular guidance cues. Important guidance mechanisms include chemotaxis, haptotaxis, durotaxis, and strain-induced mechanosensing to move cell groups along interfaces and paths of least resistance. Additional guidance mechanisms steering cell groups during specialized conditions comprise electrotaxis and passive drift. To form higher-order cell and tissue structures during morphogenesis and cancer invasion, these guidance principles act in parallel and are integrated for collective adaptation to and shaping of varying tissue environments. We review mechanochemical and electrical inputs and multiparameter signal integration underlying collective guidance, decision making, and outcome. PMID:26137890

  5. Migration of cells in a social context

    OpenAIRE

    Vedel, Søren; Tay, Savaş; Johnston, Darius M.; Bruus, Henrik; Quake, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    In multicellular organisms and complex ecosystems, cells migrate in a social context. Whereas this is essential for the basic processes of life, the influence of neighboring cells on the individual remains poorly understood. Previous work on isolated cells has observed a stereotypical migratory behavior characterized by short-time directional persistence with long-time random movement. We discovered a much richer dynamic in the social context, with significant variations in directionality, di...

  6. Plasticity of cell migration: a multiscale tuning model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedl, P.H.A.; Wolf, K. van der

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration underlies tissue formation, maintenance, and regeneration as well as pathological conditions such as cancer invasion. Structural and molecular determinants of both tissue environment and cell behavior define whether cells migrate individually (through amoeboid or mesenchymal modes) or

  7. Bursts of activity in collective cell migration

    CERN Document Server

    Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Mastrapasqua, Eleonora; Nourazar, Mehdi; Ascagni, Miriam; Sugni, Michela; Fascio, Umberto; Leggio, Livio; Malinverno, Chiara; Scita, Giorgio; Santucci, Stephane; Alava, Mikko J; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A M

    2016-01-01

    Dense monolayers of living cells display intriguing relaxation dynamics, reminiscent of soft and glassy materials close to the jamming transition, and migrate collectively when space is available, as in wound healing or in cancer invasion. Here we show that collective cell migration occurs in bursts that are similar to those recorded in the propagation of cracks, fluid fronts in porous media and ferromagnetic domain walls. In analogy with these systems, the distribution of activity bursts displays scaling laws that are universal in different cell types and for cells moving on different substrates. The main features of the invasion dynamics are quantitatively captured by a model of interacting active particles moving in a disordered landscape. Our results illustrate that collective motion of living cells is analogous to the corresponding dynamics in driven, but inanimate, systems.

  8. Migration of cells in a social context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Søren; Tay, Savas; Johnston, Darius M;

    2013-01-01

    In multicellular organisms and complex ecosystems, cells migrate in a social context. Whereas this is essential for the basic processes of life, the influence of neighboring cells on the individual remains poorly understood. Previous work on isolated cells has observed a stereotypical migratory...... based on the experimentally identified "cellular traffic rules" and basic physics that revealed that these emergent behaviors are caused by the interplay of single-cell properties and intercellular interactions, the latter being dominated by a pseudopod formation bias mediated by secreted chemicals...... and pseudopod collapse following collisions. The model demonstrates how aspects of complex biology can be explained by simple rules of physics and constitutes a rapid test bed for future studies of collective migration of individual cells....

  9. A dynamic real time in vivo and static ex vivo analysis of granulomonocytic cell migration in the collagen-induced arthritis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Byrne

    Full Text Available Neutrophilic granulocytes and monocytes (granulomonocytic cells; GMC drive the inflammatory process at the earliest stages of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The migratory behavior and functional properties of GMC within the synovial tissue are, however, only incompletely characterized. Here we have analyzed GMC in the murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA model of RA using multi-photon real time in vivo microscopy together with ex vivo analysis of GMC in tissue sections.GMC were abundant as soon as clinical arthritis was apparent. GMC were motile and migrated randomly through the synovial tissue. In addition, we observed the frequent formation of cell clusters consisting of both neutrophilic granulocytes and monocytes that actively contributed to the inflammatory process of arthritis. Treatment of animals with a single dose of prednisolone reduced the mean velocity of cell migration and diminished the overall immigration of GMC.In summary, our study shows that the combined application of real time in vivo microscopy together with elaborate static post-mortem analysis of GMC enables the description of dynamic migratory characteristics of GMC together with their precise location in a complex anatomical environment. Moreover, this approach is sensitive enough to detect subtle therapeutic effects within a very short period of time.

  10. T cell migration, search strategies and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krummel, Matthew F; Bartumeus, Frederic; Gérard, Audrey

    2016-03-01

    T cell migration is essential for T cell responses; it allows for the detection of cognate antigen at the surface of antigen-presenting cells and for interactions with other cells involved in the immune response. Although appearing random, growing evidence suggests that T cell motility patterns are strategic and governed by mechanisms that are optimized for both the activation stage of the cell and for environment-specific cues. In this Opinion article, we discuss how the combined effects of T cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic forces influence T cell motility patterns in the context of highly complex tissues that are filled with other cells involved in parallel motility. In particular, we examine how insights from 'search theory' can be used to describe T cell movement across an 'exploitation-exploration trade-off' in the context of activation versus effector function and lymph nodes versus peripheral tissues. PMID:26852928

  11. Nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Toro, Raquel; Chèvre, Raphael; Rodríguez, Cristina; Ordóñez, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Andrés, Vicente; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading death cause. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells participate in atherogenesis, but it is unclear whether other mesenchymal cells contribute to this process. Bone marrow (BM) nestin(+) cells cooperate with endothelial cells in directing monocyte egress to bloodstream in response to infections. However, it remains unknown whether nestin(+) cells regulate inflammatory cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Here, we show that nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration during chronic inflammation. In Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice fed with high-fat diet, BM nestin(+) cells regulate the egress of inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils. In the aorta, nestin(+) stromal cells increase ∼30 times and contribute to the atheroma plaque. Mcp1 deletion in nestin(+) cells-but not in endothelial cells only- increases circulating inflammatory cells, but decreases their aortic infiltration, delaying atheroma plaque formation and aortic valve calcification. Therefore, nestin expression marks cells that regulate inflammatory cell migration during atherosclerosis. PMID:27586429

  12. Primary Cilia, Signaling Networks and Cell Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veland, Iben Rønn

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based, sensory organelles that emerge from the centrosomal mother centriole to project from the surface of most quiescent cells in the human body. Ciliary entry is a tightly controlled process, involving diffusion barriers and gating complexes that maintain a unique...... this controls directional cell migration as a physiological response. The ciliary pocket is a membrane invagination with elevated activity of clathrin-dependent endocytosis (CDE). In paper I, we show that the primary cilium regulates TGF-β signaling and the ciliary pocket is a compartment for CDE...... on formation of the primary cilium and CDE at the pocket region. The ciliary protein Inversin functions as a molecular switch between canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling. In paper II, we show that Inversin and the primary cilium control Wnt signaling and are required for polarization and cell migration...

  13. Determinants of leader cells in collective cell migration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, A.; Friedl, P.H.A.

    2010-01-01

    Collective migration is a basic mechanism of cell translocation during morphogenesis, wound repair and cancer invasion. Collective movement requires cells to retain cell-cell contacts, exhibit group polarization with defined front-rear asymmetry, and consequently move as one multicellular unit. Depe

  14. Analysis of cytoskeleton dynamics and cell migration in drosophila ovaries using GFP-actin and E-cadherin-GFP fusion molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhusha, Vladyslav V.; Tsukita, Shoichiro; Oda, Hiroki

    1999-06-01

    Coordination of cell migration and adhesion is essential for movement of tissues during morphogenesis. During Drosophila oogenesis so called border cells (BCs) break from an anterior epithelium of egg chamber, acquire a mesenchymal-like morphology, and migrate posteriorly between nurse cells to oocyte. The confocal microscopic observation of BCs has revealed well-developed forepart lamellipodium stained with Drosophila E-cadherin (DE-cadherin), PS2 integrin, cytoplasmic myosin and F-actin. To investigate mechanism of BC migration in vivo we have constructed a DE-cadherin-GFP and a GFP-actin fusion proteins and induced their expression BCs utilizing the UAS/GAL4 system. The DE-cadherin-GFP signal as well as immunostaining of PS2 integrin visualized a track of migrating BCs providing an evidence that adhesive molecules are pulled out and left behind on the surface of nurse cells. Our data suggest that two distinct adhesive systems, DE-cadherins and PS2 integrins simultaneously mediate the migration of BCs. Release of adhesive contacts in the tail region is a rate- limited event in BC migration. The spatial-temporal sequence of actin-based events visualized by the GFP-actin suggest a treadmilling model for actin behavior in BC lamellipodium. BC migration can be considered as simultaneous reiterating processes of lamellipodium extension and adhesive attachment, cytoskeletal contraction, and rear detachment.

  15. Comparative proteomic analysis of primary schwann cells and a spontaneously immortalized schwann cell line RSC 96: a comprehensive overview with a focus on cell adhesion and migration related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yuhua; Shen, Mi; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Shuqiang; Yu, Shu; Chen, Gang; Gu, Xiaosong; Ding, Fei

    2012-06-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) are the principal glial cells of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). As a result of tissue heterogeneity and difficulties in the isolation and culture of primary SCs, a considerable understanding of SC biology is obtained from SC lines. However, the differences between the primary SCs and SC lines remain uncertain. In the present study, quantitative proteomic analysis based on isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling was conducted to obtain an unbiased view of the proteomic profiles of primary rat SCs and RSC96, a spontaneously immortalized rat SC line. Out of 1757 identified proteins (FDR RSC96. Bioinformatics analysis indicated the unique features of spontaneous immortalization, illustrated the dedifferentiated state of RSC96, and highlighted a panel of novel proteins associated with cell adhesion and migration including CADM4, FERMT2, and MCAM. Selected proteomic data and the requirement of these novel proteins in SC adhesion and migration were properly validated. Taken together, our data collectively revealed proteome differences between primary SCs and RSC96, validated several differentially expressed proteins with potential biological significance, and generated a database that may serve as a useful resource for studies of SC biology and pathology.

  16. Optimal chemotaxis in animal cell intermittent migration

    CERN Document Server

    Romanczuk, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    Animal cells can sense chemical gradients without moving, and are faced with the challenge of migrating towards a target despite noisy information on the target position. Here we discuss optimal search strategies for a chaser that moves by switching between two phases of motion ("run" and "tumble"), reorienting itself towards the target during tumble phases, and performing a persistent random walk during run phases. We show that the chaser average run time can be adjusted to minimize the target catching time or the spatial dispersion of the chasers. We obtain analytical results for the catching time and for the spatial dispersion in the limits of small and large ratios of run time to tumble time, and scaling laws for the optimal run times. Our findings have implications for optimal chemotactic strategies in animal cell migration.

  17. Spatial Autocorrelation Analysis of Migration and Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Sokal, R R; Jacquez, G M; Wooten, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    We test various assumptions necessary for the interpretation of spatial autocorrelation analysis of gene frequency surfaces, using simulations of Wright's isolation-by-distance model with migration or selection superimposed. Increasing neighborhood size enhances spatial autocorrelation, which is reduced again for the largest neighborhood sizes. Spatial correlograms are independent of the mean gene frequency of the surface. Migration affects surfaces and correlograms when immigrant gene freque...

  18. Correction of Migration Through Resolution Cell in ISAR Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANGZhenglin; XINGMengdao; BAOZheng

    2004-01-01

    For ISAR imaging-radar, after the translation motion compensated, the target can be changed to turntable and the R-D (Range-Doppler) algorithm usually adopted is based on small target flying steadily, with the assumption that all of the scatterers are not migrated through their range cells. But for maneuvering target this assumption is not satisfied, as the Doppler frequency is time varying. Actually, to obtain the cross-range resolution of dozens of centimeters for the large-scale or medium targets, especially for S or L wave band, with wave length so short, MTRC (the Migration through resolution cell)would occur on both fringes of the ISAR imaging. The Doppler migration is basically caused by nonuniform rotation of several parts of the target, so that the Doppler frequency of each scatterer is time varying, which can be accumulated coherently by the method of time-frequency analysis in order to get instant range-Doppler image. In this paper, the reason that causes migration through resolution cell is discussed, and a compensating algorithm is proposed. The method of time-frequency analysis to every range cell of scattererer is applied to estimate its instant frequency after range compressing and MTRC correcting,so that the quadratic term can be adjusted. Simulated data and real data prove that this method is effective.

  19. Glucocorticoid receptor beta increases migration of human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeth, Lucien; Nwaneri, Assumpta C; Grabnar, Maria; Demeter, Jonathan; Nestor-Kalinoski, Andrea; Hinds, Terry D

    2016-05-10

    Bladder cancer is observed worldwide having been associated with a host of environmental and lifestyle risk factors. Recent investigations on anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid signaling point to a pathway that may impact bladder cancer. Here we show an inverse effect on the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) isoform signaling that may lead to bladder cancer. We found similar GRα expression levels in the transitional uroepithelial cancer cell lines T24 and UMUC-3. However, the T24 cells showed a significant (p < 0.05) increased expression of GRβ compared to UMUC-3, which also correlated with higher migration rates. Knockdown of GRβ in the T24 cells resulted in a decreased migration rate. Mutational analysis of the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of human GRβ revealed that miR144 might positively regulate expression. Indeed, overexpression of miR144 increased GRβ by 3.8 fold. In addition, miR144 and GRβ were upregulated during migration. We used a peptide nucleic acid conjugated to a cell penetrating-peptide (Sweet-P) to block the binding site for miR144 in the 3'UTR of GRβ. Sweet-P effectively prevented miR144 actions and decreased GRβ expression, as well as the migration of the T24 human bladder cancer cells. Therefore, GRβ may have a significant role in bladder cancer, and possibly serve as a therapeutic target for the disease. PMID:27036026

  20. Functional screening with a live cell imaging-based random cell migration assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roosmalen, Wies; Le Dévédec, Sylvia E; Zovko, Sandra; de Bont, Hans; van de Water, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration, essential in cancer progression, is a complex process comprising a number of spatiotemporally regulated and well-coordinated mechanisms. In order to study (random) cell migration in the context of responses to various external cues (such as growth factors) or intrinsic cell signaling, a number of different tools and approaches have been developed. In order to unravel the key pathways and players involved in the regulation of (cancer) cell migration, a systematical mapping of the players/pathways is required. For this purpose, we developed a cell migration assay based on automatic high-throughput microscopy screen. This approach allows for screening of hundreds of genes, e.g., those encoding various kinases and phosphatases but can also be used for screening of drugs libraries. Moreover, we have developed an automatic analysis pipeline comprising of (a) automatic data acquisition (movie) and (b) automatic analysis of the acquired movies of the migrating cells. Here, we describe various facets of this approach. Since cell migration is essential in progression of cancer metastasis, we describe two examples of experiments performed on highly motile (metastatic) cancer cells.

  1. Collective cell migration: Implications for wound healing and cancer invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available During embryonic morphogenesis, wound repair and cancer invasion, cells often migrate collectively via tight cell-cell junctions, a process named collective migration. During such migration, cells move as coherent groups, large cell sheets, strands or tubes rather than individually. One unexpected finding regarding collective cell migration is that being a "multicellular structure" enables cells to better respond to chemical and physical cues, when compared with isolated cells. This is important because epithelial cells heal wounds via the migration of large sheets of cells with tight intercellular connections. Recent studies have gained some mechanistic insights that will benefit the clinical understanding of wound healing in general. In this review, we will briefly introduce the role of collective cell migration in wound healing, regeneration and cancer invasion and discuss its underlying mechanisms as well as implications for wound healing.

  2. Analysis of in vitro lymphocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration by fluorescent-beads-based flow cytometric cell counting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molema, Ingrid; Mesander, G; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Helfrich, Wijnand; Meijer, D.K F; de Leij, Lou

    1998-01-01

    In this report, we describe a new and simple method for flow cytometric quantitation of lymphocyte numbers in lymphocute-endothelial adhesion/transendothelial migration assays. The method exploits fluorescent flow cytometer alignment beads as a counting reference. Known amounts of beads are added to

  3. Desmosome dynamics in migrating epithelial cells requires the actin cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Brett J.; Pashaj, Anjeza; Johnson, Keith R.; Wahl, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Re-modeling of epithelial tissues requires that the cells in the tissue rearrange their adhesive contacts in order to allow cells to migrate relative to neighboring cells. Desmosomes are prominent adhesive structures found in a variety of epithelial tissues that are believed to inhibit cell migration and invasion. Mechanisms regulating desmosome assembly and stability in migrating cells are largely unknown. In this study we established a cell culture model to examine the fate of desmosomal components during scratch wound migration. Desmosomes are rapidly assembled between epithelial cells at the lateral edges of migrating cells and structures are transported in a retrograde fashion while the structures become larger and mature. Desmosome assembly and dynamics in this system are dependent on the actin cytoskeleton prior to being associated with the keratin intermediate filament cytoskeleton. These studies extend our understanding of desmosome assembly and provide a system to examine desmosome assembly and dynamics during epithelial cell migration. PMID:21945137

  4. Carbon Ion Irradiation Inhibits Glioma Cell Migration Through Downregulation of Integrin Expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of carbon ion irradiation on glioma cell migration. Methods and Materials: U87 and Ln229 glioma cells were irradiated with photons and carbon ions. Migration was analyzed 24 h after irradiation. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis was performed in order to quantify surface expression of integrins. Results: Single photon doses of 2 Gy and 10 Gy enhanced ανβ3 and ανβ5 integrin expression and caused tumor cell hypermigration on both vitronectin (Vn) and fibronectin (Fn). Compared to integrin expression in unirradiated cells, carbon ion irradiation caused decreased integrin expression and inhibited cell migration on both Vn and Fn. Conclusion: Photon radiotherapy (RT) enhances the risk of tumor cell migration and subsequently promotes locoregional spread via photon induction of integrin expression. In contrast to photon RT, carbon ion RT causes decreased integrin expression and suppresses glioma cell migration on both Vn and Fn, thus promising improved local control.

  5. A modeling approach to study the effect of cell polarization on keratinocyte migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Jörg Fuhr

    Full Text Available The skin forms an efficient barrier against the environment, and rapid cutaneous wound healing after injury is therefore essential. Healing of the uppermost layer of the skin, the epidermis, involves collective migration of keratinocytes, which requires coordinated polarization of the cells. To study this process, we developed a model that allows analysis of live-cell images of migrating keratinocytes in culture based on a small number of parameters, including the radius of the cells, their mass and their polarization. This computational approach allowed the analysis of cell migration at the front of the wound and a reliable identification and quantification of the impaired polarization and migration of keratinocytes from mice lacking fibroblast growth factors 1 and 2--an established model of impaired healing. Therefore, our modeling approach is suitable for large-scale analysis of migration phenotypes of cells with specific genetic defects or upon treatment with different pharmacological agents.

  6. Cell Adhesion and Its Endocytic Regulation in Cell Migration during Neural Development and Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Kawauchi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration is a crucial event for tissue organization during development, and its dysregulation leads to several diseases, including cancer. Cells exhibit various types of migration, such as single mesenchymal or amoeboid migration, collective migration and scaffold cell-dependent migration. The migration properties are partly dictated by cell adhesion and its endocytic regulation. While an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT-mediated mesenchymal cell migration requires the endocytic recycling of integrin-mediated adhesions after the disruption of cell-cell adhesions, an amoeboid migration is not dependent on any adhesions to extracellular matrix (ECM or neighboring cells. In contrast, a collective migration is mediated by both cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesions, and a scaffold cell-dependent migration is regulated by the endocytosis and recycling of cell-cell adhesion molecules. Although some invasive carcinoma cells exhibit an EMT-mediated mesenchymal or amoeboid migration, other cancer cells are known to maintain cadherin-based cell-cell adhesions and epithelial morphology during metastasis. On the other hand, a scaffold cell-dependent migration is mainly utilized by migrating neurons in normal developing brains. This review will summarize the structures of cell adhesions, including adherens junctions and focal adhesions, and discuss the regulatory mechanisms for the dynamic behavior of cell adhesions by endocytic pathways in cell migration in physiological and pathological conditions, focusing particularly on neural development and cancer metastasis.

  7. Selective migration of neuralized embryonic stem cells to stem cell factor and media conditioned by glioma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bernard L

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pluripotent mouse embryonic stem (ES cells can be induced in vitro to become neural progenitors. Upon transplantation, neural progenitors migrate toward areas of damage and inflammation in the CNS. We tested whether undifferentiated and neuralized mouse ES cells migrate toward media conditioned by glioma cell lines (C6, U87 & N1321 or Stem Cell Factor (SCF. Results Cell migration assays revealed selective migration by neuralized ES cells to conditioned media as well as to synthetic SCF. Migration of undifferentiated ES cells was extensive, but not significantly different from that of controls (Unconditioned Medium. RT-PCR analysis revealed that all the three tumor cell lines tested synthesized SCF and that both undifferentiated and neuralized ES cells expressed c-kit, the receptor for SCF. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that undifferentiated ES cells are highly mobile and that neural progenitors derived from ES cells are selectively attracted toward factors produced by gliomas. Given that the glioma cell lines synthesize SCF, SCF may be one of several factors that contribute to the selective migration observed.

  8. Selective migration of neuralized embryonic stem cells to stem cell factor and media conditioned by glioma cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serfozo, Peter; Schlarman, Maggie S; Pierret, Chris; Maria, Bernard L; Kirk, Mark D

    2006-01-01

    Background Pluripotent mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells can be induced in vitro to become neural progenitors. Upon transplantation, neural progenitors migrate toward areas of damage and inflammation in the CNS. We tested whether undifferentiated and neuralized mouse ES cells migrate toward media conditioned by glioma cell lines (C6, U87 & N1321) or Stem Cell Factor (SCF). Results Cell migration assays revealed selective migration by neuralized ES cells to conditioned media as well as to synthetic SCF. Migration of undifferentiated ES cells was extensive, but not significantly different from that of controls (Unconditioned Medium). RT-PCR analysis revealed that all the three tumor cell lines tested synthesized SCF and that both undifferentiated and neuralized ES cells expressed c-kit, the receptor for SCF. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that undifferentiated ES cells are highly mobile and that neural progenitors derived from ES cells are selectively attracted toward factors produced by gliomas. Given that the glioma cell lines synthesize SCF, SCF may be one of several factors that contribute to the selective migration observed. PMID:16436212

  9. Silencing of directional migration in roundabout4 knockdown endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts David D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Roundabouts are axon guidance molecules that have recently been identified to play a role in vascular guidance as well. In this study, we have investigated gene knockdown analysis of endothelial Robos, in particular roundabout 4 (robo4, the predominant Robo in endothelial cells using small interfering RNA technology in vitro. Results Robo1 and Robo4 knockdown cells display distinct activity in endothelial cell migration assay. The knockdown of robo4 abrogated the chemotactic response of endothelial cells to serum but enhanced a chemokinetic response to Slit2, while robo1 knockdown cells do not display chemotactic response to serum or VEGF. Robo4 knockdown endothelial cells unexpectedly show up regulation of Rho GTPases. Zebrafish Robo4 rescues both Rho GTPase homeostasis and serum reduced chemotaxis in robo4 knockdown cells. Robo1 and Robo4 interact and share molecules such as Slit2, Mena and Vilse, a Cdc42-GAP. In addition, this study mechanistically implicates IRSp53 in the signaling nexus between activated Cdc42 and Mena, both of which have previously been shown to be involved with Robo4 signaling in endothelial cells. Conclusion This study identifies specific components of the Robo signaling apparatus that work together to guide directional migration of endothelial cells.

  10. Differential migration and proliferation of geometrical ensembles of cell clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Girish; Chen, Bo; Co, Carlos C.; Ho, Chia-Chi, E-mail: hocc@email.uc.edu

    2011-06-10

    Differential cell migration and growth drives the organization of specific tissue forms and plays a critical role in embryonic development, tissue morphogenesis, and tumor invasion. Localized gradients of soluble factors and extracellular matrix have been shown to modulate cell migration and proliferation. Here we show that in addition to these factors, initial tissue geometry can feedback to generate differential proliferation, cell polarity, and migration patterns. We apply layer by layer polyelectrolyte assembly to confine multicellular organization and subsequently release cells to demonstrate the spatial patterns of cell migration and growth. The cell shapes, spreading areas, and cell-cell contacts are influenced strongly by the confining geometry. Cells within geometric ensembles are morphologically polarized. Symmetry breaking was observed for cells on the circular pattern and cells migrate toward the corners and in the direction parallel to the longest dimension of the geometric shapes. This migration pattern is disrupted when actomyosin based tension was inhibited. Cells near the edge or corner of geometric shapes proliferate while cells within do not. Regions of higher rate of cell migration corresponded to regions of concentrated growth. These findings demonstrate that multicellular organization can result in spatial patterns of migration and proliferation.

  11. On the theory of cell migration: durotaxis and chemotaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Íñiguez, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental element in a variety of physiological and pathological processes. Alteration of its regulatory mechanisms leads to loss of adhesion and increased motility, critical steps in the initial stages of metastasis. Consequently, cell migration has become the focus of intensive experimental and theoretical studies; however the understanding many of its mechanisms remains elusive. Cell migration is the result of a periodic sequence of protrusion, adhesion remodeling and...

  12. Notch1-Dll4 signalling and mechanical force regulate leader cell formation during collective cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Reza; Sun, Jian; Wang, Shue; Long, Min; Zhang, Donna D; Wong, Pak Kin

    2015-03-13

    At the onset of collective cell migration, a subset of cells within an initially homogenous population acquires a distinct 'leader' phenotype with characteristic morphology and motility. However, the factors driving the leader cell formation as well as the mechanisms regulating leader cell density during the migration process remain to be determined. Here we use single-cell gene expression analysis and computational modelling to show that the leader cell identity is dynamically regulated by Dll4 signalling through both Notch1 and cellular stress in a migrating epithelium. Time-lapse microscopy reveals that Dll4 is induced in leader cells after the creation of the cell-free region and leader cells are regulated via Notch1-Dll4 lateral inhibition. Furthermore, mechanical stress inhibits Dll4 expression and leader cell formation in the monolayer. Collectively, our findings suggest that a reduction of mechanical force near the boundary promotes Notch1-Dll4 signalling to dynamically regulate the density of leader cells during collective cell migration.

  13. IN VITRO ANALYSIS OF MIGRATION ACTIVITY OF ENCEPHALYTOGENIC T CEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Nosov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in an adoptive transfer model is caused by injecting animal with activated T cells specific for a CNS antigen, e.g., basic myelin protein. Development of autimmune inflammation in such a model is connected with changed functional stateof encephalytogenic (EG T cells in the coure of disease progression, as reflected by changes in their activation, proliferation and motility levels. Present work describes an original technique allowing for in vitro analysis of encephalytogenic T cell motility, and studying effects of certain compomemts of extracellular matrix upon migration and functional activities of EG T cells.

  14. Lutein Inhibits the Migration of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells via Cytosolic and Mitochondrial Akt Pathways (Lutein Inhibits RPE Cells Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chieh Su

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available During the course of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells will de-differentiate, proliferate, and migrate onto the surfaces of the sensory retina. Several studies have shown that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF can induce migration of RPE cells via an Akt-related pathway. In this study, the effect of lutein on PDGF-BB-induced RPE cells migration was examined using transwell migration assays and Western blot analyses. We found that both phosphorylation of Akt and mitochondrial translocation of Akt in RPE cells induced by PDGF-BB stimulation were suppressed by lutein. Furthermore, the increased migration observed in RPE cells with overexpressed mitochondrial Akt could also be suppressed by lutein. Our results demonstrate that lutein can inhibit PDGF-BB induced RPE cells migration through the inhibition of both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Akt activation.

  15. Extravillous trophoblast cells-derived exosomes promote Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos eSalomon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs migration is a critical process during human uterine spiral artery (SpA remodeling and a successful pregnancy. Extravillous trophoblast cells (EVT interact with VSMC and enhance their migration, however, the mechanisms by which EVT remodel SpA remain to be fully elucidated. We hypothesize that exosomes released from EVT promote VSMC migration.Methods: JEG-3 and HTR-8/SVneo cell lines were used as models for EVT. Cells were cultured at 37 0C and humidified under an atmosphere of 5% CO2-balanced N2 to obtain 8% O2. Cell-conditioned media were collected and exosomes (exo-JEG-3 and exo- HTR-8/SVneo isolated by differential and buoyant density centrifugation. The effects of exo-EVT on VSMC migration were established using a real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™. Exosomal proteins where identified by mass spectrometry and submitted to bioinformatic pathway analysis (Ingenuity software .Results: HTR-8/SVneo cells were significantly more (~30% invasive than JEG-3 cells. HTR-8/SVneo cells released 2.6-fold more exosomes (6.39 x 108 ± 2.5 x108 particles/106 cells compared to JEG-3 (2.86 x 108 ± 0.78 x108 particles/106 cells. VSMC migration was significantly increased in the presence of exo-JEG-3 and exo-HTR-8/SVneo compared to control (-exosomes (21.83 ± 0.49 h and 15.57 ± 0.32, respectively, versus control 25.09 ± 0.58 h, p<0.05. Sonication completely abolished the effect of exosomes on VSMC migration. Finally, mass spectrometry analysis identified unique exosomal proteins for each EVT cell line-derived exosomes.Conclusion: The data obtained in this study are consistent with the hypothesis that the release, content and bioactivity of exosomes derived from EVT-like cell lines is cell origin-dependent and differentially regulates VSMC migration. Thus, an EVT exosomal signaling pathway may contribute to SpA remodeling by promoting the migration of VSMC out of the vessel walls.

  16. Depth migration and de-migration for 3-D migration velocity analysis; Migration profondeur et demigration pour l'analyse de vitesse de migration 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assouline, F.

    2001-07-01

    3-D seismic imaging of complex geologic structures requires the use of pre-stack imaging techniques, the post-stack ones being unsuitable in that case. Indeed, pre-stack depth migration is a technique which allows to image accurately complex structures provided that we have at our disposal a subsurface velocity model accurate enough. The determination of this velocity model is thus a key element for seismic imaging, and to this end, migration velocity analysis methods have met considerable interest. The SMART method is a specific migration velocity analysis method: the singularity of this method is that it does not rely on any restrictive assumptions on the complexity of the velocity model to determine. The SMART method uses a detour through the pre-stack depth migrated domain for extracting multi-offset kinematic information hardly accessible in the time domain. Once achieved the interpretation of the pre-stack depth migrated seismic data, a kinematic de-migration technique of the interpreted events enables to obtain a consistent kinematic database (i.e. reflection travel-times). Then, the inversion of these travel-times, by means of reflection tomography, allows the determination of an accurate velocity model. To be able to really image geologic structures for which the 3-D feature is predominant, we have studied the implementation of migration velocity analysis in 3-D in the context of the SMART method, and more generally, we have developed techniques allowing to overcome the intrinsic difficulties in the 3-D aspects of seismic imaging. Indeed, although formally the SMART method can be directly applied to the case of 3-D complex structures, the feasibility of its implementation requires to choose well the imaging domain. Once this choice done, it is also necessary to conceive a method allowing, via the associated de-migration, to obtain the reflection travel-times. We first consider the offset domain which constitutes, still today, the strategy most usually used

  17. Leader Cells Define Directionality of Trunk, but Not Cranial, Neural Crest Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jo; Gauert, Anton; Briones Montecinos, Luis; Fanlo, Lucía; Alhashem, Zainalabdeen Mohmammed; Assar, Rodrigo; Marti, Elisa; Kabla, Alexandre; Härtel, Steffen; Linker, Claudia

    2016-05-31

    Collective cell migration is fundamental for life and a hallmark of cancer. Neural crest (NC) cells migrate collectively, but the mechanisms governing this process remain controversial. Previous analyses in Xenopus indicate that cranial NC (CNC) cells are a homogeneous population relying on cell-cell interactions for directional migration, while chick embryo analyses suggest a heterogeneous population with leader cells instructing directionality. Our data in chick and zebrafish embryos show that CNC cells do not require leader cells for migration and all cells present similar migratory capacities. In contrast, laser ablation of trunk NC (TNC) cells shows that leader cells direct movement and cell-cell contacts are required for migration. Moreover, leader and follower identities are acquired before the initiation of migration and remain fixed thereafter. Thus, two distinct mechanisms establish the directionality of CNC cells and TNC cells. This implies the existence of multiple molecular mechanisms for collective cell migration.

  18. Multi-cellular logistics of collective cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Yamao

    Full Text Available During development, the formation of biological networks (such as organs and neuronal networks is controlled by multicellular transportation phenomena based on cell migration. In multi-cellular systems, cellular locomotion is restricted by physical interactions with other cells in a crowded space, similar to passengers pushing others out of their way on a packed train. The motion of individual cells is intrinsically stochastic and may be viewed as a type of random walk. However, this walk takes place in a noisy environment because the cell interacts with its randomly moving neighbors. Despite this randomness and complexity, development is highly orchestrated and precisely regulated, following genetic (and even epigenetic blueprints. Although individual cell migration has long been studied, the manner in which stochasticity affects multi-cellular transportation within the precisely controlled process of development remains largely unknown. To explore the general principles underlying multicellular migration, we focus on the migration of neural crest cells, which migrate collectively and form streams. We introduce a mechanical model of multi-cellular migration. Simulations based on the model show that the migration mode depends on the relative strengths of the noise from migratory and non-migratory cells. Strong noise from migratory cells and weak noise from surrounding cells causes "collective migration," whereas strong noise from non-migratory cells causes "dispersive migration." Moreover, our theoretical analyses reveal that migratory cells attract each other over long distances, even without direct mechanical contacts. This effective interaction depends on the stochasticity of the migratory and non-migratory cells. On the basis of these findings, we propose that stochastic behavior at the single-cell level works effectively and precisely to achieve collective migration in multi-cellular systems.

  19. HIF-1α Promotes A Hypoxia-Independent Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liyuan; Madu, Chikezie O; Lu, Andrew; Lu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is known as a transactivator for VEGF gene promoter. It can be induced by hypoxia. However, no study has been done so far to dissect HIF-1α-mediated effects from hypoxia or VEGF-mediated effects. By using a HIF-1α knockout (HIF-1α KO) cell system in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells, this study analyzes cell migration and HIF-1α, hypoxia and VEGF activation. A hypoxia-mediated HIF-1α induction and VEGF transactivation were observed: both HIF-1α WT lines had significantly increased VEGF transactivation, as an indicator for HIF-1α induction, in hypoxia compared to normoxia; in contrast, HIF-1α KO line had no increased VEGF transactivation under hypoxia. HIF-1α promotes cell migration: HIF-1α-KO cells had a significantly reduced migration compared to that of the HIF-1α WT cells under both normoxia and hypoxia. The significantly reduced cell migration in HIF-1α KO cells can be partially rescued by the restoration of WT HIF-1α expression mediated by adenoviral-mediated gene transfer. Interestingly, hypoxia has no effect on cell migration: the cells had a similar cell migration rate under hypoxic and normoxic conditions for both HIF-1α WT and HIF-1α KO lines, respectively. Collectively, these data suggest that HIF-1α plays a role in MEF cell migration that is independent from hypoxia-mediated effects.

  20. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J

    2016-09-14

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration. PMID:27406341

  1. Physical role for the nucleus in cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruleux, Antoine; Hawkins, Rhoda J.

    2016-09-01

    Cell migration is important for the function of many eukaryotic cells. Recently the nucleus has been shown to play an important role in cell motility. After giving an overview of cell motility mechanisms we review what is currently known about the mechanical properties of the nucleus and the connections between it and the cytoskeleton. We also discuss connections to the extracellular matrix and mechanotransduction. We identify key physical roles of the nucleus in cell migration.

  2. Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans Regulate Fgf Signaling and Cell Polarity during Collective Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Venero Galanternik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Collective cell migration is a highly regulated morphogenetic movement during embryonic development and cancer invasion that involves the precise orchestration and integration of cell-autonomous mechanisms and environmental signals. Coordinated lateral line primordium migration is controlled by the regulation of chemokine receptors via compartmentalized Wnt/β-catenin and fibroblast growth factor (Fgf signaling. Analysis of mutations in two exostosin glycosyltransferase genes (extl3 and ext2 revealed that loss of heparan sulfate (HS chains results in a failure of collective cell migration due to enhanced Fgf ligand diffusion and loss of Fgf signal transduction. Consequently, Wnt/β-catenin signaling is activated ectopically, resulting in the subsequent loss of the chemokine receptor cxcr7b. Disruption of HS proteoglycan (HSPG function induces extensive, random filopodia formation, demonstrating that HSPGs are involved in maintaining cell polarity in collectively migrating cells. The HSPGs themselves are regulated by the Wnt/β-catenin and Fgf pathways and thus are integral components of the regulatory network that coordinates collective cell migration with organ specification and morphogenesis.

  3. Cancer cell migration:when red light switched to green

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seth J Corey; Jindan Yu

    2011-01-01

    @@ The doctrine of 'the golden mean'of the Confucian certainly applies at the molecular level to cell growth and migration.It is critically important for tissue architec-ture and homeostasis that cells stop prolifera-tion when reaching appropriate density and halt migration in a direction to avoid collision with others.

  4. Osteoactivin Promotes Migration of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosarena, Oneida A; Dela Cadena, Raul A; Denny, Michael F; Bryant, Evan; Barr, Eric W; Thorpe, Ryan; Safadi, Fayez F

    2016-08-01

    Nearly 50% of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) die of metastases or locoregional recurrence. Metastasis is mediated by cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Osteoactivin (OA) overexpression plays a role in metastases in several malignancies. The aims were to determine how integrin interactions modulate OA-induced OSCC cell migration; and to investigate OA effects on cell survival and proliferation. We confirmed OA mRNA and protein overexpression in OSCC cell lines. We assessed OA's interactions with integrins using adhesion inhibition assays, fluorescent immunocytochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation. We investigated OA-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and cell survival. Integrin inhibition effects on OA-mediated cell migration were determined. We assessed effects of OA knock-down on cell migration and proliferation. OA is overexpressed in OSCC cell lines, and serves as a migration-promoting adhesion molecule. OA co-localized with integrin subunits, and co-immunoprecipitated with the subunits. Integrin blocking antibodies, especially those directed against the β1 subunit, inhibited cell adhesion (P = 0.03 for SCC15 cells). Adhesion to OA activated MAPKs in UMSCC14a cells and OA treatment promoted survival of SCC15 cells. Integrin-neutralizing antibodies enhanced cell migration with OA in the extracellular matrix. OA knock-down resulted in decreased proliferation of SCC15 and SCC25 cells, but did not inhibit cell migration. OA in the extracellular matrix promotes OSCC cell adhesion and migration, and may be a novel target in the prevention of HNSCC spread. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1761-1770, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Glycation of extracellular matrix proteins impairs migration of immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haucke, Elisa; Navarrete-Santos, Alexander; Simm, Andreas; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Hofmann, Britt

    2014-01-01

    The immune response during aging and diabetes is disturbed and may be due to the altered migration of immune cells in an aged tissue. Our study should prove the hypothesis that age and diabetes-related advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have an impact on the migration and adhesion of human T-cells. To achieve our purpose, we used in vitro AGE-modified proteins (soluble albumin and fibronectin [FN]), as well as human collagen obtained from bypass graft. A Boyden chamber was used to study cell migration. Migrated Jurkat T-cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and cell adhesion by crystal violet staining. Actin polymerization was determined by phalloidin-Alexa-fluor 488-labeled antibody and fluorescence microscopy. We found that significantly fewer cells (50%, p = 0.003) migrated through methylglyoxal modified FN. The attachment to FN in the presence of AGE-bovine serum albumin (BSA) was also reduced (p < 0.05). In ex vivo experiments, isolated collagen from human vein graft material negatively affected the migration of the cells depending on the grade of AGE modification of the collagen. Collagen with a low AGE level reduced the cell migration by 30%, and collagen with a high AGE level by 60%. Interaction of the cells with an AGE-modified matrix, but not with soluble AGEs like BSA-AGE per se, was responsible for a disturbed migration. The reduced migration was accompanied by an impaired actin polymerization. We conclude that AGEs-modified matrix protein inhibits cell migration and adhesion of Jurkat T-cells.

  6. Collagen attachment to the substrate controls cell clustering through migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell clustering and scattering play important roles in cancer progression and tissue engineering. While the extracellular matrix (ECM) is known to control cell clustering, much of the quantitative work has focused on the analysis of clustering between cells with strong cell–cell junctions. Much less is known about how the ECM regulates cells with weak cell–cell contact. Clustering characteristics were quantified in rat adenocarcinoma cells, which form clusters on physically adsorbed collagen substrates, but not on covalently attached collagen substrates. Covalently attaching collagen inhibited desorption of collagen from the surface. While changes in proliferation rate could not explain differences seen in the clustering, changes in cell motility could. Cells plated under conditions that resulted in more clustering had a lower persistence time and slower migration rate than those under conditions that resulted in less clustering. Understanding how the ECM regulates clustering will not only impact the fundamental understanding of cancer progression, but also will guide the design of tissue engineered constructs that allow for the clustering or dissemination of cells throughout the construct. (paper)

  7. Collective cell migration drives morphogenesis of the kidney nephron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Vasilyev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue organization in epithelial organs is achieved during development by the combined processes of cell differentiation and morphogenetic cell movements. In the kidney, the nephron is the functional organ unit. Each nephron is an epithelial tubule that is subdivided into discrete segments with specific transport functions. Little is known about how nephron segments are defined or how segments acquire their distinctive morphology and cell shape. Using live, in vivo cell imaging of the forming zebrafish pronephric nephron, we found that the migration of fully differentiated epithelial cells accounts for both the final position of nephron segment boundaries and the characteristic convolution of the proximal tubule. Pronephric cells maintain adherens junctions and polarized apical brush border membranes while they migrate collectively. Individual tubule cells exhibit basal membrane protrusions in the direction of movement and appear to establish transient, phosphorylated Focal Adhesion Kinase-positive adhesions to the basement membrane. Cell migration continued in the presence of camptothecin, indicating that cell division does not drive migration. Lengthening of the nephron was, however, accompanied by an increase in tubule cell number, specifically in the most distal, ret1-positive nephron segment. The initiation of cell migration coincided with the onset of fluid flow in the pronephros. Complete blockade of pronephric fluid flow prevented cell migration and proximal nephron convolution. Selective blockade of proximal, filtration-driven fluid flow shifted the position of tubule convolution distally and revealed a role for cilia-driven fluid flow in persistent migration of distal nephron cells. We conclude that nephron morphogenesis is driven by fluid flow-dependent, collective epithelial cell migration within the confines of the tubule basement membrane. Our results establish intimate links between nephron function, fluid flow, and morphogenesis.

  8. Single cell migration dynamics mediated by geometric confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Hou, Ruixia; Xiao, Peng; Xing, Rubo; Chen, Tao; Han, Yanchun; Ren, Penggang; Fu, Jun

    2016-09-01

    The migration dynamics of cells plays a key role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Previous studies mostly focus on regulating stem cell fate and phenotype by biophysical cues. In contrast, less is known about how the geometric cues mediate the migration dynamics of cells. Here, we fabricate graphene oxide (GO) microstripes on cell non-adhesive PEG substrate by using micromolding in capillary (MIMIC) method. Such micropatterns with alternating cell adhesion and cell resistance enable an effective control of selective adhesion and migration of single cells. The sharp contrast in cell adhesion minimizes the invasion of cells into the PEG patterns, and thereby strongly confines the cells on GO microstripes. As a result, the cells are forced to adapt highly polarized, elongated, and oriented geometry to fit the patterns. A series of pattern widths have been fabricated to modulate the extent of cell deformation and polarization. Under strong confinement, the cytoskeleton contractility, intracellular traction, and actin filament elongation are highly promoted, which result in enhanced cell migration along the patterns. This work provides an important insight into developing combinatorial graphene-based patterns for the control of cell migration dynamics, which is of great significance for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:27137805

  9. Nuclear stiffening inhibits migration of invasive melanoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Alexandre J. S.; Khanna, Payal; Sukumar, Aishwarya; Dong, Cheng; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2014-01-01

    During metastasis, melanoma cells must be sufficiently deformable to squeeze through extracellular barriers with small pore sizes. We visualize and quantify deformability of single cells using micropipette aspiration and examine the migration potential of a population of melanoma cells using a flow migration apparatus. We artificially stiffen the nucleus with recombinant overexpression of Δ50 lamin A, which is found in patients with Hutchison Gilford progeria syndrome and in aged individuals....

  10. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, E; te Riet, J; Domanski, M; Luttge, R; Figdor, C G; Gardeniers, J G E; Walboomers, X F; Jansen, J A

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to initiate and increase cell locomotion and coverage with cells, and thus achieve an enhanced wound healing response around an implantable material. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate how MC3T3-E1 osteoblast initial adhesion and directional migration are influenced by nanogrooves with pitches ranging from 150 nm up to 1000 nm. In this study, we used a multi-patterned substrate with five different groove patterns and a smooth area with either a concentric or radial orientation. Initial cell adhesion measurements after 10 s were performed using atomic force spectroscopy-assisted single-cell force spectroscopy, and demonstrated that nascent cell adhesion was highly induced by a 600 nm pitch and reduced by a 150 nm pitch. Addition of RGD peptide significantly reduced adhesion, indicating that integrins and cell adhesive proteins (e.g. fibronectin or vitronectin) are key factors in specific cell adhesion on nanogrooved substrates. Also, cell migration was highly dependent on the groove pitch; the highest directional migration parallel to the grooves was observed on a 600 nm pitch, whereas a 150 nm pitch restrained directional cell migration. From this study, we conclude that grooves with a pitch of 600 nm may be favourable to enhance fast wound closure, thereby promoting tissue regeneration.

  11. EMPIRICAL-NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF HEADCUT MIGRATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Headcut migration is studied by using empirical and numerical modeling approaches. Empirical formulas for the headcut migration are established using available measurement data, which consider not only the flow strength but also the properties of soil. Numerical model for the headcut migration is proposed. The influences of dynamic pressure gradient, downward flow, and bed slope on sediment entrainment are considered. The local erosion patterns and migration speeds of headcut calculated by the numerical model agree reasonably well with observed data.

  12. A minimal model for spontaneous cell polarization and edge activity in oscillating, rotating and migrating cells

    CERN Document Server

    Raynaud, Franck; Gabella, Chiara; Bornert, Alicia; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B

    2016-01-01

    How the cells break symmetry and organize their edge activity to move directionally is a fun- damental question in cell biology. Physical models of cell motility commonly rely on gradients of regulatory factors and/or feedback from the motion itself to describe polarization of edge activity. Theses approaches, however, fail to explain cell behavior prior to the onset of polarization. Our analysis using the model system of polarizing and moving fish epidermal keratocytes suggests a novel and simple principle of self-organization of cell activity in which local cell-edge dynamics depends on the distance from the cell center, but not on the orientation with respect to the front-back axis. We validate this principle with a stochastic model that faithfully reproduces a range of cell-migration behaviors. Our findings indicate that spontaneous polarization, persistent motion, and cell shape are emergent properties of the local cell-edge dynamics controlled by the distance from the cell center.

  13. Migration Flows: Measurement, Analysis and Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willekens, F.J.; White, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter is an introduction to the study of migration flows. It starts with a review of major definition and measurement issues. Comparative studies of migration are particularly difficult because different countries define migration differently and measurement methods are not harmonized. Insigh

  14. Intracellular pH gradients in migrating cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christine; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Schwab, Albrecht;

    2011-01-01

    Cell polarization along the axis of movement is required for migration. The localization of proteins and regulators of the migratory machinery to either the cell front or its rear results in a spatial asymmetry enabling cells to simultaneously coordinate cell protrusion and retraction. Protons...

  15. An economic analysis of migration in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, M J; Ladman, J R

    1978-07-01

    This paper analyzes internal migration in Mexico over the 1960-70 period. A model of the determinants of migration is specified and estimated for aggregated interstate migration flows. Results show that distance serves as a significant deterrent to migration, that higher destination earning levels are attractive to migrants, and that regions with high unemployment rates experience lower rates of inmigration. An unanticipated finding is that regions with higher earning levels have greater rates of outmigration. The data are disaggregated to examine separate migration relationships for each state. The results are that distance is a lesser deterrent for those migrants with more accessible alternatives, that higher earning levels reduce the deterring effects of distance, and that regions with higher earning levels have lower associated elasticities of migration. It is concluded that economic factors have played a crucial role in internal migration and thus in the changing occupational and geographic structure of the Mexican labor force.

  16. An economic analysis of migration in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, M J; Ladman, J R

    1978-07-01

    This paper analyzes internal migration in Mexico over the 1960-70 period. A model of the determinants of migration is specified and estimated for aggregated interstate migration flows. Results show that distance serves as a significant deterrent to migration, that higher destination earning levels are attractive to migrants, and that regions with high unemployment rates experience lower rates of inmigration. An unanticipated finding is that regions with higher earning levels have greater rates of outmigration. The data are disaggregated to examine separate migration relationships for each state. The results are that distance is a lesser deterrent for those migrants with more accessible alternatives, that higher earning levels reduce the deterring effects of distance, and that regions with higher earning levels have lower associated elasticities of migration. It is concluded that economic factors have played a crucial role in internal migration and thus in the changing occupational and geographic structure of the Mexican labor force. PMID:12265626

  17. Phosphorylation of actopaxin regulates cell spreading and migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Dominic M.; Brown, Michael C.; LaLonde, David P.; Turner, Christopher E.

    2004-01-01

    Actopaxin is an actin and paxillin binding protein that localizes to focal adhesions. It regulates cell spreading and is phosphorylated during mitosis. Herein, we identify a role for actopaxin phosphorylation in cell spreading and migration. Stable clones of U2OS cells expressing actopaxin wild-type (WT), nonphosphorylatable, and phosphomimetic mutants were developed to evaluate actopaxin function. All proteins targeted to focal adhesions, however the nonphosphorylatable mutant inhibited spreading whereas the phosphomimetic mutant cells spread more efficiently than WT cells. Endogenous and WT actopaxin, but not the nonphosphorylatable mutant, were phosphorylated in vivo during cell adhesion/spreading. Expression of the nonphosphorylatable actopaxin mutant significantly reduced cell migration, whereas expression of the phosphomimetic increased cell migration in scrape wound and Boyden chamber migration assays. In vitro kinase assays demonstrate that extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase phosphorylates actopaxin, and treatment of U2OS cells with the MEK1 inhibitor UO126 inhibited adhesion-induced phosphorylation of actopaxin and also inhibited cell migration. PMID:15353548

  18. Multiwave velocity analysis based on Gaussian beam prestack depth migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Jian-Guang; Wang Yun; Han Ning; Xing Zhan-Tao; Lu Jun

    2014-01-01

    Prestack depth migration of multicomponent seismic data improves the imaging accuracy of subsurface complex geological structures. An accurate velocityfi eld is critical to accurate imaging. Gaussian beam migration was used to perform multicomponent migration velocity analysis of PP- and PS-waves. First, PP- and PS-wave Gaussian beam prestack depth migration algorithms that operate on common-offset gathers are presented to extract offset-domain common-image gathers of PP- and PS-waves. Second, based on the residual moveout equation, the migration velocity fields of P- and S-waves are updated. Depth matching is used to ensure that the depth of the target layers in the PP- and PS-wave migration profi les are consistent, and high-precision P- and S-wave velocities are obtained. Finally, synthetic andfi eld seismic data suggest that the method can be used effectively in multiwave migration velocity analysis.

  19. Analysis of Phosphorylation-dependent Protein Interactions of Adhesion and Degranulation Promoting Adaptor Protein (ADAP) Reveals Novel Interaction Partners Required for Chemokine-directed T cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuropka, Benno; Witte, Amelie; Sticht, Jana; Waldt, Natalie; Majkut, Paul; Hackenberger, Christian P R; Schraven, Burkhart; Krause, Eberhard; Kliche, Stefanie; Freund, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Stimulation of T cells leads to distinct changes of their adhesive and migratory properties. Signal propagation from activated receptors to integrins depends on scaffolding proteins such as the adhesion and degranulation promoting adaptor protein (ADAP)(1). Here we have comprehensively investigated the phosphotyrosine interactome of ADAP in T cells and define known and novel interaction partners of functional relevance. While most phosphosites reside in unstructured regions of the protein, thereby defining classical SH2 domain interaction sites for master regulators of T cell signaling such as SLP76, Fyn-kinase, and NCK, other binding events depend on structural context. Interaction proteomics using different ADAP constructs comprising most of the known phosphotyrosine motifs as well as the structured domains confirm that a distinct set of proteins is attracted by pY571 of ADAP, including the ζ-chain-associated protein kinase of 70 kDa (ZAP70). The interaction of ADAP and ZAP70 is inducible upon stimulation either of the T cell receptor (TCR) or by chemokine. NMR spectroscopy reveals that the N-terminal SH2 domains within a ZAP70-tandem-SH2 construct is the major site of interaction with phosphorylated ADAP-hSH3(N) and microscale thermophoresis (MST) indicates an intermediate binding affinity (Kd = 2.3 μm). Interestingly, although T cell receptor dependent events such as T cell/antigen presenting cell (APC) conjugate formation and adhesion are not affected by mutation of Y571, migration of T cells along a chemokine gradient is compromised. Thus, although most phospho-sites in ADAP are linked to T cell receptor related functions we have identified a unique phosphotyrosine that is solely required for chemokine induced T cell behavior.

  20. Exploration of molecular pathways mediating electric field-directed Schwann cell migration by RNA-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Li; Li, Yongchao; Knapp, Jennifer; Smith, Peter

    2015-07-01

    In peripheral nervous systems, Schwann cells wrap around axons of motor and sensory neurons to form the myelin sheath. Following spinal cord injury, Schwann cells regenerate and migrate to the lesion and are involved in the spinal cord regeneration process. Transplantation of Schwann cells into injured neural tissue results in enhanced spinal axonal regeneration. Effective directional migration of Schwann cells is critical in the neural regeneration process. In this study, we report that Schwann cells migrate anodally in an applied electric field (EF). The directedness and displacement of anodal migration increased significantly when the strength of the EF increased from 50 mV/mm to 200 mV/mm. The EF did not significantly affect the cell migration speed. To explore the genes and signaling pathways that regulate cell migration in EFs, we performed a comparative analysis of differential gene expression between cells stimulated with an EF (100 mV/mm) and those without using next-generation RNA sequencing, verified by RT-qPCR. Based on the cut-off criteria (FC > 1.2, q < 0.05), we identified 1,045 up-regulated and 1,636 down-regulated genes in control cells versus EF-stimulated cells. A Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis found that compared to the control group, 21 pathways are down-regulated, while 10 pathways are up-regulated. Differentially expressed genes participate in multiple cellular signaling pathways involved in the regulation of cell migration, including pathways of regulation of actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, and PI3K-Akt. PMID:25557037

  1. Laser-photophoretic migration and fractionation of human blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjushiro, Hideaki; Tanahashi, Yuko; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2013-05-13

    Laser photophoretic migration behavior of human blood cells in saline solution was investigated under the irradiation of Nd:YAG laser beam (532 nm) in the absence and the presence of the flow in a fused silica capillary. Red blood cells (RBC) were migrated faster than white blood cells (WBC) and blood pellets to the direction of propagation of laser light. The observed photophoretic velocity of RBC was about 11 times faster than those of others. This was understood from the larger photophoretic efficiency of RBC than that of WBC, which was simulated based on the Mie scattering theory. Furthermore, it was found that, during the photophoretic migration, RBCs spontaneously orientated parallel to the migration direction so as to reduce the drag force. Finally, it was demonstrated that RBC and WBC were separated in a micro-channel flow system by the laser photophoresis.

  2. Dynamic Cell Adhesion and Migration on Nanoscale Grooved Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, E.; Riet, te J.; Domanski, M.; Luttge, R.; Figdor, C.G.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to init

  3. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, E.; Riet, J. te; Domanski, M.; Luttge, R.; Figdor, C.G.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to init

  4. Transforming potential and matrix stiffness co-regulate confinement sensitivity of tumor cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Amit

    2013-01-01

    It is now well established that tumor cell invasion through tissue is strongly regulated by the microstructural and mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, it remains unclear how these physical microenvironmental inputs are jointly processed with oncogenic lesions to drive invasion. In this study, we address this open question by combining a microfabricated polyacrylamide channel (μPAC) platform that enables independent control of ECM stiffness and confinement with an isogenically-matched breast tumor progression series in which the oncogenes ErbB2 and 14-3-3ζ are overexpressed independently or in tandem. We find that increasing channel confinement and overexpressing ErbB2 both promote cell migration to a similar degree when other parameters are kept constant. In contrast, 14-3-3ζ overexpression slows migration speed, and does so in a fashion that dwarfs effects of ECM confinement and stiffness. We also find that ECM stiffness dramatically enhances cell motility when combined with ErbB2 overexpression, demonstrating that biophysical cues and cell-intrinsic parameters promote cell invasion in an integrative manner. Morphometric analysis of cells inside the μPAC platform reveals that the rapid cell migration induced by narrow channels and ErbB2 overexpression both are accompanied by increased cell polarization. Disruption of this polarization by pharmacological inhibition of Rac GTPase phenocopies 14-3-3ζ overexpression by reducing cell polarization and slowing migration. By systematically measuring migration speed as a function of matrix stiffness and confinement, we also quantify for the first time the sensitivity of migration speed to microchannel properties and transforming potential. These results demonstrate that oncogenic lesions and ECM biophysical properties can synergistically interact to drive invasive migration, and that both inputs may act through common molecular mechanisms to enhance migration speed. PMID:23832051

  5. Olfactory ensheathing cells form the microenvironment of migrating GnRH-1 neurons during mouse development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Sarah; Kolasa, Elise; Tillet, Yves; Duittoz, Anne; Vaudin, Pascal

    2013-04-01

    During development, GnRH-1 neurons differentiate extracerebraly from the nasal placode and migrate from the vomeronasal organ to the forebrain along vomeronasal and terminal nerves. Numerous studies have described the influence of different molecules on the migration of GnRH-1 neurons, however, the role of microenvironment cells remains poorly understood. This study used GFAP-GFP transgenic mice to detect glial cells at early developmental stages. Using nasal explant cultures, the comigration of glial cells with GnRH-1 neurons was clearly demonstrated. This in vitro approach showed that glial cells began migrating from the explants before GnRH-1 neurons. They remained ahead of the GnRH-1 migratory front and stopped migrating after the GnRH-1 neurons. The association of these glial cells with the axons combined with gene expression analysis of GFAP-GFP sorted cells enabled them to be identified as olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC). Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the presence of multiple glial cell-type markers showing several OEC subpopulations surrounding GnRH-1 neurons. Moreover, these OEC expressed genes whose products are involved in the migration of GnRH-1 neurons, such as Nelf and Semaphorin 4. In situ data confirmed that the majority of the GnRH-1 neurons were associated with glial cells along the vomeronasal axons in nasal septum and terminal nerves in the nasal forebrain junction as early as E12.5. Overall, these data demonstrate an OEC microenvironment for migrating GnRH-1 neurons during mouse development. The fact that this glial cell type precedes GnRH-1 neurons and encodes for molecules involved in their nasal migration suggests that it participates in the GnRH-1 system ontogenesis. PMID:23404564

  6. Alk1 controls arterial endothelial cell migration in lumenized vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, Elizabeth R; Menon, Prahlad G; Roman, Beth L

    2016-07-15

    Heterozygous loss of the arterial-specific TGFβ type I receptor, activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1; ACVRL1), causes hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). HHT is characterized by development of fragile, direct connections between arteries and veins, or arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). However, how decreased ALK1 signaling leads to AVMs is unknown. To understand the cellular mis-steps that cause AVMs, we assessed endothelial cell behavior in alk1-deficient zebrafish embryos, which develop cranial AVMs. Our data demonstrate that alk1 loss has no effect on arterial endothelial cell proliferation but alters arterial endothelial cell migration within lumenized vessels. In wild-type embryos, alk1-positive cranial arterial endothelial cells generally migrate towards the heart, against the direction of blood flow, with some cells incorporating into endocardium. In alk1-deficient embryos, migration against flow is dampened and migration in the direction of flow is enhanced. Altered migration results in decreased endothelial cell number in arterial segments proximal to the heart and increased endothelial cell number in arterial segments distal to the heart. We speculate that the consequent increase in distal arterial caliber and hemodynamic load precipitates the flow-dependent development of downstream AVMs. PMID:27287800

  7. Impact of Mesenchymal Stem Cell secreted PAI-1 on colon cancer cell migration and proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Niamh M. [Discipline of Surgery, School of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Joyce, Myles R. [Department of Colorectal Surgery, University College Hospital, Galway (Ireland); Murphy, J. Mary; Barry, Frank P.; O’Brien, Timothy [Regenerative Medicine Institute, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Kerin, Michael J. [Discipline of Surgery, School of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Dwyer, Roisin M., E-mail: roisin.dwyer@nuigalway.ie [Discipline of Surgery, School of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •MSCs were directly co-cultured with colorectal cancer (CRC) cells on 3D scaffolds. •MSCs influence CRC protein/gene expression, proliferation and migration. •We report a significant functional role of MSC-secreted PAI-1 in colon cancer. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal Stem Cells are known to engraft and integrate into the architecture of colorectal tumours, with little known regarding their fate following engraftment. This study aimed to investigate mediators of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) and colon cancer cell (CCC) interactions. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and colon cancer cells (HT29 and HCT-116) were cultured individually or in co-culture on 3-dimensional scaffolds. Conditioned media containing all secreted factors was harvested at day 1, 3 and 7. Chemokine secretion and expression were analyzed by Chemi-array, ELISA (Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1)) and RQ-PCR. Colon cancer cell migration and proliferation in response to recombinant PAI-1, MSCs and MSCs + antibody to PAI-1 was analyzed using Transwell inserts and an MTS proliferation assay respectively. Chemi-array revealed secretion of a wide range of factors by each cell population, including PAI-1and MIF. ELISA analysis revealed Mesenchymal Stem Cells to secrete the highest levels of PAI-1 (MSC mean 10.6 ng/mL, CCC mean 1.01 ng/mL), while colon cancer cells were the principal source of MIF. MSC-secreted PAI-1 stimulated significant migration of both CCC lines, with an antibody to the chemokine shown to block this effect (67–88% blocking,). A cell-line dependant effect on CCC proliferation was shown for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-secreted PAI-1 with HCT-116 cells showing decreased proliferation at all concentrations, and HT29 cells showing increased proliferation in the presence of higher PAI-1 levels. This is the first study to identify PAI-1 as an important mediator of Mesenchymal Stem Cell/colon cancer cell interactions and highlights the

  8. Molecular mechanisms underlying progesterone-enhanced breast cancer cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Chen; Lee, Wen-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone (P4) was demonstrated to inhibit migration in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), but to enhance migration in T47D breast cancer cells. To investigate the mechanism responsible for this switch in P4 action, we examined the signaling pathway responsible for the P4-induced migration enhancement in breast cancer cell lines, T47D and MCF-7. Here, we demonstrated that P4 activated the cSrc/AKT signaling pathway, subsequently inducing RSK1 activation, which in turn increased phosphorylation of p27 at T198 and formation of the p27pT198-RhoA complex in the cytosol, thereby preventing RhoA degradation, and eventually enhanced migration in T47D cells. These findings were confirmed in the P4-treated MCF-7. Comparing the P4-induced molecular events in between breast cancer cells and VSMCs, we found that P4 increased p27 phosphorylation at T198 in breast cancer cells through RSK1 activation, while P4 increased p27 phosphorlation at Ser10 in VSMCs through KIS activation. P27pT198 formed the complex with RhoA and prevented RhoA degradation in T47D cells, whereas p-p27Ser10 formed the complex with RhoA and caused RhoA degradation in VSMCs. The results of this study highlight the molecular mechanism underlying P4-enhanced breast cancer cell migration, and suggest that RSK1 activation is responsible for the P4-induced migration enhancement in breast cancer cells. PMID:27510838

  9. Multidisciplinary approaches to understanding collective cell migration in developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Linus J; Kulesa, Paul M; McLennan, Rebecca; Baker, Ruth E; Maini, Philip K

    2016-06-01

    Mathematical models are becoming increasingly integrated with experimental efforts in the study of biological systems. Collective cell migration in developmental biology is a particularly fruitful application area for the development of theoretical models to predict the behaviour of complex multicellular systems with many interacting parts. In this context, mathematical models provide a tool to assess the consistency of experimental observations with testable mechanistic hypotheses. In this review, we showcase examples from recent years of multidisciplinary investigations of neural crest cell migration. The neural crest model system has been used to study how collective migration of cell populations is shaped by cell-cell interactions, cell-environmental interactions and heterogeneity between cells. The wide range of emergent behaviours exhibited by neural crest cells in different embryonal locations and in different organisms helps us chart out the spectrum of collective cell migration. At the same time, this diversity in migratory characteristics highlights the need to reconcile or unify the array of currently hypothesized mechanisms through the next generation of experimental data and generalized theoretical descriptions. PMID:27278647

  10. Dkk-1 Inhibits Intestinal Epithelial Cell Migration by Attenuating Directional Polarization of Leading Edge Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Stefan; Capaldo, Christopher T.; Samarin, Stanislav; Nava, Porfirio; Neumaier, Irmgard; Skerra, Arne; Sacks, David B; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2009-01-01

    Wnt signaling pathways regulate proliferation, motility, and survival in a variety of human cell types. Dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1) is a secreted Wnt antagonist that has been proposed to regulate tissue homeostasis in the intestine. In this report, we show that Dkk-1 is secreted by intestinal epithelial cells after wounding and that it inhibits cell migration by attenuating the directional orientation of migrating epithelial cells. Dkk-1 exposure induced mislocalized activation of Cdc42 in migrating c...

  11. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, N. R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  12. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration

    OpenAIRE

    Maneet Bhatia; Kelly L. McGrath; Giovanna Di Trapani; Pornpimol Charoentong; Fenil Shah; Mallory M. King; Clarke, Frank M.; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient ...

  13. Junctional communication is induced in migrating capillary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, M S; Spray, D C; Chanson, M; Montesano, R; Orci, L; Meda, P

    1989-12-01

    Using an in vitro model in which a confluent monolayer of capillary endothelial cells is mechanically wounded, gap junction-mediated intercellular communication has been studied by loading the cells with the fluorescent dye, Lucifer Yellow. Approximately 40-50% of the cells in a nonwounded confluent monolayer were coupled in groups of four to five cells (basal level). Basal levels of communication were also observed in sparse and preconfluent cultures, but were reduced in postconfluent monolayers. 30 min after wounding, coupling was markedly reduced between cells lining the wound. Communication at the wound was partially reestablished by 2 h, exceeded basal levels after 6 h and reached a maximum after 24 h, at which stage approximately 90% of the cells were coupled in groups of six to seven cells. When the wound had closed (after 8 d), the increase in communication was no longer observed. Induction of wound-associated communication was unaffected by exposure of the cells to the DNA synthesis inhibitor mitomycin C, but was prevented by the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. The induction of wound-associated communication was also inhibited when migration was prevented by placing the cells immediately after wounding at 22 degrees C or after exposure to cytochalasin D, suggesting that the increase in communication is dependent on cells migrating into the wound area. In contrast, migration was not prevented when coupling was blocked by exposure of the cells to retinoic acid, although this agent did disrupt the characteristic sheet-like pattern of migration typically seen during endothelial repair. These results suggest that junctional communication may play an important role in wound repair, possibly by coordinating capillary endothelial cell migration. PMID:2592412

  14. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Lamers

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to initiate and increase cell locomotion and coverage with cells, and thus achieve an enhanced wound healing response around an implantable material. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate how MC3T3-E1 osteoblast initial adhesion and directional migration are influenced by nanogrooves with pitches ranging from 150 nm up to 1000 nm. In this study, we used a multi-patterned substrate with five different groove patterns and a smooth area with either a concentric or radial orientation. Initial cell adhesion measurements after 10 s were performed using atomic force spectroscopy-assisted single-cell force spectroscopy, and demonstrated that nascent cell adhesion was highly induced by a 600 nm pitch and reduced by a 150 nm pitch. Addition of RGD peptide significantly reduced adhesion, indicating that integrins and cell adhesive proteins (e.g. fibronectin or vitronectin are key factors in specific cell adhesion on nanogrooved substrates. Also, cell migration was highly dependent on the groove pitch; the highest directional migration parallel to the grooves was observed on a 600 nm pitch, whereas a 150 nm pitch restrained directional cell migration. From this study, we conclude that grooves with a pitch of 600 nm may be favourable to enhance fast wound closure, thereby promoting tissue regeneration.

  15. Molecular mechanisms underlying adhesion and migration of hematopoietic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sahin, Aysegul Ocal; Buitenhuis, Miranda

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the most powerful treatment modality for a large number of hematopoietic malignancies, including leukemia. Successful hematopoietic recovery after transplantation depends on homing of hematopoietic stem cells to the bone marrow and subsequent lodging of those cells in specific niches in the bone marrow. Migration of hematopoietic stem cells to the bone marrow is a highly regulated process that requires correct regulation of the expression and activit...

  16. The effects of acoustic vibration on fibroblast cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Taybia; Murphy, Mark F; Lilley, Francis; Burton, David R; Bezombes, Frederic

    2016-12-01

    Cells are known to interact and respond to external mechanical cues and recent work has shown that application of mechanical stimulation, delivered via acoustic vibration, can be used to control complex cell behaviours. Fibroblast cells are known to respond to physical cues generated in the extracellular matrix and it is thought that such cues are important regulators of the wound healing process. Many conditions are associated with poor wound healing, so there is need for treatments/interventions, which can help accelerate the wound healing process. The primary aim of this research was to investigate the effects of mechanical stimulation upon the migratory and morphological properties of two different fibroblast cells namely; human lung fibroblast cells (LL24) and subcutaneous areolar/adipose mouse fibroblast cells (L929). Using a speaker-based system, the effects of mechanical stimulation (0-1600Hz for 5min) on the mean cell migration distance (μm) and actin organisation was investigated. The results show that 100Hz acoustic vibration enhanced cell migration for both cell lines whereas acoustic vibration above 100Hz was found to decrease cell migration in a frequency dependent manner. Mechanical stimulation was also found to promote changes to the morphology of both cell lines, particularly the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia. Overall lamellipodia was the most prominent actin structure displayed by the lung cell (LL24), whereas filopodia was the most prominent actin feature displayed by the fibroblast derived from subcutaneous areolar/adipose tissue. Mechanical stimulation at all the frequencies used here was found not to affect cell viability. These results suggest that low-frequency acoustic vibration may be used as a tool to manipulate the mechanosensitivity of cells to promote cell migration. PMID:27612824

  17. Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein 7 Mediates Glioma Cell Growth and Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jiang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP-7 is the only member of the IGFBP superfamily that binds strongly to insulin, suggesting that IGFBP-7 may have different functions from other IGFBPs. Unlike other IGFBPs, the expression and functions of IGFBP-7 in glioma tumors have not been reported. Using cDNA microarray analysis, we found that expression of IGFBP-7 correlated with the grade of glioma tumors and the overall patient survival. This finding was further validated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. We used RNAi to examine the role of IGFBP-7 in glioma cells, inhibiting IGFBP-7 expression by short interfering RNA transfection. Cell proliferation was suppressed after IGFBP-7 expression was inhibited for 5 days, and glioma cell growth was stimulated consistently by the addition of recombinant IGFBP-7 protein. Moreover, glioma cell migration was attenuated by IGFBP-7 depletion but enhanced by IGFBP-7 overexpression and addition. Overexpression of AKT1 in IGFBP-7-overxpressed cells attenuated the IGFBP-7-promoted migration and further enhanced inhibition of IGFBP-7 depletion on the migration. Phosphorylation of AKT and Erk1/2 was also inversely regulated by IGFBP-7 expression. These two factors together suggest that IGFBP-7 can regulate glioma cell migration through the AKT-ERK pathway, thereby playing an important role in glioma growth and migration.

  18. High glucose-mediated oxidative stress impairs cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo L Lamers

    Full Text Available Deficient wound healing in diabetic patients is very frequent, but the cellular and molecular causes are poorly defined. In this study, we evaluate the hypothesis that high glucose concentrations inhibit cell migration. Using CHO.K1 cells, NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, mouse embryonic fibroblasts and primary skin fibroblasts from control and diabetic rats cultured in 5 mM D-glucose (low glucose, LG, 25 mM D-glucose (high glucose, HG or 25 mM L-glucose medium (osmotic control--OC, we analyzed the migration speed, protrusion stability, cell polarity, adhesion maturation and the activity of the small Rho GTPase Rac1. We also analyzed the effects of reactive oxygen species by incubating cells with the antioxidant N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC. We observed that HG conditions inhibited cell migration when compared to LG or OC. This inhibition resulted from impaired cell polarity, protrusion destabilization and inhibition of adhesion maturation. Conversely, Rac1 activity, which promotes protrusion and blocks adhesion maturation, was increased in HG conditions, thus providing a mechanistic basis for the HG phenotype. Most of the HG effects were partially or completely rescued by treatment with NAC. These findings demonstrate that HG impairs cell migration due to an increase in oxidative stress that causes polarity loss, deficient adhesion and protrusion. These alterations arise, in large part, from increased Rac1 activity and may contribute to the poor wound healing observed in diabetic patients.

  19. Subventricular zone cell migration: lessons from quantitative 2-photon microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel eJames

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblasts born in the adult subventricular zone (SVZ migrate long distances in the rostral migratory stream (RMS to the olfactory bulbs where they integrate into circuitry as functional interneurons. As very little was known about the dynamic parameters of SVZ neuroblast migration, we used two-photon time-lapse microscopy to analyze migration in acute slices. This involved analyzing 3-dimensional stacks of images over time and uncovered several novel aspects of SVZ migration: chains remain stable, cells can be immotile for extensive periods, morphology does not necessarily correlate with motility, neuroblasts exhibit local exploratory motility, dorsoventral migration occurs throughout the striatal SVZ and neuroblasts turn at distinctive angles. We investigated these novel findings in the SVZ and RMS from the population to the single cell level. In this review we also discuss some technical considerations when setting up a two-photon microscopic imaging system. Throughout the review we identify several unsolved questions about SVZ neuroblast migration that might be addressed with current or emerging techniques.

  20. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing. PMID:27105673

  1. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing.

  2. CD133 promotes gallbladder carcinoma cell migration through activating Akt phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Jiaojiao; Ai, Zhilong

    2016-01-01

    Gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) is the fifth most common malignancy of gastrointestinal tract. The prognosis of gallbladder carcinoma is extremely terrible partially due to metastasis. However, the mechanisms underlying gallbladder carcinoma metastasis remain largely unknown. CD133 is a widely used cancer stem cell marker including in gallbladder carcinoma. Here, we found that CD133 was highly expressed in gallbladder carcinoma as compared to normal tissues. CD133 was located in the invasive areas in gallbladder carcinoma. Down-regulation expression of CD133 inhibited migration and invasion of gallbladder carcinoma cell without obviously reducing cell proliferation. Mechanism analysis revealed that down-regulation expression of CD133 inhibited Akt phosphorylation and increased PTEN protein level. The inhibitory effect of CD133 down-regulation on gallbladder carcinoma cell migration could be rescued by Akt activation. Consistent with this, addition of Akt inhibitor Wortmannin markedly inhibited the migration ability of CD133-overexpressing cells. Thus, down-regulation of CD133 inhibits migration of gallbladder carcinoma cells through reducing Akt phosphorylation. These findings explore the fundamental biological aspect of CD133 in gallbladder carcinoma progression, providing insights into gallbladder carcinoma cell migration. PMID:26910892

  3. On-Chip Quantitative Measurement of Mechanical Stresses During Cell Migration with Emulsion Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molino, D.; Quignard, S.; Gruget, C.; Pincet, F.; Chen, Y.; Piel, M.; Fattaccioli, J.

    2016-07-01

    The ability of immune cells to migrate within narrow and crowded spaces is a critical feature involved in various physiological processes from immune response to metastasis. Several in-vitro techniques have been developed so far to study the behaviour of migrating cells, the most recent being based on the fabrication of microchannels within which cells move. To address the question of the mechanical stress a cell is able to produce during the encounter of an obstacle while migrating, we developed a hybrid microchip made of parallel PDMS channels in which oil droplets are sparsely distributed and serve as deformable obstacles. We thus show that cells strongly deform droplets while passing them. Then, we show that the microdevice can be used to study the influence of drugs on migration at the population level. Finally, we describe a quantitative analysis method of the droplet deformation that allows measuring in real-time the mechanical stress exerted by a single cell. The method presented herein thus constitutes a powerful analytical tool for cell migration studies under confinement.

  4. On-Chip Quantitative Measurement of Mechanical Stresses During Cell Migration with Emulsion Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molino, D.; Quignard, S.; Gruget, C.; Pincet, F.; Chen, Y.; Piel, M.; Fattaccioli, J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of immune cells to migrate within narrow and crowded spaces is a critical feature involved in various physiological processes from immune response to metastasis. Several in-vitro techniques have been developed so far to study the behaviour of migrating cells, the most recent being based on the fabrication of microchannels within which cells move. To address the question of the mechanical stress a cell is able to produce during the encounter of an obstacle while migrating, we developed a hybrid microchip made of parallel PDMS channels in which oil droplets are sparsely distributed and serve as deformable obstacles. We thus show that cells strongly deform droplets while passing them. Then, we show that the microdevice can be used to study the influence of drugs on migration at the population level. Finally, we describe a quantitative analysis method of the droplet deformation that allows measuring in real-time the mechanical stress exerted by a single cell. The method presented herein thus constitutes a powerful analytical tool for cell migration studies under confinement. PMID:27373558

  5. Running with neighbors: coordinating cell migration and cell-cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Caitlin; Nelson, W James

    2015-10-01

    Coordinated movement of large groups of cells is required for many biological processes, such as gastrulation and wound healing. During collective cell migration, cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesions must be integrated so that cells maintain strong interactions with neighboring cells and the underlying substratum. Initiation and maintenance of cadherin adhesions at cell-cell junctions and integrin-based cell-ECM adhesions require integration of mechanical cues, dynamic regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, and input from specific signaling cascades, including Rho family GTPases. Here, we summarize recent advances made in understanding the interplay between these pathways at cadherin-based and integrin-based adhesions during collective cell migration and highlight outstanding questions that remain in the field. PMID:26201843

  6. Effect of 7-hydroxystaurosporine on glioblastoma cell invasion and migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-hui MENG; Li-xin ZHOU; Jia-lin LUO; Jian-ping CAO; Jian TONG; Sai-jun FAN

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of 7-hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01), a selective protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, on cell growth, migration, and invasion in inva sive human glioblastoma U-87MG cells. Methods: PKC activity was determined based on the PKC-catalyzed transfer of the 32p-phosphate group from [g-32p]ATP into a PKC-specific peptide substrate. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay.Cell invasion and migration were evaluated by a Boyden chamber assay and scratch wound assay, respectively. Protein expression was analyzed using Western blot assay. The formation of 3-dimensional cellular aggregates was examined by a cell-cell aggregation assay. Results: UCN-01 treatment resulted in concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of U-87MG cell growth at higher doses (> 100 nmol/L), and reduced cell invasion and migration capability at less cytotoxic doses (<100 nmol/L). UCN-01 significantly repressed PKC activity. Consistent with this result, UCN-01 blocked cell invasion stimulated by phorbel 12-myristate13-acetate (PMA) and ethanol (EtOH), 2 PKC activators. Enforced expression of the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and PTEN increased the anti-invasion potential of UCN-01. Exposure to UCN-01 caused a dose-dependent increase in cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. The effect of UCN-01 on the formation of cell-cell aggregation was significantly reduced by the addition of an anti-E-cadherin antibody. Conclusion: UCN-01 inhibits the invasion and migration of human glioma cells. Accordingly, UCN-01 can have potential clinical applications for the treatment of human glioma metastasis.

  7. Electrolytic cell stack with molten electrolyte migration control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, H. Russell; Guthrie, Robin J.; Katz, Murray

    1988-08-02

    An electrolytic cell stack includes inactive electrolyte reservoirs at the upper and lower end portions thereof. The reservoirs are separated from the stack of the complete cells by impermeable, electrically conductive separators. Reservoirs at the negative end are initially low in electrolyte and the reservoirs at the positive end are high in electrolyte fill. During stack operation electrolyte migration from the positive to the negative end will be offset by the inactive reservoir capacity. In combination with the inactive reservoirs, a sealing member of high porosity and low electrolyte retention is employed to limit the electrolyte migration rate.

  8. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells migrate in afferent skin lymph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Florentina; Pascale, Florentia; Contreras, Vanessa; Bonneau, Michel; Courbet, Alexandre; Chilmonczyk, Stefan; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Epardaud, Mathieu; Eparaud, Mathieu; Niborski, Violeta; Riffault, Sabine; Balazuc, Anne-Marie; Foulon, Eliane; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Riteau, Beatrice; Hope, Jayne; Bertho, Nicolas; Charley, Bernard; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2008-05-01

    Conventional dendritic cells enter lymph nodes by migrating from peripheral tissues via the lymphatic route, whereas plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), also called IFN-producing cells (IPC), are described to gain nodes from blood via the high endothelial venules. We demonstrate here that IPC/pDC migrate in the afferent lymph of two large mammals. In sheep, injection of type A CpG oligodinucleotide (ODN) induced lymph cells to produce type I IFN. Furthermore, low-density lymph cells collected at steady state produced type I IFN after stimulation with type A CpG ODN and enveloped viruses. Sheep lymph IPC were found within a minor B(neg)CD11c(neg) subset expressing CD45RB. They presented a plasmacytoid morphology, expressed high levels of TLR-7, TLR-9, and IFN regulatory factor 7 mRNA, induced IFN-gamma production in allogeneic CD4(pos) T cells, and differentiated into dendritic cell-like cells under viral stimulation, thus fulfilling criteria of bona fide pDC. In mini-pig, a CD4(pos)SIRP(pos) subset in afferent lymph cells, corresponding to pDC homologs, produced type I IFN after type A CpG-ODN triggering. Thus, pDC can link innate and acquired immunity by migrating from tissue to draining node via lymph, similarly to conventional dendritic cells. PMID:18424716

  9. Nuclear envelope rupture and repair during cancer cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denais, Celine M.; Gilbert, Rachel M.; Isermann, Philipp; McGregor, Alexandra L.; te Lindert, Mariska; Weigelin, Bettina; Davidson, Patricia M.; Friedl, Peter; Wolf, Katarina; Lammerding, Jan

    2016-01-01

    During cancer metastasis, tumor cells penetrate tissues through tight interstitial spaces, requiring extensive deformation of the cell and its nucleus. Here, we investigated tumor cell migration in confining microenvironments in vitro and in vivo. Nuclear deformation caused localized loss of nuclear envelope (NE) integrity, which led to the uncontrolled exchange of nucleo-cytoplasmic content, herniation of chromatin across the NE, and DNA damage. The incidence of NE rupture increased with cell confinement and with depletion of nuclear lamins, NE proteins that structurally support the nucleus. Cells restored NE integrity using components of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport-III (ESCRT-III) machinery. Our findings indicate that cell migration incurs substantial physical stress on the NE and its content, requiring efficient NE and DNA damage repair for survival. PMID:27013428

  10. Study of dendritic cell migration using micro-fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Pablo; Chabaud, Mélanie; Thiam, Hawa-Racine; Lankar, Danielle; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Dumenil, Ana-Maria

    2016-05-01

    Cell migration is a hallmark of dendritic cells (DCs) function. It is needed for DCs to scan their environment in search for antigens as well as to reach lymphatic organs in order to trigger T lymphocyte's activation. Such interaction leads to tolerance in the case of DCs migrating under homeostatic conditions or to immunity in the case of DCs migrating upon encounter with pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Cell migration is therefore essential for DCs to transfer information from peripheral tissues to lymphoid organs, thereby linking innate to adaptive immunity. This stresses the need to unravel the molecular mechanisms involved. However, the tremendous complexity of the tissue microenvironment as well as the limited spatio-temporal resolution of in vivo imaging techniques has made this task difficult. To bypass this problem, we have developed microfabrication-based experimental tools that are compatible with high-resolution imaging. Here, we will discuss how such devices can be used to study DC migration under controlled conditions that mimic their physiological environment in a robust quantitative manner.

  11. Cell migration in the developing rodent olfactory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huilgol, Dhananjay; Tole, Shubha

    2016-07-01

    The components of the nervous system are assembled in development by the process of cell migration. Although the principles of cell migration are conserved throughout the brain, different subsystems may predominantly utilize specific migratory mechanisms, or may display unusual features during migration. Examining these subsystems offers not only the potential for insights into the development of the system, but may also help in understanding disorders arising from aberrant cell migration. The olfactory system is an ancient sensory circuit that is essential for the survival and reproduction of a species. The organization of this circuit displays many evolutionarily conserved features in vertebrates, including molecular mechanisms and complex migratory pathways. In this review, we describe the elaborate migrations that populate each component of the olfactory system in rodents and compare them with those described in the well-studied neocortex. Understanding how the components of the olfactory system are assembled will not only shed light on the etiology of olfactory and sexual disorders, but will also offer insights into how conserved migratory mechanisms may have shaped the evolution of the brain. PMID:26994098

  12. Reciprocal control of cell proliferation and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Donatis Alina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In adult tissue the quiescent state of a single cell is maintained by the steady state conditions of its own microenvironment for what concern both cell-cell as well as cell-ECM interaction and soluble factors concentration. Physiological or pathological conditions can alter this quiescent state through an imbalance of both soluble and insoluble factors that can trigger a cellular phenotypic response. The kind of cellular response depends by many factors but one of the most important is the concentration of soluble cytokines sensed by the target cell. In addition, due to the intrinsic plasticity of many cellular types, every single cell is able, in response to the same stimulus, to rapidly switch phenotype supporting minimal changes of microenviromental cytokines concentration. Wound healing is a typical condition in which epithelial, endothelial as well as mesenchymal cells are firstly subjected to activation of their motility in order to repopulate the damaged region and then they show a strong proliferative response in order to successfully complete the wound repair process. This schema constitute the leitmotif of many other physiological or pathological conditions such as development vasculogenesis/angiogenesis as well as cancer outgrowth and metastasis. Our review focuses on the molecular mechanisms that control the starting and, eventually, the switching of cellular phenotypic outcome in response to changes in the symmetry of the extracellular environment.

  13. Quantification of hydrodynamic factors influencing cell lateral migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nix, Stephanie; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2015-11-01

    The study of the migration of blood cells perpendicular to the direction of blood flow, or lateral migration, is motivated by the differing behavior of the various types of blood cells. In vivo, red blood cells are observed to flow in the central region of the blood vessel, particularly in the microcirculation, while other types of cells in the blood, including white blood cells and platelets, are observed to flow disproportionately near the vessel wall. However, the specifics regarding the effect of hydrodynamic and biological factors are still unknown. Thus, in this study, we aim to quantify the effect of hydrodynamic factors on a cell model numerically using the boundary integral method. By using the boundary integral method, we can isolate the effect of a single hydrodynamic factor, such as a wall or given flow distribution, in an otherwise infinite flow. Then, we can use the obtained numerical results to develop a semi-analytical model describing the cell lateral migration dependent on only the flow geometry and the viscosity ratio between the cell and external fluid.

  14. NHERF-1: Modulator of Glioblastoma Cell Migration and Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerri L. Kislin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The invasive nature of malignant gliomas is a clinical problem rendering tumors incurable by conventional treatment modalities such as surgery, ionizing radiation, and temozolomide. Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF-1 is a multifunctional adaptor protein, recruiting cytoplasmic signaling proteins and membrane receptors/transporters into functional complexes. This study revealed that NHERF-1 expression is increased in highly invasive cells that reside in the rim of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM tumors and that NHERF-1 sustains glioma migration and invasion. Gene expression profiles were evaluated from laser capture-microdissected human GBM cells isolated from patient tumor cores and corresponding invaded white matter regions. The role of NHERF-1 in the migration and dispersion of GBM cell lines was examined by reducing its expression with small-interfering RNA followed by radial migration, three-dimensional collagen dispersion, immunofluorescence, and survival assays. The in situ expression of NHERF-1 protein was restricted to glioma cells and the vascular endothelium, with minimal to no detection in adjacent normal brain tissue. Depletion of NHERF-1 arrested migration and dispersion of glioma cell lines and caused an increase in cell-cell cohesiveness. Glioblastoma multiforme cells with depleted NHERF-1 evidenced a marked decrease in stress fibers, a larger cell size, and a more rounded shape with fewer cellular processes. When NHERF-1 expression was reduced, glioma cells became sensitized to temozolomide treatment resulting in increased apoptosis. Taken together, these results provide the first evidence for NHERF-1 as a participant in the highly invasive phenotype of malignant gliomas and implicate NHERF-1 as a possible therapeutic target for treatment of GBM.

  15. Amyloid precursor protein regulates migration and metalloproteinase gene expression in prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko [Division of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-1241 (Japan); Inoue, Satoshi, E-mail: INOUE-GER@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-1241 (Japan); Department of Geriatric Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Department of Anti-Aging Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • APP knockdown reduced proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells. • APP knockdown reduced expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. • APP overexpression promoted LNCaP cell migration. • APP overexpression increased expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. - Abstract: Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a type I transmembrane protein, and one of its processed forms, β-amyloid, is considered to play a central role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. We previously showed that APP is a primary androgen-responsive gene in prostate cancer and that its increased expression is correlated with poor prognosis for patients with prostate cancer. APP has also been implicated in several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying the pro-proliferative effects of APP on cancers is still not well-understood. In the present study, we explored a pathophysiological role for APP in prostate cancer cells using siRNA targeting APP (siAPP). The proliferation and migration of LNCaP and DU145 prostate cancer cells were significantly suppressed by siAPP. Differentially expressed genes in siAPP-treated cells compared to control siRNA-treated cells were identified by microarray analysis. Notably, several metalloproteinase genes, such as ADAM10 and ADAM17, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes, such as VIM, and SNAI2, were downregulated in siAPP-treated cells as compared to control cells. The expression of these genes was upregulated in LNCaP cells stably expressing APP when compared with control cells. APP-overexpressing LNCaP cells exhibited enhanced migration in comparison to control cells. These results suggest that APP may contribute to the proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells by modulating the expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes.

  16. China ASON Network Migration Scenarios and Their Quantitative Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoying Zhang; Soichiro Araki; Itaru Nishioka; Yoshihiko Suemura

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes two migration scenarios from China rin g networks to ASON mesh networks . In our quantitative analysis with ASON/GMPLS simulator, a subnetwork protection scheme achieved best balanced performance in resource utilization and restoration time.

  17. China ASON Network Migration Scenarios and Their Quantitative Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soichiro; Araki; Itaru; Nishioka; Yoshihiko; Suemura

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes two migration scenarios from China ring networks to ASON mesh networks. In our quantitative analysis with ASON/GMPLS simulator, a subnetwork protection scheme achieved best balanced performance in resource utilization and restoration time.

  18. Tetrahydrocurcumin inhibits HT1080 cell migration and invasion via downregulation of MMPs and uPA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Supachai YODKEEREE; Spiridione GARBISA; Pomngarm LIMTRAKUL

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC) is an active metabolite of curcumin. It has been reported to have similar pharmacological activity to curcumin. The proteases that participate in extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation are involved in cancer cell metastasis. The present study investigates the effect of an ultimate metabolite of curcumin, THC, on the invasion and motility of highly-metastatic HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells. Methods: The effect of THC on HTI080 cell invasion and migration was determined using Boyden chamber assay. Cell-adhesion assay was used for examining the binding of cells to ECM molecules. Zymography assay was used to analyze the effect of THC on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) secretion from HT1080 cells. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2 and membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) proteins levels were analyzed by Western blotting. Results: Treatment with THC reduced HT1080 cell invasion and migration in a dose-dependent manner. THC also decreased the cell adhesion to Matrigel and laminin-coated plates. Analysis by zymography demonstrated that treatment with THC reduced the levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and uPA. THC also inhibited the levels of MT1-MMP and TIMP-2 proteins detected by Western blot analysis. Conclusion: Our findings revealed that THC reduced HT1080 cell invasion and migration. The inhibition of cancer cell invasion is associated with the downregulation of ECM degradation enzymes and the inhibition of cell adhesion to ECM proteins.

  19. Minimal model for spontaneous cell polarization and edge activity in oscillating, rotating and migrating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, Franck; Ambühl, Mark E.; Gabella, Chiara; Bornert, Alicia; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2016-04-01

    How cells break symmetry and organize activity at their edges to move directionally is a fundamental question in cell biology. Physical models of cell motility commonly incorporate gradients of regulatory proteins and/or feedback from the motion itself to describe the polarization of this edge activity. These approaches, however, fail to explain cell behaviour before the onset of polarization. We use polarizing and moving fish epidermal cells as a model system to bridge the gap between cell behaviours before and after polarization. Our analysis suggests a novel and simple principle of self-organizing cell activity, in which local cell-edge dynamics depends on the distance from the cell centre, but not on the orientation with respect to the front-back axis. We validate this principle with a stochastic model that faithfully reproduces a range of cell-migration behaviours. Our findings indicate that spontaneous polarization, persistent motion and cell shape are emergent properties of the local cell-edge dynamics controlled by the distance from the cell centre.

  20. The Dynamics of Repeat Migration: A Markov Chain Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann, Klaus F.; Amelie F. Constant

    2003-01-01

    While the literature has established that there is substantial and highly selective return migration, the growing importance of repeat migration has been largely ignored. Using Markov chain analysis, this paper provides a modeling framework for repeated moves of migrants between the host and home countries. The Markov transition matrix between the states in two consecutive periods is parameterized and estimated using a logit specification and a large panel data with 14 waves. The analysis for...

  1. Manipulation of Neutrophil-Like HL-60 Cells for the Study of Directed Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Millius, Arthur; Weiner, Orion D

    2010-01-01

    Many cells undergo directed cell migration in response to external cues in a process known as chemotaxis. This ability is essential for many single-celled organisms to hunt and mate, the development of multicellular organisms, and the functioning of the immune system. Because of their relative ease of manipulation and their robust chemotactic abilities, the neutrophil-like cell line (HL-60) has been a powerful system to analyze directed cell migration. In this chapter, we describe the mainten...

  2. An automated cell-counting algorithm for fluorescently-stained cells in migration assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novielli Nicole M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A cell-counting algorithm, developed in Matlab®, was created to efficiently count migrated fluorescently-stained cells on membranes from migration assays. At each concentration of cells used (10,000, and 100,000 cells, images were acquired at 2.5 ×, 5 ×, and 10 × objective magnifications. Automated cell counts strongly correlated to manual counts (r2 = 0.99, P

  3. Regulation of Glioma Cell Migration by Seri ne-Phosphorylated P3111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy S. McDonough

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available P311, an 8-kDa polypeptide, was previously shown to be highly expressed in invasive glioma cells. Here, we report the functional characteristics of P311 with regard to influencing glioma cell migration. P311 is constitutively serine-phosphorylated; decreased phosphorylation is observed in migration-activated glioma cells. The primary amino acid sequence of P311 indicates a putative serine phosphorylation site (S59 near the PEST domain. Site-directed mutagenesis of S59A retarded P311 degradation, induced glioma cell motility. In contrast, S59D mutation resulted in the rapid degradation of P311, reduced glioma cell migration. Coimmunoprecipitation coupled with matrixassisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis identified Filamin A as a binding partner of P311, immunofluorescence studies showed that both proteins colocalized at the cell periphery. Moreover, P311-induced cell migration was abrogated by inhibition of β1 integrin function using TACβ1A, a dominant-negative inhibitor of β1 integrin signaling, suggesting that P311 acts downstream of β1 signaling. Finally, overexpression of P311 or P311 S59A mutant protein activates Raci GTPase; small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of Raci suppresses P311-induced motility. Collectively, these results suggest a role for levels of P311 in regulating glioma motility, invasion through the reorganization of actin cytoskeleton at the cell periphery.

  4. ST13, a proliferation regulator, inhibits growth and migration of colorectal cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui BAI; Zhong SHI; Jia-wei ZHANG; Dan LI; Yong-liang ZHU; Shu ZHENG

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective:ST13,is the gene encoding the HSP70 interacting protein (HIP).Previous research has shown that ST13 mRNA and protein levels are down-regulated in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues.This study aims at the role of ST13 in the proliferation and migration of CRC cells.Methods:The transcript level of ST13 in different CRC cell lines was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR).ST13-overexpressed and ST13-knockdown CRC cells were constructed respectively by lentiviral transduction,followed by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay,plate colony formation,cell-cycle analysis,and migration assays to evaluate the influence of ST13 on proliferation and migration in vitro.Moreover,a mouse xenograft study was performed to test in vivo tumorigenicity of ST13-knockdown CRC cells.Results:Lentivirus-mediated overexpression of ST13 in CRC cells inhibited cell proliferation,colony formation,and cell migration in vitro.In contrast,down-regulation of ST13 by lentiviralbased short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference in CRC cells significantly increased cell proliferation and cloning efficiency in vitro.In addition,down-regulation of ST13 expression significantly increased the tumorigenicity of CRC cells in vivo.Conclusions:ST13 gene is a proliferation regulator that inhibits tumor growth in CRC and may affect cell migration.

  5. The Analysis of International Migration towards Economic Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdous Alam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study discusses the analysis of international migration towards economic growth in Bangladesh. International migration refers to the cross-border movement of people from a mother country to a location outside that mother country, with the purpose of taking up higher income employment, better living conditions, higher education get access to civic amenities and conducting a daily existence there for an extended period of time. The exports of labor, human capital, play a major role to minimize the poverty level in Bangladesh. In the last four decades, Bangladesh exports the huge number of labors abroad for economic growth through remittances. Remittances affect poverty eradication most directly by increasing the income of households which have a family member working abroad. Because income from remittances is usually larger than that which could have been earned by migrants they stayed at home. Approach: The aim of this study is to highlight the policy implications for the maximization of international migration and the analysis of economic growth in Bangladesh. The data for analysis is perceived from the secondary sources. The significant manipulations for acquired data are migration of employment and remittances for economic growth in Bangladesh. Results: Migration contributed for the development of macro and micro level in Bangladesh. Conclusion: There would be potential benefits to world's poor if more international attention were focused on integrating migration policy to within the larger global dialogue economic development and poverty reduction. Strong institutions and good policies will enhance the benefits of human capital migration for Bangladesh.

  6. Curcumin suppresses migration and invasion of human endometrial carcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Qian; Gao, Qing; Chen, Kunlun; Wang, Yidong; Chen, Lijuan; Li, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, a widely used Chinese herbal medicine, has historically been used in anti-cancer therapies. However, the anti-metastatic effect and molecular mechanism of curcumin in endometrial carcinoma (EC) are still poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to detect the anti-metastatic effects of curcumin and the associated mechanism(s) in EC. Based on assays carried out in EC cell lines, it was observed that curcumin inhibited EC cell migration and invasion in vitro. Furthermore, follo...

  7. Cell Migration and Invasion Assays as Tools for Drug Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Hulkower, Keren I.; Herber, Renee L.

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration and invasion are processes that offer rich targets for intervention in key physiologic and pathologic phenomena such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. With the advent of high-throughput and high content imaging systems, there has been a movement towards the use of physiologically relevant cell-based assays earlier in the testing paradigm. This allows more effective identification of lead compounds and recognition of undesirable effects sooner in the drug discovery screeni...

  8. Migration of amoeba cells in an electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, Isabella; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2015-03-01

    Exogenous and endogenous electric fields play a role in cell physiology as a guiding mechanism for the orientation and migration of cells. Electrotaxis of living cells has been observed for several cell types, e.g. neurons, fibroblasts, leukocytes, neural crest cells, cancer cells. Dictyostelium discoideum (Dd), an intensively investigated chemotactic model organism, also exhibits a strong electrotactic behavior moving toward the cathode under the influence of electric fields. Here we report experiments on the effects of DC electric fields on the directional migration of Dd cells. We apply the electric field to cells seeded into microfluidic devices equipped with agar bridges to avoid any harmful effects of the electric field on the cells (ions formation, pH changes, etc.) and a constant flow to prevent the build-up of chemical gradient that elicits chemotaxis. Our results show that the cells linearly increase their speed over time when a constant electric field is applied for a prolonged duration (2 hours). This novel phenomenon cannot be attributed to mechanotaxis as the drag force of the electroosmotic flow is too small to produce shear forces that can reorient cells. It is independent of the cellular developmental stage and to our knowledge, it was not observed in chemotaxis. This work is supported by MaxSynBio project of the Max Planck Society.

  9. Computational Analysis of mRNA Expression Profiles Identifies the ITG Family and PIK3R3 as Crucial Genes for Regulating Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhontip Klahan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is an aggressive type of breast cancer that does not express estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, and human epidermal growth factor receptor (Her2/neu. TNBC has worse clinical outcomes than other breast cancer subtypes. However, the key molecules and mechanisms of TNBC migration remain unclear. In this study, we compared two normalized microarray datasets from GEO database between Asian (GSE33926 and non-Asian populations (GSE46581 to determine the molecules and common pathways in TNBC migration. We demonstrated that 16 genes in non-Asian samples and 9 genes in Asian samples are related to TNBC migration. In addition, our analytic results showed that 4 genes, PIK3R3, ITGB1, ITGAL, and ITGA6, were involved in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. Our results indicated potential genes that link to TNBC migration. This study may help identify novel therapeutic targets for drug development in cancer therapy.

  10. Cell Migration and Invasion Assays as Tools for Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren I. Hulkower

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration and invasion are processes that offer rich targets for intervention in key physiologic and pathologic phenomena such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. With the advent of high-throughput and high content imaging systems, there has been a movement towards the use of physiologically relevant cell-based assays earlier in the testing paradigm. This allows more effective identification of lead compounds and recognition of undesirable effects sooner in the drug discovery screening process. This article will review the effective use of several principle formats for studying cell motility: scratch assays, transmembrane assays, microfluidic devices and cell exclusion zone assays.

  11. CCDC-55 is required for larval development and distal tip cell migration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, Ismar; Ho, Richard; Cram, Erin J

    2012-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans distal tip cells (DTCs) are an in vivo model for the study of developmentally regulated cell migration. In this study, we characterize a novel role for CCDC-55, a conserved coiled-coil domain containing protein, in DTC migration and larval development in C. elegans. Although animals homozygous for a probable null allele, ccdc-55(ok2851), display an early larval arrest, RNAi depletion experiments allow the analysis of later phenotypes and suggest that CCDC-55 is needed within the DTC for migration to cease at the end of larval morphogenesis. The ccdc-55 gene is found in an operon with rnf-121 and rnf-5, E3 ubiquitin ligases that target cell migration genes such as the β-integrin PAT-3. Genetic interaction studies using RNAi depletion and the deletion alleles rnf-121(ok848) and rnf-5(tm794) indicate that CCDC-55 and the RNF genes act at least partially in parallel to promote termination of cell migration in the adult DTC.

  12. CCDC-55 is required for larval development and distal tip cell migration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, Ismar; Ho, Richard; Cram, Erin J

    2012-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans distal tip cells (DTCs) are an in vivo model for the study of developmentally regulated cell migration. In this study, we characterize a novel role for CCDC-55, a conserved coiled-coil domain containing protein, in DTC migration and larval development in C. elegans. Although animals homozygous for a probable null allele, ccdc-55(ok2851), display an early larval arrest, RNAi depletion experiments allow the analysis of later phenotypes and suggest that CCDC-55 is needed within the DTC for migration to cease at the end of larval morphogenesis. The ccdc-55 gene is found in an operon with rnf-121 and rnf-5, E3 ubiquitin ligases that target cell migration genes such as the β-integrin PAT-3. Genetic interaction studies using RNAi depletion and the deletion alleles rnf-121(ok848) and rnf-5(tm794) indicate that CCDC-55 and the RNF genes act at least partially in parallel to promote termination of cell migration in the adult DTC. PMID:22285439

  13. Reduced CTGF expression promotes cell growth, migration, and invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of CTGF varies in different types of cancer. The purpose of this study is to investigate the involvement of CTGF in tumor progression and prognosis of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: CTGF expression levels were examined in NPC tissues and cells, nasopharynx (NP tissues, and NP69 cells. The effects and molecular mechanisms of CTGF expression on cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and cell cycle were also explored. RESULTS: NPC cells exhibited decreased mRNA expression of CTGF compared to immortalized human nasopharyngeal epithelial cell line NP69. Similarly, CTGF was observed to be downregulated in NPC compared to normal tissues at mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, reduced CTGF was negatively associated with the progression of NPC. Knocking down CTGF expression enhanced the colony formation, cell migration, invasion, and G1/S cell cycle transition. Mechanistic analysis revealed that CTGF suppression activated FAK/PI3K/AKT and its downstream signals regulating the cell cycle, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and MMPs. Finally, DNA methylation microarray revealed a lack of hypermethylation at the CTGF promoter, suggesting other mechanisms are associated with suppression of CTGF in NPC. CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrates that reduced expression of CTGF promoted cell proliferation, migration, invasion and cell cycle progression through FAK/PI3K/AKT, EMT and MMP pathways in NPC.

  14. Controlled Cell Growth and Cell Migration in Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica/Alginate Nanocomposite Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda Kehr, Nermin; Riehemann, Kristina

    2016-01-21

    Nanocomposite (NC) hydrogels with different periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) concentrations and a NC hydrogel bilayer with various PMO concentrations inside the layers of the hydrogel matrix are prepared. The effect of the PMO concentration on cell growth and migration of cells is reported. The cells migrate in the bilayer NC hydrogel towards higher PMO concentrations and from cell culture plates to NC hydrogel scaffolds. PMID:26648333

  15. Migration of Drosophila intestinal stem cells across organ boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Shigeo; Paul, Manash; Aghajanian, Patrick; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-05-01

    All components of the Drosophila intestinal tract, including the endodermal midgut and ectodermal hindgut/Malpighian tubules, maintain populations of dividing stem cells. In the midgut and hindgut, these stem cells originate from within larger populations of intestinal progenitors that proliferate during the larval stage and form the adult intestine during metamorphosis. The origin of stem cells found in the excretory Malpighian tubules ('renal stem cells') has not been established. In this paper, we investigate the migration patterns of intestinal progenitors that take place during metamorphosis. Our data demonstrate that a subset of adult midgut progenitors (AMPs) move posteriorly to form the adult ureters and, consecutively, the renal stem cells. Inhibiting cell migration by AMP-directed expression of a dominant-negative form of Rac1 protein results in the absence of stem cells in the Malpighian tubules. As the majority of the hindgut progenitor cells migrate posteriorly and differentiate into hindgut enterocytes, a group of the progenitor cells, unexpectedly, invades anteriorly into the midgut territory. Consequently, these progenitor cells differentiate into midgut enterocytes. The midgut determinant GATAe is required for the differentiation of midgut enterocytes derived from hindgut progenitors. Wingless signaling acts to balance the proportion of hindgut progenitors that differentiate as midgut versus hindgut enterocytes. Our findings indicate that a stable boundary between midgut and hindgut/Malpighian tubules is not established during early embryonic development; instead, pluripotent progenitor populations cross in between these organs in both directions, and are able to adopt the fate of the organ in which they come to reside. PMID:23571215

  16. Tetrandrine suppresses proliferation, induces apoptosis, and inhibits migration and invasion in human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrandrine (TET, a traditional Chinese medicine, exerts remarkable anticancer activity on various cancer cells. However, little is known about the effect of TET on human prostate cancer cells, and the mechanism of function of TET on prostate cancer has not yet been elucidated. To investigate the effects of TET on the suppression of proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and inhibition of migration and invasion in human prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and PC-3. Inhibition of growth was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and clone formation assay, and flow cytometry analysis was performed to detect the induction of apoptosis. Activation of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase, caspase-3, Akt, phospho-Akt, Bcl-2, and Bax was analyzed by Western blotting. Wound healing assay and transwell migration assay were used to evaluate the effect of TET on migration and invasion of cancer cells. TET inhibited the growth of DU145 and PC-3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Cell cloning was inhibited in the presence of TET in DU145 and PC-3 cells. TET suppressed the migration of DU145 and PC-3 cells. Transwell invasion assay showed that TET significantly weakened invasion capacity of DU145 and PC-3 cells. TET exhibited strong inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, and invasion of prostate cancer cells. In addition, TET induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner by activating the caspase cascade and inhibiting phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt signal pathway. The accumulating evidence suggests that TET could be a potential therapeutic candidate against prostate cancer in a clinical setting.

  17. Signaling through the G-protein-coupled receptor Rickets is important for polarity, detachment, and migration of the border cells in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anllo, Lauren; Schüpbach, Trudi

    2016-06-15

    Cell migration plays crucial roles during development. An excellent model to study coordinated cell movements is provided by the migration of border cell clusters within a developing Drosophila egg chamber. In a mutagenesis screen, we isolated two alleles of the gene rickets (rk) encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor. The rk alleles result in border cell migration defects in a significant fraction of egg chambers. In rk mutants, border cells are properly specified and express the marker Slbo. Yet, analysis of both fixed as well as live samples revealed that some single border cells lag behind the main border cell cluster during migration, or, in other cases, the entire border cell cluster can remain tethered to the anterior epithelium as it migrates. These defects are observed significantly more often in mosaic border cell clusters, than in full mutant clusters. Reduction of the Rk ligand, Bursicon, in the border cell cluster also resulted in migration defects, strongly suggesting that Rk signaling is utilized for communication within the border cell cluster itself. The mutant border cell clusters show defects in localization of the adhesion protein E-cadherin, and apical polarity proteins during migration. E-cadherin mislocalization occurs in mosaic clusters, but not in full mutant clusters, correlating well with the rk border cell migration phenotype. Our work has identified a receptor with a previously unknown role in border cell migration that appears to regulate detachment and polarity of the border cell cluster coordinating processes within the cells of the cluster themselves.

  18. ANALYSIS ON THE PHENOMENON OF POPULATION'S MIGRATION IN ROMANIA

    OpenAIRE

    Nicoleta MATEOC-SÎRB; Teodor MATEOC; Camelia MĂNESCU; Ioan GRAD

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the authors analyze the migratory movement of population from Romania. Demographic dynamics of the last decade confirms that Romania's population declined. The demographic developments in Romania have mainly economic reasons (examples : migration, low birth rate, rural - urban migration). The comparative analysis of statistical data obtained in the population censuses of 2002 and 2011 shows that the most of the Romanian communities have lost population due to a negative natural ...

  19. How Do Cells Make Decisions: Engineering Micro- and Nanoenvironments for Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Hawa Ngalim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration contributes to cancer metastasis and involves cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM, force generation through the cell's cytoskeletal, and finally cell detachment. Both adhesive cues from the ECM and soluble cues from neighbouring cells and tissue trigger intracellular signalling pathways that are essential for cell migration. While the machinery of many signalling pathways is relatively well understood, how hierarchies of different and conflicting signals are established is a new area of cellular cancer research. We examine the recent advances in microfabrication, microfluidics, and nanotechnology that can be utilized to engineer micro- and nanoscaled cellular environments. Controlling both adhesive and soluble cues for migration may allow us to decipher how cells become motile, choose the direction for migration, and how oncogenic transformations influences these decision-making processes.

  20. SENP1 regulates cell migration and invasion in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang-Ming, Yan; Zhi-Qiang, Xu; Ting, Zhang; Jian, Wang; Jian, Pan; Li-Qun, Yuan; Ming-Cui, Fu; Hong-Liang, Xia; Xu, Cao; Yun, Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is an embryonic solid tumor derived from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system, and accounts for 11% of childhood cancers and around 15% of cancer deaths in children. SUMOylation and deSUMOylation are dynamic mechanisms regulating a spectrum of protein activities. The SUMO proteases (SENP) remove SUMO conjugate from proteins, and their expression is deregulated in diverse cancers. However, nothing is known about the role of SENPs in NBL. In the present study, we found that SENP1 expression was significantly high in metastatic NB tissues compared with primary NB tissues. Overexpression of SENP1 promoted NB cells migration and invasion. Inhibition of SENP1 could significantly suppress NB cell migration and invasion. Moreover, we found that SENP1 could regulate the expression of CDH1, MMP9, and MMP2. In summary, the data presented here indicate a significant role of SENP1 in the regulation of cell migration and invasion in NB and suppress SENP1 expression as promising candidates for novel treatment strategies of NB.

  1. Nifedipine promotes the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Qing Guo

    Full Text Available Nifedipine is widely used as a calcium channel blocker (CCB to treat angina and hypertension,but it is controversial with respect the risk of stimulation of cancers. In this study, we demonstrated that nifedipine promoted the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells both invivo and invitro. However, verapamil, another calcium channel blocker, didn't exert the similar effects. Nifedipine and high concentration KCl failed to alter the [Ca2+]i in MDA-MB-231 cells, suggesting that such nifedipine effect was not related with calcium channel. Moreover, nifedipine decreased miRNA-524-5p, resulting in the up-regulation of brain protein I3 (BRI3. Erk pathway was consequently activated and led to the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Silencing BRI3 reversed the promoting effect of nifedipine on the breast cancer. In a summary, nifedipine stimulated the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells via the axis of miRNA-524-5p-BRI3-Erk pathway independently of its calcium channel-blocking activity. Our findings highlight that nifedipine but not verapamil is conducive for breast cancer growth and metastasis, urging that the caution should be taken in clinic to prescribe nifedipine to women who suffering both hypertension and breast cancer, and hypertension with a tendency in breast cancers.

  2. Bromoenol Lactone Attenuates Nicotine-Induced Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation and Migration.

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    Lindsay E Calderon

    Full Text Available Calcium independent group VIA phospholipase A2 (iPLA2β and Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 are upregulated in many disease states; their involvement with cancer cell migration has been a recent subject for study. Further, the molecular mechanisms mediating nicotine-induced breast cancer cell progression have not been fully investigated. This study aims to investigate whether iPLA2β mediates nicotine-induced breast cancer cell proliferation and migration through both in-vitro and in-vivo techniques. Subsequently, the ability of Bromoenol Lactone (BEL to attenuate the severity of nicotine-induced breast cancer was examined.We found that BEL significantly attenuated both basal and nicotine-induced 4T1 breast cancer cell proliferation, via an MTT proliferation assay. Breast cancer cell migration was examined by both a scratch and transwell assay, in which, BEL was found to significantly decrease both basal and nicotine-induced migration. Additionally, nicotine-induced MMP-9 expression was found to be mediated in an iPLA2β dependent manner. These results suggest that iPLA2β plays a critical role in mediating both basal and nicotine-induced breast cancer cell proliferation and migration in-vitro. In an in-vivo mouse breast cancer model, BEL treatment was found to significantly reduce both basal (p<0.05 and nicotine-induced tumor growth (p<0.01. Immunohistochemical analysis showed BEL decreased nicotine-induced MMP-9, HIF-1alpha, and CD31 tumor tissue expression. Subsequently, BEL was observed to reduce nicotine-induced lung metastasis.The present study indicates that nicotine-induced migration is mediated by MMP-9 production in an iPLA2β dependent manner. Our data suggests that BEL is a possible chemotherapeutic agent as it was found to reduce both nicotine-induced breast cancer tumor growth and lung metastasis.

  3. Angiotensin II facilitates breast cancer cell migration and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Rodrigues-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Breast cancer metastasis is a leading cause of death by malignancy in women worldwide. Efforts are being made to further characterize the rate-limiting steps of cancer metastasis, i.e. extravasation of circulating tumor cells and colonization of secondary organs. In this study, we investigated whether angiotensin II, a major vasoactive peptide both produced locally and released in the bloodstream, may trigger activating signals that contribute to cancer cell extravasation and metastasis. We used an experimental in vivo model of cancer metastasis in which bioluminescent breast tumor cells (D3H2LN were injected intra-cardiacally into nude mice in order to recapitulate the late and essential steps of metastatic dissemination. Real-time intravital imaging studies revealed that angiotensin II accelerates the formation of metastatic foci at secondary sites. Pre-treatment of cancer cells with the peptide increases the number of mice with metastases, as well as the number and size of metastases per mouse. In vitro, angiotensin II contributes to each sequential step of cancer metastasis by promoting cancer cell adhesion to endothelial cells, trans-endothelial migration and tumor cell migration across extracellular matrix. At the molecular level, a total of 102 genes differentially expressed following angiotensin II pre-treatment were identified by comparative DNA microarray. Angiotensin II regulates two groups of connected genes related to its precursor angiotensinogen. Among those, up-regulated MMP2/MMP9 and ICAM1 stand at the crossroad of a network of genes involved in cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Our data suggest that targeting angiotensin II production or action may represent a valuable therapeutic option to prevent metastatic progression of invasive breast tumors.

  4. Capsaicin modulates proliferation, migration, and activation of hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitencourt, Shanna; Mesquita, Fernanda; Basso, Bruno; Schmid, Júlia; Ferreira, Gabriela; Rizzo, Lucas; Bauer, Moises; Bartrons, Ramon; Ventura, Francesc; Rosa, Jose Luis; Mannaerts, Inge; van Grunsven, Leo Adrianus; Oliveira, Jarbas

    2014-03-01

    Capsaicin, the active component of chili pepper, has been reported to have antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory effects on a variety of cell lines. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the effects of capsaicin during HSC activation and maintenance. Activated and freshly isolated HSCs were treated with capsaicin. Proliferation was measured by incorporation of EdU. Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were investigated using flow cytometry. The migratory response to chemotactic stimuli was evaluated by a modified Boyden chamber assay. Activation markers and inflammatory cytokines were determined by qPCR, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry. Our results show that capsaicin reduces HSC proliferation, migration, and expression of profibrogenic markers of activated and primary mouse HSCs. In conclusion, the present study shows that capsaicin modulates proliferation, migration, and activation of HSC in vitro. PMID:23955514

  5. Rho GTPases and regulation of cell migration and polarization in human corneal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Hou

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Epithelial cell migration is required for regeneration of tissues and can be defective in a number of ocular surface diseases. This study aimed to determine the expression pattern of Rho family small G-proteins in human corneal epithelial cells to test their requirement in directional cell migration. METHODS: Rho family small G-protein expression was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Dominant-inhibitory constructs encoding Rho proteins or Rho protein targeting small interfering RNA were transfected into human corneal epithelial large T antigen cells, and wound closure rate were evaluated by scratch wounding assay, and a complementary non-traumatic cell migration assay. Immunofluorescence staining was performed to study cell polarization and to assess Cdc42 downstream effector. RESULTS: Cdc42, Chp, Rac1, RhoA, TC10 and TCL were expressed in human corneal epithelial cells. Among them, Cdc42 and TCL were found to significantly affect cell migration in monolayer scratch assays. These results were confirmed through the use of validated siRNAs directed to Cdc42 and TCL. Scramble siRNA transfected cells had high percentage of polarized cells than Cdc42 or TCL siRNA transfected cells at the wound edge. We showed that the Cdc42-specific effector p21-activated kinase 4 localized predominantly to cell-cell junctions in cell monolayers, but failed to translocate to the leading edge in Cdc42 siRNA transfected cells after monolayer wounding. CONCLUSION: Rho proteins expressed in cultured human corneal epithelial cells, and Cdc42, TCL facilitate two-dimensional cell migration in-vitro. Although silencing of Cdc42 and TCL did not noticeably affect the appearance of cell adhesions at the leading edge, the slower migration of these cells indicates both GTP-binding proteins play important roles in promoting cell movement of human corneal epithelial cells.

  6. Modeling and Analysis of Epidemic Diffusion with Population Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible (SIS epidemic diffusion model with population migration between two cities is modeled. Global stability conditions for both the disease-free equilibrium and the endemic equilibrium are analyzed and proved. The main contribution of this paper is reflected in epidemic modeling and analysis which considers unequal migration rates, and only susceptible individuals can migrate between the two cities. Numerical simulation shows when the epidemic diffusion system is stable, number of infected individuals in one city can reach zero, while the number of infected individuals in the other city is still positive. On the other hand, decreasing population migration in only one city seems not as effective as improving the recovery rate for controlling the epidemic diffusion.

  7. River Channel Migration: A Remote Sensing and GIS Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Tariqul

    2010-12-01

    Remote sensing and geographic information system provide tools for quantitative and qualitative river morphological analysis. Bangladesh is a riverine, flood prone country and, the Padma and the Jamuna are two of major three rivers in the country. The aim of this research is to monitor the channel migration of the Padma and the Jamuna rivers since 1977 to 2004 using remote sensing and GIS. Four scenes for dry season's cloud free Landsat images were used in this study. Images were processed using PCI Geomatica and ArcGIS 9.3 was used for GIS analysis. The Landsat images were visualized and identified nine locations to investigate the channel migration. The images were classified into two broad categories, i.e. water and nonwater body. ArcGIS 9.3 was used to transfer these classified images into GIS layers. A standard measurement tool of ArcGIS was applied to measure the movement of river channel based on initial river channel in 1977. General trend of the Padma and the Jamuna river channel migration at locations A, B, C, D, F, G, H and I towards north, northeast and southwest eventually, north, northeast, east, east, west and west, respectively. The confluence point of the Padma and Jamuna (at location E) migrated toward southeast with high rate. During 1977-2004, it migrated about 9000m toward southeast. Trend of migration of the confluence point was faster than any other locations in the channel of the Padma river.

  8. Surface Modification of Intact Poly(dimethylsiloxane) for Cell Culture and Cell Migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li; LIU WenMing; WANG JinYi

    2009-01-01

    @@ Cell migration plays a crucial role in various biological processes including embryogenests,wound healing,immune response,and tissue development~([1]).Exploring and understanding the mechanisms and related factors underlying cell migration arc also very important for emerging areas of biotedmology which focus on cellular transplantation and the manufacture of artificial tissues,as well as for the development of new therapeutic strategies for controlling invasive tumor cells~([2]).

  9. AHNAK is highly expressed and plays a key role in cell migration and invasion in mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Hitomi; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Sugyo, Aya; Abe, Masaaki; Hino, Okio; Saga, Tsuneo

    2014-02-01

    The worldwide incidence of the highly aggressive tumor mesothelioma is expected to increase. Mesothelioma is classified into three main histological subtypes: epithelioid, sarcomatoid and biphasic. Although the pathological diagnostic markers for epithelioid are established, to date no adequate marker for sarcomatoid mesothelioma has been found. Thus, a reliable diagnostic marker of sarcomatoid mesothelioma is necessary. In this study, to identify an unknown protein with 120 kDa expressed only in the mesothelioma cell line 211H, we conducted proteomic analysis and found five candidate proteins. One such protein, AHNAK, was highly expressed in all seven mesothelioma cell lines (211H, H28, H226, H2052, H2452, MESO1 and MESO4), but not in the mesothelial cell line MeT-5A by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence staining. Furthermore, we confirmed high AHNAK expression not only in xenografts but also in human mesothelioma specimens including sarcomatoid, epithelioid and biphasic mesothelioma using immunohistochemical staining. These findings suggest that AHNAK has the potential to be a new marker for detecting mesothelioma. Since AHNAK is involved in cell migration and invasion in other metastatic tumor cells, we conducted migration and invasion assays in mesothelioma cell lines. The number of migrating cells in six of seven mesothelioma cell lines and the number of invading cells in all seven cell lines were significantly increased compared with those in MeT-5A. Knockdown of AHNAK significantly reduced the cell migration and invasion ability in all seven mesothelioma cell lines. These results support further clinical evaluation of the association of AHNAK and metastasis in mesothelioma. PMID:24253341

  10. Involvement of regulatory volume decrease in the migration of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Wen MAO; Li Xin CHEN; Li Wei WANG; Tim JACOB; Xue Rong SUN; Hui LI; Lin Yan ZHU; Pan LI; Ping ZHONG; Si Huai NIE

    2005-01-01

    The transwell chamber migration assay and CCD digital camera imaging techniques were used to investigate the relationship between regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and cell migration in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells (CNE-2Z cells). Both migrated and non-migrated CNE-2Z cells, when swollen by 47% hypotonic solution, exhibited RVD which was inhibited by extracellular application of chloride channel blockers adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) and tamoxifen. However, RVD rate in migrated CNE-2Z cells was bigger than that of non-migrated cells and the sensitivity of migrated cells to NPPB and tamoxifen was higher than that of nonmigrated cells. ATP, NPPB and tamoxifen also inhibited migration of CNE-2Z cells. The inhibition of migration was positively correlated to the blockage of RVD, with a correlation coefficient (r) = 0.99, suggesting a functional relationship between RVD and cell migration. We conclude that RVD is involved in cell migration and RVD may play an important role in migratory process in CNE-2Z cells.

  11. Cu Migration in Polycrystalline CdTe Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Da [Arizona State University; Akis, Richard [Arizona State University; Brinkman, Daniel [Arizona State University; Sankin, Igor [First Solar; Fang, Tian [First Solar; Vasileska, Dragica [Arizona State University; Ringhofer, Christian [Arizona State University

    2014-03-12

    An impurity reaction-diffusion model is applied to Cu defects and related intrinsic defects in polycrystalline CdTe for a better understanding of Cu’s role in the cell level reliability of CdTe PV devices. The simulation yields transient Cu distributions in polycrystalline CdTe during solar cell processing and stressing. Preliminary results for Cu migration using available diffusivity and solubility data show that Cu accumulates near the back contact, a phenomena that is commonly observed in devices after back-contact processing or stress conditions.

  12. Computational Analysis of mRNA Expression Profiles Identifies the ITG Family and PIK3R3 as Crucial Genes for Regulating Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Klahan, Sukhontip; Wu, Mei-Shin; Hsi, Edward; Huang, Chi-Cheng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2014-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive type of breast cancer that does not express estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor (Her2/neu). TNBC has worse clinical outcomes than other breast cancer subtypes. However, the key molecules and mechanisms of TNBC migration remain unclear. In this study, we compared two normalized microarray datasets from GEO database between Asian (GSE33926) and non-Asian populations (GSE46581) to det...

  13. From cell differentiation to cell collectives : Bacillus subtilis uses division of labor to migrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The organization of cells, emerging from cell-cell interactions, can give rise to collective properties. These properties are adaptive when together cells can face environmental challenges that they separately cannot. One particular challenge that is important for microorganisms is migration. In thi

  14. The disintegrin tzabcanin inhibits adhesion and migration in melanoma and lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saviola, Anthony J; Burns, Patrick D; Mukherjee, Ashis K; Mackessy, Stephen P

    2016-07-01

    Integrins play an essential role in cancer survival and invasion, and they have been major targets in drug development and design. Disintegrins are small (4-16kDa) viperid snake venom proteins that exhibit a canonical integrin-binding site (often RGD). These non-enzymatic proteins inhibit integrin-mediated cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions, making them potential candidates as therapeutics in cancer and numerous other human disorders. The present study examined the cytotoxic, anti-adhesion, and anti-migration effects of a recently characterized disintegrin, tzabcanin, towards melanoma (A-375) and lung (A-549) cancer cell lines. Tzabcanin inhibits adhesion of both cells lines to vitronectin and exhibited very weak cytotoxicity towards A-375 cells; however, it had no effect on cell viability of A-549 cells. Further, tzabcanin significantly inhibited migration of both cell lines in cell scratch/wound healing assays. Flow cytometric analysis indicates that both A-375 and A-549 cell lines express integrin αvβ3, a critical integrin in tumor motility and invasion, and a major receptor of the extracellular matrix protein vitronectin. Flow cytometric analysis also identified αvβ3 as a binding site of tzabcanin. These results suggest that tzabcanin may have utility in the development of anticancer therapies, or may be used as a biomarker to detect neoplasms that over-express integrin αvβ3. PMID:27060015

  15. Mechanobiology of cell migration in the context of dynamic two-way cell-matrix interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Nicholas A; Chaudhuri, Parthiv Kant; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-05-24

    Migration of cells is integral in various physiological processes in all facets of life. These range from embryonic development, morphogenesis, and wound healing, to disease pathology such as cancer metastasis. While cell migratory behavior has been traditionally studied using simple assays on culture dishes, in recent years it has been increasingly realized that the physical, mechanical, and chemical aspects of the matrix are key determinants of the migration mechanism. In this paper, we will describe the mechanobiological changes that accompany the dynamic cell-matrix interactions during cell migration. Furthermore, we will review what is to date known about how these changes feed back to the dynamics and biomechanical properties of the cell and the matrix. Elucidating the role of these intimate cell-matrix interactions will provide not only a better multi-scale understanding of cell motility in its physiological context, but also a more holistic perspective for designing approaches to regulate cell behavior.

  16. Effects of ovarian cancer G protein coupled receptor 1 on the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of human ovarian cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Juan; ZHANG Long

    2011-01-01

    Background OGR1 was found as a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and proton sensor. Our previous studies have found that OGR1 has inhibitory effect on the metastasis of prostate cancer. In order to investigate the roles of OGR1 gene in the biological activities of ovarian cancer, we studied the OGR1 effects on ovarian cancer cells, HEY cells.Methods OGR1 gene was transfected into HEY cell, in which endogenous expression is low. OGR1-overxepressed cells and vector-transfected cells were compared in different assays. Western blotting was employed to confirm the high expression level of OGR1. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay and cell doubling time assay. Cell migration assay (transwell assay) and cell adhesion assay were performed to determine the migration and adhesion potential of cells. Student's t test was employed for statistical analysis.Results Proliferation of OGR1-overexpressed cells was significantly reduced (P <0.01); cell migration was significantly inhibited in the OGR1-transfected cells (P <0.01); cell adhesion to extracellular matrix including fibronectin, vitronectin,collagen Ⅰ/Ⅳ was significantly increased (P <0.01).Conclusions OGR1 expression in human ovarian cancer cells significantly inhibited the cell proliferation and migration,but significantly enhanced cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. It indicated that OGR1 may be a tumor suppressor gene for ovarian cancer.

  17. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Morphology and Migration on Microtextured Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Brittany L.; Riley, Thomas R.; Platt, Christina J.; Brown, Justin L.

    2016-01-01

    The implant used in spinal fusion procedures is an essential component to achieving successful arthrodesis. At the cellular level, the implant impacts healing and fusion through a series of steps: first, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) need to adhere and proliferate to cover the implant; second, the MSCs must differentiate into osteoblasts; third, the osteoid matrix produced by the osteoblasts needs to generate new bone tissue, thoroughly integrating the implant with the vertebrate above and below. Previous research has demonstrated that microtextured titanium is advantageous over smooth titanium and PEEK implants for both promoting osteogenic differentiation and integrating with host bone tissue; however, no investigation to date has examined the early morphology and migration of MSCs on these surfaces. This study details cell spreading and morphology changes over 24 h, rate and directionality of migration 6–18 h post-seeding, differentiation markers at 10 days, and the long-term morphology of MSCs at 7 days, on microtextured, acid-etched titanium (endoskeleton), smooth titanium, and smooth PEEK surfaces. The results demonstrate that in all metrics, the two titanium surfaces outperformed the PEEK surface. Furthermore, the rough acid-etched titanium surface presented the most favorable overall results, demonstrating the random migration needed to efficiently cover a surface in addition to morphologies consistent with osteoblasts and preosteoblasts. PMID:27243001

  18. Human omental-derived adipose stem cells increase ovarian cancer proliferation, migration, and chemoresistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Nowicka

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue contains a population of multipotent adipose stem cells (ASCs that form tumor stroma and can promote tumor progression. Given the high rate of ovarian cancer metastasis to the omental adipose, we hypothesized that omental-derived ASC may contribute to ovarian cancer growth and dissemination.We isolated ASCs from the omentum of three patients with ovarian cancer, with (O-ASC4, O-ASC5 and without (O-ASC1 omental metastasis. BM-MSCs, SQ-ASCs, O-ASCs were characterized with gene expression arrays and metabolic analysis. Stromal cells effects on ovarian cancer cells proliferation, chemoresistance and radiation resistance was evaluated using co-culture assays with luciferase-labeled human ovarian cancer cell lines. Transwell migration assays were performed with conditioned media from O-ASCs and control cell lines. SKOV3 cells were intraperitionally injected with or without O-ASC1 to track in-vivo engraftment.O-ASCs significantly promoted in vitro proliferation, migration chemotherapy and radiation response of ovarian cancer cell lines. O-ASC4 had more marked effects on migration and chemotherapy response on OVCA 429 and OVCA 433 cells than O-ASC1. Analysis of microarray data revealed that O-ASC4 and O-ASC5 have similar gene expression profiles, in contrast to O-ASC1, which was more similar to BM-MSCs and subcutaneous ASCs in hierarchical clustering. Human O-ASCs were detected in the stroma of human ovarian cancer murine xenografts but not uninvolved ovaries.ASCs derived from the human omentum can promote ovarian cancer proliferation, migration, chemoresistance and radiation resistance in-vitro. Furthermore, clinical O-ASCs isolates demonstrate heterogenous effects on ovarian cancer in-vitro.

  19. Co-culture with Sertoli cells promotes proliferation and migration of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fenxi, E-mail: fxzhang0824@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Sanquan College, Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China); Hong, Yan; Liang, Wenmei [Department of Histology and Embryology, Guiyang Medical University, Guizhou 550004, People' s Republic of China (China); Ren, Tongming [Department of Anatomy, Sanquan College, Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China); Jing, Suhua [ICU Center, The Third Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China); Lin, Juntang [Stem Cell Center, Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-culture of Sertoli cells (SCs) with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of SCs dramatically increased proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of SCs stimulated expression of Mdm2, Akt, CDC2, Cyclin D, CXCR4, MAPKs. -- Abstract: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) have been recently used in transplant therapy. The proliferation and migration of MSCs are the determinants of the efficiency of MSC transplant therapy. Sertoli cells are a kind of 'nurse' cells that support the development of sperm cells. Recent studies show that Sertoli cells promote proliferation of endothelial cells and neural stem cells in co-culture. We hypothesized that co-culture of UCMSCs with Sertoli cells may also promote proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. To examine this hypothesis, we isolated UCMSCs from human cords and Sertoli cells from mouse testes, and co-cultured them using a Transwell system. We found that UCMSCs exhibited strong proliferation ability and potential to differentiate to other cell lineages such as osteocytes and adipocytes. The presence of Sertoli cells in co-culture significantly enhanced the proliferation and migration potential of UCMSCs (P < 0.01). Moreover, these phenotypic changes were accompanied with upregulation of multiple genes involved in cell proliferation and migration including phospho-Akt, Mdm2, phospho-CDC2, Cyclin D1, Cyclin D3 as well as CXCR4, phospho-p44 MAPK and phospho-p38 MAPK. These findings indicate that Sertoli cells boost UCMSC proliferation and migration potential.

  20. Rapamycin promotes Schwann cell migration and nerve growth factor secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Liu; Haiwei Zhang; Kaiming Zhang; Xinyu Wang; Shipu Li; Yixia Yin

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin, similar to FK506, can promote neural regeneration in vitro. We assumed that the mechanisms of action of rapamycin and FK506 in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration were similar. This study compared the effects of different concentrations of rapamycin and FK506 on Sc hwann cells and investigated effects and mechanisms of rapamycin on improving peripheral nerve regeneration. Results demonstrated that the lowest rapamycin concentration (1.53 nmol/L) more signiifcantly promoted Schwann cell migration than the highest FK506 concentration (100μmol/L). Rapamycin promoted the secretion of nerve growth factors and upregulated growth-associated protein 43 expression in Schwann cells, but did not signiifcantly affect Schwann cell proliferation. Therefore, rapamycin has potential application in peripheral nerve regeneration therapy.

  1. Neural crest migration: interplay between chemorepellents, chemoattractants, contact inhibition, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and collective cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theveneau, Eric; Mayor, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Neural crest (NC) cells are induced at the border of the neural plate and subsequently leave the neuroepithelium during a delamination phase. This delamination involves either a complete or partial epithelium-to-mesenchyme transition, which is directly followed by an extensive cell migration. During migration, NC cells are exposed to a wide variety of signals controlling their polarity and directionality, allowing them to colonize specific areas or preventing them from invading forbidden zones. For instance, NC cells are restricted to very precise pathways by the presence of inhibitory signals at the borders of each route, such as Semaphorins, Ephrins, and Slit/Robo. Although specific NC chemoattractants have been recently identified, there is evidence that repulsive interactions between the cells, in a process called contact inhibition of locomotion, is one of the major driving forces behind directional migration. Interestingly, in cellular and molecular terms, the invasive behavior of NC is similar to the invasion of cancer cells during metastasis. NC cells eventually settle in various places and make an immense contribution to the vertebrate body. They form the major constituents of the skull, the peripheral nervous system, and the pigment cells among others, which show the remarkable diversity and importance of this embryonic-stem cell like cell population. Consequently, several birth defects and craniofacial disorders, such as Treacher Collins syndrome, are due to improper NC cell migration. PMID:23801492

  2. Glioma Cell Migration on Three-dimensional Nanofiber Scaffolds Is Regulated by Substrate Topography and Abolished by Inhibition of STAT3 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula A. Agudelo-Garcia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of malignant gliomas is their ability to disperse through neural tissue, leading to long-term failure of all known therapies. Identifying new antimigratory targets could reduce glioma recurrence and improve therapeutic efficacy, but screens based on conventional migration assays are hampered by the limited ability of these assays to reproduce native cell motility. Here, we have analyzed the motility, gene expression, and sensitivity to migration inhibitors of glioma cells cultured on scaffolds formed by submicron-sized fibers (nanofibers mimicking the neural topography. Glioma cells cultured on aligned nanofiber scaffolds reproduced the elongated morphology of cells migrating in white matter tissue and were highly sensitive to myosin II inhibition but only moderately affected by stress fiber disruption. In contrast, the same cells displayed a flat morphology and opposite sensitivity to myosin II and actin inhibition when cultured on conventional tissue culture polystyrene. Gene expression analysis indicated a correlation between migration on aligned nanofibers and increased STAT3 signaling, a known driver of glioma progression. Accordingly, cell migration out of glioblastoma-derived neurospheres and tumor explants was reduced by STAT3 inhibitors at subtoxic concentrations. Remarkably, these inhibitors were ineffective when tested at the same concentrations in a conventional two-dimensional migration assay. We conclude that migration of glioma cells is regulated by topographical cues that affect cell adhesion and gene expression. Cell migration analysis using nanofiber scaffolds could be used to reproduce native mechanisms of migration and to identify antimigratory strategies not disclosed by other in vitro models.

  3. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S.; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-03-01

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters.

  4. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-03-03

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters.

  5. The migrations of Drosophila muscle founders and primordial germ cells are interdependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanik, Vincent; Dunipace, Leslie; Bae, Young-Kyung; Macabenta, Frank; Sun, Jingjing; Trisnadi, Nathanie; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2016-09-01

    Caudal visceral mesoderm (CVM) cells migrate from posterior to anterior of the Drosophila embryo as two bilateral streams of cells to support the specification of longitudinal muscles along the midgut. To accomplish this long-distance migration, CVM cells receive input from their environment, but little is known about how this collective cell migration is regulated. In a screen we found that wunen mutants exhibit CVM cell migration defects. Wunens are lipid phosphate phosphatases known to regulate the directional migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs). PGC and CVM cell types interact while PGCs are en route to the somatic gonadal mesoderm, and previous studies have shown that CVM impacts PGC migration. In turn, we found here that CVM cells exhibit an affinity for PGCs, localizing to the position of PGCs whether mislocalized or trapped in the endoderm. In the absence of PGCs, CVM cells exhibit subtle changes, including more cohesive movement of the migrating collective, and an increased number of longitudinal muscles is found at anterior sections of the larval midgut. These data demonstrate that PGC and CVM cell migrations are interdependent and suggest that distinct migrating cell types can coordinately influence each other to promote effective cell migration during development. PMID:27578182

  6. To The Abercrombie Meeting and back again: a journey into the world of cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, Katarzyna Anna

    2013-01-01

    The 7th Abercrombie Meeting took place in Oxford this past summer. It was organized by The Royal Microscopical Society with the support of The British Society for Cell Biology. Michael Abercrombie was a pioneer in the field of investigating cell behavior using time-lapse microscopy. The meeting was focused on "multi-dimensional cell migration in development and disease" and it brought together many of the world's leading researchers in the area, providing an opportunity to discuss the very latest advances and possible future developments in the field. The meeting sessions included Invasive Migration, Invasive Adhesions in Migrating Cells, Signaling in Migration, Immune Cell Migration, Migrations during Morphogenesis and Migration and Disease. As with all Abercrombie meetings, the conference delegates were treated to a staggering array of live cell imaging, in vivo imaging and images generated by the latest developments in microscopy.

  7. [The historical analysis of migration: the pertinence of longitudinal analysis based on retrospective histories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piche, V; Gregory, J; Lavoie, J

    1984-01-01

    The appropriateness of longitudinal analysis as a technique for studying migration is considered. Migration in Upper Volta (now Burkina Faso) is used as the example. Data are taken from the 1974-75 National Survey of Migration, in which 36,785 men and 38,987 women were questioned. The authors begin with a theoretical discussion of the biases to be expected in retrospective histories. They next look at the migration data using first longitudinal analysis and then cross-sectional analysis. Results, at least for this example, show that cross-sectional analysis of migration has the advantage over longitudinal analysis of allowing the correlations between changes in migration patterns and particular historical events to be seen more readily.

  8. Cancer cell-oriented migration of mesenchymal stem cells engineered with an anticancer gene (PTEN: an imaging demonstration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang ZS

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Zhuo-Shun Yang,1,* Xiang-Jun Tang,2,* Xing-Rong Guo,1 Dan-Dan Zou,1 Xu-Yong Sun,3 Jing-Bo Feng,1 Jie Luo,1 Long-Jun Dai,1,4 Garth L Warnock4 1Hubei Key Laboratory of Stem Cell Research, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Neurosurgery, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, People’s Republic of China; 3Guangxi Key Laboratory for Transplant Medicine, 303 Hospital of PLA, Nanning, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been considered to hold great potential as ideal carriers for the delivery of anticancer agents since the discovery of their tumor tropism. This study was performed to demonstrate the effects of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN engineering on MSCs’ capacity for cancer cell-oriented migration. Methods: MSCs were engineered with a PTEN-bearing plasmid and the expression was confirmed with Western blotting. A human glioma cell line (DBTRG was used as the target cell; DBTRG cell-oriented migration of MSCs was monitored with a micro speed photographic system. Results: The expression of transfected PTEN in MSCs was identified by immunoblotting analysis and confirmed with cell viability assessment of target cells. The DBTRG cell-oriented migration of PTEN-engineered MSCs was demonstrated by a real-time dynamic monitoring system, and a phagocytosis-like action of MSCs was also observed. Conclusion: MSCs maintained their capacity for cancer cell-directed migration after they were engineered with anticancer genes. This study provides the first direct evidence of MSCs’ tropism post-anticancer gene engineering. Keywords: gene therapy, mesenchymal stem cells, phosphatase and tensin homolog, cancer

  9. Nardosinone improves the proliferation, migration and selective differentiation of mouse embryonic neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Hui Li

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the impact of Nardosinone, a bioactive component in Nardostachys root, on the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. The neural stem cells were isolated from cerebrums of embryonic day 14 CD1 mice. The proliferation of cells was monitored using the cell counting kit-8 assay, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and cell cycle analysis. Cell migration and differentiation were investigated with the neurosphere assay and cell specific markers, respectively. The results showed that Nardosinone promotes cells proliferation and increases cells migration distance in a dose-dependent manner. Nardosinone also induces the selective differentiation of neural stem cells to neurons and oligodendrocytes, as indicated by the expression of microtubule-associated protein-2 and myelin basic protein, respectively. Nardosinone also increases the expression of phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase and phospho-cAMP response element binding protein during proliferation and differentiation. In conclusion, this study reveals the regulatory effects of Nardosinone on neural stem cells, which may have significant implications for the treatment of brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Tre1, a G protein-coupled receptor, directs transepithelial migration of Drosophila germ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhat S Kunwar

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In most organisms, germ cells are formed distant from the somatic part of the gonad and thus have to migrate along and through a variety of tissues to reach the gonad. Transepithelial migration through the posterior midgut (PMG is the first active step during Drosophila germ cell migration. Here we report the identification of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR, Tre1, that is essential for this migration step. Maternal tre1 RNA is localized to germ cells, and tre1 is required cell autonomously in germ cells. In tre1 mutant embryos, most germ cells do not exit the PMG. The few germ cells that do leave the midgut early migrate normally to the gonad, suggesting that this gene is specifically required for transepithelial migration and that mutant germ cells are still able to recognize other guidance cues. Additionally, inhibiting small Rho GTPases in germ cells affects transepithelial migration, suggesting that Tre1 signals through Rho1. We propose that Tre1 acts in a manner similar to chemokine receptors required during transepithelial migration of leukocytes, implying an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of transepithelial migration. Recently, the chemokine receptor CXCR4 was shown to direct migration in vertebrate germ cells. Thus, germ cells may more generally use GPCR signaling to navigate the embryo toward their target.

  11. Protein kinase C, focal adhesions and the regulation of cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh, Betina S; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John Robert

    2014-01-01

    and adhesion turnover. Focal adhesions, or focal contacts, are widespread organelles at the cell-matrix interface. They arise as a result of receptor interactions with matrix ligands, together with clustering. Recent analysis shows that focal adhesions contain a very large number of protein components......Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix is a complex process involving protrusive activity driven by the actin cytoskeleton, engagement of specific receptors, followed by signaling and cytoskeletal organization. Thereafter, contractile and endocytic/recycling activities may facilitate migration...... in their intracellular compartment. Among these are tyrosine kinases, which have received a great deal of attention, whereas the serine/threonine kinase protein kinase C has received much less. Here the status of protein kinase C in focal adhesions and cell migration is reviewed, together with discussion of its roles...

  12. Flavonoid Fraction of Citrus reticulata Juice Reduces Proliferation and Migration of Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celano, Marilena; Maggisano, Valentina; De Rose, Roberta Francesca; Bulotta, Stefania; Maiuolo, Jessica; Navarra, Michele; Russo, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Effects of flavonoids extracted from Citrus reticulata (mandarin) juice on proliferation and migration of 3 human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) cell lines were evaluated. Flavonoid components of Mandarin juice extract (MJe) were analyzed by uHPLC. Proliferation of CAL-62, C-643, and 8505C cells, measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, was significantly reduced by MJe in a concentration- and time-dependent way, with maximal effect elicited at 0.5 mg/ml concentration after 48 h. Cytofluorimetric analysis showed a block in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, accompanied by low cell mortality owed to autophagic death. The extract caused also a reduction of cell migration, associated with decreased activity of the metalloproteinase MMP-2. These findings demonstrate that the flavonoid fraction of mandarin juice exerts in vitro antiproliferative effects on ATC cells, associated with a reduction of migration, suggesting for such a functional food a potential use as adjuvant in the treatment of thyroid cancer. PMID:26365817

  13. Security Analysis in the Migration to Cloud Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fernández-Medina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a new paradigm that combines several computing concepts and technologies of the Internet creating a platform for more agile and cost-effective business applications and IT infrastructure. The adoption of Cloud computing has been increasing for some time and the maturity of the market is steadily growing. Security is the question most consistently raised as consumers look to move their data and applications to the cloud. We justify the importance and motivation of security in the migration of legacy systems and we carry out an analysis of different approaches related to security in migration processes to cloud with the aim of finding the needs, concerns, requirements, aspects, opportunities and benefits of security in the migration process of legacy systems.

  14. On-Chip Quantitative Measurement of Mechanical Stresses During Cell Migration with Emulsion Droplets

    OpenAIRE

    Molino, D.; S. Quignard; Gruget, C.; Pincet, F.; Y. Chen; Piel, M.; Fattaccioli, J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of immune cells to migrate within narrow and crowded spaces is a critical feature involved in various physiological processes from immune response to metastasis. Several in-vitro techniques have been developed so far to study the behaviour of migrating cells, the most recent being based on the fabrication of microchannels within which cells move. To address the question of the mechanical stress a cell is able to produce during the encounter of an obstacle while migrating, we devel...

  15. Doxycycline inhibits leukemic cell migration via inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, CHUNHUAI; Xiang, Ru; ZHANG, XIANGZHONG; CHEN, YUNXIAN

    2015-01-01

    Doxycycline, a tetracycline-based antibiotic, has been reported to attenuate melanoma cell migration through inhibiting the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway. However, it remains to be elucidated whether doxycycline exerts this effect on leukemia cell migration. The present study aimed to examine the role of doxycycline in leukemia cell migration. The invasion capacities of the human leukemia cell lines KG1a (acute myelogenous leukemia) and K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia) were...

  16. Analysis of melamine migration from melamine food contact articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chik, Z; Haron, D E Mohamad; Ahmad, E D; Taha, H; Mustafa, A M

    2011-01-01

    Migration of melamine has been determined for 41 types of retail melamine-ware products in Malaysia. This study was initiated by the Ministry of Health, Malaysia, in the midst of public anxiety on the possibility of melamine leaching into foods that come into contact with the melamine-ware. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the level of melamine migration in melamine utensils available on the market. Samples of melamine tableware, including cups and plates, forks and spoons, tumblers, bowls, etc., were collected from various retail outlets. Following the test guidelines for melamine migration set by the European Committee for Standardisation (CEN 2004) with some modifications, the samples were exposed to two types of food simulants (3% acetic acid and distilled water) at three test conditions (25°C (room temperature), 70 and 100°C) for 30 min. Melamine analysis was carried out using LC-MS/MS with a HILIC column and mobile phase consisting of ammonium acetate/formic acid (0.05%) in water and ammonium acetate/formic acid (0.05%) in acetonitrile (95 : 5, v/v). The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 5 ng/ml. Melamine migration was detected from all samples. For the articles tested with distilled water, melamine migration were [median (interquartile range)] 22.2 (32.6), 49.3 (50.9), 84.9 (89.9) ng/ml at room temperature (25°C), 70 and 100°C, respectively. In 3% acetic acid, melamine migration was 31.5 (35.7), 81.5 (76.2), 122.0 (126.7) ng/ml at room temperature (25°C), 70 and 100°C, respectively. This study suggests that excessive heat and acidity may directly affect melamine migration from melamine-ware products. However the results showed that melamine migration in the tested items were well below the specific migration limit (SML) of 30 mg/kg (30,000 ng/ml) set out in European Commission Directive 2002/72/EC. PMID:21607892

  17. Actin-Based Feedback Circuits in Cell Migration and Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinxin

    In this thesis, we study the switch and pulse functions of actin during two important cellular processes, cell migration and endocytosis. Actin is an abundant protein that can polymerize to form a dendritic network. The actin network can exert force to push or bend the cell membrane. During cell migration, the actin network behaves like a switch, assembling mostly at one end or at the other end. The end with the majority of the actin network is the leading edge, following which the cell can persistently move in the same direction. The other end, with the minority of the actin network, is the trailing edge, which is dragged by the cell as it moves forward. When subjected to large fluctuations or external stimuli, the leading edge and the trailing edge can interchange and change the direction of motion, like a motion switch. Our model of the actin network in a cell reveals that mechanical force is crucial for forming the motion switch. We find a transition from single state symmetric behavior to switch behavior, when tuning parameters such as the force. The model is studied by both stochastic simulations, and a set of rate equations that are consistent with the simulations. Endocytosis is a process by which cells engulf extracellular substances and recycle the cell membrane. In yeast cells, the actin network is transiently needed to overcome the pressure difference across the cell membrane caused by turgor pressure. The actin network behaves like a pulse, which assembles and then disassembles within about 30 seconds. Using a stochastic model, we reproduce the pulse behaviors of the actin network and one of its regulatory proteins, Las17. The model matches green fluorescence protein (GFP) experiments for wild-type cells. The model also predicts some phenotypes that modify or diminish the pulse behavior. The phenotypes are verified with both experiments performed at Washington University and with other groups' experiments. We find that several feedback mechanisms are

  18. Dkk-1 Inhibits Intestinal Epithelial Cell Migration by Attenuating Directional Polarization of Leading Edge Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Stefan; Capaldo, Christopher T.; Samarin, Stanislav; Nava, Porfirio; Neumaier, Irmgard; Skerra, Arne; Sacks, David B.; Parkos, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Wnt signaling pathways regulate proliferation, motility, and survival in a variety of human cell types. Dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1) is a secreted Wnt antagonist that has been proposed to regulate tissue homeostasis in the intestine. In this report, we show that Dkk-1 is secreted by intestinal epithelial cells after wounding and that it inhibits cell migration by attenuating the directional orientation of migrating epithelial cells. Dkk-1 exposure induced mislocalized activation of Cdc42 in migrating cells, which coincided with a displacement of the polarity protein Par6 from the leading edge. Consequently, the relocation of the microtubule organizing center and the Golgi apparatus in the direction of migration was significantly and persistently inhibited in the presence of Dkk-1. Small interfering RNA-induced down-regulation of Dkk-1 confirmed that extracellular exposure to Dkk-1 was required for this effect. Together, these data demonstrate a novel role of Dkk-1 in the regulation of directional polarization of migrating intestinal epithelial cells, which contributes to the effect of Dkk-1 on wound closure in vivo. PMID:19776352

  19. A Nanoprinted Model of Interstitial Cancer Migration Reveals a Link between Cell Deformability and Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotakopoulou, Magdalini; Bergert, Martin; Taubenberger, Anna; Guck, Jochen; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ferrari, Aldo

    2016-07-26

    Metastatic progression of tumors requires the coordinated dissemination of cancerous cells through interstitial tissues and their replication in distant body locations. Despite their importance in cancer treatment decisions, key factors, such as cell shape adaptation and the role it plays in dense tissue invasion by cancerous cells, are not well understood. Here, we employ a 3D electrohydrodynamic nanoprinting technology to generate vertical arrays of topographical pores that mimic interstitial tissue resistance to the mesenchymal migration of cancerous cells, in order to determine the effect of nuclear size, cell deformability, and cell-to-substrate adhesion on tissue invasion efficiency. The high spatial and temporal resolution of our analysis demonstrates that the ability of cells to deform depends on the cell cycle phase, peaks immediately after mitosis, and is key to the invasion process. Increased pore penetration efficiency by cells in early G1 phase also coincided with their lower nuclear volume and higher cell deformability, compared with the later cell cycle stages. Furthermore, artificial decondensation of chromatin induced an increase in cell and nuclear deformability and improved pore penetration efficiency of cells in G1. Together, these results underline that along the cell cycle cells have different abilities to dynamically remodel their actin cytoskeleton and induce nuclear shape changes, which determines their pore penetration efficiency. Thus, our results support a mechanism in which cell proliferation and pore penetration are functionally linked to favor the interstitial dissemination of metastatic cells. PMID:27268411

  20. Nuclide migration analysis in fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the results of PA studies considering heterogeneous fracture characteristics, for the purpose of contributing for the performance assessment of the natural barrier system PA in H12 report (The second progress report on research and development for the Geological Disposal of HLW in Japan). In this study, 3-D discrete fracture network model (DFN) and 1-D multiple pathways model is applied for 100 m scale of rock block. Although nuclide release rate calculated by DFN are widely distributed among the realizations, it is shown that several tens realizations are enough number to understand the stochastic characteristics of the nuclide release. From the data uncertainty analysis, there are no significant effects for the nuclide retardation in fracture geometry parameters such as fracture radius, density and etc. 1-D multiple pathways model is developed with focusing on the heterogeneity of the transmissivity, which has a large effect to the nuclide retardation effects. The nuclide release rate calculated by using 1-D multiple pathways model approximates to the results of DFN. This result also shows that the relatively large fractures/faults that connects disposal tunnel and downstream faults have an important role for performance assessment in natural barrier system. (author)

  1. Iodine Migration and its Effect on Hysteresis in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Tscheuschner, Steffen; Paulus, Fabian; Hopkinson, Paul E; Kießling, Johannes; Köhler, Anna; Vaynzof, Yana; Huettner, Sven

    2016-03-23

    The migration and accumulation of iodide ions create a modulation of the respective interfacial barriers causing the hysteresis in solar cells based on methylammonium lead iodide perovskites. Iodide ions are identified as the migrating species by measuring temperature dependent current-transients and photoelectron spectroscopy. The involved changes in the built-in potential due to ion migration are directly measured by electroabsorption spectroscopy.

  2. Nuclear translocation of phosphorylated STAT3 regulates VEGF-A-induced lymphatic endothelial cell migration and tube formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okazaki, Hideki; Tokumaru, Sho; Hanakawa, Yasushi; Shiraishi, Ken; Shirakata, Yuji; Dai, Xiuju; Yang, Lijun; Tohyama, Mikiko; Hashimoto, Koji [Department of Dermatology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Toon, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan); Sayama, Koji, E-mail: sayama@m.ehime-u.ac.jp [Department of Dermatology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Toon, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan)

    2011-09-02

    Highlights: {yields} VEGF-A enhanced lymphatic endothelial cell migration and increased tube formation. {yields} VEGF-A treated lymphatic endothelial cell showed activation of STAT3. {yields} Dominant-negative STAT3 inhibited VEGF-A-induced lymphatic endothelial cell migration and tube formation. -- Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific growth factor that regulates endothelial functions, and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) are known to be important during VEGF receptor signaling. The aim of this study was to determine whether STAT3 regulates VEGF-induced lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) migration and tube formation. VEGF-A (33 ng/ml) enhanced LEC migration by 2-fold and increased tube length by 25% compared with the control, as analyzed using a Boyden chamber and Matrigel assay, respectively. Western blot analysis and immunostaining revealed that VEGF-A induced the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated STAT3 in LECs, and this translocation was blocked by the transfection of LECs with an adenovirus vector expressing a dominant-negative mutant of STAT3 (Ax-STAT3F). Transfection with Ax-STAT3F also almost completely inhibited VEGF-A-induced LEC migration and tube formation. These results indicate that STAT3 is essential for VEGF-A-induced LEC migration and tube formation and that STAT3 regulates LEC functions.

  3. Polydatin induces bone marrow stromal cells migration by activation of ERK1/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, ZhenQiu; Wei, QiuShi; Hong, GuoJu; Chen, Da; Liang, Jiang; He, Wei; Chen, Mei Hui

    2016-08-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have proven to be useful for the treatment of numerous human diseases. However, the reparative ability of BMSCs is limited by their poor migration. Polydatin, widely used in traditional Chinese remedies, has proven to exert protective effects to BMSCs. However, little is known about its role in BMSCs migration. In this study, we studied the effects of polydatin on rat BMSCs migration using the scratch wound healing and transwell migration assays. Our results showed polydatin could promote BMSCs migration. Further experiments showed activation of ERK 1/2, but not JNK, was required for polydatin-induced BMSCs migration, suggesting that polydatin may promote BMSCs migration via the ERK 1/2 signaling pathways. Taken together, our results indicate that polydatin might be beneficial for stem cell replacement therapy by improving BMSCs migration.

  4. Wash functions downstream of Rho1 GTPase in a subset of Drosophila immune cell developmental migrations

    OpenAIRE

    Verboon, Jeffrey M; Travis K Rahe; Rodriguez-Mesa, Evelyn; Parkhurst, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila immune cells, the hemocytes, undergo four stereotypical developmental migrations to populate the embryo, where they provide immune reconnoitering, as well as a number of non–immune-related functions necessary for proper embryogenesis. Here, we describe a role for Rho1 in one of these developmental migrations in which posteriorly located hemocytes migrate toward the head. This migration requires the interaction of Rho1 with its downstream effector Wash, a Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome fa...

  5. Prostaglandins in Cancer Cell Adhesion, Migration, and Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Menter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostaglandins exert a profound influence over the adhesive, migratory, and invasive behavior of cells during the development and progression of cancer. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 (mPGES-1 are upregulated in inflammation and cancer. This results in the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, which binds to and activates G-protein-coupled prostaglandin E1-4 receptors (EP1-4. Selectively targeting the COX-2/mPGES-1/PGE2/EP1-4 axis of the prostaglandin pathway can reduce the adhesion, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis. Once stimulated by prostaglandins, cadherin adhesive connections between epithelial or endothelial cells are lost. This enables cells to invade through the underlying basement membrane and extracellular matrix (ECM. Interactions with the ECM are mediated by cell surface integrins by “outside-in signaling” through Src and focal adhesion kinase (FAK and/or “inside-out signaling” through talins and kindlins. Combining the use of COX-2/mPGES-1/PGE2/EP1-4 axis-targeted molecules with those targeting cell surface adhesion receptors or their downstream signaling molecules may enhance cancer therapy.

  6. First Evidence that Ecklonia cava-Derived Dieckol Attenuates MCF-7 Human Breast Carcinoma Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Kyung Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of Ecklonia cava (E. cava-derived dieckol on movement behavior and the expression of migration-related genes in MCF-7 human breast cancer cell. Phlorotannins (e.g., dieckol, 6,6′-biecko, and 2,7″-phloroglucinol-6,6′-bieckol were purified from E. cava by using centrifugal partition chromatography. Among the phlorotannins, we found that dieckol inhibited breast cancer cell the most and was selected for further study. Radius™-well was used to assess cell migration, and dieckol (1–100 µM was found to suppress breast cancer cell movement. Metastasis-related gene expressions were evaluated by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. In addition, dieckol inhibited the expression of migration-related genes such as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. On the other hand, it stimulated the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2. These results suggest that dieckol exerts anti-breast cancer activity via the regulation of the expressions of metastasis-related genes, and this is the first report on the anti-breast cancer effect of dieckol.

  7. Siegesbeckia orientalis Extract Inhibits TGFβ1-Induced Migration and Invasion of Endometrial Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chang Chang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Type II endometrial carcinoma typically exhibits aggressive metastasis and results in a poor prognosis. Siegesbeckia orientalis Linne is a traditional Chinese medicinal herb with several medicinal benefits, including the cytotoxicity against various cancers. This study investigates the inhibitory effects of S. orientalis ethanol extract (SOE on the migration and invasion of endometrial cancer cells, which were stimulated by transforming growth factor β (TGFβ. The inhibitory effects were evaluated by determining wound healing and performing the Boyden chamber assay. This study reveals that SOE can inhibit TGFβ1-induced cell wound healing, cell migration, and cell invasion in a dose-dependent manner in RL95-2 and HEC-1A endometrial cancer cells. SOE also reversed the TGFβ1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition, including the loss of the cell-cell junction and the lamellipodia-like structures. Western blot analysis revealed that SOE inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK1/2, and Akt, as well as the expression of MMP-9, MMP-2, and u-PA in RL95-2 cells dose-dependently. The results of this investigation suggest that SOE is a potential anti-metastatic agent against human endometrial tumors.

  8. From cell differentiation to cell collectives: Bacillus subtilis uses division of labor to migrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi van Gestel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The organization of cells, emerging from cell-cell interactions, can give rise to collective properties. These properties are adaptive when together cells can face environmental challenges that they separately cannot. One particular challenge that is important for microorganisms is migration. In this study, we show how flagellum-independent migration is driven by the division of labor of two cell types that appear during Bacillus subtilis sliding motility. Cell collectives organize themselves into bundles (called "van Gogh bundles" of tightly aligned cell chains that form filamentous loops at the colony edge. We show, by time-course microscopy, that these loops migrate by pushing themselves away from the colony. The formation of van Gogh bundles depends critically on the synergistic interaction of surfactin-producing and matrix-producing cells. We propose that surfactin-producing cells reduce the friction between cells and their substrate, thereby facilitating matrix-producing cells to form bundles. The folding properties of these bundles determine the rate of colony expansion. Our study illustrates how the simple organization of cells within a community can yield a strong ecological advantage. This is a key factor underlying the diverse origins of multicellularity.

  9. Integrin-mediated cell migration is blocked by inhibitors of human neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Feng; Howlader, Md Amran; Cairo, Christopher W

    2016-09-01

    Integrins are critical receptors in cell migration and adhesion. A number of mechanisms are known to regulate the function of integrins, including phosphorylation, conformational change, and cytoskeletal anchoring. We investigated whether native neuraminidase (Neu, or sialidase) enzymes which modify glycolipids could play a role in regulating integrin-mediated cell migration. Using a scratch assay, we found that exogenously added Neu3 and Neu4 activity altered rates of cell migration. We observed that Neu4 increased the rate of migration in two cell lines (HeLa, A549); while Neu3 only increased migration in HeLa cells. A bacterial neuraminidase was able to increase the rate of migration in HeLa, but not in A549 cells. Treatment of cells with complex gangliosides (GM1, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b) resulted in decreased cell migration rates, while LacCer was able to increase rates of migration in both lines. Importantly, our results show that treatment of cells with inhibitors of native Neu enzymes had a dramatic effect on the rates of cell migration. The most potent compound tested targeted the human Neu4 isoenzyme, and was able to substantially reduce the rate of cell migration. We found that the lateral mobility of integrins was reduced by treatment of cells with Neu3, suggesting that Neu3 enzyme activity resulted in changes to integrin-co-receptor or integrin-cytoskeleton interactions. Finally, our results support the hypothesis that inhibitors of human Neu can be used to investigate mechanisms of cell migration and for the development of anti-adhesive therapies. PMID:27344026

  10. Integrin-mediated cell migration is blocked by inhibitors of human neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Feng; Howlader, Md Amran; Cairo, Christopher W

    2016-09-01

    Integrins are critical receptors in cell migration and adhesion. A number of mechanisms are known to regulate the function of integrins, including phosphorylation, conformational change, and cytoskeletal anchoring. We investigated whether native neuraminidase (Neu, or sialidase) enzymes which modify glycolipids could play a role in regulating integrin-mediated cell migration. Using a scratch assay, we found that exogenously added Neu3 and Neu4 activity altered rates of cell migration. We observed that Neu4 increased the rate of migration in two cell lines (HeLa, A549); while Neu3 only increased migration in HeLa cells. A bacterial neuraminidase was able to increase the rate of migration in HeLa, but not in A549 cells. Treatment of cells with complex gangliosides (GM1, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b) resulted in decreased cell migration rates, while LacCer was able to increase rates of migration in both lines. Importantly, our results show that treatment of cells with inhibitors of native Neu enzymes had a dramatic effect on the rates of cell migration. The most potent compound tested targeted the human Neu4 isoenzyme, and was able to substantially reduce the rate of cell migration. We found that the lateral mobility of integrins was reduced by treatment of cells with Neu3, suggesting that Neu3 enzyme activity resulted in changes to integrin-co-receptor or integrin-cytoskeleton interactions. Finally, our results support the hypothesis that inhibitors of human Neu can be used to investigate mechanisms of cell migration and for the development of anti-adhesive therapies.

  11. New strategy to control cell migration and metastasis regulated by CCN2/CTGF

    OpenAIRE

    Aguiar, Diego Pinheiro; de Farias, Gabriel Correa; de Sousa, Eduardo Branco; de Mattos Coelho-Aguiar, Juliana; Lobo, Julie Calixto; Casado, Priscila Ladeira; Duarte, Maria Eugênia Leite; Abreu, José Garcia Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)/CCN family member 2 (CCN2) is a CCN family member of matricellular signaling modulators. It has been shown that CCN2/CTGF mediates cell adhesion, aggregation and migration in a large variety of cell types, including vascular endothelial cells, fibroblasts, epithelial cells, aortic smooth muscle and also pluripotent stem cells. Others matricellular proteins are capable of interacting with CCN2/CTGF to mediate its function. Cell migration is a key feature ...

  12. The secretory pathway calcium ATPase PMR-1/SPCA1 has essential roles in cell migration during Caenorhabditis elegans embryonic development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Praitis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining levels of calcium in the cytosol is important for many cellular events, including cell migration, where localized regions of high calcium are required to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics, contractility, and adhesion. Studies show inositol-trisphosphate receptors (IP3R and ryanodine receptors (RyR, which release calcium into the cytosol, are important regulators of cell migration. Similarly, proteins that return calcium to secretory stores are likely to be important for cell migration. The secretory protein calcium ATPase (SPCA is a Golgi-localized protein that transports calcium from the cytosol into secretory stores. SPCA has established roles in protein processing, metal homeostasis, and inositol-trisphosphate signaling. Defects in the human SPCA1/ATP2C1 gene cause Hailey-Hailey disease (MIM# 169600, a genodermatosis characterized by cutaneous blisters and fissures as well as keratinocyte cell adhesion defects. We have determined that PMR-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of SPCA1, plays an essential role in embryogenesis. Pmr-1 strains isolated from genetic screens show terminal phenotypes, such as ventral and anterior enclosure failures, body morphogenesis defects, and an unattached pharynx, which are caused by earlier defects during gastrulation. In Pmr-1 embryos, migration rates are significantly reduced for cells moving along the embryo surface, such as ventral neuroblasts, C-derived, and anterior-most blastomeres. Gene interaction experiments show changing the activity of itr-1/IP3R and unc-68/RyR modulates levels of embryonic lethality in Pmr-1 strains, indicating pmr-1 acts with these calcium channels to regulate cell migration. This analysis reveals novel genes involved in C. elegans cell migration, as well as a new role in cell migration for the highly conserved SPCA gene family.

  13. ESCRT III repairs nuclear envelope ruptures during cell migration to limit DNA damage and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, M; Gentili, M; de Belly, H; Thiam, H R; Vargas, P; Jimenez, A J; Lautenschlaeger, F; Voituriez, Raphaël; Lennon-Duménil, A M; Manel, N; Piel, M

    2016-04-15

    In eukaryotic cells, the nuclear envelope separates the genomic DNA from the cytoplasmic space and regulates protein trafficking between the two compartments. This barrier is only transiently dissolved during mitosis. Here, we found that it also opened at high frequency in migrating mammalian cells during interphase, which allowed nuclear proteins to leak out and cytoplasmic proteins to leak in. This transient opening was caused by nuclear deformation and was rapidly repaired in an ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport)-dependent manner. DNA double-strand breaks coincided with nuclear envelope opening events. As a consequence, survival of cells migrating through confining environments depended on efficient nuclear envelope and DNA repair machineries. Nuclear envelope opening in migrating leukocytes could have potentially important consequences for normal and pathological immune responses. PMID:27013426

  14. The RNA binding protein Larp1 regulates cell division, apoptosis and cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Carla; Abd Latip, Normala; Lam, Sarah-Jane; Carpenter, Lee; Sawicka, Kirsty; Tzolovsky, George; Gabra, Hani; Bushell, Martin; Glover, David M; Willis, Anne E; Blagden, Sarah P

    2010-09-01

    The RNA binding protein Larp1 was originally shown to be involved in spermatogenesis, embryogenesis and cell-cycle progression in Drosophila. Our data show that mammalian Larp1 is found in a complex with poly A binding protein and eukaryote initiation factor 4E and is associated with 60S and 80S ribosomal subunits. A reduction in Larp1 expression by siRNA inhibits global protein synthesis rates and results in mitotic arrest and delayed cell migration. Consistent with these data we show that Larp1 protein is present at the leading edge of migrating cells and interacts directly with cytoskeletal components. Taken together, these data suggest a role for Larp1 in facilitating the synthesis of proteins required for cellular remodelling and migration. PMID:20430826

  15. ERP44 inhibits human lung cancer cell migration mainly via IP3R2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xue; Jin, Meng; Chen, Ying-Xiao; Wang, Jun; Zhai, Kui; Chang, Yan; Yuan, Qi; Yao, Kai-Tai; Ji, Guangju

    2016-06-01

    Cancer cell migration is involved in tumour metastasis. However, the relationship between calcium signalling and cancer migration is not well elucidated. In this study, we used the human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell line to examine the role of endoplasmic reticulum protein 44 (ERP44), which has been reported to regulate calcium release inside of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), in cell migration. We found that the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs/ITPRs) inhibitor 2-APB significantly inhibited A549 cell migration by inhibiting cell polarization and pseudopodium protrusion, which suggests that Ca2+ is necessary for A549 cell migration. Similarly, the overexpression of ERP44 reduced intracellular Ca2+ release via IP3Rs, altered cell morphology and significantly inhibited the migration of A549 cells. These phenomena were primarily dependent on IP3R2 because wound healing in A549 cells with IP3R2 rather than IP3R1 or IP3R3 siRNA was markedly inhibited. Moreover, the overexpression of ERP44 did not affect the migration of the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y, which mainly expresses IP3R1. Based on the above observations, we conclude that ERP44 regulates A549 cell migration mainly via an IP3R2-dependent pathway.

  16. Zerumbone suppresses IL-1β-induced cell migration and invasion by inhibiting IL-8 and MMP-3 expression in human triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jeonghun; Bae, Soo Youn; Oh, Soo-Jin; Lee, Jeongmin; Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Hyun-Chul; Lee, Se Kyung; Kil, Won Ho; Kim, Seok Won; Nam, Seok Jin; Kim, Sangmin; Lee, Jeong Eon

    2014-11-01

    Inflammation is a key regulatory process in cancer development. Prolonged exposure of breast tumor cells to inflammatory cytokines leads to epithelial-mesenchymal transition, which is the principal mechanism involved in metastasis and tumor invasion. Interleukin (IL)-1β is a major inflammatory cytokine in a variety of tumors. To date, the regulatory mechanism of IL-1β-induced cell migration and invasion has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of zerumbone (ZER) on IL-1β-induced cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells. The levels of IL-8 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 mRNA were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The levels of secreted IL-8 and MMP-3 protein were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blot analysis, respectively. Cell invasion and migration was detected by Boyden chamber assay. The levels of IL-8 and MMP-3 expression were significantly increased by IL-1β treatment in Hs578T and MDA-MB231 cells. On the other hand, IL-1β-induced IL-8 and MMP-3 expression was decreased by ZER. Finally, IL-1β-induced cell migration and invasion were decreased by ZER in Hs578T and MDA-MB231 cells. ZER suppresses IL-1β-induced cell migration and invasion by inhibiting IL-8 expression and MMP-3 expression in TNBC cells. ZER could be a promising therapeutic drug for treatment of triple-negative breast cancer patients.

  17. Extension of migration velocity analysis to transmitted wavefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameloise, Charles-Antoine; Chauris, Hervé

    2016-10-01

    Migration velocity analysis aims at automatically updating the large-scale components of the velocity model, called macromodel. Extended Common Image Gathers are panels used to evaluate focusing after imaging and are constructed as a function of a spatial shift introduced in the imaging condition. We investigate how transmitted waves can also be used in migration velocity analysis: instead of back-propagating the residuals associated with reflected waves, we propose to back-propagate the full wavefield. The image function, equivalent to the migrated section for reflected data, does not exhibit localized events in space along horizons but is still sensitive to the choice of the background velocity model and can thus be coupled to the same objective function defined in the image domain. In order to enhance the benefits of direct waves, we consider a cross-well configuration. Direct waves provide a large illumination between two vertical wells. Associated Common Image Gathers present different characteristics than the ones associated with reflected waves in surface acquisition. In particular, energy is spread over up to the maximum penetration depth. We invert cross-well seismic data along two lines. In the first case, the input data contain the full wavefield dominated by transmitted waves. It demonstrates the possibility to handle transmitted waves to determine the velocity model. It appears that the misfit in the data domain is largely reduced after inversion. In the second case, we use the same algorithm, but with reflected observed data only, as in a classical approach. Most of velocity updates are localized around the reflectivity, leading to an incorrect final model. This demonstrates the benefit of transmitted waves for migration velocity analysis in a cross-well configuration.

  18. Microbial desalination cell with capacitive adsorption for ion migration control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrestal, Casey; Xu, Pei; Jenkins, Peter E; Ren, Zhiyong

    2012-09-01

    A new microbial desalination cell with capacitive adsorption capability (cMDC) was developed to solve the ion migration problem facing current MDC systems. Traditional MDCs remove salts by transferring ions to the anode and cathode chambers, which may prohibit wastewater beneficial reuse due to increased salinity. The cMDC uses adsorptive activated carbon cloth (ACC) as the electrodes and utilizes the formed capacitive double layers for electrochemical ion adsorption. The cMDC removed an average of 69.4% of the salt from the desalination chamber through electrode adsorption during one batch cycle, and it did not add salts to the anode or cathode chamber. It was estimated that 61-82.2mg of total dissolved solids (TDS) was adsorbed to 1g of ACC electrode. The cMDC provides a new approach for salt management, organic removal, and energy production. Further studies will be conducted to optimize reactor configuration and achieve in situ electrode regeneration. PMID:22784594

  19. The acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyano enone), TBE-31, targets microtubule dynamics and cell polarity in migrating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eddie; Saito, Akira; Honda, Tadashi; Di Guglielmo, Gianni M

    2016-04-01

    Cell migration is dependent on the microtubule network for structural support as well as for the proper delivery and positioning of polarity proteins at the leading edge of migrating cells. Identification of drugs that target cytoskeletal-dependent cell migration and protein transport in polarized migrating cells is important in understanding the cell biology of normal and tumor cells and can lead to new therapeutic targets in disease processes. Here, we show that the tricyclic compound TBE-31 directly binds to tubulin and interferes with microtubule dynamics, as assessed by end binding 1 (EB1) live cell imaging. Interestingly, this interference is independent of in vitro tubulin polymerization. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we also observed that TBE-31 interferes with the polarity of migratory cells. The polarity proteins Rac1, IQGAP and Tiam1 were localized at the leading edge of DMSO-treated migrating cell, but were observed to be in multiple protrusions around the cell periphery of TBE-31-treated cells. Finally, we observed that TBE-31 inhibits the migration of Rat2 fibroblasts with an IC50 of 0.75 μM. Taken together, our results suggest that the inhibition of cell migration by TBE-31 may result from the improper maintenance of cell polarity of migrating cells.

  20. MiR-141 suppresses the migration and invasion of HCC cells by targeting Tiam1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have demonstrated that T lymphoma invasion and metastasis 1 (Tiam1 gene is associated with the poor prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, and we used a computational approach to identify miR-141 as a Tiam1-targeting microRNA (miRNA. Here, we explored the function of miR-141 and the relationship between miR-141 and Tiam1 gene in HCC. METHODS: The miR-141 expression in HCC tissues and cell lines was detected and its roles in regulation of HCC cell proliferation, migration and invasion and target gene expression was investigated. Tiam1 was identified as a novel target of miR-141. Ethics statement: our study was approved by the Nanfang Hospital Medical Ethics Committee Ethics statement. Written informed consent was obtained before collection. RESULTS: Based on in situ hybridization (ISH analysis, miR-141 was down-regulated in the same HCC samples. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that patients with low miR-141 expression had poorer overall survival rate than that of the patients with high miR-141 expression. Furthermore, multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that miR-141 could serve as an independent prognostic factor in HCC. MiR-141 significantly inhibited in vitro cell proliferation, migration and invasion as proved by gain- and loss- of function studies, while the mRNA and protein levels of Tiam1 were reduced in cells over-expressing miR-141. Moreover, Tiam1 treatment antagonized this effect, while knockdown of Tiam1 by Tiam1 short hairpin RNA (shTiam1 induced inhibitory effects. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicated that miR-141 functions as a tumor suppressor and inhibits the migration and invasion of HCC cells by targeting Tiam1, which may provide novel prognostic and treatment strategies for HCC patients.

  1. A simple non-perturbing cell migration assay insensitive to proliferation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Honor L; Messner, Jacob; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2016-01-01

    Migration is a fundamental cellular behavior that plays an indispensable role in development and homeostasis, but can also contribute to pathology such as cancer metastasis. Due to its relevance to many aspects of human health, the ability to accurately measure cell migration is of broad interest, and numerous approaches have been developed. One of the most commonly employed approaches, because of its simplicity and throughput, is the exclusion zone assay in which cells are allowed to migrate into an initially cell-free region. A major drawback of this assay is that it relies on simply counting cells in the exclusion zone and therefore cannot distinguish the effects of proliferation from migration. We report here a simple modification to the exclusion zone migration assay that exclusively measures cell migration and is not affected by proliferation. This approach makes use of a lineage-tracing vital stain that is retained through cell generations and effectively reads out migration relative to the original, parental cell population. This modification is simple, robust, non-perturbing, and inexpensive. We validate the method in a panel of cell lines under conditions that inhibit or promote migration and demonstrate its use in normal and cancer cell lines as well as primary cells. PMID:27535324

  2. Jak3 is involved in dendritic cell maturation and CCR7-dependent migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rivas-Caicedo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CCR7-mediated signalling is important for dendritic cell maturation and homing to the lymph nodes. We have previously demonstrated that Jak3 participates in the signalling pathway of CCR7 in T lymphocytes. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we used Jak3(-/- mice to analyze the role of Jak3 in CCR7-mediated dendritic cells migration and function. First, we found no differences in the generation of DCs from Jak3(-/- bone marrow progenitors, when compared to wild type cells. However, phenotypic analysis of the bone marrow derived DCs obtained from Jak3(-/- mice showed reduced expression of co-stimulatory molecules compared to wild type (Jak3(+/+. In addition, when we analyzed the migration of Jak3(-/- and Jak3(+/+ mature DCs in response to CCL19 and CCL21 chemokines, we found that the absence of Jak3 results in impaired chemotactic responses both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, lymphocyte proliferation and contact hypersensitivity experiments showed that DC-mediated T lymphocyte activation is reduced in the absence of Jak3. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Altogether, our data provide strong evidence that Jak3 is important for DC maturation, migration and function, through a CCR7-mediated signalling pathway.

  3. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 µg cm−2) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  4. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanyuan; Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Sun, Jianbo; Li, Xiang; Wang, Liying; Wu, Nianqiang; Rojanasakul, Yon; Liu, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 μg cm−2) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  5. Suppression of Human Liver Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion via the GABAA Receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the roles of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and to explore the potential of a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of HCC. The expression levels of GABA receptor subunit genes in various HCC cell lines and patients‘ tissues were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Transwell cell migration and invasion assays were carried out for functional analysis. The effects of GABA on liver cancer cell cytoskeletal were determined by immunofluorescence staining. And the effects of GABA on HCC metastasis in nude mice were evaluated using an in vivo orthotopic model of liver cancer. The mRNA level of GABA receptor subunits varied between the primary hepatocellular carcinoma tissue and the adjacent non-tumor liver tissue. GABA inhibited human liver cancer cell migration and invasion via the ionotropic GABAA receptor as a result of the induction of liver cancer cell cytoskeletal reorganization. Pretreatment with GABA also significantly reduced intrahepatic liver metastasis and primary tumor formation in vivo. These findings introduce a potential and novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer patients based on the modulation of the GABAergic system

  6. PLACENTAL SECRETORY FACTORS INFLUENCE TO THP-1 CELLS PHENOTYPE AND THP-1 CELLS TRANSENDOTHELIAL MIGRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Stepanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Decidual and placental macrophage pools are renewed due to its transendothelial monocyte migration from peripheral blood. Tissue macrophages control placental development and provide fetomaternal immunological tolerance. Preeclamptic pregnancy is accompanied by increased monocyte migration to decidual tissue and local inflammatory events. Regulatory mechanisms of monocyte recruitment to placental and decidual tissues is still unclear. Therefore we investigated the influence soluble placental factors (SPFs during the first- and third-trimester normal pregnancy, as compared to effects of these factors in preeclamptic pregnancy. We studied biological actions of SPF upon transendothelial migration of monocyte-like THP-1 cells and their phenotypic pattern. Transendothelial migration of THP-1 cells was more intensive with firsttrimester SPFs from normal pregnancy, when compared with third-trimester samples, and it was accompanied by decreased CD11a expression. SPFs from pre-eclamptic pregnancy caused an increase in transendothelial migration of THP-1 cells, as compared to SPFs from normal pregnancies, being accompanied by increased CD11b expression. The present study was supported by grants ГК №  02.740.11.0711, НШ-3594.2010.7, МД-150.2011.7 and a grant from St.-Petersburg Goverment for young scientists.

  7. Dynamic actin polymerization on endosomes regulates integrin trafficking, cell adhesion and cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Duleh, Steve Niessen

    2012-01-01

    Activators of the Arp2/3 complex, termed nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs), are required for the proper spatial and temporal control of actin assembly in cells. Mammalian cells express several NPFs, each of which serve distinct functions in specific cellular processes, including N-WASP in phagocytosis and endocytosis, WAVE and JMY in cell migration, and WHAMM in ER-to-Golgi transport. Although another NPF termed WASH was recently identified, the cellular function and activity of this prot...

  8. The Pro-Fibrotic Factor IGFBP-5 Induces Lung Fibroblast and Mononuclear Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuoka, Hidekata; Yamaguchi, Yukie; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    We have previously shown that insulin-like growth factor–binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) is overexpressed in fibrotic lung tissues and that it induces production of extracellular matrix components such as collagen and fibronectin both in vitro and in vivo. We recently observed mononuclear cell infiltration in lung tissues of mice expressing IGFBP-5. We therefore examined the role of IGFBP-5 on the migration of immune cells. Migration assays demonstrated that IGFBP-5 induced migration of periphera...

  9. miRNA-135a promotes breast cancer cell migration and invasion by targeting HOXA10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    miRNAs are a group of small RNA molecules regulating target genes by inducing mRNA degradation or translational repression. Aberrant expression of miRNAs correlates with various cancers. Although miR-135a has been implicated in several other cancers, its role in breast cancer is unknown. HOXA10 however, is associated with multiple cancer types and was recently shown to induce p53 expression in breast cancer cells and reduce their invasive ability. Because HOXA10 is a confirmed miR-135a target in more than one tissue, we examined miR-135a levels in relation to breast cancer phenotypes to determine if miR-135a plays role in this cancer type. Expression levels of miR-135a in tissues and cells were determined by poly (A)-RT PCR. The effect of miR-135a on proliferation was evaluated by CCK8 assay, cell migration and invasion were evaluated by transwell migration and invasion assays, and target protein expression was determined by western blotting. GFP and luciferase reporter plasmids were constructed to confirm the action of miR-135a on downstream target genes including HOXA10. Results are reported as means ± S.D. and differences were tested for significance using 2-sided Student's t-test. Here we report that miR-135a was highly expressed in metastatic breast tumors. We found that the expression of miR-135a was required for the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells, but not their proliferation. HOXA10, which encodes a transcription factor required for embryonic development and is a metastasis suppressor in breast cancer, was shown to be a direct target of miR-135a in breast cancer cells. Our analysis showed that miR-135a suppressed the expression of HOXA10 both at the mRNA and protein level, and its ability to promote cellular migration and invasion was partially reversed by overexpression of HOXA10. In summary, our results indicate that miR-135a is an onco-miRNA that can promote breast cancer cell migration and invasion. HOXA10 is a target gene for mi

  10. ProBDNF inhibits collective migration and chemotaxis of rat Schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, You-Quan; Li, Xuan-Yang; Xia, Guan-Nan; Ren, Hong-Yi; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Su, Bing-Yin; Qi, Jian-Guo

    2016-10-01

    Schwann cell migration, including collective migration and chemotaxis, is essential for the formation of coordinate interactions between Schwann cells and axons during peripheral nerve development and regeneration. Moreover, limited migration of Schwann cells imposed a serious obstacle on Schwann cell-astrocytes intermingling and spinal cord repair after Schwann cell transplantation into injured spinal cords. Recent studies have shown that mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor, a member of the neurotrophin family, inhibits Schwann cell migration. The precursor form of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, proBDNF, was expressed in the developing or degenerating peripheral nerves and the injured spinal cords. Since "the yin and yang of neurotrophin action" has been established as a common sense, proBDNF would be expected to promote Schwann cell migration. However, we found, in the present study, that exogenous proBDNF also inhibited in vitro collective migration and chemotaxis of RSC 96 cells, a spontaneously immortalized rat Schwann cell line. Moreover, proBDNF suppressed adhesion and spreading of those cells. At molecular level, proBDNF inhibits F-actin polymerization and focal adhesion dynamics in cultured RSC 96 cells. Therefore, our results suggested a special case against the classical opinion of "the yin and yang of neurotrophin action" and implied that proBDNF might modulate peripheral nerve development or regeneration and spinal cord repair through perturbing native or transplanted Schwann cell migration.

  11. Computational modelling of multi-cell migration in a multi-signalling substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell migration is a vital process in many biological phenomena ranging from wound healing to tissue regeneration. Over the past few years, it has been proven that in addition to cell–cell and cell-substrate mechanical interactions (mechanotaxis), cells can be driven by thermal, chemical and/or electrical stimuli. A numerical model was recently presented by the authors to analyse single cell migration in a multi-signalling substrate. That work is here extended to include multi-cell migration due to cell–cell interaction in a multi-signalling substrate under different conditions. This model is based on balancing the forces that act on the cell population in the presence of different guiding cues. Several numerical experiments are presented to illustrate the effect of different stimuli on the trajectory and final location of the cell population within a 3D heterogeneous multi-signalling substrate. Our findings indicate that although multi-cell migration is relatively similar to single cell migration in some aspects, the associated behaviour is very different. For instance, cell–cell interaction may delay single cell migration towards effective cues while increasing the magnitude of the average net cell traction force as well as the local velocity. Besides, the random movement of a cell within a cell population is slightly greater than that of single cell migration. Moreover, higher electrical field strength causes the cell slug to flatten near the cathode. On the other hand, as with single cell migration, the existence of electrotaxis dominates mechanotaxis, moving the cells to the cathode or anode pole located at the free surface. The numerical results here obtained are qualitatively consistent with related experimental works. (paper)

  12. Inhibition of Rho-Kinase Abrogates Migration of Human Transitional Cell Carcinoma Cells : Results of an in vitro Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vom Dorp, Frank; Sanders, Harald; Boergermann, Christof; Luemmen, Gerd; Ruebben, Herbert; Jakobs, Karl H.; Schmidt, Martina

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Migration of cells involves a complex signaling network. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the impact of Rho-kinase (ROK) on G protein-coupled receptor-induced migration of human transitional cell carcinoma cells in an in vitro experimental setting. Materials and Methods: I

  13. Heme oxygenase-1 promotes Caco-2 cell proliferation and migration by targeting CTNND1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li; LIU Yu-lin; CHEN Guang-xiang; CUI Bin; WANG Jin-shen; SHI Yu-long; LI Le-ping

    2013-01-01

    Background Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) can be induced by inflammatory cytokines,oxidation,ischemia,hypoxia,and endotoxins.As a "graft survival protective gene," HO-1 is a hot spot in organ transplantation research.However,the role of HO-1 gene expression in the function of human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (Caco-2) cells has not been reported previously.Methods The role of HO-1 in the proliferation and migration of Caco-2 cells was analyzed using a stable HO-1 expression plasmid.We constructed a recombinant adeno-associated virus plasmid containing the HO-1 gene,heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1),which was transfected into Caco-2 intestinal cells.We identified a number of target genes by global microarray analysis combined with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay.Results Our results showed that significant HO-1 upregulation was demonstrated in the Caco-2 cells after HO-1 transfection.Restoration of HO-1 expression promoted proliferation and invasion in vitro.The CTNND1 gene,a member of the armadillo protein family,was identified as a direct HO-1 target gene.Conclusion Overexpression of HO-1 promotes Caco-2 cell proliferation and migration by targeting the CTNND1 gene.

  14. Thrombospondin type I domain containing 7A (THSD7A) mediates endothelial cell migration and tube formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chieh-Huei; Su, Pei-Tsu; Du, Xiao-Yan; Kuo, Meng-Wei; Lin, Chia-Yi; Yang, Chung-Chi; Chan, Hau-Shien; Chang, Shing-Jyh; Kuo, Calvin; Seo, Kyunga; Leung, Lawrence L; Chuang, Yung-Jen

    2010-03-01

    Angiogenesis is a highly organized process controlled by a series of molecular events. While much effort has been devoted to identifying angiogenic factors and their reciprocal receptors, far less information is available on the molecular mechanisms underlying directed endothelial cell migration. To search for novel proteins that participate in this process, we used the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) transcript profiling approach to identify genes that are selectively expressed in endothelial cells (ECs). Two EC SAGE libraries were constructed from human umbilical vein and artery ECs to enable data-mining against other non-ECs. A novel endothelial protein, Thrombospondin Type I Domain Containing 7A (THSD7A), with preferential expression in placenta vasculature and in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was identified and targeted for further characterization. Overexpression of a THSD7A carboxyl-terminal fragment in HUVECs inhibited cell migration and disrupted tube formation, while suppression of THSD7A expression enhanced HUVEC migration and tube formation. Immunohistological analysis revealed that THSD7A was expressed at the leading edge of migrating HUVECs, and it co-localized with alpha(V)beta(3) integrin and paxillin. This distribution was dispersed from focal adhesions after disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, suggesting the involvement of THSD7A in cytoskeletal organization. Our results show that THSD7A is a novel placenta endothelial protein that mediates EC migration and tube formation, and they highlight its potential as a new target for anti-angiogenic therapy.

  15. Nonpolarized signaling reveals two distinct modes of 3D cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Ryan J; Gavara, Núria; Chadwick, Richard S; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2012-04-30

    We search in this paper for context-specific modes of three-dimensional (3D) cell migration using imaging for phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) and active Rac1 and Cdc42 in primary fibroblasts migrating within different 3D environments. In 3D collagen, PIP3 and active Rac1 and Cdc42 were targeted to the leading edge, consistent with lamellipodia-based migration. In contrast, elongated cells migrating inside dermal explants and the cell-derived matrix (CDM) formed blunt, cylindrical protrusions, termed lobopodia, and Rac1, Cdc42, and PIP3 signaling was nonpolarized. Reducing RhoA, Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), or myosin II activity switched the cells to lamellipodia-based 3D migration. These modes of 3D migration were regulated by matrix physical properties. Specifically, experimentally modifying the elasticity of the CDM or collagen gels established that nonlinear elasticity supported lamellipodia-based migration, whereas linear elasticity switched cells to lobopodia-based migration. Thus, the relative polarization of intracellular signaling identifies two distinct modes of 3D cell migration governed intrinsically by RhoA, ROCK, and myosin II and extrinsically by the elastic behavior of the 3D extracellular matrix.

  16. The mechanism for primordial germ-cell migration is conserved between Japanese eel and zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiju Saito

    Full Text Available Primordial germ cells (PGCs are segregated and specified from somatic cells during early development. These cells arise elsewhere and have to migrate across the embryo to reach developing gonadal precursors. Several molecules associated with PGC migration (i.e. dead-end, nanos1, and cxcr4 are highly conserved across phylum boundaries. However, since cell migration is a complicated process that is regulated spatially and temporally by multiple adaptors and signal effectors, the process is unlikely to be explained by these known genes only. Indeed, it has been shown that there are variations in PGC migration pattern during development among teleost species. However, it is still unclear whether the actual mechanism of PGC migration is conserved among species. In this study, we studied the migration of PGCs in Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica embryos and tested the migration mechanism between Japanese eel and zebrafish (Danio rerio for conservation, by transplanting eel PGCs into zebrafish embryos. The experiments showed that eel PGCs can migrate toward the gonadal region of zebrafish embryos along with endogenous PGCs, even though the migration patterns, behaviors, and settlements of PGCs are somewhat different between these species. Our results demonstrate that the migration mechanism of PGCs during embryonic development is highly conserved between these two distantly related species (belonging to different teleost orders.

  17. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Secreted by Hypoxia Cardiac Fibroblasts Triggers Cardiac Stem Cell Migration In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cessation of blood supply due to myocardial infarction (MI leads to complicated pathological alteration in the affected regions. Cardiac stem cells (CSCs migration plays a major role in promoting recovery of cardiac function and protecting cardiomyocytes in post-MI remodeling. Despite being the most abundant cell type in the mammalian heart, cardiac fibroblasts (CFs were underestimated in the mechanism of CSCs migration. Our objective in this study is therefore to investigate the migration related factors secreted by hypoxia CFs in vitro and the degree that they contribute to CSCs migration. We found that supernatant from hypoxia induced CFs could accelerate CSCs migration. Four migration-related cytokines were reported upregulated both in mRNA and protein levels. Upon adding antagonists of these cytokines, the number of migration cells significantly declined. When the cocktail antagonists of all above four cytokines were added, the migration cells number reduced to the minimum level. Besides, MMP-9 had an important effect on triggering CSCs migration. As shown in our results, MMP-9 induced CSCs migration and the underlying mechanism might involve TNF-α signaling which induced VEGF and MMP-9 expression.

  18. A Cellular Potts Model simulating cell migration on and in matrix environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scianna, M.; Preziosi, L.; Wolf, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    Cell migration on and through extracellular matrix is fundamental in a wide variety of physiological and pathological phenomena, and is exploited in scaffold-based tissue engineering. Migration is regulated by a number of extracellular matrix- or cell-derived biophysical parameters, such as matrix f

  19. ANALYSIS ON THE PHENOMENON OF POPULATION'S MIGRATION IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta MATEOC-SÎRB

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors analyze the migratory movement of population from Romania. Demographic dynamics of the last decade confirms that Romania's population declined. The demographic developments in Romania have mainly economic reasons (examples : migration, low birth rate, rural - urban migration. The comparative analysis of statistical data obtained in the population censuses of 2002 and 2011 shows that the most of the Romanian communities have lost population due to a negative natural and migratory growth. Fron the situation of the absent population ( migrants at the time of the population census, between 2002 and 2011 is that the number of those who have left home for longer periods has increased exponentially. Most of those absents from their home at the time of the last population census were living abroad. Romania needs a realistic vision of economic and social development in the coming decades. In defining and naming a strategy for sustainable development, population is the central element and from this perspective one of the strategy component should be to stop the demographic skidding. Simultaneously with the decrease of the total population, Romania records a demographic aging trend. The causes are both negative natural growth ( low birth rate combined with high mortality and also the migration phenomena. Projections show that these trends will persist on the medium and long term.

  20. ELK3 Expression Correlates With Cell Migration, Invasion, and Membrane Type 1-Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression in MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Sun-Hee; Lee, Je-Yong; Yang, Kyung-Min; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2015-01-01

    ELK3 is a member of the Ets family of transcription factors. Its expression is associated with angiogenesis, vasculogenesis, and chondrogenesis. ELK3 inhibits endothelial migration and tube formation through the regulation of MT1-MMP transcription. This study assessed the function of ELK3 in breast cancer (BC) cells by comparing its expression between basal and luminal cells in silico and in vitro. In silico analysis showed that ELK3 expression was higher in the more aggressive basal BC cells than in luminal BC cells. Similarly, in vitro analysis showed that ELK3 mRNA and protein expression was higher in basal BC cells than in normal cells and luminal BC cells. To investigate whether ELK3 regulates basal cell migration or invasion, knockdown was achieved by siRNA in the basal BC cell line MDA-MB-231. Inhibition of ELK3 expression decreased cell migration and invasion and downregulated MT1-MMP, the expression of which is positively correlated with tumor cell invasion. In silico analysis revealed that ELK3 expression was associated with that of MT1-MMP in several BC cell lines (0.98 Pearson correlation coefficient). Though MT1-MMP expression was upregulated upon ELK3 nuclear translocation, ELK3 did not directly bind to the 1.3-kb promoter region of the MT1-MMP gene. These results suggest that ELK3 plays a positive role in the metastasis of BC cells by indirectly regulating MT1-MMP expression. PMID:26637400

  1. Cross talk Initiated by Endothelial Cells Enhances Migration and Inhibits Anoikis of Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells through STAT3/Akt/ERK Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen G. Neiva

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that cancer cells secrete angiogenic factors to recruit and sustain tumor vascular networks. However, little is known about the effect of endothelial cell-secreted factors on the phenotype and behavior of tumor cells. The hypothesis underlying this study is that endothelial cells initiate signaling pathways that enhance tumor cell survival and migration. Here, we observed that soluble mediators from primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells induce phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, Akt, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK in a panel of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC cells (OSCC-3, UM-SCC-1, UM-SCC-17B, UM-SCC-74A. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that interleukin-6 (IL- 6, interleukin-8 (CXCL8, and epidermal growth factor (EGF are upregulated in endothelial cells cocultured with HNSCC. Blockade of endothelial cell-derived IL-6, CXCL8, or EGF by gene silencing or neutralizing antibodies inhibited phosphorylation of STAT3, Akt, and ERK in tumor cells, respectively. Notably, activation of STAT3, Akt, and ERK by endothelial cells enhanced migration and inhibited anoikis of tumor cells. We have previously demonstrated that Bcl-2 is upregulated in tumor microvessels in patients with HNSCC. Here, we observed that Bcl-2 signaling induces expression of IL-6, CXCL8, and EGF, providing a mechanism for the upregulation of these cytokines in tumor-associated endothelial cells. This study expands the contribution of endothelial cells to the pathobiology of tumor cells. It unveils a new mechanism in which endothelial cells function as initiators of molecular crosstalks that enhance survival and migration of tumor cells.

  2. miR-965 controls cell proliferation and migration during tissue morphogenesis in the Drosophila abdomen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verma, Pushpa; Cohen, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    , they remain quiescent during larval development. During pupal development, the abdominal histoblast cells proliferate and migrate to replace the larval epidermis. Here, we provide evidence that the microRNA, miR-965, acts via string and wingless to control histoblast proliferation and migration. Ecdysone...... signaling downregulates miR-965 at the onset of pupariation, linking activation of the histoblast nests to the hormonal control of metamorphosis. Replacement of the larval epidermis by adult epidermal progenitors involves regulation of both cell-intrinsic events and cell communication. By regulating both...... cell proliferation and cell migration, miR-965 contributes to the robustness of this morphogenetic system....

  3. A novel role for Lh3 dependent ECM modifications during neural crest cell migration in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santanu Banerjee

    Full Text Available During vertebrate development, trunk neural crest cells delaminate along the entire length of the dorsal neural tube and initially migrate as a non-segmented sheet. As they enter the somites, neural crest cells rearrange into spatially restricted segmental streams. Extracellular matrix components are likely to play critical roles in this transition from a sheet-like to a stream-like mode of migration, yet the extracellular matrix components and their modifying enzymes critical for this transition are largely unknown. Here, we identified the glycosyltransferase Lh3, known to modify extracellular matrix components, and its presumptive substrate Collagen18A1, to provide extrinsic signals critical for neural crest cells to transition from a sheet-like migration behavior to migrating as a segmental stream. Using live cell imaging we show that in lh3 null mutants, neural crest cells fail to transition from a sheet to a stream, and that they consequently enter the somites as multiple streams, or stall shortly after entering the somites. Moreover, we demonstrate that transgenic expression of lh3 in a small subset of somitic cells adjacent to where neural crest cells switch from sheet to stream migration restores segmental neural crest cell migration. Finally, we show that knockdown of the presumptive Lh3 substrate Collagen18A1 recapitulates the neural crest cell migration defects observed in lh3 mutants, consistent with the notion that Lh3 exerts its effect on neural crest cell migration by regulating post-translational modifications of Collagen18A1. Together these data suggest that Lh3-Collagen18A1 dependent ECM modifications regulate the transition of trunk neural crest cells from a non-segmental sheet like migration mode to a segmental stream migration mode.

  4. A novel role for Lh3 dependent ECM modifications during neural crest cell migration in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Santanu; Isaacman-Beck, Jesse; Schneider, Valerie A; Granato, Michael

    2013-01-01

    During vertebrate development, trunk neural crest cells delaminate along the entire length of the dorsal neural tube and initially migrate as a non-segmented sheet. As they enter the somites, neural crest cells rearrange into spatially restricted segmental streams. Extracellular matrix components are likely to play critical roles in this transition from a sheet-like to a stream-like mode of migration, yet the extracellular matrix components and their modifying enzymes critical for this transition are largely unknown. Here, we identified the glycosyltransferase Lh3, known to modify extracellular matrix components, and its presumptive substrate Collagen18A1, to provide extrinsic signals critical for neural crest cells to transition from a sheet-like migration behavior to migrating as a segmental stream. Using live cell imaging we show that in lh3 null mutants, neural crest cells fail to transition from a sheet to a stream, and that they consequently enter the somites as multiple streams, or stall shortly after entering the somites. Moreover, we demonstrate that transgenic expression of lh3 in a small subset of somitic cells adjacent to where neural crest cells switch from sheet to stream migration restores segmental neural crest cell migration. Finally, we show that knockdown of the presumptive Lh3 substrate Collagen18A1 recapitulates the neural crest cell migration defects observed in lh3 mutants, consistent with the notion that Lh3 exerts its effect on neural crest cell migration by regulating post-translational modifications of Collagen18A1. Together these data suggest that Lh3-Collagen18A1 dependent ECM modifications regulate the transition of trunk neural crest cells from a non-segmental sheet like migration mode to a segmental stream migration mode.

  5. Epac1 increases migration of endothelial cells and melanoma cells via FGF2-mediated paracrine signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baljinnyam, Erdene; Umemura, Masanari; Chuang, Christine;

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) regulates endothelial and melanoma cell migration. The binding of FGF2 to its receptor requires N-sulfated heparan sulfate (HS) glycosamine. We have previously reported that Epac1, an exchange protein activated by cAMP, increases N-sulfation of HS in melanoma. Ther...

  6. Common mechanisms linking connexin43 to neural progenitor cell migration and glioma invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naus, Christian C; Aftab, Qurratulain; Sin, Wun Chey

    2016-02-01

    Cell migration is critical for cell differentiation, tissue formation and organ development. Several mechanisms come to play in the process of cell migration, orchestrating changes in cell polarity, adhesion, process extension and motility. Recent findings have shown that gap junctions, and specifically connexin43 (Cx43), can play a significant role in these processes, impacting adhesion and cytoskeletal rearrangements. Thus Cx43 within a cell regulates its motility and migration via intracellular signaling. Furthermore, Cx43 in the host cells can impact the degree of cellular migration through that tissue. Similarities in these connexin-based processes account for both neural progenitor migration in the developing brain, and for glioma cell invasion in the mature brain. In both cases, Cx43 in the tissue ("soil") in which cells ("seeds") exist facilitates their migration and, for glioma cells, tissue invasion. Cx43 mediates these effects through channel- and non-channel-dependent mechanisms which have similarities in both paradigms of cell migration. This provides insight into developmental processes and pathological situations, as well as possible therapeutic approaches regarding specific functional domains of gap junction proteins.

  7. Lipid raft association restricts CD44-ezrin interaction and promotion of breast cancer cell migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2012-12-01

    Cancer cell migration is an early event in metastasis, the main cause of breast cancer-related deaths. Cholesterol-enriched membrane domains called lipid rafts influence the function of many molecules, including the raft-associated protein CD44. We describe a novel mechanism whereby rafts regulate interactions between CD44 and its binding partner ezrin in migrating breast cancer cells. Specifically, in nonmigrating cells, CD44 and ezrin localized to different membranous compartments: CD44 predominantly in rafts, and ezrin in nonraft compartments. After the induction of migration (either nonspecific or CD44-driven), CD44 affiliation with lipid rafts was decreased. This was accompanied by increased coprecipitation of CD44 and active (threonine-phosphorylated) ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins in nonraft compartments and increased colocalization of CD44 with the nonraft protein, transferrin receptor. Pharmacological raft disruption using methyl-β-cyclodextrin also increased CD44-ezrin coprecipitation and colocalization, further suggesting that CD44 interacts with ezrin outside rafts during migration. Conversely, promoting CD44 retention inside lipid rafts by pharmacological inhibition of depalmitoylation virtually abolished CD44-ezrin interactions. However, transient single or double knockdown of flotillin-1 or caveolin-1 was not sufficient to increase cell migration over a short time course, suggesting complex crosstalk mechanisms. We propose a new model for CD44-dependent breast cancer cell migration, where CD44 must relocalize outside lipid rafts to drive cell migration. This could have implications for rafts as pharmacological targets to down-regulate cancer cell migration.

  8. PLEKHG3 enhances polarized cell migration by activating actin filaments at the cell front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trang Thi Thu; Park, Wei Sun; Park, Byung Ouk; Kim, Cha Yeon; Oh, Yohan; Kim, Jin Man; Choi, Hana; Kyung, Taeyoon; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Lee, Gabsang; Hahn, Klaus M; Meyer, Tobias; Heo, Won Do

    2016-09-01

    Cells migrate by directing Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) and cell division control protein 42 (Cdc42) activities and by polymerizing actin toward the leading edge of the cell. Previous studies have proposed that this polarization process requires a local positive feedback in the leading edge involving Rac small GTPase and actin polymerization with PI3K likely playing a coordinating role. Here, we show that the pleckstrin homology and RhoGEF domain containing G3 (PLEKHG3) is a PI3K-regulated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RhoGEF) for Rac1 and Cdc42 that selectively binds to newly polymerized actin at the leading edge of migrating fibroblasts. Optogenetic inactivation of PLEKHG3 showed that PLEKHG3 is indispensable both for inducing and for maintaining cell polarity. By selectively binding to newly polymerized actin, PLEKHG3 promotes local Rac1/Cdc42 activation to induce more local actin polymerization, which in turn promotes the recruitment of more PLEKHG3 to induce and maintain cell front. Thus, autocatalytic reinforcement of PLEKHG3 localization to the leading edge of the cell provides a molecular basis for the proposed positive feedback loop that is required for cell polarization and directed migration.

  9. Exosomal signaling during hypoxia mediates microvascular endothelial cell migration and vasculogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Salomon

    Full Text Available Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are critical processes in fetal circulation and placental vasculature development. Placental mesenchymal stem cells (pMSC are known to release paracrine factors (some of which are contained within exosomes that promote angiogenesis and cell migration. The aims of this study were: to determine the effects of oxygen tension on the release of exosomes from pMSC; and to establish the effects of pMSC-derived exosomes on the migration and angiogenic tube formation of placental microvascular endothelial cells (hPMEC. pMSC were isolated from placental villi (8-12 weeks of gestation, n = 6 and cultured under an atmosphere of 1%, 3% or 8% O2. Cell-conditioned media were collected and exosomes (exo-pMSC isolated by differential and buoyant density centrifugation. The dose effect (5-20 µg exosomal protein/ml of pMSC-derived exosomes on hPMEC migration and tube formation were established using a real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™. The exosome pellet was resuspended in PBS and protein content was established by mass spectrometry (MS. Protein function and canonical pathways were identified using the PANTHER program and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, respectively. Exo-pMSC were identified, by electron microscopy, as spherical vesicles, with a typical cup-shape and diameters around of 100 nm and positive for exosome markers: CD63, CD9 and CD81. Under hypoxic conditions (1% and 3% O2 exo-pMSC released increased by 3.3 and 6.7 folds, respectively, when compared to the controls (8% O2; p<0.01. Exo-pMSC increased hPMEC migration by 1.6 fold compared to the control (p<0.05 and increased hPMEC tube formation by 7.2 fold (p<0.05. MS analysis identified 390 different proteins involved in cytoskeleton organization, development, immunomodulatory, and cell-to-cell communication. The data obtained support the hypothesis that pMSC-derived exosomes may contribute to placental vascular adaptation to low oxygen tension under both

  10. Neurotensin is a Versatile Modulator of In Vitro Human Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Cell (PDAC Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Mijatovic

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: While the neurotensin (NT roles in pancreatic cancer growth are well documented, its effects on pancreatic cancer cell migration have not been described. Methods: The NT-induced effects on the migration process of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells (PDACs were characterized by means of various assays including computer-assisted video-microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, ELISA-based, small GTPase pull-down and phosphorylation assays. Results: The NT-induced modifications on in vitro PDACs migration largely depended on the extra-cellular matrix environment and cell propensity to migrate collectively or individually. While NT significantly reduced the level of migration of collectively migrating PDACs on vitronectin, it significantly increased the level of individually migrating PDACs. These effects were mainly mediated through the sortilin/NTR3 receptor. Neurotensin both induced altered expression of αV and β5 integrin subunits in PDACs cultured on vitronectin resulting in modified adhesion abilities, and caused modifications to the organization of the actin cytoskeleton through the NT-mediated activation of small Rho GTPases. While the NT effects on individually migrating PDACs were mediated at least through the EGFR/ERK signaling pathways, those on collectively migrating PDACs appeared highly dependent on the PI 3-kinase pathway. Conclusion: This study strongly suggests the involvement of neurotensin in the modulation of human PDAC migration.

  11. Tectorigenin inhibits osteosarcoma cell migration through downregulation of matrix metalloproteinases in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu; Chen, Ya-Hong; Cheng, Zhi-Hua; Ou-Yang, Huo-Niu; Luo, Cong; Guo, Zhi-Lin

    2016-07-01

    Tectorigenin (Tec) is an effective component of the traditional Chinese medicine Belamcanda chinensis, which has been reported to exert beneficial effects in various types of cancer. However, the activity and mechanism of Tec in osteosarcoma (OS) have not been investigated to date. The aim of the present study was to examine the inhibitory effect of Tec on OS and its underlying mechanism of action. OS cells (Saos2 and U2OS) were treated with various concentrations of Tec for 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell proliferation was evaluated using an CCK-8 assay. Cell migration and invasion ability were measured using the Transwell assay. The expressions of MMP1, MMP2, MMP9, and cleaved caspase3 were measured using real-time PCR and/or western blot analysis. We found that Tec inhibited the proliferation of OS cells (Saos2 and U2OS) in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. In addition, Tec significantly inhibited migration and invasion in OS cells (Pchemotherapy against OS. PMID:26991068

  12. Exploration of molecular pathways mediating electric field-directed Schwann cell migration by RNA-Seq

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Li; Li, Yongchao; Knapp, Jennifer; Smith, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In peripheral nervous systems, Schwann cells wrap around axons of motor and sensory neurons to form the myelin sheath. Following spinal cord injury, Schwann cells regenerate and migrate to the lesion and are involved in the spinal cord regeneration process. Transplantation of Schwann cells into injured neural tissue results in enhanced spinal axonal regeneration. Effective directional migration of Schwann cells is critical in the neural regeneration process. In this study, we report that Schw...

  13. Directional Migration of MDA-MB-231 Cells Under Oxygen Concentration Gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahara, D; Yoshida, T; Enokida, Y; Takahashi, E

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the initial mechanism of hematogenous metastasis of cancer cells, we hypothesized that cancer cells migrate toward regions with higher oxygen concentration such as intratumor micro vessels along the oxygen concentration gradient. To produce gradients of oxygen concentration in vitro, we devised the gap cover glass (GCG). After placing a GCG onto cultured MDA-MB-231 cells (a metastatic breast cancer cell line), the migration of individual cells under the GCG was tracked up to 12 h at 3 % oxygen in the micro incubator. We quantified the migration of individual cells using forward migration index (FMI). The cell migration perpendicular to the oxygen gradients was random in the direction whereas FMIs of the cell located at 300, 500, 700, and 1500 μm from the oxygen inlet were positive (p < 0.05) indicating a unidirectional migration toward the oxygen inlet. Present results are consistent with our hypothesis that MDA-MB-231 cells migrate toward regions with higher oxygen concentration. PMID:27526134

  14. Hypoxia promotes Rab5 activation, leading to tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Patricio; Mendoza, Pablo; Rivas, Solange; Díaz, Jorge; Moraga, Carolina; Quest, Andrew F G; Torres, Vicente A

    2016-05-17

    Hypoxia, a common condition of the tumor microenvironment, is associated with poor patient prognosis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia alters endosome dynamics in tumor cells, leading to augmented cell proliferation and migration and this is particularly relevant, because endosomal components have been shown to be deregulated in cancer. The early endosome protein Rab5 is a small GTPase that promotes integrin trafficking, focal adhesion turnover, Rac1 activation, tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rab5 and downstream events in hypoxia remain unknown. Here, we identify Rab5 as a critical player in hypoxia-driven tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma, ZR-75, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer and B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells to hypoxia increased Rab5 activation, followed by its re-localization to the leading edge and association with focal adhesions. Importantly, Rab5 was required for hypoxia-driven cell migration, FAK phosphorylation and Rac1 activation, as shown by shRNA-targeting and transfection assays with Rab5 mutants. Intriguingly, the effect of hypoxia on both Rab5 activity and migration was substantially higher in metastatic B16-F10 cells than in poorly invasive B16-F0 cells. Furthermore, exogenous expression of Rab5 in B16-F0 cells predisposed to hypoxia-induced migration, whereas expression of the inactive mutant Rab5/S34N prevented the migration of B16-F10 cells induced by hypoxia. Finally, using an in vivo syngenic C57BL/6 mouse model, Rab5 expression was shown to be required for hypoxia-induced metastasis. In summary, these findings identify Rab5 as a key mediator of hypoxia-induced tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. PMID:27121131

  15. Hypoxia promotes Rab5 activation, leading to tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Patricio; Mendoza, Pablo; Rivas, Solange; Díaz, Jorge; Moraga, Carolina; Quest, Andrew F G; Torres, Vicente A

    2016-05-17

    Hypoxia, a common condition of the tumor microenvironment, is associated with poor patient prognosis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia alters endosome dynamics in tumor cells, leading to augmented cell proliferation and migration and this is particularly relevant, because endosomal components have been shown to be deregulated in cancer. The early endosome protein Rab5 is a small GTPase that promotes integrin trafficking, focal adhesion turnover, Rac1 activation, tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rab5 and downstream events in hypoxia remain unknown. Here, we identify Rab5 as a critical player in hypoxia-driven tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma, ZR-75, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer and B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells to hypoxia increased Rab5 activation, followed by its re-localization to the leading edge and association with focal adhesions. Importantly, Rab5 was required for hypoxia-driven cell migration, FAK phosphorylation and Rac1 activation, as shown by shRNA-targeting and transfection assays with Rab5 mutants. Intriguingly, the effect of hypoxia on both Rab5 activity and migration was substantially higher in metastatic B16-F10 cells than in poorly invasive B16-F0 cells. Furthermore, exogenous expression of Rab5 in B16-F0 cells predisposed to hypoxia-induced migration, whereas expression of the inactive mutant Rab5/S34N prevented the migration of B16-F10 cells induced by hypoxia. Finally, using an in vivo syngenic C57BL/6 mouse model, Rab5 expression was shown to be required for hypoxia-induced metastasis. In summary, these findings identify Rab5 as a key mediator of hypoxia-induced tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

  16. Enhancement of endothelial cell migration by constitutively active LPA{sub 1}-expressing tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitayoshi, Misaho; Kato, Kohei; Tanabe, Eriko; Yoshikawa, Kyohei; Fukui, Rie [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutated LPA{sub 1} stimulates cell migration of endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF expressions are increased by mutated LPA{sub 1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPA signaling via mutated LPA{sub 1} is involved in angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutated LPA{sub 1} promotes cancer cell progression. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors belong to G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors (LPA receptors; LPA{sub 1} to LPA{sub 6}). They indicate a variety of cellular response by the interaction with LPA, including cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Recently, we have reported that constitutive active mutated LPA{sub 1} induced the strong biological effects of rat neuroblastoma B103 cells. In the present study, we examined the effects of mutated LPA{sub 1} on the interaction between B103 cells and endothelial F-2 cells. Each LPA receptor expressing B103 cells were maintained in serum-free DMEM and cell motility assay was performed with a Cell Culture Insert. When F-2 cells were cultured with conditioned medium from Lpar1 and Lpar3-expressing cells, the cell motility of F-2 cells was significantly higher than control cells. Interestingly, the motile activity of F-2 cells was strongly induced by mutated LPA{sub 1} than other cells, correlating with the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf)-A and Vegf-C. Pretreatment of LPA signaling inhibitors inhibited F-2 cell motility stimulated by mutated LPA{sub 1}. These results suggest that activation of LPA signaling via mutated LPA{sub 1} may play an important role in the promotion of angiogenesis in rat neuroblastoma cells.

  17. Substrate stiffness modulates lung cancer cell migration but not epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, V C; Higuita-Castro, N; Nana-Sinkam, P; Ghadiali, S N

    2016-05-01

    Biomechanical properties of the tumor microenvironment, including matrix/substrate stiffness, play a significant role in tumor evolution and metastasis. Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is a fundamental biological process that is associated with increased cancer cell migration and invasion. The goal of this study was to investigate (1) how substrate stiffness modulates the migration behaviors of lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549) and (2) if stiffness-induced changes in cell migration correlate with biochemical markers of EMT. Collagen-coated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates and an Ibidi migration assay were used to investigate how substrate stiffness alters the migration patterns of A549 cells. RT-PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to investigate how substrate stiffness alters biochemical markers of EMT, that is, E-cadherin and N-cadherin, and the phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins. Increases in substrate stiffness led to slower, more directional migration but did not alter the biochemical markers of EMT. Interestingly, growth factor (i.e., Transforming Growth Factor-β) stimulation resulted in similar levels of EMT regardless of substrate stiffness. We also observed decreased levels of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin on stiffer substrates which correlated with slower cell migration. These results indicate that substrate stiffness modulates lung cancer cell migration via focal adhesion signaling as opposed to EMT signaling. PMID:26779779

  18. Subcurative radiation significantly increases cell proliferation, invasion, and migration of primary glioblastoma multiforme in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adarsh Shankar; Robert A. Knight; Stephen Brown; Ali S. Arbab; Sanath Kumar; Asm Iskander; Nadimpalli RS Varma; Branislava Janic; Ana deCarvalho; Tom Mikkelsen; Joseph A. Frank; Meser M. Ali

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cellproliferation, infiltration, migration, and neovascularization are known causes of treatment resistance in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of radiation on the growth characteristics of primary human GBM developed in a nude rat. Primary GBM cells grown from explanted GBM tissues were implanted orthotopically in nude rats. Tumor growth was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging on day 77 (baseline) after implantation. The rats underwent irradiation to a dose of 50 Gy delivered subcuratively on day 84 postimplantation (n= 8), or underwent no radiation (n= 8). Brain tissues were obtained on day 112 (nonirradiated) or day 133 (irradiated). Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine tumor cell proliferation (Ki-67) and to assess the expression of infiltration marker (matrix metalloproteinase-2, MMP-2) and cell migration marker (CD44). Tumor neovascularization was assessed by microvessel density using von-Willebrand factor (vWF) staining. Magnetic resonance imaging showed well-developed, infiltrative tumors in 11 weeks postimplantation. The proportion of Ki-67-positive cells in tumors undergoing radiation was (71 ± 15)%compared with (25 ± 12)%in the nonirradiated group (P=0.02). The number of MMP-2-positive areas and proportion of CD44-positive cells were also high in tumors receiving radiation, indicating great invasion and infiltration. Microvessel density analysis did not show a significant difference between nonirradiated and irradiated tumors. Taken together, we found that subcurative radiation significantly increased proliferation, invasion, and migration of primary GBM. Our study provides insights into possible mechanisms of treatment resistance fol owing radiation therapy for GBM.

  19. Cell migration or cytokinesis and proliferation? – Revisiting the “go or grow” hypothesis in cancer cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garay, Tamás; Juhász, Éva; Molnár, Eszter [2nd Department of Pathology, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Eisenbauer, Maria [Institute of Cancer Research and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Czirók, András [Department of Biological Physics, Eötvös University, Budapest (Hungary); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Dekan, Barbara; László, Viktória; Hoda, Mir Alireza [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Döme, Balázs [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); National Korányi Institute of TB and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Tímár, József [2nd Department of Pathology, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); MTA-SE Tumor Progression Research Group, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Klepetko, Walter [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Berger, Walter [Institute of Cancer Research and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Hegedűs, Balázs, E-mail: balazs.hegedus@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); MTA-SE Tumor Progression Research Group, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary)

    2013-12-10

    The mortality of patients with solid tumors is mostly due to metastasis that relies on the interplay between migration and proliferation. The “go or grow” hypothesis postulates that migration and proliferation spatiotemporally excludes each other. We evaluated this hypothesis on 35 cell lines (12 mesothelioma, 13 melanoma and 10 lung cancer) on both the individual cell and population levels. Following three-day-long videomicroscopy, migration, proliferation and cytokinesis-length were quantified. We found a significantly higher migration in mesothelioma cells compared to melanoma and lung cancer while tumor types did not differ in mean proliferation or duration of cytokinesis. Strikingly, we found in melanoma and lung cancer a significant positive correlation between mean proliferation and migration. Furthermore, non-dividing melanoma and lung cancer cells displayed slower migration. In contrast, in mesothelioma there were no such correlations. Interestingly, negative correlation was found between cytokinesis-length and migration in melanoma. FAK activation was higher in melanoma cells with high motility. We demonstrate that the cancer cells studied do not defer proliferation for migration. Of note, tumor cells from various organ systems may differently regulate migration and proliferation. Furthermore, our data is in line with the observation of pathologists that highly proliferative tumors are often highly invasive. - Highlights: • We investigated the “go or grow” hypothesis in human cancer cells in vitro. • Proliferation and migration positively correlate in melanoma and lung cancer cells. • Duration of cytokinesis and migration shows inverse correlation. • Increased FAK activation is present in highly motile melanoma cells.

  20. Loss of expression of miR-335 is implicated in hepatic stellate cell migration and activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chao [Department of Gastroenterology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, No.415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China); Wu, Chao-Qun [Genetics Institute, Fudan University, No. 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhang, Zong-Qi [Department of Cardiology, No. 3 Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Medical school, No.280 Mohe Road, Shanghai 201900 (China); Yao, Ding-Kang; Zhu, Liang, E-mail: 15900611429@163.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, No.415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Activation and migration of resident stellate cells (HSCs) within the hepatic space of Disse play an important role in hepatic fibrosis, which accounts for the increased numbers of activated HSCs in areas of inflammation during hepatic fibrosis. Currently, microRNAs have been found to play essential roles in HSC differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, fat accumulation and collagen production. However, little is known about microRNA mediated HSC activation and migration. In this study, the miRNA expression profiles of quiescent HSCs, partially activated HSCs and fully activated HSCs were compared in pairs. Gene ontology (GO) and GO-Map network analysis indicated that the activation of HSCs was regulated by microRNAs. Among them miR-335 was confirmed to be significantly reduced during HSC activation by qRT-PCR, and restoring expression of miR-335 inhibited HSC migration and reduced {alpha}-SMA and collagen type I. Previous study revealed that tenascin-C (TNC), an extracellular matrix glycoprotein involved in cell migration, might be a target of miR-335. Therefore, we further studied the TNC expression in miR-335 over-expressed HSCs. Our data showed that exogenous TNC could enhance HSC migration in vitro and miR-335 restoration resulted in a significant inhibition of TNC expression. These results demonstrated that miR-335 restoration inhibited HSC migration, at least in part, via downregulating the TNC expression.

  1. Dynamic tensile forces drive collective cell migration through three-dimensional extracellular matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjorevski, Nikolce; S. Piotrowski, Alexandra; Varner, Victor D.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2015-01-01

    Collective cell migration drives tissue remodeling during development, wound repair, and metastatic invasion. The physical mechanisms by which cells move cohesively through dense three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) remain incompletely understood. Here, we show directly that migration of multicellular cohorts through collagenous matrices occurs via a dynamic pulling mechanism, the nature of which had only been inferred previously in 3D. Tensile forces increase at the invasive front of cohorts, serving a physical, propelling role as well as a regulatory one by conditioning the cells and matrix for further extension. These forces elicit mechanosensitive signaling within the leading edge and align the ECM, creating microtracks conducive to further migration. Moreover, cell movements are highly correlated and in phase with ECM deformations. Migrating cohorts use spatially localized, long-range forces and consequent matrix alignment to navigate through the ECM. These results suggest biophysical forces are critical for 3D collective migration. PMID:26165921

  2. Plexin-B1 silencing inhibits ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elevated Plexin-B1 expression has been found in diverse human cancers and in non-neoplastic tissues, and it mediates diverse biological and pathological activities. However, whether or not Plexin-B1 expression is involved in human ovarian tumors remains unclear. In the present study, Plexin-B1 expression was explored in benign and malignant human ovarian tumor tissues. In addition, the impact of Plexin-B1 expression on ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion were investigated in vitro. Plexin-B1 expression was analyzed in normal and benign ovarian tissues and serous ovarian tumors (both borderline and malignant) by immunohistochemical staining, as well as in four human ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780, C13*, SKOV3, and OV2008) by RT-PCR and western blot analyses. Furthermore, endogenous Plexin-B1 expression was suppressed by Plexin-B1 siRNA in SKOV3 cells, which overexpress Plexin-B1. Protein levels of Plexin-B1, AKT and AKTSer473 were examined by western blot analysis. Cell proliferation, migration and invasion were measured with MTT, wound healing and boyden chamber assays, respectively, and the cytoskeleton was monitored via F-actin staining. Expression levels of Plexin-B1 protein were significantly higher in serous ovarian carcinomas than in normal ovaries or benign ovarian neoplasms, and in the former, Plexin-B1 expression was positively correlated with lymphatic metastasis, and the membrane and cytoplasm of cancer cells stained positively. SKOV3 cells displayed the highest Plexin-B1 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels among the four tested human ovarian cancer cell lines and was selected as a cell model for further in vitro experiments. Plexin-B1 siRNA significantly suppressed phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473 in SKOV3 cells, but it did not alter total AKT expression. In addition, silencing of Plexin-B1 in SKOV3 cells inhibited cell migration and invasion and reorganized the cytoskeleton, whereas cell proliferation was not affected

  3. Exogenous Expression of N-Cadherin in Breast Cancer Cells Induces Cell Migration, Invasion, and Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Hazan, Rachel B.; Phillips, Greg R.; Qiao, Rui Fang; Norton, Larry; Aaronson, Stuart A.

    2000-01-01

    E- and N-cadherin are calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules that mediate cell–cell adhesion and also modulate cell migration and tumor invasiveness. The loss of E-cadherin–mediated adhesion has been shown to play an important role in the transition of epithelial tumors from a benign to an invasive state. However, recent evidence indicates that another member of the cadherin family, N-cadherin, is expressed in highly invasive tumor cell lines that lacked E-cadherin expression. These findin...

  4. miR-940 Suppresses Tumor Cell Invasion and Migration via Regulation of CXCR2 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dong; Zhang, Yaodong; Yang, Renjie; Wang, Xing; Ji, Guwei; Huo, Liqun; Shao, Zicheng

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the expression of miR-940 in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its impact on function and biological mechanism in the HCC cells. Methods. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis was used to quantify miR-940 expression in 46 cases of tissues and cells. Transfection of HCC cell lines was performed by miR-940 mimics; the abilities of invasion and migration were assessed through Transwell array. Western blot represents the alteration in expression of CXCR2 by miR-940 mimics. Results. miR-940 expression was decreased significantly in the HCC tissues and the relevant cell lines. miR-940 upregulation suppressed the invasion and migration of HCC cells in vitro. Furthermore, the CXCR2 was downregulated to suppress invasion and migration after miR-940 mimics. Moreover, decreased miR-940 expression was negatively correlated with Edmondson grade (P = 0.008), tumor microsatellite or multiple tumors (P = 0.04), vascular invasion (P = 0.035), and recurrence and metastasis (P = 0.038). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that decreased miR-940 expression contributed to poor overall survival (P migration in vitro. Our study suggests that miR-940 may be a novel poor prognostic biomarker for HCC.

  5. Co-regulation of cell polarization and migration by caveolar proteins PTRF/Cavin-1 and caveolin-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Hill

    Full Text Available Caveolin-1 and caveolae are differentially polarized in migrating cells in various models, and caveolin-1 expression has been shown to quantitatively modulate cell migration. PTRF/cavin-1 is a cytoplasmic protein now established to be also necessary for caveola formation. Here we tested the effect of PTRF expression on cell migration. Using fluorescence imaging, quantitative proteomics, and cell migration assays we show that PTRF/cavin-1 modulates cellular polarization, and the subcellular localization of Rac1 and caveolin-1 in migrating cells as well as PKCα caveola recruitment. PTRF/cavin-1 quantitatively reduced cell migration, and induced mesenchymal epithelial reversion. Similar to caveolin-1, the polarization of PTRF/cavin-1 was dependent on the migration mode. By selectively manipulating PTRF/cavin-1 and caveolin-1 expression (and therefore caveola formation in multiple cell systems, we unveil caveola-independent functions for both proteins in cell migration.

  6. Aptamers Binding to c-Met Inhibiting Tumor Cell Migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Piater

    Full Text Available The human receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met plays an important role in the control of critical cellular processes. Since c-Met is frequently over expressed or deregulated in human malignancies, blocking its activation is of special interest for therapy. In normal conditions, the c-Met receptor is activated by its bivalent ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF. Also bivalent antibodies can activate the receptor by cross linking, limiting therapeutic applications. We report the generation of the RNA aptamer CLN64 containing 2'-fluoro pyrimidine modifications by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX. CLN64 and a previously described single-stranded DNA (ssDNA aptamer CLN3 exhibited high specificities and affinities to recombinant and cellular expressed c-Met. Both aptamers effectively inhibited HGF-dependent c-Met activation, signaling and cell migration. We showed that these aptamers did not induce c-Met activation, revealing an advantage over bivalent therapeutic molecules. Both aptamers were shown to bind overlapping epitopes but only CLN3 competed with HGF binding to cMet. In addition to their therapeutic and diagnostic potential, CLN3 and CLN64 aptamers exhibit valuable tools to further understand the structural and functional basis for c-Met activation or inhibition by synthetic ligands and their interplay with HGF binding.

  7. Aquaporin 1 Facilitated Hepatocellular Carcinoma SMMC7221 Cell Migration Associated with Water Permeability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ai-li; LI Jiang; WANG Yan-qing; ZAKNROU Zohra; MA Tong-hui; LI Xiao-meng

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated the regulation of human aquaporin l(hAQPl) and the involvement of aquaporin l(AQPl) in the migration of human hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7221 cells using RNA intereference technology.Firstly, two short hairpin RNA(shRNA) constructs in PBSU6 vector were reconstructed and their knockdown effects were identified in SMMC-7221 cells. Next, the involvement of endogenous hAQPl in regulating the migration of SMMC-7221 cells was investigated via siRNA technology. HAQPl-shRNA can specifically inhibit AQPl dependent osmotic water permeability. Meanwhile the migration of SMMC-7221 cells was inhibited remarkably after silencing AQPl by performing transwell cell migration assay and in vitro wound healing assay. Furthermore, in the presence of an inhibitor HgCl2, the water permeability of the cell membrane was remarkably decreased, the expression of AQPl was upregulated after HgCl2 treatment and the cell movement was decreased at the moment. Increased AQPl cannot attenuate cell migration ability when cell membrane loses its water permeability function. This demonstrates that the cell migration was remarkably related to the transporting water function of cell membrane.

  8. Cdc42 is not essential for filopodium formation, directed migration, cell polarization, and mitosis in fibroblastoid cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czuchra, Aleksandra; Wu, Xunwei; Meyer, Hannelore;

    2005-01-01

    of Cdc42 did not affect filopodium or lamellipodium formation and had no significant influence on the speed of directed migration nor on mitosis. Cdc42-deficient cells displayed a more elongated cell shape and had a reduced area. Furthermore, directionality during migration and reorientation of the Golgi...

  9. Cardiac migration of endogenous mesenchymal stromal cells in patients with inflammatory cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Lucke, Caroline; Escher, Felicitas; Van Linthout, Sophie; Kühl, Uwe; Miteva, Kapka; Ringe, Jochen; Zobel, Thomas; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Tschöpe, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have immunomodulatory features. The aim of this study was to investigate the migration and homing potential of endogenous circulating MSC in virus negative inflammatory cardiomyopathy (CMi). Methods. In 29 patients with (n = 23) or without (n = 6) CMi undergoing endomyocardial biopsies (EMB), transcardiac gradients (TCGs) of circulating MSC were measured by flow cytometry from blood simultaneously sampled from aorta and coronary sinus. The presence of MSC in EMB, cardiac inflammation, and SDF-1α mRNA expression were detected via immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Results. MSC defined as CD45(-)CD34(-)CD11b(-)CD73(+)CD90(+) cells accounted for 0.010 [0.0025-0.048]%/peripheral mononuclear cell (PMNC) and as CD45(-)CD34(-)CD11b(-)CD73(+)CD105(+) cells for 0.019 [0.0026-0.067]%/PMNC, both with similar counts in patients with or without cardiac inflammation. There was a 29.9% (P TCG of circulating MSC and numbers of MSC (CD45(-)CD34(-)CD90(+)CD105(+)) in EMB (r = -0.73, P < 0.005). SDF-1α was the strongest predictor for increased MSC in EMB (P < 0.005, multivariate analysis). Conclusions. Endogenous MSC continuously migrate to the heart in patients with CMi triggered by cardiac inflammation. PMID:25814787

  10. WISP1 overexpression promotes proliferation and migration of human vascular smooth muscle cells via AKT signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shun; Liu, Hao; Lu, Lihe; Wan, Heng; Lin, Zhiqi; Qian, Kai; Yao, Xingxing; Chen, Qing; Liu, Wenjun; Yan, Jianyun; Liu, Zhengjun

    2016-10-01

    Proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play crucial roles in the development of vascular restenosis. Our previous study showed that CCN4, namely Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (WISP1), significantly promotes proliferation and migration of rat VSMCs, but its mechanism remains unclear. This study aims to investigate whether and how WISP1 stimulates proliferation and migration of human VSMCs. Western blot analysis showed that FBS treatment increased WISP1 protein levels in human VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner. Overexpression of WISP1 using adenovirus encoding WISP1 (AD-WISP1) significantly increased proliferation rate of human VSMCs by 2.98-fold compared with empty virus (EV)-transfected cells, shown by EdU incorporation assay. Additionally, Scratch-induced wound healing assay revealed that adenovirus-mediated overexpression of WISP1 significantly increased cell migration compared with EV-transfected cells from 6h (4.56±1.14% vs. 11.23±2.25%, PMigration Assay confirmed that WISP1 overexpression significantly promoted human VSMC migration by 2.25-fold compared with EV. Furthermore, WISP1 overexpression stimulated Akt signaling activation in human VSMCs. Blockage of Akt signaling by Akt inhibitor AZD5363 or PI3K inhibitor LY294002, led to an inhibitory effect of WISP1-induced proliferation and migration in human VSMCs. Moreover, we found that WISP1 overexpression stimulated GSK3α/β phosphorylation, and increased expression of cyclin D1 and MMP9 in human VSMCs, and this effect was abolished by AZD5363. Collectively, we demonstrated that Akt signaling pathway mediates WISP1-induced migration and proliferation of human VSMCs, suggesting that WISP1 may act as a novel potential therapeutic target for vascular restenosis.

  11. Quantitative Analysis on Carbon Migration in Double-Glow Discharge Plasma Surface Alloying Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhen-xia; WANG Cong-zeng; ZHANG Wen-quan; SU Xue-kuan

    2004-01-01

    Carbon migration is of great significance in double-glow discharge plasma surface alloying process, but literature of quantitative analysis about carbon migration is relatively scarce. In this paper differential equations of the carbon and metal concentration distribution were established. By means of differential equations carbon migration was described and a numerical solution was acquired. The computational results fit the experiment results quite well.

  12. Primordial germ cell migration in the yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi) and identification of stromal cell-derived factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, J A; Bubner, E J; Takeuchi, Y; Yoshizaki, G; Wang, T; Cummins, S F; Elizur, A

    2015-03-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are progenitors of the germ cell lineage, giving rise to either spermatogonia or oogonia after the completion of gonadal differentiation. Currently, there is little information on the mechanism of PGCs migration leading to the formation of the primordial gonad in perciform fish. Yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi) (YTK) (order Perciforms) inhabit tropical and temperate waters in the southern hemisphere. Fundamental details into the molecular basis of larval development in this species can be easily studied in Australia, as they are commercially cultured and readily available. In this study, histological analysis of YTK larvae revealed critical time points for the migration of PGCs to the genital ridge, resulting in the subsequent development of the primordial gonad. In YTK larvae at 3, 5, 7 and 10 days post hatch (DPH), PGCs were not yet enclosed by somatic cells, indicating the primordial gonad had not yet started to form. While at 15, 18 and 20 DPH PGCs had already settled at the genital ridge and started to become enclosed by somatic cells indicating the primordial gonad had started to develop. A higher number of PGCs were observed in the larvae at 15 and 18 DPH indicating PGCs proliferation, which corresponds with them becoming enclosed by the somatic cells. Directional migration of PGCs toward the genital ridge is a critical event in the subsequent development of a gonad. In zebrafish, mouse and chicken, stromal-cell derived factor (SDF1) signalling is one of the key molecules for PGC migration. We subsequently isolated from YTK the SDF1 (Slal-SDF1) gene, which encodes for a 98-residue precursor protein with a signal peptide at the N-terminus. There is spatial conservation between fish species of four cysteine residues at positions C9, C11, C34 and C49, expected to form disulphide bonds and stabilize the SDF structure. In YTK, Slal-SDF1 gene expression analyses shows that this gene is expressed in larvae from 1 to 22 DPH and

  13. The Exposure of Breast Cancer Cells to Fulvestrant and Tamoxifen Modulates Cell Migration Differently

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionysia Lymperatou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt that there are increased benefits of hormonal therapy to breast cancer patients; however, current evidence suggests that estrogen receptor (ER blockage using antiestrogens is associated with a small induction of invasiveness in vitro. The mechanism by which epithelial tumor cells escape from the primary tumor and colonize to a distant site is not entirely understood. This study investigates the effect of two selective antagonists of the ER, Fulvestrant (Fulv and Tamoxifen (Tam, on the invasive ability of breast cancer cells. We found that 17β-estradiol (E2 demonstrated a protective role regarding cell migration and invasion. Fulv did not alter this effect while Tam stimulated active cell migration according to an increase in Snail and a decrease in E-cadherin protein expression. Furthermore, both tested agents increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and enhanced invasive potential of breast cancer cells. These changes were in line with focal adhesion kinase (FAK rearrangement. Our data indicate that the anti-estrogens counteracted the protective role of E2 concerning migration and invasion since their effect was not limited to antiproliferative events. Although Fulv caused a less aggressive result compared to Tam, the benefits of hormonal therapy concerning invasion and metastasis yet remain to be investigated.

  14. A role for PP1/NIPP1 in steering migration of human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Martin-Granados

    Full Text Available Electrical gradients are present in many developing and regenerating tissues and around tumours. Mimicking endogenous electric fields in vitro has profound effects on the behaviour of many cell types. Intriguingly, specific cell types migrate cathodally, others anodally and some polarise with their long axis perpendicular to the electric vector. These striking phenomena are likely to have in vivo relevance since one of the determining factors during cancer metastasis is the ability to switch between attractive and repulsive migration in response to extracellular guidance stimuli. We present evidence that the cervical cancer cell line HeLa migrates cathodally in a direct current electric field of physiological intensity, while the strongly metastatic prostate cancer cell line PC-3-M migrates anodally. Notably, genetic disruption of protein serine/threonine phosphatase-1 (PP1 and its regulator NIPP1 decrease directional migration in these cell lines. Conversely, the inducible expression of NIPP1 switched the directional response of HeLa cells from cathodal to slightly anodal in a PP1-dependent manner. Remarkably, induction of a hyperactive PP1/NIPP1 holoenzyme, further shifted directional migration towards the anode. We show that PP1 association with NIPP1 upregulates signalling by the GTPase Cdc42 and demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of Cdc42 in cells overexpressing NIPP1 recovered cathodal migration. Taken together, we provide the first evidence for regulation of directional cell migration by NIPP1. In addition, we identify PP1/NIPP1 as a novel molecular compass that controls directed cell migration via upregulation of Cdc42 signalling and suggest a way by which PP1/NIPP1 may contribute to the migratory properties of cancer cells.

  15. Effect of basic fibroblast growth factor on the proliferation, migration and phenotypic modulation of airway smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Hui; NIE Xiu-hong; ZHANG Yi; HU Mu; ZHANG Yu Alex

    2008-01-01

    Background Proliferation,cell migration and phenotypic modulation of airway smooth muscle cells(ASMCs)are important features of airway remodelling in asthma.The precise cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate ASMCs proliferation,migration and phenotypic modulation in the lung remain unknown.Basic fibroblast growth factor(bFGF),a highly specific chemotactic and mitogenic factor for many cell types,appears to be involved in the development of airway remodelling.Our study assessed whether bFGF directly stimulates the proliferation,migration and phenotypic modulation of ASMCs.Methods Confluent and growth arrested human ASMCs were treated with human recombinant FGF.Proliferation was measured by BrdU incorporation and cell counting.Migration was examined using Boyden chamber apparatus.Expressions of smooth muscle(sm)-α-actin and sm-myosin heavy chain(MHC)isoform 1 were determined by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis.Results It was found that hrbFGF(10 ng/ml),when added to ASMCs,induced a significant increase in BrdU uptake and cell number by ASMCS as compared to controls and a significant increase in ASMCs migration with respect to controls.The mRNA and protein expressions of sm-α-actin and sm-MHC in ASMCs that were stimulated with hrbFGF decreased with respect to controls.Conclusion It appears that bFGF can directly stimulate proliferation and migration of ASMCs.however,the expressions of cells'contractive phenotype decreased.

  16. Stimulation of cortical myosin phosphorylation by p114RhoGEF drives cell migration and tumor cell invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Terry

    Full Text Available Actinomyosin activity is an important driver of cell locomotion and has been shown to promote collective cell migration of epithelial sheets as well as single cell migration and tumor cell invasion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying activation of cortical myosin to stimulate single cell movement, and the relationship between the mechanisms that drive single cell locomotion and those that mediate collective cell migration of epithelial sheets are incompletely understood. Here, we demonstrate that p114RhoGEF, an activator of RhoA that associates with non-muscle myosin IIA, regulates collective cell migration of epithelial sheets and tumor cell invasion. Depletion of p114RhoGEF resulted in specific spatial inhibition of myosin activation at cell-cell contacts in migrating epithelial sheets and the cortex of migrating single cells, but only affected double and not single phosphorylation of myosin light chain. In agreement, overall elasticity and contractility of the cells, processes that rely on persistent and more constant forces, were not affected, suggesting that p114RhoGEF mediates process-specific myosin activation. Locomotion was p114RhoGEF-dependent on Matrigel, which favors more roundish cells and amoeboid-like actinomyosin-driven movement, but not on fibronectin, which stimulates flatter cells and lamellipodia-driven, mesenchymal-like migration. Accordingly, depletion of p114RhoGEF led to reduced RhoA, but increased Rac activity. Invasion of 3D matrices was p114RhoGEF-dependent under conditions that do not require metalloproteinase activity, supporting a role of p114RhoGEF in myosin-dependent, amoeboid-like locomotion. Our data demonstrate that p114RhoGEF drives cortical myosin activation by stimulating myosin light chain double phosphorylation and, thereby, collective cell migration of epithelial sheets and amoeboid-like motility of tumor cells.

  17. A new method to address unmet needs for extracting individual cell migration features from a large number of cells embedded in 3D volumes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Adanja

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In vitro cell observation has been widely used by biologists and pharmacologists for screening molecule-induced effects on cancer cells. Computer-assisted time-lapse microscopy enables automated live cell imaging in vitro, enabling cell behavior characterization through image analysis, in particular regarding cell migration. In this context, 3D cell assays in transparent matrix gels have been developed to provide more realistic in vitro 3D environments for monitoring cell migration (fundamentally different from cell motility behavior observed in 2D, which is related to the spread of cancer and metastases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this paper we propose an improved automated tracking method that is designed to robustly and individually follow a large number of unlabeled cells observed under phase-contrast microscopy in 3D gels. The method automatically detects and tracks individual cells across a sequence of acquired volumes, using a template matching filtering method that in turn allows for robust detection and mean-shift tracking. The robustness of the method results from detecting and managing the cases where two cell (mean-shift trackers converge to the same point. The resulting trajectories quantify cell migration through statistical analysis of 3D trajectory descriptors. We manually validated the method and observed efficient cell detection and a low tracking error rate (6%. We also applied the method in a real biological experiment where the pro-migratory effects of hyaluronic acid (HA were analyzed on brain cancer cells. Using collagen gels with increased HA proportions, we were able to evidence a dose-response effect on cell migration abilities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The developed method enables biomedical researchers to automatically and robustly quantify the pro- or anti-migratory effects of different experimental conditions on unlabeled cell cultures in a 3D environment.

  18. In vivo knockdown of ErbB3 in mice inhibits Schwann cell precursor migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Tomohiro; Miyamoto, Yuki; Takada, Shuji; Tsumura, Hideki; Arai, Miyuki; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Tanoue, Akito; Yamauchi, Junji

    2014-09-26

    The myelin sheath insulates neuronal axons and markedly increases the nerve conduction velocity. In the peripheral nervous system (PNS), Schwann cell precursors migrate along embryonic neuronal axons to their final destinations, where they eventually wrap around individual axons to form the myelin sheath after birth. ErbB2 and ErbB3 tyrosine kinase receptors form a heterodimer and are extensively expressed in Schwann lineage cells. ErbB2/3 is thought to be one of the primary regulators controlling the entire Schwann cell development. ErbB3 is the bona fide Schwann cell receptor for the neuronal ligand neuregulin-1. Although ErbB2/3 is well known to regulate both Schwann cell precursor migration and myelination by Schwann cells in fishes, it still remains unclear whether in mammals, ErbB2/3 actually regulates Schwann cell precursor migration. Here, we show that knockdown of ErbB3 using a Schwann cell-specific promoter in mice causes delayed migration of Schwann cell precursors. In contrast, littermate control mice display normal migration. Similar results are seen in an in vitro migration assay using reaggregated Schwann cell precursors. Also, ErbB3 knockdown in mice reduces myelin thickness in sciatic nerves, consistent with the established role of ErbB3 in myelination. Thus, ErbB3 plays a key role in migration, as well as in myelination, in mouse Schwann lineage cells, presenting a genetically conservative role of ErbB3 in Schwann cell precursor migration. PMID:25204498

  19. Androgen-induced cell migration: role of androgen receptor/filamin A association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Castoria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Androgen receptor (AR controls male morphogenesis, gametogenesis and prostate growth as well as development of prostate cancer. These findings support a role for AR in cell migration and invasiveness. However, the molecular mechanism involved in AR-mediated cell migration still remains elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mouse embryo NIH3T3 fibroblasts and highly metastatic human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells harbor low levels of transcriptionally incompetent AR. We now report that, through extra nuclear action, AR triggers migration of both cell types upon stimulation with physiological concentrations of the androgen R1881. We analyzed the initial events leading to androgen-induced cell migration and observed that challenging NIH3T3 cells with 10 nM R1881 rapidly induces interaction of AR with filamin A (FlnA at cytoskeleton. AR/FlnA complex recruits integrin beta 1, thus activating its dependent cascade. Silencing of AR, FlnA and integrin beta 1 shows that this ternary complex controls focal adhesion kinase (FAK, paxillin and Rac, thereby driving cell migration. FAK-null fibroblasts migrate poorly and Rac inhibition by EHT impairs motility of androgen-treated NIH3T3 cells. Interestingly, FAK and Rac activation by androgens are independent of each other. Findings in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells strengthen the role of Rac in androgen signaling. The Rac inhibitor significantly impairs androgen-induced migration in these cells. A mutant AR, deleted of the sequence interacting with FlnA, fails to mediate FAK activation and paxillin tyrosine phosphorylation in androgen-stimulated cells, further reinforcing the role of AR/FlnA interaction in androgen-mediated motility. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present report, for the first time, indicates that the extra nuclear AR/FlnA/integrin beta 1 complex is the key by which androgen activates signaling leading to cell migration. Assembly of this ternary complex may control organ development

  20. Ectopic cerebellar cell migration causes maldevelopment of Purkinje cells and abnormal motor behaviour in Cxcr4 null mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Jen Huang

    Full Text Available SDF-1/CXCR4 signalling plays an important role in neuronal cell migration and brain development. However, the impact of CXCR4 deficiency in the postnatal mouse brain is still poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the importance of CXCR4 on cerebellar development and motor behaviour by conditional inactivation of Cxcr4 in the central nervous system. We found CXCR4 plays a key role in cerebellar development. Its loss leads to defects in Purkinje cell dentritogenesis and axonal projection in vivo but not in cell culture. Transcriptome analysis revealed the most significantly affected pathways in the Cxcr4 deficient developing cerebellum are involved in extra cellular matrix receptor interactions and focal adhesion. Consistent with functional impairment of the cerebellum, Cxcr4 knockout mice have poor coordination and balance performance in skilled motor tests. Together, these results suggest ectopic the migration of granule cells impairs development of Purkinje cells, causes gross cerebellar anatomical disruption and leads to behavioural motor defects in Cxcr4 null mice.

  1. Collective migration models: Dynamic monitoring of leader cells in migratory/invasive disease processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Zachary Steven

    Leader cells are a fundamental biological process that have only been investigated since the early 2000s. These cells have often been observed emerging at the edge of an artificial wound in 2D epithelial cell collective invasion, created with either a mechanical scrape from a pipette tip or from the removal of a plastic, physical blocker. During migration, the moving cells maintain cell-cell contacts, an important quality of collective migration; the leader cells originate from either the first or the second row, they increase in size compared to other cells, and they establish ruffled lamellipodia. Recent studies in 3D have also shown that cells emerging from an invading collective group that also exhibit leader-like properties. Exactly how leader cells influence and interact with follower cells as well as other cells types during collective migration, however, is another matter, and is a subject of intense investigation between many different labs and researchers. The majority of leader cell research to date has involved epithelial cells, but as collective migration is implicated in many different pathogenic diseases, such as cancer and wound healing, a better understanding of leader cells in many cell types and environments will allow significant improvement to therapies and treatments for a wide variety of disease processes. In fact, more recent studies on collective migration and invasion have broadened the field to include other cell types, including mesenchymal cancer cells and fibroblasts. However, the proper technology for picking out dynamic, single cells within a moving and changing cell population over time has severely limited previous investigation into leader cell formation and influence over other cells. In line with these previous studies, we not only bring new technology capable of dynamically monitoring leader cell formation, but we propose that leader cell behavior is more than just an epithelial process, and that it is a critical physiological

  2. The Culture of Mexican Migration: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, William; Massey, Douglas S.

    2002-01-01

    Examines a Mexican "culture of migration," in which U.S. migration becomes an expectation for young people. Among approximately 7,000 secondary students surveyed in Zacatecas (Mexico), adolescents from families involved in U.S. migration were more likely to aspire to live and work in the United States, increasing the likelihood they would drop out…

  3. WNT5A inhibits human dental papilla cell proliferation and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WNT proteins are a large family of cysteine-rich secreted molecules that are linked to both canonical and non-canonical signal pathways, and have been implicated in oncogenesis and tissue development. Canonical WNT proteins have been proven to play critical roles in tooth development, while little is known about the role of non-canonical WNT proteins such as WNT5A. In this study, WNT5A was localized to human dental papilla tissue and human dental papilla cells (HDPCs) cultured in vitro, using immunochemistry and RT-PCR. Recombinant adenovirus encoding full-length Wnt5a cDNA was constructed to investigate the biological role of WNT5A on HDPCs. The BrdU incorporation assay, the MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis showed that over-expression of Wnt5a strongly inhibited the proliferation of HDPCs in vitro. Wound healing and transwell migration assays indicated that over-expression of WNT5A reduced migration of HDPCs. In conclusion, our results showed that WNT5A negatively regulates both proliferation and migration of HDPCs, suggesting its important role in odontogenesis via controlling the HDPCs.

  4. WNT5A inhibits human dental papilla cell proliferation and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, L. [West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Ye, L.; Dong, G.; Ren, L.B.; Wang, C.L.; Xu, P. [West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Zhou, X.D., E-mail: pl_huaxi@yahoo.com.cn [West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    2009-12-18

    WNT proteins are a large family of cysteine-rich secreted molecules that are linked to both canonical and non-canonical signal pathways, and have been implicated in oncogenesis and tissue development. Canonical WNT proteins have been proven to play critical roles in tooth development, while little is known about the role of non-canonical WNT proteins such as WNT5A. In this study, WNT5A was localized to human dental papilla tissue and human dental papilla cells (HDPCs) cultured in vitro, using immunochemistry and RT-PCR. Recombinant adenovirus encoding full-length Wnt5a cDNA was constructed to investigate the biological role of WNT5A on HDPCs. The BrdU incorporation assay, the MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis showed that over-expression of Wnt5a strongly inhibited the proliferation of HDPCs in vitro. Wound healing and transwell migration assays indicated that over-expression of WNT5A reduced migration of HDPCs. In conclusion, our results showed that WNT5A negatively regulates both proliferation and migration of HDPCs, suggesting its important role in odontogenesis via controlling the HDPCs.

  5. p75 neurotrophin receptor and pro-BDNF promote cell survival and migration in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Prieto, Ricardo; Saada, Sofiane; Naves, Thomas; Guillaudeau, Angélique; Perraud, Aurélie; Sindou, Philippe; Lacroix, Aurélie; Descazeaud, Aurélien; Lalloué, Fabrice; Jauberteau, Marie-Odile

    2016-01-01

    p75NTR, a member of TNF receptor family, is the low affinity receptor common to several mature neurotrophins and the high affinity receptor for pro-neurotrophins. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), a member of neurotrophin family has been described to play an important role in development and progression of several cancers, through its binding to a high affinity tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) and/or p75NTR. However, the functions of these two receptors in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have never been investigated. An overexpression of p75NTR, pro-BDNF, and to a lesser extent for TrkB and sortilin, was detected by immunohistochemistry in a cohort of 83 clear cell RCC tumors. p75NTR, mainly expressed in tumor tissues, was significantly associated with higher Fuhrman grade in multivariate analysis. In two derived-RCC lines, 786-O and ACHN cells, we demonstrated that pro-BDNF induced cell survival and migration, through p75NTR as provided by p75NTR RNA silencing or blocking anti-p75NTR antibody. This mechanism is independent of TrkB activation as demonstrated by k252a, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor for Trk neurotrophin receptors. Taken together, these data highlight for the first time an important role for p75NTR in renal cancer and indicate a putative novel target therapy in RCC. PMID:27120782

  6. Coagulation Factor Xa inhibits cancer cell migration via LIMK1-mediated cofilin inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borensztajn, Keren; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Spek, C. Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we showed that activated coagulation factor X (FXa) inhibits migration of breast, lung and colon cancer cells. We showed that the effect of FXa on migration was protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1-dependent, but the subsequent cellular signaling routes remained elusive. In the current ma

  7. Stable SET knockdown in breast cell carcinoma inhibits cell migration and invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We employed RNA interference to knockdown SET expression in breast cancer cells. • Knockdown of SET expression inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Knockdown of SET expression increases the activity and expression of PP2A. • Knockdown of SET expression decreases the expression of MMP-9. - Abstract: Breast cancer is the most malignant tumor for women, however, the mechanisms underlying this devastating disease remain unclear. SET is an endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and involved in many physiological and pathological processes. SET could promote the occurrence of tumor through inhibiting PP2A. In this study, we explore the role of SET in the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and ZR-75-30. The stable suppression of SET expression through lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was shown to inhibit the growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Knockdown of SET increases the activity and expression of PP2Ac and decrease the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). These data demonstrate that SET may be involved in the pathogenic processes of breast cancer, indicating that SET can serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer

  8. Stable SET knockdown in breast cell carcinoma inhibits cell migration and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jie [Department of Occupational Health and Occupational Medicine, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen (China); Yang, Xi-fei [Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen (China); Ren, Xiao-hu [Department of Occupational Health and Occupational Medicine, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen (China); Meng, Xiao-jing [Department of Occupational Health and Occupational Medicine, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Huang, Hai-yan [Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen (China); Zhao, Qiong-hui [Shenzhen Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, Shenzhen (China); Yuan, Jian-hui; Hong, Wen-xu; Xia, Bo; Huang, Xin-feng; Zhou, Li [Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen (China); Liu, Jian-jun, E-mail: bio-research@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Shenzhen, Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen (China); Zou, Fei, E-mail: zoufei616@163.com [Department of Occupational Health and Occupational Medicine, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • We employed RNA interference to knockdown SET expression in breast cancer cells. • Knockdown of SET expression inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Knockdown of SET expression increases the activity and expression of PP2A. • Knockdown of SET expression decreases the expression of MMP-9. - Abstract: Breast cancer is the most malignant tumor for women, however, the mechanisms underlying this devastating disease remain unclear. SET is an endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and involved in many physiological and pathological processes. SET could promote the occurrence of tumor through inhibiting PP2A. In this study, we explore the role of SET in the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and ZR-75-30. The stable suppression of SET expression through lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was shown to inhibit the growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Knockdown of SET increases the activity and expression of PP2Ac and decrease the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). These data demonstrate that SET may be involved in the pathogenic processes of breast cancer, indicating that SET can serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  9. Modulation of p75 neurotrophin receptor under hypoxic conditions induces migration and invasion of C6 glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Chung; Luo, Sheng-Jie; Lin, Chun-Liang; Chang, Pey-Jium; Chen, Miao-Fen

    2015-01-01

    p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) has been reported to play important roles in various cancer types. However, the exact mechanism of tumorigenesis involving p75NTR is unknown. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the expression of p75NTR in malignant glioma and the impact on tumor cell migration and invasion. p75NTR and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression was down-regulated by short-hairpin RNA and up-regulated with expression vectors. By immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis, we found that p75NTR was expressed in both human and rat malignant gliomas. Knockdown of p75NTR increased the expression of vimentin, vascular endothelial growth factor, Matrix metalloproteinase 9, and TWIST, and enhanced the invasion and migration abilities assessed by transwell assay in the C6 tumor cells. Inverse expressions of p75NTR and HIF-1α were detected in glioma cell lines under hypoxic conditions, while increased HIF-1α significantly downregulated the expression of p75NTR, suggesting a HIF-1α-p75NTR-EMT pathway that may regulate glioma cells invasion and migration. Downregulation of p75NTR increased phosphorylation of Src, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin. Knockdown of p75NTR also dysregulated β-catenin-mediated cell junctions, and up-regulated the expressions of fibronectin and L1CAM in the cell-cell junctions, thus suggesting that p75NTR knockdown contributed to a more aggressive migration phenotype via FAK signaling pathway. Our studies suggested that modulation of p75NTR under hypoxic condition could enhance C6 cells migration and invasion by induction of EMT, and activation of the FAK pathway. The HIF-1α-p75NTR-EMT axis may play a central role in glioma tumorigenesis. PMID:25527128

  10. Computational models reveal a passive mechanism for cell migration in the crypt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara-Jane Dunn

    Full Text Available Cell migration in the intestinal crypt is essential for the regular renewal of the epithelium, and the continued upward movement of cells is a key characteristic of healthy crypt dynamics. However, the driving force behind this migration is unknown. Possibilities include mitotic pressure, active movement driven by motility cues, or negative pressure arising from cell loss at the crypt collar. It is possible that a combination of factors together coordinate migration. Here, three different computational models are used to provide insight into the mechanisms that underpin cell movement in the crypt, by examining the consequence of eliminating cell division on cell movement. Computational simulations agree with existing experimental results, confirming that migration can continue in the absence of mitosis. Importantly, however, simulations allow us to infer mechanisms that are sufficient to generate cell movement, which is not possible through experimental observation alone. The results produced by the three models agree and suggest that cell loss due to apoptosis and extrusion at the crypt collar relieves cell compression below, allowing cells to expand and move upwards. This finding suggests that future experiments should focus on the role of apoptosis and cell extrusion in controlling cell migration in the crypt.

  11. Adult subependymal neural precursors, but not differentiated cells, undergo rapid cathodal migration in the presence of direct current electric fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robart Babona-Pilipos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The existence of neural stem and progenitor cells (together termed neural precursor cells in the adult mammalian brain has sparked great interest in utilizing these cells for regenerative medicine strategies. Endogenous neural precursors within the adult forebrain subependyma can be activated following injury, resulting in their proliferation and migration toward lesion sites where they differentiate into neural cells. The administration of growth factors and immunomodulatory agents following injury augments this activation and has been shown to result in behavioural functional recovery following stroke. METHODS AND FINDINGS: With the goal of enhancing neural precursor migration to facilitate the repair process we report that externally applied direct current electric fields induce rapid and directed cathodal migration of pure populations of undifferentiated adult subependyma-derived neural precursors. Using time-lapse imaging microscopy in vitro we performed an extensive single-cell kinematic analysis demonstrating that this galvanotactic phenomenon is a feature of undifferentiated precursors, and not differentiated phenotypes. Moreover, we have shown that the migratory response of the neural precursors is a direct effect of the electric field and not due to chemotactic gradients. We also identified that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling plays a role in the galvanotactic response as blocking EGFR significantly attenuates the migratory behaviour. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest direct current electric fields may be implemented in endogenous repair paradigms to promote migration and tissue repair following neurotrauma.

  12. The Hippo pathway polarizes the actin cytoskeleton during collective migration of Drosophila border cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Eliana P; Khanal, Ichha; Gaspar, Pedro; Fletcher, Georgina C; Polesello, Cedric; Tapon, Nicolas; Thompson, Barry J

    2013-06-10

    Collective migration of Drosophila border cells depends on a dynamic actin cytoskeleton that is highly polarized such that it concentrates around the outer rim of the migrating cluster of cells. How the actin cytoskeleton becomes polarized in these cells to enable collective movement remains unknown. Here we show that the Hippo signaling pathway links determinants of cell polarity to polarization of the actin cytoskeleton in border cells. Upstream Hippo pathway components localize to contacts between border cells inside the cluster and signal through the Hippo and Warts kinases to polarize actin and promote border cell migration. Phosphorylation of the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki)/YAP by Warts does not mediate the function of this pathway in promoting border cell migration, but rather provides negative feedback to limit the speed of migration. Instead, Warts phosphorylates and inhibits the actin regulator Ena to activate F-actin Capping protein activity on inner membranes and thereby restricts F-actin polymerization mainly to the outer rim of the migrating cluster.

  13. Subversion of cell-autonomous immunity and cell migration by Legionella pneumophila effectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia eSimon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria trigger host defense and inflammatory processes such as cytokine production, pyroptosis and the chemotactic migration of immune cells towards the source of infection. However, a number of pathogens interfere with these immune functions by producing specific so-called effector proteins, which are delivered to host cells via dedicated secretion systems. Air-borne Legionella pneumophila bacteria trigger an acute and potential fatal inflammation in the lung termed Legionnaires’ disease. The opportunistic pathogen L. pneumophila is a natural parasite of free-living amoebae, but also replicates in alveolar macrophages and accidentally infects humans. The bacteria employ the Icm/Dot type IV secretion system and as many as 300 different effector proteins to govern host cell interactions and establish in phagocytes an intracellular replication niche, the Legionella-containing vacuole. Some Icm/Dot-translocated effector proteins target cell autonomous immunity or cell migration, i.e. they interfere with (i endocytic, secretory or retrograde vesicle trafficking pathways, (ii organelle or cell motility, (iii the inflammasome and programmed cell death, or (iv the transcription factor NF-κB. Here we review recent mechanistic insights into the subversion of cellular immune functions by L. pneumophila.

  14. Subversion of Cell-Autonomous Immunity and Cell Migration by Legionella pneumophila Effectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Sylvia; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria trigger host defense and inflammatory processes, such as cytokine production, pyroptosis, and the chemotactic migration of immune cells toward the source of infection. However, a number of pathogens interfere with these immune functions by producing specific so-called “effector” proteins, which are delivered to host cells via dedicated secretion systems. Air-borne Legionella pneumophila bacteria trigger an acute and potential fatal inflammation in the lung termed Legionnaires’ disease. The opportunistic pathogen L. pneumophila is a natural parasite of free-living amoebae, but also replicates in alveolar macrophages and accidentally infects humans. The bacteria employ the intracellular multiplication/defective for organelle trafficking (Icm/Dot) type IV secretion system and as many as 300 different effector proteins to govern host–cell interactions and establish in phagocytes an intracellular replication niche, the Legionella-containing vacuole. Some Icm/Dot-translocated effector proteins target cell-autonomous immunity or cell migration, i.e., they interfere with (i) endocytic, secretory, or retrograde vesicle trafficking pathways, (ii) organelle or cell motility, (iii) the inflammasome and programed cell death, or (iv) the transcription factor NF-κB. Here, we review recent mechanistic insights into the subversion of cellular immune functions by L. pneumophila. PMID:26441958

  15. In-vivo cell tracking to quantify endothelial cell migration during zebrafish angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Prahlad G.; Rochon, Elizabeth R.; Roman, Beth L.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism of endothelial cell migration as individual cells or collectively while remaining an integral component of a functional blood vessel has not been well characterized. In this study, our overarching goal is to define an image processing workflow to facilitate quantification of how endothelial cells within the first aortic arch and are proximal to the zebrafish heart behave in response to the onset of flow (i.e. onset of heart beating). Endothelial cell imaging was conducted at this developmental time-point i.e. ~24-28 hours post fertilization (hpf) when flow first begins, using 3D+time two-photon confocal microscopy of a live, wild-type, transgenic, zebrafish expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in endothelial cell nuclei. An image processing pipeline comprised of image signal enhancement, median filtering for speckle noise reduction, automated identification of the nuclei positions, extraction of the relative movement of nuclei between consecutive time instances, and finally tracking of nuclei, was designed for achieving the tracking of endothelial cell nuclei and the identification of their movement towards or away from the heart. Pilot results lead to a hypothesis that upon the onset of heart beat and blood flow, endothelial cells migrate collectively towards the heart (by 21.51+/-10.35 μm) in opposition to blood flow (i.e. subtending 142.170+/-21.170 with the flow direction).

  16. Multiple scale model for cell migration in monolayers: Elastic mismatch between cells enhances motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Benoit; Bresler, Yony; Wirtz, Denis; Grant, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We propose a multiscale model for monolayer of motile cells that comprise normal and cancer cells. In the model, the two types of cells have identical properties except for their elasticity; cancer cells are softer and normal cells are stiffer. The goal is to isolate the role of elasticity mismatch on the migration potential of cancer cells in the absence of other contributions that are present in real cells. The methodology is based on a phase-field description where each cell is modeled as a highly-deformable self-propelled droplet. We simulated two types of nearly confluent monolayers. One contains a single cancer cell in a layer of normal cells and the other contains normal cells only. The simulation results demonstrate that elasticity mismatch alone is sufficient to increase the motility of the cancer cell significantly. Further, the trajectory of the cancer cell is decorated by several speed "bursts" where the cancer cell quickly relaxes from a largely deformed shape and consequently increases its translational motion. The increased motility and the amplitude and frequency of the bursts are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments. PMID:26134134

  17. Effect of epidermal growth factor on the migration of neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Faliang Duan; Guoping Yang; Junwu Wei; Jinglei Wu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Recently,researches on neural stem cells(NSCs)are focus on differentiation and migration of stem cells.How to regulate and control differentiation and migration of NSCs based on human wills is still a hot topic.OBJECTIVE:To investigate the effct of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the migration and proliferation of NSCs and analyze duration of the effect.DESIGN:Contrast study based on cells.SETFING:Department of Neurological Surgery,the First Hospital of Wuhan.MATERIALS:Healthy SD rats aged 13-14 embryonic days.EGF(Sigma Company).METHODS:The experiment was carried out in the Animal Laboratory of Experimental Center Affiliated to the First Hospital of Wuhan from October 2004 to July 2006.NSCs selected from embryonic striatum of rats with 13-14 embryonic days were cultured;7 days later,suspended neural sphere was used to make simple cell suspension and cultured once more.Then,DMEM-F12+20 μg/L EGF was added into culture medium;14 days latar.the rats were divided into experimental group and control group.Rats in the experimental group were cultured with the same medium mentioned above;however, rats in the control group were cultured with only DMEM-F12.Migration of cells was observed under microscope every day.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:NSCs migration in both experimental group and control group.RESULTS:Cell spheres in primary culture were NSCs.In addition,14 days later,proliferation of stem cells were observed remarkably in EGF culture.and size of cell sphere was about that of 100 cells.In exparimental group.proliferation of cell sphere was slow down on the 14th culture day,and apophysis was erupted to neighbor cell sphere.Moreover,NSCs migrated from big cell sphere to small cell sphere during 14-17 culture days.and then,cell migration was disappeared at 17 days after culture.In control group.cell migration was not observed.CONCLUSION:EGF can induce proliferation and migration of NSCs during a special time(14-17 days).However,NSCs do not immigrate over the

  18. Effect of chymotrypsin C and related proteins on pancreatic cancer cell migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haibo Wang; Wei Sha; Zhixue Liu; Cheng-Wu Chi

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a malignant cancer with a bigh mortality rate. The amount of chymotrypsin C in pancreatic cancer cells is only 20% of that found in normal cells.Chymotrypsin C has been reported to be involved in cancer cell apoptosis, but its effect on pancreatic cancer cell migration is unclear. We performed cell migration scratch assays and Transwell experiments, and found that cell migration ability was downregulated in pancreatic cancer Aspc-1 cells that overexpressed chymotrypsin C, whereas the cell migration ability was upregulated in Aspc-1 cells in which chymotrypsin C was suppressed. Two-dimensional fluorescence differential in gel electrophoresis/mass spectrometry method was used to identify the proteins that were differentially expressed in Aspc-1 cells that were transfected with plasmids to induce either overexpression or suppressed expression of chymotrypsin C. Among 26 identified differential proteins, cytokeratin 18 was most obviously correlated with chymotrypsin C expression. Cytokeratin 18 is expressed in developmental tissues in early stages of cancer,and is highly expressed in most carcinomas. We speculated that chymotrypsin C might regulate pancreatic cancer cell migration in relation to cytokeratin 18 expression.

  19. Effect of heavy ion on the activity of migration and invasion of malignant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim of present study was to clarify a role of p53 gene for ability of in vitro invasion and migration of malignant cells irradiated with carbon ions or X-rays. Three cell lines, which were produced by transfection of the plasmid encoding wild-, mutant- or deletion (neo)-type of p53 gene into human lung cancer H1299 cells (p53 deletion type), were used throughout the study. In vitro invasion and migration assay of cells were performed using a multiwell cell culture insert coated with MatrigelTM or fibronectin. Migration- and invasion-rates of cells irradiated with carbon-ions at 40 and 100 keV/μm decreased with increasing dose, showing a little dependence of p53 gene status. For all of three cell lines, the invasion-rates of cells irradiated at 1 and 2 Gy of X-rays increased as compared with that of non-irradiated cells. Migration of both deletion- and mutation-type cells were inhibited by exposure at 1-8 Gy of X-rays. The present results suggest that p53 gene status of cells may contribute to the ability of migration after X-ray irradiation. (author)

  20. Derivatives of Dictyostelium differentiation-inducing factors inhibit lysophosphatidic acid–stimulated migration of murine osteosarcoma LM8 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteosarcoma is a common metastatic bone cancer that predominantly develops in children and adolescents. Metastatic osteosarcoma remains associated with a poor prognosis; therefore, more effective anti-metastatic drugs are needed. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), −2, and −3 are novel lead anti-tumor agents that were originally isolated from the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Here we investigated the effects of a panel of DIF derivatives on lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced migration of mouse osteosarcoma LM8 cells by using a Boyden chamber assay. Some DIF derivatives such as Br-DIF-1, DIF-3(+2), and Bu-DIF-3 (5–20 μM) dose-dependently suppressed LPA-induced cell migration with associated IC50 values of 5.5, 4.6, and 4.2 μM, respectively. On the other hand, the IC50 values of Br-DIF-1, DIF-3(+2), and Bu-DIF-3 versus cell proliferation were 18.5, 7.2, and 2.0 μM, respectively, in LM8 cells, and >20, 14.8, and 4.3 μM, respectively, in mouse 3T3-L1 fibroblasts (non-transformed). Together, our results demonstrate that Br-DIF-1 in particular may be a valuable tool for the analysis of cancer cell migration, and that DIF derivatives such as DIF-3(+2) and Bu-DIF-3 are promising lead anti-tumor agents for the development of therapies that suppress osteosarcoma cell proliferation, migration, and metastasis. - Highlights: • LPA induces cell migration (invasion) in murine osteosarcoma LM8 cells. • DIFs are novel lead anti-tumor agents found in Dictyostelium discoideum. • We examined the effects of DIF derivatives on LPA-induced LM8 cell migration in vitro. • Some of the DIF derivatives inhibited LPA-induced LM8 cell migration

  1. Derivatives of Dictyostelium differentiation-inducing factors inhibit lysophosphatidic acid–stimulated migration of murine osteosarcoma LM8 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubohara, Yuzuru, E-mail: ykuboha@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation (IMCR), Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Department of Health Science, Juntendo University Graduate School of Health and Sports Science, Inzai 270-1695 (Japan); Komachi, Mayumi [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation (IMCR), Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Homma, Yoshimi [Department of Biomolecular Science, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Fukushima 960-1295 (Japan); Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Oshima, Yoshiteru [Laboratory of Natural Product Chemistry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Aoba-yama, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    Osteosarcoma is a common metastatic bone cancer that predominantly develops in children and adolescents. Metastatic osteosarcoma remains associated with a poor prognosis; therefore, more effective anti-metastatic drugs are needed. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), −2, and −3 are novel lead anti-tumor agents that were originally isolated from the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Here we investigated the effects of a panel of DIF derivatives on lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced migration of mouse osteosarcoma LM8 cells by using a Boyden chamber assay. Some DIF derivatives such as Br-DIF-1, DIF-3(+2), and Bu-DIF-3 (5–20 μM) dose-dependently suppressed LPA-induced cell migration with associated IC{sub 50} values of 5.5, 4.6, and 4.2 μM, respectively. On the other hand, the IC{sub 50} values of Br-DIF-1, DIF-3(+2), and Bu-DIF-3 versus cell proliferation were 18.5, 7.2, and 2.0 μM, respectively, in LM8 cells, and >20, 14.8, and 4.3 μM, respectively, in mouse 3T3-L1 fibroblasts (non-transformed). Together, our results demonstrate that Br-DIF-1 in particular may be a valuable tool for the analysis of cancer cell migration, and that DIF derivatives such as DIF-3(+2) and Bu-DIF-3 are promising lead anti-tumor agents for the development of therapies that suppress osteosarcoma cell proliferation, migration, and metastasis. - Highlights: • LPA induces cell migration (invasion) in murine osteosarcoma LM8 cells. • DIFs are novel lead anti-tumor agents found in Dictyostelium discoideum. • We examined the effects of DIF derivatives on LPA-induced LM8 cell migration in vitro. • Some of the DIF derivatives inhibited LPA-induced LM8 cell migration.

  2. Estrogen-dependent sushi domain containing 3 regulates cytoskeleton organization and migration in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, I; Todorović, V; Dubash, A D; Coon, J S; Parker, J B; Buranapramest, M; Huang, C C; Zhao, H; Green, K J; Bulun, S E

    2015-01-15

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the standard endocrine therapy for postmenopausal breast cancer; however, currently used biomarkers, such as, estrogen receptor-alpha/progesterone receptor (ERα/PR), predict only slightly more than half of the potential responders to AI treatment. To identify novel markers of AI responsiveness, a genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using primary breast tumor samples from 50 postmenopausal women who later developed metastatic breast cancer. Sushi domain containing 3 (SUSD3) is a significantly differentially expressed gene, with 3.38-fold higher mRNA levels in AI-responsive breast tumors vs non-responders (P<0.001). SUSD3 was highly expressed in ERα-positive breast tumors and treatment with estradiol increased SUSD3 expression in ERα-positive breast cancer cells. Treatment with an antiestrogen or ERα knockdown abolished basal and estradiol-dependent SUSD3 expression. Recruitment of ERα upstream of the transcription start site of SUSD3 was demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR. Flow cytometric analysis of SUSD3-knockdown cells revealed blunted estradiol effects on progression into S and M phases. SUSD3 was localized to the plasma membrane of breast cancer cells. SUSD3 knockdown decreased the appearance of actin-rich protrusions, stress fibers and large basal focal adhesions, while increasing the presence of cortical actin concomitant with a decrease in Rho and focal adhesion kinase activity. SUSD3-deficient cells demonstrated diminished cell spreading, cell-cell adhesion and motility. In conclusion, SUSD3 is a novel promoter of estrogen-dependent cell proliferation and regulator of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions and migration in breast cancer. It may serve as a novel predictor of response to endocrine therapy and potential therapeutic target. PMID:24413080

  3. Tipping the balance: robustness of tip cell selection, migration and fusion in angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Bentley

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Vascular abnormalities contribute to many diseases such as cancer and diabetic retinopathy. In angiogenesis new blood vessels, headed by a migrating tip cell, sprout from pre-existing vessels in response to signals, e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Tip cells meet and fuse (anastomosis to form blood-flow supporting loops. Tip cell selection is achieved by Dll4-Notch mediated lateral inhibition resulting, under normal conditions, in an interleaved arrangement of tip and non-migrating stalk cells. Previously, we showed that the increased VEGF levels found in many diseases can cause the delayed negative feedback of lateral inhibition to produce abnormal oscillations of tip/stalk cell fates. Here we describe the development and implementation of a novel physics-based hierarchical agent model, tightly coupled to in vivo data, to explore the system dynamics as perpetual lateral inhibition combines with tip cell migration and fusion. We explore the tipping point between normal and abnormal sprouting as VEGF increases. A novel filopodia-adhesion driven migration mechanism is presented and validated against in vivo data. Due to the unique feature of ongoing lateral inhibition, 'stabilised' tip/stalk cell patterns show sensitivity to the formation of new cell-cell junctions during fusion: we predict cell fates can reverse. The fusing tip cells become inhibited and neighbouring stalk cells flip fate, recursively providing new tip cells. Junction size emerges as a key factor in establishing a stable tip/stalk pattern. Cell-cell junctions elongate as tip cells migrate, which is shown to provide positive feedback to lateral inhibition, causing it to be more susceptible to pathological oscillations. Importantly, down-regulation of the migratory pathway alone is shown to be sufficient to rescue the sprouting system from oscillation and restore stability. Thus we suggest the use of migration inhibitors as therapeutic agents for vascular

  4. MicroRNA-200b Impacts Breast Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion by Regulating Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hong; Yu, Haizhong; Yuan, Jianfen; Guo, Chunyan; Cao, Hongyan; Li, Weibing; Xiao, Chunhong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) plays an important role in multiple links of tumors. It also involved in breast cancer invasion and metastasis, and might be a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Another study suggested that ERM expression was regulated directly by miR-200c, and had a critical role in miR-200c suppressing cell migration. This study aimed to investigate the effect of miR-200b on ERM expression in a breast cancer cell line and its influence on invasion and metastasis ability in vitro. MATERIAL AND METHODS Breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 with different metastatic potentials were selected as a model. MiR-200b overexpression or inhibition was achieved by Lipofectamine™ 2000-mediated miRNA transfection. RT-PCR was used to test miR-200b level, while Western blot was selected to detect ERM protein expression. Wound healing assay and Transwell assay were performed to determine cell migration and invasion ability. RESULTS RT-PCR revealed that miR-200b level in MDA-MB-231 was obviously lower than that in MCF-7, while Western blot analysis showed that ERM expression was significantly higher. MiR-200b inhibition by transfection in MCF-7 markedly decreased miR-200b level, elevated ERM expression, and enhanced cell migration and invasion. MiR-200b overexpression in MDA-MB-231 obviously increased miR-200b level, reduced ERM expression, and weakened cell migration and invasion. CONCLUSIONS MiR-200b participates in breast cancer cell migration and invasion through regulating ERM in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. PMID:27276064

  5. LSD1-mediated epigenetic modification contributes to ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanxia; Wan, Xiaolei; Wei, Ye; Liu, Xiuwen; Lai, Wensheng; Zhang, Liuping; Jin, Jie; Wu, Chaoyang; Shao, Qixiang; Shao, Genbao; Lin, Qiong

    2016-06-01

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) has been implicated in the process of tumor progression at various steps, but its role in epithelial-messenchymal transition (EMT) and the migration of ovarian cancer cells remains obscure. In this study, we demonstrated the effect of LSD1 on ovarian cancer cell migration and the regulatory role of LSD1 in the expression of EMT markers. Inhibition of LSD1 expression impaired the migration and invasion of HO8910 ovarian cancer cells. In contrast, overexpression of LSD1 enhanced the cell migration and invasion of HO8910 cells. Mechanistic analyses showed that LSD1 promoted cell migration through induction of N-cadherin, vimentin, MMP-2 and inhibition of E-cadherin. Furthermore, LSD1 interacted with the promoter of E-cadherin and demethylated histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) at this region, downregulated E-cadherin expression, and consequently enhanced ovarian cancer cell migration. These data indicate that LSD1 acts as an epigenetic regulator of EMT and contributes to the metastasis of ovarian cancer. PMID:27109588

  6. A Computational Model of Cell Migration in Response to Biochemical Diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexter, Nicholas C [ORNL; Kruse, Kara L [ORNL; Nutaro, James J [ORNL; Ward, Richard C [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The Computational Sciences and Engineering Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is partnering with the University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine to design a computational model describing various factors related to the development of intimal hyperplasia (IH) in response to arterial injury. This research focuses on modeling the chemotactic and haptotactic processes that stimulate vascular smooth muscle cell migration into the intima. A hybrid discrete-continuous mathematical model of cell migration in response to biochemical diffusion was developed in C++. Chemoattractant diffusion is modeled as a continuous partial differential equation, whereas migration of the cells is modeled as a series of discrete events. Results obtained from the discrete state model for cell migration agree with those obtained from Boyden chamber experiments.

  7. FTSJ2, a heat shock-inducible mitochondrial protein, suppresses cell invasion and migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Lai

    Full Text Available Ribosomal RNA large subunit methyltransferase J (RrmJ, an Escherichia coli heat shock protein, is responsible for 2'-O-ribose methylation in 23S rRNA. In mammals, three close homologs of RrmJ have been identified and have been designated as FTSJ1, FTSJ2 and FTSJ3; however, little is known about these genes. In this study, we characterized the mammalian FTSJ2, which was the most related protein to RrmJ in a phylogenetic analysis that had similar amino acid sequence features and tertiary protein structures of RrmJ. FTSJ2 was first identified in this study as a nucleus encoded mitochondrial protein that preserves the heat shock protein character in mammals in which the mRNA expressions was increased in porcine lung tissues and A549 cells after heat shock treatment. In addition, a recent study in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC suggested that the FTSJ2 gene is located in a novel oncogenic locus. However, our results demonstrate that the expression of FTSJ2 mRNA was decreased in the more invasive subline (CL1-5 of the lung adenocarcinoma cells (CL1 compared with the less invasive subline (CL1-0, and overexpression of FTSJ2 resulted in the inhibition of cell invasion and migration in the rhabdomyosarcoma cell (TE671. In conclusion, our findings indicate that mammalian FTSJ2 is a mitochondrial ortholog of E. coli RrmJ and conserves the heat shock protein properties. Moreover, FTSJ2 possesses suppressive effects on the invasion and migration of cancer cells.

  8. Three-dimensional Cell Culture Devices for Cancer Migration and Drug Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liang

    Porous polymeric materials are widely used to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) environment for applications such as 3D cell culturing and tissue engineering. A series of comparative experiments on 3D cell cultures both in PLA porous scaffolds and alginate gels were conducted to create an in vitro tumor model. A novel 3D cell culture device based on porous polymeric material was developed to study cancer migration. Significant cell migration was observed through the porous channel within 1--2 weeks induced by 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS). A three-dimensional micro-scale perfusion-based two-chamber (3D-muPTC) tissue model system was developed to test the cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs by emulating liver metabolism effects in vitro. Hepatoma cells and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cancer cells were cultured in porous polymeric scaffolds in two separate chambers, representing the liver and tumor, respectively. The cytotoxic effect of temozolomide (TMZ) was first tested using this system. It was found that the GBM cells showed a much higher viability under the TMZ treatment with liver cells in the system, suggesting that the drug metabolism in liver is affecting the efficacy of the drug. The favorable metabolism effect of cytochrome P450 (CYP) was tested using a prodrug ifosfamide (IFO). Without the liver cells, IFO showed only slight toxicity to GBM cells. Moreover, it was shown that different expression levels of CYP 3A4, a major drug metabolizing enzyme, in liver cells caused significantly different levels of GBM cell viability. Simulation of the flow characteristics in the 3D-muPTC system was conducted using the finite-element analysis approach. The shear stress was predicted in the porous scaffolds under different flow rate conditions. The predicted shear stress effects agreed well with an experimental cell viability study. A low cost organic solvent free approach to fabricating tissue engineering scaffolds was developed by combining the twin-screw extrusion

  9. ATM regulation of IL-8 links oxidative stress to cancer cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Ta; Ebelt, Nancy D; Stracker, Travis H; Xhemalce, Blerta; Van Den Berg, Carla L; Miller, Kyle M

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase regulates the DNA damage response (DDR) and is associated with cancer suppression. Here we report a cancer-promoting role for ATM. ATM depletion in metastatic cancer cells reduced cell migration and invasion. Transcription analyses identified a gene network, including the chemokine IL-8, regulated by ATM. IL-8 expression required ATM and was regulated by oxidative stress. IL-8 was validated as an ATM target by its ability to rescue cell migration and invasion defects in ATM-depleted cells. Finally, ATM-depletion in human breast cancer cells reduced lung tumors in a mouse xenograft model and clinical data validated IL-8 in lung metastasis. These findings provide insights into how ATM activation by oxidative stress regulates IL-8 to sustain cell migration and invasion in cancer cells to promote metastatic potential. Thus, in addition to well-established roles in tumor suppression, these findings identify a role for ATM in tumor progression.

  10. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma

  11. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takabe, Piia, E-mail: piia.takabe@uef.fi [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Biomedicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Bart, Geneviève [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Biomedicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Ropponen, Antti [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Biomedicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2015-09-10

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma.

  12. General Analysis of Type I Planetary Migration with Stochastic Perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Fred C

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a generalized treatment of Type I planetary migration in the presence of stochastic perturbations. In many planet-forming disks, the Type I migration mechanism, driven by asymmetric torques, acts on a short time scale and compromises planet formation. If the disk also supports MHD instabilities, however, the corresponding turbulent fluctuations produce additional stochastic torques that modify the steady inward migration scenario. This work studies the migration of planetary cores in the presence of stochastic fluctuations using complementary methods, including a Fokker-Planck approach and iterative maps. Stochastic torques have two main effects: [1] Through outward diffusion, a small fraction of the planetary cores can survive in the face of Type I inward migration. [2] For a given starting condition, the result of any particular realization of migration is uncertain, so that results must be described in terms of the distributions of outcomes. In addition to exploring different regimes of...

  13. Migratory properties of cultured olfactory ensheathing cells by single-cell migration assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-hui Huang; Ying Wang; Li Cao; Zhi-da Su; Yan-ling Zhu; Yi-zhang Chen; Xiao-bing Yuan; Cheng He

    2008-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a unique type of glial cells that have axonal growth-promoting properties. OEC transplantation has emerged as a promising experimental therapy of axonal injuries and demyelinating diseases. However, some fundamental cellular properties of OECs remain unclear. In this study, we found that the distinct OEC subpopulations exhibited different migratory properties based on time-lapse imaging of single isolated cells, possibly due to their different cytoskeletal organizations. Moreover, OEC subpopulations displayed different attractive migratory responses to a gradient of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in single-cell migration assays. Finally, we found that OEC subpopulations transformed into each other spontaneously. Together, these results demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, that distinct OEC subpopulations display different migratory properties in vitro and provide new evidence to support the notion of OECs as a single cell type with malleable functional phenotypes.

  14. Specific Myosins Control Actin Organization, Cell Morphology, and Migration in Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna A. Makowska; Ruth E. Hughes; Kathryn J. White; Claire M. Wells; Michelle Peckham

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the myosin expression profile in prostate cancer cell lines and found that Myo1b, Myo9b, Myo10, and Myo18a were expressed at higher levels in cells with high metastatic potential. Moreover, Myo1b and Myo10 were expressed at higher levels in metastatic tumors. Using an siRNA-based approach, we found that knockdown of each myosin resulted in distinct phenotypes. Myo10 knockdown ablated filopodia and decreased 2D migration speed. Myo18a knockdown increased circumferential non-mus...

  15. MiR-153 inhibits migration and invasion of human non-small-cell lung cancer by targeting ADAM19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, Nianxi [Department of Oncology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Institute of Medical Sciences, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Shen, Liangfang [Department of Oncology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Wang, Jun; He, Dan [Institute of Medical Sciences, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Duan, Chaojun, E-mail: duancjxy@163.com [Department of Oncology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Institute of Medical Sciences, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Decreased miR-153 and up-regulated ADAM19 are correlated with NSCLC pathology. • MiR-153 inhibits the proliferation and migration and invasion of NSCLC cells in vitro. • ADAM19 is a direct target of miR-153. • ADAM19 is involved in miR-153-suppressed migration and invasion of NSCLC cells. - Abstract: MiR-153 was reported to be dysregulated in some human cancers. However, the function and mechanism of miR-153 in lung cancer cells remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-153 in human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using qRT-PCR, we demonstrated that miR-153 was significantly decreased in clinical NSCLC tissues and cell lines, and downregulation of miR-153 was significantly correlated with lymph node status. We further found that ectopic expression of miR-153 significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration and invasion of NSCLC cells in vitro, suggesting that miR-153 may be a novel tumor suppressor in NSCLC. Further integrated analysis revealed that ADAM19 is as a direct and functional target of miR-153. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR-153 directly targeted 3′UTR of ADAM19, and correlation analysis revealed an inverse correlation between miR-153 and ADAM19 mRNA levels in clinical NSCLC tissues. Knockdown of ADAM19 inhibited migration and invasion of NSCLC cells which was similar with effects of overexpression of miR-153, while overexpression of ADAM19 attenuated the function of miR-153 in NSCLC cells. Taken together, our results highlight the significance of miR-153 and ADAM19 in the development and progression of NSCLC.

  16. MiR-153 inhibits migration and invasion of human non-small-cell lung cancer by targeting ADAM19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Decreased miR-153 and up-regulated ADAM19 are correlated with NSCLC pathology. • MiR-153 inhibits the proliferation and migration and invasion of NSCLC cells in vitro. • ADAM19 is a direct target of miR-153. • ADAM19 is involved in miR-153-suppressed migration and invasion of NSCLC cells. - Abstract: MiR-153 was reported to be dysregulated in some human cancers. However, the function and mechanism of miR-153 in lung cancer cells remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-153 in human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using qRT-PCR, we demonstrated that miR-153 was significantly decreased in clinical NSCLC tissues and cell lines, and downregulation of miR-153 was significantly correlated with lymph node status. We further found that ectopic expression of miR-153 significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration and invasion of NSCLC cells in vitro, suggesting that miR-153 may be a novel tumor suppressor in NSCLC. Further integrated analysis revealed that ADAM19 is as a direct and functional target of miR-153. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR-153 directly targeted 3′UTR of ADAM19, and correlation analysis revealed an inverse correlation between miR-153 and ADAM19 mRNA levels in clinical NSCLC tissues. Knockdown of ADAM19 inhibited migration and invasion of NSCLC cells which was similar with effects of overexpression of miR-153, while overexpression of ADAM19 attenuated the function of miR-153 in NSCLC cells. Taken together, our results highlight the significance of miR-153 and ADAM19 in the development and progression of NSCLC

  17. The Role of TG2 in Regulating S100A4-Mediated Mammary Tumour Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuo Wang; Martin Griffin

    2013-01-01

    The importance of S100A4, a Ca(2+)-binding protein, in mediating tumour cell migration, both intracellularly and extracellularly, is well documented. Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) a Ca(2+)-dependent protein crosslinking enzyme, has also been shown to enhance cell migration. Here by using the well characterised non-metastatic rat mammary R37 cells (transfected with empty vector) and highly metastatic KP1 cells (R37 cells transfected with S100A4), we demonstrate that inhibition of TG2 either by...

  18. A dynamic analysis of net migration and state employment change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruidl, J S; Pulver, G C

    1991-01-01

    "The dynamic relationship of net migration and employment change is examined for ten selected states of the U.S. using a multivariate time series approach--a vector autoregression (VAR) model. Granger causality tests and dynamic multipliers provide information on the dynamic process. The results suggest a state-level process in which employment change occurs first, and net migration follows with a lag. The procedure appears promising in investigating the timing of net migration and regional employment change."

  19. Macroeconomic Consequences of Global Endogenous Migration: a General Equilibrium Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Borgy, Vladimir; Chojnicki, Xavier; Le Garrec, Gilles; Cyrille SCHWELLNUS

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the consequences of endogenous migration flows over the coming decades in a dynamic general equilibrium model of the world economy. Such an approach has two major benefits. First, it offers a global perspective on the economic consequences of international migration flows by taking into account effects on both the destination and the origin regions. Second, by allowing migration flows to be related to economic fundamentals, they are determined endogenously in the mod...

  20. Do climate variations explain bilateral migration? A gravity model analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Backhaus, Andreas; Martínez Zarzoso, Inmaculada; Muris, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates to what extent international migration can be explained by climatic variations. A gravity model of migration augmented with average temperature and precipitation in the country of origin is estimated using a panel data set of 142 sending countries for the period 1995 to 2006. We find two primary results. First, temperature is positively correlated with migration. Second, stronger changes in precipitation are also associated with aligned, but small change...

  1. A Multilevel Analysis of Young Adult Migration, 1980-1998

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ji-Youn

    2002-01-01

    The primary objective of this research was to investigate the propensity to migrate the destination choices of young adults, and the importance of individual, household, and community characteristics in these migration choices. Using cohort data from the National Longitudinal Survey ofYouth79 from 1980 to 1998, this study specifies the set of individual-, household-, and community-level of determinants on migrat ion and then incorporates these variables in multivariate analyses to test their ...

  2. Three-dimensional numerical model of cell morphology during migration in multi-signaling substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Jamaleddin Mousavi

    Full Text Available Cell Migration associated with cell shape changes are of central importance in many biological processes ranging from morphogenesis to metastatic cancer cells. Cell movement is a result of cyclic changes of cell morphology due to effective forces on cell body, leading to periodic fluctuations of the cell length and cell membrane area. It is well-known that the cell can be guided by different effective stimuli such as mechanotaxis, thermotaxis, chemotaxis and/or electrotaxis. Regulation of intracellular mechanics and cell's physical interaction with its substrate rely on control of cell shape during cell migration. In this notion, it is essential to understand how each natural or external stimulus may affect the cell behavior. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D computational model is here developed to analyze a free mode of cell shape changes during migration in a multi-signaling micro-environment. This model is based on previous models that are presented by the same authors to study cell migration with a constant spherical cell shape in a multi-signaling substrates and mechanotaxis effect on cell morphology. Using the finite element discrete methodology, the cell is represented by a group of finite elements. The cell motion is modeled by equilibrium of effective forces on cell body such as traction, protrusion, electrostatic and drag forces, where the cell traction force is a function of the cell internal deformations. To study cell behavior in the presence of different stimuli, the model has been employed in different numerical cases. Our findings, which are qualitatively consistent with well-known related experimental observations, indicate that adding a new stimulus to the cell substrate pushes the cell to migrate more directionally in more elongated form towards the more effective stimuli. For instance, the presence of thermotaxis, chemotaxis and electrotaxis can further move the cell centroid towards the corresponding stimulus, respectively

  3. Analysis of gross migration profiles in England and Wales: some developments in classification

    OpenAIRE

    I Bracken; Bates, J.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper we describe the development and application of two approaches to the analysis of age and sex specific interarea migration. The data relate to local authority areas in England and Wales. These approaches are developments of established migration profile-fitting and cluster analytic methods. The paper shows how these methods have been used to develop complementary classifications from which potentially valuable criteria for migration analysis can emerge. The work described is part...

  4. Orai1 and STIM1 are critical for cell migration and proliferation of clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji-Hee [Department of Physiology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lkhagvadorj, Sayamaa; Lee, Mi-Ra [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Kyu-Hee [Department of Physiology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hyun Chul; Jung, Jae Hung [Department of Urology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Seung-Kuy, E-mail: skcha@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Physiology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, and Nuclear Receptor Research Consortium, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Minseob, E-mail: eomm@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Pathology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-23

    Highlights: • Orai1 channel is highly expressed in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) tissues. • Orai1 and STIM1 constitute a native store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry in ccRCC cells. • Orai1 and STIM1 promote cell migration and proliferation of ccRCC cells. - Abstract: The intracellular Ca{sup 2+} regulation has been implicated in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Notably, store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) is a major Ca{sup 2+} entry mechanism in non-excitable cells, being involved in cell proliferation and migration in several types of cancer. However, the expression and biological role of SOCE have not been investigated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Here, we demonstrate that Orai1 and STIM1, not Orai3, are crucial components of SOCE in the progression of ccRCC. The expression levels of Orai1 in tumor tissues were significantly higher than those in the adjacent normal parenchymal tissues. In addition, native SOCE was blunted by inhibiting SOCE or by silencing Orai1 and STIM1. Pharmacological blockade or knockdown of Orai1 or STIM1 also significantly inhibited RCC cell migration and proliferative capability. Taken together, Orai1 is highly expressed in ccRCC tissues illuminating that Orai1-mediated SOCE may play an important role in ccRCC development. Indeed, Orai1 and STIM1 constitute a native SOCE pathway in ccRCC by promoting cell proliferation and migration.

  5. The role of TG2 in regulating S100A4-mediated mammary tumour cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Wang

    Full Text Available The importance of S100A4, a Ca(2+-binding protein, in mediating tumour cell migration, both intracellularly and extracellularly, is well documented. Tissue transglutaminase (TG2 a Ca(2+-dependent protein crosslinking enzyme, has also been shown to enhance cell migration. Here by using the well characterised non-metastatic rat mammary R37 cells (transfected with empty vector and highly metastatic KP1 cells (R37 cells transfected with S100A4, we demonstrate that inhibition of TG2 either by TG2 inhibitors or transfection of cells with TG2 shRNA block S100A4-accelerated cell migration in the KP1cells and in R37 cells treated with exogenous S100A4. Cell migration was also blocked by the treatment with the non-cell permeabilizing TG2 inhibitor R294, in the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 (Clone 16, which has a high level of TG2 expression. Inhibition was paralleled by a decrease in S100A4 polymer formation. In vitro co-immunoprecipitation and Far Western blotting assays and cross-linking assays showed not only the direct interaction between TG2 and S100A4, but also confirmed S100A4 as a substrate for TG2. Using specific functional blocking antibodies, a targeting peptide and a recombinant protein as a competitive treatment, we revealed the involvement of syndecan-4 and α5β1 integrin co-signalling pathways linked by activation of PKCα in this TG2 and S100A4-mediated cell migration. We propose a mechanism for TG2-regulated S100A4-related mediated cell migration, which is dependent on TG2 crosslinking.

  6. Cardiac Migration of Endogenous Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Patients with Inflammatory Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Schmidt-Lucke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC have immunomodulatory features. The aim of this study was to investigate the migration and homing potential of endogenous circulating MSC in virus negative inflammatory cardiomyopathy (CMi. Methods. In 29 patients with n=23 or without n=6 CMi undergoing endomyocardial biopsies (EMB, transcardiac gradients (TCGs of circulating MSC were measured by flow cytometry from blood simultaneously sampled from aorta and coronary sinus. The presence of MSC in EMB, cardiac inflammation, and SDF-1α mRNA expression were detected via immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Results. MSC defined as CD45−CD34−CD11b−CD73+CD90+ cells accounted for 0.010 [0.0025–0.048]%/peripheral mononuclear cell (PMNC and as CD45−CD34−CD11b−CD73+CD105+ cells for 0.019 [0.0026–0.067]%/PMNC, both with similar counts in patients with or without cardiac inflammation. There was a 29.9% P<0.01 transcardiac reduction of circulating MSC in patients with CMi, correlating with the extent of cardiac inflammation (P<0.05, multivariate analysis. A strong correlation was found between the TCG of circulating MSC and numbers of MSC (CD45−CD34−CD90+CD105+ in EMB (r=-0.73, P<0.005. SDF-1α was the strongest predictor for increased MSC in EMB (P<0.005, multivariate analysis. Conclusions. Endogenous MSC continuously migrate to the heart in patients with CMi triggered by cardiac inflammation.

  7. Angiogenin enhances cell migration by regulating stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saisai Wei

    Full Text Available Angiogenin (ANG acts on both vascular endothelial cells and cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we carried out a co-immunoprecipitation assay in HeLa cells and identified 14 potential ANG-interacting proteins. Among these proteins, β-actin, α-actinin 4, and non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 are stress fiber components and involved in cytoskeleton organization and movement, which prompted us to investigate the mechanism of action of ANG in cell migration. Upon confirmation of the interactions between ANG and the three proteins, further studies revealed that ANG co-localized with β-actin and α-actinin 4 at the leading edge of migrating cells. Down-regulation of ANG resulted in fewer but thicker stress fibers with less dynamics, which was associated with the enlargements of focal adhesions. The focal adhesion kinase activity and cell migration capacity were significantly decreased in ANG-deficient cells. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the existence of ANG in the cytoplasm optimizes stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion formation to accommodate cell migration. The finding that ANG promoted cancer cell migration might provide new clues for tumor metastasis research.

  8. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier [Laboratory of Cell Physiology, IoNS, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine [Pôle de Recherche Cardiovasculaire, IREC, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Morel, Nicole, E-mail: nicole.morel@uclouvain.be [Laboratory of Cell Physiology, IoNS, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium)

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  9. Tangential migration of glutamatergic neurons and cortical patterning during development: Lessons from Cajal-Retzius cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Melissa; Pierani, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    Tangential migration is a mode of cell movement, which in the developing cerebral cortex, is defined by displacement parallel to the ventricular surface and orthogonal to the radial glial fibers. This mode of long-range migration is a strategy by which distinct neuronal classes generated from spatially and molecularly distinct origins can integrate to form appropriate neural circuits within the cortical plate. While it was previously believed that only GABAergic cortical interneurons migrate tangentially from their origins in the subpallial ganglionic eminences to integrate in the cortical plate, it is now known that transient populations of glutamatergic neurons also adopt this mode of migration. These include Cajal-Retzius cells (CRs), subplate neurons (SPs), and cortical plate transient neurons (CPTs), which have crucial roles in orchestrating the radial and tangential development of the embryonic cerebral cortex in a noncell-autonomous manner. While CRs have been extensively studied, it is only in the last decade that the molecular mechanisms governing their tangential migration have begun to be elucidated. To date, the mechanisms of SPs and CPTs tangential migration remain unknown. We therefore review the known signaling pathways, which regulate parameters of CRs migration including their motility, contact-redistribution and adhesion to the pial surface, and discuss this in the context of how CR migration may regulate their signaling activity in a spatial and temporal manner. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 847-881, 2016. PMID:26581033

  10. Tangential migration of glutamatergic neurons and cortical patterning during development: Lessons from Cajal-Retzius cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Melissa; Pierani, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    Tangential migration is a mode of cell movement, which in the developing cerebral cortex, is defined by displacement parallel to the ventricular surface and orthogonal to the radial glial fibers. This mode of long-range migration is a strategy by which distinct neuronal classes generated from spatially and molecularly distinct origins can integrate to form appropriate neural circuits within the cortical plate. While it was previously believed that only GABAergic cortical interneurons migrate tangentially from their origins in the subpallial ganglionic eminences to integrate in the cortical plate, it is now known that transient populations of glutamatergic neurons also adopt this mode of migration. These include Cajal-Retzius cells (CRs), subplate neurons (SPs), and cortical plate transient neurons (CPTs), which have crucial roles in orchestrating the radial and tangential development of the embryonic cerebral cortex in a noncell-autonomous manner. While CRs have been extensively studied, it is only in the last decade that the molecular mechanisms governing their tangential migration have begun to be elucidated. To date, the mechanisms of SPs and CPTs tangential migration remain unknown. We therefore review the known signaling pathways, which regulate parameters of CRs migration including their motility, contact-redistribution and adhesion to the pial surface, and discuss this in the context of how CR migration may regulate their signaling activity in a spatial and temporal manner. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 847-881, 2016.

  11. Revised analysis of in-migrating workers during site characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Deaf Smith Environmental Assessment's analysis of in-migrating workers and community service impacts was predicated on the assumption that a peak of approximately 480 workers would be needed on location to conduct site characterization activities. This analysis assumed that DOE's prime contractor(s) would have a limited staff in the area; the majority of the workers would be on site for the construction of the exploratory shaft and to conduct geologic and environmental studies. Since the time when the Environmental Assessment was prepared, the prime contractors [Battelle-ISSC and the Technical Field Service Contractor (TFSC)] were requested to move their offices to the site area. Therefore, many more administrative and technical workers would be expected to relocate in the Deaf Smith County regions. A change in the expected number of in-migrants could also change the expected nature of community service impacts. It is the purpose of this analysis to evaluate the site characterization workforce and thresholds for local community services. 22 refs., 24 tabs

  12. Oligodendroglial p130Cas is a target of Fyn kinase involved in process formation, cell migration and survival.

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    Constantin Gonsior

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating glial cells of the central nervous system. In the course of brain development, oligodendrocyte precursor cells migrate, scan the environment and differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes with multiple cellular processes which recognize and ensheath neuronal axons. During differentiation, oligodendrocytes undergo dramatic morphological changes requiring cytoskeletal rearrangements which need to be tightly regulated. The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Fyn plays a central role in oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. In order to improve our understanding of the role of oligodendroglial Fyn kinase, we have identified Fyn targets in these cells. Purification and mass-spectrometric analysis of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in response to overexpressed active Fyn in the oligodendrocyte precursor cell line Oli-neu, yielded the adaptor molecule p130Cas. We analyzed the function of this Fyn target in oligodendroglial cells and observed that reduction of p130Cas levels by siRNA affects process outgrowth, the thickness of cellular processes and migration behavior of Oli-neu cells. Furthermore, long term p130Cas reduction results in decreased cell numbers as a result of increased apoptosis in cultured primary oligodendrocytes. Our data contribute to understanding the molecular events taking place during oligodendrocyte migration and morphological differentiation and have implications for myelin formation.

  13. SLUG promotes prostate cancer cell migration and invasion via CXCR4/CXCL12 axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uygur Berna

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SLUG is a zinc-finger transcription factor of the Snail/Slug zinc-finger family that plays a role in migration and invasion of tumor cells. Mechanisms by which SLUG promotes migration and invasion in prostate cancers remain elusive. Methods Expression level of CXCR4 and CXCL12 was examined by Western blot, RT-PCR, and qPCR analyses. Forced expression of SLUG was mediated by retroviruses, and SLUG and CXCL12 was downregulated by shRNAs-expressing lentiviruses. Migration and invasion of prostate cancer were measured by scratch-wound assay and invasion assay, respectively. Research We demonstrated that forced expression of SLUG elevated CXCR4 and CXCL12 expression in human prostate cancer cell lines PC3, DU145, 22RV1, and LNCaP; conversely, reduced expression of SLUG by shRNA downregulated CXCR4 and CXCL12 expression at RNA and protein levels in prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, ectopic expression of SLUG increased MMP9 expression and activity in PC3, 22RV1, and DU-145 cells, and SLUG knockdown by shRNA downregulated MMP9 expression. We showed that CXCL12 is required for SLUG-mediated MMP9 expression in prostate cancer cells. Moreover, we found that migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells was increased by ectopic expression of SLUG and decreased by SLUG knockdown. Notably, knockdown of CXCL12 by shRNA impaired SLUG-mediated migration and invasion in prostate cancer cells. Lastly, our data suggest that CXCL12 and SLUG regulate migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells independent of cell growth. Conclusion We provide the first compelling evidence that upregulation of autocrine CXCL12 is a major mechanism underlying SLUG-mediated migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells. Our findings suggest that CXCL12 is a therapeutic target for prostate cancer metastasis.

  14. Extracellular vesicles from malignant effusions induce tumor cell migration: inhibitory effect of LMWH tinzaparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamperl, Hans; Plattfaut, Corinna; Freund, Annika; Quecke, Tabea; Theophil, Friederike; Gieseler, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Elevated levels of extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been correlated with inflammatory diseases as well as progressive and metastatic cancer. By presenting tissue factor (TF) on their membrane surface, cellular microparticles (MPs) activate both the coagulation system and cell-signaling pathways such as the PAR/ERK pathway. We have shown before that malignant effusions are a rich source of tumor cell-derived EVs. Here, we used EVs from malignant effusions from three different patients after serial low-speed centrifugation steps as recommended by the ISTH (lsEV). Significant migration of human pancreatic carcinoma cells could be induced by lsEVs and was effectively inhibited by pre-incubation with tinzaparin, a low-molecular-weight heparin. Tinzaparin induced tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) release from tumor cells, and recombinant TFPI inhibited EV-induced tumor cell migration. EVs also induced ERK phosphorylation, whereas inhibitors of PAR2 and ERK suppressed EV-induced tumor cell migration. LsEVs have been characterized by high-resolution flow cytometry and, after elimination of smaller vesicles including exosomes, by further high-speed centrifugation (hsEV). The remaining population consisting primarily of MPs is indeed the main migration-inducing population with tenase activity. Compared to other LMWHs, tinzaparin is suggested to have high potency to induce TFPI release from epithelial cells. The migration-inhibitory effect of TFPI and the interruption of tumor cell migration by inhibitors of PAR2 and ERK suggest that lsEVs induce tumor cell migration by activating the PAR2 signaling pathway. Tinzaparin might inhibit this process at least partly by inducing the release of TFPI from tumor cells, which blocks PAR-activating TF complexes. The clinical relevance of the results is discussed.

  15. Extracellular vesicles from malignant effusions induce tumor cell migration: inhibitory effect of LMWH tinzaparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamperl, Hans; Plattfaut, Corinna; Freund, Annika; Quecke, Tabea; Theophil, Friederike; Gieseler, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Elevated levels of extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been correlated with inflammatory diseases as well as progressive and metastatic cancer. By presenting tissue factor (TF) on their membrane surface, cellular microparticles (MPs) activate both the coagulation system and cell-signaling pathways such as the PAR/ERK pathway. We have shown before that malignant effusions are a rich source of tumor cell-derived EVs. Here, we used EVs from malignant effusions from three different patients after serial low-speed centrifugation steps as recommended by the ISTH (lsEV). Significant migration of human pancreatic carcinoma cells could be induced by lsEVs and was effectively inhibited by pre-incubation with tinzaparin, a low-molecular-weight heparin. Tinzaparin induced tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) release from tumor cells, and recombinant TFPI inhibited EV-induced tumor cell migration. EVs also induced ERK phosphorylation, whereas inhibitors of PAR2 and ERK suppressed EV-induced tumor cell migration. LsEVs have been characterized by high-resolution flow cytometry and, after elimination of smaller vesicles including exosomes, by further high-speed centrifugation (hsEV). The remaining population consisting primarily of MPs is indeed the main migration-inducing population with tenase activity. Compared to other LMWHs, tinzaparin is suggested to have high potency to induce TFPI release from epithelial cells. The migration-inhibitory effect of TFPI and the interruption of tumor cell migration by inhibitors of PAR2 and ERK suggest that lsEVs induce tumor cell migration by activating the PAR2 signaling pathway. Tinzaparin might inhibit this process at least partly by inducing the release of TFPI from tumor cells, which blocks PAR-activating TF complexes. The clinical relevance of the results is discussed. PMID:27435911

  16. Three-Dimensional Numerical Model of Cell Morphology during Migration in Multi-Signaling Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Seyed Jamaleddin; Hamdy Doweidar, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Cell Migration associated with cell shape changes are of central importance in many biological processes ranging from morphogenesis to metastatic cancer cells. Cell movement is a result of cyclic changes of cell morphology due to effective forces on cell body, leading to periodic fluctuations of the cell length and cell membrane area. It is well-known that the cell can be guided by different effective stimuli such as mechanotaxis, thermotaxis, chemotaxis and/or electrotaxis. Regulation of intracellular mechanics and cell’s physical interaction with its substrate rely on control of cell shape during cell migration. In this notion, it is essential to understand how each natural or external stimulus may affect the cell behavior. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D) computational model is here developed to analyze a free mode of cell shape changes during migration in a multi-signaling micro-environment. This model is based on previous models that are presented by the same authors to study cell migration with a constant spherical cell shape in a multi-signaling substrates and mechanotaxis effect on cell morphology. Using the finite element discrete methodology, the cell is represented by a group of finite elements. The cell motion is modeled by equilibrium of effective forces on cell body such as traction, protrusion, electrostatic and drag forces, where the cell traction force is a function of the cell internal deformations. To study cell behavior in the presence of different stimuli, the model has been employed in different numerical cases. Our findings, which are qualitatively consistent with well-known related experimental observations, indicate that adding a new stimulus to the cell substrate pushes the cell to migrate more directionally in more elongated form towards the more effective stimuli. For instance, the presence of thermotaxis, chemotaxis and electrotaxis can further move the cell centroid towards the corresponding stimulus, respectively, diminishing the

  17. A photoactivatable nanopatterned substrate for analyzing collective cell migration with precisely tuned cell-extracellular matrix ligand interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Shimizu

    Full Text Available Collective cell migration is involved in many biological and pathological processes. Various factors have been shown to regulate the decision to migrate collectively or individually, but the impact of cell-extracellular matrix (ECM interactions is still debated. Here, we developed a method for analyzing collective cell migration by precisely tuning the interactions between cells and ECM ligands. Gold nanoparticles are arrayed on a glass substrate with a defined nanometer spacing by block copolymer micellar nanolithography (BCML, and photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol (Mw  =  12 kDa, PEG12K and a cyclic RGD peptide, as an ECM ligand, are immobilized on this substrate. The remaining glass regions are passivated with PEG2K-silane to make cells interact with the surface via the nanoperiodically presented cyclic RGD ligands upon the photocleavage of PEG12K. On this nanostructured substrate, HeLa cells are first patterned in photo-illuminated regions, and cell migration is induced by a second photocleavage of the surrounding PEG12K. The HeLa cells gradually lose their cell-cell contacts and become disconnected on the nanopatterned substrate with 10-nm particles and 57-nm spacing, in contrast to their behavior on the homogenous substrate. Interestingly, the relationship between the observed migration collectivity and the cell-ECM ligand interactions is the opposite of that expected based on conventional soft matter models. It is likely that the reduced phosphorylation at tyrosine-861 of focal adhesion kinase (FAK on the nanopatterned surface is responsible for this unique migration behavior. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the presented method in understanding the process of determining collective and non-collective migration features in defined micro- and nano-environments and resolving the crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesions.

  18. Using a co-culture microsystem for cell migration under fluid shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chia-Hsien; Tsai, Shen-Hsing; Wu, Li-Wha; Lin, Yu-Cheng

    2011-08-01

    We have successfully developed a microsystem to co-cultivate two types of cells with a minimum defined gap of 50 μm, and to quantitatively study the impact of fluid shear stress on the mutual influence of cell migration velocity and distance. We used the hydrostatic pressure to seed two different cells, endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs), on opposite sides of various gap sizes (500 μm, 200 μm, 100 μm, and 50 μm). After cultivating the cells for 12 h and peeling the co-culture microchip from the culture dish, we studied the impacts of gap size on the migration of either cell type in the absence or presence of fluid shear stress (7 dyne cm(-2) and 12 dyne cm(-2)) influence. We found that both gap size and shear stress have profound influence on cell migration. Smaller gap sizes (100 μm and 50 μm) significantly enhanced cell migration, suggesting a requirement of an effective concentration of released factor(s) by either cell type in the gap region. Flow-induced shear stress delayed the migration onset of either cell type in a dose-dependent manner regardless of the gap size. Moreover, shear stress-induced decrease of cell migration becomes evident when the gap size was 500 μm. We have developed a co-culture microsystem for two kinds of cells and overcome the conventional difficulties in observation and mixed culture, and it would have more application for bio-manipulation and tissue repair engineering.

  19. A model for cell density effect on stress fiber alignment and collective directional migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeddoust, Mohammad; Shamloo, Amir

    2015-12-01

    In this study, numerical simulation of collective cell migration is presented in order to mimic the group migration of endothelial cells subjected to the concentration gradients of a biochemical factor. The developed 2D model incorporates basic elements of the cell, including both the cell membrane and the cell cytoskeleton, based on a viscoelastic cell mechanic model. Various cell processes--including cell random walk, cell-cell interactions, cell chemotaxis, and cellular cytoskeleton rearrangements--are considered and analyzed in our developed model. After validating the model by using available experimental data, the model is used to investigate various important parameters during collective cell chemotaxis, such as cell density, cytoskeleton organization, stress fiber reorientations, and intracellular forces. The results suggest that increasing the cell density causes the cell-cell interactions to affect the orientation of stress fibers throughout the cytoskeleton and makes the stress fibers more aligned in the direction of the imposed concentration gradient. This improved alignment of the stress fibers correlates with the intensification of the intracellular forces transferred in the gradient direction; this improves the cell group migration. Comparison of the obtained results with available experimental observations of collective chemotaxis of endothelial cells shows an interesting agreement. PMID:26717999

  20. Mechano-sensing and cell migration: a 3D model approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell migration is essential for tissue development in different physiological and pathological conditions. It is a complex process orchestrated by chemistry, biological factors, microstructure and surrounding mechanical properties. Focusing on the mechanical interactions, cells do not only exert forces on the matrix that surrounds them, but they also sense and react to mechanical cues in a process called mechano-sensing. Here, we hypothesize the involvement of mechano-sensing in the regulation of directional cell migration through a three-dimensional (3D) matrix. For this purpose, we develop a 3D numerical model of individual cell migration, which incorporates the mechano-sensing process of the cell as the main mechanism regulating its movement. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that factors, such as substrate stiffness, boundary conditions and external forces, regulate specific and distinct cell movements

  1. Lumican Inhibits SNAIL-Induced Melanoma Cell Migration Specifically by Blocking MMP-14 Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiak, Marta; Boncela, Joanna; Perreau, Corinne; Karamanou, Konstantina; Chatron-Colliet, Aurore; Proult, Isabelle; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Chakravarti, Shukti; Maquart, François-Xavier; Kowalska, M. Anna; Wegrowski, Yanusz; Brézillon, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Lumican, a small leucine rich proteoglycan, inhibits MMP-14 activity and melanoma cell migration in vitro and in vivo. Snail triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transitions endowing epithelial cells with migratory and invasive properties during tumor progression. The aim of this work was to investigate lumican effects on MMP-14 activity and migration of Snail overexpressing B16F1 (Snail-B16F1) melanoma cells and HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. Lumican inhibits the Snail induced MMP-14 activity in B16F1 but not in HT-29 cells. In Snail-B16F1 cells, lumican inhibits migration, growth, and melanoma primary tumor development. A lumican-based strategy targeting Snail-induced MMP-14 activity might be useful for melanoma treatment. PMID:26930497

  2. Tuning cell migration: contractility as an integrator of intracellular signals from multiple cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeleau, Francois; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2016-01-01

    There has been immense progress in our understanding of the factors driving cell migration in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional microenvironments over the years. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that even though most cells share many of the same signaling molecules, they rarely respond in the same way to migration cues. To add to the complexity, cells are generally exposed to multiple cues simultaneously, in the form of growth factors and/or physical cues from the matrix. Understanding the mechanisms that modulate the intracellular signals triggered by multiple cues remains a challenge. Here, we will focus on the molecular mechanism involved in modulating cell migration, with a specific focus on how cell contractility can mediate the crosstalk between signaling initiated at cell-matrix adhesions and growth factor receptors. PMID:27508074

  3. Effects of osthole on migration and invasion in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dapeng; Gu, Tianwei; Wang, Ting; Tang, Qingjiu; Ma, Changyan

    2010-01-01

    Osthole, a natural coumarin derivative, is extracted from the fruit of Cnidium monnieri Cusson. Breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers and the leading cause of death in women. Recent studies have shown that Osthole has anti-tumor activity. However, the effects of Osthole on the migration and invasion of cancer cells have not yet been reported. Here, we found that Osthole is effective in inhibiting the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells by wound healing and transwell assays. Luciferase and zymography assays revealed that Osthole effectively inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-2 promoter and enzyme activity, which might be one of the causes that lead to the inhibition of migration and invasion by Osthole. This is the first report on the inhibitory function of Osthole in migration and invasion in breast cancer cells. Our findings indicate a need for further evaluation of Osthole in breast cancer chemotherapy and chemoprevention. PMID:20622464

  4. The migration of human lens epithelial cells induced by UV-irradiation in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Yao; Guoxing Yuan; Yuan Liu; Yi Shen; Qin Jiang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is one of the important cataract risk factors. However, the pathogenesis is still poorly understood.The migration of human lens epithelial cells(HLECs) plays a crucial role in the remodeling of lens capsule and cataract formation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the mechanism of UV inducing cataractogenesis. Methods:The toxicity of UV-irradiation on HLECs was assessed by Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium(MTT) assay. The activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2(MMP-2) was observed by Gelatin zymography. The migration of HLECs was examined by Cell Track Motility. Results:UV-irradiation does great harm to HLECs, and may induce apoptosis in the cells when UV higher than 15 mj/cm2. UV significantly increased MMP-2 activity in a timedependent manner. In addition, the irradiation could induce the migration of HLECs. Conclusion:UV-irradiation could induce the migration of HLECs by increasing the activity of MMP-2.

  5. Rat monocyte-derived dendritic cells function and migrate in the same way as isolated tissue dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richters, C D; Mayen, I; Havenith, C E G; Beelen, R H J; Kamperdijk, E W A

    2002-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells and are therefore useful to induce immune responses against tumor cells in patients. DC can be generated in vitro from monocytes using GM-CSF and IL-4, the so-called monocyte-derived DC (MoDC). To achieve antitumor responses, MoDC must be able to migrate to the draining lymph nodes after injection to induce cytotoxic T cells. Therefore, we studied migration of MoDC in a rat model. Functional rat MoDC were generated from PVG-RT7B rats and injected subcutaneously into PVG rats. These rat strains differ only at one epitope of the leukocyte-common antigen, which can be recognized by the antibody His 41. The advantage is that migrated cells can be detected in the draining lymph nodes by staining sections with His 41+; thus, migration is not influenced by labeling procedures. Rat MoDC migrated to the T-cell areas of the draining lymph nodes, just as isolated Langerhans cells or spleen DC do. In contrast, monocytes also migrated to the B-cell areas and the medulla. PMID:11927643

  6. Timosaponin AIII inhibits melanoma cell migration by suppressing COX-2 and in vivo tumor metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Mo; Im, A-Rang; Kim, Seung Hyung; Hyun, Jin Won; Chae, Sungwook

    2016-02-01

    Melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin disease, due in large part to its propensity to metastasize. We examined the effects of timosaponin AIII, a compound isolated from Anemarrhena asphodeloides Bunge, on melanoma cancer cell migration and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects using B16-F10 and WM-115 melanoma cells lines. Overexpression of COX-2, its metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and PGE2 receptors (EP2 and EP4) promoted cell migration in vitro. Exposure to timosaponin AIII resulted in concentration-dependent inhibition of cell migration, which was associated with reduced levels of COX-2, PGE2, and PGE2 receptors. Transient transfection of COX-2 siRNA also inhibited cell migration. Exposure to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbal-13-acetate enhanced cell migration, whereas timosaponin AIII inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbal-13-acetate-induced cell migration and reduced basal levels of EP2 and EP4. Moreover, timosaponin AIII inhibited activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), an upstream regulator of COX-2 in B16-F10 cells. Consistent with our in vitro findings, in vivo studies showed that timosaponin AIII treatment significantly reduced the total number of metastatic nodules in the mouse lung and improved histological alterations in B16-F10-injected C57BL/6 mice. In addition, C57BL/6 mice treated with timosaponin AIII showed reduced expression of COX-2 and NF-κB in the lung. Together, these results indicate that timosaponin AIII has the capacity to inhibit melanoma cell migration, an essential step in the process of metastasis, by inhibiting expression of COX-2, NF-κB, PGE2, and PGE2 receptors.

  7. Mammary epithelial tubes elongate through MAPK-dependent coordination of cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Robert J; Neumann, Neil M; Ewald, Andrew J

    2016-03-15

    Mammary branching morphogenesis is regulated by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). We sought to determine how these RTK signals alter proliferation and migration to accomplish tube elongation in mouse. Both behaviors occur but it has been difficult to determine their relative contribution to elongation in vivo, as mammary adipocytes scatter light and limit the depth of optical imaging. Accordingly, we utilized 3D culture to study elongation in an experimentally accessible setting. We first used antibodies to localize RTK signals and discovered that phosphorylated ERK1/2 (pERK) was spatially enriched in cells near the front of elongating ducts, whereas phosphorylated AKT was ubiquitous. We next observed a gradient of cell migration speeds from rear to front of elongating ducts, with the front characterized by both high pERK and the fastest cells. Furthermore, cells within elongating ducts oriented both their protrusions and their migration in the direction of tube elongation. By contrast, cells within the organoid body were isotropically protrusive. We next tested the requirement for proliferation and migration. Early inhibition of proliferation blocked the creation of migratory cells, whereas late inhibition of proliferation did not block continued duct elongation. By contrast, pharmacological inhibition of either MEK or Rac1 signaling acutely blocked both cell migration and duct elongation. Finally, conditional induction of MEK activity was sufficient to induce collective cell migration and ductal elongation. Our data suggest a model for ductal elongation in which RTK-dependent proliferation creates motile cells with high pERK, the collective migration of which acutely requires both MEK and Rac1 signaling.

  8. Chemokine CXCL16 Expression Suppresses Migration and Invasiveness and Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeying Fang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Increasing evidence argues that soluble CXCL16 promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of cancer cells in vitro. However, the role of transmembrane or cellular CXCL16 in cancer remains relatively unknown. In this study, we determine the function of cellular CXCL16 as tumor suppressor in breast cancer cells. Methods. Expression of cellular CXCL16 in breast cancer cell lines was determined at both RNA and protein levels. In vitro and in vivo studies that overexpressed or downregulated CXCL16 were conducted in breast cancer cells. Results. We report differential expression of cellular CXCL16 in breast cancer cell lines that was negatively correlated with cell invasiveness and migration. Overexpression of CXCL16 in MDA-MB-231 cells led to a decrease in cell invasion and migration and induced apoptosis of the cells; downregulation of CXCL16 in MCF-7 cells increased cell migration and invasiveness. Consistent with the in vitro data, CXCL16 overexpression inhibited tumorigenesis in vivo. Conclusions. Cellular CXCL16 suppresses invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells in vitro and inhibits tumorigenesis in vivo. Targeting of cellular CXCL16 expression is a potential therapeutic strategy for breast cancer.

  9. Cell migration is another player of the minute virus of mice infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcin, Pierre O.; Panté, Nelly, E-mail: pante@zoology.ubc.ca

    2014-11-15

    The parvovirus minute virus of mice, prototype strain (MVMp), preferentially infects and kills cancer cells. This intrinsic MVMp oncotropism may depend in part on the early stages of MVMp infection. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the early events of MVMp infection in mouse LA9 fibroblasts and a highly invasive mouse mammary tumor cell line derived from polyomavirus middle T antigen-mediated transformation. Using a combination of fluorescence and electron microscopy, we found that various parameters of the cell migration process affect MVMp infection. We show that, after binding to the plasma membrane, MVMp particles rapidly cluster at the leading edge of migrating cells, which exhibit higher levels of MVMp uptake than non-motile cells. Moreover, promoting cell migration on a fibronectin matrix increased MVMp infection, and induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition allowed MVMp replication in non-permissive epithelial cells. Hence, we propose that cell migration influences the early stages of MVMp infection. - Highlights: • We document early steps of MVMp infection. • We report that a fibronectin matrix promotes MVMp infection. • We show that cellular migration plays a role in MVMp uptake. • We show that epithelial–mesenchymal transition allows MVMp replication.

  10. Cell migration is another player of the minute virus of mice infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parvovirus minute virus of mice, prototype strain (MVMp), preferentially infects and kills cancer cells. This intrinsic MVMp oncotropism may depend in part on the early stages of MVMp infection. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the early events of MVMp infection in mouse LA9 fibroblasts and a highly invasive mouse mammary tumor cell line derived from polyomavirus middle T antigen-mediated transformation. Using a combination of fluorescence and electron microscopy, we found that various parameters of the cell migration process affect MVMp infection. We show that, after binding to the plasma membrane, MVMp particles rapidly cluster at the leading edge of migrating cells, which exhibit higher levels of MVMp uptake than non-motile cells. Moreover, promoting cell migration on a fibronectin matrix increased MVMp infection, and induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition allowed MVMp replication in non-permissive epithelial cells. Hence, we propose that cell migration influences the early stages of MVMp infection. - Highlights: • We document early steps of MVMp infection. • We report that a fibronectin matrix promotes MVMp infection. • We show that cellular migration plays a role in MVMp uptake. • We show that epithelial–mesenchymal transition allows MVMp replication

  11. The SHIP2 interactor Myo1c is required for cell migration in 1321 N1 glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edimo, William's Elong; Ramos, Ana Raquel; Ghosh, Somadri; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Erneux, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    The phosphoinositide 5-phosphatases consist of several enzymes that have been shown to modulate cell migration and invasion. SHIP2, one family member, is known to interact with growth factor receptors and cytoskeletal proteins. In a human model of glioblastoma 1321 N1 cells, we recently identified Myo1c as a new interactor of SHIP2. This was shown in a complex of proteins also containing filamin A. We show here that SHIP2 localization at lamellipodia and ruffles is impaired in Myo1c depleted cells. In the absence of Myo1c, N1 cells tend to associate to form clusters. Cell migration is very much reduced in Myo1c depleted cells, concomitantly with a decrease in FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation, focal adhesion length and PI(4,5)P2 immunostaining. In N1 cells, Myo1c is thus important for lamellipodia formation to assemble a protein complex containing SHIP2 to facilitate cell migration. PMID:27246739

  12. Novel migrating mouse neural crest cell assay system utilizing P0-Cre/EGFP fluorescent time-lapse imaging

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    Kawakami Minoru

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural crest cells (NCCs are embryonic, multipotent stem cells. Their long-range and precision-guided migration is one of their most striking characteristics. We previously reported that P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-lacZ double-transgenic mice showed significant lacZ expression in tissues derived from NCCs. Results In this study, by embedding a P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-EGFP embryo at E9.5 in collagen gel inside a culture glass slide, we were able to keep the embryo developing ex vivo for more than 24 hours; this development was with enough NCC fluorescent signal intensity to enable single-cell resolution analysis, with the accompanying NCC migration potential intact and with the appropriate NCC response to the extracellular signal maintained. By implantation of beads with absorbed platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA, we demonstrated that PDGF-AA acts as an NCC-attractant in embryos. We also performed assays with NCCs isolated from P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-EGFP embryos on culture plates. The neuromediator 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT has been known to regulate NCC migration. We newly demonstrated that dopamine, in addition to 5-HT, stimulated NCC migration in vitro. Two NCC populations, with different axial levels of origins, showed unique distribution patterns regarding migration velocity and different dose-response patterns to both 5-HT and dopamine. Conclusions Although avian species predominated over the other species in the NCC study, our novel system should enable us to use mice to assay many different aspects of NCCs in embryos or on culture plates, such as migration, division, differentiation, and apoptosis.

  13. miR-148b-3p promotes migration of Schwann cells by targeting cullin-associated and neddylation-dissociated 1

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    Qian, Tian-mei; Zhao, Li-li; Wang, Jing; Li, Ping; Qin, Jing; Liu, Yi-sheng; Yu, Bin; Ding, Fei; Gu, Xiao-song; Zhou, Song-lin

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively adjust gene expression in multifarious biological processes. However, the regulatory effects of miRNAs on Schwann cells remain poorly understood. Previous microarray analysis results have shown that miRNA expression is altered following sciatic nerve transaction, thereby affecting proliferation and migration of Schwann cells. This study investigated whether miR-148b-3p could regulate migration of Schwann cells by directly targeting cullin-associated and neddylation-dissociated 1 (Cand1). Up-regulated expression of miR-148b-3p promoted Schwann cell migration, whereas silencing of miR-148b-3p inhibited Schwann cell migration in vitro. Further experiments confirmed that Cand1 was a direct target of miR-148b-3p, and Cand1 knockdown reversed suppression of the miR-148b-3p inhibitor on Schwann cell migration. These results suggested that miR-148b-3p promoted migration of Schwann cells by directly targeting Cand1 in vitro.

  14. MicroRNA-145 is downregulated in glial tumors and regulates glioma cell migration by targeting connective tissue growth factor.

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    Hae Kyung Lee

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas (GBM, the most common and aggressive type of malignant glioma, are characterized by increased invasion into the surrounding brain tissues. Despite intensive therapeutic strategies, the median survival of GBM patients has remained dismal over the last decades. In this study we examined the expression of miR-145 in glial tumors and its function in glioma cells. Using TCGA analysis and real-time PCR we found that the expression of miR-145/143 cluster was downregulated in astrocytic tumors compared to normal brain specimens and in glioma cells and glioma stem cells (GSCs compared to normal astrocytes and neural stem cells. Moreover, the low expression of both miR-145 and miR-143 in GBM was correlated with poor patient prognosis. Transfection of glioma cells with miR-145 mimic or transduction with a lentivirus vector expressing pre-miR 145 significantly decreased the migration and invasion of glioma cells. We identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF as a novel target of miR-145 in glioma cells; transfection of the cells with this miRNA decreased the expression of CTGF as determined by Western blot analysis and the expression of its 3'-UTR fused to luciferase. Overexpression of a CTGF plasmid lacking the 3'-UTR and administration of recombinant CTGF protein abrogated the inhibitory effect of miR-145 on glioma cell migration. Similarly, we found that silencing of CTGF decreased the migration of glioma cells. CTGF silencing also decreased the expression of SPARC, phospho-FAK and FAK and overexpression of SPARC abrogated the inhibitory effect of CTGF silencing on cell migration. These results demonstrate that miR-145 is downregulated in glial tumors and its low expression in GBM predicts poor patient prognosis. In addition miR-145 regulates glioma cell migration by targeting CTGF which downregulates SPARC expression. Therefore, miR-145 is an attractive therapeutic target for anti-invasive treatment of astrocytic tumors.

  15. Expression of S1P metabolizing enzymes and receptors correlate with survival time and regulate cell migration in glioblastoma multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien-Möller, Sandra; Lange, Sandra; Holm, Tobias; Böhm, Andreas; Paland, Heiko; Küpper, Johannes; Herzog, Susann; Weitmann, Kerstin; Havemann, Christoph; Vogelgesang, Silke; Marx, Sascha; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Schroeder, Henry W.S.; Rauch, Bernhard H.

    2016-01-01

    A signaling molecule which is involved in proliferation and migration of malignant cells is the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). There are hints for a potential role of S1P signaling in malignant brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) which is characterized by a poor prognosis. Therefore, a comprehensive expression analysis of S1P receptors (S1P1-S1P5) and S1P metabolizing enzymes in human GBM (n = 117) compared to healthy brain (n = 10) was performed to evaluate their role for patient's survival. Furthermore, influence of S1P receptor inhibition on proliferation and migration were studied in LN18 GBM cells. Compared to control brain, mRNA levels of S1P1, S1P2, S1P3 and S1P generating sphingosine kinase-1 were elevated in GBM. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated an association between S1P1 and S1P2 with patient's survival times. In vitro, an inhibitory effect of the SphK inhibitor SKI-II on viability of LN18 cells was shown. S1P itself had no effect on viability but stimulated LN18 migration which was blocked by inhibition of S1P1 and S1P2. The participation of S1P1 and S1P2 in LN18 migration was further supported by siRNA-mediated silencing of these receptors. Immunoblots and inhibition experiments suggest an involvement of the PI3-kinase/AKT1 pathway in the chemotactic effect of S1P in LN18 cells. In summary, our data argue for a role of S1P signaling in proliferation and migration of GBM cells. Individual components of the S1P pathway represent prognostic factors for patients with GBM. Perspectively, a selective modulation of S1P receptor subtypes could represent a therapeutic approach for GBM patients and requires further evaluation. PMID:26887055

  16. Directed Migration of Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Cells toward Airway Branches Organizes the Stereotypic Location of Neuroepithelial Bodies

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    Masafumi Noguchi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The airway epithelium consists of diverse cell types, including neuroendocrine (NE cells. These cells are thought to function as chemoreceptors and as a component of the stem cell niche as well as the cells of origin in small-cell lung cancer. NE cells often localize at bifurcation points of airway tubes, forming small clusters called neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs. To investigate NEB development, we established methods for 3D mapping and ex vivo 4D imaging of developing lungs. We found that NEBs localize at stereotypic positions in the bifurcation area irrespective of variations in size. Notch-Hes1 signaling contributes to the differentiation of solitary NE cells, regulating their number but not localization. Live imaging revealed that individual NE cells migrate distally to and cluster at bifurcation points, driving NEB formation. We propose that NEB development is a multistep process involving differentiation of individual NE cells and their directional migration to organize NEBs.

  17. Inhibition of Pim-1 attenuates the proliferation and migration in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Jie; Qi-Yi He; Bo-Tao Luo; Shao-Jiang Zheng; Yue-Qiong Kong; Han-Guo Jiang; Ru-Jia Li; Jun-Li Guo; Zhi-Hua Shen

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To explore the role of proto-oncogenePim-1 in the proliferation and migration of nasopharyngeal carcinoma(NPC) cells.Methods:Pim-1 expressions inNPC cell lines CNE1,CNE1-GL,CNE-2Z andC666-1 were examined byRT-PCR, western blotting and immunoflucesence, respectively.AfterCNE1,CNE1-GL andC666-1 cells were treated with different concentrations ofPim-1 special inhibitor, quercetagetin, the cell viability, colony formation rate and migration ability were analyzed.Results:Pim-1 expression was negative in well-differentiatedCNE1 cells, whereas expressed weakly positive in poor-differentiated CNE-2Z cells and strongly positive in undifferentiatedC666-1 cells.Interestingly,CNE1-GL cells that derived fromCNE1 transfected with anEpsteinBarr virus latent membrane protein-1 over-expression plasmid displayed stronger expression ofPim-1.Treatment ofCNE1-GL and C666-1 cells with quercetagetin significantly decreased the cell viability, colony formation rate and migration ability but not theCNE1 cells.Conclusions:These findings suggest thatPim-1 overexpression contributes toNPC proliferation and migration, and targetingPim-1 may be a potential treatment for anti-Pim-1-expressedNPCs.

  18. Over-expression of LSD1 promotes proliferation, migration and invasion in non-small cell lung cancer.

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    Tangfeng Lv

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1 has been identified and biochemically characterized in epigenetics, but the pathological roles of its dysfunction in lung cancer remain to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of LSD1 expression in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and to define its exact role in lung cancer proliferation, migration and invasion. METHODS: The protein levels of LSD1 in surgically resected samples from NSCLC patients were detected by immunohistochemistry or Western blotting. The mRNA levels of LSD1 were detected by qRT-PCR. The correlation of LSD1 expression with clinical characteristics and prognosis was determined by statistical analysis. Cell proliferation rate was assessed by MTS assay and immunofluorescence. Cell migration and invasion were detected by scratch test, matrigel assay and transwell invasion assay. RESULTS: LSD1 expression was higher in lung cancer tissue more than in normal lung tissue. Our results showed that over-expression of LSD1 protein were associated with shorter overall survival of NSCLC patients. LSD1 was localized mainly to the cancer cell nucleus. Interruption of LSD1 using siRNA or a chemical inhibitor, pargyline, suppressed proliferation, migration and invasion of A549, H460 and 293T cells. Meanwhile, over-expression of LSD1 enhanced cell growth. Finally, LSD1 was shown to regulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in lung cancer cells. CONCLUSIONS: Over-expression of LSD1 was associated with poor prognosis in NSCLC, and promoted tumor cell proliferation, migration and invasion. These results suggest that LSD1 is a tumor-promoting factor with promising therapeutic potential for NSCLC.

  19. Effect of γ-ray irradiation on migration of pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells and its mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effect of radiation on the migration of the pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell line, A549, and the mechanism involved in this process. Methods: Migration of A549 cells irradiated with 2 and 4 Gy doses of γ-ray was detected using wound healing assay. The level of STAT3 and phosphorylated STAT3 was detected by Western blot. The distribution of p-STAT3 (Y705) in A549 cells was examined by immunofluorescence staining. Finally, the secretion of IL-6 by cultured A549 cells was detected by ELISA. Results: The migration of A549 cells was significantly enhanced by γ-ray radiation at dose levels of either 2 or 4 Gy. Furthermore, radiation was found to activate the phosphorylation of STAT3 and promote the nucleus localization of STAT3. The result of ELISA showed that the secretion of IL-6 increased after 2 or 4 Gy doses of γ-ray. AG490, a special inhibitor of JAK-2, suppressed the radiation-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 and migration of A549 cells. Conclusion: Our results indicated that radiation results in the activation of JAK-2/STAT3 pathway, which triggers the migration of A549 cells. It is possible that the IL-6 is involved in the radiation-induced activation of JAK-2/STAT3 pathway. (authors)

  20. Independent regulation of tumor cell migration by matrix stiffness and confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Amit; Kumar, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Tumor invasion and metastasis are strongly regulated by biophysical interactions between tumor cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). While the influence of ECM stiffness on cell migration, adhesion, and contractility has been extensively studied in 2D culture, extension of this concept to 3D cultures that more closely resemble tissue has proven challenging, because perturbations that change matrix stiffness often concurrently change cellular confinement. This coupling is particularly problematic given that matrix-imposed steric barriers can regulate invasion speed independent of mechanics. Here we introduce a matrix platform based on microfabrication of channels of defined wall stiffness and geometry that allows independent variation of ECM stiffness and channel width. For a given ECM stiffness, cells confined to narrow channels surprisingly migrate faster than cells in wide channels or on unconstrained 2D surfaces, which we attribute to increased polarization of cell-ECM traction forces. Confinement also enables cells to migrate increasingly rapidly as ECM stiffness rises, in contrast with the biphasic relationship observed on unconfined ECMs. Inhibition of nonmuscle myosin II dissipates this traction polarization and renders the relationship between migration speed and ECM stiffness comparatively insensitive to matrix confinement. We test these hypotheses in silico by devising a multiscale mathematical model that relates cellular force generation to ECM stiffness and geometry, which we show is capable of recapitulating key experimental trends. These studies represent a paradigm for investigating matrix regulation of invasion and demonstrate that matrix confinement alters the relationship between cell migration speed and ECM stiffness. PMID:22689955

  1. The Migration of Cancer Cells in Gradually Varying Chemical Gradients and Mechanical Constraints

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    Smitha M. N. Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel approach to study cell migration under physical stresses by utilizing established growth factor chemotaxis. This was achieved by studying cell migration in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF chemoattraction in a gradually tapered space, imposing mechanical stresses. The device consisted of two 5-mm-diameter chambers connected by ten 600 µm-long and 10 µm-high tapered microchannels. The taper region gradually changes the width of the channel. The channels tapered from 20 µm to 5 µm over a transition length of 50 µm at a distance of 250 µm from one of the chambers. The chemoattractant drove cell migration into the narrow confines of the tapered channels, while the mechanical gradient clearly altered the migration of cells. Cells traversing the channels from the wider to narrow-end and vice versa were observed using time-lapsed imaging. Our results indicated that the impact of physical stress on cell migration patterns may be cell type specific.

  2. Predicted molecular signaling guiding photoreceptor cell migration following transplantation into damaged retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unachukwu, Uchenna John; Warren, Alice; Li, Ze; Mishra, Shawn; Zhou, Jing; Sauane, Moira; Lim, Hyungsik; Vazquez, Maribel; Redenti, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    To replace photoreceptors lost to disease or trauma and restore vision, laboratories around the world are investigating photoreceptor replacement strategies using subretinal transplantation of photoreceptor precursor cells (PPCs) and retinal progenitor cells (RPCs). Significant obstacles to advancement of photoreceptor cell-replacement include low migration rates of transplanted cells into host retina and an absence of data describing chemotactic signaling guiding migration of transplanted cells in the damaged retinal microenvironment. To elucidate chemotactic signaling guiding transplanted cell migration, bioinformatics modeling of PPC transplantation into light-damaged retina was performed. The bioinformatics modeling analyzed whole-genome expression data and matched PPC chemotactic cell-surface receptors to cognate ligands expressed in the light-damaged retinal microenvironment. A library of significantly predicted chemotactic ligand-receptor pairs, as well as downstream signaling networks was generated. PPC and RPC migration in microfluidic ligand gradients were analyzed using a highly predicted ligand-receptor pair, SDF-1α - CXCR4, and both PPCs and RPCs exhibited significant chemotaxis. This work present a systems level model and begins to elucidate molecular mechanisms involved in PPC and RPC migration within the damaged retinal microenvironment.

  3. Predicted molecular signaling guiding photoreceptor cell migration following transplantation into damaged retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unachukwu, Uchenna John; Warren, Alice; Li, Ze; Mishra, Shawn; Zhou, Jing; Sauane, Moira; Lim, Hyungsik; Vazquez, Maribel; Redenti, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    To replace photoreceptors lost to disease or trauma and restore vision, laboratories around the world are investigating photoreceptor replacement strategies using subretinal transplantation of photoreceptor precursor cells (PPCs) and retinal progenitor cells (RPCs). Significant obstacles to advancement of photoreceptor cell-replacement include low migration rates of transplanted cells into host retina and an absence of data describing chemotactic signaling guiding migration of transplanted cells in the damaged retinal microenvironment. To elucidate chemotactic signaling guiding transplanted cell migration, bioinformatics modeling of PPC transplantation into light-damaged retina was performed. The bioinformatics modeling analyzed whole-genome expression data and matched PPC chemotactic cell-surface receptors to cognate ligands expressed in the light-damaged retinal microenvironment. A library of significantly predicted chemotactic ligand-receptor pairs, as well as downstream signaling networks was generated. PPC and RPC migration in microfluidic ligand gradients were analyzed using a highly predicted ligand-receptor pair, SDF-1α - CXCR4, and both PPCs and RPCs exhibited significant chemotaxis. This work present a systems level model and begins to elucidate molecular mechanisms involved in PPC and RPC migration within the damaged retinal microenvironment. PMID:26935401

  4. Berberine suppresses migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through down-regulation of chemokine receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Naghmeh Ahmadiankia; Hamid Kalalian Moghaddam; Mohammad Amir Mishan; Ahmad Reza Bahrami; Hojjat Naderi-Meshkin; Hamid Reza Bidkhori; Maryam Moghaddam; Seyed Jamal Aldin Mirfeyzi

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Berberine is one of the main alkaloids and it has been proven to have different pharmacological effects including inhibition of cell cycle and progression of apoptosis in various cancerous cells; however, its effects on cancer metastasis are not well known. Cancer cells obtain the ability to change their chemokine system and convert into metastatic cells. In this study, we examined the effect of berberine on breast cancer cell migration and its probable interaction with the chem...

  5. The Role of Lipid Rafts in Cancer Cell Adhesion and Migration

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    Toshiyuki Murai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid rafts are cholesterol-enriched microdomains of the cell membrane and possess a highly dynamic nature. They have been involved in various cellular functions including the regulation of cell adhesion and membrane signaling through proteins within lipid rafts. The dynamic features of the cancer cell surface may modulate the malignant phenotype of cancer, including adhesion disorders and aggressive phenotypes of migration and invasion. Recently, it was demonstrated that lipid rafts play critical roles in cancer cell adhesion and migration. This article summarizes the important roles of lipid rafts in cancer cell adhesion and migration, with a focus on the current state of knowledge. This article will improve the understanding of cancer progression and lead to the development of novel targets for cancer therapy.

  6. Targeting cell migration and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response with calmodulin antagonists: a clinically tested small molecule phenocopy of SEC62 gene silencing in human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor cells benefit from their ability to avoid apoptosis and invade other tissues. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein Sec62 is a key player in these processes. Sec62 is essential for cell migration and protects tumor cells against thapsigargin-induced ER stress, which are both linked to cytosolic Ca2+. SEC62 silencing leads to elevated cytosolic Ca2+ and increased ER Ca2+ leakage after thapsigargin treatment. Sec62 protein levels are significantly increased in different tumors, including prostate, lung and thyroid cancer. In lung cancer, the influence of Sec62 protein levels on patient survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. To elucidate the underlying pathophysiological functions of Sec62, Ca2+ imaging techniques, real-time cell analysis and cell migration assays were performed. The effects of treatment with the calmodulin antagonists, trifluoperazine (TFP) and ophiobolin A, on cellular Ca2+ homeostasis, cell growth and cell migration were compared with the effects of siRNA-mediated Sec62 depletion or the expression of a mutated SEC62 variant in vitro. Using Biacore analysis we examined the Ca2+-sensitive interaction of Sec62 with the Sec61 complex. Sec62 overproduction significantly correlated with reduced patient survival. Therefore, Sec62 is not only a predictive marker for this type of tumor, but also an interesting therapeutic target. The present study suggests a regulatory function for Sec62 in the major Ca2+ leakage channel in the ER, Sec61, by a direct and Ca2+-sensitive interaction. A Ca2+-binding motif in Sec62 is essential for its molecular function. Treatment of cells with calmodulin antagonists mimicked Sec62 depletion by inhibiting cell migration and rendering the cells sensitive to thapsigargin treatment. Targeting tumors that overproduce Sec62 with calmodulin antagonists in combination with targeted thapsigargin analogues may offer novel personalized therapeutic options

  7. Hypoxia impairs primordial germ cell migration in zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos.

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    Kwok Hong Lo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As a global environmental concern, hypoxia is known to be associated with many biological and physiological impairments in aquatic ecosystems. Previous studies have mainly focused on the effect of hypoxia in adult animals. However, the effect of hypoxia and the underlying mechanism of how hypoxia affects embryonic development of aquatic animals remain unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the current study, the effect of hypoxia on primordial germ cell (PGC migration in zebrafish embryos was investigated. Hypoxic embryos showed PGC migration defect as indicated by the presence of mis-migrated ectopic PGCs. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF signaling is required for embryonic germ line development. Using real-time PCR, we found that the mRNA expression levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP-1, an inhibitor of IGF bioactivity, were significantly increased in hypoxic embryos. Morpholino knockdown of IGFBP-1 rescued the PGC migration defect phenotype in hypoxic embryos, suggesting the role of IGFBP-1 in inducing PGC mis-migration. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides novel evidence that hypoxia disrupts PGC migration during embryonic development in fish. IGF signaling is shown to be one of the possible mechanisms for the causal link between hypoxia and PGC migration. We propose that hypoxia causes PGC migration defect by inhibiting IGF signaling through the induction of IGFBP-1.

  8. A novel role for MuSK and non-canonical Wnt signaling during segmental neural crest cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Santanu; Gordon, Laura; Donn, Thomas M; Berti, Caterina; Moens, Cecilia B; Burden, Steven J; Granato, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Trunk neural crest cells delaminate from the dorsal neural tube as an uninterrupted sheet; however, they convert into segmentally organized streams before migrating through the somitic territory. These neural crest cell streams join the segmental trajectories of pathfinding spinal motor axons, suggesting that interactions between these two cell types might be important for neural crest cell migration. Here, we show that in the zebrafish embryo migration of both neural crest cells and motor axons is temporally synchronized and spatially restricted to the center of the somite, but that motor axons are dispensable for segmental neural crest cell migration. Instead, we find that muscle-specific receptor kinase (MuSK) and its putative ligand Wnt11r are crucial for restricting neural crest cell migration to the center of each somite. Moreover, we find that blocking planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling in somitic muscle cells also results in non-segmental neural crest cell migration. Using an F-actin biosensor we show that in the absence of MuSK neural crest cells fail to retract non-productive leading edges, resulting in non-segmental migration. Finally, we show that MuSK knockout mice display similar neural crest cell migration defects, suggesting a novel, evolutionarily conserved role for MuSK in neural crest migration. We propose that a Wnt11r-MuSK dependent, PCP-like pathway restricts neural crest cells to their segmental path.

  9. The Wnt pathway controls cell death engulfment, spindle orientation, and migration through CED-10/Rac.

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    Juan Cabello

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Wnt signalling pathways have extremely diverse functions in animals, including induction of cell fates or tumours, guidance of cell movements during gastrulation, and the induction of cell polarity. Wnt can induce polar changes in cellular morphology by a remodelling of the cytoskeleton. However, how activation of the Frizzled receptor induces cytoskeleton rearrangement is not well understood. We show, by an in depth 4-D microscopy analysis, that the Caenorhabditis elegans Wnt pathway signals to CED-10/Rac via two separate branches to regulate modulation of the cytoskeleton in different cellular situations. Apoptotic cell clearance and migration of the distal tip cell require the MOM-5/Fz receptor, GSK-3 kinase, and APC/APR-1, which activate the CED-2/5/12 branch of the engulfment machinery. MOM-5 (Frizzled thus can function as an engulfment receptor in C. elegans. Our epistatic analyses also suggest that the two partially redundant signalling pathways defined earlier for engulfment may act in a single pathway in early embryos. By contrast, rearrangement of mitotic spindles requires the MOM-5/Fz receptor, GSK-3 kinase, and beta-catenins, but not the downstream factors LIT-1/NLK or POP-1/Tcf. Taken together, our results indicate that in multiple developmental processes, CED-10/Rac can link polar signals mediated by the Wnt pathway to rearrangements of the cytoskeleton.

  10. Tumor suppressive microRNA-218 inhibits cancer cell migration and invasion through targeting laminin-332 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Takashi; Hanazawa, Toyoyuki; Nohata, Nijiro; Kikkawa, Naoko; Enokida, Hideki; Yoshino, Hirofumi; Yamasaki, Takeshi; Hidaka, Hideo; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Seki, Naohiko

    2012-11-01

    Recent our microRNA (miRNA) expression signature revealed that expression of microRNA-218 (miR-218) was reduced in cancer tissues, suggesting a candidate of tumor suppressor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the functional significance of miR-218 and its mediated moleculer pathways in HNSCC. Restoration of miR-218 in cancer cells led to significant inhibition of cell migration and invasion activities in HNSCC cell lines (FaDu and SAS). Genome-wide gene expression analysis of miR-218 transfectants and in silico database analysis showed that focal adhesion pathway was a promising candidate of miR-218 target pathways. The laminins are an important and biologically active part of the basal lamina, the function of that are various such as influencing cell differentiation, migration and adhesion as well as proliferation and cell survival. Interestingly, all components of laminin-332 (LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2) are listed on the candidate genes in focal adhesion pathway. Furthermore, we focused on LAMB3 which has a miR-218 target site and gene expression studies and luciferase reporter assays showed that LAMB3 was directly regulated by miR-218. Silencing study of LAMB3 demonstrated significant inhibition of cell migration and invasion. In clinical specimens with HNSCC, the expression levels of laminin-332 were significantly upregulated in cancer tissues compared to adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Our analysis data showed that tumor suppressive miR-218 contributes to cancer cell migration and invasion through regulating focal adhesion pathway, especially laminin-332. Tumor suppressive miRNA-mediated novel cancer pathways provide new insights into the potential mechanisms of HNSCC oncogenesis. PMID:23159910

  11. Silencing of SOX12 by shRNA suppresses migration, invasion and proliferation of breast cancer cells

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    Ding, Hanzhi; Quan, Hong; Yan, Weiguo; Han, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Sex determining region Y-box protein 12 (SOX12) is essential for embryonic development and cell-fate determination. The role of SOX12 in tumorigenesis of breast cancer is not well-understood. Here, we found that SOX12 mRNA expression was up-regulated in human breast cancer tissues. To clarify the roles of SOX12 in breast cancer, we used lentiviral shRNAs to suppress its expression in two breast cancer cells with relatively higher expression of SOX12 (BT474 and MCF-7). Our findings strongly suggested that SOX12 was critical for cell migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. We found that silencing of SOX12 significantly decreased the mRNA and protein levels of MMP9 and Twist, while notably increased E-cadherin. Moreover, SOX12 knockdown significantly inhibited the proliferation of breast cancer cells in vitro and the growth of xenograft tumours in vivo. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that breast cancer cells with SOX12 knockdown showed cell cycle arrest and decreased mRNA and protein levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), CDK2 and Cyclin D1. Taken together, SOX12 plays an important role in growth inhibition through cell-cycle arrest, as well as migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. PMID:27582508

  12. Cell migration is regulated by AGE-RAGE interaction in human oral cancer cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Yao Ko

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end products (AGEs are produced in an irreversible non-enzymatic reaction of carbohydrates and proteins. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM are known to have elevated AGE levels, which is viewed as a risk factor of diabetes-related complications. In a clinical setting, it has been shown that patients with oral cancer in conjunction with DM have a higher likelihood of cancer metastasis and lower cancer survival rates. AGE-RAGE (a receptor of AGEs is also correlated with metastasis and angiogenesis. Recent studies have suggested that the malignancy of cancer may be enhanced by glyceraldehyde-derived AGEs; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study examined the apparently close correlation between AGE-RAGE and the malignancy of SAS oral cancer cell line. In this study, AGEs increased ERK phosphorylation, enhanced cell migration, and promoted the expression of RAGE, MMP2, and MMP9. Using PD98059, RAGE antibody, and RAGE RNAi to block RAGE pathway resulted in the inhibition of ERK phosphorylation. Cell migration, MMP2 and MMP9 expression were also reduced by this treatment. Our findings demonstrate the importance of AGE-RAGE with regard to the malignancy of oral cancer, and help to explain the poor prognosis of DM subjects with oral cancer.

  13. Role of B7-H4 siRNA in Proliferation, Migration, and Invasion of LOVO Colorectal Carcinoma Cell Line

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    Hai-xia Peng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies. Recent studies investigated that B7-H4 is highly expressed in various cancers. We aimed at exploring the effect of B7-H4 siRNA on proliferation, invasion, and migration of LOVO cells which expressed B7-H4 notably. Design and Methods. Colon adenocarcinoma dataset was downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas. 35 colorectal cancer patients admitted to Shanghai Tongren Hospital were enrolled in this study. Cell proliferation and cell cycle distribution were identified by CCK8 and flow cytometry, respectively. Transwell assay was performed to detect the invasion and migration of LOVO cells. CXCL12/CXCR4 expression and JAK2/STAT3 phosphorylation were determined by real-time PCR and western blot. Results. B7-H4 expressed is elevated in colorectal cancer tissues than in the adjacent normal tissues. B7-H4 siRNA effectively inhibited the proliferation at 24 h and 48 h, arrested cell cycle at G0/G1, and suppressed cell invasion and migration. Gene set enrichment analysis showed that CXCL12/CXCR4 and JAK/STAT were correlative with the B7-H4 expression. Additionally, CXCL12/CXCR4 expression and JAK2/STAT3 phosphorylation were reduced. Conclusions. B7-H4 siRNA can effectively inhibit proliferation, invasion, and migration of LOVO cells by targeting CXCL12/CXCR4 and JAK2/STAT3 signaling, which can serve as a new target for colorectal carcinoma treatment.

  14. MiR-519d-3p suppresses invasion and migration of trophoblast cells via targeting MMP-2.

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    Jie Ding

    Full Text Available Our study was approved by the Medical Ethics Committee of Tang Du Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University and complied strictly with national ethical guidelines. Preeclampsia (PE is a specific clinical disorder characterized by gestational hypertension and proteinuria and is a leading cause of maternal and perinatal mortality worldwide. The miR-519d-3p is upregulated in the maternal plasma of patients with PE which indicates a possible association between this microRNA and the pathogenesis of PE. No studies to date have addressed the effect of miR-519d-3p on the invasion and migration of trophoblast cells. In our study, we found that miR-519d-3p expression was elevated in placental samples from patients with PE. In vitro, overexpression of miR-519d-3p significantly inhibited trophoblast cell migration and invasion, whereas transfection of a miR-519d-3p inhibitor enhanced trophoblast cell migration and invasion. Luciferase assays confirmed that matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 is a direct target of miR-519d-3p. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blot assays showed that overexpression of miR-519d-3p downregulated MMP-2 mRNA and protein expression. Knockdown of MMP-2 using a siRNA attenuated the increased trophoblast migration and invasion promoted by the miR-519d-3p inhibitor. In placentas from patients with PE or normal pregnancies, a negative correlation between the expression of MMP-2 and miR-519d-3p was observed using the Pearson correlation and linear regression analysis. Our present findings suggest that upregulation of miR-519d-3p may contribute to the development of PE by inhibiting trophoblast cell migration and invasion via targeting MMP-2; miR-519d-3p may represent a potential predictive and therapeutic target for PE.

  15. Factors affecting directional migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to the injured spinal cord

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Peng; Pan, Su; Cheng, Jieping; Yang, Maoguang; Qi, Zhiping; Hou, Tingting; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 1B plays an important role in axon guidance and neuronal migration. In the present study, we sought to discover the mechanisms underlying microtubule-associated protein 1B mediation of axon guidance and neuronal migration. We exposed bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to okadaic acid or N-acetyl-D-erythro-sphingosine (an inhibitor and stimulator, respectively, of protein phosphatase 2A) for 24 hours. The expression of the phosphorylated form of type I microtubul...

  16. Sox10 controls migration of B16F10 melanoma cells through multiple regulatory target genes.

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    Ikjoo Seong

    Full Text Available It is believed that the inherent differentiation program of melanocytes during embryogenesis predisposes melanoma cells to high frequency of metastasis. Sox10, a transcription factor expressed in neural crest stem cells and a subset of progeny lineages, plays a key role in the development of melanocytes. We show that B16F10 melanoma cells transfected with siRNAs specific for Sox10 display reduced migratory activity which in turn indicated that a subset of transcriptional regulatory target genes of Sox10 is likely to be involved in migration and metastasis of melanoma cells. We carried out a microarray-based gene expression profiling using a Sox10-specific siRNA to identify relevant regulatory targets and found that multiple genes including melanocortin-1 receptor (Mc1r partake in the regulation of migration. We provide evidences that the effect of Sox10 on migration is mediated in large part by Mitf, a transcription factor downstream to Sox10. Among the mouse melanoma cell lines examined, however, only B16F10 showed robust down-regulation of Sox10 and inhibition of cell migration indicating that further dissection of dosage effects and/or cell line-specific regulatory networks is necessary. The involvement of Mc1r in migration was studied in detail in vivo using a murine metastasis model. Specifically, B16F10 melanoma cells treated with a specific siRNA showed reduced tendency in metastasizing to and colonizing the lung after being injected in the tail vein. These data reveal a cadre of novel regulators and mediators involved in migration and metastasis of melanoma cells that represents potential targets of therapeutic intervention.

  17. Annexin A6 and Late Endosomal Cholesterol Modulate Integrin Recycling and Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Melero, Ana; Reverter, Meritxell; Hoque, Monira; Meneses-Salas, Elsa; Koese, Meryem; Conway, James R W; Johnsen, Camilla H; Alvarez-Guaita, Anna; Morales-Paytuvi, Frederic; Elmaghrabi, Yasmin A; Pol, Albert; Tebar, Francesc; Murray, Rachael Z; Timpson, Paul; Enrich, Carlos; Grewal, Thomas; Rentero, Carles

    2016-01-15

    Annexins are a family of proteins that bind to phospholipids in a calcium-dependent manner. Earlier studies implicated annexin A6 (AnxA6) to inhibit secretion and participate in the organization of the extracellular matrix. We recently showed that elevated AnxA6 levels significantly reduced secretion of the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin (FN). Because FN is directly linked to the ability of cells to migrate, this prompted us to investigate the role of AnxA6 in cell migration. Up-regulation of AnxA6 in several cell models was associated with reduced cell migration in wound healing, individual cell tracking and three-dimensional migration/invasion assays. The reduced ability of AnxA6-expressing cells to migrate was associated with decreased cell surface expression of αVβ3 and α5β1 integrins, both FN receptors. Mechanistically, we found that elevated AnxA6 levels interfered with syntaxin-6 (Stx6)-dependent recycling of integrins to the cell surface. AnxA6 overexpression caused mislocalization and accumulation of Stx6 and integrins in recycling endosomes, whereas siRNA-mediated AnxA6 knockdown did not modify the trafficking of integrins. Given our recent findings that inhibition of cholesterol export from late endosomes (LEs) inhibits Stx6-dependent integrin recycling and that elevated AnxA6 levels cause LE cholesterol accumulation, we propose that AnxA6 and blockage of LE cholesterol transport are critical for endosomal function required for Stx6-mediated recycling of integrins in cell migration.

  18. Advanced Glycation End-Products Enhance Lung Cancer Cell Invasion and Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Te-Chun; Yin, Mei-Chin; Mong, Mei-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Effects of carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pentosidine, two advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), upon invasion and migration in A549 and Calu-6 cells, two non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines were examined. CML or pentosidine at 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 μmol/L were added into cells. Proliferation, invasion and migration were measured. CML or pentosidine at 4–16 μmol/L promoted invasion and migration in both cell lines, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and transforming growth factor-β1. CML or pentosidine at 2–16 μmol/L up-regulated the protein expression of AGE receptor, p47phox, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and fibronectin in test NSCLC cells. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 protein expression in A549 and Calu-6 cells was increased by CML or pentosidine at 4–16 μmol/L. These two AGEs at 2–16 μmol/L enhanced nuclear factor κ-B (NF-κ B) p65 protein expression and p38 phosphorylation in A549 cells. However, CML or pentosidine at 4–16 μmol/L up-regulated NF-κB p65 and p-p38 protein expression in Calu-6 cells. These findings suggest that CML and pentosidine, by promoting the invasion, migration and production of associated factors, benefit NSCLC metastasis. PMID:27517907

  19. TRPM7 is required for ovarian cancer cell growth, migration and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Liao, Qian-jin [The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Zhang, Yi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China); Zhou, Hui; Luo, Chen-hui; Tang, Jie; Wang, Ying; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Min; Zhao, Xue-heng [The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Zhang, Qiong-yu [Department of Basic Medical Science, Yongzhou Vocational Technical College, Yong Zhou 425100 (China); Xiao, Ling, E-mail: lingxiaocsu@126.com [Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Central South University, Changsha 410013 (China); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Changsha 410018 (China)

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Silence of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cells inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Silence of TRPM7 decreases phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 in ovarian cancer cells. • Silence of TRPM7 increases expression of filamentous actin and number of focal adhesions in ovarian cancer cells. - Abstract: Our previous study demonstrated that the melastatin-related transient receptor potential channel 7 (TRPM7) was highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and its overexpression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer patients. However, the function of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer is mostly unknown. In this study, we examined the roles of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We found that short hairpin RNA interference-mediated silence of TRPM7 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in multiple ovarian cancer cell lines. Mechanistic investigation revealed that silence of TRPM7 decreased phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 and increased filamentous actin and focal adhesion number in ovarian cancer cells. Thus, our results suggest that TRPM7 is required for proliferation, migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells through regulating multiple signaling transduction pathways and the formation of focal adhesions.

  20. AAMP Regulates Endothelial Cell Migration and Angiogenesis Through RhoA/Rho Kinase Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianjun; Qiu, Juhui; Zheng, Yiming; Zhang, Tao; Yin, Tieying; Xie, Xiang; Wang, Guixue

    2016-05-01

    Angiogenesis is a complicated process including endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation. AAMP plays a role in regulating cell migration of multiple cell types. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether AAMP regulates angiogenesis, and to clarify the role of AAMP in the VEGF-induced angiogenesis. We found that AAMP expressed in multiple cell types and mainly localized in cytoplasm and membrane in vascular endothelial cells. Using tube formation assay in vitro and aortic ring assay, siRNA-mediated knockdown and antibody blockade of AAMP impaired VEGF-induced endothelial cell tube formation and aortic ring angiogenic sprouting. Mechanistic studies showed that AAMP expression was significantly upregulated by VEGF in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Moreover, VEGF recruited AAMP to the cell membrane protrusions. AAMP regulates angiogenesis by mediating the spreading and migration of vascular endothelial cells. AAMP knock-down reduced VEGF-induced actin stress fibers and collagen gel contraction. Furthermore, we identified RhoA/Rho kinase signaling as an important factor that contributes to the action of AAMP in regulating endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis. Altogether, these data demonstrated the critical role of AAMP in angiogenesis and suggested blocking AAMP could serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:26350504

  1. ROLE OF MACROPHAGES IN REGULATION OF HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL MIGRATION IN BONE MARROW PERIPHERAL BLOOD SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. G. Yushkov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms by which HSCs mobilize into damaged organs are currently under scrutiny.Macrophage role in these processes is investigated. In this study, we performed a flow cytometry analysis ofCD117+CD38+ and CD117+CD90low HSCs quantity in murine peripheral blood and bone marrow after liverand kidney injury under stimulation of phagocyte mononuclear system by injection of tamerit. This study havedemonstrated increased levels of CD117+CD38+ HSCs in bone marrow after partial hepatectomy, along withtheir migration to peripheral blood in response to tamerit injection. We also demonstrated that peripheralblood CD117+CD38+ HSCs levels were elevated after kidney injury. After partial hepatectomy, nochangesof CD117+CD90low HSCs quantity in investigated tissues were detected. We observed increased number ofCD117+CD90low HSCs in murine blood following kidney injury. Thus, we observed different influence ofmacrophage stimulation on the quantity of CD117+CD38+ and CD117+CD90low cells. These data suggestthat HSCs mobilization from the bone marrow to peripheral blood depends, at least in part, on phagocytemononuclear system, and that macrophage stimulation is important for proliferation and migration of variousHSCs populations following liver and kidney injury.

  2. ANALYSIS OF POPULATION MIGRATION AS A CRIMINOGENIC FACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana MITRA-NIŢĂ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Migration is a voluntary movement of population from one geographic location to another. This movement can be of several types, depending on the cause determining the respective migration. Population movements or its mobility is not a new phenomenon but has deep roots in ancient history. We can even say that in the beginning man was migratory, nomadic and later it became steadfast, linked in some way to certain geographic locations. Population migration has multiple consequences, both positive and negative. Among the negative we can mention overpopulation or underpopulation of certain areas, heterogeneity of traditions and cultures of immigrants, inability of migratory population to adapt to the area they migrated to, not finding a job, marginalization, etc. All these are genuine and objective criminological factors that could actually cause committing crimes in the migratory population. We cannot and do not want to stop the mobility of people, but we can be careful to avoid harmful consequences caused by this phenomenon.

  3. Gβγ subunits inhibit Epac-induced melanoma cell migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goydos James S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently we reported that activation of Epac1, an exchange protein activated by cAMP, increases melanoma cell migration via Ca 2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. G-protein βγ subunits (Gβγ are known to act as an independent signaling molecule upon activation of G-protein coupled receptor. However, the role of Gβγ in cell migration and Ca 2+ signaling in melanoma has not been well studied. Here we report that there is crosstalk of Ca 2+ signaling between Gβγ and Epac in melanoma, which plays a role in regulation of cell migration. Methods SK-Mel-2 cells, a human metastatic melanoma cell line, were mainly used in this study. Intracellular Ca 2+ was measured with Fluo-4AM fluorescent dyes. Cell migration was examined using the Boyden chambers. Results The effect of Gβγ on Epac-induced cell migration was first examined. Epac-induced cell migration was inhibited by mSIRK, a Gβγ -activating peptide, but not its inactive analog, L9A, in SK-Mel-2 cells. Guanosine 5', α-β-methylene triphosphate (Gp(CH2pp, a constitutively active GTP analogue that activates Gβγ, also inhibited Epac-induced cell migration. In addition, co-overexpression of β1 and γ2, which is the major combination of Gβγ, inhibited Epac1-induced cell migration. By contrast, when the C-terminus of β adrenergic receptor kinase (βARK-CT, an endogenous inhibitor for Gβγ, was overexpressed, mSIRK's inhibitory effect on Epac-induced cell migration was negated, suggesting the specificity of mSIRK for Gβγ. We next examined the effect of mSIRK on Epac-induced Ca 2+ response. When cells were pretreated with mSIRK, but not with L9A, 8-(4-Methoxyphenylthio-2'-O-methyladenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-pMeOPT, an Epac-specific agonist, failed to increase Ca 2+ signal. Co-overexpression of β1 and γ2 subunits inhibited 8-pMeOPT-induced Ca 2+ elevation. Inhibition of Gβγ with βARK-CT or guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate (GDPβS, a GDP

  4. A role for multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4; ABCC4) in human dendritic cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Rieneke; Scheffer, George L; Reurs, Anneke W; Lindenberg, Jelle J; Oerlemans, Ruud; Jansen, Gerrit; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Glasgow, Joel N; Pereboev, Alexander; Curiel, David T; Scheper, Rik J; de Gruijl, Tanja D

    2008-09-15

    The capacity of dendritic cells (DCs) to migrate from peripheral organs to lymph nodes (LNs) is important in the initiation of a T cell-mediated immune response. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1) and the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1; ABCC1) have been shown to play a role in both human and murine DC migration. Here we show that a more recently discovered family member, MRP4 (ABCC4), is expressed on both epidermal and dermal human skin DCs and contributes to the migratory capacity of DCs. Pharmacological inhibition of MRP4 activity or down-regulation through RNAi in DCs resulted in reduced migration of DCs from human skin explants and of in vitro generated Langerhans cells. The responsible MRP4 substrate remains to be identified as exogenous addition of MRP4's known substrates prostaglandin E(2), leukotriene B(4) and D(4), or cyclic nucleotides (all previously implicated in DC migration) could not restore migration. This notwithstanding, our data show that MRP4 is an important protein, significantly contributing to human DC migration toward the draining lymph nodes, and therefore relevant for the initiation of an immune response and a possible target for immunotherapy.

  5. Saltatory formation, sliding and dissolution of ER–PM junctions in migrating cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dingsdale, Hayley; Okeke, Emmanuel; Awais, Muhammad; Haynes, Lee; Criddle, David N.; Sutton, Robert; Tepikin, Alexei V.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrated three novel forms of dynamic behaviour of junctions between the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) and the PM (plasma membrane) in migrating cancer cells: saltatory formation, long-distance sliding and dissolution. The individual ER–PM junctions formed near the leading edge of migrating cells (usually within 0.5 μm of polymerized actin and close to focal adhesions) and appeared suddenly without sliding from the interior of the cell. The long distance sliding and dissolution of ER–PM j...

  6. Optimizing micropattern geometries for cell shape and migration with genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Philipp J; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2016-07-11

    Adhesive micropatterns have become a standard tool to control cell shape and function in cell culture. However, the variety of possible patterns is infinitely large and experiments often restrict themselves to established designs. Here we suggest a systematic method to establish novel micropatterns for desired functions using genetic algorithms. The evolutionary fitness of a certain pattern is computed using a cellular Potts model that describes cell behavior on micropattern. We first predict optimal patterns for a desired cell shape. We then optimize ratchet geometries to bias cell migration in a certain direction and find that asymmetric triangles are superior over the symmetric ones often used in experiments. Finally we design geometries which reverse the migration direction of cells when cell density increases due to cell division. PMID:27334659

  7. International Migration and Gender in Latin America: A Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Douglas S; Fischer, Mary J; Capoferro, Chiara

    2006-12-01

    We review census data to assess the standing of five Latin American nations on a gender continuum ranging from patriarchal to matrifocal. We show that Mexico and Costa Rica lie close to one another with a highly patriarchal system of gender relations whereas Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic are similar in having a matrifocal system. Puerto Rico occupies a middle position, blending characteristics of both systems. These differences yield different patterns of female relative to male migration. Female householders in the two patriarchal settings displayed low rates of out-migration compared with males, whereas in the two matrifocal countries the ratio of female to male migration was much higher, in some case exceeding their male counterparts. Multivariate analyses showed that in patriarchal societies, a formal or informal union with a male dramatically lowers the odds of female out-migration, whereas in matrifocal societies marriage and cohabitation have no real effect. The most important determinants of female migration from patriarchal settings are the migrant status of the husband or partner, having relatives in the United States, and the possession of legal documents. In matrifocal settings, however, female migration is less related to the possession of documents, partner's migrant status, or having relatives in the United States and more strongly related to the woman's own migratory experience. Whereas the process of cumulative causation appears to be driven largely by men in patriarchal societies, it is women who dominate the process in matrifocal settings. PMID:21399742

  8. Long Non-Coding RNA HOTAIR Promotes Cell Migration and Invasion via Down-Regulation of RNA Binding Motif Protein 38 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaofeng Ding

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR exerts regulatory functions in various biological processes in cancer cells, such as proliferation, apoptosis, mobility, and invasion. We previously found that HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR is a negative prognostic factor and exhibits oncogenic activity in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role and molecular mechanism of HOTAIR in promoting HCC cell migration and invasion. Firstly, we profiled its gene expression pattern by microarray analysis of HOTAIR loss in Bel-7402 HCC cell line. The results showed that 129 genes were significantly down-regulated, while 167 genes were significantly up-regulated (fold change >2, p < 0.05. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that RNA binding proteins were involved in this biological process. HOTAIR suppression using RNAi strategy with HepG2 and Bel-7402 cells increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of RNA binding motif protein 38 (RBM38. Moreover, the expression levels of RBM38 in HCC specimens were significantly lower than paired adjacent noncancerous tissues. In addition, knockdown of HOTAIR resulted in a decrease of cell migration and invasion, which could be specifically rescued by down-regulation of RBM38. Taken together, HOTAIR could promote migration and invasion of HCC cells by inhibiting RBM38, which indicated critical roles of HOTAIR and RBM38 in HCC progression.

  9. Engineering of silicon surfaces at the micro- and nanoscales for cell adhesion and migration control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Costa V

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Vicente Torres-Costa1, Gonzalo Martínez-Muñoz2, Vanessa Sánchez-Vaquero3, Álvaro Muñoz-Noval1, Laura González-Méndez3, Esther Punzón-Quijorna1,4, Darío Gallach-Pérez1, Miguel Manso-Silván1, Aurelio Climent-Font1,4, Josefa P García-Ruiz3, Raúl J Martín-Palma11Department of Applied Physics, 2Department of Computer Science, 3Department of Molecular Biology, 4Centre for Micro Analysis of Materials, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, SpainAbstract: The engineering of surface patterns is a powerful tool for analyzing cellular communication factors involved in the processes of adhesion, migration, and expansion, which can have a notable impact on therapeutic applications including tissue engineering. In this regard, the main objective of this research was to fabricate patterned and textured surfaces at micron- and nanoscale levels, respectively, with very different chemical and topographic characteristics to control cell–substrate interactions. For this task, one-dimensional (1-D and two-dimensional (2-D patterns combining silicon and nanostructured porous silicon were engineered by ion beam irradiation and subsequent electrochemical etch. The experimental results show that under the influence of chemical and morphological stimuli, human mesenchymal stem cells polarize and move directionally toward or away from the particular stimulus. Furthermore, a computational model was developed aiming at understanding cell behavior by reproducing the surface distribution and migration of human mesenchymal stem cells observed experimentally.Keywords: surface patterns, silicon, hMSCs, ion-beam patterning

  10. The study of migration of bone mesenchymal stem cells transplanted in intervertebral discs of rabbits and expression of exogenous gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jintang Wang; Hong Zhang; Yingang Zhang; Xiaowei Zhang; Meng Li

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the survival and migration of bone mesenchymal stem cells transplantated in intervertebral disc of rabbits and expression of the exogenic genes. Methods: Thirty-two rabbits were used, A randomized block design was used and discs in the same rabbit were one block,the lumbar discs from L2-3 to L5-6 were randomly divided into blank group, saline group, cell transplantation group Ⅰ and cell transplantation group Ⅱ. The fluorescence microscopy was used to determine the fluorescence of the maker protein GFP and DNA-PCR was used to analyze the copies of DNA of neomycin-resistant gene at 1, 3, 6, months after transplantation. Results: There was fluorescence in cell transplantation group Ⅰ and Ⅱ and none in blank group, saline group at 1, 3, 6 months after transplantation. In cell transplantation groups,the fluorescent distribution was more scatter with time, but no significant difference between cell groups Ⅰ and Ⅱ. The test of neomycin resistant gene expressed in cell transplantation group Ⅰ and Ⅱ and quantitative analysis showed that there was no significant difference between the cell groups Ⅰ and Ⅱ (P>0.05). Conclusion: The transplanted bone mesenchymal stem cells can survive, migrate and the transfer genes can express efficiently, it suggests that the BMSC therapy may be effective to prevent and treat intervertebral disc degeneration.

  11. Nox4 and Duox1/2 Mediate Redox Activation of Mesenchymal Cell Migration by PDGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhova, Anna A.; Sagaradze, George D.; Albert, Eugene A.; Ageeva, Ludmila V.; Sharonov, George V.; Tkachuk, Vsevolod A.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) orchestrates wound healing and tissue regeneration by regulating recruitment of the precursor mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and fibroblasts. PDGF stimulates generation of hydrogen peroxide that is required for cell migration, but the sources and intracellular targets of H2O2 remain obscure. Here we demonstrate sustained live responses of H2O2 to PDGF and identify PKB/Akt, but not Erk1/2, as the target for redox regulation in cultured 3T3 fibroblasts and MSC. Apocynin, cell-permeable catalase and LY294002 inhibited PDGF-induced migration and mitotic activity of these cells indicating involvement of PI3-kinase pathway and H2O2. Real-time PCR revealed Nox4 and Duox1/2 as the potential sources of H2O2. Silencing of Duox1/2 in fibroblasts or Nox4 in MSC reduced PDGF-stimulated intracellular H2O2, PKB/Akt phosphorylation and migration, but had no such effect on Erk1/2. In contrast to PDGF, EGF failed to increase cytoplasmic H2O2, phosphorylation of PKB/Akt and migration of fibroblasts and MSC, confirming the critical impact of redox signaling. We conclude that PDGF-induced migration of mesenchymal cells requires Nox4 and Duox1/2 enzymes, which mediate redox-sensitive activation of PI3-kinase pathway and PKB/Akt. PMID:27110716

  12. Trefoil factor 3 peptide regulates migration via a Twist-dependent pathway in gastric cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qianqian; Gao, Jian; Li, Honglin; Guo, Wendong; Mao, Qi; Gao, Enhui; Zhu, Ya-qin

    2013-08-16

    Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is a member of the TFF-domain peptide family and essential in regulating cell migration and maintaining mucosal integrity in gastrointestinal tract. However, the role of TFF3 and its downstream regulating mechanisms in cancer cell migration remain unclear. We previously reported that TFF3 prolonged the up-regulation of Twist protein to modulate IL-8 secretion in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated the role of Twist protein in TFF3-induced migration of SGC7901 cells. While Twist was activated by TFF3, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Twist abolished TFF3-induced cell migration. Furthermore, the migration related marker CK-8 as well as ZO-1 and MMP-9 was also regulated by TFF3 via a Twist-dependent mechanism. Our study suggests that Twist, as an important potential downstream effector, plays a key role in TFF3-modulated metastasis in gastric cancer and can be a promising therapeutic target against intestinal-type gastric cancer.

  13. The p38/MK2/Hsp25 pathway is required for BMP-2-induced cell migration.

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    Cristina Gamell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs have been shown to participate in the patterning and specification of several tissues and organs during development and to regulate cell growth, differentiation and migration in different cell types. BMP-mediated cell migration requires activation of the small GTPase Cdc42 and LIMK1 activities. In our earlier report we showed that activation of LIMK1 also requires the activation of PAKs through Cdc42 and PI3K. However, the requirement of additional signaling is not clearly known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Activation of p38 MAPK has been shown to be relevant for a number of BMP-2's physiological effects. We report here that BMP-2 regulation of cell migration and actin cytoskeleton remodelling are dependent on p38 activity. BMP-2 treatment of mesenchymal cells results in activation of the p38/MK2/Hsp25 signaling pathway downstream from the BMP receptors. Moreover, chemical inhibition of p38 signaling or genetic ablation of either p38α or MK2 blocks the ability to activate the downstream effectors of the pathway and abolishes BMP-2-induction of cell migration. These signaling effects on p38/MK2/Hsp25 do not require the activity of either Cdc42 or PAK, whereas p38/MK2 activities do not significantly modify the BMP-2-dependent activation of LIMK1, measured by either kinase activity or with an antibody raised against phospho-threonine 508 at its activation loop. Finally, phosphorylated Hsp25 colocalizes with the BMP receptor complexes in lamellipodia and overexpression of a phosphorylation mutant form of Hsp25 is able to abolish the migration of cells in response to BMP-2. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that Cdc42/PAK/LIMK1 and p38/MK2/Hsp25 pathways, acting in parallel and modulating specific actin regulatory proteins, play a critical role in integrating responses during BMP-induced actin reorganization and cell migration.

  14. Role of laminin receptor in tumor cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Taraboletti, G; Sobel, M E;

    1987-01-01

    Polyclonal antisera were made against biochemically purified laminin receptor protein as well as against synthetic peptides deduced from a complementary DNA clone corresponding to the COOH-terminal end of the laminin receptor (U.M. Wewer et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 83: 7137-7141, 1986...... in vivo exhibited a marked cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for the receptor antigen. Together these findings indicate a specific role for the laminin receptor in laminin-mediated migration and that the ligand binding of the laminin receptor is encompassed in the COOH-terminal end of the protein....

  15. District Level Analysis of Urbanization from Rural-to-Urban Migration in the Rajasthan State

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Jayant; Smarandache, Florentin

    2009-01-01

    Migration has various dimensions; urbanization due to migration is one of them. In Rajasthan State, district level analysis of urbanization due to migrants shows trend invariably for all districts of the state, though the contribution in urbanization by migrants varies from district to district. In some districts the share of migrants moving to urban areas is very impressive, in others it is not that much high. The migrants' contribution is on the raising over the decades. In this paper, the district level migration in the Rajasthan State is examined in relation to total urbanization and urbanization due to migration.

  16. Maspin Regulates Endothelial Cell Adhesion and Migration through an Integrin Signaling Pathway*

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Li; Zhang, Ming

    2010-01-01

    Maspin has been identified as a potent angiogenesis inhibitor. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for its anti-angiogenic property is unclear. In this study, we examined the effect of maspin on endothelial cell (EC) adhesion and migration in a cell culture system. We found that maspin was expressed in blood vessels ECs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Maspin significantly enhanced HUVEC cell adhesion to various matrix proteins. This effect was dependent on the ac...

  17. Rho-family GTPase Cdc42 controls migration of Langerhans cells in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luckashenak, Nancy; Wähe, Anna; Breit, Katharina;

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) of the skin represent the prototype migratory dendritic cell (DC) subtype. In the skin, they take up Ag, migrate to the draining lymph nodes, and contribute to Ag transport and immunity. Different depletion models for LCs have revealed contrasting roles and contri...

  18. Cell-stiffness-induced mechanosignaling - a key driver of leukocyte transendothelial migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Schaefer; P.L. Hordijk

    2015-01-01

    The breaching of cellular and structural barriers by migrating cells is a driving factor in development, inflammation and tumor cell metastasis. One of the most extensively studied examples is the extravasation of activated leukocytes across the vascular endothelium, the inner lining of blood vessel

  19. Aflatoxin B1 up-regulates insulin receptor substrate 2 and stimulates hepatoma cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Ma

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 is a potent carcinogen that can induce hepatocellular carcinoma. AFB1-8,9-exo-epoxide, one of AFB1 metabolites, acts as a mutagen to react with DNA and induce gene mutations, including the tumor suppressor p53. In addition, AFB1 reportedly stimulates IGF receptor activation. Aberrant activation of IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR signaling is tightly associated with various types of human tumors. In the current study, we investigated the effects of AFB1 on key elements in IGF-IR signaling pathway, and the effects of AFB1 on hepatoma cell migration. The results demonstrated that AFB1 induced IGF-IR, Akt, and Erk1/2 phosphorylation in hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and SMMC-7721, and an immortalized human liver cell line Chang liver. AFB1 also down-regulated insulin receptor substrate (IRS 1 but paradoxically up-regulated IRS2 through preventing proteasomal degradation. Treatment of hepatoma cells and Chang liver cells with IGF-IR inhibitor abrogated AFB1-induced Akt and Erk1/2 phosphorylation. In addition, IRS2 knockdown suppressed AFB1-induced Akt and Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Finally, AFB1 stimulated hepatoma cell migration. IGF-IR inhibitor or IRS2 knockdown suppressed AFB1-induced hepatoma cell migration. These data demonstrate that AFB1 stimulates hepatoma cell migration through IGF-IR/IRS2 axis.

  20. Tubular Bridges for Bronchial Epithelial Cell Migration and Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Zani, Brett G.; Laura Indolfi; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biological processes from embryogenesis to tumorigenesis rely on the coordinated coalescence of cells and synchronized cell-to-cell communication. Intercellular signaling enables cell masses to communicate through endocrine pathways at a distance or by direct contact over shorter dimensions. Cellular bridges, the longest direct connections between cells, facilitate transfer of cellular signals and components over hundreds of microns in vitro and in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FIND...

  1. Role of LPAR3, PKC and EGFR in LPA-induced cell migration in oral squamous carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is an aggressive neoplasm with serious morbidity and mortality, which typically spreads through local invasive growth. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is involved in a number of biological processes, and may have a role in cancer cell migration and invasiveness. LPA is present in most tissues and can activate cells through six different LPA receptors (LPAR1-6). Although LPA is predominantly promigratory, some of the receptors may have antimigratory effects in certain cells. The signalling mechanisms of LPA are not fully understood, and in oral carcinoma cells the specific receptors and pathways involved in LPA-stimulated migration are unknown. The oral carcinoma cell lines E10, SCC-9, and D2 were investigated. Cell migration was studied in a scratch wound assay, and invasion was demonstrated in organotypic three dimensional co-cultures. Protein and mRNA expression of LPA receptors was studied with Western blotting and qRT-PCR. Activation of signalling proteins was examined with Western blotting and isoelectric focusing, and signalling mechanisms were further explored using pharmacological agents and siRNA directed at specific receptors and pathways. LPA stimulated cell migration in the two oral carcinoma cell lines E10 and SCC-9, but was slightly inhibitory in D2. The receptor expression profile and the effects of specific pharmacological antagonist and agonists indicated that LPA-stimulated cell migration was mediated through LPAR3 in E10 and SCC-9. Furthermore, in both these cell lines, the stimulation by LPA was dependent on PKC activity. However, while LPA induced transactivation of EGFR and the stimulated migration was blocked by EGFR inhibitors in E10 cells, LPA did not induce EGFR transactivation in SCC-9 cells. In D2 cells, LPA induced EGFR transactivation, but this was associated with slowing of a very high inherent migration rate in these cells. The results demonstrate LPA-stimulated migration in oral carcinoma cells through LPAR3

  2. Derivatives of Dictyostelium differentiation-inducing factors inhibit lysophosphatidic acid-stimulated migration of murine osteosarcoma LM8 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubohara, Yuzuru; Komachi, Mayumi; Homma, Yoshimi; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Oshima, Yoshiteru

    2015-08-01

    Osteosarcoma is a common metastatic bone cancer that predominantly develops in children and adolescents. Metastatic osteosarcoma remains associated with a poor prognosis; therefore, more effective anti-metastatic drugs are needed. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), -2, and -3 are novel lead anti-tumor agents that were originally isolated from the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Here we investigated the effects of a panel of DIF derivatives on lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced migration of mouse osteosarcoma LM8 cells by using a Boyden chamber assay. Some DIF derivatives such as Br-DIF-1, DIF-3(+2), and Bu-DIF-3 (5-20 μM) dose-dependently suppressed LPA-induced cell migration with associated IC50 values of 5.5, 4.6, and 4.2 μM, respectively. On the other hand, the IC50 values of Br-DIF-1, DIF-3(+2), and Bu-DIF-3 versus cell proliferation were 18.5, 7.2, and 2.0 μM, respectively, in LM8 cells, and >20, 14.8, and 4.3 μM, respectively, in mouse 3T3-L1 fibroblasts (non-transformed). Together, our results demonstrate that Br-DIF-1 in particular may be a valuable tool for the analysis of cancer cell migration, and that DIF derivatives such as DIF-3(+2) and Bu-DIF-3 are promising lead anti-tumor agents for the development of therapies that suppress osteosarcoma cell proliferation, migration, and metastasis. PMID:26056940

  3. Autophagy suppresses cell migration by degrading GEF-H1, a RhoA GEF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tatsushi; Tsujioka, Masatsune; Honda, Shinya; Tanaka, Masato; Shimizu, Shigeomi

    2016-06-01

    Cell migration is a process crucial for a variety of biological events, such as morphogenesis and wound healing. Several reports have described the possible regulation of cell migration by autophagy; however, this remains controversial. We here demonstrate that mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking autophagy protein 5 (Atg5), an essential molecule of autophagy, moved faster than wild-type (WT) MEFs. Similar results were obtained for MEFs lacking Atg7 and unc-51-like kinase 1 (Ulk1), which are molecules required for autophagy. This phenotype was also observed in Atg7-deficient macrophages. WT MEFs moved by mesenchymal-type migration, whereas Atg5 knockout (KO) MEFs moved by amoeba-like migration. This difference was thought to be mediated by the level of RhoA activity, because Atg5 KO MEFs had higher RhoA activity, and treatment with a RhoA inhibitor altered Atg5 KO MEF migration from the amoeba type to the mesenchymal type. Autophagic regulation of RhoA activity was dependent on GEF-H1, a member of the RhoA family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors. In WT MEFs, GEF-H1 directly bound to p62 and was degraded by autophagy, resulting in low RhoA activity. In contrast, the loss of autophagy increased GEF-H1 levels and thereby activated RhoA, which caused cells to move by amoeba-like migration. This amoeba-like migration was cancelled by the silencing of GEF-H1. These results indicate that autophagy plays a role in the regulation of migration by degrading GEF-H1.

  4. Autophagy suppresses cell migration by degrading GEF-H1, a RhoA GEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masato; Shimizu, Shigeomi

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is a process crucial for a variety of biological events, such as morphogenesis and wound healing. Several reports have described the possible regulation of cell migration by autophagy; however, this remains controversial. We here demonstrate that mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking autophagy protein 5 (Atg5), an essential molecule of autophagy, moved faster than wild-type (WT) MEFs. Similar results were obtained for MEFs lacking Atg7 and unc-51-like kinase 1 (Ulk1), which are molecules required for autophagy. This phenotype was also observed in Atg7-deficient macrophages. WT MEFs moved by mesenchymal-type migration, whereas Atg5 knockout (KO) MEFs moved by amoeba-like migration. This difference was thought to be mediated by the level of RhoA activity, because Atg5 KO MEFs had higher RhoA activity, and treatment with a RhoA inhibitor altered Atg5 KO MEF migration from the amoeba type to the mesenchymal type. Autophagic regulation of RhoA activity was dependent on GEF-H1, a member of the RhoA family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors. In WT MEFs, GEF-H1 directly bound to p62 and was degraded by autophagy, resulting in low RhoA activity. In contrast, the loss of autophagy increased GEF-H1 levels and thereby activated RhoA, which caused cells to move by amoeba-like migration. This amoeba-like migration was cancelled by the silencing of GEF-H1. These results indicate that autophagy plays a role in the regulation of migration by degrading GEF-H1. PMID:27120804

  5. Knockdown of SVCT2 impairs in-vitro cell attachment, migration and wound healing in bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnikumar Sangani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC adhesion and migration are fundamental to a number of pathophysiologic processes, including fracture and wound healing. Vitamin C is beneficial for bone formation, fracture repair and wound healing. However, the role of the vitamin C transporter in BMSC adhesion, migration and wound healing is not known. In this study, we knocked-down the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter, SVCT2, the only known transporter of vitamin C in BMSCs, and performed cell adhesion, migration, in-vitro scratch wound healing and F-actin re-arrangement studies. We also investigated the role of oxidative stress on the above processes. Our results demonstrate that both oxidative stress and down-regulation of SVCT2 decreased cell attachment and spreading. A trans-well cell migration assay showed that vitamin C helped in BMSC migration and that knockdown of SVCT2 decreased cell migration. In the in-vitro scratch wound healing studies, we established that oxidative stress dose-dependently impairs wound healing. Furthermore, the supplementation of vitamin C significantly rescued the BMSCs from oxidative stress and increased wound closing. The knockdown of SVCT2 in BMSCs strikingly decreased wound healing, and supplementing with vitamin C failed to rescue cells efficiently. The knockdown of SVCT2 and induction of oxidative stress in cells produced an alteration in cytoskeletal dynamics. Signaling studies showed that oxidative stress phosphorylated members of the MAP kinase family (p38 and that vitamin C inhibited their phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that both the SVCT2 transporter and oxidative stress play a vital role in BMSC attachment, migration and cytoskeletal re-arrangement. BMSC-based cell therapy and modulation of SVCT2 could lead to a novel therapeutic approach that enhances bone remodeling, fracture repair and wound healing in chronic disease conditions.

  6. Alterations in cell migration and cell viability of wounded human skin fibroblasts following visible red light exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Bola Sadashiva S.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2014-02-01

    The present study intended to examine the effect of visible red light on structural and cellular parameters on wounded skin fibroblast cells. To achieve the stated objective, uniform scratch was created on confluent monolayered human skin fibroblast cells, and were exposed to single dose of He-Ne laser (15 mm spot, 6.6808 mWcm-2) at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 Jcm-2 in the presence and absence of 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Beam profile measurements of the expanded laser beam were conducted to ensure the beam uniformity. The influence of laser dose on the change in temperature was recorded using sensitive temperature probe. Additionally, following laser exposure cell migration and cell survival were documented at different time intervals on wounded human skin fibroblast cells grown in vitro. Beam profile measurements indicated more or less uniform power distribution over the whole beam area. Temperature monitoring of sham irradiated control and laser treatment groups displayed negligible temperature change indicating the absence of thermal effect at the tested laser doses. In the absence of 10% FBS, single exposure of different laser doses failed to produce any significant effects on cell migration or cell survival. However, in the presence of serum single exposure of 5 J/cm2 on wounded skin fibroblasts significantly enhanced the cell migration (PLLLT acts by improving cell migration and cell proliferation to produce measurable changes in wounded fibroblast cells.

  7. Endothelial directed collective migration depends on substrate stiffness via localized myosin contractility and cell-matrix interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canver, Adam Charles; Ngo, Olivia; Urbano, Rebecca Lownes; Clyne, Alisa Morss

    2016-05-24

    Macrovascular endothelial injury, which may be caused by percutaneous intervention, requires endothelial cell directed collective migration to restore an intact endothelial monolayer. While interventions are often performed in arteries stiffened by cardiovascular disease, the effect of substrate stiffness on endothelial cell collective migration has not been examined. We studied porcine aortic endothelial cell directed collective migration using a modified cage assay on 4, 14, and 50kPa collagen-coated polyacrylamide gels. Total cell migration distance was measured over time, as were nuclear alignment and nuclear:total β-catenin as measures of cell directedness and cell-cell junction integrity, respectively. In addition, fibronectin fibers were examined as a measure of extracellular matrix deposition and remodeling. We now show that endothelial cells collectively migrate farther on stiffer substrates by 24h. Cells were more directed in the migration direction on intermediate stiffness substrates from 12 to 24h, with an alignment peak 400-700µm back from the migratory interface. However, cells on the softest substrates had the highest cell-cell junction integrity. Cells on all substrates deposited fibronectin, however fibronectin fibers were most linear and aligned on the stiffer substrates. When Rho kinase (ROCK) was inhibited with Y27632, cells on soft substrates migrated farther and cells on both soft and stiff substrates were more directed. When α5 integrin was knocked down with siRNA, cells on stiffer substrates did not migrate as far and were less directed. These data suggest that ROCK-mediated myosin contractility inhibits endothelial cell collective migration on soft substrates, while cell-matrix interactions are critical to endothelial cell collective migration on stiff substrates.

  8. Reframing the Migration Question: An Analysis of Men, Women, and Gender in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaiaupuni, Shawn Malia

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of data on approximately 14,000 individuals in 43 Mexican villages examined how gender relations and expectations differentiate male and female patterns of Mexico-to-U.S. migration. Education and migration were related positively for women but negatively for men. Age, marital status, and social networks also had differential effects on…

  9. TNFα Regulates Endothelial Progenitor Cell Migration via CADM1 and NF-kB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisco, Anthony R.; Hoffmann, Brian R.; Kaczorowski, Catherine C.; McDermott-Roe, Chris; Stodola, Timothy J.; Exner, Eric C.; Greene, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    Shortly after the discovery of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in 1997, many clinical trials were conducted using EPCs as a cellular based therapy with the goal of restoring damaged organ function by inducing growth of new blood vessels (angiogenesis). Results were disappointing, largely because the cellular and molecular mechanisms of EPC-induced angiogenesis were not clearly understood. Following injection, EPCs must migrate to the target tissue and engraft prior to induction of angiogenesis. In this study EPC migration was investigated in response to tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, to test the hypothesis that organ damage observed in ischemic diseases induces an inflammatory signal that is important for EPC homing. In this study, EPC migration and incorporation were modeled in vitro using a co-culture assay where TNFα treated EPCs were tracked while migrating towards vessel-like structures. It was found that TNFα treatment of EPCs increased migration and incorporation into vessel-like structures. Using a combination of genomic and proteomic approaches, NF-kB mediated upregulation of CADM1 was identified as a mechanism of TNFα induced migration. Inhibition of NF-kB or CADM1 significantly decreased migration of EPCs in vitro suggesting a role for TNFα signaling in EPC homing during tissue repair. PMID:26867147

  10. Lipocalin-2-induced cytokine production enhances endometrial carcinoma cell survival and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Hsia Lin, Chi-Jr Liao, Ying-Chu Lee, Keng-Hsun Hu, Hsien-Wei Meng, Sin-Tak Chu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipocalin-2 (Lcn-2 is an acute-phase protein that has been implicated in diverse physiological processes in mice, including: apoptosis, ion transport, inflammation, cell survival, and tumorigenesis. This study characterized the biological activity of Lcn-2 in human endometrial carcinoma cells (RL95-2. Exposure of RL95-2 cells to Lcn-2 for >24 h reduced Lcn-2-induced cell apoptosis, changed the cell proliferation and up-regulated cytokine secretions, including: interleukin-8 (IL-8, inteleukin-6 (IL-6, monocyte chemotatic protein-1 (MCP-1 and growth-related oncogene (GRO. However, IL-8 mRNA and protein levels were dramatically increased in Lcn-2-treated RL95-2 cells. To determine the IL-8 effect on Lcn-2-treated RL95-2 cells was our major focus. Adding recombinant IL-8 (rIL-8 resulted in decreased caspase-3 activity in Lcn-2-treated cells, whereas the addition of IL-8 antibodies resulted in significantly increased caspase-3 activity and decreased cell migration. Data indicate that IL-8 plays a crucial role in the induction of cell migration. Interestingly, Lcn-2-induced cytokines, secretion from RL95-2 cells, could not show the potent cell migration ability with the exception of IL-8. We conclude that Lcn-2 triggered cytokine secretions to prevent RL95-2 cells from undergoing apoptosis and subsequently increased cell migration. We hypothesize that Lcn-2 increased cytokine secretion by RL95-2 cells, which in turn activated a cellular defense system. This study suggests that Lcn-2 may play a role in the human female reproductive system or in endometrial cancer.

  11. Protein kinase d isoforms differentially modulate cofilin-driven directed cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Döppler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein kinase D (PKD enzymes regulate cofilin-driven actin reorganization and directed cell migration through both p21-activated kinase 4 (PAK4 and the phosphatase slingshot 1L (SSH1L. The relative contributions of different endogenous PKD isoforms to both signaling pathways have not been elucidated, sufficiently. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We here analyzed two cell lines (HeLa and MDA-MB-468 that express the subtypes protein kinase D2 (PKD2 and protein kinase D3 (PKD3. We show that under normal growth conditions both isoforms can form a complex, in which PKD3 is basally-active and PKD2 is inactive. Basal activity of PKD3 mediates PAK4 activity and downstream signaling, but does not significantly inhibit SSH1L. This signaling constellation was required for facilitating directed cell migration. Activation of PKD2 and further increase of PKD3 activity leads to additional phosphorylation and inhibition of endogenous SSH1L. Net effect is a dramatic increase in phospho-cofilin and a decrease in cell migration, since now both PAK4 and SSH1L are regulated by the active PKD2/PKD3 complex. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that PKD complexes provide an interface for both cofilin regulatory pathways. Dependent on the activity of involved PKD enzymes signaling can be balanced to guarantee a functional cofilin activity cycle and increase cell migration, or imbalanced to decrease cell migration. Our data also provide an explanation of how PKD isoforms mediate different effects on directed cell migration.

  12. Nanofiber-modified surface directed cell migration and orientation in microsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Gao, Xinghua; Jiang, Lei; Zhang, Xulang; Qin, Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    Cell-microscale pattern surface interactions are crucial to understand many fundamental biological questions and develop regenerative medicine and tissue engineering approaches. In this work, we demonstrated a simple method to pattern PDMS surface by sacrificing poly vinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) electrospinning nanofibers and investigated the growth profile of cells on the modified patterned surfaces using stroma cells. The stromal cells were observed to exhibit good viability on this modified surface and the patterned surface with alignment nanofibers could promote cell migration. Furthermore, the modified PDMS surface was integrated with microfluidic channels to create the microscale spatial factor and was used to explore the cell migration and orientation under this microsystem. Both spatial factor and patterned surfaces were found to contribute to the complex cell orientation under the combined dual effects. This established method is simple, fast, and easy for use, demonstrating the potential of this microsystem for applications in addressing biological questions in complex environment. PMID:22662030

  13. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 regulates differentiation onset and migration of trophoblast stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongmei; Hölz, Stefanie; Metzger, Eric; Pavlovic, Mihael; Jandausch, Anett; Jilg, Cordula; Galgoczy, Petra; Herz, Corinna; Moser, Markus; Metzger, Daniel; Günther, Thomas; Arnold, Sebastian J.; Schüle, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Propagation and differentiation of stem cell populations are tightly regulated to provide sufficient cell numbers for tissue formation while maintaining the stem cell pool. Embryonic parts of the mammalian placenta are generated from differentiating trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) invading the maternal decidua. Here we demonstrate that lysine-specific demethylase 1 (Lsd1) regulates differentiation onset of TSCs. Deletion of Lsd1 in mice results in the reduction of TSC number, diminished formation of trophectoderm tissues and early embryonic lethality. Lsd1-deficient TSCs display features of differentiation initiation, including alterations of cell morphology, and increased migration and invasion. We show that increased TSC motility is mediated by the premature expression of the transcription factor Ovol2 that is directly repressed by Lsd1 in undifferentiated cells. In summary, our data demonstrate that the epigenetic modifier Lsd1 functions as a gatekeeper for the differentiation onset of TSCs, whereby differentiation-associated cell migration is controlled by the transcription factor Ovol2.

  14. Cell-permeable p38 MAP kinase promotes migration of adult neural stem/progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanoue, Makoto; Morioka, Kazuhito; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Ohsawa, Keiko; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Tsuburaya, Kayo; Akasaka, Yoshikiyo; Mikami, Tetsuo; Ogata, Toru; Takamatsu, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) can migrate toward sites of injury, but the migration activity of NPCs is insufficient to regenerate damaged brain tissue. In this study, we showed that p38 MAP kinase (p38) is expressed in doublecortin-positive adult NPCs. Experiments using the p38 inhibitor SB203580 revealed that endogenous p38 participates in NPC migration. To enhance NPC migration, we generated a cell-permeable wild-type p38 protein (PTD-p38WT) in which the HIV protein transduction domain (PTD) was fused to the N-terminus of p38. Treatment with PTD-p38WT significantly promoted the random migration of adult NPCs without affecting cell survival or differentiation; this effect depended on the cell permeability and kinase activity of the fusion protein. These findings indicate that PTD-p38WT is a novel and useful tool for unraveling the roles of p38, and that this protein provides a reasonable approach for regenerating the injured brain by enhancing NPC migration. PMID:27067799

  15. Drain tube migration into the anastomotic site of an esophagojejunostomy for gastric small cell carcinoma: short report

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Long-Wei; Lo Chiao; Lai Peng-Sheng; Lee Po-Chu

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Intraluminal migration of a drain through an anastomotic site is a rare complication of gastric surgery. Case Presentation We herein report the intraluminal migration of a drain placed after a lower esophagectomy and total gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y anastomosis for gastric small cell carcinoma. Persistent drainage was noted 1 month after surgery, and radiographic studies were consistent with drain tube migration. Endoscopy revealed the drain had migrated into the esophagoj...

  16. Role of RhoA in platelet-derived growth factor-BB-induced migration of rat hepatic stellate cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lei; LI Jing; WANG Ji-yao; YANG Chang-qing; JIA Ming-lei; JIANG Wei

    2010-01-01

    Background Although the migration of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is essential for hepatic fibrotic response, the detailed mechanisms involved are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to examine the role of Rho GTPases (especially RhoA) in platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced migration of HSCs.Methods The migration of primary rat HSCs was evaluated using transwell Boyden chamber, while cytoskeletal changes were visualized by immunofluorescence staining of intracellular actins and vinculin. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting analysis were used to detect the expression of Rho GTPases (RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42) within HSCs and their activation was determined by glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay. Finally, the effects of RhoA on PDGF-BB-induced cell migration and cytoskeletal remodeling were analyzed using HSC-T6 cells stably transfected with constitutively active (CA, Q63L) or dominant negative (DN, T19N) RhoA mutants. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 software. Student's t test was used to analyze differences between two groups and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used among multiple groups.Results Rapid cytoskeletal remodeling led to a significant increase in the motility of primary rat HSCs after haptotactic (direct) and chemotactic (indirect) stimulation by PDGF-BB. PDGF-BB caused a dramatic elevation in the levels of both total and active RhoA protein. However, the levels of mRNA for Rho GTPases, including RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42, were unaffected. Furthermore, PDGF-BB induced increased formation of stress fibers and focal adhesions in HSC-T6 cells transfected with CA-RhoA, but not in HSC-T6 transfected with DN-RhoA. Surprisingly, both CA- and DN-RhoA-transfected HSC-T6 cells showed decreased migratory potential in the absence or presence of PDGF-BB compared with controls.Conclusions PDGF-BB induced cytoskeletal remodeling in rat HSCs and promoted their migration via regulation of intracellular RhoA. RhoA may be one of

  17. Displacement of p130Cas from focal adhesions links actomyosin contraction to cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiyama, Hiroaki; Hirata, Hiroaki; Loh, Xia Kun; Kanchi, Madhu Mathi; Fujita, Hideaki; Tan, Song Hui; Kawauchi, Keiko; Sawada, Yasuhiro

    2014-08-15

    Cell adhesion complexes provide platforms where cell-generated forces are transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins is crucial for cells to communicate with the extracellular environment. However, the mechanisms that transmit actin cytoskeletal motion to the extracellular environment to drive cell migration are poorly understood. We find that the movement of p130Cas (Cas, also known as BCAR1), a mechanosensor at focal adhesions, correlates with actin retrograde flow and depends upon actomyosin contraction and phosphorylation of the Cas substrate domain (CasSD). This indicates that CasSD phosphorylation underpins the physical link between Cas and the actin cytoskeleton. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments reveal that CasSD phosphorylation, as opposed to the association of Cas with Src, facilitates Cas displacement from adhesion complexes in migrating cells. Furthermore, the stabilization of Src-Cas binding and inhibition of myosin II, both of which sustain CasSD phosphorylation but mitigate Cas displacement from adhesion sites, retard cell migration. These results indicate that Cas promotes cell migration by linking actomyosin contractions to the adhesion complexes through a dynamic interaction with Src as well as through the phosphorylation-dependent association with the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:24928898

  18. PDGFBB promotes PDGFR{alpha}-positive cell migration into artificial bone in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Shigeyuki [Department of Dentistry and Oral Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Center for Human Metabolomic Systems Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Iwasaki, Ryotaro; Kawana, Hiromasa [Department of Dentistry and Oral Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Miyauchi, Yoshiteru [Center for Human Metabolomic Systems Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Integrated Bone Metabolism and Immunology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hoshi, Hiroko; Miyamoto, Hiroya; Mori, Tomoaki [Center for Human Metabolomic Systems Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Kanagawa, Hiroya [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Katsuyama, Eri; Fujie, Atsuhiro [Center for Human Metabolomic Systems Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hao, Wu [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); and others

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined effects of PDGFBB in PDGFR{alpha} positive cell migration in artificial bones. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PDGFBB was not expressed in osteoblastic cells but was expressed in peripheral blood cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PDGFBB promoted PDGFR{alpha} positive cell migration into artificial bones but not osteoblast proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PDGFBB did not inhibit osteoblastogenesis. -- Abstract: Bone defects caused by traumatic bone loss or tumor dissection are now treated with auto- or allo-bone graft, and also occasionally by artificial bone transplantation, particularly in the case of large bone defects. However, artificial bones often exhibit poor affinity to host bones followed by bony union failure. Thus therapies combining artificial bones with growth factors have been sought. Here we report that platelet derived growth factor bb (PDGFBB) promotes a significant increase in migration of PDGF receptor {alpha} (PDGFR{alpha})-positive mesenchymal stem cells/pre-osteoblastic cells into artificial bone in vivo. Growth factors such as transforming growth factor beta (TGF{beta}) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) reportedly inhibit osteoblast differentiation; however, PDGFBB did not exhibit such inhibitory effects and in fact stimulated osteoblast differentiation in vitro, suggesting that combining artificial bones with PDGFBB treatment could promote host cell migration into artificial bones without inhibiting osteoblastogenesis.

  19. Jin Fu Kang Oral Liquid Inhibits Lymphatic Endothelial Cells Formation and Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Lang He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Jin Fu Kang (JFK, an oral liquid prescription of Chinese herbal drugs, has been clinically available for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Lymphangiogenesis is a primary event in the process of cancer development and metastasis, and the formation and migration of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs play a key role in the lymphangiogenesis. To assess the activity of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1 and the coeffect of SDF-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C on the formation and migration of LECs and clarify the inhibitory effects of JFK on the LECs, the LECs were differentiated from CD34+/VEGFR-3+ endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, and JFK-containing serums were prepared from rats. SDF-1 and VEGF-C both induced the differentiation of CD34+/VEGFR-3+ EPCs towards LECs and enhanced the LECs migration. Couse of SDF-1 and VEGF-C displayed an additive effect on the LECs formation but not on their migration. JFK inhibited the formation and migration of LECs, and the inhibitory effects were most probably via regulation of the SDF-1/CXCR4 and VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 axes. The current finding suggested that JFK might inhibit NSCLC through antilymphangiogenesis and also provided a potential to discover antilymphangiogenesis agents from natural resources.

  20. C3G regulates cortical neuron migration, preplate splitting and radial glial cell attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Anne K; Britto, Joanne M; Dixon, Mathew P; Sheikh, Bilal N; Collin, Caitlin; Tan, Seong-Seng; Thomas, Tim

    2008-06-01

    Neuronal migration is integral to the development of the cerebral cortex and higher brain function. Cortical neuron migration defects lead to mental disorders such as lissencephaly and epilepsy. Interaction of neurons with their extracellular environment regulates cortical neuron migration through cell surface receptors. However, it is unclear how the signals from extracellular matrix proteins are transduced intracellularly. We report here that mouse embryos lacking the Ras family guanine nucleotide exchange factor, C3G (Rapgef1, Grf2), exhibit a cortical neuron migration defect resulting in a failure to split the preplate into marginal zone and subplate and a failure to form a cortical plate. C3G-deficient cortical neurons fail to migrate. Instead, they arrest in a multipolar state and accumulate below the preplate. The basement membrane is disrupted and radial glial processes are disorganised and lack attachment in C3G-deficient brains. C3G is activated in response to reelin in cortical neurons, which, in turn, leads to activation of the small GTPase Rap1. In C3G-deficient cells, Rap1 GTP loading in response to reelin stimulation is reduced. In conclusion, the Ras family regulator C3G is essential for two aspects of cortex development, namely radial glial attachment and neuronal migration.

  1. VEGF-A isoform-specific regulation of calcium ion flux, transcriptional activation and endothelial cell migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W. Fearnley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A regulates many aspects of vascular physiology such as cell migration, proliferation, tubulogenesis and cell-cell interactions. Numerous isoforms of VEGF-A exist but their physiological significance is unclear. Here we evaluated two different VEGF-A isoforms and discovered differential regulation of cytosolic calcium ion flux, transcription factor localisation and endothelial cell response. Analysis of VEGF-A isoform-specific stimulation of VEGFR2-dependent signal transduction revealed differential capabilities for isoform activation of multiple signal transduction pathways. VEGF-A165 treatment promoted increased phospholipase Cγ1 phosphorylation, which was proportional to the subsequent rise in cytosolic calcium ions, in comparison to cells treated with VEGF-A121. A major consequence of this VEGF-A isoform-specific calcium ion flux in endothelial cells is differential dephosphorylation and subsequent nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NFATc2. Using reverse genetics, we discovered that NFATc2 is functionally required for VEGF-A-stimulated endothelial cell migration but not tubulogenesis. This work presents a new mechanism for understanding how VEGF-A isoforms program complex cellular outputs by converting signal transduction pathways into transcription factor redistribution to the nucleus, as well as defining a novel role for NFATc2 in regulating the endothelial cell response.

  2. Stopping cancer in its tracks: using small molecular inhibitors to target glioblastoma migrating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, Austin K; Li, Jing; Adamson, David C

    2012-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) represents one of the most common aggressive types of primary brain tumors. Despite advances in surgical resection, novel neuroimaging procedures, and the most recent adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the median survival after diagnosis is about 12-14 months. Targeting migrating GBM cells is a key research strategy in the fight against this devastating cancer. Though the vast majority of the primary tumor focus can be surgically resected, these migrating cells are responsible for its universal recurrence. Numerous strategies and technologies are being explored to target migrating glioma cells, with small molecular inhibitors as one of the most commonly studied. Small molecule inhibitors, such as protein kinase inhibitors, phosphorylation site inhibitors, protease inhibitors, and antisense oligonucleotides show promise in slowing the progression of this disease. A better understanding of these small molecule inhibitors and how they target various extra- and intracellular signaling pathways may eventually lead to a cure for GBM.

  3. Embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitors transplanted to the hippocampus migrate on host vasculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea M. Lassiter

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the migration of transplanted ESNPs either injected directly into the hippocampus of a mouse, seeded onto hippocampal slices, or under in vitro culture conditions. We show that transplanted mouse ESNPs associate with, and appear to migrate on the surface of the vasculature, and that human ESNPs also associate with blood vessels when seeded on hippocampal slices, and migrate towards BECs in vitro using a Boyden chamber assay. This initial adhesion to vessels is mediated, at least in part, via the integrin α6β1, as observed for SVZ neural progenitor cells. Our data are consistent with CXCL12, expressed by the astroglial-vasculature niche, playing an important role in the migration of transplanted neural progenitors within and outside of the hippocampus.

  4. Human cytomegalovirus chemokine receptor US28 induces migration of cells on a CX3CL1-presenting surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortø, Gertrud M; Kiilerich-Pedersen, Katrine; Selmeczi, David;

    2013-01-01

    endothelium. We observed that US28-expressing cells migrated more than CX3CR1-expressing cells when adhering to immobilized CX3CL1. US28-induced migration was G protein-signalling dependent and was blocked by the phospholipase Cβ inhibitor U73122 and the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA-AM. In addition......, migration was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by competition from CCL2 and CCL5, whereas CCL3 had little effect. Instead of migrating, CX3CR1-expressing cells performed 'dancing-on-the-spot' movements, demonstrating that anchored CX3CL1 acts as a strong tether for these cells. At low receptor...

  5. Global developmental gene expression and pathway analysis of normal brain development and mouse models of human neuronal migration defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziano Pramparo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Heterozygous LIS1 mutations are the most common cause of human lissencephaly, a human neuronal migration defect, and DCX mutations are the most common cause of X-linked lissencephaly. LIS1 is part of a protein complex including NDEL1 and 14-3-3ε that regulates dynein motor function and microtubule dynamics, while DCX stabilizes microtubules and cooperates with LIS1 during neuronal migration and neurogenesis. Targeted gene mutations of Lis1, Dcx, Ywhae (coding for 14-3-3ε, and Ndel1 lead to neuronal migration defects in mouse and provide models of human lissencephaly, as well as aid the study of related neuro-developmental diseases. Here we investigated the developing brain of these four mutants and wild-type mice using expression microarrays, bioinformatic analyses, and in vivo/in vitro experiments to address whether mutations in different members of the LIS1 neuronal migration complex lead to similar and/or distinct global gene expression alterations. Consistent with the overall successful development of the mutant brains, unsupervised clustering and co-expression analysis suggested that cell cycle and synaptogenesis genes are similarly expressed and co-regulated in WT and mutant brains in a time-dependent fashion. By contrast, focused co-expression analysis in the Lis1 and Ndel1 mutants uncovered substantial differences in the correlation among pathways. Differential expression analysis revealed that cell cycle, cell adhesion, and cytoskeleton organization pathways are commonly altered in all mutants, while synaptogenesis, cell morphology, and inflammation/immune response are specifically altered in one or more mutants. We found several commonly dysregulated genes located within pathogenic deletion/duplication regions, which represent novel candidates of human mental retardation and neurocognitive disabilities. Our analysis suggests that gene expression and pathway analysis in mouse models of a similar disorder or within a common pathway can

  6. In-Vivo Imaging of Cell Migration Using Contrast Enhanced MRI and SVM Based Post-Processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Weis

    Full Text Available The migration of cells within a living organism can be observed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in combination with iron oxide nanoparticles as an intracellular contrast agent. This method, however, suffers from low sensitivity and specificty. Here, we developed a quantitative non-invasive in-vivo cell localization method using contrast enhanced multiparametric MRI and support vector machines (SVM based post-processing. Imaging phantoms consisting of agarose with compartments containing different concentrations of cancer cells labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles were used to train and evaluate the SVM for cell localization. From the magnitude and phase data acquired with a series of T2*-weighted gradient-echo scans at different echo-times, we extracted features that are characteristic for the presence of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, in particular hyper- and hypointensities, relaxation rates, short-range phase perturbations, and perturbation dynamics. High detection quality was achieved by SVM analysis of the multiparametric feature-space. The in-vivo applicability was validated in animal studies. The SVM detected the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles in the imaging phantoms with high specificity and sensitivity with a detection limit of 30 labeled cells per mm3, corresponding to 19 μM of iron oxide. As proof-of-concept, we applied the method to follow the migration of labeled cancer cells injected in rats. The combination of iron oxide labeled cells, multiparametric MRI and a SVM based post processing provides high spatial resolution, specificity, and sensitivity, and is therefore suitable for non-invasive in-vivo cell detection and cell migration studies over prolonged time periods.

  7. Effects of Garlic Oil on the Migration of Neutrophil-Like Cell Studied by Using a Chemotactic Gradient Labchip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Chen Shih

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have designed and fabricated a novel chemotactic gradient Labchip for studying cell migration quantitatively. Owing to the great potential of garlic and its preparations in developing antiinflammatory drugs, the aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of garlic oil on the locomotion of a neutrophil-like cell by measuring the dynamic features of cell migration including migration direction, average migration speed, chemotactic index (CI, and motility index (MI with the newly designed Labchip. We found that garlic oil treatment lowered the values of CI and MI and reduced the average speed of cell migration from 13 to 8 μm/min. The results indicate that garlic oil is a potential inhibitor for neutrophil-like cell migration and chemotactic responsiveness. By comparing with the effects of nocodazole and cytochalasin B, we also suggest that the antiinflammatory activity exhibited by garlic oil was mainly through inhibiting the assembly-disassembly processes of the cytoskeleton.

  8. miR-148b-3p promotes migration of Schwann cells by targeting cullin-associated and neddylation-dissociated 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-mei Qian; Song-lin Zhou; Li-li Zhao; Jing Wang; Ping Li; Jing Qin; Yi-sheng Liu; Bin Yu; Fei Ding; Xiao-song Gu

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively adjust gene expression in multifarious biological processes. Howev-er, the regulatory effects of miRNAs on Schwann cells remain poorly understood. Previous microarray analysis results have shown that miRNA expression is altered following sciatic nerve transaction, thereby affecting proliferation and migration of Schwann cells. This study investigated whether miR-148b-3p could regulate migration of Schwann cells by directly targeting cullin-associated and neddylation-disso-ciated 1 (Cand1). Up-regulated expression of miR-148b-3p promoted Schwann cell migration, whereas silencing of miR-148b-3p inhibited Schwann cell migrationin vitro. Further experiments conifrmed that Cand1 was a direct target of miR-148b-3p, and Cand1 knockdown reversed suppression of the miR-148b-3p inhibitor on Schwann cell migration. These results suggested that miR-148b-3p promoted migra-tion of Schwann cells by directly targeting Cand1in vitro.

  9. Investigating migration inhibition and apoptotic effects of Fomitopsis pinicola chloroform extract on human colorectal cancer SW-480 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqin Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fomitopsis pinicola (Sw. Ex Fr.m Karst (FPK which belongs to the Basidiomycota fungal class is one of the most popular medical fungi in China. It has been used for many diseases: cancer, heart diseases, diabetes and so on. However, little study on the pro-apoptotic effect and migration inhibition of FPK chloroform extract (FPKc has been reported and the possible involved mechanism has not been illuminated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Chemical analysis was performed by HPLC which showed ergosterol (ES concentration was 105 µg/mg. MTT assay revealed that FPKc could selectively inhibit SW-480 cells viability with the IC50 of 190.28 µg/ml. Wound healing and transwell assay indicated that FPKc could inhibit the migration of SW-480 cells obviously, FPKc could also dramatically decreased the matrix metalloproteinases-2, 9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining, nuclear Hoechst 33342 staining and DNA fragmentation analysis revealed that FPKc and ES could induce SW-480 cells apoptosis. The apoptosis process closely involved in ROS accumulation and depletion of GSH, activation of caspase 3, poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP degradation. FPKc could also up-regulate P53 expression and thus lead to G1 phase arrest. When SW-480 cells were pretreated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC, the ROS generation, cell viability and apoptotic ratio were partially declined, which indicated that ROS was vertical in the pro-apoptosis process induced by FPKc. Moreover, in the whole process, ES which has been previously found in FPKc had the similar effect to FPKc. Thus we could conclude that ES, as one of the highest abundant components in FPKc, might also be one of the active constituents. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: FPKc could inhibit the migration of SW-480 cells, induce SW-480 cells G1 phase arrest and cause ROS-mediated apoptosis effect. And ES might be one of the effective constituents in the whole process.

  10. Radioautographic study of the synthesis and migration of glycoproteins in the cells of the rat adrenal medulla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rats were injected intravenously with (3H) fucose to study the synthesis and migration of glycoproteins into adrenaline-storing and noradrenaline-storing cells of the adrenal medulla and to evaluate the fate of this radioactive sugar in both serum and adrenal-medulla at various time intervals. Radioactivity was decreased in serum by 50% between 5 and 20 min after the injection and by a hundred fold with 1 h. There was a sharp decrease in the radioactivity of the adrenal-medulla between 5 and 20 min after the injection and a slight, continuous decrease thereafter. The adrenal-medullae were fixed 5 min, 20 min, 1 h and 4 h after intravenous injection of [3H] fucose, and radiautographs were analysed quantitatively after development in Microdol X. Kinetic analysis showed that, in both cell types, glycoprotein synthesis is completed in the Golgi complex and glycoproteins migrate subsequently to the secretory granules and to the cell coat. This analysis also revealed that [3H] fucose moves much more rapidly in the Golgi complex of noradrenaline-storing cells than in that of adrenaline-storing cells and appears much earlier in the secretory granules of the former cell type

  11. Ion channels involved in cell volume regulation: effects on migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death in non adherent EAT cells and adherent ELA cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2011-01-01

    This mini review outlines studies of cell volume regulation in two closely related mammalian cell lines: nonadherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettre ascites (ELA) cells. Focus is on the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) that occurs after cell swelling, the volume regulatory ion channels involved, and the mechanisms (cellular signalling pathways) that regulate these channels. Finally, I shall also briefly review current investigations in these two cell lines that focuses on how changes in cell volume can regulate cell functions such as cell migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death.

  12. NFAT5 promotes proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells in part through regulating AQP5 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Kai, E-mail: gk161@163.com [Department of Respiration, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Department of Respiration, 161th Hospital, PLA, Wuhan 430015 (China); Jin, Faguang, E-mail: jinfag@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Respiration, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China)

    2015-09-25

    The osmoregulated transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5(NFAT5), has been found to play important roles in the development of many kinds of human cancers, including breast cancer, colon carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma and melanoma. The aim of the present study was to determine whether NFAT5 is involved in the proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. We found that NFAT5 was upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of NFAT5 decreased proliferation and migration of the cells, accompanied by a significant reduction in the expression of AQP5. AQP5 was upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of AQP5 also inhibited proliferation and migration of the cells as knockdown of NFAT5 did. Moreover, overexpression of NFAT5 promoted proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells, accompanied by a significant increase in the expression of AQP5. These results indicate that NFAT5 plays important roles in proliferation and migration of human lung adenocarcinoma cells through regulating AQP5 expression, providing a new therapeutic option for lung adenocarcinoma therapy. - Highlights: • NFAT5 expression is higher in lung adenocarcinoma cells compared with normal cells. • NFAT5 knockdown decreases proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Knockdown of NFAT5 reduces AQP5 expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Overexpression of NFAT5 promotes proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Overexpression of NFAT5 increases AQP5 expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  13. NFAT5 promotes proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells in part through regulating AQP5 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The osmoregulated transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5(NFAT5), has been found to play important roles in the development of many kinds of human cancers, including breast cancer, colon carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma and melanoma. The aim of the present study was to determine whether NFAT5 is involved in the proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. We found that NFAT5 was upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of NFAT5 decreased proliferation and migration of the cells, accompanied by a significant reduction in the expression of AQP5. AQP5 was upregulated in lung adenocarcinoma cells and knockdown of AQP5 also inhibited proliferation and migration of the cells as knockdown of NFAT5 did. Moreover, overexpression of NFAT5 promoted proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells, accompanied by a significant increase in the expression of AQP5. These results indicate that NFAT5 plays important roles in proliferation and migration of human lung adenocarcinoma cells through regulating AQP5 expression, providing a new therapeutic option for lung adenocarcinoma therapy. - Highlights: • NFAT5 expression is higher in lung adenocarcinoma cells compared with normal cells. • NFAT5 knockdown decreases proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Knockdown of NFAT5 reduces AQP5 expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Overexpression of NFAT5 promotes proliferation and migration of lung adenocarcinoma cells. • Overexpression of NFAT5 increases AQP5 expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

  14. T Cell Interstitial Migration: Motility Cues from the Inflamed Tissue for Micro- and Macro-Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylo, Alison; Schrock, Dillon C.; Fernandes, Ninoshka R. J.; Fowell, Deborah J.

    2016-01-01

    Effector T cells exit the inflamed vasculature into an environment shaped by tissue-specific structural configurations and inflammation-imposed extrinsic modifications. Once within interstitial spaces of non-lymphoid tissues, T cells migrate in an apparent random, non-directional, fashion. Efficient T cell scanning of the tissue environment is essential for successful location of infected target cells or encounter with antigen-presenting cells that activate the T cell’s antimicrobial effector functions. The mechanisms of interstitial T cell motility and the environmental cues that may promote or hinder efficient tissue scanning are poorly understood. The extracellular matrix (ECM) appears to play an important scaffolding role in guidance of T cell migration and likely provides a platform for the display of chemotactic factors that may help to direct the positioning of T cells. Here, we discuss how intravital imaging has provided insight into the motility patterns and cellular machinery that facilitates T cell interstitial migration and the critical environmental factors that may optimize the efficiency of effector T cell scanning of the inflamed tissue. Specifically, we highlight the local micro-positioning cues T cells encounter as they migrate within inflamed tissues, from surrounding ECM and signaling molecules, as well as a requirement for appropriate long-range macro-positioning within distinct tissue compartments or at discrete foci of infection or tissue damage. The central nervous system (CNS) responds to injury and infection by extensively remodeling the ECM and with the de novo generation of a fibroblastic reticular network that likely influences T cell motility. We examine how inflammation-induced changes to the CNS landscape may regulate T cell tissue exploration and modulate function. PMID:27790220

  15. Tbx16 and Msgn1 are required to establish directional cell migration of zebrafish mesodermal progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Alyssa J; Kimelman, David

    2015-10-15

    The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an essential process that occurs repeatedly during embryogenesis whereby stably adherent cells convert to an actively migrating state. While much is known about the factors and events that initiate the EMT, the steps that cells undergo to become directionally migratory are far less well understood. Zebrafish embryos lacking the transcription factors Tbx16/Spadetail and Mesogenin1 (Msgn1) are a valuable system for investigating the EMT. Mesodermal cells in these embryos are unable to perform the EMT necessary to leave the most posterior end of the body (the tailbud) and join the pre-somitic mesoderm, a process that is conserved in all vertebrates. It has previously been very difficult to study this EMT in vertebrates because of the multiple cell types in the tailbud and the morphogenetic changes the whole embryo undergoes. Here, we describe a novel tissue explant system for imaging the mesodermal cell EMT in vivo that allows us to investigate the requirements for cells to acquire migratory properties during the EMT with high spatio-temporal resolution. This method revealed that, despite the inability of tbx16;msgn1-deficient cells to leave the tailbud, actin-based protrusions form surprisingly normally in these cells and they become highly motile. However, tbx16;msgn1-deficient cells have specific cell-autonomous defects in the persistence and anterior direction of migration because the lamellipodia they form are not productive in driving anteriorward migration. Additionally, we show that mesoderm morphogenesis and differentiation are separable and that there is a migratory cue that directs mesodermal cell migration that is independent of Tbx16 and Msgn1. This work defines changes that cells undergo as they complete the EMT and provides new insight into the mechanisms required in vivo for cells to become mesenchymal.

  16. Cell surface syndecan-1 contributes to binding and function of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) on epithelial tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualon, Tobias; Lue, Hongqi; Groening, Sabine; Pruessmeyer, Jessica; Jahr, Holger; Denecke, Bernd; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Ludwig, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Surface expressed proteoglycans mediate the binding of cytokines and chemokines to the cell surface and promote migration of various tumor cell types including epithelial tumor cells. We here demonstrate that binding of the chemokine-like inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) to epithelial lung and breast tumor cell lines A549 and MDA-MB231 is sensitive to enzymatic digestion of heparan sulphate chains and competitive inhibition with heparin. Moreover, MIF interaction with heparin was confirmed by chromatography and a structural comparison indicated a possible heparin binding site. These results suggested that proteoglycans carrying heparan sulphate chains are involved in MIF binding. Using shRNA-mediated gene silencing, we identified syndecan-1 as the predominant proteoglycan required for the interaction with MIF. MIF binding was decreased by induction of proteolytic shedding of syndecan-1, which could be prevented by inhibition of the metalloproteinases involved in this process. Finally, MIF induced the chemotactic migration of A549 cells, wound closure and invasion into matrigel without affecting cell proliferation. These MIF-induced responses were abrogated by heparin or by silencing of syndecan-1. Thus, our study indicates that syndecan-1 on epithelial tumor cells promotes MIF binding and MIF-mediated cell migration. This may represent a relevant mechanism through which MIF enhances tumor cell motility and metastasis.

  17. Effect of bortezomib on migration and invasion in cervical carcinoma HeLa cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong; Shi; Guo-Bin; Zhang; Shu-Wang; Yin

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effect of bortezomib on migration and invasion of cervical carcinoma HeLa cell and specific molecular mechanism.Methods:The effect of bortezomib on the viability of HeLa cell was measured by MTT assay.The effect of bortezomib on cell migration and invasion was measured by Transwell assay and invasion experiment respectively.The activation of Akt/mTOR signaling pathway and expression level of MMP2,MMP9 were assayed by western blot.Results:MTT assay indicated bortezomib(2.5 μM.5 μM,10 μM)could inhibit HeLa cell viability,and the inhibitory rate was highest at 48 h.Transwell assay and invasion experiment results showed that bortezomib inhibited HeLa cell migration and invasion.Western blotting assays presented bortezomib could suppress the phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR.and down-regulate the expression of MMP2 and MMP9.Conclusions:These results suggested bortezomib could inhibit migration and invasion in cervical carcinoma HeLa cell,which might be related to Akt/mTOR signal pathway.

  18. Effect of bortezomib on migration and invasion in cervical carcinoma HeLa cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong Shi; Guo-Bin Zhang; Shu-Wang Yin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of bortezomib on migration and invasion of cervical carcinoma HeLa cell and specific molecular mechanism. Methods:The effect of bortezomib on the viability of HeLa cell was measured by MTT assay. The effect of bortezomib on cell migration and invasion was measured by Transwell assay and invasion experiment respectively. The activation of Akt/mTOR signaling pathway and expression level of MMP2, MMP9 were assayed by western blot. Results:MTT assay indicated bortezomib (2.5μM, 5μM, 10μM) could inhibit HeLa cell viability, and the inhibitory rate was highest at 48 h. Transwell assay and invasion experiment results showed that bortezomib inhibited HeLa cell migration and invasion. Western blotting assays presented bortezomib could suppress the phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR, and down-regulate the expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Conclusions:These results suggested bortezomib could inhibit migration and invasion in cervical carcinoma HeLa cell, which might be related to Akt/mTOR signal pathway.

  19. Cardiotoxin III Inhibits Proliferation and Migration of Oral Cancer Cells through MAPK and MMP Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yu Yen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiotoxin III (CTXIII, isolated from the snake venom of Formosan cobra Naja naja atra, has previously been found to induce apoptosis in many types of cancer. Early metastasis is typical for the progression of oral cancer. To modulate the cell migration behavior of oral cancer is one of the oral cancer therapies. In this study, the possible modulating effect of CTXIII on oral cancer migration is addressed. In the example of oral squamous carcinoma Ca9-22 cells, the cell viability was decreased by CTXIII treatment in a dose-responsive manner. In wound-healing assay, the cell migration of Ca9-22 cells was attenuated by CTXIII in a dose- and time-responsive manner. After CTXIII treatment, the MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein expressions were downregulated, and the phosphorylation of JNK and p38-MAPK was increased independent of ERK phosphorylation. In conclusion, CTXIII has antiproliferative and -migrating effects on oral cancer cells involving the p38-MAPK and MMP-2/-9 pathways.

  20. Axitinib affects cell viability and migration of a primary foetal lung adenocarcinoma culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menna, Cecilia; De Falco, Elena; Pacini, Luca; Scafetta, Gaia; Ruggieri, Paola; Puca, Rosa; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Ciccone, Anna Maria; Rendina, Erino Angelo; Calogero, Antonella; Ibrahim, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Fetal lung adenocarcinoma (FLAC) is a rare variant of lung adenocarcinoma. Studies regarding FLAC have been based only on histopathological observations, thus representative in vitro models of FLAC cultures are unavailable. We have established and characterized a human primary FLAC cell culture, exploring its biology, chemosensitivity, and migration. FLAC cells and specimen showed significant upregulation of VEGF165 and HIF-1α mRNA levels. This observation was confirmed by in vitro chemosensitivity and migration assay, showing that only Axitinib was comparable to Cisplatin treatment. We provide a suitable in vitro model to further investigate the nature of this rare type of cancer. PMID:24380379

  1. Modeled microgravity suppressed invasion and migration of human glioblastoma U87 cells through downregulating store-operated calcium entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor and is characterized with robust invasion and migration potential resulting in poor prognosis. Previous investigations have demonstrated that modeled microgravity (MMG) could decline the cell proliferation and attenuate the metastasis potential in several cell lines. In this study, we studied the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials of glioblastoma in human glioblastoma U87 cells. We found that MMG stimulation significantly attenuated the invasion and migration potentials, decreased thapsigargin (TG) induced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and downregulated the expression of Orai1 in U87 cells. Inhibition of SOCE by 2-APB or stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) downregulation both mimicked the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Furthermore, upregulation of Orai1 significantly weakened the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Therefore, these findings indicated that MMG stimulation inhibited the invasion and migration potentials of U87 cells by downregulating the expression of Orai1 and sequentially decreasing the SOCE, suggesting that MMG might be a new potential therapeutic strategy in glioblastoma treatment in the future. - Highlights: • Modeled microgravity (MMG) suppressed migration and invasion in U87 cells. • MMG downregulated the SOCE and the expression of Orai1. • SOCE inhibition mimicked the effects of MMG on migration and invasion potentials. • Restoration of SOCE diminished the effects of MMG on migration and invasion

  2. Modeled microgravity suppressed invasion and migration of human glioblastoma U87 cells through downregulating store-operated calcium entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Zi-xuan [Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Rao, Wei [Department of Neurosurgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Wang, Huan [Department of Dermatology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Wang, Nan-ding [Department of Cardiology, Xi' an Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Si, Jing-Wen; Zhao, Jiao; Li, Jun-chang [Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Wang, Zong-ren, E-mail: zongren@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China)

    2015-02-13

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor and is characterized with robust invasion and migration potential resulting in poor prognosis. Previous investigations have demonstrated that modeled microgravity (MMG) could decline the cell proliferation and attenuate the metastasis potential in several cell lines. In this study, we studied the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials of glioblastoma in human glioblastoma U87 cells. We found that MMG stimulation significantly attenuated the invasion and migration potentials, decreased thapsigargin (TG) induced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and downregulated the expression of Orai1 in U87 cells. Inhibition of SOCE by 2-APB or stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) downregulation both mimicked the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Furthermore, upregulation of Orai1 significantly weakened the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Therefore, these findings indicated that MMG stimulation inhibited the invasion and migration potentials of U87 cells by downregulating the expression of Orai1 and sequentially decreasing the SOCE, suggesting that MMG might be a new potential therapeutic strategy in glioblastoma treatment in the future. - Highlights: • Modeled microgravity (MMG) suppressed migration and invasion in U87 cells. • MMG downregulated the SOCE and the expression of Orai1. • SOCE inhibition mimicked the effects of MMG on migration and invasion potentials. • Restoration of SOCE diminished the effects of MMG on migration and invasion.

  3. Heparan Sulfate Inhibits Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Migration and Engraftment in Mucopolysaccharidosis I*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, H. Angharad; Holley, Rebecca J.; Langford-Smith, Kia J.; Wilkinson, Fiona L.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Wynn, Robert F.; Wraith, J. Edmond; Merry, Catherine L. R.; Bigger, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis I Hurler (MPSI-H) is a pediatric lysosomal storage disease caused by genetic deficiencies in IDUA, coding for α-l-iduronidase. Idua−/− mice share similar clinical pathology with patients, including the accumulation of the undegraded glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) heparan sulfate (HS), and dermatan sulfate (DS), progressive neurodegeneration, and dysostosis multiplex. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the most effective treatment for Hurler patients, but reduced intensity conditioning is a risk factor in transplantation, suggesting an underlying defect in hematopoietic cell engraftment. HS is a co-receptor in the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) migration to the bone marrow (BM), but the effect of HS alterations on HSPC migration, or the functional role of HS in MPSI-H are unknown. We demonstrate defective WT HSPC engraftment and migration in Idua−/− recipient BM, particularly under reduced intensity conditioning. Both intra- but especially extracellular Idua−/− BM HS was significantly increased and abnormally sulfated. Soluble heparinase-sensitive GAGs from Idua−/− BM and specifically 2-O-sulfated HS, elevated in Idua−/− BM, both inhibited CXCL12-mediated WT HSPC transwell migration, while DS had no effect. Thus we have shown that excess overly sulfated extracellular HS binds, and sequesters CXCL12, limiting hematopoietic migration and providing a potential mechanism for the limited scope of HSCT in Hurler disease. PMID:25359774

  4. DEX-1 and DYF-7 establish sensory dendrite length by anchoring dendritic tips during cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Heiman, Maxwell G.; Shaham, Shai

    2009-01-01

    Cells are devices whose structures delimit function. For example, in the nervous system, neuronal and glial shapes dictate paths of information flow. To understand how cells acquire their shapes, we examined the formation of a sense organ in C. elegans. Using time-lapse imaging, we found that sensory dendrites form by stationary anchoring of dendritic tips during cell-body migration. A genetic screen identified DEX-1 and DYF-7, extracellular proteins required for dendritic tip anchoring, whic...

  5. A microfluidic-based genetic screen to identify microbial virulence factors that inhibit dendritic cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    McLaughlin, Laura M.; Xu, Hui; Carden, Sarah E.; Fisher, Samantha; Reyes, Monique; Heilshorn, Sarah C.; Monack, Denise M.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial pathogens are able to modulate host cells and evade the immune system by multiple mechanisms. For example, Salmonella injects effector proteins into host cells and evades the host immune system in part by inhibiting dendritic cell (DC) migration. The identification of microbial factors that modulate normal host functions should lead to the development of new classes of therapeutics that target these pathways. Current screening methods to identify either host or pathogen genes involv...

  6. Cellular bridges: Routes for intercellular communication and cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Zani, Brett G.; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2010-01-01

    Cell-to-cell communication is the basis of all biology in multicellular organisms, allowing evolution of complex forms and viability in dynamic environments. Though biochemical interactions occur over distances, physical continuity remains the most direct means of cellular interactions. Cellular bridging through thin cytoplasmic channels—plasmodesmata in plants and tunneling nanotubes in animals—creates direct routes for transfer of signals and components, even pathogens, between cells. Recen...

  7. Migration of Drosophila intestinal stem cells across organ boundaries

    OpenAIRE

    Takashima, Shigeo; Paul, Manash; Aghajanian, Patrick; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-01-01

    All components of the Drosophila intestinal tract, including the endodermal midgut and ectodermal hindgut/Malpighian tubules, maintain populations of dividing stem cells. In the midgut and hindgut, these stem cells originate from within larger populations of intestinal progenitors that proliferate during the larval stage and form the adult intestine during metamorphosis. The origin of stem cells found in the excretory Malpighian tubules (‘renal stem cells’) has not been established. In this p...

  8. TGF-β1 promotes the migration and invasion of bladder carcinoma cells by increasing fascin1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Naiwen; Bi, Xiaojun; Zeng, Yu; Zhu, Yuyan; Zhang, Zhe; Liu, Yang; Wang, Jianfeng; Li, Xuejie; Bi, Jianbin; Kong, Chuize

    2016-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is a multifunctional cytokine that is reported to regulate cellular motility and invasive capability during tumor progression. Fascin1, an actin-bundling protein, increases cell motility, migration and adhesion. To investigate the function of TGF-β1 and test whether fascin1 is an important mediator of the tumor response to TGF-β1 in bladder carcinoma cells, real-time RT-PCR and western blot analysis were used to test changes in fascin1 expression after TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml) treatment in T24 and BIU87 cells. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique was performed to silence fascin1. Cell viability and biological behavior changes were evaluated by cell growth (MTT), wound-healing and Matrigel invasion assays. In the present study, we found that the mRNA and protein levels of fascin1 in the T24 and BIU87 cells were significantly increased after 10 ng/ml TGF-β1 treatment (pTGF-β1. The findings suggested that TGF-β1 can promote invasion and migration of T24 and BIU87 bladder carcinoma cells, and the increase in fascin1 expression may be the key point of this impact of TGF-β1.

  9. Effect of S1P5 on proliferation and migration of human esophageal cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the sphingosine 1phosphate (S1P) receptor expression profile in human esophageal cancer cells and the effects of S1P5 on proliferation and migration of human esophageal cancer cells. METHODS: S1P receptor expression profile in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line Eca109 was detected by semiquantitative reverse trans cription polymerase chain reaction. Eca109 cells were stably transfected with S1P5EGFP or controlEGFP constructs. The relation between the responses of cell prol...

  10. Live imaging of Drosophila gonad formation reveals roles for Six4 in regulating germline and somatic cell migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarman Andrew P

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Movement of cells, either as amoeboid individuals or in organised groups, is a key feature of organ formation. Both modes of migration occur during Drosophila embryonic gonad development, which therefore provides a paradigm for understanding the contribution of these processes to organ morphogenesis. Gonads of Drosophila are formed from three distinct cell types: primordial germ cells (PGCs, somatic gonadal precursors (SGPs, and in males, male-specific somatic gonadal precursors (msSGPs. These originate in distinct locations and migrate to associate in two intermingled clusters which then compact to form the spherical primitive gonads. PGC movements are well studied, but much less is known of the migratory events and other interactions undergone by their somatic partners. These appear to move in organised groups like, for example, lateral line cells in zebra fish or Drosophila ovarian border cells. Results We have used time-lapse fluorescence imaging to characterise gonadal cell behaviour in wild type and mutant embryos. We show that the homeodomain transcription factor Six4 is required for the migration of the PGCs and the msSGPs towards the SGPs. We have identified a likely cause of this in the case of PGCs as we have found that Six4 is required for expression of Hmgcr which codes for HMGCoA reductase and is necessary for attraction of PGCs by SGPs. Six4 affects msSGP migration by a different pathway as these move normally in Hmgcr mutant embryos. Additionally, embryos lacking fully functional Six4 show a novel phenotype in which the SGPs, which originate in distinct clusters, fail to coalesce to form unified gonads. Conclusion Our work establishes the Drosophila gonad as a model system for the analysis of coordinated cell migrations and morphogenesis using live imaging and demonstrates that Six4 is a key regulator of somatic cell function during gonadogenesis. Our data suggest that the initial association of SGP clusters

  11. Design and Analysis of a Service Migration Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, Aamir; Olsen, Rasmus Løvenstein; Pedersen, Jens Myrup

    2013-01-01

    on another device. For such a need, an architecture is proposed to design and develop applications that migrate from one device to another and resume its operation. A simple application was constructed based on the proposed framework. Experiments were carried out to demonstrate its applicability...

  12. Iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate affects directional migration of aortic smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Bartolini

    Full Text Available Aortic smooth muscle cells produce chondroitin/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS proteoglycans that regulate extracellular matrix organization and cell behavior in normal and pathological conditions. A unique feature of CS/DS proteoglycans is the presence of iduronic acid (IdoA, catalyzed by two DS epimerases. Functional ablation of DS-epi1, the main epimerase in these cells, resulted in a major reduction of IdoA both on cell surface and in secreted CS/DS proteoglycans. Downregulation of IdoA led to delayed ability to re-populate wounded areas due to loss of directional persistence of migration. DS-epi1-/- aortic smooth muscle cells, however, had not lost the general property of migration showing even increased speed of movement compared to wild type cells. Where the cell membrane adheres to the substratum, stress fibers were denser whereas focal adhesion sites were fewer. Total cellular expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK and phospho-FAK (pFAK was decreased in mutant cells compared to control cells. As many pathological conditions are dependent on migration, modulation of IdoA content may point to therapeutic strategies for diseases such as cancer and atherosclerosis.

  13. Slit2 involvement in glioma cell migration is mediated by Robo1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsch, Sonja; Schmitz, Nicole; Jeibmann, Astrid; Geng, Jian-Guo; Paulus, Werner; Senner, Volker

    2008-03-01

    Slit and Robo proteins are evolutionarily conserved molecules whose interaction underlies axon guidance and neuronal precursor cell migration. During development secreted Slit proteins mediate chemorepulsive signals on cells expressing Robo receptors. Because similar molecular mechanisms may be utilized in glioma cell invasion and neuroblast migration, we studied the expression of Slit2 and its transmembrane receptor Robo1 as well as their functional role in migration in glioma cells. qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry of human specimens revealed that Slit2 was distinctly expressed by non-neoplastic neurons, but at only very low levels in fibrillary astrocytoma and glioblastoma. Robo1 also was mainly restricted to neurons in the normal brain, whereas astrocytic tumor cells in situ as well as glioblastoma cell lines overexpressed Robo1 at mRNA and protein levels. Recombinant human Slit2 in a concentration of 0.45 nM was repulsive for glioma cell lines in a modified Boyden chamber assay. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Robo1 in glioma cell lines neutralized the repulsive effect of Slit2, demonstrating that Robo1 served as the major Slit2 receptor. Our findings suggest that a chemorepulsive effect mediated by interaction of Slit2 and Robo1 participates in glioma cell guidance in the brain.

  14. 14-3-3ε Is required for germ cell migration in Drosophila.

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    K Kirki Tsigkari

    Full Text Available Although 14-3-3 proteins participate in multiple biological processes, isoform-specific specialized functions, as well as functional redundancy are emerging with tissue and developmental stage-specificity. Accordingly, the two 14-3-3ε proteins in Drosophila exhibit functional specificity and redundancy. Homozygotes for loss of function alleles of D14-3-3ε contain significantly fewer germ line cells (pole cells in their gonads, a phenotype not shared by mutants in the other 14-3-3 gene leo. We show that although D14-3-3ε is enriched within pole cells it is required in mesodermal somatic gonad precursor cells which guide pole cells in their migration through the mesoderm and coalesce with them to form the embryonic gonad. Loss of D14-3-3ε results in defective pole cell migration, reduced pole cell number. We present evidence that D14-3-3ε loss results in reduction or loss of the transcription factor Zfh-1, one of the main regulatory molecules of the pole cell migration, from the somatic gonad precursor cells.

  15. Downregulation of SOK1 promotes the migration of MCF-7 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xu-Dong, E-mail: xudongchen305@hotmail.com [Key Lab of Molecular Medicine, Ministry of Education, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Cho, Chien-Yu [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan (China)

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} SOK1 is a member of GCK-III subfamily. It is activated by oxidative stress or chemical anoxia. {yields} Barr's group have found that autophosphorylation of SOK1 is triggered by binding to the Golgi matrix protein GM130 and made the cells migration through dimeric adaptor protein 14-3-3. {yields} But what we found is that downregulation of SOK1 promotes cell migration and leads to the upregulation of GM130 and Tyr861 of FAK in MCF-7 cells. -- Abstract: SOK1 is a member of the germinal center kinase (GCK-III) subfamily but little is known about it, particularly with respect to its role in signal transduction pathways relative to tumor metastasis. By stably transfecting SOK1 siRNA into the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line we found that SOK1 promotes the migration of MCF-7 cells, as determined using wound-healing and Boyden chamber assays. However, cell proliferation assays revealed that silencing SOK1 had no effect on cell growth relative to the normal cells. Silencing SOK1 also had an effect on the expression and phosphorylation status of a number of proteins in MCF-7 cells, including FAK and GM130, whereby a decrease in SOK1 led to an increase in the expression of these proteins.

  16. Effect of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor α gene silencing on mouse gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUN, ZHONGWEI; MENG, YAN; LIU, GUOQIN; JIANG, YONGSHENG; MENG, QINGHUA; HU, SANYUAN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) gene co-silencing in mouse gastric cancer (GC) cells. Respectively, three pairs of liposome-encapsulated IL-1β and TNFα small interfering RNA (siRNA) were transfected into the mouse GC cell line MFC. The most effective siRNA, as identified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, was used for co-suppression of IL-1β and TNFα genes. The activities of cell proliferation, colony formation and migration were determined by the Cell Counting Kit 8 method, colony formation assay and Transwell assay, respectively. Protein array analysis was performed to identify the differentially expressed factors. The possible signaling pathways of the various factors targeting the genes were identified by pathway enrichment analysis using KOBAS 2.0. siRNA1 and siRNAc were the most effective interference sequences for IL-1β and TNFα, respectively. Following co-transfection of siRNA1 and siRNAc, the expression of IL-1β and TNFα was inhibited at the mRNA and protein levels, and the cell proliferation, colony forming and migration abilities were reduced (P<0.05). The expression of inflammatory factors, including chemokine ligand 5, cyclooxygenase-2, IL-6, transforming growth factor β, IL-17A, matrix metallopeptidase 9 and stromal cell-derived factor 1α were also inhibited (P<0.05). These factors are mainly involved in the rheumatoid arthritis pathway, the intestinal immune network for IgA production, the TNF signaling pathway and the inflammatory bowel disease pathway. IL-1β and TNFα gene silencing inhibits the proliferation and migration of MFC. The mechanisms may involve multiple inflammatory factors that participate in the signaling pathways of tumor tissue inflammation, the immune network and TNF. PMID:27073517

  17. The Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Production and Cell Migration in Human Immune Cells: Implications for Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Lynne Shinto; Gail Marracci; Lauren Bumgarner; Vijayshree Yadav

    2011-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), compromised blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity contributes to inflammatory T cell migration into the central nervous system. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is associated with BBB disruption and subsequent T cell migration into the CNS. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the effects of omega-3 fatty acids on MMP-9 levels and T cell migration. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy controls were pretreated with two types of omega-3 fatty acids...

  18. Y-27632 Increases Sensitivity of PANC-1 Cells to Epigallocatechin Gallate (EGCG) in Regulating Cell Proliferation and Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Bi, Yongyi

    2016-01-01

    Background The study aimed to investigate the inhibitory effect of (1R,4r)-4-((R)-1-aminoethyl)-N-(pyridin-4-yl) cyclohexanecarboxamide (Y-27632) and (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the proliferation and migration of PANC-1 cells. EGCG, found in green tea, has been previously shown to be one of the most abundant and powerful catechins in cancer prevention and treatment. Y-27632, a selective inhibitor of rho-associated protein kinase 1, is widely used in treating cardiovascular disease, inflammation, and cancer. Material/Methods PANC-1 cells, maintained in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium, were treated with dimethyl sulfoxide (control) as well as different concentrations (20, 40, 60, and 80 μg/mL) of EGCG for 48 h. In addition, PANC-1 cells were treated separately with 60 μg/mL EGCG, 20 μM Y-27632, and EGCG combined with Y-27632 (60 μg/mL EGCG + 20 μM Y-27632) for 48 h. The effect of EGCG and Y-27632 on the proliferation and migration of PANC-1 cells was evaluated using Cell Counting Kit-8 and transwell migration assays. The expression of peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and Caspase-3 mRNA was determined by Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Results EGCG (20–80 μg/mL) inhibited cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Y-27632 enhanced the sensitivity of PANC-1 cells to EGCG (by increasing the expression of PPARα and Caspase-3 mRNA) and suppressed cell proliferation. PANC-1 cell migration was inhibited by treatment with a combination of EGCG and Y-27632. Conclusions Y-27632 increases the sensitivity of PANC-1 cells to EGCG in regulating cell proliferation and migration, which is likely to be related to the expression of PPARα mRNA and Caspase-3 mRNA. PMID:27694793

  19. FGF8 activates proliferation and migration in mouse post-natal oligodendrocyte progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Cruz-Martinez

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8 is a key molecular signal that is necessary for early embryonic development of the central nervous system, quickly disappearing past this point. It is known to be one of the primary morphogenetic signals required for cell fate and survival processes in structures such as the cerebellum, telencephalic and isthmic organizers, while its absence causes severe abnormalities in the nervous system and the embryo usually dies in early stages of development. In this work, we have observed a new possible therapeutic role for this factor in demyelinating disorders, such as leukodystrophy or multiple sclerosis. In vitro, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were cultured with differentiating medium and in the presence of FGF8. Differentiation and proliferation studies were performed by immunocytochemistry and PCR. Also, migration studies were performed in matrigel cultures, where oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were placed at a certain distance of a FGF8-soaked heparin bead. The results showed that both migration and proliferation was induced by FGF8. Furthermore, a similar effect was observed in an in vivo demyelinating mouse model, where oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were observed migrating towards the FGF8-soaked heparin beads where they were grafted. In conclusion, the results shown here demonstrate that FGF8 is a novel factor to induce oligodendrocyte progenitor cell activation, migration and proliferation in vitro, which can be extrapolated in vivo in demyelinated animal models.

  20. A microfluidic-based genetic screen to identify microbial virulence factors that inhibit dendritic cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Laura M; Xu, Hui; Carden, Sarah E; Fisher, Samantha; Reyes, Monique; Heilshorn, Sarah C; Monack, Denise M

    2014-04-01

    Microbial pathogens are able to modulate host cells and evade the immune system by multiple mechanisms. For example, Salmonella injects effector proteins into host cells and evades the host immune system in part by inhibiting dendritic cell (DC) migration. The identification of microbial factors that modulate normal host functions should lead to the development of new classes of therapeutics that target these pathways. Current screening methods to identify either host or pathogen genes involved in modulating migration towards a chemical signal are limited because they do not employ stable, precisely controlled chemical gradients. Here, we develop a positive selection microfluidic-based genetic screen that allows us to identify Salmonella virulence factors that manipulate DC migration within stable, linear chemokine gradients. Our screen identified 7 Salmonella effectors (SseF, SifA, SspH2, SlrP, PipB2, SpiC and SseI) that inhibit DC chemotaxis toward CCL19. This method is widely applicable for identifying novel microbial factors that influence normal host cell chemotaxis as well as revealing new mammalian genes involved in directed cell migration. PMID:24599496

  1. Control of directed cell migration in vivo by membrane-to-cortex attachment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Diz-Muñoz

    Full Text Available Cell shape and motility are primarily controlled by cellular mechanics. The attachment of the plasma membrane to the underlying actomyosin cortex has been proposed to be important for cellular processes involving membrane deformation. However, little is known about the actual function of membrane-to-cortex attachment (MCA in cell protrusion formation and migration, in particular in the context of the developing embryo. Here, we use a multidisciplinary approach to study MCA in zebrafish mesoderm and endoderm (mesendoderm germ layer progenitor cells, which migrate using a combination of different protrusion types, namely, lamellipodia, filopodia, and blebs, during zebrafish gastrulation. By interfering with the activity of molecules linking the cortex to the membrane and measuring resulting changes in MCA by atomic force microscopy, we show that reducing MCA in mesendoderm progenitors increases the proportion of cellular blebs and reduces the directionality of cell migration. We propose that MCA is a key parameter controlling the relative proportions of different cell protrusion types in mesendoderm progenitors, and thus is key in controlling directed migration during gastrulation.

  2. Identification of Novel Regulators of the JAK/STAT Signaling Pathway that Control Border Cell Migration in the Drosophila Ovary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadin, Afsoon; Starz-Gaiano, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    The Janus Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling pathway is an essential regulator of cell migration both in mammals and fruit flies. Cell migration is required for normal embryonic development and immune response but can also lead to detrimental outcomes, such as tumor metastasis. A cluster of cells termed “border cells” in the Drosophila ovary provides an excellent example of a collective cell migration, in which two different cell types coordinate their movements. Border cells arise within the follicular epithelium and are required to invade the neighboring cells and migrate to the oocyte to contribute to a fertilizable egg. Multiple components of the STAT signaling pathway are required during border cell specification and migration; however, the functions and identities of other potential regulators of the pathway during these processes are not yet known. To find new components of the pathway that govern cell invasiveness, we knocked down 48 predicted STAT modulators using RNAi expression in follicle cells, and assayed defective cell movement. We have shown that seven of these regulators are involved in either border cell specification or migration. Examination of the epistatic relationship between candidate genes and Stat92E reveals that the products of two genes, Protein tyrosine phosphatase 61F (Ptp61F) and brahma (brm), interact with Stat92E during both border cell specification and migration. PMID:27175018

  3. Tumorigenic fragments of APC cause dominant defects in directional cell migration in multiple model systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A. Nelson

    2012-11-01

    Nonsense mutations that result in the expression of truncated, N-terminal, fragments of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC tumour suppressor protein are found in most sporadic and some hereditary colorectal cancers. These mutations can cause tumorigenesis by eliminating β-catenin-binding sites from APC, which leads to upregulation of β-catenin and thereby results in the induction of oncogenes such as MYC. Here we show that, in three distinct experimental model systems, expression of an N-terminal fragment of APC (N-APC results in loss of directionality, but not speed, of cell motility independently of changes in β-catenin regulation. We developed a system to culture and fluorescently label live pieces of gut tissue to record high-resolution three-dimensional time-lapse movies of cells in situ. This revealed an unexpected complexity of normal gut cell migration, a key process in gut epithelial maintenance, with cells moving with spatial and temporal discontinuity. Quantitative comparison of gut tissue from wild-type mice and APC heterozygotes (APCMin/+; multiple intestinal neoplasia model demonstrated that cells in precancerous epithelia lack directional preference when moving along the crypt-villus axis. This effect was reproduced in diverse experimental systems: in developing chicken embryos, mesoderm cells expressing N-APC failed to migrate normally; in amoeboid Dictyostelium, which lack endogenous APC, expressing an N-APC fragment maintained cell motility, but the cells failed to perform directional chemotaxis; and multicellular Dictyostelium slug aggregates similarly failed to perform phototaxis. We propose that N-terminal fragments of APC represent a gain-of-function mutation that causes cells within tissue to fail to migrate directionally in response to relevant guidance cues. Consistent with this idea, crypts in histologically normal tissues of APCMin/+ intestines are overpopulated with cells, suggesting that a lack of migration might cause cell

  4. Comparative actions of progesterone, medroxyprogesterone acetate, drospirenone and nestorone on breast cancer cell migration and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitruk-Ware Regine

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Limited information is available on the effects of progestins on breast cancer progression and metastasis. Cell migration and invasion are central for these processes, and require dynamic cytoskeletal and cell membrane rearrangements for cell motility to be enacted. Methods We investigated the effects of progesterone (P, medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA, drospirenone (DRSP and nestorone (NES alone or with 17β-estradiol (E2 on T47-D breast cancer cell migration and invasion and we linked some of these actions to the regulation of the actin-regulatory protein, moesin and to cytoskeletal remodeling. Results Breast cancer cell horizontal migration and invasion of three-dimensional matrices are enhanced by all the progestins, but differences are found in terms of potency, with MPA being the most effective and DRSP being the least. This is related to the differential ability of the progestins to activate the actin-binding protein moesin, leading to distinct effects on actin cytoskeleton remodeling and on the formation of cell membrane structures that mediate cell movement. E2 also induces actin remodeling through moesin activation. However, the addition of some progestins partially offsets the action of estradiol on cell migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Conclusion These results imply that P, MPA, DRSP and NES alone or in combination with E2 enhance the ability of breast cancer cells to move in the surrounding environment. However, these progestins show different potencies and to some extent use distinct intracellular intermediates to drive moesin activation and actin remodeling. These findings support the concept that each progestin acts differently on breast cancer cells, which may have relevant clinical implications.

  5. Control of the collective migration of enteric neural crest cells by the Complement anaphylatoxin C3a and N-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broders-Bondon, Florence; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Gazquez, Elodie; Heysch, Julie; Piel, Matthieu; Mayor, Roberto; Lambris, John D; Dufour, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing the adhesive and migratory behavior of enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs) during their collective migration within the developing mouse gut. We aimed to decipher the role of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a during this process, because this well-known immune system attractant has been implicated in cephalic NCC co-attraction, a process controlling directional migration. We used the conditional Ht-PA-cre transgenic mouse model allowing a specific ablation of the N-cadherin gene and the expression of a fluorescent reporter in migratory ENCCs without affecting the central nervous system. We performed time-lapse videomicroscopy of ENCCs from control and N-cadherin mutant gut explants cultured on fibronectin (FN) and micropatterned FN-stripes with C3a or C3aR antagonist, and studied cell migration behavior with the use of triangulation analysis to quantify cell dispersion. We performed ex vivo gut cultures with or without C3aR antagonist to determine the effect on ENCC behavior. Confocal microscopy was used to analyze the cell-matrix adhesion properties. We provide the first demonstration of the localization of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a and its receptor on ENCCs during their migration in the embryonic gut. C3aR receptor inhibition alters ENCC adhesion and migration, perturbing directionality and increasing cell dispersion both in vitro and ex vivo. N-cadherin-null ENCCs do not respond to C3a co-attraction. These findings indicate that C3a regulates cell migration in a N-cadherin-dependent process. Our results shed light on the role of C3a in regulating collective and directional cell migration, and in ganglia network organization during enteric nervous system ontogenesis. The detection of an immune system chemokine in ENCCs during ENS development may also shed light on new mechanisms for gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:27041467

  6. Control of the collective migration of enteric neural crest cells by the Complement anaphylatoxin C3a and N-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broders-Bondon, Florence; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Gazquez, Elodie; Heysch, Julie; Piel, Matthieu; Mayor, Roberto; Lambris, John D; Dufour, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing the adhesive and migratory behavior of enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs) during their collective migration within the developing mouse gut. We aimed to decipher the role of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a during this process, because this well-known immune system attractant has been implicated in cephalic NCC co-attraction, a process controlling directional migration. We used the conditional Ht-PA-cre transgenic mouse model allowing a specific ablation of the N-cadherin gene and the expression of a fluorescent reporter in migratory ENCCs without affecting the central nervous system. We performed time-lapse videomicroscopy of ENCCs from control and N-cadherin mutant gut explants cultured on fibronectin (FN) and micropatterned FN-stripes with C3a or C3aR antagonist, and studied cell migration behavior with the use of triangulation analysis to quantify cell dispersion. We performed ex vivo gut cultures with or without C3aR antagonist to determine the effect on ENCC behavior. Confocal microscopy was used to analyze the cell-matrix adhesion properties. We provide the first demonstration of the localization of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a and its receptor on ENCCs during their migration in the embryonic gut. C3aR receptor inhibition alters ENCC adhesion and migration, perturbing directionality and increasing cell dispersion both in vitro and ex vivo. N-cadherin-null ENCCs do not respond to C3a co-attraction. These findings indicate that C3a regulates cell migration in a N-cadherin-dependent process. Our results shed light on the role of C3a in regulating collective and directional cell migration, and in ganglia network organization during enteric nervous system ontogenesis. The detection of an immune system chemokine in ENCCs during ENS development may also shed light on new mechanisms for gastrointestinal disorders.

  7. Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) regulates polarized neutrophil transendothelial cell migration in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfin, Abigail; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Beyrau, Martina; Colom, Bartomeu; Caille, Dorothée; Diapouli, Frantzeska-Maria; Nash, Gerard B; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Albelda, Steven M.; Rainger, G Ed; Meda, Paolo; Imhof, Beat A.; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2011-01-01

    Neutrophil migration into inflamed tissues is a fundamental component of innate immunity. A decisive step in this process is the polarised migration of blood neutrophils through endothelial cells (ECs) lining the venular lumen (transendothelial cell migration; TEM) in a luminal to abluminal direction. Using real-time confocal imaging we report that neutrophils can exhibit disrupted polarised TEM (“hesitant” and “reverse”) in vivo. These events were noted in inflammation following ischemia-reperfusion injury, characterised by reduced expression of junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) from EC junctions, and were enhanced by EC JAM-C blockade or genetic deletion. The results identify JAM-C as a key regulator of polarised neutrophil TEM in vivo and suggest that reverse TEM neutrophils can contribute to dissemination of systemic inflammation. PMID:21706006

  8. Fibulin-2 is present in murine vascular lesions and is important for smooth muscle cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ström, A.; Olin, A. I.; Aspberg, A.;

    2006-01-01

    and is upregulated during SMC phenotypic modulation in cell culture. Moreover, treatments with peptides that block the interaction between versican and fibulin-2 inhibit SMC migration in vitro. Conclusions: Fibulin-2 can be produced by SMC as a response to injury and may participate in the ECM organisation......Objective: The vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) can affect smooth muscle cell (SMC) adhesion, migration and proliferation-events that are important during the atherosclerotic process. Fibulin-2 is a member of the ECM protein family of fibulins and has been found to cross-link versican....../hyaluronan complexes, an ECM network that has been suggested to be important during tissue repair. In this study we have analysed the presence of fibulin-2 in two different models of murine vascular lesions. We have also examined how the fibulin-2/versican network influences SMC migration. Methods: Presence of fibulin...

  9. Slit2-Robo1 signaling promotes the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells via upregulating matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and downregulating E-cadherin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhou, Feng-Li; Li, Wei-Ping; Wang, Jing; Wang, Li-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Whether Slit homologue 2 (Slit2) inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration remains controversial, and the role of Slit2-Roundabout 1 (Robo1) signaling in oral cancer remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Slit2-Robo1 signaling in the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells, and the mechanism by which Slit2-Robo1 signaling inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration. Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were treated with the monoclonal anti-human Robo1 antibody, R5, to inhibit the Slit2-Robo1 signaling pathway, with immunoglobulin (Ig)G2b treatment as a negative control. The expression levels of Slit2 and Robo1 were determined using flow cytometry. The effects of R5 on the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were investigated. Gelatin zymography was used to investigate the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the expression levels of E-cadherin in Tca8113 cells treated with 10 µg/ml of either R5 or IgG2b. Slit2 and Robo1 proteins were found to be expressed in the Tca8113 cells. R5 significantly inhibited the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 cells in vitro. R5 also inhibited the activities of MMP2 and MMP9, and increased the expression of E-cadherin in the Tca8113 cells. These results suggested that Slit2-Robo1 signaling promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells by upregulating the expression levels of MMP2 and MMP9 and, downregulating the expression of E-cadherin. PMID:27431199

  10. [Macrophages promote the migration of neural stem cells into mouse spinal cord injury site].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhijian; Zhu, Wen; Li, Haopeng; He, Xijing

    2016-09-01

    Objective To explore the role of macrophages in the migration of neural stem cells (NSCs) in vivo and in vitro . Methods NSCs with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were isolated from GFP transgenic mice and the immunofluorescence cytochemical staining of nestin was used to identify NSCs. After spinal cord injury was induced, the tissue level of macrophage chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) mRNA was detected using quantitative real time PCR. The migration of GFP-NSCs was investigated 1 week after GFP-NSCs were injected into both sides of the damaged area. The effect of macrophage on the migration of NSCs in vitro was tested by Transwell(TM) system and the content of MCP-1 was detected by ELISA. Results NSCs highly expressed nestin. Compared with the control group, the level of MCP-1 mRNA significantly increased in the spinal cord injury group. The NSCs which were injected into the spinal cord migrated into the center of the injured site where F4/80 was highly expressed. Macrophages significantly increased the number of migrating NSCs in vitro and the secretion of MCP-1. Conclusion Macrophages induce NSC migrating into the spinal cord injury site possibly through promoting the secretion of MCP-1. PMID:27609570

  11. MYEOV (myeloma overexpressed gene) drives colon cancer cell migration and is regulated by PGE2.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lawlor, Garrett

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We have previously reported that Myeov (MYEloma OVerexpressed gene) expression is enhanced in colorectal cancer (CRC) and that it promotes CRC cell proliferation and invasion. The role of Myeov in CRC migration is unclear. ProstaglandinE2 (PGE 2) is a known factor in promoting CRC carcinogenesis. The role of PGE 2 in modulating Myeov expression has also not been defined. AIM: To assess the role of Myeov expression in CRC cell migration and to evaluate the role of PGE 2 in Myeov bioactivity. METHODS: siRNA mediated Myeov knockdown was achieved in T84 CRC cells. Knockdown was assessed using quantitative real time PCR. The effect of knockdown on CRC cell migration was assessed using a scratch wound healing assay. Separately, T84 cells were treated with PGE 2 (0.00025 micro M, 0.1 micro M and 1 micro M) from 30 min to 3 hours and the effect on Myeov gene expression was assessed using real time PCR. RESULTS: Myeov knockdown resulted in a significant reduction in CRC cell migration, observable as early as 12 hours (P < 0.05) with a 39% reduction compared to control at 36 hours (p < 0.01). Myeov expression was enhanced after treatment with PGE 2, with the greatest effect seen at 60 mins for all 3 PGE 2 doses. This response was dose dependent with a 290%, 550% & 1,000% increase in Myeov expression for 0.00025 micro M, 0.1 micro M and 1 micro M PGE 2 respectively. CONCLUSION: In addition to promoting CRC proliferation and invasion, our findings indicate that Myeov stimulates CRC cell migration, and its expression may be PGE 2 dependant.

  12. Myeov (myeloma overexpressed gene) drives colon cancer cell migration and is regulated by PGE2

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lawlor, Garrett

    2010-06-22

    Abstract Introduction We have previously reported that Myeov (MYEloma OVerexpressed gene) expression is enhanced in colorectal cancer (CRC) and that it promotes CRC cell proliferation and invasion. The role of Myeov in CRC migration is unclear. ProstaglandinE2 (PGE 2) is a known factor in promoting CRC carcinogenesis. The role of PGE 2 in modulating Myeov expression has also not been defined. Aim To assess the role of Myeov expression in CRC cell migration and to evaluate the role of PGE 2 in Myeov bioactivity. Methods siRNA mediated Myeov knockdown was achieved in T84 CRC cells. Knockdown was assessed using quantitative real time PCR. The effect of knockdown on CRC cell migration was assessed using a scratch wound healing assay. Separately, T84 cells were treated with PGE 2 (0.00025 μ M, 0.1 μ M and 1 μ M) from 30 min to 3 hours and the effect on Myeov gene expression was assessed using real time PCR. Results Myeov knockdown resulted in a significant reduction in CRC cell migration, observable as early as 12 hours (P < 0.05) with a 39% reduction compared to control at 36 hours (p < 0.01). Myeov expression was enhanced after treatment with PGE 2, with the greatest effect seen at 60 mins for all 3 PGE 2 doses. This response was dose dependent with a 290%, 550% & 1,000% increase in Myeov expression for 0.00025 μ M, 0.1 μ M and 1 μ M PGE 2 respectively. Conclusion In addition to promoting CRC proliferation and invasion, our findings indicate that Myeov stimulates CRC cell migration, and its expression may be PGE 2 dependant.

  13. Investigating the Influence of Extracellular Matrix and Glycolytic Metabolism on Muscle Stem Cell Migration on Their Native Fiber Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Butera

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM of skeletal muscle fibers is a unique environment that supports the regenerative capacity of satellite cells; the resident stem cell population. The impact of environment has great bearing on key properties permitting satellite cells to carry out tissue repair. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the ECM and glycolytic metabolism on satellite cell emergence and migration—two early processes required for muscle repair. Our results show that both influence the rate at which satellite cells emerge from the sub-basal lamina position and their rate of migration. These studies highlight the necessity of performing analysis of satellite behavior on their native substrate and will inform on the production of artificial scaffolds intended for medical uses.

  14. Cathepsin L knockdown enhances curcumin-mediated inhibition of growth, migration, and invasion of glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Yao; Xiong, Yajie; Zhao, Yifan; Wang, Wenjuan; Han, Meilin; Wang, Long; Tan, Caihong; Liang, Zhongqin

    2016-09-01

    Curcumin can be used to prevent and treat cancer. However, its exact underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Cathepsin L, a lysosomal cysteine protease, is overexpressed in several cancer types. This study aimed to determine the role of cathepsin L in curcumin-mediated inhibition of growth, migration, and invasion of glioma cells. Results revealed that the activity of cathepsin L was enhanced in curcumin-treated glioma cells. Cathepsin L knockdown induced by RNA interference significantly promoted curcumin-induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest. The knockdown also inhibited the migration and invasion of glioma cells. Our results suggested that the inhibition of cathepsin L can enhance the sensitivity of glioma cells to curcumin. Therefore, cathepsin L may be a new target to enhance the efficacy of curcumin against cancers. PMID:27373979

  15. Effects of neuritin on the migration, senescence and proliferation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuhui; Liu, Chunyan; Xu, Fen; Cui, Lijuan; Tan, Siwei; Chen, Rong; Yang, Lei; Huang, Jin

    2015-09-01

    Neuritin is a neurotrophic factor associated with neuroplasticity. Most studies on neuritin focus on the nervous system; however, there has been no comprehensive evaluation of neuritin in non-neuronal cells. In this study, we screened 11 cell lines and found that neuritin was not expressed in bone marrowderived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Neuritin-expressing BMSCs were obtained by transfection. In the neuritin-expressing BMSC model, we observed significantly greater cell migration and improved anti-senescence protection, in addition to reduced proliferation and viability. In conclusion, neuritin not only plays an important role in the nervous system but also has an effect on the migration, senescence, proliferation, and viability of stem cells. This study provides a theoretical basis for understanding the function of neuritin. PMID:26208391

  16. Protein kinase D2 regulates migration and invasion of U87MG glioblastoma cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor, which, despite combined modality treatment, reoccurs and is invariably fatal for affected patients. Recentl