WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell microscopy segmentation

  1. Fast globally optimal segmentation of cells in fluorescence microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeest, Jan-Philip; Rohr, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Accurate and efficient segmentation of cells in fluorescence microscopy images is of central importance for the quantification of protein expression in high-throughput screening applications. We propose a new approach for segmenting cell nuclei which is based on active contours and convex energy functionals. Compared to previous work, our approach determines the global solution. Thus, the approach does not suffer from local minima and the segmentation result does not depend on the initialization. We also suggest a numeric approach for efficiently computing the solution. The performance of our approach has been evaluated using fluorescence microscopy images of different cell types. We have also performed a quantitative comparison with previous segmentation approaches.

  2. Segmentation of fluorescence microscopy cell images using unsupervised mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xian; Dua, Sumeet

    2010-05-28

    The accurate measurement of cell and nuclei contours are critical for the sensitive and specific detection of changes in normal cells in several medical informatics disciplines. Within microscopy, this task is facilitated using fluorescence cell stains, and segmentation is often the first step in such approaches. Due to the complex nature of cell issues and problems inherent to microscopy, unsupervised mining approaches of clustering can be incorporated in the segmentation of cells. In this study, we have developed and evaluated the performance of multiple unsupervised data mining techniques in cell image segmentation. We adapt four distinctive, yet complementary, methods for unsupervised learning, including those based on k-means clustering, EM, Otsu's threshold, and GMAC. Validation measures are defined, and the performance of the techniques is evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively using synthetic and recently published real data. Experimental results demonstrate that k-means, Otsu's threshold, and GMAC perform similarly, and have more precise segmentation results than EM. We report that EM has higher recall values and lower precision results from under-segmentation due to its Gaussian model assumption. We also demonstrate that these methods need spatial information to segment complex real cell images with a high degree of efficacy, as expected in many medical informatics applications.

  3. Comparison of segmentation algorithms for fluorescence microscopy images of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, Alden A; Elliott, John T; Filliben, James J; Halter, Michael; Peskin, Adele; Bernal, Javier; Kociolek, Marcin; Brady, Mary C; Tang, Hai C; Plant, Anne L

    2011-07-01

    The analysis of fluorescence microscopy of cells often requires the determination of cell edges. This is typically done using segmentation techniques that separate the cell objects in an image from the surrounding background. This study compares segmentation results from nine different segmentation techniques applied to two different cell lines and five different sets of imaging conditions. Significant variability in the results of segmentation was observed that was due solely to differences in imaging conditions or applications of different algorithms. We quantified and compared the results with a novel bivariate similarity index metric that evaluates the degree of underestimating or overestimating a cell object. The results show that commonly used threshold-based segmentation techniques are less accurate than k-means clustering with multiple clusters. Segmentation accuracy varies with imaging conditions that determine the sharpness of cell edges and with geometric features of a cell. Based on this observation, we propose a method that quantifies cell edge character to provide an estimate of how accurately an algorithm will perform. The results of this study will assist the development of criteria for evaluating interlaboratory comparability. Published 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. AUTOMATED CELL SEGMENTATION WITH 3D FLUORESCENCE MICROSCOPY IMAGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jun; Wang, Fusheng; Teodoro, George; Liang, Yanhui; Zhu, Yangyang; Tucker-Burden, Carol; Brat, Daniel J

    2015-04-01

    A large number of cell-oriented cancer investigations require an effective and reliable cell segmentation method on three dimensional (3D) fluorescence microscopic images for quantitative analysis of cell biological properties. In this paper, we present a fully automated cell segmentation method that can detect cells from 3D fluorescence microscopic images. Enlightened by fluorescence imaging techniques, we regulated the image gradient field by gradient vector flow (GVF) with interpolated and smoothed data volume, and grouped voxels based on gradient modes identified by tracking GVF field. Adaptive thresholding was then applied to voxels associated with the same gradient mode where voxel intensities were enhanced by a multiscale cell filter. We applied the method to a large volume of 3D fluorescence imaging data of human brain tumor cells with (1) small cell false detection and missing rates for individual cells; and (2) trivial over and under segmentation incidences for clustered cells. Additionally, the concordance of cell morphometry structure between automated and manual segmentation was encouraging. These results suggest a promising 3D cell segmentation method applicable to cancer studies.

  5. Robust Nucleus/Cell Detection and Segmentation in Digital Pathology and Microscopy Images: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fuyong; Yang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Digital pathology and microscopy image analysis is widely used for comprehensive studies of cell morphology or tissue structure. Manual assessment is labor intensive and prone to interobserver variations. Computer-aided methods, which can significantly improve the objectivity and reproducibility, have attracted a great deal of interest in recent literature. Among the pipeline of building a computer-aided diagnosis system, nucleus or cell detection and segmentation play a very important role to describe the molecular morphological information. In the past few decades, many efforts have been devoted to automated nucleus/cell detection and segmentation. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of the recent state-of-the-art nucleus/cell segmentation approaches on different types of microscopy images including bright-field, phase-contrast, differential interference contrast, fluorescence, and electron microscopies. In addition, we discuss the challenges for the current methods and the potential future work of nucleus/cell detection and segmentation.

  6. Segmentation and morphometric analysis of cells from fluorescence microscopy images of cytoskeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujihara, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Masanori; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Wada, Shigeo

    2013-01-01

    We developed a method to reconstruct cell geometry from confocal fluorescence microscopy images of the cytoskeleton. In the method, region growing was implemented twice. First, it was applied to the extracellular regions to differentiate them from intracellular noncytoskeletal regions, which both appear black in fluorescence microscopy imagery, and then to cell regions for cell identification. Analysis of morphological parameters revealed significant changes in cell shape associated with cytoskeleton disruption, which offered insight into the mechanical role of the cytoskeleton in maintaining cell shape. The proposed segmentation method is promising for investigations on cell morphological changes with respect to internal cytoskeletal structures.

  7. Robust Nucleus/Cell Detection and Segmentation in Digital Pathology and Microscopy Images: A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fuyong; Yang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Digital pathology and microscopy image analysis is widely used for comprehensive studies of cell morphology or tissue structure. Manual assessment is labor intensive and prone to inter-observer variations. Computer-aided methods, which can significantly improve the objectivity and reproducibility, have attracted a great deal of interest in recent literatures. Among the pipeline of building a computer-aided diagnosis system, nucleus or cell detection and segmentation play a very important role to describe the molecular morphological information. In the past few decades, many efforts have been devoted to automated nucleus/cell detection and segmentation. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of the recent state-of-the-art nucleus/cell segmentation approaches on different types of microscopy images including bright-field, phase-contrast, differential interference contrast (DIC), fluorescence, and electron microscopies. In addition, we discuss the challenges for the current methods and the potential future work of nucleus/cell detection and segmentation. PMID:26742143

  8. Towards automated segmentation of cells and cell nuclei in nonlinear optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medyukhina, Anna; Meyer, Tobias; Schmitt, Michael; Romeike, Bernd F M; Dietzek, Benjamin; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-11-01

    Nonlinear optical (NLO) imaging techniques based e.g. on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) or two photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) show great potential for biomedical imaging. In order to facilitate the diagnostic process based on NLO imaging, there is need for an automated calculation of quantitative values such as cell density, nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio, average nuclear size. Extraction of these parameters is helpful for the histological assessment in general and specifically e.g. for the determination of tumor grades. This requires an accurate image segmentation and detection of locations and boundaries of cells and nuclei. Here we present an image processing approach for the detection of nuclei and cells in co-registered TPEF and CARS images. The algorithm developed utilizes the gray-scale information for the detection of the nuclei locations and the gradient information for the delineation of the nuclear and cellular boundaries. The approach reported is capable for an automated segmentation of cells and nuclei in multimodal TPEF-CARS images of human brain tumor samples. The results are important for the development of NLO microscopy into a clinically relevant diagnostic tool. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Attributed relational graphs for cell nucleus segmentation in fluorescence microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Salim; Ersahin, Tulin; Cetin-Atalay, Rengul; Gunduz-Demir, Cigdem

    2013-06-01

    More rapid and accurate high-throughput screening in molecular cellular biology research has become possible with the development of automated microscopy imaging, for which cell nucleus segmentation commonly constitutes the core step. Although several promising methods exist for segmenting the nuclei of monolayer isolated and less-confluent cells, it still remains an open problem to segment the nuclei of more-confluent cells, which tend to grow in overlayers. To address this problem, we propose a new model-based nucleus segmentation algorithm. This algorithm models how a human locates a nucleus by identifying the nucleus boundaries and piecing them together. In this algorithm, we define four types of primitives to represent nucleus boundaries at different orientations and construct an attributed relational graph on the primitives to represent their spatial relations. Then, we reduce the nucleus identification problem to finding predefined structural patterns in the constructed graph and also use the primitives in region growing to delineate the nucleus borders. Working with fluorescence microscopy images, our experiments demonstrate that the proposed algorithm identifies nuclei better than previous nucleus segmentation algorithms.

  10. Automatic segmentation of cell nuclei from confocal laser scanning microscopy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelemen, A.; Reist, H.W.

    1997-01-01

    A newly developed experimental method combines the possibility of irradiating more than a thousand cells simultaneous with an efficient colony-forming ability and with the capability of localizing a particle track through a cell nucleus together with the assessment of the energy transfer by digital superposition of the image containing the track with that of the cells. To assess the amount of energy deposition by particles traversing the cell nucleus the intersection lengths of the particle tracks have to be known. Intersection lengths can be obtained by determining the 3D surface contours of the irradiated cell nuclei. Confocal laser scanning microscopy using specific DNA fluorescent dye offers a possible way for the determination of the 3D shape of individual nuclei. Unfortunately, such experiments cannot be performed on living cells. One solution to this problem can be provided by building a statistical model of the shape of the nuclei of the exposed cells. In order to build such a statistical model, a large number of cell nuclei have to be identified and segmented from confocal laser scanning microscopy images. The present paper describes a method to perform this 3D segmentation in an automatic manner in order to create a solid basis for the statistical model. (author) 2 figs., 4 refs

  11. Cell motility dynamics: a novel segmentation algorithm to quantify multi-cellular bright field microscopy images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaf Zaritsky

    Full Text Available Confocal microscopy analysis of fluorescence and morphology is becoming the standard tool in cell biology and molecular imaging. Accurate quantification algorithms are required to enhance the understanding of different biological phenomena. We present a novel approach based on image-segmentation of multi-cellular regions in bright field images demonstrating enhanced quantitative analyses and better understanding of cell motility. We present MultiCellSeg, a segmentation algorithm to separate between multi-cellular and background regions for bright field images, which is based on classification of local patches within an image: a cascade of Support Vector Machines (SVMs is applied using basic image features. Post processing includes additional classification and graph-cut segmentation to reclassify erroneous regions and refine the segmentation. This approach leads to a parameter-free and robust algorithm. Comparison to an alternative algorithm on wound healing assay images demonstrates its superiority. The proposed approach was used to evaluate common cell migration models such as wound healing and scatter assay. It was applied to quantify the acceleration effect of Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF on healing rate in a time lapse confocal microscopy wound healing assay and demonstrated that the healing rate is linear in both treated and untreated cells, and that HGF/SF accelerates the healing rate by approximately two-fold. A novel fully automated, accurate, zero-parameters method to classify and score scatter-assay images was developed and demonstrated that multi-cellular texture is an excellent descriptor to measure HGF/SF-induced cell scattering. We show that exploitation of textural information from differential interference contrast (DIC images on the multi-cellular level can prove beneficial for the analyses of wound healing and scatter assays. The proposed approach is generic and can be used alone or alongside traditional

  12. Cell motility dynamics: a novel segmentation algorithm to quantify multi-cellular bright field microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaritsky, Assaf; Natan, Sari; Horev, Judith; Hecht, Inbal; Wolf, Lior; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Tsarfaty, Ilan

    2011-01-01

    Confocal microscopy analysis of fluorescence and morphology is becoming the standard tool in cell biology and molecular imaging. Accurate quantification algorithms are required to enhance the understanding of different biological phenomena. We present a novel approach based on image-segmentation of multi-cellular regions in bright field images demonstrating enhanced quantitative analyses and better understanding of cell motility. We present MultiCellSeg, a segmentation algorithm to separate between multi-cellular and background regions for bright field images, which is based on classification of local patches within an image: a cascade of Support Vector Machines (SVMs) is applied using basic image features. Post processing includes additional classification and graph-cut segmentation to reclassify erroneous regions and refine the segmentation. This approach leads to a parameter-free and robust algorithm. Comparison to an alternative algorithm on wound healing assay images demonstrates its superiority. The proposed approach was used to evaluate common cell migration models such as wound healing and scatter assay. It was applied to quantify the acceleration effect of Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) on healing rate in a time lapse confocal microscopy wound healing assay and demonstrated that the healing rate is linear in both treated and untreated cells, and that HGF/SF accelerates the healing rate by approximately two-fold. A novel fully automated, accurate, zero-parameters method to classify and score scatter-assay images was developed and demonstrated that multi-cellular texture is an excellent descriptor to measure HGF/SF-induced cell scattering. We show that exploitation of textural information from differential interference contrast (DIC) images on the multi-cellular level can prove beneficial for the analyses of wound healing and scatter assays. The proposed approach is generic and can be used alone or alongside traditional fluorescence single-cell

  13. Efficient globally optimal segmentation of cells in fluorescence microscopy images using level sets and convex energy functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeest, Jan-Philip; Rohr, Karl

    2012-10-01

    In high-throughput applications, accurate and efficient segmentation of cells in fluorescence microscopy images is of central importance for the quantification of protein expression and the understanding of cell function. We propose an approach for segmenting cell nuclei which is based on active contours using level sets and convex energy functionals. Compared to previous work, our approach determines the global solution. Thus, the approach does not suffer from local minima and the segmentation result does not depend on the initialization. We consider three different well-known energy functionals for active contour-based segmentation and introduce convex formulations of these functionals. We also suggest a numeric approach for efficiently computing the solution. The performance of our approach has been evaluated using fluorescence microscopy images from different experiments comprising different cell types. We have also performed a quantitative comparison with previous segmentation approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Automatic segmentation of fluorescence lifetime microscopy images of cells using multiresolution community detection--a first study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, D; Sarder, P; Ronhovde, P; Orthaus, S; Achilefu, S; Nussinov, Z

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by a multiresolution community detection based network segmentation method, we suggest an automatic method for segmenting fluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging microscopy (FLIM) images of cells in a first pilot investigation on two selected images. The image processing problem is framed as identifying segments with respective average FLTs against the background in FLIM images. The proposed method segments a FLIM image for a given resolution of the network defined using image pixels as the nodes and similarity between the FLTs of the pixels as the edges. In the resulting segmentation, low network resolution leads to larger segments, and high network resolution leads to smaller segments. Furthermore, using the proposed method, the mean-square error in estimating the FLT segments in a FLIM image was found to consistently decrease with increasing resolution of the corresponding network. The multiresolution community detection method appeared to perform better than a popular spectral clustering-based method in performing FLIM image segmentation. At high resolution, the spectral segmentation method introduced noisy segments in its output, and it was unable to achieve a consistent decrease in mean-square error with increasing resolution. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2013 Royal Microscopical Society.

  15. Cell nuclei segmentation in fluorescence microscopy images using inter- and intra-region discriminative information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Cai, Weidong; Feng, David Dagan; Chen, Mei

    2013-01-01

    Automated segmentation of cell nuclei in microscopic images is critical to high throughput analysis of the ever increasing amount of data. Although cell nuclei are generally visually distinguishable for human, automated segmentation faces challenges when there is significant intensity inhomogeneity among cell nuclei or in the background. In this paper, we propose an effective method for automated cell nucleus segmentation using a three-step approach. It first obtains an initial segmentation by extracting salient regions in the image, then reduces false positives using inter-region feature discrimination, and finally refines the boundary of the cell nuclei using intra-region contrast information. This method has been evaluated on two publicly available datasets of fluorescence microscopic images with 4009 cells, and has achieved superior performance compared to popular state of the art methods using established metrics.

  16. Automatic Segmentation of Fluorescence Lifetime Microscopy Images of Cells Using Multi-Resolution Community Detection -A First Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dandan; Sarder, Pinaki; Ronhovde, Peter; Orthaus, Sandra; Achilefu, Samuel; Nussinov, Zohar

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by a multi-resolution community detection (MCD) based network segmentation method, we suggest an automatic method for segmenting fluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging microscopy (FLIM) images of cells in a first pilot investigation on two selected images. The image processing problem is framed as identifying segments with respective average FLTs against the background in FLIM images. The proposed method segments a FLIM image for a given resolution of the network defined using image pixels as the nodes and similarity between the FLTs of the pixels as the edges. In the resulting segmentation, low network resolution leads to larger segments, and high network resolution leads to smaller segments. Further, using the proposed method, the mean-square error (MSE) in estimating the FLT segments in a FLIM image was found to consistently decrease with increasing resolution of the corresponding network. The MCD method appeared to perform better than a popular spectral clustering based method in performing FLIM image segmentation. At high resolution, the spectral segmentation method introduced noisy segments in its output, and it was unable to achieve a consistent decrease in MSE with increasing resolution. PMID:24251410

  17. Cell segmentation in time-lapse fluorescence microscopy with temporally varying sub-cellular fusion protein patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyak, Filiz; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Chagin, Vadim; Cardoso, M

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescently tagged proteins such as GFP-PCNA produce rich dynamically varying textural patterns of foci distributed in the nucleus. This enables the behavioral study of sub-cellular structures during different phases of the cell cycle. The varying punctuate patterns of fluorescence, drastic changes in SNR, shape and position during mitosis and abundance of touching cells, however, require more sophisticated algorithms for reliable automatic cell segmentation and lineage analysis. Since the cell nuclei are non-uniform in appearance, a distribution-based modeling of foreground classes is essential. The recently proposed graph partitioning active contours (GPAC) algorithm supports region descriptors and flexible distance metrics. We extend GPAC for fluorescence-based cell segmentation using regional density functions and dramatically improve its efficiency for segmentation from O(N(4)) to O(N(2)), for an image with N(2) pixels, making it practical and scalable for high throughput microscopy imaging studies.

  18. Statistical region based active contour using a fractional entropy descriptor: Application to nuclei cell segmentation in confocal \\ud microscopy images

    OpenAIRE

    Histace, A; Meziou, B J; Matuszewski, Bogdan; Precioso, F; Murphy, M F; Carreiras, F

    2013-01-01

    We propose an unsupervised statistical region based active contour approach integrating an original fractional entropy measure for image segmentation with a particular application to single channel actin tagged fluorescence confocal microscopy image segmentation. Following description of statistical based active contour segmentation and the mathematical definition of the proposed fractional entropy descriptor, we demonstrate comparative segmentation results between the proposed approach and s...

  19. Image segmentation and dynamic lineage analysis in single-cell fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quanli; Niemi, Jarad; Tan, Chee-Meng; You, Lingchong; West, Mike

    2010-01-01

    An increasingly common component of studies in synthetic and systems biology is analysis of dynamics of gene expression at the single-cell level, a context that is heavily dependent on the use of time-lapse movies. Extracting quantitative data on the single-cell temporal dynamics from such movies remains a major challenge. Here, we describe novel methods for automating key steps in the analysis of single-cell, fluorescent images-segmentation and lineage reconstruction-to recognize and track individual cells over time. The automated analysis iteratively combines a set of extended morphological methods for segmentation, and uses a neighborhood-based scoring method for frame-to-frame lineage linking. Our studies with bacteria, budding yeast and human cells, demonstrate the portability and usability of these methods, whether using phase, bright field or fluorescent images. These examples also demonstrate the utility of our integrated approach in facilitating analyses of engineered and natural cellular networks in diverse settings. The automated methods are implemented in freely available, open-source software.

  20. Dual photon excitation microscopy and image threshold segmentation in live cell imaging during compression testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moo, Eng Kuan; Abusara, Ziad; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Herzog, Walter

    2013-08-09

    Morphological studies of live connective tissue cells are imperative to helping understand cellular responses to mechanical stimuli. However, photobleaching is a constant problem to accurate and reliable live cell fluorescent imaging, and various image thresholding methods have been adopted to account for photobleaching effects. Previous studies showed that dual photon excitation (DPE) techniques are superior over conventional one photon excitation (OPE) confocal techniques in minimizing photobleaching. In this study, we investigated the effects of photobleaching resulting from OPE and DPE on morphology of in situ articular cartilage chondrocytes across repeat laser exposures. Additionally, we compared the effectiveness of three commonly-used image thresholding methods in accounting for photobleaching effects, with and without tissue loading through compression. In general, photobleaching leads to an apparent volume reduction for subsequent image scans. Performing seven consecutive scans of chondrocytes in unloaded cartilage, we found that the apparent cell volume loss caused by DPE microscopy is much smaller than that observed using OPE microscopy. Applying scan-specific image thresholds did not prevent the photobleaching-induced volume loss, and volume reductions were non-uniform over the seven repeat scans. During cartilage loading through compression, cell fluorescence increased and, depending on the thresholding method used, led to different volume changes. Therefore, different conclusions on cell volume changes may be drawn during tissue compression, depending on the image thresholding methods used. In conclusion, our findings confirm that photobleaching directly affects cell morphology measurements, and that DPE causes less photobleaching artifacts than OPE for uncompressed cells. When cells are compressed during tissue loading, a complicated interplay between photobleaching effects and compression-induced fluorescence increase may lead to interpretations in

  1. TLM-Tracker: software for cell segmentation, tracking and lineage analysis in time-lapse microscopy movies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Johannes; Leupold, Stefan; Biegler, Ilona; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Münch, Richard; Jahn, Dieter

    2012-09-01

    Time-lapse imaging in combination with fluorescence microscopy techniques enable the investigation of gene regulatory circuits and uncovered phenomena like culture heterogeneity. In this context, computational image processing for the analysis of single cell behaviour plays an increasing role in systems biology and mathematical modelling approaches. Consequently, we developed a software package with graphical user interface for the analysis of single bacterial cell behaviour. A new software called TLM-Tracker allows for the flexible and user-friendly interpretation for the segmentation, tracking and lineage analysis of microbial cells in time-lapse movies. The software package, including manual, tutorial video and examples, is available as Matlab code or executable binaries at http://www.tlmtracker.tu-bs.de.

  2. CNNs for electron microscopy segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    García-Amorena García, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of Biomedicine, mitochondria are known to play an important role in neural function. Recent studies show mitochondrial morphology to be crucial to cellular physiology and synaptic function, and a link between mitochondrial defects and neuro-degenerative diseases is strongly suspected. Electron microscopy (EM), with its very high resolution in all three directions, is one of the key tools to look more closely into these tissues, but the huge amounts of data it produces m...

  3. Boundary segmentation for fluorescence microscopy using steerable filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, David Joon; Salama, Paul; Dunn, Kenneth W.; Delp, Edward J.

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is used to image multiple subcellular structures in living cells which are not readily observed using conventional optical microscopy. Moreover, two-photon microscopy is widely used to image structures deeper in tissue. Recent advancement in fluorescence microscopy has enabled the generation of large data sets of images at different depths, times, and spectral channels. Thus, automatic object segmentation is necessary since manual segmentation would be inefficient and biased. However, automatic segmentation is still a challenging problem as regions of interest may not have well defined boundaries as well as non-uniform pixel intensities. This paper describes a method for segmenting tubular structures in fluorescence microscopy images of rat kidney and liver samples using adaptive histogram equalization, foreground/background segmentation, steerable filters to capture directional tendencies, and connected-component analysis. The results from several data sets demonstrate that our method can segment tubular boundaries successfully. Moreover, our method has better performance when compared to other popular image segmentation methods when using ground truth data obtained via manual segmentation.

  4. Boundary fitting based segmentation of fluorescence microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soonam; Salama, Paul; Dunn, Kenneth W.; Delp, Edward J.

    2015-03-01

    Segmentation is a fundamental step in quantifying characteristics, such as volume, shape, and orientation of cells and/or tissue. However, quantification of these characteristics still poses a challenge due to the unique properties of microscopy volumes. This paper proposes a 2D segmentation method that utilizes a combination of adaptive and global thresholding, potentials, z direction refinement, branch pruning, end point matching, and boundary fitting methods to delineate tubular objects in microscopy volumes. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method achieves better performance than an active contours based scheme.

  5. SEGMENTATION OF MITOCHONDRIA IN ELECTRON MICROSCOPY IMAGES USING ALGEBRAIC CURVES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedhosseini, Mojtaba; Ellisman, Mark H; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution microscopy techniques have been used to generate large volumes of data with enough details for understanding the complex structure of the nervous system. However, automatic techniques are required to segment cells and intracellular structures in these multi-terabyte datasets and make anatomical analysis possible on a large scale. We propose a fully automated method that exploits both shape information and regional statistics to segment irregularly shaped intracellular structures such as mitochondria in electron microscopy (EM) images. The main idea is to use algebraic curves to extract shape features together with texture features from image patches. Then, these powerful features are used to learn a random forest classifier, which can predict mitochondria locations precisely. Finally, the algebraic curves together with regional information are used to segment the mitochondria at the predicted locations. We demonstrate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art algorithms in segmentation of mitochondria in EM images.

  6. Millisecond single-molecule localization microscopy combined with convolution analysis and automated image segmentation to determine protein concentrations in complexly structured, functional cells, one cell at a time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, Adam J M; Leake, Mark C

    2015-01-01

    We present a single-molecule tool called the CoPro (concentration of proteins) method that uses millisecond imaging with convolution analysis, automated image segmentation and super-resolution localization microscopy to generate robust estimates for protein concentration in different compartments of single living cells, validated using realistic simulations of complex multiple compartment cell types. We demonstrate its utility experimentally on model Escherichia coli bacteria and Saccharomyces cerevisiae budding yeast cells, and use it to address the biological question of how signals are transduced in cells. Cells in all domains of life dynamically sense their environment through signal transduction mechanisms, many involving gene regulation. The glucose sensing mechanism of S. cerevisiae is a model system for studying gene regulatory signal transduction. It uses the multi-copy expression inhibitor of the GAL gene family, Mig1, to repress unwanted genes in the presence of elevated extracellular glucose concentrations. We fluorescently labelled Mig1 molecules with green fluorescent protein (GFP) via chromosomal integration at physiological expression levels in living S. cerevisiae cells, in addition to the RNA polymerase protein Nrd1 with the fluorescent protein reporter mCherry. Using CoPro we make quantitative estimates of Mig1 and Nrd1 protein concentrations in the cytoplasm and nucleus compartments on a cell-by-cell basis under physiological conditions. These estimates indicate a ∼4-fold shift towards higher values in the concentration of diffusive Mig1 in the nucleus if the external glucose concentration is raised, whereas equivalent levels in the cytoplasm shift to smaller values with a relative change an order of magnitude smaller. This compares with Nrd1 which is not involved directly in glucose sensing, and which is almost exclusively localized in the nucleus under high and low external glucose levels. CoPro facilitates time-resolved quantification of

  7. 3D membrane segmentation and quantification of intact thick cells using cryo soft X-ray transmission microscopy: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klementieva, Oxana; Werner, Stephan; Guttmann, Peter; Pratsch, Christoph; Cladera, Josep

    2017-01-01

    Structural analysis of biological membranes is important for understanding cell and sub-cellular organelle function as well as their interaction with the surrounding environment. Imaging of whole cells in three dimension at high spatial resolution remains a significant challenge, particularly for thick cells. Cryo-transmission soft X-ray microscopy (cryo-TXM) has recently gained popularity to image, in 3D, intact thick cells (∼10μm) with details of sub-cellular architecture and organization in near-native state. This paper reports a new tool to segment and quantify structural changes of biological membranes in 3D from cryo-TXM images by tracking an initial 2D contour along the third axis of the microscope, through a multi-scale ridge detection followed by an active contours-based model, with a subsequent refinement along the other two axes. A quantitative metric that assesses the grayscale profiles perpendicular to the membrane surfaces is introduced and shown to be linearly related to the membrane thickness. Our methodology has been validated on synthetic phantoms using realistic microscope properties and structure dimensions, as well as on real cryo-TXM data. Results demonstrate the validity of our algorithms for cryo-TXM data analysis. PMID:28376110

  8. Microscopy image segmentation tool: Robust image data analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valmianski, Ilya, E-mail: ivalmian@ucsd.edu; Monton, Carlos; Schuller, Ivan K. [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Nanoscience, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    We present a software package called Microscopy Image Segmentation Tool (MIST). MIST is designed for analysis of microscopy images which contain large collections of small regions of interest (ROIs). Originally developed for analysis of porous anodic alumina scanning electron images, MIST capabilities have been expanded to allow use in a large variety of problems including analysis of biological tissue, inorganic and organic film grain structure, as well as nano- and meso-scopic structures. MIST provides a robust segmentation algorithm for the ROIs, includes many useful analysis capabilities, and is highly flexible allowing incorporation of specialized user developed analysis. We describe the unique advantages MIST has over existing analysis software. In addition, we present a number of diverse applications to scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  9. Microscopy image segmentation tool: Robust image data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmianski, Ilya; Monton, Carlos; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2014-03-01

    We present a software package called Microscopy Image Segmentation Tool (MIST). MIST is designed for analysis of microscopy images which contain large collections of small regions of interest (ROIs). Originally developed for analysis of porous anodic alumina scanning electron images, MIST capabilities have been expanded to allow use in a large variety of problems including analysis of biological tissue, inorganic and organic film grain structure, as well as nano- and meso-scopic structures. MIST provides a robust segmentation algorithm for the ROIs, includes many useful analysis capabilities, and is highly flexible allowing incorporation of specialized user developed analysis. We describe the unique advantages MIST has over existing analysis software. In addition, we present a number of diverse applications to scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  10. Microscopy image segmentation tool: Robust image data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valmianski, Ilya; Monton, Carlos; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2014-01-01

    We present a software package called Microscopy Image Segmentation Tool (MIST). MIST is designed for analysis of microscopy images which contain large collections of small regions of interest (ROIs). Originally developed for analysis of porous anodic alumina scanning electron images, MIST capabilities have been expanded to allow use in a large variety of problems including analysis of biological tissue, inorganic and organic film grain structure, as well as nano- and meso-scopic structures. MIST provides a robust segmentation algorithm for the ROIs, includes many useful analysis capabilities, and is highly flexible allowing incorporation of specialized user developed analysis. We describe the unique advantages MIST has over existing analysis software. In addition, we present a number of diverse applications to scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy

  11. Three Dimensional Fluorescence Microscopy Image Synthesis and Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Chichen; Lee, Soonam; Ho, David Joon; Han, Shuo; Salama, Paul; Dunn, Kenneth W.; Delp, Edward J.

    2018-01-01

    Advances in fluorescence microscopy enable acquisition of 3D image volumes with better image quality and deeper penetration into tissue. Segmentation is a required step to characterize and analyze biological structures in the images and recent 3D segmentation using deep learning has achieved promising results. One issue is that deep learning techniques require a large set of groundtruth data which is impractical to annotate manually for large 3D microscopy volumes. This paper describes a 3D d...

  12. NUCLEAR SEGMENTATION IN MICROSCOPE CELL IMAGES: A HAND-SEGMENTED DATASET AND COMPARISON OF ALGORITHMS

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Luís Pedro; Shariff, Aabid; Murphy, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    Image segmentation is an essential step in many image analysis pipelines and many algorithms have been proposed to solve this problem. However, they are often evaluated subjectively or based on a small number of examples. To fill this gap, we hand-segmented a set of 97 fluorescence microscopy images (a total of 4009 cells) and objectively evaluated some previously proposed segmentation algorithms.

  13. Community detection for fluorescent lifetime microscopy image segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dandan; Sarder, Pinaki; Ronhovde, Peter; Achilefu, Samuel; Nussinov, Zohar

    2014-03-01

    Multiresolution community detection (CD) method has been suggested in a recent work as an efficient method for performing unsupervised segmentation of fluorescence lifetime (FLT) images of live cell images containing fluorescent molecular probes.1 In the current paper, we further explore this method in FLT images of ex vivo tissue slices. The image processing problem is framed as identifying clusters with respective average FLTs against a background or "solvent" in FLT imaging microscopy (FLIM) images derived using NIR fluorescent dyes. We have identified significant multiresolution structures using replica correlations in these images, where such correlations are manifested by information theoretic overlaps of the independent solutions ("replicas") attained using the multiresolution CD method from different starting points. In this paper, our method is found to be more efficient than a current state-of-the-art image segmentation method based on mixture of Gaussian distributions. It offers more than 1:25 times diversity based on Shannon index than the latter method, in selecting clusters with distinct average FLTs in NIR FLIM images.

  14. Algorithms for Cytoplasm Segmentation of Fluorescence Labelled Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Wählby; Joakim Lindblad; Mikael Vondrus; Ewert Bengtsson; Lennart Björkesten

    2002-01-01

    Automatic cell segmentation has various applications in cytometry, and while the nucleus is often very distinct and easy to identify, the cytoplasm provides a lot more challenge. A new combination of image analysis algorithms for segmentation of cells imaged by fluorescence microscopy is presented. The algorithm consists of an image pre?processing step, a general segmentation and merging step followed by a segmentation quality measurement. The quality measurement consists of a statistical ana...

  15. Advanced Microscopy of Microbial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Regenberg, Birgitte; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Growing awareness of heterogeneity in cells of microbial populations has emphasized the importance of advanced microscopy for visualization and understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cell-to-cell variation. In this review, we highlight some of the recent advances in confocal...... microscopy, super-resolution optical microscopy (STED, SIM, PALM) as well as atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using examples of bistability in microbial populations as well as biofilm development and differentiation in bacterial and yeast consortia, we demonstrate the importance of microscopy...

  16. Automated seeding-based nuclei segmentation in nonlinear optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medyukhina, Anna; Meyer, Tobias; Heuke, Sandro; Vogler, Nadine; Dietzek, Benjamin; Popp, Jürgen

    2013-10-01

    Nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopy based, e.g., on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) or two-photon-excited fluorescence (TPEF) is a fast label-free imaging technique, with a great potential for biomedical applications. However, NLO microscopy as a diagnostic tool is still in its infancy; there is a lack of robust and durable nuclei segmentation methods capable of accurate image processing in cases of variable image contrast, nuclear density, and type of investigated tissue. Nonetheless, such algorithms specifically adapted to NLO microscopy present one prerequisite for the technology to be routinely used, e.g., in pathology or intraoperatively for surgical guidance. In this paper, we compare the applicability of different seeding and boundary detection methods to NLO microscopic images in order to develop an optimal seeding-based approach capable of accurate segmentation of both TPEF and CARS images. Among different methods, the Laplacian of Gaussian filter showed the best accuracy for the seeding of the image, while a modified seeded watershed segmentation was the most accurate in the task of boundary detection. The resulting combination of these methods followed by the verification of the detected nuclei performs high average sensitivity and specificity when applied to various types of NLO microscopy images.

  17. Segmentation-based retrospective shading correction in fluorescence microscopy E. coli images for quantitative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Fei; Chang, Chunqi; Liu, Wenqing; Xu, Weichao; Hung, Yeung S.

    2009-10-01

    Due to the inherent imperfections in the imaging process, fluorescence microscopy images often suffer from spurious intensity variations, which is usually referred to as intensity inhomogeneity, intensity non uniformity, shading or bias field. In this paper, a retrospective shading correction method for fluorescence microscopy Escherichia coli (E. Coli) images is proposed based on segmentation result. Segmentation and shading correction are coupled together, so we iteratively correct the shading effects based on segmentation result and refine the segmentation by segmenting the image after shading correction. A fluorescence microscopy E. Coli image can be segmented (based on its intensity value) into two classes: the background and the cells, where the intensity variation within each class is close to zero if there is no shading. Therefore, we make use of this characteristics to correct the shading in each iteration. Shading is mathematically modeled as a multiplicative component and an additive noise component. The additive component is removed by a denoising process, and the multiplicative component is estimated using a fast algorithm to minimize the intra-class intensity variation. We tested our method on synthetic images and real fluorescence E.coli images. It works well not only for visual inspection, but also for numerical evaluation. Our proposed method should be useful for further quantitative analysis especially for protein expression value comparison.

  18. Embryonic Heart Morphogenesis from Confocal Microscopy Imaging and Automatic Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongda Mao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic heart morphogenesis (EHM is a complex and dynamic process where the heart transforms from a single tube into a four-chambered pump. This process is of great biological and clinical interest but is still poorly understood for two main reasons. On the one hand, the existing imaging modalities for investigating EHM suffered from either limited penetration depth or limited spatial resolution. On the other hand, current works typically adopted manual segmentation, which was tedious, subjective, and time consuming considering the complexity of developing heart geometry and the large size of images. In this paper, we propose to utilize confocal microscopy imaging with tissue optical immersion clearing technique to image the heart at different stages of development for EHM study. The imaging method is able to produce high spatial resolution images and achieve large penetration depth at the same time. Furthermore, we propose a novel convex active contour model for automatic image segmentation. The model has the ability to deal with intensity fall-off in depth which is characterized by confocal microscopy images. We acquired the images of embryonic quail hearts from day 6 to day 14 of incubation for EHM study. The experimental results were promising and provided us with an insight view of early heart growth pattern and also paved the road for data-driven heart growth modeling.

  19. A novel multiphoton microscopy images segmentation method based on superpixel and watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weilin; Lin, Jinyong; Wang, Shu; Li, Yan; Liu, Mingyu; Liu, Gaoqiang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Guannan; Chen, Rong

    2017-04-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) imaging technique based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) shows fantastic performance for biological imaging. The automatic segmentation of cellular architectural properties for biomedical diagnosis based on MPM images is still a challenging issue. A novel multiphoton microscopy images segmentation method based on superpixels and watershed (MSW) is presented here to provide good segmentation results for MPM images. The proposed method uses SLIC superpixels instead of pixels to analyze MPM images for the first time. The superpixels segmentation based on a new distance metric combined with spatial, CIE Lab color space and phase congruency features, divides the images into patches which keep the details of the cell boundaries. Then the superpixels are used to reconstruct new images by defining an average value of superpixels as image pixels intensity level. Finally, the marker-controlled watershed is utilized to segment the cell boundaries from the reconstructed images. Experimental results show that cellular boundaries can be extracted from MPM images by MSW with higher accuracy and robustness. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Fast Segmentation From Blurred Data in 3D Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storath, Martin; Rickert, Dennis; Unser, Michael; Weinmann, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    We develop a fast algorithm for segmenting 3D images from linear measurements based on the Potts model (or piecewise constant Mumford-Shah model). To that end, we first derive suitable space discretizations of the 3D Potts model, which are capable of dealing with 3D images defined on non-cubic grids. Our discretization allows us to utilize a specific splitting approach, which results in decoupled subproblems of moderate size. The crucial point in the 3D setup is that the number of independent subproblems is so large that we can reasonably exploit the parallel processing capabilities of the graphics processing units (GPUs). Our GPU implementation is up to 18 times faster than the sequential CPU version. This allows to process even large volumes in acceptable runtimes. As a further contribution, we extend the algorithm in order to deal with non-negativity constraints. We demonstrate the efficiency of our method for combined image deconvolution and segmentation on simulated data and on real 3D wide field fluorescence microscopy data.

  1. A statistical pixel intensity model for segmentation of confocal laser scanning microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calapez, Alexandre; Rosa, Agostinho

    2010-09-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) has been widely used in the life sciences for the characterization of cell processes because it allows the recording of the distribution of fluorescence-tagged macromolecules on a section of the living cell. It is in fact the cornerstone of many molecular transport and interaction quantification techniques where the identification of regions of interest through image segmentation is usually a required step. In many situations, because of the complexity of the recorded cellular structures or because of the amounts of data involved, image segmentation either is too difficult or inefficient to be done by hand and automated segmentation procedures have to be considered. Given the nature of CLSM images, statistical segmentation methodologies appear as natural candidates. In this work we propose a model to be used for statistical unsupervised CLSM image segmentation. The model is derived from the CLSM image formation mechanics and its performance is compared to the existing alternatives. Results show that it provides a much better description of the data on classes characterized by their mean intensity, making it suitable not only for segmentation methodologies with known number of classes but also for use with schemes aiming at the estimation of the number of classes through the application of cluster selection criteria.

  2. Algorithms for Cytoplasm Segmentation of Fluorescence Labelled Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Wählby

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic cell segmentation has various applications in cytometry, and while the nucleus is often very distinct and easy to identify, the cytoplasm provides a lot more challenge. A new combination of image analysis algorithms for segmentation of cells imaged by fluorescence microscopy is presented. The algorithm consists of an image pre‐processing step, a general segmentation and merging step followed by a segmentation quality measurement. The quality measurement consists of a statistical analysis of a number of shape descriptive features. Objects that have features that differ to that of correctly segmented single cells can be further processed by a splitting step. By statistical analysis we therefore get a feedback system for separation of clustered cells. After the segmentation is completed, the quality of the final segmentation is evaluated. By training the algorithm on a representative set of training images, the algorithm is made fully automatic for subsequent images created under similar conditions. Automatic cytoplasm segmentation was tested on CHO‐cells stained with calcein. The fully automatic method showed between 89% and 97% correct segmentation as compared to manual segmentation.

  3. Atomic Force Microscopy Based Cell Shape Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adia-Nimuwa, Usienemfon; Mujdat Tiryaki, Volkan; Hartz, Steven; Xie, Kan; Ayres, Virginia

    2013-03-01

    Stellation is a measure of cell physiology and pathology for several cell groups including neural, liver and pancreatic cells. In the present work, we compare the results of a conventional two-dimensional shape index study of both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescent microscopy images with the results obtained using a new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index similar to sphericity index. The stellation of astrocytes is investigated on nanofibrillar scaffolds composed of electrospun polyamide nanofibers that has demonstrated promise for central nervous system (CNS) repair. Recent work by our group has given us the ability to clearly segment the cells from nanofibrillar scaffolds in AFM images. The clear-featured AFM images indicated that the astrocyte processes were longer than previously identified at 24h. It was furthermore shown that cell spreading could vary significantly as a function of environmental parameters, and that AFM images could record these variations. The new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index incorporates the new information: longer stellate processes and cell spreading. The support of NSF PHY-095776 is acknowledged.

  4. Smart markers for watershed-based cell segmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Fahrettin Koyuncu

    Full Text Available Automated cell imaging systems facilitate fast and reliable analysis of biological events at the cellular level. In these systems, the first step is usually cell segmentation that greatly affects the success of the subsequent system steps. On the other hand, similar to other image segmentation problems, cell segmentation is an ill-posed problem that typically necessitates the use of domain-specific knowledge to obtain successful segmentations even by human subjects. The approaches that can incorporate this knowledge into their segmentation algorithms have potential to greatly improve segmentation results. In this work, we propose a new approach for the effective segmentation of live cells from phase contrast microscopy. This approach introduces a new set of "smart markers" for a marker-controlled watershed algorithm, for which the identification of its markers is critical. The proposed approach relies on using domain-specific knowledge, in the form of visual characteristics of the cells, to define the markers. We evaluate our approach on a total of 1,954 cells. The experimental results demonstrate that this approach, which uses the proposed definition of smart markers, is quite effective in identifying better markers compared to its counterparts. This will, in turn, be effective in improving the segmentation performance of a marker-controlled watershed algorithm.

  5. Smart markers for watershed-based cell segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncu, Can Fahrettin; Arslan, Salim; Durmaz, Irem; Cetin-Atalay, Rengul; Gunduz-Demir, Cigdem

    2012-01-01

    Automated cell imaging systems facilitate fast and reliable analysis of biological events at the cellular level. In these systems, the first step is usually cell segmentation that greatly affects the success of the subsequent system steps. On the other hand, similar to other image segmentation problems, cell segmentation is an ill-posed problem that typically necessitates the use of domain-specific knowledge to obtain successful segmentations even by human subjects. The approaches that can incorporate this knowledge into their segmentation algorithms have potential to greatly improve segmentation results. In this work, we propose a new approach for the effective segmentation of live cells from phase contrast microscopy. This approach introduces a new set of "smart markers" for a marker-controlled watershed algorithm, for which the identification of its markers is critical. The proposed approach relies on using domain-specific knowledge, in the form of visual characteristics of the cells, to define the markers. We evaluate our approach on a total of 1,954 cells. The experimental results demonstrate that this approach, which uses the proposed definition of smart markers, is quite effective in identifying better markers compared to its counterparts. This will, in turn, be effective in improving the segmentation performance of a marker-controlled watershed algorithm.

  6. Microscopy Image Browser: A Platform for Segmentation and Analysis of Multidimensional Datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya Belevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the structure-function relationship of cells and organelles in their natural context requires multidimensional imaging. As techniques for multimodal 3-D imaging have become more accessible, effective processing, visualization, and analysis of large datasets are posing a bottleneck for the workflow. Here, we present a new software package for high-performance segmentation and image processing of multidimensional datasets that improves and facilitates the full utilization and quantitative analysis of acquired data, which is freely available from a dedicated website. The open-source environment enables modification and insertion of new plug-ins to customize the program for specific needs. We provide practical examples of program features used for processing, segmentation and analysis of light and electron microscopy datasets, and detailed tutorials to enable users to rapidly and thoroughly learn how to use the program.

  7. A workflow for the automatic segmentation of organelles in electron microscopy image stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Alex J.; Seyedhosseini, Mojtaba; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Bushong, Eric A.; Panda, Satchidananda; Tasdizen, Tolga; Ellisman, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) facilitates analysis of the form, distribution, and functional status of key organelle systems in various pathological processes, including those associated with neurodegenerative disease. Such EM data often provide important new insights into the underlying disease mechanisms. The development of more accurate and efficient methods to quantify changes in subcellular microanatomy has already proven key to understanding the pathogenesis of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, as well as glaucoma. While our ability to acquire large volumes of 3D EM data is progressing rapidly, more advanced analysis tools are needed to assist in measuring precise three-dimensional morphologies of organelles within data sets that can include hundreds to thousands of whole cells. Although new imaging instrument throughputs can exceed teravoxels of data per day, image segmentation and analysis remain significant bottlenecks to achieving quantitative descriptions of whole cell structural organellomes. Here, we present a novel method for the automatic segmentation of organelles in 3D EM image stacks. Segmentations are generated using only 2D image information, making the method suitable for anisotropic imaging techniques such as serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM). Additionally, no assumptions about 3D organelle morphology are made, ensuring the method can be easily expanded to any number of structurally and functionally diverse organelles. Following the presentation of our algorithm, we validate its performance by assessing the segmentation accuracy of different organelle targets in an example SBEM dataset and demonstrate that it can be efficiently parallelized on supercomputing resources, resulting in a dramatic reduction in runtime. PMID:25426032

  8. Advanced Microscopy of Microbial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Regenberg, Birgitte; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    microscopy, super-resolution optical microscopy (STED, SIM, PALM) as well as atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using examples of bistability in microbial populations as well as biofilm development and differentiation in bacterial and yeast consortia, we demonstrate the importance of microscopy...

  9. Statistical validation of individual fibre segmentation from tomograms and microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emerson, Monica Jane; Dahl, Vedrana Andersen; Conradsen, Knut

    2018-01-01

    at different resolutions to optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), where we characterise fibres by their diameters and positions. In addition to comparing individual fibre diameters, we also model their spatial distribution, and compare the obtained model parameters. Our study shows...

  10. Investigation of autofocus algorithms for brightfield microscopy of unstained cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu Yu; Dugan, Nazim; Hennelly, Bryan M.

    2014-05-01

    In the past decade there has been significant interest in image processing for brightfield cell microscopy. Much of the previous research on image processing for microscopy has focused on fluorescence microscopy, including cell counting, cell tracking, cell segmentation and autofocusing. Fluorescence microscopy provides functional image information that involves the use of labels in the form of chemical stains or dyes. For some applications, where the biochemical integrity of the cell is required to remain unchanged so that sensitive chemical testing can later be applied, it is necessary to avoid staining. For this reason the challenge of processing images of unstained cells has become a topic of increasing attention. These cells are often effectively transparent and appear to have a homogenous intensity profile when they are in focus. Bright field microscopy is the most universally available and most widely used form of optical microscopy and for this reason we are interested in investigating image processing of unstained cells recorded using a standard bright field microscope. In this paper we investigate the application of a range of different autofocus metrics applied to unstained bladder cancer cell lines using a standard inverted bright field microscope with microscope objectives that have high magnification and numerical aperture. We present a number of conclusions on the optimum metrics and the manner in which they should be applied for this application.

  11. FogBank: a single cell segmentation across multiple cell lines and image modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfoun, Joe; Majurski, Michael; Dima, Alden; Stuelten, Christina; Peskin, Adele; Brady, Mary

    2014-12-30

    Many cell lines currently used in medical research, such as cancer cells or stem cells, grow in confluent sheets or colonies. The biology of individual cells provide valuable information, thus the separation of touching cells in these microscopy images is critical for counting, identification and measurement of individual cells. Over-segmentation of single cells continues to be a major problem for methods based on morphological watershed due to the high level of noise in microscopy cell images. There is a need for a new segmentation method that is robust over a wide variety of biological images and can accurately separate individual cells even in challenging datasets such as confluent sheets or colonies. We present a new automated segmentation method called FogBank that accurately separates cells when confluent and touching each other. This technique is successfully applied to phase contrast, bright field, fluorescence microscopy and binary images. The method is based on morphological watershed principles with two new features to improve accuracy and minimize over-segmentation. First, FogBank uses histogram binning to quantize pixel intensities which minimizes the image noise that causes over-segmentation. Second, FogBank uses a geodesic distance mask derived from raw images to detect the shapes of individual cells, in contrast to the more linear cell edges that other watershed-like algorithms produce. We evaluated the segmentation accuracy against manually segmented datasets using two metrics. FogBank achieved segmentation accuracy on the order of 0.75 (1 being a perfect match). We compared our method with other available segmentation techniques in term of achieved performance over the reference data sets. FogBank outperformed all related algorithms. The accuracy has also been visually verified on data sets with 14 cell lines across 3 imaging modalities leading to 876 segmentation evaluation images. FogBank produces single cell segmentation from confluent cell

  12. Automatic neuron segmentation and neural network analysis method for phase contrast microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Jincheng; Özkucur, Nurdan; Ren, Michael; Kaplan, David L; Levin, Michael; Miller, Eric L

    2015-11-01

    Phase Contrast Microscopy (PCM) is an important tool for the long term study of living cells. Unlike fluorescence methods which suffer from photobleaching of fluorophore or dye molecules, PCM image contrast is generated by the natural variations in optical index of refraction. Unfortunately, the same physical principles which allow for these studies give rise to complex artifacts in the raw PCM imagery. Of particular interest in this paper are neuron images where these image imperfections manifest in very different ways for the two structures of specific interest: cell bodies (somas) and dendrites. To address these challenges, we introduce a novel parametric image model using the level set framework and an associated variational approach which simultaneously restores and segments this class of images. Using this technique as the basis for an automated image analysis pipeline, results for both the synthetic and real images validate and demonstrate the advantages of our approach.

  13. General Purpose Segmentation for Microorganisms in Microscopy Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sebastian H. Nesgaard; Moeslund, Thomas B.; Rankl, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach for achieving generalized segmentation of microorganisms in mi- croscopy images. It employs a pixel-wise classification strategy based on local features. Multilayer percep- trons are utilized for classification of the local features and is trained for each sp...

  14. Segmentation and classification of cell cycle phases in fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, Ilker; Bunyak, Filiz; Chagin, Vadim; Cardoso, M Christina; Palaniappan, Kannappan

    2009-01-01

    Current chemical biology methods for studying spatiotemporal correlation between biochemical networks and cell cycle phase progression in live-cells typically use fluorescence-based imaging of fusion proteins. Stable cell lines expressing fluorescently tagged protein GFP-PCNA produce rich, dynamically varying sub-cellular foci patterns characterizing the cell cycle phases, including the progress during the S-phase. Variable fluorescence patterns, drastic changes in SNR, shape and position changes and abundance of touching cells require sophisticated algorithms for reliable automatic segmentation and cell cycle classification. We extend the recently proposed graph partitioning active contours (GPAC) for fluorescence-based nucleus segmentation using regional density functions and dramatically improve its efficiency, making it scalable for high content microscopy imaging. We utilize surface shape properties of GFP-PCNA intensity field to obtain descriptors of foci patterns and perform automated cell cycle phase classification, and give quantitative performance by comparing our results to manually labeled data.

  15. Pupil-segmentation-based adaptive optics for microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Na; Milkie, Daniel E.; Betzig, Eric

    2011-03-01

    Inhomogeneous optical properties of biological samples make it difficult to obtain diffraction-limited resolution in depth. Correcting the sample-induced optical aberrations needs adaptive optics (AO). However, the direct wavefront-sensing approach commonly used in astronomy is not suitable for most biological samples due to their strong scattering of light. We developed an image-based AO approach that is insensitive to sample scattering. By comparing images of the sample taken with different segments of the pupil illuminated, local tilt in the wavefront is measured from image shift. The aberrated wavefront is then obtained either by measuring the local phase directly using interference or with phase reconstruction algorithms similar to those used in astronomical AO. We implemented this pupil-segmentation-based approach in a two-photon fluorescence microscope and demonstrated that diffraction-limited resolution can be recovered from nonbiological and biological samples.

  16. Automatic segmentation of time-lapse microscopy images depicting a live Dharma embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharia, Eleni; Bondesson, Maria; Riu, Anne; Ducharme, Nicole A; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Kakadiaris, Ioannis A

    2011-01-01

    Biological inferences about the toxicity of chemicals reached during experiments on the zebrafish Dharma embryo can be greatly affected by the analysis of the time-lapse microscopy images depicting the embryo. Among the stages of image analysis, automatic and accurate segmentation of the Dharma embryo is the most crucial and challenging. In this paper, an accurate and automatic segmentation approach for the segmentation of the Dharma embryo data obtained by fluorescent time-lapse microscopy is proposed. Experiments performed in four stacks of 3D images over time have shown promising results.

  17. Adaptive segmentation of nuclei in H&S stained tendon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Bo-I.; Wu, Po-Ting; Hsu, Jian-Han; Jou, I.-Ming; Su, Fong-Chin; Sun, Yung-Nien

    2015-12-01

    Tendiopathy is a popular clinical issue in recent years. In most cases like trigger finger or tennis elbow, the pathology change can be observed under H and E stained tendon microscopy. However, the qualitative analysis is too subjective and thus the results heavily depend on the observers. We develop an automatic segmentation procedure which segments and counts the nuclei in H and E stained tendon microscopy fast and precisely. This procedure first determines the complexity of images and then segments the nuclei from the image. For the complex images, the proposed method adopts sampling-based thresholding to segment the nuclei. While for the simple images, the Laplacian-based thresholding is employed to re-segment the nuclei more accurately. In the experiments, the proposed method is compared with the experts outlined results. The nuclei number of proposed method is closed to the experts counted, and the processing time of proposed method is much faster than the experts'.

  18. Segmenting overlapping nano-objects in atomic force microscopy image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Han, Yuexing; Li, Qing; Wang, Bing; Konagaya, Akihiko

    2018-01-01

    Recently, techniques for nanoparticles have rapidly been developed for various fields, such as material science, medical, and biology. In particular, methods of image processing have widely been used to automatically analyze nanoparticles. A technique to automatically segment overlapping nanoparticles with image processing and machine learning is proposed. Here, two tasks are necessary: elimination of image noises and action of the overlapping shapes. For the first task, mean square error and the seed fill algorithm are adopted to remove noises and improve the quality of the original image. For the second task, four steps are needed to segment the overlapping nanoparticles. First, possibility split lines are obtained by connecting the high curvature pixels on the contours. Second, the candidate split lines are classified with a machine learning algorithm. Third, the overlapping regions are detected with the method of density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise (DBSCAN). Finally, the best split lines are selected with a constrained minimum value. We give some experimental examples and compare our technique with two other methods. The results can show the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  19. Segmentation and quantification of subcellular structures in fluorescence microscopy images using Squassh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Aurélien; Paul, Grégory; Incardona, Pietro; Bugarski, Milica; Mansouri, Maysam; Niemann, Axel; Ziegler, Urs; Berger, Philipp; Sbalzarini, Ivo F

    2014-03-01

    Detection and quantification of fluorescently labeled molecules in subcellular compartments is a key step in the analysis of many cell biological processes. Pixel-wise colocalization analyses, however, are not always suitable, because they do not provide object-specific information, and they are vulnerable to noise and background fluorescence. Here we present a versatile protocol for a method named 'Squassh' (segmentation and quantification of subcellular shapes), which is used for detecting, delineating and quantifying subcellular structures in fluorescence microscopy images. The workflow is implemented in freely available, user-friendly software. It works on both 2D and 3D images, accounts for the microscope optics and for uneven image background, computes cell masks and provides subpixel accuracy. The Squassh software enables both colocalization and shape analyses. The protocol can be applied in batch, on desktop computers or computer clusters, and it usually requires images, respectively. Basic computer-user skills and some experience with fluorescence microscopy are recommended to successfully use the protocol.

  20. Automatic Cell Segmentation in Fluorescence Images of Confluent Cell Monolayers Using Multi-object Geometric Deformable Model

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhen; Bogovic, John A.; Carass, Aaron; Ye, Mao; Searson, Peter C.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid development of microscopy for cell imaging, there is a strong and growing demand for image analysis software to quantitatively study cell morphology. Automatic cell segmentation is an important step in image analysis. Despite substantial progress, there is still a need to improve the accuracy, efficiency, and adaptability to different cell morphologies. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic method for segmenting cells in fluorescence images of confluent cell monolayers. T...

  1. Multi-focus Image Fusion Using Epifluorescence Microscopy for Robust Vascular Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Pelapur, Rengarajan; Prasath, Surya; Palaniappan, Kannappan

    2014-01-01

    We are building a computerized image analysis system for Dura Mater vascular network from fluorescence microscopy images. We propose a system that couples a multi-focus image fusion module with a robust adaptive filtering based segmentation. The robust adaptive filtering scheme handles noise without destroying small structures, and the multi focal image fusion considerably improves the overall segmentation quality by integrating information from multiple images. Based on the segmenta...

  2. An automated image analysis framework for segmentation and division plane detection of single live Staphylococcus aureus cells which can operate at millisecond sampling time scales using bespoke Slimfield microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, Adam J. M.; Miller, Helen; Foster, Simon; Leake, Mark C.

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen, giving rise to antimicrobial resistance in cell strains such as Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Here we report an image analysis framework for automated detection and image segmentation of cells in S. aureus cell clusters, and explicit identification of their cell division planes. We use a new combination of several existing analytical tools of image analysis to detect cellular and subcellular morphological features relevant to cell division from millisecond time scale sampled images of live pathogens at a detection precision of single molecules. We demonstrate this approach using a fluorescent reporter GFP fused to the protein EzrA that localises to a mid-cell plane during division and is involved in regulation of cell size and division. This image analysis framework presents a valuable platform from which to study candidate new antimicrobials which target the cell division machinery, but may also have more general application in detecting morphologically complex structures of fluorescently labelled proteins present in clusters of other types of cells.

  3. Cell reactions with biomaterials: the microscopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis A. S.G.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The methods and results of optical microscopy that can be used to observe cell reactions to biomaterials are Interference Reflection Microscopy (IRM, Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM, Surface Plasmon Resonance Microscopy (SPRM and Forster Resonance Energy Transfer Microscopy (FRETM and Standing Wave Fluorescence Microscopy. The last three are new developments, which have not yet been fully perfected. TIRFM and SPRM are evanescent wave methods. The physics of these methods depend upon optical phenomena at interfaces. All these methods give information on the dimensions of the gap between cell and the substratum to which it is adhering and thus are especially suited to work with biomaterials. IRM and FRETM can be used on opaque surfaces though image interpretation is especially difficult for IRM on a reflecting opaque surface. These methods are compared with several electron microscopical methods for studying cell adhesion to substrata. These methods all yield fairly consistent results and show that the cell to substratum distance on many materials is in the range 5 to 30 nm. The area of contact relative to the total projected area of the cell may vary from a few per cent to close to 100% depending on the cell type and substratum. These methods show that those discrete contact areas well known as focal contacts are frequently present. The results of FRETM suggest that the separation from the substratum even in a focal contact is about 5 nm.

  4. Superpixel-based segmentation of muscle fibers in multi-channel microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Binh P; Heemskerk, Hans; So, Peter T C; Tucker-Kellogg, Lisa

    2016-12-05

    Confetti fluorescence and other multi-color genetic labelling strategies are useful for observing stem cell regeneration and for other problems of cell lineage tracing. One difficulty of such strategies is segmenting the cell boundaries, which is a very different problem from segmenting color images from the real world. This paper addresses the difficulties and presents a superpixel-based framework for segmentation of regenerated muscle fibers in mice. We propose to integrate an edge detector into a superpixel algorithm and customize the method for multi-channel images. The enhanced superpixel method outperforms the original and another advanced superpixel algorithm in terms of both boundary recall and under-segmentation error. Our framework was applied to cross-section and lateral section images of regenerated muscle fibers from confetti-fluorescent mice. Compared with "ground-truth" segmentations, our framework yielded median Dice similarity coefficients of 0.92 and higher. Our segmentation framework is flexible and provides very good segmentations of multi-color muscle fibers. We anticipate our methods will be useful for segmenting a variety of tissues in confetti fluorecent mice and in mice with similar multi-color labels.

  5. Cerebral vessels segmentation for light-sheet microscopy image using convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chaoen; Hui, Hui; Wang, Shuo; Dong, Di; Liu, Xia; Yang, Xin; Tian, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Cerebral vessel segmentation is an important step in image analysis for brain function and brain disease studies. To extract all the cerebrovascular patterns, including arteries and capillaries, some filter-based methods are used to segment vessels. However, the design of accurate and robust vessel segmentation algorithms is still challenging, due to the variety and complexity of images, especially in cerebral blood vessel segmentation. In this work, we addressed a problem of automatic and robust segmentation of cerebral micro-vessels structures in cerebrovascular images acquired by light-sheet microscope for mouse. To segment micro-vessels in large-scale image data, we proposed a convolutional neural networks (CNNs) architecture trained by 1.58 million pixels with manual label. Three convolutional layers and one fully connected layer were used in the CNNs model. We extracted a patch of size 32x32 pixels in each acquired brain vessel image as training data set to feed into CNNs for classification. This network was trained to output the probability that the center pixel of input patch belongs to vessel structures. To build the CNNs architecture, a series of mouse brain vascular images acquired from a commercial light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) system were used for training the model. The experimental results demonstrated that our approach is a promising method for effectively segmenting micro-vessels structures in cerebrovascular images with vessel-dense, nonuniform gray-level and long-scale contrast regions.

  6. CellSegm - a MATLAB toolbox for high-throughput 3D cell segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The application of fluorescence microscopy in cell biology often generates a huge amount of imaging data. Automated whole cell segmentation of such data enables the detection and analysis of individual cells, where a manual delineation is often time consuming, or practically not feasible. Furthermore, compared to manual analysis, automation normally has a higher degree of reproducibility. CellSegm, the software presented in this work, is a Matlab based command line software toolbox providing an automated whole cell segmentation of images showing surface stained cells, acquired by fluorescence microscopy. It has options for both fully automated and semi-automated cell segmentation. Major algorithmic steps are: (i) smoothing, (ii) Hessian-based ridge enhancement, (iii) marker-controlled watershed segmentation, and (iv) feature-based classfication of cell candidates. Using a wide selection of image recordings and code snippets, we demonstrate that CellSegm has the ability to detect various types of surface stained cells in 3D. After detection and outlining of individual cells, the cell candidates can be subject to software based analysis, specified and programmed by the end-user, or they can be analyzed by other software tools. A segmentation of tissue samples with appropriate characteristics is also shown to be resolvable in CellSegm. The command-line interface of CellSegm facilitates scripting of the separate tools, all implemented in Matlab, offering a high degree of flexibility and tailored workflows for the end-user. The modularity and scripting capabilities of CellSegm enable automated workflows and quantitative analysis of microscopic data, suited for high-throughput image based screening. PMID:23938087

  7. An Automatic Indirect Immunofluorescence Cell Segmentation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Kuan Chan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Indirect immunofluorescence (IIF with HEp-2 cells has been used for the detection of antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA in systemic autoimmune diseases. The ANA testing allows us to scan a broad range of autoantibody entities and to describe them by distinct fluorescence patterns. Automatic inspection for fluorescence patterns in an IIF image can assist physicians, without relevant experience, in making correct diagnosis. How to segment the cells from an IIF image is essential in developing an automatic inspection system for ANA testing. This paper focuses on the cell detection and segmentation; an efficient method is proposed for automatically detecting the cells with fluorescence pattern in an IIF image. Cell culture is a process in which cells grow under control. Cell counting technology plays an important role in measuring the cell density in a culture tank. Moreover, assessing medium suitability, determining population doubling times, and monitoring cell growth in cultures all require a means of quantifying cell population. The proposed method also can be used to count the cells from an image taken under a fluorescence microscope.

  8. Single cell elemental analysis using nuclear microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, M.Q.; Thong, P.S.P.; Kara, U.; Watt, F.

    1999-01-01

    The use of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) to provide quantitative elemental analysis of single cells is an area which has high potential, particularly when the trace elements such as Ca, Fe, Zn and Cu can be monitored. We describe the methodology of sample preparation for two cell types, the procedures of cell imaging using STIM, and the quantitative elemental analysis of single cells using RBS and PIXE. Recent work on single cells at the Nuclear Microscopy Research Centre,National University of Singapore has centred around two research areas: (a) Apoptosis (programmed cell death), which has been recently implicated in a wide range of pathological conditions such as cancer, Parkinson's disease etc, and (b) Malaria (infection of red blood cells by the malaria parasite). Firstly we present results on the elemental analysis of human Chang liver cells (ATTCC CCL 13) where vanadium ions were used to trigger apoptosis, and demonstrate that nuclear microscopy has the capability of monitoring vanadium loading within individual cells. Secondly we present the results of elemental changes taking place in individual mouse red blood cells which have been infected with the malaria parasite and treated with the anti-malaria drug Qinghaosu (QHS)

  9. Telocytes and putative stem cells in the lungs: electron microscopy, electron tomography and laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Laurentiu M; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Suciu, Laura C; Manole, Catalin G; Hinescu, Mihail E

    2011-09-01

    This study describes a novel type of interstitial (stromal) cell - telocytes (TCs) - in the human and mouse respiratory tree (terminal and respiratory bronchioles, as well as alveolar ducts). TCs have recently been described in pleura, epicardium, myocardium, endocardium, intestine, uterus, pancreas, mammary gland, etc. (see www.telocytes.com ). TCs are cells with specific prolongations called telopodes (Tp), frequently two to three per cell. Tp are very long prolongations (tens up to hundreds of μm) built of alternating thin segments known as podomers (≤ 200 nm, below the resolving power of light microscope) and dilated segments called podoms, which accommodate mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum and caveolae. Tp ramify dichotomously, making a 3-dimensional network with complex homo- and heterocellular junctions. Confocal microscopy reveals that TCs are c-kit- and CD34-positive. Tp release shed vesicles or exosomes, sending macromolecular signals to neighboring cells and eventually modifying their transcriptional activity. At bronchoalveolar junctions, TCs have been observed in close association with putative stem cells (SCs) in the subepithelial stroma. SCs are recognized by their ultrastructure and Sca-1 positivity. Tp surround SCs, forming complex TC-SC niches (TC-SCNs). Electron tomography allows the identification of bridging nanostructures, which connect Tp with SCs. In conclusion, this study shows the presence of TCs in lungs and identifies a TC-SC tandem in subepithelial niches of the bronchiolar tree. In TC-SCNs, the synergy of TCs and SCs may be based on nanocontacts and shed vesicles.

  10. Quantitative segmentation of fluorescence microscopy images of heterogeneous tissue: Approach for tuning algorithm parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jenna L.; Harmany, Zachary T.; Mito, Jeffrey K.; Kennedy, Stephanie A.; Kim, Yongbaek; Dodd, Leslie; Geradts, Joseph; Kirsch, David G.; Willett, Rebecca M.; Brown, J. Quincy; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2013-02-01

    The combination of fluorescent contrast agents with microscopy is a powerful technique to obtain real time images of tissue histology without the need for fixing, sectioning, and staining. The potential of this technology lies in the identification of robust methods for image segmentation and quantitation, particularly in heterogeneous tissues. Our solution is to apply sparse decomposition (SD) to monochrome images of fluorescently-stained microanatomy to segment and quantify distinct tissue types. The clinical utility of our approach is demonstrated by imaging excised margins in a cohort of mice after surgical resection of a sarcoma. Representative images of excised margins were used to optimize the formulation of SD and tune parameters associated with the algorithm. Our results demonstrate that SD is a robust solution that can advance vital fluorescence microscopy as a clinically significant technology.

  11. Segmentation of Drosophila Heart in Optical Coherence Microscopy Images Using Convolutional Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Lian; Qin, Xi; He, Yuanhao; Sang, Xialin; Pan, Jinda; Xu, Tao; Men, Jing; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Li, Airong; Ma, Yutao; Zhou, Chao

    2018-01-01

    Convolutional neural networks are powerful tools for image segmentation and classification. Here, we use this method to identify and mark the heart region of Drosophila at different developmental stages in the cross-sectional images acquired by a custom optical coherence microscopy (OCM) system. With our well-trained convolutional neural network model, the heart regions through multiple heartbeat cycles can be marked with an intersection over union (IOU) of ~86%. Various morphological and dyn...

  12. Fast segmentation of stained nuclei in terabyte-scale, time resolved 3D microscopy image stacks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Stegmaier

    Full Text Available Automated analysis of multi-dimensional microscopy images has become an integral part of modern research in life science. Most available algorithms that provide sufficient segmentation quality, however, are infeasible for a large amount of data due to their high complexity. In this contribution we present a fast parallelized segmentation method that is especially suited for the extraction of stained nuclei from microscopy images, e.g., of developing zebrafish embryos. The idea is to transform the input image based on gradient and normal directions in the proximity of detected seed points such that it can be handled by straightforward global thresholding like Otsu's method. We evaluate the quality of the obtained segmentation results on a set of real and simulated benchmark images in 2D and 3D and show the algorithm's superior performance compared to other state-of-the-art algorithms. We achieve an up to ten-fold decrease in processing times, allowing us to process large data sets while still providing reasonable segmentation results.

  13. Quantification of plant cell coupling with live-cell microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Schulz, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    by confocal microscopy, loaded tracer is activated by UV illumination in a target cell and its spread to neighboring cells monitored. When combined with high-speed acquisition by resonant scanning or spinning disc confocal microscopy, the high signal-to-noise ratio of photoactivation allows collection...

  14. Axial tomography in live cell laser microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Verena; Bruns, Sarah; Bruns, Thomas; Weber, Petra; Wagner, Michael; Cremer, Christoph; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2017-09-01

    Single cell microscopy in a three-dimensional (3-D) environment is reported. Cells are grown in an agarose culture gel, located within microcapillaries and observed from different sides after adaptation of an innovative device for sample rotation. Thus, z-stacks can be recorded by confocal microscopy in different directions and used for illustration in 3-D. This gives additional information, since cells or organelles that appear superimposed in one direction, may be well resolved in another one. The method is tested and validated with single cells expressing a membrane or a mitochondrially associated green fluorescent protein, or cells accumulating fluorescent quantum dots. In addition, axial tomography supports measurements of cellular uptake and distribution of the anticancer drug doxorubicin in the nucleus (2 to 6 h after incubation) or the cytoplasm (24 h). This paper discusses that upon cell rotation an enhanced optical resolution in lateral direction compared to axial direction can be utilized to obtain an improved effective 3-D resolution, which represents an important step toward super-resolution microscopy of living cells.

  15. Circumventing photodamage in live-cell microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magidson, Valentin; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool in cell biology. This technique allows researchers to visualize the dynamics of tissue, cells, individual organelles and macromolecular assemblies inside the cell. Unfortunately, fluorescence microscopy is not completely ‘non-invasive’ as the high-intensity excitation light required for excitation of fluorophores is inherently toxic for live cells. Physiological changes induced by excessive illumination can lead to artifacts and abnormal responses. In this chapter we review major factors that contribute to phototoxicity and discuss practical solutions for circumventing photodamage. These solutions include the proper choice of image acquisition parameters, optimization of filter sets, hardware synchronization, and the use of intelligent illumination to avoid unnecessary light exposure. PMID:23931522

  16. Reconstruction of incomplete cell paths through a 3D-2D level set segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Maia; Wan, Justin W. L.

    2012-02-01

    Segmentation of fluorescent cell images has been a popular technique for tracking live cells. One challenge of segmenting cells from fluorescence microscopy is that cells in fluorescent images frequently disappear. When the images are stacked together to form a 3D image volume, the disappearance of the cells leads to broken cell paths. In this paper, we present a segmentation method that can reconstruct incomplete cell paths. The key idea of this model is to perform 2D segmentation in a 3D framework. The 2D segmentation captures the cells that appear in the image slices while the 3D segmentation connects the broken cell paths. The formulation is similar to the Chan-Vese level set segmentation which detects edges by comparing the intensity value at each voxel with the mean intensity values inside and outside of the level set surface. Our model, however, performs the comparison on each 2D slice with the means calculated by the 2D projected contour. The resulting effect is to segment the cells on each image slice. Unlike segmentation on each image frame individually, these 2D contours together form the 3D level set function. By enforcing minimum mean curvature on the level set surface, our segmentation model is able to extend the cell contours right before (and after) the cell disappears (and reappears) into the gaps, eventually connecting the broken paths. We will present segmentation results of C2C12 cells in fluorescent images to illustrate the effectiveness of our model qualitatively and quantitatively by different numerical examples.

  17. An Automatic Segmentation Method Combining an Active Contour Model and a Classification Technique for Detecting Polycomb-group Proteinsin High-Throughput Microscopy Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoretti, Francesco; Cesarini, Elisa; Lanzuolo, Chiara; Oliva, Gennaro; Antonelli, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The large amount of data generated in biological experiments that rely on advanced microscopy can be handled only with automated image analysis. Most analyses require a reliable cell image segmentation eventually capable of detecting subcellular structures.We present an automatic segmentation method to detect Polycomb group (PcG) proteins areas isolated from nuclei regions in high-resolution fluorescent cell image stacks. It combines two segmentation algorithms that use an active contour model and a classification technique serving as a tool to better understand the subcellular three-dimensional distribution of PcG proteins in live cell image sequences. We obtained accurate results throughout several cell image datasets, coming from different cell types and corresponding to different fluorescent labels, without requiring elaborate adjustments to each dataset.

  18. Analysis of gene expression levels in individual bacterial cells without image segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, In Hae; Son, Minjun [Physics Department, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118440, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States); Hagen, Stephen J., E-mail: sjhagen@ufl.edu [Physics Department, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118440, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a method for extracting gene expression data from images of bacterial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method does not employ cell segmentation and does not require high magnification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence and phase contrast images of the cells are correlated through the physics of phase contrast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate the method by characterizing noisy expression of comX in Streptococcus mutans. -- Abstract: Studies of stochasticity in gene expression typically make use of fluorescent protein reporters, which permit the measurement of expression levels within individual cells by fluorescence microscopy. Analysis of such microscopy images is almost invariably based on a segmentation algorithm, where the image of a cell or cluster is analyzed mathematically to delineate individual cell boundaries. However segmentation can be ineffective for studying bacterial cells or clusters, especially at lower magnification, where outlines of individual cells are poorly resolved. Here we demonstrate an alternative method for analyzing such images without segmentation. The method employs a comparison between the pixel brightness in phase contrast vs fluorescence microscopy images. By fitting the correlation between phase contrast and fluorescence intensity to a physical model, we obtain well-defined estimates for the different levels of gene expression that are present in the cell or cluster. The method reveals the boundaries of the individual cells, even if the source images lack the resolution to show these boundaries clearly.

  19. Analysis of gene expression levels in individual bacterial cells without image segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, In Hae; Son, Minjun; Hagen, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We present a method for extracting gene expression data from images of bacterial cells. ► The method does not employ cell segmentation and does not require high magnification. ► Fluorescence and phase contrast images of the cells are correlated through the physics of phase contrast. ► We demonstrate the method by characterizing noisy expression of comX in Streptococcus mutans. -- Abstract: Studies of stochasticity in gene expression typically make use of fluorescent protein reporters, which permit the measurement of expression levels within individual cells by fluorescence microscopy. Analysis of such microscopy images is almost invariably based on a segmentation algorithm, where the image of a cell or cluster is analyzed mathematically to delineate individual cell boundaries. However segmentation can be ineffective for studying bacterial cells or clusters, especially at lower magnification, where outlines of individual cells are poorly resolved. Here we demonstrate an alternative method for analyzing such images without segmentation. The method employs a comparison between the pixel brightness in phase contrast vs fluorescence microscopy images. By fitting the correlation between phase contrast and fluorescence intensity to a physical model, we obtain well-defined estimates for the different levels of gene expression that are present in the cell or cluster. The method reveals the boundaries of the individual cells, even if the source images lack the resolution to show these boundaries clearly.

  20. A wavelet-based Bayesian framework for 3D object segmentation in microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Kangyu; Corrigan, David; Hillebrand, Jens; Ramaswami, Mani; Kokaram, Anil

    2012-03-01

    In confocal microscopy, target objects are labeled with fluorescent markers in the living specimen, and usually appear with irregular brightness in the observed images. Also, due to the existence of out-of-focus objects in the image, the segmentation of 3-D objects in the stack of image slices captured at different depth levels of the specimen is still heavily relied on manual analysis. In this paper, a novel Bayesian model is proposed for segmenting 3-D synaptic objects from given image stack. In order to solve the irregular brightness and out-offocus problems, the segmentation model employs a likelihood using the luminance-invariant 'wavelet features' of image objects in the dual-tree complex wavelet domain as well as a likelihood based on the vertical intensity profile of the image stack in 3-D. Furthermore, a smoothness 'frame' prior based on the a priori knowledge of the connections of the synapses is introduced to the model for enhancing the connectivity of the synapses. As a result, our model can successfully segment the in-focus target synaptic object from a 3D image stack with irregular brightness.

  1. Active Appearance Segmentation for Intensity Inhomogeneity in Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bo; Lyksborg, Mark; Hecksher-Sørensen, J.

    2016-01-01

    inhomogeneities which are often seen in Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM) images. This robustness is achieved by modelling the appearance of an image as a regularized Normalized Gradient Field (rNGF). We perform two experiments to challenge the model. First it is tested using a repeated leave......Active Appearance Models (AAM) are used for annotating or segmenting shapes in biomedical images. Performance relies heavily on the image data used to train the AAM. In this paper we improve the generalization properties of the model by making it robust to slowly varying spatial intensity......-one-out approach on images with minimal imperfections where the left out images are corrupted by a simulated bias field and segmented using the AAM. Secondly we test the model on LSFM images with common acquisition problems. In both experiments the proposed approach outperforms the often used AAM implementation...

  2. THE STRUCTURE AND CONCENTRATION OF SOLIDS IN PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS STUDIED BY REFRACTOMETRY AND INTERFERENCE MICROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidman, Richard L.

    1957-01-01

    Fragments of freshly obtained retinas of several vertebrate species were studied by refractometry, with reference to the structure of the rods and cones. The findings allowed a reassessment of previous descriptions based mainly on fixed material. The refractometric method was used also to measure the refractice indices and to calculate the concentrations of solids and water in the various cell segments. The main quantitative data were confirmed by interference microscopy. When examined by the method of refractometry the outer segments of freshly prepared retinal rods appear homogeneous. Within a few minutes a single eccentric longitudinal fiber appears, and transverse striations may develop. These changes are attributed to imbibition of water and swelling in structures normally too small for detection by light microscopy. The central "core" of outer segments and the chromophobic disc between outer and inner segments appear to be artifacts resulting from shrinkage during dehydration. The fresh outer segments of cones, and the inner segments of rods and cones also are described and illustrated. The volumes, refractive indices, concentrations of solids, and wet and dry weights of various segments of the photoreceptor cells were tabulated. Rod outer segments of the different species vary more than 100-fold in volume and mass but all have concentrations of solids of 40 to 43 per cent. Cone outer segments contain only about 30 per cent solids. The myoids, paraboloids, and ellipsoids of the inner segments likewise have characteristic refractive indices and concentrations of solids. Some of the limitations and particular virtues of refractometry as a method for quantitative analysis of living cells are discussed in comparison with more conventional biochemical techniques. Also the shapes and refractive indices of the various segments of photoreceptor cells are considered in relation to the absorption and transmission of light. The Stiles-Crawford effect can be accounted

  3. Segmentation Method of Time-Lapse Microscopy Images with the Focus on Biocompatibility Assessment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukup, Jindřich; Císař, P.; Šroubek, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 3 (2016), s. 497-506 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-29225S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LO1205; GA UK(CZ) 914813/2013; GA UK(CZ) SVV-2016-260332; CENAKVA(CZ) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0024 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : phase contrast microscopy * segmentation * biocompatibility assessment * time-lapse * cytotoxicity testing Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/ZOI/soukupj-0460642.pdf

  4. Segmentation of clustered cells in negative phase contrast images with integrated light intensity and cell shape information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Wang, C; Zhang, Z

    2018-05-01

    Automated cell segmentation plays a key role in characterisations of cell behaviours for both biology research and clinical practices. Currently, the segmentation of clustered cells still remains as a challenge and is the main reason for false segmentation. In this study, the emphasis was put on the segmentation of clustered cells in negative phase contrast images. A new method was proposed to combine both light intensity and cell shape information through the construction of grey-weighted distance transform (GWDT) within preliminarily segmented areas. With the constructed GWDT, the clustered cells can be detected and then separated with a modified region skeleton-based method. Moreover, a contour expansion operation was applied to get optimised detection of cell boundaries. In this paper, the working principle and detailed procedure of the proposed method are described, followed by the evaluation of the method on clustered cell segmentation. Results show that the proposed method achieves an improved performance in clustered cell segmentation compared with other methods, with 85.8% and 97.16% accuracy rate for clustered cells and all cells, respectively. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. Automatic Cell Segmentation in Fluorescence Images of Confluent Cell Monolayers Using Multi-object Geometric Deformable Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Bogovic, John A; Carass, Aaron; Ye, Mao; Searson, Peter C; Prince, Jerry L

    2013-03-13

    With the rapid development of microscopy for cell imaging, there is a strong and growing demand for image analysis software to quantitatively study cell morphology. Automatic cell segmentation is an important step in image analysis. Despite substantial progress, there is still a need to improve the accuracy, efficiency, and adaptability to different cell morphologies. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic method for segmenting cells in fluorescence images of confluent cell monolayers. This method addresses several challenges through a combination of ideas. 1) It realizes a fully automatic segmentation process by first detecting the cell nuclei as initial seeds and then using a multi-object geometric deformable model (MGDM) for final segmentation. 2) To deal with different defects in the fluorescence images, the cell junctions are enhanced by applying an order-statistic filter and principal curvature based image operator. 3) The final segmentation using MGDM promotes robust and accurate segmentation results, and guarantees no overlaps and gaps between neighboring cells. The automatic segmentation results are compared with manually delineated cells, and the average Dice coefficient over all distinguishable cells is 0.88.

  6. Electron Microscopy of Nanostructures in Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købler, Carsten

    with cells is therefore increasingly more relevant from both an engineering and a toxicological viewpoint. My work involves developing and exploring electron microscopy (EM) for imaging nanostructures in cells, for the purpose of understanding nanostructure-cell interactions in terms of their possibilities...... in science and concerns in toxicology. In the present work, EM methods for imaging nanostructure-cell interactions have been explored, and the complex interactions documented and ordered. In particular the usability of the focused ion beam scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) was explored. Using EM...... in literature. Furthermore, EM proved valuable as it revealed an unnoticed CNT effect. FIB-SEM helped establish that the effect was linked to eosionophilic crystalline pneumonia (ECP)....

  7. In Vivo Confocal Microscopy and Anterior Segment Optic Coherence Tomography Findings in Ocular Ochronosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Demirkilinc Biler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To report clinical and in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM findings of two patients with ocular ochronosis secondary due to alkaptonuria. Materials and Methods. Complete ophthalmologic examinations, including IVCM (HRT II/Rostock Cornea Module, Heidelberg, Germany, anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT (Topcon 3D spectral-domain OCT 2000, Topcon Medical Systems, Paramus, NJ, USA, corneal topography (Pentacam, OCULUS Optikgeräte GmbH, Wetzlar, Germany, and anterior segment photography, were performed. Results. Biomicroscopic examination showed bilateral darkly pigmented lesions of the nasal and temporal conjunctiva and episclera in both patients. In vivo confocal microscopy of the lesions revealed prominent degenerative changes, including vacuoles and fragmentation of collagen fibers in the affected conjunctival lamina propria and episclera. Hyperreflective pigment granules in different shapes were demonstrated in the substantia propria beneath the basement membrane. AS-OCT of Case 1 demonstrated hyporeflective areas. Fundus examination was within normal limits in both patients, except tilted optic discs with peripapillary atrophy in one of the patients. Corneal topography, thickness, and macular OCT were normal bilaterally in both cases. Conclusion. The degenerative and anatomic changes due to ochronotic pigment deposition in alkaptonuria can be demonstrated in detail with IVCM and AS-OCT. Confocal microscopic analysis in ocular ochronosis may serve as a useful adjunct in diagnosis and monitoring of the disease progression.

  8. Multistage morphological segmentation of bright-field and fluorescent microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzyńska, A.; Iwanowski, M.

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the multistage morphological segmentation method (MSMA) for microscopic cell images. The proposed method enables us to study the cell behaviour by using a sequence of two types of microscopic images: bright field images and/or fluorescent images. The proposed method is based on two types of information: the cell texture coming from the bright field images and intensity of light emission, done by fluorescent markers. The method is dedicated to the image sequences segmentation and it is based on mathematical morphology methods supported by other image processing techniques. The method allows for detecting cells in image independently from a degree of their flattening and from presenting structures which produce the texture. It makes use of some synergic information from the fluorescent light emission image as the support information. The MSMA method has been applied to images acquired during the experiments on neural stem cells as well as to artificial images. In order to validate the method, two types of errors have been considered: the error of cell area detection and the error of cell position using artificial images as the "gold standard".

  9. Nuclear microscopy of rat colon epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, M.; Rajendran, Reshmi; Ng, Mary; Udalagama, Chammika; Rodrigues, Anna E.; Watt, Frank; Jenner, Andrew Michael

    2011-10-01

    Using Nuclear microscopy, we have investigated iron distributions in the colons of Sprague Dawley rats, in order to elucidate heme uptake. Four groups of five Sprague Dawley rats (mean weight 180 g) were fed different purified diets containing either heme diet (2.5% w/w hemoglobin), high fat diet (HFD) (18% w/w fat, 1% w/w cholesterol), 'western' diet (combination of hemoglobin 2.5% and 18% fat, 1% cholesterol) or control diet (7% w/w fat). After 4 weeks, animals were sacrificed by exsanguination after anaesthesia. Thin sections of frozen colon tissue were taken, freeze dried and scanned using nuclear microscopy utilising the techniques PIXE, RBS and STIM. The new data acquisition system (IonDaq) developed in CIBA was used to obtain high resolution images and line scans were used to map the iron distributions across the colon boundaries. The nuclear microscope results indicate that when HFD is given in addition to heme, the iron content of the epithelial cells that line the colon decreases, and the zinc in the smooth muscle wall increases. This implies that the level of heme and fat in diet has an important role in colon health, possibly by influencing epithelial cells directly or changing luminal composition such as bacterial flora or levels of metabolites and cytotoxins.

  10. Nuclear microscopy of rat colon epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, M.; Rajendran, Reshmi; Ng, Mary; Udalagama, Chammika; Rodrigues, Anna E.; Watt, Frank; Jenner, Andrew Michael

    2011-01-01

    Using Nuclear microscopy, we have investigated iron distributions in the colons of Sprague Dawley rats, in order to elucidate heme uptake. Four groups of five Sprague Dawley rats (mean weight 180 g) were fed different purified diets containing either heme diet (2.5% w/w hemoglobin), high fat diet (HFD) (18% w/w fat, 1% w/w cholesterol), 'western' diet (combination of hemoglobin 2.5% and 18% fat, 1% cholesterol) or control diet (7% w/w fat). After 4 weeks, animals were sacrificed by exsanguination after anaesthesia. Thin sections of frozen colon tissue were taken, freeze dried and scanned using nuclear microscopy utilising the techniques PIXE, RBS and STIM. The new data acquisition system (IonDaq) developed in CIBA was used to obtain high resolution images and line scans were used to map the iron distributions across the colon boundaries. The nuclear microscope results indicate that when HFD is given in addition to heme, the iron content of the epithelial cells that line the colon decreases, and the zinc in the smooth muscle wall increases. This implies that the level of heme and fat in diet has an important role in colon health, possibly by influencing epithelial cells directly or changing luminal composition such as bacterial flora or levels of metabolites and cytotoxins.

  11. Nuclear microscopy of rat colon epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, M., E-mail: phyrenmq@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Rajendran, Reshmi [Lab of Molecular Imaging, Singapore Bioimaging Consotium, 11 Biopolis Way, 02-02 Helios, Singapore 138667 (Singapore); Ng, Mary [Department of Pharmacology, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Udalagama, Chammika; Rodrigues, Anna E.; Watt, Frank [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Jenner, Andrew Michael [Illawara Health and Medical Research Institute (IHMRI), University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    Using Nuclear microscopy, we have investigated iron distributions in the colons of Sprague Dawley rats, in order to elucidate heme uptake. Four groups of five Sprague Dawley rats (mean weight 180 g) were fed different purified diets containing either heme diet (2.5% w/w hemoglobin), high fat diet (HFD) (18% w/w fat, 1% w/w cholesterol), 'western' diet (combination of hemoglobin 2.5% and 18% fat, 1% cholesterol) or control diet (7% w/w fat). After 4 weeks, animals were sacrificed by exsanguination after anaesthesia. Thin sections of frozen colon tissue were taken, freeze dried and scanned using nuclear microscopy utilising the techniques PIXE, RBS and STIM. The new data acquisition system (IonDaq) developed in CIBA was used to obtain high resolution images and line scans were used to map the iron distributions across the colon boundaries. The nuclear microscope results indicate that when HFD is given in addition to heme, the iron content of the epithelial cells that line the colon decreases, and the zinc in the smooth muscle wall increases. This implies that the level of heme and fat in diet has an important role in colon health, possibly by influencing epithelial cells directly or changing luminal composition such as bacterial flora or levels of metabolites and cytotoxins.

  12. A Parallel Distributed-Memory Particle Method Enables Acquisition-Rate Segmentation of Large Fluorescence Microscopy Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Afshar

    Full Text Available Modern fluorescence microscopy modalities, such as light-sheet microscopy, are capable of acquiring large three-dimensional images at high data rate. This creates a bottleneck in computational processing and analysis of the acquired images, as the rate of acquisition outpaces the speed of processing. Moreover, images can be so large that they do not fit the main memory of a single computer. We address both issues by developing a distributed parallel algorithm for segmentation of large fluorescence microscopy images. The method is based on the versatile Discrete Region Competition algorithm, which has previously proven useful in microscopy image segmentation. The present distributed implementation decomposes the input image into smaller sub-images that are distributed across multiple computers. Using network communication, the computers orchestrate the collectively solving of the global segmentation problem. This not only enables segmentation of large images (we test images of up to 10(10 pixels, but also accelerates segmentation to match the time scale of image acquisition. Such acquisition-rate image segmentation is a prerequisite for the smart microscopes of the future and enables online data compression and interactive experiments.

  13. A Parallel Distributed-Memory Particle Method Enables Acquisition-Rate Segmentation of Large Fluorescence Microscopy Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Yaser; Sbalzarini, Ivo F

    2016-01-01

    Modern fluorescence microscopy modalities, such as light-sheet microscopy, are capable of acquiring large three-dimensional images at high data rate. This creates a bottleneck in computational processing and analysis of the acquired images, as the rate of acquisition outpaces the speed of processing. Moreover, images can be so large that they do not fit the main memory of a single computer. We address both issues by developing a distributed parallel algorithm for segmentation of large fluorescence microscopy images. The method is based on the versatile Discrete Region Competition algorithm, which has previously proven useful in microscopy image segmentation. The present distributed implementation decomposes the input image into smaller sub-images that are distributed across multiple computers. Using network communication, the computers orchestrate the collectively solving of the global segmentation problem. This not only enables segmentation of large images (we test images of up to 10(10) pixels), but also accelerates segmentation to match the time scale of image acquisition. Such acquisition-rate image segmentation is a prerequisite for the smart microscopes of the future and enables online data compression and interactive experiments.

  14. A Parallel Distributed-Memory Particle Method Enables Acquisition-Rate Segmentation of Large Fluorescence Microscopy Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Yaser; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.

    2016-01-01

    Modern fluorescence microscopy modalities, such as light-sheet microscopy, are capable of acquiring large three-dimensional images at high data rate. This creates a bottleneck in computational processing and analysis of the acquired images, as the rate of acquisition outpaces the speed of processing. Moreover, images can be so large that they do not fit the main memory of a single computer. We address both issues by developing a distributed parallel algorithm for segmentation of large fluorescence microscopy images. The method is based on the versatile Discrete Region Competition algorithm, which has previously proven useful in microscopy image segmentation. The present distributed implementation decomposes the input image into smaller sub-images that are distributed across multiple computers. Using network communication, the computers orchestrate the collectively solving of the global segmentation problem. This not only enables segmentation of large images (we test images of up to 1010 pixels), but also accelerates segmentation to match the time scale of image acquisition. Such acquisition-rate image segmentation is a prerequisite for the smart microscopes of the future and enables online data compression and interactive experiments. PMID:27046144

  15. Approaches to automatic parameter fitting in a microscopy image segmentation pipeline: An exploratory parameter space analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Christian; Nattkemper, Tim; Palmisano, Ralf; Wittenberg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Research and diagnosis in medicine and biology often require the assessment of a large amount of microscopy image data. Although on the one hand, digital pathology and new bioimaging technologies find their way into clinical practice and pharmaceutical research, some general methodological issues in automated image analysis are still open. In this study, we address the problem of fitting the parameters in a microscopy image segmentation pipeline. We propose to fit the parameters of the pipeline's modules with optimization algorithms, such as, genetic algorithms or coordinate descents, and show how visual exploration of the parameter space can help to identify sub-optimal parameter settings that need to be avoided. This is of significant help in the design of our automatic parameter fitting framework, which enables us to tune the pipeline for large sets of micrographs. The underlying parameter spaces pose a challenge for manual as well as automated parameter optimization, as the parameter spaces can show several local performance maxima. Hence, optimization strategies that are not able to jump out of local performance maxima, like the hill climbing algorithm, often result in a local maximum.

  16. Approaches to automatic parameter fitting in a microscopy image segmentation pipeline: An exploratory parameter space analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Held

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Research and diagnosis in medicine and biology often require the assessment of a large amount of microscopy image data. Although on the one hand, digital pathology and new bioimaging technologies find their way into clinical practice and pharmaceutical research, some general methodological issues in automated image analysis are still open. Methods: In this study, we address the problem of fitting the parameters in a microscopy image segmentation pipeline. We propose to fit the parameters of the pipeline′s modules with optimization algorithms, such as, genetic algorithms or coordinate descents, and show how visual exploration of the parameter space can help to identify sub-optimal parameter settings that need to be avoided. Results: This is of significant help in the design of our automatic parameter fitting framework, which enables us to tune the pipeline for large sets of micrographs. Conclusion: The underlying parameter spaces pose a challenge for manual as well as automated parameter optimization, as the parameter spaces can show several local performance maxima. Hence, optimization strategies that are not able to jump out of local performance maxima, like the hill climbing algorithm, often result in a local maximum.

  17. A fast global fitting algorithm for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy based on image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelet, S; Previte, M J R; Laiho, L H; So, P T C

    2004-10-01

    Global fitting algorithms have been shown to improve effectively the accuracy and precision of the analysis of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy data. Global analysis performs better than unconstrained data fitting when prior information exists, such as the spatial invariance of the lifetimes of individual fluorescent species. The highly coupled nature of global analysis often results in a significantly slower convergence of the data fitting algorithm as compared with unconstrained analysis. Convergence speed can be greatly accelerated by providing appropriate initial guesses. Realizing that the image morphology often correlates with fluorophore distribution, a global fitting algorithm has been developed to assign initial guesses throughout an image based on a segmentation analysis. This algorithm was tested on both simulated data sets and time-domain lifetime measurements. We have successfully measured fluorophore distribution in fibroblasts stained with Hoechst and calcein. This method further allows second harmonic generation from collagen and elastin autofluorescence to be differentiated in fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy images of ex vivo human skin. On our experimental measurement, this algorithm increased convergence speed by over two orders of magnitude and achieved significantly better fits. Copyright 2004 Biophysical Society

  18. Analysis of gene expression levels in individual bacterial cells without image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, In Hae; Son, Minjun; Hagen, Stephen J

    2012-05-11

    Studies of stochasticity in gene expression typically make use of fluorescent protein reporters, which permit the measurement of expression levels within individual cells by fluorescence microscopy. Analysis of such microscopy images is almost invariably based on a segmentation algorithm, where the image of a cell or cluster is analyzed mathematically to delineate individual cell boundaries. However segmentation can be ineffective for studying bacterial cells or clusters, especially at lower magnification, where outlines of individual cells are poorly resolved. Here we demonstrate an alternative method for analyzing such images without segmentation. The method employs a comparison between the pixel brightness in phase contrast vs fluorescence microscopy images. By fitting the correlation between phase contrast and fluorescence intensity to a physical model, we obtain well-defined estimates for the different levels of gene expression that are present in the cell or cluster. The method reveals the boundaries of the individual cells, even if the source images lack the resolution to show these boundaries clearly. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A new level set model for cell image segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing-Feng; Hou, Kai; Bao, Shang-Lian; Chen, Chun

    2011-02-01

    In this paper we first determine three phases of cell images: background, cytoplasm and nucleolus according to the general physical characteristics of cell images, and then develop a variational model, based on these characteristics, to segment nucleolus and cytoplasm from their relatively complicated backgrounds. In the meantime, the preprocessing obtained information of cell images using the OTSU algorithm is used to initialize the level set function in the model, which can speed up the segmentation and present satisfactory results in cell image processing.

  20. A fully automated cell segmentation and morphometric parameter system for quantifying corneal endothelial cell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fahdawi, Shumoos; Qahwaji, Rami; Al-Waisy, Alaa S; Ipson, Stanley; Ferdousi, Maryam; Malik, Rayaz A; Brahma, Arun

    2018-07-01

    Corneal endothelial cell abnormalities may be associated with a number of corneal and systemic diseases. Damage to the endothelial cells can significantly affect corneal transparency by altering hydration of the corneal stroma, which can lead to irreversible endothelial cell pathology requiring corneal transplantation. To date, quantitative analysis of endothelial cell abnormalities has been manually performed by ophthalmologists using time consuming and highly subjective semi-automatic tools, which require an operator interaction. We developed and applied a fully-automated and real-time system, termed the Corneal Endothelium Analysis System (CEAS) for the segmentation and computation of endothelial cells in images of the human cornea obtained by in vivo corneal confocal microscopy. First, a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) Band-pass filter is applied to reduce noise and enhance the image quality to make the cells more visible. Secondly, endothelial cell boundaries are detected using watershed transformations and Voronoi tessellations to accurately quantify the morphological parameters of the human corneal endothelial cells. The performance of the automated segmentation system was tested against manually traced ground-truth images based on a database consisting of 40 corneal confocal endothelial cell images in terms of segmentation accuracy and obtained clinical features. In addition, the robustness and efficiency of the proposed CEAS system were compared with manually obtained cell densities using a separate database of 40 images from controls (n = 11), obese subjects (n = 16) and patients with diabetes (n = 13). The Pearson correlation coefficient between automated and manual endothelial cell densities is 0.9 (p system, and the possibility of utilizing it in a real world clinical setting to enable rapid diagnosis and for patient follow-up, with an execution time of only 6 seconds per image. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Function of bunching segment in multi-cell RF gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xingfan; Xu Zhou Liu Xisan

    2001-01-01

    With a bunching segment and a shortened first cell, the 4 + 1/2 cell RF gun produced in CAEP has been proved experimentally to be effective in reducing electron back bombardment. The analysis of the electric field distribution and electron motion in bunching segment of multi-cell RF gun is presented. The electron capture efficiency and electron trajectory with different initial phase are calculated using Runge-Kutta method. The function of the bunching segment is discussed. The calculated parameters of the 4 + 1/2 cell RF gun agree well with the experimental results

  2. Quantitative tracking of tumor cells in phase-contrast microscopy exploiting halo artifact pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Song, Soo-Min; Lee, Hana; Kim, Myoung-Hee

    2012-03-01

    Tumor cell morphology is closely related to its invasiveness characteristics and migratory behaviors. An invasive tumor cell has a highly irregular shape, whereas a spherical cell is non-metastatic. Thus, quantitative analysis of cell features is crucial to determine tumor malignancy or to test the efficacy of anticancer treatment. We use phase-contrast microscopy to analyze single cell morphology and to monitor its change because it enables observation of long-term activity of living cells without photobleaching and phototoxicity, which is common in other fluorescence-labeled microscopy. Despite this advantage, there are image-level drawbacks to phase-contrast microscopy, such as local light effect and contrast interference ring, among others. Thus, we first applied a local filter to compensate for non-uniform illumination. Then, we used intensity distribution information to detect the cell boundary. In phase-contrast microscopy images, the cell normally appears as a dark region surrounded by a bright halo. As the halo artifact around the cell body is minimal and has an asymmetric diffusion pattern, we calculated the cross-sectional plane that intersected the center of each cell and was orthogonal to the first principal axis. Then, we extracted the dark cell region by level set. However, a dense population of cultured cells still rendered single-cell analysis difficult. Finally, we measured roundness and size to classify tumor cells into malignant and benign groups. We validated segmentation accuracy by comparing our findings with manually obtained results.

  3. Joint level-set and spatio-temporal motion detection for cell segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukari, Fatima; Makrogiannis, Sokratis

    2016-08-10

    Cell segmentation is a critical step for quantification and monitoring of cell cycle progression, cell migration, and growth control to investigate cellular immune response, embryonic development, tumorigenesis, and drug effects on live cells in time-lapse microscopy images. In this study, we propose a joint spatio-temporal diffusion and region-based level-set optimization approach for moving cell segmentation. Moving regions are initially detected in each set of three consecutive sequence images by numerically solving a system of coupled spatio-temporal partial differential equations. In order to standardize intensities of each frame, we apply a histogram transformation approach to match the pixel intensities of each processed frame with an intensity distribution model learned from all frames of the sequence during the training stage. After the spatio-temporal diffusion stage is completed, we compute the edge map by nonparametric density estimation using Parzen kernels. This process is followed by watershed-based segmentation and moving cell detection. We use this result as an initial level-set function to evolve the cell boundaries, refine the delineation, and optimize the final segmentation result. We applied this method to several datasets of fluorescence microscopy images with varying levels of difficulty with respect to cell density, resolution, contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio. We compared the results with those produced by Chan and Vese segmentation, a temporally linked level-set technique, and nonlinear diffusion-based segmentation. We validated all segmentation techniques against reference masks provided by the international Cell Tracking Challenge consortium. The proposed approach delineated cells with an average Dice similarity coefficient of 89 % over a variety of simulated and real fluorescent image sequences. It yielded average improvements of 11 % in segmentation accuracy compared to both strictly spatial and temporally linked Chan

  4. Impact of image segmentation on high-content screening data quality for SK-BR-3 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yizheng

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High content screening (HCS is a powerful method for the exploration of cellular signalling and morphology that is rapidly being adopted in cancer research. HCS uses automated microscopy to collect images of cultured cells. The images are subjected to segmentation algorithms to identify cellular structures and quantitate their morphology, for hundreds to millions of individual cells. However, image analysis may be imperfect, especially for "HCS-unfriendly" cell lines whose morphology is not well handled by current image segmentation algorithms. We asked if segmentation errors were common for a clinically relevant cell line, if such errors had measurable effects on the data, and if HCS data could be improved by automated identification of well-segmented cells. Results Cases of poor cell body segmentation occurred frequently for the SK-BR-3 cell line. We trained classifiers to identify SK-BR-3 cells that were well segmented. On an independent test set created by human review of cell images, our optimal support-vector machine classifier identified well-segmented cells with 81% accuracy. The dose responses of morphological features were measurably different in well- and poorly-segmented populations. Elimination of the poorly-segmented cell population increased the purity of DNA content distributions, while appropriately retaining biological heterogeneity, and simultaneously increasing our ability to resolve specific morphological changes in perturbed cells. Conclusion Image segmentation has a measurable impact on HCS data. The application of a multivariate shape-based filter to identify well-segmented cells improved HCS data quality for an HCS-unfriendly cell line, and could be a valuable post-processing step for some HCS datasets.

  5. Graphene-enabled electron microscopy and correlated super-resolution microscopy of wet cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Michal; Hauser, Margaret; Li, Wan; Moon, Seonah; Xu, Ke

    2015-06-11

    The application of electron microscopy to hydrated biological samples has been limited by high-vacuum operating conditions. Traditional methods utilize harsh and laborious sample dehydration procedures, often leading to structural artefacts and creating difficulties for correlating results with high-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Here, we utilize graphene, a single-atom-thick carbon meshwork, as the thinnest possible impermeable and conductive membrane to protect animal cells from vacuum, thus enabling high-resolution electron microscopy of wet and untreated whole cells with exceptional ease. Our approach further allows for facile correlative super-resolution and electron microscopy of wet cells directly on the culturing substrate. In particular, individual cytoskeletal actin filaments are resolved in hydrated samples through electron microscopy and well correlated with super-resolution results.

  6. Characterisation of cell-wall polysaccharides from mandarin segment membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coll-Almela, L.; Saura-Lopez, D.; Laencina-Sanchez, J.; Schols, H.A.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Ros-García, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to develop a process of enzymatic peeling of mandarin segments suitable for use on an industrial scale, the cell wall fraction of the segment membrane of Satsuma mandarin fruits was extracted to obtain a chelating agent-soluble pectin fraction (ChSS), a dilute sodium hydroxide-soluble

  7. In vivo calcium imaging from dentate granule cells with wide-field fluorescence microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichiro Hayashi

    Full Text Available A combination of genetically-encoded calcium indicators and micro-optics has enabled monitoring of large-scale dynamics of neuronal activity from behaving animals. In these studies, wide-field microscopy is often used to visualize neural activity. However, this method lacks optical sectioning capability, and therefore its axial resolution is generally poor. At present, it is unclear whether wide-field microscopy can visualize activity of densely packed small neurons at cellular resolution. To examine the applicability of wide-field microscopy for small-sized neurons, we recorded calcium activity of dentate granule cells having a small soma diameter of approximately 10 micrometers. Using a combination of high numerical aperture (0.8 objective lens and independent component analysis-based image segmentation technique, activity of putative single granule cell activity was separated from wide-field calcium imaging data. The result encourages wider application of wide-field microscopy in in vivo neurophysiology.

  8. Atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy on the cytoskeleton of permeabilised and embedded cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meller, Karl; Theiss, Carsten

    2006-01-01

    We describe a technical method of cell permeabilisation and embedding to study the organisation and distribution of intracellular proteins with aid of atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy in identical areas. While confocal laser scanning microscopy is useful for the identification of certain proteins subsequent labelling with markers or antibodies, atomic force microscopy allows the observation of macromolecular structures in fixed and living cells. To demonstrate the field of application of this preparatory technique, cells were permeabilised, fixed, and the actin cytoskeleton was stained with phalloidin-rhodamine. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to show the organisation of these microfilaments, e.g. geodesic dome structures. Thereafter, cells were embedded in Durcupan water-soluble resin, followed by UV-polymerisation of resin at 4 o C. This procedure allowed intracellular visualisation of the cell nucleus or cytoskeletal elements by atomic force microscopy, for instance to analyse the globular organisation of actin filaments. Therefore, this method offers a great potential to combine both microscopy techniques in order to understand and interpret intracellular protein relations, for example, the biochemical and morphological interaction of the cytoskeleton

  9. Background fluorescence estimation and vesicle segmentation in live cell imaging with conditional random fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pécot, Thierry; Bouthemy, Patrick; Boulanger, Jérôme; Chessel, Anatole; Bardin, Sabine; Salamero, Jean; Kervrann, Charles

    2015-02-01

    Image analysis applied to fluorescence live cell microscopy has become a key tool in molecular biology since it enables to characterize biological processes in space and time at the subcellular level. In fluorescence microscopy imaging, the moving tagged structures of interest, such as vesicles, appear as bright spots over a static or nonstatic background. In this paper, we consider the problem of vesicle segmentation and time-varying background estimation at the cellular scale. The main idea is to formulate the joint segmentation-estimation problem in the general conditional random field framework. Furthermore, segmentation of vesicles and background estimation are alternatively performed by energy minimization using a min cut-max flow algorithm. The proposed approach relies on a detection measure computed from intensity contrasts between neighboring blocks in fluorescence microscopy images. This approach permits analysis of either 2D + time or 3D + time data. We demonstrate the performance of the so-called C-CRAFT through an experimental comparison with the state-of-the-art methods in fluorescence video-microscopy. We also use this method to characterize the spatial and temporal distribution of Rab6 transport carriers at the cell periphery for two different specific adhesion geometries.

  10. Toward single cell traction microscopy within 3D collagen matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Matthew S.; Long, Rong; Feng, Xinzeng; Huang, YuLing; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Wu, Mingming

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three-dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell–ECM and cell–cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cell migration within collagen gels. - Highlights: • Review of the current state of the art in 3D cell traction force microscopy. • Bulk and micro-characterization of remodelable fibrous collagen gels. • Strategies for performing 3D cell traction microscopy within collagen gels

  11. Toward single cell traction microscopy within 3D collagen matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Matthew S. [Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Long, Rong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2G8 (Canada); Feng, Xinzeng [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Huang, YuLing [Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hui, Chung-Yuen [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Wu, Mingming, E-mail: mw272@cornell.edu [Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three-dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell–ECM and cell–cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cell migration within collagen gels. - Highlights: • Review of the current state of the art in 3D cell traction force microscopy. • Bulk and micro-characterization of remodelable fibrous collagen gels. • Strategies for performing 3D cell traction microscopy within collagen gels.

  12. Empirical gradient threshold technique for automated segmentation across image modalities and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfoun, J; Majurski, M; Peskin, A; Breen, C; Bajcsy, P; Brady, M

    2015-10-01

    New microscopy technologies are enabling image acquisition of terabyte-sized data sets consisting of hundreds of thousands of images. In order to retrieve and analyze the biological information in these large data sets, segmentation is needed to detect the regions containing cells or cell colonies. Our work with hundreds of large images (each 21,000×21,000 pixels) requires a segmentation method that: (1) yields high segmentation accuracy, (2) is applicable to multiple cell lines with various densities of cells and cell colonies, and several imaging modalities, (3) can process large data sets in a timely manner, (4) has a low memory footprint and (5) has a small number of user-set parameters that do not require adjustment during the segmentation of large image sets. None of the currently available segmentation methods meet all these requirements. Segmentation based on image gradient thresholding is fast and has a low memory footprint. However, existing techniques that automate the selection of the gradient image threshold do not work across image modalities, multiple cell lines, and a wide range of foreground/background densities (requirement 2) and all failed the requirement for robust parameters that do not require re-adjustment with time (requirement 5). We present a novel and empirically derived image gradient threshold selection method for separating foreground and background pixels in an image that meets all the requirements listed above. We quantify the difference between our approach and existing ones in terms of accuracy, execution speed, memory usage and number of adjustable parameters on a reference data set. This reference data set consists of 501 validation images with manually determined segmentations and image sizes ranging from 0.36 Megapixels to 850 Megapixels. It includes four different cell lines and two image modalities: phase contrast and fluorescent. Our new technique, called Empirical Gradient Threshold (EGT), is derived from this reference

  13. A new level set model for cell image segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jing-Feng; Chen Chun; Hou Kai; Bao Shang-Lian

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we first determine three phases of cell images: background, cytoplasm and nucleolus according to the general physical characteristics of cell images, and then develop a variational model, based on these characteristics, to segment nucleolus and cytoplasm from their relatively complicated backgrounds. In the meantime, the preprocessing obtained information of cell images using the OTSU algorithm is used to initialize the level set function in the model, which can speed up the segmentation and present satisfactory results in cell image processing. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  14. Electron Microscopy of Ebola Virus-Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) replicates in host cells, where both viral and cellular components show morphological changes during the process of viral replication from entry to budding. These steps in the replication cycle can be studied using electron microscopy (EM), including transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which is one of the most useful methods for visualizing EBOV particles and EBOV-infected cells at the ultrastructural level. This chapter describes conventional methods for EM sample preparation of cultured cells infected with EBOV.

  15. Super-resolution Microscopy in Plant Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komis, George; Šamajová, Olga; Ovečka, Miroslav; Šamaj, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    Although the development of super-resolution microscopy methods dates back to 1994, relevant applications in plant cell imaging only started to emerge in 2010. Since then, the principal super-resolution methods, including structured-illumination microscopy (SIM), photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM), stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), and stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED), have been implemented in plant cell research. However, progress has been limited due to the challenging properties of plant material. Here we summarize the basic principles of existing super-resolution methods and provide examples of applications in plant science. The limitations imposed by the nature of plant material are reviewed and the potential for future applications in plant cell imaging is highlighted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 4Pi-confocal microscopy of live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlmann, Karsten; Jakobs, Stefan; Hell, Stefan W.

    2002-06-01

    By coherently adding the spherical wavefronts of two opposing lenses, two-photon excitation 4Pi-confocal fluorescence microscopy has achieved three-dimensional imaging with an axial resolution 3-7 times better than confocal microscopy. So far this improvement was possible only in glycerol-mounted, fixed cells. Here we report 4Pi-confocal microscopy of watery objects and its application to the imaging of live cells. Water immersion 4Pi-confocal microscopy of membrane stained live Escherichia coli bacteria attains a 4.3 fold better axial resolution as compared to the best water immersion confocal microscope. The resolution enhancement results into a vastly improved three-dimensional representation of the bacteria. The first images of live biological samples with an all-directional resolution in the 190-280 nm range are presented here, thus establishing a new resolution benchmark in live cell microscopy.

  17. SuperSegger: robust image segmentation, analysis and lineage tracking of bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianidou, Stella; Brennan, Connor; Nissen, Silas B; Kuwada, Nathan J; Wiggins, Paul A

    2016-11-01

    Many quantitative cell biology questions require fast yet reliable automated image segmentation to identify and link cells from frame-to-frame, and characterize the cell morphology and fluorescence. We present SuperSegger, an automated MATLAB-based image processing package well-suited to quantitative analysis of high-throughput live-cell fluorescence microscopy of bacterial cells. SuperSegger incorporates machine-learning algorithms to optimize cellular boundaries and automated error resolution to reliably link cells from frame-to-frame. Unlike existing packages, it can reliably segment microcolonies with many cells, facilitating the analysis of cell-cycle dynamics in bacteria as well as cell-contact mediated phenomena. This package has a range of built-in capabilities for characterizing bacterial cells, including the identification of cell division events, mother, daughter and neighbouring cells, and computing statistics on cellular fluorescence, the location and intensity of fluorescent foci. SuperSegger provides a variety of postprocessing data visualization tools for single cell and population level analysis, such as histograms, kymographs, frame mosaics, movies and consensus images. Finally, we demonstrate the power of the package by analyzing lag phase growth with single cell resolution. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Exploring Neural Cell Dynamics with Digital Holographic Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, Pierre; Jourdain, Pascal; Boss, Daniel; Depeursinge, Christian D.; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2013-01-01

    In this talk, I will present how digital holographic microscopy, as a powerful quantitative phase technique, can non-invasively measure cell dynamics and especially resolve local neuronal network activity through simultaneous multiple site optical recording.

  19. Exploring Neural Cell Dynamics with Digital Holographic Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, Pierre

    2013-04-21

    In this talk, I will present how digital holographic microscopy, as a powerful quantitative phase technique, can non-invasively measure cell dynamics and especially resolve local neuronal network activity through simultaneous multiple site optical recording.

  20. Axial tomography in 3D live cell microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Verena; Bruns, Sarah; Bruns, Thomas; Piper, Mathis; Weber, Petra; Wagner, Michael; Cremer, Christoph; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2017-07-01

    A miniaturized setup for sample rotation on a microscope stage has been developed, combined with light sheet, confocal or structured illumination microscopy and applied to living cells as well as to small organisms. This setup permits axial tomography with improved visualization of single cells or small cell clusters as well as an enhanced effective 3D resolution upon sample rotation.

  1. Mammogram segmentation using maximal cell strength updation in cellular automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, J; Peter, J Dinesh

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed type of cancer among women. Mammogram is one of the most effective tools for early detection of the breast cancer. Various computer-aided systems have been introduced to detect the breast cancer from mammogram images. In a computer-aided diagnosis system, detection and segmentation of breast masses from the background tissues is an important issue. In this paper, an automatic segmentation method is proposed to identify and segment the suspicious mass regions of mammogram using a modified transition rule named maximal cell strength updation in cellular automata (CA). In coarse-level segmentation, the proposed method performs an adaptive global thresholding based on the histogram peak analysis to obtain the rough region of interest. An automatic seed point selection is proposed using gray-level co-occurrence matrix-based sum average feature in the coarse segmented image. Finally, the method utilizes CA with the identified initial seed point and the modified transition rule to segment the mass region. The proposed approach is evaluated over the dataset of 70 mammograms with mass from mini-MIAS database. Experimental results show that the proposed approach yields promising results to segment the mass region in the mammograms with the sensitivity of 92.25% and accuracy of 93.48%.

  2. Track segment studies with Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    Survival curves of near-diploid and near-tetraploid Chinese hamster cell cultures following irradiation by an 241 Am α source indicate different growth rates for the two clones. Possible reasons for the difference are discussed

  3. Probing stem cell differentiation using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Xiaobin; Shi, Xuetao; Ostrovidov, Serge; Wu, Hongkai; Nakajima, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation. • The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. • AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring stem cell differentiation in a non-invasive manner. - Abstract: A real-time method using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation by measuring the mechanical properties of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. It is clear that AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring the differentiation of stem cells in a non-invasive manner.

  4. Probing stem cell differentiation using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xiaobin [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Shi, Xuetao, E-mail: mrshixuetao@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Ostrovidov, Serge [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Wu, Hongkai, E-mail: chhkwu@ust.hk [Department of Chemistry & Division of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Nakajima, Ken [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation. • The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. • AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring stem cell differentiation in a non-invasive manner. - Abstract: A real-time method using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation by measuring the mechanical properties of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. It is clear that AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring the differentiation of stem cells in a non-invasive manner.

  5. Waveguide evanescent field fluorescence microscopy & its application in cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Abdollah

    There are many powerful microscopy technologies available for the investigation of bulk materials as well as for thin film samples. Nevertheless, for imaging an interface, especially live cells on a substrate and ultra thin-films, only Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is available. This TIRF microscopy allows imaging without interference of the bulk. Various approaches are employed in fluorescence microscopy applications to restrict the excitation and detection of fluorophores to a thin region of the specimen. Elimination of background fluorescence from outside the focal plane can dramatically improve the signal-to-noise ratio, and consequently, the spatial resolution of the features or events of interest. TIRF microscopy is an evanescent field based microscopy. In this method, fluorescent dyes are only excited within an evanescent field: roughly within 100 nm above a glass coverslip. This will allow imaging surface and interfacial issues of the glass coverslip and an adjacent material. Waveguide evanescent field fluorescence (WEFF) microscopy is a new development for imaging cell-substrate interactions in real time and in vitro. It is an alternative to TIRF microscopy. In this method the light is coupled into a waveguide via an optical grating. The coupled light propagates as a waveguide mode and exhibits an evanescent field on top of the waveguide. This can be used as a surface-bound illumination source to excite fluorophores. This evanescent field serves as an extremely powerful tool for quality control of thin films, to study cell-substrate contacts, and investigating the effect of external agents and drugs on the cell-substrate interaction in real time and in vitro. This new method has been established and optimized to minimize non-uniformity, scattering and photo bleaching issues. Visualizing and quantifying of the cell-substrates and solid thin films have been carried out by WEFF microscopy. The images of the cell-substrate interface

  6. Espina: A Tool for the Automated Segmentation and Counting of Synapses in Large Stacks of Electron Microscopy Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Juan; Alonso-Nanclares, Lidia; Rodríguez, José-Rodrigo; DeFelipe, Javier; Rodríguez, Ángel; Merchán-Pérez, Ángel

    2011-01-01

    The synapses in the cerebral cortex can be classified into two main types, Gray's type I and type II, which correspond to asymmetric (mostly glutamatergic excitatory) and symmetric (inhibitory GABAergic) synapses, respectively. Hence, the quantification and identification of their different types and the proportions in which they are found, is extraordinarily important in terms of brain function. The ideal approach to calculate the number of synapses per unit volume is to analyze 3D samples reconstructed from serial sections. However, obtaining serial sections by transmission electron microscopy is an extremely time consuming and technically demanding task. Using focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope microscopy, we recently showed that virtually all synapses can be accurately identified as asymmetric or symmetric synapses when they are visualized, reconstructed, and quantified from large 3D tissue samples obtained in an automated manner. Nevertheless, the analysis, segmentation, and quantification of synapses is still a labor intensive procedure. Thus, novel solutions are currently necessary to deal with the large volume of data that is being generated by automated 3D electron microscopy. Accordingly, we have developed ESPINA, a software tool that performs the automated segmentation and counting of synapses in a reconstructed 3D volume of the cerebral cortex, and that greatly facilitates and accelerates these processes. PMID:21633491

  7. ESPINA: a tool for the automated segmentation and counting of synapses in large stacks of electron microscopy images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eMorales

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The synapses in the cerebral cortex can be classified into two main types, Gray’s type I and type II, which correspond to asymmetric (mostly glutamatergic excitatory and symmetric (inhibitory GABAergic synapses, respectively. Hence, the quantification and identification of their different types and the proportions in which they are found, is extraordinarily important in terms of brain function. The ideal approach to calculate the number of synapses per unit volume is to analyze three-dimensional samples reconstructed from serial sections. However, obtaining serial sections by transmission electron microscopy is an extremely time consuming and technically demanding task. Using FIB/SEM microscopy, we recently showed that virtually all synapses can be accurately identified as asymmetric or symmetric synapses when they are visualized, reconstructed and quantified from large three-dimensional tissue samples obtained in an automated manner. Nevertheless, the analysis, segmentation and quantification of synapses is still a labor intensive procedure. Thus, novel solutions are currently necessary to deal with the large volume of data that is being generated by automated 3D electron microscopy. Accordingly, we have developed ESPINA, a software tool that performs the automated segmentation and counting of synapses in a reconstructed 3D volume of the cerebral cortex, and that greatly facilitates and accelerates these processes.

  8. Segmentation and analysis of mouse pituitary cells with graphic user interface (GUI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Erika; Medina, Lucía.; Hautefeuille, Mathieu; Fiordelisio, Tatiana

    2018-02-01

    In this work we present a method to perform pituitary cell segmentation in image stacks acquired by fluorescence microscopy from pituitary slice preparations. Although there exist many procedures developed to achieve cell segmentation tasks, they are generally based on the edge detection and require high resolution images. However in the biological preparations that we worked on, the cells are not well defined as experts identify their intracellular calcium activity due to fluorescence intensity changes in different regions over time. This intensity changes were associated with time series over regions, and because they present a particular behavior they were used into a classification procedure in order to perform cell segmentation. Two logistic regression classifiers were implemented for the time series classification task using as features the area under the curve and skewness in the first classifier and skewness and kurtosis in the second classifier. Once we have found both decision boundaries in two different feature spaces by training using 120 time series, the decision boundaries were tested over 12 image stacks through a python graphical user interface (GUI), generating binary images where white pixels correspond to cells and the black ones to background. Results show that area-skewness classifier reduces the time an expert dedicates in locating cells by up to 75% in some stacks versus a 92% for the kurtosis-skewness classifier, this evaluated on the number of regions the method found. Due to the promising results, we expect that this method will be improved adding more relevant features to the classifier.

  9. Segmentation of vessels cluttered with cells using a physics based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmugge, Stephen J; Keller, Steve; Nguyen, Nhat; Souvenir, Richard; Huynh, Toan; Clemens, Mark; Shin, Min C

    2008-01-01

    Segmentation of vessels in biomedical images is important as it can provide insight into analysis of vascular morphology, topology and is required for kinetic analysis of flow velocity and vessel permeability. Intravital microscopy is a powerful tool as it enables in vivo imaging of both vasculature and circulating cells. However, the analysis of vasculature in those images is difficult due to the presence of cells and their image gradient. In this paper, we provide a novel method of segmenting vessels with a high level of cell related clutter. A set of virtual point pairs ("vessel probes") are moved reacting to forces including Vessel Vector Flow (VVF) and Vessel Boundary Vector Flow (VBVF) forces. Incorporating the cell detection, the VVF force attracts the probes toward the vessel, while the VBVF force attracts the virtual points of the probes to localize the vessel boundary without being distracted by the image features of the cells. The vessel probes are moved according to Newtonian Physics reacting to the net of forces applied on them. We demonstrate the results on a set of five real in vivo images of liver vasculature cluttered by white blood cells. When compared against the ground truth prepared by the technician, the Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) of segmentation with VVF and VBVF was 55% lower than the method without VVF and VBVF.

  10. Cell nuclei and cytoplasm joint segmentation using the sliding band filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quelhas, Pedro; Marcuzzo, Monica; Mendonça, Ana Maria; Campilho, Aurélio

    2010-08-01

    Microscopy cell image analysis is a fundamental tool for biological research. In particular, multivariate fluorescence microscopy is used to observe different aspects of cells in cultures. It is still common practice to perform analysis tasks by visual inspection of individual cells which is time consuming, exhausting and prone to induce subjective bias. This makes automatic cell image analysis essential for large scale, objective studies of cell cultures. Traditionally the task of automatic cell analysis is approached through the use of image segmentation methods for extraction of cells' locations and shapes. Image segmentation, although fundamental, is neither an easy task in computer vision nor is it robust to image quality changes. This makes image segmentation for cell detection semi-automated requiring frequent tuning of parameters. We introduce a new approach for cell detection and shape estimation in multivariate images based on the sliding band filter (SBF). This filter's design makes it adequate to detect overall convex shapes and as such it performs well for cell detection. Furthermore, the parameters involved are intuitive as they are directly related to the expected cell size. Using the SBF filter we detect cells' nucleus and cytoplasm location and shapes. Based on the assumption that each cell has the same approximate shape center in both nuclei and cytoplasm fluorescence channels, we guide cytoplasm shape estimation by the nuclear detections improving performance and reducing errors. Then we validate cell detection by gathering evidence from nuclei and cytoplasm channels. Additionally, we include overlap correction and shape regularization steps which further improve the estimated cell shapes. The approach is evaluated using two datasets with different types of data: a 20 images benchmark set of simulated cell culture images, containing 1000 simulated cells; a 16 images Drosophila melanogaster Kc167 dataset containing 1255 cells, stained for DNA and

  11. Exploring neural cell dynamics with digital holographic microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, Pierre; Depeursinge, Christian D.; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we summarize how the new concept of digital optics applied to the field of holographic microscopy has allowed the development of a reliable and flexible digital holographic quantitative phase microscopy (DH-QPM) technique at the nanoscale particularly suitable for cell imaging. Particular emphasis is placed on the original biological ormation provided by the quantitative phase signal. We present the most relevant DH-QPM applications in the field of cell biology, including automated cell counts, recognition, classification, three-dimensional tracking, discrimination between physiological and pathophysiological states, and the study of cell membrane fluctuations at the nanoscale. In the last part, original results show how DH-QPM can address two important issues in the field of neurobiology, namely, multiple-site optical recording of neuronal activity and noninvasive visualization of dendritic spine dynamics resulting from a full digital holographic microscopy tomographic approach. Copyright © 2013 by Annual Reviews.

  12. Exploring neural cell dynamics with digital holographic microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, Pierre

    2013-07-11

    In this review, we summarize how the new concept of digital optics applied to the field of holographic microscopy has allowed the development of a reliable and flexible digital holographic quantitative phase microscopy (DH-QPM) technique at the nanoscale particularly suitable for cell imaging. Particular emphasis is placed on the original biological ormation provided by the quantitative phase signal. We present the most relevant DH-QPM applications in the field of cell biology, including automated cell counts, recognition, classification, three-dimensional tracking, discrimination between physiological and pathophysiological states, and the study of cell membrane fluctuations at the nanoscale. In the last part, original results show how DH-QPM can address two important issues in the field of neurobiology, namely, multiple-site optical recording of neuronal activity and noninvasive visualization of dendritic spine dynamics resulting from a full digital holographic microscopy tomographic approach. Copyright © 2013 by Annual Reviews.

  13. New approaches for the analysis of confluent cell layers with quantitative phase digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, L.; Kaiser, M.; Ketelhut, S.; Pereira, S.; Goycoolea, F.; Kemper, Björn

    2016-03-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) enables high resolution non-destructive inspection of technical surfaces and minimally-invasive label-free live cell imaging. However, the analysis of confluent cell layers represents a challenge as quantitative DHM phase images in this case do not provide sufficient information for image segmentation, determination of the cellular dry mass or calculation of the cell thickness. We present novel strategies for the analysis of confluent cell layers with quantitative DHM phase contrast utilizing a histogram based-evaluation procedure. The applicability of our approach is illustrated by quantification of drug induced cell morphology changes and it is shown that the method is capable to quantify reliable global morphology changes of confluent cell layers.

  14. Towards comprehensive cell lineage reconstructions in complex organisms using light-sheet microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amat, Fernando; Keller, Philipp J

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the development of complex multicellular organisms as a function of the underlying cell behavior is one of the most fundamental goals of developmental biology. The ability to quantitatively follow cell dynamics in entire developing embryos is an indispensable step towards such a system-level understanding. In recent years, light-sheet fluorescence microscopy has emerged as a particularly promising strategy for recording the in vivo data required to realize this goal. Using light-sheet fluorescence microscopy, entire complex organisms can be rapidly imaged in three dimensions at sub-cellular resolution, achieving high temporal sampling and excellent signal-to-noise ratio without damaging the living specimen or bleaching fluorescent markers. The resulting datasets allow following individual cells in vertebrate and higher invertebrate embryos over up to several days of development. However, the complexity and size of these multi-terabyte recordings typically preclude comprehensive manual analyses. Thus, new computational approaches are required to automatically segment cell morphologies, accurately track cell identities and systematically analyze cell behavior throughout embryonic development. We review current efforts in light-sheet microscopy and bioimage informatics towards this goal, and argue that comprehensive cell lineage reconstructions are finally within reach for many key model organisms, including fruit fly, zebrafish and mouse. © 2013 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  15. Iterative h-minima-based marker-controlled watershed for cell nucleus segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncu, Can Fahrettin; Akhan, Ece; Ersahin, Tulin; Cetin-Atalay, Rengul; Gunduz-Demir, Cigdem

    2016-04-01

    Automated microscopy imaging systems facilitate high-throughput screening in molecular cellular biology research. The first step of these systems is cell nucleus segmentation, which has a great impact on the success of the overall system. The marker-controlled watershed is a technique commonly used by the previous studies for nucleus segmentation. These studies define their markers finding regional minima on the intensity/gradient and/or distance transform maps. They typically use the h-minima transform beforehand to suppress noise on these maps. The selection of the h value is critical; unnecessarily small values do not sufficiently suppress the noise, resulting in false and oversegmented markers, and unnecessarily large ones suppress too many pixels, causing missing and undersegmented markers. Because cell nuclei show different characteristics within an image, the same h value may not work to define correct markers for all the nuclei. To address this issue, in this work, we propose a new watershed algorithm that iteratively identifies its markers, considering a set of different h values. In each iteration, the proposed algorithm defines a set of candidates using a particular h value and selects the markers from those candidates provided that they fulfill the size requirement. Working with widefield fluorescence microscopy images, our experiments reveal that the use of multiple h values in our iterative algorithm leads to better segmentation results, compared to its counterparts. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  16. Automatic cell identification and visualization using digital holographic microscopy with head mounted augmented reality devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Timothy; Rawat, Siddharth; Markman, Adam; Javidi, Bahram

    2018-03-01

    We propose a compact imaging system that integrates an augmented reality head mounted device with digital holographic microscopy for automated cell identification and visualization. A shearing interferometer is used to produce holograms of biological cells, which are recorded using customized smart glasses containing an external camera. After image acquisition, segmentation is performed to isolate regions of interest containing biological cells in the field-of-view, followed by digital reconstruction of the cells, which is used to generate a three-dimensional (3D) pseudocolor optical path length profile. Morphological features are extracted from the cell's optical path length map, including mean optical path length, coefficient of variation, optical volume, projected area, projected area to optical volume ratio, cell skewness, and cell kurtosis. Classification is performed using the random forest classifier, support vector machines, and K-nearest neighbor, and the results are compared. Finally, the augmented reality device displays the cell's pseudocolor 3D rendering of its optical path length profile, extracted features, and the identified cell's type or class. The proposed system could allow a healthcare worker to quickly visualize cells using augmented reality smart glasses and extract the relevant information for rapid diagnosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the integration of digital holographic microscopy with augmented reality devices for automated cell identification and visualization.

  17. Super-resolution microscopy in studying neuroendocrine cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneka eBost

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The last two decades have seen a tremendous development in high resolution microscopy techniques giving rise to acronyms such as TIRFM, SIM, PALM, STORM, and STED. The goal of all these techniques is to overcome the physical resolution barrier of light microscopy in order to resolve precise protein localization and possibly their interaction in cells. Neuroendocrine cell function is to secrete hormones and peptides on demand. This fine-tuned multi-step process is mediated by a large array of proteins. Here, we review the new microscopy techniques used to obtain high resolution and how they have been applied to increase our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in neuroendocrine cell secretion. Further the limitations of these methods are discussed and insights in possible new applications are provided.

  18. Basal Cell Carcinoma in Type 2 Segmental Dariers Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, L.; Sauder, M. B.

    2012-01-01

    Dariers disease (DD), also known as Keratosis Follicularis or Dariers-White disease, is a rare disorder of keratinisation. DD can present as a generalized autosomal dominant condition as well as a localized or segmental post zygotic condition (Vasquez et al., 2002). Clinical features of DD include greasy, warty papules and plaques on seborrhoeic areas, dystrophic nails, palmo-plantar pits, and papules on the dorsum of the hands and feet. Objective. We report a case of basal cell carcinoma developing in a patient with type 2 segmental DD. Conclusion. According to the current literature, Type 2 segmental disease is a rare presentation of Dariers disease with only 8 previous cases reported to date. In addition, non melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) arising from DD is rarely reported; however, there may be an association between DD and risk of carcinogenesis.

  19. Basal Cell Carcinoma in Type 2 Segmental Darier's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne Robertson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Darier's disease (DD, also known as Keratosis Follicularis or Darier-White disease, is a rare disorder of keratinization. DD can present as a generalized autosomal dominant condition as well as a localized or segmental postzygotic condition (Vázquez et al., 2002. Clinical features of DD include greasy, warty papules and plaques on seborrheic areas, dystrophic nails, palmo-plantar pits, and papules on the dorsum of the hands and feet. Objective. We report a case of basal cell carcinoma developing in a patient with type 2 segmental DD. Conclusion. According to the current literature, Type 2 segmental disease is a rare presentation of Darier's disease with only 8 previous cases reported to date. In addition, nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC arising from DD is rarely reported; however, there may be an association between DD and risk of carcinogenesis.

  20. Electron microscopy of primary cell cultures in solution and correlative optical microscopy using ASEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Kazumi; Kinoshita, Takaaki; Uemura, Takeshi; Motohashi, Hozumi; Watanabe, Yohei; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Sato, Mari; Suga, Mitsuo; Maruyama, Yuusuke; Tsuji, Noriko M.; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Nishihara, Shoko; Sato, Chikara

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light-electron microscopy of cells in a natural environment of aqueous liquid facilitates high-throughput observation of protein complex formation. ASEM allows the inverted SEM to observe the wet sample from below, while an optical microscope observes it from above quasi-simultaneously. The disposable ASEM dish with a silicon nitride (SiN) film window can be coated variously to realize the primary-culture of substrate-sensitive cells in a few milliliters of culture medium in a stable incubator environment. Neuron differentiation, neural networking, proplatelet-formation and phagocytosis were captured by optical or fluorescence microscopy, and imaged at high resolution by gold-labeled immuno-ASEM with/without metal staining. Fas expression on the cell surface was visualized, correlated to the spatial distribution of F-actin. Axonal partitioning was studied using primary-culture neurons, and presynaptic induction by GluRδ2-N-terminus-linked fluorescent magnetic beads was correlated to the presynaptic-marker Bassoon. Further, megakaryocytes secreting proplatelets were captured, and P-selectins with adherence activity were localized to some of the granules present by immuno-ASEM. The phagocytosis of lactic acid bacteria by dendritic cells was also imaged. Based on these studies, ASEM correlative microscopy promises to allow the study of various mesoscopic-scale dynamics in the near future. - Highlights: • In situ correlative light electron microscopy of samples in open solution by ASEM. • Primary cultures for in-solution CLEM by developing SiN-film coating methods • First visualization of fluorescent magnetic beads in aqueous solution by CLEM. • Presynaptic induction of neurons by GluRδ2-N-terminus-coated beads studied by CLEM. • Axonal partitioning, bacterial phagocytosis, platelet formation imaged by CLEM

  1. Electron microscopy of primary cell cultures in solution and correlative optical microscopy using ASEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Kazumi; Kinoshita, Takaaki [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Department of Bioinformatics, Faculty of Engineering, Soka University, 1-236 Tangi-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-8577 (Japan); Uemura, Takeshi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology and Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Motohashi, Hozumi [Department of Gene Expression Regulation, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Watanabe, Yohei; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Nishiyama, Hidetoshi [JEOL Ltd., 1-2 Musashino 3-chome, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Sato, Mari [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Suga, Mitsuo [JEOL Ltd., 1-2 Musashino 3-chome, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Maruyama, Yuusuke; Tsuji, Noriko M. [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Yamamoto, Masayuki [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Nishihara, Shoko, E-mail: shoko@soka.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Department of Bioinformatics, Faculty of Engineering, Soka University, 1-236 Tangi-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-8577 (Japan); Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    Correlative light-electron microscopy of cells in a natural environment of aqueous liquid facilitates high-throughput observation of protein complex formation. ASEM allows the inverted SEM to observe the wet sample from below, while an optical microscope observes it from above quasi-simultaneously. The disposable ASEM dish with a silicon nitride (SiN) film window can be coated variously to realize the primary-culture of substrate-sensitive cells in a few milliliters of culture medium in a stable incubator environment. Neuron differentiation, neural networking, proplatelet-formation and phagocytosis were captured by optical or fluorescence microscopy, and imaged at high resolution by gold-labeled immuno-ASEM with/without metal staining. Fas expression on the cell surface was visualized, correlated to the spatial distribution of F-actin. Axonal partitioning was studied using primary-culture neurons, and presynaptic induction by GluRδ2-N-terminus-linked fluorescent magnetic beads was correlated to the presynaptic-marker Bassoon. Further, megakaryocytes secreting proplatelets were captured, and P-selectins with adherence activity were localized to some of the granules present by immuno-ASEM. The phagocytosis of lactic acid bacteria by dendritic cells was also imaged. Based on these studies, ASEM correlative microscopy promises to allow the study of various mesoscopic-scale dynamics in the near future. - Highlights: • In situ correlative light electron microscopy of samples in open solution by ASEM. • Primary cultures for in-solution CLEM by developing SiN-film coating methods • First visualization of fluorescent magnetic beads in aqueous solution by CLEM. • Presynaptic induction of neurons by GluRδ2-N-terminus-coated beads studied by CLEM. • Axonal partitioning, bacterial phagocytosis, platelet formation imaged by CLEM.

  2. Using simulated fluorescence cell micrographs for the evaluation of cell image segmentation algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmann, Veit; Bergler, Matthias; Palmisano, Ralf; Prinzen, Martin; Franz, Daniela; Wittenberg, Thomas

    2017-03-18

    Manual assessment and evaluation of fluorescent micrograph cell experiments is time-consuming and tedious. Automated segmentation pipelines can ensure efficient and reproducible evaluation and analysis with constant high quality for all images of an experiment. Such cell segmentation approaches are usually validated and rated in comparison to manually annotated micrographs. Nevertheless, manual annotations are prone to errors and display inter- and intra-observer variability which influence the validation results of automated cell segmentation pipelines. We present a new approach to simulate fluorescent cell micrographs that provides an objective ground truth for the validation of cell segmentation methods. The cell simulation was evaluated twofold: (1) An expert observer study shows that the proposed approach generates realistic fluorescent cell micrograph simulations. (2) An automated segmentation pipeline on the simulated fluorescent cell micrographs reproduces segmentation performances of that pipeline on real fluorescent cell micrographs. The proposed simulation approach produces realistic fluorescent cell micrographs with corresponding ground truth. The simulated data is suited to evaluate image segmentation pipelines more efficiently and reproducibly than it is possible on manually annotated real micrographs.

  3. Effective segmentation of fresh post-mortem murine lung parenchyma in phase contrast X-ray tomographic microscopy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikonomidis, Ioannis Vogiatzis; Cremona, Tiziana P; Schittny, Johannes C; Lovric, Goran; Arcadu, Filippo; Stampanoni, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The acinus represents the functional unit of the mammalian lung. It is defined as the small tree of gas-exchanging airways, which is fed by the most distal purely conducting airway. Different hypotheses exist on how the fine structure of the acinus changes during ventilation and development. Since in classical 2-dimensional (2D) sections of the lung the borders of the acini are not detectable, every study of acini requires 3-dimensional (3D) datasets. As a basis for further studies of pulmonary acini we imaged rodent lungs as close to life as possible using phase contrast synchrotron radiation-based X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM), and developed a protocol for the segmentation of the alveolar septa. The method is based on a combined multilevel filtering approach. Seeds are automatically defined for separate regions of tissue and airspace during each 2D filtering level and then given as input to a 3D random walk segmentation. Thus, the different types of artifacts present in the images are treated separately, taking into account the sample’s structural complexity. The proposed procedure yields high-quality 3D segmentations of acinar microstructure that can be used for a reliable morphological analysis. (paper)

  4. Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia A. Moss; Les Groom

    2001-01-01

    Microscopy is the study and interpretation of images produced by a microscope. "Interpretation" is the keyword, because the microscope enables one to see structures that are too small or too close together to be resolved by the unaided eye. (The human eye cannot separate two points or lines that are closer together than 0.1 mm.) it is important to...

  5. Automated Method for the Rapid and Precise Estimation of Adherent Cell Culture Characteristics from Phase Contrast Microscopy Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, Nicolas; Griffin, Lewis D; Keser, Ana; Macown, Rhys J; Super, Alexandre; Veraitch, Farlan S; Szita, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative determination of key adherent cell culture characteristics such as confluency, morphology, and cell density is necessary for the evaluation of experimental outcomes and to provide a suitable basis for the establishment of robust cell culture protocols. Automated processing of images acquired using phase contrast microscopy (PCM), an imaging modality widely used for the visual inspection of adherent cell cultures, could enable the non-invasive determination of these characteristics. We present an image-processing approach that accurately detects cellular objects in PCM images through a combination of local contrast thresholding and post hoc correction of halo artifacts. The method was thoroughly validated using a variety of cell lines, microscope models and imaging conditions, demonstrating consistently high segmentation performance in all cases and very short processing times (image). Based on the high segmentation performance, it was possible to precisely determine culture confluency, cell density, and the morphology of cellular objects, demonstrating the wide applicability of our algorithm for typical microscopy image processing pipelines. Furthermore, PCM image segmentation was used to facilitate the interpretation and analysis of fluorescence microscopy data, enabling the determination of temporal and spatial expression patterns of a fluorescent reporter. We created a software toolbox (PHANTAST) that bundles all the algorithms and provides an easy to use graphical user interface. Source-code for MATLAB and ImageJ is freely available under a permissive open-source license. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 504–517. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24037521

  6. A Fast Global Fitting Algorithm for Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy Based on Image Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Pelet, S.; Previte, M.J.R.; Laiho, L.H.; So, P.T. C.

    2004-01-01

    Global fitting algorithms have been shown to improve effectively the accuracy and precision of the analysis of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy data. Global analysis performs better than unconstrained data fitting when prior information exists, such as the spatial invariance of the lifetimes of individual fluorescent species. The highly coupled nature of global analysis often results in a significantly slower convergence of the data fitting algorithm as compared with unconstrained ana...

  7. Live cell refractometry using Hilbert phase microscopy and confocal reflectance microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Niyom; Choi, Wonshik; Popescu, Gabriel; Yaqoob, Zahid; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2009-11-26

    Quantitative chemical analysis has served as a useful tool for understanding cellular metabolisms in biology. Among many physical properties used in chemical analysis, refractive index in particular has provided molecular concentration that is an important indicator for biological activities. In this report, we present a method of extracting full-field refractive index maps of live cells in their native states. We first record full-field optical thickness maps of living cells by Hilbert phase microscopy and then acquire physical thickness maps of the same cells using a custom-built confocal reflectance microscope. Full-field and axially averaged refractive index maps are acquired from the ratio of optical thickness to physical thickness. The accuracy of the axially averaged index measurement is 0.002. This approach can provide novel biological assays of label-free living cells in situ.

  8. Segmentation, Reconstruction, and Analysis of Blood Thrombus Formation in 3D 2-Photon Microscopy Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhiliang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the problem of segmenting, reconstructing, and analyzing the structure growth of thrombi (clots in blood vessels in vivo based on 2-photon microscopic image data. First, we develop an algorithm for segmenting clots in 3D microscopic images based on density-based clustering and methods for dealing with imaging artifacts. Next, we apply the union-of-balls (or alpha-shape algorithm to reconstruct the boundary of clots in 3D. Finally, we perform experimental studies and analysis on the reconstructed clots and obtain quantitative data of thrombus growth and structures. We conduct experiments on laser-induced injuries in vessels of two types of mice (the wild type and the type with low levels of coagulation factor VII and analyze and compare the developing clot structures based on their reconstructed clots from image data. The results we obtain are of biomedical significance. Our quantitative analysis of the clot composition leads to better understanding of the thrombus development, and is valuable to the modeling and verification of computational simulation of thrombogenesis.

  9. Analysis of endoplasmic reticulum of tobacco cells using confocal microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Radochová, Barbora; Janáček, Jiří; Schwarzerová, K.; Demjénová, E.; Tomori, Z.; Karen, Petr; Kubínová, Lucie

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 11 (2005), s. 181-185 ISSN 1580-3139 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB6011309 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : confocal microscopy * endoplasmic reticulum * image analysis Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology

  10. Immunogold labels: cell-surface markers in atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Putman, C.A.J.; de Grooth, B.G.; Hansma, Paul K.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of using immunogold labels as cell-surface markers in atomic force microscopy is shown in this paper. The atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to image the surface of immunogold-labeled human lymphocytes. The lymphocytes were isolated from whole blood and labeled by an indirect

  11. Classification of Normal and Apoptotic Cells from Fluorescence Microscopy Images Using Generalized Polynomial Chaos and Level Set Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuncheng; Budman, Hector M; Duever, Thomas A

    2016-06-01

    Accurate automated quantitative analysis of living cells based on fluorescence microscopy images can be very useful for fast evaluation of experimental outcomes and cell culture protocols. In this work, an algorithm is developed for fast differentiation of normal and apoptotic viable Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. For effective segmentation of cell images, a stochastic segmentation algorithm is developed by combining a generalized polynomial chaos expansion with a level set function-based segmentation algorithm. This approach provides a probabilistic description of the segmented cellular regions along the boundary, from which it is possible to calculate morphological changes related to apoptosis, i.e., the curvature and length of a cell's boundary. These features are then used as inputs to a support vector machine (SVM) classifier that is trained to distinguish between normal and apoptotic viable states of CHO cell images. The use of morphological features obtained from the stochastic level set segmentation of cell images in combination with the trained SVM classifier is more efficient in terms of differentiation accuracy as compared with the original deterministic level set method.

  12. Single molecule microscopy in 3D cell cultures and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Florian M; Kaemmerer, Elke; Meckel, Tobias

    2014-12-15

    From the onset of the first microscopic visualization of single fluorescent molecules in living cells at the beginning of this century, to the present, almost routine application of single molecule microscopy, the method has well-proven its ability to contribute unmatched detailed insight into the heterogeneous and dynamic molecular world life is composed of. Except for investigations on bacteria and yeast, almost the entire story of success is based on studies on adherent mammalian 2D cell cultures. However, despite this continuous progress, the technique was not able to keep pace with the move of the cell biology community to adapt 3D cell culture models for basic research, regenerative medicine, or drug development and screening. In this review, we will summarize the progress, which only recently allowed for the application of single molecule microscopy to 3D cell systems and give an overview of the technical advances that led to it. While initially posing a challenge, we finally conclude that relevant 3D cell models will become an integral part of the on-going success of single molecule microscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficient Semi-Automatic 3D Segmentation for Neuron Tracing in Electron Microscopy Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cory; Liu, Ting; Cohan, Nathaniel Wood; Ellisman, Mark; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2015-01-01

    0.1. Background In the area of connectomics, there is a significant gap between the time required for data acquisition and dense reconstruction of the neural processes contained in the same dataset. Automatic methods are able to eliminate this timing gap, but the state-of-the-art accuracy so far is insufficient for use without user corrections. If completed naively, this process of correction can be tedious and time consuming. 0.2. New Method We present a new semi-automatic method that can be used to perform 3D segmentation of neurites in EM image stacks. It utilizes an automatic method that creates a hierarchical structure for recommended merges of superpixels. The user is then guided through each predicted region to quickly identify errors and establish correct links. 0.3. Results We tested our method on three datasets with both novice and expert users. Accuracy and timing were compared with published automatic, semi-automatic, and manual results. 0.4. Comparison with Existing Methods Post-automatic correction methods have also been used in [1] and [2]. These methods do not provide navigation or suggestions in the manner we present. Other semi-automatic methods require user input prior to the automatic segmentation such as [3] and [4] and are inherently different than our method. 0.5. Conclusion Using this method on the three datasets, novice users achieved accuracy exceeding state-of-the-art automatic results, and expert users achieved accuracy on par with full manual labeling but with a 70% time improvement when compared with other examples in publication. PMID:25769273

  14. Raman microscopy of individual living human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novikov, Sergey M.; Beermann, Jonas; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of mapping the distribution of different biomolecules in living human embryonic stem cells grown on glass substrates, without the need for fluorescent markers. In our work we improve the quality of measurements by finding a buffer that gives low fluorescence, growing...... cells on glass substrates (whose Raman signals are relatively weak compared to that of the cells) and having the backside covered with gold to improve the image contrast under direct white light illumination. The experimental setup used for Raman microscopy is the commercially available confocal...

  15. Oriented Markov random field based dendritic spine segmentation for fluorescence microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie; Zhou, Xiaobo; Miller, Eric L; Alvarez, Veronica A; Sabatini, Bernardo L; Wong, Stephen T C

    2010-10-01

    Dendritic spines have been shown to be closely related to various functional properties of the neuron. Usually dendritic spines are manually labeled to analyze their morphological changes, which is very time-consuming and susceptible to operator bias, even with the assistance of computers. To deal with these issues, several methods have been recently proposed to automatically detect and measure the dendritic spines with little human interaction. However, problems such as degraded detection performance for images with larger pixel size (e.g. 0.125 μm/pixel instead of 0.08 μm/pixel) still exist in these methods. Moreover, the shapes of detected spines are also distorted. For example, the "necks" of some spines are missed. Here we present an oriented Markov random field (OMRF) based algorithm which improves spine detection as well as their geometric characterization. We begin with the identification of a region of interest (ROI) containing all the dendrites and spines to be analyzed. For this purpose, we introduce an adaptive procedure for identifying the image background. Next, the OMRF model is discussed within a statistical framework and the segmentation is solved as a maximum a posteriori estimation (MAP) problem, whose optimal solution is found by a knowledge-guided iterative conditional mode (KICM) algorithm. Compared with the existing algorithms, the proposed algorithm not only provides a more accurate representation of the spine shape, but also improves the detection performance by more than 50% with regard to reducing both the misses and false detection.

  16. Parallel and Efficient Sensitivity Analysis of Microscopy Image Segmentation Workflows in Hybrid Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiros, Willian; Teodoro, George; Kurc, Tahsin; Kong, Jun; Melo, Alba C M A; Saltz, Joel

    2017-09-01

    We investigate efficient sensitivity analysis (SA) of algorithms that segment and classify image features in a large dataset of high-resolution images. Algorithm SA is the process of evaluating variations of methods and parameter values to quantify differences in the output. A SA can be very compute demanding because it requires re-processing the input dataset several times with different parameters to assess variations in output. In this work, we introduce strategies to efficiently speed up SA via runtime optimizations targeting distributed hybrid systems and reuse of computations from runs with different parameters. We evaluate our approach using a cancer image analysis workflow on a hybrid cluster with 256 nodes, each with an Intel Phi and a dual socket CPU. The SA attained a parallel efficiency of over 90% on 256 nodes. The cooperative execution using the CPUs and the Phi available in each node with smart task assignment strategies resulted in an additional speedup of about 2×. Finally, multi-level computation reuse lead to an additional speedup of up to 2.46× on the parallel version. The level of performance attained with the proposed optimizations will allow the use of SA in large-scale studies.

  17. Automated Identification and Localization of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in 3D Intravital Microscopy Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reema A. Khorshed

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Measuring three-dimensional (3D localization of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs within the bone marrow microenvironment using intravital microscopy is a rapidly expanding research theme. This approach holds the key to understanding the detail of HSC-niche interactions, which are critical for appropriate stem cell function. Due to the complex tissue architecture of the bone marrow and to the progressive introduction of scattering and signal loss at increasing imaging depths, there is no ready-made software to handle efficient segmentation and unbiased analysis of the data. To address this, we developed an automated image analysis tool that simplifies and standardizes the biological interpretation of 3D HSC microenvironment images. The algorithm identifies HSCs and measures their localization relative to surrounding osteoblast cells and bone collagen. We demonstrate here the effectiveness, consistency, and accuracy of the proposed approach compared to current manual analysis and its wider applicability to analyze other 3D bone marrow components.

  18. Measuring the elasticity of plant cells with atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braybrook, Siobhan A

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of biological materials impact their functions. This is most evident in plants where the cell wall contains each cell's contents and connects each cell to its neighbors irreversibly. Examining the physical properties of the plant cell wall is key to understanding how plant cells, tissues, and organs grow and gain the shapes important for their respective functions. Here, we present an atomic force microscopy-based nanoindentation method for examining the elasticity of plant cells at the subcellular, cellular, and tissue level. We describe the important areas of experimental design to be considered when planning and executing these types of experiments and provide example data as illustration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The effects of atomic force microscopy upon nominated living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hagan, Barry Michael Gerard [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Cromore Road, Coleraine, County Londonderry, BT52 1SA (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: bmg.ohagan@ulstser.ac.uk; Doyle, Peter [Unilever Research, Port Sunlight, The Wirral, Merseyside (United Kingdom); Allen, James M. [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Cromore Road, Coleraine, County Londonderry, BT52 1SA (United Kingdom); Sutton, Kerry [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Cromore Road, Coleraine, County Londonderry, BT52 1SA (United Kingdom); McKerr, George [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Cromore Road, Coleraine, County Londonderry, BT52 1SA (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-15

    This work describes a system for precise re-location of cells within a monolayer after atomic force imaging. As we know little about probe interaction with soft biological surfaces any corroborative evidence is of great importance. For example, it is of paramount importance in living cell force microscopy that interrogated cells can be re-located and imaged by other corroborative technologies. Methodologies expressed here have shown that non-invasive force parameters can be established for specific cell types. Additionally, we show that the same sample can be transferred reliably to an SEM. Results here indicate that further work with live cells should initially establish appropriate prevailing force parameters and that cell damage should be checked for before and after an imaging experiment.

  20. The effects of atomic force microscopy upon nominated living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hagan, Barry Michael Gerard; Doyle, Peter; Allen, James M.; Sutton, Kerry; McKerr, George

    2004-01-01

    This work describes a system for precise re-location of cells within a monolayer after atomic force imaging. As we know little about probe interaction with soft biological surfaces any corroborative evidence is of great importance. For example, it is of paramount importance in living cell force microscopy that interrogated cells can be re-located and imaged by other corroborative technologies. Methodologies expressed here have shown that non-invasive force parameters can be established for specific cell types. Additionally, we show that the same sample can be transferred reliably to an SEM. Results here indicate that further work with live cells should initially establish appropriate prevailing force parameters and that cell damage should be checked for before and after an imaging experiment

  1. Assessing resolution in live cell structured illumination microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospíšil, Jakub; Fliegel, Karel; Klíma, Miloš

    2017-12-01

    Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) is a powerful super-resolution technique, which is able to enhance the resolution of optical microscope beyond the Abbe diffraction limit. In the last decade, numerous SIM methods that achieve the resolution of 100 nm in the lateral dimension have been developed. The SIM setups with new high-speed cameras and illumination pattern generators allow rapid acquisition of the live specimen. Therefore, SIM is widely used for investigation of the live structures in molecular and live cell biology. Quantitative evaluation of resolution enhancement in a real sample is essential to describe the efficiency of super-resolution microscopy technique. However, measuring the resolution of a live cell sample is a challenging task. Based on our experimental findings, the widely used Fourier ring correlation (FRC) method does not seem to be well suited for measuring the resolution of SIM live cell video sequences. Therefore, the resolution assessing methods based on Fourier spectrum analysis are often used. We introduce a measure based on circular average power spectral density (PSDca) estimated from a single SIM image (one video frame). PSDca describes the distribution of the power of a signal with respect to its spatial frequency. Spatial resolution corresponds to the cut-off frequency in Fourier space. In order to estimate the cut-off frequency from a noisy signal, we use a spectral subtraction method for noise suppression. In the future, this resolution assessment approach might prove useful also for single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) live cell imaging.

  2. Hybrid confocal Raman fluorescence microscopy on single cells using semiconductor quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Manen, H.J.; Otto, Cornelis

    2007-01-01

    We have overcome the traditional incompatibility of Raman microscopy with fluorescence microscopy by exploiting the optical properties of semiconductor fluorescent quantum dots (QDs). Here we present a hybrid Raman fluorescence spectral imaging approach for single-cell microscopy applications. We

  3. Fast and accurate automated cell boundary determination for fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, Stephen Hugo; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Tseng, Yiider

    2013-07-01

    Detailed measurement of cell phenotype information from digital fluorescence images has the potential to greatly advance biomedicine in various disciplines such as patient diagnostics or drug screening. Yet, the complexity of cell conformations presents a major barrier preventing effective determination of cell boundaries, and introduces measurement error that propagates throughout subsequent assessment of cellular parameters and statistical analysis. State-of-the-art image segmentation techniques that require user-interaction, prolonged computation time and specialized training cannot adequately provide the support for high content platforms, which often sacrifice resolution to foster the speedy collection of massive amounts of cellular data. This work introduces a strategy that allows us to rapidly obtain accurate cell boundaries from digital fluorescent images in an automated format. Hence, this new method has broad applicability to promote biotechnology.

  4. Mandatory chromosomal segment balance in aneuploid tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kost-Alimova, Maria; Stanbridge, Eric; Klein, George; Imreh, Stefan; Darai-Ramqvist, Eva; Yau, Wing Lung; Sandlund, Agneta; Fedorova, Ludmila; Yang, Ying; Kholodnyuk, Irina; Cheng, Yue; Li Lung, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Euploid chromosome balance is vitally important for normal development, but is profoundly changed in many tumors. Is each tumor dependent on its own structurally and numerically changed chromosome complement that has evolved during its development and progression? We have previously shown that normal chromosome 3 transfer into the KH39 renal cell carcinoma line and into the Hone1 nasopharyngeal carcinoma line inhibited their tumorigenicity. The aim of the present study was to distinguish between a qualitative and a quantitative model of this suppression. According to the former, a damaged or deleted tumor suppressor gene would be restored by the transfer of a normal chromosome. If so, suppression would be released only when the corresponding sequences of the exogenous normal chromosome are lost or inactivated. According to the alternative quantitative model, the tumor cell would not tolerate an increased dosage of the relevant gene or segment. If so, either a normal cell derived, or, a tumor derived endogenous segment could be lost. Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization based methods, as well as analysis of polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to follow chromosome 3 constitution changes in monochromosomal hybrids. In both tumor lines with introduced supernumerary chromosomes 3, the copy number of 3p21 or the entire 3p tended to fall back to the original level during both in vitro and in vivo growth. An exogenous, normal cell derived, or an endogenous, tumor derived, chromosome segment was lost with similar probability. Identification of the lost versus retained segments showed that the intolerance for increased copy number was particularly strong for 3p14-p21, and weaker for other 3p regions. Gains in copy number were, on the other hand, well tolerated in the long arm and particularly the 3q26-q27 region. The inability of the cell to tolerate an experimentally imposed gain in 3p14-p21 in contrast to the well tolerated gain in 3q26-q27 is consistent with the

  5. Label-free quantitative cell division monitoring of endothelial cells by digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Björn; Bauwens, Andreas; Vollmer, Angelika; Ketelhut, Steffi; Langehanenberg, Patrik; Müthing, Johannes; Karch, Helge; von Bally, Gert

    2010-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) enables quantitative multifocus phase contrast imaging for nondestructive technical inspection and live cell analysis. Time-lapse investigations on human brain microvascular endothelial cells demonstrate the use of DHM for label-free dynamic quantitative monitoring of cell division of mother cells into daughter cells. Cytokinetic DHM analysis provides future applications in toxicology and cancer research.

  6. Fluorescence cell imaging and manipulation using conventional halogen lamp microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Yamagata

    Full Text Available Technologies for vitally labeling cells with fluorescent dyes have advanced remarkably. However, to excite fluorescent dyes currently requires powerful illumination, which can cause phototoxic damage to the cells and increases the cost of microscopy. We have developed a filter system to excite fluorescent dyes using a conventional transmission microscope equipped with a halogen lamp. This method allows us to observe previously invisible cell organelles, such as the metaphase spindle of oocytes, without causing phototoxicity. Cells remain healthy even after intensive manipulation under fluorescence observation, such as during bovine, porcine and mouse somatic cell cloning using nuclear transfer. This method does not require expensive epifluorescence equipment and so could help to reduce the science gap between developed and developing countries.

  7. Proliferating cells in HIV and pamidronate-associated collapsing focal segmental glomerulosclerosis are parietal epithelial cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkman, H.B.P.M.; Weening, J.J.; Smeets, B.; Verrijp, K.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Assmann, K.K.; Steenbergen, E.; Wetzels, J.F.M.

    2006-01-01

    Collapsing focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (cFSGS) is characterized by hyperplasia of glomerular epithelial cells. In a mouse model of FSGS and in a patient with recurrent idiopathic FSGS, we identified the proliferating cells as parietal epithelial cells (PECs). In the present study, we have

  8. Proliferating cells in HIV and pamidronate-associated collapsing focal segmental glomerulosclerosis are parietal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkman, H. B. P. M.; Weening, J. J.; Smeets, B.; Verrijp, K. C. N.; van Kuppevelt, T. H.; Assmann, K. K. J. M.; Steenbergen, E. J.; Wetzels, J. F. M.

    2006-01-01

    Collapsing focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (cFSGS) is characterized by hyperplasia of glomerular epithelial cells. In a mouse model of FSGS and in a patient with recurrent idiopathic FSGS, we identified the proliferating cells as parietal epithelial cells (PECs). In the present study, we have

  9. Automatic choroid cells segmentation and counting based on approximate convexity and concavity of chain code in fluorescence microscopic image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Weihua; Chen, Xinjian; Zhu, Weifang; Yang, Lei; Cao, Zhaoyuan; Chen, Haoyu

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we proposed a method based on the Freeman chain code to segment and count rhesus choroid-retinal vascular endothelial cells (RF/6A) automatically for fluorescence microscopy images. The proposed method consists of four main steps. First, a threshold filter and morphological transform were applied to reduce the noise. Second, the boundary information was used to generate the Freeman chain codes. Third, the concave points were found based on the relationship between the difference of the chain code and the curvature. Finally, cells segmentation and counting were completed based on the characteristics of the number of the concave points, the area and shape of the cells. The proposed method was tested on 100 fluorescence microscopic cell images, and the average true positive rate (TPR) is 98.13% and the average false positive rate (FPR) is 4.47%, respectively. The preliminary results showed the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  10. Electron microscopy study of antioxidant interaction with bacterial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Oleg P.; Novikova, Olga V.; Konnov, Nikolai P.; Korsukov, Vladimir N.; Gunkin, Ivan F.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    2000-10-01

    To maintain native microorganisms genotype and phenotype features a lyophylization technique is widely used. However in this case cells are affected by influences of vacuum and low temperature that cause a part of the cells population to be destruction. Another factor reduced microorganisms vitality is formation of reactive oxygen forms that damage certain biological targets (such as DNA, membranes etc.) Recently to raise microorganism's resistance against adverse condition natural and synthetic antioxidants are used. Antioxidant- are antagonists of free radicals. Introduction of antioxidants in protective medium for lyophylization increase bacteria storage life about 2,0-4,8 fold in comparison with reference samples. In the article the main results of our investigation of antioxidants interaction with microorganism cells is described. As bacteria cells we use vaccine strain yersinia pestis EV, that were grown for 48 h at 28 degree(s)C on the Hottinger agar (pH 7,2). Antioxidants are inserted on the agar surface in specimen under test. To investigate a localization of antioxidants for electron microscopy investigation, thallium organic antioxidants were used. The thallium organic compounds have an antioxidant features if thallium is in low concentration (about 1(mu) g/ml). The localization of the thallium organic antioxidants on bacteria Y. pestis EV is visible in electron microscopy images, thallium being heavy metal with high electron density. The negatively stained bacteria and bacteria thin sections with thallium organic compounds were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy. The localization of the thallium organic compounds is clearly visible in electron micrographs as small dark spots with size about 10-80nm. Probably mechanisms of interaction of antioxidants with bacteria cells are discussed.

  11. A software solution for recording circadian oscillator features in time-lapse live cell microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmon Patrick

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescent and bioluminescent time-lapse microscopy approaches have been successfully used to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying the mammalian circadian oscillator at the single cell level. However, most of the available software and common methods based on intensity-threshold segmentation and frame-to-frame tracking are not applicable in these experiments. This is due to cell movement and dramatic changes in the fluorescent/bioluminescent reporter protein during the circadian cycle, with the lowest expression level very close to the background intensity. At present, the standard approach to analyze data sets obtained from time lapse microscopy is either manual tracking or application of generic image-processing software/dedicated tracking software. To our knowledge, these existing software solutions for manual and automatic tracking have strong limitations in tracking individual cells if their plane shifts. Results In an attempt to improve existing methodology of time-lapse tracking of a large number of moving cells, we have developed a semi-automatic software package. It extracts the trajectory of the cells by tracking theirs displacements, makes the delineation of cell nucleus or whole cell, and finally yields measurements of various features, like reporter protein expression level or cell displacement. As an example, we present here single cell circadian pattern and motility analysis of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts expressing a fluorescent circadian reporter protein. Using Circadian Gene Express plugin, we performed fast and nonbiased analysis of large fluorescent time lapse microscopy datasets. Conclusions Our software solution, Circadian Gene Express (CGE, is easy to use and allows precise and semi-automatic tracking of moving cells over longer period of time. In spite of significant circadian variations in protein expression with extremely low expression levels at the valley phase, CGE allows accurate and

  12. A software solution for recording circadian oscillator features in time-lapse live cell microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Daniel; Unser, Michael; Salmon, Patrick; Dibner, Charna

    2010-07-06

    Fluorescent and bioluminescent time-lapse microscopy approaches have been successfully used to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying the mammalian circadian oscillator at the single cell level. However, most of the available software and common methods based on intensity-threshold segmentation and frame-to-frame tracking are not applicable in these experiments. This is due to cell movement and dramatic changes in the fluorescent/bioluminescent reporter protein during the circadian cycle, with the lowest expression level very close to the background intensity. At present, the standard approach to analyze data sets obtained from time lapse microscopy is either manual tracking or application of generic image-processing software/dedicated tracking software. To our knowledge, these existing software solutions for manual and automatic tracking have strong limitations in tracking individual cells if their plane shifts. In an attempt to improve existing methodology of time-lapse tracking of a large number of moving cells, we have developed a semi-automatic software package. It extracts the trajectory of the cells by tracking theirs displacements, makes the delineation of cell nucleus or whole cell, and finally yields measurements of various features, like reporter protein expression level or cell displacement. As an example, we present here single cell circadian pattern and motility analysis of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts expressing a fluorescent circadian reporter protein. Using Circadian Gene Express plugin, we performed fast and nonbiased analysis of large fluorescent time lapse microscopy datasets. Our software solution, Circadian Gene Express (CGE), is easy to use and allows precise and semi-automatic tracking of moving cells over longer period of time. In spite of significant circadian variations in protein expression with extremely low expression levels at the valley phase, CGE allows accurate and efficient recording of large number of cell parameters, including

  13. Early cell death detection with digital holographic microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Pavillon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Digital holography provides a non-invasive measurement of the quantitative phase shifts induced by cells in culture, which can be related to cell volume changes. It has been shown previously that regulation of cell volume, in particular as it relates to ionic homeostasis, is crucially involved in the activation/inactivation of the cell death processes. We thus present here an application of digital holographic microscopy (DHM dedicated to early and label-free detection of cell death. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We provide quantitative measurements of phase signal obtained on mouse cortical neurons, and caused by early neuronal cell volume regulation triggered by excitotoxic concentrations of L-glutamate. We show that the efficiency of this early regulation of cell volume detected by DHM, is correlated with the occurrence of subsequent neuronal death assessed with the widely accepted trypan blue method for detection of cell viability. CONCLUSIONS: The determination of the phase signal by DHM provides a simple and rapid optical method for the early detection of cell death.

  14. Correlating Intravital Multi-Photon Microscopy to 3D Electron Microscopy of Invading Tumor Cells Using Anatomical Reference Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karreman, Matthia A.; Mercier, Luc; Schieber, Nicole L.; Shibue, Tsukasa; Schwab, Yannick; Goetz, Jacky G.

    2014-01-01

    Correlative microscopy combines the advantages of both light and electron microscopy to enable imaging of rare and transient events at high resolution. Performing correlative microscopy in complex and bulky samples such as an entire living organism is a time-consuming and error-prone task. Here, we investigate correlative methods that rely on the use of artificial and endogenous structural features of the sample as reference points for correlating intravital fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. To investigate tumor cell behavior in vivo with ultrastructural accuracy, a reliable approach is needed to retrieve single tumor cells imaged deep within the tissue. For this purpose, fluorescently labeled tumor cells were subcutaneously injected into a mouse ear and imaged using two-photon-excitation microscopy. Using near-infrared branding, the position of the imaged area within the sample was labeled at the skin level, allowing for its precise recollection. Following sample preparation for electron microscopy, concerted usage of the artificial branding and anatomical landmarks enables targeting and approaching the cells of interest while serial sectioning through the specimen. We describe here three procedures showing how three-dimensional (3D) mapping of structural features in the tissue can be exploited to accurately correlate between the two imaging modalities, without having to rely on the use of artificially introduced markers of the region of interest. The methods employed here facilitate the link between intravital and nanoscale imaging of invasive tumor cells, enabling correlating function to structure in the study of tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:25479106

  15. Raman microscopy of individual living human embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, S. M.; Beermann, J.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Harkness, L. M.; Kassem, M.

    2010-04-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of mapping the distribution of different biomolecules in living human embryonic stem cells grown on glass substrates, without the need for fluorescent markers. In our work we improve the quality of measurements by finding a buffer that gives low fluorescence, growing cells on glass substrates (whose Raman signals are relatively weak compared to that of the cells) and having the backside covered with gold to improve the image contrast under direct white light illumination. The experimental setup used for Raman microscopy is the commercially available confocal scanning Raman microscope (Alpha300R) from Witec and sub-μm spatially resolved Raman images were obtained using a 532 nm excitation wavelength.

  16. Segmentation of the Clustered Cells with Optimized Boundary Detection in Negative Phase Contrast Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliang Wang

    Full Text Available Cell image segmentation plays a central role in numerous biology studies and clinical applications. As a result, the development of cell image segmentation algorithms with high robustness and accuracy is attracting more and more attention. In this study, an automated cell image segmentation algorithm is developed to get improved cell image segmentation with respect to cell boundary detection and segmentation of the clustered cells for all cells in the field of view in negative phase contrast images. A new method which combines the thresholding method and edge based active contour method was proposed to optimize cell boundary detection. In order to segment clustered cells, the geographic peaks of cell light intensity were utilized to detect numbers and locations of the clustered cells. In this paper, the working principles of the algorithms are described. The influence of parameters in cell boundary detection and the selection of the threshold value on the final segmentation results are investigated. At last, the proposed algorithm is applied to the negative phase contrast images from different experiments. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated. Results show that the proposed method can achieve optimized cell boundary detection and highly accurate segmentation for clustered cells.

  17. Segmentation of the Clustered Cells with Optimized Boundary Detection in Negative Phase Contrast Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuliang; Zhang, Zaicheng; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng

    2015-01-01

    Cell image segmentation plays a central role in numerous biology studies and clinical applications. As a result, the development of cell image segmentation algorithms with high robustness and accuracy is attracting more and more attention. In this study, an automated cell image segmentation algorithm is developed to get improved cell image segmentation with respect to cell boundary detection and segmentation of the clustered cells for all cells in the field of view in negative phase contrast images. A new method which combines the thresholding method and edge based active contour method was proposed to optimize cell boundary detection. In order to segment clustered cells, the geographic peaks of cell light intensity were utilized to detect numbers and locations of the clustered cells. In this paper, the working principles of the algorithms are described. The influence of parameters in cell boundary detection and the selection of the threshold value on the final segmentation results are investigated. At last, the proposed algorithm is applied to the negative phase contrast images from different experiments. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated. Results show that the proposed method can achieve optimized cell boundary detection and highly accurate segmentation for clustered cells.

  18. Cell Membrane Tracking in Living Brain Tissue Using Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John; Kolb, Ilya; Forest, Craig R; Rozell, Christopher J

    2018-04-01

    Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is widely used for observing unstained biological samples that are otherwise optically transparent. Combining this optical technique with machine vision could enable the automation of many life science experiments; however, identifying relevant features under DIC is challenging. In particular, precise tracking of cell boundaries in a thick ( ) slice of tissue has not previously been accomplished. We present a novel deconvolution algorithm that achieves the state-of-the-art performance at identifying and tracking these membrane locations. Our proposed algorithm is formulated as a regularized least squares optimization that incorporates a filtering mechanism to handle organic tissue interference and a robust edge-sparsity regularizer that integrates dynamic edge tracking capabilities. As a secondary contribution, this paper also describes new community infrastructure in the form of a MATLAB toolbox for accurately simulating DIC microscopy images of in vitro brain slices. Building on existing DIC optics modeling, our simulation framework additionally contributes an accurate representation of interference from organic tissue, neuronal cell-shapes, and tissue motion due to the action of the pipette. This simulator allows us to better understand the image statistics (to improve algorithms), as well as quantitatively test cell segmentation and tracking algorithms in scenarios, where ground truth data is fully known.

  19. Reactor cell assembly for use in spectroscopy and microscopy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindstaff, Quirinus; Stowe, Ashley Clinton; Smyrl, Norm; Powell, Louis; McLane, Sam

    2015-08-04

    The present disclosure provides a reactor cell assembly that utilizes a novel design and that is wholly or partially manufactured from Aluminum, such that reactions involving Hydrogen, for example, including solid-gas reactions and thermal decomposition reactions, are not affected by any degree of Hydrogen outgassing. This reactor cell assembly can be utilized in a wide range of optical and laser spectroscopy applications, as well as optical microscopy applications, including high-temperature and high-pressure applications. The result is that the elucidation of the role of Hydrogen in the reactions studied can be achieved. Various window assemblies can be utilized, such that high temperatures and high pressures can be accommodated and the signals obtained can be optimized.

  20. Using wavelet denoising and mathematical morphology in the segmentation technique applied to blood cells images

    OpenAIRE

    Boix García, Macarena; Cantó Colomina, Begoña

    2013-01-01

    Accurate image segmentation is used in medical diagnosis since this technique is a noninvasive pre-processing step for biomedical treatment. In this work we present an efficient segmentation method for medical image analysis. In particular, with this method blood cells can be segmented. For that, we combine the wavelet transform with morphological operations. Moreover, the wavelet thresholding technique is used to eliminate the noise and prepare the image for suitable segmentation. In wavelet...

  1. Robust Cell Detection for Large-Scale 3D Microscopy Using GPU-Accelerated Iterative Voting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Saadatifard

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput imaging techniques, such as Knife-Edge Scanning Microscopy (KESM,are capable of acquiring three-dimensional whole-organ images at sub-micrometer resolution. These images are challenging to segment since they can exceed several terabytes (TB in size, requiring extremely fast and fully automated algorithms. Staining techniques are limited to contrast agents that can be applied to large samples and imaged in a single pass. This requires maximizing the number of structures labeled in a single channel, resulting in images that are densely packed with spatial features. In this paper, we propose a three-dimensional approach for locating cells based on iterative voting. Due to the computational complexity of this algorithm, a highly efficient GPU implementation is required to make it practical on large data sets. The proposed algorithm has a limited number of input parameters and is highly parallel.

  2. Characterization of the Distance Relationship Between Localized Serotonin Receptors and Glia Cells on Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Brain Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacak, Jaroslaw; Schaller, Susanne; Borgmann, Daniela; Winkler, Stephan M

    2015-08-01

    We here present two new methods for the characterization of fluorescent localization microscopy images obtained from immunostained brain tissue sections. Direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy images of 5-HT1A serotonin receptors and glial fibrillary acidic proteins in healthy cryopreserved brain tissues are analyzed. In detail, we here present two image processing methods for characterizing differences in receptor distribution on glial cells and their distribution on neural cells: One variant relies on skeleton extraction and adaptive thresholding, the other on k-means based discrete layer segmentation. Experimental results show that both methods can be applied for distinguishing classes of images with respect to serotonin receptor distribution. Quantification of nanoscopic changes in relative protein expression on particular cell types can be used to analyze degeneration in tissues caused by diseases or medical treatment.

  3. TimeLapseAnalyzer: Multi-target analysis for live-cell imaging and time-lapse microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huth, Johannes; Buchholz, Malte; Kraus, Johann M.

    2011-01-01

    The direct observation of cells over time using time-lapse microscopy can provide deep insights into many important biological processes. Reliable analyses of motility, proliferation, invasive potential or mortality of cells are essential to many studies involving live cell imaging and can aid in...... counting and tube formation analysis in high throughput screening of live-cell experiments. TimeLapseAnalyzer is freely available (MATLAB, Open Source) at http://www.informatik.uniulm. de/ni/mitarbeiter/HKestler/tla......., we developed TimeLapseAnalyzer. Apart from general purpose image enhancements and segmentation procedures, this extensible, self-contained, modular cross-platform package provides dedicated modalities for fast and reliable analysis of multi-target cell tracking, scratch wound healing analysis, cell...

  4. White blood cell segmentation by color-space-based k-means clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Congcong; Xiao, Xiaoyan; Li, Xiaomei; Chen, Ying-Jie; Zhen, Wu; Chang, Jun; Zheng, Chengyun; Liu, Zhi

    2014-09-01

    White blood cell (WBC) segmentation, which is important for cytometry, is a challenging issue because of the morphological diversity of WBCs and the complex and uncertain background of blood smear images. This paper proposes a novel method for the nucleus and cytoplasm segmentation of WBCs for cytometry. A color adjustment step was also introduced before segmentation. Color space decomposition and k-means clustering were combined for segmentation. A database including 300 microscopic blood smear images were used to evaluate the performance of our method. The proposed segmentation method achieves 95.7% and 91.3% overall accuracy for nucleus segmentation and cytoplasm segmentation, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can segment WBCs effectively with high accuracy.

  5. A spectral k-means approach to bright-field cell image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Laura; Wan, Justin W L

    2010-01-01

    Automatic segmentation of bright-field cell images is important to cell biologists, but difficult to complete due to the complex nature of the cells in bright-field images (poor contrast, broken halo, missing boundaries). Standard approaches such as level set segmentation and active contours work well for fluorescent images where cells appear as round shape, but become less effective when optical artifacts such as halo exist in bright-field images. In this paper, we present a robust segmentation method which combines the spectral and k-means clustering techniques to locate cells in bright-field images. This approach models an image as a matrix graph and segment different regions of the image by computing the appropriate eigenvectors of the matrix graph and using the k-means algorithm. We illustrate the effectiveness of the method by segmentation results of C2C12 (muscle) cells in bright-field images.

  6. Interactions of Condensed Tannins with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Cells and Cell Walls: Tannin Location by Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekoue Nguela, Julie; Vernhet, Aude; Sieczkowski, Nathalie; Brillouet, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-02

    Interactions between grape tannins/red wine polyphenols and yeast cells/cell walls was previously studied within the framework of red wine aging and the use of yeast-derived products as an alternative to aging on lees. Results evidenced a quite different behavior between whole cells (biomass grown to elaborate yeast-derived products, inactivated yeast, and yeast inactivated after autolysis) and yeast cell walls (obtained from mechanical disruption of the biomass). Briefly, whole cells exhibited a high capacity to irreversibly adsorb grape and wine tannins, whereas only weak interactions were observed for cell walls. This last point was quite unexpected considering the literature and called into question the real role of cell walls in yeasts' ability to fix tannins. In the present work, tannin location after interactions between grape and wine tannins and yeast cells and cell walls was studied by means of transmission electron microscopy, light epifluorescence, and confocal microscopy. Microscopy observations evidenced that if tannins interact with cell walls, and especially cell wall mannoproteins, they also diffuse freely through the walls of dead cells to interact with their plasma membrane and cytoplasmic components.

  7. An automated approach for single-cell tracking in epifluorescence microscopy applied to E. coli growth analysis on microfluidics biochips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetita, Catalin; Kirov, Boris; Jaramillo, Alfonso; Lefevre, Christophe

    2012-03-01

    With the accumulation of knowledge for the intimate molecular mechanisms governing the processes inside the living cells in the later years, the ability to characterize the performance of elementary genetic circuits and parts at the single-cell level is becoming of crucial importance. Biological science is arriving to the point where it can develop hypothesis for the action of each molecule participating in the biochemical reactions and need proper techniques to test those hypothesis. Microfluidics is emerging as the technology that combined with high-magnification microscopy will allow for the long-term single-cell level observation of bacterial physiology. In this study we design, build and characterize the gene dynamics of genetic circuits as one of the basic parts governing programmed cell behavior. We use E. coli as model organism and grow it in microfluidics chips, which we observe with epifluorescence microscopy. One of the most invaluable segments of this technology is the consequent image processing, since it allows for the automated analysis of vast amount of single-cell observation and the fast and easy derivation of conclusions based on that data. Specifically, we are interested in promoter activity as function of time. We expect it to be oscillatory and for that we use GFP (green fluorescent protein) as a reporter in our genetic circuits. In this paper, an automated framework for single-cell tracking in phase-contrast microscopy is developed, combining 2D segmentation of cell time frames and graph-based reconstruction of their spatiotemporal evolution with fast tracking of the associated fluorescence signal. The results obtained on the investigated biological database are presented and discussed.

  8. A Marked Poisson Process Driven Latent Shape Model for 3D Segmentation of Reflectance Confocal Microscopy Image Stacks of Human Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanta, Sindhu; Jordan, Michael I.; Kose, Kivanc; Brooks, Dana H.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Dy, Jennifer G.

    2016-01-01

    Segmenting objects of interest from 3D datasets is a common problem encountered in biological data. Small field of view and intrinsic biological variability combined with optically subtle changes of intensity, resolution and low contrast in images make the task of segmentation difficult, especially for microscopy of unstained living or freshly excised thick tissues. Incorporating shape information in addition to the appearance of the object of interest can often help improve segmentation performance. However, shapes of objects in tissue can be highly variable and design of a flexible shape model that encompasses these variations is challenging. To address such complex segmentation problems, we propose a unified probabilistic framework that can incorporate the uncertainty associated with complex shapes, variable appearance and unknown locations. The driving application which inspired the development of this framework is a biologically important segmentation problem: the task of automatically detecting and segmenting the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ) in 3D reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) images of human skin. RCM imaging allows noninvasive observation of cellular, nuclear and morphological detail. The DEJ is an important morphological feature as it is where disorder, disease and cancer usually start. Detecting the DEJ is challenging because it is a 2D surface in a 3D volume which has strong but highly variable number of irregularly spaced and variably shaped “peaks and valleys”. In addition, RCM imaging resolution, contrast and intensity vary with depth. Thus a prior model needs to incorporate the intrinsic structure while allowing variability in essentially all its parameters. We propose a model which can incorporate objects of interest with complex shapes and variable appearance in an unsupervised setting by utilizing domain knowledge to build appropriate priors of the model. Our novel strategy to model this structure combines a spatial Poisson process

  9. New tools for comparing microscopy images : Quantitative analysis of cell types in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a method commonly used to examine individual differences between bacterial cells, yet many studies still lack a quantitative analysis of fluorescence microscopy data. Here we introduce some simple tools that microbiologists can use to analyze and compare their microscopy

  10. The method of segmentation of leukocytes in information-measuring systems on the basis of light microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitaev, V. G.; Pronichev, A. N.; Polyakov, E. V.; Zaharenko, Yu V.

    2018-01-01

    The paper considers the problem of leukocytes segmentation in microscopic images of bone marrow smears for automated diagnosis of the blood system diseases. The method was proposed to solve the problem of segmentation of contacting leukocytes in images of bone marrow smears. The method is based on the analysis of structure of objects of a separation and distances filter in combination with the watershed method and distance transformation method.

  11. MitoGen: A Framework for Generating 3D Synthetic Time-Lapse Sequences of Cell Populations in Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, David; Ulman, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    The proper analysis of biological microscopy images is an important and complex task. Therefore, it requires verification of all steps involved in the process, including image segmentation and tracking algorithms. It is generally better to verify algorithms with computer-generated ground truth datasets, which, compared to manually annotated data, nowadays have reached high quality and can be produced in large quantities even for 3D time-lapse image sequences. Here, we propose a novel framework, called MitoGen, which is capable of generating ground truth datasets with fully 3D time-lapse sequences of synthetic fluorescence-stained cell populations. MitoGen shows biologically justified cell motility, shape and texture changes as well as cell divisions. Standard fluorescence microscopy phenomena such as photobleaching, blur with real point spread function (PSF), and several types of noise, are simulated to obtain realistic images. The MitoGen framework is scalable in both space and time. MitoGen generates visually plausible data that shows good agreement with real data in terms of image descriptors and mean square displacement (MSD) trajectory analysis. Additionally, it is also shown in this paper that four publicly available segmentation and tracking algorithms exhibit similar performance on both real and MitoGen-generated data. The implementation of MitoGen is freely available.

  12. Using wavelet denoising and mathematical morphology in the segmentation technique applied to blood cells images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boix, Macarena; Cantó, Begoña

    2013-04-01

    Accurate image segmentation is used in medical diagnosis since this technique is a noninvasive pre-processing step for biomedical treatment. In this work we present an efficient segmentation method for medical image analysis. In particular, with this method blood cells can be segmented. For that, we combine the wavelet transform with morphological operations. Moreover, the wavelet thresholding technique is used to eliminate the noise and prepare the image for suitable segmentation. In wavelet denoising we determine the best wavelet that shows a segmentation with the largest area in the cell. We study different wavelet families and we conclude that the wavelet db1 is the best and it can serve for posterior works on blood pathologies. The proposed method generates goods results when it is applied on several images. Finally, the proposed algorithm made in MatLab environment is verified for a selected blood cells.

  13. Sequential processing of quantitative phase images for the study of cell behaviour in real-time digital holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikmund, T; Kvasnica, L; Týč, M; Křížová, A; Colláková, J; Chmelík, R

    2014-11-01

    Transmitted light holographic microscopy is particularly used for quantitative phase imaging of transparent microscopic objects such as living cells. The study of the cell is based on extraction of the dynamic data on cell behaviour from the time-lapse sequence of the phase images. However, the phase images are affected by the phase aberrations that make the analysis particularly difficult. This is because the phase deformation is prone to change during long-term experiments. Here, we present a novel algorithm for sequential processing of living cells phase images in a time-lapse sequence. The algorithm compensates for the deformation of a phase image using weighted least-squares surface fitting. Moreover, it identifies and segments the individual cells in the phase image. All these procedures are performed automatically and applied immediately after obtaining every single phase image. This property of the algorithm is important for real-time cell quantitative phase imaging and instantaneous control of the course of the experiment by playback of the recorded sequence up to actual time. Such operator's intervention is a forerunner of process automation derived from image analysis. The efficiency of the propounded algorithm is demonstrated on images of rat fibrosarcoma cells using an off-axis holographic microscope. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  14. Comparative methods for PET image segmentation in pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaidi, Habib; Abdoli, Mehrsima; Fuentes, Carolina Llina; El Naqa, Issam M.

    Several methods have been proposed for the segmentation of F-18-FDG uptake in PET. In this study, we assessed the performance of four categories of F-18-FDG PET image segmentation techniques in pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma using clinical studies where the surgical specimen served as the

  15. Cell segmentation in histopathological images with deep learning algorithms by utilizing spatial relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoglu, Nuh; Bilgin, Gokhan

    2017-10-01

    In many computerized methods for cell detection, segmentation, and classification in digital histopathology that have recently emerged, the task of cell segmentation remains a chief problem for image processing in designing computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. In research and diagnostic studies on cancer, pathologists can use CAD systems as second readers to analyze high-resolution histopathological images. Since cell detection and segmentation are critical for cancer grade assessments, cellular and extracellular structures should primarily be extracted from histopathological images. In response, we sought to identify a useful cell segmentation approach with histopathological images that uses not only prominent deep learning algorithms (i.e., convolutional neural networks, stacked autoencoders, and deep belief networks), but also spatial relationships, information of which is critical for achieving better cell segmentation results. To that end, we collected cellular and extracellular samples from histopathological images by windowing in small patches with various sizes. In experiments, the segmentation accuracies of the methods used improved as the window sizes increased due to the addition of local spatial and contextual information. Once we compared the effects of training sample size and influence of window size, results revealed that the deep learning algorithms, especially convolutional neural networks and partly stacked autoencoders, performed better than conventional methods in cell segmentation.

  16. Live-cell fluorescent microscopy platforms for real-time monitoring of polyplex-cell interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parhamifar, Ladan; Wu, LinPing; Andersen, Helene

    2014-01-01

    A myriad of cationic polymeric delivery vehicles are currently being developed with the aim of transporting various forms of nucleic acids to mammalian cells. The complexes between polycations and nucleic acids are referred to as polyplexes. The screening for successful polyplex candidates requir...... of performance and intracellular trafficking of polyplexes as well as for assessing cell functionality. This review highlights the application of some of the most promising fluorescent microscopy platforms in relation to polyplex-mediated transfection processes....

  17. A multivariate shape quantification approach for sickle red blood cell in patient-specific microscopy image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengjia; Yang, Jinzhu; Zhao, Hong

    2017-07-01

    The morphological change of red blood cells(RBCs) plays an important role in revealing the biomechanical and biorheological characteristics of RBCs. Aiming to extract the shape indices for the sickle RBCs, an automated ex-vivo RBC shape quantification method is proposed. First, single RBC regions (ROIs) are extracted from raw microscopy image via an automatic hierarchical ROI extraction method. Second, an improved random walk method is used to detect the RBC outline. Finally, three types of RBC shape factors are calculated based on the elliptical fitting RBC contour. Experiments indicate that the proposed method can accurately segment the RBCs from the microscopy images with low contrast and prevent the disturbance of artifacts. Moreover, it can provide an efficient shape quantification means for diverse RBC shapes in a batch manner.

  18. Synchronizing atomic force microscopy force mode and fluorescence microscopy in real time for immune cell stimulation and activation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazaux, Séverine; Sadoun, Anaïs; Biarnes-Pelicot, Martine; Martinez, Manuel; Obeid, Sameh [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); Bongrand, Pierre [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); APHM, Hôpital de la Conception, Laboratoire d’Immunologie, Marseille F-13385 (France); Limozin, Laurent [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); Puech, Pierre-Henri, E-mail: pierre-henri.puech@inserm.fr [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France)

    2016-01-15

    A method is presented for combining atomic force microscopy (AFM) force mode and fluorescence microscopy in order to (a) mechanically stimulate immune cells while recording the subsequent activation under the form of calcium pulses, and (b) observe the mechanical response of a cell upon photoactivation of a small G protein, namely Rac. Using commercial set-ups and a robust signal coupling the fluorescence excitation light and the cantilever bending, the applied force and activation signals were very easily synchronized. This approach allows to control the entire mechanical history of a single cell up to its activation and response down to a few hundreds of milliseconds, and can be extended with very minimal adaptations to other cellular systems where mechanotransduction is studied, using either purely mechanical stimuli or via a surface bound specific ligand. - Highlights: • A signal coupling AFM and fluorescence microscopy was characterized for soft cantilevers. • It can be used as an intrinsic timer to synchronize images and forces. • Mechanical stimulation of single immune cells while recording calcium fluxes was detailed. • Light-induced mechanical modifications of lymphocytes using a PA-Rac protein were demonstrated. • The precautions and limitations of use of this effect were presented.

  19. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; van Es, Peter; Petersen, Wilhelmina; van Leeuwen, Ton; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; Otto, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  20. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, L.; van Es, P.; Petersen, W.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Terstappen, L. W. M. M.; Otto, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  1. Automated profiling of individual cell-cell interactions from high-throughput time-lapse imaging microscopy in nanowell grids (TIMING).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merouane, Amine; Rey-Villamizar, Nicolas; Lu, Yanbin; Liadi, Ivan; Romain, Gabrielle; Lu, Jennifer; Singh, Harjeet; Cooper, Laurence J N; Varadarajan, Navin; Roysam, Badrinath

    2015-10-01

    There is a need for effective automated methods for profiling dynamic cell-cell interactions with single-cell resolution from high-throughput time-lapse imaging data, especially, the interactions between immune effector cells and tumor cells in adoptive immunotherapy. Fluorescently labeled human T cells, natural killer cells (NK), and various target cells (NALM6, K562, EL4) were co-incubated on polydimethylsiloxane arrays of sub-nanoliter wells (nanowells), and imaged using multi-channel time-lapse microscopy. The proposed cell segmentation and tracking algorithms account for cell variability and exploit the nanowell confinement property to increase the yield of correctly analyzed nanowells from 45% (existing algorithms) to 98% for wells containing one effector and a single target, enabling automated quantification of cell locations, morphologies, movements, interactions, and deaths without the need for manual proofreading. Automated analysis of recordings from 12 different experiments demonstrated automated nanowell delineation accuracy >99%, automated cell segmentation accuracy >95%, and automated cell tracking accuracy of 90%, with default parameters, despite variations in illumination, staining, imaging noise, cell morphology, and cell clustering. An example analysis revealed that NK cells efficiently discriminate between live and dead targets by altering the duration of conjugation. The data also demonstrated that cytotoxic cells display higher motility than non-killers, both before and during contact. broysam@central.uh.edu or nvaradar@central.uh.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Quantitative analysis of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling using live-cell total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Heath E; Haugh, Jason M

    2013-12-02

    This unit focuses on the use of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and image analysis methods to study the dynamics of signal transduction mediated by class I phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) in mammalian cells. The first four protocols cover live-cell imaging experiments, image acquisition parameters, and basic image processing and segmentation. These methods are generally applicable to live-cell TIRF experiments. The remaining protocols outline more advanced image analysis methods, which were developed in our laboratory for the purpose of characterizing the spatiotemporal dynamics of PI3K signaling. These methods may be extended to analyze other cellular processes monitored using fluorescent biosensors. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. Visualization and correction of automated segmentation, tracking and lineaging from 5-D stem cell image sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wait, Eric; Winter, Mark; Bjornsson, Chris; Kokovay, Erzsebet; Wang, Yue; Goderie, Susan; Temple, Sally; Cohen, Andrew R

    2014-10-03

    Neural stem cells are motile and proliferative cells that undergo mitosis, dividing to produce daughter cells and ultimately generating differentiated neurons and glia. Understanding the mechanisms controlling neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation will play a key role in the emerging fields of regenerative medicine and cancer therapeutics. Stem cell studies in vitro from 2-D image data are well established. Visualizing and analyzing large three dimensional images of intact tissue is a challenging task. It becomes more difficult as the dimensionality of the image data increases to include time and additional fluorescence channels. There is a pressing need for 5-D image analysis and visualization tools to study cellular dynamics in the intact niche and to quantify the role that environmental factors play in determining cell fate. We present an application that integrates visualization and quantitative analysis of 5-D (x,y,z,t,channel) and large montage confocal fluorescence microscopy images. The image sequences show stem cells together with blood vessels, enabling quantification of the dynamic behaviors of stem cells in relation to their vascular niche, with applications in developmental and cancer biology. Our application automatically segments, tracks, and lineages the image sequence data and then allows the user to view and edit the results of automated algorithms in a stereoscopic 3-D window while simultaneously viewing the stem cell lineage tree in a 2-D window. Using the GPU to store and render the image sequence data enables a hybrid computational approach. An inference-based approach utilizing user-provided edits to automatically correct related mistakes executes interactively on the system CPU while the GPU handles 3-D visualization tasks. By exploiting commodity computer gaming hardware, we have developed an application that can be run in the laboratory to facilitate rapid iteration through biological experiments. We combine unsupervised image

  4. A Gaussian process and derivative spectral-based algorithm for red blood cell segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yingying; Wang, Jianbiao; Zhou, Mei; Hou, Xiyue; Li, Qingli; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Yiting

    2017-07-01

    As an imaging technology used in remote sensing, hyperspectral imaging can provide more information than traditional optical imaging of blood cells. In this paper, an AOTF based microscopic hyperspectral imaging system is used to capture hyperspectral images of blood cells. In order to achieve the segmentation of red blood cells, Gaussian process using squared exponential kernel function is applied first after the data preprocessing to make the preliminary segmentation. The derivative spectrum with spectral angle mapping algorithm is then applied to the original image to segment the boundary of cells, and using the boundary to cut out cells obtained from the Gaussian process to separated adjacent cells. Then the morphological processing method including closing, erosion and dilation is applied so as to keep adjacent cells apart, and by applying median filtering to remove noise points and filling holes inside the cell, the final segmentation result can be obtained. The experimental results show that this method appears better segmentation effect on human red blood cells.

  5. Fast and robust segmentation of white blood cell images by self-supervised learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xin; Wang, Yong; Wang, Guoyou; Liu, Jianguo

    2018-04-01

    A fast and accurate white blood cell (WBC) segmentation remains a challenging task, as different WBCs vary significantly in color and shape due to cell type differences, staining technique variations and the adhesion between the WBC and red blood cells. In this paper, a self-supervised learning approach, consisting of unsupervised initial segmentation and supervised segmentation refinement, is presented. The first module extracts the overall foreground region from the cell image by K-means clustering, and then generates a coarse WBC region by touching-cell splitting based on concavity analysis. The second module further uses the coarse segmentation result of the first module as automatic labels to actively train a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Then, the trained SVM classifier is further used to classify each pixel of the image and achieve a more accurate segmentation result. To improve its segmentation accuracy, median color features representing the topological structure and a new weak edge enhancement operator (WEEO) handling fuzzy boundary are introduced. To further reduce its time cost, an efficient cluster sampling strategy is also proposed. We tested the proposed approach with two blood cell image datasets obtained under various imaging and staining conditions. The experiment results show that our approach has a superior performance of accuracy and time cost on both datasets. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of scanning electron microscopy to monitor nanofibre/cell interaction in digestive epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millaku, Agron, E-mail: agron.mi@hotmail.com [Limnos-Company for Applied Ecology Ltd, Podlimbarskega 31, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Drobne, Damjana [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence, Advanced Materials and Technologies for the Future (CO NAMASTE), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (Nanocentre), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Torkar, Matjaz [Institute of Metals and Technology IMT, Lepi pot 11, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jožef Stefan Institute, Condensed Matter Physics Department, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Novak, Sara [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Remškar, Maja [Jožef Stefan Institute, Condensed Matter Physics Department, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pipan-Tkalec, Živa [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy is particularly well suited to the observation of nanofibre/cell interaction in the endothelial cells lining the hepatopancreas. (a) Tungsten oxide nanofibres, (b) test organism Porcellio scaber and schematic appearance of digestive tubes, (c) digestive tube (hepatopancreas) prepared for SEM investigation, (d) digestive gland cells (C) with nanofibres (NF) embedded in the cell membrane and (e) nanofibres inserted deeply in the cells and damaged nanofibres due to peristalsis. -- Highlights: • Tungsten oxide nanofibres react physically with digestive gland epithelial cells in Porcellio scaber. • Physical peristaltic forces of lead to insertion of nanofibres into the cells. • No toxic responses as measured by conventional toxicity biomarkers were detected. • Physical interactions were observed in a majority of the investigated animals. -- Abstract: We provide data obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on the interaction of ingested tungsten nanofibers with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes of a test organism Porcellio scaber. Conventional toxicity endpoints including feeding behaviour, weight loss and mortality were also measured in each investigated animal. No toxicity was detected in any of exposed animals after 14 days of feeding on tungsten nanofiber dosed food, but when nanofibers enter the digestive system they can react with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes, becoming physically inserted into the cells. In this way, nanofibers can injure the epithelial cells of digestive gland tubes when they are ingested with food. Our SEM data suggest that peristaltic forces may have an important role, not predicted by in vitro experiments, in the interactions of nanomaterials with digestive intestinal cells.

  7. Use of scanning electron microscopy to monitor nanofibre/cell interaction in digestive epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millaku, Agron; Drobne, Damjana; Torkar, Matjaz; Novak, Sara; Remškar, Maja; Pipan-Tkalec, Živa

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy is particularly well suited to the observation of nanofibre/cell interaction in the endothelial cells lining the hepatopancreas. (a) Tungsten oxide nanofibres, (b) test organism Porcellio scaber and schematic appearance of digestive tubes, (c) digestive tube (hepatopancreas) prepared for SEM investigation, (d) digestive gland cells (C) with nanofibres (NF) embedded in the cell membrane and (e) nanofibres inserted deeply in the cells and damaged nanofibres due to peristalsis. -- Highlights: • Tungsten oxide nanofibres react physically with digestive gland epithelial cells in Porcellio scaber. • Physical peristaltic forces of lead to insertion of nanofibres into the cells. • No toxic responses as measured by conventional toxicity biomarkers were detected. • Physical interactions were observed in a majority of the investigated animals. -- Abstract: We provide data obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on the interaction of ingested tungsten nanofibers with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes of a test organism Porcellio scaber. Conventional toxicity endpoints including feeding behaviour, weight loss and mortality were also measured in each investigated animal. No toxicity was detected in any of exposed animals after 14 days of feeding on tungsten nanofiber dosed food, but when nanofibers enter the digestive system they can react with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes, becoming physically inserted into the cells. In this way, nanofibers can injure the epithelial cells of digestive gland tubes when they are ingested with food. Our SEM data suggest that peristaltic forces may have an important role, not predicted by in vitro experiments, in the interactions of nanomaterials with digestive intestinal cells

  8. Induction of morphological changes in death-induced cancer cells monitored by holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Schich, Zahra; Mölder, Anna; Tassidis, Helena; Härkönen, Pirkko; Falck Miniotis, Maria; Gjörloff Wingren, Anette

    2015-03-01

    We are using the label-free technique of holographic microscopy to analyze cellular parameters including cell number, confluence, cellular volume and area directly in the cell culture environment. We show that death-induced cells can be distinguished from untreated counterparts by the use of holographic microscopy, and we demonstrate its capability for cell death assessment. Morphological analysis of two representative cell lines (L929 and DU145) was performed in the culture flasks without any prior cell detachment. The two cell lines were treated with the anti-tumour agent etoposide for 1-3days. Measurements by holographic microscopy showed significant differences in average cell number, confluence, volume and area when comparing etoposide-treated with untreated cells. The cell volume of the treated cell lines was initially increased at early time-points. By time, cells decreased in volume, especially when treated with high doses of etoposide. In conclusion, we have shown that holographic microscopy allows label-free and completely non-invasive morphological measurements of cell growth, viability and death. Future applications could include real-time monitoring of these holographic microscopy parameters in cells in response to clinically relevant compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Multi-scale Gaussian representation and outline-learning based cell image segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background High-throughput genome-wide screening to study gene-specific functions, e.g. for drug discovery, demands fast automated image analysis methods to assist in unraveling the full potential of such studies. Image segmentation is typically at the forefront of such analysis as the performance of the subsequent steps, for example, cell classification, cell tracking etc., often relies on the results of segmentation. Methods We present a cell cytoplasm segmentation framework which first separates cell cytoplasm from image background using novel approach of image enhancement and coefficient of variation of multi-scale Gaussian scale-space representation. A novel outline-learning based classification method is developed using regularized logistic regression with embedded feature selection which classifies image pixels as outline/non-outline to give cytoplasm outlines. Refinement of the detected outlines to separate cells from each other is performed in a post-processing step where the nuclei segmentation is used as contextual information. Results and conclusions We evaluate the proposed segmentation methodology using two challenging test cases, presenting images with completely different characteristics, with cells of varying size, shape, texture and degrees of overlap. The feature selection and classification framework for outline detection produces very simple sparse models which use only a small subset of the large, generic feature set, that is, only 7 and 5 features for the two cases. Quantitative comparison of the results for the two test cases against state-of-the-art methods show that our methodology outperforms them with an increase of 4-9% in segmentation accuracy with maximum accuracy of 93%. Finally, the results obtained for diverse datasets demonstrate that our framework not only produces accurate segmentation but also generalizes well to different segmentation tasks. PMID:24267488

  10. Auxin-induced modifications of cell wall polysaccharides in cat coleoptile segments. Effect of galactose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, R.; Masuda, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Galactose inhibits auxin-induced cell elongation in oat coleoptile segments. Cell elongation induced by exogenously applied auxin is controlled by factors such as auxin uptake, cell wall loosening, osmotic concentration of sap and hydraulic conductivity. However, galactose does not have any effect on these factors. The results discussed in this paper led to the conclusion that galactose does not affect cell wall loosening which controls rapid growth, but inhibits cell wall synthesis which is required to maintain long-term growth

  11. Use of scanning electron microscopy to monitor nanofibre/cell interaction in digestive epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millaku, Agron; Drobne, Damjana; Torkar, Matjaz; Novak, Sara; Remškar, Maja; Pipan-Tkalec, Živa

    2013-09-15

    We provide data obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on the interaction of ingested tungsten nanofibers with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes of a test organism Porcellio scaber. Conventional toxicity endpoints including feeding behaviour, weight loss and mortality were also measured in each investigated animal. No toxicity was detected in any of exposed animals after 14 days of feeding on tungsten nanofiber dosed food, but when nanofibers enter the digestive system they can react with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes, becoming physically inserted into the cells. In this way, nanofibers can injure the epithelial cells of digestive gland tubes when they are ingested with food. Our SEM data suggest that peristaltic forces may have an important role, not predicted by in vitro experiments, in the interactions of nanomaterials with digestive intestinal cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Adapting Mask-RCNN for Automatic Nucleus Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jeremiah W.

    2018-01-01

    Automatic segmentation of microscopy images is an important task in medical image processing and analysis. Nucleus detection is an important example of this task. Mask-RCNN is a recently proposed state-of-the-art algorithm for object detection, object localization, and object instance segmentation of natural images. In this paper we demonstrate that Mask-RCNN can be used to perform highly effective and efficient automatic segmentations of a wide range of microscopy images of cell nuclei, for ...

  13. Extracting Fluorescent Reporter Time Courses of Cell Lineages from High-Throughput Microscopy at Low Temporal Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Mike J.; Jeziorska, Danuta M.; Ott, Sascha; Tamai, T. Katherine; Koentges, Georgy; Vance, Keith W.; Bretschneider, Till

    2011-01-01

    The extraction of fluorescence time course data is a major bottleneck in high-throughput live-cell microscopy. Here we present an extendible framework based on the open-source image analysis software ImageJ, which aims in particular at analyzing the expression of fluorescent reporters through cell divisions. The ability to track individual cell lineages is essential for the analysis of gene regulatory factors involved in the control of cell fate and identity decisions. In our approach, cell nuclei are identified using Hoechst, and a characteristic drop in Hoechst fluorescence helps to detect dividing cells. We first compare the efficiency and accuracy of different segmentation methods and then present a statistical scoring algorithm for cell tracking, which draws on the combination of various features, such as nuclear intensity, area or shape, and importantly, dynamic changes thereof. Principal component analysis is used to determine the most significant features, and a global parameter search is performed to determine the weighting of individual features. Our algorithm has been optimized to cope with large cell movements, and we were able to semi-automatically extract cell trajectories across three cell generations. Based on the MTrackJ plugin for ImageJ, we have developed tools to efficiently validate tracks and manually correct them by connecting broken trajectories and reassigning falsely connected cell positions. A gold standard consisting of two time-series with 15,000 validated positions will be released as a valuable resource for benchmarking. We demonstrate how our method can be applied to analyze fluorescence distributions generated from mouse stem cells transfected with reporter constructs containing transcriptional control elements of the Msx1 gene, a regulator of pluripotency, in mother and daughter cells. Furthermore, we show by tracking zebrafish PAC2 cells expressing FUCCI cell cycle markers, our framework can be easily adapted to different cell

  14. Extracting fluorescent reporter time courses of cell lineages from high-throughput microscopy at low temporal resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike J Downey

    Full Text Available The extraction of fluorescence time course data is a major bottleneck in high-throughput live-cell microscopy. Here we present an extendible framework based on the open-source image analysis software ImageJ, which aims in particular at analyzing the expression of fluorescent reporters through cell divisions. The ability to track individual cell lineages is essential for the analysis of gene regulatory factors involved in the control of cell fate and identity decisions. In our approach, cell nuclei are identified using Hoechst, and a characteristic drop in Hoechst fluorescence helps to detect dividing cells. We first compare the efficiency and accuracy of different segmentation methods and then present a statistical scoring algorithm for cell tracking, which draws on the combination of various features, such as nuclear intensity, area or shape, and importantly, dynamic changes thereof. Principal component analysis is used to determine the most significant features, and a global parameter search is performed to determine the weighting of individual features. Our algorithm has been optimized to cope with large cell movements, and we were able to semi-automatically extract cell trajectories across three cell generations. Based on the MTrackJ plugin for ImageJ, we have developed tools to efficiently validate tracks and manually correct them by connecting broken trajectories and reassigning falsely connected cell positions. A gold standard consisting of two time-series with 15,000 validated positions will be released as a valuable resource for benchmarking. We demonstrate how our method can be applied to analyze fluorescence distributions generated from mouse stem cells transfected with reporter constructs containing transcriptional control elements of the Msx1 gene, a regulator of pluripotency, in mother and daughter cells. Furthermore, we show by tracking zebrafish PAC2 cells expressing FUCCI cell cycle markers, our framework can be easily adapted

  15. Cell Identity Switching Regulated by Retinoic Acid Signaling Maintains Homogeneous Segments in the Hindbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Megan; Xu, Qiling; Cayuso, Jordi; Wilkinson, David G

    2018-06-04

    The patterning of tissues to form subdivisions with distinct and homogeneous regional identity is potentially disrupted by cell intermingling. Transplantation studies suggest that homogeneous segmental identity in the hindbrain is maintained by identity switching of cells that intermingle into another segment. We show that switching occurs during normal development and is mediated by feedback between segment identity and the retinoic acid degrading enzymes, cyp26b1 and cyp26c1. egr2, which specifies the segmental identity of rhombomeres r3 and r5, underlies the lower expression level of cyp26b1 and cyp26c1 in r3 and r5 compared with r2, r4, and r6. Consequently, r3 or r5 cells that intermingle into adjacent segments encounter cells with higher cyp26b1/c1 expression, which we find is required for downregulation of egr2b expression. Furthermore, egr2b expression is regulated in r2, r4, and r6 by non-autonomous mechanisms that depend upon the number of neighbors that express egr2b. These findings reveal that a community regulation of retinoid signaling maintains homogeneous segmental identity. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Imaging and quantitative data acquisition of biological cell walls with Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tittmann, B. R. [Penn State; Xi, X. [Penn State

    2014-09-01

    This chapter demonstrates the feasibility of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (HF-SAM) as tools to characterize biological tissues. Both the AFM and the SAM have shown to provide imaging (with different resolution) and quantitative elasticity measuring abilities. Plant cell walls with minimal disturbance and under conditions of their native state have been examined with these two kinds of microscopy. After descriptions of both the SAM and AFM, their special features and the typical sample preparation is discussed. The sample preparation is focused here on epidermal peels of onion scales and celery epidermis cells which were sectioned for the AFM to visualize the inner surface (closest to the plasma membrane) of the outer epidermal wall. The nm-wide cellulose microfibrils orientation and multilayer structure were clearly observed. The microfibril orientation and alignment tend to be more organized in older scales compared with younger scales. The onion epidermis cell wall was also used as a test analog to study cell wall elasticity by the AFM nanoindentation and the SAM V(z) feature. The novelty in this work was to demonstrate the capability of these two techniques to analyze isolated, single layered plant cell walls in their natural state. AFM nanoindentation was also used to probe the effects of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and calcium ion treatment to modify pectin networks in cell walls. The results suggest a significant modulus increase in the calcium ion treatment and a slight decrease in EDTA treatment. To complement the AFM measurements, the HF-SAM was used to obtain the V(z) signatures of the onion epidermis. These measurements were focused on documenting the effect of pectinase enzyme treatment. The results indicate a significant change in the V(z) signature curves with time into the enzyme treatment. Thus AFM and HF-SAM open the door to a systematic nondestructive structure and mechanical property

  17. Quantitative Segmentation of Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Heterogeneous Tissue: Application to the Detection of Residual Disease in Tumor Margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jenna L; Harmany, Zachary T; Mito, Jeffrey K; Kennedy, Stephanie A; Kim, Yongbaek; Dodd, Leslie; Geradts, Joseph; Kirsch, David G; Willett, Rebecca M; Brown, J Quincy; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2013-01-01

    To develop a robust tool for quantitative in situ pathology that allows visualization of heterogeneous tissue morphology and segmentation and quantification of image features. TISSUE EXCISED FROM A GENETICALLY ENGINEERED MOUSE MODEL OF SARCOMA WAS IMAGED USING A SUBCELLULAR RESOLUTION MICROENDOSCOPE AFTER TOPICAL APPLICATION OF A FLUORESCENT ANATOMICAL CONTRAST AGENT: acriflavine. An algorithm based on sparse component analysis (SCA) and the circle transform (CT) was developed for image segmentation and quantification of distinct tissue types. The accuracy of our approach was quantified through simulations of tumor and muscle images. Specifically, tumor, muscle, and tumor+muscle tissue images were simulated because these tissue types were most commonly observed in sarcoma margins. Simulations were based on tissue characteristics observed in pathology slides. The potential clinical utility of our approach was evaluated by imaging excised margins and the tumor bed in a cohort of mice after surgical resection of sarcoma. Simulation experiments revealed that SCA+CT achieved the lowest errors for larger nuclear sizes and for higher contrast ratios (nuclei intensity/background intensity). For imaging of tumor margins, SCA+CT effectively isolated nuclei from tumor, muscle, adipose, and tumor+muscle tissue types. Differences in density were correctly identified with SCA+CT in a cohort of ex vivo and in vivo images, thus illustrating the diagnostic potential of our approach. The combination of a subcellular-resolution microendoscope, acriflavine staining, and SCA+CT can be used to accurately isolate nuclei and quantify their density in anatomical images of heterogeneous tissue.

  18. Dynamic quantitative analysis of adherent cell cultures by means of lens-free video microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allier, C.; Vincent, R.; Navarro, F.; Menneteau, M.; Ghenim, L.; Gidrol, X.; Bordy, T.; Hervé, L.; Cioni, O.; Bardin, S.; Bornens, M.; Usson, Y.; Morales, S.

    2018-02-01

    We present our implementation of lens-free video microscopy setup for the monitoring of adherent cell cultures. We use a multi-wavelength LED illumination together with a dedicated holographic reconstruction algorithm that allows for an efficient removal of twin images from the reconstructed phase image for densities up to those of confluent cell cultures (>500 cells/mm2). We thereby demonstrate that lens-free video microscopy, with a large field of view ( 30 mm2) can enable us to capture the images of thousands of cells simultaneously and directly inside the incubator. It is then possible to trace and quantify single cells along several cell cycles. We thus prove that lens-free microscopy is a quantitative phase imaging technique enabling estimation of several metrics at the single cell level as a function of time, for example the area, dry mass, maximum thickness, major axis length and aspect ratio of each cell. Combined with cell tracking, it is then possible to extract important parameters such as the initial cell dry mass (just after cell division), the final cell dry mass (just before cell division), the average cell growth rate, and the cell cycle duration. As an example, we discuss the monitoring of a HeLa cell cultures which provided us with a data-set featuring more than 10 000 cell cycle tracks and more than 2x106 cell morphological measurements in a single time-lapse.

  19. White blood cell counting analysis of blood smear images using various segmentation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safuan, Syadia Nabilah Mohd; Tomari, Razali; Zakaria, Wan Nurshazwani Wan; Othman, Nurmiza

    2017-09-01

    In white blood cell (WBC) diagnosis, the most crucial measurement parameter is the WBC counting. Such information is widely used to evaluate the effectiveness of cancer therapy and to diagnose several hidden infection within human body. The current practice of manual WBC counting is laborious and a very subjective assessment which leads to the invention of computer aided system (CAS) with rigorous image processing solution. In the CAS counting work, segmentation is the crucial step to ensure the accuracy of the counted cell. The optimal segmentation strategy that can work under various blood smeared image acquisition conditions is remain a great challenge. In this paper, a comparison between different segmentation methods based on color space analysis to get the best counting outcome is elaborated. Initially, color space correction is applied to the original blood smeared image to standardize the image color intensity level. Next, white blood cell segmentation is performed by using combination of several color analysis subtraction which are RGB, CMYK and HSV, and Otsu thresholding. Noises and unwanted regions that present after the segmentation process is eliminated by applying a combination of morphological and Connected Component Labelling (CCL) filter. Eventually, Circle Hough Transform (CHT) method is applied to the segmented image to estimate the number of WBC including the one under the clump region. From the experiment, it is found that G-S yields the best performance.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy of cells from periapical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, P A

    1975-09-01

    Examination of lymphocytes from peripheral blood with the scanning electron microscope (SEM) has shown differences between B cells and T cells on the basis of their surface architecture. This study was initiated to determine whether the cellular components of periapical lesions could be identified with the use of similar criteria. Cells were dispersed from lesions by aspiration of fragments of tissue through syringe needles of decreasing diameters. The liberated cells were filtered on silver-coated Flotronic membranes and examined under the SEM. Lymphocytes, macrophages, epithelial cells, and mast cells were observed in granulomas and cysts. Most of the lymphocytes had smooth surfaces similar to that of T cells; others had villous projections similar to that of B cells. Epithelial nests were seen in the cyst linings while the cyst fluid was rich in lymphocytes. These findings suggest that SEM examination of periapical lesions can be a useful adjunct in studying cellular composition and possible immunological reactions in these tissues.

  1. The mathematical cell model reconstructed from interference microscopy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogotnev, A. A.; Nikitiuk, A. S.; Naimark, O. B.; Nebogatikov, V. O.; Grishko, V. V.

    2017-09-01

    The mathematical model of cell dynamics is developed to link the dynamics of the phase cell thickness with the signs of the oncological pathology. The measurements of irregular oscillations of cancer cells phase thickness were made with laser interference microscope MIM-340 in order to substantiate this model. These data related to the dynamics of phase thickness for different cross-sections of cells (nuclei, nucleolus, and cytoplasm) allow the reconstruction of the attractor of dynamic system. The attractor can be associated with specific types of collective modes of phase thickness responsible for the normal and cancerous cell dynamics. Specific type of evolution operator was determined using an algorithm of designing of the mathematical cell model and temporal phase thickness data for cancerous and normal cells. Qualitative correspondence of attractor types to the cell states was analyzed in terms of morphological signs associated with maximum value of mean square irregular oscillations of phase thickness dynamics.

  2. Concomitant use of polarization and positive phase contrast microscopy for the study of microbial cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žižka, Zdeněk; Gabriel, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 6 (2014), s. 545-550 ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : microbial cells * microscopy * microorganism Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  3. Concomitant use of polarization and positive phase contrast microscopy for the study of microbial cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žižka, Zdeněk; Gabriel, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 6 (2015), s. 545-550 ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : polarization microscopy * microbial cells * positive phase contrast Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.335, year: 2015

  4. Raman and fluorescence microscopy to study the internalization and dissolution of photosensitizer nanoparticles into living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalfi-Happ, Claudia; Steiner, Rudolf; Wittig, Rainer; Graefe, Susanna; Ryabova, Anastasia; Loschenov, Victor

    2015-07-01

    In this present study we applied Raman and fluorescence microscopy to investigate the internalisation, cellular distribution and effects on cell metabolism of photosensitizer nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy in fibroblasts and macrophages.

  5. CMEIAS color segmentation: an improved computing technology to process color images for quantitative microbial ecology studies at single-cell resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Colin A; Reddy, Chandan K; Dazzo, Frank B

    2010-02-01

    Quantitative microscopy and digital image analysis are underutilized in microbial ecology largely because of the laborious task to segment foreground object pixels from background, especially in complex color micrographs of environmental samples. In this paper, we describe an improved computing technology developed to alleviate this limitation. The system's uniqueness is its ability to edit digital images accurately when presented with the difficult yet commonplace challenge of removing background pixels whose three-dimensional color space overlaps the range that defines foreground objects. Image segmentation is accomplished by utilizing algorithms that address color and spatial relationships of user-selected foreground object pixels. Performance of the color segmentation algorithm evaluated on 26 complex micrographs at single pixel resolution had an overall pixel classification accuracy of 99+%. Several applications illustrate how this improved computing technology can successfully resolve numerous challenges of complex color segmentation in order to produce images from which quantitative information can be accurately extracted, thereby gain new perspectives on the in situ ecology of microorganisms. Examples include improvements in the quantitative analysis of (1) microbial abundance and phylotype diversity of single cells classified by their discriminating color within heterogeneous communities, (2) cell viability, (3) spatial relationships and intensity of bacterial gene expression involved in cellular communication between individual cells within rhizoplane biofilms, and (4) biofilm ecophysiology based on ribotype-differentiated radioactive substrate utilization. The stand-alone executable file plus user manual and tutorial images for this color segmentation computing application are freely available at http://cme.msu.edu/cmeias/ . This improved computing technology opens new opportunities of imaging applications where discriminating colors really matter most

  6. Quantitative Segmentation of Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Heterogeneous Tissue: Application to the Detection of Residual Disease in Tumor Margins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna L Mueller

    Full Text Available To develop a robust tool for quantitative in situ pathology that allows visualization of heterogeneous tissue morphology and segmentation and quantification of image features.TISSUE EXCISED FROM A GENETICALLY ENGINEERED MOUSE MODEL OF SARCOMA WAS IMAGED USING A SUBCELLULAR RESOLUTION MICROENDOSCOPE AFTER TOPICAL APPLICATION OF A FLUORESCENT ANATOMICAL CONTRAST AGENT: acriflavine. An algorithm based on sparse component analysis (SCA and the circle transform (CT was developed for image segmentation and quantification of distinct tissue types. The accuracy of our approach was quantified through simulations of tumor and muscle images. Specifically, tumor, muscle, and tumor+muscle tissue images were simulated because these tissue types were most commonly observed in sarcoma margins. Simulations were based on tissue characteristics observed in pathology slides. The potential clinical utility of our approach was evaluated by imaging excised margins and the tumor bed in a cohort of mice after surgical resection of sarcoma.Simulation experiments revealed that SCA+CT achieved the lowest errors for larger nuclear sizes and for higher contrast ratios (nuclei intensity/background intensity. For imaging of tumor margins, SCA+CT effectively isolated nuclei from tumor, muscle, adipose, and tumor+muscle tissue types. Differences in density were correctly identified with SCA+CT in a cohort of ex vivo and in vivo images, thus illustrating the diagnostic potential of our approach.The combination of a subcellular-resolution microendoscope, acriflavine staining, and SCA+CT can be used to accurately isolate nuclei and quantify their density in anatomical images of heterogeneous tissue.

  7. Live cell microscopy of DNA damage response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinela da Silva, Sonia Cristina; Gallina, Irene; Eckert-Boulet, Nadine Valerie

    2012-01-01

    live cell imaging allows for multiple cellular markers to be monitored over several hours. This chapter reviews useful fluorescent markers and genotoxic agents for studying the DNA damage response in living cells and provides protocols for live cell imaging, time-lapse microscopy, and for induction...

  8. Controlled initiation and quantitative visualization of cell interaction dynamics - a novel hybrid microscopy method -

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder-van As, M.I.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the development, validation, and application of a hybrid microscopy technique to study cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions in a controlled and quantitative manner. We studied the spatial and temporal dynamics of the selected membrane molecules CD6 and the activated

  9. Digital holographic microscopy for toxicity testing and cell culture quality control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Björn

    2018-02-01

    For the example of digital holographic microscopy (DHM), it is illustrated how label-free biophysical parameter sets can be extracted from quantitative phase images of adherent and suspended cells, and how the retrieved data can be applied for in-vitro toxicity testing and cell culture quality assessment. This includes results from the quantification of the reactions of cells to toxic substances as well as data from sophisticated monitoring of cell alterations that are related to changes of cell culture conditions.

  10. Opto-acoustic microscopy reveals adhesion mechanics of single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Ghanem, Maroun; Dehoux, Thomas; Liu, Liwang; Le Saux, Guillaume; Plawinski, Laurent; Durrieu, Marie-Christine; Audoin, Bertrand

    2018-01-01

    Laser-generated GHz-ultrasonic-based technologies have shown the ability to image single cell adhesion and stiffness simultaneously. Using this new modality, we here demonstrate quantitative indicators to investigate contact mechanics and adhesion processes of the cell. We cultured human cells on a rigid substrate, and we used an inverted pulsed opto-acoustic microscope to generate acoustic pulses containing frequencies up to 100 GHz in the substrate. We map the reflection of the acoustic pulses at the cell-substrate interface to obtain images of the acoustic impedance of the cell, Zc, as well as of the stiffness of the interface, K, with 1 μm lateral resolution. Our results show that the standard deviation ΔZc reveals differences between different cell types arising from the multiplicity of local conformations within the nucleus. From the distribution of K-values within the nuclear region, we extract a mean interfacial stiffness, Km, that quantifies the average contact force in areas of the cell displaying weak bonding. By analogy with classical contact mechanics, we also define the ratio of the real to nominal contact areas, Sr/St. We show that Km can be interpreted as a quantitative indicator of passive contact at metal-cell interfaces, while Sr/St is sensitive to active adhesive processes in the nuclear region. The ability to separate the contributions of passive and active adhesion processes should allow gaining insight into cell-substrate interactions, with important applications in tissue engineering.

  11. Intensity-based segmentation and visualization of cells in 3D microscopic images using the GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Lee, Jeong-Eom; Jeon, Woong-ki; Choi, Heung-Kook; Kim, Myoung-Hee

    2013-02-01

    3D microscopy images contain abundant astronomical data, rendering 3D microscopy image processing time-consuming and laborious on a central processing unit (CPU). To solve these problems, many people crop a region of interest (ROI) of the input image to a small size. Although this reduces cost and time, there are drawbacks at the image processing level, e.g., the selected ROI strongly depends on the user and there is a loss in original image information. To mitigate these problems, we developed a 3D microscopy image processing tool on a graphics processing unit (GPU). Our tool provides efficient and various automatic thresholding methods to achieve intensity-based segmentation of 3D microscopy images. Users can select the algorithm to be applied. Further, the image processing tool provides visualization of segmented volume data and can set the scale, transportation, etc. using a keyboard and mouse. However, the 3D objects visualized fast still need to be analyzed to obtain information for biologists. To analyze 3D microscopic images, we need quantitative data of the images. Therefore, we label the segmented 3D objects within all 3D microscopic images and obtain quantitative information on each labeled object. This information can use the classification feature. A user can select the object to be analyzed. Our tool allows the selected object to be displayed on a new window, and hence, more details of the object can be observed. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of our tool by comparing the CPU and GPU processing times by matching the specification and configuration.

  12. Cell volume and geometric parameters determination in living cells using confocal microscopy and 3D reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: David Hevia, Aida Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta Alonso-Gervós, Isabel Quirós-González, Henar M Cimadevilla, Carmen Gómez-Cordovés, Rosa M Sainz & Juan C Mayo ### Abstract The protocol reported here describes a simple, easy, fast and reproducible method aimed to know the geometric parameters of living cells based on confocal laser scanning microscopy combined with 3D reconstruction software. Briefly, the method is based on intrinsic fluorescence properties of acridine orange (AO), a...

  13. The counting of native blood cells by digital microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbin, S. O.; Doubrovski, V. A.; Zabenkov, I. V.; Tsareva, O. E.

    2017-03-01

    An algorithm for photographic images processing of blood samples in its native state was developed to determine the concentration of erythrocytes, leukocytes and platelets without individual separate preparation of cells' samples. Special "photo templates" were suggested to use in order to identify red blood cells. The effect of "highlighting" of leukocytes, which was found by authors, was used to increase the accuracy of this type of cells counting. Finally to raise the resolution of platelets from leukocytes the areas of their photo images were used, but not their sizes. It is shown that the accuracy of cells counting for native blood samples may be comparable with the accuracy of similar studies for smears. At the same time the proposed native blood analysis simplifies greatly the procedure of sample preparation in comparison to smear, permits to move from the detection of blood cells ratio to the determination of their concentrations in the sample.

  14. In Situ Ecophysiology of Microbial Biofilm Communities Analyzed by CMEIAS Computer-Assisted Microscopy at Single-Cell Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef G. Yanni

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the utility of CMEIAS (Center for Microbial Ecology Image Analysis System computer-assisted microscopy to extract data from accurately segmented images that provide 63 different insights into the ecophysiology of microbial populations and communities within biofilms and other habitats. Topics include quantitative assessments of: (i morphological diversity as an indicator of impacts that substratum physicochemistries have on biofilm community structure and dominance-rarity relationships among populations; (ii morphotype-specific distributions of biovolume body size that relate microbial allometric scaling, metabolic activity and growth physiology; (iii fractal geometry of optimal cellular positioning for efficient utilization of allocated nutrient resources; (iv morphotype-specific stress responses to starvation, environmental disturbance and bacteriovory predation; (v patterns of spatial distribution indicating positive and negative cell–cell interactions affecting their colonization behavior; and (vi significant methodological improvements to increase the accuracy of color-discriminated ecophysiology, e.g., differentiation of cell viability based on cell membrane integrity, cellular respiratory activity, phylogenetically differentiated substrate utilization, and N-acyl homoserine lactone-mediated cell–cell communication by bacteria while colonizing plant roots. The intensity of these ecophysiological attributes commonly varies at the individual cell level, emphasizing the importance of analyzing them at single-cell resolution and the proper spatial scale at which they occur in situ.

  15. Multimodal microscopy of immune cells and melanoma for longitudinal studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entenberg, David; Aranda, Iana; Li, Yongbiao; Toledo-Crow, Ricardo; Schaer, David; Li, Yanyun

    2006-02-01

    Intravital microscopy of cancer is a well established tool that provides direct visualization of the tumor cycle. It traditionally involves one of several strategies: invasive subcutaneous (SC) implantation of tumors followed by surgical opening of skin flaps for imaging, techniques utilizing skin fold chambers and implanted optical windows or intradermal injections under 200μm from the skin surface. All of these techniques allow the use of fluorescent proteins as markers for biologically significant constituents. However, observation methods utilizing skin-flaps, skin-fold chambers and optical windows are invasive and tend to alter the immune environment of the tissue and/or limit the duration of studies that can be performed. If implanted correctly, intradermally injected tumors can be minimally invasive, will not require biopsies or surgical intervention to observe and are accessible for direct transdermal imaging with a number of in vivo modalities. We present our work in the development of a small animal intravital microscopy workstation that allows the acquisition of different contrast imaging modalities: reflectance confocal, wide field epifluorescence, multiphoton and second harmonic generation (SHG). The images are acquired pair-wise simultaneously and sequentially in time. The aim of our instrumentation is to gather all information generated by the single probing beam via the reflected or back-scattered signal, SHG signal and various fluorescence signals. Additionally, we also present our development of a microscopic tissue navigation technique to mark, label and track sites of interest. This technique enables us to revisit sites periodically and record, with different imaging contrasts, their biological changes over time.

  16. Labeling proteins inside living cells using external fluorophores for microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Kai Wen; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Ren, Pin; Youn, Yeoan; Deng, Xiang; Ge, Pinghua; Lee, Sang Hak; Belmont, Andrew S; Selvin, Paul R

    2016-12-09

    Site-specific fluorescent labeling of proteins inside live mammalian cells has been achieved by employing Streptolysin O, a bacterial enzyme which forms temporary pores in the membrane and allows delivery of virtually any fluorescent probes, ranging from labeled IgG's to small ligands, with high efficiency (>85% of cells). The whole process, including recovery, takes 30 min, and the cell is ready to be imaged immediately. A variety of cell viability tests were performed after treatment with SLO to ensure that the cells have intact membranes, are able to divide, respond normally to signaling molecules, and maintains healthy organelle morphology. When combined with Oxyrase, a cell-friendly photostabilizer, a ~20x improvement in fluorescence photostability is achieved. By adding in glutathione, fluorophores are made to blink, enabling super-resolution fluorescence with 20-30 nm resolution over a long time (~30 min) under continuous illumination. Example applications in conventional and super-resolution imaging of native and transfected cells include p65 signal transduction activation, single molecule tracking of kinesin, and specific labeling of a series of nuclear and cytoplasmic protein complexes.

  17. Opto-acoustic microscopy reveals adhesion mechanics of single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Ghanem, Maroun; Dehoux, Thomas; Liu, Liwang; Le Saux, Guillaume; Plawinski, Laurent; Durrieu, Marie-Christine; Audoin, Bertrand

    2018-01-01

    Laser-generated GHz-ultrasonic-based technologies have shown the ability to image single cell adhesion and stiffness simultaneously. Using this new modality, we here demonstrate quantitative indicators to investigate contact mechanics and adhesion processes of the cell. We cultured human cells on a rigid substrate, and we used an inverted pulsed opto-acoustic microscope to generate acoustic pulses containing frequencies up to 100 GHz in the substrate. We map the reflection of the acoustic pulses at the cell-substrate interface to obtain images of the acoustic impedance of the cell, Z c , as well as of the stiffness of the interface, K, with 1 μm lateral resolution. Our results show that the standard deviation ΔZ c reveals differences between different cell types arising from the multiplicity of local conformations within the nucleus. From the distribution of K-values within the nuclear region, we extract a mean interfacial stiffness, K m , that quantifies the average contact force in areas of the cell displaying weak bonding. By analogy with classical contact mechanics, we also define the ratio of the real to nominal contact areas, S r /S t . We show that K m can be interpreted as a quantitative indicator of passive contact at metal-cell interfaces, while S r /S t is sensitive to active adhesive processes in the nuclear region. The ability to separate the contributions of passive and active adhesion processes should allow gaining insight into cell-substrate interactions, with important applications in tissue engineering.

  18. Water-clear cell adenoma of the parathyroid. A case report with immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenko, R T; Anderson, K M; Kauffman, G; Abt, A B

    1995-11-01

    We report a water-clear cell adenoma of the parathyroid gland, a lesion which to our knowledge has not been described previously. Like its rare but well-described hyperplastic counterpart, water-clear cell hyperplasia, this adenoma is composed of cells with abundant foamy-to-granular cytoplasm and mild nuclear pleomorphism. The cells form glandular structures and cell nests separated by fine fibrovascular septae. The tumor cells stain positively with anti-parathyroid hormone and show characteristic glassy and flocculate material by electron microscopy. Unlike water-clear cell hyperplasia, water-clear cell adenoma is a solitary lesion that compresses the residual nonneoplastic parathyroid gland.

  19. Super-resolution microscopy reveals cell wall dynamics and peptidoglycan architecture in ovococcal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Richard; Mesnage, Stéphane; Boneca, Ivo G; Hobbs, Jamie K; Foster, Simon J

    2011-12-01

    Cell morphology and viability in Eubacteria is dictated by the architecture of peptidoglycan, the major and essential structural component of the cell wall. Although the biochemical composition of peptidoglycan is well understood, how the peptidoglycan architecture can accommodate the dynamics of growth and division while maintaining cell shape remains largely unknown. Here, we elucidate the peptidoglycan architecture and dynamics of bacteria with ovoid cell shape (ovococci), which includes a number of important pathogens, by combining biochemical analyses with atomic force and super-resolution microscopies. Atomic force microscopy analysis showed preferential orientation of the peptidoglycan network parallel to the short axis of the cell, with distinct architectural features associated with septal and peripheral wall synthesis. Super-resolution three-dimensional structured illumination fluorescence microscopy was applied for the first time in bacteria to unravel the dynamics of peptidoglycan assembly in ovococci. The ovococci have a unique peptidoglycan architecture and growth mode not observed in other model organisms. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. A multi-cell, multi-scale model of vertebrate segmentation and somite formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan D Hester

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Somitogenesis, the formation of the body's primary segmental structure common to all vertebrate development, requires coordination between biological mechanisms at several scales. Explaining how these mechanisms interact across scales and how events are coordinated in space and time is necessary for a complete understanding of somitogenesis and its evolutionary flexibility. So far, mechanisms of somitogenesis have been studied independently. To test the consistency, integrability and combined explanatory power of current prevailing hypotheses, we built an integrated clock-and-wavefront model including submodels of the intracellular segmentation clock, intercellular segmentation-clock coupling via Delta/Notch signaling, an FGF8 determination front, delayed differentiation, clock-wavefront readout, and differential-cell-cell-adhesion-driven cell sorting. We identify inconsistencies between existing submodels and gaps in the current understanding of somitogenesis mechanisms, and propose novel submodels and extensions of existing submodels where necessary. For reasonable initial conditions, 2D simulations of our model robustly generate spatially and temporally regular somites, realistic dynamic morphologies and spontaneous emergence of anterior-traveling stripes of Lfng. We show that these traveling stripes are pseudo-waves rather than true propagating waves. Our model is flexible enough to generate interspecies-like variation in somite size in response to changes in the PSM growth rate and segmentation-clock period, and in the number and width of Lfng stripes in response to changes in the PSM growth rate, segmentation-clock period and PSM length.

  1. Comparison of Endothelial Cell Loss by Specular Microscopy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endothelial cell loss was also compared in phacoemulsification group by temporal clear corneal incision (CCI) and by superior scleral incision (SI) technique. ..... vs manual sutureless small-incision extracapsular cataract surgery in Nepal.

  2. Atomic force microscopy as a tool for the investigation of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morkvėnaitė-Vilkončienė, Inga; Ramanavičienė, Almira; Ramanavičius, Arūnas

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy is a valuable and useful tool for the imaging and investigation of living cells in their natural environment at high resolution. Procedures applied to living cell preparation before measurements should be adapted individually for different kinds of cells and for the desired measurement technique. Different ways of cell immobilization, such as chemical fixation on the surface, entrapment in the pores of a membrane, or growing them directly on glass cover slips or on plastic substrates, result in the distortion or appearance of artifacts in atomic force microscopy images. Cell fixation allows the multiple use of samples and storage for a prolonged period; it also increases the resolution of imaging. Different atomic force microscopy modes are used for the imaging and analysis of living cells. The contact mode is the best for cell imaging because of high resolution, but it is usually based on the following: (i) image formation at low interaction force, (ii) low scanning speed, and (iii) usage of "soft," low resolution cantilevers. The tapping mode allows a cell to behave like a very solid material, and destructive shear forces are minimized, but imaging in liquid is difficult. The force spectroscopy mode is used for measuring the mechanical properties of cells; however, obtained results strongly depend on the cell fixation method. In this paper, the application of 3 atomic force microscopy modes including (i) contact, (ii) tapping, and (iii) force spectroscopy for the investigation of cells is described. The possibilities of cell preparation for the measurements, imaging, and determination of mechanical properties of cells are provided. The applicability of atomic force microscopy to diagnostics and other biomedical purposes is discussed.

  3. New robust algorithm for tracking cells in videos of Drosophila morphogenesis based on finding an ideal path in segmented spatio-temporal cellular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaïche, Yohanns; Bosveld, Floris; Graner, François; Mikula, Karol; Remesíková, Mariana; Smísek, Michal

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel algorithm for tracking cells in time lapse confocal microscopy movie of a Drosophila epithelial tissue during pupal morphogenesis. We consider a 2D + time video as a 3D static image, where frames are stacked atop each other, and using a spatio-temporal segmentation algorithm we obtain information about spatio-temporal 3D tubes representing evolutions of cells. The main idea for tracking is the usage of two distance functions--first one from the cells in the initial frame and second one from segmented boundaries. We track the cells backwards in time. The first distance function attracts the subsequently constructed cell trajectories to the cells in the initial frame and the second one forces them to be close to centerlines of the segmented tubular structures. This makes our tracking algorithm robust against noise and missing spatio-temporal boundaries. This approach can be generalized to a 3D + time video analysis, where spatio-temporal tubes are 4D objects.

  4. Implementation of stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for single cell analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arco, Annalisa; Ferrara, Maria Antonietta; Indolfi, Maurizio; Tufano, Vitaliano; Sirleto, Luigi

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we present successfully realization of a nonlinear microscope, not purchasable in commerce, based on stimulated Raman scattering. It is obtained by the integration of a femtosecond SRS spectroscopic setup with an inverted research microscope equipped with a scanning unit. Taking account of strength of vibrational contrast of SRS, it provides label-free imaging of single cell analysis. Validation tests on images of polystyrene beads are reported to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach. In order to test the microscope on biological structures, we report and discuss the label-free images of lipid droplets inside fixed adipocyte cells.

  5. In SITU Transmission Electron Microscopy on Operating Electrochemical CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gualandris, Fabrizio; Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2016-01-01

    Solid oxide cells (SOC) have the potential of playing a significant role in the future efficient energy system scenario. In order to become widely commercially available, an improved performance and durability of the cells has to be achieved [1]. Conventional scanning and transmission SEM and TEM...... have been often used for ex-situ post mortem characterization of SOFCs and SOECs [2,3]. However, in order to get fundamental insight of the microstructural development of SOFC/SOEC during operation conditions in situ studies are necessary [4]....

  6. Quantitative assessment of cancer cell morphology and motility using telecentric digital holographic microscopy and machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Van K; Nguyen, Thanh C; Chung, Byung M; Nehmetallah, George; Raub, Christopher B

    2018-03-01

    The noninvasive, fast acquisition of quantitative phase maps using digital holographic microscopy (DHM) allows tracking of rapid cellular motility on transparent substrates. On two-dimensional surfaces in vitro, MDA-MB-231 cancer cells assume several morphologies related to the mode of migration and substrate stiffness, relevant to mechanisms of cancer invasiveness in vivo. The quantitative phase information from DHM may accurately classify adhesive cancer cell subpopulations with clinical relevance. To test this, cells from the invasive breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell line were cultured on glass, tissue-culture treated polystyrene, and collagen hydrogels, and imaged with DHM followed by epifluorescence microscopy after staining F-actin and nuclei. Trends in cell phase parameters were tracked on the different substrates, during cell division, and during matrix adhesion, relating them to F-actin features. Support vector machine learning algorithms were trained and tested using parameters from holographic phase reconstructions and cell geometric features from conventional phase images, and used to distinguish between elongated and rounded cell morphologies. DHM was able to distinguish between elongated and rounded morphologies of MDA-MB-231 cells with 94% accuracy, compared to 83% accuracy using cell geometric features from conventional brightfield microscopy. This finding indicates the potential of DHM to detect and monitor cancer cell morphologies relevant to cell cycle phase status, substrate adhesion, and motility. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  7. Imaging immune response of skin mast cells in vivo with two-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunqiang; Pastila, Riikka K.; Lin, Charles P.

    2012-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has provided insightful information of the dynamic process of immune cells in vivo. However, the use of exogenous labeling agents limits its applications. There is no method to perform functional imaging of mast cells, a population of innate tissue-resident immune cells. Mast cells are widely recognized as the effector cells in allergy. Recently their roles as immunoregulatory cells in certain innate and adaptive immune responses are being actively investigated. Here we report in vivo mouse skin mast cells imaging with two-photon microscopy using endogenous tryptophan as the fluorophore. We studied the following processes. 1) Mast cells degranulation, the first step in the mast cell activation process in which the granules are released into peripheral tissue to trigger downstream reactions. 2) Mast cell reconstitution, a procedure commonly used to study mast cells functioning by comparing the data from wild type mice, mast cell-deficient mice, and mast-cell deficient mice reconstituted with bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Imaging the BMMCs engraftment in tissue reveals the mast cells development and the efficiency of BMMCs reconstitution. We observed the reconstitution process for 6 weeks in the ear skin of mast cell-deficient Kit wsh/ w-sh mice by two-photon imaging. Our finding is the first instance of imaging mast cells in vivo with endogenous contrast.

  8. Enlightening intracellular complexity of living cells with quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Torres, C.; Laperrousaz, B.; Berguiga, L.; Boyer Provera, E.; Elezgaray, J.; Nicolini, F. E.; Maguer-Satta, V.; Arneodo, A.; Argoul, F.

    2016-03-01

    The internal distribution of refractive indices (RIs) of a living cell is much more complex than usually admitted in multi-shell models. The reconstruction of RI maps from single phase images has rarely been achieved for several reasons: (i) we still have very little knowledge of the impact of internal macromolecular complexes on the local RI and (ii) phase changes produced by light propagation through the sample are mixed with diffraction effects by internal cell bodies. We propose the implementation a 2D wavelet-based contour chain detection method to distinguish internal boundaries thanks to their greatest optical path difference gradients. These contour chains correspond to the highest image phase contrast and follow the local RI inhomogeneities linked to the intracellular structural intricacy. Their statistics and spatial distribution are morphological indicators for distinguishing cells of different origins and to follow their transformation in pathologic situations. We use this method to compare non adherent blood cells from primary and laboratory culture origins, in healthy and pathological situations (chronic myelogenous leukaemia). In a second part of this presentation, we concentrate on the temporal dynamics of the phase contour chains and we discuss the spectral decomposition of their dynamics in both health and disease.

  9. Three-dimensional counting of morphologically normal human red blood cells via digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Faliu; Moon, Inkyu; Lee, Yeon H.

    2015-01-01

    Counting morphologically normal cells in human red blood cells (RBCs) is extremely beneficial in the health care field. We propose a three-dimensional (3-D) classification method of automatically determining the morphologically normal RBCs in the phase image of multiple human RBCs that are obtained by off-axis digital holographic microscopy (DHM). The RBC holograms are first recorded by DHM, and then the phase images of multiple RBCs are reconstructed by a computational numerical algorithm. To design the classifier, the three typical RBC shapes, which are stomatocyte, discocyte, and echinocyte, are used for training and testing. Nonmain or abnormal RBC shapes different from the three normal shapes are defined as the fourth category. Ten features, including projected surface area, average phase value, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, perimeter, mean corpuscular hemoglobin surface density, circularity, mean phase of center part, sphericity coefficient, elongation, and pallor, are extracted from each RBC after segmenting the reconstructed phase images by using a watershed transform algorithm. Moreover, four additional properties, such as projected surface area, perimeter, average phase value, and elongation, are measured from the inner part of each cell, which can give significant information beyond the previous 10 features for the separation of the RBC groups; these are verified in the experiment by the statistical method of Hotelling's T-square test. We also apply the principal component analysis algorithm to reduce the dimension number of variables and establish the Gaussian mixture densities using the projected data with the first eight principal components. Consequently, the Gaussian mixtures are used to design the discriminant functions based on Bayesian decision theory. To improve the performance of the Bayes classifier and the accuracy of estimation of its error rate, the leaving-one-out technique is applied. Experimental results show that the proposed method can

  10. Label-free three-dimensional imaging of cell nucleus using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jian; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zi; Huang, Zhiwei, E-mail: biehzw@nus.edu.sg [Optical Bioimaging Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-09-08

    We report the implementation of the combined third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy for label-free three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of cell nucleus morphological changes in liver tissue. THG imaging shows regular spherical shapes of normal hepatocytes nuclei with inner chromatin structures while revealing the condensation of chromatins and nuclear fragmentations in hepatocytes of diseased liver tissue. Colocalized THG and TPEF imaging provides complementary information of cell nuclei and cytoplasm in tissue. This work suggests that 3-D THG microscopy has the potential for quantitative analysis of nuclear morphology in cells at a submicron-resolution without the need for DNA staining.

  11. Label-free three-dimensional imaging of cell nucleus using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Jian; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    We report the implementation of the combined third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy for label-free three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of cell nucleus morphological changes in liver tissue. THG imaging shows regular spherical shapes of normal hepatocytes nuclei with inner chromatin structures while revealing the condensation of chromatins and nuclear fragmentations in hepatocytes of diseased liver tissue. Colocalized THG and TPEF imaging provides complementary information of cell nuclei and cytoplasm in tissue. This work suggests that 3-D THG microscopy has the potential for quantitative analysis of nuclear morphology in cells at a submicron-resolution without the need for DNA staining.

  12. Facile method to stain the bacterial cell surface for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Hu, Dehong; Mihai, Cosmin; Lohse, Samuel E.; Lee, Chang-Soo; Torelli, Marco; Hamers, Robert J.; Murphy, Catherine; Orr, Galya; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    A method to fluorescently stain the surfaces of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cells compatible with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is presented. This method utilizes a commercially-available fluorescent probe to label primary amines at the surface of the cell. We demonstrate efficient staining of two bacterial strains, the Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis 168. Using structured illumination microscopy and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, which require high quantum yield or specialized dyes, we show that this staining method may be used to resolve the bacterial cell surface with sub-diffraction-limited resolution. We further use this method to identify localization patterns of nanomaterials, specifically cadmium selenide quantum dots, following interaction with bacterial cells.

  13. Determination of the refractive index of dehydrated cells by means of digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belashov, A. V.; Zhikhoreva, A. A.; Bespalov, V. G.; Vasyutinskii, O. S.; Zhilinskaya, N. T.; Novik, V. I.; Semenova, I. V.

    2017-10-01

    Spatial distributions of the integral refractive index in dehydrated cells of human oral cavity epithelium are obtained by means of digital holographic microscopy, and mean refractive index of the cells is determined. The statistical analysis of the data obtained is carried out, and absolute errors of the method are estimated for different experimental conditions.

  14. Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies of Electron-Selective Titanium Oxide Contacts in Silicon Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Haider; Yang, Xinbo; Weber, Klaus; Schoenfeld, Winston V.; Davis, Kristopher O.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the cross-section of electron-selective titanium oxide (TiO2) contacts for n-type crystalline silicon solar cells were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. It was revealed that the excellent cell efficiency of 21

  15. Optical imaging of non-fluorescent nanodiamonds in live cells using transient absorption microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Lu, Feng; Streets, Aaron M; Fei, Peng; Quan, Junmin; Huang, Yanyi

    2013-06-07

    We directly observe non-fluorescent nanodiamonds in living cells using transient absorption microscopy. This label-free technology provides a novel modality to study the dynamic behavior of nanodiamonds inside the cells with intrinsic three-dimensional imaging capability. We apply this method to capture the cellular uptake of nanodiamonds under various conditions, confirming the endocytosis mechanism.

  16. Common histological patterns in glomerular epithelial cells in secondary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuppe, C.; Grone, H.J.; Ostendorf, T.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Boor, P.; Floege, J.; Smeets, B.; Moeller, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Parietal epithelial cells (PECs) are involved in the development of sclerotic lesions in primary focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Here, the role of PECs was explored in the more common secondary FSGS lesions in 68 patient biopsies, diagnosed with 11 different frequently or rarely

  17. Fibered Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy for the Noninvasive Imaging of Langerhans Cells in Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorova, Biliana; Salabert, Nina; Tricot, Sabine; Boisgard, Raphaël; Rathaux, Mélanie; Le Grand, Roger; Chapon, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    We developed a new approach to visualize skin Langerhans cells by in vivo fluorescence imaging in nonhuman primates. Macaques were intradermally injected with a monoclonal, fluorescently labeled antibody against HLA-DR molecule and were imaged for up to 5 days by fibered confocal microscopy (FCFM). The network of skin Langerhans cells was visualized by in vivo fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy. Quantification of Langerhans cells revealed no changes to cell density with time. Ex vivo experiments confirmed that injected fluorescent HLA-DR antibody specifically targeted Langerhans cells in the epidermis. This study demonstrates the feasibility of single-cell, in vivo imaging as a noninvasive technique to track Langerhans cells in nontransgenic animals.

  18. 2. Brazilian Congress on Cell Biology and 7. Brazilian Colloquium on Electron Microscopy - Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Immunology, virology, bacteriology, genetics and protozoology are some of the subjects treated in the 2. Brazilian Congress on Cell Biology. Studies using radioisotopic techniques and ultrastructural cytological studies are presented. Use of optical - and electron microscopy in some of these studies is discussed. In the 7. Brazilian Colloquium on Electron Microscopy, the application of this technique to materials science is discussed (failure analysis in metallurgy, energy dispersion X-ray analysis, etc). (I.C.R.) [pt

  19. Helium Ion Microscopy of proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrode structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiriaev, Serguei; Dam Madsen, Nis; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2017-01-01

    electrode interface structure dependence on ionomer content, systematically studied by Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM). A special focus was on acquiring high resolution images of the electrode structure and avoiding interface damage from irradiation and tedious sample preparation. HIM demonstrated its....... In the hot-pressed electrodes, we found more closed contact between the electrode components, reduced particle size, polymer coalescence and formation of nano-sized polymer fiber architecture between the particles. Keywords: proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs); Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM...

  20. In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy on Operating Electrochemical Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gualandris, Fabrizio; Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    have been often used for ex-situpost mortem characterization of SOFCs and SOECs [2,3]. However, in order to get fundamental insight of themicrostructural development of SOFC/SOEC during operation conditions in-situ studies are necessary [4]. Thedevelopment of advanced TEM chips and holders makes...... it possible to undertake analysis during exposure to theSOFC/SOEC sample of reactive gas flow, elevated temperatures and electrical biasing in combination. Thisallows the study of nanostructure development under temperature and electrode polarisation conditions similarto operation conditions.In this work, we...... with animage corrector and a differential pumping system.A symmetric cell was prepared by depositing a cell consisting of three thin films on a strontium titanate (STO)single crystal substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Lanthanum strontium cobaltite La0.6Sr0.4CoO3-δ (LSC)was chosen as electrode...

  1. Immunogold scanning electron microscopy can reveal the polysaccharide architecture of xylem cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuliang; Juzenas, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) and immunogold transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are the two main techniques commonly used to detect polysaccharides in plant cell walls. Both are important in localizing cell wall polysaccharides, but both have major limitations, such as low resolution in IFM and restricted sample size for immunogold TEM. In this study, we have developed a robust technique that combines immunocytochemistry with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study cell wall polysaccharide architecture in xylem cells at high resolution over large areas of sample. Using multiple cell wall monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), this immunogold SEM technique reliably localized groups of hemicellulosic and pectic polysaccharides in the cell walls of five different xylem structures (vessel elements, fibers, axial and ray parenchyma cells, and tyloses). This demonstrates its important advantages over the other two methods for studying cell wall polysaccharide composition and distribution in these structures. In addition, it can show the three-dimensional distribution of a polysaccharide group in the vessel lateral wall and the polysaccharide components in the cell wall of developing tyloses. This technique, therefore, should be valuable for understanding the cell wall polysaccharide composition, architecture and functions of diverse cell types. PMID:28398585

  2. Monitoring the elasticity changes of HeLa cells during mitosis by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ningcheng; Wang, Yuhua; Zeng, Jinshu; Ding, Xuemei; Xie, Shusen; Yang, Hongqin

    2016-10-01

    Cell mitosis plays a crucial role in cell life activity, which is one of the important phases in cell division cycle. During the mitosis, the cytoskeleton micro-structure of the cell changed and the biomechanical properties of the cell may vary depending upon different mitosis stages. In this study, the elasticity property of HeLa cells during mitosis was monitored by atomic force microscopy. Also, the actin filaments in different mitosis stages of the cells were observed by confocal imaging. Our results show that the cell in anaphase is stiffer than that in metaphase and telophase. Furthermore, lots of actin filaments gathered in cells' center area in anaphase, which contributes to the rigidity of the cell in this phase. Our findings demonstrate that the nano-biomechanics of living cells could provide a new index for characterizing cell physiological states.

  3. New tools for comparing microscopy images: quantitative analysis of cell types in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2015-02-15

    Fluorescence microscopy is a method commonly used to examine individual differences between bacterial cells, yet many studies still lack a quantitative analysis of fluorescence microscopy data. Here we introduce some simple tools that microbiologists can use to analyze and compare their microscopy images. We show how image data can be converted to distribution data. These data can be subjected to a cluster analysis that makes it possible to objectively compare microscopy images. The distribution data can further be analyzed using distribution fitting. We illustrate our methods by scrutinizing two independently acquired data sets, each containing microscopy images of a doubly labeled Bacillus subtilis strain. For the first data set, we examined the expression of srfA and tapA, two genes which are expressed in surfactin-producing and matrix-producing cells, respectively. For the second data set, we examined the expression of eps and tapA; these genes are expressed in matrix-producing cells. We show that srfA is expressed by all cells in the population, a finding which contrasts with a previously reported bimodal distribution of srfA expression. In addition, we show that eps and tapA do not always have the same expression profiles, despite being expressed in the same cell type: both operons are expressed in cell chains, while single cells mainly express eps. These findings exemplify that the quantification and comparison of microscopy data can yield insights that otherwise would go unnoticed. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Necrosis and apoptosis pathways of cell death at photodynamic treatment in vitro as revealed by digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, I. V.; Belashov, A. V.; Belyaeva, T. N.; Kornilova, E. S.; Salova, A. V.; Zhikhoreva, A. A.; Vasyutinskii, O. S.

    2018-02-01

    Monitoring of variations in morphological characteristics of cultured HeLa cells after photodynamic treatment with Radachlorin photosensitizer is performed by means of digital holographic microscopy. The observed dose-dependent post-treatment variations of phase shift evidence threshold effect of photodynamic treatment and allow for distinguishing between necrotic or apoptotic pathways of cell death. Results obtained by holographic microscopy were confirmed by means of far-field optical microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy with commonly used test assays.

  5. Electron microscopy localization and characterization of functionalized composite organic-inorganic SERS nanoparticles on leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Ai Leen; Shachaf, Catherine M; Elchuri, Sailaja; Nolan, Garry P; Sinclair, Robert

    2008-12-01

    We demonstrate the use of electron microscopy as a powerful characterization tool to identify and locate antibody-conjugated composite organic-inorganic nanoparticle (COINs) surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles on cells. U937 leukemia cells labeled with antibody CD54-conjugated COINs were characterized in their native, hydrated state using wet scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and in their dehydrated state using high-resolution SEM. In both cases, the backscattered electron (BSE) detector was used to detect and identify the silver constituents in COINs due to its high sensitivity to atomic number variations within a specimen. The imaging and analytical capabilities in the SEM were further complemented by higher resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and scanning Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) data to give reliable and high-resolution information about nanoparticles and their binding to cell surface antigens.

  6. Electron microscopy localization and characterization of functionalized composite organic-inorganic SERS nanoparticles on leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Ai Leen; Shachaf, Catherine M.; Elchuri, Sailaja; Nolan, Garry P.; Sinclair, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of electron microscopy as a powerful characterization tool to identify and locate antibody-conjugated composite organic-inorganic nanoparticle (COINs) surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles on cells. U937 leukemia cells labeled with antibody CD54-conjugated COINs were characterized in their native, hydrated state using wet scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and in their dehydrated state using high-resolution SEM. In both cases, the backscattered electron (BSE) detector was used to detect and identify the silver constituents in COINs due to its high sensitivity to atomic number variations within a specimen. The imaging and analytical capabilities in the SEM were further complemented by higher resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and scanning Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) data to give reliable and high-resolution information about nanoparticles and their binding to cell surface antigens.

  7. Automatic extraction of nuclei centroids of mouse embryonic cells from fluorescence microscopy images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Khayrul Bashar

    Full Text Available Accurate identification of cell nuclei and their tracking using three dimensional (3D microscopic images is a demanding task in many biological studies. Manual identification of nuclei centroids from images is an error-prone task, sometimes impossible to accomplish due to low contrast and the presence of noise. Nonetheless, only a few methods are available for 3D bioimaging applications, which sharply contrast with 2D analysis, where many methods already exist. In addition, most methods essentially adopt segmentation for which a reliable solution is still unknown, especially for 3D bio-images having juxtaposed cells. In this work, we propose a new method that can directly extract nuclei centroids from fluorescence microscopy images. This method involves three steps: (i Pre-processing, (ii Local enhancement, and (iii Centroid extraction. The first step includes two variations: first variation (Variant-1 uses the whole 3D pre-processed image, whereas the second one (Variant-2 modifies the preprocessed image to the candidate regions or the candidate hybrid image for further processing. At the second step, a multiscale cube filtering is employed in order to locally enhance the pre-processed image. Centroid extraction in the third step consists of three stages. In Stage-1, we compute a local characteristic ratio at every voxel and extract local maxima regions as candidate centroids using a ratio threshold. Stage-2 processing removes spurious centroids from Stage-1 results by analyzing shapes of intensity profiles from the enhanced image. An iterative procedure based on the nearest neighborhood principle is then proposed to combine if there are fragmented nuclei. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses on a set of 100 images of 3D mouse embryo are performed. Investigations reveal a promising achievement of the technique presented in terms of average sensitivity and precision (i.e., 88.04% and 91.30% for Variant-1; 86.19% and 95.00% for Variant-2

  8. Quantification of plant cell coupling with three-dimensional photoactivation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesche, J; Schulz, A

    2012-07-01

    Plant cells are directly connected by plasmodesmata that form channels through the cell wall and enable the intercellular movement of cytosolic solutes, membrane lipids and signalling molecules. Transport through plasmodesmata is regulated not only by a fixed size-exclusion limit, but also by physiological and pathological adaptation. To understand plant cell communication, carbon allocation and pathogen attack, the capacities for a specific molecule to pass a specific cell-wall interface is an essential parameter. So far, the degree of cell coupling was derived from frequency and diameter of plasmodesmata in relevant tissues as assessed by electron microscopy of fixed material. However, plasmodesmata functionality and capacity can only be determined in live material, not from electron microscopy, which is static and prone to fixation artefacts. Plasmodesmata functionality was a few times assessed using fluorescent tracers with diffusion properties similar to cytosolic solutes. Here, we used three-dimensional photoactivation microscopy to quantify plasmodesmata-mediated cell-wall permeability between living Cucurbita maxima leaf mesophyll cells with caged fluorescein as tracer. For the first time, all necessary functional and anatomical data were gathered for each individual cell from three-dimensional time series. This approach utilized a confocal microscope equipped with resonant scanner, which provides the high acquisition speed necessary to record optical sections of whole cells and offers time resolution high enough to follow the kinetics of photoactivation. The results were compared to two-dimensional measurements, which are shown to give a good estimate of cell coupling adequate for homogenous tissues. The two-dimensional approach is limited whenever tissues interfaces are studied that couple different cell types with diverse cell geometries. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2011 Royal Microscopical Society.

  9. Methods for studying biofilm formation: flow cells and confocal laser scanning microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter methods for growing and analyzing biofilms under hydrodynamic conditions in flow cells are described. Use of flow cells allows for direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The flow in these chambers is essentially laminar, which means that the biofilms can be grown u......, inoculation of the flow cells, running of the system, confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis, and disassembly and cleaning of the system....

  10. Single Cell Oxygen Mapping (SCOM) by Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy Uncovers Heterogeneous Intracellular Oxygen Consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Carla Santana; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Bertotti, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    We developed a highly sensitive oxygen consumption scanning microscopy system using platinized platinum disc microelectrodes. The system is capable of reliably detecting single-cell respiration, responding to classical regulators of mitochondrial oxygen consumption activity as expected. Comparisons with commercial multi-cell oxygen detection systems show that the system has comparable errors (if not smaller), with the advantage of being able to monitor inter and intra-cell heterogeneity in ox...

  11. Comparative methods for PET image segmentation in pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva (Switzerland); Geneva University, Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Abdoli, Mehrsima [University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Fuentes, Carolina Llina [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva (Switzerland); Naqa, Issam M.El [McGill University, Department of Medical Physics, Montreal (Canada)

    2012-05-15

    Several methods have been proposed for the segmentation of {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in PET. In this study, we assessed the performance of four categories of {sup 18}F-FDG PET image segmentation techniques in pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma using clinical studies where the surgical specimen served as the benchmark. Nine PET image segmentation techniques were compared including: five thresholding methods; the level set technique (active contour); the stochastic expectation-maximization approach; fuzzy clustering-based segmentation (FCM); and a variant of FCM, the spatial wavelet-based algorithm (FCM-SW) which incorporates spatial information during the segmentation process, thus allowing the handling of uptake in heterogeneous lesions. These algorithms were evaluated using clinical studies in which the segmentation results were compared to the 3-D biological tumour volume (BTV) defined by histology in PET images of seven patients with T3-T4 laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma who underwent a total laryngectomy. The macroscopic tumour specimens were collected ''en bloc'', frozen and cut into 1.7- to 2-mm thick slices, then digitized for use as reference. The clinical results suggested that four of the thresholding methods and expectation-maximization overestimated the average tumour volume, while a contrast-oriented thresholding method, the level set technique and the FCM-SW algorithm underestimated it, with the FCM-SW algorithm providing relatively the highest accuracy in terms of volume determination (-5.9 {+-} 11.9%) and overlap index. The mean overlap index varied between 0.27 and 0.54 for the different image segmentation techniques. The FCM-SW segmentation technique showed the best compromise in terms of 3-D overlap index and statistical analysis results with values of 0.54 (0.26-0.72) for the overlap index. The BTVs delineated using the FCM-SW segmentation technique were seemingly the most accurate and approximated closely the 3-D BTVs

  12. Transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and confocal raman microscopic analysis of ultrastructural and compositional heterogeneity of Cornus alba L. wood cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianfeng; Ji, Zhe; Zhou, Xia; Zhang, Zhiheng; Xu, Feng

    2013-02-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorescence microscopy, and confocal Raman microscopy can be used to characterize ultrastructural and compositional heterogeneity of plant cell walls. In this study, TEM observations revealed the ultrastructural characterization of Cornus alba L. fiber, vessel, axial parenchyma, ray parenchyma, and pit membrane between cells, notably with the ray parenchyma consisting of two well-defined layers. Fluorescence microscopy evidenced that cell corner middle lamella was more lignified than adjacent compound middle lamella and secondary wall with variation in lignification level from cell to cell. In situ Raman images showed that the inhomogeneity in cell wall components (cellulose and lignin) among different cells and within morphologically distinct cell wall layers. As the significant precursors of lignin biosynthesis, the pattern of coniferyl alcohol and aldehyde (joint abbreviation Lignin-CAA for both structures) distribution in fiber cell wall was also identified by Raman images, with higher concentration occurring in the fiber secondary wall where there was the highest cellulose concentration. Moreover, noteworthy was the observation that higher concentration of lignin and very minor amounts of cellulose were visualized in the pit membrane areas. These complementary microanalytical methods provide more accurate and complete information with regard to ultrastructural and compositional characterization of plant cell walls.

  13. Parietal Epithelial Cells Participate in the Formation of Sclerotic Lesions in Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Bart; Kuppe, Christoph; Sicking, Eva-Maria; Fuss, Astrid; Jirak, Peggy; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Endlich, Karlhans; Wetzels, Jack F.M.; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Floege, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the development of sclerotic lesions in focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) remains unknown. Here, we selectively tagged podocytes or parietal epithelial cells (PECs) to determine whether PECs contribute to sclerosis. In three distinct models of FSGS (5/6-nephrectomy + DOCA-salt; the murine transgenic chronic Thy1.1 model; or the MWF rat) and in human biopsies, the primary injury to induce FSGS associated with focal activation of PECs and the formation of cellular adhesions to the capillary tuft. From this entry site, activated PECs invaded the affected segment of the glomerular tuft and deposited extracellular matrix. Within the affected segment, podocytes were lost and mesangial sclerosis developed within the endocapillary compartment. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that PECs contribute to the development and progression of the sclerotic lesions that define FSGS, but this pathogenesis may be relevant to all etiologies of glomerulosclerosis. PMID:21719782

  14. Fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Michael J; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D

    2014-10-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  15. Digital Holographic Microscopy: Quantitative Phase Imaging and Applications in Live Cell Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Björn; Langehanenberg, Patrik; Kosmeier, Sebastian; Schlichthaber, Frank; Remmersmann, Christian; von Bally, Gert; Rommel, Christina; Dierker, Christian; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    The analysis of complex processes in living cells creates a high demand for fast and label-free methods for online monitoring. Widely used fluorescence methods require specific labeling and are often restricted to chemically fixated samples. Thus, methods that offer label-free and minimally invasive detection of live cell processes and cell state alterations are of particular interest. In combination with light microscopy, digital holography provides label-free, multi-focus quantitative phase imaging of living cells. In overview, several methods for digital holographic microscopy (DHM) are presented. First, different experimental setups for the recording of digital holograms and the modular integration of DHM into common microscopes are described. Then the numerical processing of digitally captured holograms is explained. This includes the description of spatial and temporal phase shifting techniques, spatial filtering based reconstruction, holographic autofocusing, and the evaluation of self-interference holograms. Furthermore, the usage of partial coherent light and multi-wavelength approaches is discussed. Finally, potentials of digital holographic microscopy for quantitative cell imaging are illustrated by results from selected applications. It is shown that DHM can be used for automated tracking of migrating cells and cell thickness monitoring as well as for refractive index determination of cells and particles. Moreover, the use of DHM for label-free analysis in fluidics and micro-injection monitoring is demonstrated. The results show that DHM is a highly relevant method that allows novel insights in dynamic cell biology, with applications in cancer research and for drugs and toxicity testing.

  16. Localizing Proteins in Fixed Giardia lamblia and Live Cultured Mammalian Cells by Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyindodo-Ogari, Lilian; Schwartzbach, Steven D; Skalli, Omar; Estraño, Carlos E

    2016-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) are complementary methods for studying the intracellular localization of proteins. Confocal fluorescence microscopy provides a rapid and technically simple method to identify the organelle in which a protein localizes but only EM can identify the suborganellular compartment in which that protein is present. Confocal fluorescence microscopy, however, can provide information not obtainable by EM but required to understand the dynamics and interactions of specific proteins. In addition, confocal fluorescence microscopy of cells transfected with a construct encoding a protein of interest fused to a fluorescent protein tag allows live cell studies of the subcellular localization of that protein and the monitoring in real time of its trafficking. Immunostaining methods for confocal fluorescence microscopy are also faster and less involved than those for EM allowing rapid optimization of the antibody dilution needed and a determination of whether protein antigenicity is maintained under fixation conditions used for EM immunogold labeling. This chapter details a method to determine by confocal fluorescence microscopy the intracellular localization of a protein by transfecting the organism of interest, in this case Giardia lamblia, with the cDNA encoding the protein of interest and then processing these organisms for double label immunofluorescence staining after chemical fixation. Also presented is a method to identify the organelle targeting information in the presequence of a precursor protein, in this case the presequence of the precursor to the Euglena light harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein of photosystem II precursor (pLHCPII), using live cell imaging of mammalian COS7 cells transiently transfected with a plasmid encoding a pLHCPII presequence fluorescent protein fusion and stained with organelle-specific fluorescent dyes.

  17. Visual-servoing optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Daniel E.; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-06-09

    The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time: quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

  18. Label free imaging of cell-substrate contacts by holographic total internal reflection microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandracchia, Biagio; Gennari, Oriella; Marchesano, Valentina; Paturzo, Melania; Ferraro, Pietro

    2017-09-01

    The study of cell adhesion contacts is pivotal to understand cell mechanics and interaction at substrates or chemical and physical stimuli. We designed and built a HoloTIR microscope for label-free quantitative phase imaging of total internal reflection. Here we show for the first time that HoloTIR is a good choice for label-free study of focal contacts and of cell/substrate interaction as its sensitivity is enhanced in comparison with standard TIR microscopy. Finally, the simplicity of implementation and relative low cost, due to the requirement of less optical components, make HoloTIR a reasonable alternative, or even an addition, to TIRF microscopy for mapping cell/substratum topography. As a proof of concept, we studied the formation of focal contacts of fibroblasts on three substrates with different levels of affinity for cell adhesion. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Label-free and live cell imaging by interferometric scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Sung; Lee, Il-Buem; Moon, Hyeon-Min; Joo, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Kyoung-Hoon; Hong, Seok-Cheol; Cho, Minhaeng

    2018-03-14

    Despite recent remarkable advances in microscopic techniques, it still remains very challenging to directly observe the complex structure of cytoplasmic organelles in live cells without a fluorescent label. Here we report label-free and live-cell imaging of mammalian cell, Escherischia coli , and yeast, using interferometric scattering microscopy, which reveals the underlying structures of a variety of cytoplasmic organelles as well as the underside structure of the cells. The contact areas of the cells attached onto a glass substrate, e.g. , focal adhesions and filopodia, are clearly discernible. We also found a variety of fringe-like features in the cytoplasmic area, which may reflect the folded structures of cytoplasmic organelles. We thus anticipate that the label-free interferometric scattering microscopy can be used as a powerful tool to shed interferometric light on in vivo structures and dynamics of various intracellular phenomena.

  20. Robust and automated three-dimensional segmentation of densely packed cell nuclei in different biological specimens with Lines-of-Sight decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, B; Schmitz, A; Muñoz-Descalzo, S; Ansari, N; Pampaloni, F; Stelzer, E H K; Fischer, S C

    2015-06-08

    Due to the large amount of data produced by advanced microscopy, automated image analysis is crucial in modern biology. Most applications require reliable cell nuclei segmentation. However, in many biological specimens cell nuclei are densely packed and appear to touch one another in the images. Therefore, a major difficulty of three-dimensional cell nuclei segmentation is the decomposition of cell nuclei that apparently touch each other. Current methods are highly adapted to a certain biological specimen or a specific microscope. They do not ensure similarly accurate segmentation performance, i.e. their robustness for different datasets is not guaranteed. Hence, these methods require elaborate adjustments to each dataset. We present an advanced three-dimensional cell nuclei segmentation algorithm that is accurate and robust. Our approach combines local adaptive pre-processing with decomposition based on Lines-of-Sight (LoS) to separate apparently touching cell nuclei into approximately convex parts. We demonstrate the superior performance of our algorithm using data from different specimens recorded with different microscopes. The three-dimensional images were recorded with confocal and light sheet-based fluorescence microscopes. The specimens are an early mouse embryo and two different cellular spheroids. We compared the segmentation accuracy of our algorithm with ground truth data for the test images and results from state-of-the-art methods. The analysis shows that our method is accurate throughout all test datasets (mean F-measure: 91%) whereas the other methods each failed for at least one dataset (F-measure≤69%). Furthermore, nuclei volume measurements are improved for LoS decomposition. The state-of-the-art methods required laborious adjustments of parameter values to achieve these results. Our LoS algorithm did not require parameter value adjustments. The accurate performance was achieved with one fixed set of parameter values. We developed a novel and

  1. Mathematical imaging methods for mitosis analysis in live-cell phase contrast microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grah, Joana Sarah; Harrington, Jennifer Alison; Koh, Siang Boon; Pike, Jeremy Andrew; Schreiner, Alexander; Burger, Martin; Schönlieb, Carola-Bibiane; Reichelt, Stefanie

    2017-02-15

    In this paper we propose a workflow to detect and track mitotic cells in time-lapse microscopy image sequences. In order to avoid the requirement for cell lines expressing fluorescent markers and the associated phototoxicity, phase contrast microscopy is often preferred over fluorescence microscopy in live-cell imaging. However, common specific image characteristics complicate image processing and impede use of standard methods. Nevertheless, automated analysis is desirable due to manual analysis being subjective, biased and extremely time-consuming for large data sets. Here, we present the following workflow based on mathematical imaging methods. In the first step, mitosis detection is performed by means of the circular Hough transform. The obtained circular contour subsequently serves as an initialisation for the tracking algorithm based on variational methods. It is sub-divided into two parts: in order to determine the beginning of the whole mitosis cycle, a backwards tracking procedure is performed. After that, the cell is tracked forwards in time until the end of mitosis. As a result, the average of mitosis duration and ratios of different cell fates (cell death, no division, division into two or more daughter cells) can be measured and statistics on cell morphologies can be obtained. All of the tools are featured in the user-friendly MATLAB®Graphical User Interface MitosisAnalyser. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Segmentation of white blood cells and comparison of cell morphology by linear and naïve Bayes classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinyakupt, Jaroonrut; Pluempitiwiriyawej, Charnchai

    2015-06-30

    Blood smear microscopic images are routinely investigated by haematologists to diagnose most blood diseases. However, the task is quite tedious and time consuming. An automatic detection and classification of white blood cells within such images can accelerate the process tremendously. In this paper we propose a system to locate white blood cells within microscopic blood smear images, segment them into nucleus and cytoplasm regions, extract suitable features and finally, classify them into five types: basophil, eosinophil, neutrophil, lymphocyte and monocyte. Two sets of blood smear images were used in this study's experiments. Dataset 1, collected from Rangsit University, were normal peripheral blood slides under light microscope with 100× magnification; 555 images with 601 white blood cells were captured by a Nikon DS-Fi2 high-definition color camera and saved in JPG format of size 960 × 1,280 pixels at 15 pixels per 1 μm resolution. In dataset 2, 477 cropped white blood cell images were downloaded from CellaVision.com. They are in JPG format of size 360 × 363 pixels. The resolution is estimated to be 10 pixels per 1 μm. The proposed system comprises a pre-processing step, nucleus segmentation, cell segmentation, feature extraction, feature selection and classification. The main concept of the segmentation algorithm employed uses white blood cell's morphological properties and the calibrated size of a real cell relative to image resolution. The segmentation process combined thresholding, morphological operation and ellipse curve fitting. Consequently, several features were extracted from the segmented nucleus and cytoplasm regions. Prominent features were then chosen by a greedy search algorithm called sequential forward selection. Finally, with a set of selected prominent features, both linear and naïve Bayes classifiers were applied for performance comparison. This system was tested on normal peripheral blood smear slide images from two datasets. Two sets

  3. 3D measurements of live cells via digital holographic microscopy and terahertz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Yong; Oser, Dorian; Iapozzuto, Peter; Norbury, Sean; Mahajan, Supriya; Khmaladze, Alexander; Sharikova, Anna

    2016-03-01

    This is a study of the central nervous system (CNS) cells, including brain micro vascular endothelial cells (BMV) that constitute the blood brain barrier, and C6 glial cells that are the predominant cell in the brain. The cells are exposed to various chemicals by non-invasive, label-free methods. Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is a technique that records an interference pattern between an object and reference waves, so that the computationally reconstructed holographic image contains both amplitude and phase information, and 3D images are obtained. The measurement of cell cultures by digital holographic microscopy yields information about cell death mechanisms, since these processes are correlated with individual cell volume. Our in-house DHM combines a visible (red) laser source with a conventional microscope base, and LabVIEW-run data processing. Terahertz spectral signatures are associated with structural changes in molecules and provide complementary information about cells. Both CNS cells BMV and C6 cells are treated with the drug "Methamphetamine" (METH), which induces apoptosis in neuronal cells and exhibits decrease in cell volume, a characteristic of cells undergoing apoptosis (induced cell death). METH can cause CNS cell death by cross-talk between mitochondria-, endoplasmic reticulum-, and receptor-mediated apoptotic events, all of which results in drug induced changes in neuroplasticity and significant neuropathology. Doxorubicin (DOX), a popular anticancer drug, is used as a control. We observe that METH treatment resulted in more pronounced cell volume shrinkage in both the BMV and C6 cells, as compared to DOX-induced cell apoptosis.

  4. A workflow to process 3D+time microscopy images of developing organisms and reconstruct their cell lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Emmanuel; Savy, Thierry; Rizzi, Barbara; Melani, Camilo; Stašová, Olga; Fabrèges, Dimitri; Špir, Róbert; Hammons, Mark; Čúnderlík, Róbert; Recher, Gaëlle; Lombardot, Benoît; Duloquin, Louise; Colin, Ingrid; Kollár, Jozef; Desnoulez, Sophie; Affaticati, Pierre; Maury, Benoît; Boyreau, Adeline; Nief, Jean-Yves; Calvat, Pascal; Vernier, Philippe; Frain, Monique; Lutfalla, Georges; Kergosien, Yannick; Suret, Pierre; Remešíková, Mariana; Doursat, René; Sarti, Alessandro; Mikula, Karol; Peyriéras, Nadine; Bourgine, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative and systematic analysis of embryonic cell dynamics from in vivo 3D+time image data sets is a major challenge at the forefront of developmental biology. Despite recent breakthroughs in the microscopy imaging of living systems, producing an accurate cell lineage tree for any developing organism remains a difficult task. We present here the BioEmergences workflow integrating all reconstruction steps from image acquisition and processing to the interactive visualization of reconstructed data. Original mathematical methods and algorithms underlie image filtering, nucleus centre detection, nucleus and membrane segmentation, and cell tracking. They are demonstrated on zebrafish, ascidian and sea urchin embryos with stained nuclei and membranes. Subsequent validation and annotations are carried out using Mov-IT, a custom-made graphical interface. Compared with eight other software tools, our workflow achieved the best lineage score. Delivered in standalone or web service mode, BioEmergences and Mov-IT offer a unique set of tools for in silico experimental embryology. PMID:26912388

  5. Scanning ion conductance microscopy for visualizing the three-dimensional surface topography of cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Masato; Mizutani, Yusuke; Iwata, Futoshi; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2018-01-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM), which belongs to the family of scanning probe microscopy, regulates the tip-sample distance by monitoring the ion current through the use of an electrolyte-filled nanopipette as the probing tip. Thus, SICM enables "contact-free" imaging of cell surface topography in liquid conditions. In this paper, we applied hopping mode SICM for obtaining topographical images of convoluted tissue samples such as trachea and kidney in phosphate buffered saline. Some of the SICM images were compared with the images obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after drying the same samples. We showed that the imaging quality of hopping mode SICM was excellent enough for investigating the three-dimensional surface structure of the soft tissue samples. Thus, SICM is expected to be used for imaging a wide variety of cells and tissues - either fixed or alive- at high resolution under physiologically relevant liquid conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cystine uptake by cultured cells originating from dog proximal tubule segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    States, B.; Reynolds, R.; Lee, J.; Segal, S.

    1990-01-01

    Large numbers of kidney epithelial cells were cultured successfully from isolated dog proximal tubule segments. Cells in primary culture and in first passage retained the cystine-dibasic amino acid co-transporter system which is found in vivo and in freshly isolated proximal tubule segments. In contrast to other cultured cells, the cystine-glutamate anti-porter was absent in primary cultures. However, this anti-porter system seemed to be developing in cells in first passage. The intracellular ratio of cysteine:reduced glutathione (CSH:GSH) was maintained at 1:36 in both primary cultures and in low passage cells. Incubation of cells in primary culture for 5 min at 37 degrees C with 0.025 mM [ 35 S]L-cystine resulted in incorporation of approximately 36 and 8.5% of the label into intracellular CSH and GSH, respectively. These cultured cells, therefore, seem to be an excellent model system for the eventual elucidation of (a) the inticacies of cystine metabolism and (b) regulation of (1) the cystine-dibasic amino acid co-transporter system and (2) the development of the cysteine-glutamate anti-porter system

  7. Analysis of cell-tissue grafts under weightless conditions using confocal fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volova, L. T.; Milyakova, M. N.; Rossinskaya, V. V.; Boltovskaya, V. V.; Kulagina, L. N.; Kurganskaya, L. V.; Timchenko, P. E.; Timchenko, E. V.; Zherdeva Taskina, Larisa A.

    2015-03-01

    The research results of monitoring of viable cells in a cellular-tissue graft using confocal laser fluorescence microscopy at 488 nm and 561 nm with the use of fluorophore propidium iodide (propidium iodide, PI Sigma Aldrich USA) are presented. The processing of the received images was carried out using the software ANDOR. It is experimentally shown that the method of confocal fluorescence microscopy is one of the informational methods for detecting cells populated in a 3-D bio-carrier with a resolution of at least 400 nm. Analysis of the received micrographs suggests that the cells that were in a bio-carrier for 30 days in a synchronous ground-based experiment retained their viability compared to a similar space-based experiment in which the cells were hardly detected in a bio-carrier.

  8. Confocal Raman microscopy to monitor extracellular matrix during dental pulp stem cells differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Hamideh; Collart-Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves; Gergely, Csilla; Cuisinier, Frédéric J. G.

    2015-07-01

    Regenerative medicine brings promising applications for mesenchymal stem cells, such as dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Confocal Raman microscopy, a noninvasive technique, is used to study osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs. Integrated Raman intensities in the 2800 to 3000 cm-1 region (C-H stretching) and the 960 cm-1 peak (ν1 PO43-) were collected (to image cells and phosphate, respectively), and the ratio of two peaks 1660 over 1690 cm-1 (amide I bands) to measure the collagen cross-linking has been calculated. Raman spectra of DPSCs after 21 days differentiation reveal several phosphate peaks: ν1 (first stretching mode) at 960 cm-1, ν2 at 430 cm-1, and ν4 at 585 cm-1 and collagen cross-linking can also be calculated. Confocal Raman microscopy enables monitoring osteogenic differentiation in vitro and can be a credible tool for clinical stem cell based research.

  9. Refractive index sensing of green fluorescent proteins in living cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; van den Berg, Timo K; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91(phox), which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH

  10. In vivo Diagnosis of Basal Cell Carcinoma Subtype by Reflectance Confocal Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peppelman, M.; Wolberink, E.A.W.; Blokx, W.A.M.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Erp, P.E.J. van; Gerritsen, M.J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a noninvasive imaging technique. Currently, RCM is mainly used for the diagnosis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer including basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Until now, it has not been possible to distinguish between subtypes of BCC using RCM.

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of confocal microscopy imaging vs. punch biopsy for diagnosing and subtyping basal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadouch, D. J.; Leeflang, M. M.; Elshot, Y. S.; Longo, C.; Ulrich, M.; van der Wal, A. C.; Wolkerstorfer, A.; Bekkenk, M. W.; de Rie, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundIn vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a promising non-invasive skin imaging technique that could facilitate early diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) instead of routine punch biopsies. However, the clinical value and utility of RCM vs. a punch biopsy in diagnosing and

  12. Imaging modes of atomic force microscopy for application in molecular and cell biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dufrêne, Yves F.; Ando, Toshio; Garcia, Ricardo; Alsteens, David; Martinez-Martin, David; Engel, A.H.; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful, multifunctional imaging platform that allows biological samples, from single molecules to living cells, to be visualized and manipulated. Soon after the instrument was invented, it was recognized that in order to maximize the opportunities of AFM

  13. Label-free nonlinear optical microscopy detects early markers for osteogenic differentiation of human stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofemeier, Arne D.; Hachmeister, Henning; Pilger, Christian; Schürmann, Matthias; Greiner, Johannes F. W.; Nolte, Lena; Sudhoff, Holger; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Huser, Thomas; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    Tissue engineering by stem cell differentiation is a novel treatment option for bone regeneration. Most approaches for the detection of osteogenic differentiation are invasive or destructive and not compatible with live cell analysis. Here, non-destructive and label-free approaches of Raman spectroscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy were used to detect and image osteogenic differentiation of human neural crest-derived inferior turbinate stem cells (ITSCs). Combined CARS and SHG microscopy was able to detect markers of osteogenesis within 14 days after osteogenic induction. This process increased during continued differentiation. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy showed significant increases of the PO43- symmetric stretch vibrations at 959 cm-1 assigned to calcium hydroxyapatite between days 14 and 21. Additionally, CARS microscopy was able to image calcium hydroxyapatite deposits within 14 days following osteogenic induction, which was confirmed by Alizarin Red-Staining and RT- PCR. Taken together, the multimodal label-free analysis methods Raman spectroscopy, CARS and SHG microscopy can monitor osteogenic differentiation of adult human stem cells into osteoblasts with high sensitivity and spatial resolution in three dimensions. Our findings suggest a great potential of these optical detection methods for clinical applications including in vivo observation of bone tissue-implant-interfaces or disease diagnosis.

  14. Single cell adhesion strength assessed with variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelina Cardoso Dos Santos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new strategy to evaluate adhesion strength at the single cell level. This approach involves variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to monitor in real time the topography of cell membranes, i.e. a map of the membrane/substrate separation distance. According to the Boltzmann distribution, both potential energy profile and dissociation energy related to the interactions between the cell membrane and the substrate were determined from the membrane topography. We have highlighted on glass substrates coated with poly-L-lysine and fibronectin, that the dissociation energy is a reliable parameter to quantify the adhesion strength of MDA-MB-231 motile cells.

  15. In vivo imaging of cell nuclei by photoacoustic microscopy without staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Da-Kang; Chen, Ruimin; Maslov, Konstantin; Zhou, Qifa; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    Ultraviolet photoacoustic microscopy (UVPAM) can image cell nuclei in vivo with high contrast and resolution noninvasively without staining. Here, we used UV light at wavelengths of 210-310 nm for excitation of DNA and RNA to produce photoacoustic waves. We applied the UVPAM to in vivo imaging of cell nuclei in mouse skin, and obtained UVPAM images of the unstained cell nuclei at wavelengths of 245-282 nm as ultrasound gel was used for acoustic coupling. The largest ratio of contrast to noise was found for the images of cell nuclei at a 250 nm wavelength.

  16. [The segmentation of urinary cells--a first step in the automated processing in urine cytology (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedtke, C E; Aeikens, B

    1980-01-01

    By segmentation of cell images we understand the automated decomposition of microscopic cell scenes into nucleus, plasma and background. A segmentation is achieved by using information from the microscope image and prior knowledge about the content of the scene. Different algorithms have been investigated and applied to samples of urothelial cells. A particular algorithm based on a histogram approach which can be easily implemented in hardware is discussed in more detail.

  17. Correlation of Cell Surface Biomarker Expression Levels with Adhesion Contact Angle Measured by Lateral Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, Jenna A; Mace, Charles R

    2018-06-05

    Immunophenotyping is typically achieved using flow cytometry, but any influence a biomarker may have on adhesion or surface recognition cannot be determined concurrently. In this manuscript, we demonstrate the utility of lateral microscopy for correlating cell surface biomarker expression levels with quantitative descriptions of cell morphology. With our imaging system, we observed single cells from two T cell lines and two B cell lines adhere to antibody-coated substrates and quantified this adhesion using contact angle measurements. We found that SUP-T1 and CEM CD4+ cells, both of which express similar levels of CD4, experienced average changes in contact angle that were not statistically different from one another on surfaces coated in anti-CD4. However, MAVER-1 and BJAB K20 cells, both of which express different levels of CD20, underwent average changes in contact angle that were significantly different from one another on surfaces coated in anti-CD20. Our results indicate that changes in cell contact angles on antibody-coated substrates reflect the expression levels of corresponding antigens on the surfaces of cells as determined by flow cytometry. Our lateral microscopy approach offers a more reproducible and quantitative alternative to evaluate adhesion compared to commonly used wash assays and can be extended to many additional immunophenotyping applications to identify cells of interest within heterogeneous populations.

  18. [Revealing the chemical changes of tea cell wall induced by anthracnose with confocal Raman microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-li; Luo, Liu-bin; Hu, Xiao-qian; Lou, Bing-gan; He, Yong

    2014-06-01

    Healthy tea and tea infected by anthracnose were first studied by confocal Raman microscopy to illustrate chemical changes of cell wall in the present paper. Firstly, Raman spectra of both healthy and infected sample tissues were collected with spatial resolution at micron-level, and ultrastructure of healthy and infected tea cells was got from scanning electron microscope. These results showed that there were significant changes in Raman shift and Raman intensity between healthy and infected cell walls, indicating that great differences occurred in chemical compositions of cell walls between healthy and infected samples. In details, intensities at many Raman bands which were closely associated with cellulose, pectin, esters were reduced after infection, revealing that the content of chemical compounds such as cellulose, pectin, esters was decreased after infection. Subsequently, chemical imaging of both healthy and infected tea cell walls were realized based on Raman fingerprint spectra of cellulose and microscopic spatial structure. It was found that not only the content of cellulose was reduced greatly after infection, but also the ordered structure of cellulose was destroyed by anthracnose infection. Thus, confocal Raman microscopy was shown to be a powerful tool to detect the chemical changes in cell wall of tea caused by anthracnose without any chemical treatment or staining. This research firstly applied confocal Raman microscopy in phytopathology for the study of interactive relationship between host and pathogen, and it will also open a new way for intensive study of host-pathogen at cellular level.

  19. Cell differentiation in cardiac myxomas: confocal microscopy and gene expression analysis after laser capture microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucci, Angela; Mattioli, Claudia; Matteucci, Marco; Lorenzini, Daniele; Panvini, Francesca; Pacini, Simone; Ippolito, Chiara; Celiento, Michele; De Martino, Andrea; Dolfi, Amelio; Belgio, Beatrice; Bortolotti, Uberto; Basolo, Fulvio; Bartoloni, Giovanni

    2018-05-22

    Cardiac myxomas are rare tumors with a heterogeneous cell population including properly neoplastic (lepidic), endothelial and smooth muscle cells. The assessment of neoplastic (lepidic) cell differentiation pattern is rather difficult using conventional light microscopy immunohistochemistry and/or whole tissue extracts for mRNA analyses. In a preliminary study, we investigated 20 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded cardiac myxomas by means of conventional immunohistochemistry; in 10/20 cases, cell differentiation was also analyzed by real-time RT-PCR after laser capture microdissection of the neoplastic cells, whereas calretinin and endothelial antigen CD31 immunoreactivity was localized in 4/10 cases by double immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. Gene expression analyses of α-smooth muscle actin, endothelial CD31 antigen, alpha-cardiac actin, matrix metalloprotease-2 (MMP2) and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloprotease-1 (TIMP1) was performed on cDNA obtained from either microdissected neoplastic cells or whole tumor sections. We found very little or absent CD31 and α-Smooth Muscle Actin expression in the microdissected cells as compared to the whole tumors, whereas TIMP1 and MMP2 genes were highly expressed in both ones, greater levels being found in patients with embolic phenomena. α-Cardiac Actin was not detected. Confocal microscopy disclosed two different signals corresponding to calretinin-positive myxoma cells and to endothelial CD31-positive cells, respectively. In conclusion, the neoplastic (lepidic) cells showed a distinct gene expression pattern and no consistent overlapping with endothelial and smooth muscle cells or cardiac myocytes; the expression of TIMP1 and MMP2 might be related to clinical presentation; larger series studies using also systematic transcriptome analysis might be useful to confirm the present results.

  20. Investigation of adhesion and mechanical properties of human glioma cells by single cell force spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfi, Laura; Bourkoula, Eugenia; Migliorini, Elisa; Palma, Anita; Pucer, Anja; Skrap, Miran; Scoles, Giacinto; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Cesselli, Daniela; Lazzarino, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Active cell migration and invasion is a peculiar feature of glioma that makes this tumor able to rapidly infiltrate into the surrounding brain tissue. In our recent work, we identified a novel class of glioma-associated-stem cells (defined as GASC for high-grade glioma--HG--and Gasc for low-grade glioma--LG) that, although not tumorigenic, act supporting the biological aggressiveness of glioma-initiating stem cells (defined as GSC for HG and Gsc for LG) favoring also their motility. Migrating cancer cells undergo considerable molecular and cellular changes by remodeling their cytoskeleton and cell interactions with surrounding environment. To get a better understanding about the role of the glioma-associated-stem cells in tumor progression, cell deformability and interactions between glioma-initiating stem cells and glioma-associated-stem cells were investigated. Adhesion of HG/LG-cancer cells on HG/LG-glioma-associated stem cells was studied by time-lapse microscopy, while cell deformability and cell-cell adhesion strengths were quantified by indentation measurements by atomic force microscopy and single cell force spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate that for both HG and LG glioma, cancer-initiating-stem cells are softer than glioma-associated-stem cells, in agreement with their neoplastic features. The adhesion strength of GSC on GASC appears to be significantly lower than that observed for Gsc on Gasc. Whereas, GSC spread and firmly adhere on Gasc with an adhesion strength increased as compared to that obtained on GASC. These findings highlight that the grade of glioma-associated-stem cells plays an important role in modulating cancer cell adhesion, which could affect glioma cell migration, invasion and thus cancer aggressiveness. Moreover this work provides evidence about the importance of investigating cell adhesion and elasticity for new developments in disease diagnostics and therapeutics.

  1. Analysis of incomplete excisions of basal-cell carcinomas after breadloaf microscopy compared with 3D-microscopy: a prospective randomized and blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Alexandra; Adam, Patrick; Schnabl, Saskia; Häfner, Hans-Martin; Breuninger, Helmut

    2015-08-01

    Basal-cell carcinomas may show irregular, asymmetric subclinical growth. This study analyzed the efficacy of 'breadloaf' microscopy (serial sectioning) and three-dimensional (3D) microscopy in detecting positive tumor margins. Two hundred eighty-three (283) tumors (51.2%) were put into the breadloaf microscopy group; 270 tumors (48.8%) into the 3D microscopy group. The position of any detected tumor outgrowths was identified in clock face fashion. The time required for cutting and embedding the specimens and the examination of the microscopic slides was measured. Patient/tumor characteristics and surgical margins did not differ significantly. Tumor outgrowths at the excision margin were found in 62 of 283 cases (21.9%) in the breadloaf microscopy group and in 115 of 270 cases (42.6%) in the 3D microscopy group, constituting a highly significant difference (p < 0.001). This difference held true with incomplete excision of fibrosing (infiltrative/sclerosing/morpheaform) tumors [32.9% in the breadloaf microscopy group and 57.5% in the 3D microscopy group (p = 0.003)] and also with solid (nodular) tumors [16.1 and 34.2%, respectively (p < 0.001)]. The mean overall examination time required showed no important difference. In summary, for detection of tumor outgrowths, 3D microscopy has almost twice the sensitivity of breadloaf microscopy, particularly in the situation of aggressive/infiltrative carcinomas. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Application of oblique plane microscopy to high speed live cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Wilding, Dean; Sikkel, Markus B.; Lyon, Alexander R.; MacLeod, Ken T.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-07-01

    Oblique Plane Microscopy (OPM) is a light sheet microscopy technique that combines oblique illumination with correction optics that tilt the focal plane of the collection system. OPM can be used to image conventionally mounted specimens on coverslips or tissue culture dishes and has low out-of-plane photobleaching and phototoxicity. No moving parts are required to achieve an optically sectioned image and so high speed optically sectioned imaging is possible. We present high speed 2D and 3D optically sectioned OPM imaging of live cells using a high NA water immersion lens.

  3. Study of Image Analysis Algorithms for Segmentation, Feature Extraction and Classification of Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Gamarra

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in microcopy and improvements in image processing algorithms have allowed the development of computer-assisted analytical approaches in cell identification. Several applications could be mentioned in this field: Cellular phenotype identification, disease detection and treatment, identifying virus entry in cells and virus classification; these applications could help to complement the opinion of medical experts. Although many surveys have been presented in medical image analysis, they focus mainly in tissues and organs and none of the surveys about image cells consider an analysis following the stages in the typical image processing: Segmentation, feature extraction and classification. The goal of this study is to provide comprehensive and critical analyses about the trends in each stage of cell image processing. In this paper, we present a literature survey about cell identification using different image processing techniques.

  4. Wide-field fluorescent microscopy and fluorescent imaging flow cytometry on a cell-phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-04-11

    Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry are widely used tools in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. However these devices are in general relatively bulky and costly, making them less effective in the resource limited settings. To potentially address these limitations, we have recently demonstrated the integration of wide-field fluorescent microscopy and imaging flow cytometry tools on cell-phones using compact, light-weight, and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments. In our flow cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are flushed through a microfluidic channel that is positioned above the existing cell-phone camera unit. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the side of this microfluidic chip, which effectively acts as a multi-mode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to uniformly excite the fluorescent targets. The cell-phone camera records a time lapse movie of the fluorescent cells flowing through the microfluidic channel, where the digital frames of this movie are processed to count the number of the labeled cells within the target solution of interest. Using a similar opto-fluidic design, we can also image these fluorescently labeled cells in static mode by e.g. sandwiching the fluorescent particles between two glass slides and capturing their fluorescent images using the cell-phone camera, which can achieve a spatial resolution of e.g. - 10 μm over a very large field-of-view of - 81 mm(2). This cell-phone based fluorescent imaging flow cytometry and microscopy platform might be useful especially in resource limited settings, for e.g. counting of CD4+ T cells toward monitoring of HIV+ patients or for detection of water-borne parasites in drinking water.

  5. A new image correction method for live cell atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Y; Sun, J L; Zhang, A; Hu, J; Xu, L X

    2007-01-01

    During live cell imaging via atomic force microscopy (AFM), the interactions between the AFM probe and the membrane yield distorted cell images. In this work, an image correction method was developed based on the force-distance curve and the modified Hertzian model. The normal loading and lateral forces exerted on the cell membrane by the AFM tip were both accounted for during the scanning. Two assumptions were made in modelling based on the experimental measurements: (1) the lateral force on the endothelial cells was linear to the height; (2) the cell membrane Young's modulus could be derived from the displacement measurement of a normal force curve. Results have shown that the model could be used to recover up to 30% of the actual cell height depending on the loading force. The accuracy of the model was also investigated with respect to the loading force and mechanical property of the cell membrane

  6. A new image correction method for live cell atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Y; Sun, J L; Zhang, A; Hu, J; Xu, L X [College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2007-04-21

    During live cell imaging via atomic force microscopy (AFM), the interactions between the AFM probe and the membrane yield distorted cell images. In this work, an image correction method was developed based on the force-distance curve and the modified Hertzian model. The normal loading and lateral forces exerted on the cell membrane by the AFM tip were both accounted for during the scanning. Two assumptions were made in modelling based on the experimental measurements: (1) the lateral force on the endothelial cells was linear to the height; (2) the cell membrane Young's modulus could be derived from the displacement measurement of a normal force curve. Results have shown that the model could be used to recover up to 30% of the actual cell height depending on the loading force. The accuracy of the model was also investigated with respect to the loading force and mechanical property of the cell membrane.

  7. Probing living bacterial adhesion by single cell force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Regina, Viduthalai R.

    be considered. We have therefore developed a simple and versatile method to make single-cell bacterial probes for measuring single cell adhesion with atomic force microscopy (AFM).[1] A single-cell probe was readily made by picking up a bacterial cell from a glass surface using a tipless AFM cantilever coated...... random immobilization is obtained by submerging the cantilever in a bacterial suspension. The reported method provides a general platform for investigating single cell interactions of bacteria with different surfaces and other cells by AFM force spectroscopy, thus improving our understanding....... The strain-dependent susceptibility to bacterial colonization on conventional PLL-g-PEG illustrates how bacterial diversity challenges development of “universal” antifouling coatings, and AFM single-cell force spectroscopy was proven to be a powerful tool to provide insights into the molecular mechanisms...

  8. Mechanical properties of cancer cells depend on number of passages: Atomic force microscopy indentation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokukin, Maxim E.; Guz, Natalia V.; Sokolov, Igor

    2017-08-01

    Here we investigate one of the key questions in cell biology, if the properties of cell lines depend on the number of passages in-vitro. It is generally assumed that the change of cell properties (phenotypic drift) is insignificant when the number of passages is low (cell body and parameters of the pericellular brush layer from indentation force curves, which are recorded by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Using this method, we tested the change of the cell properties of human cancer breast epithelial cell line, MCF-7 (ATCC® HTB-22™), within the passages between 2 and 10. In contrast to the previous expectations, we observed a substantial transient change of the elastic modulus of the cell body during the first four passages (up to 4 times). The changes in the parameters of the pericellular coat were less dramatic (up to 2 times) but still statistically significant.

  9. A Microfluidic Platform for Correlative Live-Cell and Super-Resolution Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Johnny; Cordier, Guillaume Alan; Bálint, Štefan; Sandoval Álvarez, Ángel; Borbely, Joseph Steven; Lakadamyali, Melike

    2014-01-01

    Recently, super-resolution microscopy methods such as stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) have enabled visualization of subcellular structures below the optical resolution limit. Due to the poor temporal resolution, however, these methods have mostly been used to image fixed cells or dynamic processes that evolve on slow time-scales. In particular, fast dynamic processes and their relationship to the underlying ultrastructure or nanoscale protein organization cannot be discerned. To overcome this limitation, we have recently developed a correlative and sequential imaging method that combines live-cell and super-resolution microscopy. This approach adds dynamic background to ultrastructural images providing a new dimension to the interpretation of super-resolution data. However, currently, it suffers from the need to carry out tedious steps of sample preparation manually. To alleviate this problem, we implemented a simple and versatile microfluidic platform that streamlines the sample preparation steps in between live-cell and super-resolution imaging. The platform is based on a microfluidic chip with parallel, miniaturized imaging chambers and an automated fluid-injection device, which delivers a precise amount of a specified reagent to the selected imaging chamber at a specific time within the experiment. We demonstrate that this system can be used for live-cell imaging, automated fixation, and immunostaining of adherent mammalian cells in situ followed by STORM imaging. We further demonstrate an application by correlating mitochondrial dynamics, morphology, and nanoscale mitochondrial protein distribution in live and super-resolution images. PMID:25545548

  10. Probing the compressibility of tumor cell nuclei by combined atomic force-confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Marina; te Riet, Joost; Wolf, Katarina

    2013-12-01

    The cell nucleus is the largest and stiffest organelle rendering it the limiting compartment during migration of invasive tumor cells through dense connective tissue. We here describe a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)-confocal microscopy approach for measurement of bulk nuclear stiffness together with simultaneous visualization of the cantilever-nucleus contact and the fate of the cell. Using cantilevers functionalized with either tips or beads and spring constants ranging from 0.06-10 N m-1, force-deformation curves were generated from nuclear positions of adherent HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell populations at unchallenged integrity, and a nuclear stiffness range of 0.2 to 2.5 kPa was identified depending on cantilever type and the use of extended fitting models. Chromatin-decondensating agent trichostatin A (TSA) induced nuclear softening of up to 50%, demonstrating the feasibility of our approach. Finally, using a stiff bead-functionalized cantilever pushing at maximal system-intrinsic force, the nucleus was deformed to 20% of its original height which after TSA treatment reduced further to 5% remaining height confirming chromatin organization as an important determinant of nuclear stiffness. Thus, combined AFM-confocal microscopy is a feasible approach to study nuclear compressibility to complement concepts of limiting nuclear deformation in cancer cell invasion and other biological processes.

  11. Electrocatalytic activity mapping of model fuel cell catalyst films using scanning electrochemical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, P.G.; Zhou, S.; Hinds, G.; Wain, A.J.; Turnbull, A.

    2009-01-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy has been employed to spatially map the electrocatalytic activity of model proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) catalyst films towards the hydrogen oxidation reaction (the PEMFC anode reaction). The catalyst films were composed of platinum-loaded carbon nanoparticles, similar to those typically used in PEMFCs. The electrochemical characterisation was correlated with a detailed physical characterisation using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The nanoparticles were found to be reasonably mono-dispersed, with a tendency to agglomerate into porous bead-type structures when spun-cast. The number of carbon nanoparticles with little or no platinum was surprisingly higher than would be expected based on the platinum-carbon mass ratio. Furthermore, the platinum-rich carbon particles tended to agglomerate and the clusters formed were non-uniformly distributed. This morphology was reflected in a high degree of heterogeneity in the film activity towards the hydrogen oxidation reaction.

  12. Time-series observation of the spreading out of microvessel endothelial cells with atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Dong; Ma Wanyun; Liao Fulong; Yeh Meiling; Ouyang Zhigang; Sun Yunxu

    2003-01-01

    The spreading out of microvessel endothelial cells plays a key role in angiogenesis and the post-injury healing of endothelial cells. In our study, a physical force applied with an atomic force microscopic (AFM) cantilever tip in contact mode partly broke the peripheral adhesion that just-confluent cultured rat cerebral microvessel endothelial cells had formed with basal structures and resulted in the cells actively withdrawing from the stimulated area. Time-series changes in cell extension were imaged using tapping mode AFM, in conjunction with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, intensified charge-coupled device and field emission scanning electron microscopy. We also interpreted phase images of living endothelial cells. The results showed that formation of a fibronectin molecule monolayer is key to the spreading out of the cells. Lamellipods as well as filopods would spread out in temporal and spatial distribution following the formation of fibronectin layer. In addition, a lattice-like meshwork of filopods formed in the regions leading lamellipods, which would possibly provide a fulcrum for the filaments of the cytoskeleton within the leading cell body periphery

  13. Biological Atomic Force Microscopy for Imaging Gold-Labeled Liposomes on Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-María Zaske

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although atomic force microscopy (AFM has been used extensively to characterize cell membrane structure and cellular processes such as endocytosis and exocytosis, the corrugated surface of the cell membrane hinders the visualization of extracellular entities, such as liposomes, that may interact with the cell. To overcome this barrier, we used 90 nm nanogold particles to label FITC liposomes and monitor their endocytosis on human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs in vitro. We were able to study the internalization process of gold-coupled liposomes on endothelial cells, by using AFM. We found that the gold-liposomes attached to the HCAEC cell membrane during the first 15–30 min of incubation, liposome cell internalization occurred from 30 to 60 min, and most of the gold-labeled liposomes had invaginated after 2 hr of incubation. Liposomal uptake took place most commonly at the periphery of the nuclear zone. Dynasore monohydrate, an inhibitor of endocytosis, obstructed the internalization of the gold-liposomes. This study showed the versatility of the AFM technique, combined with fluorescent microscopy, for investigating liposome uptake by endothelial cells. The 90 nm colloidal gold nanoparticles proved to be a noninvasive contrast agent that efficiently improves AFM imaging during the investigation of biological nanoprocesses.

  14. Segmentation and abnormality detection of cervical cancer cells using fast elm with particle swarm optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukumar P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer arises when the anomalous cells on the cervix mature unmanageable obviously in the renovation sector. The most probably used methods to detect abnormal cervical cells are the routine and there is no difference between the abnormal and normal nuclei. So that the abnormal nuclei found are brown in color while normal nuclei are blue in color. The spread or cells are examined and the image denoising is performed based on the Iterative Decision Based Algorithm. Image Segmentation is the method of paneling a digital image into compound sections. The major utilize of segmentation is to abridge or modify the demonstration of an image. The images are segmented by applying anisotropic diffusion on the Denoised image. Image can be enhanced using dark stretching to increase the quality of the image. It separates the cells into all nuclei region and abnormal nuclei region. The abnormal nuclei regions are further classified into touching and non-touching regions and touching regions undergoes feature selection process. The existing Support Vector Machines (SVM is classified few nuclei regions but the time to taken for execution is high. The abnormality detected from the image is calculated as 45% from the total abnormal nuclei. Thus the proposed method of Fast Particle Swarm Optimization with Extreme Learning Machines (Fast PSO-ELM to classify all nuclei regions further into touching region and separated region. The iterative method for to training the ELM and make it more efficient than the SVM method. In experimental result, the proposed method of Fast PSO-ELM may shows the accuracy as above 90% and execution time is calculated based on the abnormality (ratio of abnormal nuclei regions to all nuclei regions image. Therefore, Fast PSO-ELM helps to detect the cervical cancer cells with maximum accuracy.

  15. Combination of Small Molecule Microarray and Confocal Microscopy Techniques for Live Cell Staining Fluorescent Dye Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Bokros

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Discovering new fluorochromes is significantly advanced by high-throughput screening (HTS methods. In the present study a combination of small molecule microarray (SMM prescreening and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM was developed in order to discover novel cell staining fluorescent dyes. Compounds with high native fluorescence were selected from a 14,585-member library and further tested on living cells under the microscope. Eleven compartment-specific, cell-permeable (or plasma membrane-targeted fluorochromes were identified. Their cytotoxicity was tested and found that between 1–10 micromolar range, they were non-toxic even during long-term incubations.

  16. Noninvasive characterization of the fission yeast cell cycle by monitoring dry mass with digital holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaz, Benjamin; Cano, Elena; Colomb, Tristan; Kühn, Jonas; Depeursinge, Christian; Simanis, Viesturs; Magistretti, Pierre J; Marquet, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Digital holography microscopy (DHM) is an optical technique which provides phase images yielding quantitative information about cell structure and cellular dynamics. Furthermore, the quantitative phase images allow the derivation of other parameters, including dry mass production, density, and spatial distribution. We have applied DHM to study the dry mass production rate and the dry mass surface density in wild-type and mutant fission yeast cells. Our study demonstrates the applicability of DHM as a tool for label-free quantitative analysis of the cell cycle and opens the possibility for its use in high-throughput screening.

  17. The influence of physical and physiological cues on atomic force microscopy-based cell stiffness assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Chiou

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy provides a novel technique for differentiating the mechanical properties of various cell types. Cell elasticity is abundantly used to represent the structural strength of cells in different conditions. In this study, we are interested in whether physical or physiological cues affect cell elasticity in Atomic force microscopy (AFM-based assessments. The physical cues include the geometry of the AFM tips, the indenting force and the operating temperature of the AFM. All of these cues show a significant influence on the cell elasticity assessment. Sharp AFM tips create a two-fold increase in the value of the effective Young's modulus (E(eff relative to that of the blunt tips. Higher indenting force at the same loading rate generates higher estimated cell elasticity. Increasing the operation temperature of the AFM leads to decreases in the cell stiffness because the structure of actin filaments becomes disorganized. The physiological cues include the presence of fetal bovine serum or extracellular matrix-coated surfaces, the culture passage number, and the culture density. Both fetal bovine serum and the extracellular matrix are critical for cells to maintain the integrity of actin filaments and consequently exhibit higher elasticity. Unlike primary cells, mouse kidney progenitor cells can be passaged and maintain their morphology and elasticity for a very long period without a senescence phenotype. Finally, cell elasticity increases with increasing culture density only in MDCK epithelial cells. In summary, for researchers who use AFM to assess cell elasticity, our results provide basic and significant information about the suitable selection of physical and physiological cues.

  18. The influence of physical and physiological cues on atomic force microscopy-based cell stiffness assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Yu-Wei; Lin, Hsiu-Kuan; Tang, Ming-Jer; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Yeh, Ming-Long

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy provides a novel technique for differentiating the mechanical properties of various cell types. Cell elasticity is abundantly used to represent the structural strength of cells in different conditions. In this study, we are interested in whether physical or physiological cues affect cell elasticity in Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based assessments. The physical cues include the geometry of the AFM tips, the indenting force and the operating temperature of the AFM. All of these cues show a significant influence on the cell elasticity assessment. Sharp AFM tips create a two-fold increase in the value of the effective Young's modulus (E(eff)) relative to that of the blunt tips. Higher indenting force at the same loading rate generates higher estimated cell elasticity. Increasing the operation temperature of the AFM leads to decreases in the cell stiffness because the structure of actin filaments becomes disorganized. The physiological cues include the presence of fetal bovine serum or extracellular matrix-coated surfaces, the culture passage number, and the culture density. Both fetal bovine serum and the extracellular matrix are critical for cells to maintain the integrity of actin filaments and consequently exhibit higher elasticity. Unlike primary cells, mouse kidney progenitor cells can be passaged and maintain their morphology and elasticity for a very long period without a senescence phenotype. Finally, cell elasticity increases with increasing culture density only in MDCK epithelial cells. In summary, for researchers who use AFM to assess cell elasticity, our results provide basic and significant information about the suitable selection of physical and physiological cues.

  19. Carbon black nanoparticles and vascular dysfunction in cultured endothelial cells and artery segments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterdal, Lise K; Mikkelsen, Lone; Folkmann, Janne K

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to small size particulates is regarded as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We investigated effects of exposure to nanosized carbon black (CB) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and segments of arteries from rodents. The CB exposure was associated with increased......, whereas it did not alter the mitochondrial enzyme activity (WST-1) or the nitric oxide level in HUVECs. Incubation of aorta segments with 10µg/ml of CB increased the endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation, induced by acetylcholine, and shifted the endothelium-independent vasorelaxation, induced by sodium...... nitroprusside, towards a decreased sensitivity. In mesenteric arteries, the exposure to 10µg/ml was associated with a reduced pressure-diameter relationship. Incubation with 100µg/ml CB significantly decreased both acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside responses as well as decreased the receptor...

  20. Micro patterned surfaces: an effective tool for long term digital holographic microscopy cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mues, Sarah; Lilge, Inga; Schönherr, Holger; Kemper, Björn; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    The major problem of Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) long term live cell imaging is that over time most of the tracked cells move out of the image area and other ones move in. Therefore, most of the cells are lost for the evaluation of individual cellular processes. Here, we present an effective solution for this crucial problem of long-term microscopic live cell analysis. We have generated functionalized slides containing areas of 250 μm per 200 μm. These micropatterned biointerfaces consist of passivating polyaclrylamide brushes (PAAm). Inner areas are backfilled with octadecanthiol (ODT), which allows cell attachment. The fouling properties of these surfaces are highly controllable and therefore the defined areas designed for the size our microscopic image areas were effective in keeping all cells inside the rectangles over the selected imaging period.

  1. Intravital two-photon microscopy of immune cell dynamics in corneal lymphatic vessels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Steven

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of lymphatic vessels in tissue and organ transplantation as well as in tumor growth and metastasis has drawn great attention in recent years. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We now developed a novel method using non-invasive two-photon microscopy to simultaneously visualize and track specifically stained lymphatic vessels and autofluorescent adjacent tissues such as collagen fibrils, blood vessels and immune cells in the mouse model of corneal neovascularization in vivo. The mouse cornea serves as an ideal tissue for this technique due to its easy accessibility and its inducible and modifiable state of pathological hem- and lymphvascularization. Neovascularization was induced by suture placement in corneas of Balb/C mice. Two weeks after treatment, lymphatic vessels were stained intravital by intrastromal injection of a fluorescently labeled LYVE-1 antibody and the corneas were evaluated in vivo by two-photon microscopy (TPM. Intravital TPM was performed at 710 nm and 826 nm excitation wavelengths to detect immunofluorescence and tissue autofluorescence using a custom made animal holder. Corneas were then harvested, fixed and analyzed by histology. Time lapse imaging demonstrated the first in vivo evidence of immune cell migration into lymphatic vessels and luminal transport of individual cells. Cells immigrated within 1-5.5 min into the vessel lumen. Mean velocities of intrastromal corneal immune cells were around 9 µm/min and therefore comparable to those of T-cells and macrophages in other mucosal surfaces. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge we here demonstrate for the first time the intravital real-time transmigration of immune cells into lymphatic vessels. Overall this study demonstrates the valuable use of intravital autofluorescence two-photon microscopy in the model of suture-induced corneal vascularizations to study interactions of immune and subsequently tumor cells with lymphatic vessels under close as possible

  2. Scanning fluorescent microscopy is an alternative for quantitative fluorescent cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Viktor Sebestyén; Bocsi, József; Sipos, Ferenc; Csendes, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2004-07-01

    Fluorescent measurements on cells are performed today with FCM and laser scanning cytometry. The scientific community dealing with quantitative cell analysis would benefit from the development of a new digital multichannel and virtual microscopy based scanning fluorescent microscopy technology and from its evaluation on routine standardized fluorescent beads and clinical specimens. We applied a commercial motorized fluorescent microscope system. The scanning was done at 20 x (0.5 NA) magnification, on three channels (Rhodamine, FITC, Hoechst). The SFM (scanning fluorescent microscopy) software included the following features: scanning area, exposure time, and channel definition, autofocused scanning, densitometric and morphometric cellular feature determination, gating on scatterplots and frequency histograms, and preparation of galleries of the gated cells. For the calibration and standardization Immuno-Brite beads were used. With application of shading compensation, the CV of fluorescence of the beads decreased from 24.3% to 3.9%. Standard JPEG image compression until 1:150 resulted in no significant change. The change of focus influenced the CV significantly only after +/-5 microm error. SFM is a valuable method for the evaluation of fluorescently labeled cells. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Correlated Fluorescence-Atomic Force Microscopy Studies of the Clathrin Mediated Endocytosis in SKMEL Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steve; Hor, Amy; Luu, Anh; Kang, Lin; Scott, Brandon; Bailey, Elizabeth; Hoppe, Adam

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is one of the central pathways for cargo transport into cells, and plays a major role in the maintenance of cellular functions, such as intercellular signaling, nutrient intake, and turnover of plasma membrane in cells. The clathrin-mediated endocytosis process involves invagination and formation of clathrin-coated vesicles. However, the biophysical mechanisms of vesicle formation are still debated. We investigate clathrin vesicle formation mechanisms through the utilization of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy for high resolution topographical imaging in neutral buffer solution of unroofed cells exposing the inner membrane, combined with fluorescence imaging to definitively label intracellular constituents with specific fluorescent fusion proteins (actin filaments labeled with green phalloidin-antibody and clathrin coated vesicles with the fusion protein Tq2) in SKMEL (Human Melanoma) cells. Results from our work are compared against dynamical polarized total internal fluorescence (TIRF), super-resolution photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to draw conclusions regarding the prominent model of vesicle formation in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Funding provided by NSF MPS/DMR/BMAT award # 1206908.

  4. Garlic (Allium sativum) feeding impairs Sertoli cell junctional proteins in male Wistar rat testis: microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, I; Nahdi, A; Atig, F; El May, A; El May, M V

    2016-12-01

    Sertoli cell junctions, such as adhesion junction (AJ), gap junction (GJ) and tight junction (TJ), are important for maintaining spermatogenesis. In previous studies, we showed the inhibitory effect of crude garlic (Allium sativum, As) on spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis. The aim of this work was to complete our investigation on the impact of this plant, especially on Sertoli cell junctional proteins (SCJPs). During 1 month, 24 male rats were divided into groups: group control (0% of As) and treated groups fed 5%, 10% and 15% of As. Light and electron microscopy observations were performed to localise junctional proteins: connexin-43, Zona Occluding-1 and N-cadherin (immunohistochemistry) and to describe junctions. We showed that the specific cells involved in the localisation of the SCJP were similar in both control and treated groups, but with different immunoreactivity intensity between them. The electron microscopy observation focused on TJs between Sertoli cells, constituting the blood-testis barrier, showed ultrastructural changes such as fragmentation of TJs between adjacent Sertoli cell membranes and dilatation of rough endoplasmic reticulum saccules giving an aspect of scale to these junctions. We concluded that crude garlic consumption during 1 month induces perturbations on Sertoli cell junctions. These alterations can explain apoptosis in testicular germ cells previously showed. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Insights into Caco-2 cell culture structure using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarinen, Jukka; Sözeri, Erkan; Fraser-Miller, Sara J; Peltonen, Leena; Santos, Hélder A; Isomäki, Antti; Strachan, Clare J

    2017-05-15

    We have used coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy as a novel and rapid, label-free and non-destructive imaging method to gain structural insights into live intestinal epithelial cell cultures used for drug permeability testing. Specifically we have imaged live Caco-2 cells in (bio)pharmaceutically relevant conditions grown on membrane inserts. Imaging conditions were optimized, including evaluation of suitable membrane materials and media solutions, as well as tolerable laser powers for non-destructive imaging of the live cells. Lipid structures, in particular lipid droplets, were imaged within the cells on the insert membranes. The size of the individual lipid droplets increased substantially over the 21-day culturing period up to approximately 10% of the volume of the cross section of individual cells. Variation in lipid content has important implications for intestinal drug permeation testing during drug development but has received limited attention to date due to a lack of suitable analytical techniques. CARS microscopy was shown to be well suited for such analysis with the potential for in situ imaging of the same individual cell-cultures that are used for permeation studies. Overall, the method may be used to provide important information about cell monolayer structure to better understand drug permeation results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of intact cells of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Myung K

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM is a powerful tool for observing fluorescently labeled molecules on the plasma membrane surface of animal cells. However, the utility of TIRFM in plant cell studies has been limited by the fact that plants have cell walls, thick peripheral layers surrounding the plasma membrane. Recently, a new technique known as variable-angle epifluorescence microscopy (VAEM was developed to circumvent this problem. However, the lack of a detailed analysis of the optical principles underlying VAEM has limited its applications in plant-cell biology. Results Here, we present theoretical and experimental evidence supporting the use of variable-angle TIRFM in observations of intact plant cells. We show that when total internal reflection occurs at the cell wall/cytosol interface with an appropriate angle of incidence, an evanescent wave field of constant depth is produced inside the cytosol. Results of experimental TIRFM observations of the dynamic behaviors of phototropin 1 (a membrane receptor protein and clathrin light chain (a vesicle coat protein support our theoretical analysis. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that variable-angle TIRFM is appropriate for quantitative live imaging of cells in intact tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana.

  7. Study of SEM preparation artefacts with correlative microscopy: Cell shrinkage of adherent cells by HMDS-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsen-Globa, Alisa; Puetz, Norbert; Gepp, Michael M; Neubauer, Julia C; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2016-11-01

    One of the often reported artefacts during cell preparation to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is the shrinkage of cellular objects, that mostly occurs at a certain time-dependent stage of cell drying. Various methods of drying for SEM, such as critical point drying, freeze-drying, as well as hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS)-drying, were usually used. The latter becomes popular since it is a low cost and fast method. However, the correlation of drying duration and real shrinkage of objects was not investigated yet. In this paper, cell shrinkage at each stage of preparation for SEM was studied. We introduce a shrinkage coefficient using correlative light microscopy (LM) and SEM of the same human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The influence of HMDS-drying duration on the cell shrinkage is shown: the longer drying duration, the more shrinkage is observed. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that cell shrinkage is inversely proportional to cultivation time: the longer cultivation time, the more cell spreading area and the less cell shrinkage. Our results can be applicable for an exact SEM quantification of cell size and determination of cell spreading area in engineering of artificial cellular environments using biomaterials. SCANNING 38:625-633, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Opto-fluidics based microscopy and flow cytometry on a cell phone for blood analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-01-01

    Blood analysis is one of the most important clinical tests for medical diagnosis. Flow cytometry and optical microscopy are widely used techniques to perform blood analysis and therefore cost-effective translation of these technologies to resource limited settings is critical for various global health as well as telemedicine applications. In this chapter, we review our recent progress on the integration of imaging flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy on a cell phone using compact, light-weight and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments integrated onto the camera module of a smartphone. In our cell-phone based opto-fluidic imaging cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are delivered into the imaging area using a disposable micro-fluidic chip that is positioned above the existing camera unit of the cell phone. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the sides of this micro-fluidic chip without any lenses, which effectively acts as a multimode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to excite the fluorescent targets within the micro-fluidic chip. Since the excitation light propagates perpendicular to the detection path, an inexpensive plastic absorption filter is able to reject most of the scattered light and create a decent dark-field background for fluorescent imaging. With this excitation geometry, the cell-phone camera can record fluorescent movies of the particles/cells as they are flowing through the microchannel. The digital frames of these fluorescent movies are then rapidly processed to quantify the count and the density of the labeled particles/cells within the solution under test. With a similar opto-fluidic design, we have recently demonstrated imaging and automated counting of stationary blood cells (e.g., labeled white blood cells or unlabeled red blood cells) loaded within a disposable cell counting chamber. We tested the performance of this cell-phone based imaging cytometry and blood analysis platform

  9. Method for semi-automated microscopy of filtration-enriched circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailler, Emma; Oulhen, Marianne; Billiot, Fanny; Galland, Alexandre; Auger, Nathalie; Faugeroux, Vincent; Laplace-Builhé, Corinne; Besse, Benjamin; Loriot, Yohann; Ngo-Camus, Maud; Hemanda, Merouan; Lindsay, Colin R; Soria, Jean-Charles; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Françoise

    2016-07-14

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC)-filtration methods capture high numbers of CTCs in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and metastatic prostate cancer (mPCa) patients, and hold promise as a non-invasive technique for treatment selection and disease monitoring. However filters have drawbacks that make the automation of microscopy challenging. We report the semi-automated microscopy method we developed to analyze filtration-enriched CTCs from NSCLC and mPCa patients. Spiked cell lines in normal blood and CTCs were enriched by ISET (isolation by size of epithelial tumor cells). Fluorescent staining was carried out using epithelial (pan-cytokeratins, EpCAM), mesenchymal (vimentin, N-cadherin), leukocyte (CD45) markers and DAPI. Cytomorphological staining was carried out with Mayer-Hemalun or Diff-Quik. ALK-, ROS1-, ERG-rearrangement were detected by filter-adapted-FISH (FA-FISH). Microscopy was carried out using an Ariol scanner. Two combined assays were developed. The first assay sequentially combined four-color fluorescent staining, scanning, automated selection of CD45(-) cells, cytomorphological staining, then scanning and analysis of CD45(-) cell phenotypical and cytomorphological characteristics. CD45(-) cell selection was based on DAPI and CD45 intensity, and a nuclear area >55 μm(2). The second assay sequentially combined fluorescent staining, automated selection of CD45(-) cells, FISH scanning on CD45(-) cells, then analysis of CD45(-) cell FISH signals. Specific scanning parameters were developed to deal with the uneven surface of filters and CTC characteristics. Thirty z-stacks spaced 0.6 μm apart were defined as the optimal setting, scanning 82 %, 91 %, and 95 % of CTCs in ALK-, ROS1-, and ERG-rearranged patients respectively. A multi-exposure protocol consisting of three separate exposure times for green and red fluorochromes was optimized to analyze the intensity, size and thickness of FISH signals. The semi-automated microscopy method reported here

  10. Method for semi-automated microscopy of filtration-enriched circulating tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pailler, Emma; Oulhen, Marianne; Billiot, Fanny; Galland, Alexandre; Auger, Nathalie; Faugeroux, Vincent; Laplace-Builhé, Corinne; Besse, Benjamin; Loriot, Yohann; Ngo-Camus, Maud; Hemanda, Merouan; Lindsay, Colin R.; Soria, Jean-Charles; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Françoise

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC)-filtration methods capture high numbers of CTCs in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and metastatic prostate cancer (mPCa) patients, and hold promise as a non-invasive technique for treatment selection and disease monitoring. However filters have drawbacks that make the automation of microscopy challenging. We report the semi-automated microscopy method we developed to analyze filtration-enriched CTCs from NSCLC and mPCa patients. Spiked cell lines in normal blood and CTCs were enriched by ISET (isolation by size of epithelial tumor cells). Fluorescent staining was carried out using epithelial (pan-cytokeratins, EpCAM), mesenchymal (vimentin, N-cadherin), leukocyte (CD45) markers and DAPI. Cytomorphological staining was carried out with Mayer-Hemalun or Diff-Quik. ALK-, ROS1-, ERG-rearrangement were detected by filter-adapted-FISH (FA-FISH). Microscopy was carried out using an Ariol scanner. Two combined assays were developed. The first assay sequentially combined four-color fluorescent staining, scanning, automated selection of CD45 − cells, cytomorphological staining, then scanning and analysis of CD45 − cell phenotypical and cytomorphological characteristics. CD45 − cell selection was based on DAPI and CD45 intensity, and a nuclear area >55 μm 2 . The second assay sequentially combined fluorescent staining, automated selection of CD45 − cells, FISH scanning on CD45 − cells, then analysis of CD45 − cell FISH signals. Specific scanning parameters were developed to deal with the uneven surface of filters and CTC characteristics. Thirty z-stacks spaced 0.6 μm apart were defined as the optimal setting, scanning 82 %, 91 %, and 95 % of CTCs in ALK-, ROS1-, and ERG-rearranged patients respectively. A multi-exposure protocol consisting of three separate exposure times for green and red fluorochromes was optimized to analyze the intensity, size and thickness of FISH signals. The semi-automated microscopy method reported here

  11. Investigation of integrin expression on the surface of osteoblast-like cells by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caneva Soumetz, Federico; Saenz, Jose F.; Pastorino, Laura; Ruggiero, Carmelina; Nosi, Daniele; Raiteri, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) is a human cytokine which has been demonstrated to modulate cell surface integrin repertoire. In this work integrin expression in response to TGF-β1 stimulation has been investigated on the surface of human osteoblast-like cells. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy to assess integrin expression and to evaluate their distribution over the dorsal side of the plasma membrane. AFM probes have been covalently functionalised with monoclonal antibodies specific to the β1 integrin subunit. Force curves have been collected in order to obtain maps of the interaction between the immobilized antibody and the respective cell membrane receptors. Adhesion peaks have been automatically detected by means of an ad hoc developed data analysis software. The specificity of the detected interactions has been assessed by adding free antibody in the solution and monitoring the dramatic decrease in the recorded interactions. In addition, the effect of TGF-β1 treatment on both the fluorescence signal and the adhesion events has been tested. The level of expression of the β1 integrin subunit was enhanced by TGF-β1. As a further analysis, the adhesion force of the single living cells to the substrate was measured by laterally pushing the cell with the AFM tip and measuring the force necessary to displace it. The treatment with TGF-β1 resulted in a decrease of the cell/substrate adhesion force. Results obtained by AFM have been validated by confocal laser scanning microscopy thus demonstrating the high potential of the AFM technique for the investigation of cell surface receptors distribution and trafficking at the nanoscale.

  12. Investigation of integrin expression on the surface of osteoblast-like cells by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caneva Soumetz, Federico [Department of Communication, Computer and System Sciences, University of Genova, Via Opera Pia, 13-16145 Genova (Italy); Saenz, Jose F. [Biophysical and Electronic Engineering Department, University of Genova, Via All' Opera Pia 11a, 16145 Genova (Italy); Pastorino, Laura; Ruggiero, Carmelina [Department of Communication, Computer and System Sciences, University of Genova, Via Opera Pia, 13-16145 Genova (Italy); Nosi, Daniele [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Forensic Medicine, Bio-photonic Laboratory, University of Florence, viale Morgagni, 85 Firenze, CAP 50134 Florence (Italy); Raiteri, Roberto, E-mail: rr@unige.it [Biophysical and Electronic Engineering Department, University of Genova, Via All' Opera Pia 11a, 16145 Genova (Italy)

    2010-03-15

    The transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) is a human cytokine which has been demonstrated to modulate cell surface integrin repertoire. In this work integrin expression in response to TGF-{beta}1 stimulation has been investigated on the surface of human osteoblast-like cells. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy to assess integrin expression and to evaluate their distribution over the dorsal side of the plasma membrane. AFM probes have been covalently functionalised with monoclonal antibodies specific to the {beta}1 integrin subunit. Force curves have been collected in order to obtain maps of the interaction between the immobilized antibody and the respective cell membrane receptors. Adhesion peaks have been automatically detected by means of an ad hoc developed data analysis software. The specificity of the detected interactions has been assessed by adding free antibody in the solution and monitoring the dramatic decrease in the recorded interactions. In addition, the effect of TGF-{beta}1 treatment on both the fluorescence signal and the adhesion events has been tested. The level of expression of the {beta}1 integrin subunit was enhanced by TGF-{beta}1. As a further analysis, the adhesion force of the single living cells to the substrate was measured by laterally pushing the cell with the AFM tip and measuring the force necessary to displace it. The treatment with TGF-{beta}1 resulted in a decrease of the cell/substrate adhesion force. Results obtained by AFM have been validated by confocal laser scanning microscopy thus demonstrating the high potential of the AFM technique for the investigation of cell surface receptors distribution and trafficking at the nanoscale.

  13. Investigating the use of in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguy, Amanda [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-02-19

    Engineering nanoparticles with desired shape-dependent properties is the key to many applications in nanotechnology. Although many synthetic procedures exist to produce anisotropic gold nanoparticles, the dynamics of growth are typically unknown or hypothetical. In the case of seed-mediated growth in the presence of DNA into anisotropic nanoparticles, it is not known exactly how DNA directs growth into specific morphologies. A series of preliminary experiments were carried out to contribute to the investigation of the possible mechanism of DNA-mediated growth of gold nanoprisms into gold nanostars using liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Imaging in the liquid phase was achieved through the use of a liquid cell platform and liquid cell holder that allow the sample to be contained within a “chip sandwich” between two electron transparent windows. Ex situ growth experiments were performed using Au-T30 NPrisms (30-base thymine oligonucleotide-coated gold nanoprisms) that are expected to grow into gold nanostars. Growth to form these nanostars were imaged using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and liquid cell STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy). An attempt to perform in situ growth experiments with the same Au-T30 nanoprisms revealed challenges in obtaining desired morphology results due to the environmental differences within the liquid cell compared to the ex situ environment. Different parameters in the experimental method were explored including fluid line set up, simultaneous and alternating reagent addition, and the effect of different liquid cell volumes to ensure adequate flow of reagents into the liquid cell. Lastly, the binding affinities were compared for T30 and A30 DNA incubated with gold nanoparticles using zeta potential measurements, absorption spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). It was previously reported thymine bases have a lower binding affinity to gold surfaces than adenine

  14. Environmental cell assembly for use in for use in spectroscopy and microscopy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Ashley Clinton; Smyrl, Norman; Hallman, Jr., Russell L.

    2014-09-02

    An environmental cell assembly for use in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, including: an environmentally sealed body assembly configured to selectively hold and contain a sample; a plurality of ports manufactured into one or more surfaces of the body assembly for one or more of evacuating the body assembly and injecting a gas into or removing a gas from the body assembly; a port manufactured into a surface of the body assembly for receiving a translating stage configured to move the sample within the body assembly; and a port manufactured into a surface of the body assembly for receiving one or more lenses utilized in a microscopy or spectroscopy application; wherein the one or more lenses are disposed adjacent the sample without intervening structures disposed there between. The cell assembly also includes a port manufactured into a surface of the body assembly for retaining a window and providing visualization of the sample.

  15. Wavelength-Dependent Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy: Selectively Imaging Nanoparticle Probes in Live Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei; Wang, Gufeng; Fang, Ning; and Yeung, Edward S.

    2009-11-15

    Gold and silver nanoparticles display extraordinarily large apparent refractive indices near their plasmon resonance (PR) wavelengths. These nanoparticles show good contrast in a narrow spectral band but are poorly resolved at other wavelengths in differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. The wavelength dependence of DIC contrast of gold/silver nanoparticles is interpreted in terms of Mie's theory and DIC working principles. We further exploit this wavelength dependence by modifying a DIC microscope to enable simultaneous imaging at two wavelengths. We demonstrate that gold/silver nanoparticles immobilized on the same glass slides through hybridization can be differentiated and imaged separately. High-contrast, video-rate images of living cells can be recorded both with and without illuminating the gold nanoparticle probes, providing definitive probe identification. Dual-wavelength DIC microscopy thus presents a new approach to the simultaneous detection of multiple probes of interest for high-speed live-cell imaging.

  16. Investigation into local cell mechanics by atomic force microscopy mapping and optical tweezer vertical indentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coceano, G; Yousafzai, M S; Ma, W; Ndoye, F; Venturelli, L; Hussain, I; Bonin, S; Niemela, J; Scoles, G; Cojoc, D; Ferrari, E

    2016-02-12

    Investigating the mechanical properties of cells could reveal a potential source of label-free markers of cancer progression, based on measurable viscoelastic parameters. The Young's modulus has proved to be the most thoroughly studied so far, however, even for the same cell type, the elastic modulus reported in different studies spans a wide range of values, mainly due to the application of different experimental conditions. This complicates the reliable use of elasticity for the mechanical phenotyping of cells. Here we combine two complementary techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical tweezer microscopy (OTM), providing a comprehensive mechanical comparison of three human breast cell lines: normal myoepithelial (HBL-100), luminal breast cancer (MCF-7) and basal breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells. The elastic modulus was measured locally by AFM and OTM on single cells, using similar indentation approaches but different measurement parameters. Peak force tapping AFM was employed at nanonewton forces and high loading rates to draw a viscoelastic map of each cell and the results indicated that the region on top of the nucleus provided the most meaningful results. OTM was employed at those locations at piconewton forces and low loading rates, to measure the elastic modulus in a real elastic regime and rule out the contribution of viscous forces typical of AFM. When measured by either AFM or OTM, the cell lines' elasticity trend was similar for the aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells, which were found to be significantly softer than the other two cell types in both measurements. However, when comparing HBL-100 and MCF-7 cells, we found significant differences only when using OTM.

  17. Helium ion microscopy and ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy analysis of membrane-extracted cells reveals novel characteristics of the cytoskeleton of Giardia intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadelha, Ana Paula Rocha; Benchimol, Marlene; de Souza, Wanderley

    2015-06-01

    Giardia intestinalis presents a complex microtubular cytoskeleton formed by specialized structures, such as the adhesive disk, four pairs of flagella, the funis and the median body. The ultrastructural organization of the Giardia cytoskeleton has been analyzed using different microscopic techniques, including high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Recent advances in scanning microscopy technology have opened a new venue for the characterization of cellular structures and include scanning probe microscopy techniques such as ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (UHRSEM) and helium ion microscopy (HIM). Here, we studied the organization of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis trophozoites using UHRSEM and HIM in membrane-extracted cells. The results revealed a number of new cytoskeletal elements associated with the lateral crest and the dorsal surface of the parasite. The fine structure of the banded collar was also observed. The marginal plates were seen linked to a network of filaments, which were continuous with filaments parallel to the main cell axis. Cytoplasmic filaments that supported the internal structures were seen by the first time. Using anti-actin antibody, we observed a labeling in these filamentous structures. Taken together, these data revealed new surface characteristics of the cytoskeleton of G. intestinalis and may contribute to an improved understanding of the structural organization of trophozoites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. In-air scanning transmission ion microscopy of cultured cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, R.; Deves, G.; Moretto, Ph.

    2001-01-01

    Scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) imaging of living cultured cells has been carried out using a proton external-beam with the nuclear microprobe of Bordeaux-Gradignan. STIM could be performed in air atmosphere after passage of a focused proton beam through a 150 nm thick silicon nitride window. Energy loss STIM images were obtained with a spatial resolution in the micrometer range and enabled the identification of sub-cellular ultrastructures

  19. Automated classification of cell morphology by coherence-controlled holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strbkova, Lenka; Zicha, Daniel; Vesely, Pavel; Chmelik, Radim

    2017-08-01

    In the last few years, classification of cells by machine learning has become frequently used in biology. However, most of the approaches are based on morphometric (MO) features, which are not quantitative in terms of cell mass. This may result in poor classification accuracy. Here, we study the potential contribution of coherence-controlled holographic microscopy enabling quantitative phase imaging for the classification of cell morphologies. We compare our approach with the commonly used method based on MO features. We tested both classification approaches in an experiment with nutritionally deprived cancer tissue cells, while employing several supervised machine learning algorithms. Most of the classifiers provided higher performance when quantitative phase features were employed. Based on the results, it can be concluded that the quantitative phase features played an important role in improving the performance of the classification. The methodology could be valuable help in refining the monitoring of live cells in an automated fashion. We believe that coherence-controlled holographic microscopy, as a tool for quantitative phase imaging, offers all preconditions for the accurate automated analysis of live cell behavior while enabling noninvasive label-free imaging with sufficient contrast and high-spatiotemporal phase sensitivity. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  20. Detection of wood cell wall porosity using small carbohydrate molecules and confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, L A; Kroese, H W; Hill, S J; Franich, R A

    2015-09-01

    A novel approach to nanoscale detection of cell wall porosity using confocal fluorescence microscopy is described. Infiltration of cell walls with a range of nitrophenyl-substituted carbohydrates of different molecular weights was assessed by measuring changes in the intensity of lignin fluorescence, in response to the quenching effect of the 4-nitrophenyl group. The following carbohydrates were used in order of increasing molecular weight; 4-nitrophenyl β-D-glucopyrano-side (monosaccharide), 4-nitrophenyl β-D-lactopyranoside (disaccharide), 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl β-D-maltotrioside (trisaccharide), and 4-nitrophenyl α-D-maltopentaoside (pentasaccharide). This technique was used to compare cell wall porosity in wood which had been dewatered to 40% moisture content using supercritical CO2, where cell walls remain fully hydrated, with kiln dried wood equilibrated to 12% moisture content. Infiltration of cell walls as measured by fluorescence quenching, was found to decrease with increasing molecular weight, with the pentasaccharide being significantly excluded compared to the monosaccharide. Porosity experiments were performed on blocks and sections to assess differences in cell wall accessibility. Dewatered and kiln dried wood infiltrated as blocks showed similar results, but greater infiltration was achieved by using sections, indicating that not all pores were easily accessible by infiltration from the lumen surface. In wood blocks infiltrated with 4-nitrophenyl α-D-maltopentaoside, quenching of the secondary wall was quite variable, especially in kiln dried wood, indicating limited connectivity of pores accessible from the lumen surface. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. Automated classification of cell morphology by coherence-controlled holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strbkova, Lenka; Zicha, Daniel; Vesely, Pavel; Chmelik, Radim

    2017-08-01

    In the last few years, classification of cells by machine learning has become frequently used in biology. However, most of the approaches are based on morphometric (MO) features, which are not quantitative in terms of cell mass. This may result in poor classification accuracy. Here, we study the potential contribution of coherence-controlled holographic microscopy enabling quantitative phase imaging for the classification of cell morphologies. We compare our approach with the commonly used method based on MO features. We tested both classification approaches in an experiment with nutritionally deprived cancer tissue cells, while employing several supervised machine learning algorithms. Most of the classifiers provided higher performance when quantitative phase features were employed. Based on the results, it can be concluded that the quantitative phase features played an important role in improving the performance of the classification. The methodology could be valuable help in refining the monitoring of live cells in an automated fashion. We believe that coherence-controlled holographic microscopy, as a tool for quantitative phase imaging, offers all preconditions for the accurate automated analysis of live cell behavior while enabling noninvasive label-free imaging with sufficient contrast and high-spatiotemporal phase sensitivity.

  2. Topography and refractometry of sperm cells using spatial light interference microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lina; Kandel, Mikhail E; Rubessa, Marcello; Schreiber, Sierra; Wheeler, Mathew B; Popescu, Gabriel

    2018-02-01

    Characterization of spermatozoon viability is a common test in treating infertility. Recently, it has been shown that label-free, phase-sensitive imaging can provide a valuable alternative for this type of assay. We employ spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) to perform high-accuracy single-cell phase imaging and decouple the average thickness and refractive index information for the population. This procedure was enabled by quantitative-phase imaging cells on media of two different refractive indices and using a numerical tool to remove the curvature from the cell tails. This way, we achieved ensemble averaging of topography and refractometry of 100 cells in each of the two groups. The results show that the thickness profile of the cell tail goes down to 150 nm and the refractive index can reach values of 1.6 close to the head. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  3. Lab-On-Chip Clinorotation System for Live-Cell Microscopy Under Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Alvin G.; Atencia, Javier; Chinn, Ben; Hsieh, Adam H.

    2013-01-01

    Cells in microgravity are subject to mechanical unloading and changes to the surrounding chemical environment. How these factors jointly influence cellular function is not well understood. We can investigate their role using ground-based analogues to spaceflight, where mechanical unloading is simulated through the time-averaged nullification of gravity. The prevailing method for cellular microgravity simulation is to use fluid-filled containers called clinostats. However, conventional clinostats are not designed for temporally tracking cell response, nor are they able to establish dynamic fluid environments. To address these needs, we developed a Clinorotation Time-lapse Microscopy (CTM) system that accommodates lab-on- chip cell culture devices for visualizing time-dependent alterations to cellular behavior. For the purpose of demonstrating CTM, we present preliminary results showing time-dependent differences in cell area between human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) under modeled microgravity and normal gravity.

  4. Atomic Force Microscopy in Characterizing Cell Mechanics for Biomedical Applications: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Dang, Dan; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2017-09-01

    Cell mechanics is a novel label-free biomarker for indicating cell states and pathological changes. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a powerful tool for quantifying the mechanical properties of single living cells in aqueous conditions. The wide use of AFM in characterizing cell mechanics in the past two decades has yielded remarkable novel insights in understanding the development and progression of certain diseases, such as cancer, showing the huge potential of cell mechanics for practical applications in the field of biomedicine. In this paper, we reviewed the utilization of AFM to characterize cell mechanics. First, the principle and method of AFM single-cell mechanical analysis was presented, along with the mechanical responses of cells to representative external stimuli measured by AFM. Next, the unique changes of cell mechanics in two types of physiological processes (stem cell differentiation, cancer metastasis) revealed by AFM were summarized. After that, the molecular mechanisms guiding cell mechanics were analyzed. Finally the challenges and future directions were discussed.

  5. An Algorithm to Automate Yeast Segmentation and Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doncic, Andreas; Eser, Umut; Atay, Oguzhan; Skotheim, Jan M.

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of dynamic cellular processes has been greatly enhanced by rapid advances in quantitative fluorescence microscopy. Imaging single cells has emphasized the prevalence of phenomena that can be difficult to infer from population measurements, such as all-or-none cellular decisions, cell-to-cell variability, and oscillations. Examination of these phenomena requires segmenting and tracking individual cells over long periods of time. However, accurate segmentation and tracking of cells is difficult and is often the rate-limiting step in an experimental pipeline. Here, we present an algorithm that accomplishes fully automated segmentation and tracking of budding yeast cells within growing colonies. The algorithm incorporates prior information of yeast-specific traits, such as immobility and growth rate, to segment an image using a set of threshold values rather than one specific optimized threshold. Results from the entire set of thresholds are then used to perform a robust final segmentation. PMID:23520484

  6. An algorithm to automate yeast segmentation and tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Doncic

    Full Text Available Our understanding of dynamic cellular processes has been greatly enhanced by rapid advances in quantitative fluorescence microscopy. Imaging single cells has emphasized the prevalence of phenomena that can be difficult to infer from population measurements, such as all-or-none cellular decisions, cell-to-cell variability, and oscillations. Examination of these phenomena requires segmenting and tracking individual cells over long periods of time. However, accurate segmentation and tracking of cells is difficult and is often the rate-limiting step in an experimental pipeline. Here, we present an algorithm that accomplishes fully automated segmentation and tracking of budding yeast cells within growing colonies. The algorithm incorporates prior information of yeast-specific traits, such as immobility and growth rate, to segment an image using a set of threshold values rather than one specific optimized threshold. Results from the entire set of thresholds are then used to perform a robust final segmentation.

  7. N-way FRET microscopy of multiple protein-protein interactions in live cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D Hoppe

    Full Text Available Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET microscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to visualize nanoscale protein-protein interactions while capturing their microscale organization and millisecond dynamics. Recently, FRET microscopy was extended to imaging of multiple donor-acceptor pairs, thereby enabling visualization of multiple biochemical events within a single living cell. These methods require numerous equations that must be defined on a case-by-case basis. Here, we present a universal multispectral microscopy method (N-Way FRET to enable quantitative imaging for any number of interacting and non-interacting FRET pairs. This approach redefines linear unmixing to incorporate the excitation and emission couplings created by FRET, which cannot be accounted for in conventional linear unmixing. Experiments on a three-fluorophore system using blue, yellow and red fluorescent proteins validate the method in living cells. In addition, we propose a simple linear algebra scheme for error propagation from input data to estimate the uncertainty in the computed FRET images. We demonstrate the strength of this approach by monitoring the oligomerization of three FP-tagged HIV Gag proteins whose tight association in the viral capsid is readily observed. Replacement of one FP-Gag molecule with a lipid raft-targeted FP allowed direct observation of Gag oligomerization with no association between FP-Gag and raft-targeted FP. The N-Way FRET method provides a new toolbox for capturing multiple molecular processes with high spatial and temporal resolution in living cells.

  8. Label-free imaging of gold nanoparticles in single live cells by photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chao; Qian, Wei; Shao, Xia; Xie, Zhixing; Cheng, Xu; Liu, Shengchun; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Bing; Wang, Xueding

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been extensively explored as a model nanostructure in nanomedicine and have been widely used to provide advanced biomedical research tools in diagnostic imaging and therapy. Due to the necessity of targeting AuNPs to individual cells, evaluation and visualization of AuNPs in the cellular level is critical to fully understand their interaction with cellular environment. Currently imaging technologies, such as fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy all have advantages and disadvantages. In this paper, we synthesized AuNPs by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation, modified their surface chemistry through sequential bioconjugation, and targeted the functionalized AuNPs with individual cancer cells. Based on their high optical absorption contrast, we developed a novel, label-free imaging method to evaluate and visualize intracellular AuNPs using photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). Preliminary study shows that the PAM imaging technique is capable of imaging cellular uptake of AuNPs in vivo at single-cell resolution, which provide an important tool for the study of AuNPs in nanomedicine.

  9. Label-free evanescent microscopy for membrane nano-tomography in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bon, Pierre; Barroca, Thomas; Lévèque-Fort, Sandrine; Fort, Emmanuel

    2014-11-01

    We show that through-the-objective evanescent microscopy (epi-EM) is a powerful technique to image membranes in living cells. Readily implementable on a standard inverted microscope, this technique enables full-field and real-time tracking of membrane processes without labeling and thus signal fading. In addition, we demonstrate that the membrane/interface distance can be retrieved with 10 nm precision using a multilayer Fresnel model. We apply this nano-axial tomography of living cell membranes to retrieve quantitative information on membrane invagination dynamics. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  10. Nanograting-based plasmon enhancement for total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of live cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyujung; Cho, Eun-Jin; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min; Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Dong Jun

    2009-01-01

    We investigated evanescent field enhancement based on subwavelength nanogratings for improved sensitivity in total internal reflection microscopy of live cells. The field enhancement is associated with subwavelength-grating-coupled plasmon excitation. An optimum sample employed a silver grating on a silver film and an SF10 glass substrate. Field intensity was enhanced by approximately 90% when measured by fluorescent excitation of microbeads relative to that on a bare prism as a control, which is in good agreement with numerical results. The subwavelength-grating-mediated field enhancement was also applied to live cell imaging of quantum dots, which confirmed the sensitivity enhancement qualitatively.

  11. Single-cell manipulation and DNA delivery technology using atomic force microscopy and nanoneedle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sung-Woong; Nakamura, Chikashi; Miyake, Jun; Chang, Sang-Mok; Adachi, Taiji

    2014-01-01

    The recent single-cell manipulation technology using atomic force microscopy (AFM) not only allows high-resolution visualization and probing of biomolecules and cells but also provides spatial and temporal access to the interior of living cells via the nanoneedle technology. Here we review the development and application of single-cell manipulations and the DNA delivery technology using a nanoneedle. We briefly describe various DNA delivery methods and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Fabrication of the nanoneedle, visualization of nanoneedle insertion into living cells, DNA modification on the nanoneedle surface, and the invasiveness of nanoneedle insertion into living cells are described. Different methods of DNA delivery into a living cell, such as lipofection, microinjection, and nanoneedles, are then compared. Finally, single-cell diagnostics using the nanoneedle and the perspectives of the nanoneedle technology are outlined. The nanoneedle-based DNA delivery technology provides new opportunities for efficient and specific introduction of DNA and other biomolecules into precious living cells with a high spatial resolution within a desired time frame. This technology has the potential to be applied for many basic cellular studies and for clinical studies such as single-cell diagnostics.

  12. An electron microscopy study of the diversity of Streptococcus sanguinis cells induced by lysozyme in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yuqing; Li, Li; Li, Wei; Zhou, Xuedong; Lu, Junjun

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial virulence could be altered by the antimicrobial agents of the host. Our aim was to identify the damage and survival of Streptococcus sanguinis induced by lysozymes in vitro and to analyse the potential of oral microorganisms to shirk host defences, which cause infective endocarditis. S. sanguinis ATCC 10556 received lysozyme at concentrations of 12.5, 25, 50 and 100 microg/ml. Cells were examined by electron microscopy. The survival was assessed by colony counting and construction of a growth curve. Challenged by lysozymes, cells mainly exhibited cell wall damage, which seemed to increase with increasing lysozyme concentration and longer incubation period in the presence of ions. Cells with little as well as apparent lesion were observed under the same treatment set, and anomalous stick and huge rotund bodies were occasionally observed. After the removal of the lysozyme, some damaged cells could be reverted to its original form with brain heart infusion (BHI), and their growth curve was similar to the control cells. After further incubation in BHI containing lysozyme, S. sanguinis cell damage stopped progressing, and their growth curve was also similar to the control cells. The results suggested that the S. sanguinis lesions caused by the lysozyme in the oral cavity may be nonhomogeneous and that some damaged cells could self-repair and survive. It also indicated that S. sanguinis with damaged cell walls may survive and be transmitted in the bloodstream.

  13. An efficient and reproducible process for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of rare cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sachin; Ciraolo, Georgianne; Hinge, Ashwini; Filippi, Marie-Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides ultra-structural details of cells at the sub-organelle level. However, details of the cellular ultrastructure, and the cellular organization and content of various organelles in rare populations, particularly in the suspension, like hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remained elusive. This is mainly due to the requirement of millions of cells for TEM studies. Thus, there is a vital requirement of a method that will allow TEM studies with low cell numbers of such rare populations. We describe an alternative and novel approach for TEM studies for rare cell populations. Here we performed TEM study from 10,000 HSC cells with quite ease. In particular, tiny cell pellets were identified by Evans blue staining after PFA-GA fixation. The cell pellet was pre-embedded in agarose in a small microcentrifuge tube and processed for dehydration, infiltration and embedding. Semi-thin and ultra-thin sections identified clusters of numerous cells per sections with well preserved morphology and ultrastructural details of golgi complex and mitochondria. Together, this method provides an efficient, easy and reproducible process to perform qualitative and quantitative TEM analysis from limited biological samples including cells in suspension. PMID:24291346

  14. Tumor cell survival dependence on helical tomotherapy, continuous arc and segmented dose delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Wensha; Wang Li; Larner, James; Read, Paul; Benedict, Stan; Sheng Ke

    2009-01-01

    The temporal pattern of radiation delivery has been shown to influence the tumor cell survival fractions for the same radiation dose. To study the effect more specifically for state of the art rotational radiation delivery modalities, 2 Gy of radiation dose was delivered to H460 lung carcinoma, PC3 prostate cancer cells and MCF-7 breast tumor cells by helical tomotherapy (HT), seven-field LINAC (7F), and continuous dose delivery (CDD) over 2 min that simulates volumetric rotational arc therapy. Cell survival was measured by the clonogenic assay. The number of viable H460 cell colonies was 23.2 ± 14.4% and 27.7 ± 15.6% lower when irradiated by CDD compared with HT and 7F, respectively, and the corresponding values were 36.8 ± 18.9% and 35.3 ± 18.9% lower for MCF7 cells (p < 0.01). The survival of PC3 was also lower when irradiated by CDD than by HT or 7F but the difference was not as significant (p = 0.06 and 0.04, respectively). The higher survival fraction from HT delivery was unexpected because 90% of the 2 Gy was delivered in less than 1 min at a significantly higher dose rate than the other two delivery techniques. The results suggest that continuous dose delivery at a constant dose rate results in superior in vitro tumor cell killing compared with prolonged, segmented or variable dose rate delivery.

  15. Integration of statistical modeling and high-content microscopy to systematically investigate cell-substrate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen Li Kelly; Likhitpanichkul, Morakot; Ho, Anthony; Simmons, Craig A

    2010-03-01

    Cell-substrate interactions are multifaceted, involving the integration of various physical and biochemical signals. The interactions among these microenvironmental factors cannot be facilely elucidated and quantified by conventional experimentation, and necessitate multifactorial strategies. Here we describe an approach that integrates statistical design and analysis of experiments with automated microscopy to systematically investigate the combinatorial effects of substrate-derived stimuli (substrate stiffness and matrix protein concentration) on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) spreading, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. C3H10T1/2 cells were grown on type I collagen- or fibronectin-coated polyacrylamide hydrogels with tunable mechanical properties. Experimental conditions, which were defined according to central composite design, consisted of specific permutations of substrate stiffness (3-144 kPa) and adhesion protein concentration (7-520 microg/mL). Spreading area, BrdU incorporation and Runx2 nuclear translocation were quantified using high-content microscopy and modeled as mathematical functions of substrate stiffness and protein concentration. The resulting response surfaces revealed distinct patterns of protein-specific, substrate stiffness-dependent modulation of MSC proliferation and differentiation, demonstrating the advantage of statistical modeling in the detection and description of higher-order cellular responses. In a broader context, this approach can be adapted to study other types of cell-material interactions and can facilitate the efficient screening and optimization of substrate properties for applications involving cell-material interfaces. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Internalisation of polymeric nanosensors in mesenchymal stem cells: analysis by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupland, Paul G; Fisher, Karen A; Jones, D Rhodri E; Aylott, Jonathan W

    2008-09-10

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate that flow cytometry and confocal microscopy could be applied in a complementary manner to analyse the internalisation of polymeric nanosensors in mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). The two techniques are able to provide en masse data analysis of nanosensors from large cell populations and detailed images of intracellular nanosensor localisation, respectively. The polyacrylamide nanosensors used in this investigation had been modified to contain free amine groups which were subsequently conjugated to Tat peptide, which acted as a delivery vector for nanosensor internalisation. Flow cytometry was used to confirm the health of MSC culture and assess the impact of nanosensor internalisation. MSC were characterised using fluorescently tagged CD cell surface markers that were also used to show that nanosensor internalisation did not negatively impact on MSC culture. Additionally it was shown that flow cytometry can be used to measure fluorophores located both on the cell surface and internalised within the cell. Complementary data was obtained using confocal microscopy to confirm nanosensor internalisation within MSC.

  17. [Comparison of cell elasticity analysis methods based on atomic force microscopy indentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Hao, Fengtao; Chen, Xiaohu; Yang, Zhouqi; Ding, Chong; Shang, Peng

    2014-10-01

    In order to investigate in greater detail the two methods based on Hertz model for analyzing force-distance curve obtained by atomic force microscopy, we acquired the force-distance curves of Hela and MCF-7 cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation in this study. After the determination of contact point, Young's modulus in different indentation depth were calculated with two analysis methods of "two point" and "slope fitting". The results showed that the Young's modulus of Hela cell was higher than that of MCF-7 cell,which is in accordance with the F-actin distribution of the two types of cell. We found that the Young's modulus of the cells was decreased with increasing indentation depth and the curve trends by "slope fitting". This indicated that the "slope fitting" method could reduce the error caused by the miscalculation of contact point. The purpose of this study was to provide a guidance for researcher to choose an appropriate method for analyzing AFM indentation force-distance curve.

  18. Mapping the local organization of cell membranes using excitation-polarization-resolved confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Alla; Wang, Xiao; Ranchon, Hubert; Savatier, Julien; Rigneault, Hervé; Ferrand, Patrick; Brasselet, Sophie

    2013-07-02

    Fluorescence anisotropy and linear dichroism imaging have been widely used for imaging biomolecular orientational distributions in protein aggregates, fibrillar structures of cells, and cell membranes. However, these techniques do not give access to complete orientational order information in a whole image, because their use is limited to parts of the sample where the average orientation of molecules is known a priori. Fluorescence anisotropy is also highly sensitive to depolarization mechanisms such as those induced by fluorescence energy transfer. A fully excitation-polarization-resolved fluorescence microscopy imaging that relies on the use of a tunable incident polarization and a nonpolarized detection is able to circumvent these limitations. We have developed such a technique in confocal epifluorescence microscopy, giving access to new regions of study in the complex and heterogeneous molecular organization of cell membranes. Using this technique, we demonstrate morphological changes at the subdiffraction scale in labeled COS-7 cell membranes whose cytoskeleton is perturbed. Molecular orientational order is also seen to be affected by cholesterol depletion, reflecting the strong interplay between lipid-packing regions and their nearby cytoskeleton. This noninvasive optical technique can reveal local organization in cell membranes when used as a complement to existing methods such as generalized polarization. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-term tracking of budding yeast cells in brightfield microscopy: CellStar and the Evaluation Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versari, Cristian; Stoma, Szymon; Batmanov, Kirill; Llamosi, Artémis; Mroz, Filip; Kaczmarek, Adam; Deyell, Matt; Lhoussaine, Cédric; Hersen, Pascal; Batt, Gregory

    2017-02-01

    With the continuous expansion of single cell biology, the observation of the behaviour of individual cells over extended durations and with high accuracy has become a problem of central importance. Surprisingly, even for yeast cells that have relatively regular shapes, no solution has been proposed that reaches the high quality required for long-term experiments for segmentation and tracking (S&T) based on brightfield images. Here, we present CellStar , a tool chain designed to achieve good performance in long-term experiments. The key features are the use of a new variant of parametrized active rays for segmentation, a neighbourhood-preserving criterion for tracking, and the use of an iterative approach that incrementally improves S&T quality. A graphical user interface enables manual corrections of S&T errors and their use for the automated correction of other, related errors and for parameter learning. We created a benchmark dataset with manually analysed images and compared CellStar with six other tools, showing its high performance, notably in long-term tracking. As a community effort, we set up a website, the Yeast Image Toolkit, with the benchmark and the Evaluation Platform to gather this and additional information provided by others. © 2017 The Authors.

  20. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Rodighiero, Simona

    2015-03-22

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Live Cell Refractometry Using Hilbert Phase Microscopy and Confocal Reflectance Microscopy†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Niyom; Choi, Wonshik; Popescu, Gabriel; Yaqoob, Zahid; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative chemical analysis has served as a useful tool for understanding cellular metabolisms in biology. Among many physical properties used in chemical analysis, refractive index in particular has provided molecular concentration that is an important indicator for biological activities. In this report, we present a method of extracting full-field refractive index maps of live cells in their native states. We first record full-field optical thickness maps of living cells by Hilbert phase microscopy and then acquire physical thickness maps of the same cells using a custom-built confocal reflectance microscope. Full-field and axially averaged refractive index maps are acquired from the ratio of optical thickness to physical thickness. The accuracy of the axially averaged index measurement is 0.002. This approach can provide novel biological assays of label-free living cells in situ. PMID:19803506

  2. Force and Compliance Measurements on Living Cells Using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojcikiewicz Ewa P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM in studies of cell adhesion and cell compliance. Our studies use the interaction between leukocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1/intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 as a model system. The forces required to unbind a single LFA-1/ICAM-1 bond were measured at different loading rates. This data was used to determine the dynamic strength of the LFA-1/ICAM-1 complex and characterize the activation potential that this complex overcomes during its breakage. Force measurements acquired at the multiple- bond level provided insight about the mechanism of cell adhesion. In addition, the AFM was used as a microindenter to determine the mechanical properties of cells. The applications of these methods are described using data from a previous study.

  3. Scanning transmission proton microscopy tomography of reconstruction cells from simulated data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Conghua; Li Min; Hou Qing

    2011-01-01

    For scanning transmission proton microscopy tomography, to compare cell images of the proton stopping power and relative electron density, two cell phantoms are designed and simulated by code FLUKA. The cell images are reconstructed by the filtered back projection algorithm, and compared with their tomography imaging. The images of stopping power and relative electron density slightly vary with proton energies, but the internal images are of clear with high resolution. The organic glass image of relative electron density reveals the resolution power of proton tomography. Also, the simulation results reflect effects of the boundary enhancement, the weak artifacts, and the internal structure border extension by multiple scattering. So using proton tomography to analyze internal structure of a cell is a superior. (authors)

  4. Behavior of HepG2 liver cancer cells using microfluidic-microscopy: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamahmutoglu, Hande; ćetin, Metin; Yaǧcı, Tamer; Elitaş, Meltem

    2018-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most common types of liver cancer causing death all over the world. Although early-stage liver cancer can sometimes be treated with partial hepatectomy, liver transplantation, ablation, and embolization, sorafenib treatment is the only approved systemic therapy for advanced HCC. The aim of this research is to develop tools and methods to understand the individuality of hepatocellular carcinoma. Microfluidic cell-culture platform has been developed to observe behavior of single-cells; fluorescence microscopy has been implemented to investigate phenotypic changes of cells. Our preliminary data proved high-level heterogeneity of hepatocellular carcinoma while verifying limited growth of liver cancer cell lines on the silicon wafer.

  5. Atomic Force Microscopy Investigation of Morphological and Nanomechanical Properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Ninell Pollas

    2008-01-01

    changes in the fraction of individual bacteria and bacteria undergoing proliferation, and decrease of cell length of mother and daughter cells. The results indicated that colistin arrested the bacterial growth just after septum formation. Furthermore did the morphology change from a smooth bacterial......Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is unique in the aspect of studying living biological sample under physiological conditions. AFM was invented in 1986 by Binnig and Gerber and began in the early 1990’s to be implemented in life science. AFM can give a detailed three dimensional image of an intact cell......, but also be used to examine the nanomechanical properties on single cell level. These qualities make AFM a powerful tool in biology and can be used to examine both morphological and nanomechanical response to various liquids environments, such as osmotic pressure, but also the effects of e.g. antibiotic...

  6. Imaging lipid domains in cell membranes: the advent of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan Myers Owen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The lipid bilayer of model membranes, liposomes reconstituted from cell lipids, and plasma membrane vesicles and spheres can separate into two distinct liquid phases to yield lipid domains with liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered properties. These observations are the basis of the lipid raft hypothesis that postulates the existence of cholesterol-enriched ordered-phase lipid domains in cell membranes that could regulate protein mobility, localization and interaction. Here we review the evidence that nano-scaled lipid complexes and meso-scaled lipid domains exist in cell membranes and how new fluorescence microscopy techniques that overcome the diffraction limit provide new insights into lipid organization in cell membranes.

  7. Variability and repertoire size of T-cell receptor V alpha gene segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, D M; Pattern, P; Chien, Y; Yokota, T; Eshhar, Z; Giedlin, M; Gascoigne, N R; Goodnow, C; Wolf, R; Arai, K

    The immune system of higher organisms is composed largely of two distinct cell types, B lymphocytes and T lymphocytes, each of which is independently capable of recognizing an enormous number of distinct entities through their antigen receptors; surface immunoglobulin in the case of the former, and the T-cell receptor (TCR) in the case of the latter. In both cell types, the genes encoding the antigen receptors consist of multiple gene segments which recombine during maturation to produce many possible peptides. One striking difference between B- and T-cell recognition that has not yet been resolved by the structural data is the fact that T cells generally require a major histocompatibility determinant together with an antigen whereas, in most cases, antibodies recognize antigen alone. Recently, we and others have found that a series of TCR V beta gene sequences show conservation of many of the same residues that are conserved between heavy- and light-chain immunoglobulin V regions, and these V beta sequences are predicted to have an immunoglobulin-like secondary structure. To extend these studies, we have isolated and sequenced eight additional alpha-chain complementary cDNA clones and compared them with published sequences. Analyses of these sequences, reported here, indicate that V alpha regions have many of the characteristics of V beta gene segments but differ in that they almost always occur as cross-hybridizing gene families. We conclude that there may be very different selective pressures operating on V alpha and V beta sequences and that the V alpha repertoire may be considerably larger than that of V beta.

  8. Automated segmentation and isolation of touching cell nuclei in cytopathology smear images of pleural effusion using distance transform watershed method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Khin Yadanar; Choomchuay, Somsak; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2017-06-01

    The automated segmentation of cell nuclei is an essential stage in the quantitative image analysis of cell nuclei extracted from smear cytology images of pleural fluid. Cell nuclei can indicate cancer as the characteristics of cell nuclei are associated with cells proliferation and malignancy in term of size, shape and the stained color. Nevertheless, automatic nuclei segmentation has remained challenging due to the artifacts caused by slide preparation, nuclei heterogeneity such as the poor contrast, inconsistent stained color, the cells variation, and cells overlapping. In this paper, we proposed a watershed-based method that is capable to segment the nuclei of the variety of cells from cytology pleural fluid smear images. Firstly, the original image is preprocessed by converting into the grayscale image and enhancing by adjusting and equalizing the intensity using histogram equalization. Next, the cell nuclei are segmented using OTSU thresholding as the binary image. The undesirable artifacts are eliminated using morphological operations. Finally, the distance transform based watershed method is applied to isolate the touching and overlapping cell nuclei. The proposed method is tested with 25 Papanicolaou (Pap) stained pleural fluid images. The accuracy of our proposed method is 92%. The method is relatively simple, and the results are very promising.

  9. Electron microscopy using the genetically encoded APEX2 tag in cultured mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martell, Jeffrey D; Deerinck, Thomas J; Lam, Stephanie S; Ellisman, Mark H; Ting, Alice Y

    2018-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) is the premiere technique for high-resolution imaging of cellular ultrastructure. Unambiguous identification of specific proteins or cellular compartments in electron micrographs, however, remains challenging because of difficulties in delivering electron-dense contrast agents to specific subcellular targets within intact cells. We recently reported enhanced ascorbate peroxidase 2 (APEX2) as a broadly applicable genetic tag that generates EM contrast on a specific protein or subcellular compartment of interest. This protocol provides guidelines for designing and validating APEX2 fusion constructs, along with detailed instructions for cell culture, transfection, fixation, heavy-metal staining, embedding in resin, and EM imaging. Although this protocol focuses on EM in cultured mammalian cells, APEX2 is applicable to many cell types and contexts, including intact tissues and organisms, and is useful for numerous applications beyond EM, including live-cell proteomic mapping. This protocol, which describes procedures for sample preparation from cell monolayers and cell pellets, can be completed in 10 d, including time for APEX2 fusion construct validation, cell growth, and solidification of embedding resins. Notably, the only additional steps required relative to a standard EM sample preparation are cell transfection and a 2- to 45-min staining period with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine (DAB) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). PMID:28796234

  10. Electron microscopy of glial cells of the central nervous system in the crab Ucides cordatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allodi S.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Invertebrate glial cells show a variety of morphologies depending on species and location. They have been classified according to relatively general morphological or functional criteria and also to their location. The present study was carried out to characterize the organization of glial cells and their processes in the zona fasciculata and in the protocerebral tract of the crab Ucides cordatus. We performed routine and cytochemical procedures for electron microscopy analysis. Semithin sections were observed at the light microscope. The Thiéry procedure indicated the presence of carbohydrates, particularly glycogen, in tissue and in cells. To better visualize the axonal ensheathment at the ultrastructural level, we employed a method to enhance the unsaturated fatty acids present in membranes. Our results showed that there are at least two types of glial cells in these nervous structures, a light one and a dark one. Most of the dark cell processes have been mentioned in the literature as extracellular matrix, but since they presented an enveloping membrane, glycogen and mitochondria - intact and with different degrees of disruption - they were considered to be glial cells in the present study. We assume that they correspond to the perineurial cells on the basis of their location. The light cells must correspond to the periaxonal cells. Some characteristics of the axons such as their organization, ensheathment and subcellular structures are also described.

  11. Quantitative neuroanatomy of all Purkinje cells with light sheet microscopy and high-throughput image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovico eSilvestri

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the cytoarchitecture of mammalian central nervous system on a brain-wide scale is becoming a compelling need in neuroscience. For example, realistic modeling of brain activity requires the definition of quantitative features of large neuronal populations in the whole brain. Quantitative anatomical maps will also be crucial to classify the cytoarchtitectonic abnormalities associated with neuronal pathologies in a high reproducible and reliable manner. In this paper, we apply recent advances in optical microscopy and image analysis to characterize the spatial distribution of Purkinje cells across the whole cerebellum. Light sheet microscopy was used to image with micron-scale resolution a fixed and cleared cerebellum of an L7-GFP transgenic mouse, in which all Purkinje cells are fluorescently labeled. A fast and scalable algorithm for fully automated cell identification was applied on the image to extract the position of all the fluorescent Purkinje cells. This vectorized representation of the cell population allows a thorough characterization of the complex three-dimensional distribution of the neurons, highlighting the presence of gaps inside the lamellar organization of Purkinje cells, whose density is believed to play a significant role in autism spectrum disorders. Furthermore, clustering analysis of the localized somata permits dividing the whole cerebellum in groups of Purkinje cells with high spatial correlation, suggesting new possibilities of anatomical partition. The quantitative approach presented here can be extended to study the distribution of different types of cell in many brain regions and across the whole encephalon, providing a robust base for building realistic computational models of the brain, and for unbiased morphological tissue screening in presence of pathologies and/or drug treatments.

  12. Comparison of manual & automated analysis methods for corneal endothelial cell density measurements by specular microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianyan; Maram, Jyotsna; Tepelus, Tudor C; Modak, Cristina; Marion, Ken; Sadda, SriniVas R; Chopra, Vikas; Lee, Olivia L

    2017-08-07

    To determine the reliability of corneal endothelial cell density (ECD) obtained by automated specular microscopy versus that of validated manual methods and factors that predict such reliability. Sharp central images from 94 control and 106 glaucomatous eyes were captured with Konan specular microscope NSP-9900. All images were analyzed by trained graders using Konan CellChek Software, employing the fully- and semi-automated methods as well as Center Method. Images with low cell count (input cells number <100) and/or guttata were compared with the Center and Flex-Center Methods. ECDs were compared and absolute error was used to assess variation. The effect on ECD of age, cell count, cell size, and cell size variation was evaluated. No significant difference was observed between the Center and Flex-Center Methods in corneas with guttata (p=0.48) or low ECD (p=0.11). No difference (p=0.32) was observed in ECD of normal controls <40 yrs old between the fully-automated method and manual Center Method. However, in older controls and glaucomatous eyes, ECD was overestimated by the fully-automated method (p=0.034) and semi-automated method (p=0.025) as compared to manual method. Our findings show that automated analysis significantly overestimates ECD in the eyes with high polymegathism and/or large cell size, compared to the manual method. Therefore, we discourage reliance upon the fully-automated method alone to perform specular microscopy analysis, particularly if an accurate ECD value is imperative. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  13. Microscopy studies on pronton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes with different ionomer contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Shuang; Solterbeck, Claus Henning; Odgaard, Madeleine

    2009-01-01

    of the electrode was well displayed in the topography and phase images. The particle and pore size (Z) distributions showed the most frequent values at 30-40 nm and 20-30 nm, respectively. The particle size corresponds to the size of the carbon support for the platinum catalyst. Catalyst agglomeration was observed......Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell electrodes with different ionomer contents were studied with various microscopic techniques. The morphology and surface potential were examined by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin Probe Microscopy (KPM), respectively. The particulate nature...... in high ionomer content electrodes. The surface potential images showed distinct difference to the topography images. The overall grain size was seen to increase, the pore volume to decrease, the surface roughness to decrease, and the surface potential variation to increase with the increase of ionomer...

  14. Refractive Index Sensing of Green Fluorescent Proteins in Living Cells Using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; van den Berg, Timo K.; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91phox, which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase enzyme, in human myeloid PLB-985 cells and showed by high-resolution confocal fluorescence microscopy that GFP-Rac2 and GFP-gp91phox are targeted to the cytosol and to membranes, respectively. Frequency-domain FLIM experiments on these PLB-985 cells resulted in average fluorescence lifetimes of 2.70 ns for cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and 2.31 ns for membrane-bound GFP-gp91phox. By comparing these lifetimes with a calibration curve obtained by measuring GFP lifetimes in PBS/glycerol mixtures of known refractive index, we found that the local refractive indices of cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and membrane-targeted GFP-gp91phox are ∼1.38 and ∼1.46, respectively, which is in good correspondence with reported values for the cytosol and plasma membrane measured by other techniques. The ability to measure the local refractive index of proteins in living cells by FLIM may be important in revealing intracellular spatial heterogeneities within organelles such as the plasma and phagosomal membrane. PMID:18223002

  15. Biomimetic Coating on Porous Alumina for Tissue Engineering: Characterisation by Cell Culture and Confocal Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Kolos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study porous alumina samples were prepared and then coated using the biomimetic coating technique using a five times Simulated Body Fluid (5.0SBF as the growth solution. A coating was achieved after pre-treatment with concentrated acid. From elemental analysis, the coating contained calcium and phosphorous, but also sodium and chlorine. Halite was identified by XRD, a sodium chloride phase. Sintering was done to remove the halite phase. Once halite was burnt off, the calcium phosphate crystals were not covered with halite and, therefore, the apatite phases can be clearly observed. Cell culturing showed sufficient cell attachment to the less porous alumina, Sample B, that has more calcium phosphate growth, while the porous alumina, Sample A, with minimal calcium phosphate growth attained very little cell attachment. This is likely due to the contribution that calcium phosphate plays in the attachment of bone-like cells to a bioinert ceramic such as alumina. These results were repeated on both SEM and confocal microscopy analysis. Confocal microscopy was a novel characterisation approach which gave useful information and was a visual aid.

  16. Labeling Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Gold Nanocages for in vitro and in vivo Tracking by Two-Photon Microscopy and Photoacoustic Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Wang, Yu; Wang, Lidai; Wang, Yucai; Cai, Xin; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V.; Xia, Younan

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell tracking is a highly important subject. Current techniques based on nanoparticle-labeling, such as magnetic resonance imaging, fluorescence microscopy, and micro-computed tomography, are plagued by limitations including relatively low sensitivity or penetration depth, involvement of ionizing irradiation, and potential cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles. Here we introduce a new class of contrast agents based on gold nanocages (AuNCs) with hollow interiors and porous walls to label human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) for both in vitro and in vivo tracking using two-photon microscopy and photoacoustic microscopy. As demonstrated by the viability assay, the AuNCs showed negligible cytotoxicity under a reasonable dose, and did not alter the differentiation potential of the hMSCs into desired lineages. We were able to image the cells labeled with AuNCs in vitro for at least 28 days in culture, as well as to track the cells that homed to the tumor region in nude mice in vivo. PMID:23946820

  17. Solid oxide fuel cell anode image segmentation based on a novel quantum-inspired fuzzy clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaowei; Xiang, Yuhan; Chen, Li; Xu, Xin; Li, Xi

    2015-12-01

    High quality microstructure modeling can optimize the design of fuel cells. For three-phase accurate identification of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) microstructure, this paper proposes a novel image segmentation method on YSZ/Ni anode Optical Microscopic (OM) images. According to Quantum Signal Processing (QSP), the proposed approach exploits a quantum-inspired adaptive fuzziness factor to adaptively estimate the energy function in the fuzzy system based on Markov Random Filed (MRF). Before defuzzification, a quantum-inspired probability distribution based on distance and gray correction is proposed, which can adaptively adjust the inaccurate probability estimation of uncertain points caused by noises and edge points. In this study, the proposed method improves accuracy and effectiveness of three-phase identification on the micro-investigation. It provides firm foundation to investigate the microstructural evolution and its related properties.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy for monitoring cell adhesion using metal induced energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wonsang; Seo, JinWon; Song, Jun ho; Kim, DongEun; Won, YoungJae; Choi, In-Hong; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Dug Young

    2018-02-01

    A precise control and a reliable monitoring tool for the adhesion properties of a cell are very important in atherosclerosis studies. If endothelial cells in contact with the intracellular membrane are not attached securely, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles can enter into the inner membrane. It is therefore necessary to measure conditions under which endothelial cell detachment occurs. When a cell is attached to a metal thin film, the lifetime of a fluorescence probe attached to the membrane of the cell is reduced by the metal-induced energy transfer (MIET). Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is used to monitor the attachment condition of a cell to a metal surface using FRET. However, this requires high numerical aperture (NA) objective lens because axial confocal resolution must be smaller than the cell thickness. This requirement limits the field of view of the measurement specimen. In this study we provides a new method which can measure adhesion properties of endothelial cells even with a low NA objective lens by resolving two lifetime components in FLIM.

  19. Refractometry of melanocyte cell nuclei using optical scatter images recorded by digital Fourier microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seet, Katrina Y T; Nieminen, Timo A; Zvyagin, Andrei V

    2009-01-01

    The cell nucleus is the dominant optical scatterer in the cell. Neoplastic cells are characterized by cell nucleus polymorphism and polychromism-i.e., the nuclei exhibits an increase in the distribution of both size and refractive index. The relative size parameter, and its distribution, is proportional to the product of the nucleus size and its relative refractive index and is a useful discriminant between normal and abnormal (cancerous) cells. We demonstrate a recently introduced holographic technique, digital Fourier microscopy (DFM), to provide a sensitive measure of this relative size parameter. Fourier holograms were recorded and optical scatter of individual scatterers were extracted and modeled with Mie theory to determine the relative size parameter. The relative size parameter of individual melanocyte cell nuclei were found to be 16.5+/-0.2, which gives a cell nucleus refractive index of 1.38+/-0.01 and is in good agreement with previously reported data. The relative size parameters of individual malignant melanocyte cell nuclei are expected to be greater than 16.5.

  20. Elasticity of human embryonic stem cells as determined by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Robert; Bock, Henry; Pells, Steve; Canetta, Elisabetta; Adya, Ashok K; Moore, Andrew J; De Sousa, Paul; Willoughby, Nicholas A

    2011-10-01

    The expansive growth and differentiation potential of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) make them a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine. However, this promise is off set by the propensity for spontaneous or uncontrolled differentiation to result in heterogeneous cell populations. Cell elasticity has recently been shown to characterize particular cell phenotypes, with undifferentiated and differentiated cells sometimes showing significant differences in their elasticities. In this study, we determined the Young's modulus of hESCs by atomic force microscopy using a pyramidal tip. Using this method we are able to take point measurements of elasticity at multiple locations on a single cell, allowing local variations due to cell structure to be identified. We found considerable differences in the elasticity of the analyzed hESCs, reflected by a broad range of Young's modulus (0.05-10 kPa). This surprisingly high variation suggests that elasticity could serve as the basis of a simple and efficient large scale purification/separation technique to discriminate subpopulations of hESCs.

  1. Identification of Proliferative and Apoptotic Sertoli Cells Using Fluorescence and Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Hernández, Jesús; Seco-Rovira, Vicente; Beltrán-Frutos, Ester; Quesada-Cubo, Victor; Ferrer, Concepción; Pastor, Luis Miguel

    2018-01-01

    Sertoli cells, the testicular somatic cells of the seminiferous epithelium, are vital for the survival of the epithelium. They undergo proliferation and apoptosis during fetal, neonatal, and prepubertal development. Apoptosis is increased in certain situations such as exposure to many substances, for example, toxics, or short photoperiod in the non-breeding season of some mammals. Therefore, it has always been considered that Sertoli cells that reach adulthood are quiescent cells, that is to say, nonproliferative, do not die, are terminally differentiated, and whose numbers remain constant. Recently, a degree of both proliferation and apoptosis has been observed in normal adult conditions, suggesting that consideration of this cell as quiescent may be subject to change. All this make it necessary to use histochemical techniques to demonstrate whether Sertoli cells are undergoing proliferation or apoptosis in histological sections and to allow the qualitative and quantitative study of these. In this chapter, we present two double-staining techniques that can be used for identifying Sertoli cells in proliferation or apoptosis by fluorescence microscopy. In both, the Sertoli cells are identified by an immunohistochemistry for vimentin followed by an immunohistochemistry for PCNA or a TUNEL histochemistry.

  2. Confocal microscopy and electrophysiological study of single patient corneal endothelium cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatini, Francesca; Rossi, Francesca; Coppi, Elisabetta; Magni, Giada; Fusco, Irene; Menabuoni, Luca; Pedata, Felicita; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Pini, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The characterization of the ion channels in corneal endothelial cells and the elucidation of their involvement in corneal pathologies would lead to the identification of new molecular target for pharmacological treatments and to the clarification of corneal physiology. The corneal endothelium is an amitotic cell monolayer with a major role in preserving corneal transparency and in regulating the water and solute flux across the posterior surface of the cornea. Although endothelial cells are non-excitable, they express a range of ion channels, such as voltage-dependent Na+ channels and K+ channels, L-type Ca2 channels and many others. Interestingly, purinergic receptors have been linked to a variety of conditions within the eye but their presence in the endothelium and their role in its pathophysiology is still uncertain. In this study, we were able to extract endothelial cells from single human corneas, thus obtaining primary cultures that represent the peculiarity of each donor. Corneas were from tissues not suitable for transplant in patients. We characterized the endothelial cells by confocal microscopy, both within the intact cornea and in the primary endothelial cells cultures. We also studied the functional role of the purinergic system (adenosine, ATP and their receptors) by means of electrophysiological recordings. The experiments were performed by patch clamp recordings and confocal time-lapse microscopy and our results indicate that the application of purinergic compounds modulates the amplitude of outward currents in the isolated endothelial cells. These findings may lead to the proposal of new therapies for endothelium-related corneal diseases.

  3. Association of intracellular and synaptic organization in cochlear inner hair cells revealed by 3D electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Bullen, Anwen; West, Timothy; Moores, Carolyn; Ashmore, Jonathan; Fleck, Roland A.; MacLellan-Gibson, Kirsty; Forge, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ways in which cell architecture is modelled to meet cell function is a poorly understood facet of cell biology. To address this question, we have studied the cytoarchitecture of a cell with highly specialised organisation, the cochlear inner hair cell (IHC), using multiple hierarchies of three-dimensional (3D) electron microscopy analyses. We show that synaptic terminal distribution on the IHC surface correlates with cell shape, and the distribution of a highly organised network ...

  4. Nanoparticle uptake and their co-localization with cell compartments - a confocal Raman microscopy study at single cell level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrela-Lopis, I; Donath, E; Romero, G; Rojas, E; Moya, S E

    2011-01-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy, a non-invasive, non-destructive and label-free technique, was employed to study the uptake and localization of nanoparticles (NPs) in the Hepatocarcinoma human cell line HepG2 at the level of single cells. Cells were exposed to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) the surface of which was engineered with polyelectrolytes and lipid layers, aluminium oxide and cerium dioxide nanoparticles. Raman spectra deconvolution was applied to obtain the spatial distributions of NPs together with lipids/proteins in cells. The colocalization of the NPs with different intracellular environments, lipid bodies, protein and DNA, was inferred. Lipid coated CNTs associated preferentially with lipid rich regions, whereas polyelectrolyte coated CNTs were excluded from lipid rich regions. Al 2 O 3 NPs were found in the cytoplasm. CeO 2 NPs were readily taken up and have been observed all over the cell. Raman z-scans proved the intracellular distribution of the respective NPs.

  5. Nanoparticle uptake and their co-localization with cell compartments - a confocal Raman microscopy study at single cell level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela-Lopis, I.; Romero, G.; Rojas, E.; Moya, S. E.; Donath, E.

    2011-07-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy, a non-invasive, non-destructive and label-free technique, was employed to study the uptake and localization of nanoparticles (NPs) in the Hepatocarcinoma human cell line HepG2 at the level of single cells. Cells were exposed to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) the surface of which was engineered with polyelectrolytes and lipid layers, aluminium oxide and cerium dioxide nanoparticles. Raman spectra deconvolution was applied to obtain the spatial distributions of NPs together with lipids/proteins in cells. The colocalization of the NPs with different intracellular environments, lipid bodies, protein and DNA, was inferred. Lipid coated CNTs associated preferentially with lipid rich regions, whereas polyelectrolyte coated CNTs were excluded from lipid rich regions. Al2O3 NPs were found in the cytoplasm. CeO2 NPs were readily taken up and have been observed all over the cell. Raman z-scans proved the intracellular distribution of the respective NPs.

  6. Surface topography of hairy cell leukemia cells compared to other leukemias as seen by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polliack, Aaron; Tadmor, Tamar

    2011-06-01

    This short review deals with the ultrastructural surface architecture of hairy cell leukemia (HCL) compared to other leukemic cells, as seen by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The development of improved techniques for preparing blood cells for SEM in the 1970s readily enabled these features to be visualized more accurately. This review returns us to the earlier history of SEM, when the surface topography of normal and neoplastic cells was visualized and reported for the first time, in an era before the emergence and use of monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry, now used routinely to define cells by their immunophenotype. Surface microvilli are characteristic for normal and leukemic lymphoid cells, myelo-monocytic cells lack microvilli and show surface ruffles, while leukemic plasma and myeloma cells and megakaryocytes display large surface blebs. HCL cell surfaces are complex and typically 'hybrid' in nature, displaying both lymphoid and monocytic features with florid ruffles of varying sizes interspersed with clumps of short microvilli cytoplasm. The surface features of other leukemic cells and photomicrographs of immuno-SEM labeling of cells employing antibodies and colloidal gold, reported more than 20 years ago, are shown.

  7. Clonal expansion of T-cell receptor beta gene segment in the retrocochlear lesions of EAE mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, K C; Lee, K M; Yoo, T J

    1998-01-01

    It has been reported that the T cell receptor V beta 8.2 (TcrbV8.2) gene segment is predominantly expressed in encephalomyelitic T cells responding to myelin basic protein (MBP) in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. We have demonstrated retrocochlear hearing loss in EAE mice in previous studies. Administration of a monoclonal antibody specific to the T cell receptor V beta 8 (TcrbV8) subfamily prevented both this type of hearing loss and the central nerve disease. In this study, we examined the role of the TcrbV8.2 gene segment in the retrocochlear lesions of EAE mice. A clonal expression of T cell receptor beta chain gene segment (TcrbV8.2-TcrbD2-TcrbJ2.7) was identified in the retrocochlear lesions. The TcrbV8.2 gene segment appears to recombine only with TcrbJ2.1 (32.1%) and TcrbJ2.7 (67.9%) gene segments. The TcrbJ2.7 gene segment has also been previously identified as the dominant TcrbJ gene in the lymph nodes of EAE mice. Only TcrbD2, with a length of 4 amino acids, was observed recombining with these TcrbV8.2 sequences. G and C nucleotides are predominantly expressed at the N regions between the V-D and D-J junctions. This dominant TcrbV gene segment (TcrbV8.2-TcrbD2-TcrbJ2.7) observed in the retrocochlear lesions has been identified in the MBP-specific T cells from the lymph nodes of EAE mice. These results suggest that a small subset of antigen-specific T cells migrate to, and expand at, the retrocochlear lesions, which leads to hearing loss.

  8. The 'grey area' between small cell and non-small cell lung carcinomas. Light and electron microscopy versus clinical data in 14 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooi, W. J.; van Zandwijk, N.; Dingemans, K. P.; Koolen, M. G.; Wagenvoort, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    We studied 14 lung tumours which on light microscopy had posed difficulties on classification as either small cell or non-small cell carcinomas. The light and electron microscopical features were compared with patient follow-up data. Electron microscopy showed neuroendocrine granules in 12 cases,

  9. Common histological patterns in glomerular epithelial cells in secondary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppe, Christoph; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Ostendorf, Tammo; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Boor, Peter; Floege, Jürgen; Smeets, Bart; Moeller, Marcus J

    2015-11-01

    Parietal epithelial cells (PECs) are involved in the development of sclerotic lesions in primary focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Here, the role of PECs was explored in the more common secondary FSGS lesions in 68 patient biopsies, diagnosed with 11 different frequently or rarely encountered glomerular pathologies and additional secondary FSGS lesions. For each biopsy, one section was quadruple stained for PECs (ANXA3), podocytes (synaptopodin), PEC matrix (LKIV69), and Hoechst (nuclei), and a second was quadruple stained for activated PECs (CD44 and cytokeratin-19), PEC matrix, and nuclei. In all lesions, cellular adhesions (synechiae) between Bowman's capsule and the tuft were formed by cells expressing podocyte and/or PEC markers. Cells expressing PEC markers were detected in all FSGS lesions independent of the underlying glomerular disease and often stained positive for markers of activation. Small FSGS lesions, which were hardly identified on PAS sections previously, were detectable by immunofluorescent staining using PEC markers, potentially improving the diagnostic sensitivity to identify these lesions. Thus, similar patterns of cells expressing podocyte and/or PEC markers were found in the formation of secondary FSGS lesions independent of the underlying glomerular disease. Hence, our findings support the hypothesis that FSGS lesions follow a final cellular pathway to nephron loss that includes involvement of cells expressing PEC markers.

  10. Discrimination Between Cervical Cancer Cells and Normal Cervical Cells Based on Longitudinal Elasticity Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueqin; Zhong, Yunxin; Ye, Ting; Wang, Dajing; Mao, Bingwei

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical properties of cells are considered promising biomarkers for the early diagnosis of cancer. Recently, atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation technology has been utilized for the examination of cell cortex mechanics in order to distinguish malignant cells from normal cells. However, few attempts to evaluate the biomechanical properties of cells have focused on the quantification of the non-homogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cellular structures. In the present study, we applied a variation of the method of Carl and Schillers to investigate the differences between longitudinal elasticity of human cervical squamous carcinoma cells (CaSki) and normal cervical epithelial cells (CRL2614) using AFM. The results reveal a three-layer heterogeneous structure in the probing volume of both cell types studied. CaSki cells exhibited a lower whole-cell stiffness and a softer nuclei zone compared to the normal counterpart cells. Moreover, a better differentiated cytoskeleton was found in the inner cytoplasm/nuclei zone of the normal CRL2614 cells, whereas a deeper cytoskeletal distribution was observed in the probing volume of the cancerous counterparts. The sensitive cortical panel of CaSki cells, with a modulus of 0.35~0.47 kPa, was located at 237~225 nm; in normal cells, the elasticity was 1.20~1.32 kPa at 113~128 nm. The present improved method may be validated using the conventional Hertz-Sneddon method, which is widely reported in the literature. In conclusion, our results enable the quantification of the heterogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cancer cells, in particular the correlation with the corresponding depth. Preliminary results indicate that our method may potentially be applied to improve the detection of cancerous cells and provide insights into the pathophysiology of the disease.

  11. Validation of cell-free culture using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and gene expression studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R; Elankumaran, Y; Hijjawi, N; Ryan, U

    2015-06-01

    A cell-free culture system for Cryptosporidium parvum was analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to characterise life cycle stages and compare gene expression in cell-free culture and cell culture using HCT-8 cells. Cryptosporidium parvum samples were harvested at 2 h, 8 h, 14 h, 26 h, 50 h, 74 h, 98 h, 122 h and 170 h, chemically fixed and specimens were observed using a Zeiss 1555 scanning electron microscope. The presence of sporozoites, trophozoites and type I merozoites were identified by SEM. Gene expression in cell culture and cell-free culture was studied using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the sporozoite surface antigen protein (cp15), the glycoprotein 900 (gp900), the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes in both cell free and conventional cell culture. In cell culture, cp15 expression peaked at 74 h, gp900 expression peaked at 74 h and 98 h and COWP expression peaked at 50 h. In cell-free culture, CP15 expression peaked at 98 h, gp900 expression peaked at 74 h and COWP expression peaked at 122 h. The present study is the first to compare gene expression of C. parvum in cell culture and cell-free culture and to characterise life cycle stages of C. parvum in cell-free culture using SEM. Findings from this study showed that gene expression patterns in cell culture and cell-free culture were similar but in cell-free culture, gene expression was delayed for CP15 and COWP in cell free culture compared with the cell culture system and was lower. Although three life cycle stageswere conclusively identified, improvements in SEM methodology should lead to the detection of more life cycle stages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of menadione-glutathione conjugate export from yeast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauzeroll, Janine; Bard, Allen J.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of menadione (2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), which is toxic to yeast cells, and its expulsion as a glutathione complex were studied by scanning electrochemical microscopy. The progression of the in vitro reaction between menadione and glutathione was monitored electrochemically by cyclic voltammetry and correlated with the spectroscopic (UV–visible) behavior. By observing the scanning electrochemical microscope tip current of yeast cells suspended in a menadione-containing solution, the export of the conjugate from the cells with time could be measured. Similar experiments were performed on immobilized yeast cell aggregates stressed by a menadione solution. From the export of the menadione-glutathione conjugate detected at a 1-μm-diameter electrode situated 10 μm from the cells, a flux of about 30,000 thiodione molecules per second per cell was extracted. Numerical simulations based on an explicit finite difference method further revealed that the observation of a constant efflux of thiodione from the cells suggested the rate was limited by the uptake of menadione and that the efflux through the glutathione-conjugate pump was at least an order of magnitude faster. PMID:15148374

  13. Intracellular imaging of docosanol in living cells by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Sixian; Liu, Yuan; Arp, Zane; Zhao, Youbo; Chaney, Eric J.; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2017-07-01

    Docosanol is an over-the-counter topical agent that has proved to be one of the most effective therapies for treating herpes simplex labialis. However, the mechanism by which docosanol suppresses lesion formation remains poorly understood. To elucidate its mechanism of action, we investigated the uptake of docosanol in living cells using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. Based on direct visualization of the deuterated docosanol, we observed highly concentrated docosanol inside living cells 24 h after drug treatment. In addition, different spatial patterns of drug accumulation were observed in different cell lines. In keratinocytes, which are the targeted cells of docosanol, the drug molecules appeared to be docking at the periphery of the cell membrane. In contrast, the drug molecules in fibroblasts appeared to accumulate in densely packed punctate regions throughout the cytoplasm. These results suggest that this molecular imaging approach is suitable for the longitudinal tracking of drug molecules in living cells to identify cell-specific trafficking and may also have implications for elucidating the mechanism by which docosanol suppresses lesion formation.

  14. Full-angle tomographic phase microscopy of flowing quasi-spherical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villone, Massimiliano M; Memmolo, Pasquale; Merola, Francesco; Mugnano, Martina; Miccio, Lisa; Maffettone, Pier Luca; Ferraro, Pietro

    2017-12-19

    We report a reliable full-angle tomographic phase microscopy (FA-TPM) method for flowing quasi-spherical cells along microfluidic channels. This method lies in a completely passive optical system, i.e. mechanical scanning or multi-direction probing of the sample is avoided. It exploits the engineered rolling of cells while they are flowing along a microfluidic channel. Here we demonstrate significant progress with respect to the state of the art of in-flow TPM by showing a general extension to cells having almost spherical shapes while they are flowing in suspension. In fact, the adopted strategy allows the accurate retrieval of rotation angles through a theoretical model of the cells' rotation in a dynamic microfluidic flow by matching it with phase-contrast images resulting from holographic reconstructions. So far, the proposed method is the first and the only one that permits to get in-flow TPM by probing the cells with full-angle, achieving accurate 3D refractive index mapping and the simplest optical setup, simultaneously. Proof of concept experiments were performed successfully on human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells, opening the way for the full characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the new paradigm of liquid biopsy.

  15. Cell tracking with gadophrin-2: a bifunctional contrast agent for MR imaging, optical imaging, and fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E.; Rudelius, Martina; Piontek, Guido; Schlegel, Juergen; Metz, Stephan; Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pichler, Bernd; Heinzmann, Ulrich; Oostendorp, Robert A.J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of use of gadophrin-2 to trace intravenously injected human hematopoietic cells in athymic mice, employing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, optical imaging (OI), and fluorescence microscopy. Mononuclear peripheral blood cells from GCSF-primed patients were labeled with gadophrin-2 (Schering AG, Berlin, Germany), a paramagnetic and fluorescent metalloporphyrin, using established transfection techniques with cationic liposomes. The labeled cells were evaluated in vitro with electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Then, 1 x 10 6 -3 x 10 8 labeled cells were injected into 14 nude Balb/c mice and the in vivo cell distribution was evaluated with MR imaging and OI before and 4, 24, and 48 h after intravenous injection (p.i.). Five additional mice served as controls: three mice were untreated controls and two mice were investigated after injection of unlabeled cells. The contrast agent effect was determined quantitatively for MR imaging by calculating signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) data. After completion of in vivo imaging studies, fluorescence microscopy of excised organs was performed. Intracellular cytoplasmatic uptake of gadophrin-2 was confirmed by electron microscopy. Spectrometry determined an uptake of 31.56 nmol Gd per 10 6 cells. After intravenous injection, the distribution of gadophrin-2 labeled cells in nude mice could be visualized by MR, OI, and fluorescence microscopy. At 4 h p.i., the transplanted cells mainly distributed to lung, liver, and spleen, and 24 h p.i. they also distributed to the bone marrow. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed the distribution of gadophrin-2 labeled cells to these target organs. Gadophrin-2 is suited as a bifunctional contrast agent for MR imaging, OI, and fluorescence microscopy and may be used to combine the advantages of each individual imaging modality for in vivo tracking of intravenously injected hematopoietic cells. (orig.)

  16. Scalable, incremental learning with MapReduce parallelization for cell detection in high-resolution 3D microscopy data

    KAUST Repository

    Sung, Chul; Woo, Jongwook; Goodman, Matthew; Huffman, Todd; Choe, Yoonsuck

    2013-01-01

    Accurate estimation of neuronal count and distribution is central to the understanding of the organization and layout of cortical maps in the brain, and changes in the cell population induced by brain disorders. High-throughput 3D microscopy

  17. Automatic tracking of cells for video microscopy in patch clamp experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Helton M; Munguba, Hermany; Cruz, Rossana M S; Guerreiro, Ana M G; Leao, Richardson N

    2014-06-20

    Visualisation of neurons labeled with fluorescent proteins or compounds generally require exposure to intense light for a relatively long period of time, often leading to bleaching of the fluorescent probe and photodamage of the tissue. Here we created a technique to drastically shorten light exposure and improve the targeting of fluorescent labeled cells that is specially useful for patch-clamp recordings. We applied image tracking and mask overlay to reduce the time of fluorescence exposure and minimise mistakes when identifying neurons. Neurons are first identified according to visual criteria (e.g. fluorescence protein expression, shape, viability etc.) and a transmission microscopy image Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) or Dodt contrast containing the cell used as a reference for the tracking algorithm. A fluorescence image can also be acquired later to be used as a mask (that can be overlaid on the target during live transmission video). As patch-clamp experiments require translating the microscope stage, we used pattern matching to track reference neurons in order to move the fluorescence mask to match the new position of the objective in relation to the sample. For the image processing we used the Open Source Computer Vision (OpenCV) library, including the Speeded-Up Robust Features (SURF) for tracking cells. The dataset of images (n = 720) was analyzed under normal conditions of acquisition and with influence of noise (defocusing and brightness). We validated the method in dissociated neuronal cultures and fresh brain slices expressing Enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein (eYFP) or Tandem Dimer Tomato (tdTomato) proteins, which considerably decreased the exposure to fluorescence excitation, thereby minimising photodamage. We also show that the neuron tracking can be used in differential interference contrast or Dodt contrast microscopy. The techniques of digital image processing used in this work are an important addition to the set of microscopy

  18. Neural network control of focal position during time-lapse microscopy of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ling; Roberts, Elijah

    2018-05-09

    Live-cell microscopy is quickly becoming an indispensable technique for studying the dynamics of cellular processes. Maintaining the specimen in focus during image acquisition is crucial for high-throughput applications, especially for long experiments or when a large sample is being continuously scanned. Automated focus control methods are often expensive, imperfect, or ill-adapted to a specific application and are a bottleneck for widespread adoption of high-throughput, live-cell imaging. Here, we demonstrate a neural network approach for automatically maintaining focus during bright-field microscopy. Z-stacks of yeast cells growing in a microfluidic device were collected and used to train a convolutional neural network to classify images according to their z-position. We studied the effect on prediction accuracy of the various hyperparameters of the neural network, including downsampling, batch size, and z-bin resolution. The network was able to predict the z-position of an image with ±1 μm accuracy, outperforming human annotators. Finally, we used our neural network to control microscope focus in real-time during a 24 hour growth experiment. The method robustly maintained the correct focal position compensating for 40 μm of focal drift and was insensitive to changes in the field of view. About ~100 annotated z-stacks were required to train the network making our method quite practical for custom autofocus applications.

  19. Imaging arterial cells, atherosclerosis, and restenosis by multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han-Wei; Simianu, Vlad; Locker, Matthew J.; Sturek, Michael; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2008-02-01

    By integrating sum-frequency generation (SFG), and two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) on a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscope platform, multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) imaging of arteries and atherosclerotic lesions was demonstrated. CARS signals arising from CH II-rich membranes allowed visualization of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in a carotid artery. Additionally, CARS microscopy allowed vibrational imaging of elastin and collagen fibrils which are rich in CH II bonds in their cross-linking residues. The extracellular matrix organization was further confirmed by TPEF signals arising from elastin's autofluorescence and SFG signals arising from collagen fibrils' non-centrosymmetric structure. The system is capable of identifying different atherosclerotic lesion stages with sub-cellular resolution. The stages of atherosclerosis, such as macrophage infiltration, lipid-laden foam cell accumulation, extracellular lipid distribution, fibrous tissue deposition, plaque establishment, and formation of other complicated lesions could be viewed by our multimodal CARS microscope. Collagen percentages in the region adjacent to coronary artery stents were resolved. High correlation between NLO and histology imaging evidenced the validity of the NLO imaging. The capability of imaging significant components of an arterial wall and distinctive stages of atherosclerosis in a label-free manner suggests the potential application of multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy to monitor the onset and progression of arterial diseases.

  20. Fluorescent Rhodamines and Fluorogenic Carbopyronines for Super‐Resolution STED Microscopy in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitronova, Gyuzel Yu.; Sidenstein, Sven C.; Klocke, Jessica L.; Kamin, Dirk; Meineke, Dirk N. H.; D'Este, Elisa; Kraemer, Philip‐Tobias; Danzl, Johann G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A range of bright and photostable rhodamines and carbopyronines with absorption maxima in the range of λ=500–630 nm were prepared, and enabled the specific labeling of cytoskeletal filaments using HaloTag technology followed by staining with 1 μm solutions of the dye–ligand conjugates. The synthesis, photophysical parameters, fluorogenic behavior, and structure–property relationships of the new dyes are discussed. Light microscopy with stimulated emission depletion (STED) provided one‐ and two‐color images of living cells with an optical resolution of 40–60 nm. PMID:26844929

  1. Correlative microscopy of radial junction nanowire solar cells using nanoindent position markers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fejfar, Antonín; Hývl, Matěj; Vetushka, Aliaksi; Pikna, Peter; Hájková, Zdeňka; Ledinský, Martin; Kočka, Jan; Klapetek, P.; Marek, A.; Mašková, A.; Vyskočil, J.; Merkel, J.; Becker, Ch.; Itoh, T.; Misra, S.; Foldyna, M.; Yu, L.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 135, SI (2015), s. 106-112 ISSN 0927-0248 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7E10061; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA ČR GA13-12386S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 240826 - PolySiMode Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101216; AVČR(CZ) M100101217 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : radial junction solar cells * silicon nanowires * thin films * structural disorder * conductive AFM * nanoindentation * correlative microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.732, year: 2015

  2. Investigating inhomogeneous electronic properties of radial junction solar cells using correlative microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müller, Martin; Hývl, Matěj; Kratzer, M.; Teichert, C.; Misra, S.; Foldyna, M.; Yu, L.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.; Itoh, T.; Hájková, Zdeňka; Vetushka, Aliaksi; Ledinský, Martin; Kočka, Jan; Fejfar, Antonín

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 8 (2015), "08KA08-1"-"08KA08-5" ISSN 0021-4922 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-15357S; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14ATE004; GA ČR GA13-25747S; GA ČR GA13-12386S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA ČR GB14-37427G Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101217 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : solar cells * radial junctions * silicon nanowires * correlative microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.122, year: 2015

  3. Helium Ion Microscopy of proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrode structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serguei Chiriaev

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of composite materials with microscopy techniques is an essential route to understanding their properties and degradation mechanisms, though the observation with a suitable type of microscopy is not always possible. In this work, we present proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrode interface structure dependence on ionomer content, systematically studied by Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM. A special focus was on acquiring high resolution images of the electrode structure and avoiding interface damage from irradiation and tedious sample preparation. HIM demonstrated its advantages in surface imaging, which is paramount in studies of the interface morphology of ionomer covered or absorbed catalyst structures in a combination with electrochemical characterization and accelerated stress test. The electrode porosity was found to depend on the ionomer content. The stressed electrodes demonstrated higher porosity in comparison to the unstressed ones on the condition of no external mechanical pressure. Moreover, formation of additional small grains was observed for the electrodes with the low ionomer content, indicating Pt redeposition through Ostwald ripening. Polymer nanofiber structures were found in the crack regions of the catalyst layer, which appear due to the internal stress originated from the solvent evaporation. These fibers have fairly uniform diameters of a few tens of nanometers, and their density increases with the increasing ionomer content in the electrodes. In the hot-pressed electrodes, we found more closed contact between the electrode components, reduced particle size, polymer coalescence and formation of nano-sized polymer fiber architecture between the particles.

  4. Proving tumour cells by acute nutritional/energy deprivation as a survival threat: a task for microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janečková, H.; Veselý, Pavel; Chmelík, R.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 6 (2009), s. 2339-2345 ISSN 0250-7005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : tumour cell * nutritional deprivation * energy deprivation * cell survival * cell death * digital holographic microscopy * dynamic phase difference Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.428, year: 2009

  5. A segmented cell approach for studying the effects of serpentine flow field parameters on PEMFC current distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reshetenko, Tatyana V.; Bender, Guido; Bethune, Keith; Rocheleau, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Effects of a flow field design on PEMFC were investigated. ► A segmented cell was used to study 6- and 10-channel serpentine flow fields. ► 10-Channel flow field improved a fuel cell's performance at high current. ► Performance distribution was more uniform for 10-channel than for 6-channel flow field. ► The performance improvement was due to an increased pressure drop. -- Abstract: A serpentine flow field is a commonly used design in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Consequently, optimization of the flow field parameters is critically needed. A segmented cell system was used to study the impact of the flow field's parameters on the current distribution in a PEMFC, and the data obtained were analyzed in terms of voltage overpotentials. 6-Channel and 10-channel serpentine flow field designs were investigated. At low current the segments performance was found to slightly decrease for a 10-channel serpentine flow field. However, increasing the number of channels increased the fuel cell performance when operating at high current and the cell performance became more uniform downstream. The observed improvement in fuel cell performance was attributed to a decrease in mass transfer voltage losses (permeability and diffusion), due to an increased pressure drop. Spatially distributed electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) data showed differences in the local segment impedance response and confirmed the performance distribution and the impact of the flow field design

  6. Fluorescence Dynamics in the Endoplasmic Reticulum of a Live Cell: Time-Resolved Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shirsendu; Nandi, Somen; Ghosh, Catherine; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-09-19

    Fluorescence dynamics in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of a live non-cancer lung cell (WI38) and a lung cancer cell (A549) are studied by using time-resolved confocal microscopy. To selectively study the organelle, ER, we have used an ER-Tracker dye. From the emission maximum (λmaxem) of the ER-Tracker dye, polarity (i.e. dielectric constant, ϵ) in the ER region of the cells (≈500 nm in WI38 and ≈510 nm in A549) is estimated to be similar to that of chloroform (λmaxem =506 nm, ϵ≈5). The red shift by 10 nm in λmaxem in the cancer cell (A549) suggests a slightly higher polarity compared to the non-cancer cell (WI38). The fluorescence intensity of the ER-Tracker dye exhibits prolonged intermittent oscillations on a timescale of 2-6 seconds for the cancer cell (A549). For the non-cancer cell (WI38), such fluorescence oscillations are much less prominent. The marked fluorescence intensity oscillations in the cancer cell are attributed to enhanced calcium oscillations. The average solvent relaxation time () of the ER region in the lung cancer cell (A549, 250±50 ps) is about four times faster than that in the non-cancer cell (WI38, 1000±50 ps). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. The parietal epithelial cell is crucially involved in human idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkman, Henry; Smeets, Bart; van der Laak, Jeroen; Steenbergen, Eric; Wetzels, Jack

    2005-10-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is one of the most common patterns of glomerular injury encountered in human renal biopsies. Epithelial hyperplasia, which can be prominent in FSGS, has been attributed to dedifferentiation and proliferation of podocytes. Based on observations in a mouse model of FSGS, we pointed to the role of parietal epithelial cells (PECs). In the present study we investigated the relative role of PECs and podocytes in human idiopathic FSGS. We performed a detailed study of lesions from a patient with recurrent idiopathic FSGS by serial sectioning, marker analysis and three-dimensional reconstruction of glomeruli. We have studied the expression of markers for podocytes, PECs, mesangial cells, endothelium, and myofibroblasts. We also looked at proliferation and composition of the deposited extracellular matrix (ECM). We found that proliferating epithelial cells in FSGS lesions are negative for podocyte and macrophage markers, but stain for PEC markers. The composition of the matrix deposited by these cells is identical to Bowman's capsule. Our study demonstrates that PECs are crucially involved in the pathogenesis of FSGS lesions.

  8. Context based mixture model for cell phase identification in automated fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xiaobo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automated identification of cell cycle phases of individual live cells in a large population captured via automated fluorescence microscopy technique is important for cancer drug discovery and cell cycle studies. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy images provide an important method to study the cell cycle process under different conditions of perturbation. Existing methods are limited in dealing with such time-lapse data sets while manual analysis is not feasible. This paper presents statistical data analysis and statistical pattern recognition to perform this task. Results The data is generated from Hela H2B GFP cells imaged during a 2-day period with images acquired 15 minutes apart using an automated time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. The patterns are described with four kinds of features, including twelve general features, Haralick texture features, Zernike moment features, and wavelet features. To generate a new set of features with more discriminate power, the commonly used feature reduction techniques are used, which include Principle Component Analysis (PCA, Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA, Maximum Margin Criterion (MMC, Stepwise Discriminate Analysis based Feature Selection (SDAFS, and Genetic Algorithm based Feature Selection (GAFS. Then, we propose a Context Based Mixture Model (CBMM for dealing with the time-series cell sequence information and compare it to other traditional classifiers: Support Vector Machine (SVM, Neural Network (NN, and K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN. Being a standard practice in machine learning, we systematically compare the performance of a number of common feature reduction techniques and classifiers to select an optimal combination of a feature reduction technique and a classifier. A cellular database containing 100 manually labelled subsequence is built for evaluating the performance of the classifiers. The generalization error is estimated using the cross validation technique. The

  9. Micro-patterned agarose gel devices for single-cell high-throughput microscopy of E. coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, David G; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Yo; Taniguchi, Yuichi

    2017-12-21

    High-throughput microscopy of bacterial cells elucidated fundamental cellular processes including cellular heterogeneity and cell division homeostasis. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices provide advantages including precise positioning of cells and throughput, however device fabrication is time-consuming and requires specialised skills. Agarose pads are a popular alternative, however cells often clump together, which hinders single cell quantitation. Here, we imprint agarose pads with micro-patterned 'capsules', to trap individual cells and 'lines', to direct cellular growth outwards in a straight line. We implement this micro-patterning into multi-pad devices called CapsuleHotel and LineHotel for high-throughput imaging. CapsuleHotel provides ~65,000 capsule structures per mm 2 that isolate individual Escherichia coli cells. In contrast, LineHotel provides ~300 line structures per mm that direct growth of micro-colonies. With CapsuleHotel, a quantitative single cell dataset of ~10,000 cells across 24 samples can be acquired and analysed in under 1 hour. LineHotel allows tracking growth of > 10 micro-colonies across 24 samples simultaneously for up to 4 generations. These easy-to-use devices can be provided in kit format, and will accelerate discoveries in diverse fields ranging from microbiology to systems and synthetic biology.

  10. Identification of tumor cells infiltrating into connective tissue in esophageal cancer by multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Jiang, Liwei; Kang, Deyong; Wu, Xuejing; Xu, Meifang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Lin, Jiangbo; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the most common malignancies of the gastrointestinal cancers and carries poorer prognosis than other gastrointestinal cancers. In general practice, the depth of tumor infiltration in esophageal wall is crucial to establishing appropriate treatment plan which is established by detecting the tumor infiltration depth. Connective tissue is one of the main structures that form the esophageal wall. So, identification of tumor cells infiltrating into connective tissue is helping for detecting the tumor infiltration depth. Our aim is to evaluate whether multiphoton microscopy (MPM) can be used to detect tumor cells infiltrating into connective tissue in the esophageal cancer. MPM is well-suited for real-time detecting morphologic and cellular changes in fresh tissues since many endogenous fluorophores of fresh tissues are excited through two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). In this work, microstructure of tumor cells and connective tissue are first studied. Then, morphological changes of collagen fibers after the infiltration of tumor cells are shown. These results show that MPM has the ability to detect tumor cells infiltrating into connective tissue in the esophageal cancer. In the future, MPM may be a promising imaging technique for detecting tumor cells in esophageal cancer.

  11. In situ microscopy for online monitoring of cell concentration in Pichia pastoris cultivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquard, D; Enders, A; Roth, G; Rinas, U; Scheper, T; Lindner, P

    2016-09-20

    In situ Microscopy (ISM) is an optical non-invasive technique to monitor cells in bioprocesses in real-time. Pichia pastoris is one of the most promising protein expression systems. This yeast combines fast growth on simple media and important eukaryotic features such as glycosylation. In this work, the ISM technology was applied to Pichia pastoris cultivations for online monitoring of the cell concentration during cultivation. Different ISM settings were tested. The acquired images were analyzed with two image processing algorithms. In seven cultivations the cell concentration was monitored by the applied algorithms and offline samples were taken to determine optical density (OD) and dry cell mass (DCM). Cell concentrations up to 74g/L dry cell mass could be analyzed via the ISM. Depending on the algorithm and the ISM settings, an accuracy between 0.3 % and 12 % was achieved. The overall results show that for a robust measurement a combination of the two described algorithms is required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Heavy-ion microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, G.; Yang, T.C.H.; Richards, T.; Tobias, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter briefly describes the techniques of optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, soft x-ray microscopy and compares these latter techniques with heavy-ion microscopy. The resolution obtained with these various types of microscopy are compared and the influence of the etching procedure on total resolution is discussed. Several micrographs of mammalian cells are included

  13. SU-F-T-665: Confocal Microscopy Imaging of Cell Cycle Distribution in Cells Treated with Pegylated Gold Nanoshells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadetaporn, D [Rice University, Houston, TX (United States); The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Flint, D; McFadden, C; Sawakuchi, G [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Asaithamby, A [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To use confocal microscopy to distinguish cells in different phases of the cell cycle before and after treatment with pegylated gold nanoshells (PEG-AuNSs). Methods: Transfected fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080-EYFP-53BP1-FUCCI) were cultured in T-25 flasks and seeded in glass bottom dishes. These cells express the fluorescent probe AmCyan during the G2/S phases of the cell cycle, mCherry during the G1 phase, and EYFP tagged to the DNA repair protein 53BP1. After allowing cells 4 h to adhere to dishes, PEG-AuNS (Nanospectra Biosciences, Houston, TX) at a concentration of 0.15 OD were administered. At time points of 8, 16 and 24 h following treatment, the PEG-AuNS-treated and control samples were washed with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and fixed using 4% paraformaldehyde in PBS. Samples were imaged with an Olympus FV1200 confocal microscope using 473, 543, and 641 nm excitation lasers. We used band-pass filters to select AmCyan and mCherry fluorescence. Reflection from the 641 nm laser was used to detect PEG-AuNSs. Z-stack images were analyzed to assess cell cycle distribution through fluorescent probe expression. Live cells were imaged after PEG-AuNS treatment using a confocal microscope with a stage top CO2 incubator. Results: We were able to obtain high-resolution images of cells with internalized AuNSs. We were also able to distinguish cells in different phases of the cell cycle. Conclusion: This work demonstrates a new assay to investigate the effect of AuNSs on the cell cycle phase in live cells. Future work will employ confocal microscopy and flow cytometry to focus on effects of AuNS treatment on cell cycle distribution. This research was supported by the Sister Institution Network Fund and the Center for Radiation Oncology Research at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. Gabriel Sawakuchi has research support from Elekta Inc.

  14. SU-F-T-665: Confocal Microscopy Imaging of Cell Cycle Distribution in Cells Treated with Pegylated Gold Nanoshells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadetaporn, D; Flint, D; McFadden, C; Sawakuchi, G; Asaithamby, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To use confocal microscopy to distinguish cells in different phases of the cell cycle before and after treatment with pegylated gold nanoshells (PEG-AuNSs). Methods: Transfected fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080-EYFP-53BP1-FUCCI) were cultured in T-25 flasks and seeded in glass bottom dishes. These cells express the fluorescent probe AmCyan during the G2/S phases of the cell cycle, mCherry during the G1 phase, and EYFP tagged to the DNA repair protein 53BP1. After allowing cells 4 h to adhere to dishes, PEG-AuNS (Nanospectra Biosciences, Houston, TX) at a concentration of 0.15 OD were administered. At time points of 8, 16 and 24 h following treatment, the PEG-AuNS-treated and control samples were washed with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and fixed using 4% paraformaldehyde in PBS. Samples were imaged with an Olympus FV1200 confocal microscope using 473, 543, and 641 nm excitation lasers. We used band-pass filters to select AmCyan and mCherry fluorescence. Reflection from the 641 nm laser was used to detect PEG-AuNSs. Z-stack images were analyzed to assess cell cycle distribution through fluorescent probe expression. Live cells were imaged after PEG-AuNS treatment using a confocal microscope with a stage top CO2 incubator. Results: We were able to obtain high-resolution images of cells with internalized AuNSs. We were also able to distinguish cells in different phases of the cell cycle. Conclusion: This work demonstrates a new assay to investigate the effect of AuNSs on the cell cycle phase in live cells. Future work will employ confocal microscopy and flow cytometry to focus on effects of AuNS treatment on cell cycle distribution. This research was supported by the Sister Institution Network Fund and the Center for Radiation Oncology Research at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. Gabriel Sawakuchi has research support from Elekta Inc.

  15. Low-cost motility tracking system (LOCOMOTIS for time-lapse microscopy applications and cell visualisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam E Lynch

    Full Text Available Direct visualisation of cells for the purpose of studying their motility has typically required expensive microscopy equipment. However, recent advances in digital sensors mean that it is now possible to image cells for a fraction of the price of a standard microscope. Along with low-cost imaging there has also been a large increase in the availability of high quality, open-source analysis programs. In this study we describe the development and performance of an expandable cell motility system employing inexpensive, commercially available digital USB microscopes to image various cell types using time-lapse and perform tracking assays in proof-of-concept experiments. With this system we were able to measure and record three separate assays simultaneously on one personal computer using identical microscopes, and obtained tracking results comparable in quality to those from other studies that used standard, more expensive, equipment. The microscopes used in our system were capable of a maximum magnification of 413.6×. Although resolution was lower than that of a standard inverted microscope we found this difference to be indistinguishable at the magnification chosen for cell tracking experiments (206.8×. In preliminary cell culture experiments using our system, velocities (mean µm/min ± SE of 0.81 ± 0.01 (Biomphalaria glabrata hemocytes on uncoated plates, 1.17 ± 0.004 (MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, 1.24 ± 0.006 (SC5 mouse Sertoli cells and 2.21 ± 0.01 (B. glabrata hemocytes on Poly-L-Lysine coated plates, were measured and are consistent with previous reports. We believe that this system, coupled with open-source analysis software, demonstrates that higher throughput time-lapse imaging of cells for the purpose of studying motility can be an affordable option for all researchers.

  16. Low-cost motility tracking system (LOCOMOTIS) for time-lapse microscopy applications and cell visualisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Adam E; Triajianto, Junian; Routledge, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Direct visualisation of cells for the purpose of studying their motility has typically required expensive microscopy equipment. However, recent advances in digital sensors mean that it is now possible to image cells for a fraction of the price of a standard microscope. Along with low-cost imaging there has also been a large increase in the availability of high quality, open-source analysis programs. In this study we describe the development and performance of an expandable cell motility system employing inexpensive, commercially available digital USB microscopes to image various cell types using time-lapse and perform tracking assays in proof-of-concept experiments. With this system we were able to measure and record three separate assays simultaneously on one personal computer using identical microscopes, and obtained tracking results comparable in quality to those from other studies that used standard, more expensive, equipment. The microscopes used in our system were capable of a maximum magnification of 413.6×. Although resolution was lower than that of a standard inverted microscope we found this difference to be indistinguishable at the magnification chosen for cell tracking experiments (206.8×). In preliminary cell culture experiments using our system, velocities (mean µm/min ± SE) of 0.81 ± 0.01 (Biomphalaria glabrata hemocytes on uncoated plates), 1.17 ± 0.004 (MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells), 1.24 ± 0.006 (SC5 mouse Sertoli cells) and 2.21 ± 0.01 (B. glabrata hemocytes on Poly-L-Lysine coated plates), were measured and are consistent with previous reports. We believe that this system, coupled with open-source analysis software, demonstrates that higher throughput time-lapse imaging of cells for the purpose of studying motility can be an affordable option for all researchers.

  17. Low-Cost Motility Tracking System (LOCOMOTIS) for Time-Lapse Microscopy Applications and Cell Visualisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Adam E.; Triajianto, Junian; Routledge, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Direct visualisation of cells for the purpose of studying their motility has typically required expensive microscopy equipment. However, recent advances in digital sensors mean that it is now possible to image cells for a fraction of the price of a standard microscope. Along with low-cost imaging there has also been a large increase in the availability of high quality, open-source analysis programs. In this study we describe the development and performance of an expandable cell motility system employing inexpensive, commercially available digital USB microscopes to image various cell types using time-lapse and perform tracking assays in proof-of-concept experiments. With this system we were able to measure and record three separate assays simultaneously on one personal computer using identical microscopes, and obtained tracking results comparable in quality to those from other studies that used standard, more expensive, equipment. The microscopes used in our system were capable of a maximum magnification of 413.6×. Although resolution was lower than that of a standard inverted microscope we found this difference to be indistinguishable at the magnification chosen for cell tracking experiments (206.8×). In preliminary cell culture experiments using our system, velocities (mean µm/min ± SE) of 0.81±0.01 (Biomphalaria glabrata hemocytes on uncoated plates), 1.17±0.004 (MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells), 1.24±0.006 (SC5 mouse Sertoli cells) and 2.21±0.01 (B. glabrata hemocytes on Poly-L-Lysine coated plates), were measured and are consistent with previous reports. We believe that this system, coupled with open-source analysis software, demonstrates that higher throughput time-lapse imaging of cells for the purpose of studying motility can be an affordable option for all researchers. PMID:25121722

  18. Investigating Ceria Nanocrystals Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells and its Related Effects: An Electron Microscopy Study

    KAUST Repository

    Aloufi, Bader

    2017-01-22

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles have been utilized widely nowadays in cancer research. It has been suggested by many studies that these nanoparticles are capable of having dual antioxidant behavior in healthy and cancer microenvironment; where in physiological condition, they act as antioxidant and do not affect the healthy cells, while in tumor-like condition; they act as an oxidase, and result in a selective killing for the cancer cells. In this experiment, the interaction of nanoceria with glioblastoma and healthy astrocyte cells was examined, and further correlated with the in vitro cytotoxic effects of various nanoceria concentrations (100 and 300 µg/ml) and exposure times (12, 24, and 48 hours). Electron microscopes were used to investigate the cellular-NPs interactions, and to examine the related cytotoxic effects in combination with trypan blue and propidium iodide viability assays. Our data suggest the following results. First, the two cell lines demonstrated capability of taken up the ceria through endocytosis pathway, where the NPs were recognized engulfed by double membrane vesicles at various regions over the cellular cytoplasm. Secondly, cerium oxide nanoparticles were found to affect the glioblastoma cells, but not so severely the corresponding healthy astrocytes at the various concentrations and incubation times, as revealed by the viability assays and the electron microscopy analysis. Thirdly, the viability of the glioblastoma cells after the treatment displayed a declined trend when increasing the ceria concentrations, but did not show such dependency with regard to the different time points. In all cases, the healthy astrocyte cells showed slight alterations in mitochondrial shape which did not influence their viability. Among the various nanoceria concentrations and exposure times, the most efficient dose of treatment was found to be with a concentration of 300 µg/ml at a time point of 24-hour, where higher reduction on the viability of

  19. A device for real-time live-cell microscopy during dynamic dual-modal mechanostimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, D.; Nikolov, H. N.; Chmiel, T.; Beach, R. J.; Sims, S. M.; Dixon, S. J.; Holdsworth, D. W.

    2017-03-01

    Mechanotransduction - the process by which cells sense and respond to mechanical stimuli - is essential for several physiological processes including skeletal homeostasis. Mammalian cells are thought to be sensitive to different modes of mechanical stimuli, including vibration and fluid shear. To better understand the mechanisms underlying the early stages of mechanotransduction, we describe the development of devices for mechanostimulation (by vibration and fluid shear) of live cells that can be integrated with real-time optical microscopy. The integrated system can deliver up to 3 Pa of fluid shear simultaneous with high-frequency sinusoidal vibrations up to 1 g. Stimuli can be applied simultaneously or independently to cells during real-time microscopic imaging. A custom microfluidic chamber was prepared from polydimethylsiloxane on a glass-bottom cell culture dish. Fluid flow was applied with a syringe pump to induce shear stress. This device is compatible with a custom-designed motion control vibration system. A voice coil actuates the system that is suspended on linear air bushings. Accelerations produced by the system were monitored with an on-board accelerometer. Displacement was validated optically using particle tracking digital high-speed imaging (1200 frames per second). During operation at nominally 45 Hz and 0.3 g, displacements were observed to be within 3.56% of the expected value. MC3T3-E1 osteoblast like cells were seeded into the microfluidic device and loaded with the calcium sensitive fluorescent probe fura-2, then mounted onto the dual-modal mechanostimulation platform. Cells were then imaged and monitored for fluorescence emission. In summary, we have developed a system to deliver physiologically relevant vibrations and fluid shear to live cells during real-time imaging and photometry. Monitoring the behavior of live cells loaded with appropriate fluorescent probes will enable characterization of the signals activated during the initial

  20. Phase microscopy using light-field reconstruction method for cell observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Kuang, Cuifang; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2015-08-01

    The refractive index (RI) distribution can serve as a natural label for undyed cell imaging. However, the majority of images obtained through quantitative phase microscopy is integrated along the illumination angle and cannot reflect additional information about the refractive map on a certain plane. Herein, a light-field reconstruction method to image the RI map within a depth of 0.2 μm is proposed. It records quantitative phase-delay images using a four-step phase shifting method in different directions and then reconstructs a similar scattered light field for the refractive sample on the focus plane. It can image the RI of samples, transparent cell samples in particular, in a manner similar to the observation of scattering characteristics. The light-field reconstruction method is therefore a powerful tool for use in cytobiology studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Functional magnetic resonance microscopy at single-cell resolution in Aplysia californica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radecki, Guillaume; Nargeot, Romuald; Jelescu, Ileana Ozana; Le Bihan, Denis; Ciobanu, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we show the feasibility of performing functional MRI studies with single-cell resolution. At ultrahigh magnetic field, manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance microscopy allows the identification of most motor neurons in the buccal network of Aplysia at low, nontoxic Mn2+ concentrations. We establish that Mn2+ accumulates intracellularly on injection into the living Aplysia and that its concentration increases when the animals are presented with a sensory stimulus. We also show that we can distinguish between neuronal activities elicited by different types of stimuli. This method opens up a new avenue into probing the functional organization and plasticity of neuronal networks involved in goal-directed behaviors with single-cell resolution. PMID:24872449

  2. Monitoring the effect of mechanical stress on mesenchymal stem cell collagen production by multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Liang; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Li, Tsung-Hsien; Liu, Yuan; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2008-02-01

    Tissue engineering is emerging as a promising method for repairing damaged tissues. Due to cartilage's common wear and injury, in vitro production of cartilage replacements have been an active area of research. Finding the optimal condition for the generation of the collagen matrix is crucial in reproducing cartilages that closely match those found in human. Using multiphoton autofluorescence and second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy we monitored the effect of mechanical stress on mesenchymal stem cell collagen production. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the form of pellets were cultured and periodically placed under different mechanical stress by centrifugation over a period of four weeks. The differently stressed samples were imaged several times during the four week period, and the collagen production under different mechanical stress is characterized.

  3. Calcium dynamics in root cells of Arabidopsis thaliana visualized with selective plane illumination microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Costa

    Full Text Available Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM is an imaging technique particularly suited for long term in-vivo analysis of transparent specimens, able to visualize small organs or entire organisms, at cellular and eventually even subcellular resolution. Here we report the application of SPIM in Calcium imaging based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the genetically encoded-FRET-based Ca(2+ probe Cameleon, in the cytosol or nucleus, were used to demonstrate that SPIM enables ratiometric fluorescence imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution, both at tissue and single cell level. The SPIM-FRET technique enabled us to follow nuclear and cytosolic Ca(2+ dynamics in Arabidopsis root tip cells, deep inside the organ, in response to different stimuli. A relevant physiological phenomenon, namely Ca(2+ signal percolation, predicted in previous studies, has been directly visualized.

  4. Intravital Microscopy Reveals Differences in the Kinetics of Endocytic Pathways between Cell Cultures and Live Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Weigert

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Intravital microscopy has enabled imaging of the dynamics of subcellular structures in live animals, thus opening the door to investigating membrane trafficking under physiological conditions. Here, we sought to determine whether the architecture and the environment of a fully developed tissue influences the dynamics of endocytic processes. To this aim, we imaged endocytosis in the stromal cells of rat salivary glands both in situ and after they were isolated and cultured on a solid surface. We found that the internalization of transferrin and dextran, two molecules that traffic via distinct mechanisms, is substantially altered in cultured cells, supporting the idea that the three dimensional organization of the tissue and the cues generated by the surrounding environment strongly affect membrane trafficking events.

  5. Surface patterned dielectrics by direct writing of anodic oxides using scanning droplet cell microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siket, Christian M.; Mardare, Andrei Ionut; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Bauer, Siegfried; Hassel, Achim Walter

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Scanning droplet cell microscopy was applied for local gate oxide writing. • Sharp lines are obtained at the highest writing speed of 1 mm min −1 . • 13.4 kC cm −3 was found as charge per volume for aluminium oxide. • High field constant of 24 nm V −1 and dielectric constant of 12 were determined for Al 2 O 3 by CV and EIS. -- Abstract: Scanning droplet cell microscopy was used for patterning of anodic oxide lines on the surface of Al thin films by direct writing. The structural modifications of the written oxide lines as a function of the writing speed were studied by analyzing the relative error of the line widths. Sharper lines were obtained for writing speeds faster than 1 mm min −1 . An increase in sharpness was observed for higher writing speeds. A theoretical model based on the Faraday law is proposed to explain the constant anodisation current measured during the writing process and yielded a charge per volume of 13.4 kC cm −3 for Al 2 O 3 . From calculated oxide film thicknesses the high field constant was found to be 24 nm V −1 . Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed an increase of the electrical permittivity up to ε = 12 with the decrease of the writing speed of the oxide line. Writing of anodic oxide lines was proven to be an important step in preparing capacitors and gate dielectrics in plastic electronics

  6. Directly Observing Micelle Fusion and Growth in Solution by Liquid-Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parent, Lucas R. [Department; amp, Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, United States; Bakalis, Evangelos [Dipartimento; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo [Materials; Institute; Kammeyer, Jacquelin K. [Department; amp, Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, United States; Park, Chiwoo [Department; de Pablo, Juan [Materials; Institute; Zerbetto, Francesco [Dipartimento; Patterson, Joseph P. [Department; amp, Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, United States; Laboratory; Gianneschi, Nathan C. [Department; amp, Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, United States

    2017-11-16

    Amphiphilic small molecules and polymers form commonplace nanoscale macromolecular compartments and bilayers, and as such are truly essential components in all cells and in many cellular processes. The nature of these architectures, including their formation, phase changes, and stimuli-response behaviors, is necessary for the most basic functions of life, and over the past half-century, these natural micellar structures have inspired a vast diversity of industrial products, from biomedicines to detergents, lubricants, and coatings. The importance of these materials and their ubiquity have made them the subject of intense investigation regarding their nanoscale dynamics with increasing interest in obtaining sufficient temporal and spatial resolution to directly observe nanoscale processes. However, the vast majority of experimental methods involve either bulk-averaging techniques including light, neutron, and X-ray scattering, or are static in nature including even the most advanced cryogenic transmission electron microscopy techniques. Here, we employ in situ liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM) to directly observe the evolution of individual amphiphilic block copolymer micellar nanoparticles in solution, in real time with nanometer spatial resolution. These observations, made on a proof-of-concept bioconjugate polymer amphiphile, revealed growth and evolution occurring by unimer addition processes and by particle-particle collision-and-fusion events. The experimental approach, combining direct LCTEM observation, quantitative analysis of LCTEM data, and correlated in silico simulations, provides a unique view of solvated soft matter nanoassemblies as they morph and evolve in time and space, enabling us to capture these phenomena in solution.

  7. Human airway epithelial cells investigated by atomic force microscopy: A hint to cystic fibrosis epithelial pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasalvia, Maria [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Castellani, Stefano [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy); D’Antonio, Palma [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy); Perna, Giuseppe [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Carbone, Annalucia [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy); Colia, Anna Laura; Maffione, Angela Bruna [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy); Capozzi, Vito [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Conese, Massimo, E-mail: massimo.conese@unifg.it [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy)

    2016-10-15

    The pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) airway disease stems from mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene, leading to a chronic respiratory disease. Actin cytoskeleton is disorganized in CF airway epithelial cells, likely contributing to the CF-associated basic defects, i.e. defective chloride secretion and sodium/fluid hypersorption. In this work, we aimed to find whether this alteration could be pointed out by means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) investigation, as roughness and Young's elastic module. Moreover, we also sought to determine whether disorganization of actin cytoskeleton is linked to hypersoption of apical fluid. Not only CFBE41o- (CFBE) cells, immortalized airway epithelial cells homozygous for the F508del CFTR allele, showed a different morphology in comparison with 16HBE14o- (16HBE) epithelial cells, wild-type for CFTR, but also they displayed a lack of stress fibers, suggestive of a disorganized actin cytoskeleton. AFM measurements showed that CFBE cells presented a higher membrane roughness and decreased rigidity as compared with 16HBE cells. CFBE overexpressing wtCFTR became more elongated than the parental CFBE cell line and presented actin stress fibers. CFBE cells absorbed more fluid from the apical compartment. Study of fluid absorption with the F-actin-depolymerizing agent Latrunculin B demonstrated that actin cytoskeletal disorganization increased fluid absorption, an effect observed at higher magnitude in 16HBE than in CFBE cells. For the first time, we demonstrate that actin cytoskeleton disorganization is reflected by AFM parameters in CF airway epithelial cells. Our data also strongly suggest that the lack of stress fibers is involved in at least one of the early step in CF pathophysiology at the levels of the airways, i.e. fluid hypersorption. - Highlights: • CF bronchial epithelial (CFBE) cells show a disorganized actin cytoskeleton. • CFBE cells present high roughness and low rigidity in

  8. Human airway epithelial cells investigated by atomic force microscopy: A hint to cystic fibrosis epithelial pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasalvia, Maria; Castellani, Stefano; D’Antonio, Palma; Perna, Giuseppe; Carbone, Annalucia; Colia, Anna Laura; Maffione, Angela Bruna; Capozzi, Vito; Conese, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) airway disease stems from mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene, leading to a chronic respiratory disease. Actin cytoskeleton is disorganized in CF airway epithelial cells, likely contributing to the CF-associated basic defects, i.e. defective chloride secretion and sodium/fluid hypersorption. In this work, we aimed to find whether this alteration could be pointed out by means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) investigation, as roughness and Young's elastic module. Moreover, we also sought to determine whether disorganization of actin cytoskeleton is linked to hypersoption of apical fluid. Not only CFBE41o- (CFBE) cells, immortalized airway epithelial cells homozygous for the F508del CFTR allele, showed a different morphology in comparison with 16HBE14o- (16HBE) epithelial cells, wild-type for CFTR, but also they displayed a lack of stress fibers, suggestive of a disorganized actin cytoskeleton. AFM measurements showed that CFBE cells presented a higher membrane roughness and decreased rigidity as compared with 16HBE cells. CFBE overexpressing wtCFTR became more elongated than the parental CFBE cell line and presented actin stress fibers. CFBE cells absorbed more fluid from the apical compartment. Study of fluid absorption with the F-actin-depolymerizing agent Latrunculin B demonstrated that actin cytoskeletal disorganization increased fluid absorption, an effect observed at higher magnitude in 16HBE than in CFBE cells. For the first time, we demonstrate that actin cytoskeleton disorganization is reflected by AFM parameters in CF airway epithelial cells. Our data also strongly suggest that the lack of stress fibers is involved in at least one of the early step in CF pathophysiology at the levels of the airways, i.e. fluid hypersorption. - Highlights: • CF bronchial epithelial (CFBE) cells show a disorganized actin cytoskeleton. • CFBE cells present high roughness and low rigidity in the

  9. Real time imaging of live cell ATP leaking or release events by chemiluminescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yun [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-12-18

    The purpose of this research was to expand the chemiluminescence microscopy applications in live bacterial/mammalian cell imaging and to improve the detection sensitivity for ATP leaking or release events. We first demonstrated that chemiluminescence (CL) imaging can be used to interrogate single bacterial cells. While using a luminometer allows detecting ATP from cell lysate extracted from at least 10 bacterial cells, all previous cell CL detection never reached this sensitivity of single bacteria level. We approached this goal with a different strategy from before: instead of breaking bacterial cell membrane and trying to capture the transiently diluted ATP with the firefly luciferase CL assay, we introduced the firefly luciferase enzyme into bacteria using the modern genetic techniques and placed the CL reaction substrate D-luciferin outside the cells. By damaging the cell membrane with various antibacterial drugs including antibiotics such as Penicillins and bacteriophages, the D-luciferin molecules diffused inside the cell and initiated the reaction that produces CL light. As firefly luciferases are large protein molecules which are retained within the cells before the total rupture and intracellular ATP concentration is high at the millmolar level, the CL reaction of firefly luciferase, ATP and D-luciferin can be kept for a relatively long time within the cells acting as a reaction container to generate enough photons for detection by the extremely sensitive intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) camera. The result was inspiring as various single bacterium lysis and leakage events were monitored with 10-s temporal resolution movies. We also found a new way of enhancing diffusion D-luciferin into cells by dehydrating the bacteria. Then we started with this novel single bacterial CL imaging technique, and applied it for quantifying gene expression levels from individual bacterial cells. Previous published result in single cell gene expression quantification

  10. The Use of Atomic Force Microscopy as a Technique for the Identification of Cancerous Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lekka, M.

    2007-11-01

    The monograph presents the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) as a tool for the identification of cancerous cells by studies of the expression of different types of molecules directly on the surface of living cells. The full quantitative description (that is not accessible by other techniques) performed for a given type of molecular interactions has been obtained by using the following quantities: an unbinding force, probability, rupture length and the effective spring constant taking into account the stiffness of a single complex. All, these parameters were extracted from AFM measurements The analysis of the interaction forces performed by AFM allows the quantitative determination of: i) the static properties of a single molecular complex where its strength of interaction and stiffness of the studied complex can be obtained, ii) dynamic properties, on the basis of which the kinetic properties of the unbinding process can be delivered, and iii) properties of adhesion clusters, where the interrelation between single complexes can be characterized, in particular the mechanism of the unbinding can be obtained. The presented characterization of the interaction force between single molecules demonstrates that atomic force microscopy can be used as exceptional technique to study the expression of molecules on a cell surface. Such measurements are not limited to a typical interactions occurring between single molecules but also it is possible to study the interactions between parts of molecules. The results presented in this monograph point to a novel approach to identify cancer-related changes in a quantitative way what can be used for describing and confirming the pathological state of a single cell. (author)

  11. An approach to estimate spatial distribution of analyte within cells using spectrally-resolved fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Dharmendar Kumar; Irfanullah, Mir; Basu, Santanu Kumar; Madhu, Sheri; De, Suman; Jadhav, Sameer; Ravikanth, Mangalampalli; Chowdhury, Arindam

    2017-03-01

    While fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool amongst chemists and biologists for the detection of various analyte within cellular environments, non-uniform spatial distribution of sensors within cells often restricts extraction of reliable information on relative abundance of analytes in different subcellular regions. As an alternative to existing sensing methodologies such as ratiometric or FRET imaging, where relative proportion of analyte with respect to the sensor can be obtained within cells, we propose a methodology using spectrally-resolved fluorescence microscopy, via which both the relative abundance of sensor as well as their relative proportion with respect to the analyte can be simultaneously extracted for local subcellular regions. This method is exemplified using a BODIPY sensor, capable of detecting mercury ions within cellular environments, characterized by spectral blue-shift and concurrent enhancement of emission intensity. Spectral emission envelopes collected from sub-microscopic regions allowed us to compare the shift in transition energies as well as integrated emission intensities within various intracellular regions. Construction of a 2D scatter plot using spectral shifts and emission intensities, which depend on the relative amount of analyte with respect to sensor and the approximate local amounts of the probe, respectively, enabled qualitative extraction of relative abundance of analyte in various local regions within a single cell as well as amongst different cells. Although the comparisons remain semi-quantitative, this approach involving analysis of multiple spectral parameters opens up an alternative way to extract spatial distribution of analyte in heterogeneous systems. The proposed method would be especially relevant for fluorescent probes that undergo relatively nominal shift in transition energies compared to their emission bandwidths, which often restricts their usage for quantitative ratiometric imaging in

  12. The role of electron irradiation history in liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, Trevor H.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Park, Chiwoo; Kelly, Ryan T.; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Evans, James E.

    2018-04-20

    In situ liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LC-TEM) allows dynamic nanoscale characterization of systems in a hydrated state. Although powerful, this technique remains impaired by issues of repeatability that limit experimental fidelity and hinder the identification and control of some variables underlying observed dynamics. We detail new LC- TEM devices that improve experimental reproducibility by expanding available imaging area and providing a platform for investigating electron flux history on the sample. Irradiation history is an important factor influencing LC-TEM results that has, to this point, been largely qualitatively and not quantitatively described. We use these devices to highlight the role of cumulative electron flux history on samples from both nanoparticle growth and biological imaging experiments and demonstrate capture of time zero, low-dose images on beam-sensitive samples. In particular, the ability to capture pristine images of biological samples, where the acquired image is the first time that the cell experiences significant electron flux, allowed us to determine that nanoparticle movement compared to the cell membrane was a function of cell damage and therefore an artifact rather than visualizing cell dynamics in action. These results highlight just a subset of the new science that is accessible with LC-TEM through the new multiwindow devices with patterned focusing aides.

  13. Sub-cellular force microscopy in single normal and cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babahosseini, H; Carmichael, B; Strobl, J S; Mahmoodi, S N; Agah, M

    2015-08-07

    This work investigates the biomechanical properties of sub-cellular structures of breast cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure where the Generalized Maxwell model is applied to experimental data from AFM stress-relaxation tests to extract the elastic modulus, the apparent viscosity, and the relaxation time of sub-cellular structures. The triple-layered modeling results allow for determination and comparison of the biomechanical properties of the three major sub-cellular structures between normal and cancerous cells: the up plasma membrane/actin cortex, the mid cytoplasm/nucleus, and the low nuclear/integrin sub-domains. The results reveal that the sub-domains become stiffer and significantly more viscous with depth, regardless of cell type. In addition, there is a decreasing trend in the average elastic modulus and apparent viscosity of the all corresponding sub-cellular structures from normal to cancerous cells, which becomes most remarkable in the deeper sub-domain. The presented modeling in this work constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study the biomechanics of sub-cellular structures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Investigating biomolecular recognition at the cell surface using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congzhou; Yadavalli, Vamsi K

    2014-05-01

    Probing the interaction forces that drive biomolecular recognition on cell surfaces is essential for understanding diverse biological processes. Force spectroscopy has been a widely used dynamic analytical technique, allowing measurement of such interactions at the molecular and cellular level. The capabilities of working under near physiological environments, combined with excellent force and lateral resolution make atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based force spectroscopy a powerful approach to measure biomolecular interaction forces not only on non-biological substrates, but also on soft, dynamic cell surfaces. Over the last few years, AFM-based force spectroscopy has provided biophysical insight into how biomolecules on cell surfaces interact with each other and induce relevant biological processes. In this review, we focus on describing the technique of force spectroscopy using the AFM, specifically in the context of probing cell surfaces. We summarize recent progress in understanding the recognition and interactions between macromolecules that may be found at cell surfaces from a force spectroscopy perspective. We further discuss the challenges and future prospects of the application of this versatile technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Glomerular parietal epithelial cells contribute to adult podocyte regeneration in experimental focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Diana G.; Sunseri, Maria W.; Kaverina, Natalya; Roeder, Sebastian S.; Pippin, Jeffrey W.; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    Since adult podocytes cannot adequately proliferate following depletion in disease states there has been interest in the potential role of progenitors in podocyte repair and regeneration. To determine if parietal epithelial cells (PECs) can serve as adult podocyte progenitors following disease-induced podocyte depletion, PECs were permanently labeled in adult PECrtTA/LC1/R26 reporter mice. In normal mice, labeled PECs were confined to Bowman's capsule, while in disease (cytotoxic sheep anti-podocyte antibody), labeled PECs were found in the glomerular tuft in progressively higher numbers by days 7, 14 and 28. Early in disease, the majority of PECs in the tuft co-expressed CD44. By day 28, when podocyte numbers were significantly higher and disease severity was significantly lower, the majority of labeled PECs co-expressed podocyte proteins but not CD44. Neither labeled PECs on the tuft, nor podocytes stained for the proliferation marker BrdU. The de novo expression of phospho-ERK colocalized to CD44 expressing PECs, but not to PECs expressing podocyte markers. Thus, in a mouse model of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis typified by abrupt podocyte depletion followed by regeneration, PECs undergo two phenotypic changes once they migrate to the glomerular tuft. Initially these cells are predominantly activated CD44 expressing cells coinciding with glomerulosclerosis, and later they predominantly exhibit a podocyte phenotype which is likely reparative. PMID:25993321

  16. Glomerular parietal epithelial cells contribute to adult podocyte regeneration in experimental focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Diana G; Sunseri, Maria W; Kaverina, Natalya V; Roeder, Sebastian S; Pippin, Jeffrey W; Shankland, Stuart J

    2015-11-01

    As adult podocytes cannot adequately proliferate following depletion in disease states, there has been interest in the potential role of progenitors in podocyte repair and regeneration. To determine whether parietal epithelial cells (PECs) can serve as adult podocyte progenitors following disease-induced podocyte depletion, PECs were permanently labeled in adult PEC-rtTA/LC1/R26 reporter mice. In normal mice, labeled PECs were confined to Bowman's capsule, whereas in disease (cytotoxic sheep anti-podocyte antibody) labeled PECs were found in the glomerular tuft in progressively higher numbers by days 7, 14, and 28. Early in disease, the majority of PECs in the tuft coexpressed CD44. By day 28, when podocyte numbers were significantly higher and disease severity was significantly lower, the majority of labeled PECs coexpressed podocyte proteins but not CD44. Neither labeled PECs on the tuft nor podocytes stained for the proliferation marker BrdU. The de novo expression of phospho-ERK colocalized to CD44 expressing PECs, but not to PECs expressing podocyte markers. Thus, in a mouse model of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis typified by abrupt podocyte depletion followed by regeneration, PECs undergo two phenotypic changes once they migrate to the glomerular tuft. Initially these cells are predominantly activated CD44 expressing cells coinciding with glomerulosclerosis, and later they predominantly exhibit a podocyte phenotype, which is likely reparative.

  17. Sub-cellular force microscopy in single normal and cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babahosseini, H.; Carmichael, B.; Strobl, J.S.; Mahmoodi, S.N.; Agah, M.

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the biomechanical properties of sub-cellular structures of breast cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure where the Generalized Maxwell model is applied to experimental data from AFM stress-relaxation tests to extract the elastic modulus, the apparent viscosity, and the relaxation time of sub-cellular structures. The triple-layered modeling results allow for determination and comparison of the biomechanical properties of the three major sub-cellular structures between normal and cancerous cells: the up plasma membrane/actin cortex, the mid cytoplasm/nucleus, and the low nuclear/integrin sub-domains. The results reveal that the sub-domains become stiffer and significantly more viscous with depth, regardless of cell type. In addition, there is a decreasing trend in the average elastic modulus and apparent viscosity of the all corresponding sub-cellular structures from normal to cancerous cells, which becomes most remarkable in the deeper sub-domain. The presented modeling in this work constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study the biomechanics of sub-cellular structures. - Highlights: • The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure using Generalized Maxwell model. • The sub-domains include membrane/cortex, cytoplasm/nucleus, and nuclear/integrin. • Biomechanics of corresponding sub-domains are compared among normal and cancer cells. • Viscoelasticity of sub-domains show a decreasing trend from normal to cancer cells. • The decreasing trend becomes most significant in the deeper sub-domain

  18. Sub-cellular force microscopy in single normal and cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babahosseini, H. [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Carmichael, B. [Nonlinear Intelligent Structures Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0276 (United States); Strobl, J.S. [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Mahmoodi, S.N., E-mail: nmahmoodi@eng.ua.edu [Nonlinear Intelligent Structures Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0276 (United States); Agah, M., E-mail: agah@vt.edu [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2015-08-07

    This work investigates the biomechanical properties of sub-cellular structures of breast cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure where the Generalized Maxwell model is applied to experimental data from AFM stress-relaxation tests to extract the elastic modulus, the apparent viscosity, and the relaxation time of sub-cellular structures. The triple-layered modeling results allow for determination and comparison of the biomechanical properties of the three major sub-cellular structures between normal and cancerous cells: the up plasma membrane/actin cortex, the mid cytoplasm/nucleus, and the low nuclear/integrin sub-domains. The results reveal that the sub-domains become stiffer and significantly more viscous with depth, regardless of cell type. In addition, there is a decreasing trend in the average elastic modulus and apparent viscosity of the all corresponding sub-cellular structures from normal to cancerous cells, which becomes most remarkable in the deeper sub-domain. The presented modeling in this work constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study the biomechanics of sub-cellular structures. - Highlights: • The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure using Generalized Maxwell model. • The sub-domains include membrane/cortex, cytoplasm/nucleus, and nuclear/integrin. • Biomechanics of corresponding sub-domains are compared among normal and cancer cells. • Viscoelasticity of sub-domains show a decreasing trend from normal to cancer cells. • The decreasing trend becomes most significant in the deeper sub-domain.

  19. Probing the mechanical properties of TNF-α stimulated endothelial cell with atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sei-Young Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sei-Young Lee1,2, Ana-Maria Zaske3, Tommaso Novellino1,4*, Delia Danila3, Mauro Ferrari1,5*, Jodie Conyers3, Paolo Decuzzi1,6*1Department of Nanomedicine and Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX, USA; 2Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA; 3CeTIR – Center for Translational Injury Research, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA; 4Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Campus University of Rome, Italy; 5MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 6BioNEM – Center of Bio-Nanotechnology and Engineering for Medicine, University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro, Italy; *Currently at Department of Nanomedicine and Biomedical Engineering, The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine that regulates the permeability of blood and lymphatic vessels. The plasma concentration of TNF-α is elevated (> 1 pg/mL in several pathologies, including rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, cancer, pre-eclampsia; in obese individuals; and in trauma patients. To test whether circulating TNF-α could induce similar alterations in different districts along the vascular system, three endothelial cell lines, namely HUVEC, HPMEC, and HCAEC, were characterized in terms of 1 mechanical properties, employing atomic force microscopy; 2 cytoskeletal organization, through fluorescence microscopy; and 3 membrane overexpression of adhesion molecules, employing ELISA and immunostaining. Upon stimulation with TNF-α (10 ng/mL for 20 h, for all three endothelial cells, the mechanical stiffness increased by about 50% with a mean apparent elastic modulus of E ~5 ± 0.5 kPa (~3.3 ± 0.35 kPa for the control cells; the density of F-actin filaments increased in the apical and median planes; and the ICAM-1 receptors were overexpressed compared with

  20. Nonlinear optical microscopy reveals invading endothelial cells anisotropically alter three-dimensional collagen matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, P.-F.; Yeh, Alvin T.; Bayless, Kayla J.

    2009-01-01

    The interactions between endothelial cells (ECs) and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are fundamental in mediating various steps of angiogenesis, including cell adhesion, migration and sprout formation. Here, we used a noninvasive and non-destructive nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) technique to optically image endothelial sprouting morphogenesis in three-dimensional (3D) collagen matrices. We simultaneously captured signals from collagen fibers and endothelial cells using second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF), respectively. Dynamic 3D imaging revealed EC interactions with collagen fibers along with quantifiable alterations in collagen matrix density elicited by EC movement through and morphogenesis within the matrix. Specifically, we observed increased collagen density in the area between bifurcation points of sprouting structures and anisotropic increases in collagen density around the perimeter of lumenal structures, but not advancing sprout tips. Proteinase inhibition studies revealed membrane-associated matrix metalloproteinase were utilized for sprout advancement and lumen expansion. Rho-associated kinase (p160ROCK) inhibition demonstrated that the generation of cell tension increased collagen matrix alterations. This study followed sprouting ECs within a 3D matrix and revealed that the advancing structures recognize and significantly alter their extracellular environment at the periphery of lumens as they progress

  1. Raman Spectroscopy and Microscopy of Individual Cells andCellular Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J; Fore, S; Wachsmann-Hogiu, S; Huser, T

    2008-05-15

    Raman spectroscopy provides the unique opportunity to non-destructively analyze chemical concentrations on the submicron length scale in individual cells without the need for optical labels. This enables the rapid assessment of cellular biochemistry inside living cells, and it allows for their continuous analysis to determine cellular response to external events. Here, we review recent developments in the analysis of single cells, subcellular compartments, and chemical imaging based on Raman spectroscopic techniques. Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy provides for the full spectral assessment of cellular biochemistry, while coherent Raman techniques, such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering is primarily used as an imaging tool comparable to confocal fluorescence microscopy. These techniques are complemented by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, which provides higher sensitivity and local specificity, and also extends the techniques to chemical indicators, i.e. pH sensing. We review the strengths and weaknesses of each technique, demonstrate some of their applications and discuss their potential for future research in cell biology and biomedicine.

  2. Nanomechanical and topographical imaging of living cells by atomic force microscopy with colloidal probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puricelli, Luca; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Schulte, Carsten; Podestà, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.podesta@mi.infn.it; Milani, Paolo [CIMaINa and Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-03-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has a great potential as a tool to characterize mechanical and morphological properties of living cells; these properties have been shown to correlate with cells’ fate and patho-physiological state in view of the development of novel early-diagnostic strategies. Although several reports have described experimental and technical approaches for the characterization of cellular elasticity by means of AFM, a robust and commonly accepted methodology is still lacking. Here, we show that micrometric spherical probes (also known as colloidal probes) are well suited for performing a combined topographic and mechanical analysis of living cells, with spatial resolution suitable for a complete and accurate mapping of cell morphological and elastic properties, and superior reliability and accuracy in the mechanical measurements with respect to conventional and widely used sharp AFM tips. We address a number of issues concerning the nanomechanical analysis, including the applicability of contact mechanical models and the impact of a constrained contact geometry on the measured Young’s modulus (the finite-thickness effect). We have tested our protocol by imaging living PC12 and MDA-MB-231 cells, in order to demonstrate the importance of the correction of the finite-thickness effect and the change in Young’s modulus induced by the action of a cytoskeleton-targeting drug.

  3. Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies of Electron-Selective Titanium Oxide Contacts in Silicon Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Haider

    2017-08-15

    In this study, the cross-section of electron-selective titanium oxide (TiO2) contacts for n-type crystalline silicon solar cells were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. It was revealed that the excellent cell efficiency of 21.6% obtained on n-type cells, featuring SiO2/TiO2/Al rear contacts and after forming gas annealing (FGA) at 350°C, is due to strong surface passivation of SiO2/TiO2 stack as well as low contact resistivity at the Si/SiO2/TiO2 heterojunction. This can be attributed to the transformation of amorphous TiO2 to a conducting TiO2-x phase. Conversely, the low efficiency (9.8%) obtained on cells featuring an a-Si:H/TiO2/Al rear contact is due to severe degradation of passivation of the a-Si:H upon FGA.

  4. Microscopy of hierarchically organized TiO{sub 2} photoelectrode for dye solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskandar, A., E-mail: aeska07@gmail.com [Department of Electrical and Electronics, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Mohamed, N. M., E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my [Centre of Innovative Nanostructures and Nanodevices, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Research on improving the performance of dye solar cells has various aspects of the device being investigated. This paper analyzes the deliberately hierarchized photoelectrode configuration for DSC applications to improve the performance of DSCs. Multiple layers of differently composed TiO{sub 2} particle types namely aggregates and nanoparticles were deposited to form a photoelectrode with thickness of about 12 µm. The photoelectrodes were assembled into working DSCs with an active area of 1 cm{sup 2}. Measurement for solar power conversion performance was measured under 1 sun at AM1.5 spectrum simulated sunlight. Electron microscopy for photoelectrode analysis was conducted using Field Emission Scattering Electron Microscopy with enhanced resolution. External Quantum Efficiency was measured using a purpose built instrument. Kinetics were investigated using the Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) measurement with a potentiostat. The best performing DSC is of the hierarchically organized photoelectrode with a photoconversion efficiency of 4.58%, an increase of 14% in comparison to the reference samples with fully aggregates configuration. Short circuit current density, Jsc increases by about 2.223 mA cm{sup −2} relative to the blanks. The electron microscopy confirmed expected thickness at around 10 µm and layers forming the photoelectrode being hierarchically deposited with ∼20 nm TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and 450 nm TiO{sub 2} aggregates mixture composition. EQE improved especially for visible region of 500-550 nm light wavelengths with 12 % increase in the response of in that region. Improvement to the diffusion coefficient as measured by the EIS contributed to the performance increase of the photoelectrode configuration under investigation.

  5. Adhesion of living cells revealed by variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso Dos Santos, Marcelina; Vézy, Cyrille; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2016-02-01

    Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM) is a widespread technique to study cellular process occurring near the contact region with the glass substrate. In this field, determination of the accurate distance from the surface to the plasma membrane constitutes a crucial issue to investigate the physical basis of cellular adhesion process. However, quantitative interpretation of TIRF pictures regarding the distance z between a labeled membrane and the substrate is not trivial. Indeed, the contrast of TIRF images depends on several parameters more and less well known (local concentration of dyes, absorption cross section, angular emission pattern…). The strategy to get around this problem is to exploit a series of TIRF pictures recorded at different incident angles in evanescent regime. This technique called variable-angle TIRF microscopy (vaTIRFM), allowing to map the membrane-substrate separation distance with a nanometric resolution (10-20 nm). vaTIRFM was developed by Burmeister, Truskey and Reichert in the early 1990s with a prism-based TIRF setup [Journal of Microscopy 173, 39-51 (1994)]. We propose a more convenient prismless setup, which uses only a rotatable mirror to adjust precisely the laser beam on the back focal plane of the oil immersion objective (no azimuthal scanning is needed). The series of TIRF images permit us to calculate accurately membrane-surface distances in each pixel. We demonstrate that vaTIRFM are useful to quantify the adhesion of living cells for specific and unspecific membrane-surface interactions, achieved on various functionalized substrates with polymers (BSA, poly-L-lysin) or extracellular matrix proteins (collagen and fibronectin).

  6. Diagnostic impact of anterior segment angiography of limbal stem cell insufficiency in PAX6-related aniridia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käsmann-Kellner, Barbara; Latta, Lorenz; Fries, Fabian N; Viestenz, Arne; Seitz, Berthold

    2018-04-01

    PAX6 is a master gene of ocular development and postnatal ocular equilibrium. Congenital aniridia is the hallmark of PAX6 gene haploinsufficiency (Chr. 11 p. 13), but PAX6-associated aniridia is a profound, progressive pan-ocular developmental disorder often leading to blindness. There is congenital visual impairment with advancing loss of vision mainly due to secondary glaucoma and to corneal blindness caused by limbal stem cell insufficiency (LSCI). LSCI leads to ARK (aniridia-related keratopathy), which typically develops in four stages. Incipient LSCI with vessels starting to grow into the cornea can be imaged by fluorescein anterior segment angiography, which enables fine vessels to be more easily detected than by routine slit lamp examination, especially in patients with nystagmus. Thus, clinical stage 1 ARK is often diagnosed at stage 2 by angiography. Corneal neovascularizations often start at the 12 and 6 positions and subsequently progress circumferentially, not at the 3 and 9 positions as previously believed. Anterior segment angiography can provide an easily standardizable tool for monitoring progress, treatment-induced regress or stabilization of ARK. Especially in children, angiography could be used to monitor new treatment regimens for reducing LSCI. Angiography could enable treatment to begin earlier to preserve corneal hemostasis. In addition, the fact that vascularization often starts at the subpalpebral 6 and 12 positions as opposed to the 3 and 9 positions raises more questions concerning factors that promote LSCI and related corneal injuries. Clin. Anat. 31:392-397, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Uterine inactivation of muscle segment homeobox (Msx) genes alters epithelial cell junction proteins during embryo implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaofei; Park, Craig B; Deng, Wenbo; Potter, S Steven; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2016-04-01

    Embryo implantation requires that the uterus differentiate into the receptive state. Failure to attain uterine receptivity will impede blastocyst attachment and result in a compromised pregnancy. The molecular mechanism by which the uterus transitions from the prereceptive to the receptive stage is complex, involving an intricate interplay of various molecules. We recently found that mice with uterine deletion ofMsxgenes (Msx1(d/d)/Msx2(d/d)) are infertile because of implantation failure associated with heightened apicobasal polarity of luminal epithelial cells during the receptive period. However, information on Msx's roles in regulating epithelial polarity remains limited. To gain further insight, we analyzed cell-type-specific gene expression by RNA sequencing of separated luminal epithelial and stromal cells by laser capture microdissection fromMsx1(d/d)/Msx2(d/d)and floxed mouse uteri on d 4 of pseudopregnancy. We found that claudin-1, a tight junction protein, and small proline-rich (Sprr2) protein, a major component of cornified envelopes in keratinized epidermis, were substantially up-regulated inMsx1(d/d)/Msx2(d/d)uterine epithelia. These factors also exhibited unique epithelial expression patterns at the implantation chamber (crypt) inMsx1(f/f)/Msx2(f/f)females; the patterns were lost inMsx1(d/d)/Msx2(d/d)epithelia on d 5, suggesting important roles during implantation. The results suggest thatMsxgenes play important roles during uterine receptivity including modulation of epithelial junctional activity.-Sun, X., Park, C. B., Deng, W., Potter, S. S., Dey, S. K. Uterine inactivation of muscle segment homeobox (Msx) genes alters epithelial cell junction proteins during embryo implantation. © FASEB.

  8. Outer segment phagocytosis by cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells requires Gas6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M O; Prieto, A L; Obin, M S; Abrams, T A; Burgess, B L; Heeb, M J; Agnew, B J

    2001-10-01

    The function and viability of vertebrate photoreceptors requires the daily phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments (OS) by the adjacent retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We demonstrate here a critical role in this process for Gas6 and by implication one of its receptor protein tyrosine kinases (RTKs), Mertk (Mer). Gas6 specifically and selectively stimulates the phagocytosis of OS by normal cultured rat RPE cells. The magnitude of the response is dose-dependent and shows an absolute requirement for calcium. By contrast the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat RPE cells, in which a mutation in the gene Mertk results in the expression of a truncated, non-functional receptor, does not respond to Gas6. These data strongly suggest that activation of Mertk by its ligand, Gas6, is the specific signaling pathway responsible for initiating the ingestion of shed OS. Moreover, photoreceptor degeneration in the RCS rat retina, which lacks Mertk, and in humans with a mutation in Mertk, strongly suggests that the Gas6/Mertk signaling pathway is essential for photoreceptor viability. We believe that this is the first demonstration of a specific function for Gas6 in the eye. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  9. Classifying distinct basal cell carcinoma subtype by means of dermatoscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Caterina; Lallas, Aimilios; Kyrgidis, Athanassios; Rabinovitz, Harold; Moscarella, Elvira; Ciardo, Silvana; Zalaudek, Iris; Oliviero, Margaret; Losi, Amanda; Gonzalez, Salvador; Guitera, Pascale; Piana, Simonetta; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    The current guidelines for the management of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) suggest a different therapeutic approach according to histopathologic subtype. Although dermatoscopic and confocal criteria of BCC have been investigated, no specific studies were performed to evaluate the distinct reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) aspects of BCC subtypes. To define the specific dermatoscopic and confocal criteria for delineating different BCC subtypes. Dermatoscopic and confocal images of histopathologically confirmed BCCs were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of predefined criteria. Frequencies of dermatoscopic and confocal parameters are provided. Univariate and adjusted odds ratios were calculated. Discriminant analyses were performed to define the independent confocal criteria for distinct BCC subtypes. Eighty-eight BCCs were included. Dermatoscopically, superficial BCCs (n=44) were primarily typified by the presence of fine telangiectasia, multiple erosions, leaf-like structures, and revealed cords connected to the epidermis and epidermal streaming upon RCM. Nodular BCCs (n=22) featured the classic dermatoscopic features and well outlined large basaloid islands upon RCM. Infiltrative BCCs (n=22) featured structureless, shiny red areas, fine telangiectasia, and arborizing vessels on dermatoscopy and dark silhouettes upon RCM. The retrospective design. Dermatoscopy and confocal microscopy can reliably classify different BCC subtypes. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluating ex vivo fluorescence confocal microscopy images of basal cell carcinomas in Mohs excised tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, C; Rajadhyaksha, M; Ragazzi, M; Nehal, K; Gardini, S; Moscarella, E; Lallas, A; Zalaudek, I; Piana, S; Argenziano, G; Pellacani, G

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence confocal microscopy (FCM) is an emerging technology for rapid imaging of excised tissue, without the need for frozen- or fixed-section processing. Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) can be detected in Mohs excisions although few studies have described the major BCC findings as seen on FCM. To describe the major BCC findings of excised tissue during Mohs surgery and to correlate them with histopathology. Freshly excised tumours and frozen-thawed discarded tissue of BCC during Mohs surgery were analysed by means of FCM. A side-by-side correlation between FCM images and histological sections was performed. The FCM features of overlying skin and adnexal structures were also described. Sixty-four BCC cases were analysed. Distinct BCC types appeared unique in terms of shape and size of tumour islands [bigger in nodular (18/25), smaller and rounded in micronodular (7/7) and tiny cords for infiltrative ones (24/30)] and for the presence of clefting, palisading and increased nucleus/cytoplasm ratio. An excellent correlation was found between FCM and histological findings (Cohen's κ statistics = 0·9). In six cases, the presence of sebaceous glands and intense stroma reaction represented possible confounders. Fluorescence confocal microscopy is a fast and new imaging technique that allows an excellent visualization of skin structures and BCC findings during Mohs surgery. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  11. Vibrational imaging of newly synthesized proteins in live cells by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lu; Yu, Yong; Shen, Yihui; Wang, Meng C.; Min, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis of new proteins, a key step in the central dogma of molecular biology, has been a major biological process by which cells respond rapidly to environmental cues in both physiological and pathological conditions. However, the selective visualization of a newly synthesized proteome in living systems with subcellular resolution has proven to be rather challenging, despite the extensive efforts along the lines of fluorescence staining, autoradiography, and mass spectrometry. Herein, we report an imaging technique to visualize nascent proteins by harnessing the emerging stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy coupled with metabolic incorporation of deuterium-labeled amino acids. As a first demonstration, we imaged newly synthesized proteins in live mammalian cells with high spatial–temporal resolution without fixation or staining. Subcellular compartments with fast protein turnover in HeLa and HEK293T cells, and newly grown neurites in differentiating neuron-like N2A cells, are clearly identified via this imaging technique. Technically, incorporation of deuterium-labeled amino acids is minimally perturbative to live cells, whereas SRS imaging of exogenous carbon–deuterium bonds (C–D) in the cell-silent Raman region is highly sensitive, specific, and compatible with living systems. Moreover, coupled with label-free SRS imaging of the total proteome, our method can readily generate spatial maps of the quantitative ratio between new and total proteomes. Thus, this technique of nonlinear vibrational imaging of stable isotope incorporation will be a valuable tool to advance our understanding of the complex spatial and temporal dynamics of newly synthesized proteome in vivo. PMID:23798434

  12. Identification of fluorescent compounds with non-specific binding property via high throughput live cell microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Nath

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Compounds exhibiting low non-specific intracellular binding or non-stickiness are concomitant with rapid clearing and in high demand for live-cell imaging assays because they allow for intracellular receptor localization with a high signal/noise ratio. The non-stickiness property is particularly important for imaging intracellular receptors due to the equilibria involved. METHOD: Three mammalian cell lines with diverse genetic backgrounds were used to screen a combinatorial fluorescence library via high throughput live cell microscopy for potential ligands with high in- and out-flux properties. The binding properties of ligands identified from the first screen were subsequently validated on plant root hair. A correlative analysis was then performed between each ligand and its corresponding physiochemical and structural properties. RESULTS: The non-stickiness property of each ligand was quantified as a function of the temporal uptake and retention on a cell-by-cell basis. Our data shows that (i mammalian systems can serve as a pre-screening tool for complex plant species that are not amenable to high-throughput imaging; (ii retention and spatial localization of chemical compounds vary within and between each cell line; and (iii the structural similarities of compounds can infer their non-specific binding properties. CONCLUSION: We have validated a protocol for identifying chemical compounds with non-specific binding properties that is testable across diverse species. Further analysis reveals an overlap between the non-stickiness property and the structural similarity of compounds. The net result is a more robust screening assay for identifying desirable ligands that can be used to monitor intracellular localization. Several new applications of the screening protocol and results are also presented.

  13. High Resolution Radioluminescence Microscopy for the Study of Prostate Tissue Slice Cell Metabolism and Monitoring of Treatment Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    built an inverted fluorescence microscopy platform to image the FDG distribution in TSCs. To image the FDG content on a single-cell level, we turn to...set-up of an inverted fluorescence microscopy platform to image the FDG distribution in TSCs (task 1). We also developed an algorithm (task 2) that...performed according to USP823. Because of its short lifetime , FDG was used within 8 h after it was produced and dosed at the levels described below for

  14. Atomic force microscopy of silica nanoparticles and carbon nanohorns in macrophages and red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tetard, L. [Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Passian, A., E-mail: passianan@ornl.gov [Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Farahi, R.H. [Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Thundat, T. [Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    The emerging interest in understanding the interactions of nanomaterial with biological systems necessitates imaging tools that capture the spatial and temporal distributions and attributes of the resulting nano-bio amalgam. Studies targeting organ specific response and/or nanoparticle-specific system toxicity would be profoundly benefited from tools that would allow imaging and tracking of in-vivo or in-vitro processes and particle-fate studies. Recently we demonstrated that mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM) can provide subsurface nanoscale information on the mechanical properties of materials at the nanoscale. However, the underlying mechanism of this imaging methodology is currently subject to theoretical and experimental investigation. In this paper we present further analysis by investigating tip-sample excitation forces associated with nanomechanical image formation. Images and force curves acquired under various operational frequencies and amplitudes are presented. We examine samples of mouse cells, where buried distributions of single-walled carbon nanohorns and silica nanoparticles are visualized.

  15. Imaging modes of atomic force microscopy for application in molecular and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufrêne, Yves F; Ando, Toshio; Garcia, Ricardo; Alsteens, David; Martinez-Martin, David; Engel, Andreas; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J

    2017-04-06

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful, multifunctional imaging platform that allows biological samples, from single molecules to living cells, to be visualized and manipulated. Soon after the instrument was invented, it was recognized that in order to maximize the opportunities of AFM imaging in biology, various technological developments would be required to address certain limitations of the method. This has led to the creation of a range of new imaging modes, which continue to push the capabilities of the technique today. Here, we review the basic principles, advantages and limitations of the most common AFM bioimaging modes, including the popular contact and dynamic modes, as well as recently developed modes such as multiparametric, molecular recognition, multifrequency and high-speed imaging. For each of these modes, we discuss recent experiments that highlight their unique capabilities.

  16. Artificial intelligence in label-free microscopy biological cell classification by time stretch

    CERN Document Server

    Mahjoubfar, Ata; Jalali, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces time-stretch quantitative phase imaging (TS-QPI), a high-throughput label-free imaging flow cytometer developed for big data acquisition and analysis in phenotypic screening. TS-QPI is able to capture quantitative optical phase and intensity images simultaneously, enabling high-content cell analysis, cancer diagnostics, personalized genomics, and drug development. The authors also demonstrate a complete machine learning pipeline that performs optical phase measurement, image processing, feature extraction, and classification, enabling high-throughput quantitative imaging that achieves record high accuracy in label -free cellular phenotypic screening and opens up a new path to data-driven diagnosis. • Demonstrates how machine learning is used in high-speed microscopy imaging to facilitate medical diagnosis; • Provides a systematic and comprehensive illustration of time stretch technology; • Enables multidisciplinary application, including industrial, biomedical, and artificial intell...

  17. Parallel excitation-emission multiplexed fluorescence lifetime confocal microscopy for live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Li, Yu; Peng, Leilei

    2014-05-05

    We present a novel excitation-emission multiplexed fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM) method that surpasses current FLIM techniques in multiplexing capability. The method employs Fourier multiplexing to simultaneously acquire confocal fluorescence lifetime images of multiple excitation wavelength and emission color combinations at 44,000 pixels/sec. The system is built with low-cost CW laser sources and standard PMTs with versatile spectral configuration, which can be implemented as an add-on to commercial confocal microscopes. The Fourier lifetime confocal method allows fast multiplexed FLIM imaging, which makes it possible to monitor multiple biological processes in live cells. The low cost and compatibility with commercial systems could also make multiplexed FLIM more accessible to biological research community.

  18. FRET microscopy autologous tumor lysate processing in mature dendritic cell vaccine therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridolfi Ruggero

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antigen processing by dendritic cells (DC exposed to specific stimuli has been well characterized in biological studies. Nonetheless, the question of whether autologous whole tumor lysates (as used in clinical trials are similarly processed by these cells has not yet been resolved. Methods In this study, we examined the transfer of peptides from whole tumor lysates to major histocompatibility complex class II molecules (MHC II in mature dendritic cells (mDC from a patient with advanced melanoma. Tumor antigenic peptides-MHC II proximity was revealed by Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET measurements, which effectively extends the application of fluorescence microscopy to the molecular level ( Results We detected significant energy transfer between donor and acceptor-labelled antibodies against HLA-DR at the membrane surface of mDC. FRET data indicated that fluorescent peptide-loaded MHC II molecules start to accumulate on mDC membranes at 16 hr from the maturation stimulus, steeply increasing at 22 hr with sustained higher FRET detected up to 46 hr. Conclusions The results obtained imply that the patient mDC correctly processed the tumor specific antigens and their display on the mDC surface may be effective for several days. These observations support the rationale for immunogenic efficacy of autologous tumor lysates.

  19. Genetic and Nongenetic Determinants of Cell Growth Variation Assessed by High-Throughput Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Naomi; Siegal, Mark L.; Gresham, David

    2013-01-01

    In microbial populations, growth initiation and proliferation rates are major components of fitness and therefore likely targets of selection. We used a high-throughput microscopy assay, which enables simultaneous analysis of tens of thousands of microcolonies, to determine the sources and extent of growth rate variation in the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in different glucose environments. We find that cell growth rates are regulated by the extracellular concentration of glucose as proposed by Monod (1949), but that significant heterogeneity in growth rates is observed among genetically identical individuals within an environment. Yeast strains isolated from different geographic locations and habitats differ in their growth rate responses to different glucose concentrations. Inheritance patterns suggest that the genetic determinants of growth rates in different glucose concentrations are distinct. In addition, we identified genotypes that differ in the extent of variation in growth rate within an environment despite nearly identical mean growth rates, providing evidence that alleles controlling phenotypic variability segregate in yeast populations. We find that the time to reinitiation of growth (lag) is negatively correlated with growth rate, yet this relationship is strain-dependent. Between environments, the respirative activity of individual cells negatively correlates with glucose abundance and growth rate, but within an environment respirative activity and growth rate show a positive correlation, which we propose reflects differences in protein expression capacity. Our study quantifies the sources of genetic and nongenetic variation in cell growth rates in different glucose environments with unprecedented precision, facilitating their molecular genetic dissection. PMID:23938868

  20. CellAnimation: an open source MATLAB framework for microscopy assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Walter; Wikswo, John P; Quaranta, Vito

    2012-01-01

    Advances in microscopy technology have led to the creation of high-throughput microscopes that are capable of generating several hundred gigabytes of images in a few days. Analyzing such wealth of data manually is nearly impossible and requires an automated approach. There are at present a number of open-source and commercial software packages that allow the user to apply algorithms of different degrees of sophistication to the images and extract desired metrics. However, the types of metrics that can be extracted are severely limited by the specific image processing algorithms that the application implements, and by the expertise of the user. In most commercial software, code unavailability prevents implementation by the end user of newly developed algorithms better suited for a particular type of imaging assay. While it is possible to implement new algorithms in open-source software, rewiring an image processing application requires a high degree of expertise. To obviate these limitations, we have developed an open-source high-throughput application that allows implementation of different biological assays such as cell tracking or ancestry recording, through the use of small, relatively simple image processing modules connected into sophisticated imaging pipelines. By connecting modules, non-expert users can apply the particular combination of well-established and novel algorithms developed by us and others that are best suited for each individual assay type. In addition, our data exploration and visualization modules make it easy to discover or select specific cell phenotypes from a heterogeneous population. CellAnimation is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). CellAnimationsource code and documentation may be downloaded from www.vanderbilt.edu/viibre/software/documents/CellAnimation.zip. Sample data are available at www

  1. Dynamics of cell and tissue growth acquired by means of extended field of view lensfree microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momey, F; Coutard, J-G; Bordy, T; Navarro, F; Menneteau, M; Dinten, J-M; Allier, C

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss a new methodology based on lensfree imaging to perform wound healing assay with unprecedented statistics. Our video lensfree microscopy setup is a simple device featuring only a CMOS sensor and a semi coherent illumination system. Yet it is a powerful mean for the real-time monitoring of cultivated cells. It presents several key advantages, e.g. integration into standard incubator, compatibility with standard cell culture protocol, simplicity and ease of use. It can perform the follow-up in a large field of view (25 mm(2)) of several crucial parameters during the culture of cells i.e. their motility, their proliferation rate or their death. Consequently the setup can gather large statistics both in space and time. Here we uses this facility in the context of wound healing assay to perform label-free measurements of the velocities of the fronts of proliferation of the cell layer as a function of time by means of particle image velocimetry (PIV) processing. However, for such tissue growth experiments, the field of view of 25 mm(2) remains not sufficient and results can be biased depending on the position of the device with respect to the recipient of the cell culture. Hence, to conduct exhaustive wound healing assays, we propose to enlarge the field of view up to 10 cm(2) through a raster scan, by moving the source/sensor with respect to the Petri dish. We have performed acquisitions of wound healing assay (keratinocytes HaCaT) both in real-time (25 mm(2)) and in final point (10 cm(2)) to assess the combination of velocimetry measurements and final point wide field imaging. In the future, we aim at combining directly our extended field of view acquisitions (>10 cm(2)) with real time ability inside the incubator.

  2. Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Transplantation Restores Inflammatory Balance of Cytokines after ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Alestalo

    Full Text Available Acute myocardial infarction (AMI launches an inflammatory response and a repair process to compensate cardiac function. During this process, the balance between proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines is important for optimal cardiac repair. Stem cell transplantation after AMI improves tissue repair and increases the ventricular ejection fraction. Here, we studied in detail the acute effect of bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMMNC transplantation on proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI.Patients with STEMI treated with thrombolysis followed by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI were randomly assigned to receive either BMMNC or saline as an intracoronary injection. Cardiac function was evaluated by left ventricle angiogram during the PCI and again after 6 months. The concentrations of 27 cytokines were measured from plasma samples up to 4 days after the PCI and the intracoronary injection.Twenty-six patients (control group, n = 12; BMMNC group, n = 14 from the previously reported FINCELL study (n = 80 were included to this study. At day 2, the change in the proinflammatory cytokines correlated with the change in the anti-inflammatory cytokines in both groups (Kendall's tau, control 0.6; BMMNC 0.7. At day 4, the correlation had completely disappeared in the control group but was preserved in the BMMNC group (Kendall's tau, control 0.3; BMMNC 0.7.BMMNC transplantation is associated with preserved balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines after STEMI in PCI-treated patients. This may partly explain the favorable effect of stem cell transplantation after AMI.

  3. 3D+time acquisitions of 3D cell culture by means of lens-free tomographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdeu, Anthony; Laperrousaz, Bastien; Bordy, Thomas; Morales, S.; Gidrol, Xavier; Picollet-D'hahan, Nathalie; Allier, Cédric

    2018-02-01

    We propose a three-dimensional (3D) imaging platform based on lens-free microscopy to perform multi-angle acquisitions on 3D cell cultures embedded in extracellular matrix (ECM). We developed algorithms based on the Fourier diffraction theorem to perform fully 3D reconstructions of biological samples and we adapted the lens-free microscope to incubator conditions. Here we demonstrate for the first time, 3D+time lens-free acquisitions of 3D cell culture over 8 days directly into the incubator. The 3D reconstructed volume is as large as 5 mm3 and provides a unique way to observe in the same 3D cell culture experiment multiple cell migration strategies. Namely, in a 3D cell culture of prostate epithelial cells embedded within a Matrigel® matrix, we are able to distinguish single cell 'leaders', migration of cell clusters, migration of large aggregates of cells, and also close-gap and large-scale branching. In addition, we observe long-scale 3D deformations of the ECM that modify the geometry of the 3D cell culture. Interestingly, we also observed the opposite, i.e. we found that large aggregates of cells may deform the ECM by generating traction forces over very long distances. In sum we put forward a novel 3D lens-free microscopy tomographic technique to study the single and collective cell migrations, the cell-to-cell interactions and the cell-to-matrix interactions.

  4. A fluorescence in situ staining method for investigating spores and vegetative cells of Clostridia by confocal laser scanning microscopy and structured illuminated microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Incecco, P; Ong, L; Gras, S; Pellegrino, L

    2018-04-18

    Non-pathogenic spore-forming Clostridia are of increasing interest due to their application in biogas production and their capability to spoil different food products. The life cycle for Clostridium includes a spore stage that can assist in survival under environmentally stressful conditions, such as extremes of temperature or pH. Due to their size, spores can be investigated by a range of microscopic techniques, many of which involve sample pre-treatment. We have developed a quick, simple and non-destructive fluorescent staining procedure that allows a clear differentiation between spores and vegetative cells and effectively stains spores, allowing recovery and tracking in subsequent experiments. Hoechst 34580, Propidium iodide and wheat germ agglutinin WGA 488 were used in combination to stain four strains of Clostridia at different life cycle stages. Staining was conducted without drying the sample, preventing changes induced by dehydration and cells observed by confocal laser scanner microscopy or using a super-resolution microscope equipped with a 3D-structured illumination module. Dual staining with Hoechst/Propidium iodide differentiated spores from vegetative cells, provided information on the viability of cells and was successfully applied to follow spore production induced by heating. Super-resolution microscopy of spores probed by Hoechst 34580 also allowed chromatin to be visualised. Direct staining of a cheese specimen using Nile Red and Fast Green allowed in situ observation of spores within the cheese and their position within the cheese matrix. The proposed staining method has broad applicability and can potentially be applied to follow Clostridium spore behaviour in a range of different environments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Two-photon microscopy for non-invasive, quantitative monitoring of stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William L Rice

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The engineering of functional tissues is a complex multi-stage process, the success of which depends on the careful control of culture conditions and ultimately tissue maturation. To enable the efficient optimization of tissue development protocols, techniques suitable for monitoring the effects of added stimuli and induced tissue changes are needed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we present the quantitative use of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF and second harmonic generation (SHG as a noninvasive means to monitor the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs using entirely endogenous sources of contrast. We demonstrate that the individual fluorescence contribution from the intrinsic cellular fluorophores NAD(PH, flavoproteins and lipofuscin can be extracted from TPEF images and monitored dynamically from the same cell population over time. Using the redox ratio, calculated from the contributions of NAD(PH and flavoproteins, we identify distinct patterns in the evolution of the metabolic activity of hMSCs maintained in either propagation, osteogenic or adipogenic differentiation media. The differentiation of these cells is mirrored by changes in cell morphology apparent in high resolution TPEF images and by the detection of collagen production via SHG imaging. Finally, we find dramatic increases in lipofuscin levels in hMSCs maintained at 20% oxygen vs. those in 5% oxygen, establishing the use of this chromophore as a potential biomarker for oxidative stress. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study we demonstrate that it is possible to monitor the metabolic activity, morphology, ECM production and oxidative stress of hMSCs in a non-invasive manner. This is accomplished using generally available multiphoton microscopy equipment and simple data analysis techniques, such that the method can widely adopted by laboratories with a diversity of comparable equipment. This method therefore represents a powerful tool

  6. Characterizing automotive fuel cell materials by soft x-ray scanning transmission x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitchcock, A. P., E-mail: aph@mcmaster.ca; Lee, V.; Wu, J.; Cooper, G. [Chemistry & Chemical Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada); West, M. M.; Berejnov, V. [Faculty of Health Sciences Electron Microscopy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Soboleva, T.; Susac, D.; Stumper, J. [Automotive Fuel Cell Cooperation Corp., Burnaby BC V5J 5J8 (Canada)

    2016-01-28

    Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEM-FC) based engines are being developed rapidly for near-term implementation in hydrogen fueled, mass production, personal automobiles. Research is focused on understanding and controlling various degradation processes (carbon corrosion, Pt migration, cold start), and reducing cost by reducing or eliminating Pt catalyst. We are using soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the S 2p, C 1s, O 1s and F 1s edges to study a variety of issues related to optimization of PEM-FC materials for automotive applications. A method to efficiently and accurately measure perfluorosulfonic acid distributions was developed and is being used to better understand how different loadings and preparation methods affect the ionomer distribution in the cathode. Progress towards an environmental cell capable of controlling the temperature and humidity of a PEM-FC sample in the STXM is described. Methods for studying the 3D chemical structure of PEM-FC are outlined.

  7. Exploring the Dynamics of Cell Processes through Simulations of Fluorescence Microscopy Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiolini, Juan; Plachta, Nicolas; Mocskos, Esteban; Levi, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) methods are powerful tools for unveiling the dynamical organization of cells. For simple cases, such as molecules passively moving in a homogeneous media, FCS analysis yields analytical functions that can be fitted to the experimental data to recover the phenomenological rate parameters. Unfortunately, many dynamical processes in cells do not follow these simple models, and in many instances it is not possible to obtain an analytical function through a theoretical analysis of a more complex model. In such cases, experimental analysis can be combined with Monte Carlo simulations to aid in interpretation of the data. In response to this need, we developed a method called FERNET (Fluorescence Emission Recipes and Numerical routines Toolkit) based on Monte Carlo simulations and the MCell-Blender platform, which was designed to treat the reaction-diffusion problem under realistic scenarios. This method enables us to set complex geometries of the simulation space, distribute molecules among different compartments, and define interspecies reactions with selected kinetic constants, diffusion coefficients, and species brightness. We apply this method to simulate single- and multiple-point FCS, photon-counting histogram analysis, raster image correlation spectroscopy, and two-color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy. We believe that this new program could be very useful for predicting and understanding the output of fluorescence microscopy experiments. PMID:26039162

  8. Characterizing automotive fuel cell materials by soft x-ray scanning transmission x-ray microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitchcock,