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Sample records for cell membrane proteome

  1. Membrane proteomic analysis of pancreatic cancer cells

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    Liu Xiaojun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human tumors due to its high potential of local invasion and metastasis. The aim of this study was to characterize the membrane proteomes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC cells of primary and metastatic origins, and to identify potential target proteins related to metastasis of pancreatic cancer. Methods Membrane/membrane-associated proteins were isolated from AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells and identified with a proteomic approach based on SDS-PAGE, in-gel tryptic digestion and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. X! Tandem was used for database searching against the SwissProt human protein database. Results We identified 221 & 208 proteins from AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells, respectively, most of which are membrane or membrane-associated proteins. A hundred and nine proteins were found in both cell lines while the others were present in either AsPC-1 or BxPC-3 cells. Differentially expressed proteins between two cell lines include modulators of cell adhesion, cell motility or tumor invasion as well as metabolic enzymes involved in glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, or nucleotide/lipid metabolism. Conclusion Membrane proteomes of AsPC-1 (metastatic and BxPC-3 (primary cells are remarkably different. The differentially expressed membrane proteins may serve as potential targets for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions.

  2. Systems analysis of endothelial cell plasma membrane proteome of rat lung microvasculature

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    Witkiewicz Halina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelial cells line all blood vessels to form the blood-tissue interface which is critical for maintaining organ homeostasis and facilitates molecular exchange. We recently used tissue subcellular fractionation combined with several multi-dimensional mass spectrometry-based techniques to enhance identification of lipid-embedded proteins for large-scale proteomic mapping of luminal endothelial cell plasma membranes isolated directly from rat lungs in vivo. The biological processes and functions of the proteins expressed at this important blood-tissue interface remain unexplored at a large scale. Results We performed an unbiased systems analysis of the endothelial cell surface proteome containing over 1800 proteins to unravel the major functions and pathways apparent at this interface. As expected, many key functions of plasma membranes in general (i.e., cell surface signaling pathways, cytoskeletal organization, adhesion, membrane trafficking, metabolism, mechanotransduction, membrane fusion, and vesicle-mediated transport and endothelial cells in particular (i.e., blood vessel development and maturation, angiogenesis, regulation of endothelial cell proliferation, protease activity, and endocytosis were significantly overrepresented in this proteome. We found that endothelial cells express multiple proteins that mediate processes previously reported to be restricted to neuronal cells, such as neuronal survival and plasticity, axon growth and regeneration, synaptic vesicle trafficking and neurotransmitter metabolic process. Surprisingly, molecular machinery for protein synthesis was also detected as overrepresented, suggesting that endothelial cells, like neurons, can synthesize proteins locally at the cell surface. Conclusion Our unbiased systems analysis has led to the potential discovery of unexpected functions in normal endothelium. The discovery of the existence of protein synthesis at the plasma membrane in endothelial

  3. Comparative membrane proteomics: a technical advancement in the search of renal cell carcinoma biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Francesca; Corbetta, Samuele; Savoia, Andrea; Chinello, Clizia; Cazzaniga, Marta; Rocco, Francesco; Bosari, Silvano; Grasso, Marco; Bovo, Giorgio; Magni, Fulvio; Pitto, Marina

    2015-06-01

    Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) is the most common kidney cancer, accounting for 3% of adult malignancies, with high metastatic potential and radio-/chemo-resistance. To investigate the protein profile of membrane microdomains (MD), plasma membrane supramolecular structures involved in cell signaling, transport, and neoplastic transformation, we set up a proteomic bottom-up approach as a starting point for the identification of potential RCC biomarkers. We purified MD from RCC and adjacent normal kidney (ANK) tissues, through their resistance to non-ionic detergents followed by ultracentrifugation in sucrose density gradient. MD from 5 RCC/ANK tissues were then pooled and analysed by LC-ESI-MS/MS. In order to identify the highest number of proteins and increase the amount of membrane and hydrophobic ones, we first optimized an enzymatic digestion protocol based on Filter Aided Sample Preparation (FASP), coupled to MD delipidation. The MS analysis led to the identification of 742 ANK MD and 721 RCC MD proteins, of which, respectively, 53.1% and 52.6% were membrane- bound. Additionally, we evaluated RCC MD differential proteome by label-free quantification; 170 and 126 proteins were found to be, respectively, up-regulated and down-regulated in RCC MD. Some differential proteins, namely CA2, CD13, and ANXA2, were subjected to validation by immunodecoration. These results show the importance of setting up different protocols for the proteomic analysis of membrane proteins, specific to the different molecular features of the samples. Furthermore, the subcellular proteomic approach provided a list of differentially expressed proteins among which RCC biomarkers may be looked for. PMID:25926002

  4. Analysis of membrane proteome and secretome in cells over-expressing ADAM17 using quantitative proteomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) protease is involved in proteolytic ectodomain shedding of several membrane-associated proteins and modulation of key cell signaling pathways in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we examined the effect of over-expressing the full length human ADAM17 in membrane and secreted proteins. To this end, we constructed a stable Flp-In T-RExHEK293 cells expressing ADAM17 by tetracycline induction. These cells were grown in Dulbeccos modified Eagles medium containing light lysine, arginine or heavy, L-Arg-13C615N4 and L-Lys -13C615N2 (SILAC: stable isotope labeling with amino acid in cell culture) media and they were treated with an ADAM17 activator, phorbolester (PMA). Controls such as Flp-In T-RExHEK293 cell without PMA treatment and without ADAM17 cloned were cultivated in light medium. The ADAM17 overexpression was induced with tetracycline 500 ng/ml for 24 hours. Cells in a heavy condition were treated with PMA 50 ng/ml for 1 hour and vehicle DMSO was used as control in a light cell condition. The extracellular media were collected, concentrated and used to evaluate the secretome and a cell surface biotinylation-based approach was used to capture cell surface-associated proteins. The biotinylated proteins were eluted with dithiothreitol, alkylated with iodoacetamide and then digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis on an ETD enabled Orbitrap Velos instrument. The results showed different proteins up or down regulated in membrane and secretome analysis which might represent potential molecules involved in signaling or ADAM17 regulation events. (author)

  5. Analysis of membrane proteome and secretome in cells over-expressing ADAM17 using quantitative proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawahara, R.; Simabuco, F.M. [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias - LNBIO, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Yokoo, S.; Paes Leme, A.F. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Sherman, N. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) protease is involved in proteolytic ectodomain shedding of several membrane-associated proteins and modulation of key cell signaling pathways in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we examined the effect of over-expressing the full length human ADAM17 in membrane and secreted proteins. To this end, we constructed a stable Flp-In T-RExHEK293 cells expressing ADAM17 by tetracycline induction. These cells were grown in Dulbeccos modified Eagles medium containing light lysine, arginine or heavy, L-Arg-13C615N4 and L-Lys -13C615N2 (SILAC: stable isotope labeling with amino acid in cell culture) media and they were treated with an ADAM17 activator, phorbolester (PMA). Controls such as Flp-In T-RExHEK293 cell without PMA treatment and without ADAM17 cloned were cultivated in light medium. The ADAM17 overexpression was induced with tetracycline 500 ng/ml for 24 hours. Cells in a heavy condition were treated with PMA 50 ng/ml for 1 hour and vehicle DMSO was used as control in a light cell condition. The extracellular media were collected, concentrated and used to evaluate the secretome and a cell surface biotinylation-based approach was used to capture cell surface-associated proteins. The biotinylated proteins were eluted with dithiothreitol, alkylated with iodoacetamide and then digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis on an ETD enabled Orbitrap Velos instrument. The results showed different proteins up or down regulated in membrane and secretome analysis which might represent potential molecules involved in signaling or ADAM17 regulation events. (author)

  6. Comparative proteomic analysis of plasma membrane proteins between human osteosarcoma and normal osteoblastic cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone in children and adolescents. However, the knowledge in diagnostic modalities has progressed less. To identify new biomarkers for the early diagnosis of OS as well as for potential novel therapeutic candidates, we performed a sub-cellular comparative proteomic research. An osteosarcoma cell line (MG-63) and human osteoblastic cells (hFOB1.19) were used as our comparative model. Plasma membrane (PM) was obtained by aqueous two-phase partition. Proteins were analyzed through iTRAQ-based quantitative differential LC/MS/MS. The location and function of differential proteins were analyzed through GO database. Protein-protein interaction was examined through String software. One of differentially expressed proteins was verified by immunohistochemistry. 342 non-redundant proteins were identified, 68 of which were differentially expressed with 1.5-fold difference, with 25 up-regulated and 43 down-regulated. Among those differential proteins, 69% ware plasma membrane, which are related to the biological processes of binding, cell structure, signal transduction, cell adhesion, etc., and interaction with each other. One protein--CD151 located in net nodes was verified to be over-expressed in osteosarcoma tissue by immunohistochemistry. It is the first time to use plasma membrane proteomics for studying the OS membrane proteins according to our knowledge. We generated preliminary but comprehensive data about membrane protein of osteosarcoma. Among these, CD151 was further validated in patient samples, and this small molecule membrane might be a new target for OS research. The plasma membrane proteins identified in this study may provide new insight into osteosarcoma biology and potential diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers

  7. Proteomics and the dynamic plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprenger, Richard R; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2010-01-01

    plasma membrane is of particular interest, by not only serving as a barrier between the "cell interior" and the external environment, but moreover by organizing and clustering essential components to enable dynamic responses to internal and external stimuli. Defining and characterizing the dynamic plasma...... the challenges in functional proteomic studies of the plasma membrane. We review the recent progress in MS-based plasma membrane proteomics by presenting key examples from eukaryotic systems, including mammals, yeast and plants. We highlight the importance of enrichment and quantification technologies...... required for detailed functional and comparative analysis of the dynamic plasma membrane proteome....

  8. Proteomics of membrane microdomains from activated human natural killer cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Man, Petr; Pompach, Petr; Vančurová, Markéta; Novák, Petr; Kavan, Daniel; Mrázek, Hynek; Bezouška, Karel

    Bremen : German Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2009. s. 128-128. [International Mass Spectrometry Conference /18./. 30.08.2009-04.09.2009, Bremen] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017; GA AV ČR KJB500200612 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : mass spectrometry * natural killer cells Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  9. Quantitative proteomics of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae cell envelope and membrane vesicles for the discovery of potential therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielke, Ryszard A; Wierzbicki, Igor H; Weber, Jacob V; Gafken, Philip R; Sikora, Aleksandra E

    2014-05-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) is a human-specific pathogen, and the agent of a sexually transmitted disease, gonorrhea. There is a critical need for new approaches to study and treat GC infections because of the growing threat of multidrug-resistant isolates and the lack of a vaccine. Despite the implied role of the GC cell envelope and membrane vesicles in colonization and infection of human tissues and cell lines, comprehensive studies have not been undertaken to elucidate their constituents. Accordingly, in pursuit of novel molecular therapeutic targets, we have applied isobaric tagging for absolute quantification coupled with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry for proteome quantitative analyses. Mining the proteome of cell envelopes and native membrane vesicles revealed 533 and 168 common proteins, respectively, in analyzed GC strains FA1090, F62, MS11, and 1291. A total of 22 differentially abundant proteins were discovered including previously unknown proteins. Among those proteins that displayed similar abundance in four GC strains, 34 were found in both cell envelopes and membrane vesicles fractions. Focusing on one of them, a homolog of an outer membrane protein LptD, we demonstrated that its depletion caused loss of GC viability. In addition, we selected for initial characterization six predicted outer membrane proteins with unknown function, which were identified as ubiquitous in the cell envelopes derived from examined GC isolates. These studies entitled a construction of deletion mutants and analyses of their resistance to different chemical probes. Loss of NGO1985, in particular, resulted in dramatically decreased GC viability upon treatment with detergents, polymyxin B, and chloramphenicol, suggesting that this protein functions in the maintenance of the cell envelope permeability barrier. Together, these findings underscore the concept that the cell envelope and membrane vesicles contain crucial, yet under-explored determinants of GC

  10. STEM CELLS AND PROTEOMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yong-ming; GUO Tian-nan; HUANG Shi-ang

    2006-01-01

    The distinctive features of proteomics are large-scale and high throughput. The key techniques of proteomics are two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics. Stem cell can differentiate into all kinds of cells, tissues and organs. There are many proteins and cytokines involved in the process of differentiation. Applying proteomics techniques to the research of the complex process of stem cell differentiation is of great importance to study the mechanism and applications of stem cell differentiation.

  11. Efficient Isolation and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Cancer Cell Plasma Membrane Proteins for Identification of Metastasis-Associated Cell Surface Markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rikke; Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Jensen, Ole N; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2009-01-01

    proteins that could be quantified from 40 to 93%. Repeated LC-MS/MS analyses (3-4 times) of each sample increased the number of identified proteins by 60%. The use of Percoll/sucrose density separation allowed subfractionation of membranes leading to enrichment of membrane proteins (66%) and reduction from...... 33% to only 16% of protein from other membranous organelles such as endoplasmatic reticulum, Golgi, and mitochondria. In total, our optimized methods resulted in 1919 protein identifications (corresponding to 826 at similarity level 80% (SL80); 1145 (509 at SL80) were identified by two or more...... peptides of which 622 (300 at SL80) were membrane proteins. The quantitative proteomic analysis identified 16 cell surface proteins as potential markers of the ability of breast cancer cells to form distant metastases....

  12. Combining phenotypic and proteomic approaches to identify membrane targets in a ‘triple negative’ breast cancer cell type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rust Steven

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The continued discovery of therapeutic antibodies, which address unmet medical needs, requires the continued discovery of tractable antibody targets. Multiple protein-level target discovery approaches are available and these can be used in combination to extensively survey relevant cell membranomes. In this study, the MDA-MB-231 cell line was selected for membranome survey as it is a ‘triple negative’ breast cancer cell line, which represents a cancer subtype that is aggressive and has few treatment options. Methods The MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cell line was used to explore three membranome target discovery approaches, which were used in parallel to cross-validate the significance of identified antigens. A proteomic approach, which used membrane protein enrichment followed by protein identification by mass spectrometry, was used alongside two phenotypic antibody screening approaches. The first phenotypic screening approach was based on hybridoma technology and the second was based on phage display technology. Antibodies isolated by the phenotypic approaches were tested for cell specificity as well as internalisation and the targets identified were compared to each other as well as those identified by the proteomic approach. An anti-CD73 antibody derived from the phage display-based phenotypic approach was tested for binding to other ‘triple negative’ breast cancer cell lines and tested for tumour growth inhibitory activity in a MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. Results All of the approaches identified multiple cell surface markers, including integrins, CD44, EGFR, CD71, galectin-3, CD73 and BCAM, some of which had been previously confirmed as being tractable to antibody therapy. In total, 40 cell surface markers were identified for further study. In addition to cell surface marker identification, the phenotypic antibody screening approaches provided reagent antibodies for target validation studies. This is illustrated

  13. Bacillus subtilis Spore Inner Membrane Proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Linli; Abhyankar, Wishwas; Ouwerling, Natasja; Dekker, Henk L; van Veen, Henk; van der Wel, Nicole N; Roseboom, Winfried; de Koning, Leo J; Brul, Stanley; de Koster, Chris G

    2016-02-01

    The endospore is the dormant form of Bacillus subtilis and many other Firmicutes. By sporulation, these spore formers can survive very harsh physical and chemical conditions. Yet, they need to go through germination to return to their growing form. The spore inner membrane (IM) has been shown to play an essential role in triggering the initiation of germination. In this study, we isolated the IM of bacterial spores, in parallel with the isolation of the membrane of vegetative cells. With the use of GeLC-MS/MS, over 900 proteins were identified from the B. subtilis spore IM preparations. By bioinformatics-based membrane protein predictions, ca. one-third could be predicted to be membrane-localized. A large number of unique proteins as well as proteins common to the two membrane proteomes were identified. In addition to previously known IM proteins, a number of IM proteins were newly identified, at least some of which are likely to provide new insights into IM physiology, unveiling proteins putatively involved in spore germination machinery and hence putative germination inhibition targets. PMID:26731423

  14. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease. PMID:26381655

  15. Proteomic analysis of ERK1/2-mediated human sickle red blood cell membrane protein phosphorylation

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    Soderblom Erik J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sickle cell disease (SCD, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK ERK1/2 is constitutively active and can be inducible by agonist-stimulation only in sickle but not in normal human red blood cells (RBCs. ERK1/2 is involved in activation of ICAM-4-mediated sickle RBC adhesion to the endothelium. However, other effects of the ERK1/2 activation in sickle RBCs leading to the complex SCD pathophysiology, such as alteration of RBC hemorheology are unknown. Results To further characterize global ERK1/2-induced changes in membrane protein phosphorylation within human RBCs, a label-free quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis was applied to sickle and normal RBC membrane ghosts pre-treated with U0126, a specific inhibitor of MEK1/2, the upstream kinase of ERK1/2, in the presence or absence of recombinant active ERK2. Across eight unique treatment groups, 375 phosphopeptides from 155 phosphoproteins were quantified with an average technical coefficient of variation in peak intensity of 19.8%. Sickle RBC treatment with U0126 decreased thirty-six phosphopeptides from twenty-one phosphoproteins involved in regulation of not only RBC shape, flexibility, cell morphology maintenance and adhesion, but also glucose and glutamate transport, cAMP production, degradation of misfolded proteins and receptor ubiquitination. Glycophorin A was the most affected protein in sickle RBCs by this ERK1/2 pathway, which contained 12 unique phosphorylated peptides, suggesting that in addition to its effect on sickle RBC adhesion, increased glycophorin A phosphorylation via the ERK1/2 pathway may also affect glycophorin A interactions with band 3, which could result in decreases in both anion transport by band 3 and band 3 trafficking. The abundance of twelve of the thirty-six phosphopeptides were subsequently increased in normal RBCs co-incubated with recombinant ERK2 and therefore represent specific MEK1/2 phospho-inhibitory targets mediated via ERK2

  16. Quantitative proteomics of fractionated membrane and lumen exosome proteins from isogenic metastatic and nonmetastatic bladder cancer cells reveal differential expression of EMT factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Nawrocki, Arkadiusz; Jensen, Steffen Grann;

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells secrete soluble factors and various extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, into their tissue microenvironment. The secretion of exosomes is speculated to facilitate local invasion and metastatic spread. Here, we used an in vivo metastasis model of human bladder carcinoma cell line...... T24 without metastatic capacity and its two isogenic derivate cell lines SLT4 and FL3, which form metastases in the lungs and liver of mice, respectively. Cultivation in CLAD1000 bioreactors rather than conventional culture flasks resulted in a 13-16-fold increased exosome yield and facilitated...... quantitative proteomics of fractionated exosomes. Exosomes from T24, SLT4, and FL3 cells were partitioned into membrane and luminal fractions and changes in protein abundance related to the gain of metastatic capacity were identified by quantitative iTRAQ- proteomics. We identified several proteins linked...

  17. Comprehensive quantitative comparison of the membrane proteome and PTM-ome of human embryonic stem cells and neural stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braga, Marcella Nunes de Melo; Schulz, Melanie; Jakobsen, Lene;

    Introduction: Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can differentiate into all three germ layers and self-renew. Due to its ability to differentiate in vitro into human neural stem cells (hNSCs), which can further be differentiated into motor neurons and dopaminergic neurons, these cells are potential...... source for treatment of neurological diseases such as Parkinson´s disease. Membrane proteins are very important in cellular signaling and they are regulated by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and glycosylation. In order to obtain more information about important membrane proteins...... identified phosphorylated and SA glycosylated proteins, respectively. This study allowed us to identify several significantly regulated proteins during the differentiation process, including proteins involved in the early embryonic development as well as in the neural development. In the latter group of...

  18. Quantitative Membrane Proteomics in a Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Line Undergoing Osteogenic Differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Helle

    . Mesenchymal stem cells are generally isolated based on physical-chemical characteristics such as adherence to plastic, isolating the monocyte fraction. The resultant cultures are often heterogeneous and can contain other cell types, providing a currently poorly defined basis for future clinical use. The...... associated or GPI anchored proteins. A considerable number of CD antigens and GPI anchored proteins were identified and quantified, illustrating a high degree of sub-fractional proteome resolution. We identified and quantified known markers of hMSC (e.g. CD71, CD166, CD105, CD44, CD29, CD90 and CD63) as well...

  19. Proteome profiling of human neutrophil granule subsets, secretory vesicles, and cell membrane: correlation with transcriptome profiling of neutrophil precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rørvig, Sara; Østergaard, Ole; Heegaard, Niels H H; Borregaard, Niels

    2013-10-01

    Neutrophils are indispensable in the innate immune defense against invading microorganisms. Neutrophils contain SVs and several subsets of granules that are essential for their function. Proteins present in neutrophil SVs and granules are synthesized during terminal granulopoiesis in the bone marrow. The heterogeneity of granules, as determined by marker proteins characteristic of each granule subset, is thought to result from differences in the biosynthetic windows of major classes of granule proteins, a process referred to as targeting by timing. Qualitative proteomic analysis of neutrophil granules, SVs, and plasma membrane has been performed before. Here, we performed subcellular fractionation on freshly isolated human neutrophils by nitrogen cavitation and density centrifugation on a four-layer Percoll gradient. Granule subsets were pooled and subjected to SDS-PAGE, and gel pieces were in-gel-digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were analyzed using LTQ Orbitrap XL tandem MS. A total of 1292 unique proteins were identified and grouped, according to the neutrophil fraction, in which they displayed maximal expression. In addition to various known neutrophil proteins, several uncharacterized proteins were found, as well as proteins not described previously in neutrophils. To study the correlation between mRNA expression in neutrophil precursors and the localization of their cognate proteins, the distribution of 126 identified proteins was compared with their mRNA expression profiles. The neutrophil subcellular proteome profiles presented here may be used as a database in combination with the mRNA array database to predict and test the presence and localization of proteins in neutrophil granules and membranes. PMID:23650620

  20. Comprehensive Quantitative Comparison of the Membrane Proteome, Phosphoproteome, and Sialiome of Human Embryonic and Neural Stem Cells*

    OpenAIRE

    Melo-Braga, Marcella Nunes; Schulz, Melanie; Liu, Qiuyue; Swistowski, Andrzej; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Jakobsen, Lene; Zeng, Xianmin; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can differentiate into neural stem cells (NSCs), which can further be differentiated into neurons and glia cells. Therefore, these cells have huge potential as source for treatment of neurological diseases. Membrane-associated proteins are very important in cellular signaling and recognition, and their function and activity are frequently regulated by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and glycosylation. To obtain information about memb...

  1. Evaluation of strategy for analyzing mouse liver plasma membrane proteome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Ping; ZHANG; LiJun; LI; XuanWen; WANG; XiE; CAO; Rui; LIU; Zhen; XIONG; JiXian; PENG; Xia; WEI; YingJuan; YING; XingFeng; WANG; XianChun; LIANG; SongPing

    2007-01-01

    Plasma membrane (PM) proteome is one of the major subproteomes present in the cell,and is very important in liver function. In the present work, C57 mouse liver PM was purified by density-gradient centrifugation. The purified PM was verified by electron microscope analysis and Western blotting. The results showed that the PM was enriched by more than 20-fold and the contamination of mitochondria was reduced by 2-fold compared with the homogenization fraction. Proteins were separated by 2DE and 1DE, trypsin-digested and submitted to ESI-Q-TOF and MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry or directly digested in solution and analyzed by LC-ESI ion trap mass spectrometry. In all, 547 non-redundant mouse liver PM proteins were identified, of which 34% contributed to plasma membrane or plasma membrane-related proteins. This study optimized and evaluated the HLPP plasma membrane proteome analysis method and made a systematic analysis on PM proteome.

  2. Differential expression profiling of membrane proteins by quantitative proteomics in a human mesenchymal stem cell line undergoing osteoblast differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foster, Leonard J; Zeemann, Patricia A; Li, Chen; Mann, Matthias; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Kassem, Moustapha

    2005-01-01

    of another 21 decreased by at least twofold. For example, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), versican core protein, and tenascin increased 27-, 12-, and 4-fold, respectively, and fatty acid synthase decreased sixfold. The observed increases in veriscan and ALP were confirmed using immunocytochemistry and......One of the major limitations for understanding the biology of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is the absence of prospective markers needed for distinguishing them from other cells and for monitoring lineage-specific differentiation. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has proven extremely...... in a cell model of hMSCs established by overexpression of human telomerase reverse-transcriptase gene. We identified 463 unique proteins with extremely high confidence, including all known markers of hMSCs (e.g., SH3 [CD71], SH2 [CD105], CD166, CD44, Thy1, CD29, and HOP26 [CD63]) among 148 integral...

  3. Cell wall proteins: a new insight through proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2006-01-01

    Cell wall proteins are essential constituents of plant cell walls; they are involved in modifications of cell wall components, wall structure, signaling and interactions with plasma membrane proteins at the cell surface. The application of proteomic approaches to the cell wall compartment raises important questions: are there technical problems specific to cell wall proteomics? What kinds of proteins can be found in Arabidopsis walls? Are some of them unexpected? What sort of post-translation...

  4. Proteomic analysis of GPI-anchored membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Hye Ryung; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2006-01-01

    humans. GPI-APs confer important cellular functions as receptors, enzymes and scaffolding molecules. Specific enzymes and detergent extraction methods combined with separation technologies and mass spectrometry permit proteomic analysis of GPI-APs from plasma membrane preparations to reveal cell......Glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) represent a subset of post-translationally modified proteins that are tethered to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane via a C-terminal GPI anchor. GPI-APs are found in a variety of eukaryote species, from pathogenic microorganisms to...

  5. Comprehensive quantitative comparison of the membrane proteome, phosphoproteome, and sialiome of human embryonic and neural stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melo-Braga, Marcella Nunes; Schulz, Melanie; Liu, Qiuyue;

    2014-01-01

    calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-2, emphasizing a possible importance of this kinase for this cell stage. Collectively, this data represent the most diverse set of post-translational modifications reported for hESCs and NSCs. This study revealed potential markers to distinguish NSCs from hESCs and will......Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can differentiate into neural stem cells (NSCs), which can further be differentiated into neurons and glia cells. Therefore, these cells have huge potential as source for treatment of neurological diseases. Membrane-associated proteins are very important in...... cellular signaling and recognition, and their function and activity are frequently regulated by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and glycosylation. To obtain information about membrane-associated proteins and their modified amino acids potentially involved in changes of hESCs and...

  6. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and quantitative comparison of the membrane proteomes of self-renewing and differentiating human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokhorova, Tatyana A; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Johansen, Pia T;

    2009-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is a powerful quantitative proteomics platform for comprehensive characterization of complex biological systems. However, the potential of SILAC-based approaches has not been fully utilized in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research...

  7. Membrane labeling of coral gastrodermal cells by biotinylation: the proteomic identification of surface proteins involving cnidaria-dinoflagellate endosymbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsing-Hui Li

    Full Text Available The cellular and molecular-scale processes underlying the stability of coral-Symbiodinium endosymbioses remain unclear despite decades of investigation. As the coral gastroderm is the only tissue layer characterized by this unique symbiotic association, the membranes of these symbiotic gastrodermal cells (SGCs may play important roles in the initiation and maintenance of the endosymbiosis. In order to elucidate the interactions between the endosymbiotic dinoflagellates and their coral hosts, a thorough characterization of SGC membranes is therefore required. Cell surface proteins of isolated SGCs were biotinylated herein by a cell impermeant agent, biotin-XX sulfosuccinimidyl ester. The in situ distribution of these biotinylated proteins was uncovered by both fluorescence and transmission electron microscopic imaging of proteins bound to Alexa Fluor® 488-conjugated streptavidin. The identity of these proteins was then determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Nineteen (19 proteins were identified, and they are known to be involved in the molecular chaperone/stress response, cytoskeletal remodeling, and energy metabolism. These results not only reveal the molecular characters of the host SGC membrane, but also provide critical insight into understanding the possible role of host membranes in this ecologically important endosymbiotic association.

  8. Cell death proteomics database: consolidating proteomics data on cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntzen, Magnus Ø; Bull, Vibeke H; Thiede, Bernd

    2013-05-01

    Programmed cell death is a ubiquitous process of utmost importance for the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. More than 10 different types of programmed cell death forms have been discovered. Several proteomics analyses have been performed to gain insight in proteins involved in the different forms of programmed cell death. To consolidate these studies, we have developed the cell death proteomics (CDP) database, which comprehends data from apoptosis, autophagy, cytotoxic granule-mediated cell death, excitotoxicity, mitotic catastrophe, paraptosis, pyroptosis, and Wallerian degeneration. The CDP database is available as a web-based database to compare protein identifications and quantitative information across different experimental setups. The proteomics data of 73 publications were integrated and unified with protein annotations from UniProt-KB and gene ontology (GO). Currently, more than 6,500 records of more than 3,700 proteins are included in the CDP. Comparing apoptosis and autophagy using overrepresentation analysis of GO terms, the majority of enriched processes were found in both, but also some clear differences were perceived. Furthermore, the analysis revealed differences and similarities of the proteome between autophagosomal and overall autophagy. The CDP database represents a useful tool to consolidate data from proteome analyses of programmed cell death and is available at http://celldeathproteomics.uio.no. PMID:23537399

  9. Analysis of the membrane proteome of ciprofloxacin-resistant macrophages by stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy E Caceres

    Full Text Available Overexpression of multidrug transporters is a well-established mechanism of resistance to chemotherapy, but other changes may be co-selected upon exposure to drugs that contribute to resistance. Using a model of J774 macrophages made resistant to the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin and comparing it with the wild-type parent cell line, we performed a quantitative proteomic analysis using the stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture technology coupled with liquid chromatography electrospray ionization Fourier transform tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-FT-MS/MS on 2 samples enriched in membrane proteins (fractions F1 and F2 collected from discontinuous sucrose gradient. Nine hundred proteins were identified with at least 3 unique peptides in these 2 pooled fractions among which 61 (F1 and 69 (F2 showed a significantly modified abundance among the 2 cell lines. The multidrug resistance associated protein Abcc4, known as the ciprofloxacin efflux transporter in these cells, was the most upregulated, together with Dnajc3, a protein encoded by a gene located downstream of Abcc4. The other modulated proteins are involved in transport functions, cell adhesion and cytoskeleton organization, immune response, signal transduction, and metabolism. This indicates that the antibiotic ciprofloxacin is able to trigger a pleiotropic adaptative response in macrophages that includes the overexpression of its efflux transporter.

  10. Differential quantitative analysis of the plasma membrane proteome of the yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Szopinska, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    The plasma membrane is a lipid bilayer that separates the cells from the external environment. It contains a mixture of polar lipids with proteins inserted into this bilayer. Specialized plasma membrane proteins perform and control different defensive, signaling, metabolic and transport functions. Despite the progress in proteomic research, global analysis of membrane proteins remains a difficult task. Serious limitation in membrane protein studies is their hydrophobicity, which results in lo...

  11. Extraction, Enrichment, Solubilization, and Digestion Techniques for Membrane Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Stephanie M; Hess, Stephanie M; Jorgenson, James W

    2016-04-01

    The importance of membrane proteins in biological systems is indisputable; however, their amphipathic nature makes them difficult to analyze. In this study, the most popular techniques for extraction, enrichment, solubilization, and digestion are compared, resulting in an overall improved workflow for the insoluble portion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell lysate. Yeast cells were successfully lysed using a French press pressure cell at 20 000 psi, and resulting proteins were fractionated prior to digestion to reduce sample complexity. The proteins were best solubilized with the addition of ionic detergent sodium deoxycholate (1%) and through the application of high-frequency sonication prior to a tryptic digestion at 37 °C. Overall, the improved membrane proteomic workflow resulted in a 26% increase in membrane protein identifications for baker's yeast. In addition, more membrane protein identifications were unique to the improved protocol. When comparing membrane proteins that were identified in the improved protocol and the standard operating procedure (176 proteins), 93% of these proteins were present in greater abundance (higher intensity) when using the improved method. PMID:26979493

  12. Cell wall proteomics of crops

    OpenAIRE

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Yanagawa, Yuki

    2013-01-01

    Cell wall proteins play key roles in cell structure and metabolism, cell enlargement, signal transduction, responses to environmental stress, and many other physiological events. Agricultural crops are often used for investigating stress tolerance because cultivars with differing degrees of tolerance are available. Abiotic and biotic stress factors markedly influence the geographical distribution and yields of many crop species. Crop cell wall proteomics is of particular importance for improv...

  13. Towards functional proteomics of membrane protein complexes: analysis of thylakoid membranes from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippler, M; Klein, J; Fink, A; Allinger, T; Hoerth, P

    2001-12-01

    Functional proteomics of membrane proteins is an important tool for the understanding of protein networks in biological membranes but structural studies on this part of the proteome are limited. In this study we undertook such an approach to analyse photosynthetic thylakoid membranes isolated from wild-type and mutant strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Thylakoid membrane proteins were separated by high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and analysed by immuno-blotting and mass spectrometry for the presence of membrane-spanning proteins. Our data show that light-harvesting complex proteins (LHCP), that cross the membrane with three transmembrane domains, can be separated using this method. We have identified more than 30 different LHCP spots on our gels. Mass spectrometric analysis of 2-DE separated Lhcb1 indicates that this major LHCII protein can associate with the thylakoid membrane with part of its putative transit sequence. Separation of isolated photosystem I (PSI) complexes by 2-DE revealed the presence of 18 LHCI protein spots. The use of two peptide-specific antibodies directed against LHCI subunits supports the interpretation that some of these spots represent products arising from differential processing and post-translational modifications. In addition our data indicate that the reaction centre subunit of PSI, PsaA, that possesses 11 transmembrane domains, can be separated by 2-DE. Comparison between 2-DE maps from thylakoid membrane proteins isolated from a PSI-deficient (Deltaycf4) and a crd1 mutant, which is conditionally reduced in PSI and LHCI under copper-deficiency, showed the presence of most of the LHCI spots in the former but their absence in the latter. Our data demonstrate that (i) hydrophobic membrane proteins like the LHCPs can be faithfully separated by 2-DE, and (ii) that high-resolution 2-DE facilitates the comparative analysis of membrane protein complexes in wild-type and mutants cells. PMID:11849598

  14. Characterization of membrane-shed micro-vesicles from cytokine-stimulated beta-cells using proteomics strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmisano, Giuseppe; Jensen, Soren Skov; Le Bihan, Marie Catherine;

    2012-01-01

    Micro-particles and exosomes are two of the most well characterized membrane-derived micro-vesicles released either directly from the plasma membrane or released through the fusion of intracellular multi-vesicular bodies with the plasma membrane, respectively. They are thought to be involved...

  15. Nuclear envelope proteomics: Novel integral membrane proteins of the inner nuclear membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreger, Mathias; Bengtsson, Luiza; Schöneberg, Torsten; Otto, Henning; Hucho, Ferdinand

    2001-01-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) is one of the least characterized structures of eukaryotic cells. The study of its functional roles is hampered by the small number of proteins known to be specifically located to it. Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of the NE proteome. We applied different fractionation procedures and isolated protein subsets derived from distinct NE compartments. We identified 148 different proteins by 16-benzyl dimethyl hexadecyl ammonium chloride (16-BAC) gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry; among them were 19 previously unknown or noncharacterized. The identification of known proteins in particular NE fractions enabled us to assign novel proteins to NE substructures. Thus, our subcellular proteomics approach retains the screening character of classical proteomic studies, but also allows a number of predictions about subcellular localization and interactions of previously noncharacterized proteins. We demonstrate this result by showing that two novel transmembrane proteins, a 100-kDa protein with similarity to Caenorhabditis elegans Unc-84A and an unrelated 45-kDa protein we named LUMA, reside in the inner nuclear membrane and likely interact with the nuclear lamina. The utility of our approach is not restricted to the investigation of the NE. Our approach should be applicable to the analysis of other complex membrane structures of the cell as well. PMID:11593002

  16. Proteomics Study of Cotton Fiber Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jin-yuan

    2008-01-01

    @@ A comparative proteomic analysis was applied to explore the mechanism of fiber cell development in cotton.Initially,an efficient protein preparation method was established for proteomic analysis of developing cotton fibers by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis,and a microwave enhanced ink staining technique also was created for fast and sensitive protein quantification in proteomic studies.

  17. Mass spectrometry based proteomics for absolute quantification of proteins from tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hong; Hanash, Sam

    2015-01-01

    In-depth quantitative profiling of the proteome and sub-proteomes of tumor cells has relevance to tumor classification, the development of novel therapeutics, and of prognostic and predictive markers and to disease monitoring. In particular the tumor cell surface represents a highly relevant compartment for the development of targeted therapeutics and immunotherapy. We have developed a proteomic platform to profile tumor cells that encompasses enrichment of surface membrane proteins, intact p...

  18. Unique proteomic signatures distinguish macrophages and dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Becker

    Full Text Available Monocytes differentiate into heterogeneous populations of tissue macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs that regulate inflammation and immunity. Identifying specific populations of myeloid cells in vivo is problematic, however, because only a limited number of proteins have been used to assign cellular phenotype. Using mass spectrometry and bone marrow-derived cells, we provided a global view of the proteomes of M-CSF-derived macrophages, classically and alternatively activated macrophages, and GM-CSF-derived DCs. Remarkably, the expression levels of half the plasma membrane proteins differed significantly in the various populations of cells derived in vitro. Moreover, the membrane proteomes of macrophages and DCs were more distinct than those of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Hierarchical cluster and dual statistical analyses demonstrated that each cell type exhibited a robust proteomic signature that was unique. To interrogate the phenotype of myeloid cells in vivo, we subjected elicited peritoneal macrophages harvested from wild-type and GM-CSF-deficient mice to mass spectrometric and functional analysis. Unexpectedly, we found that peritoneal macrophages exhibited many features of the DCs generated in vitro. These findings demonstrate that global analysis of the membrane proteome can help define immune cell phenotypes in vivo.

  19. Proteomic Analysis of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Tabb, David L.; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Chen, Lily; Lewis, Nathan; Nagarajan, Harish; Sarkaria, Vishaldeep; Kumar, Amit; Wolozny, Daniel; Colao, Joe; Jacobson, Elena; Tian, Yuan; O’Meally, Robert N.; Krag, Sharon S.; Cole, Robert N.; Palsson, Bernhard; Zhang, Hui; Betenbaugh, Michael

    2012-01-01

    this analysis, the CHO codon frequency was determined and found to be distinct from humans, which will facilitate expression of human proteins in CHO cells. Analysis of the combined proteomic and mRNA data sets indicated the enrichment of a number of pathways including protein processing and apoptosis......To complement the recent genomic sequencing of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, proteomic analysis was performed on CHO cells including the cellular proteome, secretome, and glycoproteome using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of multiple fractions obtained from gel electrophoresis...... identified from both glycoproteome and proteome analysis, representing an 8-fold increase in the number of proteins currently identified in the CHO proteome. Furthermore, this is the first proteomic study done using the CHO genome exclusively, which provides for more accurate identification of proteins. From...

  20. A Proteomics Approach to Membrane Trafficking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, A.J.; Vries, de S.C.; Lilley, K.S.

    2008-01-01

    Membrane trafficking, including that of integral membrane proteins as well as peripherally associated proteins, appears to be a vital process common to all eukaryotes. An important element of membrane trafficking is to determine the protein composition of the various endomembrane compartments. A maj

  1. Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tølbøll, Trine Højgaard; Danscher, Anne Mette; Andersen, Pia Haubro;

    2012-01-01

    grouped manually to one or more of five major functional groups related to metabolism, cell structure, immunity, apoptosis and angiogenesis. These were chosen to represent basic cell functions and biological processes potentially involved in the pathogenesis of CHD. The LC–MS/MS-based proteomic analysis...... presented here is the largest published survey, so far, of the bovine claw tissue proteome....

  2. Proteomic analysis of secreted membrane vesicles of archaeal Sulfolobus species reveals the presence of endosome sorting complex components

    OpenAIRE

    Ellen, Albert F.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Huibers, Wim; Pitcher, Angela; Hobel, Cedric F. V.; Schwarz, Heinz; Folea, Mihaela; Schouten, Stefan; Boekema, Egbert J.; Poolman, Bert; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2009-01-01

    The crenarchaea Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, S. solfataricus and S. tokodaii, release membrane vesicles into the medium. These membrane vesicles consist of tetraether lipids and are coated with an S-layer. A proteomic analysis reveals the presence of proteins homologous to subunits of the eukaryotic endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT). Immunodetection of one of these homologs suggest a cell surface localization in intact cells. These data suggest that the membrane vesicles ...

  3. The plasma membrane proteome of germinating barley embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hynek, Radovan; Svensson, Birte; Jensen, O.N.;

    2009-01-01

    amphiphilicity and low abundance of membrane proteins. A fraction enriched in plasma membranes was prepared from embryos dissected from 18 h germinated barley seeds using aqueous two-phase partitioning. Reversed-phase chromatography on C-4 resin performed in micro-spin columns with stepwise elution by 2-propanol......Cereal seed germination involves a complex coordination between different seed tissues. Plasma membranes must play crucial roles in coordination and execution of germination; however, very little is known about seed plasma membrane proteomes due to limited tissue amounts combined with...... was used to reduce soluble protein contamination and enrich for hydrophobic proteins. Sixty-one proteins in 14 SDS-PAGE bands were identified by LC-MS/MS and database searches. The identifications provide new insight into the plasma membrane functions in seed germination....

  4. Proteomic analysis of the shistosome tegument and its surface membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Braschi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The tegument surface of the adult schistosome, bounded by a normal plasma membrane overlain by a secreted membranocalyx, holds the key to understanding how schistosomes evade host immune responses. Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS, and the sequencing of the Schistosoma mansoni transcriptome/genome, have facilitated schistosome proteomics. We detached the tegument from the worm body and enriched its surface membranes by differential extraction, before subjecting the preparation to liquid chromatography-based proteomics to identify its constituents. The most exposed proteins on live worms were labelled with impearmeant biotinylation reagents, and we also developed methods to isolate the membranocalyx for analysis. We identified transporters for sugars, amino acids, inorganic ions and water, which confirm the importance of the tegument plasma membrane in nutrient acquisition and solute balance. Enzymes, including phosphohydrolases, esterases and carbonic anhydrase were located with their catalytic domains external to the plasma membrane, while five tetraspanins, annexin and dysferlin were implicated in membrane architecture. In contrast, few parasite proteins could be assigned to the membranocalyx but mouse immune response proteins, including three immunoglobulins and two complement factors, were detected, plus host membrane proteins such as CD44, integrin and a complement regulatory protein, testifying to the acquisitive properties of the secreted bilayer.

  5. Nanodisc-solubilized membrane protein library reflects the membrane proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Marty, Michael T.; Wilcox, Kyle C.; Klein, William L.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2013-01-01

    The isolation and identification of unknown membrane proteins offers the prospect of discovering new pharmaceutical targets and identifying key biochemical receptors. However, interactions between membrane protein targets and soluble ligands are difficult to study in vitro due to the insolubility of membrane proteins in non-detergent systems. Nanodiscs, nanoscale discoidal lipid bilayers encircled by a membrane scaffold protein belt, have proven to be an effective platform to solubilize membr...

  6. Proteomic analysis of Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Tabb, David L; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Chen, Lily; Lewis, Nathan E; Nagarajan, Harish; Sarkaria, Vishaldeep; Kumar, Amit; Wolozny, Daniel; Colao, Joe; Jacobson, Elena; Tian, Yuan; O'Meally, Robert N; Krag, Sharon S; Cole, Robert N; Palsson, Bernhard O; Zhang, Hui; Betenbaugh, Michael

    2012-11-01

    To complement the recent genomic sequencing of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, proteomic analysis was performed on CHO cells including the cellular proteome, secretome, and glycoproteome using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of multiple fractions obtained from gel electrophoresis, multidimensional liquid chromatography, and solid phase extraction of glycopeptides (SPEG). From the 120 different mass spectrometry analyses generating 682,097 MS/MS spectra, 93,548 unique peptide sequences were identified with at most 0.02 false discovery rate (FDR). A total of 6164 grouped proteins were identified from both glycoproteome and proteome analysis, representing an 8-fold increase in the number of proteins currently identified in the CHO proteome. Furthermore, this is the first proteomic study done using the CHO genome exclusively, which provides for more accurate identification of proteins. From this analysis, the CHO codon frequency was determined and found to be distinct from humans, which will facilitate expression of human proteins in CHO cells. Analysis of the combined proteomic and mRNA data sets indicated the enrichment of a number of pathways including protein processing and apoptosis but depletion of proteins involved in steroid hormone and glycosphingolipid metabolism. Five-hundred four of the detected proteins included N-acetylation modifications, and 1292 different proteins were observed to be N-glycosylated. This first large-scale proteomic analysis will enhance the knowledge base about CHO capabilities for recombinant expression and provide information useful in cell engineering efforts aimed at modifying CHO cellular functions. PMID:22971049

  7. Neural Stem Cells (NSCs) and Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Lorelei D; Kornblum, Harley I

    2016-02-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) can self-renew and give rise to the major cell types of the CNS. Studies of NSCs include the investigation of primary, CNS-derived cells as well as animal and human embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived sources. NSCs provide a means with which to study normal neural development, neurodegeneration, and neurological disease and are clinically relevant sources for cellular repair to the damaged and diseased CNS. Proteomics studies of NSCs have the potential to delineate molecules and pathways critical for NSC biology and the means by which NSCs can participate in neural repair. In this review, we provide a background to NSC biology, including the means to obtain them and the caveats to these processes. We then focus on advances in the proteomic interrogation of NSCs. This includes the analysis of posttranslational modifications (PTMs); approaches to analyzing different proteomic compartments, such the secretome; as well as approaches to analyzing temporal differences in the proteome to elucidate mechanisms of differentiation. We also discuss some of the methods that will undoubtedly be useful in the investigation of NSCs but which have not yet been applied to the field. While many proteomics studies of NSCs have largely catalogued the proteome or posttranslational modifications of specific cellular states, without delving into specific functions, some have led to understandings of functional processes or identified markers that could not have been identified via other means. Many challenges remain in the field, including the precise identification and standardization of NSCs used for proteomic analyses, as well as how to translate fundamental proteomics studies to functional biology. The next level of investigation will require interdisciplinary approaches, combining the skills of those interested in the biochemistry of proteomics with those interested in modulating NSC function. PMID:26494823

  8. Neural Stem Cells (NSCs) and Proteomics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Lorelei D.; Kornblum, Harley I.

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) can self-renew and give rise to the major cell types of the CNS. Studies of NSCs include the investigation of primary, CNS-derived cells as well as animal and human embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived sources. NSCs provide a means with which to study normal neural development, neurodegeneration, and neurological disease and are clinically relevant sources for cellular repair to the damaged and diseased CNS. Proteomics studies of NSCs have the potential to delineate molecules and pathways critical for NSC biology and the means by which NSCs can participate in neural repair. In this review, we provide a background to NSC biology, including the means to obtain them and the caveats to these processes. We then focus on advances in the proteomic interrogation of NSCs. This includes the analysis of posttranslational modifications (PTMs); approaches to analyzing different proteomic compartments, such the secretome; as well as approaches to analyzing temporal differences in the proteome to elucidate mechanisms of differentiation. We also discuss some of the methods that will undoubtedly be useful in the investigation of NSCs but which have not yet been applied to the field. While many proteomics studies of NSCs have largely catalogued the proteome or posttranslational modifications of specific cellular states, without delving into specific functions, some have led to understandings of functional processes or identified markers that could not have been identified via other means. Many challenges remain in the field, including the precise identification and standardization of NSCs used for proteomic analyses, as well as how to translate fundamental proteomics studies to functional biology. The next level of investigation will require interdisciplinary approaches, combining the skills of those interested in the biochemistry of proteomics with those interested in modulating NSC function. PMID:26494823

  9. Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture and Differential Plasma Membrane Proteome Quantitation Identify New Substrates for the MARCH9 Transmembrane E3 Ligase*

    OpenAIRE

    Hör, Simon; Ziv, Tamar; Admon, Arie; Lehner, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of cell surface receptor expression is essential for immune cell differentiation and function. At the plasma membrane ubiquitination is an important post-translational mechanism for regulating expression of a wide range of surface proteins. MARCH9, a member of the RING-CH family of transmembrane E3 ubiquitin ligases, down-regulates CD4, major histocompatibility complex-I (MHC), and ICAM-1 in lymphoid cells. To identify novel MARCH9 substrates, we used high throughput flow cytom...

  10. A Shotgun Proteomic Method for the Identification of Membrane-Embedded Proteins and Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Blackler, Adele R.; Speers, Anna E.; Ladinsky, Mark S.; Wu, Christine C

    2008-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins perform crucial cellular functions and are the targets for the majority of pharmaceutical agents. However, the hydrophobic nature of their membrane-embedded domains makes them difficult to work with. Here, we describe a shotgun proteomic method for the high-throughput analysis of the membrane-embedded transmembrane domains of integral membrane proteins which extends the depth of coverage of the membrane proteome.

  11. RNAi-mediated downregulation of poplar plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) changes plasma membrane proteome composition and affects leaf physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Zhen; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Uehlein, Norbert; Zimmer, Ina; Mühlhans, Stefanie; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel Karl; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Palme, Klaus; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Block, Katja

    2015-10-14

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) are one subfamily of aquaporins that mediate the transmembrane transport of water. To reveal their function in poplar, we generated transgenic poplar plants in which the translation of PIP genes was downregulated by RNA interference investigated these plants with a comprehensive leaf plasma membrane proteome and physiome analysis. First, inhibition of PIP synthesis strongly altered the leaf plasma membrane protein composition. Strikingly, several signaling components and transporters involved in the regulation of stomatal movement were differentially regulated in transgenic poplars. Furthermore, hormonal crosstalk related to abscisic acid, auxin and brassinosteroids was altered, in addition to cell wall biosynthesis/cutinization, the organization of cellular structures and membrane trafficking. A physiological analysis confirmed the proteomic results. The leaves had wider opened stomata and higher net CO2 assimilation and transpiration rates as well as greater mesophyll conductance for CO2 (gm) and leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf). Based on these results, we conclude that PIP proteins not only play essential roles in whole leaf water and CO2 flux but have important roles in the regulation of stomatal movement. PMID:26248320

  12. Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Svend; Stougaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics is an efficient tool to identify proteins present in specific tissues, cell types, or organelles. The resulting proteome reference maps and/or comparative analyses provide overviews of regulated proteins between wild type and mutants or between different conditions together with a...... comprehensive list of proteins. Post translation modifications (PTMs), such as glycosylation and phosphorylation, are pivotal for protein stability and function. Several strategies for enrichment of PTMs have been developed where targeted proteomic approaches are used to identify these PTMs. The sequenced and...... annotated Lotus japonicus (Lotus) genome has been essential for obtaining high-quality protein identifications from proteomics studies. Furthermore, additional genomics and transcriptomics studies from several Lotus species/ecotypes support putative gene structures and these can be further supported using...

  13. Immunogenic membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed by proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sudhir; Kosalai, K; Arora, Shalini; Namane, Abdelkader; Sharma, Pawan; Gaikwad, Anil N; Brodin, Priscille; Cole, Stewart T

    2005-07-01

    Membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis offer a challenge, as well as an opportunity, in the quest for better therapeutic and prophylactic interventions against tuberculosis. The authors have previously reported that extraction with the detergent Triton X-114 (TX-114) is a useful step in proteomic analysis of mycobacterial cell membranes, and detergent-soluble membrane proteins of mycobacteria are potent stimulators of human T cells. In this study 1-D and 2-D gel electrophoresis-based protocols were used for the analysis of proteins in the TX-114 extract of M. tuberculosis membranes. Peptide mass mapping (using MALDI-TOF-MS, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry) of 116 samples led to the identification of 105 proteins, 9 of which were new to the M. tuberculosis proteome. Functional orthologues of 73 of these proteins were also present in Mycobacterium leprae, suggesting their relative importance. Bioinformatics predicted that as many as 73% of the proteins had a hydrophobic disposition. 1-D gel electrophoresis revealed more hydrophobic/transmembrane and basic proteins than 2-D gel electrophoresis. Identified proteins fell into the following major categories: protein synthesis, cell wall biogenesis/architecture and conserved hypotheticals/unknowns. To identify immunodominant proteins of the detergent phase (DP), 14 low-molecular-mass fractions prepared by continuous-elution gel electrophoresis were subjected to T cell activation assays using blood samples from BCG-vaccinated healthy donors from a tuberculosis endemic area. Analysis of the responses (cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production) showed that the immunodominance of certain DP fractions was most probably due to ribosomal proteins, which is consistent with both their specificity for mycobacteria and their abundance. Other membrane-associated proteins, including transmembrane proteins/lipoproteins and ESAT-6, did not appear to contribute

  14. The pancreatic beta cell surface proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Stützer, I.; Esterházy, D.; Stoffel, M.

    2012-01-01

    The pancreatic beta cell is responsible for maintaining normoglycaemia by secreting an appropriate amount of insulin according to blood glucose levels. The accurate sensing of the beta cell extracellular environment is therefore crucial to this endocrine function and is transmitted via its cell surface proteome. Various surface proteins that mediate or affect beta cell endocrine function have been identified, including growth factor and cytokine receptors, transporters, ion channels and prote...

  15. Proteomics of cell-cell interactions in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindoso, Rafael S; Sandim, Vanessa; Collino, Federica; Carvalho, Adriana B; Dias, Juliana; da Costa, Milene R; Zingali, Russolina B; Vieyra, Adalberto

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of cell-cell communications are now under intense study by proteomic approaches. Proteomics has unraveled changes in protein profiling as the result of cell interactions mediated by ligand/receptor, hormones, soluble factors, and the content of extracellular vesicles. Besides being a brief overview of the main and profitable methodologies now available (evaluating theory behind the methods, their usefulness, and pitfalls), this review focuses on-from a proteome perspective-some signaling pathways and post-translational modifications (PTMs), which are essential for understanding ischemic lesions and their recovery in two vital organs in mammals, the heart, and the kidney. Knowledge of misdirection of the proteome during tissue recovery, such as represented by the convergence between fibrosis and cancer, emerges as an important tool in prognosis. Proteomics of cell-cell interaction is also especially useful for understanding how stem cells interact in injured tissues, anticipating clues for rational therapeutic interventions. In the effervescent field of induced pluripotency and cell reprogramming, proteomic studies have shown what proteins from specialized cells contribute to the recovery of infarcted tissues. Overall, we conclude that proteomics is at the forefront in helping us to understand the mechanisms that underpin prevalent pathological processes. PMID:26552723

  16. A workflow for peptide-based proteomics in a poorly sequenced plant: A case study on the plasma membrane proteome of banana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vertommen, A.; Laurell Blom Møller, Anders; Cordewener, J. H. G.;

    2011-01-01

    membrane proteomics. However, their application in non-model plants demands special precautions to prevent false positive identification of proteins.In the current paper, a workflow for membrane proteomics in banana, a poorly sequenced plant, is proposed. The main steps of this workflow are (i......, integral plasma membrane proteins from banana leaves were successfully identified....

  17. Proteomic analysis of plasma membrane and secretory vesicles from human neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Kevin P

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN constitute an essential cellular component of innate host defense against microbial invasion and exhibit a wide array of responses both to particulate and soluble stimuli. As the cells recruited earliest during acute inflammation, PMN respond rapidly and release a variety of potent cytotoxic agents within minutes of exposure to microbes or their products. PMN rely on the redistribution of functionally important proteins, from intracellular compartments to the plasma membrane and phagosome, as the means by which to respond quickly. To determine the range of membrane proteins available for rapid recruitment during PMN activation, we analyzed the proteins in subcellular fractions enriched for plasma membrane and secretory vesicles recovered from the light membrane fraction of resting PMN after Percoll gradient centrifugation and free-flow electrophoresis purification using mass spectrometry-based proteomics methods. Results To identify the proteins light membrane fractions enriched for plasma membrane vesicles and secretory vesicles, we employed a proteomic approach, first using MALDI-TOF (peptide mass fingerprinting and then by HPLC-MS/MS using a 3D ion trap mass spectrometer to analyze the two vesicle populations from resting PMN. We identified several proteins that are functionally important but had not previously been recovered in PMN secretory vesicles. Two such proteins, 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP and dysferlin were further validated by immunoblot analysis. Conclusion Our data demonstrate the broad array of proteins present in secretory vesicles that provides the PMN with the capacity for remarkable and rapid reorganization of its plasma membrane after exposure to proinflammatory agents or stimuli.

  18. Membrane proteomics of phagosomes suggests a connection to autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui, Wenqing; Sheu, Leslie; Liu, Jun; Smart, Brian; Petzold, Christopher J.; Hsieh, Tsung-yen; Pitcher, Austin; Keasling*, Jay D.; Bertozzi*, Carolyn R.

    2008-11-25

    Phagocytosis is the central process by which macrophage cellsinternalize and eliminate infectious microbes as well as apoptoticcells. During maturation, phagosomes containing engulfed particlesfuse with various endosomal compartments through theaction of regulatory molecules on the phagosomal membrane. Inthis study, we performed a proteomic analysis of the membranefraction from latex bead-containing (LBC) phagosomes isolatedfrom macrophages. The profile, which comprised 546 proteins,suggests diverse functions of the phagosome and potential connectionsto secretory processes, toll-like receptor signaling, andautophagy. Many identified proteins were not previously knownto reside in the phagosome. We characterized several proteins inLBC phagosomes that change in abundance on induction of autophagy,a process that has been previously implicated in the hostdefense against microbial pathogens. These observations suggestcrosstalk between autophagy and phagocytosis that may be relevantto the innate immune response of macrophages.

  19. Proteomic cornerstones of hematopoietic stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimmeck, Daniel; Hansson, Jenny; Raffel, Simon;

    2012-01-01

    Regenerative tissues such as the skin epidermis, the intestinal mucosa or the hematopoietic system are organized in a hierarchical manner with stem cells building the top of this hierarchy. Somatic stem cells harbor the highest self-renewal activity and generate a series of multipotent progenitors...... which differentiate into lineage committed progenitors and subsequently mature cells. In this report, we applied an in-depth quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare the full proteomes of ex vivo isolated and FACS-sorted populations highly enriched for either multipotent hematopoietic stem....../progenitor cells (HSPCs, Lin(neg)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+)) or myeloid committed precursors (Lin(neg)Sca-1(-)c-Kit(+)). By employing stable isotope dimethyl labeling and high-resolution mass spectrometry, more than 5,000 proteins were quantified. From biological triplicate experiments subjected to rigorous statistical...

  20. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbach, Sebastian; Dengjel, Jörn; Brummer, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is driven by the oncogenic fusion kinase Bcr-Abl, which organizes its own signaling network with various proteins. These proteins, their interactions, and their role in relevant signaling pathways can be analyzed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) approaches in various models systems, e.g., in cell culture models. In this chapter, we describe in detail immunoprecipitations and quantitative proteomics analysis using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) of components of the Bcr-Abl signaling pathway in the human CML cell line K562. PMID:27581145

  1. Proteomic analysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elortza, Felix; Nühse, Thomas S; Foster, Leonard J;

    2003-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) are a functionally and structurally diverse family of post-translationally modified membrane proteins found mostly in the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane in a variety of eukaryotic cells. Although the general role of GPI-APs remains...... unclear, they have attracted attention because they act as enzymes and receptors in cell adhesion, differentiation, and host-pathogen interactions. GPI-APs may represent potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets in humans and are interesting in plant biotechnology because of their key role in root...... and 44 GPI-APs in an Arabidopsis thaliana membrane preparation, representing the largest experimental dataset of GPI-anchored proteins to date....

  2. Differential proteomic analysis of outer membrane enriched extracts of Bacteroides fragilis grown under bile salts stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boente, Renata F; Pauer, Heidi; Silva, Deborah N S; Filho, Joaquim Santos; Sandim, Vanessa; Antunes, Luis Caetano M; Ferreira, Rosana Barreto Rocha; Zingali, Russolina B; Domingues, Regina M C P; Lobo, Leandro A

    2016-06-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the most commonly isolated anaerobic bacteria from infectious processes. Several virulence traits contribute to the pathogenic nature of this bacterium, including the ability to tolerate the high concentrations of bile found in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The activity of bile salts is similar to detergents and may lead to membrane permeabilization and cell death. Modulation of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) is considered a crucial event to bile salts resistance. The primary objective of the current work was to identify B. fragilis proteins associated with the stress induced by high concentration of bile salts. The outer membrane of B. fragilis strain 638R was isolated after growth either in the presence of 2% conjugated bile salts or without bile salts. The membrane fractions were separated on SDS-PAGE and analyzed by ESI-Q/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 37 proteins were identified; among them nine were found to be expressed exclusively in the absence of bile salts whereas eight proteins were expressed only in the presence of bile salts. These proteins are related to cellular functions such as transport through membrane, nutrient uptake, and protein-protein interactions. This study demonstrates the alteration of OMPs composition in B. fragilis during bile salts stress resistance and adaptation to environmental changes. Proteomics of OMPs was also shown to be a useful approach in the identification of new targets for functional analyses. PMID:26948242

  3. Structural and Functional Proteomic Analysis of a Developing Energy Transducing Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niederman, Robert A

    2012-06-04

    While much is known about the light reactions of photosynthesis in purple bacteria, comparatively little information is available on how the requisite integral membrane proteins are assembled, their patterns of cellular localization are established or their apoproteins cooperate with numerous assembly factors in their insertion into the growing intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM). This problem was approached through a detailed structural and functional proteomic analysis of ICM assembly process in the well-characterized purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Proteomic approaches have focused upon identification of membrane proteins temporally expressed during ICM development and spatially localized in both membrane growth initiation sites and in mature ICM vesicles. Protocols were established for ICM induction under reduced aeration and ICM remodeling in cells adapting to low intensity illumination, which permitted isolation, in sucrose density gradients, of ICM growth initiation sites as an upper pigmented band (UPB) and mature ICM vesicles as the main (chromatophore) band. Non-denaturing clear native gel electrophoresis (CNE) of these isolated membrane fractions gave rise to pigmented bands containing the peripheral light-harvesting 2 (LH2) antenna and the reaction center-light-harvesting 1 (RC-LH1) core complex, together with a full array of other ICM proteins, which were subjected to proteomic analysis. Proteomic analysis of the gel bands from chromatophores revealed developmental changes including increasing levels of the LH2 complex as ICM development proceeded, as well as a large array of other associated proteins including high spectral counts for the F1FO– ATP synthase subunits, given the inability to detect this coupling factor, as well as the more abundant cytochrome bc1 complex by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Significant levels of general membrane assembly factors were encountered, as well as high counts for RSP6124, a protein of unknown

  4. Proteomics of neural stem cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skalníková, Helena; Vodička, Petr; Gadher, S. J.; Kovářová, Hana

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2008), s. 175-186. ISSN 1478-9450 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : cell-based regnerative and reparative therapy * conditioned media * differentiation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.848, year: 2008

  5. Modification-specific proteomics of plasma membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elortza, Felix; Mohammed, Shabaz; Bunkenborg, Jakob;

    2006-01-01

    that phospholipase D (PLD) treatment of human and plant plasma membrane fractions leads to the release of GPI-anchored proteins that were identified and characterized by capillary liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. In contrast to phospholipase C, the PLD enzyme is not affected by structural......-recognized as they are candidate cell surface biomarker molecules with potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications in molecular medicine. GPI-APs have also attracted interest in plant biotechnology because of their role in root development and cell remodeling. Using a shave-and-conquer concept, we demonstrate...

  6. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics in cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Walther, T. C.; Mann, M

    2010-01-01

    The global analysis of protein composition, modifications, and dynamics are important goals in cell biology. Mass spectrometry (MS)–based proteomics has matured into an attractive technology for this purpose. Particularly, high resolution MS methods have been extremely successful for quantitative analysis of cellular and organellar proteomes. Rapid advances in all areas of the proteomic workflow, including sample preparation, MS, and computational analysis, should make the technology more eas...

  7. Protein cleavage strategies for an improved analysis of the membrane proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Poetsch Ansgar; Fischer Frank

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Membrane proteins still remain elusive in proteomic studies. This is in part due to the distribution of the amino acids lysine and arginine, which are less frequent in integral membrane proteins and almost absent in transmembrane helices. As these amino acids are cleavage targets for the commonly used protease trypsin, alternative cleavage conditions, which should improve membrane protein analysis, were tested by in silico digestion for the three organisms Saccharomyces ce...

  8. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Preface Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsFuel CellsTypes of Fuel CellsAdvantages of Fuel CellsProton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsMembraneCatalystCatalyst LayerGas Diffusion MediumMicroporous LayerMembrane Electrode AssemblyPlateSingle CellStackSystemCell Voltage Monitoring Module (CVM)Fuel Supply Module (FSM)Air Supply Module (ASM)Exhaust Management Module (EMM)Heat Management Module (HMM)Water Management Module (WMM)Internal Power Supply Module (IPM)Power Conditioning Module (PCM)Communications Module (COM)Controls Module (CM)SummaryThermodynamics and KineticsTheoretical EfficiencyVoltagePo

  9. Proteomes and Neural Stem Cells: cellular signalling during differentiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skalníková, Helena; Halada, Petr; Vodička, Petr; Motlík, Jan; Horning, O.; Jensen, O. N.; Gadher, S. J.; Pelech, S.; Kovářová, Hana

    Cambridge : -, 2007, s. 1-1. [BSPR-EBI Meeting: Integrative Proteomics: From Molecules to Systems,. Cambridge (GB), 25.07.2007-27.07.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : neural stem cells * differentiation * signalling * proteome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  10. Cell Membrane Softening in Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Händel, Chris; Käs, Josef

    Biomechanical properties are useful characteristics and regulators of the cell's state. Current research connects mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton to many cellular processes but does not investigate the biomechanics of the plasma membrane. We evaluated thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles, directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells and observed a lowered rigidity in the plasma membrane of malignant cells compared to non-malignant cells. To investigate the specific role of membrane rigidity changes, we treated two cell lines with the Acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitor Soraphen A. It changed the lipidome of cells and drastically increased membrane stiffness by up regulating short chained membrane lipids. These altered cells had a decreased motility in Boyden chamber assays. Our results indicate that the thermal fluctuations of the membrane, which are much smaller than the fluctuations driven by the cytoskeleton, can be modulated by the cell and have an impact on adhesion and motility.

  11. Investigation of the Cell Surface Proteome of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jimin; Menicanin, Danijela; Zilm, Peter S; Marino, Victor; Bartold, P Mark; Gronthos, Stan

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the cell surface proteome of human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC) compared to human fibroblasts. Cell surface proteins were prelabelled with CyDye before processing to extract the membrane lysates, which were separated using 2D electrophoresis. Selected differentially expressed protein "spots" were identified using Mass spectrometry. Four proteins were selected for validation: CD73, CD90, Annexin A2, and sphingosine kinase 1 previously associated with mesenchymal stem cells. Flow cytometric analysis found that CD73 and CD90 were highly expressed by human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts but not by keratinocytes, indicating that these antigens could be used as potential markers for distinguishing between mesenchymal cells and epithelial cell populations. Annexin A2 was also found to be expressed at low copy number on the cell surface of human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts, while human keratinocytes lacked any cell surface expression of Annexin A2. In contrast, sphingosine kinase 1 expression was detected in all the cell types examined using immunocytochemical analysis. These proteomic studies form the foundation to further define the cell surface protein expression profile of PDLSC in order to better characterise this cell population and help develop novel strategies for the purification of this stem cell population. PMID:27579043

  12. Enrichment and proteomic analysis of plasma membrane from rat dorsal root ganglions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons are primary sensory neurons that conduct neuronal impulses related to pain, touch and temperature senses. Plasma membrane (PM of DRG cells plays important roles in their functions. PM proteins are main performers of the functions. However, mainly due to the very low amount of DRG that leads to the difficulties in PM sample collection, few proteomic analyses on the PM have been reported and it is a subject that demands further investigation. Results By using aqueous polymer two-phase partition in combination with high salt and high pH washing, PMs were efficiently enriched, demonstrated by western blot analysis. A total of 954 non-redundant proteins were identified from the plasma membrane-enriched preparation with CapLC-MS/MS analysis subsequent to protein separation by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE or shotgun digestion. 205 (21.5% of the identified proteins were unambiguously assigned as PM proteins, including a large number of signal proteins, receptors, ion channel and transporters. Conclusion The aqueous polymer two-phase partition is a simple, rapid and relatively inexpensive method. It is well suitable for the purification of PMs from small amount of tissues. Therefore, it is reasonable for the DRG PM to be enriched by using aqueous two-phase partition as a preferred method. Proteomic analysis showed that DRG PM was rich in proteins involved in the fundamental biological processes including material exchange, energy transformation and information transmission, etc. These data would help to our further understanding of the fundamental DRG functions.

  13. Rapid preparation of nuclei-depleted detergent-resistant membrane fractions suitable for proteomics analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhopadhyay Nishit K

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts have been implicated in diverse physiologic processes including lipid transport and signal transduction. Lipid rafts were originally defined as detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs due to their relative insolubility in cold non-ionic detergents. Recent findings suggest that, although DRMs are not equivalent to lipid rafts, the presence of a given protein within DRMs strongly suggests its potential for raft association in vivo. Therefore, isolation of DRMs represents a useful starting point for biochemical analysis of lipid rafts. The physicochemical properties of DRMs present unique challenges to analysis of their protein composition. Existing methods of isolating DRM-enriched fractions involve flotation of cell extracts in a sucrose density gradient, which, although successful, can be labor intensive, time consuming and results in dilute sucrose-containing fractions with limited utility for direct proteomic analysis. In addition, several studies describing the proteomic characterization of DRMs using this and other approaches have reported the presence of nuclear proteins in such fractions. It is unclear whether these results reflect trafficking of nuclear proteins to DRMs or whether they arise from nuclear contamination during isolation. To address these issues, we have modified a published differential detergent extraction method to enable rapid DRM isolation that minimizes nuclear contamination and yields fractions compatible with mass spectrometry. Results DRM-enriched fractions isolated using the conventional or modified extraction methods displayed comparable profiles of known DRM-associated proteins, including flotillins, GPI-anchored proteins and heterotrimeric G-protein subunits. Thus, the modified procedure yielded fractions consistent with those isolated by existing methods. However, we observed a marked reduction in the percentage of nuclear proteins

  14. Study of monocyte membrane proteome perturbation during lipopolysaccharide-induced tolerance using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Huoming

    2010-07-02

    Human monocytes\\' exposure to low-level lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces temporary monocytic insensitivity to subsequent LPS challenge. The underlying mechanism of this phenomenon could have important clinical utilities in preventing and/or treating severe infections. In this study, we used an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach to comprehensively characterize the membrane proteomes of monocytes before and after LPS exposure. We identified a total of 1651 proteins, of which 53.6% were membrane proteins. Ninety-four percent of the proteins were quantified and 255 proteins were shown to be tightly regulated by LPS. Subcellular location analysis revealed organelle-specific response to LPS exposure: more than 90% of identified mitochondrial membrane proteins were significant downregulated, whereas the majority of proteins from other organelles such as ER, Golgi and ribosome were upregulated. Moreover, we found that the expression of most receptors potentially involved in LPS signal pathway (CD14, toll-like receptor 4, CD11/CD18 complex) were substantially decreased, while the expression of molecules involved in LPS neutralization were enhanced after LPS challenge. Together, these findings could be of significance in understanding the mechanism of LPS tolerance and provide values for designing new approaches for regulating monocytic responses in sepsis patients.

  15. Proteomic analysis of liver plasma membrane from hepatitis B surface antigen transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾小芳

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the differential liver plasma membrane( PM) proteins that may be related to the occurrence,development and reversal process of hepatitis and to understand the pathogenesis of hepatitis and the new drug targets by performing a comparative proteomics research of liver PM between

  16. Characterisation by proteomics of peribacteroid space and peribacteroid membrane preparations from pea (¤Pisum sativum¤) symbiosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saalbach, G.; Erik, P.; Wienkoop, S.

    2002-01-01

    The legume Rhizobium symbiosis leads to the formation of a new compartment in the plant cell, the symbiosome. This compartment harbours the bacteroids surrounded by a peribacteroid membrane (PBM) originating from the plant plasma membrane. The PBM and the space between the PBM and the bacteroid...... membrane, called peribacteroid space (PS), mediate the exchange of metabolites between the symbionts. Proteome analysis was used as an approach to characterise the proteins in the PBM and the PS. A standard differential centrifugation procedure including a Percoll gradient was used for symbiosome isolation...... from pea root nodules. Proteins in the PBM and PS fractions obtained from the symbiosomes were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and 89 spots were analysed by tandem mass spectrometry. The proteins of 46 spots could be identified by database search. The results showed that PS and even...

  17. Insights into physiological traits of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 through membrane proteome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilad, Ofir; Hjernø, Karin; Østerlund, Eva Christina;

    2012-01-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 is a widely used probiotic strain associated with a variety of health-promoting traits. There is, however, only limited knowledge available regarding the membrane proteome and the proteins involved in oligosaccharide transport in BB-12. We applied two...... enrichment strategies to improve the identification of membrane proteins from BB-12 cultures grown on glucose and on xylo-oligosaccharides, the latter being an emerging prebiotic substrate recently reported to be fermented by BB-12. Our approach encompassed consecutive steps of detergent- and carbonate......-treatment in order to generate inside-out membrane vesicles and to interfere with binding of membrane-associated proteins to the membrane, respectively. Proteins in the enriched membrane fraction and membrane-associated fraction were digested by lysyl endopeptidase and trypsin followed by peptide sequencing by...

  18. Proteomics Applied to Porcine and Human Neural Stem Cell Differentiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mairychová, Kateřina; Skalníková, Helena; Tylečková, Jiřina; Halada, Petr; Marsala, M.; Kovářová, Hana

    Liběchov : Institute of Animal Physiology and Genetics AS CR, v.v.i, 2010. s. 61-61. [Informal Proteomic Meeting 2010. 09.11.2010-10.11.2010, Liblice] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10044 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : proteomics * cell differentiation * neural stem cell s Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  19. Fuel cell with ionization membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A fuel cell is disclosed comprising an ionization membrane having at least one area through which gas is passed, and which ionizes the gas passing therethrough, and a cathode for receiving the ions generated by the ionization membrane. The ionization membrane may include one or more openings in the membrane with electrodes that are located closer than a mean free path of molecules within the gas to be ionized. Methods of manufacture are also provided.

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Rice Plasma Membrane-associated Proteins in Response to Chitooligosaccharide Elicitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Chen; Qun Li; Zuhua He

    2007-01-01

    Chitooligomers or chitooligosaccharides (COS) are elicitors that bind to the plasma membrane (PM) and elicit various defense responses. However, the PM-bound proteins involved in elicitor-mediated plant defense responses still remain widely unknown. In order to get more information about PM proteins involved in rice defense responses, we conducted PM proteomic analysis of the rice suspension cells elicited by COS. A total of 14 up- or down-regulated protein spots were observed on 2-D gels of PM fractions at 12 h and 24 h after COS incubation. Of them, eight protein spots were successfully identified by MS (mass spectrography) and predicted to be associated to the PM and function in plant defense, including a putative PKN/PRK1 protein kinase, a putative pyruvate kinase isozyme G, a putative zinc finger protein, a putative MAR-binding protein MFP1, and a putative calcium-dependent protein kinase. Interestingly, a COS-induced pM5-like protein was identified for the first time in plants, which is a trans-membrane nodal modulator in transforming growth factor-β(TGFβ) signaling in vertebrates. We also identified two members of a rice polyprotein family, which were up-regulated by COS. Our study would provide a starting point for functionality of PM proteins in the rice basal defense.

  1. Membrane proteomics characterization of brush border membrane proteins of mice intestinal mucosa : case study: cholesterol absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Tsirogianni, Eirini

    2009-01-01

    The epithelial absorbing cells of the small intestinal villi, the enterocytes, are the main protagonists for the transport of nutrients from the intestinal lumen to the interstitial fluids. The oriented flow of nutrients is carried out by different and complementary transport systems present in the apical and the basolateral domains of the enterocyte’s plasma membrane. One of the distinctive characteristics of those intestinal cells is the presence of numerous structurally distinct protrusion...

  2. Solitons in cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Pradip; Schwarz, W. H.

    1995-04-01

    Using a two-dimensional smectic liquid crystal model, we have shown the plausibility of electrical solitary wave propagation along a bimolecular leaflet such as the cell membrane of a nerve axon which consists of chiral, lipid building blocks. Our model is a head-to-tail correlated ferroelectric, chiral Sm-C* liquid crystal, which is a unique class of substances that combines the electric polarization and anisotropy of ferroelectric crystals with the hydrodynamic properties of liquids. Polar Sm-A models can also be used with the same results. In addition to the usual transverse ferroelectricity, characteristic of the Sm-C* liquid crystal, the head-to-tail correlation ensures a longitudinal ferroelectricity component. The electric polarization due to the latter can couple to the transmembrane electric field resulting from the ionic imbalance between the two sides of the membrane-a mechanism detailed in the so-called Hodgkin-Huxley set of partial differential equations for the propagation of the action potential. We obtain a Landau-de Gennes-like free energy, which is the sum of elastic, fluctuation, and polarization terms, together with a ferroelectric term showing a direct coupling between the electric field and the mechanical deformation variable. Minimizing and equating to a viscous damping term leads to an equation similar to one equation of the Fitzhugh-Nagumo coupled set of partial differential equations, which is a simplified version of the Hodgkin-Huxley equations. The other equation of the set resembles an equation derived from the Nernst-Planck equation, which describes transmembrane ion transport and hence provides a mechanism for transmembrane potential variation. A more complete calculation of the velocity of the asymptotic wave form shows a lower wave speed than the estimate of Nagumo et al. The piezoelectric properties of the phase compete with its curvature elasticity to produce the soliton lattice of the cell membrane, which consists of juxtaposed

  3. The cell-surface proteome of cultured adipose stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnenberg, Albert D; Meyer, E Michael; Rubin, J Peter; Donnenberg, Vera S

    2015-07-01

    In this technical note we describe a method to evaluate the cell surface proteome of human primary cell cultures and cell lines. The method utilizes the BD Biosciences lyoplate, a system covering 242 surface proteins, glycoproteins, and glycosphingolipids plus relevant isotype controls, automated plate-based flow cytometry, conventional file-level analysis and unsupervised K-means clustering of markers on the basis of percent of positive events and mean fluorescence intensity of positive and total clean events. As an example, we determined the cell surface proteome of cultured adipose stromal cells (ASC) derived from 5 independent clinical isolates. Between-sample agreement of very strongly expressed (n = 32) and strongly expressed (n =16) markers was excellent, constituting a reliable profile for ASC identification and determination of functional properties. Known mesenchymal markers (CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105) were among the identified strongly expressed determinants. Among other strongly expressed markers are several that are potentially immunomodulatory including three proteins that protect from complement mediated effects (CD46, CD55, and CD59), two that regulate apoptosis (CD77 and CD95) and several with ectoenzymatic (CD10, CD26, CD13, CD73, and CD143) or receptor tyrosine kinase (CD140b (PDGFR), CD340 (Her-2), EGFR) activity, suggesting mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory and tissue remodeling properties of ASC. Because variables are standardized for K-means clustering, results generated using this methodology should be comparable between instrumentation platforms. It is widely generalizable to human primary explant cultures and cells lines and will prove useful to determine how cell passage, culture interventions, and gene expression and silencing affect the cell-surface proteome. PMID:25929697

  4. Cell invasion through basement membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Morrissey, Meghan A; Hagedorn, Elliott J.; Sherwood, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Cell invasion through basement membrane is an essential part of normal development and physiology, and occurs during the pathological progression of human inflammatory diseases and cancer. F-actin-rich membrane protrusions, called invadopodia, have been hypothesized to be the “drill bits” of invasive cells, mediating invasion through the dense, highly cross-linked basement membrane matrix. Though studied in vitro for over 30 y, invadopodia function in vivo has remained elusive. We have recent...

  5. Model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Nylander, Tommy; Cardenas Gomez, Marite

    2014-01-01

    The high complexity of biological membranes has motivated the development and application of a wide range of model membrane systems to study biochemical and biophysical aspects of membranes in situ under well defined conditions. The aim is to provide fundamental understanding of processes control...

  6. Protein cleavage strategies for an improved analysis of the membrane proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poetsch Ansgar

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Membrane proteins still remain elusive in proteomic studies. This is in part due to the distribution of the amino acids lysine and arginine, which are less frequent in integral membrane proteins and almost absent in transmembrane helices. As these amino acids are cleavage targets for the commonly used protease trypsin, alternative cleavage conditions, which should improve membrane protein analysis, were tested by in silico digestion for the three organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, and Corynebacterium glutamicum as hallmarks for eukaryotes, archea and eubacteria. Results For the membrane proteomes from all three analyzed organisms, we identified cleavage conditions that achieve better sequence and proteome coverage than trypsin. Greater improvement was obtained for bacteria than for yeast, which was attributed to differences in protein size and GRAVY. It was demonstrated for bacteriorhodopsin that the in silico predictions agree well with the experimental observations. Conclusion For all three examined organisms, it was found that a combination of chymotrypsin and staphylococcal peptidase I gave significantly better results than trypsin. As some of the improved cleavage conditions are not more elaborate than trypsin digestion and have been proven useful in practice, we suppose that the cleavage at both hydrophilic and hydrophobic amino acids should facilitate in general the analysis of membrane proteins for all organisms.

  7. Yeast membrane proteomics using leucine metabolic labelling: Bioinformatic data processing and exemplary application to the ER-intramembrane protease Ypf1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilse, Lars; Avci, Dönem; Heisterkamp, Patrick; Serang, Oliver; Lemberg, Marius K; Schilling, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    We describe in detail the usage of leucine metabolic labelling in yeast in order to monitor quantitative proteome alterations, e.g. upon removal of a protease. Since laboratory yeast strains are typically leucine auxotroph, metabolic labelling with trideuterated leucine (d3-leucine) is a straightforward, cost-effective, and ubiquitously applicable strategy for quantitative proteomic studies, similar to the widely used arginine/lysine metabolic labelling method for mammalian cells. We showcase the usage of advanced peptide quantification using the FeatureFinderMultiplex algorithm (part of the OpenMS software package) for robust and reliable quantification. Furthermore, we present an OpenMS bioinformatics data analysis workflow that combines accurate quantification with high proteome coverage. In order to enable visualization, peptide-mapping, and sharing of quantitative proteomic data, especially for membrane-spanning and cell-surface proteins, we further developed the web-application Proteator (http://proteator.appspot.com). Due to its simplicity and robustness, we expect metabolic leucine labelling in yeast to be of great interest to the research community. As an exemplary application, we show the identification of the copper transporter Ctr1 as a putative substrate of the ER-intramembrane protease Ypf1 by yeast membrane proteomics using d3-leucine isotopic labelling. PMID:27426920

  8. Detection and identification of stable oligomeric protein complexes in Escherichi coli inner membranes: a proteomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelbrink, Robin E J; Kolkman, Annemieke; Slijper, Monique; Killian, J Antoinette; de Kruijff, Ben

    2005-08-01

    In this study we present a new technology to detect stable oligomeric protein complexes in membranes. The technology is based on the ability of small membrane-active alcohols to dissociate the highly stable homotetrameric potassium channel KcsA. It is shown via a proteomics approach, using diagonal electrophoresis and nano-flow liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, that a large number of both integral and peripheral Escherichia coli inner membrane proteins are part of stable oligomeric complexes that can be dissociated by small alcohols. This study gives insight into the composition and stability of these complexes. PMID:15919657

  9. MBPpred: Proteome-wide detection of membrane lipid-binding proteins using profile Hidden Markov Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastou, Katerina C; Tsaousis, Georgios N; Papandreou, Nikos C; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2016-07-01

    A large number of modular domains that exhibit specific lipid binding properties are present in many membrane proteins involved in trafficking and signal transduction. These domains are present in either eukaryotic peripheral membrane or transmembrane proteins and are responsible for the non-covalent interactions of these proteins with membrane lipids. Here we report a profile Hidden Markov Model based method capable of detecting Membrane Binding Proteins (MBPs) from information encoded in their amino acid sequence, called MBPpred. The method identifies MBPs that contain one or more of the Membrane Binding Domains (MBDs) that have been described to date, and further classifies these proteins based on their position in respect to the membrane, either as peripheral or transmembrane. MBPpred is available online at http://bioinformatics.biol.uoa.gr/MBPpred. This method was applied in selected eukaryotic proteomes, in order to examine the characteristics they exhibit in various eukaryotic kingdoms and phyla. PMID:27048983

  10. Plasma membrane proteomics in the maize primary root growth zone: novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voothuluru, Priyamvada; Anderson, Jeffrey C; Sharp, Robert E; Peck, Scott C

    2016-09-01

    Previous work on maize (Zea mays L.) primary root growth under water stress showed that cell elongation is maintained in the apical region of the growth zone but progressively inhibited further from the apex. These responses involve spatially differential and coordinated regulation of osmotic adjustment, modification of cell wall extensibility, and other cellular growth processes that are required for root growth under water-stressed conditions. As the interface between the cytoplasm and the apoplast (including the cell wall), the plasma membrane likely plays critical roles in these responses. Using a simplified method for enrichment of plasma membrane proteins, the developmental distribution of plasma membrane proteins was analysed in the growth zone of well-watered and water-stressed maize primary roots. The results identified 432 proteins with differential abundances in well-watered and water-stressed roots. The majority of changes involved region-specific patterns of response, and the identities of the water stress-responsive proteins suggest involvement in diverse biological processes including modification of sugar and nutrient transport, ion homeostasis, lipid metabolism, and cell wall composition. Integration of the distinct, region-specific plasma membrane protein abundance patterns with results from previous physiological, transcriptomic and cell wall proteomic studies reveals novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress. PMID:27341663

  11. Comparison of the Proteome of Adult and Cord Erythroid Cells, and Changes in the Proteome Following Reticulocyte Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Marieangela C; Trakarnsanga, Kongtana; Heesom, Kate J; Cogan, Nicola; Green, Carole; Toye, Ashley M; Parsons, Steve F; Anstee, David J; Frayne, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Cord blood stem cells are an attractive starting source for the production of red blood cells in vitro for therapy because of additional expansion potential compared with adult peripheral blood progenitors and cord blood banks usually being more representative of national populations than blood donors. Consequently, it is important to establish how similar cord RBCs are to adult cells. In this study, we used multiplex tandem mass tag labeling combined with nano-LC-MS/MS to compare the proteome of adult and cord RBCs and reticulocytes. 2838 unique proteins were identified, providing the most comprehensive compendium of RBC proteins to date. Using stringent criteria, 1674 proteins were quantified, and only a small number differed in amount between adult and cord RBC. We focused on proteins critical for RBC function. Of these, only the expected differences in globin subunits, along with higher levels of carbonic anhydrase 1 and 2 and aquaporin-1 in adult RBCs would be expected to have a phenotypic effect since they are associated with the differences in gaseous exchange between adults and neonates. Since the RBC and reticulocyte samples used were autologous, we catalogue the change in proteome following reticulocyte maturation. The majority of proteins (>60% of the 1671 quantified) reduced in abundance between 2- and 100-fold following maturation. However, ∼5% were at a higher level in RBCs, localized almost exclusively to cell membranes, in keeping with the known clearance of intracellular recycling pools during reticulocyte maturation. Overall, these data suggest that, with respect to the proteome, there is no barrier to the use of cord progenitors for the in vitro generation of RBCs for transfusion to adults other than the expression of fetal, not adult, hemoglobin. PMID:27006477

  12. Drafting the proteome landscape of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gato, María; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Zudaire, Maribel; de Morentin, Xabier Martínez; Perez-Valderrama, Estela; Zabaleta, Aintzane; Kochan, Grazyna; Escors, David; Fernandez-Irigoyen, Joaquín; Santamaría, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of cells that are defined by their myeloid origin, immature state, and ability to potently suppress T-cell responses. They regulate immune responses and the population significantly increases in the tumor microenvironment of patients with glioma and other malignant tumors. For their study, MDSCs are usually isolated from the spleen or directly of tumors from a large number of tumor-bearing mice although promising ex vivo differentiated MDSC production systems have been recently developed. During the last years, proteomics has emerged as a powerful approach to analyze MDSCs proteomes using shotgun-based mass spectrometry (MS), providing functional information about cellular homeostasis and metabolic state at a global level. Here, we will revise recent proteome profiling studies performed in MDSCs from different origins. Moreover, we will perform an integrative functional analysis of the protein compilation derived from these large-scale proteomic studies in order to obtain a comprehensive view of MDSCs biology. Finally, we will also discuss the potential application of high-throughput proteomic approaches to study global proteome dynamics and post-translational modifications (PTMs) during the differentiation process of MDSCs that will greatly boost the identification of novel MDSC-specific therapeutic targets to apply in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26403437

  13. Quantitative inner membrane proteome datasets of the wild-type and the Δmin mutant of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Suh-Yuen; Lin, Shu-Yu; Chiang, I-Chen; Shih, Yu-Ling

    2016-09-01

    This article presents data that were obtained through measuring the impact of the Min oscillation on membrane proteins in Escherichia coli by quantitative protemoics analysis. We isolated inner membranes from the wild-type and mutant strains to generate proteomics datasets based on NanoLC-nanoESI-MS/MS mass spectrometry using the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) method. The datasets included the raw spectral files from four sample replicates and the processed files using Proteome Discoverer that contained a total of 40,072 MS/MS spectra with confident peptide identifier (FDRmembrane proteome of unique proteins with quantitation. Proteins of interest, that show significant difference in protein abundance of the mutant membrane, were isolated through statistical filtering. The data is related to "Quantitative proteomics analysis reveals the Min system of Escherichia coli modulates reversible protein association with the inner membrane" (Lee et al., 2016 [1]). PMID:27331106

  14. Comparison of Milk Fat Globule Membrane (MFGM Proteins of Chianina and Holstein Cattle Breed Milk Samples Through Proteomics Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Pariset

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Identification of proteins involved in milk production is important to understand the biology of lactation. Many studies have advanced the understanding of mammary function and milk secretion, but the critical molecular mechanisms implicated in milk fat secretion is still incomplete. Milk Fat Globules are secreted from the apical surface of the mammary cells, surrounded by a thin membrane bilayer, the Milk Fat Globule Membrane (MFGM, formed by proteins which have been suggested to be cholesterolemia-lowering factors, inhibitors of cancer cell growth, vitamin binders, bactericidal, suppressors of multiple sclerosis. Using a proteomic approach, we compared MFGM from milk samples of individuals belonging to two different cattle breeds, Chianina and Holstein, representative of selection for milk and meat traits, respectively. We were able to isolate some of the major MFGM proteins in the examined samples and to identify differences between the protein fractions of the two breeds. We detected differences in the amount of proteins linked to mammary gland development and lipid droplets formation, as well as host defence mechanisms. We have shown that proteomics is a suitable, unbiased method for the study of milk fractions proteins and a powerful tool in nutritional genomics.

  15. Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification-based Comparative Proteomics Reveals the Features of Plasma Membrane-Associated Proteomes of Pollen Grains and Pollen Tubes from Lilium davidii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Han; Sixue Chen; Shaojun Dai; Ning Yang; Tai Wang

    2010-01-01

    Mature pollen grains (PGs) from most plant species are metabolically quiescent. However, once pollinated onto stigma, they quickly hydrate and germinate. APG can give rise to a vegetative cell-derived polarized pollen tube (PT), which represents a specialized polar cell. The polarized PT grows by the tip and requires interaction of different signaling molecules localized in the apical plasma membrane and active membrane trafficking. The mechanisms underlying the interaction and membrane trafficking are not well understood. In this work, we purified PG and PT plasma-membrane vesicles from Lilium davidii Duch. using the aqueous two-phase partition technique, then enriched plasma membrane proteins by using Brij58 and KCl to remove loosely bound contaminants. We identified 223 integral and membrane-associated proteins in the plasma membrane of PGs and PTs by using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) and 2-D high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. More than 68% of the proteins have putative transmembrane domains and/or lipid-modified motifs. Proteins involved in signal transduction, membrane trafficking and transport are predominant in the plasma-membrane proteome. We revealed most components of the clathrin-dependent endocytosis pathway. Statistical analysis revealed 14 proteins differentially expressed in the two development stages: in PTs, six upregulated and eight downregulated are mainly involved in signaling, transport and membrane trafficking. These results provide novel insights into polarized PT growth.

  16. POLYMER ELECTROLYTE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    A method for preparing polybenzimidazole or polybenzimidazole blend membranes and fabricating gas diffusion electrodes and membrane-electrode assemblies is provided for a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell. Blend polymer electrolyte membranes based on PBI and various...... thermoplastic polymers for high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells have also been developed. Miscible blends are used for solution casting of polymer membranes (solid electrolytes). High conductivity and enhanced mechanical strength were obtained for the blend polymer solid electrolytes. With the...... thermally resistant polymer, e.g., polybenzimidazole or a mixture of polybenzimidazole and other thermoplastics as binder, the carbon-supported noble metal catalyst is tape-cast onto a hydrophobic supporting substrate. When doped with an acid mixture, electrodes are assembled with an acid doped solid...

  17. WallProtDB, a database resource for plant cell wall proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    San Clemente, Hélène; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background During the last fifteen years, cell wall proteomics has become a major research field with the publication of more than 50 articles describing plant cell wall proteomes. The WallProtDB database has been designed as a tool to facilitate the inventory, the interpretation of cell wall proteomics data and the comparisons between cell wall proteomes. Results WallProtDB (http://www.polebio.lrsv.ups-tlse.fr/WallProtDB/) presently contains 2170 proteins and ESTs identified experimentally i...

  18. Advancing cell biology through proteomics in space and time (PROSPECTS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamond, A.I.; Uhlen, M.; Horning, S.;

    2012-01-01

    a range of sensitive and quantitative approaches for measuring protein structures and dynamics that promise to revolutionize our understanding of cell biology and molecular mechanisms in both human cells and model organisms. The Proteomics Specification in Time and Space (PROSPECTS) Network is a unique EU...

  19. Plasma membrane proteomics and its application in clinical cancer biomarker discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Lund, Rikke; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2010-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins that are exposed on the cell surface have important biological functions, such as signaling into and out of the cells, ion transport, and cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The expression level of many of the plasma membrane proteins involved in these key functions i...

  20. The cell surface proteome of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreisbach, Annette; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Buist, Girbe

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is a wide spread opportunistic pathogen that can cause a range of life-threatening diseases. To obtain a better understanding of the global mechanisms for pathogenesis and to identify novel targets for therapeutic interventions, the S. aureus proteom

  1. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  2. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte; Corbeil, Denis; Hoflack, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  3. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis Reveals the Min System of Escherichia coli Modulates Reversible Protein Association with the Inner Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsiao-Lin; Chiang, I-Chen; Liang, Suh-Yuen; Lee, Der-Yen; Chang, Geen-Dong; Wang, Kwan-Yu; Lin, Shu-Yu; Shih, Yu-Ling

    2016-05-01

    The Min system of Escherichia coli mediates placement of the division septum at the midcell. It oscillates from pole to pole to establish a concentration gradient of the division inhibition that is high at the poles but low at the midcell; the cell middle thereby becomes the most favorable site for division. Although Min oscillation is well studied from molecular and biophysical perspectives, it is still an enigma as to whether such a continuous, energy-consuming, and organized movement of the Min proteins would affect cellular processes other than the division site selection. To tackle this question, we compared the inner membrane proteome of the wild-type and Δmin strains using a quantitative approach. Forty proteins that showed differential abundance on the inner membrane of the mutant cells were identified and defined as proteins of interest (POIs). More than half of the POIs were peripheral membrane proteins, suggesting that the Min system affects mainly reversible protein association with the inner membrane. In addition, 6 out of 10 selected POIs directly interacted with at least one of the Min proteins, confirming the correlation between POIs and the Min system.Further analysis revealed a functional relationship between metabolism and the Min system. Metabolic enzymes accounted for 45% of the POIs, and there was a change of metabolites in the related reactions. We hypothesize that the Min system could alter the membrane location of proteins to modulate their enzymatic activity. Thus, the metabolic modulation in the Δmin mutant is likely an adaptive phenotype in cells of abnormal size and chromosome number due to an imbalanced abundance of proteins on the inner membrane. Taken together, the current work reports novel interactions of the Min system and reveals a global physiological impact of the Min system in addition to the division site placement. PMID:26889046

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Human Blastocoel Fluid and Blastocyst Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnert Jensen, Pernille; Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen;

    cells of the blastocyst are exposed. The ICM is the starting point for the development of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which posses the potential to develop into any cell type present in the adult human body [1,2]. This ability makes hESCs a potential source of cells for...... blastocoel fluid (1-8 nanoliters per blastocyst), has hampered an in-depth study of the human blastocyst proteome. However, recent developments in mass spectrometry-based proteomic techniques allow the identification and characterization of thousands of proteins from low microgram levels of protein extracted......The human blastocyst consists of 100-200 cells that are organized in an outer layer of differentiated trophectoderm (TE) cells lining the blastocyst cavity into which the undifferentiated inner cell mass (ICM) protrudes. The cavity of the blastocyst is filled with blastocoel fluid to which all the...

  5. Proteomics of CDK inhibition in cancer cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářová, Hana; Skalníková, Helena; Halada, Petr; Strnad, M.; Hajdúch, M.

    Olomouc: -, 2007, s. 1-1. [Symposium and Workshop on Molecular Pathology /3./. Olomouc (CZ), 04.05.2007-05.05.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/05/0418; GA MŠk LC07017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors * cancer * proteomics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  6. Proteomic techniques for characterisation of mesenchymal stem cell secretome.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kupcová Skalníková, Helena

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 12 (2013), s. 2196-2211. ISSN 0300-9084 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA TA ČR TA01011466 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : mesenchymal stem cells * secretome * exosome * conditioned medium * proteomics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.123, year: 2013

  7. The time is right: proteome biology of stem cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whetton, A.D.; Williamson, A.J.K.; Krijgsveld, J.; Lee, B.H.; Lemischka, I.; Oh, S.; Pera, M.; Mummery, C.L.; Heck, A.J.R.

    2008-01-01

    In stem cell biology, there is a growing need for advanced technologies that may help to unravel the molecular mechanisms of self-renewal and differentiation. Proteomics, the comprehensive analysis of proteins, is such an emerging technique. To facilitate interactions between specialists in proteomi

  8. Differential membrane proteomics using 18O-labeling to identify biomarkers for cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Troels Zakarias; Harsha, H C; Grønborg, Mads; Maitra, Anirban; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2008-01-01

    enrichment of cellular subproteomes prior to mass spectrometric analysis can provide increased coverage of certain classes of molecules. We used a membrane protein enrichment strategy coupled with 18O labeling based quantitative proteomics to identify proteins that are highly expressed in cholangiocarcinomas....... In addition to identifying several proteins previously known to be overexpressed in cholangiocarcinoma, we discovered a number of molecules that were previously not associated with cholangiocarcinoma. Using immunoblotting and immunohistochemical labeling of tissue microarrays, we validated Golgi...... membrane protein 1, Annexin IV and Epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 (EPS8) as candidate biomarkers for cholangiocarcinomas. Golgi membrane protein 1 was observed to be overexpressed in 89% of cholangiocarcinoma cases analyzed by staining tissue microarrays. In light of recent reports...

  9. Proteomic profiling of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells upon TGF-beta stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Daojing; Park, Jennifer S.; Chu, Julia S.F.; Ari, Krakowski; Luo, Kunxin; Chen, David J.; Li, Song

    2004-08-08

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into different types of cells, and have tremendous potential for cell therapy and tissue engineering. Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}) plays an important role in cell differentiation and vascular remodeling. We showed that TGF-{beta} induced cell morphology change and an increase in actin fibers in MSCs. To determine the global effects of TGF-{beta} on MSCs, we employed a proteomic strategy to analyze the effect of TGF-{beta} on the human MSC proteome. By using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and electrospray ionization coupled to Quadrupole/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometers, we have generated a proteome reference map of MSCs, and identified {approx}30 proteins with an increase or decrease in expression or phosphorylation in response to TGF-{beta}. The proteins regulated by TGF-{beta} included cytoskeletal proteins, matrix synthesis proteins, membrane proteins, metabolic enzymes, etc. TGF-{beta} increased the expression of smooth muscle (SM) {alpha}-actin and decreased the expression of gelsolin. Over-expression of gelsolin inhibited TGF-{beta}-induced assembly of SM {alpha}-actin; on the other hand, knocking down gelsolin expression enhanced the assembly of {alpha}-actin and actin filaments without significantly affecting {alpha}-actin expression. These results suggest that TGF-{beta} coordinates the increase of {alpha}-actin and the decrease of gelsolin to promote MSC differentiation. This study demonstrates that proteomic tools are valuable in studying stem cell differentiation and elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms.

  10. Immunoscreening of the extracellular proteome of colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of proteins from tumors can trigger an immune response in cancer patients involving T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes, which results in the generation of antibodies to tumor-derived proteins. Many studies aim to use humoral immune responses, namely autoantibody profiles, directly, as clinical biomarkers. Alternatively, the antibody immune response as an amplification system for tumor associated alterations may be used to indicate putative protein biomarkers with high sensitivity. Aiming at the latter approach we here have implemented an autoantibody profiling strategy which particularly focuses on proteins released by tumor cells in vitro: the so-called secretome. For immunoscreening, the extracellular proteome of five colorectal cancer cell lines was resolved on 2D gels, immobilized on PVDF membranes and used for serological screening with individual sera from 21 colorectal cancer patients and 24 healthy controls. All of the signals from each blot were assigned to a master map, and autoantigen candidates were defined based of the pattern of immunoreactivities. The corresponding proteins were isolated from preparative gels, identified by MALDI-MS and/or by nano-HPLC/ESI-MS/MS and exemplarily confirmed by duplex Western blotting combining the human serum samples with antibodies directed against the protein(s) of interest. From 281 secretome proteins stained with autoantibodies in total we first defined the 'background patterns' of frequently immunoreactive extracellular proteins in healthy and diseased people. An assignment of these proteins, among them many nominally intracellular proteins, to the subset of exosomal proteins within the secretomes revealed a large overlap. On this basis we defined and consequently confirmed novel biomarker candidates such as the extreme C-terminus of the extracellular matrix protein agrin within the set of cancer-enriched immunorectivities. Our findings suggest, first, that autoantibody responses may be due, in

  11. Proteomic Applications in the Study of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Mateos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are undifferentiated cells with an unlimited capacity for self-renewal and able to differentiate towards specific lineages under appropriate conditions. MSCs are, a priori, a good target for cell therapy and clinical trials as an alternative to embryonic stem cells, avoiding ethical problems and the chance for malignant transformation in the host. However, regarding MSCs, several biological implications must be solved before their application in cell therapy, such as safe ex vivo expansion and manipulation to obtain an extensive cell quantity amplification number for use in the host without risk accumulation of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. Cell surface markers for direct characterization of MSCs remain unknown, and the precise molecular mechanisms whereby growth factors stimulate their differentiation are still missing. In the last decade, quantitative proteomics has emerged as a promising set of techniques to address these questions, the answers to which will determine whether MSCs retain their potential for use in cell therapy. Proteomics provides tools to globally analyze cellular activity at the protein level. This proteomic profiling allows the elucidation of connections between broad cellular pathways and molecules that were previously impossible to determine using only traditional biochemical analysis. However; thus far, the results obtained must be orthogonally validated with other approaches. This review will focus on how these techniques have been applied in the evaluation of MSCs for their future applications in safe therapies.

  12. Corrugated Membrane Fuel Cell Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grot, Stephen [President, Ion Power Inc.

    2013-09-30

    One of the most challenging aspects of traditional PEM fuel cell stacks is the difficulty achieving the platinum catalyst utilization target of 0.2 gPt/kWe set forth by the DOE. Good catalyst utilization can be achieved with state-of-the-art catalyst coated membranes (CCM) when low catalyst loadings (<0.3 mg/cm2) are used at a low current. However, when low platinum loadings are used, the peak power density is lower than conventional loadings, requiring a larger total active area and a larger bipolar plate. This results in a lower overall stack power density not meeting the DOE target. By corrugating the fuel cell membrane electrode structure, Ion Power?s goal is to realize both the Pt utilization targets as well as the power density targets of the DOE. This will be achieved by demonstrating a fuel cell single cell (50 cm2) with a twofold increase in the membrane active area over the geometric area of the cell by corrugating the MEA structure. The corrugating structure must be able to demonstrate the target properties of < 10 mOhm-cm2 electrical resistance at > 20 psi compressive strength over the active area, in combination with offering at least 80% of power density that can be achieved by using the same MEA in a flat plate structure. Corrugated membrane fuel cell structures also have the potential to meet DOE power density targets by essentially packaging more membrane area into the same fuel cell volume as compared to conventional stack constructions.

  13. Probing the membrane interface-interacting proteome using photoactivatable lipid cross-linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbens, Jacob; Vader, Pieter; Damen, J Mirjam A; O'Flaherty, Martina C; Slijper, Monique; de Kruijff, Ben; de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2007-05-01

    To analyze proteins interacting at the membrane interface, a phospholipid analogue was used with a photoactivatable headgroup (ASA-DLPE, N-(4-azidosalicylamidyl)-1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine) for selective cross-linking. The peripheral membrane protein cytochrome c from the inner mitochondrial membrane was rendered carbonate wash-resistant by cross-linking to ASA-DLPE in a model membrane system, validating our approach. Cross-link products of cytochrome c and its precursor apocytochrome c were demonstrated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and were specifically detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), taking advantage of the intrinsic UV absorbance of the cross-linker. Application of the method to inner mitochondrial membranes from Saccharomyces cerevisae revealed cross-link products of both exogenously added apocytochrome c and endogenous proteins with molecular weights around 34 and 72 kDa. Liquid chromatograpy (LC)-MS/MS was performed to identify these proteins, resulting in a list of candidate proteins potentially cross-linked at the membrane interface. The approach described here provides methodology for capturing phospholipid-protein interactions in their native environment of the biomembrane using modern proteomics techniques. PMID:17375948

  14. Learning robust cell signalling models from high throughput proteomic data

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Mitchell; Broom, Bradley M.; Subramanian, Devika

    2009-01-01

    We propose a framework for learning robust Bayesian network models of cell signalling from high-throughput proteomic data. We show that model averaging using Bayesian bootstrap resampling generates more robust structures than procedures that learn structures using all of the data. We also develop an algorithm for ranking the importance of network features using bootstrap resample data. We apply our algorithms to derive the T-cell signalling network from the flow cytometry data of Sachs et al....

  15. Proteome analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage in pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Background Pulmonary Langerhans-cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is a rare interstitial lung disease characterized by clusters of Langerhans cells, organized in granulomas, in the walls of distal bronchioles. It is a diffuse lung disease related to tobacco smoking but otherwise of unknown etiopathogenesis. Methods In this study we used a proteomic approach to analyze BAL protein composition of patients with PLCH and of healthy smoker and non-smoker controls to obtain insights into the pathogenetic m...

  16. Membrane Protein Mobility and Orientation Preserved in Supported Bilayers Created Directly from Cell Plasma Membrane Blebs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Mark J; Hsia, Chih-Yun; Singh, Rohit R; Haider, Huma; Kumpf, Julia; Kawate, Toshimitsu; Daniel, Susan

    2016-03-29

    Membrane protein interactions with lipids are crucial for their native biological behavior, yet traditional characterization methods are often carried out on purified protein in the absence of lipids. We present a simple method to transfer membrane proteins expressed in mammalian cells to an assay-friendly, cushioned, supported lipid bilayer platform using cell blebs as an intermediate. Cell blebs, expressing either GPI-linked yellow fluorescent proteins or neon-green fused transmembrane P2X2 receptors, were induced to rupture on glass surfaces using PEGylated lipid vesicles, which resulted in planar supported membranes with over 50% mobility for multipass transmembrane proteins and over 90% for GPI-linked proteins. Fluorescent proteins were tracked, and their diffusion in supported bilayers characterized, using single molecule tracking and moment scaling spectrum (MSS) analysis. Diffusion was characterized for individual proteins as either free or confined, revealing details of the local lipid membrane heterogeneity surrounding the protein. A particularly useful result of our bilayer formation process is the protein orientation in the supported planar bilayer. For both the GPI-linked and transmembrane proteins used here, an enzymatic assay revealed that protein orientation in the planar bilayer results in the extracellular domains facing toward the bulk, and that the dominant mode of bleb rupture is via the "parachute" mechanism. Mobility, orientation, and preservation of the native lipid environment of the proteins using cell blebs offers advantages over proteoliposome reconstitution or disrupted cell membrane preparations, which necessarily result in significant scrambling of protein orientation and typically immobilized membrane proteins in SLBs. The bleb-based bilayer platform presented here is an important step toward integrating membrane proteomic studies on chip, especially for future studies aimed at understanding fundamental effects of lipid interactions

  17. Global Proteome Analysis of the NCI-60 Cell Line Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Moghaddas Gholami

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The NCI-60 cell line collection is a very widely used panel for the study of cellular mechanisms of cancer in general and in vitro drug action in particular. It is a model system for the tissue types and genetic diversity of human cancers and has been extensively molecularly characterized. Here, we present a quantitative proteome and kinome profile of the NCI-60 panel covering, in total, 10,350 proteins (including 375 protein kinases and including a core cancer proteome of 5,578 proteins that were consistently quantified across all tissue types. Bioinformatic analysis revealed strong cell line clusters according to tissue type and disclosed hundreds of differentially regulated proteins representing potential biomarkers for numerous tumor properties. Integration with public transcriptome data showed considerable similarity between mRNA and protein expression. Modeling of proteome and drug-response profiles for 108 FDA-approved drugs identified known and potential protein markers for drug sensitivity and resistance. To enable community access to this unique resource, we incorporated it into a public database for comparative and integrative analysis (http://wzw.tum.de/proteomics/nci60.

  18. Differential proteome analysis of chikungunya virus infection on host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Li-Ping Thio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus that has caused multiple unprecedented and re-emerging outbreaks in both tropical and temperate countries. Despite ongoing research efforts, the underlying factors involved in facilitating CHIKV replication during early infection remains ill-characterized. The present study serves to identify host proteins modulated in response to early CHIKV infection using a proteomics approach. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The whole cell proteome profiles of CHIKV-infected and mock control WRL-68 cells were compared and analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE. Fifty-three spots were found to be differentially modulated and 50 were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF. Eight were significantly up-regulated and 42 were down-regulated. The mRNA expressions of 15 genes were also found to correlate with the corresponding protein expression. STRING network analysis identified several biological processes to be affected, including mRNA processing, translation, energy production and cellular metabolism, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP and cell cycle regulation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study constitutes a first attempt to investigate alteration of the host cellular proteome during early CHIKV infection. Our proteomics data showed that during early infection, CHIKV affected the expression of proteins that are involved in mRNA processing, host metabolic machinery, UPP, and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1 regulation (in favour of virus survival, replication and transmission. While results from this study complement the proteomics results obtained from previous late host response studies, functional characterization of these proteins is warranted to reinforce our understanding of their roles during early CHIKV infection in humans.

  19. Traumatically injured astrocytes release a proteomic signature modulated by STAT3-dependent cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jaclynn; Kwon, Eunice; Paez, Pablo; Yan, Weihong; Czerwieniec, Gregg; Loo, Joseph A; Sofroniew, Michael V; Wanner, Ina-Beate

    2016-05-01

    Molecular markers associated with CNS injury are of diagnostic interest. Mechanical trauma generates cellular deformation associated with membrane permeability with unknown molecular consequences. We used an in vitro model of stretch-injury and proteomic analyses to determine protein changes in murine astrocytes and their surrounding fluids. Abrupt pressure-pulse stretching resulted in the rapid release of 59 astrocytic proteins with profiles reflecting cell injury and cell death, i.e., mechanoporation and cell lysis. This acute trauma-release proteome was overrepresented with metabolic proteins compared with the uninjured cellular proteome, bearing relevance for post-traumatic metabolic depression. Astrocyte-specific deletion of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3-CKO) resulted in reduced stretch-injury tolerance, elevated necrosis and increased protein release. Consistent with more lysed cells, more protein complexes, nuclear and transport proteins were released from STAT3-CKO versus nontransgenic astrocytes. STAT3-CKO astrocytes had reduced basal expression of GFAP, lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB), aldolase C (ALDOC), and astrocytic phosphoprotein 15 (PEA15), and elevated levels of tropomyosin (TPM4) and α actinin 4 (ACTN4). Stretching caused STAT3-dependent cellular depletion of PEA15 and GFAP, and its filament disassembly in subpopulations of injured astrocytes. PEA15 and ALDOC signals were low in injured astrocytes acutely after mouse spinal cord crush injury and were robustly expressed in reactive astrocytes 1 day postinjury. In contrast, α crystallin (CRYAB) was present in acutely injured astrocytes, and absent from uninjured and reactive astrocytes, demonstrating novel marker differences among postinjury astrocytes. These findings reveal a proteomic signature of traumatically-injured astrocytes reflecting STAT3-dependent cellular survival with potential diagnostic value. GLIA 2016;64:668-694. PMID:26683444

  20. Novel utilization of the outer membrane proteins for the identification and differentiation of pathogenic versus nonpathogenic microbial strains using mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Rabih E.; Wade, Mary; Deshpande, Samir V.; McCubbin, Patrick; Snyder, A. Peter; Bevilacqua, Vicky

    2012-06-01

    Mass spectrometry based proteomic approaches are showing promising capabilities in addressing various biological and biochemical issues. Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are often associated with virulence in gram-negative pathogens and could prove to be excellent model biomarkers for strain level differentiation among bacteria. Whole cells and OMP extracts were isolated from pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of Francisella tularensis, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia mallei. OMP extracts were compared for their ability to differentiate and delineate the correct database organism to an experimental sample and for the degree of dissimilarity to the nearest-neighbor database strains. This study addresses the comparative experimental proteome analyses of OMPs vs. whole cell lysates on the strain-level discrimination among gram negative pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains.

  1. Proteomic Profiling of Nonenzymatically Glycated Proteins in Human Plasma and Erythrocyte Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Tang, Ning; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Phillips, Lawrence S.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of peptides and proteins by D-glucose has important implications in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, particularly in the development of diabetic complications. In this report, a thorough proteomic profiling of glycated proteins was attempted by using phenylboronate affinity chromatography to enrich glycated proteins and glycated, tryptic peptides from human plasma and erythrocyte membranes. Enriched peptides were subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry, and 76 and 31 proteins were confidently identified as glycated from human plasma and erythrocyte membrane, respectively. It was observed that most of the glycated proteins can be identified in samples from individuals with normal glucose tolerance, although samples from individuals with impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus have slightly higher numbers of glycated proteins and more glycation sites identified.

  2. What Is Cancer Proteomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What is Proteomics? Video Tutorial What is Cancer Proteomics? Print This Page The term "proteome" refers to ... that a cell or organism undergoes. The term "proteomics" is a large-scale comprehensive study of a ...

  3. Proteomic profiling of a robust Wolbachia infection in an Aedes albopictus mosquito cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, Gerald D; Baldridge, Abigail S; Witthuhn, Bruce A; Higgins, LeeAnn; Markowski, Todd W; Fallon, Ann M

    2014-11-01

    Wolbachia pipientis, a widespread vertically transmitted intracellular bacterium, provides a tool for insect control through manipulation of host-microbe interactions. We report proteomic characterization of wStr, a Wolbachia strain associated with a strong cytoplasmic incompatibility phenotype in its native host, Laodelphax striatellus. In the Aedes albopictus C/wStr1 mosquito cell line, wStr maintains a robust, persistent infection. MS/MS analyses of gel bands revealed a protein 'footprint' dominated by Wolbachia-encoded chaperones, stress response and cell membrane proteins, including the surface antigen WspA, a peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein and a 73 kDa outer membrane protein. Functional classifications and estimated abundance levels of 790 identified proteins suggested that expression, stabilization and secretion of proteins predominate over bacterial genome replication and cell division. High relative abundances of cysteine desulphurase, serine/glycine hydroxymethyl transferase, and components of the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex in conjunction with above average abundances of glutamate dehydrogenase and proline utilization protein A support Wolbachia genome-based predictions for amino acid metabolism as a primary energy source. wStr expresses 15 Vir proteins of a Type IV secretion system and its transcriptional regulator. Proteomic characterization of a robust insect-associated Wolbachia strain provides baseline information that will inform further development of in vitro protocols for Wolbachia manipulation. PMID:25155417

  4. Elucidation of the outer membrane proteome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium utilising a lipid-based protein immobilization technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appleton Hazel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is a major cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. The outer membrane proteins expressed by S. Typhimurium mediate the process of adhesion and internalisation within the intestinal epithelium of the host thus influencing the progression of disease. Since the outer membrane proteins are surface-exposed, they provide attractive targets for the development of improved antimicrobial agents and vaccines. Various techniques have been developed for their characterisation, but issues such as carryover of cytosolic proteins still remain a problem. In this study we attempted to characterise the surface proteome of S. Typhimurium using Lipid-based Protein Immobilisation technology in the form of LPI™ FlowCells. No detergents are required and no sample clean up is needed prior to downstream analysis. The immobilised proteins can be digested with proteases in multiple steps to increase sequence coverage, and the peptides eluted can be characterised directly by liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and identified from mass spectral database searches. Results In this study, 54 outer membrane proteins, were identified with two or more peptide hits using a multi-step digest approach. Out of these 28 were lipoproteins, nine were involved in transport and three with enzyme activity These included the transporters BtuB which is responsible for the uptake of vitamin B12, LamB which is involved in the uptake of maltose and maltodextrins and LolB which is involved in the incorporation of lipoproteins in the outer membrane. Other proteins identified included the enzymes MltC which may play a role in cell elongation and division and NlpD which is involved in catabolic processes in cell wall formation as well as proteins involved in virulence such as Lpp1, Lpp2 and OmpX. Conclusion Using a multi-step digest approach the LPI™ technique enables the incorporation of a

  5. Multiplexed immunofluorescence delineates proteomic cancer cell states associated with metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Sood, Anup; Miller, Alexandra M.; Brogi, Edi; Sui, Yunxia; Armenia, Joshua; McDonough, Elizabeth; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Carlin, Sean; Stamper, Aleksandra; Campos, Carl; Pang, Zhengyu; Li, Qing; Port, Elisa; Graeber, Thomas G.; Schultz, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    The phenotypic diversity of cancer results from genetic and nongenetic factors. Most studies of cancer heterogeneity have focused on DNA alterations, as technologies for proteomic measurements in clinical specimen are currently less advanced. Here, we used a multiplexed immunofluorescence staining platform to measure the expression of 27 proteins at the single-cell level in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples from treatment-naive stage II/III human breast cancer. Unsupervised cluster...

  6. Plasma membrane proteome analysis of the early effect of alcohol on liver:implications for alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijun Zhang; Ye Zheng; Pengyuan Yang; Zhenghong Yuan; Xiaofang Jia; Yanling Feng; Xia Peng; Zhiyong Zhang; Wenjiang Zhou; Zhanqing Zhang; Fang Ma; Xiaohui Liu

    2011-01-01

    In humans, the over-consumption of alcohol can lead to serious liver disease. To examine the early effects of alcohol on liver disease, rats were given sufficient ethanol to develop liver cirrhosis. Rats before the onset of fibrosis were studied in this work. Plasma membranes (PM) of liver were extracted by twice sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The proteome profiles of PM from ethanol-treated rats and the controls were analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) tech-nology. Ethanol treatment altered the amount of 15 differ-ent liver proteins: 10 of them were detected by 2-DE and 5 by iTRAQ. Keratin 8 was detected by both methods.Gene ontology analysis of these differentially detected proteins indicated that most of them were involved in important cell functions such as binding activity (includ-ing ion, DNA, ATP binding, etc.), cell structure, or enzyme activity. Among these, annexin A2, keratin 8, and keratin 18 were further verified using western blot analy-sis and annexin A2 was verified by immunohistochemis-try. Our results suggested that alcohol has the potential to affect cell structure, adhesion and enzyme activity by altering expression levels of several relevant proteins in the PM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to study the effect of alcohol on the liver PM pro-teome and it might be helpful for understanding the poss-ible mechanisms of alcohol-induced liver disease.

  7. Identification of salt-tolerant Sinorhizobium sp. strain BL3 membrane proteins based on proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanthanuch, Waraporn; Tittabutr, Panlada; Mohammed, Shabaz; Matthiesen, Rune; Yamabhai, Montarop; Manassila, Monchai; Jensen, Ole Noerregaard; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Teaumroong, Neung

    2010-01-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 is a salt-tolerant strain that can fix atmospheric nitrogen in symbiosis with leguminous host plants under salt-stress conditions. Since cell membranes are the first barrier to environmental change, it is interesting to explore the membrane proteins within this protective...... barrier under salt stress. The protein contents of membrane-enriched fractions obtained from BL3 were analyzed by nanoflow liquid chromatography interfaced with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 105 membrane proteins were identified. These proteins could be classified into 17...... functional categories, the two biggest of which were energy production and conversion, and proteins not in clusters of orthologous groups (COGs). In addition, a comparative analysis of membrane proteins between salt-stressed and non-stressed BL3 cells was conducted using a membrane enrichment method and off...

  8. The Genomic and Proteomic Content of Cancer Cell-Derived Exosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith C Henderson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are secreted membrane vesicles that have been proposed as an effective means to detect a variety of disease states, including cancer. The properties of exosomes, including stability in biological fluids, allow for their efficient isolation and make them an ideal vehicle for studies on early disease detection and evaluation. Much data has been collected over recent years regarding the mRNA, miRNA, and protein contents of exosomes. In addition, many studies have described the functional role that exosomes play in disease initiation and progression. Tumor cells have been shown to secrete exosomes, often in increased amounts compared to normal cells, and these exosomes can carry the genomic and proteomic signatures characteristic of the tumor cells from which they were derived. While these unique signatures make exosomes ideal for cancer detection, exosomes derived from cancer cells have also been shown to play a functional role in cancer progression. Here, we review the unique genomic and proteomic contents of exosomes originating from cancer cells as well as their functional effects to promote tumor progression.

  9. Mass spectrometry based proteomics in cell biology and signaling research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Proteomics is one of the most powerful post-genomics technologies. Recently accomplishments include large scale protein-protein interaction mapping, large scale mapping of phosphorylation sites and the cloning of key signaling molecules. In this talk, current state of the art of the technology will be reviewed. Applications of proteomics to the mapping of multiprotein complexes will be illustrated with recent work on the spliceosome and the nucleolus. More than 300 proteins have been mapped to each of these complexes. Quantitative techniques are becoming more and more essential in proteomics. They are usually performed by the incorporation of stable isotopes - a light form in cell state 'A' and a heavy form in cell state 'E' - and subsequent comparison of mass spectrometric peak heights. A new technique called, SILAC for Stable isotope Incorporation by Amino acids in Cell culture, has been applied to studying cell differentiation and mapping secreted proteins from adipocytes. A number of known and novel proteins important in adipocyte differentiation have been identified by this technique. Some of these proved to be upregulated at the 1 mRNA level, too, whereas others appear to be regulated post-translationally. We have also applied the SILAC method to protein-protein interaction mapping. For example, we compared immunoprecipitates from stimulated and non-stimulated cells to find binding partners recruited to the bait due to the stimulus. Several novel substrates in the EGF pathway were found in this way. An important application of proteomics in the signaling field is the mapping of post-translational modifications. In particular, there are a number of techniques for phosphotyrosine phosphorylation mapping which have proven very useful. Making use of the mass deficiency of the phosphogroup, 'parent ion scans' con be performed, which selectively reveal phosphotyrosine peptides from complex peptides mixtures. This technique has been used to clone several

  10. Application of proteomics in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, William C S

    2016-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a heterogeneous disease with diverse pathological features. Clinical proteomics allows the discovery of molecular markers and new therapeutic targets for this most prevalent type of lung cancer. Some of them may be used to detect early lung cancer, while others may serve as predictive markers of resistance to different therapies. Therapeutic targets and prognostic markers in NSCLC have also been discovered. These proteomics biomarkers may help to pair the individual NSCLC patient with the best treatment option. Despite the fact that implementation of these biomarkers in the clinic appears to be scarce, the recently launched Precision Medicine Initiative may encourage their translation into clinical practice. PMID:26577456

  11. Quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteins using membrane-impermeable chemical probe coupled with 18O labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Brown, Roslyn N.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shi, Liang; Romine, Margaret F; Fredrickson, James K.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2010-01-01

    We report a mass spectrometry-based strategy for quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteome changes. The strategy includes enrichment of surface membrane proteins using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe followed by stable isotope 18O labeling and LC-MS analysis. We applied this strategy for enriching membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram-negative bacterium with known metal-reduction capability via extracellular electron transfer between outer membrane proteins and extracellular electron receptors. LC/MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of about 400 proteins with 79% of them being predicted to be membrane localized. Quantitative aspects of the membrane enrichment were shown by peptide level 16O and 18O labeling of proteins from wild-type and mutant cells (generated from deletion of a type II secretion protein, GspD) prior to LC-MS analysis. Using a chemical probe labeled pure protein as an internal standard for normalization, the quantitative data revealed reduced abundances in ΔgspD mutant cells of many outer membrane proteins including the outer membrane c-cype cytochromes OmcA and MtrC, in agreement with previously investigation demonstrating that these proteins are substrates of the type II secretion system. PMID:20380418

  12. STUDYING MEMBRANE ANCHOR ORGANIZATION IN LIVING CELL MEMBRANES

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Hector Han-Li

    2011-01-01

    The cell membrane is a complex mixture of various lipids, proteins and other biomolecules that are all organized into a fluid 2-dimensional bilayer. A rather unique trait of this organelle is the lateral mobility of the component molecules. Surprisingly, these molecules are not necessarily distributed homogeneously in the membrane. From a physical perspective, these inhomogeneities are interesting because they indicate some level of organization in the membrane. From a biological perspect...

  13. Proteomic analysis of outer membrane vesicles from the probiotic strain Escherichia coli Nissle 1917.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Laura; Toloza, Lorena; Giménez, Rosa; Odena, Antonia; Oliveira, Eliandre; Aguilar, Juan; Badia, Josefa; Baldomà, Laura

    2014-02-01

    Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is a probiotic used for the treatment of intestinal disorders. EcN improves gastrointestinal homeostasis and microbiota balance; however, little is known about how this probiotic delivers effector molecules to the host. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are constitutively produced by Gram-negative bacteria and have a relevant role in bacteria-host interactions. Using 1D SDS-PAGE and highly sensitive LC-MS/MS analysis we identified in this study 192 EcN vesicular proteins with high confidence in three independent biological replicates. Of these proteins, 18 were encoded by strain-linked genes and 57 were common to pathogen-derived OMVs. These proteins may contribute to the ability of this probiotic to colonize the human gut as they fulfil functions related to adhesion, immune modulation or bacterial survival in host niches. This study describes the first global OMV proteome of a probiotic strain and provides evidence that probiotic-derived OMVs contain proteins that can target these vesicles to the host and mediate their beneficial effects on intestinal function. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000367 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000367). PMID:24307187

  14. Proteomics and glycoproteomics of pluripotent stem-cell surface proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bingyun

    2015-03-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are a unique cell type with promising potential in regenerative and personalized medicine. Yet the difficulty to understand and coax their seemingly stochastic differentiation and spontaneous self-renewal have largely limited their clinical applications. A call has been made by numerous researchers for a better characterization of surface proteins on these cells, in search of biomarkers that can dictate developmental stages and lineage specifications, and can help formulate mechanistic insight of stem-cell fate choices. In the past two decades, proteomics has gained significant recognition in profiling surface proteins at high throughput. This review will summarize the impact of these studies on stem-cell biology, and discuss the used proteomic techniques. A systematic comparison of all the techniques and their results is also attempted here to help reveal pros, cons, and the complementarity of the existing methods. This awareness should assist in selecting suitable strategies for stem-cell related research, and shed light on technical improvements that can be explored in the future. PMID:25211708

  15. Sperm membrane proteome in wild Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) and Sika deer (Cervus nippon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Osamu; Cao, Shinuo; Xuan, Xuenan

    2015-01-01

    Whereas recent advances in proteome-related techniques have accumulated a lot of information about sperm proteins in model animals, the information in non-model wildlife species is absolutely deficient, although this knowledge would be valuable to regulate wildlife overabundance. To characterize the repertoires of sperm membrane proteins in Japanese overpopulated wildlife, our study focuses on the following two species: Macaca fuscata and Cervus nippon. We enriched sperm membrane proteins by the phase partitioning with Triton X-114, and then separated them by two-dimensional electrophoresis, and, finally, they were comprehensively identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. Sperm membrane proteins were successfully enriched. They included some proteins with unknown function and fertility-related proteins that work in sperm development, motility, capacitation, transport, protection, acrosome reaction, and fertilization. Additionally, beta-defensin 126 and epithelial chloride channel were strongly detected in M. fuscata but not in C. nippon, whereas lactadherin and NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase 1 were strongly detected in C. nippon alone. This study is an initiative case showing that the sperm of wildlife conserve major fertility-related proteins, but express some proteins in a species-specific manner. In the development of a practical method for fertility control, this aspect may be taken into consideration. PMID:25277530

  16. Evaluation of cell wall preparations for proteomics: a new procedure for purifying cell walls from Arabidopsis hypocotyls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canut Hervé

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ultimate goal of proteomic analysis of a cell compartment should be the exhaustive identification of resident proteins; excluding proteins from other cell compartments. Reaching such a goal closely depends on the reliability of the isolation procedure for the cell compartment of interest. Plant cell walls possess specific difficulties: (i the lack of a surrounding membrane may result in the loss of cell wall proteins (CWP during the isolation procedure, (ii polysaccharide networks of cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectins form potential traps for contaminants such as intracellular proteins. Several reported procedures to isolate cell walls for proteomic analyses led to the isolation of a high proportion (more than 50% of predicted intracellular proteins. Since isolated cell walls should hold secreted proteins, one can imagine alternative procedures to prepare cell walls containing a lower proportion of contaminant proteins. Results The rationales of several published procedures to isolate cell walls for proteomics were analyzed, with regard to the bioinformatic-predicted subcellular localization of the identified proteins. Critical steps were revealed: (i homogenization in low ionic strength acid buffer to retain CWP, (ii purification through increasing density cushions, (iii extensive washes with a low ionic strength acid buffer to retain CWP while removing as many cytosolic proteins as possible, and (iv absence of detergents. A new procedure was developed to prepare cell walls from etiolated hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana. After salt extraction, a high proportion of proteins predicted to be secreted was released (73%, belonging to the same functional classes as proteins identified using previously described protocols. Finally, removal of intracellular proteins was obtained using detergents, but their amount represented less than 3% in mass of the total protein extract, based on protein quantification. Conclusion The

  17. Proteomic Profile of Brucella abortus-Infected Bovine Chorioallantoic Membrane Explants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, Juliana P. S.; Pires, Simone F.; Chapeaurouge, Alexander D.; Perales, Jonas; Santos, Renato L.; Andrade, Hélida M.; Lage, Andrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus is the etiological agent of bovine brucellosis, a zoonotic disease that causes significant economic losses worldwide. The differential proteomic profile of bovine chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) explants at early stages of infection with B. abortus (0.5, 2, 4, and 8 h) was determined. Analysis of CAM explants at 0.5 and 4 h showed the highest differences between uninfected and infected CAM explants, and therefore were used for the Differential Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE). A total of 103 spots were present in only one experimental group and were selected for identification by mass spectrometry (MALDI/ToF-ToF). Proteins only identified in extracts of CAM explants infected with B. abortus were related to recognition of PAMPs by TLR, production of reactive oxygen species, intracellular trafficking, and inflammation. PMID:27104343

  18. Human fallopian tube proteome shows high coverage of mesenchymal stem cells associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenyuan; Liu, Yang; Chang, Cheng; Wu, Songfeng; Gao, Jie; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Yingjie; Zhong, Fan; Deng, Gaopi

    2016-01-01

    The object of this research was to report a draft proteome of human fallopian tube (hFT) comprises 5416 identified proteins, which could be considered as a physiological reference to complement Human Proteome Draft. The proteomic raw data and metadata were stored in an integrated proteome resources centre iProX (IPX00034300). This hFT proteome contains many hFT markers newly identified by mass spectrum. This hFT proteome comprises 660 high-, 3605 medium- and 1181 low-abundant proteins. Ribosome, cytoskeleton, vesicle and protein folding associated proteins showed obvious tendency to be higher abundance in hFT. The extraordinary high coverage of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-associated proteins were identified in this hFT proteome, which highly supported that hFT should contain a plenty of MSCs. PMID:26759384

  19. Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). We have elucidated that the aryl-ether moiety of membranes is one of the weakest site against attack of hydroxide ions. The results of DFT calculations for hydroxide initiated aryl-ether cleavage indicated that the aryl-ether cleavage occurred prior to degradation of cationic functional group. Such a weak nature of the aryl-ether group arises from the electron deficiency of the aryl group as well as the low bond dissociation energy. The DFT results suggests that removal of the aryl-ether group in the membrane should enhance the stability of membranes under alkaline conditions. In fact, an ether fee poly(phenylene) membrane exhibits excellent stability against the attack from hydroxide ions

  20. Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Yoong-Kee [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba (Japan); Henson, Neil J.; Kim, Yu Seung [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). We have elucidated that the aryl-ether moiety of membranes is one of the weakest site against attack of hydroxide ions. The results of DFT calculations for hydroxide initiated aryl-ether cleavage indicated that the aryl-ether cleavage occurred prior to degradation of cationic functional group. Such a weak nature of the aryl-ether group arises from the electron deficiency of the aryl group as well as the low bond dissociation energy. The DFT results suggests that removal of the aryl-ether group in the membrane should enhance the stability of membranes under alkaline conditions. In fact, an ether fee poly(phenylene) membrane exhibits excellent stability against the attack from hydroxide ions.

  1. In-membrane micro fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omosebi, Ayokunle; Besser, Ronald

    2016-09-06

    An in-membrane micro fuel cell comprises an electrically-insulating membrane that is permissive to the flow of cations, such as protons, and a pair of electrodes deposited on channels formed in the membrane. The channels are arranged as conduits for fluids, and define a membrane ridge between the channels. The electrodes are porous and include catalysts for promoting the liberation of a proton and an electron from a chemical species and/or or the recombination of a proton and an electron with a chemical specie. The fuel cell may be provided a biosensor, an electrochemical sensor, a microfluidic device, or other microscale devices fabricated in the fuel cell membrane.

  2. A Proteomic Study of Human Merkel Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qiang; Byrum, Stephanie D; Moreland, Linley E; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Kannan, Aarthi; Lin, Zhenyu; Morgan, Michael; Stack, Brendan C; Cornelius, Lynn A; Tackett, Alan J; Gao, Ling

    2013-11-25

    Merkel Cell Carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine cancer of the skin. The incidence has been quadrupled with a 5-year mortality rate of 46%, presently there is no cure for metastatic disease. Despite the contribution of Merkel cell polyomavirus, the molecular events of MCC carcinogenesis are poorly defined. To better understand MCC carcinogensis, we have performed the first quantitative proteomic comparison of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) MCC tissues using another neuroendocrine tumor (carcinoid tumor of the lung) as controls. Bioinformatic analysis of the proteomic data has revealed that MCCs carry distinct protein expression patterns. Further analysis of significantly over-expressed proteins suggested the involvement of MAPK, PI3K/Akt/mTOR, wnt, and apoptosis signaling pathways. Our previous study and that from others have shown mTOR activation in MCCs. Therefore, we have focused on two downstream molecules of the mTOR pathway, lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB) and heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein F (hnRNPF). We confirm over-expression of LDHB and hnRNPF in two primary human MCC cell lines, 16 fresh tumors, and in the majority of 80 tissue microarray samples. Moreover, mTOR inhibition suppresses LDHB and hnRNPF expression in MCC cells. The results of the current study provide insight into MCC carcinogenesis and provide rationale for mTOR inhibition in pre-clinical studies. PMID:25284964

  3. Quantitative proteomic profiling of membrane proteins from the mouse brain cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum using the HysTag reagent: mapping of neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper V; Nielsen, Peter Aa; Andersen, Jens R;

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of the brain proteome and studying brain diseases through clinical biopsies and animal disease models require methods of quantitative proteomics that are sensitive and allow identification and quantification of low abundant membrane proteins from minute amount of tissue. Taking advantage...

  4. Evaluation of preparation methods for MS-based analysis of intestinal epithelial cell proteomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselager, Marianne Overgaard; Codrea, Marius Cosmin; Bendixen, Emøke

    2015-01-01

    The gut epithelium formed between an organism and the environment plays an essential role in host–microbe interactions, yet remains one of the least characterized mammalian tissues. Especially the membrane proteins, which are critical to bacterial adhesion, are understudied, because these proteins...... are low in abundance, and large amounts of sample is needed for their preparation and for undertaking MS-based analysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate three different methods for isolation and preparation of pig intestinal epithelial cells for MS-based analysis of the proteome. Samples were...... of ease and speed of sample preparation, as well as protein recovery. In comparison, more gentle methods where intestinal epithelial cells are harvested by shaking are more time consuming, result in lower protein yield, and are prone to increased technical variation due to multiple steps involved....

  5. LOCALIZATION AND PROTEOMIC CHARACTERIZATION OF CHOLESTEROL-RICH MEMBRANE MICRODOMAINS IN THE INNER EAR

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Paul V.; Cheng, Andrew L.; Colby, Candice C.; Liu, Liqian; Patel, Chintan K.; Josephs, Lydia; Duncan, R. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes organize and compartmentalize cell signaling into discrete microdomains, a process that often involves stable, cholesterol-rich platforms that facilitate protein-protein interactions. Polarized cells with distinct apical and basolateral cell processes rely on such compartmentalization to maintain proper function. In the cochlea, a variety of highly polarized sensory and non-sensory cells are responsible for the early stages of sound processing in the ear, yet little is kn...

  6. Polymer electrolyte membrane assembly for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Yavrouian, Andre (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An electrolyte membrane for use in a fuel cell can contain sulfonated polyphenylether sulfones. The membrane can contain a first sulfonated polyphenylether sulfone and a second sulfonated polyphenylether sulfone, wherein the first sulfonated polyphenylether and the second sulfonated polyphenylether sulfone have equivalent weights greater than about 560, and the first sulfonated polyphenylether and the second sulfonated polyphenylether sulfone also have different equivalent weights. Also, a membrane for use in a fuel cell can contain a sulfonated polyphenylether sulfone and an unsulfonated polyphenylether sulfone. Methods for manufacturing a membrane electrode assemblies for use in fuel cells can include roughening a membrane surface. Electrodes and methods for fabricating such electrodes for use in a chemical fuel cell can include sintering an electrode. Such membranes and electrodes can be assembled into chemical fuel cells.

  7. Intriguing bronchoalveolar lavage proteome in a case of pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ghafouri, Bijar; Persson, H Lennart; Tagesson, Christer

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is a rare interstitial lung disease associated with tobacco smoke exposure. New insights into its pathogenesis and how it differs from that of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may be provided by proteomic studies on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Case Report: We present the BALF proteome in a biopsy-proven case of PLCH and compare it with typical proteomes of COPD and of the healthy lung. The BALF proteins were separ...

  8. Proteome of leukaemic cells after cisplatin treatment - comparison of three independent analytical techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martinková, Jiřina; Skalníková, Helena; Hrabáková, Rita; Novák, Petr; Man, Petr; Pompach, Petr; Strohalm, Martin; Havlíček, Vladimír; Džubák, P.; Hajdúch, M.; Kovářová, Hana

    Budapest : Hungarian proteomic society, 2009, s. 56-56. ISBN 978-963-9319-99-8. [3rd Central and Eastern European Proteomics Conference. Budapešť (HU), 06.10.2009-09.10.2009] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Proteomics * Cis-platin * Leukaemic cells Subject RIV: FK - Gynaecology, Childbirth

  9. Characterization of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum cell wall proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longzhou; Free, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    We used a proteomic analysis to identify cell wall proteins released from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hyphal and sclerotial cell walls via a trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMS) digestion. Cell walls from hyphae grown in Vogel's glucose medium (a synthetic medium lacking plant materials), from hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth and from sclerotia produced on potato dextrose agar were used in the analysis. Under the conditions used, TFMS digests the glycosidic linkages in the cell walls to release intact cell wall proteins. The analysis identified 24 glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell wall proteins and 30 non-GPI-anchored cell wall proteins. We found that the cell walls contained an array of cell wall biosynthetic enzymes similar to those found in the cell walls of other fungi. When comparing the proteins in hyphal cell walls grown in potato dextrose broth with those in hyphal cell walls grown in the absence of plant material, it was found that a core group of cell wall biosynthetic proteins and some proteins associated with pathogenicity (secreted cellulases, pectin lyases, glucosidases and proteases) were expressed in both types of hyphae. The hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth contained a number of additional proteins (laccases, oxalate decarboxylase, peroxidase, polysaccharide deacetylase and several proteins unique to Sclerotinia and Botrytis) that might facilitate growth on a plant host. A comparison of the proteins in the sclerotial cell wall with the proteins in the hyphal cell wall demonstrated that sclerotia formation is not marked by a major shift in the composition of cell wall protein. We found that the S. sclerotiorum cell walls contained 11 cell wall proteins that were encoded only in Sclerotinia and Botrytis genomes. PMID:26661933

  10. Proteomic analysis of osteogenic differentiation of dental follicle precursor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsczeck, Christian; Petersen, Jørgen; Völlner, Florian;

    2009-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increased interest in unravelling the molecular mechanisms and cellular pathways controlling the differentiation and proliferation of human stem cell lines. Proteome analysis has proven to be an effective approach to comprehensive analysis of the regulatory network of...... after osteogenic differentiation. We also identified regulatory proteins, such as the transcription factors TP53 and Sp-1, associated with the differentiation process. Further studies will investigate the impact of identified regulatory proteins for cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in...... differentiation. In the present study we applied 2-DE combined with capillary-LC-MS/MS analysis to profile differentially regulated proteins upon differentiation of dental follicle precursor cells (DFPCs). Out of 115 differentially regulated proteins, glutamine synthetase, lysosomal proteinase cathepsin B...

  11. Development of a laser capture microscope-based single-cell-type proteomics tool for studying proteomes of individual cell layers of plant roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingde; Li, Hui; Bhatti, Sarabjit; Zhou, Suping; Yang, Yong; Fish, Tara; Thannhauser, Theodore W

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell-type proteomics provides the capability to revealing the genomic and proteomics information at cell-level resolution. However, the methodology for this type of research has not been well-developed. This paper reports developing a workflow of laser capture microdissection (LCM) followed by gel-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS)-based proteomics analysis for the identification of proteomes contained in individual cell layers of tomato roots. Thin-sections (~10-μm thick, 10 sections per root tip) were prepared for root tips of tomato germinating seedlings. Epidermal and cortical cells (5000–7000 cells per tissue type) were isolated under a LCM microscope. Proteins were isolated and then separated by SDS–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by in-gel-tryptic digestion. The MS and MS/MS spectra generated using nanoLC-MS/MS analysis of the tryptic peptides were searched against ITAG2.4 tomato protein database to identify proteins contained in each single-cell-type sample. Based on the biological functions, proteins with proven functions in root hair development were identified in epidermal cells but not in the cortical cells. Several of these proteins were found in Al-treated roots only. The results demonstrated that the cell-type-specific proteome is relevant for tissue-specific functions in tomato roots. Increasing the coverage of proteomes and reducing the inevitable cross-contamination from adjacent cell layers, in both vertical and cross directions when cells are isolated from slides prepared using intact root tips, are the major challenges using the technology in proteomics analysis of plant roots. PMID:27280026

  12. Comparative proteomic analysis of outer membrane vesicles from Shigella flexneri under different culture conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We utilized mTRAQ-based quantification to study protein changes in Congo red-induced OMVs. • A total of 148 proteins were identified in S. flexneri-derived OMVs. • Twenty-eight and five proteins are significantly up- and down-regulated in the CR-induced OMV, respectively. • The result implied that a special sorting mechanism of particular proteins into OMVs may exist. • Key node proteins in the protein interaction network might be important for pathogenicity. - Abstract: The production of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is a common and regulated process of gram-negative bacteria. Nonetheless, the processes of Shigella flexneri OMV production still remain unclear. S. flexneri is the causative agent of endemic shigellosis in developing countries. The Congo red binding of strains is associated with increased infectivity of S. flexneri. Therefore, understanding the modulation pattern of OMV protein expression induced by Congo red will help to elucidate the bacterial pathogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the proteomic composition of OMVs and the change in OMV protein expression induced by Congo red using mTRAQ-based quantitative comparative proteomics. mTRAQ labelling increased the confidence in protein identification, and 148 total proteins were identified in S. flexneri-derived OMVs. These include a variety of important virulence factors, including Ipa proteins, TolC family, murein hydrolases, and members of the serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) family. Among the identified proteins, 28 and five proteins are significantly up- and down-regulated in the Congo red-induced OMV, respectively. Additionally, by comprehensive comparison with previous studies focused on DH5a-derived OMV, we identified some key node proteins in the protein–protein interaction network that may be involved in OMV biogenesis and are common to all gram-negative bacteria

  13. Comparative proteomic analysis of outer membrane vesicles from Shigella flexneri under different culture conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yong; Liu, Liguo; Fu, Hua; Wei, Candong, E-mail: weicando@ipbcams.ac.cn; Jin, Qi, E-mail: zdsys@vip.sina.com

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • We utilized mTRAQ-based quantification to study protein changes in Congo red-induced OMVs. • A total of 148 proteins were identified in S. flexneri-derived OMVs. • Twenty-eight and five proteins are significantly up- and down-regulated in the CR-induced OMV, respectively. • The result implied that a special sorting mechanism of particular proteins into OMVs may exist. • Key node proteins in the protein interaction network might be important for pathogenicity. - Abstract: The production of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is a common and regulated process of gram-negative bacteria. Nonetheless, the processes of Shigella flexneri OMV production still remain unclear. S. flexneri is the causative agent of endemic shigellosis in developing countries. The Congo red binding of strains is associated with increased infectivity of S. flexneri. Therefore, understanding the modulation pattern of OMV protein expression induced by Congo red will help to elucidate the bacterial pathogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the proteomic composition of OMVs and the change in OMV protein expression induced by Congo red using mTRAQ-based quantitative comparative proteomics. mTRAQ labelling increased the confidence in protein identification, and 148 total proteins were identified in S. flexneri-derived OMVs. These include a variety of important virulence factors, including Ipa proteins, TolC family, murein hydrolases, and members of the serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) family. Among the identified proteins, 28 and five proteins are significantly up- and down-regulated in the Congo red-induced OMV, respectively. Additionally, by comprehensive comparison with previous studies focused on DH5a-derived OMV, we identified some key node proteins in the protein–protein interaction network that may be involved in OMV biogenesis and are common to all gram-negative bacteria.

  14. Iron overload in human hepatoma cells - proteomic analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrák, J.; Myslivcová, D.; Man, Petr; Babušiak, M.; Vyoral, D.

    Lednice, 2005, s. 38-38. [Czech Proteomic Conference /2./. Lednice (CZ), 17.10.2005-20.10.2005] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : iron * proteomic analysis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  15. Quantitative proteomic analysis of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) proteins in human and bovine colostrum and mature milk samples through iTRAQ labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mei; Cong, Min; Peng, Xiuming; Wu, Junrui; Wu, Rina; Liu, Biao; Ye, Wenhui; Yue, Xiqing

    2016-05-18

    Milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) proteins have many functions. To explore the different proteomics of human and bovine MFGM, MFGM proteins were separated from human and bovine colostrum and mature milk, and analyzed by the iTRAQ proteomic approach. A total of 411 proteins were recognized and quantified. Among these, 232 kinds of differentially expressed proteins were identified. These differentially expressed proteins were analyzed based on multivariate analysis, gene ontology (GO) annotation and KEGG pathway. Biological processes involved were response to stimulus, localization, establishment of localization, and the immune system process. Cellular components engaged were the extracellular space, extracellular region parts, cell fractions, and vesicles. Molecular functions touched upon were protein binding, nucleotide binding, and enzyme inhibitor activity. The KEGG pathway analysis showed several pathways, including regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, neurotrophin signaling pathway, leukocyte transendothelial migration, tight junction, complement and coagulation cascades, vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway, and adherens junction. These results enhance our understanding of different proteomes of human and bovine MFGM across different lactation phases, which could provide important information and potential directions for the infant milk powder and functional food industries. PMID:27159491

  16. Fuel cell and membrane therefore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aindow, Tai-Tsui

    2016-08-09

    A fuel cell includes first and second flow field plates, and an anode electrode and a cathode electrode between the flow field plates. A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) is arranged between the electrodes. At least one of the flow field plates influences, at least in part, an in-plane anisotropic physical condition of the PEM that varies in magnitude between a high value direction and a low value direction. The PEM has an in-plane physical property that varies in magnitude between a high value direction and a low value direction. The PEM is oriented with its high value direction substantially aligned with the high value direction of the flow field plate.

  17. Role of DHA in aging-related changes in mouse brain synaptic plasma membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Vishaldeep K; Huang, Bill X; Desai, Abhishek; Kevala, Karl; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2016-05-01

    Aging has been related to diminished cognitive function, which could be a result of ineffective synaptic function. We have previously shown that synaptic plasma membrane proteins supporting synaptic integrity and neurotransmission were downregulated in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-deprived brains, suggesting an important role of DHA in synaptic function. In this study, we demonstrate aging-induced synaptic proteome changes and DHA-dependent mitigation of such changes using mass spectrometry-based protein quantitation combined with western blot or messenger RNA analysis. We found significant reduction of 15 synaptic plasma membrane proteins in aging brains including fodrin-α, synaptopodin, postsynaptic density protein 95, synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B, synaptosomal-associated protein 25, synaptosomal-associated protein-α, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit epsilon-2 precursor, AMPA2, AP2, VGluT1, munc18-1, dynamin-1, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2, rab3A, and EAAT1, most of which are involved in synaptic transmission. Notably, the first 9 proteins were further reduced when brain DHA was depleted by diet, indicating that DHA plays an important role in sustaining these synaptic proteins downregulated during aging. Reduction of 2 of these proteins was reversed by raising the brain DHA level by supplementing aged animals with an omega-3 fatty acid sufficient diet for 2 months. The recognition memory compromised in DHA-depleted animals was also improved. Our results suggest a potential role of DHA in alleviating aging-associated cognitive decline by offsetting the loss of neurotransmission-regulating synaptic proteins involved in synaptic function. PMID:27103520

  18. Comparative proteomics of inner membrane fraction from carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii with a reference strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishvanath Tiwari

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii has been identified by the Infectious Diseases Society of America as one of the six pathogens that cause majority of hospital infections. Increased resistance of A.baumannii even to the latest generation of β-lactams like carbapenem is an immediate threat to mankind. As inner-membrane fraction plays a significant role in survival of A.baumannii, we investigated the inner-membrane fraction proteome of carbapenem-resistant strain of A.baumannii using Differential In-Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE followed by DeCyder, Progenesis and LC-MS/MS analysis. We identified 19 over-expressed and 4 down-regulated proteins (fold change>2, p<0.05 in resistant strain as compared to reference strain. Some of the upregulated proteins in resistant strain and their association with carbapenem resistance in A.baumannii are: i β-lactamases, AmpC and OXA-51: cleave and inactivate carbapenem ii metabolic enzymes, ATP synthase, malate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase: help in increased energy production for the survival and iii elongation factor Tu and ribosomal proteins: help in the overall protein production. Further, entry of carbapenem perhaps is limited by controlled production of OmpW and low levels of surface antigen help to evade host defence mechanism in developing resistance in A.baumannii. Present results support a model for the importance of proteins of inner-membrane fraction and their synergistic effect in the mediation of resistance of A.baumannii to carbapenem.

  19. Differential proteomics of the synovial membrane between bilateral and unilateral knee osteoarthritis in surgery‑induced rabbit models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weilin; He, Jian; Lin, Ruhui; Liang, Jie; Luo, Qinglu

    2016-09-01

    The present study investigated the differential proteomics of synovial membranes between bilateral and unilateral anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) in rabbits with knee osteoarthritis (KOA), in order to elucidate the pathological biomarkers of different degrees of KOA. A total of 6 New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into groups A and B (three rabbits per group). The two groups were subjected to bilateral and unilateral ACLT, respectively. A total of 6 weeks following surgery, proteins were extracted from the knee joint synovial membranes of KOA rabbits and were separated by two‑dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The differentially expressed proteins in the OA synovial membranes were selected for further analysis by linear ion trap‑Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Ten protein spots were identified to be different between the synovial membranes of the bilateral and unilateral KOA rabbits. Protein disulfide‑isomerase and creatine kinase M‑type were identified in the unilateral KOA rabbit synovial membranes. Serum albumin (three spots), lumican, α‑2‑HS‑glycoprotein and three uncharacterized proteins were identified in the synovial membranes of the bilateral KOA rabbits. The differential proteomic expression demonstrated the different biomarkers associated with bilateral and unilateral KOA, and indicated that spontaneous and secondary KOA require diverse methods of treatment; thus the underlying mechanism of KOA requires further investigation. PMID:27430254

  20. Live cell imaging of membrane / cytoskeleton interactions and membrane topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chierico, Luca; Joseph, Adrian S.; Lewis, Andrew L.; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    We elucidate the interaction between actin and specific membrane components, using real time live cell imaging, by delivering probes that enable access to components, that cannot be accessed genetically. We initially investigated the close interplay between Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and the F-actin network. We show that, during the early stage of cell adhesion, PIP2 forms domains within the filopodia membrane. We studied these domains alongside cell spreading and observed that these very closely follow the actin tread-milling. We show that this mechanism is associated with an active transport of PIP2 rich organelles from the cell perinuclear area to the edge, along actin fibers. Finally, mapping other phospholipids and membrane components we observed that the PIP2 domains formation is correlated with sphingosine and cholesterol rafts.

  1. Proteomic assessment of a cell model of spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Kelvin H

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion or mutation(s of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene causes spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, a neuromuscular disease characterized by spinal motor neuron death and muscle paralysis. Complete loss of the SMN protein is embryonically lethal, yet reduced levels of this protein result in selective death of motor neurons. Why motor neurons are specifically targeted by SMN deficiency remains to be determined. In this study, embryonic stem (ES cells derived from a severe SMA mouse model were differentiated into motor neurons in vitro by addition of retinoic acid and sonic hedgehog agonist. Proteomic and western blot analyses were used to probe protein expression alterations in this cell-culture model of SMA that could be relevant to the disease. Results When ES cells were primed with Noggin/fibroblast growth factors (bFGF and FGF-8 in a more robust neural differentiation medium for 2 days before differentiation induction, the efficiency of in vitro motor neuron differentiation was improved from ~25% to ~50%. The differentiated ES cells expressed a pan-neuronal marker (neurofilament and motor neuron markers (Hb9, Islet-1, and ChAT. Even though SMN-deficient ES cells had marked reduced levels of SMN (~20% of that in control ES cells, the morphology and differentiation efficiency for these cells are comparable to those for control samples. However, proteomics in conjunction with western blot analyses revealed 6 down-regulated and 14 up-regulated proteins with most of them involved in energy metabolism, cell stress-response, protein degradation, and cytoskeleton stability. Some of these activated cellular pathways showed specificity for either undifferentiated or differentiated cells. Increased p21 protein expression indicated that SMA ES cells were responding to cellular stress. Up-regulation of p21 was confirmed in spinal cord tissues from the same SMA mouse model from which the ES cells were derived. Conclusion SMN

  2. Membrane Organization and Dynamics in Cell Polarity

    OpenAIRE

    Orlando, Kelly; Guo, Wei

    2009-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of cell polarity is important to a wide range of biological processes ranging from chemotaxis to embryogenesis. An essential feature of cell polarity is the asymmetric organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane. In this article, we discuss how polarity regulators such as small GTP-binding proteins and phospholipids spatially and kinetically control vesicular trafficking and membrane organization. Conversely, we discuss how membrane trafficking...

  3. Comparative proteomic analysis on radioresistant nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discover radioresistance-associated proteins by performing comparative proteomic analysis on nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines. Methods: The total proteins were extracted from radioresistant human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line CNE-2R and its parental cell line CNE-2, respectively. These proteins were separated by high quality two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and then the 2-DE profiles were screened for differentially expressed protein spots by the Image Master 5.0 software. Those spots were identified by a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. Results: 32 significantly differentially expressed protein spots were screened in two different radiosensitivity cell lines and 11 proteins were identified by tandem mass spectrometry, among which 3 proteins were up-regulated in radioresistant human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line CNE-2R and the other 8 proteins were down-regulated. Conclusions: The differentially expressed proteins of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells with different radiosensitivity were mainly involved in apoptosis regulation, DNA damage and repair, cell cycle regulation, RNA transcription, cell signaling, cytoskeleton formation and radiation stress responses. (authors)

  4. Mass Spectrometry-based Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Human Pancreatic and Hepatic Stellate Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo, Joao A.; Kadiyala, Vivek; Banks, Peter A; Conwell, Darwin L; Steen, Hanno

    2013-01-01

    The functions of the liver and the pancreas differ; however, chronic inflammation in both organs is associated with fibrosis. Evidence suggests that fibrosis in both organs is partially regulated by organ-specific stellate cells. We explore the proteome of human hepatic stellate cells (hHSC) and human pancreatic stellate cells (hPaSC) using mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative proteomics to investigate pathophysiologic mechanisms. Proteins were isolated from whole cell lysates of immorta...

  5. Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics and N-terminal Analysis of Human Metastatic Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Min, Hophil; Han, Dohyun; Kim, Yikwon; Cho, Jee Yeon; Jin, Jonghwa; Kim, Youngsoo

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic analysis is helpful in identifying cancer-associated proteins that are differentially expressed and fragmented that can be annotated as dysregulated networks and pathways during metastasis. To examine meta-static process in lung cancer, we performed a proteomics study by label-free quantitative analysis and N-terminal analysis in 2 human non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines with disparate metastatic potentials—NCI-H1703 (primary cell, stage I) and NCI-H1755 (metastatic cell, stage ...

  6. Proteomic Analysis to Identify Tightly-Bound Cell Wall Protein in Rice Calli

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Won Kyong; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Kumar, Dhinesh; Rim, Yeonggil; Chen, Xiong Yan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Kim, Suwha; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Zee-Yong; Lucas, William J.; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2015-01-01

    Rice is a model plant widely used for basic and applied research programs. Plant cell wall proteins play key roles in a broad range of biological processes. However, presently, knowledge on the rice cell wall proteome is rudimentary in nature. In the present study, the tightly-bound cell wall proteome of rice callus cultured cells using sequential extraction protocols was developed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics methods, leading to the identification of 1568 candidate proteins. Ba...

  7. Does ATP cross the cell plasma membrane.

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudry, I. H.

    1982-01-01

    Although there is an abundance of evidence which indicates that ATP is released as well as taken up by cells, the concept that ATP cannot cross the cell membrane has tended to prevail. This article reviews the evidence for the release as well as uptake of ATP by cells. The evidence presented by various investigators clearly indicates that ATP can cross the cell membrane and suggests that the release and uptake of ATP are physiological processes.

  8. Functional dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Noritaka; Osawa, Masanori; Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Shunsuke; Stampoulis, Pavlos; Kofuku, Yutaka; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-04-01

    Cell surface receptors are integral membrane proteins that receive external stimuli, and transmit signals across plasma membranes. In the conventional view of receptor activation, ligand binding to the extracellular side of the receptor induces conformational changes, which convert the structure of the receptor into an active conformation. However, recent NMR studies of cell surface membrane proteins have revealed that their structures are more dynamic than previously envisioned, and they fluctuate between multiple conformations in an equilibrium on various timescales. In addition, NMR analyses, along with biochemical and cell biological experiments indicated that such dynamical properties are critical for the proper functions of the receptors. In this review, we will describe several NMR studies that revealed direct linkage between the structural dynamics and the functions of the cell surface membrane proteins, such as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, membrane transporters, and cell adhesion molecules.

  9. Identification of proteins enriched in rice egg or sperm cells by single-cell proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafumi Abiko

    Full Text Available In angiosperms, female gamete differentiation, fertilization, and subsequent zygotic development occur in embryo sacs deeply embedded in the ovaries. Despite their importance in plant reproduction and development, how the egg cell is specialized, fuses with the sperm cell, and converts into an active zygote for early embryogenesis remains unclear. This lack of knowledge is partly attributable to the difficulty of direct analyses of gametes in angiosperms. In the present study, proteins from egg and sperm cells obtained from rice flowers were separated by one-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and globally identified by highly sensitive liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectroscopy. Proteome analyses were also conducted for seedlings, callus, and pollen grains to compare their protein expression profiles to those of gametes. The proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000265. A total of 2,138 and 2,179 expressed proteins were detected in egg and sperm cells, respectively, and 102 and 77 proteins were identified as preferentially expressed in egg and sperm cells, respectively. Moreover, several rice or Arabidopsis lines with mutations in genes encoding the putative gamete-enriched proteins showed clear phenotypic defects in seed set or seed development. These results suggested that the proteomic data presented in this study are foundational information toward understanding the mechanisms of reproduction and early development in angiosperms.

  10. Proteomic analysis of plasma membrane proteins in wheat roots exposed to phenanthrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu; Du, Jiangxue; Yue, Le; Zhan, Xinhua

    2016-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are potentially carcinogenic and toxic to humans through ingestion of contaminated food crops. PAHs can enter crop roots through proton/PAH symporters; however, to date, the symporter remains unclear. Here we reveal, for the first time, the plasma membrane proteome of Triticum aestivum seedling roots in response to phenanthrene (a model PAH) exposure. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and protein database search engines were employed to analyze and identify phenanthrene-responsive proteins. Over 192 protein spots are reproducibly detected in each gel, while 8 spots are differentially expressed under phenanthrene treatment. Phenanthrene induces five up-regulated proteins distinguished as 5-methyltetrahydropteroyltriglutamate-homocysteine methyltransferase 2, enolase, heat shock protein 80-2, probable mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription subunit 37e (heat shock 70-kDa protein 1), and lactoylglutathione lyase. Three proteins identified as adenosine kinase 2, 4-hydroxy-7-methoxy-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-2-yl glucoside beta-D-glucosidase 1c, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 3 are down-regulated under exposure to phenanthrene. The up-regulated proteins are related to plant defense response, antioxidant system, and glycolysis. The down-regulated proteins involve the metabolism of high-energy compounds and plant growth. Magnesium, which is able to bind to enolase, can enhance the transport of phenanthrene into wheat roots. Therefore, it is concluded that phenanthrene can induce differential expression of proteins in relation to carbohydrate metabolism, self-defense, and plant growth on wheat root plasma membrane. This study not only provides novel insights into PAH uptake by plant roots and PAH stress responses, but is also a good starting point for further determination and analyses of their functions using genetic and other approaches. PMID:26897580

  11. Proteomic Studies of Cholangiocarcinoma and Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Secretomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantragan Srisomsap

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC occur with relatively high incidence in Thailand. The secretome, proteins secreted from cancer cells, are potentially useful as biomarkers of the diseases. Proteomic analysis was performed on the secreted proteins of cholangiocarcinoma (HuCCA-1 and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC-S102, HepG2, SK-Hep-1, and Alexander cell lines. The secretomes of the five cancer cell lines were analyzed by SDS-PAGE combined with LC/MS/MS. Sixty-eight proteins were found to be expressed only in HuCCA-1. Examples include neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (lipocalin 2, laminin 5 beta 3, cathepsin D precursor, desmoplakin, annexin IV variant, and annexin A5. Immunoblotting was used to confirm the presence of lipocalin 2 in conditioned media and cell lysate of 5 cell lines. The results showed that lipocalin 2 was a secreted protein which is expressed only in the conditioned media of the cholangiocarcinoma cell line. Study of lipocalin 2 expression in different types of cancer and normal tissues from cholangiocarcinoma patients showed that lipocalin 2 was expressed only in the cancer tissues. We suggest that lipocalin 2 may be a potential biomarker for cholangiocarcinoma.

  12. Mechanical tension drives cell membrane fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Ren, Yixin; Ng, Win Pin; Li, Shuo; Son, Sungmin; Kee, Yee-Seir; Zhang, Shiliang; Zhang, Guofeng; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Robinson, Douglas N.; Chen, Elizabeth H.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an energy-consuming process that requires tight juxtaposition of two lipid bilayers. Little is known about how cells overcome energy barriers to bring their membranes together for fusion. Previously, we have shown that cell-cell fusion is an asymmetric process in which an “attacking” cell drills finger-like protrusions into the “receiving” cell to promote cell fusion. Here we show that the receiving cell mounts a Myosin II (MyoII)-mediated mechanosensory response to its inv...

  13. Response of the cytoplasmic and membrane proteome of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 to pH changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poetsch Ansgar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background C. glutamicum has traditionally been grown in neutral-pH media for amino acid production, but in a previous article we reported that this microorganism is a moderate alkaliphile since it grows optimally at pH 7.0–9.0, as shown in fermentor studies under tightly controlled pH conditions. We determined the best pH values to study differential expression of several genes after acidic or basic pH conditions (pH 6.0 for acidic expression and pH 9.0 for alkaline expression. Thus, it was interesting to perform a detailed analysis of the pH-adaptation response of the proteome of C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 to clarify the circuits involved in stress responses in this bacterium. In this paper we used the above indicated pH conditions, based on transcriptional studies, to confirm that pH adaptation results in significant changes in cytoplasmatic and membrane proteins. Results The cytoplasmatic and membrane proteome of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 at different pH conditions (6.0, 7.0 and 9.0 was analyzed by classical 2D-electrophoresis, and by anion exchange chromatography followed by SDS-PAGE (AIEC/SDS-PAGE. A few cytoplasmatic proteins showed differential expression at the three pH values with the classical 2D-technique including a hypothetical protein cg2797, L-2.3-butanediol dehydrogenase (ButA, and catalase (KatA. The AIEC/SDS-PAGE technique revealed several membrane proteins that respond to pH changes, including the succinate dehydrogenase complex (SdhABCD, F0F1-ATP synthase complex subunits b, α and δ (AtpF, AtpH and AtpA, the nitrate reductase II α subunit (NarG, and a hypothetical secreted/membrane protein cg0752. Induction of the F0F1-ATP synthase complex β subunit (AtpD at pH 9.0 was evidenced by Western analysis. By contrast, L-2.3-butanediol dehydrogenase (ButA, an ATPase with chaperone activity, the ATP-binding subunit (ClpC of an ATP-dependent protease complex, a 7 TMHs hypothetical protein cg0896, a conserved

  14. Proteomic identification of protein targets for 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14-prostaglandin J2 in neuronal plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Yamamoto

    Full Text Available 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14-prostaglandin J(2 (15d-PGJ(2 is one of factors contributed to the neurotoxicity of amyloid β (Aβ, a causative protein of Alzheimer's disease. Type 2 receptor for prostaglandin D(2 (DP2 and peroxysome-proliferator activated receptorγ (PPARγ are identified as the membrane receptor and the nuclear receptor for 15d-PGJ(2, respectively. Previously, we reported that the cytotoxicity of 15d-PGJ(2 was independent of DP2 and PPARγ, and suggested that 15d-PGJ(2 induced apoptosis through the novel specific binding sites of 15d-PGJ(2 different from DP2 and PPARγ. To relate the cytotoxicity of 15d-PGJ(2 to amyloidoses, we performed binding assay [(3H]15d-PGJ(2 and specified targets for 15d-PGJ(2 associated with cytotoxicity. In the various cell lines, there was a close correlation between the susceptibilities to 15d-PGJ(2 and fibrillar Aβ. Specific binding sites of [(3H]15d-PGJ(2 were detected in rat cortical neurons and human bronchial smooth muscle cells. When the binding assay was performed in subcellular fractions of neurons, the specific binding sites of [(3H]15d-PGJ(2 were detected in plasma membrane, nuclear and cytosol, but not in microsome. A proteomic approach was used to identify protein targets for 15d-PGJ(2 in the plasma membrane. By using biotinylated 15d-PGJ(2, eleven proteins were identified as biotin-positive spots and classified into three different functional proteins: glycolytic enzymes (Enolase2, pyruvate kinase M1 (PKM1 and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, molecular chaperones (heat shock protein 8 and T-complex protein 1 subunit α, cytoskeletal proteins (Actin β, F-actin-capping protein, Tubulin β and Internexin α. GAPDH, PKM1 and Tubulin β are Aβ-interacting proteins. Thus, the present study suggested that 15d-PGJ(2 plays an important role in amyloidoses not only in the central nervous system but also in the peripheral tissues.

  15. Optimization of human dendritic cell sample preparation for mass spectrometry-based proteomics studies

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ying; Bottinelli, Dario; Lisacek, Frédérique; Luban, Jeremy; De Castillia, Caterina Strambio; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized leukocytes that orchestrate the adaptive immune response. Mass spectrometry based proteomic study of these cells presents technical challenges, especially when the DCs are human in origin due to the paucity of available biological material. Here, to maximize mass spectrometry coverage of the global human DC proteome, different cell disruption methods, lysis conditions, protein precipitation, and protein pellet solubilisation and denaturation methods were ...

  16. Proteomic analysis of exosomes secreted by human mesothelioma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P.J.J. Hegmans (Joost); A. Hemmes (Annabrita); T.M. Luider (Theo); M.J. Kleijmeer (Monique); J-B. Prins (Jan-Bas); L. Zitvogel; S.A. Burgers (Sjaak); H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart); M.P.L. Bard (Martin)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractExosomes are small membrane vesicles secreted into the extracellular compartment by exocytosis. Tumor exosomes may be involved in the sampling of antigens to antigen presenting cells or as decoys allowing the tumor to escape immune-directed destruction. The proteins pre

  17. Specialized membrane biogenesis in mammary epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The apical membrane of the mammary gland epithelial cell is highly differentiated and adapted to participate in the process of fat secretion. Certain of the apical membrane differentiation antigens are frequently expressed on membrane carcinoma cells, and knowledge of the normal mechanisms by which these antigens are regulated may have implications for a better understanding of tumor antigen expression. Because the apical membrane of the cell is lost during secretion, active membrane biosynthesis must accompany fat secretion, and the cell represents a good model for studying membrane biogenesis in polarized epithelial cells. Experiments have been carried out using primary cultures of cells established from mammary glands of late pregnant mice and also a mouse cell line, COMMA-1-D, that differentiates in an appropriate milieu. When fat globule membranes are purified from mouse milk and the protein composition analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, four major proteins are identifiable with molecular weights of 55, 67, 90, and 150 kDa. The 67-kDa component was identified as butyrophilin and the 150-kDa one as xanthine oxidase. In addition, a high molecular weight carbohydrate rich glycoprotein, PAS-O, is also present. 3 refs., 3 figs

  18. Resistance of cell membranes to different detergents

    OpenAIRE

    Schuck, Sebastian; Honsho, Masanori; Ekroos, Kim; Shevchenko, Andrej; Simons, Kai

    2003-01-01

    Partial resistance of cell membranes to solubilization with mild detergents and the analysis of isolated detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) have been used operationally to define membrane domains. Given the multitude of detergents used for this purpose, we sought to investigate whether extraction with different detergents might reflect the same underlying principle of domain formation. We therefore compared the protein and lipid content of DRMs prepared with a variety of detergents from two...

  19. Nuclear myosin I regulates cell membrane tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venit, Tomáš; Kalendová, Alžběta; Petr, Martin; Dzijak, Rastislav; Pastorek, Lukáš; Rohožková, Jana; Malohlava, Jakub; Hozák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane tension is an important feature that determines the cell shape and influences processes such as cell motility, spreading, endocytosis and exocytosis. Unconventional class 1 myosins are potent regulators of plasma membrane tension because they physically link the plasma membrane with adjacent cytoskeleton. We identified nuclear myosin 1 (NM1) - a putative nuclear isoform of myosin 1c (Myo1c) - as a new player in the field. Although having specific nuclear functions, NM1 localizes predominantly to the plasma membrane. Deletion of NM1 causes more than a 50% increase in the elasticity of the plasma membrane around the actin cytoskeleton as measured by atomic force microscopy. This higher elasticity of NM1 knock-out cells leads to 25% higher resistance to short-term hypotonic environment and rapid cell swelling. In contrast, overexpression of NM1 in wild type cells leads to an additional 30% reduction of their survival. We have shown that NM1 has a direct functional role in the cytoplasm as a dynamic linker between the cell membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton, regulating the degree of effective plasma membrane tension. PMID:27480647

  20. Proteomic study of cancer cells response to anthracycline anticancer treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tylečková, Jiřina; Hrabáková, Rita; Mairychová, Kateřina; Halada, Petr; Radová, L.; Džubák, P.; Hajduch, M.; Kovářová, Hana

    Berlin : Freie Universität Berlin, 2011. s. 225-225. [Proteomic Forum 2011. 3.4.2011-7.4.2011, Berlin] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017; GA MŠk MSM6198959216 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : anticancer research * anthracycline * proteomics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry http://www.proteomic-forum.de/images/stories/pics/proteomic%20forum%202011%20-%20abstract%20book.pdf

  1. Diffuse Charge Effects in Fuel Cell Membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Franco, A.A.; Bazant, M.Z.

    2009-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that electrolyte membranes in fuel cells are electrically neutral, except in unsteady situations, when the double-layer capacitance is heuristically included in equivalent circuit calculations. Indeed, the standard model for electron transfer kinetics at the membrane/electrode

  2. Proton conducting membrane for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Daniel G.; Krumpelt, Michael; Myers, Deborah J.; Kopasz, John P.

    2007-03-27

    An ion conducting membrane comprising dendrimeric polymers covalently linked into a network structure. The dendrimeric polymers have acid functional terminal groups and may be covalently linked via linking compounds, cross-coupling reactions, or copolymerization reactions. The ion conducting membranes may be produced by various methods and used in fuel cells.

  3. Multiplexed immunofluorescence delineates proteomic cancer cell states associated with metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Anup; Miller, Alexandra M.; Brogi, Edi; Sui, Yunxia; Armenia, Joshua; McDonough, Elizabeth; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Carlin, Sean; Stamper, Aleksandra; Campos, Carl; Pang, Zhengyu; Li, Qing; Port, Elisa; Graeber, Thomas G.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Ginty, Fiona; Larson, Steven M.; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.

    2016-01-01

    The phenotypic diversity of cancer results from genetic and nongenetic factors. Most studies of cancer heterogeneity have focused on DNA alterations, as technologies for proteomic measurements in clinical specimen are currently less advanced. Here, we used a multiplexed immunofluorescence staining platform to measure the expression of 27 proteins at the single-cell level in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples from treatment-naive stage II/III human breast cancer. Unsupervised clustering of protein expression data from 638,577 tumor cells in 26 breast cancers identified 8 clusters of protein coexpression. In about one-third of breast cancers, over 95% of all neoplastic cells expressed a single protein coexpression cluster. The remaining tumors harbored tumor cells representing multiple protein coexpression clusters, either in a regional distribution or intermingled throughout the tumor. Tumor uptake of the radiotracer 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose was associated with protein expression clusters characterized by hormone receptor loss, PTEN alteration, and HER2 gene amplification. Our study demonstrates an approach to generate cellular heterogeneity metrics in routinely collected solid tumor specimens and integrate them with in vivo cancer phenotypes. PMID:27182557

  4. Optimized method for identification of the proteomes secreted by cardiac cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šťastná, Miroslava; Van Eyk, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1005, č. 1005 (2013), s. 225-235. ISSN 1940-6029 Institutional support : RVO:68081715 Keywords : cardiac cells * secreted proteins * proteomic technology Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  5. Membrane elastic properties and cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Pontes

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that the cell membrane, interacting with its attached cytoskeleton, is an important regulator of cell function, exerting and responding to forces. We investigate this relationship by looking for connections between cell membrane elastic properties, especially surface tension and bending modulus, and cell function. Those properties are measured by pulling tethers from the cell membrane with optical tweezers. Their values are determined for all major cell types of the central nervous system, as well as for macrophage. Astrocytes and glioblastoma cells, which are considerably more dynamic than neurons, have substantially larger surface tensions. Resting microglia, which continually scan their environment through motility and protrusions, have the highest elastic constants, with values similar to those for resting macrophage. For both microglia and macrophage, we find a sharp softening of bending modulus between their resting and activated forms, which is very advantageous for their acquisition of phagocytic functions upon activation. We also determine the elastic constants of pure cell membrane, with no attached cytoskeleton. For all cell types, the presence of F-actin within tethers, contrary to conventional wisdom, is confirmed. Our findings suggest the existence of a close connection between membrane elastic constants and cell function.

  6. Cell wall proteomics of the green alga Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Bing; Hu, Qiang; Sommerfeld, Milton; Chen, Feng

    2004-03-01

    The green microalga Haematococcus pluvialis can synthesize and accumulate large amounts of the ketocarotenoid astaxanthin, and undergo profound changes in cell wall composition and architecture during the cell cycle and in response to environmental stresses. In this study, cell wall proteins (CWPs) of H. pluvialis were systematically analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) coupled with peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) and sequence-database analysis. In total, 163 protein bands were analyzed, which resulted in positive identification of 81 protein orthologues. The highly complex and dynamic composition of CWPs is manifested by the fact that the majority of identified CWPs are differentially expressed at specific stages of the cell cycle along with a number of common wall-associated 'housekeeping' proteins. The detection of cellulose synthase orthologue in the vegetative cells suggested that the biosynthesis of cellulose occurred during primary wall formation, in contrast to earlier observations that cellulose was exclusively present in the secondary wall of the organism. A transient accumulation of a putative cytokinin oxidase at the early stage of encystment pointed to a possible role in cytokinin degradation while facilitating secondary wall formation and/or assisting in cell expansion. This work represents the first attempt to use a proteomic approach to investigate CWPs of microalgae. The reference protein map constructed and the specific protein markers obtained from this study provide a framework for future characterization of the expression and physiological functions of the proteins involved in the biogenesis and modifications in the cell wall of Haematococcus and related organisms. PMID:14997492

  7. Advanced membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Seung; Pivovar, Bryan S

    2014-02-25

    A method of preparing advanced membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) for use in fuel cells. A base polymer is selected for a base membrane. An electrode composition is selected to optimize properties exhibited by the membrane electrode assembly based on the selection of the base polymer. A property-tuning coating layer composition is selected based on compatibility with the base polymer and the electrode composition. A solvent is selected based on the interaction of the solvent with the base polymer and the property-tuning coating layer composition. The MEA is assembled by preparing the base membrane and then applying the property-tuning coating layer to form a composite membrane. Finally, a catalyst is applied to the composite membrane.

  8. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xia [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The Fifth People' s Hospital of Shanghai, School of Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Zhao, Libo [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The Third People' s Hospital of Chongqing, 400014 (China); Yang, Yongtao [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Bode, Liv [Bornavirus Research Group affiliated to the Free University of Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Huang, Hua [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Liu, Chengyu [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Huang, Rongzhong [Department of Rehabilitative Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400010 (China); Zhang, Liang [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); and others

    2014-09-15

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Methods: Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Results: Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. Conclusions: BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. - Highlights: • A human strain of BDV (BDV Hu-H1) was used to infect human oligodendroglial cells (OL cells). • This study is the first to reveal the host proteomic and histone Kac profiles in BDV-infected OL cells. • BDV infection affected the expression of many transcription factors and several HATs and HDACs.

  9. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Methods: Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Results: Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. Conclusions: BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. - Highlights: • A human strain of BDV (BDV Hu-H1) was used to infect human oligodendroglial cells (OL cells). • This study is the first to reveal the host proteomic and histone Kac profiles in BDV-infected OL cells. • BDV infection affected the expression of many transcription factors and several HATs and HDACs

  10. Comprehensive transcriptomic and proteomic characterization of human mesenchymal stem cells reveals source specific cellular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billing, Anja M; Ben Hamidane, Hisham; Dib, Shaima S; Cotton, Richard J; Bhagwat, Aditya M; Kumar, Pankaj; Hayat, Shahina; Yousri, Noha A; Goswami, Neha; Suhre, Karsten; Rafii, Arash; Graumann, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are multipotent cells with great potential in therapy, reflected by more than 500 MSC-based clinical trials registered with the NIH. MSC are derived from multiple tissues but require invasive harvesting and imply donor-to-donor variability. Embryonic stem cell-derived MSC (ESC-MSC) may provide an alternative, but how similar they are to ex vivo MSC is unknown. Here we performed an in depth characterization of human ESC-MSC, comparing them to human bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) as well as human embryonic stem cells (hESC) by transcriptomics (RNA-seq) and quantitative proteomics (nanoLC-MS/MS using SILAC). Data integration highlighted and validated a central role of vesicle-mediated transport and exosomes in MSC biology and also demonstrated, through enrichment analysis, their versatility and broad application potential. Particular emphasis was placed on comparing profiles between ESC-MSC and BM-MSC and assessing their equivalency. Data presented here shows that differences between ESC-MSC and BM-MSC are similar in magnitude to those reported for MSC of different origin and the former may thus represent an alternative source for therapeutic applications. Finally, we report an unprecedented coverage of MSC CD markers, as well as membrane associated proteins which may benefit immunofluorescence-based applications and contribute to a refined molecular description of MSC. PMID:26857143

  11. Proteomic analysis of the effect of iptakalim on human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingxia YANG; Zhengxia LIU; Shu ZHANG; Yu JING; Shijiang ZHANG; Weiping XIE; Lei MA; Changliang ZHU; Hong WANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the anti-proliferative effect of iptakalim (Ipt),a newly selective KATP channel opener,in endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) using proteomic analysis.Methods: Human PASMCs were incubated with ET-1 (10-8 mol/L) and ETA (10-8 mol/L) plus iptaklim (10-5 mol/L) for 24 h.Analysis via 2-DE gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS was employed to display the different protein profiles of whole-cell protein from cultures of control,ET-1 treatment alone,and treatment with ET-1 and iptaklim combined.Real time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were used to confirm the proteomic analysis.Results: When iptakalim inhibited the proliferative effect of ET-1 in human PASMCs by opening the KATP channels,the expression of different groups of cellular proteins was changed,including cytoskeleton-associated proteins,plasma mem-brane proteins and receptors,chaperone proteins,ion transport-associated proteins,and glycolytic and metabolism-associ-ated proteins.We found that iptakalim could inhibit the proliferation of human PASMCs partly by affecting the expression of Hsp60,vimentin,nucleoporin P54 (NUP54) and Bcl-XL by opening the KATP channel.Conclusion: The data suggest that a wide range of signaling pathways may be involved in abolishing ET-1-induced prolif-eration of human PASMCs following iptakalim treatment.

  12. Characterization of the Outer Membrane Proteome of Leptospira interrogans Expressed during Acute Lethal Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nally, Jarlath E.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Bassilian, Sara; Blanco, David R.; Lovett, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira species adapt to a wide range of environmental conditions during disease transmission and infection. While the proteome of in vitro cultivated Leptospira has been characterized in several studies to date, relatively little is known of the proteome as expressed by Leptospira during disease processes. Isolates of Leptospira obtained from patients suffering the severe pulmonary form of leptospirosis cause acute lethal infection in guinea pigs and chronic asymptomatic infect...

  13. The proteomic dataset for bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stromal cells: Effect of in vitro passaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel T. Mindaye

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs have been in clinical trials for therapy. One major bottleneck in the advancement of BMSC-based products is the challenge associated with cell isolation, characterization, and ensuring cell fitness over the course of in vitro cell propagation steps. The data in this report is part of publications that explored the proteomic changes following in vitro passaging of BMSCs [4] and the molecular heterogeneity in cultures obtained from different human donors [5,6].The methodological details involving cell manufacturing, proteome harvesting, protein identification and quantification as well as the bioinformatic analyses were described to ensure reproducibility of the results.

  14. In situ Proteomic Profiling of Curcumin Targets in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Jianbin; Zhang, Chong-Jing; Wong, Yin Kwan; Lim, Teck Kwang; Hua, Zi-Chun; Liu, Bin; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Shen, Han-Ming; Lin, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    To date, the exact targets and mechanism of action of curcumin, a natural product with anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties, remain elusive. Here we synthesized a cell permeable curcumin probe (Cur-P) with an alkyne moiety, which can be tagged with biotin for affinity enrichment, or with a fluorescent dye for visualization of the direct-binding protein targets of curcumin in situ. iTRAQ(TM) quantitative proteomics approach was applied to distinguish the specific binding targets from the non-specific ones. In total, 197 proteins were confidently identified as curcumin binding targets from HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Gene Ontology analysis showed that the targets are broadly distributed and enriched in the nucleus, mitochondria and plasma membrane, and they are involved in various biological functions including metabolic process, regulation, response to stimulus and cellular process. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis(TM) (IPA) suggested that curcumin may exert its anticancer effects over multiple critical biological pathways including the EIF2, eIF4/p70S6K, mTOR signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction pathways. Functional validations confirmed that curcumin downregulates cellular protein synthesis, and induces autophagy, lysosomal activation and increased ROS production, thus leading to cell death. PMID:26915414

  15. Quantitative proteome changes in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells in response to plant natriuretic peptides

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2015-06-30

    Proteome changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to the A. thaliana plant natriuretic peptide (PNP), AtPNP-A (At2g18660) were assessed using quantitative proteomics employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). In this study, we characterized temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM AtPNP-A at 0, 10 and 30 min post-treatment. Both concentrations we found to yield a distinct differential proteome signature. The data shown in this article are associated with the article “Plant natriuretic peptides induce a specific set of proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to abiotic stress” by Turek et al. (Front. Plant Sci. 5 (2014) 661) and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001386.

  16. Quantitative proteome changes in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells in response to plant natriuretic peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona Turek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteome changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to the A. thaliana plant natriuretic peptide (PNP, AtPNP-A (At2g18660 were assessed using quantitative proteomics employing tandem mass tag (TMT labeling and tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS. In this study, we characterized temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM AtPNP-A at 0, 10 and 30 min post-treatment. Both concentrations we found to yield a distinct differential proteome signature. The data shown in this article are associated with the article “Plant natriuretic peptides induce a specific set of proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to abiotic stress” by Turek et al. (Front. Plant Sci. 5 (2014 661 and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001386.

  17. Cell membrane softening in human breast and cervical cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Händel, Chris; Schmidt, B. U. Sebastian; Schiller, Jürgen; Dietrich, Undine; Möhn, Till; Kießling, Tobias R.; Pawlizak, Steve; Fritsch, Anatol W.; Horn, Lars-Christian; Briest, Susanne; Höckel, Michael; Zink, Mareike; Käs, Josef A.

    2015-08-01

    Biomechanical properties are key to many cellular functions such as cell division and cell motility and thus are crucial in the development and understanding of several diseases, for instance cancer. The mechanics of the cellular cytoskeleton have been extensively characterized in cells and artificial systems. The rigidity of the plasma membrane, with the exception of red blood cells, is unknown and membrane rigidity measurements only exist for vesicles composed of a few synthetic lipids. In this study, thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells, as well as breast cell lines, are analyzed. Cell blebs or GPMVs were studied via thermal membrane fluctuations and mass spectrometry. It will be shown that cancer cell membranes are significantly softer than their non-malignant counterparts. This can be attributed to a loss of fluid raft forming lipids in malignant cells. These results indicate that the reduction of membrane rigidity promotes aggressive blebbing motion in invasive cancer cells.

  18. Proteomic differences in recombinant CHO cells producing two similar antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommeregger, Wolfgang; Mayrhofer, Patrick; Steinfellner, Willibald; Reinhart, David; Henry, Michael; Clynes, Martin; Meleady, Paula; Kunert, Renate

    2016-09-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most commonly used mammalian hosts for the production of biopharmaceuticals. To overcome unfavorable features of CHO cells, a lot of effort is put into cell engineering to improve phenotype. "Omics" studies investigating elevated growth rate and specific productivities as well as extracellular stimulus have already revealed many interesting engineering targets. However, it remains largely unknown how physicochemical properties of the recombinant product itself influence the host cell. In this study, we used quantitative label-free LC-MS proteomic analyses to investigate product-specific proteome differences in CHO cells producing two similar antibody fragments. We established recombinant CHO cells producing the two antibodies, 3D6 and 2F5, both as single-chain Fv-Fc homodimeric antibody fragments (scFv-Fc). We applied three different vector strategies for transgene delivery (i.e., plasmid, bacterial artificial chromosome, recombinase-mediated cassette exchange), selected two best performing clones from transgene variants and transgene delivery methods and investigated three consecutively passaged cell samples by label-free proteomic analysis. LC-MS-MS profiles were compared in several sample combinations to gain insights into different aspects of proteomic changes caused by overexpression of two different heterologous proteins. This study suggests that not only the levels of specific product secretion but the product itself has a large impact on the proteome of the cell. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1902-1912. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26913574

  19. Metric dynamics for membrane transformation through regulated cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Hiroshi C.

    2016-01-01

    This study develops an equation for describing three-dimensional membrane transformation through proliferation of its component cells regulated by morphogen density distributions on the membrane. The equation is developed in a two-dimensional coordinate system mapped on the membrane, referred to as the membrane coordinates. When the membrane expands, the membrane coordinates expand in the same manner so that the membrane is invariant in the coordinates. In the membrane coordinate system, the ...

  20. Proteomics of Neural Stem Cell Differentiation: from Animal Model to Human

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mairychová, Kateřina; Skalníková, Helena; Tylečková, Jiřina; Halada, Petr; Marsala, M.; Kovářová, Hana

    Berlin : Freie Universität Berlin, 2011. s. 211-211. [Proteomic Forum 2011. 03.04.2011-07.04.2011, Berlin] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10044 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : stem cell s * differentiation * proteomics Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  1. Photothermal nanoblade for patterned cell membrane cutting

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Teslaa, Tara; Teitell, Michael A.; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2010-01-01

    We report a photothermal nanoblade that utilizes a metallic nanostructure to harvest short laser pulse energy and convert it into a highly localized and specifically shaped explosive vapor bubble. Rapid bubble expansion and collapse punctures a lightly-contacting cell membrane via high-speed fluidic flows and induced transient shear stress. The membrane cutting pattern is controlled by the metallic nanostructure configuration, laser pulse polarization, and energy. Highly controllable, sub-mic...

  2. Proteomics of loosely bound cell wall proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures: a critical analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Borderies, Gisèle; Jamet, Elisabeth; Lafitte, Claude; Rossignol, Michel; Jauneau, Alain; Boudart, Georges; Monsarrat, Bernard; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Boudet, Alain; Pont-Lezica, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    The complete sequencing of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome allows the use of the recently developed mass spectrometry techniques to identify the cell wall proteins (CWPs). Most proteomic approaches depend on the quality of sample preparation. Extraction of CWPs is particularly complex since the proteins may be free in the apoplast or are embedded in a polysaccharide matrix where they are retained by Van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic or ionic interactions, or cross-linked...

  3. Proteome analysis. Novel proteins identified at the peribacteroid membrane from ¤Lotus japonicus¤ root nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wienkoop, S.; Saalbach, G.

    2003-01-01

    The peribacteroid membrane (PBM) forms the structural and functional interface between the legume plant and the rhizobia. The model legume Lotus japonicus was chosen to study the proteins present at the PBM by proteome analysis. PBM was purified from root nodules by an aqueous polymer two......-phase system. Extracted proteins were subjected to a global trypsin digest. The peptides were separated by nanoscale liquid chromatography and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Searching the nonredundant protein database and the green plant expressed sequence tag database using the tandem mass spectrometry...... data identified approximately 94 proteins, a number far exceeding the number of proteins reported for the PBM hitherto. In particular, a number of membrane proteins like transporters for sugars and sulfate; endomembrane-associated proteins such as GTP-binding proteins and vesicle receptors; and...

  4. Electrically Conductive, Hydrophilic Porous Membrane for Fuel Cell Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I effort seeks to produce a conductive polyethersulfone (PES) microporous membrane for fuel cell water management applications. This membrane will...

  5. Proteomics characterization of cytoplasmic and lipid-associated membrane proteins of human pathogen Mycoplasma fermentans M64.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chang Liu

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma fermentans is a potent human pathogen which has been implicated in several diseases. Notably, its lipid-associated membrane proteins (LAMPs play a role in immunomodulation and development of infection-associated inflammatory diseases. However, the systematic protein identification of pathogenic M. fermentans has not been reported. From our recent sequencing results of M. fermentans M64 isolated from human respiratory tract, its genome is around 1.1 Mb and encodes 1050 predicted protein-coding genes. In the present study, soluble proteome of M. fermentans was resolved and analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In addition, Triton X-114 extraction was carried out to enrich amphiphilic proteins including putative lipoproteins and membrane proteins. Subsequent mass spectrometric analyses of these proteins had identified a total of 181 M. fermentans ORFs. Further bioinformatics analysis of these ORFs encoding proteins with known or so far unknown orthologues among bacteria revealed that a total of 131 proteins are homologous to known proteins, 11 proteins are conserved hypothetical proteins, and the remaining 39 proteins are likely M. fermentans-specific proteins. Moreover, Triton X-114-enriched fraction was shown to activate NF-kB activity of raw264.7 macrophage and a total of 21 lipoproteins with predicted signal peptide were identified therefrom. Together, our work provides the first proteome reference map of M. fermentans as well as several putative virulence-associated proteins as diagnostic markers or vaccine candidates for further functional study of this human pathogen.

  6. Alternate Fuel Cell Membranes for Energy Independence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storey, Robson, F.; Mauritz, Kenneth, A.; Patton, Derek, L.; Savin, Daniel, A.

    2012-12-18

    The overall objective of this project was the development and evaluation of novel hydrocarbon fuel cell (FC) membranes that possess high temperature performance and long term chemical/mechanical durability in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells (FC). The major research theme was synthesis of aromatic hydrocarbon polymers of the poly(arylene ether sulfone) (PAES) type containing sulfonic acid groups tethered to the backbone via perfluorinated alkylene linkages and in some cases also directly attached to the phenylene groups along the backbone. Other research themes were the use of nitrogen-based heterocyclics instead of acid groups for proton conduction, which provides high temperature, low relative humidity membranes with high mechanical/thermal/chemical stability and pendant moieties that exhibit high proton conductivities in the absence of water, and synthesis of block copolymers consisting of a proton conducting block coupled to poly(perfluorinated propylene oxide) (PFPO) blocks. Accomplishments of the project were as follows: 1) establishment of a vertically integrated program of synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of FC membranes, 2) establishment of benchmark membrane performance data based on Nafion for comparison to experimental membrane performance, 3) development of a new perfluoroalkyl sulfonate monomer, N,N-diisopropylethylammonium 2,2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl) pentafluoropropanesulfonate (HPPS), 4) synthesis of random and block copolymer membranes from HPPS, 5) synthesis of block copolymer membranes containing high-acid-concentration hydrophilic blocks consisting of HPPS and 3,3'-disulfonate-4,4'-dichlorodiphenylsulfone (sDCDPS), 6) development of synthetic routes to aromatic polymer backbones containing pendent 1H-1,2,3-triazole moieties, 7) development of coupling strategies to create phase-separated block copolymers between hydrophilic sulfonated prepolymers and commodity polymers such as PFPO, 8) establishment of basic

  7. Functional Proteomics Screen Enables Enrichment of Distinct Cell Types from Human Pancreatic Islets

    OpenAIRE

    Revital Sharivkin; Walker, Michael D.; Yoav Soen

    2015-01-01

    The current world-wide epidemic of diabetes has prompted attempts to generate new sources of insulin-producing cells for cell replacement therapy. An inherent challenge in many of these strategies is the lack of cell-surface markers permitting isolation and characterization of specific cell types from differentiating stem cell populations. Here we introduce an iterative proteomics procedure allowing tag-free isolation of cell types based on their function. Our method detects and associates sp...

  8. Resting microglial cells exhibit tubular membrane protrusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Gimsa

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Nano- and microtubular structures have recently become a subject of increasing interest due to their importance in biology and medicine as well as their technological potential. Such structures have been observed in anorganic (Iijima, 1991 as well as in organic (Schnur 1993; Oda et al. 1991 systems. Micro- and nanotubular protrusions of bilayer membranes have been found in cells (Kralj-Iglic et al. 1998; Kralj-Iglic et al. 2001a and phospholipid vesicles (Kralj-Iglic et al. 2002; Kralj-Iglic et al. 2001b. In this work we describe membrane protrusions in microglial cells.

  9. Proteome alteration induced by hTERT transfection of human fibroblast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riou Jean-François

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telomerase confers cellular immortality by elongating telomeres, thereby circumventing the Hayflick limit. Extended-life-span cells have been generated by transfection with the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene. hTERT transfected cell lines may be of outstanding interest to monitor the effect of drugs targeting the telomerase activity. The incidence of hTERT gene transfection at the proteome level is a prerequisite to that purpose. The effect of the transfection has been studied on the proteome of human fibroblast (WI38. Cytosolic and nuclear fractions of WI38 cells, empty vector transfected WI38 (WI38-HPV and hTERT WI38 cells were submitted to a 2D-DIGE (Two-Dimensional Differential In-Gel Electrophoresis analysis. Only spots that had a similar abundance in WI38 and WI38-HPV, but were differentially expressed in WI38 hTERT were selected for MS identification. This method directly points to the proteins linked with the hTERT expression. Number of false positive differentially expressed proteins has been excluded by using control WI38-HPV cells. The proteome alteration induced by hTERT WI38 transfection should be taken into account in subsequent use of the cell line for anti-telomerase drugs evaluation. Results 2D-DIGE experiment shows that 57 spots out of 2246 are significantly differentially expressed in the cytosolic fraction due to hTERT transfection, and 38 were confidently identified. In the nuclear fraction, 44 spots out of 2172 were selected in the differential proteome analysis, and 14 were identified. The results show that, in addition to elongating telomeres, hTERT gene transfection has other physiological roles, among which an enhanced ER capacity and a potent cell protection against apoptosis. Conclusion We show that the methodology reduces the complexity of the proteome analysis and highlights proteins implicated in other processes than telomere elongation. hTERT induced proteome changes suggest

  10. Membrane lipidome of an epithelial cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sampaio, Julio L; Gerl, Mathias J; Klose, Christian;

    2011-01-01

    Tissue differentiation is an important process that involves major cellular membrane remodeling. We used Madin-Darby canine kidney cells as a model for epithelium formation and investigated the remodeling of the total cell membrane lipidome during the transition from a nonpolarized morphology to an...... epithelial morphology and vice versa. To achieve this, we developed a shotgun-based lipidomics workflow that enabled the absolute quantification of mammalian membrane lipidomes with minimal sample processing from low sample amounts. Epithelial morphogenesis was accompanied by a major shift from sphingomyelin...... to glycosphingolipid, together with an increase in plasmalogen, phosphatidylethanolamine, and cholesterol content, whereas the opposite changes took place during an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Moreover, during polarization, the sphingolipids became longer, more saturated, and more...

  11. Lithium. Effects on excitable cell membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeger, Egbert Johan

    1974-01-01

    LITHIUM: Effects on excitable cell membranes. Lithium salts have been used in the treatment of manic-depressive psychosis for many years but their mechanism of action is not well understood. Many workers assume that the action of lithium on catecholamine metabolism and/or on electrolyte distribution

  12. Proteomic Profiling of Ex Vivo Expanded CD34-Positive Haematopoetic Cells Derived from Umbilical Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiner Falkenberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ex vivo expansion of haematopoetic cells by application of specific cytokines is one approach to overcome boundaries in cord blood transplantation due to limited numbers of haematopoetic stem cells. While many protocols describe an effective increase of total cell numbers and the amount of CD34-positive cells, it still remains unclear if and how the procedure actually affects the cells’ properties. In the presented publications, CD34-positive cells were isolated from cord blood and expanded for up to 7 days in media supplemented with stem cell factor (SCF, thrombopoietin (THPO, interleukin 6 (IL-6, and fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FLT3lg. At days 3 and 7, expanded cells were harvested and analyzed by flow cytometry and quantitative proteomics. 2970 proteins were identified, whereof proteomic analysis showed 440 proteins significantly changed in abundance during ex vivo expansion. Despite the fact that haematopoetic cells still expressed CD34 on the surface after 3 days, major changes in regard to the protein profile were observed, while further expansion showed less effect on the proteome level. Enrichment analysis of biological processes clearly showed a proteomic change toward a protein biosynthesis phenotype already within the first three days of expression.

  13. Biochemistry, proteomics, and phosphoproteomics of plant mitochondria from non-photosynthetic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Jesper; Thelen, Jay J.; Møller, Ian Max

    2013-01-01

    functions depending on the tissue and cell type, as well as environmental conditions. We will here review the biochemistry and proteomics of mitochondria from non-green cells and organs, which differ from those of photosynthetic organs in a number of respects. We will briefly cover purification of...

  14. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino S. Aricò

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion® were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK, new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA systems, and composite zirconium phosphate–PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC. The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA was higher than the benchmark Nafion® 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm−2 vs. 64 mW·cm−2. This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm−2 equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm−2 for Nafion® 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm2 for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm2 for Nafion® 115.

  15. Proteomics in Cell Culture: From Genomics to Combined ‘Omics for Cell Line Engineering and Bioprocess Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heffner, Kelley; Kaas, Christian Schrøder; Kumar, Amit;

    2015-01-01

    in media development and cell line engineering to improve growth or productivity, delay the onset of apoptosis, or utilize nutrients efficiently. Mass-spectrometry based and other proteomics methods can provide for the detection of thousands of proteins from cell culture and bioinformatics analysis...... protein production has increased significantly because proteomics can track changes in protein levels for different cell lines over time, which can be advantageous for bioprocess development and optimization. Specifically, the identification of proteins that affect cell culture processes can aid efforts...

  16. Staphylococcus aureus produces membrane-derived vesicles that induce host cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamata Gurung

    Full Text Available Gram-negative bacteria produce outer membrane vesicles that play a role in the delivery of virulence factors to host cells. However, little is known about the membrane-derived vesicles (MVs produced by gram-positive bacteria. The present study examined the production of MVs from Staphylococcus aureus and investigated the delivery of MVs to host cells and subsequent cytotoxicity. Four S. aureus strains tested, two type strains and two clinical isolates, produced spherical nanovesicles during in vitro culture. MVs were also produced during in vivo infection of a clinical S. aureus isolate in a mouse pneumonia model. Proteomic analysis showed that 143 different proteins were identified in the S. aureus-derived MVs. S. aureus MVs were interacted with the plasma membrane of host cells via a cholesterol-rich membrane microdomain and then delivered their component protein A to host cells within 30 min. Intact S. aureus MVs induced apoptosis of HEp-2 cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas lysed MVs neither delivered their component into the cytosol of host cells nor induced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, this study is the first report that S. aureus MVs are an important vehicle for delivery of bacterial effector molecules to host cells.

  17. Comparative proteomics of chloroplasts envelopes from bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts reveals novel membrane proteins with a possible role in C4-related metabolite fluxes and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana eManandhar-Shrestha

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available As the world population grows, our need for food increases drastically. Limited amounts of arable land lead to a competition between food and fuel crops, while changes in the global climate may impact future crop yields. Thus, a second green revolution will need a better understanding of the processes essential for plant growth and development. One approach toward the solution of this problem is to better understand regulatory and transport processes in C4 plants. C4 plants display an up to 10-fold higher apparent CO2 assimilation and higher yields while maintaining high water use efficiency. This requires differential regulation of mesophyll (M and bundle sheath (BS chloroplast development as well as higher metabolic fluxes of photosynthetic intermediates between cells and across chloroplast envelopes. While previous analyses of overall chloroplast membranes have yielded significant insight, our comparative proteomics approach using enriched BS and M chloroplast envelopes of Zea mays allowed us to identify 37 proteins of unknown function that have not been seen in these earlier studies. We identified 280 proteins, 84% of which are known/predicted to be present in chloroplasts (cp. 74% have a known or predicted membrane association. 21 membrane proteins were 2-15 times more abundant in BS cells, while 36 proteins were more abundant in M cp envelopes. These proteins could represent additional candidates of proteins essential for development or metabolite transport processes in C4 plants. RT-PCR confirmed differential expression of thirteen candidate genes. Cp association was confirmed using GFP labeling. Genes for a PIC-like protein and an ER-AP-like protein show an early transient increase in gene expression during the transition to light. In addition, PIC gene expression is increased in the immature part of the leaf and was lower in the fully developed parts of the leaf, suggesting a need for/incorporation of the protein during chloroplast

  18. The Transcriptomics to Proteomics of Hair Cell Regeneration: Looking for a Hair Cell in a Haystack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Smith

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mature mammals exhibit very limited capacity for regeneration of auditory hair cells, while all non-mammalian vertebrates examined can regenerate them. In an effort to find therapeutic targets for deafness and balance disorders, scientists have examined gene expression patterns in auditory tissues under different developmental and experimental conditions. Microarray technology has allowed the large-scale study of gene expression profiles (transcriptomics at whole-genome levels, but since mRNA expression does not necessarily correlate with protein expression, other methods, such as microRNA analysis and proteomics, are needed to better understand the process of hair cell regeneration. These technologies and some of the results of them are discussed in this review. Although there is a considerable amount of variability found between studies owing to different species, tissues and treatments, there is some concordance between cellular pathways important for hair cell regeneration. Since gene expression and proteomics data is now commonly submitted to centralized online databases, meta-analyses of these data may provide a better picture of pathways that are common to the process of hair cell regeneration and lead to potential therapeutics. Indeed, some of the proteins found to be regulated in the inner ear of animal models (e.g., IGF-1 have now gone through human clinical trials.

  19. Human Cancer Classification: A Systems Biology- Based Model Integrating Morphology, Cancer Stem Cells, Proteomics, and Genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Halliday A Idikio

    2011-01-01

    Human cancer classification is currently based on the idea of cell of origin, light and electron microscopic attributes of the cancer. What is not yet integrated into cancer classification are the functional attributes of these cancer cells. Recent innovative techniques in biology have provided a wealth of information on the genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic changes in cancer cells. The emergence of the concept of cancer stem cells needs to be included in a classification model to capture...

  20. Microfluidic microbial fuel cells: from membrane to membrane free

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Ye, Dingding; Li, Jun; Zhu, Xun; Liao, Qiang; Zhang, Biao

    2016-08-01

    Microfluidic microbial fuel cells (MMFCs) are small carbon-neutral devices that use self-organized bacteria to degrade organic substrates and harness energy from the waste water. Conventional MMFCs have made great strides in the past decade and have overcome some limitations, such as high capital costs and low energy output. A co-laminar flow MFC has been first proposed in 2011 with the potential to be an attractively power source to niche applications. Co-laminar MFCs typically operate without any physical membranes separating the reactants, and bacterial ecosystems can be easily manipulated by regulating the inlet conditions. This paper highlights recent accomplishments in the development of co-laminar MFCs, emphasizing basic principles, mass transport and fluid dynamics including boundary layer theory, entrance conditions and mixing zone issues. Furthermore, the development of current techniques, major challenges and the potential research directions are discussed.

  1. Noncontact microsurgery of living cell membrane using femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilina, I. V.; Ovchinnikov, A. V.; Sitnikov, D. S.; Chefonov, O. V.; Agranat, M. B.; Mikaelyan, A. S.

    2013-06-01

    Near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses were applied to initiate reversible permeabilization of cell membrane and inject extrinsic substances into the target cells. Successful laser-based injection of a membrane impermeable dye, as well as plasmid DNA was demonstrated.

  2. Proteomic analysis of proteins secreted by the extra-embryonic membranes of the preimplantation sheep conceptus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraembryonic membranes (EEM) of the preimplantation sheep conceptus play a major role in the supply of nutrition to the embryo and subsequently participate in the formation of the placentomes. Such functions are likely to be mediated by proteins secreted by the EEM. These proteins may mediate maternal-embryonic interactions or provide the embryo with essential nutrients during the period of early organogenesis and rapid growth and differentiation of the EEM, leading up to implantation. Large format (40 x 40 cm) 2-D gels were used to analyze proteins secreted by the trophoblast, allantois and the yolk sac of day 17 or 18 conceptuses after incubation separately for 3h in the presence of [35S]-methionine. Hundreds of proteins were detected, many of which have not been identified. Each of these EEM secreted different compositions of proteins, as did the two cell layers of the trophoblast. Several proteins that were secreted by the trophectoderm were absent in proteins secreted by the mesoderm layer of the trophoblast. Two of those were identified as interferon-τ and aldose reductase. The proteins secreted by the yolk sac differed markedly from those secreted by the allantois even though both of these membranes were derived from endodermal and mesodermal lineages and are both vascularized. Many of the yolk sac secretory proteins were glycoproteins similar to those found in serum that are normally synthesized by the adult liver; one of these was identified as transferrin. Northern analysis showed that the transferrin mRNA in the yolk sac was even more abundant than it was in adult liver. The similarity between the set of proteins secreted by the yolk sac and those in serum that are attributable to the liver suggests that the yolk sac performs in part, the function of the liver in the synthesis of these proteins. Many proteins secreted by the trophoblast and yolk Sac were detectable in the allantoic fluid even though these membranes were not in contact with the

  3. Interaction of peptides with cell membranes: insights from molecular modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation of the interaction of peptides with cell membranes is the focus of active research. It can enhance the understanding of basic membrane functions such as membrane transport, fusion, and signaling processes, and it may shed light on potential applications of peptides in biomedicine. In this review, we will present current advances in computational studies on the interaction of different types of peptides with the cell membrane. Depending on the properties of the peptide, membrane, and external environment, the peptide–membrane interaction shows a variety of different forms. Here, on the basis of recent computational progress, we will discuss how different peptides could initiate membrane pores, translocate across the membrane, induce membrane endocytosis, produce membrane curvature, form fibrils on the membrane surface, as well as interact with functional membrane proteins. Finally, we will present a conclusion summarizing recent progress and providing some specific insights into future developments in this field. (topical review)

  4. Detailed Functional and Proteomic Characterization of Fludarabine Resistance in Mantle Cell Lymphoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Lorkova

    Full Text Available Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL is a chronically relapsing aggressive type of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma considered incurable by currently used treatment approaches. Fludarabine is a purine analog clinically still widely used in the therapy of relapsed MCL. Molecular mechanisms of fludarabine resistance have not, however, been studied in the setting of MCL so far. We therefore derived fludarabine-resistant MCL cells (Mino/FR and performed their detailed functional and proteomic characterization compared to the original fludarabine sensitive cells (Mino. We demonstrated that Mino/FR were highly cross-resistant to other antinucleosides (cytarabine, cladribine, gemcitabine and to an inhibitor of Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK ibrutinib. Sensitivity to other types of anti-lymphoma agents was altered only mildly (methotrexate, doxorubicin, bortezomib or remained unaffacted (cisplatin, bendamustine. The detailed proteomic analysis of Mino/FR compared to Mino cells unveiled over 300 differentially expressed proteins. Mino/FR were characterized by the marked downregulation of deoxycytidine kinase (dCK and BTK (thus explaining the observed crossresistance to antinucleosides and ibrutinib, but also by the upregulation of several enzymes of de novo nucleotide synthesis, as well as the up-regulation of the numerous proteins of DNA repair and replication. The significant upregulation of the key antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 in Mino/FR cells was associated with the markedly increased sensitivity of the fludarabine-resistant MCL cells to Bcl-2-specific inhibitor ABT199 compared to fludarabine-sensitive cells. Our data thus demonstrate that a detailed molecular analysis of drug-resistant tumor cells can indeed open a way to personalized therapy of resistant malignancies.

  5. Deep coverage mouse red blood cell proteome: a first comparison with the human red blood cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Erica M; Kirkegaard, Morten; Salerno, Doris;

    2008-01-01

    Mice have close genetic/physiological relationships to humans, breed rapidly, and can be genetically modified, making them the most used mammal in biomedical research. Because the red blood cell (RBC) is the sole gas transporter in vertebrates, diseases of the RBC are frequently severe; much...... identified, and polypeptides migrating with anomalous apparent molecular weights were grouped into putatively ubiquitinated or partially degraded complexes. Overall there was close concordance between mouse and human proteomes, confirming the unexpected RBC complexity. Several novel findings in the human...

  6. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fengge; Miraoui, Abdellatif

    2013-01-01

    The fuel cell is a potential candidate for energy storage and conversion in our future energy mix. It is able to directly convert the chemical energy stored in fuel (e.g. hydrogen) into electricity, without undergoing different intermediary conversion steps. In the field of mobile and stationary applications, it is considered to be one of the future energy solutions.Among the different fuel cell types, the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has shown great potential in mobile applications, due to its low operating temperature, solid-state electrolyte and compactness.This book pre

  7. Proteomic profiling of acrolein adducts in human lung epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Spiess, Page C; Deng, Bin; Hondal, Robert J.; Matthews, Dwight E.; van der Vliet, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Acrolein (2,3-propenal) is a major indoor and outdoor air pollutant originating largely from tobacco smoke or organic combustion. Given its high reactivity, the adverse effects of inhaled acrolein are likely due to direct interactions with the airway epithelium, resulting in altered epithelial function, but only limited information exists to date regarding the primary direct cellular targets for acrolein. Here, we describe a global proteomics approach to characterize the spectrum of airway ep...

  8. Fuel cell membranes and crossover prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, Richard I.; York, Cynthia A.; Waszczuk, Piotr; Wieckowski, Andrzej

    2009-08-04

    A membrane electrode assembly for use with a direct organic fuel cell containing a formic acid fuel includes a solid polymer electrolyte having first and second surfaces, an anode on the first surface and a cathode on the second surface and electrically linked to the anode. The solid polymer electrolyte has a thickness t:.gtoreq..times..times..times..times. ##EQU00001## where C.sub.f is the formic acid fuel concentration over the anode, D.sub.f is the effective diffusivity of the fuel in the solid polymer electrolyte, K.sub.f is the equilibrium constant for partition coefficient for the fuel into the solid polymer electrolyte membrane, I is Faraday's constant n.sub.f is the number of electrons released when 1 molecule of the fuel is oxidized, and j.sub.f.sup.c is an empirically determined crossover rate of fuel above which the fuel cell does not operate.

  9. Proton-exchange membrane regenerative fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swette, Larry L.; LaConti, Anthony B.; McCatty, Stephen A.

    This paper will update the progress in developing electrocatalyst systems and electrode structures primarily for the positive electrode of single-unit solid polymer proton-exchange membrane (PEM) regenerative fuel cells. The work was done with DuPont Nafion 117 in complete fuel cells (40 cm 2 electrodes). The cells were operated alternately in fuel cell mode and electrolysis mode at 80°C. In fuel cell mode, humidified hydrogen and oxygen were supplied at 207 kPa (30 psi); in electrolysis mode, water was pumped over the positive electrode and the gases were evolved at ambient pressure. Cycling data will be presented for Pt-Ir catalysts and limited bifunctional data will be presented for Pt. Ir, Ru. Rh and Na xPt 3O 4 catalysts as well as for electrode structure variations.

  10. Solar cell preparation in thin silicon membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libezny, M.; Poortmans, J.; Caymax, M.; Beaucarne, G.; Laureys, W.; Nijs, J. [IMEC, Leuven (Belgium)

    1997-12-31

    Solar cells prepared in a thin ({approx} 30 {micro}m) crystalline silicon membrane with a supporting frame allow an evaluation of the potential of c-Si thin film cells on cheap substrates. In the same time, light-weight and more radiation-hard solar cells may have direct applications in space. This paper studies the fabrication process of solar cells in {approx} 30 {micro}m thick p-Si epitaxial layers, incorporating a p{sup +2}-Si etch-stop/back-surface field layer, using KOH etching. Wax, rubber and silicon nitride were tested as masking material during the etching. It was found that both wax and silicon nitride could be used as materials for masking of supporting frames for the solar cell thinning up to 30 {micro}m. However, silicon nitride does not reliably protect the frontside structure.

  11. Integration of genomics, proteomics, and imaging for cardiac stem cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac stem cell therapy is beginning to mature as a valid treatment for heart disease. As more clinical trials utilizing stem cells emerge, it is imperative to establish the mechanisms by which stem cells confer benefit in cardiac diseases. In this paper, we review three methods - molecular cellular imaging, gene expression profiling, and proteomic analysis - that can be integrated to provide further insights into the role of this emerging therapy. (orig.)

  12. Effects of retinoic acid isomers on proteomic pattern in human breast cancer MCF-7 cell line

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flodrová, Dana; Benkovská, Dagmar; Macejová, D.; Bialešová, L.; Bobálová, Janette; Brtko, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 4 (2013), s. 205-209. ISSN 1210-0668 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB12SK151 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : retinoic acid isomers * retinoid * breast cancer * malignant cells * proteomic analysis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  13. Specificity of secreted proteomes from cardiac stem cells and neonatal myocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šťastná, Miroslava; Chimenti, I.; Marban, E.; Van Eyk, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 276, Suppl.1 (2009), s. 346. ISSN 1742-464X. [FEBS Congress /34./. 04.07.2009-09.07.2009, Prague] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : cardiac stem cells * secreted paracrine/autocrine factors * proteomics Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  14. Kinomic and phospho-proteomic analysis of breast cancer stem-like cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Christensen, Anne Geske Lindhard; Ehmsen, Sidse;

    Kinomic and phospho-proteomic analysis of breast cancer stem-like cells Rikke Leth-Larsen1, Anne G Christensen1, Sidse Ehmsen1, Mark Møller1, Giuseppe Palmisano2, Martin R Larsen2, Henrik J Ditzel1,3 1Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark 2Institute of...

  15. Identification and functionality of proteomes secreted by rat cardiac stem cells and neonatal cardiomyocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šťastná, Miroslava; Chimenti, I.; Marban, E.; Van Eyk, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2010), s. 245-253. ISSN 1615-9853 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : animal proteomics * cardiac stem cells * neonatal cardiomyocytes Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.815, year: 2010

  16. System-wide temporal characterization of the proteome and phosphoproteome of human embryonic stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer T.G.; Prokhorova, Tatyana; Akimov, Vyacheslav;

    2011-01-01

    To elucidate cellular events underlying the pluripotency of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), we performed parallel quantitative proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses of hESCs during differentiation initiated by a diacylglycerol analog or transfer to media that had not been conditioned by...

  17. Proteomics analysis of human endothelial cells after shortterm exposure to mobile phone radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobile phones have been a part of our everyday life in the developed world since the late 1990s. This has raised concerns over the potential health risks of mobile phone use. Biological and health effects potentially caused by mobile phone radiation have been extensively studied and several biological and medical endpoints have been examined. So far, results have not been conclusive on the potential effects of mobile phone radiation. Mobile phones generate a modulated radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF), which is a form of non-ionizing radiation. This means that mobile phone radiation does not have enough energy to ionize atoms and it cannot break chemical bonds directly (e.g., in DNA strands). There could, however, be other mechanisms by which mobile phone radiation may affect cellular and physiological functions. Whether these mechanisms exist is unknown. In this thesis, large-scale screening techniques, such as proteomics, were applied to examine changes on the proteome level after exposure to mobile phone radiation. Proteomics techniques allow the screening of several hundreds, and even thousands, of proteins simultaneously, and are thus more efficient than single endpoint techniques. Four different types of human endothelial cells (two cell lines, two types of primary cells) were exposed to two types of mobile phone radiation (900 and 1800 MHz GSM). The proteome of these cells was examined immediately after short-term exposure using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). Two protein detection/analysis techniques were used: silver staining for the cell line samples and difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) for the primary cells. 2DE-DIGE technology is currently a state-of-the-art technique in 2DE studies. Several changes were found in the proteome of the human endothelial cell line EA.hy926 after exposure to 900 MHz GSM mobile phone radiation. In addition, the proteome of a variant of the same cell line, the EA.hy926v1, was affected after 900 MHz

  18. Durability Issues of High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    To achieve high temperature operation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), preferably under ambient pressure, phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane represents an effective approach, which in recent years has motivated extensive research activities with great progress. As...

  19. The application of Dow Chemical's perfluorinated membranes in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisman, G. A.

    1990-02-01

    Dow Chemical's research activities in fuel cells revolve around the development of perfluorosulfonic acid membranes, useful as the proton transport medium and separator. The following work will outline some of the performance characteristics which are typical for such membranes.

  20. Sodium selectivity of Reissner's membrane epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kyunghee X

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sodium absorption by Reissner's membrane is thought to contribute to the homeostasis of the volume of cochlear endolymph. It was previously shown that the absorptive transepithelial current was blocked by amiloride and benzamil. The most commonly-observed target of these drugs is the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC, which is composed of the three subunits α-,β- and γ-ENaC. However, other less-selective cation channels have also been observed to be sensitive to benzamil and amiloride. The aim of this study was to determine whether Reissner's membrane epithelial cells could support parasensory K+ absorption via amiloride- and benzamil-sensitive electrogenic pathways. Results We determined the molecular and functional expression of candidate cation channels with gene array (GEO GSE6196, RT-PCR, and whole-cell patch clamp. Transcript expression analysis of Reissner's membrane detected no amiloride-sensitive acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC1a, ASIC2a, ASIC2b nor amiloride-sensitive cyclic-nucleotide gated channels (CNGA1, CNGA2, CNGA4, CNGB3. By contrast, α-,β- and γ-ENaC were all previously reported as present in Reissner's membrane. The selectivity of the benzamil-sensitive cation currents was observed in whole-cell patch clamp recordings under Cl--free conditions where cations were the only permeant species. The currents were carried by Na+ but not K+, and the permeability of Li+ was greater than that of Na+ in Reissner's membrane. Complete replacement of bath Na+ with the inpermeable cation NMDG+ led to the same inward current as with benzamil in a Na+ bath. Conclusions These results are consistent with the amiloride/benzamil-sensitive absorptive flux of Reissner's membrane mediated by a highly Na+-selective channel that has several key characteristics in common with αβγ-ENaC. The amiloride-sensitive pathway therefore absorbs only Na+ in this epithelium and does not provide a parasensory K+ efflux route from scala

  1. Comparative proteomic analysis of a membrane-enriched fraction from flag leaves reveals responses to chemical hybridization agent SQ-1 in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qilu; Wang, Shuping; Zhang, Gaisheng; Li, Ying; Li, Zheng; Guo, Jialin; Niu, Na; Wang, Junwei; Ma, Shoucai

    2015-01-01

    The induction of wheat male fertile lines by using the chemical hybridizing agent SQ-1 (CHA-SQ-1) is an effective approach in the utilization of heterosis; however, the molecular basis of male fertility remains unknown. Wheat flag leaves are the initial receptors of CHA-SQ-1 and their membrane structure plays a vital role in response to CHA-SQ-1 stress. To investigate the response of wheat flag leaves to CHA-SQ-1 stress, we compared their quantitative proteomic profiles in the absence and presence of CHA-SQ-1. Our results indicated that wheat flag leaves suffered oxidative stress during CHA-SQ-1 treatments. Leaf O2 (-), H2O2, and malonaldehyde levels were significantly increased within 10 h after CHA-SQ-1 treatment, while the activities of major antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and guaiacol peroxidase were significantly reduced. Proteome profiles of membrane-enriched fraction showed a change in the abundance of a battery of membrane proteins involved in multiple biological processes. These variable proteins mainly impaired photosynthesis, ATP synthesis protein mechanisms and were involved in the response to stress. These results provide an explanation of the relationships between membrane proteomes and anther abortion and the practical application of CHA for hybrid breeding. PMID:26379693

  2. Comparative proteomic analysis of a membrane-enriched fraction from flag leaves reveals responses to chemical hybridization agent SQ-1 in wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qilu eSong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The induction of wheat male fertile lines by using the chemical hybridizing agent SQ-1 (CHA-SQ-1 is an effective approach in the utilization of heterosis; however, the molecular basis of male fertility remains unknown. Wheat flag leaves are the initial receptors of CHA-SQ-1 and their membrane structure plays a vital role in response to CHA-SQ-1 stress. To investigate the response of wheat flag leaves to CHA-SQ-1 stress, we compared their quantitative proteomic profiles in the absence and presence of CHA-SQ-1. Our results indicated that wheat flag leaves suffered oxidative stress during CHA-SQ-1 treatments. Leaf O2-, H2O2, and malonaldehyde levels were significantly increased within 10 h after CHA-SQ-1 treatment, while the activities of major antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and guaiacol peroxidase were significantly reduced. Proteome profiles of membrane-enriched fraction showed a change in the abundance of a battery of membrane proteins involved in multiple biological processes. These variable proteins mainly impaired photosynthesis, ATP synthesis protein mechanisms and were involved in the response to stress. These results provide an explanation of the relationships between membrane proteomes and anther abortion and the practical application of CHA for hybrid breeding.

  3. Comparison of Milk Fat Globule Membrane (MFGM) Proteins of Chianina and Holstein Cattle Breed Milk Samples Through Proteomics Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Lorraine Pariset; Silvia Bongiorni; Alessio Valentini; Lello Zolla; Leonardo Murgiano; Anna Maria Timperio

    2009-01-01

    Identification of proteins involved in milk production is important to understand the biology of lactation. Many studies have advanced the understanding of mammary function and milk secretion, but the critical molecular mechanisms implicated in milk fat secretion is still incomplete. Milk Fat Globules are secreted from the apical surface of the mammary cells, surrounded by a thin membrane bilayer, the Milk Fat Globule Membrane (MFGM), formed by proteins which have been suggested to be cholest...

  4. Membrane Purification Cell for Aluminum Recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David DeYoung; James Wiswall; Cong Wang

    2011-11-29

    Recycling mixed aluminum scrap usually requires adding primary aluminum to the scrap stream as a diluent to reduce the concentration of non-aluminum constituents used in aluminum alloys. Since primary aluminum production requires approximately 10 times more energy than melting scrap, the bulk of the energy and carbon dioxide emissions for recycling are associated with using primary aluminum as a diluent. Eliminating the need for using primary aluminum as a diluent would dramatically reduce energy requirements, decrease carbon dioxide emissions, and increase scrap utilization in recycling. Electrorefining can be used to extract pure aluminum from mixed scrap. Some example applications include producing primary grade aluminum from specific scrap streams such as consumer packaging and mixed alloy saw chips, and recycling multi-alloy products such as brazing sheet. Electrorefining can also be used to extract valuable alloying elements such as Li from Al-Li mixed scrap. This project was aimed at developing an electrorefining process for purifying aluminum to reduce energy consumption and emissions by 75% compared to conventional technology. An electrolytic molten aluminum purification process, utilizing a horizontal membrane cell anode, was designed, constructed, operated and validated. The electrorefining technology could also be used to produce ultra-high purity aluminum for advanced materials applications. The technical objectives for this project were to: - Validate the membrane cell concept with a lab-scale electrorefining cell; - Determine if previously identified voltage increase issue for chloride electrolytes holds for a fluoride-based electrolyte system; - Assess the probability that voltage change issues can be solved; and - Conduct a market and economic analysis to assess commercial feasibility. The process was tested using three different binary alloy compositions (Al-2.0 wt.% Cu, Al-4.7 wt.% Si, Al-0.6 wt.% Fe) and a brazing sheet scrap composition (Al-2

  5. High temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.Scott; M. Mamlouk

    2006-01-01

    One of the major issues limiting the introduction of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is the low temperature of operation which makes platinum-based anode catalysts susceptible to poisoning by the trace amount of CO, inevitably present in reformed fuel. In order to alleviate the problem of CO poisoning and improve the power density of the cell, operating at temperature above 100 ℃ is preferred. Nafion(R) -type perfluorosulfonated polymers have been typically used for PEMFC. However, the conductivity of Nafion(R) -type polymers is not high enough to be used for fuel cell operations at higher temperature ( > 90 ℃) and atmospheric pressure because they dehydrate under these condition.An additional problem which faces the introduction of PEMFC technology is that of supplying or storing hydrogen for cell operation,especially for vehicular applications. Consequently the use of alternative fuels such as methanol and ethanol is of interest, especially if this can be used directly in the fuel cell, without reformation to hydrogen. A limitation of the direct use of alcohol is the lower activity of oxidation in comparison to hydrogen, which means that power densities are considerably lower. Hence to improve activity and power output higher temperatures of operation are preferable. To achieve this goal, requires a new polymer electrolyte membrane which exhibits stability and high conductivity in the absence of liquid water.Experimental data on a polybenzimidazole based PEMFC were presented. A simple steady-state isothermal model of the fuel cell is also used to aid in fuel cell performance optimisation. The governing equations involve the coupling of kinetic, ohmic and mass transport. This paper also considers the advances made in the performance of direct methanol and solid polymer electrolyte fuel cells and considers their limitations in relation to the source and type of fuels to be used.

  6. Comparative proteomics of root plasma membrane proteins reveals the involvement of calcium signalling in NaCl-facilitated nitrate uptake in Salicornia europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Lingling; Feng, Juanjuan; Fan, Pengxiang; Chen, Xianyang; Guo, Jie; Lv, Sulian; Bao, Hexigeduleng; Jia, Weitao; Tai, Fang; Jiang, Ping; Wang, Jinhui; Li, Yinxin

    2015-08-01

    Improving crop nitrogen (N) use efficiency under salinity is essential for the development of sustainable agriculture in marginal lands. Salicornia europaea is a succulent euhalophyte that can survive under high salinity and N-deficient habitat conditions, implying that a special N assimilation mechanism may exist in this plant. In this study, phenotypic and physiological changes of S. europaea were investigated under different nitrate and NaCl levels. The results showed that NaCl had a synergetic effect with nitrate on the growth of S. europaea. In addition, the shoot nitrate concentration and nitrate uptake rate of S. europaea were increased by NaCl treatment under both low N and high N conditions, suggesting that nitrate uptake in S. europaea was NaCl facilitated. Comparative proteomic analysis of root plasma membrane (PM) proteins revealed 81 proteins, whose abundance changed significantly in response to NaCl and nitrate. These proteins are involved in metabolism, cell signalling, transport, protein folding, membrane trafficking, and cell structure. Among them, eight proteins were calcium signalling components, and the accumulation of seven of the above-mentioned proteins was significantly elevated by NaCl treatment. Furthermore, cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) was significantly elevated in S. europaea under NaCl treatment. The application of the Ca(2+) channel blocker LaCl3 not only caused a decrease in nitrate uptake rate, but also attenuated the promoting effects of NaCl on nitrate uptake rates. Based on these results, a possible regulatory network of NaCl-facilitated nitrate uptake in S. europaea focusing on the involvement of Ca(2+) signalling was proposed. PMID:25956883

  7. Membrane fluidity adjustments in ethanol-stressed Oenococcus oeni cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silveira, da M.G.; Golovina, E.A.; Hoekstra, F.A.; Rombouts, F.M.; Abee, T.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of ethanol on the cytoplasmic membrane of Oenococcus oeni cells and the role of membrane changes in the acquired tolerance to ethanol were investigated. Membrane tolerance to ethanol was defined as the resistance to ethanol-induced leakage of preloaded carboxyfluorescein (cF) from cells.

  8. Prion Protein Deficiency Causes Diverse Proteome Shifts in Cell Models That Escape Detection in Brain Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Brethour, Dylan; Williams, Declan; Wang, Hansen; Arnould, Hélène; Schneider, Benoit; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2016-01-01

    A popular method for studying the function of a given protein is to generate and characterize a suitable model deficient for its expression. For the prion protein (PrP), best known for its role in several invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases, a natural choice, therefore, would be to undertake such studies with brain samples. We recently documented the surprising observation that PrP deficiency caused a loss or enhancement of NCAM1 polysialylation, dependent on the cell model used. To identify possible causes for this disparity, we set out to systematically investigate the consequence of PrP deficiency on the global proteome in brain tissue and in four distinct cell models. Here we report that PrP deficiency causes robust but surprisingly divergent changes to the global proteomes of cell models but has no discernible impact on the global brain proteome. Amongst >1,500 proteins whose levels were compared in wild-type and PrP-deficient models, members of the MARCKS protein family exhibited pronounced, yet cell model-dependent changes to their steady-state levels. Follow-up experiments revealed that PrP collaborates with members of the MARCKS protein family in its control of NCAM1 polysialylation. We conclude that the physiological function of PrP may be masked in analyses of complex brain samples but its cell-type specific influence on a lipid raft-based NCAM1-related cell biology comes to the fore in investigations of specific cell types. PMID:27327609

  9. Origin of subdiffusion of water molecules on cell membrane surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Eiji; Yasui, Masato; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Water molecules play an important role in providing unique environments for biological reactions on cell membranes. It is widely believed that water molecules form bridges that connect lipid molecules and stabilize cell membranes. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we show that translational and rotational diffusion of water molecules on lipid membrane surfaces exhibit subdiffusion. Moreover, we provide evidence that both divergent mean trapping time (continuous-time random walk) and long-correlated noise (fractional Brownian motion) contribute to this subdiffusion. These results suggest that subdiffusion on cell membranes causes the water retardation, an enhancement of cell membrane stability, and a higher reaction efficiency.

  10. Contribution of MS-based proteomics to the understanding of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 interaction with host cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EnriqueSantamaría

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Like other DNA viruses, Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1 replicates and proliferates in host cells continuously modulating the host molecular environment. Following a sophisticated temporal expression pattern, HSV-1 encodes at least 89 multifunctional proteins that interplay with and modify the host cell proteome. During the last decade, advances in mass spectrometry applications coupled to the development of proteomic separation methods have allowed to partially monitor the impact of HSV-1 infection in human cells. In this review, we discuss the current use of different proteome fractionation strategies to define HSV-1 targets on two major application areas: i viral protein interactomics to decipher viral protein interactions in host cells and ii differential quantitative proteomics to analyse the virally induced changes in the cellular proteome. Moreover, we will also discuss the potential application of high throughput proteomic approaches to study global proteome dynamics and also post-translational modifications in HSV-1-infected cells, what will greatly improved our molecular knowledge of HSV-1 infection.

  11. Membrane tension feedback on shape and motility of eukaryotic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Benjamin; Aranson, Igor S.; Ziebert, Falko

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of a phase field model of a single cell crawling on a substrate, we investigate how the properties of the cell membrane affect the shape and motility of the cell. Since the membrane influences the cell dynamics on multiple levels and provides a nontrivial feedback, we consider the following fundamental interactions: (i) the reduction of the actin polymerization rate by membrane tension; (ii) area conservation of the cell's two-dimensional cross-section vs. conservation of the circumference (i.e. membrane inextensibility); and (iii) the contribution from the membrane's bending energy to the shape and integrity of the cell. As in experiments, we investigate two pertinent observables - the cell's velocity and its aspect ratio. We find that the most important effect is the feedback of membrane tension on the actin polymerization. Bending rigidity has only minor effects, visible mostly in dynamic reshaping events, as exemplified by collisions of the cell with an obstacle.

  12. Preparation of cell membranes for high resolution imaging by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of cell membrane structure by atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been limited because of the softness of cell membranes. Here, we utilize a new technique of sample preparation to lay red blood cell membranes on the top of a mica surface to obtain high resolution images by in-situ AFM on both sides of cell membranes. Our results indicate that the location of oligosaccharides and proteins in red blood cell membranes might be different from the current membrane model. The inner membrane leaflet is covered by dense proteins with fewer free lipids than expected. In contrast, the outer membrane leaflet is quite smooth; oligosaccharides and peptides supposed to protrude out of the outer membrane leaflet surface might be actually hidden in the middle of hydrophilic lipid heads; transmembrane proteins might form domains in the membranes revealed by PNGase F and trypsin digestion. Our result could be significant to interpret some functions about red blood cell membranes and guide to heal the blood diseases related to cell membranes.

  13. Intravacuolar Membranes Regulate CD8 T Cell Recognition of Membrane-Bound Toxoplasma gondii Protective Antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Jodie Lopez; Amina Bittame; Céline Massera; Virginie Vasseur; Grégory Effantin; Anne Valat; Célia Buaillon; Sophie Allart; Barbara A. Fox; Leah M. Rommereim; David J. Bzik; Guy Schoehn; Winfried Weissenhorn; Jean-François Dubremetz; Jean Gagnon

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexa parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii target effectors to and across the boundary of their parasitophorous vacuole (PV), resulting in host cell subversion and potential presentation by MHC class I molecules for CD8 T cell recognition. The host-parasite interface comprises the PV limiting membrane and a highly curved, membranous intravacuolar network (IVN) of uncertain function. Here, using a cell-free minimal system, we dissect how membrane tubules are shaped by the parasite effecto...

  14. Identification of thalidomide-specific transcriptomics and proteomics signatures during differentiation of human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesavan Meganathan

    Full Text Available Embryonic development can be partially recapitulated in vitro by differentiating human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. Thalidomide is a developmental toxicant in vivo and acts in a species-dependent manner. Besides its therapeutic value, thalidomide also serves as a prototypical model to study teratogenecity. Although many in vivo and in vitro platforms have demonstrated its toxicity, only a few test systems accurately reflect human physiology. We used global gene expression and proteomics profiling (two dimensional electrophoresis (2DE coupled with Tandem Mass spectrometry to demonstrate hESC differentiation and thalidomide embryotoxicity/teratogenecity with clinically relevant dose(s. Proteome analysis showed loss of POU5F1 regulatory proteins PKM2 and RBM14 and an over expression of proteins involved in neuronal development (such as PAK2, PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 after 14 days of differentiation. The genomic and proteomic expression pattern demonstrated differential expression of limb, heart and embryonic development related transcription factors and biological processes. Moreover, this study uncovered novel possible mechanisms, such as the inhibition of RANBP1, that participate in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of proteins and inhibition of glutathione transferases (GSTA1, GSTA2, that protect the cell from secondary oxidative stress. As a proof of principle, we demonstrated that a combination of transcriptomics and proteomics, along with consistent differentiation of hESCs, enabled the detection of canonical and novel teratogenic intracellular mechanisms of thalidomide.

  15. Bovine neonatal pancytopenia - Comparative proteomic characterization of two BVD vaccines and the producer cell surface proteome (MDBK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euler Kerstin N

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine neonatal pancytopenia (BNP is a disease syndrome in newborn calves of up to four weeks of age, first observed in southern Germany in 2006. By now, cases have been reported in several countries around the globe. Many affected calves die within days due to multiple haemorrhages, thrombocytopenia, leukocytopenia and bone marrow depletion. A certain vaccine directed against Bovine Virus Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV was recently shown to be associated with BNP pathogenesis. Immunized cows develop alloantibodies that are transferred to newborn calves via colostrum intake. In order to further elucidate BNP pathogenesis, the purpose of this study was to characterize and compare the protein composition of the associated vaccine to another vaccine directed against BVDV not related to BNP and the cell surface proteome of MDBK (Madin-Darby Bovine Kidney cells, the cell line used for production of the associated vaccine. Results By SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry, we were able to detect several coagulation-related and immune modulatory proteins, as well as cellular and serum derived molecules being shared between the associated vaccine and MDBK cells. Furthermore, the number of proteins identified in the BNP related vaccine was almost as high as the number of surface proteins detected on MDBK cells and exceeded the amount of proteins identified in the non-BNP related vaccine over 3.5 fold. The great amount of shared cellular and serum derived proteins confirm that the BNP associated vaccine contained many molecules originating from MDBK cells and vaccine production. Conclusions The respective vaccine was not purified enough to prevent the development of alloantibodies. To narrow down possible candidate proteins, those most likely to represent a trigger for BNP pathogenesis are presented in this study, giving a fundament for further analysis in future research.

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Terminalia chebula Extract-Dependent Changes in Human Lymphoblastic T Cell Protein Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nando Dulal; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Park, Ji Hyun; Choi, Mi Ran; Lee, Hyung Tae; Kim, Moo Sung; Lee, Sang Rin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Terminalia chebula is a native plant from southern Asia to southwestern China that is used in traditional medicine for the treatment of malignant tumors and diabetes. This plant also has antibacterial and immunomodulatory properties. The present study assessed T. chebula extract-dependent protein expression changes in Jurkat cells. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–time-of-flight mass spectrometry and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) were performed to assess protein expression and networks, respectively. A comparative proteomic profile was determined in T. chebula extract (50 μg/mL)-treated and control cells; the expressions of β-tubulin, ring finger and CHY zinc finger domain containing 1, and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor kinase were significantly down-regulated in T. chebula extract-treated Jurkat cells. Moreover, the molecular basis for the T. chebula extract-dependent protein expression changes in Jurkat cells was determined by IPA. Treatment with the T. chebula extract significantly inhibited nuclear factor-κB activity and affected the proteomic profile of Jurkat cells. The molecular network signatures and functional proteomics obtained in this study may facilitate the evaluation of potential antitumor therapeutic targets and elucidate the molecular mechanism of T. chebula extract-dependent effects in Jurkat cells. PMID:22471968

  17. Functional Implications of Plasma Membrane Condensation for T Cell Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Rentero, Carles; Zech, Tobias; Quinn, Carmel M.; Engelhardt, Karin; Williamson, David; Grewal, Thomas; Jessup, Wendy; Harder, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2008-01-01

    The T lymphocyte plasma membrane condenses at the site of activation but the functional significance of this receptor-mediated membrane reorganization is not yet known. Here we demonstrate that membrane condensation at the T cell activation sites can be inhibited by incorporation of the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC), which is known to prevent the formation of raft-like liquid-ordered domains in model membranes. We enriched T cells with 7KC, or cholesterol as control, to assess the importa...

  18. In-Depth Profiling of the Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Proteome for Clinical Blood Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Saša Končarević; Christopher Lößner; Karsten Kuhn; Thorsten Prinz; Ian Pike; Hans-Dieter Zucht

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are an easy accessible cellular part of the blood organ and, along with platelets, represent the only site of active gene expression in blood. These cells undergo immunophenotypic changes in various diseases and represent a peripheral source of monitoring gene expression and posttranslational modifications relevant to many diseases. Little is known about the source of many blood proteins and we hypothesise that release from PBMCs through active and p...

  19. Membrane-associated proteomics of chickpea identifies Sad1/UNC-84 protein (CaSUN1), a novel component of dehydration signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Mishra, Poonam; Subba, Pratigya; Rathi, Divya; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2014-01-01

    Dehydration affects almost all the physiological processes including those that result in the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which in turn elicits a highly conserved signaling, the unfolded protein response (UPR). We investigated the dehydration-responsive membrane-associated proteome of a legume, chickpea, by 2-DE coupled with mass spectrometry. A total of 184 protein spots were significantly altered over a dehydration treatment of 120 h. Among the diff...

  20. SILAC-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Human Lung Cell Response to Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Edelmann, Mariola J.; Shack, Leslie A; Caitlin D Naske; Walters, Keisha B.; Nanduri, Bindu

    2014-01-01

    Copper (II) oxide (CuO) nanoparticles (NP) are widely used in industry and medicine. In our study we evaluated the response of BEAS-2B human lung cells to CuO NP, using Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based proteomics and phosphoproteomics. Pathway modeling of the protein differential expression showed that CuO NP affect proteins relevant in cellular function and maintenance, protein synthesis, cell death and survival, cell cycle and cell morphology. Some of the...

  1. The Proteome of Native Adult Müller Glial Cells From Murine Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosche, Antje; Hauser, Alexandra; Lepper, Marlen Franziska; Mayo, Rebecca; von Toerne, Christine; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Hauck, Stefanie M

    2016-02-01

    To date, the proteomic profiling of Müller cells, the dominant macroglia of the retina, has been hampered because of the absence of suitable enrichment methods. We established a novel protocol to isolate native, intact Müller cells from adult murine retinae at excellent purity which retain in situ morphology and are well suited for proteomic analyses. Two different strategies of sample preparation - an in StageTips (iST) and a subcellular fractionation approach including cell surface protein profiling were used for quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MSMS) comparing Müller cell-enriched to depleted neuronal fractions. Pathway enrichment analyses on both data sets enabled us to identify Müller cell-specific functions which included focal adhesion kinase signaling, signal transduction mediated by calcium as second messenger, transmembrane neurotransmitter transport and antioxidant activity. Pathways associated with RNA processing, cellular respiration and phototransduction were enriched in the neuronal subpopulation. Proteomic results were validated for selected Müller cell genes by quantitative real time PCR, confirming the high expression levels of numerous members of the angiogenic and anti-inflammatory annexins and antioxidant enzymes (e.g. paraoxonase 2, peroxiredoxin 1, 4 and 6). Finally, the significant enrichment of antioxidant proteins in Müller cells was confirmed by measurements on vital retinal cells using the oxidative stress indicator CM-H2DCFDA. In contrast to photoreceptors or bipolar cells, Müller cells were most efficiently protected against H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species formation, which is in line with the protein repertoire identified in the proteomic profiling. Our novel approach to isolate intact glial cells from adult retina in combination with proteomic profiling enabled the identification of novel Müller glia specific proteins, which were validated as markers and for their functional impact in glial

  2. Resting microglial cells exhibit tubular membrane protrusions

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrike Gimsa; Veronika Kralj-Iglic; Jan Gimsa; Ales Iglic

    2002-01-01

    Nano- and microtubular structures have recently become a subject of increasing interest due to their importance in biology and medicine as well as their technological potential. Such structures have been observed in anorganic (Iijima, 1991) as well as in organic (Schnur 1993; Oda et al. 1991) systems. Micro- and nanotubular protrusions of bilayer membranes have been found in cells (Kralj-Iglic et al. 1998; Kralj-Iglic et al. 2001a) and phospholipid vesicles (Kralj-Iglic et al. 2002; Kralj-Igl...

  3. Nanocomposite Membranes based on Perlfuorosulfonic Acid/Ceramic for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qiong; WANG Guangjin; YE Hong; YAN Shilin

    2015-01-01

    Perlfuorosulfonic acid/ceramic nanocomposite membranes were investigated as electrolytes for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell applications under low relative humidity. Different nanosized ceramics (SiO2, ZrO2, TiO2) with diameters in the range of 2-6 nm were synthesized in situ in Nafion solution through a sol-gel process and the formed nanosized ceramics were well-dispersed in the solution. The nanocomposite membranes were formed through a casting process. The nanocomposite membrane showes enhanced water retention ability and improved proton conductivity compared to those of pure Naifon membrane. The mechanical strength of the formed nanocomposite membranes is slightly less than that of pure Naifon membrane. The experimental results demonstrate that the polymer ceramic nanocompsite membranes are potential electrolyte for fuel cells operating at elevated temperature.

  4. Roles of membrane trafficking in plant cell wall dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ebine, Kazuo; Ueda, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall is one of the characteristic components of plant cells. The cell wall composition differs among cell types and is modified in response to various environmental conditions. To properly generate and modify the cell wall, many proteins are transported to the plasma membrane or extracellular space through membrane trafficking, which is one of the key protein transport mechanisms in eukaryotic cells. Given the diverse composition and functions of the cell wall in plants, the transpor...

  5. Plasma membranes from insect midgut cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter R. Terra

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma membranes from insect midgut cells are separated into apical and basolateral domains. The apical domain is usually modified into microvilli with a molecular structure similar to other animals. Nevertheless, the microvillar structure should differ in some insects to permit the traffic inside them of secretory vesicles that may budd laterally or pinch-off from the tips of microvilli. Other microvillar modifications are associated with proton-pumping or with the interplay with an ensheathing lipid membrane (the perimicrovilllar membrane observed in the midgut cells of hemipterans (aphids and bugs. The perimicrovillar membranes are thought to be involved in amino acid absorption from diluted diets. The microvillar and perimicrovillar membranes have densities (and protein content that depend on the insect taxon. The role played by the microvillar and perimicrovillar proteins in insect midgut physiology is reviewed here trying to provide a coherent picture of data and highlighting further research areas.As membranas plasmáticas das células intestinais dos insetos apresentam um domínio apical e outro basal. O domínio apical é geralmente modificado em microvilosidades com organização molecular similar a de outros animais, embora possam diferir naqueles insetos que apresentam vesículas secretoras em trânsito que brotam lateralmente ou destacam-se das extremidades das microvilosidades. Outras modificações microvilares estão associadas a bombeamento de prótons ou a interrelações com uma membrana lipídica (a membrana perimicrovilar que reveste as microvilosidades de células intestinais de hemípteros (pulgões e percevejos. Admite-se que as membranas perimicrovilares estejam envolvidas na absorção de aminoácidos a partir de dietas diluídas. As membranas microvilares e perimicrovilares tem densidades distintas (e conteúdo protéico que dependem do táxon do inseto. O papel desempenhado pelas proteínas microvilares e

  6. Mechanical properties of catalyst coated membranes: A powerful indicator of membrane degradation in fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghi Alavijeh, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical durability of perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer membranes in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) is investigated in this thesis. This work contributes to a systematic characterization of the decay in mechanical properties of membranes and catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) that are subjected to controlled chemical and/or mechanical degradation mechanisms. During field operation of PEFCs, the membrane is subjected to a combination of chemical and mechanical degradation, resulti...

  7. The relevance of membrane models to understand nanoparticles-cell membrane interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascol, Estelle; Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Chopineau, Joël

    2016-02-01

    Over the past two decades, numerous types of nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed for medical applications; however only a few nanomedicines are actually available on the market. One reason is the lack of understanding and data concerning the NP fate and their behavior upon contact with biological media and cell membranes. Biomimetic membrane models are interesting tools to approach and understand NPs-cell membrane interactions. The use of these models permits one to control physical and chemical parameters and to rapidly compare membrane types and the influence of different media conditions. The interactions between NPs and cell membranes can be qualified and quantified using analytical and modeling methods. In this review, the major studies concerning NPs-cell membrane models and associated methods are described. The advantages and drawbacks for each method are compared for the different models. The key mechanisms of interactions between NPs and cell membranes are revealed using cell membrane models and are interrogated in comparison with the NP behavior in cellulo or in vivo. Investigating the interactions between NPs and cell membrane models is now proposed as an intermediate step between physicochemical characterization of NPs and biological assays.

  8. Intravacuolar Membranes Regulate CD8 T Cell Recognition of Membrane-Bound Toxoplasma gondii Protective Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jodie; Bittame, Amina; Massera, Céline; Vasseur, Virginie; Effantin, Grégory; Valat, Anne; Buaillon, Célia; Allart, Sophie; Fox, Barbara A; Rommereim, Leah M; Bzik, David J; Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Gagnon, Jean; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Blanchard, Nicolas

    2015-12-15

    Apicomplexa parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii target effectors to and across the boundary of their parasitophorous vacuole (PV), resulting in host cell subversion and potential presentation by MHC class I molecules for CD8 T cell recognition. The host-parasite interface comprises the PV limiting membrane and a highly curved, membranous intravacuolar network (IVN) of uncertain function. Here, using a cell-free minimal system, we dissect how membrane tubules are shaped by the parasite effectors GRA2 and GRA6. We show that membrane association regulates access of the GRA6 protective antigen to the MHC I pathway in infected cells. Although insertion of GRA6 in the PV membrane is key for immunogenicity, association of GRA6 with the IVN limits presentation and curtails GRA6-specific CD8 responses in mice. Thus, membrane deformations of the PV regulate access of antigens to the MHC class I pathway, and the IVN may play a role in immune modulation. PMID:26628378

  9. Exocytosis and endocytosis in neurodocrine cells: inseparable membranes !

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    StephaneGasman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although much has been learned concerning the mechanisms of secretory vesicle formation and fusion at donor and acceptor membrane compartments, relatively little attention has been paid towards understanding how cells maintain a homeostatic membrane balance through vesicular trafficking. In neurons and neuroendocrine cells, release of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones occurs through calcium-regulated exocytosis at the plasma membrane. To allow recycling of secretory vesicle components and to preserve organelles integrity, cells must initiate and regulate compensatory membrane uptake. This review relates the fate of secretory granule membranes after full fusion exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells. In particular, we focus on the potential role of lipids in preserving and sorting secretory granule membranes after exocytosis and we discuss the potential mechanisms of membrane retrieval.

  10. Plant cell wall proteomics: the leadership of Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) progressively emerged as crucial components of cell walls although present in minor amounts. Cell wall polysaccharides such as pectins, hemicelluloses, and cellulose represent more than 90% of primary cell wall mass, whereas hemicelluloses, cellulose, and lignins are the main components of lignified secondary walls. All these polymers provide mechanical properties to cell walls, participate in cell shape and prevent water loss in aerial organs. However, cell wa...

  11. Proteomic and genomic analysis reveals novel Campylobacter jejuni outer membrane proteins and potential heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor Watson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane proteins play important roles in the interaction of bacteria with their environment including nutrient acquisition, adhesion and invasion, and antibiotic resistance. In this study we identified 47 proteins within the Sarkosyl-insoluble fraction of Campylobacter jejuni 81-176, using LC–ESI-MS/MS. Comparative analysis of outer membrane protein sequences was visualised to reveal protein distribution within a panel of Campylobacter spp., identifying several C. jejuni-specific proteins. Smith–Waterman analyses of C. jejuni homologues revealed high sequence conservation amongst a number of hypothetical proteins, sequence heterogeneity of other proteins and several proteins which are absent in a proportion of strains.

  12. Reassessing ecdysteroidogenic cells from the cell membrane receptors' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandratos, Alexandros; Moulos, Panagiotis; Nellas, Ioannis; Mavridis, Konstantinos; Dedos, Skarlatos G

    2016-01-01

    Ecdysteroids secreted by the prothoracic gland (PG) cells of insects control the developmental timing of their immature life stages. These cells have been historically considered as carrying out a single function in insects, namely the biochemical conversion of cholesterol to ecdysteroids and their secretion. A growing body of evidence shows that PG cells receive multiple cues during insect development so we tested the hypothesis that they carry out more than just one function in insects. We characterised the molecular nature and developmental profiles of cell membrane receptors in PG cells of Bombyx mori during the final larval stage and determined what receptors decode nutritional, developmental and physiological signals. Through iterative approaches we identified a complex repertoire of cell membrane receptors that are expressed in intricate patterns and activate previously unidentified signal transduction cascades in PG cells. The expression patterns of some of these receptors explain precisely the mechanisms that are known to control ecdysteroidogenesis. However, the presence of receptors for the notch, hedgehog and wingless signalling pathways and the expression of innate immunity-related receptors such as phagocytosis receptors, receptors for microbial ligands and Toll-like receptors call for a re-evaluation of the role these cells play in insects. PMID:26847502

  13. Reassessing ecdysteroidogenic cells from the cell membrane receptors’ perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandratos, Alexandros; Moulos, Panagiotis; Nellas, Ioannis; Mavridis, Konstantinos; Dedos, Skarlatos G.

    2016-01-01

    Ecdysteroids secreted by the prothoracic gland (PG) cells of insects control the developmental timing of their immature life stages. These cells have been historically considered as carrying out a single function in insects, namely the biochemical conversion of cholesterol to ecdysteroids and their secretion. A growing body of evidence shows that PG cells receive multiple cues during insect development so we tested the hypothesis that they carry out more than just one function in insects. We characterised the molecular nature and developmental profiles of cell membrane receptors in PG cells of Bombyx mori during the final larval stage and determined what receptors decode nutritional, developmental and physiological signals. Through iterative approaches we identified a complex repertoire of cell membrane receptors that are expressed in intricate patterns and activate previously unidentified signal transduction cascades in PG cells. The expression patterns of some of these receptors explain precisely the mechanisms that are known to control ecdysteroidogenesis. However, the presence of receptors for the notch, hedgehog and wingless signalling pathways and the expression of innate immunity-related receptors such as phagocytosis receptors, receptors for microbial ligands and Toll-like receptors call for a re-evaluation of the role these cells play in insects. PMID:26847502

  14. Development of composite membranes of PVA-TEOS doped KOH for alkaline membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haryadi,, E-mail: haryadi@polban.ac.id; Sugianto, D.; Ristopan, E. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Politeknik Negeri Bandung Jl. Gegerkalong Hilir, Ds. Ciwaruga, Bandung West Java (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    Anion exchange membranes (AEMs) play an important role in separating fuel and oxygen (or air) in the Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells. Preparation of hybrid organic inorganic materials of Polyvinylalcohol (PVA) - Tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) composite membrane doped KOH for direct alcohol alkaline fuel cell application has been investigated. The sol-gel method has been used to prepare the composite membrane of PVA-TEOS through crosslinking step and catalyzed by concentrated of hydrochloric acid. The gel solution was cast on the membrane plastic plate to obtain membrane sheets. The dry membranes were then doped by immersing in various concentrations of KOH solutions for about 4 hours. Investigations of the cross-linking process and the presence of hydroxyl group were conducted by FTIR as shown for frequency at about 1600 cm{sup −1} and 3300 cm{sup −1} respectively. The degree of swelling in ethanol decreased as the KOH concentration for membrane soaking process increased. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) of the membrane was 0.25meq/g. This composite membranes display significant ionic conductivity of 3.23 x 10{sup −2} S/cm in deionized water at room temperature. In addition, the morphology observation by scanning electron microscope (SEM) of the membrane indicates that soaking process of membrane in KOH increased thermal resistant.

  15. Development of composite membranes of PVA-TEOS doped KOH for alkaline membrane fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anion exchange membranes (AEMs) play an important role in separating fuel and oxygen (or air) in the Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells. Preparation of hybrid organic inorganic materials of Polyvinylalcohol (PVA) - Tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) composite membrane doped KOH for direct alcohol alkaline fuel cell application has been investigated. The sol-gel method has been used to prepare the composite membrane of PVA-TEOS through crosslinking step and catalyzed by concentrated of hydrochloric acid. The gel solution was cast on the membrane plastic plate to obtain membrane sheets. The dry membranes were then doped by immersing in various concentrations of KOH solutions for about 4 hours. Investigations of the cross-linking process and the presence of hydroxyl group were conducted by FTIR as shown for frequency at about 1600 cm−1 and 3300 cm−1 respectively. The degree of swelling in ethanol decreased as the KOH concentration for membrane soaking process increased. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) of the membrane was 0.25meq/g. This composite membranes display significant ionic conductivity of 3.23 x 10−2 S/cm in deionized water at room temperature. In addition, the morphology observation by scanning electron microscope (SEM) of the membrane indicates that soaking process of membrane in KOH increased thermal resistant

  16. Development of composite membranes of PVA-TEOS doped KOH for alkaline membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryadi, Sugianto, D.; Ristopan, E.

    2015-12-01

    Anion exchange membranes (AEMs) play an important role in separating fuel and oxygen (or air) in the Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells. Preparation of hybrid organic inorganic materials of Polyvinylalcohol (PVA) - Tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) composite membrane doped KOH for direct alcohol alkaline fuel cell application has been investigated. The sol-gel method has been used to prepare the composite membrane of PVA-TEOS through crosslinking step and catalyzed by concentrated of hydrochloric acid. The gel solution was cast on the membrane plastic plate to obtain membrane sheets. The dry membranes were then doped by immersing in various concentrations of KOH solutions for about 4 hours. Investigations of the cross-linking process and the presence of hydroxyl group were conducted by FTIR as shown for frequency at about 1600 cm-1 and 3300 cm-1 respectively. The degree of swelling in ethanol decreased as the KOH concentration for membrane soaking process increased. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) of the membrane was 0.25meq/g. This composite membranes display significant ionic conductivity of 3.23 x 10-2 S/cm in deionized water at room temperature. In addition, the morphology observation by scanning electron microscope (SEM) of the membrane indicates that soaking process of membrane in KOH increased thermal resistant.

  17. Natural taurine promotes apoptosis of human hepatic stellate cells in proteomics analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Deng, Jian Liang, Zhi-Xiu Lin, Fa-Sheng Wu, Ya-Ping Zhang, Zhi-Wei Zhang

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the differential expression of proteins between natural taurine treated hepatic stellate cells and controls, and investigate the underlying regulatory mechanism of natural taurine in inhibiting hepatic fibrosis.METHODS: A proteomic strategy combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS/MS) was used to study the differential expression of proteins and Western blotting was use...

  18. Proteomic profiling of a robust Wolbachia infection in an Aedes albopictus mosquito cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Baldridge, Gerald D; Baldridge, Abigail S.; Witthuhn, Bruce A.; Higgins, LeeAnn; Markowski, Todd W.; FALLON, ANN M.

    2014-01-01

    Wolbachia pipientis a widespread vertically transmitted intracellular bacterium, provides a tool for insect control through manipulation of host-microbe interactions. We report proteomic characterization of wStr, a Wolbachia strain associated with a strong cytoplasmic incompatibility phenotype in its native host, Laodelphax striatellus. In the Aedes albopictus C/wStr1 mosquito cell line, wStr maintains a robust, persistent infection. MS/MS analyses of gel bands revealed a protein “footprint” ...

  19. Identification of Thalidomide-Specific Transcriptomics and Proteomics Signatures during Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kesavan Meganathan; Smita Jagtap; Vilas Wagh; Johannes Winkler; John Antonydas Gaspar; Diana Hildebrand; Maria Trusch; Karola Lehmann; Jürgen Hescheler; Hartmut Schlüter; Agapios Sachinidis

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic development can be partially recapitulated in vitro by differentiating human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Thalidomide is a developmental toxicant in vivo and acts in a species-dependent manner. Besides its therapeutic value, thalidomide also serves as a prototypical model to study teratogenecity. Although many in vivo and in vitro platforms have demonstrated its toxicity, only a few test systems accurately reflect human physiology. We used global gene expression and proteomics prof...

  20. Natural taurine promotes apoptosis of human hepatic stellate cells in proteomics analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To study the differential expression of proteins between natural taurine treated hepatic stellate cells and controls, and investigate the underlying regulatory mechanism of natural taurine in inhibiting hepatic fibrosis.METHODS: A proteomic strategy combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and ultraperform ance liquid chromatographyelectrospray ionizationtandem mass spectrometry (UPLCESIMS/MS) was used to study the differential expression of proteins and Western blotting was used to validate the re...

  1. Proteomic analysis of cell surface-associated proteins from probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Madsen, Søren M; Glenting, Jacob;

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we used a proteomic approach to identify surface-associated proteins from the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum 299v. Proteins were extracted from the cell surface using a mild wash in phosphate buffer and analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel...... probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The results provide the basis for future studies on the molecular mechanisms of probiotics....

  2. Comparative proteomic analysis of high cell density cultivations with two recombinant Bacillus megaterium strains for the production of a heterologous dextransucrase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deckwer Wolf-Dieter

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High cell density cultivations were performed under identical conditions for two Bacillus megaterium strains (MS941 and WH320, both carrying a heterologous dextransucrase (dsrS gene under the control of the xylA promoter. At characteristic points of the cultivations (end of batch, initial feeding, before and after induction the proteome was analyzed based on two dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometric protein identification using the protein database "bmegMEC.v2" recently made available. High expression but no secretion of DsrS was found for the chemical mutant WH320 whereas for MS 941, a defined protease deficient mutant of the same parent strain (DSM319, not even expression of DsrS could be detected. The proteomic analysis resulted in the identification of proteins involved in different cellular pathways such as in central carbon and overflow metabolism, in protein synthesis, protein secretion and degradation, in cell wall metabolism, in cell division and sporulation, in membrane transport and in stress responses. The two strains exhibited considerable variations in expression levels of specific proteins during the different phases of the cultivation process, whereas induction of DsrS production had, in general, little effect. The largely differing behaviour of the two strains with regard to DsrS expression can be attributed, at least in part, to changes observed in the proteome which predominantly concern biosynthetic enzymes and proteins belonging to the membrane translocation system, which were strongly down-regulated at high cell densities in MS941 compared with WH320. At the same time a cell envelope-associated quality control protease and two peptidoglycan-binding proteins related to cell wall turnover were strongly expressed in MS941 but not found in WH320. However, to further explain the very different physiological responses of the two strains to the same cultivation conditions, it is necessary to identify the

  3. Selective effect of cell membrane on synaptic neurotransmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postila, Pekka A.; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Róg, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were performed with 13 non-peptidic neurotransmitters (NTs) in three different membrane environments. The results provide compelling evidence that NTs are divided into membrane-binding and membrane-nonbinding molecules. NTs adhere to the postsynaptic membrane surface whenever the ligand-binding sites of their synaptic receptors are buried in the lipid bilayer. In contrast, NTs that have extracellular ligand-binding sites do not have a similar tendency to adhere to the membrane surface. This finding is a seemingly simple yet important addition to the paradigm of neurotransmission, essentially dividing it into membrane-independent and membrane-dependent mechanisms. Moreover, the simulations also indicate that the lipid composition especially in terms of charged lipids can affect the membrane partitioning of NTs. The revised paradigm, highlighting the importance of cell membrane and specific lipids for neurotransmission, should to be of interest to neuroscientists, drug industry and the general public alike.

  4. Selective effect of cell membrane on synaptic neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postila, Pekka A; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Róg, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were performed with 13 non-peptidic neurotransmitters (NTs) in three different membrane environments. The results provide compelling evidence that NTs are divided into membrane-binding and membrane-nonbinding molecules. NTs adhere to the postsynaptic membrane surface whenever the ligand-binding sites of their synaptic receptors are buried in the lipid bilayer. In contrast, NTs that have extracellular ligand-binding sites do not have a similar tendency to adhere to the membrane surface. This finding is a seemingly simple yet important addition to the paradigm of neurotransmission, essentially dividing it into membrane-independent and membrane-dependent mechanisms. Moreover, the simulations also indicate that the lipid composition especially in terms of charged lipids can affect the membrane partitioning of NTs. The revised paradigm, highlighting the importance of cell membrane and specific lipids for neurotransmission, should to be of interest to neuroscientists, drug industry and the general public alike. PMID:26782980

  5. Proteome profile of swine testicular cells infected with porcine transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruili Ma

    Full Text Available The interactions occurring between a virus and a host cell during a viral infection are complex. The purpose of this paper was to analyze altered cellular protein levels in porcine transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV-infected swine testicular (ST cells in order to determine potential virus-host interactions. A proteomic approach using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ-coupled two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identification was conducted on the TGEV-infected ST cells. The results showed that the 4-plex iTRAQ-based quantitative approach identified 4,112 proteins, 146 of which showed significant changes in expression 48 h after infection. At 64 h post infection, 219 of these proteins showed significant change, further indicating that a larger number of proteomic changes appear to occur during the later stages of infection. Gene ontology analysis of the altered proteins showed enrichment in multiple biological processes, including cell adhesion, response to stress, generation of precursor metabolites and energy, cell motility, protein complex assembly, growth, developmental maturation, immune system process, extracellular matrix organization, locomotion, cell-cell signaling, neurological system process, and cell junction organization. Changes in the expression levels of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1, caspase-8, and heat shock protein 90 alpha (HSP90α were also verified by western blot analysis. To our knowledge, this study is the first time the response profile of ST host cells following TGEV infection has been analyzed using iTRAQ technology, and our description of the late proteomic changes that are occurring after the time of vigorous viral production are novel. Therefore, this study provides a solid foundation for further investigation, and will likely help us to better understand the mechanisms of TGEV infection and pathogenesis.

  6. Synergistic effects of retinoic acid and tamoxifen on human breast cancer cells: Proteomic characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anti-estrogen tamoxifen and vitamin A-related compound, all-trans retinoic acid (RA), in combination act synergistically to inhibit the growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. In the present study, we applied two-dimensional gel electrophoresis based proteomic approach to globally analyze this synergistic effect of RA and tamoxifen. Proteomic study revealed that multiple clusters of proteins were involved in RA and tamoxifen-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, including post-transcriptional and splicing factors, proteins related to cellular proliferation or differentiation, and proteins related to energy production and internal degradation systems. The negative growth factor-transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) was secreted by RA and/or tamoxifen treatment and was studies as a potential mediator of the synergistic effects of RA and tamoxifen in apoptosis. By comparing protein alterations in treatments of RA and tamoxifen alone or in combination to those of TGFβ treatment, or co-treatment with TGFβ inhibitor SB 431542, proteomic results showed that a number of proteins were involved in TGFβ signaling pathway. These results provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of RA and tamoxifen-induced TGFβ signaling pathway in breast cancer cells

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Differential Proteome Expression in Bladder Cancer vs. Normal Bladder Cells Using SILAC Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganglong Yang

    Full Text Available The best way to increase patient survival rate is to identify patients who are likely to progress to muscle-invasive or metastatic disease upfront and treat them more aggressively. The human cell lines HCV29 (normal bladder epithelia, KK47 (low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, NMIBC, and YTS1 (metastatic bladder cancer have been widely used in studies of molecular mechanisms and cell signaling during bladder cancer (BC progression. However, little attention has been paid to global quantitative proteome analysis of these three cell lines. We labeled HCV29, KK47, and YTS1 cells by the SILAC method using three stable isotopes each of arginine and lysine. Labeled proteins were analyzed by 2D ultrahigh-resolution liquid chromatography LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Among 3721 unique identified and annotated proteins in KK47 and YTS1 cells, 36 were significantly upregulated and 74 were significantly downregulated with >95% confidence. Differential expression of these proteins was confirmed by western blotting, quantitative RT-PCR, and cell staining with specific antibodies. Gene ontology (GO term and pathway analysis indicated that the differentially regulated proteins were involved in DNA replication and molecular transport, cell growth and proliferation, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, and cell death and survival. These proteins and the advanced proteome techniques described here will be useful for further elucidation of molecular mechanisms in BC and other types of cancer.

  8. Finite element analysis of microelectrotension of cell membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Chilman; Butler, Peter J.

    2007-01-01

    Electric fields can be focused by micropipette-based electrodes to induce stresses on cell membranes leading to tension and poration. To date, however, these membrane stress distributions have not been quantified. In this study, we determine membrane tension, stress, and strain distributions in the vicinity of a microelectrode using finite element analysis of a multiscale electro-mechanical model of pipette, media, membrane, actin cortex, and cytoplasm. Electric field forces are coupled to me...

  9. Membrane Fouling in Microfiltration used for Cell Harvesting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tahereh Kaghazchi; Farzin Zokaee; Abbas Zare

    2001-01-01

    In the present study the membrane fouling in microfiltration used for cell harvesting in a deadend system has been investigated. Experimental results were analysed in terms of existing membrane filtration models and membrane resistances. The cake filtration model (CFM) and standard blocking model (SBM) have been considered in this study.Various membrane resistances were determined at different processing time, feed concentration and stirring speed. Resistances to permeation in this system include filter medium, pore blocking, adsorption, cake layer and concentration polarization.

  10. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Response to Zinc, Magnesium, and Calcium Deficiency in Specific Cell Types of Arabidopsis Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichiro Fukao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteome profiles of specific cell types have recently been investigated using techniques such as fluorescence activated cell sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, quantitative proteomic analysis of specific cell types has not yet been performed. In this study, to investigate the response of the proteome to zinc, magnesium, and calcium deficiency in specific cell types of Arabidopsis thaliana roots, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics using GFP-expressing protoplasts collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Protoplasts were collected from the pGL2-GFPer and pMGP-GFPer marker lines for epidermis or inner cell lines (pericycle, endodermis, and cortex, respectively. To increase the number of proteins identified, iTRAQ-labeled peptides were separated into 24 fractions by OFFGFEL electrophoresis prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, 1039 and 737 proteins were identified and quantified in the epidermal and inner cell lines, respectively. Interestingly, the expression of many proteins was decreased in the epidermis by mineral deficiency, although a weaker effect was observed in inner cell lines such as the pericycle, endodermis, and cortex. Here, we report for the first time the quantitative proteomics of specific cell types in Arabidopsis roots.

  11. Nanoscale cell membrane organization : a near-field optical view

    OpenAIRE

    Koopman, Marjolein

    2006-01-01

    The cell plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells is a lipid bi-layer that separates the cell cytosol from the extracellular environment. The composition and organization of proteins and lipids within this bi-layer have a direct impact on many cellular processes, since they form the senses of the cell. Technological advances, like high resolution microscopy together with the possibility to address different membrane components via specific labeling now allows researchers to investigate cell membra...

  12. Multilineage potential and proteomic profiling of human dental stem cells derived from a single donor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dental tissues provide an alternative autologous source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regenerative medicine. In this study, we isolated human dental MSCs of follicle, pulp and papilla tissue from a single donor tooth after impacted third molar extraction by excluding the individual differences. We then compared the morphology, proliferation rate, expression of MSC-specific and pluripotency markers, and in vitro differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Finally, we analyzed the protein expression profiles of undifferentiated dental MSCs using 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS. Three types of dental MSCs largely shared similar morphology, proliferation potential, expression of surface markers and pluripotent transcription factors, and differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Upon hepatogenic induction, all MSCs were transdifferentiated into functional HLCs, and acquired hepatocyte functions by showing their ability for glycogen storage and urea production. Based on the proteome profiling results, we identified nineteen proteins either found commonly or differentially expressed among the three types of dental MSCs. In conclusion, three kinds of dental MSCs from a single donor tooth possessed largely similar cellular properties and multilineage potential. Further, these dental MSCs had similar proteomic profiles, suggesting their interchangeable applications for basic research and call therapy. - Highlights: • Isolated and characterized three types of human dental MSCs from a single donor. • MSCs of dental follicle, pulp and papilla had largely similar biological properties. • All MSCs were capable of transdifferentiating into functional hepatocyte-like cells. • 2DE proteomics with MALDI-TOF/MS identified 19 proteins in three types of MSCs. • Similar proteomic profiles suggest interchangeable applications of dental MSCs

  13. Multilineage potential and proteomic profiling of human dental stem cells derived from a single donor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, Rajreddy; Kumar, B. Mohana; Lee, Won-Jae; Jeon, Ryoung-Hoon; Jang, Si-Jung; Lee, Yeon-Mi [Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Bong-Wook; Byun, June-Ho [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Medicine and Institute of Health Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Chun-Seob; Kim, Jae-Won [Department of Microbiology, Division of Life Sciences, Research Institute of Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Rho, Gyu-Jin, E-mail: jinrho@gnu.ac.kr [Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Life Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-01

    Dental tissues provide an alternative autologous source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regenerative medicine. In this study, we isolated human dental MSCs of follicle, pulp and papilla tissue from a single donor tooth after impacted third molar extraction by excluding the individual differences. We then compared the morphology, proliferation rate, expression of MSC-specific and pluripotency markers, and in vitro differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Finally, we analyzed the protein expression profiles of undifferentiated dental MSCs using 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS. Three types of dental MSCs largely shared similar morphology, proliferation potential, expression of surface markers and pluripotent transcription factors, and differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Upon hepatogenic induction, all MSCs were transdifferentiated into functional HLCs, and acquired hepatocyte functions by showing their ability for glycogen storage and urea production. Based on the proteome profiling results, we identified nineteen proteins either found commonly or differentially expressed among the three types of dental MSCs. In conclusion, three kinds of dental MSCs from a single donor tooth possessed largely similar cellular properties and multilineage potential. Further, these dental MSCs had similar proteomic profiles, suggesting their interchangeable applications for basic research and call therapy. - Highlights: • Isolated and characterized three types of human dental MSCs from a single donor. • MSCs of dental follicle, pulp and papilla had largely similar biological properties. • All MSCs were capable of transdifferentiating into functional hepatocyte-like cells. • 2DE proteomics with MALDI-TOF/MS identified 19 proteins in three types of MSCs. • Similar proteomic profiles suggest interchangeable applications of dental MSCs.

  14. Native proteomic analysis of protein complexes in murine intestinal brush border membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Babušiak, M.; Man, Petr; Petrák, J.; Vyoral, D.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2007), s. 121-129. ISSN 1615-9853 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD204/03/H066; GA AV ČR KJB500200612; GA MŠk LC545 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GA303/04/0003; GA MZd(CZ) NR8930; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06044; CZ(CZ) 023736; GA MZd(CZ) NR8317 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : blue native electrophoresis * brush border membranes * protein complexes Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.479, year: 2007

  15. Quantitative phospho-proteomics reveals the Plasmodium merozoite triggers pre-invasion host kinase modification of the red cell cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccala, Elizabeth S; Satchwell, Timothy J; Angrisano, Fiona; Tan, Yan Hong; Wilson, Marieangela C; Heesom, Kate J; Baum, Jake

    2016-01-01

    The invasive blood-stage malaria parasite - the merozoite - induces rapid morphological changes to the target erythrocyte during entry. However, evidence for active molecular changes in the host cell that accompany merozoite invasion is lacking. Here, we use invasion inhibition assays, erythrocyte resealing and high-definition imaging to explore red cell responses during invasion. We show that although merozoite entry does not involve erythrocyte actin reorganisation, it does require ATP to complete the process. Towards dissecting the ATP requirement, we present an in depth quantitative phospho-proteomic analysis of the erythrocyte during each stage of invasion. Specifically, we demonstrate extensive increased phosphorylation of erythrocyte proteins on merozoite attachment, including modification of the cytoskeletal proteins beta-spectrin and PIEZO1. The association with merozoite contact but not active entry demonstrates that parasite-dependent phosphorylation is mediated by host-cell kinase activity. This provides the first evidence that the erythrocyte is stimulated to respond to early invasion events through molecular changes in its membrane architecture. PMID:26830761

  16. Phosphoric acid doped imidazolium polysulfone membranes for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jingshuai; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf;

    2012-01-01

    A novel acid–base polymer membrane is prepared by doping of imidazolium polysulfone with phosphoric acid for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Polysulfone is first chloromethylated, followed by functionalization of the chloromethylated polysulfone with alkyl imidazoles i.......e. methyl (MePSU), ethyl (EtPSU) and butyl (BuPSU) imidazoliums, as revealed by 1H NMR spectra. The imidazolium polysulfone membranes are then doped with phosphoric acid and used as a proton exchange membrane electrolyte in fuel cells. An acid doping level of about 10–11mol H3PO4 per mole of the imidazolium...

  17. Proteomic analysis of human blastocoel fluid and blastocyst cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille; Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen;

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are derived from the inner cell mass (ICM) of the blastocyst and can differentiate into any cell type in the human body. These cells hold a great potential for regenerative medicine, but to obtain enough cells needed for medical treatment, culture is required on a...... blastocoel fluid, which is in contact with all the cells in the blastocyst, including hESCs. Fifty-three surplus human blastocysts were donated after informed consent, and blastocoel fluid was isolated by micromanipulation. Using highly sensitive nano-high-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass...

  18. Engineered nanoparticles mimicking cell membranes for toxin neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ronnie H; Luk, Brian T; Hu, Che-Ming J; Zhang, Liangfang

    2015-08-01

    Protein toxins secreted from pathogenic bacteria and venomous animals rely on multiple mechanisms to overcome the cell membrane barrier to inflict their virulence effect. A promising therapeutic concept toward developing a broadly applicable anti-toxin platform is to administer cell membrane mimics as decoys to sequester these virulence factors. As such, lipid membrane-based nanoparticulates are an ideal candidate given their structural similarity to cellular membranes. This article reviews the virulence mechanisms employed by toxins at the cell membrane interface and highlights the application of cell-membrane mimicking nanoparticles as toxin decoys for systemic detoxification. In addition, the implication of particle/toxin nanocomplexes in the development of toxoid vaccines is discussed. PMID:25868452

  19. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in...

  20. Nafion-carbon nanocomposite membranes prepared using hydrothermal carbonization for proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Zhanli [Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University, Clayton VIC 3182 (Australia); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Inner Mongolia University, Inner Mongolia 010021 (China); Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Hongjie [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Doherty, Cara M.; Hill, Anita J. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, Locked Bag 33, Clayton South MDC, VIC 3169 (Australia); Ladewig, Bradley P.; Wang, Huanting [Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University, Clayton VIC 3182 (Australia)

    2010-12-21

    Nafion-carbon (NC) composite membranes were prepared by hydrothermal treatment of Nafion membrane impregnated with glucose solution. The carbon loading of the NC membrane was tuned by controlling the hydrothermal carbonization time. X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy were used to characterize plain Nafion and NC composite membranes. Nafion-carbon composite membranes exhibited better proton conductivity and reduced methanol permeability than those of the plain Nafion membrane. A single cell prepared with the NC composite membrane with a carbon loading of 3.6 wt% exhibited the highest cell performance. Compared with the cell performance of plain Nafion membrane, the maximum power density of the new cell improved by 31.7% for an H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} fuel cell at room temperature, and by 44.0% for a direct methanol fuel cell at 60 C. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Membrane tension and cytoskeleton organization in cell motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell membrane shape changes are important for many aspects of normal biological function, such as tissue development, wound healing and cell division and motility. Various disease states are associated with deregulation of how cells move and change shape, including notably tumor initiation and cancer cell metastasis. Cell motility is powered, in large part, by the controlled assembly and disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton. Much of this dynamic happens in close proximity to the plasma membrane due to the fact that actin assembly factors are membrane-bound, and thus actin filaments are generally oriented such that their growth occurs against or near the membrane. For a long time, the membrane was viewed as a relatively passive scaffold for signaling. However, results from the last five years show that this is not the whole picture, and that the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton are intimately linked to the mechanics of the cell membrane. In this review, we summarize recent findings concerning the role of plasma membrane mechanics in cell cytoskeleton dynamics and architecture, showing that the cell membrane is not just an envelope or a barrier for actin assembly, but is a master regulator controlling cytoskeleton dynamics and cell polarity. (topical review)

  2. Anatomy of the red cell membrane skeleton: unanswered questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Samuel E

    2016-01-14

    The red cell membrane skeleton is a pseudohexagonal meshwork of spectrin, actin, protein 4.1R, ankyrin, and actin-associated proteins that laminates the inner membrane surface and attaches to the overlying lipid bilayer via band 3-containing multiprotein complexes at the ankyrin- and actin-binding ends of spectrin. The membrane skeleton strengthens the lipid bilayer and endows the membrane with the durability and flexibility to survive in the circulation. In the 36 years since the first primitive model of the red cell skeleton was proposed, many additional proteins have been discovered, and their structures and interactions have been defined. However, almost nothing is known of the skeleton's physiology, and myriad questions about its structure remain, including questions concerning the structure of spectrin in situ, the way spectrin and other proteins bind to actin, how the membrane is assembled, the dynamics of the skeleton when the membrane is deformed or perturbed by parasites, the role lipids play, and variations in membrane structure in unique regions like lipid rafts. This knowledge is important because the red cell membrane skeleton is the model for spectrin-based membrane skeletons in all cells, and because defects in the red cell membrane skeleton underlie multiple hemolytic anemias. PMID:26537302

  3. Plant cell wall proteomics: mass spectrometry data, a trove for research on protein structure/function relationships.

    OpenAIRE

    Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Zhang, Yu; San Clemente, Hélène; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    International audience Proteomics allows the large-scale study of protein expression either in whole organisms or in purified organelles. In particular, mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of gel-separated proteins produces data not only for protein identification, but for protein structure, location, and processing as well. An in-depth analysis was performed on MS data from etiolated hypocotyl cell wall proteomics of Arabidopsis thaliana. These analyses show that highly homologous members of ...

  4. Modulation of the proteome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-1 infected patients by drugs of abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica L. Reynolds; Supriya D Mahajan; Aalinkeel, Ravikunar; Nair, Bindukumar; Sykes, Donald E; Agosto-Mujica, Arnadri; Hsiao, Chiu Bin; Schwartz, Stanley A.

    2009-01-01

    We used proteomic analyses to assess how drug abuse modulates immunologic responses to infections with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Two dimensional (2D) difference gel electrophoresis was utilized to determine changes in the proteome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) isolated from HIV-1 positive donors that occurred after treatment with cocaine or methamphetamine. Both drugs differentially regulated the expression of several functional classes of proteins. We fu...

  5. Electrochemical proton gradient in Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells and membrane vesicles.

    OpenAIRE

    Friedberg, I.; Kaback, H R

    1980-01-01

    Using the distribution of weak acids to measure the pH gradient (delta pH; interior alkaline) and the distribution of the lipophilic cation [3H]tetraphenylphosphonium+ to monitor the membrane potential (delta psi; interior negative), we studied the electrochemical gradient or protons (delta mu- H+) across the membrane of Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells and plasma membrane vesicles. With reduced phenazine methosulfate as electron donor, intact cells exhibited a relatively constant delta mu- H+...

  6. Revealing the Dynamics of Thylakoid Membranes in Living Cyanobacterial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Laura-Roxana Stingaciu; Hugh O’Neill; Michelle Liberton; Urban, Volker S.; Himadri B. Pakrasi; Michael Ohl

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that make major contributions to the production of the oxygen in the Earth atmosphere. The photosynthetic machinery in cyanobacterial cells is housed in flattened membrane structures called thylakoids. The structural organization of cyanobacterial cells and the arrangement of the thylakoid membranes in response to environmental conditions have been widely investigated. However, there is limited knowledge about the internal dynamics of these membran...

  7. Human lung epithelial cell A549 proteome data after treatment with titanium dioxide and carbon black.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Ngoc Q; Goegan, Patrick; Mohottalage, Susantha; Breznan, Dalibor; Ariganello, Marianne; Williams, Andrew; Elisma, Fred; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Vincent, Renaud; Kumarathasan, Premkumari

    2016-09-01

    Here, we have described the dataset relevant to the A549 cellular proteome changes after exposure to either titanium dioxide or carbon black particles as compared to the non-exposed controls, "Proteomic changes in human lung epithelial cells (A549) in response to carbon black and titanium dioxide exposures" (Vuong et al., 2016) [1]. Detailed methodologies on the separation of cellular proteins by 2D-GE and the subsequent mass spectrometry analyses using MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS are documented. Particle exposure-specific protein expression changes were measured via 2D-GE spot volume analysis. Protein identification was done by querying mass spectrometry data against SwissProt and RefSeq protein databases using Mascot search engine. Two-way ANOVA analysis data provided information on statistically significant A549 protein expression changes associated with particle exposures. PMID:27508218

  8. Label-free quantitative proteomics of CD133-positive liver cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Sheng-Ta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD133-positive liver cancer stem cells, which are characterized by their resistance to conventional chemotherapy and their tumor initiation ability at limited dilutions, have been recognized as a critical target in liver cancer therapeutics. In the current work, we developed a label-free quantitative method to investigate the proteome of CD133-positive liver cancer stem cells for the purpose of identifying unique biomarkers that can be utilized for targeting liver cancer stem cells. Label-free quantitation was performed in combination with ID-based Elution time Alignment by Linear regression Quantitation (IDEAL-Q and MaxQuant. Results Initially, IDEAL-Q analysis revealed that 151 proteins were differentially expressed in the CD133-positive hepatoma cells when compared with CD133-negative cells. We then analyzed these 151 differentially expressed proteins by MaxQuant software and identified 10 significantly up-regulated proteins. The results were further validated by RT-PCR, western blot, flow cytometry or immunofluorescent staining which revealed that prominin-1, annexin A1, annexin A3, transgelin, creatine kinase B, vimentin, and EpCAM were indeed highly expressed in the CD133-positive hepatoma cells. Conclusions These findings confirmed that mass spectrometry-based label-free quantitative proteomics can be used to gain insights into liver cancer stem cells.

  9. Comparative proteomics of milk fat globule membrane in goat colostrum and mature milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Liu, Lu; Pang, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Shuwen; Jia, Zhenhu; Ma, Changlu; Zhao, Lili; Lv, Jiaping

    2016-10-15

    As an important nutrient source in large area of world, the composition and nutritional value of goat milk are not well deliberated. Detailed annotation of protein composition is essential to address the physiological and nutritional value of goat milk. In the present study, 423 colostrum and mature goat milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) proteins were identified. The abundance of 189 proteins was significantly different between colostrums and mature milk MFGM. The acute phase proteins were higher in colostrums MFGM than those in mature milk MFGM which protected newborns at the beginning of life. Proteins related to synthesis and secretion were conserved through lactation to ensure the milk production. Of note, long term depression (LTD) proteins were observed in colostrum and mature milk MFGM. Milk LTD proteins could be potential biomarkers for diagnosis of lactation related depressive syndromes and should be taken into considerations of their effects on newborns. PMID:27173528

  10. Cultivation of MDCK epithelial cells on chitosan membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popowicz, P; Kurzyca, J; Dolińska, B; Popowicz, J

    1985-01-01

    Deacetylated chitin upon evaporation from aqueous acetic acid solutions forms a thin, permeable and transparent porous membrane which can be successfully used as support of cell culture. An established MDCK cell line grown as monolayer on both chitosan membrane and millipore filter generates comparable bioelectrical properties when studied in a typical transporting chamber. PMID:4084278

  11. Polybenzimidazole and sulfonated polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane composite membranes for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Allward, Todd; Alfaro, Silvia Martinez;

    2014-01-01

    Composite membranes based on poly(2,2′(m-phenylene)-5,5́bibenzimidazole) (PBI) and sulfonated polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane (S-POSS) with S-POSS contents of 5 and 10wt.% were prepared by solution casting as base materials for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. With membranes...... based on pure PBI as a reference point, the composite membranes were characterized with respect to spectroscopic and physicochemical properties. After doping with phosphoric acid, the composite membranes showed considerably improved ex situ proton conductivity under anhydrous as well as under fully...... humidified conditions in the 120-180°C temperature range. The conductivity improvements were also confirmed by in situ fuel cell tests at 160°C and further supported by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data based on the operating membrane electrode assemblies, demonstrating the technical...

  12. Polybenzimidazole and sulfonated polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane composite membranes for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite membranes based on poly(2,2′(m-phenylene)-5,5′bibenzimidazole) (PBI) and sulfonated polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane (S-POSS) with S-POSS contents of 5 and 10 wt.% were prepared by solution casting as base materials for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. With membranes based on pure PBI as a reference point, the composite membranes were characterized with respect to spectroscopic and physicochemical properties. After doping with phosphoric acid, the composite membranes showed considerably improved ex situ proton conductivity under anhydrous as well as under fully humidified conditions in the 120-180 °C temperature range. The conductivity improvements were also confirmed by in situ fuel cell tests at 160 °C and further supported by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data based on the operating membrane electrode assemblies, demonstrating the technical feasibility of the novel electrolyte materials

  13. Analysis of the immune response of human dendritic cells to Mycobacterium tuberculosis by quantitative proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Chiu-Ping; Chang, Kuo-Song; Hsu, Jue-Liang; Tsai, I-Fang; Lin, Andrew Boyd; Wei, Tsai-Yin; Wu, Chien-Liang; Lu, Yen-Ta

    2016-01-01

    Background The cellular immune response for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infection remained incompletely understood. To uncover membrane proteins involved in this infection mechanism, an integrated approach consisting of an organic solvent-assisted membrane protein digestion, stable-isotope dimethyl labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis was used to comparatively profile the membrane protein expression of human dendritic cells upon heat...

  14. New ETFE-based membrane for direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigated membranes are based on 35-bar μ m thick commercial poly(ethylene-alt-tetrafluoroethylene) (ETFE) films. The films were made proton conductive by means of irradiation treatment followed by sulfonation. These membranes have exceptionally low water uptake and excellent dimensional stability. The new membranes are investigated widely in a laboratory-scale direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The temperature range used in the fuel cell tests was 30-85-bar o C and the measurement results were compared to those of the Nafion(R)115 membrane. Also methanol permeability through the ETFE-based membrane was measured as a function of temperature, resulting in values less than 10% of the corresponding values for Nafion(R)115, which was considerably thicker than the experimental membrane. Methanol crossover was reported to decrease when the thickness of the membrane increases, so the ETFE-based membrane compares favourably to Nafion(R) membranes. The maximum power densities achieved with the experimental ETFE-based membrane were about 40-65% lower than the corresponding values of the Nafion(R)115 membrane, because of the lower conductivity and noticeably higher IR-losses. Chemical and mechanical stability of the ETFE-based membrane appeared to be promising since it was tested over 2000-bar h in the DMFC without any performance loss

  15. Changes in the proteomic profile of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells during passages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capra Emanuele

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC have recently raised the attention because of their therapeutic potential in the novel context of regenerative medicine. However, the safety of these new and promising cellular products should be carefully defined before they can be used in the clinical setting, as. The protein expression profile of these cells might reveal potential hazards associated with senescence and tumoral transformation which may occur during culture. Proteomic is a valuable tool for hMSC characterization and identification of possible changes during expansion. Results We used Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time Of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (SELDI-ToF-MS to evaluate the presence of stable molecular markers in adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSC produced under conditions of good manufacturing practices (GMP. Proteomic patterns of cells prepared were consistent, with 4 up-regulated peaks (mass-to-charge ratio (m/z 8950, 10087, 10345, and 13058 through subculture steps (P0-P7 with similar trend in three donors. Among the differentially expressed proteins found in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions, a cytoplasmic 10.1 kDa protein was upregulated during culture passages and was identified as S100A6 (Calcyclin. Conclusions This study suggests for the first time that common variation could occur in AD-MSC from different donors, with the identification of S100A6, a protein prevalently related to cell proliferation and cell culture condition. These results support the hypothesis of common proteomic changes during MSCs expansion and could give important insight in the knowledge of molecular mechanisms intervening during MSC expansion.

  16. The Stirred Tank Reactor Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell

    CERN Document Server

    Benziger, J; Karnas, E; Moxley, J; Teuscher, C; Kevrekidis, Yu G; Benziger, Jay

    2003-01-01

    The design and operation of a differential Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is described. The fuel cell design is based on coupled Stirred Tank Reactors (STR); the gas phase in each reactor compartment was well mixed. The characteristic times for reactant flow, gas phase diffusion and reaction were chosen so that the gas compositions at both the anode and cathode are uniform. The STR PEM fuel cell is one-dimensional; the only spatial gradients are transverse to the membrane. The STR PEM fuel cell was employed to examine fuel cell start- up, and its dynamic responses to changes in load, temperature and reactant flow rates. Multiple time scales in systems response are found to correspond to water absorption by the membrane, water transport through the membrane and stress-related mechanical changes of the membrane.

  17. T-cell recognition is shaped by epitope sequence conservation in the host proteome and microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bresciani, Anne Gøther; Paul, Sinu; Schommer, Nina;

    2016-01-01

    allergen with the conservation of its sequence in the human proteome or the healthy human microbiome. Indeed, performing such comparisons on large sets of validated T-cell epitopes, we found that epitopes that are similar with self-antigens above a certain threshold showed lower immunogenicity, presumably...... as a result of negative selection of T cells capable of recognizing such peptides. Moreover, we also found a reduced level of immune recognition for epitopes conserved in the commensal microbiome, presumably as a result of peripheral tolerance. These findings indicate that the existence (and...

  18. Combinatory annotation of cell membrane receptors and signalling pathways of Bombyx mori prothoracic glands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulos, Panagiotis; Samiotaki, Martina; Panayotou, George; Dedos, Skarlatos G.

    2016-01-01

    The cells of prothoracic glands (PG) are the main site of synthesis and secretion of ecdysteroids, the biochemical products of cholesterol conversion to steroids that shape the morphogenic development of insects. Despite the availability of genome sequences from several insect species and the extensive knowledge of certain signalling pathways that underpin ecdysteroidogenesis, the spectrum of signalling molecules and ecdysteroidogenic cascades is still not fully comprehensive. To fill this gap and obtain the complete list of cell membrane receptors expressed in PG cells, we used combinatory bioinformatic, proteomic and transcriptomic analysis and quantitative PCR to annotate and determine the expression profiles of genes identified as putative cell membrane receptors of the model insect species, Bombyx mori, and subsequently enrich the repertoire of signalling pathways that are present in its PG cells. The genome annotation dataset we report here highlights modules and pathways that may be directly involved in ecdysteroidogenesis and aims to disseminate data and assist other researchers in the discovery of the role of such receptors and their ligands. PMID:27576083

  19. Biochemistry, proteomics and phosphoproteomics of plant mitochondria from non-photosynthetic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Foged Havelund

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria fulfill some basic roles in all plant cells. They supply the cell with energy in the form of ATP and reducing equivalents (NAD(PH and they provide the cell with intermediates for a range of biosynthetic pathways. In addition to this, mitochondria contribute to a number of specialized functions depending on the tissue and cell type, as well as environmental conditions. We will here review the biochemistry and proteomics of mitochondria from non-green cells and organs, which differ from those of photosynthetic organs in a number of respects. We will briefly cover purification of mitochondria and general biochemical properties such as oxidative phosphorylation. We will then mention a few adaptive properties in response to water stress, seed maturation and germination and the ability to function under hypoxic conditions. The discussion will mainly focus on Arabidopsis cell cultures, etiolated germinating rice seedlings and potato tubers as model plants. It will cover the general proteome as well as the posttranslational modification protein phosphorylation. To date 64 phosphorylated mitochondrial proteins with a total of 103 phosphorylation sites have been identified.

  20. Studying the Nucleated Mammalian Cell Membrane by Single Molecule Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Wu, Jiazhen; Gao, Jing; Liu, Shuheng; Jiang, Junguang; Jiang, Shibo; Wang, Hongda

    2014-01-01

    The cell membrane plays a key role in compartmentalization, nutrient transportation and signal transduction, while the pattern of protein distribution at both cytoplasmic and ectoplasmic sides of the cell membrane remains elusive. Using a combination of single-molecule techniques, including atomic force microscopy (AFM), single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), to study the structure of nucleated cell membranes, we found that (1) proteins at the ectoplasmic side of the cell membrane form a dense protein layer (4 nm) on top of a lipid bilayer; (2) proteins aggregate to form islands evenly dispersed at the cytoplasmic side of the cell membrane with a height of about 10–12 nm; (3) cholesterol-enriched domains exist within the cell membrane; (4) carbohydrates stay in microdomains at the ectoplasmic side; and (5) exposed amino groups are asymmetrically distributed on both sides. Based on these observations, we proposed a Protein Layer-Lipid-Protein Island (PLLPI) model, to provide a better understanding of cell membrane structure, membrane trafficking and viral fusion mechanisms. PMID:24806512

  1. Durability of symmetrically and asymmetrically porous polybenzimidazole membranes for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jheng, Li-Cheng; Chang, Wesley Jen-Yang; Hsu, Steve Lien-Chung; Cheng, Po-Yang

    2016-08-01

    Two types of porous polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes with symmetric and asymmetric morphologies were fabricated by the template-leaching method and characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Their physicochemical properties were compared in terms of acid-doping level, proton conductivity, mechanical strength, and oxidative stability. The durability of fuel cell operation is one of the most challenging for the PBI based membrane electrode assembly (MEA) used in high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs). In the present work, we carried out a long-term steady-state fuel cell test to compare the effect of membrane structure on the cell voltage degradation. It has also been demonstrated that the asymmetrically porous PBI could bring some notable improvements on the durability of fuel cell operation, the fuel crossover problem, and the phosphoric acid leakage.

  2. Radiation-Grafted Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Water Electrolysis Cells: Evaluation of Key Membrane Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Albert; Barnett, Alejandro O; Thomassen, Magnus S; Schmidt, Thomas J; Gubler, Lorenz

    2015-10-14

    Radiation-grafted membranes can be considered an alternative to perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) membranes, such as Nafion, in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolyzer. Styrene, acrylonitrile, and 1,3-diisopropenylbenzene monomers are cografted into preirradiated 50 μm ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) base film, followed by sulfonation to introduce proton exchange sites to the obtained grafted films. The incorporation of grafts throughout the thickness is demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) analysis of the membrane cross-sections. The membranes are analyzed in terms of grafting kinetics, ion-exchange capacity (IEC), and water uptake. The key properties of radiation-grafted membranes and Nafion, such as gas crossover, area resistance, and mechanical properties, are evaluated and compared. The plot of hydrogen crossover versus area resistance of the membranes results in a property map that indicates the target areas for membrane development for electrolyzer applications. Tensile tests are performed to assess the mechanical properties of the membranes. Finally, these three properties are combined to establish a figure of merit, which indicates that radiation-grafted membranes obtained in the present study are promising candidates with properties superior to those of Nafion membranes. A water electrolysis cell test is performed as proof of principle, including a comparison to a commercial membrane electrode assembly (MEA). PMID:26393461

  3. Metastasis-related plasma membrane proteins of human breast cancer cells identified by comparative quantitative mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Lund, Rikke; Hansen, Helle V;

    2009-01-01

    clinical samples or in vitro assays is not feasible. We have used a unique model system consisting of two isogenic human breast cancer cell lines that are equally tumorigenic in mice, but while one gives rise to metastasis, the other disseminates single cells that remain dormant at distant organs. Membrane...... purification and comparative quantitative LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis identified 13 membrane proteins that were expressed at higher levels and 3 that were under-expressed in the metastatic compared to the non-metastatic cell line from a total of 1919 identified protein entries. Among the proteins were ecto-5......'-nucleotidase (ecto-5'-NT, CD73), Ndrg1, integrin beta1, CD44, CD74 and MHC class II proteins. The altered expression levels of proteins identified by LC-MS/MS were validated using flow cytometry, Western blotting, immunocyto- and immunohisto-chemistry. Analysis of clinical breast cancer biopsies demonstrated a...

  4. Proteome array identification of bioactive soluble proteins/peptides in matrigel; relevance to stem cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrigel and similar commercial products are extracts of the Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm sarcoma that provide a basement-membrane-like attachment factor or gel that is used to grow cells on or in. To ascertain further what proteins may be present in Matrigel, besides its major basement-membrane constitue...

  5. Nano thermo-hydrodynamics method for investigating cell membrane fluidity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    As a barrier to compartmentalize cells,mem-branes form the interface between a cell and its surround-ings.The essential function of a membrane is to maintain a relatively stable environment in the cell,exchange sub-stances selectively and transfer energy and information continually from the outside.It is intriguing that above the phase transition temperature,the membrane lipid molecule will have three modes-lateral diffusion,rotational movement and flip-flop activity.These thermodynamic processes are vital to cell existence,growth,division,differentiation and are also responsible for hundreds of thousands of phenomena in life.Previously,species transport across the membrane was interpreted mainly from a phenomenological view using a lumped system model.Therefore,detailed flow processes occurred in the membrane domain and clues related to life mechanism were not sufficiently tackled.Such important issues can be clarifled by modeling nano scale thermal hydrodynamics over the gap space of a cell membrane.Previously observed complex membrane behaviors will be shown in this paper and explained by the thermally induced fluidic convections inside the membrane.A correlation between nano scale hydrodynamics,non-equilibrium thermodynamics and eell membrane activities is set up.The disclosed mechanisms are expected to provide a new viewpoint on the interaction between intracellular and extracellular processes through the membrane.

  6. Unique proteome signature of post-chemotherapy ovarian cancer ascites-derived tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nuzhat; Greening, David; Samardzija, Chantel; Escalona, Ruth M; Chen, Maoshan; Findlay, Jock K; Kannourakis, George

    2016-01-01

    Eighty % of ovarian cancer patients diagnosed at an advanced-stage have complete remission after initial surgery and chemotherapy. However, most patients die within identification of 353 proteins. There were significant differences in proteins encoding for immune surveillance, DNA repair mechanisms, cytoskeleton rearrangement, cell-cell adhesion, cell cycle pathways, cellular transport, and proteins involved with glycine/proline/arginine synthesis in tumor cells isolated from CR relative to CN patients. Pathway analyses revealed enrichment of metabolic pathways, DNA repair mechanisms and energy metabolism pathways in CR tumor cells. In conclusion, this is the first proteomics study to comprehensively analyze ascites-derived tumor cells from CN and CR ovarian cancer patients. PMID:27470985

  7. Oncostatin M regulates membrane traffic and stimulates bile canalicular membrane biogenesis in HepG2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wouden, Johanna M.; Van IJzendoorn, Sven C.D.; Hoekstra, Dick

    2002-01-01

    Hepatocytes are the major epithelial cells of the liver and they display membrane polarity: the sinusoidal membrane representing the basolateral surface, while the bile canalicular membrane is typical of the apical membrane. In polarized HepG2 cells an endosomal organelle, SAC, fulfills a prominent

  8. Catalyst Degradation in High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Buazar, F.; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Pan, Chao; Steenberg, T.; Dai, S.; Bjerrum, Niels J.

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of carbon supported platinum catalysts is a major failure mode for the long term durability of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells based on phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes. With Vulcan carbon black as a reference, thermally treated carbon black and...

  9. A Quaternary Polybenzimidazole Membrane for Intermediate Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, C.; Scott, K.; Li, Qingfeng;

    2013-01-01

    at 150 °C with the PA acid loading level of 3.5 PRU (amount of H3PO4 per repeat unit of polymer QPBI). The QPBI membrane was characterized in terms of composition, structure and morphology by NMR, FTIR, SEM, and EDX. The fuel cell performance with the membrane gave peak power densities of 440 and 240...

  10. A draft map of the mouse pluripotent stem cell spatial proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoforou, Andy; Mulvey, Claire M; Breckels, Lisa M; Geladaki, Aikaterini; Hurrell, Tracey; Hayward, Penelope C; Naake, Thomas; Gatto, Laurent; Viner, Rosa; Martinez Arias, Alfonso; Lilley, Kathryn S

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the subcellular distribution of proteins is vital for understanding cellular mechanisms. Capturing the subcellular proteome in a single experiment has proven challenging, with studies focusing on specific compartments or assigning proteins to subcellular niches with low resolution and/or accuracy. Here we introduce hyperLOPIT, a method that couples extensive fractionation, quantitative high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry with multivariate data analysis. We apply hyperLOPIT to a pluripotent stem cell population whose subcellular proteome has not been extensively studied. We provide localization data on over 5,000 proteins with unprecedented spatial resolution to reveal the organization of organelles, sub-organellar compartments, protein complexes, functional networks and steady-state dynamics of proteins and unexpected subcellular locations. The method paves the way for characterizing the impact of post-transcriptional and post-translational modification on protein location and studies involving proteome-level locational changes on cellular perturbation. An interactive open-source resource is presented that enables exploration of these data. PMID:26754106

  11. Proteomic changes resulting from gene copy number variations in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Geiger

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Along the transformation process, cells accumulate DNA aberrations, including mutations, translocations, amplifications, and deletions. Despite numerous studies, the overall effects of amplifications and deletions on the end point of gene expression--the level of proteins--is generally unknown. Here we use large-scale and high-resolution proteomics combined with gene copy number analysis to investigate in a global manner to what extent these genomic changes have a proteomic output and therefore the ability to affect cellular transformation. We accurately measure expression levels of 6,735 proteins and directly compare them to the gene copy number. We find that the average effect of these alterations on the protein expression is only a few percent. Nevertheless, by using a novel algorithm, we find the combined impact that many of these regional chromosomal aberrations have at the protein level. We show that proteins encoded by amplified oncogenes are often overexpressed, while adjacent amplified genes, which presumably do not promote growth and survival, are attenuated. Furthermore, regulation of biological processes and molecular complexes is independent of general copy number changes. By connecting the primary genome alteration to their proteomic consequences, this approach helps to interpret the data from large-scale cancer genomics efforts.

  12. SILAC-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Rüetschi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, the most common lymphoma, is a heterogeneous disease where the outcome for patients with early relapse or refractory disease is very poor, even in the era of immunochemotherapy. In order to describe possible differences in global protein expression and network patterns, we performed a SILAC-based shotgun (LC-MS/MS quantitative proteomic analysis in fresh-frozen tumor tissue from two groups of DLBCL patients with totally different clinical outcome: (i early relapsed or refractory and (ii long-term progression-free patients. We could identify over 3,500 proteins; more than 1,300 were quantified in all patients and 87 were significantly differentially expressed. By functional annotation analysis on the 66 proteins overexpressed in the progression-free patient group, we found an enrichment of proteins involved in the regulation and organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Also, five proteins from actin cytoskeleton regulation, applied in a supervised regression analysis, could discriminate the two patient groups. In conclusion, SILAC-based shotgun quantitative proteomic analysis appears to be a powerful tool to explore the proteome in DLBCL tumor tissue. Also, as progression-free patients had a higher expression of proteins involved in the actin cytoskeleton protein network, such a pattern indicates a functional role in the sustained response to immunochemotherapy.

  13. Electron Spin Resonance Study of Fuel Cell Polymer Membrane Degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander Panchenko; Elena Aleksandrova; Emil Roduner

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction The long term stability of the membrane is an important factor limiting the fuel cell lifetime. During extended use the membrane degrades, probably via reaction with hydroxyl and superoxide radicals which are regular intermediates of the oxygen reduction at the cathode. Only extremely stable membranes can withstand the aggressive chemical and physical environment in an operating fuel cell. Within a given set of operating conditions, intrinsic chemical and mechanical properties of the membrane as well as its water content impact its durability dramatically.

  14. Cell membrane potentials induced during exposure to EMP fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gailey, P.C.; Easterly, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    Internal current densities and electric fields induced in the human body during exposure to EMP fields are reviewed and used to predict resulting cell membrane potentials. Using several different approaches, membrane potentials of about 100 mV are predicted. These values are comparable to the static membrane potentials maintained by cells as a part of normal physiological function, but the EMP-induced potentials persist for only about 10 ns. Possible biological implications of EMP-induced membrane potentials including conformational changes and electroporation are discussed.

  15. Revealing the Dynamics of Thylakoid Membranes in Living Cyanobacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stingaciu, Laura-Roxana; O'Neill, Hugh; Liberton, Michelle; Urban, Volker S.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Ohl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that make major contributions to the production of the oxygen in the Earth atmosphere. The photosynthetic machinery in cyanobacterial cells is housed in flattened membrane structures called thylakoids. The structural organization of cyanobacterial cells and the arrangement of the thylakoid membranes in response to environmental conditions have been widely investigated. However, there is limited knowledge about the internal dynamics of these membranes in terms of their flexibility and motion during the photosynthetic process. We present a direct observation of thylakoid membrane undulatory motion in vivo and show a connection between membrane mobility and photosynthetic activity. High-resolution inelastic neutron scattering experiments on the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 assessed the flexibility of cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane sheets and the dependence of the membranes on illumination conditions. We observed softer thylakoid membranes in the dark that have three-to four fold excess mobility compared to membranes under high light conditions. Our analysis indicates that electron transfer between photosynthetic reaction centers and the associated electrochemical proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane result in a significant driving force for excess membrane dynamics. These observations provide a deeper understanding of the relationship between photosynthesis and cellular architecture.

  16. Proteomics study of progeny of normal human liver cells irradiated by 60Co γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To characterize the differential protein expression in the progeny of human liver cells surviving from ionizing radiation by the proteomic analysis. Methods: Two-dimensional electrophoresis gel coupled with mass spectrometry was used to explore the specific protein expression in the progeny of 7702 human liver cells surviving from ionizing radiation. Alterations in expression level of protein spots between the control and the progeny groups were statistically analyzed by ImageMaster 2D Platinum software and mass spectrometry was used to identify the protein spots with significantly altered expression-level. Results: The progeny of irradiated ceils were derived from human liver cell line exposed to 0, 2, 4, 6 Gy of 60Co γ-irradiation. A total of 42 differentially expressed proteins between the control and the progeny of the irradiated cells groups were screened, of which 17 were identified by matrix assistant laser desorption ion-top off light-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis, including 4 up-regulated and 13 down-regnlated proteins. Conclusions: The differentially expressed proteins profile could be significantly altered in the progeny of irradiated cells. The proteomics approach has the potential to detect the protein changes relevant to radiatian-induced genomic instability (RIGI). Further study of differentially expressed proteins would likely reveal the molecular mechanisms of gene expression in RIGI. (authors)

  17. Transchromosomic cell model of Down syndrome shows aberrant migration, adhesion and proteome response to extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotter Finbarr E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome (DS, caused by trisomy of human chromosome 21 (HSA21, is the most common genetic birth defect. Congenital heart defects (CHD are seen in 40% of DS children, and >50% of all atrioventricular canal defects in infancy are caused by trisomy 21, but the causative genes remain unknown. Results Here we show that aberrant adhesion and proliferation of DS cells can be reproduced using a transchromosomic model of DS (mouse fibroblasts bearing supernumerary HSA21. We also demonstrate a deacrease of cell migration in transchromosomic cells independently of their adhesion properties. We show that cell-autonomous proteome response to the presence of Collagen VI in extracellular matrix is strongly affected by trisomy 21. Conclusion This set of experiments establishes a new model system for genetic dissection of the specific HSA21 gene-overdose contributions to aberrant cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and specific proteome response to collagen VI, cellular phenotypes linked to the pathogenesis of CHD.

  18. Proteome data from a host-pathogen interaction study with Staphylococcus aureus and human lung epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Surmann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To simultaneously obtain proteome data of host and pathogen from an internalization experiment, human alveolar epithelial A549 cells were infected with Staphylococcus aureus HG001 which carried a plasmid (pMV158GFP encoding a continuously expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP. Samples were taken hourly between 1.5 h and 6.5 h post infection. By fluorescence activated cell sorting GFP-expressing bacteria could be enriched from host cell debris, but also infected host cells could be separated from those which did not carry bacteria after contact (exposed. Additionally, proteome data of A549 cells which were not exposed to S. aureus but underwent the same sample processing steps are provided as a control. Time-resolved changes in bacterial protein abundance were quantified in a label-free approach. Proteome adaptations of host cells were monitored by comparative analysis to a stable isotope labeled cell culture (SILAC standard. Proteins were extracted from the cells, digested proteolytically, measured by nanoLC–MS/MS, and subsequently identified by database search and then quantified. The data presented here are related to a previously published research article describing the interplay of S. aureus HG001 and human epithelial cells (Surmann et al., 2015 [1]. They have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange platform with the identifiers PRIDE: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002384 for the S. aureus HG001 proteome dataset and PRIDE: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002388 for the A549 proteome dataset.

  19. Functional proteomics screen enables enrichment of distinct cell types from human pancreatic islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revital Sharivkin

    Full Text Available The current world-wide epidemic of diabetes has prompted attempts to generate new sources of insulin-producing cells for cell replacement therapy. An inherent challenge in many of these strategies is the lack of cell-surface markers permitting isolation and characterization of specific cell types from differentiating stem cell populations. Here we introduce an iterative proteomics procedure allowing tag-free isolation of cell types based on their function. Our method detects and associates specific cell-surface markers with particular cell functionality by coupling cell capture on antibody arrays with immunofluorescent labeling. Using this approach in an iterative manner, we discovered marker combinations capable of enriching for discrete pancreatic cell subtypes from human islets of Langerhans: insulin-producing beta cells (CD9high/CD56+, glucagon-producing alpha cells (CD9-/CD56+ and trypsin-producing acinar cells (CD9-/CD56-. This strategy may assist future beta cell research and the development of diagnostic tools for diabetes. It can also be applied more generally for function-based purification of desired cell types from other limited and heterogeneous biological samples.

  20. Label-free and spike-in standard-free mass spectrometry in the proteomic analysis of plasma membrane proteins and membrane-associated protein networks

    OpenAIRE

    Niehage, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is the primary technology of proteomics. For the analysis of complex proteomes, protein identities and quantities are inferred from their peptides that are generated by cleaving all proteins with the endopeptidase trypsin. But there is one major disadvantage that is due to biophysical differences, different peptides cause different intensities. Miscellaneous approaches have been developed to circumvent this problem based on the chemical or metabolic introduction of heavy sta...

  1. SILAC-based quantitative proteomic analysis of human lung cell response to copper oxide nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariola J Edelmann

    Full Text Available Copper (II oxide (CuO nanoparticles (NP are widely used in industry and medicine. In our study we evaluated the response of BEAS-2B human lung cells to CuO NP, using Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC-based proteomics and phosphoproteomics. Pathway modeling of the protein differential expression showed that CuO NP affect proteins relevant in cellular function and maintenance, protein synthesis, cell death and survival, cell cycle and cell morphology. Some of the signaling pathways represented by BEAS-2B proteins responsive to the NP included mTOR signaling, protein ubiquitination pathway, actin cytoskeleton signaling and epithelial adherens junction signaling. Follow-up experiments showed that CuO NP altered actin cytoskeleton, protein phosphorylation and protein ubiquitination level.

  2. How the antimicrobial peptides destroy bacteria cell membrane: Translocations vs. membrane buckling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubovic, Leonardo; Gao, Lianghui; Chen, Licui; Fang, Weihai

    2012-02-01

    In this study, coarse grained Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulation with implementation of electrostatic interactions is developed in constant pressure and surface tension ensemble to elucidate how the antimicrobial peptide molecules affect bilayer cell membrane structure and kill bacteria. We find that peptides with different chemical-physical properties exhibit different membrane obstructing mechanisms. Peptide molecules can destroy vital functions of the affected bacteria by translocating across their membranes via worm-holes, or by associating with membrane lipids to form hydrophilic cores trapped inside the hydrophobic domain of the membranes. In the latter scenario, the affected membranes are strongly corrugated (buckled) in accord with very recent experimental observations [G. E. Fantner et al., Nat. Nanotech., 5 (2010), pp. 280-285].

  3. Lipid membrane domains in cell surface and vacuolar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T; Hirabayashi, Y

    2000-01-01

    Detergent insoluble sphingolipid-cholesterol enriched 'raft'-like membrane microdomains have been implicated in a variety of biological processes including sorting, trafficking, and signaling. Mutant cells and knockout animals of sphingolipid biosynthesis are clearly useful to understand the biological roles of lipid components in raft-like domains. It is suggested that raft-like domains distribute in internal vacuolar membranes as well as plasma membranes. In addition to sphingolipid-cholesterol-rich membrane domains, recent studies suggest the existence of another lipid-membrane domain in the endocytic pathway. This domain is enriched with a unique phospholipid, lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) and localized in the internal membrane of multivesicular endosome. LBPA-rich membrane domains are involved in lipid and protein sorting within the endosomal system. Possible interaction between sphingolipids and LBPA in sphingolipid-storage disease is discussed. PMID:11201787

  4. Measurement of the nonlinear elasticity of red blood cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongkeun; Best, Catherine A.; Kuriabova, Tatiana; Henle, Mark L.; Feld, Michael S.; Levine, Alex J.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-05-01

    The membranes of human red blood cells (RBCs) are a composite of a fluid lipid bilayer and a triangular network of semiflexible filaments (spectrin). We perform cellular microrheology using the dynamic membrane fluctuations of the RBCs to extract the elastic moduli of this composite membrane. By applying known osmotic stresses, we measure the changes in the elastic constants under imposed strain and thereby determine the nonlinear elastic properties of the membrane. We find that the elastic nonlinearities of the shear modulus in tensed RBC membranes can be well understood in terms of a simple wormlike chain model. Our results show that the elasticity of the spectrin network can mostly account for the area compression modulus at physiological osmolality, suggesting that the lipid bilayer has significant excess area. As the cell swells, the elastic contribution from the now tensed lipid membrane becomes dominant.

  5. Morphological and proteomic analysis of early stage of osteoblast differentiation in osteoblastic progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Dun [Population Council, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Orthopedic Department, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Linhai, Zhejiang 317000 (China); Chen, Hai-Xiao, E-mail: Hxchen-1@163.net [Orthopedic Department, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Linhai, Zhejiang 317000 (China); Yu, Hai-Qiang [Proteomics Resource Center, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Liang, Yong; Wang, Carrie [Population Council, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Lian, Qing-Quan [The 2nd Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325000 (China); Deng, Hai-Teng, E-mail: dengh@mail.rockefeller.edu [Proteomics Resource Center, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Ge, Ren-Shan, E-mail: rge@popcbr.rockefeller.edu [Population Council, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); The 2nd Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325000 (China)

    2010-08-15

    Bone remodeling relies on a dynamic balance between bone formation and resorption, mediated by osteoblasts and osteoclasts, respectively. Under certain stimuli, osteoprogenitor cells may differentiate into premature osteoblasts and further into mature osteoblasts. This process is marked by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralized nodule formation. In this study, we induced osteoblast differentiation in mouse osteoprogenitor MC3T3-E1 cells and divided the process into three stages. In the first stage (day 3), the MC3T3-E1 cell under osteoblast differentiation did not express ALP or deposit a mineralized nodule. In the second stage, the MC3T3-E1 cell expressed ALP but did not form a mineralized nodule. In the third stage, the MC3T3-E1 cell had ALP activity and formed mineralized nodules. In the present study, we focused on morphological and proteomic changes of MC3T3-E1 cells in the early stage of osteoblast differentiation - a period when premature osteoblasts transform into mature osteoblasts. We found that mean cell area and mean stress fiber density were increased in this stage due to enhanced cell spreading and decreased cell proliferation. We further analyzed the proteins in the signaling pathway of regulation of the cytoskeleton using a proteomic approach and found upregulation of IQGAP1, gelsolin, moesin, radixin, and Cfl1. After analyzing the focal adhesion signaling pathway, we found the upregulation of FLNA, LAMA1, LAMA5, COL1A1, COL3A1, COL4A6, and COL5A2 as well as the downregulation of COL4A1, COL4A2, and COL4A4. In conclusion, the signaling pathway of regulation of the cytoskeleton and focal adhesion play critical roles in regulating cell spreading and actin skeleton formation in the early stage of osteoblast differentiation.

  6. The Stirred Tank Reactor Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Benziger, Jay; Chia, E.; Karnas, E.; Moxley, J.; Teuscher, C.; Kevrekidis, I. G.

    2003-01-01

    The design and operation of a differential Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is described. The fuel cell design is based on coupled Stirred Tank Reactors (STR); the gas phase in each reactor compartment was well mixed. The characteristic times for reactant flow, gas phase diffusion and reaction were chosen so that the gas compositions at both the anode and cathode are uniform. The STR PEM fuel cell is one-dimensional; the only spatial gradients are transverse to the membrane. The S...

  7. The Flocculating Cationic Polypetide from Moringa oleifera Seeds Damages Bacterial Cell Membranes by Causing Membrane Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebek, Kevin; Schantz, Allen B; Sines, Ian; Lauser, Kathleen; Velegol, Stephanie; Kumar, Manish

    2015-04-21

    A cationic protein isolated from the seeds of the Moringa oleifera tree has been extensively studied for use in water treatment in developing countries and has been proposed for use in antimicrobial and therapeutic applications. However, the molecular basis for the antimicrobial action of this peptide, Moringa oleifera cationic protein (MOCP), has not been previously elucidated. We demonstrate here that a dominant mechanism of MOCP antimicrobial activity is membrane fusion. We used a combination of cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and fluorescence assays to observe and study the kinetics of fusion of membranes in liposomes representing model microbial cells. We also conducted cryo-EM experiments on E. coli cells where MOCP was seen to fuse the inner and outer membranes. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of membrane vesicles with MOCP molecules were used to elucidate steps in peptide adsorption, stalk formation, and fusion between membranes. PMID:25845029

  8. Proteome analysis of virus-host cell interaction: rabies virus replication in Vero cells in two different media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Sabine; Rourou, Samia; Vester, Diana; Majoul, Samy; Benndorf, Dirk; Genzel, Yvonne; Rapp, Erdmann; Kallel, Héla; Reichl, Udo

    2013-06-01

    The use of Vero cells for rabies vaccine production was recommended from the WHO in 2005. A controlled production process is necessary to reduce the risk of contaminants in the product. One step towards this is to turn away from animal-derived components (e.g. serum, trypsin, bovine serum albumin) and face a production process in animal component-free medium. In this study, a proteomic approach was applied, using 2-D differential gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to compare rabies virus propagation in Vero cells under different cultivation conditions in microcarrier culture. Protein alterations were investigated for uninfected and infected Vero cells over a time span from 1 to 8 days post-infection in two different types of media (serum-free versus serum-containing media). For mock-infected cells, proteins involved in stress response, redox status, protease activity or glycolysis, and protein components in the endoplasmic reticulum were found to be differentially expressed comparing both cultivation media at all sampling points. For virus-infected cells, additionally changes in protein expression involved in general cell regulation and in calcium homeostasis were identified under both cultivation conditions. The fact that neither of these additional proteins was identified for cells during mock infection, but similar protein expression changes were found for both systems during virus propagation, indicates for a specific response of the Vero cell proteome on rabies virus infection. PMID:23674149

  9. Optimization of human dendritic cell sample preparation for mass spectrometry-based proteomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Bottinelli, Dario; Lisacek, Frédérique; Luban, Jeremy; Strambio-De-Castillia, Caterina; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2015-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized leukocytes that orchestrate the adaptive immune response. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic study of these cells presents technical challenges, especially when the DCs are human in origin due to the paucity of available biological material. Here, to maximize MS coverage of the global human DC proteome, different cell disruption methods, lysis conditions, protein precipitation, and protein pellet solubilization and denaturation methods were compared. Mechanical disruption of DC cell pellets under cryogenic conditions, coupled with the use of RIPA (radioimmunoprecipitation assay) buffer, was shown to be the method of choice based on total protein extraction and on the solubilization and identification of nuclear proteins. Precipitation by acetone was found to be more efficient than that by 10% trichloroacetic acid (TCA)/acetone, allowing in excess of 28% more protein identifications. Although being an effective strategy to eliminate the detergent residue, the acetone wash step caused a loss of protein identifications. However, this potential drawback was overcome by adding 1% sodium deoxycholate into the dissolution buffer, which enhanced both solubility of the precipitated proteins and digestion efficiency. This in turn resulted in 6 to 11% more distinct peptides and 14 to 19% more total proteins identified than using 0.5M triethylammonium bicarbonate alone, with the greatest increase (34%) for hydrophobic proteins. PMID:25983236

  10. Optimization of human dendritic cell sample preparation for mass spectrometry-based proteomics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Bottinelli, Dario; Lisacek, Frédérique; Luban, Jeremy; De Castillia, Caterina Strambio; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized leukocytes that orchestrate the adaptive immune response. Mass spectrometry based proteomic study of these cells presents technical challenges, especially when the DCs are human in origin due to the paucity of available biological material. Here, to maximize mass spectrometry coverage of the global human DC proteome, different cell disruption methods, lysis conditions, protein precipitation, and protein pellet solubilisation and denaturation methods were compared. Mechanical disruption of DC cell pellets under cryogenic conditions, coupled with the use of RIPA buffer, was shown to be the method of choice based on total protein extraction and on the solubilisation and identification of nuclear proteins. Precipitation by acetone was found to be more efficient than by 10% TCA/acetone, allowing greater than 28% more protein identifications. Although being an effective strategy to eliminate the detergent residue, the acetone-wash step caused a loss of protein identifications. However, this potential drawback was overcome by adding 1% sodium deoxycholate in the dissolution buffer, which enhanced both solubility of the precipitated proteins and digestion efficiency. This in turn resulted in 6-11% more distinct peptides and 14-19% more total proteins identified than using 0.5M triethylammonium bicarbonate alone with the greatest increase (34%) for hydrophobic proteins. PMID:25983236

  11. Proteomic analysis of cervical cancer cells treated with suberonylanilide hydroxamic acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jianxiong He; Canhua Huang; Aiping Tong; Bin Chen; Zhi Zeng; Peng Zhang; Chunting Wang; Yuquan Wei

    2008-12-01

    Suberonylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is an orally administered histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) that has shown significant antitumour activity in a variety of tumour cells. To identify proteins involved in its antitumour activity, we utilized a proteomic approach to reveal protein expression changes in the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa following SAHA treatment. Protein expression profiles were analysed by 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and protein identification was performed on a MALDI-Q-TOF MS/MS instrument. As a result, a total of nine differentially expressed proteins were visualized by 2-DE and Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) staining. Further, all the changed proteins were positively identified via mass spectrometry (MS)/MS analysis. Of these, PGAM1 was significantly downregulated in HeLa cells after treatment with SAHA. Moreover, PGAM1 has been proven to be downregulated in another cervical cancer cell line (CaSki) by western blot analysis. Together, using proteomic tools, we identified several differentially expressed proteins that underwent SAHA-induced apoptosis. These changed proteins may provide some clues to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying SAHA-induced apoptosis in cervical cancer.

  12. Post-translational modifications of plant cell wall proteins and peptides: A survey from a proteomics point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut, Hervé; Albenne, Cécile; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2016-08-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) and peptides are important players in cell walls contributing to their assembly and their remodeling during development and in response to environmental constraints. Since the rise of proteomics technologies at the beginning of the 2000's, the knowledge of CWPs has greatly increased leading to the discovery of new CWP families and to the description of the cell wall proteomes of different organs of many plants. Conversely, cell wall peptidomics data are still lacking. In addition to the identification of CWPs and peptides by mass spectrometry (MS) and bioinformatics, proteomics has allowed to describe their post-translational modifications (PTMs). At present, the best known PTMs consist in proteolytic cleavage, N-glycosylation, hydroxylation of P residues into hydroxyproline residues (O), O-glycosylation and glypiation. In this review, the methods allowing the capture of the modified proteins based on the specific properties of their PTMs as well as the MS technologies used for their characterization are briefly described. A focus is done on proteolytic cleavage leading to protein maturation or release of signaling peptides and on O-glycosylation. Some new technologies, like top-down proteomics and terminomics, are described. They aim at a finer description of proteoforms resulting from PTMs or degradation mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics- a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock. PMID:26945515

  13. Improved Membrane Materials for PEM Fuel Cell Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth A. Mauritz; Robert B. Moore

    2008-06-30

    The overall goal of this project is to collect and integrate critical structure/property information in order to develop methods that lead to significant improvements in the durability and performance of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) materials. This project is focused on the fundamental improvement of PEMFC membrane materials with respect to chemical, mechanical and morphological durability as well as the development of new inorganically-modified membranes.

  14. Neural stem cells and proteomics assesment of their properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skalníková, Helena; Halada, Petr; Vodička, Petr; Motlík, Jan; Kovářová, Hana

    Vídeň : FENS (The Federation of European Neuroscience Societies), 2006. s. 1. [Forum of European Neuroscience /5./. 08.07.2006-12.07.2006, Vienna] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : neural stem cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  15. A simple method for purification of vestibular hair cells and non-sensory cells, and application for proteomic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Herget

    Full Text Available Mechanosensitive hair cells and supporting cells comprise the sensory epithelia of the inner ear. The paucity of both cell types has hampered molecular and cell biological studies, which often require large quantities of purified cells. Here, we report a strategy allowing the enrichment of relatively pure populations of vestibular hair cells and non-sensory cells including supporting cells. We utilized specific uptake of fluorescent styryl dyes for labeling of hair cells. Enzymatic isolation and flow cytometry was used to generate pure populations of sensory hair cells and non-sensory cells. We applied mass spectrometry to perform a qualitative high-resolution analysis of the proteomic makeup of both the hair cell and non-sensory cell populations. Our conservative analysis identified more than 600 proteins with a false discovery rate of <3% at the protein level and <1% at the peptide level. Analysis of proteins exclusively detected in either population revealed 64 proteins that were specific to hair cells and 103 proteins that were only detectable in non-sensory cells. Statistical analyses extended these groups by 53 proteins that are strongly upregulated in hair cells versus non-sensory cells and vice versa by 68 proteins. Our results demonstrate that enzymatic dissociation of styryl dye-labeled sensory hair cells and non-sensory cells is a valid method to generate pure enough cell populations for flow cytometry and subsequent molecular analyses.

  16. Nuclear proteome analysis of benzo(a)pyrene-treated HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously, we employed a proteomics-based 2-D gel electrophoresis assay to show that exposure to 10 μM benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) during a 24 h frame can lead to changes in nuclear protein expression and alternative splicing. To further expand our knowledge about the DNA damage response (DDR) induced by BaP, we investigated the nuclear protein expression profiles in HeLa cells treated with different concentrations of BaP (0.1, 1, and 10 μM) using this proteomics-based 2-D gel electrophoresis assay. We found 125 differentially expressed proteins in BaP-treated cells compared to control cells. Among them, 79 (63.2%) were down-regulated, 46 (36.8%) were up-regulated; 8 showed changes in the 1 μM and 10 μM BaP-treated groups, 2 in the 0.1 μM and 10 μM BaP-treated groups, 4 in the 0.1 μM and 1 μM BaP-treated groups, and only one showed changes in all three groups. Fifty protein spots were chosen for liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) identification, and of these, 39 were identified, including subunits of the 26S proteasome and Annexin A1. The functions of some identified proteins were further examined and the results showed that they might be involved in BaP-induced DDR. Taken together, these data indicate that proteomics is a valuable approach in the study of environmental chemical–host interactions, and the identified proteins could provide new leads for better understanding BaP-induced mutagenesis and carcinogenesis.

  17. Radiation Interaction with Therapeutic Drugs and Cell Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This transient permeabilized state of the cell membrane, named the 'cell electroporation' (CE) can be used to increase cells uptake of drugs that do not readily pass cell membrane, thus enabling their cytotoxicity. The anticancer drugs, such as bleomycin (BL) and cisplatin, are the most candidates for the combined use with ionizing and non-ionizing radiation fields. The methods and installations for the cell electroporation by electron beam (EB) and microwave (MW) irradiation are presented. The viability tests of the human leukocytes under EB and MW exposure with/without the BL in the cell cultures are discussed

  18. HUMAN PLASMA PROTEOME MAPPING IN HEALTH AND CLEAR CELL CARCINOMA OF THE KIDNEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Shevchenko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasma proteome from patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC and controls underwent mass spectrometric mapping. A total of 247 proteins were identified; the expression of 12 proteins of them increased on transition from the controls to patients with Stages I–II and III–IV RCC. There was decreased expression of 14 proteins in this series. Out of the 26 proteins showing a change in their expressions, 7 proteins belong to acute-phase ones, 3 proteins are associated with the intercellular matrix. These proteins can be potential markers for RCC.

  19. Proteomic analysis of mammalian sperm cells identifies new components of the centrosome

    OpenAIRE

    Fırat, Elif Nur Karalar; Sante, Joshua; Elliott, Sarah; Stearns, Tim

    2014-01-01

    1 Proteomic analysis of mammalian sperm cells identifies new components of the centrosome Elif N. Firat-Karalar1,3, Joshua Sante1,4, Sarah Elliott1, and Tim Stearns1,2 1Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5020, USA 2Department of Genetics, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305-5120, USA 3Current address: Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Koç University, Istanbul, 34450, Turkey 4Current address: Division of Pulmonary and ...

  20. Proteomic analysis and identification of cell surface-associated proteins of Clostridium chauvoei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaramaiah, Usharani; Singh, Neetu; Thankappan, Sabarinath; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar; Chaudhuri, Pallab; Singh, Vijendra Pal; Nagaleekar, Viswas Konasagara

    2016-06-01

    Blackleg is a highly fatal disease of cattle and sheep, caused by Clostridium chauvoei, a Gram positive, anaerobic, spore forming bacteria. Cell surface-associated proteins play a major role in inducing the protective immunity. However, the identity of a majority of cell surface-associated proteins of C. chauvoei is not known. In the present investigation, we have used SDS-PAGE, 2D-gel electrophoresis and Western blotting followed by mass spectrometry to identify cell surface-associated proteins of C. chauvoei. Among the identified proteins, which have shown to offer protective antigencity in other bacteria, Enolase, Chaperonin, Ribosomal protein L10, Glycosyl Hydrolase and Flavoprotein were characterized by sequencing and their overexpression in Escherichia coli. In conclusion, cell surface-associated proteins were identified using proteomic approach and the genes for the immunoreactive proteins were expressed, which may prove to be potential diagnostic or vaccine candidates. PMID:26971466

  1. Toughness of membranes applied in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiefer, J.; Brack, H.P.; Scherer, G.G. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Since several years we apply the radiation-grafting technique to prepare polymeric membranes for application in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Our investigations presented here focus on changes in toughness of these materials after the various synthesis steps and the importance of membrane toughness for their application in PEFCs. (author) 2 figs., 4 refs.

  2. Denaturation of membrane proteins and hyperthermic cell killing

    OpenAIRE

    Burgman, Paulus Wilhelmus Johannes Jozef

    1993-01-01

    Summarizing: heat induced denaturation of membrane proteins is probably related to hyperthermic cell killing. Induced resistance of heat sensitive proteins seems to be involved in the development of thermotolerance. Although many questions remain still to be answered, it appears that HSP72, when bound to membrane proteins, is capable of providing heat resistance to these proteins. ... Zie: Summary

  3. SILAC Proteomics of Planarians Identifies Ncoa5 as a Conserved Component of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Böser

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Planarian regeneration depends on the presence of pluripotent stem cells in the adult. We developed an in vivo stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC protocol in planarians to identify proteins that are enriched in planarian stem cells. Through a comparison of SILAC proteomes of normal and stem cell-depleted planarians and of a stem cell-enriched population of sorted cells, we identified hundreds of stem cell proteins. One of these is an ortholog of nuclear receptor coactivator-5 (Ncoa5/CIA, which is known to regulate estrogen-receptor-mediated transcription in human cells. We show that Ncoa5 is essential for the maintenance of the pluripotent stem cell population in planarians and that a putative mouse ortholog is expressed in pluripotent cells of the embryo. Our study thus identifies a conserved component of pluripotent stem cells, demonstrating that planarians, in particular, when combined with in vivo SILAC, are a powerful model in stem cell research.

  4. Effects of 5'-azacytidine and alendronate on a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line: a proteomics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, Amber; Hashim, Zehra; Zarina, Shamshad

    2015-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer related deaths around the world. Due to late diagnosis and development of drug resistance in patients suffering from HCC, development of more effective therapeutic strategies is inevitable. The aim of this study was to evaluate the combined apoptotic effect of 5'-Azacytidine (5'-AzaC) and alendronate (ALN) on Huh-7 HCC cell line and to explore differential expression at genomics and proteomics level. Incubation of HCC cell line with 5'-AzaC alone showed cell death in a time and dose dependent manner while in combination with ALN, increased cytotoxicity was observed. Up-regulation of CASP7(Caspase7) and LZTS1 (leucine zipper, putative tumor suppressor 1) and down-regulation of DNMT1(DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 1) was noted in treated cells. Proteomic studies on the treated cells revealed altered expression of different proteins including peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2), Annexin 5 (Anx5), Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP), Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB), tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein (TNF), triosephosphate isomerase (TPI), Glutathione S transferase (GSTP1) and Heat shock protein60 (HSP60). Our study demonstrated the cytotoxic effect of 5'-AzaC and ALN drug combination on Huh-7 HCC cells suggesting such combinations may be explored as a possible therapeutic approach. Current study revealed that Huh-7 HCC cells are sensitive to 5'-AzaC and ALN drug combination and such combination approaches could lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies. Furthermore, we also report the expression of Anx5 exclusively in untreated cancerous cell line indicating the possibility of being used as a potential therapeutic target and biomarker. PMID:25854900

  5. Prism-patterned Nafion membrane for enhanced water transport in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Moon; Kang, Yun Sik; Ahn, Chiyeong; Jang, Segeun; Kim, Minhyoung; Sung, Yung-Eun; Yoo, Sung Jong; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-06-01

    Here, we report a simple and effective strategy to enhance the performance of the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell by imprinting prism-patterned arrays onto the Nafion membrane, which provides three combined effects directly related to the device performance. First, a locally thinned membrane via imprinted micro prism-structures lead to reduced membrane resistance, which is confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Second, increments of the geometrical surface area of the prism-patterned Nafion membrane compared to a flat membrane result in the increase in the electrochemical active surface area. Third, the vertically asymmetric geometry of prism structures in the cathode catalyst layer lead to enhanced water transport, which is confirmed by oxygen gain calculation. To explain the enhanced water transport, we propose a simple theoretical model on removal of water droplets existing in the asymmetric catalyst layer. These three combined effects achieved via incorporating prism patterned arrays into the Nafion membrane effectively enhance the performance of the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell.

  6. BLEND MEMBRANES FOR DIRECT METHANOL AND PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Perurnal Bhavani; Dharmalingam Sangeetha

    2012-01-01

    Sulphonated polystyrene ethylene butylene polystyrene (SPSEBS) prepared with 35% sulphonation was found to be highly elastic and enlarged up to 300%-400% of its initial length.It absorbed over 110% of water by weight.A major drawback of this membrane is its poor mechanical properties which are not adequate for use as polymer electrolytes in fuel cells.To overcome this,SPSEBS was blended with poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF),a hydrophobic polymer.The blend membranes showed better mechanical properties than the base polymer.The effect of PVDF content on water uptake,ion exchange capacity and proton conductivity of the blend membranes was investigated.This paper presents the results of recent studies applied to develop an optimized in-house membrane electrode assembly (MEA) preparation technique combining catalyst ink spraying and assembly hot pressing.Easy steps were chosen in this preparation technique in order to simplify the method,aiming at cost reduction.The open circuit voltage for the cell with SPSEBS is 0.980 V which is higher compared to that of the cell with Nafion 117 (0.790 V).From this study,it is concluded that a polymer electrolyte membrane suitable for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) application can be obtained by blending SPSEBS and PVDF in appropriate proportions.The methanol permeability and selectivity showed a strong influence on DMFC performance.

  7. Effect of irradiation on cell transcriptome and proteome of rat submandibular salivary glands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Stiubea-Cohen

    Full Text Available Salivary glands (SGs are irreversibly damaged by irradiation (IR treatment in head and neck cancer patients. Here, we used an animal irradiation model to investigate and define the molecular mechanisms affecting SGs following IR, focusing on saliva proteome and global transcription profile of submandibular salivary gland (SSG tissue.We show that saliva secretion was gradually reduced to 50% of its initial level 12 weeks post-IR. Saliva protein composition was further examined by proteomic analysis following mass spectrometry (MS analysis that revealed proteins with reduced expression originating from SSGs and proteins with increased expression derived from the serum, both indicating salivary tissue damage. To examine alterations in mRNA expression levels microarray analysis was performed. We found significant alterations in 95 genes, including cell-cycle arrest genes, SG functional genes and a DNA repair gene.Tissue damage was seen by confocal immunofluorescence of α-amylase and c-Kit that showed an increase and decrease, respectively, in protein expression. This was coherent with real-time PCR results.This data indicates that IR damages the SSG cells' ability to produce and secrete saliva and proteins, and maintain the physiological barrier between serum and saliva. The damage does not heal due to cell-cycle arrest, which prevents tissue regeneration. Taken together, our results reveal a new insight into IR pathobiology.

  8. Gangliosides in cell recognition and membrane protein regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Pablo H. H.; Schnaar, Ronald L.

    2009-01-01

    Gangliosides, sialic acid-bearing glycosphingolipids, are expressed on all vertebrate cells, and are the major glycans on nerve cells. They are anchored to the plasma membrane through their ceramide lipids with their varied glycans extending into the extracellular space. Through sugar-specific interactions with glycan binding proteins on apposing cells, gangliosides function as receptors in cell-cell recognition, regulating natural killer cell cytotoxicity via Siglec-7 binding, myelin-axon in...

  9. Proteomic analysis of barley cell nuclei purified by flow sorting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrovská, Beáta; Jeřábková, Hana; Chamrád, I.; Vrána, Jan; Lenobel, R.; Uřinovská, J.; Šebela, M.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 143, 1-3 (2014), s. 78-86. ISSN 1424-8581 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-28443S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Cell cycle * Chromatin * Flow cytometry Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.561, year: 2014 http://gateway.isiknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=MEDLINE&DestLinkType=FullRecord&UT=25059295

  10. Subcellular Proteomics of Soybean under Flooding Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Setsuko Komatsu

    2012-01-01

    Flooding is an environmental stress found worldwide and may increase in frequency due to changes in global climate,and causes significant reductions in the growth and yield of several crops.The application of proteomics techniques to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying crop responses to flooding stress may facilitate the development of flood tolerant crops.To understand the response mechanism of soybean under flooding stress,proteomics analysis was carried out.Especially,subcellular proteomics studies have led to a better understanding of the mechanism of flooding stress tolerance in soybean.The effects of flooding stress on root plasma membrane were analyzed using an aqueous two-phase partitioning method in combination with gel-based and gel-free proteomics techniques.The results led to the following conclusions:proteins located in the cell wall were increased in the plasma membrane of flooded plants,indicating the contribution of plasma membrane to modification of the cell wall; superoxide dismutase was increased,indicating that the antioxidative system may play a crucial role in protecting cells from oxidative damage following exposure to flooding stress; heat shock cognate 70 kDa protein likely plays a significant role in protecting other proteins from denaturation and degradation during flooding stress; and signaling proteins might work cooperatively to regulate plasma membrane H +-ATPase and maintain ion homeostasis.Cell wall proteins were isolated from root of flooding stressed plants via sucrose gradient centrifugation and analyzed using gel-based proteomics technique.Cell wall proteins identified were related to lignification,and these results indicated that a decrease of lignification-related proteins is related to flooding decreased ROS and jasmonate biosynthesis.And also,lignin staining confirmed that lignification was suppressed in the roots of flooding stressed soybeans.Mitochondrial fractions were purified from root of flooding stressed

  11. Sulfated Titania-Silica Reinforced Nafion Nanocomposite Membranes for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Sayeed, M D; Kim, Hee Jin; Gopalan, A I; Kim, Young Ho; Lee, Kwang-Pill; Choi, Sang-June

    2015-09-01

    Sulfated titania-silica (SO4(2-)-/TiO2-SiO2) composites were prepared by a sol-gel method with sulfate reaction and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The nanometric diameter and geometry of the sulfated titania-silica (STS) was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A small amount of the STS composite in the range of 0.5-3 wt% was then added as reinforcing into the Nafion membrane by water-assisted solution casting method to prepare STS reinforced Nafion nanocomposite membranes (STS-Nafion nanocomposite membranes). The additional functional groups, sulfate groups, of the nanocomposite membrane having more surface oxygenated groups enhanced the fuel cell membrane properties. The STS-Nafion nanocomposite membranes exhibited improved water uptake compared to that of neat Nafion membranes, whereas methanol uptake values were decreased dramatically improved thermal property of the prepared nanocomposite membranes were measured by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Furthermore, increased ion exchange capacity values were obtained by thermoacidic pretreatment of the nanocomposite membranes. PMID:26716283

  12. Proteomics analysis reveals a Th17-prone cell population in presymptomatic graft-versus-host disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Liu, Liangyi; Gomez, Aurelie; Zhang, Jilu; Ramadan, Abdulraouf; Zhang, Qing; Choi, Sung W.; Zhang, Peng; Greenson, Joel K.; Liu, Chen; Jiang, Di; Virts, Elizabeth; Kelich, Stephanie L.; Chu, Hong Wei; Flynn, Ryan; Blazar, Bruce R.; Hanenberg, Helmut; Hanash, Samir; Paczesny, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal graft-versus-host-disease (GI-GVHD) is a life-threatening complication occurring after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), and a blood biomarker that permits stratification of HCT patients according to their risk of developing GI-GVHD would greatly aid treatment planning. Through in-depth, large-scale proteomic profiling of presymptomatic samples, we identified a T cell population expressing both CD146, a cell adhesion molecule, and CCR5, a chemokine receptor that is upregulated as early as 14 days after transplantation in patients who develop GI-GVHD. The CD4+CD146+CCR5+ T cell population is Th17 prone and increased by ICOS stimulation. shRNA knockdown of CD146 in T cells reduced their transmigration through endothelial cells, and maraviroc, a CCR5 inhibitor, reduced chemotaxis of the CD4+CD146+CCR5+ T cell population toward CCL14. Mice that received CD146 shRNA–transduced human T cells did not lose weight, showed better survival, and had fewer CD4+CD146+CCR5+ T cells and less pathogenic Th17 infiltration in the intestine, even compared with mice receiving maraviroc with control shRNA– transduced human T cells. Furthermore, the frequency of CD4+CD146+CCR5+ Tregs was increased in GI-GVHD patients, and these cells showed increased plasticity toward Th17 upon ICOS stimulation. Our findings can be applied to early risk stratification, as well as specific preventative therapeutic strategies following HCT. PMID:27195312

  13. Single Cell Proteomics with Ultra-High Sensitivity Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, M

    2005-02-16

    This project was a joint LDRD project between PAT, CMS and NAI with the objective to develop an instrument that analyzes the biochemical composition of single cells in real-time using bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS) combined with advanced laser desorption and ionization techniques. Applications include both biological defense, fundamental cell biology and biomedical research. BAMS analyzes the biochemical composition of single, micrometer-sized particles (such as bacterial cells or spores) that can be directly sampled from air or a suspension. BAMS is based on an earlier development of aerosol time of flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) by members of our collaboration [1,2]. Briefly, in ATOFMS and BAMS aerosol particles are sucked directly from the atmosphere into vacuum through a series of small orifices. As the particles approach the ion source region of the mass spectrometer, they cross and scatter light from two CW laser beams separated by a known distance. The timing of the two bursts of scattered light created by each ''tracked'' particle reveals the speed, location and size of the particle. This information then enables the firing of a high-intensity laser such that the resulting laser pulse desorbs and ionizes molecules from the tracked particle just as it reaches the center of the ion source region. The full spectrum of ions is then measured using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The ability to rapidly analyze individual particles is clearly applicable to the rapid detection of aerosolized biological warfare agents so long as agent particles can be made to produce mass spectra that are distinct from the spectra of harmless background particles. The pattern of ions formed is determined by the properties of the laser pulse, the particle, and, in aerosol matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), also the MALDI matrix used. As a result, it is critical that the properties of the laser pulses used for desorption and ionization

  14. Cell-free system for synthesizing membrane proteins cell free method for synthesizing membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laible, Philip D; Hanson, Deborah K

    2013-06-04

    The invention provides an in vitro method for producing proteins, membrane proteins, membrane-associated proteins, and soluble proteins that interact with membrane-associated proteins for assembly into an oligomeric complex or that require association with a membrane for proper folding. The method comprises, supplying intracytoplasmic membranes from organisms; modifying protein composition of intracytoplasmic membranes from organism by modifying DNA to delete genes encoding functions of the organism not associated with the formation of the intracytoplasmic membranes; generating appropriate DNA or RNA templates that encode the target protein; and mixing the intracytoplasmic membranes with the template and a transcription/translation-competent cellular extract to cause simultaneous production of the membrane proteins and encapsulation of the membrane proteins within the intracytoplasmic membranes.

  15. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of human hepatic stellate cells treated with natural taurine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jian; Deng, Xin; Wu, Fa-Sheng; Tang, Yan-Fang

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differential expression of genes and proteins between natural taurine (NTau)‑treated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and control cells as well as the underlying mechanism of NTau in inhibiting hepatic fibrosis. A microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay was used to analyze the proliferation of NTau‑treated HSCs. Flow cytometry was performed to compare the apoptosis rate between NTau-treated and non‑treated HSCs. Proteomic analysis using a combination of 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) was conducted to identify the differentially expressed proteins. Microarray analysis was performed to investigate the differential expression of genes and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to validate the results. The experimental findings obtained demonstrated that NTau decreased HSC proliferation, resulting in an increased number of cells in the G0/G1 phase and a reduced number of cells in the S phase. Flow cytometric analysis showed that NTau-treated HSCs had a significantly increased rate of apoptosis when compared with the non‑treated control group. A total of 15 differentially expressed proteins and 658 differentially expressed genes were identified by 2DE and MS, and microarray analysis, respectively. Gene ontology (GO) functional analysis indicated that these genes and proteins were enriched in the function clusters and pathways related to cell proliferation, cellular apoptosis and oxidation. The transcriptome and proteome analyses of NTau-treated HSCs demonstrated that NTau is able to significantly inhibit cell proliferation and promote cell apoptosis, highlighting its potential therapeutic benefits in the treatment of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:23525364

  16. Seperator membranes for redox-type electrochemical cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This disclosure is directed to improved redox type electrochemical cells, preferably those of the iron (+3)/iron (+2) electrolyte variety, incorporating polymeric, ion-exchange separator membranes produced by radiation grafting techniques

  17. Novel Membrane for Highly Efficient Fuel Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells and electrolyzers are key technologies for NASA space systems utilizing hydrogen, oxygen, or water as reactants. In order...

  18. Novel High Temperature Membrane for PEM Fuel Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation proposed in this STTR program is a high temperature membrane to increase the efficiency and power density of PEM fuel cells. The NASA application is...

  19. Bipolar membranes in forward bias region for fuel cell reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three bipolar membranes, two home-made composed of commercial cation (DuPont) and anion (FuMA-Tech) exchange membranes (called Nafion/FT-FAA and Nafion/FT-FAS) and a commercial one, BP-1 from FuMA-Tech, were investigated in order to characterize their suitability to use in a H2/O2 fuel cell intended to produce hydrogen peroxide on the cathode instead of water. The Nafion/FT-FAA and Nafion/FT-FAS membranes were prepared using a hot-pressing method. The optimal hot-pressing conditions were determined by measuring the ionic conductivity of the membranes. The latter was observed to depend on the relative humidity of the bipolar membrane. Of the studied bipolar membranes, Nafion/FT-FAA showed the best performance. The transport number of protons measured in a concentration cell was observed to depend on the direction of the proton diffusion flux through these membranes so that transport numbers of ca. unity were obtained when the cation exchange side faced the solution with higher proton concentration. In the opposite case, when the higher concentration faced anion exchange side, the transport number of proton was clearly lower, indicating the usefulness of the bipolar membranes for hydrogen peroxide production in the fuel cell

  20. Effects of altered gravity on the cell cycle, actin cytoskeleton and proteome in Physarum polycephalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Gao, Yong; Li, Shuijie; Sun, Yeqing

    Some researchers suggest that the changes of cell cycle under the effect of microgravity may be associated with many serious adverse physiological changes. In the search for underlying mechanisms and possible new countermeasures, we used the slime mold Physarum polycephalum in which all the nuclei traverse the cell cycle in natural synchrony to study the effects of altered gravity on the cell cycle, actin cytoskeleton and proteome. In parallel, the cell cycle was analyzed in Physarum incubated (1) in altered gravity for 20 h, (2) in altered gravity for 40 h, (3) in altered gravity for 80 h, and (4) in ground controls. The cell cycle, the actin cytoskeleton, and proteome in the altered gravity and ground controls were examined. The results indicated that the duration of the G2 phase was lengthened 20 min in high aspect ratio vessel (HARV) for 20 h, and prolonged 2 h in altered gravity either for 40 h or for 80 h, whereas the duration of other phases in the cell cycle was unchanged with respect to the control. The microfilaments in G2 phase had a reduced number of fibers and a unique abnormal morphology in altered gravity for 40 h, whereas the microfilaments in other phases of cell cycle were unchanged when compared to controls. Employing classical two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), we examined the effect of the altered gravity on P. polycephalum proteins. The increase in the duration of G2 phase in altered gravity for 40 h was accompanied by changes in the 2-DE protein profiles, over controls. Out of a total of 200 protein spots investigated in G2 phase, which were reproducible in repeated experiments, 72 protein spots were visually identified as specially expressed, and 11 proteins were up-regulated by 2-fold and 28 proteins were down-regulated by 2-fold over controls. Out of a total of three low-expressed proteins in G2 phase in altered gravity for 40 h, two proteins were unknown proteins, and one protein was spherulin 3b by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS

  1. Proteome Profiling in Lung Injury after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Maneesh; Viken, Kevin J; Dey, Sanjoy; Steinbach, Michael S; Wu, Baolin; Jagtap, Pratik D; Higgins, LeeAnn; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Kumar, Vipin; Arora, Mukta; Bitterman, Peter B; Ingbar, David H; Wendt, Chris H

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary complications due to infection and idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS), a noninfectious lung injury in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients, are frequent causes of transplantation-related mortality and morbidity. Our objective was to characterize the global bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein expression of IPS to identify proteins and pathways that differentiate IPS from infectious lung injury after HSCT. We studied 30 BALF samples from patients who developed lung injury within 180 days of HSCT or cellular therapy transfusion (natural killer cell transfusion). Adult subjects were classified as having IPS or infectious lung injury by the criteria outlined in the 2011 American Thoracic Society statement. BALF was depleted of hemoglobin and 14 high-abundance proteins, treated with trypsin, and labeled with isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) 8-plex reagent for two-dimensional capillary liquid chromatography (LC) and data dependent peptide tandem mass spectrometry (MS) on an Orbitrap Velos system in higher-energy collision-induced dissociation activation mode. Protein identification employed a target-decoy strategy using ProteinPilot within Galaxy P. The relative protein abundance was determined with reference to a global internal standard consisting of pooled BALF from patients with respiratory failure and no history of HSCT. A variance weighted t-test controlling for a false discovery rate of ≤5% was used to identify proteins that showed differential expression between IPS and infectious lung injury. The biological relevance of these proteins was determined by using gene ontology enrichment analysis and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. We characterized 12 IPS and 18 infectious lung injury BALF samples. In the 5 iTRAQ LC-MS/MS experiments 845, 735, 532, 615, and 594 proteins were identified for a total of 1125 unique proteins and 368 common proteins across all 5 LC-MS/MS experiments. When comparing IPS to

  2. Intravacuolar Membranes Regulate CD8 T Cell Recognition of Membrane-Bound Toxoplasma gondii Protective Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodie Lopez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Apicomplexa parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii target effectors to and across the boundary of their parasitophorous vacuole (PV, resulting in host cell subversion and potential presentation by MHC class I molecules for CD8 T cell recognition. The host-parasite interface comprises the PV limiting membrane and a highly curved, membranous intravacuolar network (IVN of uncertain function. Here, using a cell-free minimal system, we dissect how membrane tubules are shaped by the parasite effectors GRA2 and GRA6. We show that membrane association regulates access of the GRA6 protective antigen to the MHC I pathway in infected cells. Although insertion of GRA6 in the PV membrane is key for immunogenicity, association of GRA6 with the IVN limits presentation and curtails GRA6-specific CD8 responses in mice. Thus, membrane deformations of the PV regulate access of antigens to the MHC class I pathway, and the IVN may play a role in immune modulation.

  3. Proteomic response analysis of endothelial cells of human coronary artery to stimulation with carbachol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min YU; Dong-mei CHEN; Gang HU; Hai WANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To identify the molecular basis of the endothelial target for acetylcholine (ETA). METHODS: Proteomic methods were used to monitor changes in protein expression in the first 10 h following the stimulation of human coronary endothelial cells with carbachol 100 μmol/L. Thirty proteins showing the largest changes were identified by mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Based on analysis with Image Master 2-D Elite software, about 623 protein spots were detected in control cells and 825 protein spots in carbachol-treated cells, the matching rate was 68.1%.Among all the detected spots, 39 were up-regulated and 29 were down-regulated, showing detectable changes varied from 1.7-3.8 folds. Forty one spots in the peptide mass fingerprints were successfully obtained. The most interesting feature was that all the four newly synthesized proteins belonged to the heat shock protein family.CONCLUSION: These identified proteins played key roles in the molecular mechanism of ETA.

  4. A membrane bending model of outer hair cell electromotility.

    OpenAIRE

    Raphael, R. M.; Popel, A S; Brownell, W. E.

    2000-01-01

    We propose a new mechanism for outer hair cell electromotility based on electrically induced localized changes in the curvature of the plasma membrane (flexoelectricity). Electromechanical coupling in the cell's lateral wall is modeled in terms of linear constitutive equations for a flexoelectric membrane and then extended to nonlinear coupling based on the Langevin function. The Langevin function, which describes the fraction of dipoles aligned with an applied electric field, is shown to be ...

  5. Increased cell membrane arachidonic acid in experimental colorectal tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholson, M. L.; Neoptolemos, J P; Clayton, H A; Talbot, I C; Bell, P R

    1991-01-01

    Tumour cell membrane fatty acid composition was investigated using an animal model of colorectal carcinogenesis. Eighty six male Wistar rats were fed experimental diets containing either 5% saturated fat or 20% saturated fat. Colorectal tumours were induced by intraperitoneal injection of azoxymethane, and control rats received saline. Animals were killed at intervals up to 26 weeks after the last injection of carcinogen for histology and lipid analysis. Cell membrane fatty acids in colonic m...

  6. Electrospun nanofibre composite polymer electrolyte fuel cell and electrolysis membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Sood, Rakhi; Cavaliere, Sara; Rozière, Jacques; Jones, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    International audience Large-scale commercialisation of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) technology for automotive and stationary applications demands the development of a robust, durable and cost-effective materials. In this regard, ionomer membranes being present at the core of PEMFCs are required to maintain elevated proton conductivity, high mechanical strength and low gas permeability during the lifespan of the fuel cell. These challenges are addressed by investigating novel...

  7. A proteomic study of the regulatory role for STAT-1 in cytokine-induced beta-cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rondas, Dieter; Gudmundsdottir, Valborg; D’Hertog, Wannes; Crèvecoeur, Inne; Waelkens, Etienne; Brunak, Søren; Mathieu, Chantal; Overbergh, Lut

    PURPOSE: Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1) plays a crucial role in cytokine-induced beta-cell destruction. However, its precise downstream pathways have not been completely clarified. We performed a proteome analysis of cytokine-exposed C57Bl/6 and STAT-1-/- mouse islets...... assigned to small ubiquitin-related modifier 4 (SUMO4). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: These findings confirm a central role for STAT-1 in pancreatic islet inflammation induced destruction and most importantly elucidate the underlying proteomic pathways involved.......PURPOSE: Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1) plays a crucial role in cytokine-induced beta-cell destruction. However, its precise downstream pathways have not been completely clarified. We performed a proteome analysis of cytokine-exposed C57Bl/6 and STAT-1-/- mouse islets...

  8. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of the endothelial cell membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon W Fogarty

    Full Text Available We applied surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS to cationic gold-labeled endothelial cells to derive SERS-enhanced spectra of the bimolecular makeup of the plasma membrane. A two-step protocol with cationic charged gold nanoparticles followed by silver-intensification to generate silver nanoparticles on the cell surface was employed. This protocol of post-labelling silver-intensification facilitates the collection of SERS-enhanced spectra from the cell membrane without contribution from conjugated antibodies or other molecules. This approach generated a 100-fold SERS-enhancement of the spectral signal. The SERS spectra exhibited many vibrational peaks that can be assigned to components of the cell membrane. We were able to carry out spectral mapping using some of the enhanced wavenumbers. Significantly, the spectral maps suggest the distribution of some membrane components are was not evenly distributed over the cells plasma membrane. These results provide some possible evidence for the existence of lipid rafts in the plasma membrane and show that SERS has great potential for the study and characterization of cell surfaces.

  9. Cathode degradation of the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morphological changes occurring in membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC's) were monitored using scanning microscopy (SEM) during the course of 600 hours testing of hydrogen/air polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). The microstructural study suggests a structural change caused by loss of the recast ionomer could result in deterioration of the integrity of the electrode, a drop in both ionic and electronic conductivities, loss of platinum particle clusters (for carbon support), and increased resistance within the interfacial zone of the membrane and catalyst layer.(author)

  10. Mouse endometrial stromal cells produce basement-membrane components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Damjanov, A; Weiss, J;

    1986-01-01

    During mouse pregnancy, uterine stromal cells transform into morphologically distinct decidual cells under the influence of the implanting embryo and a proper hormonal environment. Mechanical stimulation of hormonally primed uterine stromal cells leads to the same morphologic alterations. The....... Mouse decidual cells isolated from 6- to 7-day pregnant uteri explanted in vitro continue to synthesize basement-membrane-like extracellular matrix. Using immunohistochemistry and metabolic labeling followed by immunoprecipitation, SDS-PAGE, and fluorography, it was shown that the decidual cells...... undergo pseudodecidualization. We thus showed that stromal cells from pregnant and nonpregnant mouse uteri synthesize significant amounts of basement-membrane components in vitro, and hence could serve as a good model for the study of normal basement-membrane components....

  11. Spray deposition of Nafion membranes: Electrode-supported fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Thomas; Pham, Hung Cuong; Sasaki, Kazunari; Lyth, Stephen Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Fuel cells are a key technology for the successful transition towards a hydrogen society. In order to accelerate fuel cell commercialization, improvements in performance are required. Generally, polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEFCs) are membrane-supported; the electrocatalyst layer is sprayed onto both sides of the membrane, and sandwiched between carbon-based gas diffusion layers (GDLs). In this work we redesign the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and fabricate an electrode-supported PEFC. First the electrocatalyst layer is sprayed onto the GDL, and then Nafion dispersion is sprayed over the top of this to form a thin membrane. This method has the advantage of simplifying the fabrication process, allowing the fabrication of extremely thin electrolyte layers (down to ∼10 μm in this case), and reducing the amount of ionomer required in the cell. Electrode-supported PEFCs operate at significantly increased power density compared to conventional membrane-supported PEFCs, with a maximum of 581 mW/cm2 at 80 °C (atmospheric pressure, air at the cathode). Impedance spectroscopy confirmed that the origin of the improved performance was an 80% reduction in the membrane resistance due the thinner Nafion layer. This novel fabrication method is a step towards cheaper, thinner, fully printable PEFCs with high power density and efficiency.

  12. Proton conducting membranes for high temperature fuel cells with solid state water free membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Pin S. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A water free, proton conducting membrane for use in a fuel cell is fabricated as a highly conducting sheet of converted solid state organic amine salt, such as converted acid salt of triethylenediamine with two quaternized tertiary nitrogen atoms, combined with a nanoparticulate oxide and a stable binder combined with the converted solid state organic amine salt to form a polymeric electrolyte membrane. In one embodiment the membrane is derived from triethylenediamine sulfate, hydrogen phosphate or trifiate, an oxoanion with at least one ionizable hydrogen, organic tertiary amine bisulfate, polymeric quaternized amine bisulfate or phosphate, or polymeric organic compounds with quaternizable nitrogen combined with Nafion to form an intimate network with ionic interactions.

  13. Mathematical modelling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A one-dimensional non-isothermal model of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells has been developed to investigate the effect of various design and operating conditions on the cell performance, thermal response and water management, and to understand the underlying mechanism. The model includes variable membrane hydration, ternary gas mixtures for both reactant streams, phase change of water in the electrodes with non-saturated reactant gas streams, and energy equation for the temperature distribution across the cell. It is found that temperature distribution within the PEM fuel cells is affected by water phase change in the electrodes, especially for unsaturated reactant streams. Larger peak temperature rise occurs at lower cell operating temperatures and for partially humidified reactants due to increased membrane resistance and Joule heating arising from reduced membrane hydration. The nonuniform temperature rise can be significant for fuel cell stacks. Operation on reformed fuels results in a decrease in cell performance largely due to reduced membrane hydration, which is also mainly responsible for reduced performance at high current densities for high cell operating pressures. Model predictions compare well with known experimental results. (author)

  14. Creation and Reproduction of Model Cells with Semipermeable Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu

    2008-01-01

    A high activity of reactions can be confined in a model cell with a semipermeable membrane in the Schl\\"ogl model. It is interpreted as a model of primitive metabolism in a cell. We study two generalized models to understand the creation of primitive cell systems conceptually from the view point of the nonlinear-nonequilibrium physics. In the first model, a single-cell system with a highly active state confined by a semipermeable membrane is spontaneously created from an inactive homogeneous ...

  15. Monocyte cell membrane-derived nanoghosts for targeted cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Gnanasammandhan, M. K.; Xie, C.; Huang, K.; Cui, M. Y.; Chan, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    Core-shell type `nanoghosts' were synthesized with a drug-loaded biodegradable PLGA core and a monocyte cell membrane-derived shell. The nanoghosts were monodisperse with an average size coated nanoparticle controls in metastatic MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines.Core-shell type `nanoghosts' were synthesized with a drug-loaded biodegradable PLGA core and a monocyte cell membrane-derived shell. The nanoghosts were monodisperse with an average size coated nanoparticle controls in metastatic MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07588b

  16. Why can hydrogen sulfide permeate cell membranes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Saleh; Rowley, Christopher N

    2014-10-29

    The high membrane permeability of H2S was studied using polarizable molecular dynamics simulations of a DPPC lipid bilayer. The solubility-diffusion model predicts permeability coefficients of H2S and H2O that are in good agreement with experiment. The computed diffusion coefficient profile shows H2S to diffuse at a lower rate than H2O, but the barrier for H2S permeation on the Gibbs energy profile is negligible. The hydrophobicity of H2S allows it to partition into the paraffinic interior of the membrane readily. PMID:25323018

  17. Cytotoxicity of bovine and porcine collagen membranes in mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Camilla Christian Gomes; Soares, Priscilla Barbosa Ferreira; Carneiro, Karine Fernandes; Souza, Maria Aparecida de; Magalhães, Denildo

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the cytotoxicity and the release of nitric oxide induced by collagen membranes in human mononuclear cells. Peripheral blood was collected from each patient and the separation of mononuclear cells was performed by Ficoll. Then, 2x10(5) cells were plated in 48-well culture plates under the membranes in triplicate. The polystyrene surface was used as negative control. Cell viability was assessed by measuring mitochondrial activity (MTT) at 4, 12 and 24 h, with dosage levels of nitrite by the Griess method for the same periods. Data had non-normal distribution and were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Statistically significant differences (p<0.05) were observed between the membranes and the control in the experimental period, although there was a significant reduction in viability over time (p<0.01). At 4 and 12 h, the porcine membrane induced a higher release of nitrite compared with the control and bovine membrane, respectively (p<0.01), and this difference was maintained at 24 h (p<0.05). This in vitro study showed that the porcine collagen membrane induces an increased production of proinflammatory mediators by mononuclear cells in the first hours of contact, decreasing with time. PMID:22460313

  18. Membrane Targeting of P-type ATPases in Plant Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How membrane proteins are targeted to specific subcellular locations is a very complex and poorly understood area of research. Our long-term goal is to use P-type ATPases (ion pumps), in a model plant system Arabidopsis, as a paradigm to understand how members of a family of closely related membrane proteins can be targeted to different subcellular locations. The research is divided into two specific aims. The first aim is focused on determining the targeting destination of all 10 ACA-type calcium pumps (Arabidopsis Calcium ATPase) in Arabidopsis. ACAs represent a plant specific-subfamily of plasma membrane-type calcium pumps. In contrast to animals, the plant homologs have been found in multiple membrane systems, including the ER (ACA2), tonoplast (ACA4) and plasma membrane (ACA8). Their high degree of similarity provides a unique opportunity to use a comparative approach to delineate the membrane specific targeting information for each pump. One hypothesis to be tested is that an endomembrane located ACA can be re-directed to the plasma membrane by including targeting information from a plasma membrane isoform, ACA8. Our approach is to engineer domain swaps between pumps and monitor the targeting of chimeric proteins in plant cells using a Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) as a tag. The second aim is to test the hypothesis that heterologous transporters can be engineered into plants and targeted to the plasma membrane by fusing them to a plasma membrane proton pump. As a test case we are evaluating the targeting properties of fusions made between a yeast sodium/proton exchanger (Sod2) and a proton pump (AHA2). This fusion may potentially lead to a new strategy for engineering salt resistant plants. Together these aims are designed to provide fundamental insights into the biogenesis and function of plant cell membrane systems

  19. Proteins upregulated by mild and severe hypoxia in squamous cell carcinomas in vitro identified by proteomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Solid malignant tumours are characterised by an inadequate vascular system, which can give rise to micro-regional hypoxic areas. As the negative impact of tumour hypoxia is believed largely to depend on dynamic changes in gene expression, it is important to identify the genes regulated by hypoxia to further enlighten the biology behind the cellular response to hypoxia. Previous studies have demonstrated that hypoxia has an impact not only on the gene transcription, but also on gene-specific mRNA translation. Therefore, proteomics is a suitable approach to understand the complexity of gene regulation under hypoxia at protein level. In this in vitro study we have studied the proteome of cells under intermediate hypoxia (1% O2) and anoxia and compared these to normoxic (21% O2) cells to identify proteins upregulated by mild and severe hypoxia. Materials and methods: A human cervix cancer cell line (SiHa) and a human head and neck cancer cell line (FaDuDD) were used. Total cell lysate from hypoxic and normoxic cells was separated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and images were analysed using Quantity One software. Proteins from significant spots (difference in intensity by more than a factor 2) were identified by Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In order to confirm the hypoxic regulation of the identified proteins, immunoblotting and qPCR were employed when possible. Results: All together 32 spots were found to be upregulated in the hypoxic gels. Of these, 11 different proteins were successfully identified and largely confirmed by Western blotting and qPCR. Amongst these proteins are protein disulfide isomerase family A, member 6 (PDIA6) and dynein light chain roadblock-type 1 (DynLRB1). Both 2D gels and Western blots revealed that PDAI6 exhibited a cell line specific pattern; in FaDuDD there was upregulation at 1% and further upregulated at 0% compared to atmospheric air, whereas there was no upregulation in SiHa cells. DynLRB1 was

  20. Microfluidics-Based Single-Cell Functional Proteomics for Fundamental and Applied Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Zhou, Jing; Sutherland, Alex; Wei, Wei; Shin, Young Shik; Xue, Min; Heath, James R.

    2014-06-01

    We review an emerging microfluidics-based toolkit for single-cell functional proteomics. Functional proteins include, but are not limited to, the secreted signaling proteins that can reflect the biological behaviors of immune cells or the intracellular phosphoproteins associated with growth factor-stimulated signaling networks. Advantages of the microfluidics platforms are multiple. First, 20 or more functional proteins may be assayed simultaneously from statistical numbers of single cells. Second, cell behaviors (e.g., motility) may be correlated with protein assays. Third, extensions to quantized cell populations can permit measurements of cell-cell interactions. Fourth, rare cells can be functionally identified and then separated for further analysis or culturing. Finally, certain assay types can provide a conduit between biology and the physicochemical laws. We discuss the history and challenges of the field then review design concepts and uses of the microchip platforms that have been reported, with an eye toward biomedical applications. We then look to the future of the field.

  1. Proteomic analysis of arginine methylation sites in human cells reveals dynamic regulation during transcriptional arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Horn, Heiko; Jungmichel, Stephanie;

    2014-01-01

    contain regulated functions on their own. Collectively, we present a site-specific MMA dataset in human cells and demonstrate for the first time that MMA is a dynamic post-translational modification regulated during transcriptional arrest by a hitherto uncharacterized arginine demethylase....... mono-methylation (MMA) sites. We thereby identify 1,027 site-specific MMA sites on 494 human proteins, discovering numerous novel mono-methylation targets and confirming the majority of currently known MMA substrates. Nuclear RNA-binding proteins involved in RNA processing, RNA localization......, transcription, and chromatin remodeling are predominantly found modified with MMA. Despite this, MMA sites prominently are located outside RNA-binding domains as compared to the proteome-wide distribution of arginine residues. Quantification of arginine methylation in cells treated with Actinomycin D uncovers...

  2. Proteomic analysis of oil body membrane proteins accompanying the onset of desiccation phase during sunflower seed development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Anita; Bhatla, Satish C

    2015-01-01

    A noteworthy metabolic signature accompanying oil body (OB) biogenesis during oilseed development is associated with the modulation of the oil body membranes proteins. Present work focuses on 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE)-based analysis of the temporal changes in the OB membrane proteins analyzed by LC-MS/MS accompanying the onset of desiccation (20-30 d after anthesis; DAA) in the developing seeds of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Protein spots unique to 20-30 DAA stages were picked up from 2-D gels for identification and the identified proteins were categorized into 7 functional classes. These include proteins involved in energy metabolism, reactive oxygen scavenging, proteolysis and protein turnover, signaling, oleosin and oil body biogenesis-associated proteins, desiccation and cytoskeleton. At 30 DAA stage, exclusive expressions of enzymes belonging to energy metabolism, desiccation and cytoskeleton were evident which indicated an increase in the metabolic and enzymatic activity in the cells at this stage of seed development (seed filling). Increased expression of cruciferina-like protein and dehydrin at 30 DAA stage marks the onset of desiccation. The data has been analyzed and discussed to highlight desiccation stage-associated metabolic events during oilseed development. PMID:26786011

  3. High temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and motivated extensive research activity in the field. The last 11 chapters summarize the state-of-the-art of technological development of high temperature-PEMFCs based on acid doped PBI membranes including catalysts, electrodes, MEAs, bipolar plates, modelling, stacking, diagnostics and applications....

  4. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis of the proteomes expressed in the human hepatoma cell line BEL-7404 and normal liver cell line L-02

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Proteome analysis technology has been used extensively in conducting discovery research of biology and has become one of the most essential technologies in functional genomics. The proteomes of the human hepatoma cell line BEL-7404 and the normal human liver cell line L-02 have been separated by high resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) with immobilized pH gradient isoelectric focusing (IPG-IEF) in the first dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) in the second dimension (IPG-DALT). The resulting images have been analyzed using 2-D analysis software. Quantitative analysis reveals that 7 protein spots are detected only in hepatoma BEL-7404 cells, 14 only in L-02 cells, and 78 protein spots show significant fluctuation in quantity in both cell lines (P<0.01).These protein spots have been displayed on a proteome differential expression map. Analysis for the reproducibility of 2-DE indicates that the positional variability in the IEF dimension is 0.73 mm, while the variability in the SDS-PAGE dimension is 0.44 mm, and the quantitative variability is 17.6%-19.2%. These results suggest that the reproducibility of 2-DE has been suitable for the study of differential expression of proteomes. Proteome differential expression maps can be useful tools for disease diagnosis, drug-target validation analysis and biological process elucidation.

  5. Proteome-wide analysis of arginine monomethylation reveals widespread occurrence in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sara C; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Mund, Andreas; Lyon, David; Mullari, Meeli; Madsen, Maria V; Daniel, Jeremy A; Jensen, Lars J; Nielsen, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    The posttranslational modification of proteins by arginine methylation is functionally important, yet the breadth of this modification is not well characterized. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified 8030 arginine methylation sites within 3300 human proteins in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, indicating that the occurrence of this modification is comparable to phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. A site-level conservation analysis revealed that arginine methylation sites are less evolutionarily conserved compared to arginines that were not identified as modified by methylation. Through quantitative proteomics and RNA interference to examine arginine methylation stoichiometry, we unexpectedly found that the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) family of arginine methyltransferases catalyzed methylation independently of arginine sequence context. In contrast to the frequency of somatic mutations at arginine methylation sites throughout the proteome, we observed that somatic mutations were common at arginine methylation sites in proteins involved in mRNA splicing. Furthermore, in HeLa and U2OS cells, we found that distinct arginine methyltransferases differentially regulated the functions of the pre-mRNA splicing factor SRSF2 (serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2) and the RNA transport ribonucleoprotein HNRNPUL1 (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U-like 1). Knocking down PRMT5 impaired the RNA binding function of SRSF2, whereas knocking down PRMT4 [also known as coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1)] or PRMT1 increased the RNA binding function of HNRNPUL1. High-content single-cell imaging additionally revealed that knocking down CARM1 promoted the nuclear accumulation of SRSF2, independent of cell cycle phase. Collectively, the presented human arginine methylome provides a missing piece in the global and integrative view of cellular physiology and protein regulation. PMID:27577262

  6. Proteomics reveals multiple routes to the osteogenic phenotype in mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yener Bülent

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, we demonstrated that human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC stimulated with dexamethazone undergo gene focusing during osteogenic differentiation (Stem Cells Dev 14(6: 1608–20, 2005. Here, we examine the protein expression profiles of three additional populations of hMSC stimulated to undergo osteogenic differentiation via either contact with pro-osteogenic extracellular matrix (ECM proteins (collagen I, vitronectin, or laminin-5 or osteogenic media supplements (OS media. Specifically, we annotate these four protein expression profiles, as well as profiles from naïve hMSC and differentiated human osteoblasts (hOST, with known gene ontologies and analyze them as a tensor with modes for the expressed proteins, gene ontologies, and stimulants. Results Direct component analysis in the gene ontology space identifies three components that account for 90% of the variance between hMSC, osteoblasts, and the four stimulated hMSC populations. The directed component maps the differentiation stages of the stimulated stem cell populations along the differentiation axis created by the difference in the expression profiles of hMSC and hOST. Surprisingly, hMSC treated with ECM proteins lie closer to osteoblasts than do hMSC treated with OS media. Additionally, the second component demonstrates that proteomic profiles of collagen I- and vitronectin-stimulated hMSC are distinct from those of OS-stimulated cells. A three-mode tensor analysis reveals additional focus proteins critical for characterizing the phenotypic variations between naïve hMSC, partially differentiated hMSC, and hOST. Conclusion The differences between the proteomic profiles of OS-stimulated hMSC and ECM-hMSC characterize different transitional phenotypes en route to becoming osteoblasts. This conclusion is arrived at via a three-mode tensor analysis validated using hMSC plated on laminin-5.

  7. Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) Applied to Quantitative Proteomics of Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soufi, Boumediene; Kumar, C.; Gnad, F.;

    2010-01-01

    We applied stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to large-scale quantitative proteomics analyses of the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis in two physiological conditions: growth on succinate and growth under phosphate starvation. Using a B. subtilis strain auxotrophic for...... most comprehensive quantitative proteomics studies in bacteria, covering more than 75% of the B. subtilis genes expressed in the log phase of growth. Furthermore, we detect and quantify dynamics of 35 Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation sites under growth on succinate, and 10 phosphorylation sites under...

  8. Organellar proteome analyses of ricin toxin-treated HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Peng; Li, Yunhu; Li, Hongyang; Liu, Wensen

    2016-07-01

    Apoptosis triggered by ricin toxin (RT) has previously been associated with certain cellular organellar compartments, but the diversity in the composition of the organellar proteins remains unclear. Here, we applied a shotgun proteomics strategy to examine the differential expression of proteins in the mitochondria, nuclei, and cytoplasm of HeLa cells treated and not treated with RT. Data were combined with a global bioinformatics analysis and experimental confirmations. A total of 3107 proteins were identified. Bioinformatics predictors (Proteome Analyst, WoLF PSORT, TargetP, MitoPred, Nucleo, MultiLoc, and k-nearest neighbor) and a Bayesian model that integrated these predictors were used to predict the locations of 1349 distinct organellar proteins. Our data indicate that the Bayesian model was more efficient than the individual implementation of these predictors. Additionally, a Biomolecular Interaction Network (BIN) analysis was used to identify 149 BIN subnetworks. Our experimental confirmations indicate that certain apoptosis-related proteins (e.g. cytochrome c, enolase, lamin B, Bax, and Drp1) were found to be translocated and had variable expression levels. These results provide new insights for the systematic understanding of RT-induced apoptosis responses. PMID:25227225

  9. Differential proteome analysis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianyu Zhuang

    Full Text Available Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS is a complex three-dimensional deformity of the spine. The cause and pathogenesis of scoliosis and the accompanying generalized osteopenia remain unclear despite decades of extensive research. In this study, we utilized two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE coupled with mass spectrometry (MS to analyze the differential proteome of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs from AIS patients. In total, 41 significantly altered protein spots were detected, of which 34 spots were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis and found to represent 25 distinct gene products. Among these proteins, five related to bone growth and development, including pyruvate kinase M2, annexin A2, heat shock 27 kDa protein, γ-actin, and β-actin, were found to be dysregulated and therefore selected for further validation by Western blot analysis. At the protein level, our results supported the previous hypothesis that decreased osteogenic differentiation ability of MSCs is one of the mechanisms leading to osteopenia in AIS. In summary, we analyzed the differential BM-MSCs proteome of AIS patients for the first time, which may help to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of bone loss in AIS and also increase understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of AIS.

  10. With or without rafts? Alternative views on cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevcsik, Eva; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2016-02-01

    The fundamental mechanisms of protein and lipid organization at the plasma membrane have continued to engage researchers for decades. Among proposed models, one idea has been particularly successful which assumes that sterol-dependent nanoscopic phases of different lipid chain order compartmentalize proteins, thereby modulating protein functionality. This model of membrane rafts has sustainably sparked the fields of membrane biophysics and biology, and shifted membrane lipids into the spotlight of research; by now, rafts have become an integral part of our terminology to describe a variety of cell biological processes. But is the evidence clear enough to continue supporting a theoretical concept which has resisted direct proof by observation for nearly twenty years? In this essay, we revisit findings that gave rise to and substantiated the raft hypothesis, discuss its impact on recent studies, and present alternative mechanisms to account for plasma membrane heterogeneity. PMID:26666984

  11. Proteomic analysis of mesenchymal stem cells from normal and deep carious dental pulp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Ma

    Full Text Available Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs, precursor cells of odontoblasts, are ideal seed cells for tooth tissue engineering and regeneration. Our previous study has demonstrated that stem cells exist in dental pulp with deep caries and are called carious dental pulp stem cells (CDPSCs. The results indicated that CDPSCs had a higher proliferative and stronger osteogenic differentiation potential than DPSCs. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the biological differences between DPSCs and CDPSCs are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to define the molecular features of DPSCs and CDPSCs by comparing the proteomic profiles using two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE in combination with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS. Our results revealed that there were 18 protein spots differentially expressed between DPSCs and CDPSCs in a narrow pH range of 4 to 7. These differently expressed proteins are mostly involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, cell cytoskeleton and motility. In addition, our results suggested that CDPSCs had a higher expression of antioxidative proteins that might protect CDPSCs from oxidative stress. This study explores some potential proteins responsible for the biological differences between DPSCs and CDPSCs and expands our understanding on the molecular mechanisms of mineralization of DPSCs in the formation of the dentin-pulp complex.

  12. Transcriptome and proteome characterization of surface ectoderm cells differentiated from human iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ying; Zhou, Bo; Yang, Wei; Han, Bingchen; Yu-Rice, Yi; Gao, Bowen; Johnson, Jeffery; Svendsen, Clive N; Freeman, Michael R; Giuliano, Armando E; Sareen, Dhruv; Cui, Xiaojiang

    2016-01-01

    Surface ectoderm (SE) cells give rise to structures including the epidermis and ectodermal associated appendages such as hair, eye, and the mammary gland. In this study, we validate a protocol that utilizes BMP4 and the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT to induce SE differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). hiPSC-differentiated SE cells expressed markers suggesting their commitment to the SE lineage. Computational analyses using integrated quantitative transcriptomic and proteomic profiling reveal that TGFβ superfamily signaling pathways are preferentially activated in SE cells compared with hiPSCs. SE differentiation can be enhanced by selectively blocking TGFβ-RI signaling. We also show that SE cells and neural ectoderm cells possess distinct gene expression patterns and signaling networks as indicated by functional Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Our findings advance current understanding of early human SE cell development and pave the way for modeling of SE-derived tissue development, studying disease pathogenesis, and development of regenerative medicine approaches. PMID:27550649

  13. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Characterization for Electric Vehicle Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Swan, D.H.; Dickinson, B.E.; Arikara, M.P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents experimental data and an analysis of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell system for electric vehicle applications. The dependence of the fuel cell system's performance on air stoichiometry, operating temperature, and reactant gas pressure was assessed in terms of the fuel cell's polarity and power density-efficiency graphs. All the experiments were performed by loading the fuel cell with resistive heater coils which could be controlled to provide a constant current or con...

  14. The Proteomic Landscape of Human Ex Vivo Regulatory and Conventional T Cells Reveals Specific Metabolic Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procaccini, Claudio; Carbone, Fortunata; Di Silvestre, Dario; Brambilla, Francesca; De Rosa, Veronica; Galgani, Mario; Faicchia, Deriggio; Marone, Gianni; Tramontano, Donatella; Corona, Marco; Alviggi, Carlo; Porcellini, Antonio; La Cava, Antonio; Mauri, Pierluigi; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Summary Human CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+CD127− Treg and CD4+CD25−Foxp3− Tconv cell functions are governed by their metabolic requirements. Here we report a comprehensive comparative analysis between ex vivo human Treg and Tconv cells that comprises analyses of the proteomic networks in subcellular compartments. We identified a dominant proteomic signature at the metabolic level that primarily impacted the highly-tuned balance between glucose and fatty-acid oxidation in the two cell types. Ex vivo Treg cells were highly glycolytic while Tconv cells used predominantly fatty-acid oxidation (FAO). When cultured in vitro, Treg cells engaged both glycolysis and FAO to proliferate, while Tconv cell proliferation mainly relied on glucose metabolism. Our unbiased proteomic analysis provides a molecular picture of the impact of metabolism on ex vivo human Treg versus Tconv cell functions that might be relevant for therapeutic manipulations of these cells. PMID:26885861

  15. The Proteomic Landscape of Human Ex Vivo Regulatory and Conventional T Cells Reveals Specific Metabolic Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procaccini, Claudio; Carbone, Fortunata; Di Silvestre, Dario; Brambilla, Francesca; De Rosa, Veronica; Galgani, Mario; Faicchia, Deriggio; Marone, Gianni; Tramontano, Donatella; Corona, Marco; Alviggi, Carlo; Porcellini, Antonio; La Cava, Antonio; Mauri, Pierluigi; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2016-02-16

    Human CD4(+)CD25(hi)Foxp3(+)CD127(-) Treg and CD4(+)CD25(-)Foxp3(-) Tconv cell functions are governed by their metabolic requirements. Here we report a comprehensive comparative analysis between ex vivo human Treg and Tconv cells that comprises analyses of the proteomic networks in subcellular compartments. We identified a dominant proteomic signature at the metabolic level that primarily impacted the highly-tuned balance between glucose and fatty-acid oxidation in the two cell types. Ex vivo Treg cells were highly glycolytic while Tconv cells used predominantly fatty-acid oxidation (FAO). When cultured in vitro, Treg cells engaged both glycolysis and FAO to proliferate, while Tconv cell proliferation mainly relied on glucose metabolism. Our unbiased proteomic analysis provides a molecular picture of the impact of metabolism on ex vivo human Treg versus Tconv cell functions that might be relevant for therapeutic manipulations of these cells. PMID:26885861

  16. Oxidative degradation of polybenzimidazole membranes as electrolytes for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, J.H.; Li, Qingfeng; Rudbeck, H.C.;

    2011-01-01

    Polybenzimidazole membranes imbibed with acid are emerging as a suitable electrolyte material for high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The oxidative stability of polybenzimidazole has been identified as an important issue for the long-term durability of such cells. In this paper the...... oxidative degradation of the polymer membrane was studied under the Fenton test conditions by the weight loss, intrinsic viscosity, size exclusion chromatography, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. During the Fenton test, significant weight losses depending on the...

  17. Coating nanofiber scaffolds with beta cell membrane to promote cell proliferation and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wansong; Zhang, Qiangzhe; Luk, Brian T.; Fang, Ronnie H.; Liu, Younian; Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Liangfang

    2016-05-01

    The cell membrane cloaking technique has emerged as an intriguing strategy in nanomaterial functionalization. Coating synthetic nanostructures with natural cell membranes bestows the nanostructures with unique cell surface antigens and functions. Previous studies have focused primarily on development of cell membrane-coated spherical nanoparticles and the uses thereof. Herein, we attempt to extend the cell membrane cloaking technique to nanofibers, a class of functional nanomaterials that are drastically different from nanoparticles in terms of dimensional and mechanophysical characteristics. Using pancreatic beta cells as a model cell line, we demonstrate successful preparation of cell membrane-coated nanofibers and validate that the modified nanofibers possess an antigenic exterior closely resembling that of the source beta cells. When such nanofiber scaffolds are used to culture beta cells, both cell proliferation rate and function are significantly enhanced. Specifically, glucose-dependent insulin secretion from the cells is increased by near five-fold compared with the same beta cells cultured in regular, unmodified nanofiber scaffolds. Overall, coating cell membranes onto nanofibers could add another dimension of flexibility and controllability in harnessing cell membrane functions and offer new opportunities for innovative applications.

  18. Decidual-secreted factors alter invasive trophoblast membrane and secreted proteins implying a role for decidual cell regulation of placentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkhorst, Ellen Melaleuca; Lane, Natalie; Winship, Amy Louise; Li, Priscilla; Yap, Joanne; Meehan, Katie; Rainczuk, Adam; Stephens, Andrew; Dimitriadis, Evdokia

    2012-01-01

    Inadequate or inappropriate implantation and placentation during the establishment of human pregnancy is thought to lead to first trimester miscarriage, placental insufficiency and other obstetric complications. To create the placental blood supply, specialized cells, the 'extravillous trophoblast' (EVT) invade through the differentiated uterine endometrium (the decidua) to engraft and remodel uterine spiral arteries. We hypothesized that decidual factors would regulate EVT function by altering the production of EVT membrane and secreted factors. We used a proteomics approach to identify EVT membrane and secreted proteins regulated by decidual cell factors. Human endometrial stromal cells were decidualized in vitro by treatment with estradiol (10(-8) M), medroxyprogesterone acetate (10(-7) M) and cAMP (0.5 mM) for 14 days. Conditioned media (CM) was collected on day 2 (non-decidualized CM) and 14 (decidualized CM) of treatment. Isolated primary EVT cultured on Matrigel™ were treated with media control, non-decidualized or decidualized CM for 16 h. EVT CM was fractionated for proteins HPLC-MS/MS. 43 proteins produced by EVT were identified; 14 not previously known to be expressed in the placenta and 12 which had previously been associated with diseases of pregnancy including preeclampsia. Profilin 1, lysosome associated membrane glycoprotein 1 (LAMP1), dipeptidyl peptidase 1 (DPP1/cathepsin C) and annexin A2 expression by interstitial EVT in vivo was validated by immunhistochemistry. Decidual CM regulation in vitro was validated by western blotting: decidualized CM upregulated profilin 1 in EVT CM and non-decidualized CM upregulated annexin A2 in EVT CM and pro-DPP1 in EVT cell lysate. Here, non-decidualized factors induced protease expression by EVT suggesting that non-decidualized factors may induce a pro-inflammatory cascade. Preeclampsia is a pro-inflammatory condition. Overall, we have demonstrated the potential of a proteomics approach to identify novel

  19. Integration of genomic and proteomic data to identify candidate genes in HT-29 cells after incubation with Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 29521.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao-Gui; Wu, Yaoping; Qiu, Liang; Shah, Nagendra P; Xu, Feng; Wei, Hua

    2016-09-01

    As the predominant group inhabiting the human gastrointestinal tract, bifidobacteria play a vital role in human nutrition, therapeutics, and health by shaping and maintaining the gut ecosystem, reducing blood cholesterol, and promoting the supply of nutrients. The interaction between bacterial cells and human intestinal epithelial cell lines has been studied for decades in an attempt to understand the mechanisms of action. These studies, however, have been limited by lack of genomic and proteomic database to aid in achieving comprehensive understanding of these mechanisms at molecular levels. Microarray data (GSE: 74119) coupled with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) were performed to detect differentially expressed genes and proteins in HT-29 cells after incubation with Bifidobacterium bifidum. Real-time quantitative PCR, gene ontology, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses were further conducted for mRNA validation, functional annotation, and pathway identification, respectively. According to the results of microarray, 1,717 differentially expressed genes, including 1,693 upregulated and 24 downregulated genes, were selected and classified by the gene ontology database. The iTRAQ analysis identified 43 differentially expressed proteins, where 29 proteins were upregulated and 14 proteins were downregulated. Eighty-two candidate genes showing consistent differences with microarray and iTRAQ were further validated in HT-29 and Caco-2 cells by real-time quantitative PCR. Nine of the top genes showing interesting results with high confidence were further investigated in vivo in mice intestine samples. Integration of genomic and proteomic data provides an approach to identify candidate genes that are more likely to function in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, positive regulation of apoptosis, membrane proteins, and transferase catalysis. These findings might contribute to our understanding of molecular mechanisms regulating the

  20. Proteomics Technologies and Challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics is the study of proteins and their interactions in a cell. With the completion of the Human Genome Project, the emphasis is shifting to the protein compliment of the human organism. Because proteome reflects more accurately on the dynamic state of a cell, tissue, or organism, much is expected from proteomics to yield better disease markers for diagnosis and therapy monitoring. The advent of proteomics technologies for global detection and quantitation of proteins creates new opportunities and challenges for those seeking to gain greater understanding of diseases. High-throughput proteomics technologies combining with advanced bioinformatics are extensively used to identify molecular signatures of diseases based on protein pathways and signaling cascades. Mass spectrometry plays a vital role in proteomics and has become an indispensable tool for molecular and cellular biology. While the potential is great, many challenges and issues remain to be solved, such as mining low abundant proteins and integration of proteomics with genomics and metabolomics data. Nevertheless, proteomics is the foundation for constructing and extracting useful knowledge to biomedical research. In this review, a snapshot of contemporary issues in proteomics technologies is discussed.

  1. A proteomic and genetic analysis of the Neurospora crassa conidia cell wall proteins identifies two glycosyl hydrolases involved in cell wall remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Jie; Aldabbous, Mash'el; Notaro, Marysa J; Lojacono, Mark; Free, Stephen J

    2016-09-01

    A proteomic analysis of the conidial cell wall identified 35 cell wall proteins. A comparison with the proteome of the vegetative hyphae showed that 16 cell wall proteins were shared, and that these shared cell wall proteins were cell wall biosynthetic proteins or cell wall structural proteins. Deletion mutants for 34 of the genes were analyzed for phenotypes indicative of conidial cell wall defects. Mutants for two cell wall glycosyl hydrolases, the CGL-1 β-1,3-glucanase (NCU07523) and the NAG-1 exochitinase (NCU10852), were found to have a conidial separation phenotype. These two enzymes function in remodeling the cell wall between adjacent conidia to facilitate conidia formation and dissemination. Using promoter::RFP and promoter::GFP constructs, we demonstrated that the promoters for 15 of the conidia-specific cell wall genes, including cgl-1 and nag-1, provided for conidia-specific gene expression or for a significant increase in their expression during conidiation. PMID:27381444

  2. Cationic Nanoparticles Induce Nanoscale Disruption in Living Cell Plasma Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jiumei; Hessler, Jessica A.; Putchakayala, Krishna; Panama, Brian K.; Khan, Damian P.; Hong, Seungpyo; Mullen, Douglas G.; DiMaggio, Stassi C.; Som, Abhigyan; Tew, Gregory N.; Lopatin, Anatoli N.; Baker, James R.; Banaszak Holl, Mark M.; Orr, Bradford G

    2009-01-01

    It has long been recognized that cationic nanoparticles induce cell membrane permeability. Recently, it has been found that cationic nanoparticles induce the formation and/or growth of nanoscale holes in supported lipid bilayers. In this paper we show that non-cytotoxic concentrations of cationic nanoparticles induce 30–2000 pA currents in 293A and KB cells, consistent with a nanoscale defect such as a single hole or group of holes in the cell membrane ranging from 1 to 350 nm2 in total area....

  3. Nonlinear electro-mechanobiological behavior of cell membrane during electroporation

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Peigang

    2012-01-01

    A nonlinear electroporation (EP) model is proposed to study the electro-mechanobiological behavior of cell membrane during EP, by taking the nonlinear large deformation of the membrane into account. The proposed model predicts the critical transmembrane potential and the activation energy for EP, the equilibrium pore size, and the resealing process of the pore. Single-cell EP experiments using a micro EP chip were conducted on chicken red blood cells at different temperatures to determine the activation energy and the critical transmembrane potential for EP. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Attachment of killed Mycoplasma gallisepticum cells and membranes to erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To correlate viability with attachment capacity, Mycoplasma gallisepticum cells harvested at different growth phases and treated by various agents were tested for their capacity to attach to human erythrocytes. The results show that viability per se is not essential for M. gallisepticum attachment to erythrocytes, as cells killed by ultraviolet irradiation and membranes isolated by lysing M. gallisepticum cells by various means retained attachment capacity. However, treatment of the mycoplasmas by protein-denaturing agents, such as heart, glutaraldehyde, or prolonged exposure to low pH, drastically affected or even abolished attachment, supporting the protein nature of the mycoplasma membrane components responsible for specific binding to the sialoglycoprotein receptors on the erythrocytes

  5. Altered Membrane Potential and Electrolyte in Sickle Cell Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JK Nnodim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study has been to evaluate the level of membrane potential and electrolyte in sickle cell disease patients. Material and methods: 100 sickle cell patients in steady state ages 5 to 30 years attending General Hospital Owerri were used in the study while 100 normal subjects (HbAA were used as control. Also 30 HbSS in crisis have been involved. Results: The results obtained showed that the level of membrane potential was significantly lower in sickle cell anemia as compared to the controls. Also, the level of the electrolyte was found significantly decreased in HbSS when compared with HbAA at P<0.05. Conclusion: The membrane potential translates to energy which means that there is less energy in sickle cell disease which is linked to electrolyte imbalance. Hence people with sickle disease should be monitored closely for their electrolytes to avoid crisis.

  6. Membrane Mechanics of Endocytosis in Cells with Turgor

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitrieff, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis is an essential process by which cells internalize a piece of plasma membrane and material from the outside. In cells with turgor, pressure opposes membrane defor- mations, and increases the amount of force that has to be generated by the endocytic machinery. To determine this force, and calculate the shape of the membrane, we used physical theory to model an elastic surface under pressure. Accurate fits of experimental profiles are obtained assuming that the coated membrane is highly rigid and preferentially curved at the endocytic site. The forces required from the actin machinery peaks at the onset of deformation, indicating that once invagination has been initiated, endocytosis is unlikely to stall before completion. Coat proteins do not lower the initiation force but may affect the process by the curvature they induce. In the presence of isotropic curvature inducers, pulling the tip of the invagination can trigger the formation of a neck at the base of the invagination. Hence direct neck cons...

  7. Interaction of injectable neurotropic drugs with the red cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Walter H; Lubszky, Szabina; Thöny, Sandra; Schulzki, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The normal red blood cell (RBC) shape is a biconcave discocyte. An intercalation of a drug in the outer half of the membrane lipid bilayer leads to echinocytosis, an intercalation in the inner half to stomatocytosis. We have used the shape transforming capacity of RBCs as a model to analyse the membrane interaction potential of various neurotropic drugs. Chlorpromazine, clomipramine, citalopram, clonazepam, and diazepam induced a reversible stomatocytosis, phenytoin induced echinocytosis, while the anticonvulsants levetiracetam, valproic acid and phenobarbital had no effect. This diversity of RBC shape transformations suggests that the pharmacological action is not linked to the membrane interaction. We conclude that this simple RBC shape transformation assay could be a useful tool to screen for potential drug interactions with cell membranes. PMID:24997296

  8. Direct Cytoskeleton Forces Cause Membrane Softening in Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-García, Ruddi; López-Montero, Iván; Mell, Michael; Egea, Gustavo; Gov, Nir S.; Monroy, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Erythrocytes are flexible cells specialized in the systemic transport of oxygen in vertebrates. This physiological function is connected to their outstanding ability to deform in passing through narrow capillaries. In recent years, there has been an influx of experimental evidence of enhanced cell-shape fluctuations related to metabolically driven activity of the erythroid membrane skeleton. However, no direct observation of the active cytoskeleton forces has yet been reported to our knowledge. Here, we show experimental evidence of the presence of temporally correlated forces superposed over the thermal fluctuations of the erythrocyte membrane. These forces are ATP-dependent and drive enhanced flickering motions in human erythrocytes. Theoretical analyses provide support for a direct force exerted on the membrane by the cytoskeleton nodes as pulses of well-defined average duration. In addition, such metabolically regulated active forces cause global membrane softening, a mechanical attribute related to the functional erythroid deformability. PMID:26083919

  9. Endothelial monolayers on collagen-coated nanofibrous membranes: cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Donggu; Kim, Jeong Hwa; Jeong, Young Hun; Kwak, Jong-Young; Yoon, Sik; Jin, Songwan

    2016-06-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) form a monolayer lining over the entire vascular wall and play an important role in maintaining vascular homeostasis and cancer metastasis. Loss of proper endothelial function can lead to vascular diseases. Therefore, the endothelial monolayer is particularly important in tissue regeneration and mimicking vascular tissue in vitro. Numerous studies have described the effects of ECs on nanofibers made from a variety of synthetic polymer materials designed to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, little is known about maintaining the integrity of ECs in in vitro systems. Here we describe polycaprolactone nanofibrous membranes coated with collagen gel that overcome many limitations of conventional nanofibers used for engineering endothelia. We investigated cell-cell and cell-ECM junctional complexes using collagen-coated and conventional nanofibrous membranes. Conventional nanofibrous membranes alone did not form a monolayer with ECs, whereas collagen-coated nanofibrous membranes did. Several concentrations of collagen in the gel coating promoted the formation of cell-cell junctional complexes, facilitated the deposition of laminin, and increased the focal contact organization of ECs. These results suggest the possible use of collagen-coated nanofibrous membranes for vascular tissue engineering applications and a vascular platform for organ-on-a-chip systems. PMID:27186924

  10. Modeling Of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    The objective of this doctoral thesis was to develop reliable steady-state and transient component models suitable to asses-, develop- and optimize proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. Several components in PEM fuel cell systems were characterized and modeled. The developed component...

  11. Membrane proteins of dense lysosomes from Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work membrane proteins from lysosomes were studied in order to gain more information on the biogenesis and intracellular sorting of this class of membrane proteins. Membrane proteins were isolated from a purified population of lysosomes. These proteins were then examined for various co- and post-translational modifications which could serve as potential intracellular sorting signals. Biochemical analysis using marker enzymatic activities detected no plasma membrane, Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisomes, mitochondria, or cytosol. Analysis after incorporation of [3H]thymidine or [3H]uridine detected no nuclei or ribosomes. A fraction containing integral membrane proteins was obtained from the dense lysosomes by extraction with Triton X-114. Twenty-three polypeptides which incorporated both [35S]methionine and [3H]leucine were detected by SDS PAGE in this membrane fraction, and ranged in molecular weight from 30-130 kDa. After incorporation by cells of various radioactive metabolic precursors, the membrane fraction from dense lysosomes was examined and was found to be enriched in mannose, galactose, fucose, palmitate, myristate, and sulfate, but was depleted in phosphate. The membrane fraction from dense lysosomes was then analyzed by SDS PAGE to determine the apparent molecular weights of modified polypepties

  12. Towards Extrusion of Ionomers to Process Fuel Cell Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Yves Sanchez

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available While Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC membranes are currently prepared by film casting, this paper demonstrates the feasibility of extrusion, a solvent-free alternative process. Thanks to water-soluble process-aid plasticizers, duly selected, it was possible to extrude acidic and alkaline polysulfone ionomers. Additionally, the feasibility to extrude composites was demonstrated. The impact of the plasticizers on the melt viscosity was investigated. Following the extrusion, the plasticizers were fully removed in water. The extrusion was found to impact neither on the ionomer chains, nor on the performances of the membrane. This environmentally friendly process was successfully validated for a variety of high performance ionomers.

  13. Dynamic Proteomic Analysis of Pancreatic Mesenchyme Reveals Novel Factors That Enhance Human Embryonic Stem Cell to Pancreatic Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger A. Russ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current approaches in human embryonic stem cell (hESC to pancreatic beta cell differentiation have largely been based on knowledge gained from developmental studies of the epithelial pancreas, while the potential roles of other supporting tissue compartments have not been fully explored. One such tissue is the pancreatic mesenchyme that supports epithelial organogenesis throughout embryogenesis. We hypothesized that detailed characterization of the pancreatic mesenchyme might result in the identification of novel factors not used in current differentiation protocols. Supplementing existing hESC differentiation conditions with such factors might create a more comprehensive simulation of normal development in cell culture. To validate our hypothesis, we took advantage of a novel transgenic mouse model to isolate the pancreatic mesenchyme at distinct embryonic and postnatal stages for subsequent proteomic analysis. Refined sample preparation and analysis conditions across four embryonic and prenatal time points resulted in the identification of 21,498 peptides with high-confidence mapping to 1,502 proteins. Expression analysis of pancreata confirmed the presence of three potentially important factors in cell differentiation: Galectin-1 (LGALS1, Neuroplastin (NPTN, and the Laminin α-2 subunit (LAMA2. Two of the three factors (LGALS1 and LAMA2 increased expression of pancreatic progenitor transcript levels in a published hESC to beta cell differentiation protocol. In addition, LAMA2 partially blocks cell culture induced beta cell dedifferentiation. Summarily, we provide evidence that proteomic analysis of supporting tissues such as the pancreatic mesenchyme allows for the identification of potentially important factors guiding hESC to pancreas differentiation.

  14. Dynamic Proteomic Analysis of Pancreatic Mesenchyme Reveals Novel Factors That Enhance Human Embryonic Stem Cell to Pancreatic Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Holger A; Landsman, Limor; Moss, Christopher L; Higdon, Roger; Greer, Renee L; Kaihara, Kelly; Salamon, Randy; Kolker, Eugene; Hebrok, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Current approaches in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) to pancreatic beta cell differentiation have largely been based on knowledge gained from developmental studies of the epithelial pancreas, while the potential roles of other supporting tissue compartments have not been fully explored. One such tissue is the pancreatic mesenchyme that supports epithelial organogenesis throughout embryogenesis. We hypothesized that detailed characterization of the pancreatic mesenchyme might result in the identification of novel factors not used in current differentiation protocols. Supplementing existing hESC differentiation conditions with such factors might create a more comprehensive simulation of normal development in cell culture. To validate our hypothesis, we took advantage of a novel transgenic mouse model to isolate the pancreatic mesenchyme at distinct embryonic and postnatal stages for subsequent proteomic analysis. Refined sample preparation and analysis conditions across four embryonic and prenatal time points resulted in the identification of 21,498 peptides with high-confidence mapping to 1,502 proteins. Expression analysis of pancreata confirmed the presence of three potentially important factors in cell differentiation: Galectin-1 (LGALS1), Neuroplastin (NPTN), and the Laminin α-2 subunit (LAMA2). Two of the three factors (LGALS1 and LAMA2) increased expression of pancreatic progenitor transcript levels in a published hESC to beta cell differentiation protocol. In addition, LAMA2 partially blocks cell culture induced beta cell dedifferentiation. Summarily, we provide evidence that proteomic analysis of supporting tissues such as the pancreatic mesenchyme allows for the identification of potentially important factors guiding hESC to pancreas differentiation. PMID:26681951

  15. Proteome characterization of sea star coelomocytes--the innate immune effector cells of echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Catarina F; Santos, Romana; Coelho, Ana V

    2011-09-01

    Sea star coelomic fluid is in contact with all internal organs, carrying signaling molecules and a large population of circulating cells, the coelomocytes. These cells, also known as echinoderm blood cells, are responsible for the innate immune responses and are also known to have an important role in the first stage of regeneration, i.e. wound closure, necessary to prevent disruption of the body fluid balance and to limit the invasion of pathogens. This study focuses on the proteome characterization of these multifunctional cells. The identification of 358 proteins was achieved using a combination of two techniques for protein separation (1-D SDS-PAGE followed by nanoLC and 2-D SDS-PAGE) and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS for protein identification. To our knowledge, the present report represents the first comprehensive list of sea star coelomocyte proteins, constituting an important database to validate many echinoderm-predicted proteins. Evidence for new pathways in these particular echinoderm cells are also described, and thus representing a valuable resource to stimulate future studies aiming to unravel the homology with vertebrate immune cells and particularly the origins of the immune system itself. PMID:21751360

  16. Proteomic analysis of apoptosis induction by lariciresinol in human HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhan-Jun; Wang, Xue-Xi; Su, Gang; Yang, Jing-Jing; Zhu, Ya-Juan; Wu, You-Wei; Li, Jing; Lu, Li; Zeng, Long; Pei, Hai-Xia

    2016-08-25

    Lariciresinol (LA) is a traditional Chinese medicine possessing anticancer activity, but its mechanism of action remains unclear. The present study explored the effects of LA on human HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism. Our data indicated that LA inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest in S phase, subsequently resulting in apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Using a proteomics approach, eight differentially expressed proteins were identified. Among them, three proteins, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, UDP-glucose 4-epimerase, and annexin A1, were upregulated, while the other five proteins, heat shock protein 27, haptoglobin, tropomodulin-2, tubulin alpha-1A chain, and brain acid soluble protein 1, were downregulated; all of these proteins are involved in cell proliferation, metabolism, cytoskeletal organization, and movement. Network analysis of these proteins suggested that the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (UBC) plays an important role in the mechanism of LA. Western blotting confirmed downregulation of heat shock protein 27 and upregulation of ubiquitin and UBC expression levels in LA-treated cells, consistent with the results of two-dimensional electrophoresis and a STRING software-based analysis. Overall, LA is a multi-target compound with anti-cancer effects potentially related to the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. This study will increase our understanding of the anticancer mechanisms of LA. PMID:27417256

  17. Cationic nanoparticles induce nanoscale disruption in living cell plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiumei; Hessler, Jessica A; Putchakayala, Krishna; Panama, Brian K; Khan, Damian P; Hong, Seungpyo; Mullen, Douglas G; Dimaggio, Stassi C; Som, Abhigyan; Tew, Gregory N; Lopatin, Anatoli N; Baker, James R; Holl, Mark M Banaszak; Orr, Bradford G

    2009-08-13

    It has long been recognized that cationic nanoparticles induce cell membrane permeability. Recently, it has been found that cationic nanoparticles induce the formation and/or growth of nanoscale holes in supported lipid bilayers. In this paper, we show that noncytotoxic concentrations of cationic nanoparticles induce 30-2000 pA currents in 293A (human embryonic kidney) and KB (human epidermoid carcinoma) cells, consistent with a nanoscale defect such as a single hole or group of holes in the cell membrane ranging from 1 to 350 nm(2) in total area. Other forms of nanoscale defects, including the nanoparticle porating agents adsorbing onto or intercalating into the lipid bilayer, are also consistent; although the size of the defect must increase to account for any reduction in ion conduction, as compared to a water channel. An individual defect forming event takes 1-100 ms, while membrane resealing may occur over tens of seconds. Patch-clamp data provide direct evidence for the formation of nanoscale defects in living cell membranes. The cationic polymer data are compared and contrasted with patch-clamp data obtained for an amphiphilic phenylene ethynylene antimicrobial oligomer (AMO-3), a small molecule that is proposed to make well-defined 3.4 nm holes in lipid bilayers. Here, we observe data that are consistent with AMO-3 making approximately 3 nm holes in living cell membranes. PMID:19606833

  18. Understanding the transport processes in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, May Jean

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are energy conversion devices suitable for automotive, stationary and portable applications. An engineering challenge that is hindering the widespread use of PEM fuel cells is the water management issue, where either a lack of water (resulting in membrane dehydration) or an excess accumulation of liquid water (resulting in fuel cell flooding) critically reduces the PEM fuel cell performance. The water management issue is addressed by this dissertation through the study of three transport processes occurring in PEM fuel cells. Water transport within the membrane is a combination of water diffusion down the water activity gradient and the dragging of water molecules by protons when there is a proton current, in a phenomenon termed electro-osmotic drag, EOD. The impact of water diffusion and EOD on the water flux across the membrane is reduced due to water transport resistance at the vapor/membrane interface. The redistribution of water inside the membrane by EOD causes an overall increase in the membrane resistance that regulates the current and thus EOD, thereby preventing membrane dehydration. Liquid water transport in the PEM fuel cell flow channel was examined at different gas flow regimes. At low gas Reynolds numbers, drops transitioned into slugs that are subsequently pushed out of the flow channel by the gas flow. The slug volume is dependent on the geometric shape, the surface wettability and the orientation (with respect to gravity) of the flow channel. The differential pressure required for slug motion primarily depends on the interfacial forces acting along the contact lines at the front and the back of the slug. At high gas Reynolds number, water is removed as a film or as drops depending on the flow channel surface wettability. The shape of growing drops at low and high Reynolds number can be described by a simple interfacial energy minimization model. Under flooding conditions, the fuel cell local current

  19. Non-biased enrichment does not improve quantitative proteomic delineation of reovirus T3D-infected HeLa cell protein alterations

    OpenAIRE

    KevinM.Coombs

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based methods have allowed elucidation of alterations in complex proteomes, such as eukaryotic cells. Such studies have identified and measured relative abundances of thousands of host proteins after cells are infected with a virus. One of the potential limitations in such studies is that generally only the most abundant proteins are identified, leaving the deep richness of the cellular proteome largely unexplored. We differentially labeled HeLa cells with light and heavy st...

  20. High-throughput quantitative proteomic analysis of dengue virus type 2 infected A549 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Chen Chiu

    Full Text Available Disease caused by dengue virus is a global health concern with up to 390 million individuals infected annually worldwide. There are no vaccines or antiviral compounds available to either prevent or treat dengue disease which may be fatal. To increase our understanding of the interaction of dengue virus with the host cell, we analyzed changes in the proteome of human A549 cells in response to dengue virus type 2 infection using stable isotope labelling in cell culture (SILAC in combination with high-throughput mass spectrometry (MS. Mock and infected A549 cells were fractionated into nuclear and cytoplasmic extracts before analysis to identify proteins that redistribute between cellular compartments during infection and reduce the complexity of the analysis. We identified and quantified 3098 and 2115 proteins in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions respectively. Proteins that showed a significant alteration in amount during infection were examined using gene enrichment, pathway and network analysis tools. The analyses revealed that dengue virus infection modulated the amounts of proteins involved in the interferon and unfolded protein responses, lipid metabolism and the cell cycle. The SILAC-MS results were validated for a select number of proteins over a time course of infection by Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Our study demonstrates for the first time the power of SILAC-MS for identifying and quantifying novel changes in cellular protein amounts in response to dengue virus infection.

  1. In Plant and Animal Cells, Detergent-Resistant Membranes Do Not Define Functional Membrane Rafts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tanner, W.; Malínský, Jan; Opekarová, Miroslava

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2011), s. 1191-1193. ISSN 1040-4651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : plasma-membrane * lipod rafts * proteins Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 8.987, year: 2011

  2. Corona discharge in electroporation of cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the present work is to demonstrate that electrical corona discharge is very efficient in cellular membrane electroporation due to current pulses with sharp front (2-5 ns) and to the fact that corona discharge is associated with UV radiation and micro particles emission. A comparison between DC and AC at 800 Hz and a special waveform to corona application is presented. The comparison is analyzed by means of applying all these in the maceration process (electroplasmolysis) of red wine production and in the processes of different types of the microbes.

  3. Corona discharge in electroporation of cell membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramariuc, R; Nisiparu, L [Competence Centre in Electrostatics and Electrotehchnologies (Romania); Tudorache, A; Branduse, E; Fotescu, L [Research Institute of Wine Processing, Valea Mantei Street, No.l, Valea Calugareasca (Romania); Popa, M E; Mitelut, A [Biotechnology Faculty, University of Agronomical Sciences and Veterinary Medicine (Romania); Turtoi, M O

    2008-12-01

    The objective of the present work is to demonstrate that electrical corona discharge is very efficient in cellular membrane electroporation due to current pulses with sharp front (2-5 ns) and to the fact that corona discharge is associated with UV radiation and micro particles emission. A comparison between DC and AC at 800 Hz and a special waveform to corona application is presented. The comparison is analyzed by means of applying all these in the maceration process (electroplasmolysis) of red wine production and in the processes of different types of the microbes.

  4. Proteomic analysis of hippocampal dentate granule cells in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: Application of laser capture technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YairM.Gozal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD is the most common cause of dementia with pre-senile onset, accounting for as many as 20% of cases. A common subset of FTLD cases is characterized by the presence of ubiquitinated inclusions in vulnerable neurons (FTLD-U. While the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in FTLD-U have not yet been elucidated, the presence of inclusions in this disease indicates enhanced aggregation of one or several proteins. Moreover, these inclusions suggest altered expression, processing, or degradation of proteins during FTLD-U pathogenesis. Thus, one approach to understanding disease mechanisms is to delineate the molecular changes in protein composition in FTLD-U brain. Using a combined approach consisting of laser capture microdissection (LCM and high resolution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS, we identified 1252 proteins in hippocampal dentate granule cells excised from three post-mortem FTLD-U and three unaffected control cases processed in parallel. Additionally, we employed a labeling-free quantification technique to compare the abundance of the identified proteins between FTLD-U and control cases. Quantification revealed 54 proteins with selective enrichment in FTLD-U, including TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43, a recently identified component of ubiquitinated inclusions. Moreover, 19 proteins were selectively decreased in FTLD-U. Subsequent immunohistochemical analysis of TDP-43 and three additional protein candidates suggests that our proteomic profiling of FTLD-U dentate granule cells reveals both inclusion-associated proteins and non-aggregated disease-specific proteins. Application of LCM is a valuable tool in the molecular analysis of complex tissues, and its application in the proteomic characterization of neurodegenerative disorders such as FTLD-U may be used to identify proteins altered in disease.

  5. Detecting protein association at the T cell plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Florian; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2015-04-01

    At the moment, many models on T cell signaling rely on results obtained via rather indirect methodologies, which makes direct comparison and conclusions to the in vivo situation difficult. Recently, a variety of new imaging methods were developed, which have the potential to directly shed light onto the mysteries of protein association at the T cell membrane. While the new modalities are extremely promising, for a broad readership it may be difficult to judge the results, since technological shortcomings are not always obvious. In this review article, we put key questions on the mechanism of protein interactions in the T cell plasma membrane into relation with techniques that allow to address such questions. We discuss applicability of the techniques, their strengths and weaknesses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nanoscale membrane organisation and signalling. PMID:25300585

  6. Proteomic biomarkers of peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from postmenopausal women undergoing an intervention with soy isoflavones

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchs, D; Vafeiadou, K.; Hall, W.L.; Daniel, H; Williams, C.M.; Schroot, J.H.; Wenzel, U.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The incidence of cardiovascular diseases increases after menopause, and soy consumption is suggested to inhibit disease development. Objective: The objective was to identify biomarkers of response to a dietary supplementation with an isoflavone extract in postmenopausal women by proteome analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Design: The study with healthy postmenopausal woman was performed in a placebo-controlled sequential design. Peripheral mononuclear blood cells were...

  7. Analysis of proteome response to the mobile phone radiation in two types of human primary endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kuster Niels; Nylund Reetta; Leszczynski Dariusz

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Use of mobile phones has widely increased over the past decade. However, in spite of the extensive research, the question of potential health effects of the mobile phone radiation remains unanswered. We have earlier proposed, and applied, proteomics as a tool to study biological effects of the mobile phone radiation, using as a model human endothelial cell line EA.hy926. Exposure of EA.hy926 cells to 900 MHz GSM radiation has caused statistically significant changes in exp...

  8. Analysis of proteome response to the mobile phone radiation in two types of human primary endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nylund, Reetta; KUSTER, Niels; Leszczynski, Dariusz

    2010-01-01

    Background Use of mobile phones has widely increased over the past decade. However, in spite of the extensive research, the question of potential health effects of the mobile phone radiation remains unanswered. We have earlier proposed, and applied, proteomics as a tool to study biological effects of the mobile phone radiation, using as a model human endothelial cell line EA.hy926. Exposure of EA.hy926 cells to 900 MHz GSM radiation has caused statistically significant changes in expression o...

  9. Proteomics analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) after treatment with low molecular weight heparin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YanPAN; Jun-huaWANG; He-mingYU; Xue-junLI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The endothelium is involved in the generation and the regulation of multiple physiological and pathological processes of blood vessels. Previously we confirmed low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) could inhibit tumor metastasis by protecting human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). To understand the effects of LMWH on the protein expression of HUVEC, we performed a comprehensive proteomics to survey global changes in proteins after LMWH treatment in HUVEC cells. METHODS:

  10. Proteomic identification of alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein as a plasma biomarker of hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    TIAN, WEN-DONG; Li, Jun-Zheng; Hu, Shui-Wang; Peng, Xiao-wei; Li, Gang; LIU, Xiong; Chen, Huai-hong; Xu, Xia; Li, Xiang-ping

    2015-01-01

    Hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HSCC) has very poor prognosis compared with other head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Late-stage diagnosis of HSCC increases mortality. Therefore, more effective biomarkers for early diagnosis of HSCC are necessary. Unfortunately, appropriate biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and prognosis have not been identified yet. However, recent progresses in quantitative proteomics have offered opportunities to identify plasma proteins as biomarkers for HSCC....

  11. Genomic and proteomic analyses of Prdm5 reveal interactions with insulator binding proteins in embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Giorgio Giacomo; Carrara, Matteo; Francavilla, Chiara;

    2013-01-01

    find that Prdm5 is highly expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells (mES) and exploit this cellular system to characterize molecular functions of Prdm5. By combining proteomics and next generation sequencing technologies we identify Prdm5 interaction partners and genomic occupancy. We demonstrate that......-occupies genomic loci. In summary, our data indicate how Prdm5 may modulate transcription by interacting with factors involved in genome organization in mouse embryonic stem cells....

  12. Role of the cell membrane in volume regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism for the stimulation of Na+ efflux in swollen cells was studied in red cells with increased and decreased cell volume. Results suggest that this response is the result of an increased affinity of the system for Na+ caused by reduced inhibition by intracellular K+ resulting from simple dilution during swelling, and a direct effect of membrane stretching on conformation of the transport system. (U.S.)

  13. Nafion®/ODF-silica composite membranes for medium temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Treekamol, Yaowapa

    2014-01-01

    A series of composite membranes were prepared by dispersing fluorinated polyoxadiazole oligomer (ODF)-functionalized silica nanoparticles in a Nafion matrix. Both melt-extrusion and solvent casting processes were explored. Ion exchange capacity, conductivity, water uptake and dimensional stability, thermal stability and morphology were characterized. The inclusion of functionalized nanoparticles proved advantageous, mainly due to a physical crosslinking effect and better water retention, with functionalized nanoparticles performing better than the pristine silica particles. For the same filler loading, better nanoparticle dispersion was achieved for solvent-cast membranes, resulting in higher proton conductivity. Filler agglomeration, however,was more severe for solvent-castmembranes at loadings beyond 5wt.%. The composite membranes showed excellent thermal stability, allowing for operation in medium temperature PEM fuel cells. Fuel cell performance of the compositemembranesdecreaseswithdecreasing relativehumidity, but goodperformance values are still obtained at 34% RHand 90 °C,with the best results obtained for solvent castmembranes loaded with 10 wt.% ODF-functionalized silica. Hydrogen crossover of the composite membranes is higher than that forpureNafion membranes,possiblydue toporosityresulting fromsuboptimalparticle- matrixcompatibility. © 2013 Crown Copyright and Elsevier BV. All rights reserved.

  14. Classification of Cells with Membrane Staining and/or Fixation Based on Cellular Specific Membrane Capacitance and Cytoplasm Conductivity

    OpenAIRE

    Song-Bin Huang; Yang Zhao; Deyong Chen; Shing-Lun Liu; Yana Luo; Tzu-Keng Chiu; Junbo Wang; Jian Chen; Min-Hsien Wu

    2015-01-01

    Single-cell electrical properties (e.g., specific membrane capacitance (Cspecific membrane) and cytoplasm conductivity (σcytoplasm)) have been regarded as potential label-free biophysical markers for the evaluation of cellular status. However, whether there exist correlations between these biophysical markers and cellular status (e.g., membrane-associate protein expression) is still unknown. To further validate the utility of single-cell electrical properties in cell type classification, Cspe...

  15. Preliminary Study of Membrane Preparation for Fuel Cell Polymer Electrolyte Membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton conducting membranes for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) have been prepared by radiation graft copolymerization of acrylic acid onto back bone polymers such as linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE), high density polyethylene (HDPE), and polypropylene (PP). Graft copolymers are prepared by γ-radiation and electron beam irradiation. The methods used are grafting on radiation-peroxide and grafting initiated by trapped radicals, in which the grafting reaction is done after the irradiation process (pre-irradiation grafting). The influence of the preparation conditions and the role of the initial polymer matrixes are studied. The degrees of grafting are determined by the total absorbed dose during irradiation, monomer’s concentration, grafting temperature, and the time of grafting. It is found that dose rate does not have a significant effect on the yield of grafting. The best suitable conditions for the grafting are as follows: 45 kGy for total dose, 40% (v/v) for monomer’s concentration, 70 °C for temperature and 90 minutes for period of grafting. Membranes based on different polymer matrixes show differences in their water uptake from liquid water. Apparently the ability of the membranes to take in the solvent depends on matrixes of the back bone polymers. It reflects the hydrophilic membranes properties. The preliminary characterization of the prepared grafted membranes is done by the treatment of metal uptake, using atomic absorption technique. The maximum uptake of the membranes for a given metal is Fe > Cu > Co except for LLDPE-g-Aac in which the uptake of Co > Cu. The maximum uptake of the membranes for a mixture of the metals in the same feed solution is Fe > Cu > Co. (author)

  16. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of dioscin on human HCT-116 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Xu, Lina; Yin, Lianhong; Xu, Youwei; Han, Xu; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Yanyan; Liu, Kexin; Peng, Jinyong

    2014-01-01

    Dioscin shows various pharmacological effects. However, its activity on colorectal cancer is still unknown. The present work showed that dioscin significantly inhibited cell proliferation on human HCT-116 colon cancer cells, and affected Ca(2+) release and ROS generation. The content of nitric oxide (NO) and its producer inducible NO synthase (iNOS) associated with DNA damage and aberrant cell signaling were assayed using the kits. DNA damage and cell apoptosis caused by dioscin were also analyzed through single-cell gel electrophoresis and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assays. The results showed that dioscin increased the levels of NO and inducible NO synthase. The comet length in dioscin-treated groups was much longer than that of the control group, and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling positive cells (apoptotic cells) was significantly increased by the compound (p dioscin caused mitochondrial damage and G2/M cell cycle arrest through transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. To study the cytotoxic mechanism of dioscin, an iTRAQ-based proteomics approach was used. There were 288 significantly different proteins expressed in response to dioscin, which were connected with each other and were involved in different Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. Then, some differentially expressed proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, Wnt, p53, and calcium signaling pathways were validated by Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR assays. Our work elucidates the molecular mechanism of dioscin-induced cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells, and the identified targets may be useful for treatment of colorectal cancer in future. PMID:24420967

  17. FABRICATION AND BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF CELL OUTER MEMBRANE MIMETIC SURFACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-ming Zong; Yong-kuan Gong

    2011-01-01

    The surface design used for improving biocompatibility is one of the most important issues for the fabrication of medical devices. For mimicking the ideal surface structure of cell outer membrane, a large number of polymers bearing phosphorylcholine (PC) groups have been employed to modify the surfaces of biomaterials and medical devices. It has been demonstrated that the biocompatibility of the modified materials whose surface is required to interact with a living organism has been obviously improved by introducing PC groups. In this review, the fabrication strategies of cell outer membrane mimetic surfaces and their resulted biocompatibilities were summarized.

  18. Red Blood Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles For Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Cody Westcott

    Herein we describe the development of the Red Blood Cell coated nanoparticle, RBC-NP. Purified natural erythrocyte membrane is used to coat drug-loaded poly(lacticco-glycolic acid) (PLGA). Synthetic PLGA co-polymer is biocompatible and biodegradable and has already received US FDA approval for drug-delivery and diagnostics. This work looks specifically at the retention of immunosuppressive proteins on RBC-NPs, right-sidedness of natural RBC membranes interfacing with synthetic polymer nanoparticles, sustained and retarded drug release of RBC-NPs as well as further surface modification of RBC-NPs for increased targeting of model cancer cell lines.

  19. Microstructured Electrolyte Membranes to Improve Fuel Cell Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xue

    Fuel cells, with the advantages of high efficiency, low greenhouse gas emission, and long lifetime are a promising technology for both portable power and stationary power sources. The development of efficient electrolyte membranes with high ionic conductivity, good mechanical durability and dense structure at low cost remains a challenge to the commercialization of fuel cells. This thesis focuses on exploring novel composite polymer membranes and ceramic electrolytes with the microstructure engineered to improve performance in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), respectively. Polymer/particle composite membranes hold promise to meet the demands of DMFCs at lower cost. The structure of composite membranes was controlled by aligning proton conducting particles across the membrane thickness under an applied electric field. The field-induced structural changes caused the membranes to display an enhanced water uptake, proton conductivity, and methanol permeability in comparison to membranes prepared without an applied field. Although both methanol permeability and proton conductivity are enhanced by the applied field, the permeability increase is relatively lower than the proton conductivity improvement, which results in enhanced proton/methanol selectivity and improved DMFC performance. Apatite ceramics are a new class of fast ion conductors being studied as alternative SOFC electrolytes in the intermediate temperature range. An electrochemical/hydrothermal deposition method was developed to grow fully dense apatite membranes containing well-developed crystals with c-axis alignment to promote ion conductivity. Hydroxyapatite seed crystals were first deposited onto a metal substrate electrochemically. Subsequent ion substitution during the hydrothermal growth process promoted the formation of dense, fully crystalline films with microstructure optimal for ion transport. The deposition parameters were systematically investigated, such as

  20. Identification of phosphoproteins associated with maintenance of transformed state in temperature-sensitive Rous sarcoma-virus infected cells by proteomic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify phosphotyrosine-containing proteins essential for maintaining the transformed state, we studied the tyrosine phosphorylation profile of temperature-sensitive mutant of Rous sarcoma virus, tsNY68, infected cells (68N7). Shifting the temperature from 39 oC (nonpermissive) to 32 oC (permissive) markedly increased the expression of phosphotyrosine-containing cell membrane proteins of ∼40 kDa, as assessed by SDS-PAGE. Membrane and nuclear proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and immunoblotted with anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. Proteins showing temperature-dependent changes in phosphorylation profile were subjected to in-gel digestion with trypsin and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Five proteins were identified: heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A3, hnRNP A2, annexin II, phosphoglycerate mutase 1, and triosephosphate isomerase 1. hnRNP A3 was phosphorylated at serine residues and had both serine and tyrosine phosphorylated sites. These results suggest an important complementary role for proteomics in identifying molecular abnormalities associated with tumor progression that may be attractive candidates for tumor diagnosis

  1. Comparative Studies of the Proteome, Glycoproteome, and N-Glycome of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Plasma before and after Curative Nephrectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Gbormittah, Francisca O.; Lee, Ling Y.; Taylor, KyOnese; Hancock, William S.; Iliopoulos, Othon

    2014-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma is the most prevalent of all reported kidney cancer cases, and currently there are no markers for early diagnosis. This has stimulated great research interest recently because early detection of the disease can significantly improve the low survival rate. Combining the proteome, glycoproteome, and N-glycome data from clear cell renal cell carcinoma plasma has the potential of identifying candidate markers for early diagnosis and prognosis and/or to monitor dise...

  2. Morphologic and proteomic characterization of exosomes released by cultured extravillous trophoblast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exosomes represent an important intercellular communication vehicle, mediating events essential for the decidual microenvironment. While we have demonstrated exosome induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, to date, no extensive characterization of trophoblast-derived exosomes has been provided. Our objective was to provide a morphologic and proteomic characterization of these exosomes. Exosomes were isolated from the conditioned media of Swan71 human trophoblast cells by ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation. These were analyzed for density (sucrose density gradient centrifugation), morphology (electron microscopy), size (dynamic light scattering) and protein composition (Ion Trap mass spectrometry and western immunoblotting). Based on density gradient centrifugation, microvesicles from Sw71 cells exhibit a density between 1.134 and 1.173 g/ml. Electron microscopy demonstrated that microvesicles from Sw71 cells exhibit the characteristic cup-shaped morphology of exosomes. Dynamic light scattering showed a bell-shaped curve, indicating a homogeneous population with a mean size of 165 nm ± 0.5 nm. Ion Trap mass spectrometry demonstrated the presence of exosome marker proteins (including CD81, Alix, cytoskeleton related proteins, and Rab family). The MS results were confirmed by western immunoblotting. Based on morphology, density, size and protein composition, we defined the release of exosomes from extravillous trophoblast cells and provide their first extensive characterization. This characterization is essential in furthering our understanding of 'normal' early pregnancy.

  3. Morphologic and proteomic characterization of exosomes released by cultured extravillous trophoblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atay, Safinur [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Gercel-Taylor, Cicek [Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women' s Health, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Kesimer, Mehmet [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Taylor, Douglas D., E-mail: ddtaylor@louisville.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women' s Health, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Exosomes represent an important intercellular communication vehicle, mediating events essential for the decidual microenvironment. While we have demonstrated exosome induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, to date, no extensive characterization of trophoblast-derived exosomes has been provided. Our objective was to provide a morphologic and proteomic characterization of these exosomes. Exosomes were isolated from the conditioned media of Swan71 human trophoblast cells by ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation. These were analyzed for density (sucrose density gradient centrifugation), morphology (electron microscopy), size (dynamic light scattering) and protein composition (Ion Trap mass spectrometry and western immunoblotting). Based on density gradient centrifugation, microvesicles from Sw71 cells exhibit a density between 1.134 and 1.173 g/ml. Electron microscopy demonstrated that microvesicles from Sw71 cells exhibit the characteristic cup-shaped morphology of exosomes. Dynamic light scattering showed a bell-shaped curve, indicating a homogeneous population with a mean size of 165 nm {+-} 0.5 nm. Ion Trap mass spectrometry demonstrated the presence of exosome marker proteins (including CD81, Alix, cytoskeleton related proteins, and Rab family). The MS results were confirmed by western immunoblotting. Based on morphology, density, size and protein composition, we defined the release of exosomes from extravillous trophoblast cells and provide their first extensive characterization. This characterization is essential in furthering our understanding of 'normal' early pregnancy.

  4. Comparative proteomics analysis of lanthanum citrate complex-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In a previous study,the lanthanum citrate complex([LaCit2]3-) has been found to induce apoptosis in the human HeLa cervical cancer cell line.To clarify the mechanism,we carried out comparative proteomics analysis between treated and control cells.Differentially expressed proteins were separated electrophoretically and identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry.There were profound changes in 14 proteins related to mitochondrial function and oxidative stress,suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in [LaCit2]3--induced apoptosis.This was confirmed by a decrease in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential,and increases in cytochrome c release and reactive oxygen species generation in [LaCit2]3--treated cells.Western blotting analyses show that [LaCit2]3--induced apoptosis was accompanied by the activation of caspase-9 and the specific proteolytic cleavage of PARP,leading to an increase in the proapoptotic protein Bax and a decrease in the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2.These results suggest that [LaCit2]3-induced the apoptosis of HeLa cells through oxidative stress mediated pathway involving MT participation.

  5. The effects of quercetin on SW480 human colon carcinoma cells: a proteomic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hargrove James L

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High fruit and vegetable intake is known to reduce the risk of colon cancer. To improve understanding of this phenomenon the action of different phytochemicals on colon cells has been examined. One such compound is quercetin that belongs to the group known as flavonoids. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of quercetin on the proteome of the SW480 human colon adenocarcinoma cell line, specifically to identify proteins that could be the molecular targets of quercetin in its amelioration of the progression of colon cancer. To this end, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to identify proteins that underwent a change in expression following treatment of the cells with 20 μM quercetin. This could elucidate how quercetin may reduce the progression of colon cancer. Results Quercetin treatment of the SW480 human colon cancer cells was found to result in the decreased expression of three proteins and the increased expression of one protein. The identified proteins with decreased expression were type II cytoskeletal 8 keratin and NADH dehydrogenase Fe-S protein 3. The other protein with decreased expression was not identified. The protein with increased expression belonged to the annexin family. Conclusion Several proteins were determined to have altered expression following treatment with quercetin. Such changes in the levels of these particular proteins could underlie the chemo-protective action of quercetin towards colon cancer.

  6. Flavivirus cell entry and membrane fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Jolanda M.; Moesker, Bastiaan; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela; Wilschut, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Flaviviruses, such as dengue virus and West Nile virus, are enveloped viruses that infect cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis and fusion from within acidic endosomes. The cell entry process of flaviviruses is mediated by the viral E glycoprotein. This short review will address recent advance

  7. Quantitative proteomic study of human prostate cancer cells with different metastatic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qun; Li, Yilei; Wang, Yanying; Cui, Zheng; Gong, Lulu; Qu, Zhigang; Zhong, Yanping; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Yong; Li, Yulin

    2016-04-01

    Metastatic dissemination is a feature of most cancers including prostate cancer (PCa), and is the main cause of treatment failure and mortality. The aim of the study is to explore the mechanisms of PCa metastasis and to search for potential prognostic markers using proteomics. Two-dimensional fluorescent differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) was used to quantify proteins in normal prostate epithelial cells, bone metastasis-derived PC-3 cells, and visceral metastasis-derived PC-3M cells. Metastatic potential was confirmed by flow cytometry, electron microscopy, proliferating cell nuclear antigen assay, and wound healing assay. Differential protein expression was compared between PCa cells with different metastatic potentials (LNcap, DU145, PC-3 and PC-3M) and normal prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1). Selected candidate proteins in human prostate tissues were analyzed using GOA, UniProt and GeneCards analyses. Eighty-six proteins were differentially expressed between cell lines (>1.5-fold, P<0.05). Among them, twelve proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS. One protein was upregulated in normal prostate epithelial cells, nine proteins were upregulated in PC-3, and two proteins were upregulated in PC-3M. Proteins were divided into five groups according to their functions. The SETDB1 protein was closely associated with the prognosis of PCa. Bioinformatics suggested that SETDB1 might promote PCa bone metastasis through the WNT pathway. In conclusion, SETDB1 might be associated with the development of bone metastases from PCa. Further study is necessary to assess its exact role in PCa. PMID:26846621

  8. Membrane patterned by pulsed laser micromachining for proton exchange membrane fuel cell with sputtered ultra-low catalyst loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuynet, S.; Caillard, A.; Kaya-Boussougou, S.; Lecas, T.; Semmar, N.; Bigarré, J.; Buvat, P.; Brault, P.

    2015-12-01

    Proton exchange membranes were nano- and micro-patterned on their cathode side by pressing them against stainless steel molds previously irradiated by a Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser. The membranes were associated to ultra-low loaded thin catalytic layers (25 μgPt cm-2) prepared by plasma magnetron sputtering. The Pt catalyst was sputtered either on the membrane or on the porous electrode. The fuel cell performance in dry conditions were found to be highly dependent on the morphology of the membrane surface. When nanometric ripples covered by a Pt catalyst were introduced on the surface of the membrane, the fuel cell outperformed the conventional one with a flat membrane. By combining nano- and micro-patterns (nanometric ripples and 11-24 μm deep craters), the performance of the cells was clearly enhanced. The maximum power density achieved by the fuel cell was multiplied by a factor of 3.6 (at 50 °C and 3 bar): 438 mW cm-2 vs 122 mW cm-2. This improvement is due to high catalyst utilization with a high membrane conductivity. When Pt is sputtered on the porous electrode (and not on the membrane), the contribution of the patterned membrane to the fuel cell efficiency was less significant, except in the presence of nanometric ripples. This result suggests that the patterning of the membrane must be consistent with the way the catalyst is synthesized, on the membrane or on the porous electrode.

  9. Radiation effects on membranes - 1. Cellular permeability and cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of various doses of γ radiation (5-60 krad) on the membrane permeability and cell survival of Candida albicans, a pathogenic yeast, was investigated. A reduction in the cell survival and in the accumulation of amino acids (proline, glycine, lysine, and glutamic acid) was observed following irradiation. The rate of oxygen uptake, which is often associated with transport, was also reduced. There was no damage to available sulfhydryl groups following the exposure of cells to various doses of γ radiation. The membrane lipid composition of C. albicans cells can be altered by growing them in alkanes of varying chain lengths. The effects of such altered lipid composition on radiosensitivity was examined. It was observed that C. albicans cells with altered lipid content acquire resistance to γ radiation

  10. Isolation of plasma membranes from cultured glioma cells and application to evaluation of membrane sphingomyelin turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid and reliable method for the isolation of plasma membranes and microsomes of high purity and yield from cultured glioma cells is described. The procedure involves disruption by N2 cavitation, preliminary separation by centrifugation in Tricine buffer, and final separation on a gradient formed from 40% Percoll at pH 9.3. Enzyme and chemical markers indicated greater than 60% yield with six- to eightfold enrichment for plasma membranes and greater than 25% yield with three- to fourfold enrichment for a microsomal fraction consisting mainly of endoplasmic reticulum. The final fractions were obtained with high reproducibility in less than 1 h from the time of cell harvesting. Application of this procedure to human fibroblasts in culture is assessed. The isolation procedure was applied to investigations of synthesis and turnover of sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine in plasma membranes of glioma cells following incubation for 4-24 h with [methyl-3H]choline. These studies indicated that radioactivity from phosphatidylcholine synthesized in microsomes from exogenous choline may serve as a precursor of the head-group of sphingomyelin accumulating in the plasma membrane

  11. Quantitative proteomic analysis for radiation-induced cell cycle suspension in 92-1 melanoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor with high invasive and metastatic properties. Though radiation is the major therapy for melanoma, its radio-resistance has been shown to severely influence the clinical outcome. So it is imperative to enhance the sensitivity of uveal melanoma cells to radiotherapy. Previously, we found that the cell cycle of 92-1 uveal melanoma cells was suspended and remained unchanged for up to 5 days after exposure to 10 Gy of X-rays, which might be relevant to the high radio-sensitivity of 92-1 cells. To further investigate the cell cycle suspension-associated proteins, we employed two analyses with stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture technology and two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Cells were incubated for 15 h or 48 h after irradiation with 10 Gy of X-rays. We identified a total of 737 proteins at 15 h (Group A) and 530 proteins at 48 h post-irradiation (Group B). The gene ontology biological pathway was used to obtain a systems level view of proteome changes in 92-1 cells under cell cycle suspension. We further selected the significantly changed proteins for investigation of their potential contribution to cell cycle suspension, growth arrest and cell senescence. These proteins are involved in the cell cycle, stress response, glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, etc. Our study expected to reveal potential marker proteins associated with cell suspension induced by irradiation, which might contribute to understanding the mechanism beyond the cell cycle suspension. (author)

  12. Solid alkaline membrane fuel cell : what are they advantages and drawbacks compared to proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutanceau, C.; Baranton, S.; Simoes, M. [Univ. de Poitiers, Poitiers (France). Laboratoire de Catalyse en Chimie Organique, UMR CNRS

    2010-07-01

    Low temperature fuel cells such as proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs) are promising power sources for portable electronics and transportation applications. However, these fuel cells require high amounts of platinum at the anodes to achieve high cell performance. Although alkaline membrane fuel cells (AFCs) may be an alternative to PEMFCs, the technology of low temperature fuel cells is less developed than that of fuel cells working with a solid acid electrolyte. Interest in solid alkaline membrane fuel cells (SAMFCs) has increased in recent years because it is easier to activate the oxidation and reduction reactions in alkaline medium than in acidic medium. Fewer platinum based catalysts are needed due to higher electrode kinetics. The development of hydroxyl conductive membrane makes this technology available, but the fuel to be used in the system must be considered. Pure hydrogen or hydrogen-rich gases offer high electric efficiency, but their production, storage, and distribution are not sufficient for a large-scale development. This paper discussed the relatively good electroreactivity of polyols such as glycerol and ethylene glycol in a SAMFC, as well as sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) as an alternative. The working principle of SAMFCs was also presented along with considerations regarding the electrochemical reactions occurring at the electrodes, and requirements concerning the catalysts, the triple phase boundary in the electrode and the anionic membrane. Palladium based catalysts were found to be an interesting alternative to platinum in SAMFCs. In situ FTIR measurements and oxidation products analysis was used to determine the electrooxidation pathways of alcohol and NaBH{sub 4}in alkaline medium. The study also included a comparison with oxidation mechanisms in acid medium. 8 refs.

  13. Antigenicity and immunogenicity of an extract from the cell wall and cell membrane of Histoplasma capsulatum yeast cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, A M; Rhodes, J C; Deepe, G S

    1991-01-01

    In order to identify T-cell antigens from Histoplasma capsulatum yeast cells, we prepared a detergent extract of the cell wall and cell membrane of yeast-phase H. capsulatum G217B and analyzed its antigenicity and immunogenicity. Mice injected with viable H. capsulatum yeast cells or with 500 or 1,000 micrograms of the extract mounted a delayed-type hypersensitivity response to solubilized cell wall and cell membrane. Vaccination with this antigenic preparation conferred a protective immune r...

  14. Plumbagin elicits differential proteomic responses mainly involving cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition pathways in human prostate cancer PC-3 and DU145 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qui JX

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jia-Xuan Qiu,1,2 Zhi-Wei Zhou, 3,4 Zhi-Xu He,4 Ruan Jin Zhao,5 Xueji Zhang,6 Lun Yang,7 Shu-Feng Zhou,3,4 Zong-Fu Mao11School of Public Health, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 4Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering Research Center and Sino-US Joint Laboratory for Medical Sciences, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou, People’s Republic of China; 5Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Sarasota, FL, USA; 6Research Center for Bioengineering and Sensing Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 7Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Development and Neuropsychiatric Disorders (Ministry of Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Plumbagin (PLB has exhibited a potent anticancer effect in preclinical studies, but the molecular interactome remains elusive. This study aimed to compare the quantitative proteomic responses to PLB treatment in human prostate cancer PC-3 and DU145 cells using the approach of stable-isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC. The data were finally validated using Western blot assay. First, the bioinformatic analysis predicted that PLB could interact with 78 proteins that were involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis, immunity, and signal transduction. Our quantitative proteomic study using SILAC revealed that there were at least 1,225 and 267 proteins interacting with PLB and there were 341 and 107 signaling pathways and cellular functions potentially regulated by PLB in PC-3 and DU145 cells, respectively. These proteins and pathways played a

  15. Optical Trapping Techniques Applied to the Study of Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morss, Andrew J.

    Optical tweezers allow for manipulating micron-sized objects using pN level optical forces. In this work, we use an optical trapping setup to aid in three separate experiments, all related to the physics of the cellular membrane. In the first experiment, in conjunction with Brian Henslee, we use optical tweezers to allow for precise positioning and control of cells in suspension to evaluate the cell size dependence of electroporation. Theory predicts that all cells porate at a transmembrane potential VTMof roughly 1 V. The Schwann equation predicts that the transmembrane potential depends linearly on the cell radius r, thus predicting that cells should porate at threshold electric fields that go as 1/r. The threshold field required to induce poration is determined by applying a low voltage pulse to the cell and then applying additional pulses of greater and greater magnitude, checking for poration at each step using propidium iodide dye. We find that, contrary to expectations, cells do not porate at a constant value of the transmembrane potential but at a constant value of the electric field which we find to be 692 V/cm for K562 cells. Delivering precise dosages of nanoparticles into cells is of importance for assessing toxicity of nanoparticles or for genetic research. In the second experiment, we conduct nano-electroporation—a novel method of applying precise doses of transfection agents to cells—by using optical tweezers in conjunction with a confocal microscope to manipulate cells into contact with 100 nm wide nanochannels. This work was done in collaboration with Pouyan Boukany of Dr. Lee's group. The small cross sectional area of these nano channels means that the electric field within them is extremely large, 60 MV/m, which allows them to electrophoretically drive transfection agents into the cell. We find that nano electroporation results in excellent dose control (to within 10% in our experiments) compared to bulk electroporation. We also find that

  16. Effect of stress on the membrane capacitance of the auditory outer hair cell.

    OpenAIRE

    Iwasa, K H

    1993-01-01

    The membrane capacitance of the outer hair cell, which has unique membrane potential-dependent motility, was monitored during application of membrane tension. It was found that the membrane capacitance of the cell decreased when stress was applied to the membrane. This result is the opposite of stretching the lipid bilayer in the plasma membrane. It thus indicates the importance of some other capacitance component that decreases on stretching. It has been known that charge movement across the...

  17. Analysis of transcriptomic and proteomic profiles demonstrates improved Madin-Darby canine kidney cell function in a renal microfluidic biochip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snouber, Leila Choucha; Letourneur, Franck; Chafey, Philippe; Broussard, Cedric; Monge, Matthieu; Legallais, Cécile; Leclerc, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We have evaluated the influence of the microfluidic environment on renal cell functionality. For that purpose, we performed a time lapse transcriptomic and proteomic analysis in which we compared gene and protein expressions of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells after 24 h and 96 h of culture in both microfluidic biochips and plates. The transcriptomic and proteomic integration revealed that the ion transporters involved in calcium, phosphate, and sodium homoeostasis and several genes involved in H(+) transporters and pH regulation were up-regulated in microfluidic biochips. Concerning drug metabolism, we found Phase I (CYP P450), Phase II enzymes (GST), various multidrug resistance genes (MRP), and Phase III transporters (SLC) were also up-regulated in the biochips. Furthermore, the study shows that those inductions were correlated with the induction of the Ahr and Nrf-2 dependent pathways, which results in a global cytoprotective response induced by the microenvironment. However, there was no apoptosis situation or cell death in the biochips. Microfluidic biochips may thus provide an important insight into exploring xenobiotic injury and transport modifications in this type of bioartificial microfluidic kidney. Finally, the investigation demonstrated that combining the transcriptomic and proteomic analyses obtained from a cell "on chip" culture would provide a pertinent new tool in the mechanistic interpretation of cellular mechanisms for predicting kidney cell toxicity and renal clearance in vitro. PMID:22095740

  18. Spatially selective sampling of single cells using optically trapped fusogenic emulsion droplets: a new single-cell proteomic tool

    OpenAIRE

    Lanigan, Peter M.P.; Chan, Karen; Ninkovic, Tanya; Templer, Richard H.; French, P. M. W.; de Mello, A.J.; Willison, K R; Parker, P.J.; Neil, M. A. A.; Ces, Oscar; Klug, D. R.

    2008-01-01

    We present a platform for the spatially selective sampling of the plasma membrane of single cells. Optically trapped lipid-coated oil droplets (smart droplet microtools, SDMs), typically 0.5–5 μm in size, composed of a hexadecane hydrocarbon core and fusogenic lipid outer coating (mixture of 1,2-dioleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine) were brought into controlled contact with target colon cancer cells leading to the formation of connecting membrane...

  19. The Succinated Proteome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkley, Eric D.; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Baynes, John; Frizell, Norma

    2014-03-30

    Succination is a chemical modification of cysteine in protein by the Krebs cycle intermediate, fumarate, yielding S-(2-succino)cysteine (2SC). Intracellular fumarate concentration and succination of proteins are increased by hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane, in concert with mitochondrial, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress in adipocytes grown in high glucose medium and in adipose tissue in obesity and diabetes. Increased succination of proteins is also detected in the kidney of a fumarase conditional knock-out mouse which develops renal tumors. Keap1, the gatekeeper of the antioxidant response, was identified as a major succinated protein in renal cancer cells, suggesting that succination may play a role in activation of the antioxidant response. A wide range of proteins is subject to succination, including enzymes, adipokines, cytoskeletal proteins and ER chaperones with functional cysteine residues. There is also significant overlap between succinated and glutathionylated proteins, and with proteins containing cysteine residues that are readily oxidized to the sulfenic (cysteic) acid. Succination of adipocyte proteins is inhibited by uncouplers, which discharge the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and by ER stress inhibitors. 2SC serves as a biomarker of mitochondrial stress or dysfunction in chronic diseases, such as obesity, diabetes and cancer, and recent studies suggest that succination is a mechanistic link between mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative and ER stress, and cellular progression toward apoptosis. In this article, we review the history of the succinated proteome and the challenges associated with measuring this non-enzymatic post-translational modification of proteins by proteomics approaches.

  20. Difference in Membrane Repair Capacity Between Cancer Cell Lines and a Normal Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; McNeil, Anna K; Novak, Ivana; McNeil, Paul L; Gehl, Julie

    2016-08-01

    Electroporation-based treatments and other therapies that permeabilize the plasma membrane have been shown to be more devastating to malignant cells than to normal cells. In this study, we asked if a difference in repair capacity could explain this observed difference in sensitivity. Membrane repair was investigated by disrupting the plasma membrane using laser followed by monitoring fluorescent dye entry over time in seven cancer cell lines, an immortalized cell line, and a normal primary cell line. The kinetics of repair in living cells can be directly recorded using this technique, providing a sensitive index of repair capacity. The normal primary cell line of all tested cell lines exhibited the slowest rate of dye entry after laser disruption and lowest level of dye uptake. Significantly, more rapid dye uptake and a higher total level of dye uptake occurred in six of the seven tested cancer cell lines (p electroporation. Viability in the primary normal cell line (98 % viable cells) was higher than in the three tested cancer cell lines (81-88 % viable cells). These data suggest more effective membrane repair in normal, primary cells and supplement previous explanations why electroporation-based therapies and other therapies permeabilizing the plasma membrane are more effective on malignant cells compared to normal cells in cancer treatment. PMID:27312328

  1. Formation of functional cell membrane domains: the interplay of lipid- and protein-mediated interactions.

    OpenAIRE

    Harder, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Numerous cell membrane associated processes, including signal transduction, membrane sorting, protein processing and virus trafficking take place in membrane subdomains. Protein-protein interactions provide the frameworks necessary to generate biologically functional membrane domains. For example, coat proteins define membrane areas destined for sorting processes, viral proteins self-assemble to generate a budding virus, and adapter molecules organize multimolecular signalling assemblies, whi...

  2. Durable, Low-cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chris Roger; David Mountz; Wensheng He; Tao Zhang

    2011-03-17

    The development of low cost, durable membranes and membranes electrode assemblies (MEAs) that operate under reduced relative humidity (RH) conditions remain a critical challenge for the successful introduction of fuel cells into mass markets. It was the goal of the team lead by Arkema, Inc. to address these shortages. Thus, this project addresses the following technical barriers from the fuel cells section of the Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: (A) Durability (B) Cost Arkema’s approach consisted of using blends of polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) and proprietary sulfonated polyelectrolytes. In the traditional approach to polyelectrolytes for proton exchange membranes (PEM), all the required properties are “packaged” in one macromolecule. The properties of interest include proton conductivity, mechanical properties, durability, and water/gas transport. This is the case, for example, for perfluorosulfonic acid-containing (PFSA) membranes. However, the cost of these materials is high, largely due to the complexity and the number of steps involved in their synthesis. In addition, they suffer other shortcomings such as mediocre mechanical properties and insufficient durability for some applications. The strength and originality of Arkema’s approach lies in the decoupling of ion conductivity from the other requirements. Kynar® PVDF provides an exceptional combination of properties that make it ideally suited for a membrane matrix (Kynar® is a registered trademark of Arkema Inc.). It exhibits outstanding chemical resistance in highly oxidative and acidic environments. In work with a prior grant, a membrane known as M41 was developed by Arkema. M41 had many of the properties needed for a high performance PEM, but had a significant deficiency in conductivity at low RH. In the first phase of this work, the processing parameters of M41 were explored as a means to increase its proton

  3. Proteomics of Rice Seed Germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongli eHe

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Seed is a condensed form of plant. Under suitable environmental conditions, it can resume the metabolic activity from physiological quiescent status, and mobilize the reserves, biosynthesize new proteins, regenerate organelles and cell membrane, eventually protrude the radicle and enter into seedling establishment. So far, how these activities are regulated in a coordinated and sequential manner is largely unknown. With the availability of more and more genome sequence information and the development of mass spectrometry (MS technology, proteomics has been widely applied in analyzing the mechanisms of different biological processes, and proved to be very powerful. Regulation of rice seed germination is critical for rice cultivation. In recent years, a lot of proteomic studies have been conducted in exploring the gene expression regulation, reserves mobilization and metabolisms reactivation, which brings us new insights on the mechanisms of metabolism regulation during this process. Nevertheless, it also invokes a lot of questions. In this mini-review, we summarized the progress in the proteomic studies of rice seed germination. The current challenges and future perspectives were also discussed, which might be helpful for the following studies.

  4. Comparative Proteomics Study on Human High-metastatic Large Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines Before and After Transfecting with nm23-H1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei GAO

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective As a tumor metastasis suppressor gene, the functions of nm23-H1 gene are still unclear. The aim of this study is to better understand the mechanism of lung cancer metastasis and to find new biomarkers for early diagnosis and new target for therapy by conducting comparative proteomics between the human high-metastatic large cell lung cancer cell lines (L9981 and L9981-nm23-H1 (constructed with transfecting nm23-H1 gene into the L9981 cell line. Methods The total proteins of L9981 and L9981-nm23-H1 were separated by immobilized pH gradient (IPG-based 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE; the significantly differently expressed proteins were examined by mass spectrometry and analyzed by bioinformatics. Results It was observed that nm23-H1 gene transfection caused remarkable changes of the proteome of L9981 compared with L9981-nm23-H1 cells: 5 proteins were deleted, 9 proteins appeared, 16 proteins downregulated, and 12 proteins up-regulated. These proteins are involved in cell framework, signal transduction, metabolism, proliferation and metastasis. Conclusion After nm23-H1 gene is transfected into L9981, proteome in L9981 is remarkably changed. These changes of the proteome could serve as a basis for reversing the invasive and metastatic phenotype in lung cancer and elucidating the machanisms of the metastasis of lung cancer.

  5. Systematic analysis of asymmetric partitioning of yeast proteome between mother and daughter cells reveals “aging factors” and mechanism of lifespan asymmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jing; McCormick, Mark A.; Zheng, Jiashun; Xie, Zhengwei; Tsuchiya, Mitsuhiro; Tsuchiyama, Scott; El-Samad, Hana; Ouyang, Qi; Kaeberlein, Matt; Kennedy, Brian K.; Li, Hao

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we took a proteome-centric view to analyze the cell division and lifespan asymmetry between mother and daughter cells in budding yeast. Using a flow cytometry-based, high-throughput approach, we quantified the partitioning of the proteome and identified 74 mother-enriched and 60 daughter-enriched proteins. Functional analysis of these proteins suggests mechanisms of asymmetric partitioning at an organelle/suborganelle level. We found that mother-enriched proteins are much more l...

  6. Effects of membrane disruption on dielectric properties of biological cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disruption of the plasma membrane causes serious changes in the dielectric properties of biological cells. The changes have been simulated with spherical cell models having holes in the plasma membrane. The complex permittivity of a cubic system including a cell model was calculated by a numerical technique based on the three-dimensional finite difference method. For a cell without hole, the complex permittivity showed dielectric relaxation (β-dispersion) as predicted from interfacial polarization theories for the single-shell model. When there is one hole in the membrane, the cell has anisotropic dielectric properties depending on whether the axis through the centres of the hole and the sphere is parallel (the parallel orientation) or perpendicular (the perpendicular orientation) to the electric field direction. In the parallel orientation, dielectric relaxation (called 'α-dispersion') appeared at lower frequencies in addition to the β-dispersion, whereas only the β-dispersion was found in the perpendicular orientation. When there were two holes at the opposite poles of the cell, the 'α-dispersion' did not appear and the intensity of the β-dispersion decreased with increasing size of the holes. When two holes located in the hemisphere of the cell, however, the 'α-dispersion' appeared again. These results suggest that the occurrence of the 'α-dispersion' requires either the presence of one hole or the localization of holes

  7. Estimation of membrane hydration status for standby proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems by impedance measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bidoggia, Benoit; Rugholt, Mark; Nielsen, Morten Busk;

    2014-01-01

    Fuel cells are getting growing interest in both backup systems and electric vehicles. Although these systems are characterized by long periods of inactivity, they must be able to start at any instant in the shortest time. However, the membrane of which PEMFCs are made tends to dry out when not in...... use. This increases the time required to start the system and could lead to the destruction of the fuel cell. In this article an impedance measurement circuit is presented, which is part of a humidity status estimator for monitoring the humidity status of a fuel cell stack during standby. The...

  8. The Autohumidification Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell

    CERN Document Server

    Benziger, J B; Tulyani, S; Turner, A; Bocarsly, A B; Kevrekidis, Yu G

    2003-01-01

    A PEM fuel cell was specially constructed to determine kinetics under conditions of well-defined gas phase composition and cell temperature. Steady state multiplicity was discovered in the autohumidification PEM fuel cell, resulting from a balance between water production and water removal. Ignition was observed in the PEM fuel cell for a critical water activity of about 0.1. Ignition is a consequence of the exponential increase of proton conductivity with water activity, which creates an autocatalytic feedback between the water production and the proton conduction. The steady state current in the ignited state decreases with increasing temperature between 50 to 105 deg C. At temperatures greater than 70 deg C five steady states were observed in the PEM fuel cell. The steady state performance has been followed with variable load resistance and hysteresis loops have been mapped. The dynamics of transitions between steady states are slow about 10^3 to 10^4 s. These slow dynamics are suggested to result from a c...

  9. Cell-penetrating peptides for drug delivery across membrane barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla; Nielsen, Hanne Moerck

    2008-01-01

    -penetrating peptides as transmembrane drug delivery agents, according to the recent literature, and discusses critical issues and future challenges in relation to fully understanding the fundamental principles of the cell-penetrating peptide-mediated membrane translocation of cargoes and the exploitation of their...

  10. Characterisation of cell-wall polysaccharides from mandarin segment membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coll-Almela, L.; Saura-Lopez, D.; Laencina-Sanchez, J.; Schols, H.A.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Ros-García, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to develop a process of enzymatic peeling of mandarin segments suitable for use on an industrial scale, the cell wall fraction of the segment membrane of Satsuma mandarin fruits was extracted to obtain a chelating agent-soluble pectin fraction (ChSS), a dilute sodium hydroxide-soluble

  11. Tandem cathode for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siahrostami, Samira; Björketun, Mårten E.; Strasser, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of proton exchange membrane fuel cells is limited mainly by the oxygen reduction reaction at the cathode. The large cathodic overpotential is caused by correlations between binding energies of reaction intermediates in the reduction of oxygen to water. This work introduces a novel...

  12. Durable Catalysts for High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durability of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is recognized as one of the most important issues to be addressed before the commercialization. The failure mechanisms are not well understood, however, degradation of carbon supported noble metal catalysts is identified as a major failure...

  13. Proteomic Identification of LASP-1 Down-regulation After RNAi Urokinase Silencing in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Salvi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, the high expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA is an unfavorable prognostic factor and a therapeutic target. To identify the downstream effects of uPA silencing by RNA interference, we studied proteome modifications of uPA-inhibited SKHep1C3 cells, an HCC-derived cell line. The study with two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry showed Lim and SH3 protein 1 (LASP-1, cytokeratin 1 (CK-1, cytokeratin 10 (CK-10, and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 down-modulation after uPA inhibition. LASP-1, CK-1, and CK-10 are involved in cytoskeleton dynamics as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 takes part in the mRNA processing and stability. We first confirmed the proteomic data by Western blot and immunoflorescence and then explored the link between uPA and LASP-1. The ectopic expression of uPA and LASP-1 supported the proteomic results and showed that uPA up-regulation increased LASP-1 expression and that both were implicated in SKHep1C3 motility. siRNA LASP-1 inhibition showed that LASP-1 was involved in actin microfilaments organization of SKHep1C3 cells. The disruption of the actin microfilaments after LASP-1 depletion increased uPA secretion and SKHep1C3 motility. Our results would suggest the hypothesis that uPA and LASP-1 expression may be coordinated in HCC-derived cells. In summary, the proteomic identification of a set of uPA downstream proteins provides new insight into the function of uPA in HCC cells.

  14. Fuel cell characteristics of the membrane electrode assemblies using phosphoric acid-doped poly membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Liang; Sheng, Li; Guo, Xiaoxia; Fang, Jianhua; Ma, Zi-Feng

    2011-01-15

    Recently, there has been extensive research in the development of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) for transportation and portable power applications. Nafion has been widely used as electrolyte membranes, but it has several limitations. Thus intensive efforts have been devoted to the development of low-cost proton-conducting electrolytes used at elevated temperatures to reduce the impurities poisoning. Promising candidates are the PA-doped polybenzimidazoles, which can function at higher temperature under non-humidification conditions to eliminate the water management, promote the fuel impurities tolerance, increase the electrode kinetics and facilitate the heat recovery. In this study, the novel PA-doped OPBI membrane was chosen as the electrolyte, and one molecular weight mPBI was synthesized as the binder in catalyst layers. This optimized membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) exhibited desirable performances in the electrochemical tests up to 160 degree C. This investigation opened up a new way to develop the practical proton-conducting fuel cell systems working at elevated temperatures.

  15. Investigation of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) hot-pressing parameters for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hot-pressing conditions for fabricating the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was investigated by using a 2n full factorial design. Time, temperature and pressure were key parameters that were varied from 500 to 1500 psi, 1 to 5 min and 100 to 160 deg. C, respectively. The results from the full factorial analysis indicated that the order of significance of the main MEA fabricating effects was temperature, pressure, time-temperature interaction and pressure-time-temperature interaction. By examining the cell performance curves, the lower fabrication conditions of temperature and pressure were suitable for MEA preparation. The conductive layer between the membrane and the catalyst layer became thin at high pressure and high temperature, as seen from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. In the ranges of condition studied, the most suitable hot-pressing condition for MEA fabrication was at 100 deg. C, 1000 psi and 2 min. This condition provided the highest maximum power density from the MEA and the best contact at the interfaces between the gas diffusion layer, the active layer and the electrolyte membrane. The experimental results were verified by testing with a commercial MEA in the same operating condition and with the same equipment. The performance of the fabricated MEA was better than that of the commercial one

  16. Quantitative analysis of the lipidomes of the influenza virus envelope and MDCK cell apical membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Gerl, Mathias J.; Sampaio, Julio L; Urban, Severino; Kalvodova, Lucie; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Binnington, Beth; Lindemann, Dirk; Lingwood, Clifford A.; Shevchenko, Andrej; Schroeder, Cornelia; Simons, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The influenza virus (IFV) acquires its envelope by budding from host cell plasma membranes. Using quantitative shotgun mass spectrometry, we determined the lipidomes of the host Madin–Darby canine kidney cell, its apical membrane, and the IFV budding from it. We found the apical membrane to be enriched in sphingolipids (SPs) and cholesterol, whereas glycerophospholipids were reduced, and storage lipids were depleted compared with the whole-cell membranes. The virus membrane exhibited a furthe...

  17. Design & development of innovative proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Carton, James

    2011-01-01

    The research undertaken in this thesis is concerned with the design and development of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells and provides a body of information for continued PEM fuel cell development, which will ideally aid in the future commercialisation of these electrochemical devices. Through a combination of numerical analysis, computational fluid dynamic modelling and experimental work, effective flow plate designs, flow field configurations and materials are analysed and new inn...

  18. Experimental Investigation and Discussion on the Mechanical Endurance Limit of Nafion Membrane Used in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Xiao; Chongdu Cho

    2014-01-01

    As a solution of high efficiency and clean energy, fuel cell technologies, especially proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), have caught extensive attention. However, after decades of development, the performances of PEMFCs are far from achieving the target from the Department of Energy (DOE). Thus, further understanding of the degradation mechanism is needed to overcome this obstacle. Due to the importance of proton exchange membrane in a PEMFC, the degradation of the membrane, such as ...

  19. Dendronized Polymer Architectures for Fuel Cell Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Møller; Dimitrov, Ivaylo; Takamuku, S.;

    2013-01-01

    evaluated as PEMs for use in fuel cells by proton conductivity measurements, and in the case of dendronized architectures: thermal stability. The proposed synthetic strategy facilitates exploration of a non‐fluorous system with various flexible side chains where IEC is tunable by the degree of substitution....

  20. Directed evolution of APEX2 for electron microscopy and proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Stephanie S.; Martell, Jeffrey D.; Kamer, Kimberli J; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Ting, Alice Y.

    2014-01-01

    APEX is an engineered peroxidase that functions both as an electron microscopy tag, and as a promiscuous labeling enzyme for live-cell proteomics. Because the limited sensitivity of APEX precludes applications requiring low APEX expression, we used yeast display evolution to improve its catalytic efficiency. Our evolved APEX2 is far more active in cells, enabling the superior enrichment of endogenous mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins and the use of electron microscopy ...