WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell mediated tolerance

  1. Transplantation tolerance mediated by regulatory T cells in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯宁翰; 吴宏飞; 吴军; 张炜; 眭元庚; 贺厚光; 张春雷; 郑峻松

    2004-01-01

    Background With potent suppressive effect on responder T cells, CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells have become the focus of attention only recently and they may play an important role in transplantation tolerance. However, the mechanism of action is not clear. This study was designed to assess the possibility of using CD4+CD25+ Treg cells to induce transplantation tolerance and to investigate their mechanism of action.Methods CD4+CD25+ Treg cells were isolated using magnetic cell separation techniques. Mixed lymphocyte reactions were used to assess the ability of Treg cells to suppress effector T cells. Before skin transplantation, various numbers of CD4+CD25+Treg cells, which have been induced using complex skin antigens from the donor, were injected into the host mice either intraperitoneally (0.5×105, 1×105, 2×105, 3×105, 4×105, or 5×105) or by injection through the tail vein (5×103, 1×104, 2×104, 5×104, 1×105, 2×105). Skin grafts from two different donor types were used to assess whether the induced Treg cells were antigen-specific. The survival time of the allografts were observed. Single photon emission computed tomography was also used to determine the distribution of Treg cells before and after transplantation.Results Treg cells have suppressive effect on mixed lymphocyte reactions. Grafts survived longer in mice receiving CD4+CD25+ Treg cell injections than in control mice. There was a significant difference between groups receiving intraperitoneal injection of either 2×105 or 3×105 CD4+CD25+Treg cells and the control group (P<0.05, respectively). Better results were achieved when Treg cells were injected via the tail vein than when injected intraperitoneally. The transplantation tolerance induced by CD4+CD25+ Treg cells was donor-specific. Analysis of the localization of Treg cells revealed that Treg cells mainly migrated from the liver to the allografts and the spleen.Conclusions CD4+CD25+Treg cells can induce donor

  2. Cutting edge: Human regulatory T cells require IL-35 to mediate suppression and infectious tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Vandana; Collison, Lauren W; Guy, Clifford S; Workman, Creg J; Vignali, Dario A A

    2011-06-15

    Human regulatory T cells (T(reg)) are essential for the maintenance of immune tolerance. However, the mechanisms they use to mediate suppression remain controversial. Although IL-35 has been shown to play an important role in T(reg)-mediated suppression in mice, recent studies have questioned its relevance in human T(reg). In this study, we show that human T(reg) express and require IL-35 for maximal suppressive capacity. Substantial upregulation of EBI3 and IL12A, but not IL10 and TGFB, was observed in activated human T(reg) compared with conventional T cells (T(conv)). Contact-independent T(reg)-mediated suppression was IL-35 dependent and did not require IL-10 or TGF-β. Lastly, human T(reg)-mediated suppression led to the conversion of the suppressed T(conv) into iTr35 cells, an IL-35-induced T(reg) population, in an IL-35-dependent manner. Thus, IL-35 contributes to human T(reg)-mediated suppression, and its conversion of suppressed target T(conv) into IL-35-induced T(reg) may contribute to infectious tolerance.

  3. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells mediate tolerance induction in autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Anja; Verhagen, Johan; Wraith, David C

    2017-01-31

    In multiple sclerosis (MS) T cells aberrantly recognize self-peptides of the myelin sheath and attack the central nervous system (CNS). Antigen-specific peptide immunotherapy, which aims to restore tolerance while avoiding the use of non-specific immunosuppressive drugs, is a promising approach to combat autoimmune disease, but the cellular mechanisms behind successful therapy remain poorly understood. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been studied intensively in the field of cancer and to a lesser extent in autoimmunity. Because of their suppressive effect on the immune system in cancer, we hypothesized that the development of MDSCs and their interaction with CD4(+) T cells could be beneficial for antigen-specific immunotherapy. Hence, changes in the quantity, phenotype and function of MDSCs during tolerance induction in our model of MS were evaluated. We reveal, for the first time, an involvement of a subset of MDSCs, known as polymorphonuclear (PMN)-MDSCs, in the process of tolerance induction. PMN-MDSCs were shown to adopt a more suppressive phenotype during peptide immunotherapy and inhibit CD4(+) T-cell proliferation in a cell-contact-dependent manner, mediated by arginase-1. Moreover, increased numbers of tolerogenic PMN-MDSCs, such as observed over the course of peptide immunotherapy, were demonstrated to provide protection from disease in a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

  4. Antibody-targeting of steady state dendritic cells induces tolerance mediated by regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten eMahnke

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are often defined as pivotal inducers of immunity, but these proinflammatory properties only develop after stimulation or ex vivo manipulation of DCs. Under non-inflammatory conditions in vivo, DCs are embedded into a tissue environment and encounter a plethora of self-antigens derived from apoptotic material. This material is transported to secondary lymphoid organs. As DCs maintain their non-activated phenotype in a sterile tissue environment, interaction with T cells will induce rather regulatory T cells (Treg than effector T cells. Thus, DCs are not only inducers of immunity but are also critical for maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Therapeutical intervention for the induction of long lasting tolerance in several autoimmune conditions may therefore be possible by manipulating DC activation and/or targeting of DCs in their natural tissue environment.

  5. Cell Therapy for Prophylactic Tolerance in Immunoglobulin E-mediated Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Baranyi

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion: This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that allergen-specific immunological tolerance preventing occurrence of allergy can be established through a cell-based therapy employing allergen-expressing leukocytes.

  6. Immune regulatory effects of simvastatin on regulatory T cell-mediated tumour immune tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K J; Moon, J Y; Choi, H K; Kim, H O; Hur, G Y; Jung, K H; Lee, S Y; Kim, J H; Shin, C; Shim, J J; In, K H; Yoo, S H; Kang, K H; Lee, S Y

    2010-08-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl co-enzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, and have emerged as potential anti-cancer agents based on preclinical evidence. In particular, compelling evidence suggests that statins have a wide range of immunomodulatory properties. However, little is known about the role of statins in tumour immune tolerance. Tumour immune tolerance involves the production of immunosuppressive molecules, such as interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by tumours, which induce a regulatory T cell (T(reg)) response. In this study, we investigated the effect of simvastatin on the production of IL-10, TGF-beta and IDO production and the proliferation of T(regs) using several cancer cell lines, and Lewis lung cancer (3LL) cells-inoculated mouse tumour model. Simvastatin treatment resulted in a decrease in the number of cancer cells (3LL, A549 and NCI-H292). The production of the immune regulatory markers IL-10, TGF-beta in 3LL and NCI-H292 cells increased after treatment with simvastatin. The expression of IDO and forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) transcription factor was also increased in the presence of simvastatin. In a murine 3LL model, there were no significant differences in tumour growth rate between untreated and simvastatin-treated mice groups. Therefore, while simvastatin had an anti-proliferative effect, it also exhibited immune tolerance-promoting properties during tumour development. Thus, due to these opposing actions, simvastatin had no net effect on tumour growth.

  7. IL-10 Gene Modified Dendritic Cells Inhibit T Helper Type 1-Mediated Alloimmune Responses and Promote Immunological Tolerance in Diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huifen Zhu; Feili Gong; Wenhong Qiu; Ping Lei; Wei Zhou; Xue Wen; Fengrong He; Li Li; Hong Dai; Guanxin Shen

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs)have the potency to regulate the outcome of autoimmunity through the modulation of immune responses. The induction of antigen specific tolerance is critical for prevention and treatment of allograft rejection. In the present Study, we transfected IL-10 gene into DCs and investigated their effect on inhibition of lymphocyte activity in vitro and induction of immune tolerance on islet allograft in mice. An IDDM c57BL, 6 mouse model was induced by streptozotocin. The islet cells isolated from the BALB/c mice were transplanted into the kidney capules of the model mice followed by injection of IL-10 modified DCs(mDCs).The results showed that mDCs could significantly inhibit T lymphocyte proliferation mediated by aliotype cells and induce its apoptosis, whereas, unmodified DCs(umDCs)could promote the murine lymphocyte proliferation markedly. The injection of mDCs could prolong the survival of allotype islet transplanted IDDM mice. The average plasma glucose(PG)level in mDCs treated mice returned to normal within 3 days and lasted for about 2 weeks. The rejection response in control mice occurred for 5 days after transplantation. The level of IFN-γ was lower while IL-4 Was higher in mDCs treated mice than that in umDCs treated mice. which indicated that Thl/Th2 deviation occurred.Our studies suggest that IL. 10 gene modified DCs can induce the immune tolerance to islet graft and prolong survival of the recipients by the inhibiting of T cell proliferation in allotype mice. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(1):41-46.

  8. Two small (p)ppGpp synthases in Staphylococcus aureus mediate tolerance against cell envelope stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Tobias; Kästle, Benjamin; Gratani, Fabio Lino; Goerke, Christiane; Wolz, Christiane

    2014-02-01

    The stringent response is a conserved global regulatory mechanism that is related to the synthesis of (p)ppGpp nucleotides. Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, possess three (p)ppGpp synthases: the bifunctional RSH (RelA/SpoT homolog) protein, which consists of a (p)ppGpp synthase and a (p)ppGpp hydrolase domain, and two truncated (p)ppGpp synthases, designated RelP and RelQ. Here, we characterized these two small (p)ppGpp synthases. Biochemical analyses of purified proteins and in vivo studies revealed a stronger synthetic activity for RelP than for RelQ. However, both enzymes prefer GDP over GTP as the pyrophosphate recipient to synthesize ppGpp. Each of the enzymes was shown to be responsible for the essentiality of the (p)ppGpp hydrolase domain of the RSH protein. The staphylococcal RSH-hydrolase is an efficient enzyme that prevents the toxic accumulation of (p)ppGpp. Expression of (p)ppGpp synthases in a hydrolase-negative background leads not only to growth arrest but also to cell death. Transcriptional analyses showed that relP and relQ are strongly induced upon vancomycin and ampicillin treatments. Accordingly, mutants lacking relP and relQ showed a significantly reduced survival rate upon treatments with cell wall-active antibiotics. Thus, RelP and RelQ are active (p)ppGpp synthases in S. aureus that are induced under cell envelope stress to mediate tolerance against these conditions.

  9. Donor bone marrow cells are essential for iNKT cell-mediated Foxp3+ Treg cell expansion in a murine model of transplantation tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyairi, Satoshi; Hirai, Toshihito; Ishii, Rumi; Okumi, Masayoshi; Nunoda, Shinichi; Yamazaki, Kenji; Ishii, Yasuyuki; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2017-01-26

    Mixed chimerism induction is the most reliable method for establishing transplantation tolerance. We previously described a novel treatment using a suboptimal dose of anti-CD40 ligand (anti-CD40L) and liposomal formulation of a ligand for invariant natural killer T cells administered to sub-lethally irradiated recipient mice after donor bone marrow cell (BMC) transfer. Recipient mice treated with this regimen showed expansion of a Foxp3-positive regulatory T(Treg) cell phenotype, and formation of mixed chimera. However, the mechanism of expansion and bioactivity of Treg cells remains unclear. Here, we examine the role of donor BMCs in the expansion of bioactive Treg cells. The mouse model was transplanted with a heart allograft the day after treatment. The results showed that transfer of spleen cells in place of BMCs failed to deplete host interferon (IFN)-γ-producing CD8(+) T cells, expand host Ki67(+) CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Treg cells, and prolong graft survival. Severe combined immunodeficiency mice who received Treg cells obtained from BMC-recipients accepted skin grafts in an allo-specific manner. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which were a copious cell subset in BMCs, enhanced the Ki67 expression of Treg cells. This suggests that donor BMCs are indispensable for the expansion of host bioactive Treg cells in our novel treatment for transplant tolerance induction.

  10. Limitation of immune tolerance-inducing thymic epithelial cell development by Spi-B-mediated negative feedback regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Nobuko; Shinzawa, Miho; Miyauchi, Maki; Yanai, Hiromi; Tateishi, Ryosuke; Shimo, Yusuke; Ohshima, Daisuke; Matsuo, Koichi; Sasaki, Izumi; Hoshino, Katsuaki; Wu, Guoying; Yagi, Shintaro; Inoue, Jun-ichiro; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Akiyama, Taishin

    2014-11-17

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) expressing the autoimmune regulator AIRE and various tissue-specific antigens (TSAs) are critical for preventing the onset of autoimmunity and may attenuate tumor immunity. However, molecular mechanisms controlling mTEC development remain elusive. Here, we describe the roles of the transcription factor Spi-B in mTEC development. Spi-B is rapidly up-regulated by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) cytokine signaling, which triggers mTEC differentiation, and in turn up-regulates CD80, CD86, some TSAs, and the natural inhibitor of RANKL signaling, osteoprotegerin (OPG). Spi-B-mediated OPG expression limits mTEC development in neonates but not in embryos, suggesting developmental stage-specific negative feedback regulation. OPG-mediated negative regulation attenuates cellularity of thymic regulatory T cells and tumor development in vivo. Hence, these data suggest that this negative RANKL-Spi-B-OPG feedback mechanism finely tunes mTEC development and function and may optimize the trade-off between prevention of autoimmunity and induction of antitumor immunity.

  11. Autophagy mediates tolerance to Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Katie; Reyes-Robles, Tamara; Alonzo, Francis; Durbin, Joan; Torres, Victor J; Cadwell, Ken

    2015-04-01

    Resistance and tolerance are two defense strategies employed by the host against microbial threats. Autophagy-mediated degradation of bacteria has been extensively described as a major resistance mechanism. Here we find that the dominant function of autophagy proteins during infections with the epidemic community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 is to mediate tolerance rather than resistance. Atg16L1 hypomorphic mice (Atg16L1(HM)), which have reduced autophagy, were highly susceptible to lethality in both sepsis and pneumonia models of USA300 infection. Autophagy confers protection by limiting the damage caused by α-toxin, particularly to endothelial cells. Remarkably, Atg16L1(HM) mice display enhanced survival rather than susceptibility upon infection with α-toxin-deficient S. aureus. These results identify an essential role for autophagy in tolerance to Staphylococcal disease and highlight how a single virulence factor encoded by a pathogen can determine whether a given host factor promotes tolerance or resistance.

  12. Thymic CCL2 influences induction of T-cell tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cédile, O; Løbner, M; Toft-Hansen, H;

    2014-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TEC) and dendritic cells (DC) play a role in T cell development by controlling the selection of the T cell receptor repertoire. DC have been described to take up antigens in the periphery and migrate into the thymus where they mediate tolerance via deletion of autoreactive...

  13. The Balance between CD8(+) T Cell-Mediated Clearance of AAV-Encoded Antigen in the Liver and Tolerance Is Dependent on the Vector Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep R P; Hoffman, Brad E; Terhorst, Cox; de Jong, Ype P; Herzog, Roland W

    2017-04-05

    The liver continuously receives antigens from circulation and the gastrointestinal tract. A complex immune regulatory system has evolved in order to both limit inflammation and promote tolerance in the liver. Although in situ immune tolerance mechanisms enable successful gene therapy and liver transplantation, at the same time they facilitate chronic infections by pathogens such as hepatitis viruses. It is, however, poorly understood why hepatocytes infected with hepatitis viruses or transduced with adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors may be rejected by CD8(+) T cells several months later. We found that hepatic transfer of limited doses of an AAV-ovalbumin vector rapidly induced antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells that only became functionally competent after >2 months. At this time, CD8(+) T cells had downregulated negative checkpoint markers, e.g., the programmed death 1 [PD-1] receptor, and upregulated expression of relevant cytokines. At further reduced vector dose, only intrahepatic rather than systemic CD8(+) T cell responses occurred, showing identical delay in antigen clearance. In contrast, PD-1-deficient mice rapidly cleared ovalbumin. Interestingly, higher vector dose directed sustained transgene expression without CD8(+) T cell responses. Regulatory T cells, IL-10 expression, and Fas-L contributed to high-dose tolerance. Thus, viral vector doses profoundly impact CD8(+) T cell responses.

  14. Tolerization with BLP down-regulates HMGB1 a critical mediator of sepsis-related lethality.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coffey, J Calvin

    2012-02-03

    Tolerization with bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) affords a significant survival benefit in sepsis. Given that high mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB1) is a recognized mediator of sepsis-related lethality, we determined if tolerization with BLP leads to alterations in HMGB1. In vitro, BLP tolerization led to a reduction in HMGB1 gene transcription. This was mirrored at the protein level, as HMGB1 protein expression and release were reduced significantly in BLP-tolerized human THP-1 monocytic cells. BLP tolerance in vivo led to a highly significant, long-term survival benefit following challenge with lethal dose BLP in C57BL\\/6 mice. This was associated with an attenuation of HMGB1 release into the circulation, as evidenced by negligible serum HMGB1 levels in BLP-tolerized mice. Moreover, HMGB1 levels in peritoneal macrophages from BLP-tolerized mice were reduced significantly. Hence, tolerization with BLP leads to a down-regulation of HMGB1 protein synthesis and release. The improved survival associated with BLP tolerance could thus be explained by a reduction in HMGB1, were the latter associated with lethality in BLP-related sepsis. In testing this hypothesis, it was noted that neutralization of HMGB1, using anti-HMGB1 antibodies, abrogated BLP-associated lethality almost completely. To conclude, tolerization with BLP leads to a down-regulation of HMGB1, thus offering a novel means of targeting the latter. HMGB1 is also a mediator of lethality in BLP-related sepsis.

  15. H7N9 T-cell epitopes that mimic human sequences are less immunogenic and may induce Treg-mediated tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Moise, Leonard; Tassone, Ryan; Gutierrez, Andres H; Terry, Frances E; Sangare, Kotou; Ardito, Matthew T; Martin, William D; De Groot, Anne S

    2015-01-01

    Avian-origin H7N9 influenza is a novel influenza A virus (IAV) that emerged in humans in China in 2013. Using immunoinformatics tools, we identified several H7N9 T cell epitopes with T cell receptor (TCR)-facing residues identical to those of multiple epitopes from human proteins. We hypothesized that host tolerance to these peptides may impair T helper response and contribute to the low titer, weak hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibody responses and diminished seroconversion rates that have been observed in human H7N9 infections and vaccine trials. We found that the magnitude of human T effector responses to individual H7N9 peptides was inversely correlated with the peptide's resemblance to self. Furthermore, a promiscuous T cell epitope from the hemagglutinin (HA) protein suppressed responses to other H7N9 peptides when co-administered in vitro. Along with other highly ‘human-like’ peptides from H7N9, this peptide was also shown to expand FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Thus, H7N9 may be camouflaged from effective human immune response by T cell epitope sequences that avert or regulate effector T cell responses through host tolerance. PMID:26090577

  16. Anti-CD154 mAb and rapamycin induce T regulatory cell mediated tolerance in rat-to-mouse islet transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick D Muller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anti-CD154 (MR1 monoclonal antibody (mAb and rapamycin (RAPA treatment both improve survival of rat-to-mouse islet xenograft. The present study investigated the effect of combined RAPA/MR1 treatment on rat-to-mouse islet xenograft survival and analyzed the role of CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ T regulatory cells (Treg in the induction and maintenance of the ensuing tolerance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: C57BL/6 mice were treated with MR1/RAPA and received additional monoclonal anti-IL2 mAb or anti CD25 mAb either early (0-28 d or late (100-128 d post-transplantation. Treg were characterised in the blood, spleen, draining lymph nodes and within the graft of tolerant and rejecting mice by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Fourteen days of RAPA/MR1 combination therapy allowed indefinite islet graft survival in >80% of the mice. Additional administration of anti-IL-2 mAb or depleting anti-CD25 mAb at the time of transplantation resulted in rejection (100% and 89% respectively, whereas administration at 100 days post transplantation lead to lower rejection rates (25% and 40% respectively. Tolerant mice showed an increase of Treg within the graft and in draining lymph nodes early post transplantation, whereas 100 days post transplantation no significant increase of Treg was observed. Rejecting mice showed a transient increase of Treg in the xenograft and secondary lymphoid organs, which disappeared within 7 days after rejection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCES: These results suggest a critical role for Treg in the induction phase of tolerance early after islet xenotransplantation. These encouraging data support the need of developing further Treg therapy for overcoming the species barrier in xenotransplantation.

  17. Immune tolerance. Group 3 innate lymphoid cells mediate intestinal selection of commensal bacteria-specific CD4⁺ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, Matthew R; Fung, Thomas C; Masur, Samuel H; Kelsen, Judith R; McConnell, Fiona M; Dubrot, Juan; Withers, David R; Hugues, Stephanie; Farrar, Michael A; Reith, Walter; Eberl, Gérard; Baldassano, Robert N; Laufer, Terri M; Elson, Charles O; Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2015-05-29

    Inflammatory CD4(+) T cell responses to self or commensal bacteria underlie the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), respectively. Although selection of self-specific T cells in the thymus limits responses to mammalian tissue antigens, the mechanisms that control selection of commensal bacteria-specific T cells remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that group 3 innate lymphoid cell (ILC3)-intrinsic expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) is regulated similarly to thymic epithelial cells and that MHCII(+) ILC3s directly induce cell death of activated commensal bacteria-specific T cells. Further, MHCII on colonic ILC3s was reduced in pediatric IBD patients. Collectively, these results define a selection pathway for commensal bacteria-specific CD4(+) T cells in the intestine and suggest that this process is dysregulated in human IBD.

  18. Novel process of intrathymic tumor-immune tolerance through CCR2-mediated recruitment of Sirpα+ dendritic cells: a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohisa Baba

    Full Text Available Immune surveillance system can detect more efficiently secretory tumor-specific antigens, which are superior as a target for cancer immunotherapy. On the contrary, immune tolerance can be induced in the thymus when a tumor antigen is massively secreted into circulation. Thus, the secretion of tumor-specific antigen may have contradictory roles in tumor immunity in a context-dependent manner. However, it remains elusive on the precise cellular mechanism of intrathymic immune tolerance against tumor antigens. We previously demonstrated that a minor thymic conventional dendritic cell (cDC subset, CD8α(-Sirpα(+ cDCs, but not the major subset, CD8α(+Sirpα(- cDCs can selectively capture blood-borne antigens and crucially contribute to the self-tolerance. In the present study, we further demonstrated that Sirpα(+ cDCs can capture a blood-borne antigen leaking inside the interlobular vascular-rich regions (IVRs. Blood-borne antigen selectively captured by Sirpα(+ cDCs can induce antigen-specific Treg generation or negative selection, depending on the immunogenicity of the presented antigen. Furthermore, CCR2 expression by thymic Sirpα(+ cDCs and abundant expression of its ligands, particularly, CCL2 by tumor-bearing mice prompted us to examine the function of thymic Sirpα(+ cDCs in tumor-bearing mice. Interestingly, tumor-bearing mice deposited CCL2 inside IVRs in the thymus. Moreover, tumor formation induced the accumulation of Sirpα(+ cDCs in IVRs under the control of CCR2-CCL2 axis and enhanced their capacity to take up antigens, resulting in the shift from Treg differentiation to negative selection. Finally, intrathymic negative selection similarly ensued in CCR2-competent mice once the tumor-specific antigen was secreted into bloodstream. Thus, we demonstrated that thymic Sirpα(+ cDCs crucially contribute to this novel process of intrathymic tumor immune tolerance.

  19. Micro-RNA-155-mediated control of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is required for restoring adaptively tolerant CD4+ T-cell function in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinyu; Vandevenne, Patricia; Hamdi, Haifa; Van Puyvelde, Merry; Zucchi, Alessandro; Bettonville, Marie; Weatherly, Kathleen; Braun, Michel Y

    2015-03-01

    T cells chronically stimulated by a persistent antigen often become dysfunctional and lose effector functions and proliferative capacity. To identify the importance of micro-RNA-155 (miR-155) in this phenomenon, we analyzed mouse miR-155-deficient CD4(+) T cells in a model where the chronic exposure to a systemic antigen led to T-cell functional unresponsiveness. We found that miR-155 was required for restoring function of T cells after programmed death receptor 1 blockade. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) was identified as a specific target of miR-155 and inhibition of HO-1 activity restored the expansion and tissue migration capacity of miR-155(-/-) CD4(+) T cells. Moreover, miR-155-mediated control of HO-1 expression in CD4(+) T cells was shown to sustain in vivo antigen-specific expansion and IL-2 production. Thus, our data identify HO-1 regulation as a mechanism by which miR-155 promotes T-cell-driven inflammation.

  20. Dendritic cells in peripheral tolerance and immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells capable of influencing immunity exist as functionally distinct subsets, T cell-tolerizing and T cell-immunizing subsets. The present paper reviews how these subsets of DCs develop, differentiate and function in vivo and in vitro at the cellular and molecular level. In particular...

  1. Evidence of a role for Th17 cells in the breach of immune tolerance in arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Xinhua; Ibrahim, Saleh M.

    2011-01-01

    Th17 cells are thought to play a pathogenic role in various autoimmune diseases. Cytokines secreted by Th17 cells like IL-17, IL-17F and IL-22 have the capacity to mediate a massive inflammatory response. These proinflammatroy cytokines are likely to mediate the pathogenic potential of Th17 cells. Recent evidence suggests a role for Th17 cells in the breach of immune tolerance. This might shed some new light on the pathogenic role of Th17 cells in autoimmunity.

  2. Assay of mast cell mediators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rådinger, Madeleine; Jensen, Bettina M; Swindle, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Mediator release from activated mast cells is a major initiator of the symptomology associated with allergic disorders such as anaphylaxis and asthma. Thus, methods to monitor the generation and release of such mediators have widespread applicability in studies designed to understand the processes...... regulating mast cell activation and for the identification of therapeutic approaches to block mast cell-driven disease. In this chapter, we discuss approaches used for the determination of mast cell degranulation, lipid-derived inflammatory mediator production, and cytokine/chemokine gene expression as well...

  3. B Cell Tolerance in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Gururajan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available B lymphocyte receptors are generated randomly during the bone marrow developmental phase of B cells. Hence, the B cell repertoire consists of both self and foreign antigen specificities necessitating specific tolerance mechanisms to eliminate self-reactive B cells. This review summarizes the major mechanisms of B cell tolerance, which include clonal deletion, anergy and receptor editing. In the bone marrow presentation of antigen in membrane bound form is more effective than soluble form and the role of dendritic cells in this process is discussed. Toll like receptor derived signals affect activation of B cells by certain ligands such as nucleic acids and have been shown to play crucial roles in the development of autoimmunity in several animal models. In the periphery availability of BAFF, a B cell survival factor plays a critical role in the survival of self-reactive B cells. Antibodies against BAFF have been found to be effective therapeutic agents in lupus like autoimmune diseases. Recent developments are targeting anergy to control the growth of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

  4. Nitrate tolerance impairs nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jørn Bech; Boesgaard, Søren; Poulsen, Henrik E.;

    1996-01-01

    Nitrates, Nitrate tolerence, Nitric oxide, acetylcholine, N-acetylcholine, N-acetylcysteine, L-NAME, Rat, Anesthetized......Nitrates, Nitrate tolerence, Nitric oxide, acetylcholine, N-acetylcholine, N-acetylcysteine, L-NAME, Rat, Anesthetized...

  5. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Expression in Human B Cell Precursors Is Essential for Central B Cell Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantaert, Tineke; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Bannock, Jason M; Ng, Yen-Shing; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Wu, Renee; Lavoie, Aubert; Walter, Jolan E; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Ochs, Hans D; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Durandy, Anne; Meffre, Eric

    2015-11-17

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme-mediating class-switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin genes, is essential for the removal of developing autoreactive B cells. How AID mediates central B cell tolerance remains unknown. We report that AID enzymes were produced in a discrete population of immature B cells that expressed recombination-activating gene 2 (RAG2), suggesting that they undergo secondary recombination to edit autoreactive antibodies. However, most AID+ immature B cells lacked anti-apoptotic MCL-1 and were deleted by apoptosis. AID inhibition using lentiviral-encoded short hairpin (sh)RNA in B cells developing in humanized mice resulted in a failure to remove autoreactive clones. Hence, B cell intrinsic AID expression mediates central B cell tolerance potentially through its RAG-coupled genotoxic activity in self-reactive immature B cells.

  6. Regulating regulator y T cells to achieve transplant tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran Tao; Wayne W. Hancock

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play crucial roles in both induction and maintenance of tolerance. This active immune regulation may contribute not only to the control of immune responses to self-antigens and thereby prevent autoimmune diseases, but also the control of responses to non-self molecules in adaptive immunity. Numerous experimental and clinical studies indicate that manipulating the balance between regulatory and responder T cells is an effective strategy to control immune responsiveness after transplantation. DATA SOURCES:Literature search was conducted using PubMed on the related subjects. Part of the material was based on the most recent work in the authors' laboratory. RESULTS: We propose some new strategies to achieve transplant tolerance in rodent animals via manipulating Treg function, including using histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor to regulate Foxp3 transcription and enhance Treg suppression, induction of Treg-sparing apoptosis via Nur77, and identiifcation of the co-inhibitory molecule herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) as an effector molecule for Treg function. CONCLUSION:Regulation of Treg function will deifnitely provide us very promising tools to achieve clinical tolerance in the future.

  7. CO tolerance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubler, L.; Scherer, G.G.; Wokaun, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Reformed methanol can be used as a fuel for polymer electrolyte fuel cells instead of pure hydrogen. The reformate gas contains mainly H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} in the order of 20% and low levels of CO in the order of 100 ppm. CO causes severe voltage losses due to poisoning of the anode catalyst. The effect of CO on cell performance was investigated at different CO levels up to 100 ppm. Various options to improve the CO tolerance of the fuel cell were assessed thereafter, of which the injection of a few percents of oxygen into the fuel feed stream proved to be most effective. By mixing 1% of oxygen with hydrogen containing 100 ppm CO, complete recovery of the cell performance could be attained. (author) 2 figs., 2 tabs., 3 refs.

  8. The Induction and Maintenance of Transplant Tolerance Engages Both Regulatory and Anergic CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besançon, Alix; Baas, Marije; Goncalves, Tania; Valette, Fabrice; Waldmann, Herman; Chatenoud, Lucienne; You, Sylvaine

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic tolerance to self-antigens or foreign antigens is thought to depend on constant vigilance by Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). Previous work using a pancreatic islet allograft model and a short pulse of CD3 antibody therapy has shown that CD8(+) T cells become anergic and use TGFβ and coinhibitory signaling as their contribution to the tolerance process. Here, we examine the role of CD4(+) T cells in tolerization by CD3 antibodies. We show that both Foxp3(+) Tregs and CD4(+) T cell anergy play a role in the induction of tolerance and its maintenance. Foxp3(+) Tregs resisted CD3 antibody-mediated depletion, unlike intragraft Th1 CD4(+) lymphocytes coexpressing granzyme B and Tbx21, which were selectively eliminated. Tregs were mandatory for induction of tolerance as their depletion at the time of CD3 antibody therapy or for a short time thereafter, by an antibody to CD25 (PC61), led to graft rejection. Early treatment with CTLA-4 antibody gave the same outcome. In contrast, neither PC61 nor anti-CTLA-4 given late, at day 100 posttransplant, reversed tolerance once established. Ablation of Foxp3 T cells after diphtheria toxin injection in tolerant Foxp3(DTR) recipient mice provided the same outcome. Alloreactive T cells had been rendered intrinsically unresponsive as total CD4(+) or Treg-deprived CD4(+) T cells from tolerant recipients were unable to mount donor-specific IFN-γ responses. In addition, intragraft Treg-deprived CD4(+) T cells lacked proliferative capacities, expressed high levels of the inhibitory receptor PD-1, and exhibited a CD73(hi)FR4(hi) phenotype, thus reflecting a state of T cell anergy. We conclude that Tregs play a substantive and critical role in guiding the immune system toward tolerance of the allograft, when induced by CD3 antibody, but are less important for maintenance of the tolerant state, where T cell anergy appears sufficient.

  9. The Induction and Maintenance of Transplant Tolerance Engages Both Regulatory and Anergic CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besançon, Alix; Baas, Marije; Goncalves, Tania; Valette, Fabrice; Waldmann, Herman; Chatenoud, Lucienne; You, Sylvaine

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic tolerance to self-antigens or foreign antigens is thought to depend on constant vigilance by Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Previous work using a pancreatic islet allograft model and a short pulse of CD3 antibody therapy has shown that CD8+ T cells become anergic and use TGFβ and coinhibitory signaling as their contribution to the tolerance process. Here, we examine the role of CD4+ T cells in tolerization by CD3 antibodies. We show that both Foxp3+ Tregs and CD4+ T cell anergy play a role in the induction of tolerance and its maintenance. Foxp3+ Tregs resisted CD3 antibody-mediated depletion, unlike intragraft Th1 CD4+ lymphocytes coexpressing granzyme B and Tbx21, which were selectively eliminated. Tregs were mandatory for induction of tolerance as their depletion at the time of CD3 antibody therapy or for a short time thereafter, by an antibody to CD25 (PC61), led to graft rejection. Early treatment with CTLA-4 antibody gave the same outcome. In contrast, neither PC61 nor anti-CTLA-4 given late, at day 100 posttransplant, reversed tolerance once established. Ablation of Foxp3 T cells after diphtheria toxin injection in tolerant Foxp3DTR recipient mice provided the same outcome. Alloreactive T cells had been rendered intrinsically unresponsive as total CD4+ or Treg-deprived CD4+ T cells from tolerant recipients were unable to mount donor-specific IFN-γ responses. In addition, intragraft Treg-deprived CD4+ T cells lacked proliferative capacities, expressed high levels of the inhibitory receptor PD-1, and exhibited a CD73hiFR4hi phenotype, thus reflecting a state of T cell anergy. We conclude that Tregs play a substantive and critical role in guiding the immune system toward tolerance of the allograft, when induced by CD3 antibody, but are less important for maintenance of the tolerant state, where T cell anergy appears sufficient.

  10. Interleukin 35: A Key Mediator of Suppression and the Propagation of Infectious Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian M Olson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The importance of regulatory T cells in balancing the effector arm of the immune system is well documented, playing a central role in preventing autoimmunity, facilitating graft tolerance following organ transplantation, and having a detrimental impact on the development of anti-tumor immunity. These regulatory responses use a variety of mechanisms to mediate suppression, including soluble factors. While IL-10 and TGF-β are the most commonly studied immunosuppressive cytokines, the recently identified IL-35 has been shown to have potent suppressive function in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, not only does IL-35 have the ability to directly suppress effector T cell responses, it is also able to expand regulatory responses by propagating infectious tolerance and generating a potent population of IL-35-expressing inducible regulatory T cells. In this review, we summarize research characterizing the structure and function of IL-35, examine its role in disease, and discuss how it can contribute to the induction of a distinct population of inducible regulatory T cells.

  11. Neuropilin-1 expression is induced on tolerant self-reactive CD8+ T cells but is dispensable for the tolerant phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie R Jackson

    Full Text Available Establishing peripheral CD8(+ T cell tolerance is vital to avoid immune mediated destruction of healthy self-tissues. However, it also poses a major impediment to tumor immunity since tumors are derived from self-tissue and often induce T cell tolerance and dysfunction. Thus, understanding the mechanisms that regulate T cell tolerance versus immunity has important implications for human health. Signals received from the tissue environment largely dictate whether responding T cells become activated or tolerant. For example, induced expression and subsequent ligation of negative regulatory receptors on the surface of self-reactive CD8(+ T cells are integral in the induction of tolerance. We utilized a murine model of T cell tolerance to more completely define the molecules involved in this process. We discovered that, in addition to other known regulatory receptors, tolerant self-reactive CD8(+ T cells distinctly expressed the surface receptor neuropilin-1 (Nrp1. Nrp1 was highly induced in response to self-antigen, but only modestly when the same antigen was encountered under immune conditions, suggesting a possible mechanistic link to T cell tolerance. We also observed a similar Nrp1 expression profile on human tumor infiltrating CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. Despite high expression on tolerant CD8(+ T cells, our studies revealed that Nrp1 had no detectable role in the tolerant phenotype. Specifically, Nrp1-deficient T cells displayed the same functional defects as wild-type self-reactive T cells, lacking in vivo cytolytic potential, IFNγ production, and antitumor responses. While reporting mostly negative data, our findings have therapeutic implications, as Nrp1 is now being targeted for human cancer therapy in clinical trials, but the precise molecular pathways and immune cells being engaged during treatment remain incompletely defined.

  12. The impact of T cell intrinsic antigen adaptation on peripheral immune tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevil J Singh

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Overlapping roles have been ascribed for T cell anergy, clonal deletion, and regulation in the maintenance of peripheral immunological tolerance. A measurement of the individual and additive impacts of each of these processes on systemic tolerance is often lacking. In this report we have used adoptive transfer strategies to tease out the unique contribution of T cell intrinsic receptor calibration (adaptation in the maintenance of tolerance to a systemic self-antigen. Adoptively transferred naïve T cells stably calibrated their responsiveness to a persistent self-antigen in both lymphopenic and T cell-replete hosts. In the former, this state was not accompanied by deletion or suppression, allowing us to examine the unique contribution of adaptation to systemic tolerance. Surprisingly, adapting T cells could chronically help antigen-expressing B cells, leading to polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia and pathology, in the form of mild arthritis. The helper activity mediated by CD40L and cytokines was evident even if the B cells were introduced after extended adaptation of the T cells. In contrast, in the T cell-replete host, neither arthritis nor autoantibodies were induced. The containment of systemic pathology required host T cell-mediated extrinsic regulatory mechanisms to synergize with the cell intrinsic adaptation process. These extrinsic mechanisms prevented the effector differentiation of the autoreactive T cells and reduced their precursor frequency, in vivo.

  13. Cell-mediated immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Sonja Izquierdo; Fuglsang, Katrine; Blaakaer, Jan

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This clinical review aims to assess the efficacy of human papillomavirus 16/18 (HPV16/18) vaccination on the cell-mediated immune response in women with existing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or cervical cancer induced by HPV16 or HPV18. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: A focused...... and thorough literature search conducted in five different databases found 996 publications. Six relevant articles were chosen for further review. In total, 154 patients (>18 years of age) were enrolled in prospective study trials with 3-15 months of follow up. The vaccine applications were administered two...... triggered a detectable cell-mediated immune response, some of which were statistically significant. Correlations between immunological response and clinical outcome (histopathology) were not significant, so neoplasms may not be susceptible to vaccine-generated cytotoxic T cells (CD8(+)). CONCLUSIONS...

  14. Immune cell trafficking from the brain maintains CNS immune tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Mohammad G; Tsai, Vicky W W; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Hassanpour, Masoud; Li, Hui; Hart, Prue H; Breit, Samuel N; Sawchenko, Paul E; Brown, David A

    2014-03-01

    In the CNS, no pathway dedicated to immune surveillance has been characterized for preventing the anti-CNS immune responses that develop in autoimmune neuroinflammatory disease. Here, we identified a pathway for immune cells to traffic from the brain that is associated with the rostral migratory stream (RMS), which is a forebrain source of newly generated neurons. Evaluation of fluorescently labeled leukocyte migration in mice revealed that DCs travel via the RMS from the CNS to the cervical LNs (CxLNs), where they present antigen to T cells. Pharmacologic interruption of immune cell traffic with the mononuclear cell-sequestering drug fingolimod influenced anti-CNS T cell responses in the CxLNs and modulated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) severity in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Fingolimod treatment also induced EAE in a disease-resistant transgenic mouse strain by altering DC-mediated Treg functions in CxLNs and disrupting CNS immune tolerance. These data describe an immune cell pathway that originates in the CNS and is capable of dampening anti-CNS immune responses in the periphery. Furthermore, these data provide insight into how fingolimod treatment might exacerbate CNS neuroinflammation in some cases and suggest that focal therapeutic interventions, outside the CNS have the potential to selectively modify anti-CNS immunity.

  15. Regulatory T Cell Specificity Directs Tolerance versus Allergy against Aeroantigens in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacher, Petra; Heinrich, Frederik; Stervbo, Ulrik; Nienen, Mikalai; Vahldieck, Marco; Iwert, Christina; Vogt, Katrin; Kollet, Jutta; Babel, Nina; Sawitzki, Birgit; Schwarz, Carsten; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M; Heine, Guido; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Asam, Claudia; Assenmacher, Mario; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Brakhage, Axel A; Ferreira, Fátima; Wallner, Michael; Worm, Margitta; Scheffold, Alexander

    2016-11-03

    FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) maintain tolerance against self-antigens and innocuous environmental antigens. However, it is still unknown whether Treg-mediated tolerance is antigen specific and how Treg specificity contributes to the selective loss of tolerance, as observed in human immunopathologies such as allergies. Here, we used antigen-reactive T cell enrichment to identify antigen-specific human Tregs. We demonstrate dominant Treg-mediated tolerance against particulate aeroallergens, such as pollen, house dust mites, and fungal spores. Surprisingly, we found no evidence of functional impairment of Treg responses in allergic donors. Rather, major allergenic proteins, known to rapidly dissociate from inhaled allergenic particles, have a generally reduced capability to generate Treg responses. Most strikingly, in individual allergic donors, Th2 cells and Tregs always target disparate proteins. Thus, our data highlight the importance of Treg antigen-specificity for tolerance in humans and identify antigen-specific escape from Treg control as an important mechanism enabling antigen-specific loss of tolerance in human allergy.

  16. FoxP3+ regulatory T cells essentially contribute to peripheral CD8+ T-cell tolerance induced by steady-state dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildknecht, Anita; Brauer, Sabine; Brenner, Corinne; Lahl, Katharina; Schild, Hansjörg; Sparwasser, Tim; Probst, Hans Christian; van den Broek, Maries

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral T-cell tolerance is thought to significantly contribute to the prevention of autoimmunity, and it has been shown that antigen-presenting steady-state dendritic cells efficiently induce peripheral tolerance. We previously showed that dendritic-cell–induced tolerance is a T-cell–intrinsic process that depends on coinhibitory molecules such as programmed death-1. Here we specifically analyze the involvement of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells, which are known to be important for maintenance of self-tolerance. We show that antigen presentation by steady-state dendritic cells failed to induce peripheral tolerance in the absence of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells but induced protective CD8+ T-cell–mediated immunity instead. Regulatory T-cell–depleted mice had massively increased numbers of dendritic cells in lymph nodes. Dendritic cells isolated from mice without regulatory T cells had up-regulated costimulatory molecules and showed stronger T-cell stimulatory capacity ex vivo, suggesting that regulatory T cells contribute to peripheral tolerance by keeping the dendritic cells in an immature state. Using blocking antibodies, we demonstrate that CTLA-4 but not IL-10 is necessary for control of dendritic cells by regulatory T cells. PMID:20018763

  17. Polyphosphate Kinase Mediates Antibiotic Tolerance in Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli PCN033

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eChen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC causes a variety of acute infections in its hosts, and multidrug-resistant strains present significant challenges to public health and animal husbandry. Therefore, it is necessary to explore new drug targets to control E. coli epidemics. Previous studies have reported that ppk mutants of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Mycobacterium tuberculosis are more susceptible than the wild types (WTs to stress. Therefore, we investigated the stress response to antibiotics mediated by polyphosphate kinase (PPK in ExPEC strain PCN033. We observed that planktonic cells of a ppk knockout strain (Δppk were more susceptible to antibiotics than was WT. However, biofilm-grown Δppk cells showed similar susceptibility to that of the WT and were more tolerant than the planktonic cells. During the planktonic lifestyle, the expression of genes involved in antibiotic tolerance (including resistance-conferring genes,and antibiotic influx and efflux genes did not change in the Δppk mutant without antibiotic treatment. However, the resistance-conferring gene bla and efflux genes were upregulated more in the WT than in the Δppk mutant by treatment with tazobactam. After treatment with gentamycin, the efflux genes and influx genes were upregulated and downregulated, respectively, more in the WT than in the Δppk mutant. The expression of genes involved in biofilm regulation also changed after treatment with tazobactam or gentamycin, and which is consistent with the results of the biofilm formation. Together, these observations indicate that PPK is important for the antibiotic stress response during the planktonic growth of ExPEC and might be a potential drug target in bacteria.

  18. Cytokinin Determines Thiol-Mediated Arsenic Tolerance and Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Thotegowdanapalya C; Castrillo, Gabriel; Navarro, Cristina; Zarco-Fernández, Sonia; Ramireddy, Eswarayya; Mateo, Cristian; Zamarreño, Angel M; Paz-Ares, Javier; Muñoz, Riansares; García-Mina, Jose M; Hernández, Luis E; Schmülling, Thomas; Leyva, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    The presence of arsenic in soil and water is a constant threat to plant growth in many regions of the world. Phytohormones act in the integration of growth control and stress response, but their role in plant responses to arsenic remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that arsenate [As(V)], the most prevalent arsenic chemical species in nature, causes severe depletion of endogenous cytokinins (CKs) in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that CK signaling mutants and transgenic plants with reduced endogenous CK levels showed an As(V)-tolerant phenotype. Our data indicate that in CK-depleted plants exposed to As(V), transcript levels of As(V)/phosphate-transporters were similar or even higher than in wild-type plants. In contrast, CK depletion provoked the coordinated activation of As(V) tolerance mechanisms, leading to the accumulation of thiol compounds such as phytochelatins and glutathione, which are essential for arsenic sequestration. Transgenic CK-deficient Arabidopsis and tobacco lines show a marked increase in arsenic accumulation. Our findings indicate that CK is an important regulatory factor in plant adaptation to arsenic stress.

  19. Tolerance of yeast biofilm cells towards systemic antifungals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Rasmus Kenneth

    was the only tested drug with activity against both growth arrested biofilm and planktonic cells but was found to only kill ~95 % of the cells. By using a collection of barcode tagged deletion mutants, we were identified that defects in protein synthesis, intracellular transport, cell cycle and lipid...... metabolism resulted in increased amphotericin B tolerance in both biofilm and planktonic cells. We furthermore observed that the tolerance level could be enhanced by nutrient starvation and inhibition of the TOR pathway. In conclusion, antifungal tolerance is the combined effect of the physiological state......Fungal infections have become a major problem in the hospital sector in the past decades due to the increased number of immune compromised patients susceptible to mycosis. Most human infections are believed to be associated with biofilm forming cells that are up to 1000-fold more tolerant...

  20. Regulatory T Cells Are Dispensable for Tolerance to RBC Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Amanda L; Kapp, Linda M; Wang, Xiaohong; Howie, Heather L; Hudson, Krystalyn E

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) occurs when pathogenic autoantibodies against red blood cell (RBC) antigens are generated. While the basic disease pathology of AIHA is well studied, the underlying mechanism(s) behind the failure in tolerance to RBC autoantigens are poorly understood. Thus, to investigate the tolerance mechanisms required for the establishment and maintenance of tolerance to RBC antigens, we developed a novel murine model. With this model, we evaluated the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in tolerance to RBC-specific antigens. Herein, we show that neither sustained depletion of Tregs nor immunization with RBC-specific proteins in conjunction with Treg depletion led to RBC-specific autoantibody generation. Thus, these studies demonstrate that Tregs are not required to prevent autoantibodies to RBCs and suggest that other tolerance mechanisms are likely involved.

  1. Regulatory T cells are Dispensable for Tolerance to RBC Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Richards

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA occurs when pathogenic autoantibodies against red blood cell (RBC antigens are generated. Whilst the basic disease pathology of AIHA is well studied, the underlying mechanism(s behind the failure in tolerance to RBC autoantigens are poorly understood. Thus, to investigate the tolerance mechanisms required for the establishment and maintenance of tolerance to RBC antigens, we developed a novel murine model. With this model, we evaluated the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs in tolerance to RBC-specific antigens. Herein, we show that neither sustained depletion of Tregs nor immunization with RBC-specific proteins in conjunction with Treg depletion led to RBC-specific autoantibody generation. Thus, these studies demonstrate that Tregs are not required to prevent autoantibodies to RBCs and suggest that other tolerance mechanisms are likely involved.

  2. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H; Croft, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, but whether these possess the attributes required to directly promote the development of Foxp3(+) iTreg cells is unclear. Here, we show that lung-resident tissue MØs coexpress TGF-β and retinal dehydrogenases (RALDH1 and RALDH 2) under steady-state conditions and that their sampling of harmless airborne antigen and presentation to antigen-specific CD4 T cells resulted in the generation of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Treg cell induction in this model depended on both TGF-β and retinoic acid. Transfer of the antigen-pulsed tissue MØs into the airways correspondingly prevented the development of asthmatic lung inflammation upon subsequent challenge with antigen. Moreover, exposure of lung tissue MØs to allergens suppressed their ability to generate iTreg cells coincident with blocking airway tolerance. Suppression of Treg cell generation required proteases and TLR-mediated signals. Therefore, lung-resident tissue MØs have regulatory functions, and strategies to target these cells might hold promise for prevention or treatment of allergic asthma.

  3. The submergence tolerance regulator SUB1A mediates crosstalk between submergence and drought tolerance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukao, Takeshi; Yeung, Elaine; Bailey-Serres, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Submergence and drought are major constraints to rice (Oryza sativa) production in rain-fed farmlands, both of which can occur sequentially during a single crop cycle. SUB1A, an ERF transcription factor found in limited rice accessions, dampens ethylene production and gibberellic acid responsiveness during submergence, economizing carbohydrate reserves and significantly prolonging endurance. Here, we evaluated the functional role of SUB1A in acclimation to dehydration. Comparative analysis of genotypes with and without SUB1A revealed that SUB1A enhanced recovery from drought at the vegetative stage through reduction of leaf water loss and lipid peroxidation and increased expression of genes associated with acclimation to dehydration. Overexpression of SUB1A augmented ABA responsiveness, thereby activating stress-inducible gene expression. Paradoxically, vegetative tissue undergoes dehydration upon desubmergence even though the soil contains sufficient water, indicating that leaf desiccation occurs in the natural progression of a flooding event. Desubmergence caused the upregulation of gene transcripts associated with acclimation to dehydration, with higher induction in SUB1A genotypes. SUB1A also restrained accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aerial tissue during drought and desubmergence. Consistently, SUB1A increased the abundance of transcripts encoding ROS scavenging enzymes, resulting in enhanced tolerance to oxidative stress. Therefore, in addition to providing robust submergence tolerance, SUB1A improves survival of rapid dehydration following desubmergence and water deficit during drought.

  4. Tolerance induction to human stem cell transplants with extension to their differentiated progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Kathy O; Howie, Duncan; Ng, Shu-Wing; Liu, Shubai; Chien, Kenneth R; Waldmann, Herman

    2014-12-01

    There is increasing interest in transplantation of human stem cells for therapeutic purposes. It would benefit future application if one could achieve their long-term acceptance and functional differentiation in allogeneic hosts using minimal immunosuppression. Allogeneic stem cell transplants differ from conventional tissue transplants insofar as not all alloantigens are revealed during tolerance induction. This risks that the immune system tolerized to antigens expressed by progenitors may still remain responsive to antigens expressed later during differentiation. Here we show that brief induction with monoclonal antibody-mediated coreceptor and costimulation blockade enables long-term engraftment and tolerance towards murine ESCs, hESCs, human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and hESC-derived progenitors in outbred murine recipients. Tolerance induced to PSC-derived progenitors extends to their differentiated progenies, and sometimes even to different tissues derived from the same donor. Global gene expression profiling identifies clear features in T cells from tolerized grafts that are distinct from those involved in rejection.

  5. Tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van M.

    2012-01-01

    Tolerance entails acceptance of the very things one disagrees with, disapproves of or dislikes. Tolerance can be seen as ‘a flawed virtue’ (Schuyt, 2001), because it concerns acceptance of the differences between others and ourselves we would rather fight, ignore or overcome. Although tolerance carr

  6. Antigens expressed by myelinating glia cells induce peripheral cross-tolerance of endogenous CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildknecht, Anita; Probst, Hans Christian; McCoy, Kathy D; Miescher, Iris; Brenner, Corinne; Leone, Dino P; Suter, Ueli; Ohashi, Pamela S; van den Broek, Maries

    2009-06-01

    Auto-reactivity of T cells is largely prevented by central and peripheral tolerance. Nevertheless, immunization with certain self-antigens emulsified in CFA induces autoimmunity in rodents, suggesting that tolerance to some self-antigens is not robust. To investigate the fate of nervous system-specific CD8(+) T cells, which only recently came up as being important contributors for MS pathogenesis, we developed a mouse model that allows inducible expression of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-derived CD8(+) T-cell epitopes specifically in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells, the myelinating glia of the nervous system. These transgenic CD8(+) T-cell epitopes induced robust tolerance of endogenous auto-reactive T cells, which proved thymus-independent and was mediated by cross-presenting bone-marrow-derived cells. Immunohistological staining of secondary lymphoid organs demonstrated the presence of glia-derived antigens in DC, suggesting that peripheral tolerance of CD8(+) T cells results from uptake and presentation by steady state DC.

  7. Cutting edge: TNFR-shedding by CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells inhibits the induction of inflammatory mediators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mierlo, G.J. van; Scherer, H.U.; Hameetman, M.; Morgan, M.E.; Flierman, R.; Huizinga, T.W.J.; Toes, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play an essential role in maintaining tolerance to self and nonself. In several models of T cell-mediated (auto) immunity, Treg cells exert protective effects by the inhibition of pathogenic T cell responses. In addition, Treg cells can modulate T cell-independent

  8. Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønder, Lars

    Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics is an experiment in re-orientation. The book is based on the wager that tolerance exceeds the more prevalent images of self-restraint and repressive benevolence because neither precludes the possibility of a more “active tolerance” motivated...... by the desire to experiment and to become otherwise. The objective is to discuss what gets lost, conceptually as well as politically, when we neglect the subsistence of active tolerance within other practices of tolerance, and to develop a theory of active tolerance in which tolerance's mobilizing character...... is linked to a different set of circumstances than the ones suggested by existing models in contemporary democratic theory. Reorienting the discussion of tolerance, the book raises the question of how to disclose new possibilities within our given context of affect and perception. Once we move away from...

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Induction of Tolerant and Tolerogenic Intestinal Dendritic Cells in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimle, Alex; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    How does the host manage to tolerate its own intestinal microbiota? A simple question leading to complicated answers. In order to maintain balanced immune responses in the intestine, the host immune system must tolerate commensal bacteria in the gut while it has to simultaneously keep the ability to fight pathogens and to clear infections. If this tender equilibrium is disturbed, severe chronic inflammatory reactions can result. Tolerogenic intestinal dendritic cells fulfil a crucial role in balancing immune responses and therefore creating homeostatic conditions and preventing from uncontrolled inflammation. Although several dendritic cell subsets have already been characterized to play a pivotal role in this process, less is known about definite molecular mechanisms of how intestinal dendritic cells are converted into tolerogenic ones. Here we review how gut commensal bacteria interact with intestinal dendritic cells and why this bacteria-host cell interaction is crucial for induction of dendritic cell tolerance in the intestine. Hereby, different commensal bacteria can have distinct effects on the phenotype of intestinal dendritic cells and these effects are mainly mediated by impacting toll-like receptor signalling in dendritic cells.

  10. Ethanol tolerance of immobilized brewers' yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, S; Watson, K; D'Amore, T

    1995-04-01

    A method based on the survival of yeast cells subjected to an ethanol or heat shock was utilized to compare the stress resistance of free and carrageenan-immobilized yeast cells. Results demonstrated a significant increase of yeast survival against ethanol for immobilized cells as compared to free cells, while no marked difference in heat resistance was observed. When entrapped cells were released by mechanical disruption of the gel beads and submitted to the same ethanol stress, they exhibited a lower survival rate than entrapped cells, but a similar or slightly higher survival rate than free cells. The incidence of ethanol- or heat-induced respiratory-deficient mutants of entrapped cells was equivalent to that of control or non-stressed cells (1.3 +/- 0.5%) whereas ethanol- and heat-shocked free and released cells exhibited between 4.4% and 10.9% average incidence of respiration-deficient mutants. It was concluded that the carrageenan gel matrix provided a protection against ethanol, and that entrapped cells returned to normal physiological behaviour as soon as they were released. The cell growth rate was a significant factor in the resistance of yeast to high ethanol concentrations. The optimum conditions to obtain reliable and reproducible results involved the use of slow-growing cells after exhaustion of the sugar substrate.

  11. A proposed SEU tolerant DRAM cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, G.R.; Massengill, L.W. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1994-05-01

    A novel DRAM cell technology consisting of an access transistor and a bootstrapped storage capacitor with an integrated breakdown diode is proposed. This design offers considerable resistance to single event cell hits. The information change packet is shielded from an SE hit by placing the vulnerable node in a self-compensating standby state. The proposed cell is comparable in size to a conventional DRAM cell, but simulations show an improvement in critical charge of two orders of magnitude.

  12. Pharmacological targeting of IDO-mediated tolerance for treating autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penberthy, W Todd

    2007-04-01

    Cells at the maternal-fetal interface express indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) to consume all local tryptophan for the express purpose of starving adjacent maternal T cells of this most limiting and essential amino acid. This stops local T cell proliferation to ultimately result in the most dramatic example of immune tolerance, acceptance of the fetus. By contrast, inhibition of IDO using 1-methyl-tryptophan causes a sudden catastrophic rejection of the mammalian fetus. Immunomodulatory factors including IFNgamma, TNFalpha, IL-1, and LPS use IDO induction in responsive antigen presenting cells (APCs) also to transmit tolerogenic signals to T cells. Thus it makes sense to consider IDO induction towards tolerance for autoimmune diseases in general. Approaches to cell specific therapeutic IDO induction with NAD precursor supplementation to prevent the collateral non-T cell pathogenesis due to chronic TNFalpha-IDO activated tryptophan depletion in autoimmune diseases are reviewed. Tryptophan is an essential amino acid most immediately because it is the only precursor for the endogenous biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). Both autoimmune disease and the NAD deficiency disease pellagra occur in women at greater than twice the frequency of occurrence in men. The importance of IDO dysregulation manifest as autoimmune pellagric dementia is genetically illustrated for Nasu-Hakola Disease (or PLOSL), which is caused by a mutation in the IDO antagonizing genes TYROBP/DAP12 or TREM2. Loss of function leads to psychotic symptoms rapidly progressing to presenile dementia likely due to unchecked increases in microglial IDO expression, which depletes neurons of tryptophan causing neurodegeneration. Administration of NAD precursors rescued entire mental hospitals of dementia patients literally overnight in the 1930's and NAD precursors should help Nasu-Hakola patients as well. NAD depletion mediated by peroxynitrate PARP1 activation is one of the few

  13. Adenoviral-mediated localized CTLA-4Ig gene expression induces long-term allograft pancreas survival and donor-specific immune tolerance in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    T cell activation following alloantigen recognition plays a critical role in the development of the rejection in all solid organ, tissue and cell transplantation. A recombinant molecule, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 antibody (CTLA-4Ig), is known to induce to T-cell into "anergy" by blocking the costimulatory B7-CD28 interaction. Either systemic or localized administration of CTLA-Ig has been shown to prolong allograft survival and induce donor-specific tolerance in some transplant models. In this study, we characterized the expression and immunosuppressive effectiveness of adenoviral-mediated CTLA-4Ig gene transfer. We demonstrated transduction of the allografts with AdCTLA-41g resulted in localized expression, permanent graft survival and stable donor-specific tolerance. In addition, by performing simultaneous dual-organ transplantation, we targeted on immunosuppression through a local expression of CTLA-4Ig via adenoviral-mediated gene transfer into pancreatic allografts.

  14. Cell-mediated mutagenesis by chemical carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1978-01-01

    The cell-mediated mutation system, with the proper choice of metabolizing cells, can be used to detect the mutagenic activities of different classes of chemical carcinogens. When fibroblastic cells were used as the metabolizing cells, a correlation between the in vivo carcinogenic activity and the in vitro mutagenic activity of 11 aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons was observed. When primary liver cells were used as the metabolizing cells, three known liver carcinogens were demonstrated to be mutagenic by the cell-mediated assay, while two non-carcinogenic analogues were not mutagenic. These results from the cell-mediated system suggest that the reactive intermediates of the carcinogens are stable enough to be transferred from the metabolizing cells to the V79 cells. The cell-mediated mutagenesis system is a simple in vitro assay which may simulate the in vivo situation. It was concluded that this approach could be extended to the co-cultivation of cells from other organs or tissues with mutable mammalian cells.

  15. The effects of an anxiety sensitivity intervention on anxiety, depression, and worry: mediation through affect tolerances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norr, Aaron M; Allan, Nicholas P; Macatee, Richard J; Keough, Meghan E; Schmidt, Norman B

    2014-08-01

    Recently there has been increased interest in emotional and physical tolerance risk factors for mood and anxiety disorders. Three tolerance risk factors that have been shown to be related are anxiety sensitivity (AS), distress tolerance (DT), and discomfort intolerance (DI). Although previous research has demonstrated these constructs are malleable, no research has investigated the effects of an AS intervention on DT or DI. Further, no studies have investigated whether changes in DT or DI play a role in mood and anxiety symptom amelioration due to an AS intervention. Participants (N = 104), who were selected for elevated levels of AS, completed a single-session computer-assisted AS intervention or a control intervention and follow-up assessments at 1-week and 1-month post intervention. Results revealed that the intervention reduced AS and increased DT, but did not affect DI at the 1-week follow-up. Mediation analyses revealed that changes in AS and DT both mediated changes in symptoms (depression, anxiety, worry) due to the intervention at 1-month follow-up, however, when AS and DT were considered in the same model only the effect via AS remained significant. These results have important implications for the nature of the relationships between AS, DT, and DI as well as the specific mechanistic pathways through which an AS intervention ameliorates symptoms.

  16. Regulatory T cells as a therapeutic tool to induce solid-organ transplant tolerance: current clinical experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoueinejad, Hassan; Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Amirzargar, Aliakbar; Mirshafiey, Abbas; Einollahi, Behzad

    2013-10-01

    Long-term tolerance is potentially an ideal in organ transplant. Achieving this leads us to eliminate immunosuppressive therapies and their associated side effects. Although most succession in this field belongs to mixed chimerism methods of tolerance induction, regulatory T cells and (T-reg)-based methods also have been demonstrated to prevent organ rejection and lead to transplant tolerance through different mechanisms. In contrast to chimeric protocols (which require bone marrow transplant), T-reg-mediated protocols do not aggressively manipulate blood and the immune system. Most treatment has been done for graft-versus-host disease after hematopoietic stem cell transplant. This review describes different types and mechanisms of action and clinical strategies using T-regs to induce transplant tolerance.

  17. Apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cells induce immune tolerance by specifically inhibiting development of CD4⁺ effector memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fang; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2016-02-01

    CD4(+) memory T cells play an important role in induction of autoimmunity and chronic inflammatory responses; however, regulatory mechanisms of CD4(+) memory T cell-mediated inflammatory responses are poorly understood. Here we show that apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cells inhibit development and differentiation of CD4(+) effector memory T cells in vitro and in vivo. Simultaneously, intravenous transfer of apoptotic T cell-induced tolerogenic dendritic cells can block development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system in C57 BL/6J mouse. Our results imply that it is effector memory CD4(+) T cells, not central memory CD4(+) T cells, which play a major role in chronic inflammatory responses in mice with EAE. Intravenous transfer of tolerogenic dendritic cells induced by apoptotic T cells leads to immune tolerance by specifically blocking development of CD4(+) effector memory T cells compared with results of EAE control mice. These results reveal a new mechanism of apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cell-mediated immune tolerance in vivo.

  18. RNAi-mediated disruption of squalene synthase improves drought tolerance and yield in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manavalan, Lakshmi P; Chen, Xi; Clarke, Joseph; Salmeron, John; Nguyen, Henry T

    2012-01-01

    About one-third of the world's rice area is in rain-fed lowlands and most are prone to water shortage. The identification of genes imparting tolerance to drought in the model cereal plant, rice, is an attractive strategy to engineer improved drought tolerance not only rice but other cereals as well. It is demonstrated that RNAi-mediated disruption of a rice farnesyltransferase/squalene synthase (SQS) by maize squalene synthase improves drought tolerance at both the vegetative and reproductive stages. Twenty-day-old seedlings of wild type (Nipponbare) and seven independent events of transgenic RNAi lines showed no difference in morphology. When subjected to water stress for a period of 32 d under growth chamber conditions, transgenic positives showed delayed wilting, conserved more soil water, and improved recovery. When five independent events along with wild-type plants were subjected to drought at the reproductive stage under greenhouse conditions, the transgenic plants lost water more slowly compared with the wild type, through reduced stomatal conductance and the retention of high leaf relative water content (RWC). After 28 d of slow progressive soil drying, transgenic plants recovered better and flowered earlier than wild-type plants. The yield of water-stressed transgenic positive plants ranged from 14-39% higher than wild-type plants. When grown in plates with Yoshida's nutrient solution with 1.2% agar, transgenic positives from three independent events showed increased root length and an enhanced number of lateral roots. The RNAi-mediated inactivation produced reduced stomatal conductance and subsequent drought tolerance.

  19. Transgenic sugar beet tolerant to imidazolinone obtained by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishchenko, E M; Komarnitskii, I K; Kuchuk, N V

    2011-01-01

    Sugar beet is highly sensitive to imidazolinone herbicides thus rotational restrictions exist. In order to develop imidazolinone tolerant sugar beets als gene from Arabidopsis thaliana encoding acetolactate synthase with S653N mutation was used for genetic transformation. Transgenic sugar beet plants were obtained by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of aseptic seedlings using vacuum-infiltration. The efficiency of genetic transformation was 5.8%. RT-PCR analysis of obtained plants revealed accumulation of specific als transcript. The resistance to imidazolinone was proved for developed transgenic sugar beet plants in vitro and in greenhouse conditions after spraying with imazethapyr (Pursuit, BASF).

  20. Identification of an arsenic tolerant double mutant with a thiol-mediated component and increased arsenic tolerance in phyA mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Dong-Yul; Lee, David; Harris, Hugh; Raab, Andrea; Feldmann, Jörg; Meharg, Andrew; Kumabe, Bryan; Komives, Elizabeth A; Schroeder, Julian I

    2007-03-01

    A genetic screen was performed to isolate mutants showing increased arsenic tolerance using an Arabidopsis thaliana population of activation tagged lines. The most arsenic-resistant mutant shows increased arsenate and arsenite tolerance. Genetic analyses of the mutant indicate that the mutant contains two loci that contribute to arsenic tolerance, designated ars4 and ars5. The ars4ars5 double mutant contains a single T-DNA insertion, ars4, which co-segregates with arsenic tolerance and is inserted in the Phytochrome A (PHYA) gene, strongly reducing the expression of PHYA. When grown under far-red light conditions ars4ars5 shows the same elongated hypocotyl phenotype as the previously described strong phyA-211 allele. Three independent phyA alleles, ars4, phyA-211 and a new T-DNA insertion allele (phyA-t) show increased tolerance to arsenate, although to a lesser degree than the ars4ars5 double mutant. Analyses of the ars5 single mutant show that ars5 exhibits stronger arsenic tolerance than ars4, and that ars5 is not linked to ars4. Arsenic tolerance assays with phyB-9 and phot1/phot2 mutants show that these photoreceptor mutants do not exhibit phyA-like arsenic tolerance. Fluorescence HPLC analyses show that elevated levels of phytochelatins were not detected in ars4, ars5 or ars4ars5, however increases in the thiols cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine and glutathione were observed. Compared with wild type, the total thiol levels in ars4, ars5 and ars4ars5 mutants were increased up to 80% with combined buthionine sulfoximine and arsenic treatments, suggesting the enhancement of mechanisms that mediate thiol synthesis in the mutants. The presented findings show that PHYA negatively regulates a pathway conferring arsenic tolerance, and that an enhanced thiol synthesis mechanism contributes to the arsenic tolerance of ars4ars5.

  1. Identification of An Arsenic Tolerant Double Mutant With a Thiol-Mediated Component And Increased Arsenic Tolerance in PhyA Mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, D.Y.; Lee, D.; Harris, H.; Raab, A.; Feldmann, J.; Meharg, A.; Kumabe, B.; Komives, E.A.; Schroeder, J.I.; /SLAC, SSRL /Sydney U. /Aberdeen U. /UC, San Diego

    2007-04-06

    A genetic screen was performed to isolate mutants showing increased arsenic tolerance using an Arabidopsis thaliana population of activation tagged lines. The most arsenic-resistant mutant shows increased arsenate and arsenite tolerance. Genetic analyses of the mutant indicate that the mutant contains two loci that contribute to arsenic tolerance, designated ars4 and ars5. The ars4ars5 double mutant contains a single T-DNA insertion, ars4, which co-segregates with arsenic tolerance and is inserted in the Phytochrome A (PHYA) gene, strongly reducing the expression of PHYA. When grown under far-red light conditions ars4ars5 shows the same elongated hypocotyl phenotype as the previously described strong phyA-211 allele. Three independent phyA alleles, ars4, phyA-211 and a new T-DNA insertion allele (phyA-t) show increased tolerance to arsenate, although to a lesser degree than the ars4ars5 double mutant. Analyses of the ars5 single mutant show that ars5 exhibits stronger arsenic tolerance than ars4, and that ars5 is not linked to ars4. Arsenic tolerance assays with phyB-9 and phot1/phot2 mutants show that these photoreceptor mutants do not exhibit phyA-like arsenic tolerance. Fluorescence HPLC analyses show that elevated levels of phytochelatins were not detected in ars4, ars5 or ars4ars5, however increases in the thiols cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine and glutathione were observed. Compared with wild type, the total thiol levels in ars4, ars5 and ars4ars5 mutants were increased up to 80% with combined buthionine sulfoximine and arsenic treatments, suggesting the enhancement of mechanisms that mediate thiol synthesis in the mutants. The presented findings show that PHYA negatively regulates a pathway conferring arsenic tolerance, and that an enhanced thiol synthesis mechanism contributes to the arsenic tolerance of ars4ars5.

  2. Nod2 suppresses Borrelia burgdorferi mediated murine Lyme arthritis and carditis through the induction of tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Petnicki-Ocwieja

    Full Text Available The internalization of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, by phagocytes is essential for an effective activation of the immune response to this pathogen. The intracellular, cytosolic receptor Nod2 has been shown to play varying roles in either enhancing or attenuating inflammation in response to different infectious agents. We examined the role of Nod2 in responses to B. burgdorferi. In vitro stimulation of Nod2 deficient bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM resulted in decreased induction of multiple cytokines, interferons and interferon regulated genes compared with wild-type cells. However, B. burgdorferi infection of Nod2 deficient mice resulted in increased rather than decreased arthritis and carditis compared to control mice. We explored multiple potential mechanisms for the paradoxical response in in vivo versus in vitro systems and found that prolonged stimulation with a Nod2 ligand, muramyl dipeptide (MDP, resulted in tolerance to stimulation by B. burgdorferi. This tolerance was lost with stimulation of Nod2 deficient cells that cannot respond to MDP. Cytokine patterns in the tolerance model closely paralleled cytokine profiles in infected Nod2 deficient mice. We propose a model where Nod2 has an enhancing role in activating inflammation in early infection, but moderates inflammation after prolonged exposure to the organism through induction of tolerance.

  3. The immunology of pregnancy: regulatory T cells control maternal immune tolerance toward the fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rocca, Claudia; Carbone, Fortunata; Longobardi, Salvatore; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2014-11-01

    Establishment and maintenance of pregnancy represents a challenge for the maternal immune system since it has to defend against pathogens and tolerate paternal alloantigens expressed in fetal tissues. Regulatory T (Treg) cells, a subset of suppressor CD4(+) T cells, play a dominant role in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance by preventing immune and autoimmune responses against self-antigens. Although localized mechanisms contribute to fetal evasion from immune attack, in the last few years it has been observed that Treg cells are essential in promoting fetal survival avoiding the recognition of paternal semi-allogeneic tissues by maternal immune system. Several functional studies have shown that unexplained infertility, miscarriage and pre-clampsia are often associated with deficit in Treg cell number and function while normal pregnancy selectively stimulates the accumulation of maternal forkhead-box-P3(+) (FoxP3(+)) CD4(+) Treg cells with fetal specificity. Some papers have been reported that the number of Treg cells persists at elevated levels long after delivery developing an immune regulatory memory against father's antigens, moreover these memory Treg cells rapidly proliferate during subsequent pregnancies, however, on the other hand, there are several evidence suggesting a clear decline of Treg cells number after delivery. Different factors such as cytokines, adipokines, pregnancy hormones and seminal fluid have immunoregulatory activity and influence the success of pregnancy by increasing Treg cell number and activity. The development of strategies capable of modulating immune responses toward fetal antigens through Treg cell manipulation, could have an impact on the induction of tolerance against fetal antigens during immune-mediated recurrent abortion.

  4. Toll-like Receptor 4 Mediates Morphine-Induced Neuroinflammation and Tolerance via Soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidson, Lori N; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Young, Larry J; Tansey, Malu G; Murphy, Anne Z

    2017-02-01

    Opioid tolerance and the potential for addiction is a significant burden associated with pain management, yet its precise underlying mechanism and prevention remain elusive. Immune signaling contributes to the decreased efficacy of opioids, and we recently demonstrated that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated neuroinflammation in the periaqueductal gray (PAG) drives tolerance. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a product of TLR4 signaling, promotes inflammation and facilitates glutamatergic signaling, key components of opioid tolerance. Therefore, we hypothesize that TLR4-mediated opioid tolerance requires TNF signaling. By expression of a dominant-negative TNF peptide via lentiviral vector injection in rat PAG to sequester soluble TNF (solTNF), we demonstrate that solTNF mediates morphine tolerance induced by TLR4 signaling, stimulates neuroinflammation (increased IL-1β and TLR4 mRNA), and disrupts glutamate reuptake (decreased GLT-1 and GLAST mRNA). We further demonstrate the efficacy of the brain-permeant PEGylated version of the anti-solTNF peptide, XPro1595, injected systemically, to normalize morphine-induced CNS neuroinflammation and morphine- and endotoxin-induced changes in glutamate transport, effectively preserving the efficacy of morphine analgesia and eliminating tolerance. Our findings provide a novel pharmacological target for the prevention of opioid-induced immune signaling, tolerance, and addiction.

  5. Cord blood T cells mediate enhanced antitumor effects compared with adult peripheral blood T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiwarkar, Prashant; Qasim, Waseem; Ricciardelli, Ida; Gilmour, Kimberly; Quezada, Sergio; Saudemont, Aurore; Amrolia, Persis; Veys, Paul

    2015-12-24

    Unrelated cord blood transplantation (CBT) without in vivo T-cell depletion is increasingly used to treat high-risk hematologic malignancies. Following T-replete CBT, naïve CB T cells undergo rapid peripheral expansion with memory-effector differentiation. Emerging data suggest that unrelated CBT, particularly in the context of HLA mismatch and a T-replete graft, may reduce leukemic relapse. To study the role of CB T cells in mediating graft-versus-tumor responses and dissect the underlying immune mechanisms for this, we compared the ability of HLA-mismatched CB and adult peripheral blood (PB) T cells to eliminate Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven human B-cell lymphoma in a xenogeneic NOD/SCID/IL2rg(null) mouse model. CB T cells mediated enhanced tumor rejection compared with equal numbers of PB T cells, leading to improved survival in the CB group (P cells that were autologous vs allogeneic to the lymphoma demonstrated that this antitumor effect was mediated by alloreactive rather than EBV-specific T cells. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes demonstrated that CB T cells mediated this enhanced antitumor effect by rapid infiltration of the tumor with CCR7(+)CD8(+) T cells and prompt induction of cytotoxic CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-helper (Th1) T cells in the tumor microenvironment. In contrast, in the PB group, this antilymphoma effect is impaired because of delayed tumoral infiltration of PB T cells and a relative bias toward suppressive Th2 and T-regulatory cells. Our data suggest that, despite being naturally programmed toward tolerance, reconstituting T cells after unrelated T-replete CBT may provide superior Tc1-Th1 antitumor effects against high-risk hematologic malignancies.

  6. Transcriptional and metabolomic analysis of Ascophyllum nodosum mediated freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Prasanth

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously shown that lipophilic components (LPC of the brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum (ANE improved freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the mechanism(s of this induced freezing stress tolerance is largely unknown. Here, we investigated LPC induced changes in the transcriptome and metabolome of A. thaliana undergoing freezing stress. Results Gene expression studies revealed that the accumulation of proline was mediated by an increase in the expression of the proline synthesis genes P5CS1 and P5CS2 and a marginal reduction in the expression of the proline dehydrogenase (ProDH gene. Moreover, LPC application significantly increased the concentration of total soluble sugars in the cytosol in response to freezing stress. Arabidopsis sfr4 mutant plants, defective in the accumulation of free sugars, treated with LPC, exhibited freezing sensitivity similar to that of untreated controls. The 1H NMR metabolite profile of LPC-treated Arabidopsis plants exposed to freezing stress revealed a spectrum dominated by chemical shifts (δ representing soluble sugars, sugar alcohols, organic acids and lipophilic components like fatty acids, as compared to control plants. Additionally, 2D NMR spectra suggested an increase in the degree of unsaturation of fatty acids in LPC treated plants under freezing stress. These results were supported by global transcriptome analysis. Transcriptome analysis revealed that LPC treatment altered the expression of 1113 genes (5% in comparison with untreated plants. A total of 463 genes (2% were up regulated while 650 genes (3% were down regulated. Conclusion Taken together, the results of the experiments presented in this paper provide evidence to support LPC mediated freezing tolerance enhancement through a combination of the priming of plants for the increased accumulation of osmoprotectants and alteration of cellular fatty acid composition.

  7. Tolerant chalcogenide cathodes of membraneless micro fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago, Aldo Saul; Gochi-Ponce, Yadira; Feng, Yong-Jun; Esquivel, Juan Pablo; Sabaté, Neus; Santander, Joaquin; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2012-08-01

    The most critical issues to overcome in micro direct methanol fuel cells (μDMFCs) are the lack of tolerance of the platinum cathode and fuel crossover through the polymer membrane. Thus, two novel tolerant cathodes of a membraneless microlaminar-flow fuel cell (μLFFC), Pt(x)S(y) and CoSe(2), were developed. The multichannel structure of the system was microfabricated in SU-8 polymer. A commercial platinum cathode served for comparison. When using 5 M CH(3)OH as the fuel, maximum power densities of 6.5, 4, and 0.23 mW cm(-2) were achieved for the μLFFC with Pt, Pt(x)S(y), and CoSe(2) cathodes, respectively. The Pt(x)S(y) cathode outperformed Pt in the same fuel cell when using CH(3)OH at concentrations above 10 M. In a situation where fuel crossover is 100 %, that is, mixing the fuel with the reactant, the maximum power density of the micro fuel cell with Pt decreased by 80 %. However, for Pt(x)S(y) this decrease corresponded to 35 % and for CoSe(2) there was no change in performance. This result is the consequence of the high tolerance of the chalcogenide-based cathodes. When using 10 M HCOOH and a palladium-based anode, the μLFFC with a CoSe(2) cathode achieved a maxiumum power density of 1.04 mW cm(-2). This micro fuel cell does not contain either Nafion membrane or platinum. We report, for the first time, the evaluation of Pt(x)S(y)- and CoSe(2)-based cathodes in membraneless micro fuel cells. The results suggest the development of a novel system that is not size restricted and its operation is mainly based on the selectivity of its electrodes.

  8. Radiation tolerance of boron doped dendritic web silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, A.

    1980-01-01

    The potential of dendritic web silicon for giving radiation hard solar cells is compared with the float zone silicon material. Solar cells with n(+)-p-P(+) structure and approximately 15% (AMl) efficiency were subjected to 1 MeV electron irradiation. Radiation tolerance of web cell efficiency was found to be at least as good as that of the float zone silicon cell. A study of the annealing behavior of radiation-induced defects via deep level transient spectroscopy revealed that E sub v + 0.31 eV defect, attributed to boron-oxygen-vacancy complex, is responsible for the reverse annealing of the irradiated cells in the temperature range of 150 to 350 C.

  9. Inhibition of HLA-DM mediated MHC class II peptide loading by HLA-DO promotes self tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa K. Denzin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility class II (MHCII molecules are loaded with peptides derived from foreign and self-proteins within the endosomes and lysosomes of antigen presenting cells (APCs. This process is mediated by interaction of MHCII with the conserved, nonpolymorphic MHCII-like molecule HLA-DM (DM. DM activity is directly opposed by HLA-DO (DO, another conserved, non-polymorphic MHCII like molecule. DO is an MHCII substrate mimic. Binding of DO to DM prevents MHCII from binding to DM, thereby inhibiting peptide loading. Inhibition of DM function enables low stability MHC complexes to survive and populate the surface of APCS. As a consequence, DO promotes the display of a broader pool of low abundance self-peptides. Broadening the peptide repertoire theoretically reduces the likelihood of inadvertently acquiring a density of self-ligands that is sufficient to activate self-reactive T cells. One function of DO, therefore, is to promote T cell tolerance by shaping the visible image of self. Recent data also shows that DO influences the adaptive immune response by controlling B cell entry into the germinal center reaction. This review explores the data supporting these concepts.

  10. Silicon-mediated changes in polyamines participate in silicon-induced salt tolerance in Sorghum bicolor L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lina; Wang, Shiwen; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Fujihara, Shinsuke; Itai, Akihiro; Den, Xiping; Zhang, Suiqi

    2016-02-01

    Silicon (Si) is generally considered a beneficial element for the growth of higher plants, especially under stress conditions, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Si improves salt tolerance through mediating important metabolism processes rather than acting as a mere mechanical barrier. Seedlings of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) growing in hydroponic culture were treated with NaCl (100 mm) combined with or without Si (0.83 mm). The result showed that supplemental Si enhanced sorghum salt tolerance by decreasing Na(+) accumulation. Simultaneously, polyamine (PA) levels were increased and ethylene precursor (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid: ACC) concentrations were decreased. Several key PA synthesis genes were up-regulated by Si under salt stress. To further confirm the role of PA in Si-mediated salt tolerance, seedlings were exposed to spermidine (Spd) or a PA synthesis inhibitor (dicyclohexylammonium sulphate, DCHA) combined with salt and Si. Exogenous Spd showed similar effects as Si under salt stress whereas exogenous DCHA eliminated Si-enhanced salt tolerance and the beneficial effect of Si in decreasing Na(+) accumulation. These results indicate that PAs and ACC are involved in Si-induced salt tolerance in sorghum and provide evidence that Si plays an active role in mediating salt tolerance.

  11. Targeting Dendritic Cell Function during Systemic Autoimmunity to Restore Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan P. Mackern-Oberti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic autoimmune diseases can damage nearly every tissue or cell type of the body. Although a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, current therapies have not been improved, remain unspecific and are associated with significant side effects. Because dendritic cells (DCs play a major role in promoting immune tolerance against self-antigens (self-Ags, current efforts are focusing at generating new therapies based on the transfer of tolerogenic DCs (tolDCs during autoimmunity. However, the feasibility of this approach during systemic autoimmunity has yet to be evaluated. TolDCs may ameliorate autoimmunity mainly by restoring T cell tolerance and, thus, indirectly modulating autoantibody development. In vitro induction of tolDCs loaded with immunodominant self-Ags and subsequent cell transfer to patients would be a specific new therapy that will avoid systemic immunosuppression. Herein, we review recent approaches evaluating the potential of tolDCs for the treatment of systemic autoimmune disorders.

  12. Identification of a mutant PfCRT-mediated chloroquine tolerance phenotype in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie G Valderramos

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutant forms of the Plasmodium falciparum transporter PfCRT constitute the key determinant of parasite resistance to chloroquine (CQ, the former first-line antimalarial, and are ubiquitous to infections that fail CQ treatment. However, treatment can often be successful in individuals harboring mutant pfcrt alleles, raising questions about the role of host immunity or pharmacokinetics vs. the parasite genetic background in contributing to treatment outcomes. To examine whether the parasite genetic background dictates the degree of mutant pfcrt-mediated CQ resistance, we replaced the wild type pfcrt allele in three CQ-sensitive strains with mutant pfcrt of the 7G8 allelic type prevalent in South America, the Oceanic region and India. Recombinant clones exhibited strain-dependent CQ responses that ranged from high-level resistance to an incremental shift that did not meet CQ resistance criteria. Nonetheless, even in the most susceptible clones, 7G8 mutant pfcrt enabled parasites to tolerate CQ pressure and recrudesce in vitro after treatment with high concentrations of CQ. 7G8 mutant pfcrt was found to significantly impact parasite responses to other antimalarials used in artemisinin-based combination therapies, in a strain-dependent manner. We also report clinical isolates from French Guiana that harbor mutant pfcrt, identical or related to the 7G8 haplotype, and manifest a CQ tolerance phenotype. One isolate, H209, harbored a novel PfCRT C350R mutation and demonstrated reduced quinine and artemisinin susceptibility. Our data: 1 suggest that high-level CQR is a complex biological process dependent on the presence of mutant pfcrt; 2 implicate a role for variant pfcrt alleles in modulating parasite susceptibility to other clinically important antimalarials; and 3 uncover the existence of a phenotype of CQ tolerance in some strains harboring mutant pfcrt.

  13. Tolerance to the antimicrobial peptide colistin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is linked to metabolically active cells, and depends on the pmr and mexAB-oprM genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pamp, Sünje Johanna; Gjermansen, Morten; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    to the antimicrobial peptide colistin. On the contrary, biofilm cells exhibiting low metabolic activity were killed by colistin. We demonstrate that the subpopulation of metabolically active cells is able to adapt to colistin by inducing a specific adaptation mechanism mediated by the pmr operon, as well...... as an unspecific adaptation mechanism mediated by the mexAB-oprM genes. Mutants defective in either pmr-mediated lipopolysaccharide modification or in mexAB-oprM-mediated antimicrobial efflux were not able to develop a tolerant subpopulation in biofilms. In contrast to the observed pattern of colistin...

  14. Vibrio cholerae porin OmpU induces LPS tolerance by attenuating TLR-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharwade, Sanica C; Mukhopadhaya, Arunika

    2015-12-01

    Porins can act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns, can be recognized by the host immune system and modulate immune responses. Vibrio choleraeporin OmpU aids in bacterial survival in the human gut by increasing resistance against bile acids and anti-microbial peptides. V. choleraeOmpU is pro-inflammatory in nature. However, interestingly, it can also down-regulate LPS-mediated pro-inflammatory responses. In this study, we have explored how OmpU-pretreatment affects LPS-mediated responses. Our study indicates that OmpU-pretreatment followed by LPS-activation does not induce M2-polarization of macrophages/monocytes. Further, OmpU attenuates LPS-mediated TLR2/TLR6 signaling by decreasing the association of TLRs along with recruitment of MyD88 and IRAKs to the receptor complex. This results in decreased translocation of NFκB in the nucleus. Additionally, OmpU-pretreatment up-regulates expression of IRAK-M, a negative regulator of TLR signaling, in RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage cells upon LPS-stimulation. Suppressor cytokine IL-10 is partially involved in OmpU-induced down-regulation of LPS-mediated TNFα production in human PBMCs. Furthermore, OmpU-pretreatment also affects macrophage function, by enhancing phagocytosis in LPS-treated RAW 264.7 cells, and down-regulates LPS-induced cell surface expression of co-stimulatory molecules. Altogether, OmpU causes suppression of LPS-mediated responses by attenuating the LPS-mediated TLR signaling pathway.

  15. Tolerance to the antimicrobial peptide colistin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is linked to metabolically active cells, and depends on the pmr and mexAB-oprM genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamp, Sünje Johanna; Gjermansen, Morten; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2008-04-01

    Bacteria living as biofilm are frequently reported to exhibit inherent tolerance to antimicrobial compounds, and might therefore contribute to the persistence of infections. Antimicrobial peptides are attracting increasing interest as new potential antimicrobial therapeutics; however, little is known about potential mechanisms, which might contribute to resistance or tolerance development towards these compounds in biofilms. Here we provide evidence that a spatially distinct subpopulation of metabolically active cells in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is able to develop tolerance to the antimicrobial peptide colistin. On the contrary, biofilm cells exhibiting low metabolic activity were killed by colistin. We demonstrate that the subpopulation of metabolically active cells is able to adapt to colistin by inducing a specific adaptation mechanism mediated by the pmr operon, as well as an unspecific adaptation mechanism mediated by the mexAB-oprM genes. Mutants defective in either pmr-mediated lipopolysaccharide modification or in mexAB-oprM-mediated antimicrobial efflux were not able to develop a tolerant subpopulation in biofilms. In contrast to the observed pattern of colistin-mediated killing in biofilms, conventional antimicrobial compounds such as ciprofloxacin and tetracycline were found to specifically kill the subpopulation of metabolically active biofilm cells, whereas the subpopulation exhibiting low metabolic activity survived the treatment. Consequently, targeting the two physiologically distinct subpopulations by combined antimicrobial treatment with either ciprofloxacin and colistin or tetracycline and colistin almost completely eradicated all biofilm cells.

  16. IL-35-mediated induction of a potent regulatory T cell population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, Lauren W; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Henderson, Abigail L; Giacomin, Paul R; Guy, Cliff; Bankoti, Jaishree; Finkelstein, David; Forbes, Karen; Workman, Creg J; Brown, Scott A; Rehg, Jerold E; Jones, Michael L; Ni, Hsiao-Tzu; Artis, David; Turk, Mary Jo; Vignali, Dario A A

    2010-12-01

    Regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) have a critical role in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance. Here we show that treatment of naive human or mouse T cells with IL-35 induced a regulatory population, which we call 'iT(R)35 cells', that mediated suppression via IL-35 but not via the inhibitory cytokines IL-10 or transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). We found that iT(R)35 cells did not express or require the transcription factor Foxp3, and were strongly suppressive and stable in vivo. T(reg) cells induced the generation of iT(R)35 cells in an IL-35- and IL-10-dependent manner in vitro and induced their generation in vivo under inflammatory conditions in intestines infected with Trichuris muris and within the tumor microenvironment (B16 melanoma and MC38 colorectal adenocarcinoma), where they contributed to the regulatory milieu. Thus, iT(R)35 cells constitute a key mediator of infectious tolerance and contribute to T(reg) cell-mediated tumor progression. Furthermore, iT(R)35 cells generated ex vivo might have therapeutic utility.

  17. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-04

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner.

  18. Avoiding horror autotoxicus: the importance of dendritic cells in peripheral T cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Ralph Marvin; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2002-01-08

    The immune system generally avoids horror autotoxicus or autoimmunity, an attack against the body's own constituents. This avoidance requires that self-reactive T cells be actively silenced or tolerized. We propose that dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in establishing tolerance, especially in the periphery, after functioning T cells have been produced in the thymus. In the steady state, meaning in the absence of acute infection and inflammation, DCs are in an immature state and not fully differentiated to carry out their known roles as inducers of immunity. Nevertheless, immature DCs continuously circulate through tissues and into lymphoid organs, capturing self antigens as well as innocuous environmental proteins. Recent experiments have provided direct evidence that antigen-loaded immature DCs silence T cells either by deleting them or by expanding regulatory T cells. This capacity of DCs to induce peripheral tolerance can work in two opposing ways in the context of infection. In acute infection, a beneficial effect should occur. The immune system would overcome the risk of developing autoimmunity and chronic inflammation if, before infection, tolerance were induced to innocuous environmental proteins as well as self antigens captured from dying infected cells. For chronic or persistent pathogens, a second but dire potential could take place. Continuous presentation of a pathogen by immature DCs, HIV-1 for example, may lead to tolerance and active evasion of protective immunity. The function of DCs in defining immunologic self provides a new focus for the study of autoimmunity and chronic immune-based diseases.

  19. Ageing and cell-mediated immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixa, B; Komárková, O; Chmelar, V

    1975-01-01

    The lymphocyte transformation test with phytohemagglutinin as mitogen estimated according to the incorporation of 2-(14)C-thymidine in DNA was used as an indicator of cell-mediated reactivity in 53 healthy subjects. Three age groups were examined: up to 20 years (21 subjects), 21-40 years (10 subjects) and over 70 years (22 subjects). The responsiveness of lymphocytes decreased significantly with age. In the highest age group 12 pathologically low values were found.

  20. Activation by SLAM Family Receptors Contributes to NK Cell Mediated "Missing-Self" Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alari-Pahissa, Elisenda; Grandclément, Camille; Jeevan-Raj, Beena; Leclercq, Georges; Veillette, André; Held, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells attack normal hematopoietic cells that do not express inhibitory MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules, but the ligands that activate NK cells remain incompletely defined. Here we show that the expression of the Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule (SLAM) family members CD48 and Ly9 (CD229) by MHC-I-deficient tumor cells significantly contributes to NK cell activation. When NK cells develop in the presence of T cells or B cells that lack inhibitory MHC-I but express activating CD48 and Ly9 ligands, the NK cells' ability to respond to MHC-I-deficient tumor cells is severely compromised. In this situation, NK cells express normal levels of the corresponding activation receptors 2B4 (CD244) and Ly9 but these receptors are non-functional. This provides a partial explanation for the tolerance of NK cells to MHC-I-deficient cells in vivo. Activating signaling via 2B4 is restored when MHC-I-deficient T cells are removed, indicating that interactions with MHC-I-deficient T cells dominantly, but not permanently, impair the function of the 2B4 NK cell activation receptor. These data identify an important role of SLAM family receptors for NK cell mediated "missing-self" reactivity and suggest that NK cell tolerance in MHC-I mosaic mice is in part explained by an acquired dysfunction of SLAM family receptors.

  1. Fault tolerance control for proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Boyang

    2016-08-01

    Fault diagnosis and controller design are two important aspects to improve proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system durability. However, the two tasks are often separately performed. For example, many pressure and voltage controllers have been successfully built. However, these controllers are designed based on the normal operation of PEMFC. When PEMFC faces problems such as flooding or membrane drying, a controller with a specific design must be used. This paper proposes a unique scheme that simultaneously performs fault diagnosis and tolerance control for the PEMFC system. The proposed control strategy consists of a fault diagnosis, a reconfiguration mechanism and adjustable controllers. Using a back-propagation neural network, a model-based fault detection method is employed to detect the PEMFC current fault type (flooding, membrane drying or normal). According to the diagnosis results, the reconfiguration mechanism determines which backup controllers to be selected. Three nonlinear controllers based on feedback linearization approaches are respectively built to adjust the voltage and pressure difference in the case of normal, membrane drying and flooding conditions. The simulation results illustrate that the proposed fault tolerance control strategy can track the voltage and keep the pressure difference at desired levels in faulty conditions.

  2. Neonatal helper-dependent adenoviral vector gene therapy mediates correction of hemophilia A and tolerance to human factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chuhong; Cela, Racel G; Suzuki, Masataka; Lee, Brendan; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2011-02-01

    Neonatal gene therapy is a promising strategy for treating a number of congenital diseases diagnosed shortly after birth as expression of therapeutic proteins during postnatal life may limit the pathologic consequences and result in a potential "cure." Hemophilia A is often complicated by the development of antibodies to recombinant protein resulting in treatment failure. Neonatal administration of vectors may avoid inhibitory antibody formation to factor VIII (FVIII) by taking advantage of immune immaturity. A helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human factor VIII was administered i.v. to neonatal hemophilia A knockout mice. Three days later, mice produced high levels of FVIII. Levels declined rapidly with animal growth to 5 wk of age with stable factor VIII expression thereafter to >1 y of age. Decline in factor VIII expression was not related to cell-mediated or humoral responses with lack of development of antibodies to capsid or human factor VIII proteins. Subsequent readministration and augmentation of expression was possible as operational tolerance was established to factor VIII without development of inhibitors; however, protective immunity to adenovirus remained.

  3. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 protects human umbilical vein endothelial cells against oxidative damage and increases endothelial nitric oxide production to reverse nitroglycerin tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X Y; Fang, Q; Ma, D; Jiang, L; Yang, Y; Sun, J; Yang, C; Wang, J S

    2016-06-10

    Medical nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate, GTN) use is limited principally by tolerance typified by a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) produced by biotransformation. Such tolerance may lead to endothelial dysfunction by inducing oxidative stress. In vivo studies have demonstrated that aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) plays important roles in GTN biotransformation and tolerance. Thus, modification of ALDH2 expression represents a potentially effective strategy to prevent and reverse GTN tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. In this study, a eukaryotic expression vector containing the ALDH2 gene was introduced into human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by liposome-mediated transfection. An indirect immunofluorescence assay showed that ALDH2 expression increased 24 h after transfection. Moreover, real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting revealed significantly higher ALDH2 mRNA and protein expression in the gene-transfected group than in the two control groups. GTN tolerance was induced by treating HUVECs with 10 mM GTN for 16 h + 10 min, which significantly decreased NO levels in control cells, but not in those transfected with ALDH2. Overexpression of ALDH2 increased cell survival against GTN-induced cytotoxicity and conferred protection from oxidative damage resulting from nitrate tolerance, accompanied by decreased production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and reduced expression of heme oxygenase 1. Furthermore, ALDH2 overexpression promoted Akt phosphorylation under GTN tolerance conditions. ALDH2 gene transfection can reverse and prevent tolerance to GTN through its bioactivation and protect against oxidative damage, preventing the development of endothelial dysfunction.

  4. Pancreatic islets engineered with SA-FasL protein establish robust localized tolerance by inducing regulatory T cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yolcu, Esma S; Zhao, Hong; Bandura-Morgan, Laura; Lacelle, Chantale; Woodward, Kyle B; Askenasy, Nadir; Shirwan, Haval

    2011-12-01

    Allogeneic islet transplantation is an important therapeutic approach for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. Clinical application of this approach, however, is severely curtailed by allograft rejection primarily initiated by pathogenic effector T cells regardless of chronic use of immunosuppression. Given the role of Fas-mediated signaling in regulating effector T cell responses, we tested if pancreatic islets can be engineered ex vivo to display on their surface an apoptotic form of Fas ligand protein chimeric with streptavidin (SA-FasL) and whether such engineered islets induce tolerance in allogeneic hosts. Islets were modified with biotin following efficient engineering with SA-FasL protein that persisted on the surface of islets for >1 wk in vitro. SA-FasL-engineered islet grafts established euglycemia in chemically diabetic syngeneic mice indefinitely, demonstrating functionality and lack of acute toxicity. Most importantly, the transplantation of SA-FasL-engineered BALB/c islet grafts in conjunction with a short course of rapamycin treatment resulted in robust localized tolerance in 100% of C57BL/6 recipients. Tolerance was initiated and maintained by CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, as their depletion early during tolerance induction or late after established tolerance resulted in prompt graft rejection. Furthermore, Treg cells sorted from graft-draining lymph nodes, but not spleen, of long-term graft recipients prevented the rejection of unmodified allogeneic islets in an adoptive transfer model, further confirming the Treg role in established tolerance. Engineering islets ex vivo in a rapid and efficient manner to display on their surface immunomodulatory proteins represents a novel, safe, and clinically applicable approach with important implications for the treatment of type 1 diabetes.

  5. Pancreatic Islets Engineered with SA-FasL Protein Establish Robust Localized Tolerance by Inducing T Regulatory Cells in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yolcu, Esma S; Zhao, Hong; Bandura-Morgan, Laura; Lacelle, Chantale; Woodward, Kyle B; Askenasy, Nadir; Shirwan, Haval

    2011-01-01

    Allogeneic islet transplantation is an important therapeutic approach for the treatment of T1D. Clinical application of this approach, however, is severely curtailed by allograft rejection primarily initiated by pathogenic T effector cells regardless of chronic use of immunosuppression. Given the role of Fas-mediated signaling in regulating T effector cell responses, we tested if pancreatic islets can be engineered ex vivo to display on their surface an apoptotic form of FasL protein chimeric with streptavidin (SA-FasL), and whether such engineered islets induce tolerance in allogeneic hosts. Islets were modified with biotin following efficient engineering with SA-FasL protein that persisted on the surface of islets for over a week in vitro. SA-FasL-engineered islet grafts established euglycemia in chemically diabetic syngeneic mice indefinitely, demonstrating functionality and lack of acute toxicity. Most importantly, the transplantation of SA-FasL-engineered BALB/c islet grafts in conjunction with a short course of rapamycin treatment resulted in robust localized tolerance in 100% C57BL/6 recipients. Tolerance was initiated and maintained by CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells as their depletion early during tolerance induction or late after established tolerance resulted in prompt graft rejection. Furthermore, Treg cells sorted from graft-draining lymph nodes, but not spleen, of long-term graft recipients prevented the rejection of unmodified allogeneic islets in an adoptive transfer model, further confirming the Treg role in established tolerance. Engineering islets ex vivo in a rapid and efficient manner to display on their surface immunomodulatory proteins represents a novel, safe, and clinically applicable approach with important implications for the treatment of T1D. PMID:22068235

  6. Engineering of bone marrow cells with fas-ligand protein-enhances donor-specific tolerance to solid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, E M; Shushlav, Y; Sun, Z; Shirwan, H; Yolcu, E S; Askenasy, N

    2011-11-01

    Effective immunomodulation to induce tolerance to tissue/organ allografts is attained by infusion of donor lymphocytes endowed with killing capacity through ectopic expression of a short-lived Fas-ligand (FasL) protein. The same approach has proven effective in improving hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell engraftment. This study evaluates the possibility of substitution of immune cells for bone marrow cells (BMC) to induce FasL-mediated tolerance to solid organ grafts. Expression of FasL protein on BMC increased the survival of simultaneously grafted vascularized heterotopic cardiac grafts to 90%, as compared to 30% in recipients of naïve BMC. Similar results were obtained for skin allografts implanted into radiation chimeras at 1 week after bone marrow transplantation. Further reduction of preparative conditioning to busulfan resulted in acceptance of donor skin implanted at 2 weeks after transplantation of naïve and FasL-coated BMC, whereas third-party grafts were acutely rejected. The levels of donor chimerism were in the range of 0.7% to 12% at the time of skin grafting, with higher levels in recipients of FasL-coated BMC. It is concluded that FasL-mediated abrogation of alloimmune responses can be effectively attained with BMC. There is no threshold of donor chimerism, but tolerance to solid organs evolves during the process of donor-host mutual acceptance.

  7. Induction of type I IFN is required for overcoming tumor-specific T-cell tolerance after stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horkheimer, Ian; Quigley, Michael; Zhu, Jiangao; Huang, Xiaopei; Chao, Nelson J; Yang, Yiping

    2009-05-21

    Tumor-specific T-cell tolerance represents one major mechanism of tumor-induced immune evasion. Myeloablative chemotherapy with stem cell transplantation may offer the best chance of achieving a state of minimal residual disease and, thus, minimize tumor-induced immune evasion. However, studies have shown that tumor-specific T-cell tolerance persists after transplantation. Here, we showed that CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (T(Reg)) cells play a critical role in tumor-specific CD8(+) T-cell tolerance after transplantation. Removal of T(Reg) cells from the donor lymphocyte graft did not overcome this tolerance because of rapid conversion of donor CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells into CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T(Reg) cells in recipients after transplantation, and depletion of T(Reg) cells in recipients was necessary for the reversal of tumor-specific tolerance. These results suggest that strategies capable of overcoming T-cell tolerance in recipients are required to promote antitumor immunity after transplantation. Toward this goal, we showed that dendritic cell (DC) vaccines coadministered with the TLR9 ligand, CpG could effectively overcome tumor-specific tolerance, leading to significant prolongation of tumor-free survival after transplantation. We further showed that CpG-induced type I interferon was critical for the reversal of tumor-specific tolerance in vivo. Collectively, these results may suggest effective immunotherapeutic strategies for treating cancer after stem cell transplantation.

  8. Starvation, together with the SOS response, mediates high biofilm-specific tolerance to the fluoroquinolone ofloxacin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve P Bernier

    Full Text Available High levels of antibiotic tolerance are a hallmark of bacterial biofilms. In contrast to well-characterized inherited antibiotic resistance, molecular mechanisms leading to reversible and transient antibiotic tolerance displayed by biofilm bacteria are still poorly understood. The physiological heterogeneity of biofilms influences the formation of transient specialized subpopulations that may be more tolerant to antibiotics. In this study, we used random transposon mutagenesis to identify biofilm-specific tolerant mutants normally exhibited by subpopulations located in specialized niches of heterogeneous biofilms. Using Escherichia coli as a model organism, we demonstrated, through identification of amino acid auxotroph mutants, that starved biofilms exhibited significantly greater tolerance towards fluoroquinolone ofloxacin than their planktonic counterparts. We demonstrated that the biofilm-associated tolerance to ofloxacin was fully dependent on a functional SOS response upon starvation to both amino acids and carbon source and partially dependent on the stringent response upon leucine starvation. However, the biofilm-specific ofloxacin increased tolerance did not involve any of the SOS-induced toxin-antitoxin systems previously associated with formation of highly tolerant persisters. We further demonstrated that ofloxacin tolerance was induced as a function of biofilm age, which was dependent on the SOS response. Our results therefore show that the SOS stress response induced in heterogeneous and nutrient-deprived biofilm microenvironments is a molecular mechanism leading to biofilm-specific high tolerance to the fluoroquinolone ofloxacin.

  9. Native cellulose nanofibrills induce immune tolerance in vitro by acting on dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomić, Sergej; Kokol, Vanja; Mihajlović, Dušan; Mirčić, Aleksandar; Čolić, Miodrag

    2016-08-01

    Cellulose nanofibrills (CNFs) are attractive biocompatible, natural nanomaterials for wide biomedical applications. However, the immunological mechanisms of CNFs have been poorly investigated. Considering that dendritic cells (DCs) are the key immune regulatory cells in response to nanomaterials, our aim was to investigate the immunological mechanisms of CNFs in a model of DC-mediated immune response. We found that non-toxic concentrations of CNFs impaired the differentiation, and subsequent maturation of human monocyte-derived (mo)-DCs. In a co-culture with CD4+T cells, CNF-treated mo-DCs possessed a weaker allostimulatory and T helper (Th)1 and Th17 polarizing capacity, but a stronger capacity to induce Th2 cells and CD4+CD25hiFoxP3hi regulatory T cells. This correlated with an increased immunoglobulin-like transcript-4 and indolamine dioxygenase-1 expression by CNF-treated mo-DCs, following the partial internalization of CNFs and the accumulation of CD209 and actin bundles at the place of contacts with CNFs. Cumulatively, we showed that CNFs are able to induce an active immune tolerance by inducing tolerogenic DCs, which could be beneficial for the application of CNFs in wound healing and chronic inflammation therapies.

  10. Mediated Electrochemical Measurements of Intracellular Catabolic Activities of Yeast Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Sheng ZHAO; Zhen Yu YANG; Yao LU; Zheng Yu YANG

    2005-01-01

    Coupling with the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide, microelectrode voltammetric measurements were undertaken to detect the ferrocyanide accumulations arising from the mediated reduction of ferricyanide by yeast cells. The results indicate that the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide could be used as a probe to detect cellular catabolic activities in yeast cells and the electrochemical response has a positive relationship with the specific growth rate of yeast cells.

  11. How do yeast cells become tolerant to high ethanol concentrations?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoek, Tim; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Voordeckers, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The brewer’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae displays a much higher ethanol tolerance compared to most other organisms, and it is therefore commonly used for the industrial production of bioethanol and alcoholic beverages. However, the genetic determinants underlying this yeast’s exceptional ethan...... and challenges involved in obtaining superior industrial yeasts with improved ethanol tolerance....

  12. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells precondition lung monocytes/macrophages to produce tolerance against allo- and autoimmunity in the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Hwa; Lee, Hyun Ju; Jeong, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Mee Kum; Wee, Won Ryang; Yoon, Sun-Ok; Choi, Hosoon; Prockop, Darwin J; Oh, Joo Youn

    2016-01-01

    Intravenously administered mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) engraft only transiently in recipients, but confer long-term therapeutic benefits in patients with immune disorders. This suggests that MSCs induce immune tolerance by long-lasting effects on the recipient immune regulatory system. Here, we demonstrate that i.v. infusion of MSCs preconditioned lung monocytes/macrophages toward an immune regulatory phenotype in a TNF-α-stimulated gene/protein (TSG)-6-dependent manner. As a result, mice were protected against subsequent immune challenge in two models of allo- and autoimmune ocular inflammation: corneal allotransplantation and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). The monocytes/macrophages primed by MSCs expressed high levels of MHC class II, B220, CD11b, and IL-10, and exhibited T-cell-suppressive activities independently of FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. Adoptive transfer of MSC-induced B220(+)CD11b(+) monocytes/macrophages prevented corneal allograft rejection and EAU. Deletion of monocytes/macrophages abrogated the MSC-induced tolerance. However, MSCs with TSG-6 knockdown did not induce MHC II(+)B220(+)CD11b(+) cells, and failed to attenuate EAU. Therefore, the results demonstrate a mechanism of the MSC-mediated immune modulation through induction of innate immune tolerance that involves monocytes/macrophages.

  13. Exogenous Melatonin Improves Plant Iron Deficiency Tolerance via Increased Accumulation of Polyamine-Mediated Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin has recently been demonstrated to play important roles in the regulation of plant growth, development, and abiotic and biotic stress responses. However, the possible involvement of melatonin in Fe deficiency responses and the underlying mechanisms remained elusive in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, Fe deficiency quickly induced melatonin synthesis in Arabidopsis plants. Exogenous melatonin significantly increased the soluble Fe content of shoots and roots, and decreased the levels of root cell wall Fe bound to pectin and hemicellulose, thus alleviating Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis. Intriguingly, melatonin treatments induced a significant increase of nitric oxide (NO accumulation in roots of Fe-deficient plants, but not in those of polyamine-deficient (adc2-1 and d-arginine-treated plants. Moreover, the melatonin-alleviated leaf chlorosis was blocked in the polyamine- and NO-deficient (nia1nia2noa1 and c-PTIO-treated plants, and the melatonin-induced Fe remobilization was largely inhibited. In addition, the expression of some Fe acquisition-related genes, including FIT1, FRO2, and IRT1 were significantly up-regulated by melatonin treatments, whereas the enhanced expression of these genes was obviously suppressed in the polyamine- and NO-deficient plants. Collectively, our results provide evidence to support the view that melatonin can increase the tolerance of plants to Fe deficiency in a process dependent on the polyamine-induced NO production under Fe-deficient conditions.

  14. Non-IgE mediated mast cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingxin; Blokhuis, Bart R; Garssen, Johan; Redegeld, Frank A

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells are crucial effector cells in allergic reactions, where IgE is the best known mechanism to trigger their degranulation and release of a vast array of allergic mediators. However, IgE is not the only component to stimulate these cells to degranulate, while mast cell activation can also result in differential release of mediators. There is a plethora of stimuli, such as IgG, complement components, TLR ligands, neuropeptides, cytokines, chemokines and other inflammatory products, that can directly trigger mast cell degranulation, cause selective release of mediators, and stimulate proliferation, differentiation and/or migration. Moreover, some of these stimuli have a synergic effect on the IgE-mediated mast cell activation. Because of the ability to respond to a large repertoire of stimuli, mast cells may act as a versatile cell in various physiological and pathological conditions. In this review, we discuss current knowledge on non-IgE stimuli for (human) mast cells.

  15. Malate synthesis and secretion mediated by a manganese-enhanced malate dehydrogenase confers superior manganese tolerance in Stylosanthes guianensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhijian; Sun, Lili; Liu, Pandao; Liu, Guodao; Tian, Jiang; Liao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) toxicity is a major constraint limiting plant growth on acidic soils. Superior Mn tolerance in Stylosanthes spp. has been well documented, but its molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this study, superior Mn tolerance in Stylosanthes guianensis was confirmed, as reflected by a high Mn toxicity threshold. Furthermore, genetic variation of Mn tolerance was evaluated using two S. guianensis genotypes, which revealed that the Fine-stem genotype had higher Mn tolerance than the TPRC2001-1 genotype, as exhibited through less reduction in dry weight under excess Mn, and accompanied by lower internal Mn concentrations. Interestingly, Mn-stimulated increases in malate concentrations and exudation rates were observed only in the Fine-stem genotype. Proteomic analysis of Fine-stem roots revealed that S. guianensis Malate Dehydrogenase1 (SgMDH1) accumulated in response to Mn toxicity. Western-blot and quantitative PCR analyses showed that Mn toxicity resulted in increased SgMDH1 accumulation only in Fine-stem roots, but not in TPRC2001-1. The function of SgMDH1-mediated malate synthesis was verified through in vitro biochemical analysis of SgMDH1 activities against oxaloacetate, as well as in vivo increased malate concentrations in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), soybean (Glycine max) hairy roots, and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) with SgMDH1 overexpression. Furthermore, SgMDH1 overexpression conferred Mn tolerance in Arabidopsis, which was accompanied by increased malate exudation and reduced plant Mn concentrations, suggesting that secreted malate could alleviate Mn toxicity in plants. Taken together, we conclude that the superior Mn tolerance of S. guianensis is achieved by coordination of internal and external Mn detoxification through malate synthesis and exudation, which is regulated by SgMDH1 at both transcription and protein levels.

  16. Immune tolerance induced by intravenous transfer of immature dendritic cells via up-regulating numbers of suppressive IL-10(+) IFN-γ(+)-producing CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fang; Ciric, Bogoljub; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2013-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) regulate immunity and immune tolerance in vivo. However, the mechanisms of DC-mediated tolerance have not been fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that intravenous (i.v.) transfer of bone marrow-derived DCs pulsed with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide blocks the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6J mice. i.v. transfer of MOG-pulsed DCs leads to the down-regulation of the production of IL-17A and IFN-γ and up-regulation of IL-10 secretion. The development of regulatory T cells (Tregs) is facilitated via up-regulation of FoxP3 expression and production of IL-10. The number of suppressive CD4(+)IL-10(+)IFN-γ(+) T cells is also improved. The expression of OX40, CD154, and CD28 is down-regulated, but the expression of CD152, CD80, PD-1, ICOS, and BTLA is up-regulated on CD4(+) T cells after i.v. transfer of immature DCs. The expression of CCR4, CCR5, and CCR7 on CD4(+) T cells is also improved. Our results suggest that immature DCs may induce tolerance via facilitating the development of CD4(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs and suppressive CD4(+)IL-10(+)IFN-γ(+) T cells in vivo.

  17. Transient B cell depletion or improved transgene expression by codon optimization promote tolerance to factor VIII in gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon K Sack

    Full Text Available The major complication in the treatment of hemophilia A is the development of neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors against factor VIII (FVIII. The current method for eradicating inhibitors, termed immune tolerance induction (ITI, is costly and protracted. Clinical protocols that prevent rather than treat inhibitors are not yet established. Liver-directed gene therapy hopes to achieve long-term correction of the disease while also inducing immune tolerance. We sought to investigate the use of adeno-associated viral (serotype 8 gene transfer to induce tolerance to human B domain deleted FVIII in hemophilia A mice. We administered an AAV8 vector with either human B domain deleted FVIII or a codon-optimized transgene, both under a liver-specific promoter to two strains of hemophilia A mice. Protein therapy or gene therapy was given either alone or in conjunction with anti-CD20 antibody-mediated B cell depletion. Gene therapy with a low-expressing vector resulted in sustained near-therapeutic expression. However, supplementary protein therapy revealed that gene transfer had sensitized mice to hFVIII in a high-responder strain but not in mice of a low-responding strain. This heightened response was ameliorated when gene therapy was delivered with anti-murine CD20 treatment. Transient B cell depletion prevented inhibitor formation in protein therapy, but failed to achieve a sustained hypo-responsiveness. Importantly, use of a codon-optimized hFVIII transgene resulted in sustained therapeutic expression and tolerance without a need for B cell depletion. Therefore, anti-CD20 may be beneficial in preventing vector-induced immune priming to FVIII, but higher levels of liver-restricted expression are preferred for tolerance.

  18. Evolving approaches of hematopoietic stem cell-based therapies to induce tolerance to organ transplants: the long road to tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, J; Miller, J; Abecassis, M; Tollerud, D J; Ildstad, S T

    2013-01-01

    The immunoregulatory properties of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been recognized for more than 60 years, beginning in 1945, when Owen reported that genetically disparate freemartin cattle sharing a common placenta were red blood cell chimeras. In 1953, Billingham, Brent, and Medawar demonstrated that murine neonatal chimeras prepared by infusion of donor-derived hematopoietic cells exhibited donor-specific tolerance to skin allografts. Various approaches using HSCs in organ transplantation have gradually brought closer to reality the dream of inducing donor-specific tolerance in organ transplant recipients. Several hurdles needed to be overcome, especially the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), the toxicity of ablative conditioning, and the need for close donor-recipient matching. For wide acceptance, HSC therapy must be safe and reproducible in mismatched donor-recipient combinations. Discoveries in other disciplines have often unexpectedly and synergistically contributed to progress in this area. This review presents a historic perspective of the quest for tolerance in organ transplantation, highlighting current clinical approaches.

  19. DJ-1 Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells from Cytokine- and Streptozotocin-Mediated Cell Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Jain

    Full Text Available A hallmark feature of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus is the progressive dysfunction and loss of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, and inflammatory cytokines are known to trigger beta cell death. Here we asked whether the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 encoded by the Parkinson's disease gene PARK7 protects islet cells from cytokine- and streptozotocin-mediated cell death. Wild type and DJ-1 knockout mice (KO were treated with multiple low doses of streptozotocin (MLDS to induce inflammatory beta cell stress and cell death. Subsequently, glucose tolerance tests were performed, and plasma insulin as well as fasting and random blood glucose concentrations were monitored. Mitochondrial morphology and number of insulin granules were quantified in beta cells. Moreover, islet cell damage was determined in vitro after streptozotocin and cytokine treatment of isolated wild type and DJ-1 KO islets using calcein AM/ethidium homodimer-1 staining and TUNEL staining. Compared to wild type mice, DJ-1 KO mice became diabetic following MLDS treatment. Insulin concentrations were substantially reduced, and fasting blood glucose concentrations were significantly higher in MLDS-treated DJ-1 KO mice compared to equally treated wild type mice. Rates of beta cell apoptosis upon MLDS treatment were twofold higher in DJ-1 KO mice compared to wild type mice, and in vitro inflammatory cytokines led to twice as much beta cell death in pancreatic islets from DJ-1 KO mice versus those of wild type mice. In conclusion, this study identified the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 as being capable of protecting pancreatic islet cells from cell death induced by an inflammatory and cytotoxic setting.

  20. DJ-1 Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells from Cytokine- and Streptozotocin-Mediated Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Deepak; Weber, Gesine; Eberhard, Daniel; Mehana, Amir E; Eglinger, Jan; Welters, Alena; Bartosinska, Barbara; Jeruschke, Kay; Weiss, Jürgen; Päth, Günter; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Seufert, Jochen; Lammert, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark feature of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus is the progressive dysfunction and loss of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, and inflammatory cytokines are known to trigger beta cell death. Here we asked whether the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 encoded by the Parkinson's disease gene PARK7 protects islet cells from cytokine- and streptozotocin-mediated cell death. Wild type and DJ-1 knockout mice (KO) were treated with multiple low doses of streptozotocin (MLDS) to induce inflammatory beta cell stress and cell death. Subsequently, glucose tolerance tests were performed, and plasma insulin as well as fasting and random blood glucose concentrations were monitored. Mitochondrial morphology and number of insulin granules were quantified in beta cells. Moreover, islet cell damage was determined in vitro after streptozotocin and cytokine treatment of isolated wild type and DJ-1 KO islets using calcein AM/ethidium homodimer-1 staining and TUNEL staining. Compared to wild type mice, DJ-1 KO mice became diabetic following MLDS treatment. Insulin concentrations were substantially reduced, and fasting blood glucose concentrations were significantly higher in MLDS-treated DJ-1 KO mice compared to equally treated wild type mice. Rates of beta cell apoptosis upon MLDS treatment were twofold higher in DJ-1 KO mice compared to wild type mice, and in vitro inflammatory cytokines led to twice as much beta cell death in pancreatic islets from DJ-1 KO mice versus those of wild type mice. In conclusion, this study identified the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 as being capable of protecting pancreatic islet cells from cell death induced by an inflammatory and cytotoxic setting.

  1. Potentiation and tolerance of toll-like receptor priming in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Stephen R; Lamb, Fred S; Hellman, Judith; Sherwood, Edward R; Stark, Ryan J

    2017-02-01

    Repeated challenge of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alters the response to subsequent LPS exposures via modulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Whether activation of other TLRs can modulate TLR4 responses, and vice versa, remains unclear. Specifically with regards to endothelial cells, a key component of innate immunity, the impact of TLR cross-modulation is unknown. We postulated that TLR2 priming (via Pam3Csk4) would inhibit TLR4-mediated responses while TLR3 priming (via Poly I:C) would enhance subsequent TLR4-inflammatory signaling. We studied human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and neonatal human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). Cells were primed with a combination of Poly I:C (10 μg/ml), Pam3Csk4 (10 μg/ml), or LPS (100 ng/ml), then washed and allowed to rest. They were then rechallenged with either Poly I:C, Pam3Csk4 or LPS. Endothelial cells showed significant tolerance to repeated LPS challenge. Priming with Pam3Csk4 also reduced the response to secondary LPS challenge in both cell types, despite a reduced proinflammatory response to Pam3Csk4 in HMVECs compared to HUVECs. Poly I:C priming enhanced inflammatory and interferon producing signals upon Poly I:C or LPS rechallenge, respectively. Poly I:C priming induced interferon regulatory factor 7, leading to enhancement of interferon production. Finally, both Poly I:C and LPS priming induced significant changes in receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 activity. Pharmacological inhibition of receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 or interferon regulatory factor 7 reduced the potentiated phenotype of TLR3 priming on TLR4 rechallenge. These results demonstrate that in human endothelial cells, prior activation of TLRs can have a significant impact on subsequent exposures and may contribute to the severity of the host response.

  2. The transcriptional activator LdtR from 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' mediates osmotic stress tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando A Pagliai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The causal agent of Huanglongbing disease, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', is a non-culturable, gram negative, phloem-limited α-proteobacterium. Current methods to control the spread of this disease are still limited to the removal and destruction of infected trees. In this study, we identified and characterized a regulon from 'Ca. L. asiaticus' involved in cell wall remodeling, that contains a member of the MarR family of transcriptional regulators (ldtR, and a predicted L,D-transpeptidase (ldtP. In Sinorhizobium meliloti, mutation of ldtR resulted in morphological changes (shortened rod-type phenotype and reduced tolerance to osmotic stress. A biochemical approach was taken to identify small molecules that modulate LdtR activity. The LdtR ligands identified by thermal shift assays were validated using DNA binding methods. The biological impact of LdtR inactivation by the small molecules was then examined in Sinorhizobium meliloti and Liberibacter crescens, where a shortened-rod phenotype was induced by growth in presence of the ligands. A new method was also developed to examine the effects of small molecules on the viability of 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus', using shoots from HLB-infected orange trees. Decreased expression of ldtRLas and ldtPLas was observed in samples taken from HLB-infected shoots after 6 h of incubation with the LdtR ligands. These results provide strong proof of concept for the use of small molecules that target LdtR, as a potential treatment option for Huanglongbing disease.

  3. Distinct T cell dynamics in lymph nodes during the induction of tolerance and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugues, Stéphanie; Fetler, Luc; Bonifaz, Laura; Helft, Julie; Amblard, François; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2004-12-01

    Induction of immunity and peripheral tolerance requires contacts between antigen-bearing dendritic cells (DCs) and cognate T cells. Using real-time two-photon microscopy, we have analyzed the dynamics of CD8(+) T cells in lymph nodes during the induction of antigen-specific immunity or tolerance. At 15-20 h after the induction of immunity, T cells stopped moving and established prolonged interactions with DCs. In tolerogenic conditions, despite effective initial T cell activation and proliferation, naive T cells remained motile and established serial brief contacts with multiple DCs. Thus, stable DC-T cell interactions occur during the induction of priming, whereas brief contacts may contribute to the induction of T cell tolerance.

  4. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation by chemical carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1977-01-01

    Results are reported from studies that showed that mutagenesis of mammalian cells can be achieved by carcinogenic polycyclic hydrocarbons, nitrosamines, and aflatoxins when tested in the presence of fibroblasts and hepatocytes which are able to metabolize these carcinogens. Further, we have found that there is a relationship between the degree of mutant induction and the degree of carcinogenicity of the different chemicals tested. By simultaneously measuring the frequency of cell transformation and the frequency of mutation at one locus (ouabain resistance) in the same cell system, it was possible to estimate the genetic target site for cell transformation. The results indicated that the target site for transformation is approximately 20 times larger than that determined for ouabain resistance. The results suggest that cell transformation may be due to a mutational event and the mutation can occur in one out of a small number of the same or different genes, and that the cell-mediated mutagenesis approach may be a valuable means of detecting tissue-specific carcinogens.

  5. Nanomedicine-mediated cancer stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Song; Xia, Jin-Xing; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Circumstantial evidence suggests that most tumours are heterogeneous and contain a small population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that exhibit distinctive self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation capabilities, which are believed to play a crucial role in tumour progression, drug resistance, recurrence and metastasis in multiple malignancies. Given that the existence of CSCs is a primary obstacle to cancer therapy, a tremendous amount of effort has been put into the development of anti-CSC strategies, and several potential approaches to kill therapeutically-resistant CSCs have been explored, including inhibiting ATP-binding cassette transporters, blocking essential signalling pathways involved in self-renewal and survival of CSCs, targeting CSCs surface markers and destroying the tumour microenvironment. Meanwhile, an increasing number of therapeutic agents (e.g. small molecule drugs, nucleic acids and antibodies) to selectively target CSCs have been screened or proposed in recent years. Drug delivery technology-based approaches hold great potential for tackling the limitations impeding clinical applications of CSC-specific agents, such as poor water solubility, short circulation time and inconsistent stability. Properly designed nanocarrier-based therapeutic agents (or nanomedicines) offer new possibilities of penetrating CSC niches and significantly increasing therapeutic drug accumulation in CSCs, which are difficult for free drug counterparts. In addition, intelligent nanomedicine holds great promise to overcome pump-mediated multidrug resistance which is driven by ATP and to decrease detrimental effects on normal somatic stem cells. In this review, we summarise the distinctive biological processes related to CSCs to highlight strategies against inherently drug-resistant CSCs. We then focus on some representative examples that give a glimpse into state-of-the-art nanomedicine approaches developed for CSCs elimination. A perspective on innovative therapeutic

  6. Non-IgE mediated mast cell activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Yingxin; Blokhuis, Bart R; Garssen, Johan; Redegeld, Frank A

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are crucial effector cells in allergic reactions, where IgE is the best known mechanism to trigger their degranulation and release of a vast array of allergic mediators. However, IgE is not the only component to stimulate these cells to degranulate, while mast cell activation can also res

  7. Non-IgE mediated mast cell activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Yingxin; Blokhuis, Bart R; Garssen, Johan; Redegeld, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are crucial effector cells in allergic reactions, where IgE is the best known mechanism to trigger their degranulation and release of a vast array of allergic mediators. However, IgE is not the only component to stimulate these cells to degranulate, while mast cell activation can also res

  8. Pivotal Role for a Tail Subunit of the RNA Polymerase II Mediator Complex CgMed2 in Azole Tolerance and Adherence in Candida glabrata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Sapan; Shivarathri, Raju; Srivastava, Vivek Kumar; Ferrari, Sélène; Sanglard, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Antifungal therapy failure can be associated with increased resistance to the employed antifungal agents. Candida glabrata, the second most common cause of invasive candidiasis, is intrinsically less susceptible to the azole class of antifungals and accounts for 15% of all Candida bloodstream infections. Here, we show that C. glabrata MED2 (CgMED2), which codes for a tail subunit of the RNA polymerase II Mediator complex, is required for resistance to azole antifungal drugs in C. glabrata. An inability to transcriptionally activate genes encoding a zinc finger transcriptional factor, CgPdr1, and multidrug efflux pump, CgCdr1, primarily contributes to the elevated susceptibility of the Cgmed2Δ mutant toward azole antifungals. We also report for the first time that the Cgmed2Δ mutant exhibits sensitivity to caspofungin, a constitutively activated protein kinase C-mediated cell wall integrity pathway, and elevated adherence to epithelial cells. The increased adherence of the Cgmed2Δ mutant was attributed to the elevated expression of the EPA1 and EPA7 genes. Further, our data demonstrate that CgMED2 is required for intracellular proliferation in human macrophages and modulates survival in a murine model of disseminated candidiasis. Lastly, we show an essential requirement for CgMed2, along with the Mediator middle subunit CgNut1 and the Mediator cyclin-dependent kinase/cyclin subunit CgSrb8, for the high-level fluconazole resistance conferred by the hyperactive allele of CgPdr1. Together, our findings underscore a pivotal role for CgMed2 in basal tolerance and acquired resistance to azole antifungals. PMID:25070095

  9. Mitochondrial inheritance is mediated by microtubules in mammalian cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Elizabeth; Mandato, Craig

    2013-11-01

    The mitochondrial network fragments and becomes uniformly dispersed within the cytoplasm when mammalian cells enter mitosis. Such morphology and distribution of mitochondria was previously thought to facilitate the stochastic inheritance of mitochondria by daughter cells. In contrast, we recently reported that mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells are inherited by an ordered mechanism of inheritance mediated by microtubules. We showed that mitochondria are progressively enriched at the cell equator and depleted at the poles throughout division. Furthermore, the mitochondrial distribution during division is dependent on microtubules, indicating an ordered inheritance strategy. The microtubule-mediated positioning of mitochondria in dividing mammalian cells may have functional consequences for cell division and/or mitochondrial inheritance.

  10. Rearrangement of mouse immunoglobulin kappa deleting element recombining sequence promotes immune tolerance and lambda B cell production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, José Luis; Aït-Azzouzene, Djemel; Duong, Bao Hoa; Ota, Takayuki; Nemazee, David

    2008-02-01

    The recombining sequence (RS) of mouse and its human equivalent, the immunoglobulin (Ig) kappa deleting element (IGKDE), are sequences found at the 3' end of the Ig kappa locus (Igk) that rearrange to inactivate Igk in developing B cells. RS recombination correlates with Ig lambda (Iglambda) light (L) chain expression and likely plays a role in receptor editing by eliminating Igk genes encoding autoantibodies. A mouse strain was generated in which the recombination signal of RS was removed, blocking RS-mediated Igk inactivation. In RS mutant mice, receptor editing and self-tolerance were impaired, in some cases leading to autoantibody formation. Surprisingly, mutant mice also made fewer B cells expressing lambda chain, whereas lambda versus kappa isotype exclusion was only modestly affected. These results provide insight into the mechanism of L chain isotype exclusion and indicate that RS has a physiological role in promoting the formation of lambda L chain-expressing B cells.

  11. Dendritic cells in rheumatoid arthritis: Which subset should be used as a tool to induce tolerance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Lebre; P.P. Tak

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) comprise a complex network of heterogeneous antigen-presenting cells (APC) that are critical not only to the initiation and regulation of adaptive immunity (Th1/Th2/Th17 responses), but also to the maintenance of both central and peripheral tolerance (regulatory T cells, periphe

  12. Earlier low-dose TBI or DST overcomes CD8+ T-cell-mediated alloresistance to allogeneic marrow in recipients of anti-CD40L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yasuo; Ito, Hiroshi; Kurtz, Josef; Wekerle, Thomas; Ho, Leon; Sykes, Megan

    2004-01-01

    Treatment with a single injection of anti-CD40L (CD154) monoclonal antibody (mAb) and fully mismatched allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) allows rapid tolerization of CD4+ T cells to the donor. The addition of in vivo CD8 T-cell depletion leads to permanent mixed hematopoietic chimerism and tolerance. We now describe two approaches that obviate the requirement for CD8 T-cell depletion by rapidly tolerizing recipient CD8 T cells in addition to CD4 cells. Administration of donor-specific transfusion (DST) to mice receiving 3 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), BMT and anti-CD40L mAb on day 0 uniformly led to permanent mixed chimerism and tolerance, compared with only 40% of mice receiving similar treatment without DST. In the absence of DST, moving the timing of 3 Gy TBI to day -1 or day -2 instead of day 0 led to rapid (by 2 weeks) induction of CD8+ cell tolerance, and also permitted uniform achievement of permanent mixed chimerism and donor-specific tolerance in recipients of anti-CD40L and BMT on day 0. These nontoxic regimens overcome CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell-mediated alloresistance without requiring host T-cell depletion, permitting the induction of permanent mixed chimerism and tolerance.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Sonoyama

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla. Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoyama, Wataru; Liu, Yi; Fang, Dianji; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Seo, Byoung-Moo; Zhang, Chunmei; Liu, He; Gronthos, Stan; Wang, Cun-Yu; Wang, Songlin; Shi, Songtao

    2006-12-20

    Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla). Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  15. Peripheral tolerance through clonal deletion of mature CD4-CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlow, D A; Teh, S J; van Oers, N S; Miller, R G; Teh, H S

    1992-05-01

    Transgenic mice bearing the alpha beta transgenes encoding a defined T cell receptor specific for the male (H-Y) antigen presented by the H-2Db class I MHC molecule were used to study mechanisms of peripheral tolerance. Female transgenic mice produce large numbers of functionally homogeneous CD8+ male antigen-reactive T cells in the thymus that subsequently accumulate in the peripheral lymphoid organs. We have used three experimental approaches to show that male reactive CD8+ T cells can be eliminated from peripheral lymphoid organs after exposure to male antigen. (i) In female transgenic mice that were neonatally tolerized with male spleen cells, male reactive CD8+ T cells continued to be produced in large numbers in the thymus but were virtually absent in the lymph nodes. (ii) Injection of thymocytes from female transgenic mice into female mice neonatally tolerized with the male antigen, or into normal male mice, led to the specific elimination of male-reactive CD8+ T cells in the lymph nodes. (iii) Four days after male lymphoid cells were injected intravenously into female transgenic mice, male antigen-reactive CD8+ T cells recovered from the lymph nodes of recipient mice were highly apoptotic when compared to CD4+ (non-male reactive) T cells. These data indicate that tolerance to extrathymic antigen can be achieved through elimination of mature T cells in the peripheral lymphoid organs.

  16. Changes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell membrane components and promotion to ethanol tolerance during the bioethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shi-Jun; Yi, Chen-Feng; Li, Hao

    2015-12-01

    During bioethanol fermentation process, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell membrane might provide main protection to tolerate accumulated ethanol, and S. cerevisiae cells might also remodel their membrane compositions or structure to try to adapt to or tolerate the ethanol stress. However, the exact changes and roles of S. cerevisiae cell membrane components during bioethanol fermentation still remains poorly understood. This study was performed to clarify changes and roles of S. cerevisiae cell membrane components during bioethanol fermentation. Both cell diameter and membrane integrity decreased as fermentation time lasting. Moreover, compared with cells at lag phase, cells at exponential and stationary phases had higher contents of ergosterol and oleic acid (C18:1) but lower levels of hexadecanoic (C16:0) and palmitelaidic (C16:1) acids. Contents of most detected phospholipids presented an increase tendency during fermentation process. Increased contents of oleic acid and phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acids might indicate enhanced cell membrane fluidity. Compared with cells at lag phase, cells at exponential and stationary phases had higher expressions of ACC1 and HFA1. However, OLE1 expression underwent an evident increase at exponential phase but a decrease at following stationary phase. These results indicated that during bioethanol fermentation process, yeast cells remodeled membrane and more changeable cell membrane contributed to acquiring higher ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae cells. These results highlighted our knowledge about relationship between the variation of cell membrane structure and compositions and ethanol tolerance, and would contribute to a better understanding of bioethanol fermentation process and construction of industrial ethanologenic strains with higher ethanol tolerance.

  17. Overexpression of the Mg-chelatase H subunit in guard cells confers drought tolerance via promotion of stomatal closure in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomo eTsuzuki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Mg-chelatase H subunit (CHLH has been shown to mediate chlorophyll biosynthesis, as well as plastid-to-nucleus and abscisic acid (ABA-mediated signaling. A recent study using a novel CHLH mutant, rtl1, indicated that CHLH specifically affects ABA-induced stomatal closure, but also that CHLH did not serve as an ABA receptor in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the molecular mechanism by which CHLH engages in ABA-mediated signaling in guard cells remains largely unknown. In the present study, we examined CHLH function in guard cells and explored whether CHLH expression might influence stomatal aperture. Incubation of rtl1 guard cell protoplasts with ABA induced expression of the ABA-responsive genes RAB18 and RD29B, as also observed in wild-type (WT cells, indicating that CHLH did not affect the expression of ABA-responsive genes. Earlier, ABA was reported to inhibit blue light (BL-mediated stomatal opening, at least in part through dephosphorylating/inhibiting guard cell H+-ATPase (which drives opening. Therefore, we immunohistochemically examined the phosphorylation status of guard cell H+-ATPase. Notably, ABA inhibition of BL-induced phosphorylation of H+-ATPase was impaired in rtl1 cells, suggesting that CHLH influences not only ABA-induced stomatal closure but also inhibition of BL-mediated stomatal opening by ABA. Next, we generated CHLH-GFP-overexpressing plants using CER6 promoter, which induces gene expression in the epidermis including guard cells. CHLH-transgenic plants exhibited a closed stomata phenotype even when brightly illuminated. Moreover, plant growth experiments conducted under water-deficient conditions showed that CHLH transgenic plants were more tolerant of drought than WT plants. In summary, we show that CHLH is involved in the regulation of stomatal aperture in response to ABA, but not in ABA-induced gene expression, and that manipulation of stomatal aperture via overexpression of CHLH in guard cells improves plant

  18. Tolerance to noninherited maternal antigens, reproductive microchimerism and regulatory T cell memory: 60 years after ‘Evidence for actively acquired tolerance to Rh antigens’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinder, Jeremy M.; Jiang, Tony T.; Ertelt, James M.; Xin, Lijun; Strong, Beverly S.; Shaaban, Aimen F.; Way, Sing Sing

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Compulsory exposure to genetically foreign maternal tissue imprints in offspring sustained tolerance to noninherited maternal antigens (NIMA). Immunological tolerance to NIMA was first described by Dr. Ray D. Owen for women genetically negative for erythrocyte rhesus (Rh) antigen with reduced sensitization from developmental Rh exposure by their mothers. Extending this analysis to HLA haplotypes has uncovered the exciting potential for therapeutically exploiting NIMA-specific tolerance naturally engrained in mammalian reproduction for improved clinical outcomes after allogeneic transplantation. Herein, we summarize emerging scientific concepts stemming from tolerance to NIMA that includes postnatal maintenance of microchimeric maternal origin cells in offspring, expanded accumulation of immune suppressive regulatory T cells with NIMA-specificity, along with teleological benefits and immunological consequences of NIMA-specific tolerance conserved across mammalian species. PMID:26517600

  19. Mast cells mediate neutrophil recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezel, Anouk; Lagraauw, H Maxime; van der Velden, Daniël; de Jager, Saskia C A; Quax, Paul H A; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Activated mast cells have been identified in the intima and perivascular tissue of human atherosclerotic plaques. As mast cells have been described to release a number of chemokines that mediate leukocyte fluxes, we propose that activated mast cells may play a pivotal role in leukocyte recruit

  20. Production of Transgenic Tall Fescue Plants with Enhanced Stress Tolerances by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-Mediated Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Guan-ting; CHEN Jin-qing; HU Zhang-hua; LANG Chun-xiu; CHEN Xiao-yun; WANG Fu-lin; JIN Wei; XIA Ying-wu

    2006-01-01

    In order to improve stress tolerances of turf-type tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105 carrying plasmid pCMD containing stress tolerance-related CBF1 gene from Arabidopsis thaliana was used to transform mature seeds-derived embryogenic calli of four cultivars. A total of 112 transgenic plants were regenerated from 32 independent lines and verified by histochemical detection of GUS activity, PCR assay and Southern hybridization analysis. The transformation frequency ranged from 0.92 to 2.87% with apparent differences among the cultivars. Stress tolerances of transgenic plants were enhanced, which was shown by the facts that transgenic plants had distinct growth superiority and significantly higher survival rate than non-transformed ones under high salinity and high osmosis stresses,and that relative electronic conductivity of in vitro leaves treated with low and high temperatures, dehydration and high salinity stresses was 25-30% lower in transgenic plants than in control plants. In addition, it was observed that growth of transgenic plants was inhibited due to constitutive overexpression of CBF1 gene under normal environmental conditions.

  1. Use of hematopoietic cell transplants to achieve tolerance in patients with solid organ transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strober, Samuel

    2016-03-24

    The goals of tolerance in patients with solid organ transplants are to eliminate the lifelong need for immunosuppressive (IS) drugs and to prevent graft loss due to rejection or drug toxicity. Tolerance with complete withdrawal of IS drugs has been achieved in recipients of HLA-matched and mismatched living donor kidney transplants in 3 medical centers using hematopoietic cell transplants to establish mixed or complete chimerism.

  2. The growth threshold conjecture: a theoretical framework for understanding T-cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Clemente F; Herrero, Miguel A; Cuesta, José A; Acosta, Francisco J; Fernández-Arias, Cristina

    2015-07-01

    Adaptive immune responses depend on the capacity of T cells to target specific antigens. As similar antigens can be expressed by pathogens and host cells, the question naturally arises of how can T cells discriminate friends from foes. In this work, we suggest that T cells tolerate cells whose proliferation rates remain below a permitted threshold. Our proposal relies on well-established facts about T-cell dynamics during acute infections: T-cell populations are elastic (they expand and contract) and they display inertia (contraction is delayed relative to antigen removal). By modelling inertia and elasticity, we show that tolerance to slow-growing populations can emerge as a population-scale feature of T cells. This result suggests a theoretical framework to understand immune tolerance that goes beyond the self versus non-self dichotomy. It also accounts for currently unexplained observations, such as the paradoxical tolerance to slow-growing pathogens or the presence of self-reactive T cells in the organism.

  3. Flow cytometry evaluation of cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarcone, D; Tilden, A B; Cloud, G; Friedman, H M; Landay, A; Grossi, C E

    1986-11-20

    A novel flow cytometry method for the evaluation of cell-mediated cytotoxicity is described. This method uses flow cytometry analysis to distinguish target cells from effector cells by differences in volume and light scatter characteristics. Non-viable target cells, following their interaction with effector cells, are determined via propidium iodide (PI) dye exclusion and then expressed as a percentage of the total target cell population. This assay is suitable both for analysis of systems which allow recycling of cytotoxic effector cells (total cell cytotoxicity assays, TCCA), and of systems in which recycling does not occur (single cell cytotoxicity assays, SCCA). Natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity evaluated by flow cytometry is significantly correlated with the standard 51Cr release assay. Flow cytometry can also be used to evaluate the competitive inhibition that certain cell types exert on the cell-mediated killing of NK-sensitive targets. A prerequisite for this assay is that competitor cells and target cells are distinguishable through their volume and light scatter characteristics. Advantages and pitfalls of the flow cytometry method are discussed, in comparison with the 51Cr-release assay.

  4. Modulation of immune tolerance: the role of tolerogenic dendritic cells and TNFα

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the role of tolerogenic DC and anti-TNFα agents in tolerance induction. IL-10-generated tDC potently induce Treg, while inhibiting CD4+ T cell proliferation and cytokine production by Th1 and Th2 cell subsets. Anti-TNFα shares this dual function; inducing IL-10 production and

  5. Hydrogen sulfide donor sodium hydrosulfide-induced heat tolerance in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) suspension cultured cells and involvement of Ca(2+) and calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-Guang; Gong, Ming; Xie, Hong; Yang, Lan; Li, Jing

    2012-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is considered as a new emerging cell signal in higher plants. Hydrogen sulfide donor, sodium hydrosulfide, pretreatment significantly increased survival percentage of tobacco suspension cultured cells under heat stress and regrowth ability after heat stress, and alleviated decrease in vitality of cells, increase in electrolyte leakage and accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA). In addition, sodium hydrosulfide-induced heat tolerance was markedly strengthened by application of exogenous Ca(2+) and its ionophore A23187, respectively, while this heat tolerance was weakened by addition of Ca(2+) chelator ethylene glycol-bis(b-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), plasma membrane channel blocker La(3+), as well as calmodulin (CaM) antagonists chlorpromazine (CPZ) and trifluoperazine (TFP), respectively, but intracellular channel blocker ruthenium red (RR) did not. These results suggested that sodium hydrosulfide pretreatment could improve heat tolerance in tobacco suspension cultured cells and the acquisition of this heat tolerance requires the entry of extracellular Ca(2+) into cells across the plasma membrane and the mediation of intracellular CaM.

  6. Proglucagon Promoter Cre-Mediated AMPK Deletion in Mice Increases Circulating GLP-1 Levels and Oral Glucose Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie R Sayers

    Full Text Available Enteroendocrine L-cells synthesise and release the gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 in response to food transit. Deletion of the tumour suppressor kinase LKB1 from proglucagon-expressing cells leads to the generation of intestinal polyps but no change in circulating GLP-1 levels. Here, we explore the role of the downstream kinase AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in these cells.Loss of AMPK from proglucagon-expressing cells was achieved using a preproglucagon promoter-driven Cre (iGluCre to catalyse recombination of floxed alleles of AMPKα1 and α2. Oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance were measured using standard protocols. L-cell mass was measured by immunocytochemistry. Hormone and peptide levels were measured by electrochemical-based luminescence detection or radioimmunoassay.Recombination with iGluCre led to efficient deletion of AMPK from intestinal L- and pancreatic alpha-cells. In contrast to mice rendered null for LKB1 using the same strategy, mice deleted for AMPK displayed an increase (WT: 0.05 ± 0.01, KO: 0.09±0.02%, p<0.01 in L-cell mass and elevated plasma fasting (WT: 5.62 ± 0.800 pg/ml, KO: 14.5 ± 1.870, p<0.01 and fed (WT: 15.7 ± 1.48pg/ml, KO: 22.0 ± 6.62, p<0.01 GLP-1 levels. Oral, but not intraperitoneal, glucose tolerance was significantly improved by AMPK deletion, whilst insulin and glucagon levels were unchanged despite an increase in alpha to beta cell ratio (WT: 0.23 ± 0.02, KO: 0.33 ± 0.03, p<0.01.AMPK restricts L-cell growth and GLP-1 secretion to suppress glucose tolerance. Targeted inhibition of AMPK in L-cells may thus provide a new therapeutic strategy in some forms of type 2 diabetes.

  7. Enhanced Boron Tolerance in Plants Mediated by Bidirectional Transport Through Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosa, Kareem A; Kumar, Kundan; Chhikara, Sudesh; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Dhankher, Om Parkash

    2016-02-23

    High boron (B) concentration is toxic to plants that limit plant productivity. Recent studies have shown the involvement of the members of major intrinsic protein (MIP) family in controlling B transport. Here, we have provided experimental evidences showing the bidirectional transport activity of rice OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6. Boron transport ability of OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 were displayed in yeast HD9 mutant strain (∆fps1∆acr3∆ycf1) as a result of increased B sensitivity, influx and accumulation by OsPIP1;3, and rapid efflux activity by OsPIP2;6. RT-PCR analysis showed strong upregulation of OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 transcripts in roots by B toxicity. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines overexpressing OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 exhibited enhanced tolerance to B toxicity. Furthermore, B concentration was significantly increased after 2 and 3 hours of tracer boron ((10)B) treatment. Interestingly, a rapid efflux of (10)B from the roots of the transgenic plants was observed within 1 h of (10)B treatment. Boron tolerance in OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 lines was inhibited by aquaporin inhibitors, silver nitrate and sodium azide. Our data proved that OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 are indeed involved in both influx and efflux of boron transport. Manipulation of these PIPs could be highly useful in improving B tolerance in crops grown in high B containing soils.

  8. Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells and Central Tolerance in Autoimmune Hepatitis Development: Novel Perspective from a New Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina Alexandropoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH is an immune-mediated disorder that affects the liver parenchyma. Diagnosis usually occurs at the later stages of the disease, complicating efforts towards understanding the causes of disease development. While animal models are useful for studying the etiology of autoimmune disorders, most of the existing animal models of AIH do not recapitulate the chronic course of the human condition. In addition, approaches to mimic AIH-associated liver inflammation have instead led to liver tolerance, consistent with the high tolerogenic capacity of the liver. Recently, we described a new mouse model that exhibited spontaneous and chronic liver inflammation that recapitulated the known histopathological and immunological parameters of AIH. The approach involved liver-extrinsic genetic engineering that interfered with the induction of T-cell tolerance in the thymus, the very process thought to inhibit AIH induction by liver-specific expression of exogenous antigens. The mutation led to depletion of specialized thymic epithelial cells that present self-antigens and eliminate autoreactive T-cells before they exit the thymus. Based on our findings, which are summarized below, we believe that this mouse model represents a relevant experimental tool towards elucidating the cellular and molecular aspects of AIH development and developing novel therapeutic strategies for treating this disease.

  9. Physiological and proteomic analysis of selenium-mediated tolerance to Cd stress in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongyan; Dai, Huaxin; Wang, Xiaoyun; Wang, Guohui

    2016-11-01

    Selenium can mitigate cadmium toxicity in plants. However, the mechanism of this alleviation has not been fully understood. In the present study, the role of Se in inducing tolerance to Cd stress in cucumber was elucidated. Results showed that Se significantly alleviated Cd-induced growth inhibition, reduced Cd concentration, increased SPAD value and improved photosynthetic performance. Through proteomic analysis by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with mass spectrometry, 26 protein spots were identified, which were significantly influenced by Cd stress and/or Se application. Among these proteins, the abundance of 21 spots (10 in leaves and 11 in roots) were repressed in Cd-treated and up-accumulated or no-changed in Cd+Se-treated cucumber. These altered proteins were involved in the response to stress, metabolism, photosynthesis and storage, they were including glutathione S-transferase F8, heat shock protein STI-like, peroxidase, ascorbate oxidase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase 2, NiR, Rieske type ion sulfur subunit and PsbP domain-containing protein 6. Furthermore, we identified five proteins with an increase in relative abundance after Cd treatment, they were involved in the functional groups active in response to stress and transport. The present study provided novel insights into Se-mediated tolerance of cucumber seedlings against Cd toxicity at the proteome level.

  10. Trichoderma species mediated differential tolerance against biotic stress of phytopathogens in Cicer arietinum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Amrita; Raghuwanshi, Richa; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur

    2015-02-01

    Trichoderma spp. have been reported to aid in imparting biotic as well as abiotic tolerance to plants. However, there are only few reports unfolding the differential ability of separate species of Trichoderma genera generally exploited for their biocontrol potential in this framework. A study was undertaken to evaluate the biocontrol potential of different Trichoderma species namely T. harzianum, T. asperellum, T. koningiopsis, T. longibrachiatum, and T. aureoviride as identified in the group of indigenous isolates from the agricultural soils of Eastern Uttar Pradesh, India. Their biocontrol potential against three major soilborne phytopathogens, i.e., Sclerotium rolfsii, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and Colletotrichum capsici was confirmed by dual culture plate technique. Efficient mycoparasitic ability was further assessed in all the isolates in relation to chitinase, β-1,3 glucanase, pectinase, lipase, amylase, and cellulase production while equally consistent results were obtained for their probable phosphate solubilization and indole acetic acid (IAA) production abilities. The selected isolates were further subjected to test their ability to promote plant growth, to reduce disease incidence and to tolerate biotic stress in terms of lignification pattern against S. rolfsii in chickpea plants. Among the identified Trichoderma species, excellent results were observed for T. harzianum and T. koningiopsis indicating better biocontrol potential of these species in the group and thus exhibiting perspective for their commercial exploitation.

  11. Behavioural and morphological evidence for the involvement of glial cell activation in delta opioid receptor function: implications for the development of opioid tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Anna MW

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previous studies have demonstrated that prolonged morphine treatment in vivo induces the translocation of delta opioid receptors (δORs from intracellular compartments to neuronal plasma membranes and this trafficking event is correlated with an increased functional competence of the receptor. The mechanism underlying this phenomenon is unknown; however chronic morphine treatment has been shown to involve the activation and hypertrophy of spinal glial cells. In the present study we have examined whether activated glia may be associated with the enhanced δOR-mediated antinociception observed following prolonged morphine treatment. Accordingly, animals were treated with morphine with or without concomitant administration of propentofylline, an inhibitor of glial activation that was previously shown to block the development of morphine antinociceptive tolerance. The morphine regimen previously demonstrated to initiate δOR trafficking induced the activation of both astrocytes and microglia in the dorsal spinal cord as indicated by a significant increase in cell volume and cell surface area. Consistent with previous data, morphine-treated rats displayed a significant augmentation in δOR-mediated antinociception. Concomitant spinal administration of propentofylline with morphine significantly attenuated the spinal immune response as well as the morphine-induced enhancement of δOR-mediated effects. These results complement previous reports that glial activation contributes to a state of opioid analgesic tolerance, and also suggest that neuro-glial communication is likely responsible in part for the altered functional competence in δOR-mediated effects following morphine treatment.

  12. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    OpenAIRE

    Anupam Aich; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Kalpna Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve...

  13. Polycation-mediated integrated cell death processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parhamifar, Ladan; Andersen, Helene; Wu, Linping

    2014-01-01

    standard. PEIs are highly efficient transfectants, but depending on their architecture and size they induce cytotoxicity through different modes of cell death pathways. Here, we briefly review dynamic and integrated cell death processes and pathways, and discuss considerations in cell death assay design...

  14. Immunity and Tolerance Induced by Intestinal Mucosal Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Julio Aliberti

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells present in the digestive tract are constantly exposed to environmental antigens, commensal flora, and invading pathogens. Under steady-state conditions, these cells have high tolerogenic potential, triggering differentiation of regulatory T cells to protect the host from unwanted proinflammatory immune responses to innocuous antigens or commensals. On the other hand, these cells must discriminate between commensal flora and invading pathogens and mount powerful immune response...

  15. Introduction of Pea DNA Helicase 45 Into Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. Hybrid) Enhances Cell Membrane Thermostability And Upregulation Of Stress-responsive Genes Leads To Abiotic Stress Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Sruthy Maria; Ashwin Narayan, J; Syamaladevi, Divya P; Appunu, C; Chakravarthi, M; Ravichandran, V; Tuteja, Narendra; Subramonian, N

    2015-05-01

    DNA helicases are motor proteins that play an essential role in nucleic acid metabolism, by providing a duplex-unwinding function. To improve the drought and salinity tolerance of sugarcane, a DEAD-box helicase gene isolated from pea with a constitutive promoter, Port Ubi 2.3 was transformed into the commercial sugarcane variety Co 86032 through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and the transgenics were screened for tolerance to soil moisture stress and salinity. The transgene integration was confirmed through polymerase chain reaction, and the V 0 transgenic events showed significantly higher cell membrane thermostability under normal irrigated conditions. The V 1 transgenic events were screened for tolerance to soil moisture stress and exhibited significantly higher cell membrane thermostability, transgene expression, relative water content, gas exchange parameters, chlorophyll content, and photosynthetic efficiency under soil moisture stress compared to wild-type (WT). The overexpression of PDH45 transgenic sugarcane also led to the upregulation of DREB2-induced downstream stress-related genes. The transgenic events demonstrated higher germination ability and better chlorophyll retention than WT under salinity stress. Our results suggest the possibility for development of increased abiotic stress tolerant sugarcane cultivars through overexpression of PDH45 gene. Perhaps this is the first report, which provides evidence for increased drought and salinity tolerance in sugarcane through overexpression of PDH45.

  16. Regulatory T cells: serious contenders in the promise for immunological tolerance in transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloufar eSafinia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs play an important role in immunoregulation and have been shown in animal models to promote transplantation tolerance and curb autoimmunity following their adoptive transfer. The safety and potential therapeutic efficacy of these cells has already been reported in Phase I trials of bone marrow transplantation and type I diabetes, the success of which has motivated the broadened application of these cells in solid organ transplantation. Despite major advances in the clinical translation of these cells, there are still key questions to be addressed to ensure that Tregs attest their reputation as ideal candidates for tolerance induction. In this review, we will discuss the unique traits of Tregs that have attracted such fame in the arena of tolerance induction. We will outline the protocols used for their ex vivo expansion and discuss the future directions of Treg cell therapy. In this regard, we will review the concept of Treg heterogeneity, the desire to isolate and expand a functionally superior Treg population and report on the effect of differing culture conditions. The relevance of Treg migratory capacity will also be discussed together with methods of in vivo visualization of the infused cells. Moreover, we will highlight key advances in the identification and expansion of antigen specific Tregs and discuss their significance for cell therapy application. We will also summarize the clinical parameters that are of importance, alongside cell manufacture, from the choice of immunosuppression regimens to the number of injections in order to direct the success of future efficacy trials of Treg cell therapy.Years of research in the field of tolerance have seen an accumulation of knowledge and expertise in the field of Treg biology. This perpetual progression has been the driving force behind the many successes to date and has put us now within touching distance of our ultimate success, immunological tolerance.

  17. Cdc42-mediated tubulogenesis controls cell specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesavan, Gokul; Sand, Fredrik Wolfhagen; Greiner, Thomas Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how cells polarize and coordinate tubulogenesis during organ formation is a central question in biology. Tubulogenesis often coincides with cell-lineage specification during organ development. Hence, an elementary question is whether these two processes are independently controlled......, or whether proper cell specification depends on formation of tubes. To address these fundamental questions, we have studied the functional role of Cdc42 in pancreatic tubulogenesis. We present evidence that Cdc42 is essential for tube formation, specifically for initiating microlumen formation and later...... for maintaining apical cell polarity. Finally, we show that Cdc42 controls cell specification non-cell-autonomously by providing the correct microenvironment for proper control of cell-fate choices of multipotent progenitors. For a video summary of this article, see the PaperFlick file with the Supplemental Data...

  18. The phytochelatin transporters AtABCC1 and AtABCC2 mediate tolerance to cadmium and mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jiyoung; Song, Won-Yong; Ko, Donghwi; Eom, Yujin; Hansen, Thomas H; Schiller, Michaela; Lee, Tai Gyu; Martinoia, Enrico; Lee, Youngsook

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metals such as cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg) are toxic pollutants that are detrimental to living organisms. Plants employ a two-step mechanism to detoxify toxic ions. First, phytochelatins bind to the toxic ion, and then the metal-phytochelatin complex is sequestered in the vacuole. Two ABCC-type transporters, AtABCC1 and AtABCC2, that play a key role in arsenic detoxification, have recently been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it is unclear whether these transporters are also implicated in phytochelatin-dependent detoxification of other heavy metals such as Cd(II) and Hg(II). Here, we show that atabcc1 single or atabcc1 atabcc2 double knockout mutants exhibit a hypersensitive phenotype in the presence of Cd(II) and Hg(II). Microscopic analysis using a Cd-sensitive probe revealed that Cd is mostly located in the cytosol of protoplasts of the double mutant, whereas it occurs mainly in the vacuole of wild-type cells. This suggests that the two ABCC transporters are important for vacuolar sequestration of Cd. Heterologous expression of the transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confirmed their role in heavy metal tolerance. Over-expression of AtABCC1 in Arabidopsis resulted in enhanced Cd(II) tolerance and accumulation. Together, these results demonstrate that AtABCC1 and AtABCC2 are important vacuolar transporters that confer tolerance to cadmium and mercury, in addition to their role in arsenic detoxification. These transporters provide useful tools for genetic engineering of plants with enhanced metal tolerance and accumulation, which are desirable characteristics for phytoremediation.

  19. Arsenic tolerance in Arabidopsis is mediated by two ABCC-type phytochelatin transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Won-Yong; Park, Jiyoung; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Suter-Grotemeyer, Marianne; Shim, Donghwan; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; Geisler, Markus; Weder, Barbara; Rea, Philip A; Rentsch, Doris; Schroeder, Julian I; Lee, Youngsook; Martinoia, Enrico

    2010-12-01

    Arsenic is an extremely toxic metalloid causing serious health problems. In Southeast Asia, aquifers providing drinking and agricultural water for tens of millions of people are contaminated with arsenic. To reduce nutritional arsenic intake through the consumption of contaminated plants, identification of the mechanisms for arsenic accumulation and detoxification in plants is a prerequisite. Phytochelatins (PCs) are glutathione-derived peptides that chelate heavy metals and metalloids such as arsenic, thereby functioning as the first step in their detoxification. Plant vacuoles act as final detoxification stores for heavy metals and arsenic. The essential PC-metal(loid) transporters that sequester toxic metal(loid)s in plant vacuoles have long been sought but remain unidentified in plants. Here we show that in the absence of two ABCC-type transporters, AtABCC1 and AtABCC2, Arabidopsis thaliana is extremely sensitive to arsenic and arsenic-based herbicides. Heterologous expression of these ABCC transporters in phytochelatin-producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae enhanced arsenic tolerance and accumulation. Furthermore, membrane vesicles isolated from these yeasts exhibited a pronounced arsenite [As(III)]-PC(2) transport activity. Vacuoles isolated from atabcc1 atabcc2 double knockout plants exhibited a very low residual As(III)-PC(2) transport activity, and interestingly, less PC was produced in mutant plants when exposed to arsenic. Overexpression of AtPCS1 and AtABCC1 resulted in plants exhibiting increased arsenic tolerance. Our findings demonstrate that AtABCC1 and AtABCC2 are the long-sought and major vacuolar PC transporters. Modulation of vacuolar PC transporters in other plants may allow engineering of plants suited either for phytoremediation or reduced accumulation of arsenic in edible organs.

  20. Mammalian mediator 19 mediates H1299 lung adenocarcinoma cell clone conformation, growth, and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu-Lu; Guo, Shu-Liang; Ma, Su-Ren; Luo, Yong-Ai

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian mediator (MED) is a multi-protein coactivator that has been identified by several research groups. The involvement of the MED complex subunit 19 (MED 19) in the metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cell line (H1299), which expresses the MED 19 subunit, was here investigated. When MED 19 expression was decreased by RNA interference H1299 cells demonstrated reduced clone formation, arrest in the S phase of the cell cycle, and lowered metastatic capacity. Thus, MED 19 appears to play important roles in the biological behavior of non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. These findings may be important for the development of novel lung carcinoma treatments.

  1. Reduction of methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress tolerance in antisense transgenic tobacco seedlings through restricted expression of StAPX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-hong SUN; Yong WANG; Hua-gang HE; Xue LI; Wan SONG; Bin DU; Qing-wei MENG

    2013-01-01

    Ascorbate peroxidases are directly involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging by reducing hydrogen peroxide to water.The tomato thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase gene (StAPX) was introduced into tobacco.RNA gel blot analysis confirmed that StAPX in tomato leaves was induced by methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress.The sense transgenic seedlings exhibited higher tAPX activity than that of the wild type (WT) plants under oxidative stress conditions,while the antisense seedlings exhibited lower tAPX activity.Lower APX activities of antisense transgenic seedlings caused higher malondialdehyde contents and relative electrical conductivity.The sense transgenic seedlings with higher tAPX activity maintained higher chlorophyll content and showed the importance of tAPX in maintaining the optimal chloroplast development under methylviologen stress conditions,whereas the antisense lines maintained lower chlorophyll content than WT seedlings.Results indicated that the over-expression of StAPX enhanced tolerance to methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress in sense transgenic tobacco early seedlings,whereas the suppression of StAPX in antisense transgenic seedlings showed high sensitivity to oxidative stress.

  2. Reduction of methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress tolerance in antisense transgenic tobacco seedlings through restricted expression of StAPX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei-Hong; Wang, Yong; He, Hua-Gang; Li, Xue; Song, Wan; Du, Bin; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2013-07-01

    Ascorbate peroxidases are directly involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging by reducing hydrogen peroxide to water. The tomato thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase gene (StAPX) was introduced into tobacco. RNA gel blot analysis confirmed that StAPX in tomato leaves was induced by methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress. The sense transgenic seedlings exhibited higher tAPX activity than that of the wild type (WT) plants under oxidative stress conditions, while the antisense seedlings exhibited lower tAPX activity. Lower APX activities of antisense transgenic seedlings caused higher malondialdehyde contents and relative electrical conductivity. The sense transgenic seedlings with higher tAPX activity maintained higher chlorophyll content and showed the importance of tAPX in maintaining the optimal chloroplast development under methylviologen stress conditions, whereas the antisense lines maintained lower chlorophyll content than WT seedlings. Results indicated that the over-expression of StAPX enhanced tolerance to methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress in sense transgenic tobacco early seedlings, whereas the suppression of StAPX in antisense transgenic seedlings showed high sensitivity to oxidative stress.

  3. Gz mediates the long-lasting desensitization of brain CB1 receptors and is essential for cross-tolerance with morphine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Muñoz María

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the systemic administration of cannabinoids produces antinociception, their chronic use leads to analgesic tolerance as well as cross-tolerance to morphine. These effects are mediated by cannabinoids binding to peripheral, spinal and supraspinal CB1 and CB2 receptors, making it difficult to determine the relevance of each receptor type to these phenomena. However, in the brain, the CB1 receptors (CB1Rs are expressed at high levels in neurons, whereas the expression of CB2Rs is marginal. Thus, CB1Rs mediate the effects of smoked cannabis and are also implicated in emotional behaviors. We have analyzed the production of supraspinal analgesia and the development of tolerance at CB1Rs by the direct injection of a series of cannabinoids into the brain. The influence of the activation of CB1Rs on supraspinal analgesia evoked by morphine was also evaluated. Results Intracerebroventricular (icv administration of cannabinoid receptor agonists, WIN55,212-2, ACEA or methanandamide, generated a dose-dependent analgesia. Notably, a single administration of these compounds brought about profound analgesic tolerance that lasted for more than 14 days. This decrease in the effect of cannabinoid receptor agonists was not mediated by depletion of CB1Rs or the loss of regulated G proteins, but, nevertheless, it was accompanied by reduced morphine analgesia. On the other hand, acute morphine administration produced tolerance that lasted only 3 days and did not affect the CB1R. We found that both neural mu-opioid receptors (MORs and CB1Rs interact with the HINT1-RGSZ module, thereby regulating pertussis toxin-insensitive Gz proteins. In mice with reduced levels of these Gz proteins, the CB1R agonists produced no such desensitization or morphine cross-tolerance. On the other hand, experimental enhancement of Gz signaling enabled an acute icv administration of morphine to produce a long-lasting tolerance at MORs that persisted for more than

  4. Oral tolerance to cancer can be abrogated by T regulatory cell inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C Whelan

    Full Text Available Oral administration of tumour cells induces an immune hypo-responsiveness known as oral tolerance. We have previously shown that oral tolerance to a cancer is tumour antigen specific, non-cross-reactive and confers a tumour growth advantage. We investigated the utilisation of regulatory T cell (Treg depletion on oral tolerance to a cancer and its ability to control tumour growth. Balb/C mice were gavage fed homogenised tumour tissue--JBS fibrosarcoma (to induce oral tolerance to a cancer, or PBS as control. Growth of subcutaneous JBS tumours were measured; splenic tissue excised and flow cytometry used to quantify and compare systemic Tregs and T effector (Teff cell populations. Prior to and/or following tumour feeding, mice were intraperitoneally administered anti-CD25, to inactivate systemic Tregs, or given isotype antibody as a control. Mice which were orally tolerised prior to subcutaneous tumour induction, displayed significantly higher systemic Treg levels (14% vs 6% and faster tumour growth rates than controls (p<0.05. Complete regression of tumours were only seen after Treg inactivation and occurred in all groups--this was not inhibited by tumour feeding. The cure rates for Treg inactivation were 60% during tolerisation, 75% during tumour growth and 100% during inactivation for both tolerisation and tumour growth. Depletion of Tregs gave rise to an increased number of Teff cells. Treg depletion post-tolerisation and post-tumour induction led to the complete regression of all tumours on tumour bearing mice. Oral administration of tumour tissue, confers a tumour growth advantage and is accompanied by an increase in systemic Treg levels. The administration of anti-CD25 Ab decreased Treg numbers and caused an increase in Teffs. Most notably Treg cell inhibition overcame established oral tolerance with consequent tumor regression, especially relevant to foregut cancers where oral tolerance is likely to be induced by the shedding of tumour

  5. Modelling microbial fuel cells with suspended cells and added electron transfer mediator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picoreanu, C.; Katuri, K.P.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Head, I.M.; Scott, K.

    2009-01-01

    Derivation of a mathematical model for microbial fuel cells (MFC) with suspended biomass and added electron-transfer mediator is described. The model is based on mass balances for several dissolved chemical species such as substrate, oxidized mediator and reduced mediator. Biological, chemical and e

  6. Tolerogenic nanoparticles inhibit T cell-mediated autoimmunity through SOCS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeste, Ada; Takenaka, Maisa C; Mascanfroni, Ivan D; Nadeau, Meghan; Kenison, Jessica E; Patel, Bonny; Tukpah, Ann-Marcia; Babon, Jenny Aurielle B; DeNicola, Megan; Kent, Sally C; Pozo, David; Quintana, Francisco J

    2016-06-21

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell-dependent autoimmune disease that is characterized by the destruction of insulin-producing β cells in the pancreas. The administration to patients of ex vivo-differentiated FoxP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells or tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) that promote Treg cell differentiation is considered a potential therapy for T1D; however, cell-based therapies cannot be easily translated into clinical practice. We engineered nanoparticles (NPs) to deliver both a tolerogenic molecule, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE), and the β cell antigen proinsulin (NPITE+Ins) to induce a tolerogenic phenotype in DCs and promote Treg cell generation in vivo. NPITE+Ins administration to 8-week-old nonobese diabetic mice suppressed autoimmune diabetes. NPITE+Ins induced a tolerogenic phenotype in DCs, which was characterized by a decreased ability to activate inflammatory effector T cells and was concomitant with the increased differentiation of FoxP3(+) Treg cells. The induction of a tolerogenic phenotype in DCs by NPs was mediated by the AhR-dependent induction of Socs2, which resulted in inhibition of nuclear factor κB activation and proinflammatory cytokine production (properties of tolerogenic DCs). Together, these data suggest that NPs constitute a potential tool to reestablish tolerance in T1D and potentially other autoimmune disorders.

  7. The changed balance of regulatory and naive T cells promotes tolerance after TLI and anti-T-cell antibody conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nador, R G; Hongo, D; Baker, J; Yao, Z; Strober, S

    2010-02-01

    The goal of the study was to determine how the changed balance of host naïve and regulatory T cells observed after conditioning with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and antithymocyte serum (ATS) promotes tolerance to combined organ and bone marrow transplants. Although previous studies showed that tolerance was dependent on host natural killer T (NKT) cells, this study shows that there is an additional dependence on host CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells. Depletion of the latter cells before conditioning resulted in rapid rejection of bone marrow and organ allografts. The balance of T-cell subsets changed after TLI and ATS with TLI favoring mainly NKT cells and ATS favoring mainly Treg cells. Combined modalities reduced the conventional naïve CD4(+) T cells 2800-fold. The host type Treg cells that persisted in the stable chimeras had the capacity to suppress alloreactivity to both donor and third party cells in the mixed leukocyte reaction. In conclusion, tolerance induction after conditioning in this model depends upon the ability of naturally occurring regulatory NKT and Treg cells to suppress the residual alloreactive T cells that are capable of rejecting grafts.

  8. Helios defines T cells being driven to tolerance in the periphery and thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ellen M; Bourges, Dorothée; Hogan, Thea V; Gleeson, Paul A; van Driel, Ian R

    2014-07-01

    The expression of the Ikaros transcription factor family member, Helios, has been shown to be associated with T-cell tolerance in both the thymus and the periphery. To better understand the importance of Helios in tolerance pathways, we have examined the expression of Helios in TCR-transgenic T cells specific for the gastric H(+) /K(+) ATPase, the autoantigen target in autoimmune gastritis. Analysis of H(+) /K(+) ATPase-specific T cells in mice with different patterns of H(+) /K(+) ATPase expression revealed that, in addition to the expression of Helios in CD4(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, Helios is expressed by a large proportion of CD4(+) Foxp3(-) T cells in both the thymus and the paragastric lymph node (PgLN), which drains the stomach. In the thymus, Helios was expressed by H(+) /K(+) ATPase-specific thymocytes that were undergoing negative selection. In the periphery, Helios was expressed in H(+) /K(+) ATPase-specific CD4(+) T cells following H(+) /K(+) ATPase presentation and was more highly expressed when T-cell activation occurred in the absence of inflammation. Analysis of purified H(+) /K(+) ATPase-specific CD4(+) Foxp3(-) Helios(+) T cells demonstrated that they were functionally anergic. These results demonstrate that Helios is expressed by thymic and peripheral T cells that are being driven to tolerance in response to a genuine autoantigen.

  9. Inflammation and proliferation act together to mediate intestinal cell fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paige S Davies

    Full Text Available Cell fusion between circulating bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs and non-hematopoietic cells is well documented in various tissues and has recently been suggested to occur in response to injury. Here we illustrate that inflammation within the intestine enhanced the level of BMDC fusion with intestinal progenitors. To identify important microenvironmental factors mediating intestinal epithelial cell fusion, we performed bone marrow transplantation into mouse models of inflammation and stimulated epithelial proliferation. Interestingly, in a non-injury model or in instances where inflammation was suppressed, an appreciable baseline level of fusion persisted. This suggests that additional mediators of cell fusion exist. A rigorous temporal analysis of early post-transplantation cellular dynamics revealed that GFP-expressing donor cells first trafficked to the intestine coincident with a striking increase in epithelial proliferation, advocating for a required fusogenic state of the host partner. Directly supporting this hypothesis, induction of augmented epithelial proliferation resulted in a significant increase in intestinal cell fusion. Here we report that intestinal inflammation and epithelial proliferation act together to promote cell fusion. While the physiologic impact of cell fusion is not yet known, the increased incidence in an inflammatory and proliferative microenvironment suggests a potential role for cell fusion in mediating the progression of intestinal inflammatory diseases and cancer.

  10. T cell mediated pathogenesis in EAE: Molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian C Kurschus

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available T cells are major initiators and mediators of disease in multiple sclerosis (MS and in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. EAE is an antigen-driven autoimmune model in which immunization against myelin autoantigens elicits strong T cell responses which initiate its pathology with CNS myelin destruction. T cells cause pathogenic events by several mechanisms; some work in a direct fashion in the CNS, such as direct cytokine-induced damage, granzyme-mediated killing, or glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, whereas most are indirect mechanisms, such as activation of other cell types like macrophages, B cells, or neutrophils. This review aims to describe and discuss the molecular effector mechanism by which T cells harm the CNS during EAE.

  11. Dye-mediated photosensitization of murine neuroblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieber, F.; Sieber-Blum, M.

    1986-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if photosensitization mediated by the fluorescent dye, merocyanine 540, could be used to preferentially kill murine neuroblastoma cells in simulated autologous remission marrow grafts. Simultaneous exposure of Neuro 2a or NB41A3 neuroblastoma cells to merocyanine 540 and white light reduced the concentration of in vitro-clonogenic tumor cells 50,000-fold. By contrast, the same treatment had little effect on the graft's ability to rescue lethally irradiated syngeneic hosts. Lethally irradiated C57BL/6J X A/J F1 mice transplanted with photosensitized mixtures of neuroblastoma cells and normal marrow cells (1:100 or 1:10) survived without developing neuroblastomas. It is conceivable that merocyanine 540-mediated photosensitization will prove useful for the extracorporeal purging of residual neuroblastoma cells from human autologous remission marrow grafts.

  12. The CgHaa1-Regulon Mediates Response and Tolerance to Acetic Acid Stress in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Ruben T; Cunha, Diana V; Wang, Can; Pereira, Leonel; Silva, Sónia; Salazar, Sara B; Schröder, Markus S; Okamoto, Michiyo; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Chibana, Hiroji; Aoyama, Toshihiro; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Azeredo, Joana; Butler, Geraldine; Mira, Nuno Pereira

    2017-01-05

    To thrive in the acidic vaginal tract, Candida glabrata has to cope with high concentrations of acetic acid. The mechanisms underlying C. glabrata tolerance to acetic acid at low pH remain largely uncharacterized. In this work, the essential role of the CgHaa1 transcription factor (encoded by ORF CAGL0L09339g) in the response and tolerance of C. glabrata to acetic acid is demonstrated. Transcriptomic analysis showed that CgHaa1 regulates, directly or indirectly, the expression of about 75% of the genes activated under acetic acid stress. CgHaa1-activated targets are involved in multiple physiological functions including membrane transport, metabolism of carbohydrates and amino acids, regulation of the activity of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, and adhesion. Under acetic acid stress, CgHaa1 increased the activity and the expression of the CgPma1 proton pump and contributed to increased colonization of vaginal epithelial cells by C. glabrata CgHAA1, and two identified CgHaa1-activated targets, CgTPO3 and CgHSP30, are herein demonstrated to be determinants of C. glabrata tolerance to acetic acid. The protective effect of CgTpo3 and of CgHaa1 was linked to a role of these proteins in reducing the accumulation of acetic acid inside C. glabrata cells. In response to acetic acid stress, marked differences were found in the regulons controlled by CgHaa1 and by its S. cerevisiae ScHaa1 ortholog, demonstrating a clear divergent evolution of the two regulatory networks. The results gathered in this study significantly advance the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the success of C. glabrata as a vaginal colonizer.

  13. Tolerance induction and reversal of diabetes in mice transplanted with human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szot, Gregory L; Yadav, Mahesh; Lang, Jiena; Kroon, Evert; Kerr, Justin; Kadoya, Kuniko; Brandon, Eugene P; Baetge, Emmanuel E; Bour-Jordan, Hélène; Bluestone, Jeffrey A

    2015-02-05

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease caused by T cell-mediated destruction of insulin-producing β cells in the islets of Langerhans. In most cases, reversal of disease would require strategies combining islet cell replacement with immunotherapy that are currently available only for the most severely affected patients. Here, we demonstrate that immunotherapies that target T cell costimulatory pathways block the rejection of xenogeneic human embryonic-stem-cell-derived pancreatic endoderm (hESC-PE) in mice. The therapy allowed for long-term development of hESC-PE into islet-like structures capable of producing human insulin and maintaining normoglycemia. Moreover, short-term costimulation blockade led to robust immune tolerance that could be transferred independently of regulatory T cells. Importantly, costimulation blockade prevented the rejection of allogeneic hESC-PE by human PBMCs in a humanized model in vivo. These results support the clinical development of hESC-derived therapy, combined with tolerogenic treatments, as a sustainable alternative strategy for patients with T1D.

  14. Signal molecule-mediated hepatic cell communication during liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Yu Zheng; Shun-Yan Weng; Yan Yu

    2009-01-01

    Liver regeneration is a complex and well-orchestrated process, during which hepatic cells are activated to produce large signal molecules in response to liver injury or mass reduction. These signal molecules, in turn, set up the connections and cross-talk among liver cells to promote hepatic recovery. In this review, we endeavor to summarize the network of signal molecules that mediates hepatic cell communication in the regulation of liver regeneration.

  15. Ion mediated targeting of cells with nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Vivek; Fu, Jinlong

    2010-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, Ca^2+ ions are necessary for intracellular signaling, in activity of mitochondria and a variety of other cellular process that have been linked to cell apoptosis, proteins synthesis and cell-cycle regulation. Here we show that Ca^2+ ions, serving as the bio-compatible interface can be used to target Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SaC, baker's yeast), a model eukaryotic cell, with Au nanoparticles (10 nm). The Ca^2+ ions bind to the carboxylic acid groups in the citrate functionalized Au nanoparticles. This transforms the nanoparticles into micron long 1-D branched chain assemblies due to inter-particle dipole-dipole interaction and inter-particle bonding due to the divalent nature of the Ca^2+ ion. A similar transformation is observed with the use of divalent ions Mg^2+, Cd^2+ and Fe^2+. The 1-D assembly aids the interfacing of ion-nanoparticles on the cell by providing multiple contact points. Further monovalent ions such as Na^+ are also effective for the targeting of the cell with nanoparticles. However Na-Au nanoparticles are limited in their deposition as they exist in solution as single particles. The cells remain alive after the deposition process and their vitality is unaffected by the interfacing with ion-nanoparticles.

  16. Laser-mediated perforation of plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Martin; Jacobs, Philipp; Esser, Dominik; Schinkel, Helga; Schillberg, Stefan

    2007-07-01

    The functional analysis of plant cells at the cellular and subcellular levels requires novel technologies for the directed manipulation of individual cells. Lasers are increasingly exploited for the manipulation of plant cells, enabling the study of biological processes on a subcellular scale including transformation to generate genetically modified plants. In our setup either a picosecond laser operating at 1064 nm wavelength or a continuous wave laser diode emitting at 405 nm are coupled into an inverse microscope. The beams are focused to a spot size of about 1.5 μm and the tobacco cell protoplasts are irradiated. Optoporation is achieved when targeting the laser focal spot at the outermost edge of the plasma membrane. In case of the picosecond laser a single pulse with energy of about 0.4 μJ was sufficient to perforate the plasma membrane enabling the uptake of dye or DNA from the surrounding medium into the cytosol. When the ultraviolet laser diode at a power level of 17 mW is employed an irradiation time of 200 - 500 milliseconds is necessary to enable the uptake of macromolecules. In the presence of an EYFP encoding plasmid with a C-terminal peroxisomal signal sequence in the surrounding medium transient transformation of tobacco protoplasts could be achieved in up to 2% of the optoporated cells. Single cell perforation using this novel optoporation method shows that isolated plant cells can be permeabilized without direct manipulation. This is a valuable procedure for cell-specific applications, particularly where the import of specific molecules into plant cells is required for functional analysis.

  17. Desiccation tolerance in the tardigrade Richtersius coronifer relies on muscle mediated structural reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halberg, Kenneth Agerlin; Jørgensen, Aslak; Møbjerg, Nadja

    2013-01-01

    Life unfolds within a framework of constraining abiotic factors, yet some organisms are adapted to handle large fluctuations in physical and chemical parameters. Tardigrades are microscopic ecdysozoans well known for their ability to endure hostile conditions, such as complete desiccation--a phenomenon called anhydrobiosis. During dehydration, anhydrobiotic animals undergo a series of anatomical changes. Whether this reorganization is an essential regulated event mediated by active controlled processes, or merely a passive result of the dehydration process, has not been clearly determined. Here, we investigate parameters pivotal to the formation of the so-called "tun", a state that in tardigrades and rotifers marks the entrance into anhydrobiosis. Estimation of body volume in the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer reveals an 87 % reduction in volume from the hydrated active state to the dehydrated tun state, underlining the structural stress associated with entering anhydrobiosis. Survival experiments with pharmacological inhibitors of mitochondrial energy production and muscle contractions show that i) mitochondrial energy production is a prerequisite for surviving desiccation, ii) uncoupling the mitochondria abolishes tun formation, and iii) inhibiting the musculature impairs the ability to form viable tuns. We moreover provide a comparative analysis of the structural changes involved in tun formation, using a combination of cytochemistry, confocal laser scanning microscopy and 3D reconstructions as well as scanning electron microscopy. Our data reveal that the musculature mediates a structural reorganization vital for anhydrobiotic survival, and furthermore that maintaining structural integrity is essential for resumption of life following rehydration.

  18. Tolerance of DNA Mismatches in Dmc1 Recombinase-mediated DNA Strand Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgogno, María V; Monti, Mariela R; Zhao, Weixing; Sung, Patrick; Argaraña, Carlos E; Pezza, Roberto J

    2016-03-04

    Recombination between homologous chromosomes is required for the faithful meiotic segregation of chromosomes and leads to the generation of genetic diversity. The conserved meiosis-specific Dmc1 recombinase catalyzes homologous recombination triggered by DNA double strand breaks through the exchange of parental DNA sequences. Although providing an efficient rate of DNA strand exchange between polymorphic alleles, Dmc1 must also guard against recombination between divergent sequences. How DNA mismatches affect Dmc1-mediated DNA strand exchange is not understood. We have used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to study the mechanism of Dmc1-mediated strand exchange between DNA oligonucleotides with different degrees of heterology. The efficiency of strand exchange is highly sensitive to the location, type, and distribution of mismatches. Mismatches near the 3' end of the initiating DNA strand have a small effect, whereas most mismatches near the 5' end impede strand exchange dramatically. The Hop2-Mnd1 protein complex stimulates Dmc1-catalyzed strand exchange on homologous DNA or containing a single mismatch. We observed that Dmc1 can reject divergent DNA sequences while bypassing a few mismatches in the DNA sequence. Our findings have important implications in understanding meiotic recombination. First, Dmc1 acts as an initial barrier for heterologous recombination, with the mismatch repair system providing a second level of proofreading, to ensure that ectopic sequences are not recombined. Second, Dmc1 stepping over infrequent mismatches is likely critical for allowing recombination between the polymorphic sequences of homologous chromosomes, thus contributing to gene conversion and genetic diversity.

  19. Desiccation tolerance in the tardigrade Richtersius coronifer relies on muscle mediated structural reorganization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Agerlin Halberg

    Full Text Available Life unfolds within a framework of constraining abiotic factors, yet some organisms are adapted to handle large fluctuations in physical and chemical parameters. Tardigrades are microscopic ecdysozoans well known for their ability to endure hostile conditions, such as complete desiccation--a phenomenon called anhydrobiosis. During dehydration, anhydrobiotic animals undergo a series of anatomical changes. Whether this reorganization is an essential regulated event mediated by active controlled processes, or merely a passive result of the dehydration process, has not been clearly determined. Here, we investigate parameters pivotal to the formation of the so-called "tun", a state that in tardigrades and rotifers marks the entrance into anhydrobiosis. Estimation of body volume in the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer reveals an 87 % reduction in volume from the hydrated active state to the dehydrated tun state, underlining the structural stress associated with entering anhydrobiosis. Survival experiments with pharmacological inhibitors of mitochondrial energy production and muscle contractions show that i mitochondrial energy production is a prerequisite for surviving desiccation, ii uncoupling the mitochondria abolishes tun formation, and iii inhibiting the musculature impairs the ability to form viable tuns. We moreover provide a comparative analysis of the structural changes involved in tun formation, using a combination of cytochemistry, confocal laser scanning microscopy and 3D reconstructions as well as scanning electron microscopy. Our data reveal that the musculature mediates a structural reorganization vital for anhydrobiotic survival, and furthermore that maintaining structural integrity is essential for resumption of life following rehydration.

  20. Antisense-Mediated Depletion of Tomato Chloroplast Omega-3 Fatty Acid Desaturase Enhances Thermal Tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xun-Yan Liu; Jing-Hua Yang; Bin Li; Xiu-Mei Yang; Qing-Wei Meng

    2006-01-01

    A chloroplast-localized tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) ω-3 fatty acid desaturase gene (LeFAD7) was isolated and characterized with regard to its sequence, response to various temperatures, and function in antisense transgenic tomato plants. The deduced amino acid sequence had four histidine-rich regions, of which three regions were highly conserved throughout the whole ω-3 fatty acid desaturase gene family.Southern blotting analysis showed that LeFAD7was encoded by a single copy gene and had two homologous genes in the tomato genome. Northern blot showed that LeFAD7was expressed in all organs and was especially abundant in leaf tissue. Meanwhile, expression of LeFAD7was induced by chilling stress (4 ℃),but was inhibited by high temperature (45 ℃), in leaves. Transgenic tomato plants were produced by integration of the antisense LeFAD7 DNA under the control of a CaMV35S promoter into the genome. Antisense transgenic plants with lower 18: 3 content could maintain a higher maximal photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm)and O2 evolution rate than wild-type plants. These results suggested that silence of the LeFAD7 gene alleviated high-temperature stress. There was also a correlation between the low content of 18: 3 resulting from silence of the LeFAD7 gene and tolerance to high-temperature stress.

  1. Pharmacological tolerance to alpha 1-adrenergic receptor antagonism mediated by terazosin in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, J; Dachman, W; Blaschke, T F; Hoffman, B B

    1992-01-01

    Chronic administration of alpha 1-receptor antagonists is associated with loss of clinical efficacy, especially in congestive heart failure, although the mechanism is uncertain. To evaluate changes in venous alpha 1-adrenoceptor responsiveness during chronic alpha 1-adrenoceptor blockade, dose-response curves to phenylephrine and angiotensin II were constructed in 10 healthy subjects before, during, and after administration of terazosin 1 mg orally for 28 d. Terazosin initially shifted the dose-response curve of phenylephrine to the right, with a significant increase in ED50 for phenylephrine from a control value of 102 to 759 ng/min on day 1 of terazosin (P < 0.001). However, by day 28, the dose-response curve had shifted back towards baseline with an ED50 of 112 ng/min. After discontinuing terazosin, the ED50 for phenylephrine remained near the baseline value, indicating no evidence of supersensitivity to phenylephrine. There was no change in responsiveness to angiotensin II during the course of treatment with terazosin. Plasma terazosin concentrations were stable throughout the period of drug administration. The mean Kd of terazosin was estimated as 11 +/- 15 nM in the first few days of treatment. This study demonstrates that pharmacological tolerance to the alpha 1-adrenoceptor blocking action of terazosin occurs in man and may be responsible for loss in efficacy with chronic therapy. PMID:1358918

  2. Enzyme-inhibitor mediated red cell labelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackery, D.M.; Singh, J.; Wyeth, P. (Southampton Univ. (UK). Dept. of Chemistry)

    Red blood cells contain 90% of the body's enzyme carbonic anhydrase to which aromatic sulphonamide inhibitors bind tightly. P-iodo-benzene sulphonamide (PIBS) is a lipophilic inhibitor which would afford rapid cell labelling. Radioiodinated PIBS was prepared, in high yield, by radio ion exchange in the presence of ammonium sulphate. After intravenous injection of /sup 131/I-PIBS the radiolabel was found in the blood pool.

  3. Clinical perspectives for regulatory T cells in transplantation tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Hippen, Keli L.; Riley, James L.; June, Carl H.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Three main types of CD4+ regulatory T cells can be distinguished based upon whether they express Foxp3 and differentiate naturally in the thymus (natural Tregs) or are induced in the periphery (inducible Tregs); or whether they are FoxP3 negative but secrete IL-10 in response to antigen (Tregulatory type 1, Tr1 cells). Adoptive transfer of each cell type has proven highly effective in mouse models at preventing graft vs. host disease (GVHD) and autoimmunity. Although clinical application was ...

  4. Mast cells mediate malignant pleural effusion formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannou, Anastasios D.; Marazioti, Antonia; Spella, Magda; Kanellakis, Nikolaos I.; Apostolopoulou, Hara; Psallidas, Ioannis; Prijovich, Zeljko M.; Vreka, Malamati; Zazara, Dimitra E.; Lilis, Ioannis; Papaleonidopoulos, Vassilios; Kairi, Chrysoula A.; Patmanidi, Alexandra L.; Giopanou, Ioanna; Spiropoulou, Nikolitsa; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Aidinis, Vassilis; Spyratos, Dionisios; Teliousi, Stamatia; Papadaki, Helen; Taraviras, Stavros; Snyder, Linda A.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Feyerabend, Thorsten B.; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kalomenidis, Ioannis; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Agalioti, Theodora; Stathopoulos, Georgios T.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) have been identified in various tumors; however, the role of these cells in tumorigenesis remains controversial. Here, we quantified MCs in human and murine malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) and evaluated the fate and function of these cells in MPE development. Evaluation of murine MPE-competent lung and colon adenocarcinomas revealed that these tumors actively attract and subsequently degranulate MCs in the pleural space by elaborating CCL2 and osteopontin. MCs were required for effusion development, as MPEs did not form in mice lacking MCs, and pleural infusion of MCs with MPE-incompetent cells promoted MPE formation. Once homed to the pleural space, MCs released tryptase AB1 and IL-1β, which in turn induced pleural vasculature leakiness and triggered NF-κB activation in pleural tumor cells, thereby fostering pleural fluid accumulation and tumor growth. Evaluation of human effusions revealed that MCs are elevated in MPEs compared with benign effusions. Moreover, MC abundance correlated with MPE formation in a human cancer cell–induced effusion model. Treatment of mice with the c-KIT inhibitor imatinib mesylate limited effusion precipitation by mouse and human adenocarcinoma cells. Together, the results of this study indicate that MCs are required for MPE formation and suggest that MC-dependent effusion formation is therapeutically addressable. PMID:25915587

  5. Sucrose-mediated giant cell formation in the genus Neisseria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K G; McDonald, I J

    1976-03-01

    Growth of Neisseria perflava, Neisseria cinerea, and Neisseria sicca strain Kirkland in media supplemented with sucrose (0.5 to 5.0% w/v) resulted in the formation of giant cells. Response to sucrose was specific in that a variety of other carbohydrates did not mediate giant cell formation. Giant cells appeared only under growth conditions and did not lyse upon transfer to medium lacking sucrose or upon resuspension in hypotonic media. Reversion of giant to normal cells occurred when giant cells were used as inocula and allowed to multiply in media lacking sucrose.

  6. Regulatory T-cells and immune tolerance in pregnancy : a new target for infertility treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerin, Leigh R.; Prins, Jelmer R.; Robertson, Sarah A.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptation of the maternal immune response to accommodate the semi-allogeneic fetus is necessary for pregnancy success, and disturbances in maternal tolerance are implicated in infertility and reproductive pathologies. T regulatory (Treg) cells are a recently discovered subset of T-lymphocytes with

  7. Tolerization of an established αb-crystallin-reactive T-cell response by intravenous antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, R.; Mark, K. van der; Wawrousek, E.F.; Plomp, A.C.; Noort, J.M. van

    2007-01-01

    Tolerance induction to prevent activation of a naïve T-cell repertoire has been well documented in rodents and can be readily achieved by intravenous, oral or intranasal administration of antigen in the absence of adjuvants. In autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) the presence of an e

  8. Biomaterial nanotopography-mediated cell responses: experiment and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of fabrication and processing technologies in the past two decades has enabled researchers to introduce nanoscale features into materials which, interestingly, have been shown to greatly regulate the behavior and fate of biological cells. In particular, important cell responses (such as adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, migration, and filopodial growth have all been correlated with material nanotopography. Given its great potential, intensive efforts have been made, both experimentally and theoretically, to understand why and how cells respond to nanoscale surface features, and this article reviews recent progress in this field. Specifically, a brief overview on the fabrication and modification techniques to create nanotopography on different materials is given first. After that, a summary of important experimental findings on the mediation of nanoscale surface topography on the behavior of various cells, as well as the underlying mechanism, is provided. Finally, both classical and recently developed approaches for modeling nanotopography-mediated cell adhesion and filopodial growth are reviewed.

  9. Cortactin mediated morphogenic cell movements during zebrafish (Danio rerio) gastrulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Dan; ZHANG Peijun; ZHAN Xi

    2005-01-01

    Cell migration is essential to direct embryonic cells to specific sites at which their developmental fates are ultimately determined. However, the mechanism by which cell motility is regulated in embryonic development is largely unknown. Cortactin, a filamentous actin binding protein, is an activator of Arp2/3 complex in the nucleation of actin cytoskeleton at the cell leading edge and acts directly on the machinery of cell motility. To determine whether cortactin and Arp2/3 mediated actin assembly plays a role in the morphogenic cell movements during the early development of zebrafish, we initiated a study of cortactin expression in zebrafish embryos at gastrulating stages when massive cell migrations occur. Western blot analysis using a cortactin specific monoclonal antibody demonstrated that cortactin protein is abundantly present in embryos at the most early developmental stages. Immunostaining of whole-mounted embryo showed that cortactin immunoreactivity was associated with the embryonic shield, predominantly at the dorsal side of the embryos during gastrulation. In addition, cortactin was detected in the convergent cells of the epiblast and hypoblast, and later in the central nervous system. Immunofluorescent staining with cortactin and Arp3 antibodies also revealed that cortactin and Arp2/3 complex colocalized at the periphery and many patches associated with the cell-to-cell junction in motile embryonic cells. Therefore, our data suggest that cortactin and Arp2/3 mediated actin polymerization is implicated in the cell movement during gastrulation and perhaps the development of the central neural system as well.

  10. Msh homeobox genes regulate cadherin-mediated cell adhesion and cell-cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincecum, J M; Fannon, A; Song, K; Wang, Y; Sassoon, D A

    1998-07-01

    Msx-1 and Msx-2 are two closely related homeobox genes expressed in cephalic neural crest tooth buds, the optic cup endocardial cushions, and the developing limb [Hill and Davidson, 1991; Monaghan et al., 1991; Robert et al., 1991]. These sites correspond to regions of active cell segregation and proliferation under the influence of epithelial-mesenchymal cell interactions [Brown et al., 1993; Davidson et al., 1991], suggesting that Msx-1 and Msx-2 regulate cell-cell interactions. We have investigated the potential relationship between expression of the Msh homeobox genes (Msx-1 and Msx-2) and cadherin-mediated cell adhesion and cell sorting. We report that cell lines stably expressing Msx-1 or Msx-2 differentially sort on the basis of Msh gene expression. We demonstrate in vitro that initial cell aggregation involves calcium-dependent adhesion molecules (cadherins) and that Msh genes regulate cadherin-mediated adhesion. These results support the hypothesis that Msh genes play a role in the regulation of cell-cell adhesion and provide a link between the genetic phenomena of homeobox gene expression and cellular events involved in morphogenesis, including cell sorting and proliferation.

  11. Potential for thermal tolerance to mediate climate change effects on three members of a cool temperate lizard genus, Niveoscincus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Amanda J; While, Geoffrey M; Beeton, Nicholas J; Wapstra, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Climatic changes are predicted to be greater in higher latitude and mountainous regions but species specific impacts are difficult to predict. This is partly due to inter-specific variance in the physiological traits which mediate environmental temperature effects at the organismal level. We examined variation in the critical thermal minimum (CTmin), critical thermal maximum (CTmax) and evaporative water loss rates (EWL) of a widespread lowland (Niveoscincus ocellatus) and two range restricted highland (N. microlepidotus and N. greeni) members of a cool temperate Tasmanian lizard genus. The widespread lowland species had significantly higher CTmin and CTmax and significantly lower EWL than both highland species. Implications of inter-specific variation in thermal tolerance for activity were examined under contemporary and future climate change scenarios. Instances of air temperatures below CTmin were predicted to decline in frequency for the widespread lowland and both highland species. Air temperatures of high altitude sites were not predicted to exceed the CTmax of either highland species throughout the 21st century. In contrast, the widespread lowland species is predicted to experience air temperatures in excess of CTmax on 1 or 2 days by three of six global circulation models from 2068-2096. To estimate climate change effects on activity we reran the thermal tolerance models using minimum and maximum temperatures selected for activity. A net gain in available activity time was predicted under climate change for all three species; while air temperatures were predicted to exceed maximum temperatures selected for activity with increasing frequency, the change was not as great as the predicted decline in air temperatures below minimum temperatures selected for activity. We hypothesise that the major effect of rising air temperatures under climate change is an increase in available activity period for both the widespread lowland and highland species. The

  12. Gene expression and functional analyses in brassinosteroid-mediated stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divi, Uday K; Rahman, Tawhidur; Krishna, Priti

    2016-01-01

    The plant hormone brassinosteroid (BR) plays essential roles in plant growth and development, while also controlling plant stress responses. This dual ability of BR is intriguing from a mechanistic point of view and as a viable solution for stabilizing crop yields under the changing climatic conditions. Here we report a time course analysis of BR responses under both stress and no-stress conditions, the results of which establish that BR incorporates many stress-related features even under no-stress conditions, which are then accompanied by a dynamic stress response under unfavourable conditions. Found within the BR transcriptome were distinct molecular signatures of two stress hormones, abscisic acid and jasmonic acid, which were correlated with enhanced endogenous levels of the two hormones in BR-treated seedlings. The marked presence of genes related to protein metabolism and modification, defence responses and calcium signalling highlights the significance of their associated mechanisms and roles in BR processes. Functional analysis of loss-of-function mutants of a subset of genes selected from the BR transcriptome identified abiotic stress-related roles for ACID PHOSPHATASE5 (ACP5), WRKY33, JACALIN-RELATED LECTIN1-3 (JAC-LEC1-3) and a BR-RESPONSIVE-RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE (BRRLK). Overall, the results of this study provide a clear link between the molecular changes impacted by BR and its ability to confer broad-range stress tolerance, emphasize the importance of post-translational modification and protein turnover as BR regulatory mechanisms and demonstrate the BR transcriptome as a repertoire of new stress-related regulatory and structural genes.

  13. BCR and Endosomal TLR Signals Synergize to Increase AID Expression and Establish Central B Cell Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuraoka, Masayuki; Snowden, Pilar B; Nojima, Takuya; Verkoczy, Laurent; Haynes, Barton F; Kitamura, Daisuke; Kelsoe, Garnett

    2017-02-14

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required to purge autoreactive immature and transitional-1 (immature/T1) B cells at the first tolerance checkpoint, but how AID selectively removes self-reactive B cells is unclear. We now show that B cell antigen receptor (BCR) and endosomal Toll-like receptor (TLR) signals synergize to elicit high levels of AID expression in immature/T1 B cells. This synergy is restricted to ligands for endocytic TLR and requires phospholipase-D activation, endosomal acidification, and MyD88. The first checkpoint is significantly impaired in AID- or MyD88-deficient mice and in mice doubly heterozygous for AID and MyD88, suggesting interaction of these factors in central B cell tolerance. Moreover, administration of chloroquine, an inhibitor of endosomal acidification, results in a failure to remove autoreactive immature/T1 B cells in mice. We propose that a BCR/TLR pathway coordinately establishes central tolerance by hyper-activating AID in immature/T1 B cells that bind ligands for endosomal TLRs.

  14. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation of mammalian cells by chemical carcinogens. [Rats, hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1977-01-01

    We have developed a cell-mediated mutagenesis assay in which cells with the appropriate markers for mutagenesis are co-cultivated with either lethally irradiated rodent embryonic cells that can metabolize carcinogenic hydrocarbons or with primary rat liver cells that can metabolize chemicals carcinogenic to the liver. During co-cultivation, the reactive metabolites of the procarcinogen appear to be transmitted to the mutable cells and induce mutations in them. Assays of this type make it possible to demonstrate a relationship between carcinogenic potency of the chemicals and their ability to induce mutations in mammalian cells. In addition, by simultaneously comparing the frequencies of transformation and mutation induced in normal diploid hamster cells by benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and one of its metabolites, it is possible to estimate the genetic target size for cell transformation in vitro.

  15. Signal Transduction in T Cell Activation and Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    nMunnol, 7, 175-207 26. Allison, J.P and Raulet, D.H (1990) The immunobiology of gamma delta+ T cells Seinin. InitunoI.f, 2, 59-65. 27. Blumberg, R S ... Janeway , C.A., Jr and Swain, S L. (1987) Coclustering of CD4 (L3T4) molecule with the T-cell receptor is induced by specific direct interaction of...rl ease; distribution is unl imi ted 4. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER( S ) S . MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER( S ) NMRI 93-49 6a. NAME OF

  16. Parathyroid hormone mediates hematopoietic cell expansion through interleukin-6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Q Pirih

    Full Text Available Parathyroid hormone (PTH stimulates hematopoietic cells through mechanisms of action that remain elusive. Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is upregulated by PTH and stimulates hematopoiesis. The purpose of this investigation was to identify actions of PTH and IL-6 in hematopoietic cell expansion. Bone marrow cultures from C57B6 mice were treated with fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand (Flt-3L, PTH, Flt-3L plus PTH, or vehicle control. Flt-3L alone increased adherent and non-adherent cells. PTH did not directly impact hematopoietic or osteoclastic cells but acted in concert with Flt-3L to further increase cell numbers. Flt-3L alone stimulated proliferation, while PTH combined with Flt-3L decreased apoptosis. Flt-3L increased blasts early in culture, and later increased CD45(+ and CD11b(+ cells. In parallel experiments, IL-6 acted additively with Flt-3L to increase cell numbers and IL-6-deficient bone marrow cultures (compared to wildtype controls but failed to amplify in response to Flt-3L and PTH, suggesting that IL-6 mediated the PTH effect. In vivo, PTH increased Lin(- Sca-1(+c-Kit(+ (LSK hematopoietic progenitor cells after PTH treatment in wildtype mice, but failed to increase LSKs in IL-6-deficient mice. In conclusion, PTH acts with Flt-3L to maintain hematopoietic cells by limiting apoptosis. IL-6 is a critical mediator of bone marrow cell expansion and is responsible for PTH actions in hematopoietic cell expansion.

  17. Oxidative stress tolerance of early stage diabetic endothelial progenitor cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Sukmawati

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Primitive BM-EPCs showed vasculogenic dysfunction in early diabetes. However the oxidative stress is not denoted as the major initiating factor of its cause. Our results suggest that primitive BM-KSL cell has the ability to compensate oxidative stress levels in early diabetes by increasing the expression of anti-oxidative enzymes.

  18. Role of Unusual P Loop Ejection and Autophosphorylation in HipA-Mediated Persistence and Multidrug Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Schumacher

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available HipA is a bacterial serine/threonine protein kinase that phosphorylates targets, bringing about persistence and multidrug tolerance. Autophosphorylation of residue Ser150 is a critical regulatory mechanism of HipA function. Intriguingly, Ser150 is not located on the activation loop, as are other kinases; instead, it is in the protein core, where it forms part of the ATP-binding “P loop motif.” How this buried residue is phosphorylated and regulates kinase activity is unclear. Here, we report multiple structures that reveal the P loop motif's exhibition of a remarkable “in-out” conformational equilibrium, which allows access to Ser150 and its intermolecular autophosphorylation. Phosphorylated Ser150 stabilizes the “out state,” which inactivates the kinase by disrupting the ATP-binding pocket. Thus, our data reveal a mechanism of protein kinase regulation that is vital for multidrug tolerance and persistence, as kinase inactivation provides the critical first step in allowing dormant cells to revert to the growth phenotype and to reinfect the host.

  19. Diversity of cell-mediated adhesions in breast cancer spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivascu, Andrea; Kubbies, Manfred

    2007-12-01

    Due to their three dimensional (3D) architecture, multicellular tumor spheroids mimic avascular tumor areas comprising the establishment of diffusion gradients, reduced proliferation rates and increased drug resistance. We have shown recently that the spontaneous formation of spheroids is restricted to a limited number of cell lines whereas the majority grow only as aggregates of cells with loose cell-cell contacts when cultured in 3D. However, by the addition of reconstituted basement membrane (rBM, Matrigel), aggregates can be transformed into spheroids with diffusion barriers and development of quiescent therapy-resistant cells. In this report, we investigated adhesion molecules responsible for rBM-driven versus spontaneous spheroid formation in a diverse population of eight breast tumor cell lines relevant for in vitro and in vivo antitumor drug testing. Inhibition of spheroid formation was monitored in the presence of adhesion molecule functional blocking antibodies and after siRNA-mediated down-regulation of E- and N-cadherin and integrin beta1 adhesion receptors. We identified that E-cadherin mediates the spontaneous formation of spheroids in MCF7, BT-474, T-47D and MDA-MB-361 cells, whereas N-cadherin is responsible for tight packing of MDA-MB-435S cells. In contrast, the matrix protein-induced transformation of 3D aggregates into spheroids in MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3 cells is mediated primarily by the collagen I/integrin beta1 interaction with no cadherin involvement. A combination of both, homophilic E-cadherin and integrin beta1/collagen I interaction establishes spheroids in MDA-MB-468 cells. These findings indicate that an evolutionary diverse and complex pattern of interacting cell surface proteins exists in breast cancer cells that determines the 3D growth characteristic in vitro, thereby influencing small molecule or antibody permeation in preclinical in vitro and in vivo tumor models.

  20. Cell mediated immunity to fungi: a reassessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Luigina

    2008-09-01

    Protective immunity against fungal pathogens is achieved by the integration of two distinct arms of the immune system, the innate and adaptive responses. Innate and adaptive immune responses are intimately linked and controlled by sets of molecules and receptors that act to generate the most effective form of immunity for protection against fungal pathogens. The decision of how to respond will still be primarily determined by interactions between pathogens and cells of the innate immune system, but the actions of T cells will feed back into this dynamic equilibrium to regulate the balance between tolerogenic and inflammatory responses. In the last two decades, the immunopathogenesis of fungal infections and fungal diseases was explained primarily in terms of Th1/Th2 balance. Although Th1 responses driven by the IL-12/IFN-gamma axis are central to protection against fungi, other cytokines and T cell-dependent pathways have come of age. The newly described Th17 developmental pathway may play an inflammatory role previously attributed to uncontrolled Th1 responses and serves to accommodate the seemingly paradoxical association of chronic inflammatory responses with fungal persistence in the face of an ongoing inflammation. Regulatory T cells in their capacity to inhibit aspects of innate and adaptive antifungal immunity have become an integral component of immune resistance to fungi, and provide the host with immune defense mechanisms adequate for protection, without necessarily eliminating fungal pathogens which would impair immune memory--or causing an unacceptable level of tissue damage. The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and tryptophan metabolites contribute to immune homeostasis by inducing Tregs and taming overzealous or heightened inflammatory responses.

  1. Comparison of stem-cell-mediated osteogenesis and dentinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batouli, S; Miura, M; Brahim, J; Tsutsui, T W; Fisher, L W; Gronthos, S; Robey, P Gehron; Shi, S

    2003-12-01

    The difference between stem-cell-mediated bone and dentin regeneration is not yet well-understood. Here we use an in vivo stem cell transplantation system to investigate differential regulation mechanisms of bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Elevated expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9, gelatinase B) was found to be associated with the formation of hematopoietic marrow in BMSSC transplants, but not in the connective tissue of DPSC transplants. The expression of dentin sialoprotein (DSP) specifically marked dentin synthesis in DPSC transplants. Moreover, DPSCs were found to be able to generate reparative dentin-like tissue on the surface of human dentin in vivo. This study provided direct evidence to suggest that osteogenesis and dentinogenesis mediated by BMSSCs and DPSCs, respectively, may be regulated by distinct mechanisms, leading to the different organization of the mineralized and non-mineralized tissues.

  2. Regulatory B cells and tolerance in transplantation: from animal models to human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie eChesneau

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the role of B cells in transplantation was thought to be restricted to producing antibodies that have been clearly shown to be deleterious in the long term, but, in fact, B cells are also able to produce cytokine and to present antigen. Their role as regulatory cells in various pathological situations has also been highlighted, and their role in transplantation is beginning to emerge in animal, and also in human, models. This review summarizes the different studies in animals and humans that suggest a B-cell regulatory role in the transplant tolerance mechanisms.

  3. Network topologies and dynamics leading to endotoxin tolerance and priming in innate immune cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Fu

    Full Text Available The innate immune system, acting as the first line of host defense, senses and adapts to foreign challenges through complex intracellular and intercellular signaling networks. Endotoxin tolerance and priming elicited by macrophages are classic examples of the complex adaptation of innate immune cells. Upon repetitive exposures to different doses of bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide or other stimulants, macrophages show either suppressed or augmented inflammatory responses compared to a single exposure to the stimulant. Endotoxin tolerance and priming are critically involved in both immune homeostasis and the pathogenesis of diverse inflammatory diseases. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. By means of a computational search through the parameter space of a coarse-grained three-node network with a two-stage Metropolis sampling approach, we enumerated all the network topologies that can generate priming or tolerance. We discovered three major mechanisms for priming (pathway synergy, suppressor deactivation, activator induction and one for tolerance (inhibitor persistence. These results not only explain existing experimental observations, but also reveal intriguing test scenarios for future experimental studies to clarify mechanisms of endotoxin priming and tolerance.

  4. Network Topologies and Dynamics Leading to Endotoxin Tolerance and Priming in Innate Immune Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yan; Glaros, Trevor; Zhu, Meng; Wang, Ping; Wu, Zhanghan; Tyson, John; Li, Liwu; Xing, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system, acting as the first line of host defense, senses and adapts to foreign challenges through complex intracellular and intercellular signaling networks. Endotoxin tolerance and priming elicited by macrophages are classic examples of the complex adaptation of innate immune cells. Upon repetitive exposures to different doses of bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) or other stimulants, macrophages show either suppressed or augmented inflammatory responses compared to a single exposure to the stimulant. Endotoxin tolerance and priming are critically involved in both immune homeostasis and the pathogenesis of diverse inflammatory diseases. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. By means of a computational search through the parameter space of a coarse-grained three-node network with a two-stage Metropolis sampling approach, we enumerated all the network topologies that can generate priming or tolerance. We discovered three major mechanisms for priming (pathway synergy, suppressor deactivation, activator induction) and one for tolerance (inhibitor persistence). These results not only explain existing experimental observations, but also reveal intriguing test scenarios for future experimental studies to clarify mechanisms of endotoxin priming and tolerance.

  5. Expanding dendritic cells in vivo enhances the induction of oral tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viney, J L; Mowat, A M; O'Malley, J M; Williamson, E; Fanger, N A

    1998-06-15

    The intestine is under perpetual challenge from both pathogens and essential nutrients, yet the mucosal immune system is able to discriminate effectively between harmful and innocuous Ags. It is likely that this selective immunoregulation is dependent on the nature of the APC at sites where gut Ags are processed and presented. Dendritic cells (DC) are considered the most potent of APC and are renowned for their immunostimulatory role in the initiation of immune responses. To investigate the role of DC in regulating the homeostatic balance between mucosal immunity and tolerance, we treated mice with Flt3 ligand (Flt3L), a growth factor that expands DC in vivo, and assessed subsequent systemic immune responsiveness using mouse models of oral tolerance. Surprisingly, mice treated with Flt3L to expand DC exhibited more profound systemic tolerance after they were fed soluble Ag. Most notably, tolerance could be induced in Flt3L-treated mice using very low doses of Ag that were ineffective in control animals. These findings contrast with the generally accepted view of DC as immunostimulatory APC and furthermore suggest a pivotal role for DC during the induction of tolerance following mucosal administration of Ag.

  6. IL-6 contributes to an immune tolerance checkpoint in post germinal center B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yi; Wang, Ying-Hua; Diamond, Betty

    2012-02-01

    The generation of a B cell repertoire involves producing and subsequently purging autoreactive B cells. Receptor editing, clonal deletion and anergy are key mechanisms of central B cell tolerance. Somatic mutation of antigen-activated B cells within the germinal center produces a second wave of autoreactivity; but the regulatory mechanisms that operate at this phase of B cell activation are poorly understood. We recently identified a post germinal center tolerance checkpoint, where receptor editing is re-induced to extinguish autoreactivity that is generated by somatic hypermutation. Re-induction of the recombinase genes RAG1 and RAG2 in antigen-activated B cells requires antigen to engage the B cell receptor and IL-7 to signal through the IL-7 receptor. We demonstrate that this process requires IL-6 to upregulate IL-7 receptor expression on post germinal center B cells. Diminishing IL-6 by blocking antibody or haplo-insufficiency leads to reduced expression of the IL-7 receptor and RAG and increased titers of anti-DNA antibodies following immunization with a peptide mimetope of DNA. The dependence on IL-6 to initiate receptor editing is B cell intrinsic. Interestingly, estradiol decreases IL-6 expression thereby increasing the anti-DNA response. Our data reveal a novel regulatory cascade to control post germinal center B cell autoreactivity.

  7. Dendritic cell function in vivo during the steady state: a role in peripheral tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Ralph M; Hawiger, Daniel; Liu, Kang; Bonifaz, Laura; Bonnyay, David; Mahnke, Karsten; Iyoda, Tomonori; Ravetch, Jeffrey; Dhodapkar, Madhav; Inaba, Kayo; Nussenzweig, Michel

    2003-04-01

    The avoidance of autoimmunity requires mechanisms to actively silence or tolerize self reactive T cells in the periphery. During infection, dendritic cells are not only capturing microbial antigens, but also are processing self antigens from dying cells as well as innocuous environmental proteins. Since the dendritic cells are maturing in response to microbial and other stimuli, peptides will be presented from both noxious and innocuous antigens. Therefore it would be valuable to have mechanisms whereby dendritic cells, prior to infection, establish tolerance to those self and environmental antigens that can be processed upon pathogen encounter. In the steady state, prior to acute infection and inflammation, dendritic cells are in an immature state and not fully differentiated to carry out their known roles as inducers of immunity. These immature cells are not inactive, however. They continuously circulate through tissues and into lymphoid organs, capturing self antigens as well as innocuous environmental proteins. Recent experiments have provided direct evidence that antigen-loaded immature dendritic in vivo silence T cells either by deleting them or by expanding regulatory T cells. In this way, it is proposed that the immune system overcomes at least some of the risk of developing autoimmunity and chronic inflammation. It is proposed that dendritic cells play a major role in defining immunologic self, not only centrally in the thymus but also in the periphery.

  8. Neural stem cell-derived exosomes mediate viral entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sims B

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Brian Sims,1,2,* Linlin Gu,3,* Alexandre Krendelchtchikov,3 Qiana L Matthews3,4 1Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, 2Department of Cell, Developmental, and Integrative Biology, 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, 4Center for AIDS Research, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Viruses enter host cells through interactions of viral ligands with cellular receptors. Viruses can also enter cells in a receptor-independent fashion. Mechanisms regarding the receptor-independent viral entry into cells have not been fully elucidated. Exosomal trafficking between cells may offer a mechanism by which viruses can enter cells.Methods: To investigate the role of exosomes on cellular viral entry, we employed neural stem cell-derived exosomes and adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 for the proof-of-principle study. Results: Exosomes significantly enhanced Ad5 entry in Coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR-deficient cells, in which Ad5 only had very limited entry. The exosomes were shown to contain T-cell immunoglobulin mucin protein 4 (TIM-4, which binds phosphatidylserine. Treatment with anti-TIM-4 antibody significantly blocked the exosome-mediated Ad5 entry.Conclusion: Neural stem cell-derived exosomes mediated significant cellular entry of Ad5 in a receptor-independent fashion. This mediation may be hampered by an antibody specifically targeting TIM-4 on exosomes. This set of results will benefit further elucidation of virus/exosome pathways, which would contribute to reducing natural viral infection by developing therapeutic agents or vaccines. Keywords: neural stem cell-derived exosomes, adenovirus type 5, TIM-4, viral entry, phospholipids

  9. Mast cell-derived histamine mediates cystitis pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles N Rudick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mast cells trigger inflammation that is associated with local pain, but the mechanisms mediating pain are unclear. Interstitial cystitis (IC is a bladder disease that causes debilitating pelvic pain of unknown origin and without consistent inflammation, but IC symptoms correlate with elevated bladder lamina propria mast cell counts. We hypothesized that mast cells mediate pelvic pain directly and examined pain behavior using a murine model that recapitulates key aspects of IC. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Infection of mice with pseudorabies virus (PRV induces a neurogenic cystitis associated with lamina propria mast cell accumulation dependent upon tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF, TNF-mediated bladder barrier dysfunction, and pelvic pain behavior, but the molecular basis for pelvic pain is unknown. In this study, both PRV-induced pelvic pain and bladder pathophysiology were abrogated in mast cell-deficient mice but were restored by reconstitution with wild type bone marrow. Pelvic pain developed normally in TNF- and TNF receptor-deficient mice, while bladder pathophysiology was abrogated. Conversely, genetic or pharmacologic disruption of histamine receptor H1R or H2R attenuated pelvic pain without altering pathophysiology. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that mast cells promote cystitis pain and bladder pathophysiology through the separable actions of histamine and TNF, respectively. Therefore, pain is independent of pathology and inflammation, and histamine receptors represent direct therapeutic targets for pain in IC and other chronic pain conditions.

  10. Ptch2 mediates the Shh response in Ptch1-/- cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, Astrid C; Roberts, Brock; Kwong, Lina; Bijlsma, Maarten F; Roelink, Henk

    2014-09-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling response is regulated by the interaction of three key components that include the sonic hedgehog (Shh) ligand, its receptor patched 1 (Ptch1) and the pathway activator smoothened (Smo). Under the prevailing model of Shh pathway activation, the binding of Shh to Ptch1 (the key Shh receptor) results in the release of Ptch1-mediated inhibition of Smo, leading to Smo activation and subsequent cell-autonomous activation of the Shh response. Consistent with this model, Ptch1(-/-) cells show a strong upregulation of the Shh response. Our finding that this response can be inhibited by the Shh-blocking antibody 5E1 indicates that the Shh response in Ptch1(-/-) cells remains ligand dependent. Furthermore, we find that Shh induces a strong response in Ptch1(-/-);Shh(-/-) cells, and that Ptch1(-/-) fibroblasts retain their ability to migrate towards Shh, demonstrating that Ptch1(-/-) cells remain sensitive to Shh. Expression of a dominant-negative Ptch1 mutant in the developing chick neural tube had no effect on Shh-mediated patterning, but expression of a dominant-negative form of patched 2 (Ptch2) caused an activation of the Shh response. This indicates that, at early developmental stages, Ptch2 functions to suppress Shh signaling. We found that Ptch1(-/-);Ptch2(-/-) cells cannot further activate the Shh response, demonstrating that Ptch2 mediates the response to Shh in the absence of Ptch1.

  11. Cyclic AMP represents a crucial component of Treg cell-mediated immune regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Bopp

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available T regulatory (Treg cells are one of the key players in the immune tolerance network (ITN and a plethora of manuscripts has described their development and function in the course of the last two decades. Nevertheless, it is still a matter of debate which mechanisms and agents are employed by Treg cells, providing the basis of their suppressive potency. One of the important candidates is cyclic AMP (cAMP which is long known as a potent suppressor at least of T cell activation and function. While this suppressive function by itself is widely accepted the source and the mechanism of action of cAMP are less clear and a multitude of seemingly contradictory data allow for in principle two different scenarios of cAMP-mediated suppression. In one scenario Treg cells contain high amounts of cAMP and convey this small molecule via gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC directly to the effector T cells (Teff leading to their suppression. Alternatively, it was shown that Treg cells represent the origin of considerable amounts of adenosine which trigger the adenylate cyclases (AC in Teff via A2A and A2B receptors thus strongly increasing intracellular cAMP. This review will present and discuss initial findings and recent developments concerning the function of cAMP for Treg cells and its impact on immune regulation.

  12. Beta-cell ARNT is required for normal glucose tolerance in murine pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Mei Lau

    Full Text Available AIMS: Insulin secretion increases in normal pregnancy to meet increasing demands. Inability to increase beta-cell function results in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. We have previously shown that the expression of the transcription factor ARNT (Aryl-hydrocarbon Receptor Nuclear Translocator is reduced in the islets of humans with type 2 diabetes. Mice with a beta-cell specific deletion of ARNT (β-ARNT mice have impaired glucose tolerance secondary to defective insulin secretion. We hypothesised that ARNT is required to increase beta-cell function during pregnancy, and that β-ARNT mice would be unable to compensate for the beta-cell stress of pregnancy. The aims of this study were to investigate the mechanisms of ARNT regulation of beta-cell function and glucose tolerance in pregnancy. METHODS: β-ARNT females were mated with floxed control (FC males and FC females with β-ARNT males. RESULTS: During pregnancy, β-ARNT mice had a marked deterioration in glucose tolerance secondary to defective insulin secretion. There was impaired beta-cell proliferation in late pregnancy, associated with decreased protein and mRNA levels of the islet cell-cycle regulator cyclinD2. There was also reduced expression of Irs2 and G6PI. In contrast, in control mice, pregnancy was associated with a 2.1-fold increase in ARNT protein and a 1.6-fold increase in cyclinD2 protein, and with increased beta-cell proliferation. CONCLUSIONS: Islet ARNT increases in normal murine pregnancy and beta-cell ARNT is required for cyclinD2 induction and increased beta-cell proliferation in pregnancy.

  13. Dendritic Cells and Multiple Sclerosis: Disease, Tolerance and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad G. Mohammad

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a devastating neurological disease that predominantly affects young adults resulting in severe personal and economic impact. The majority of therapies for this disease were developed in, or are beneficial in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the animal model of MS. While known to target adaptive anti-CNS immune responses, they also target, the innate immune arm. This mini-review focuses on the role of dendritic cells (DCs, the professional antigen presenting cells of the innate immune system. The evidence for a role for DCs in the appropriate regulation of anti-CNS autoimmune responses and their role in MS disease susceptibility and possible therapeutic utility are discussed. Additionally, the current controversy regarding the evidence for the presence of functional DCs in the normal CNS is reviewed. Furthermore, the role of CNS DCs and potential routes of their intercourse between the CNS and cervical lymph nodes are considered. Finally, the future role that this nexus between the CNS and the cervical lymph nodes might play in site directed molecular and cellular therapy for MS is outlined.

  14. Cell-Cell Interactions Mediate the Response of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells to Substrate Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Olga V.; Lee, Kristen L.; Isenberg, Brett C.; Rich, Celeste B.; Nugent, Matthew A.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2011-01-01

    The vessel wall experiences progressive stiffening with age and the development of cardiovascular disease, which alters the micromechanical environment experienced by resident vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In vitro studies have shown that VSMCs are sensitive to substrate stiffness, but the exact molecular mechanisms of their response to stiffness remains unknown. Studies have also shown that cell-cell interactions can affect mechanotransduction at the cell-substrate interface. Using flexible substrates, we show that the expression of proteins associated with cell-matrix adhesion and cytoskeletal tension is regulated by substrate stiffness, and that an increase in cell density selectively attenuates some of these effects. We also show that cell-cell interactions exert a strong effect on cell morphology in a substrate-stiffness dependent manner. Collectively, the data suggest that as VSMCs form cell-cell contacts, substrate stiffness becomes a less potent regulator of focal adhesion signaling. This study provides insight into the mechanisms by which VSMCs respond to the mechanical environment of the blood vessel wall, and point to cell-cell interactions as critical mediators of VSMC response to vascular injury. PMID:21806930

  15. Cytolysis of oligodendrocytes is mediated by killer (K) cells but not by natural killer (NK) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, J; Kim, S U; Kastrukoff, L F

    1991-03-01

    The cytotoxic activity of killer (K) cells against enriched cultures of bovine oligodendrocytes (BOL) was investigated in multiple sclerosis (MS) and controls. Human K cells mediated cytotoxicity to primary cultures of BOL in the presence of anti-BOL antiserum in all study groups, while BOL were resistant to human natural killer (NK) cells. Cytotoxic activity was significantly reduced in MS when compared to age-matched normal controls but not when compared to other neurologic disease (OND) patients. K cell-mediated lysis of BOL could also be induced with anti-galactocerebroside antibody but not with other antibodies including those specific for OL antigens (myelin basic protein, proteolipid apoprotein, and 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase). Enrichment of the effector population indicated that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) to BOL was mediated by large granular lymphocytes, and the effector population was further characterized by flow cytometry. The effector cells mediating ADCC could be inhibited by protein A of Staphylococcus aureus, and by K562 cells in cold competition assay. These observations indicate that oligodendrocytes are resistant to NK cells but are susceptible to cytolysis mediated by K cells. This may represent a potentially important immune mechanism in the pathogenesis of MS.

  16. MAR characteristic motifs mediate episomal vector in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Li, Zhaoxi; Wang, Tianyun; Wang, Xiaoyin; Wang, Li; Dong, Weihua; Jing, Changqin; Yang, Xianjun

    2015-04-01

    An ideal gene therapy vector should enable persistent transgene expression without limitations in safety and reproducibility. Recent researches' insight into the ability of chromosomal matrix attachment regions (MARs) to mediate episomal maintenance of genetic elements allowed the development of a circular episomal vector. Although a MAR-mediated engineered vector has been developed, little is known on which motifs of MAR confer this function during interaction with the host genome. Here, we report an artificially synthesized DNA fragment containing only characteristic motif sequences that served as an alternative to human beta-interferon matrix attachment region sequence. The potential of the vector to mediate gene transfer in CHO cells was investigated. The short synthetic MAR motifs were found to mediate episomal vector at a low copy number for many generations without integration into the host genome. Higher transgene expression was maintained for at least 4 months. In addition, MAR was maintained episomally and conferred sustained EGFP expression even in nonselective CHO cells. All the results demonstrated that MAR characteristic sequence-based vector can function as stable episomes in CHO cells, supporting long-term and effective transgene expression.

  17. Ly6Clow Monocytes Differentiate into Dendritic Cells and Cross-Tolerize T Cells through PDL-11

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, YuFeng; Latchman, Yvette; Elkon, Keith B.

    2009-01-01

    Monocyte-derived dendritic cells are active participants during the immune response against infection, but whether they play a role in maintaining self-tolerance under steady-state conditions is not known. Here we investigated the differentiation of monocytes, their ability to ingest apoptotic cells, and their potential functionality in vivo. We observed that Ly6C (Gr-1)low mature monocytes up-regulate their MHC II level in the spleen, express high levels of PDL-1 (programmed death ligand 1),...

  18. Red blood cells as innovative antigen carrier to induce specific immune tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremel, Magali; Guérin, Nathalie; Horand, Françoise; Banz, Alice; Godfrin, Yann

    2013-02-25

    The route of administration, the dose of antigen as well as the type of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) targeted are important factors to induce immune tolerance. Despite encouraging results obtained in animal models, intravenous injection of soluble antigen is unsuccessful in human clinical trials on autoimmune disease due to inefficient antigen delivery. To improve antigen delivery, we used mouse red blood cells (RBCs) as antigen vehicles to specifically target APCs which are responsible for removal of senescent RBCs after phagocytosis. In this study, we demonstrated that antigen-delivery by RBCs induced a strong decrease in the humoral response compared with the ovalbumin (OVA) free form in mice. In addition, OVA-loaded RBC treated with [bis(sulphosuccinimidyl)] suberate (BS3), a chemical compound known to enhance RBC phagocytosis, induced an inhibition of antigen-specific T cell responses and an increase in the percentage of regulatory T cells. The state of tolerance induced is long lasting, antigen-specific and sufficiently robust to withstand immunization with antigen mixed with cholera toxin adjuvant. This RBC strategy, which does not abolish the immune system, constitutes an attractive approach for induction of tolerance compared to systemic immunosuppressant therapies already in use.

  19. Acid tolerance of Streptococcus macedonicus as assessed by flow cytometry and single-cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Pratsinis, Harris; Nebe-von-Caron, Gerhard; Kletsas, Dimitris; Tsakalidou, Effie

    2007-01-01

    An in situ flow cytometric viability assay employing carboxyfluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide was used to identify Streptococcus macedonicus acid tolerance phenotypes. The logarithmic-phase acid tolerance response (L-ATR) was evident when cells were (i) left to autoacidify unbuffered medium, (ii) transiently exposed to nonlethal acidic pH, or (iii) systematically grown under suboptimal acidic conditions (acid habituation). Stationary-phase ATR was also detected; this phenotype was gradually degenerated while cells resided at this phase. Single-cell analysis of S. macedonicus during induction of L-ATR revealed heterogeneity in both the ability and the rate of tolerance acquisition within clonal populations. L-ATR was found to be partially dependent on de novo protein synthesis and compositional changes of the cell envelope. Interestingly, acid-habituated cells were interlaced in lengthier chains and exhibited an irregular pattern of active peptidoglycan biosynthesis sites when probed with BODIPY FL vancomycin. L-ATR caused cells to retain their membrane potential after lethal challenge, as judged by ratiometric analysis with oxonol [DiBAC(4)(3)]. Furthermore, F-ATPase was important during the induction of L-ATR, but in the case of a fully launched response, inhibition of F-ATPase affected acid resistance only partially. Activities of both F-ATPase and the glucose-specific phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system were increased after L-ATR induction, distinguishing S. macedonicus from oral streptococci. Finally, the in situ viability assessment was compared to medium-based recovery after single-cell sorting, revealing that the culturability of subpopulations with identical fluorescence characteristics is dependent on the treatments imposed to the cells prior to acid challenge.

  20. Phenotypic characterization of autoreactive B cells--checkpoints of B cell tolerance in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett M Jacobi

    Full Text Available DNA-reactive B cells play a central role in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; DNA antibodies precede clinical disease and in established disease correlate with renal inflammation and contribute to dendritic cell activation and high levels of type 1 interferon. A number of central and peripheral B cell tolerance mechanisms designed to control the survival, differentiation and activation of autoreactive B cells are thought to be disturbed in patients with SLE. The characterization of DNA-reactive B cells has, however, been limited by their low frequency in peripheral blood. Using a tetrameric configuration of a peptide mimetope of DNA bound by pathogenic anti-DNA antibodies, we can identify B cells producing potentially pathogenic DNA-reactive antibodies. We, therefore, characterized the maturation and differentiation states of peptide, (ds double stranded DNA cross-reactive B cells in the peripheral blood of lupus patients and correlated these with clinical disease activity. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated a significantly higher frequency of tetramer-binding B cells in SLE patients compared to healthy controls. We demonstrated the existence of a novel tolerance checkpoint at the transition of antigen-naïve to antigen-experienced. We further demonstrate that patients with moderately active disease have more autoreactive B cells in both the antigen-naïve and antigen-experienced compartments consistent with greater impairment in B cell tolerance in both early and late checkpoints in these patients than in patients with quiescent disease. This methodology enables us to gain insight into the development and fate of DNA-reactive B cells in individual patients with SLE and paves the way ultimately to permit better and more customized therapies.

  1. HIGH EFFICIENCY RETROVIRUS-MEDIATED GENE TRANSFER TO LEUKEMIA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jian-xin; CHEN Zi-xing; CEN Jian-nong; WANG Wei; RUAN Chang-geng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To establish an efficient and safe gene transfer system mediated by retrovirus for gene marking and gene therapy of human leukemia. Method: The retroviral vector LXSN, containing the neomycin resistance (NeoR) gene, was transferred into amphotropic packaging cells GP+envAm12 by liposome transfection or by ecotropic retrovirus transduction. Amphotropic retrovirus in supernatants with higher titer was used to infect human leukemic cell lines NB4, U937, and THP-1.The efficiency of gene transfer was assayed on colonies formed by transduced K562 cells. Results: The titer of DOSPER directly transfected GP+envAm12 cells determined on NIH3T3 cells was 8.0×105 CFU/ml, while that of producer infected with retrovirus was 1.6×107CFU/ml. Integration of NeoR gene into all leukemia cells was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Absence of replication-competent virus was proved by both nested PCR for env gene and marker gene rescue assay. Gene transfer with the efficiency as high as 93.3 to 100% in K562 cells was verified by seminested PCR for integrated NeoR gene on colonies after 7 days' culture.Conclusion: The efficiency and safety of retrovirus mediated gene transfer system might provide an optimal system in gene therapy for leukemia or genetic diseases.

  2. Stress-mediated p38 activation promotes somatic cell reprogramming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinxiu Xu; Quan Wang; Yuan Long; Ru Zhang; Xiaoyuan Wei; Mingzhe Xing; Haifeng Gu

    2013-01-01

    Environmental stress-mediated adaptation plays essential roles in the evolution of life.Cellular adaptation mechanisms usually involve the regulation of chromatin structure,transcription,mRNA stability and translation,which eventually lead to efficient changes in gene expression.Global epigenetic change is also involved in the reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells by defined factors.Here we report that environmental stress such as hyperosmosis not only facilitates four factor-mediated reprogramming,but also enhances two or one factor-induced iPS cell generation.Hyperosmosis-induced p38 activation plays a critical role in this process.Constitutive active p38 mimics the positive effect of hyperosmosis,while dominant negative p38 and p38 inhibitor block the effect of hyperosmosis.Further study indicates stress-mediated p38 activation may promote reprogramming by reducing the global DNA methylation level and enhancing the expression of pluripotency genes.Our results demonstrate how simple environmental stress like hyperosmosis helps to alter the fate of cells via intracellular signaling and epigenetic modulation.

  3. Nitroglycerin induces DNA damage and vascular cell death in the setting of nitrate tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhed, Yuliya; Fahrer, Jörg; Oelze, Matthias; Kröller-Schön, Swenja; Steven, Sebastian; Welschof, Philipp; Zinßius, Elena; Stamm, Paul; Kashani, Fatemeh; Roohani, Siyer; Kress, Joana Melanie; Ullmann, Elisabeth; Tran, Lan P; Schulz, Eberhard; Epe, Bernd; Kaina, Bernd; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Nitroglycerin (GTN) and other organic nitrates are widely used vasodilators. Their side effects are development of nitrate tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. Given the potential of GTN to induce nitro-oxidative stress, we investigated the interaction between nitro-oxidative DNA damage and vascular dysfunction in experimental nitrate tolerance. Cultured endothelial hybridoma cells (EA.hy 926) and Wistar rats were treated with GTN (ex vivo: 10-1000 µM; in vivo: 10, 20 and 50 mg/kg/day for 3 days, s.c.). The level of DNA strand breaks, 8-oxoguanine and O (6)-methylguanine DNA adducts was determined by Comet assay, dot blot and immunohistochemistry. Vascular function was determined by isometric tension recording. DNA adducts and strand breaks were induced by GTN in cells in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. GTN in vivo administration leads to endothelial dysfunction, nitrate tolerance, aortic and cardiac oxidative stress, formation of DNA adducts, stabilization of p53 and apoptotic death of vascular cells in a dose-dependent fashion. Mice lacking O (6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase displayed more vascular O (6)-methylguanine adducts and oxidative stress under GTN therapy than wild-type mice. Although we were not able to prove a causal role of DNA damage in the etiology of nitrate tolerance, the finding of GTN-induced DNA damage such as the mutagenic and toxic adduct O (6)-methylguanine, and cell death supports the notion that GTN based therapy may provoke adverse side effects, including endothelial function. Further studies are warranted to clarify whether GTN pro-apoptotic effects are related to an impaired recovery of patients upon myocardial infarction.

  4. High Antioxidant Activity Facilitates Maintenance of Cell Division in Leaves of Drought Tolerant Maize Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramova, Viktoriya; AbdElgawad, Hamada; Vasileva, Ivanina; Petrova, Alexandra S.; Holek, Anna; Mariën, Joachim; Asard, Han; Beemster, Gerrit T. S.

    2017-01-01

    We studied the impact of drought on growth regulation in leaves of 13 maize varieties with different drought sensitivity and geographic origins (Western Europe, Egypt, South Africa) and the inbred line B73. Combining kinematic analysis of the maize leaf growth zone with biochemical measurements at a high spatial resolution allowed us to examine the correlation between the regulation of the cellular processes cell division and elongation, and the molecular redox-regulation in response to drought. Moreover, we demonstrated differences in the response of the maize lines to mild and severe levels of water deficit. Kinematic analysis indicated that drought tolerant lines experienced less impact on leaf elongation rate due to a smaller reduction of cell production, which, in turn, was due to a smaller decrease of meristem size and number of cells in the leaf meristem. Clear differences in growth responses between the groups of lines with different geographic origin were observed in response to drought. The difference in drought tolerance between the Egyptian hybrids was significantly larger than between the European and South-African hybrids. Through biochemical analyses, we investigated whether antioxidant activity in the growth zone, contributes to the drought sensitivity differences. We used a hierarchical clustering to visualize the patterns of lipid peroxidation, H2O2 and antioxidant concentrations, and enzyme activities throughout the growth zone, in response to stress. The results showed that the lines with different geographic region used different molecular strategies to cope with the stress, with the Egyptian hybrids responding more at the metabolite level and African and the European hybrids at the enzyme level. However, drought tolerance correlated with both, higher antioxidant levels throughout the growth zone and higher activities of the redox-regulating enzymes CAT, POX, APX, and GR specifically in leaf meristems. These findings provide evidence for a link

  5. Single-cell force spectroscopy of pili-mediated adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Beaussart, Audrey; Tripathi, Prachi; Derclaye, Sylvie; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Li, James K.; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Although bacterial pili are known to mediate cell adhesion to a variety of substrates, the molecular interactions behind this process are poorly understood. We report the direct measurement of the forces guiding pili-mediated adhesion, focusing on the medically important probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). Using non-invasive single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), we quantify the adhesion forces between individual bacteria and biotic (mucin, intestinal cells) or abiotic (hydrophobic monolayers) surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, bacterial pili strengthen adhesion through remarkable nanospring properties, which - presumably - enable the bacteria to resist high shear forces under physiological conditions. On mucin, nanosprings are more frequent and adhesion forces larger, reflecting the influence of specific pili-mucin bonds. Interestingly, these mechanical responses are no longer observed on human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Rather, force curves exhibit constant force plateaus with extended ruptures reflecting the extraction of membrane nanotethers. These single-cell analyses provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which piliated bacteria colonize surfaces (nanosprings, nanotethers), and offer exciting avenues in nanomedicine for understanding and controlling the adhesion of microbial cells (probiotics, pathogens).

  6. The role of cell-mediated immunity in typhoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabel, T J; Paniker, C K

    1979-06-01

    The cell-mediated immunity in typhoid was assessed by the leukocyte migration inhibition test and delayed hypersensitivity skin test in 60 clinical typhoid patients. The property of leukocyte migration inhibition appeared first and was positive in 28 of 60 (46.7%) patients on admission and 45 of 60 (75%) at the time of discharge. This difference was definitely more in blood culture positive patients. The delayed hypersensitivity appeared later and was positive in 18 of 60 (30%) on admission and 31 of 60 (51.7%) at the time of discharge. Patients with positive cellular-immune response against typhoid antigen did not develop relapse. On the whole cell-mediated immunity seems to play an important role in typoid. The control groups--the medical and surgical patients, doctors, clinical students and preclinical students--showed positive cellular immune response of 43.3 81.3, 40.7 and 25% respectively. The significance of these results is discussed.

  7. Roles of Cortactin, an Actin Polymerization Mediator, in Cell Endocytosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li CHEN; Zhi-Wei WANG; Jian-wei ZHU; Xi ZHAN

    2006-01-01

    Cortactin, an actin-binding protein and a substrate of Src, is encoded by the EMS 1 oncogene.Cortactin is known to activate Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization and interact with dynamin, a large GTPase and proline rich domain-containing protein. Transferrin endocytosis was significantly reduced in cells by knock-down of cortactin expression as well as in vivo introduction of cortactin immunoreagents.Cortactin-dynamin interaction displayed morphologically dynamic co-distribution with a change in the endocytosis level in cells treated with an actin depolymerization reagent, cytochalasin D. In an in vitro beads assay, a branched actin network was recruited onto dynamin-coated beads in a cortactin Src homology domain 3 (SH3)-dependent manner. In addition, cortactin was found to function in the late stage of clathrin coated vesicle formation.Taken together, cortactin is required for optimal clathrin mediated endocytosis in a dynamin directed manner.

  8. Specific blockade by CD54 and MHC II of CD40-mediated signaling for B cell proliferation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doyle, I S; Hollmann, C A; Crispe, I N;

    2001-01-01

    Regulation of B lymphocyte proliferation is critical to maintenance of self-tolerance, and intercellular interactions are likely to signal such regulation. Here, we show that coligation of either the adhesion molecule ICAM-1/CD54 or MHC II with CD40 inhibited cell cycle progression and promoted...... apoptosis of mouse splenic B cells. This resulted from specific blockade of NF-kappa B induction, which normally inhibits apoptosis. LPS- or B cell receptor (BCR)-induced proliferation was not inhibited by these treatments, and mAb-induced association of CD40 with other B cell surface molecules did not have...... these effects. Addition of BCR or IL-4 signals did not overcome the effect of ICAM-1 or MHC II on CD40-induced proliferation. FasL expression was not detected in B cell populations. These results show that MHC II and ICAM-1 specifically modulate CD40-mediated signaling, so inhibiting proliferation...

  9. Multifaceted effects of synthetic TLR2 ligand and Legionella pneumophilia on Treg-mediated suppression of T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutmuller Roger PM

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory T cells (Treg play a crucial role in maintaining immune homeostasis and self-tolerance. The immune suppressive effects of Tregs should however be limited in case effective immunity is required against pathogens or cancer cells. We previously found that the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 agonist, Pam3CysSK4, directly stimulated Tregs to expand and temporarily abrogate their suppressive capabilities. In this study, we evaluate the effect of Pam3CysSK4 and Legionella pneumophila, a natural TLR2 containing infectious agent, on effector T (Teff cells and dendritic cells (DCs individually and in co-cultures with Tregs. Results TLR2 agonists can directly provide a co-stimulatory signal inducing enhanced proliferation and cytokine production of naive CD4+ Teff cells. With respect to cytokine production, DCs appear to be most sensitive to low amounts of TLR agonists. Using wild type and TLR2-deficient cells in Treg suppression assays, we accordingly show that all cells (e.g. Treg, Teff cells and DCs contributed to overcome Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cell proliferation. Furthermore, while TLR2-stimulated Tregs readily lost their ability to suppress Teff cell proliferation, cytokine production by Teff cells was still suppressed. Similar results were obtained upon stimulation with TLR2 ligand containing bacteria, Legionella pneumophila. Conclusions These findings indicate that both synthetic and natural TLR2 agonists affect DCs, Teff cells and Treg directly, resulting in multi-modal modulation of Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cells. Moreover, Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cell proliferation is functionally distinct from suppression of cytokine secretion.

  10. Suppression of cell-mediated immunity by misonidazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockwell, S.; Neaderland, M.H. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA). School of Medicine)

    1982-08-01

    The data presented in this report demonstrate that single treatments with large doses of misonidazole (l mg/g) produce significant inhibition of delayed hypersensitivity to DNFB. Contact sensitivity to DNFB is generally considered to be a cell-mediated immune response (Asherson and Ptak 1968, Moorhead 1978, Phanuphak et al. 1974, Zembala and Asherson 1973). The authors' histological observations and the lack of ear swelling in the nude mice support this interpretation.

  11. Current perspectives on natural killer cell education and tolerance: emerging roles for inhibitory receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas LM

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available L Michael Thomas Laboratory of Immunogenetics, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD, USA Abstract: Natural killer (NK cells are regulated through the coordinated functions of activating and inhibitory receptors. These receptors can act during the initial engagement of an NK cell with a target cell, or in subsequent NK cell engagements to maintain tolerance. Notably, each individual possesses a sizable minority-population of NK cells that are devoid of inhibitory receptors that recognize the surrounding MHC class I (ie, self-MHC. Since these NK cells cannot perform conventional inhibition, they are rendered less responsive through the process of NK cell education (also known as licensing in order to reduce the likelihood of auto-reactivity. This review will delineate current views on NK cell education, clarify various misconceptions about NK cell education, and, lastly, discuss the relevance of NK cell education in anti-cancer therapies. Keywords: natural killer cell education, natural killer cell inhibitory receptors, immunotherapy, cancer

  12. Fibronectin on the Surface of Myeloma Cell-derived Exosomes Mediates Exosome-Cell Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Bandari, Shyam Kumar; Liu, Jian; Mobley, James A; Brown, Elizabeth E; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-22

    Exosomes regulate cell behavior by binding to and delivering their cargo to target cells; however, the mechanisms mediating exosome-cell interactions are poorly understood. Heparan sulfates on target cell surfaces can act as receptors for exosome uptake, but the ligand for heparan sulfate on exosomes has not been identified. Using exosomes isolated from myeloma cell lines and from myeloma patients, we identify exosomal fibronectin as a key heparan sulfate-binding ligand and mediator of exosome-cell interactions. We discovered that heparan sulfate plays a dual role in exosome-cell interaction; heparan sulfate on exosomes captures fibronectin, and on target cells it acts as a receptor for fibronectin. Removal of heparan sulfate from the exosome surface releases fibronectin and dramatically inhibits exosome-target cell interaction. Antibody specific for the Hep-II heparin-binding domain of fibronectin blocks exosome interaction with tumor cells or with marrow stromal cells. Regarding exosome function, fibronectin-mediated binding of exosomes to myeloma cells activated p38 and pERK signaling and expression of downstream target genes DKK1 and MMP-9, two molecules that promote myeloma progression. Antibody against fibronectin inhibited the ability of myeloma-derived exosomes to stimulate endothelial cell invasion. Heparin or heparin mimetics including Roneparstat, a modified heparin in phase I trials in myeloma patients, significantly inhibited exosome-cell interactions. These studies provide the first evidence that fibronectin binding to heparan sulfate mediates exosome-cell interactions, revealing a fundamental mechanism important for exosome-mediated cross-talk within tumor microenvironments. Moreover, these results imply that therapeutic disruption of fibronectin-heparan sulfate interactions will negatively impact myeloma tumor growth and progression.

  13. Yokukansan, a Kampo medicine, prevents the development of morphine tolerance through the inhibition of spinal glial cell activation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Takemoto

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: These results suggest that the preadministration of YKS attenuates the development of antinociceptive morphine tolerance, and the suppression of spinal glial cell activation may be one mechanism underlying this phenomenon.

  14. Ceramide mediates caspase-independent programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thon, Lutz; Möhlig, Heike; Mathieu, Sabine; Lange, Arne; Bulanova, Elena; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; Schütze, Stefan; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia; Adam, Dieter

    2005-12-01

    Although numerous studies have implicated the sphingolipid ceramide in the induction of cell death, a causative function of ceramide in caspase-dependent apoptosis remains a highly debated issue. Here, we show that ceramide is a key mediator of a distinct route to programmed cell death (PCD), i.e., caspase-independent PCD. Under conditions where apoptosis is either not initiated or actively inhibited, TNF induces caspase-independent PCD in L929 fibrosarcoma cells, NIH3T3 fibroblasts, human leukemic Jurkat T cells, and lung fibroblasts by increasing intracellular ceramide levels prior to the onset of cell death. Survival is significantly enhanced when ceramide accumulation is prevented, as demonstrated in fibroblasts genetically deficient for acid sphingomyelinase, in L929 cells overexpressing acid ceramidase, by pharmacological intervention, or by RNA interference. Jurkat cells deficient for receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) do not accumulate ceramide and therefore are fully resistant to caspase-independent PCD whereas Jurkat cells overexpressing the mitochondrial protein Bcl-2 are partially protected, implicating RIP1 and mitochondria as components of the ceramide death pathway. Our data point to a role of caspases (but not cathepsins) in suppressing the ceramide death pathway under physiological conditions. Moreover, clonogenic survival of tumor cells is clearly reduced by induction of the ceramide death pathway, promising additional options for the development of novel tumor therapies.

  15. Cecum lymph node dendritic cells harbor slow-growing bacteria phenotypically tolerant to antibiotic treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Kaiser

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In vivo, antibiotics are often much less efficient than ex vivo and relapses can occur. The reasons for poor in vivo activity are still not completely understood. We have studied the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin in an animal model for complicated Salmonellosis. High-dose ciprofloxacin treatment efficiently reduced pathogen loads in feces and most organs. However, the cecum draining lymph node (cLN, the gut tissue, and the spleen retained surviving bacteria. In cLN, approximately 10%-20% of the bacteria remained viable. These phenotypically tolerant bacteria lodged mostly within CD103⁺CX₃CR1⁻CD11c⁺ dendritic cells, remained genetically susceptible to ciprofloxacin, were sufficient to reinitiate infection after the end of the therapy, and displayed an extremely slow growth rate, as shown by mathematical analysis of infections with mixed inocula and segregative plasmid experiments. The slow growth was sufficient to explain recalcitrance to antibiotics treatment. Therefore, slow-growing antibiotic-tolerant bacteria lodged within dendritic cells can explain poor in vivo antibiotic activity and relapse. Administration of LPS or CpG, known elicitors of innate immune defense, reduced the loads of tolerant bacteria. Thus, manipulating innate immunity may augment the in vivo activity of antibiotics.

  16. The Role of Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity in Insulin Sensitivity, Beta Cell Function, and Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lou Rose Malamug

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection, for example, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, has been thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Our aim was to determine the role of H. pylori infection in glucose metabolism in an American cohort. We examined data from 4,136 non-Hispanic white (NHW, non-Hispanic black (NHB, and Mexican Americans (MA aged 18 and over from the NHANES 1999-2000 cohort. We calculated the odds ratios for states of glucose tolerance based on the H. pylori status. We calculated and compared homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and beta cell function (HOMA-B in subjects without diabetes based on the H. pylori status. The results were adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI, poverty index, education, alcohol consumption, tobacco use, and physical activity. The H. pylori status was not a risk factor for abnormal glucose tolerance. After adjustment for age and BMI and also adjustment for all covariates, no difference was found in either HOMA-IR or HOMA-B in all ethnic and gender groups except for a marginally significant difference in HOMA-IR in NHB females. H. pylori infection was not a risk factor for abnormal glucose tolerance, nor plays a major role in insulin resistance or beta cell dysfunction.

  17. Suppression of autophagy exacerbates Mefloquine-mediated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ji Hyun; Park, So Jung; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Eun Sung; Kang, Hee; Park, Ji-Ho; Lee, Eunjoo H; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2012-05-02

    Mefloquine is an effective treatment drug for malaria. However, it can cause several adverse side effects, and the precise mechanism associated with the adverse neurological effects of Mefloquine is not clearly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Mefloquine on autophagy in neuroblastoma cells. Mefloquine treatment highly induced the formation of autophagosomes and the conversion of LC3I into LC3II. Moreover, Mefloquine-induced autophagy was efficiently suppressed by an autophagy inhibitor and by down regulation of ATG6. The autophagy was also completely blocked in ATG5 deficient mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Moreover, suppression of autophagy significantly intensified Mefloquine-mediated cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Our findings suggest that suppression of autophagy may exacerbate Mefloquine toxicity in neuroblastoma cells.

  18. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Claire [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Lafosse, Jean-Michel [CHU Toulouse, Hopital Rangueil, Service d' orthopedie et Traumatologie, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Malavaud, Bernard [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France); CHU Toulouse, Hopital Rangueil, Service d' Urologie et de Transplantation Renale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Cuvillier, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.cuvillier@ipbs.fr [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France)

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  19. Inferring RBP-Mediated Regulation in Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Lafzi

    Full Text Available RNA-binding proteins (RBPs play key roles in post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs. Dysregulations in RBP-mediated mechanisms have been found to be associated with many steps of cancer initiation and progression. Despite this, previous studies of gene expression in cancer have ignored the effect of RBPs. To this end, we developed a lasso regression model that predicts gene expression in cancer by incorporating RBP-mediated regulation as well as the effects of other well-studied factors such as copy-number variation, DNA methylation, TFs and miRNAs. As a case study, we applied our model to Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC data as we found that there are several RBPs differentially expressed in LUSC. Including RBP-mediated regulatory effects in addition to the other features significantly increased the Spearman rank correlation between predicted and measured expression of held-out genes. Using a feature selection procedure that accounts for the adaptive search employed by lasso regularization, we identified the candidate regulators in LUSC. Remarkably, several of these candidate regulators are RBPs. Furthermore, majority of the candidate regulators have been previously found to be associated with lung cancer. To investigate the mechanisms that are controlled by these regulators, we predicted their target gene sets based on our model. We validated the target gene sets by comparing against experimentally verified targets. Our results suggest that the future studies of gene expression in cancer must consider the effect of RBP-mediated regulation.

  20. Integration of principles of systems biology and radiation biology: toward development of in silico models to optimize IUdR-mediated radiosensitization of DNA mismatch repair-deficient (damage tolerant human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy James Kinsella

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 7 years, we have focused our experimental and computational research efforts on improving our understanding of the biochemical, molecular, and cellular processing of iododeoxyuridine (IUdR and ionizing radiation (IR induced DNA base damage by DNA mismatch repair (MMR. These coordinated research efforts, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP, brought together system scientists with expertise in engineering, mathematics, and complex systems theory and translational cancer researchers with expertise in radiation biology. Our overall goal was to begin to develop computational models of IUdR- and/or IR- induced base damage processing by MMR that may provide new clinical strategies to optimize IUdR-mediated radiosensitiztion in MMR deficient (MMR- damage tolerant human cancers. Using multiple scales of experimental testing, ranging from purified protein systems to in vitro (cellular and to in vivo (human tumor xenografts in athymic mice models, we have begun to integrate and interpolate these experimental data with hybrid stochastic biochemical models of MMR damage processing and probabilistic cell cycle regulation models through a systems biology approach. In this article, we highlight the results and current status of our integration of radiation biology approaches and computational modeling to enhance IUdR-mediated radiosensitization in MMR- damage tolerant cancers.

  1. TRPV-1-mediated elimination of residual iPS cells in bioengineered cardiac cell sheet tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Seta, Hiroyoshi; Haraguchi, Yuji; Alsayegh, Khaled; Sekine, Hidekazu; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa; Yamazaki, Kenji; Okano, Teruo

    2016-02-18

    The development of a suitable strategy for eliminating remaining undifferentiated cells is indispensable for the use of human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cells in regenerative medicine. Here, we show for the first time that TRPV-1 activation through transient culture at 42 °C in combination with agonists is a simple and useful strategy to eliminate iPS cells from bioengineered cardiac cell sheet tissues. When human iPS cells were cultured at 42 °C, almost all cells disappeared by 48 hours through apoptosis. However, iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts maintained transcriptional and protein expression levels, and cardiac cell sheets were fabricated after reducing the temperature. TRPV-1 expression in iPS cells was upregulated at 42 °C, and iPS cell death at 42 °C was TRPV-1-dependent. Furthermore, TRPV-1 activation through thermal or agonist treatment eliminated iPS cells in cardiac tissues for a final concentration of 0.4% iPS cell contamination. These findings suggest that the difference in tolerance to TRPV-1 activation between iPS cells and iPS cell-derived cardiac cells could be exploited to eliminate remaining iPS cells in bioengineered cell sheet tissues, which will further reduce the risk of tumour formation.

  2. Human CD14 mediates recognition and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, A; Moffatt, O D; Raykundalia, C; Capra, J D; Simmons, D L; Gregory, C D

    1998-04-02

    Cells undergoing programmed cell death (apoptosis) are cleared rapidly in vivo by phagocytes without inducing inflammation. Here we show that the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked plasma-membrane glycoprotein CD14 on the surface of human macrophages is important for the recognition and clearance of apoptotic cells. CD14 can also act as a receptor that binds bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), triggering inflammatory responses. Overstimulation of CD14 by LPS can cause the often fatal toxic-shock syndrome. Here we show that apoptotic cells interact with CD14, triggering phagocytosis of the apoptotic cells. This interaction depends on a region of CD14 that is identical to, or at least closely associated with, a region known to bind LPS. However, apoptotic cells, unlike LPS, do not provoke the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from macrophages. These results indicate that clearance of apoptotic cells is mediated by a receptor whose interactions with 'non-self' components (LPS) and 'self' components (apoptotic cells) produce distinct macrophage responses.

  3. Establishment, Growth kinetics, and Susceptibility to AcMNPV of Heat Tolerant Lepidop teran Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-lei Wu; Lei Jiang; Yoshifumi Hashimoto; Robert R.Granados; Guo-xun Li

    2011-01-01

    Lepidopteran heat-tolerant(ht)cell lines have been obtained with sf-9,sf-21 and several Bombyx cells.They have a distinct karyotype,membrane lipid composition,morphology and growth kinetics from the parental cell lines.In this paper,we report the development of ht cell lines from other insect species and examination of their growth characteristics and virus susceptibility.Adaptation of cell lines sf-9,BTI-TN-5131-4(High5)and BTI-TN-MG1(MG 1)to 33℃ and 35℃ was carried out by shifting the culture temperature between 28℃ and higher temperatures by a gradual stepwise increase in temperature.The process of adaption to a higher culture temperature was accomplished over a period of 2 months.The cell lines with the temperature adaption were designated as sf9-ht33,sf9-ht35,High5-ht33,High5-ht35,MG1-ht33,MG1-ht35.These cell lines have been subcultured over 70 passages.Adaption to high temperatures was confirmed by a constant population doubling time with individual cell lines.The population doubling time of heat adapted cell lines were 1-4 h less than these of parental cell lines.Cell shapes did not show obvious change,however,the cell size of sf9-ht cells was enlarged and those of High5 and MG1 ht cells were reduced after heat adaption.When the cell lines were infected with Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus(AcMNPV)at 28℃,33℃,35℃ and 37℃,production of budded virus and occlusion bodies in each cell line was optimum at its own adapted temperature.

  4. Myeloid derived suppressor cells and their role in tolerance induction in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Taku; Mahnke, Karsten; Enk, Alexander H

    2010-07-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) comprise a phenotypically heterogeneous population of cells, which can be found in tumor-bearing mice and in patients with cancer. MDSCs play a central role in the induction of peripheral tolerance. Together with regulatory T cells (Tregs) they promote an immunosuppressive environment in tumor-bearing hosts. The phenotype of MDSCs differs in humans and mice, and the exact mechanisms of their suppressive function are still controversially discussed. In summary, MDSCs are a group of phenotypically heterogeneous cells of myeloid origin that have common biological activities. In this review, we discuss the definition of MDSCs, the proposed mechanisms of expansion and the recruitment and activation of MDSCs, as well as their biological activities in tumorbearing hosts to assess the potential therapeutic applications.

  5. Role of Arabidopsis RAP2.4 in Regulating Light-and Ethylene-Mediated Developmental Processes and Drought Stress Tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-Cheng Lin; Hee-Jin Park; Hai-Yang Wang

    2008-01-01

    Light and the plant hormone ethylene regulate many aspects of plant growth and development in an overlapping and interdependent fashion. Little is known regarding how their signal transduction pathways cross-talk to regulate plant development in a coordinated manner. Here, we report functional characterization of an AP2/DREB-type transcription factor, Arabidopsis RAP2.4, in mediating light and ethylene signaling. Expression of the RAP2.4 gene is down-regulated by light but up-regulated by salt and drought stresses. RAP2.4 protein is constitutively targeted to the nucleus and it can bind to both the ethylene-responsive GCC-box and the dehydration-responsive element (DRE).We show that RAP2.4 protein possesses an intrinsic transcriptional activation activity in yeast cells and that it can activate a reporter gene driven by the DRE cis-element in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Overexpression of RAP2.4 or mutation in RAP2.4 cause altered expression of representative light-, ethylene-, and drought-responsive genes. Although no salient phenotype was observed with a rap2.4 loss-of-function mutant, constitutive overexpression of RAP2.4 results in defects in multiple developmental processes regulated by light and ethylene, including hypocotyl elongation and gravitropism, apical hook formation and cotyledon expansion, flowering time, root elongation, root hair formation, and drought tolerance.Based on these observations, we propose that RAP2.4 acts at or downstream of a converging point of light and ethylene signaling pathways to coordinately regulate multiple developmental processes and stress responses.

  6. Fatty acids, lipid mediators, and T-cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Anja J; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Toes, René E M; Ioan-Facsinay, Andreea

    2014-01-01

    Research toward the mechanisms underlying obesity-linked complications has intensified during the last years. As a consequence, it has become clear that metabolism and immunity are intimately linked. Free fatty acids and other lipids acquired in excess by current feeding patterns have been proposed to mediate this link due to their immune modulatory capacity. The functional differences between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, in combination with their dietary intake are believed to modulate the outcome of immune responses. Moreover, unsaturated fatty acids can be oxidized in a tightly regulated and specific manner to generate either potent pro-inflammatory or pro-resolving lipid mediators. These oxidative derivatives of fatty acids have received detailed attention during the last years, as they have proven to have strong immune modulatory capacity, even in pM ranges. Both fatty acids and oxidized fatty acids have been studied especially in relation to macrophage and T-cells functions. In this review, we propose to focus on the effect of fatty acids and their oxidative derivatives on T-cells, as it is an active area of research during the past 5 years. The effect of fatty acids and their derivatives on activation and proliferation of T-cells, as well as the delicate balance between stimulation and lipotoxicity will be discussed. Moreover, the receptors involved in the interaction between free fatty acids and their derivatives with T-cells will be summarized. Finally, the mechanisms involved in modulation of T-cells by fatty acids will be addressed, including cellular signaling and metabolism of T-cells. The in vitro results will be placed in context of in vivo studies both in humans and mice. In this review, we summarize the latest findings on the immune modulatory function of lipids on T-cells and will point out novel directions for future research.

  7. Hyperlipidemia Alters Regulatory T Cell Function and Promotes Resistance to Tolerance Induction Through Costimulatory Molecule Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, J; Yuan, J; Chandrakar, A; Iacomini, J

    2015-09-01

    Recent work from our laboratory has shown that hyperlipidemia promotes accelerated rejection of vascularized cardiac allografts in mice by inducing anti-donor Th17 reactivity and production of IL-17. Here, we show that hyperlipidemia also affects FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). Hyperlipidemia promotes the development of Tregs that express low levels of CD25. Hyperlipidemia also promotes a decrease in central Tregs and an increase in effector Tregs that appears to account for the increase in the frequency of CD25(low) Tregs. Alterations in Treg subsets also appear to lead to alterations in Treg function. The ability of FoxP3(+) , CD25(high) , CD4(+) Tregs from hyperlipidemic mice to inhibit proliferation of effector T cells stimulated with anti-CD3 and CD28 was reduced when compared with Tregs from control mice. Regulatory T cells isolated from hyperlipidemic recipients exhibit increased activation of Akt, and a reduction in Bim levels that permits the expansion of FoxP3(+) CD25(low) CD4(+) T cells. Hyperlipidemic mice were also resistant to tolerance induction using costimulatory molecule blockade consisting of anti-CD154 and CTLA4Ig, a strategy that requires Tregs. Together, our data suggest that hyperlipidemia profoundly affects Treg subsets and function as well as the ability to induce tolerance.

  8. CD40 activation rescues antiviral CD8⁺ T cells from PD-1-mediated exhaustion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Isogawa

    Full Text Available The intrahepatic immune environment is normally biased towards tolerance. Nonetheless, effective antiviral immune responses can be induced against hepatotropic pathogens. To examine the immunological basis of this paradox we studied the ability of hepatocellularly expressed hepatitis B virus (HBV to activate immunologically naïve HBV-specific CD8⁺ T cell receptor (TCR transgenic T cells after adoptive transfer to HBV transgenic mice. Intrahepatic priming triggered vigorous in situ T cell proliferation but failed to induce interferon gamma production or cytolytic effector function. In contrast, the same T cells differentiated into cytolytic effector T cells in HBV transgenic mice if Programmed Death 1 (PD-1 expression was genetically ablated, suggesting that intrahepatic antigen presentation per se triggers negative regulatory signals that prevent the functional differentiation of naïve CD8⁺ T cells. Surprisingly, coadministration of an agonistic anti-CD40 antibody (αCD40 inhibited PD-1 induction and restored T cell effector function, thereby inhibiting viral gene expression and causing a necroinflammatory liver disease. Importantly, the depletion of myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs strongly diminished the αCD40 mediated functional differentiation of HBV-specific CD8⁺ T cells, suggesting that activation of mDCs was responsible for the functional differentiation of HBV-specific CD8⁺ T cells in αCD40 treated animals. These results demonstrate that antigen-specific, PD-1-mediated CD8⁺ T cell exhaustion can be rescued by CD40-mediated mDC-activation.

  9. CXCR5+ T helper cells mediate protective immunity against tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slight, Samantha R.; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Gopal, Radha; Lin, Yinyao; Fallert Junecko, Beth A.; Mehra, Smriti; Selman, Moises; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Baquera-Heredia, Javier; Pavon, Lenin; Kaushal, Deepak; Reinhart, Todd A.; Randall, Troy D.; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2013-01-01

    One third of the world’s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Although most infected people remain asymptomatic, they have a 10% lifetime risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB). Thus, the current challenge is to identify immune parameters that distinguish individuals with latent TB from those with active TB. Using human and experimental models of Mtb infection, we demonstrated that organized ectopic lymphoid structures containing CXCR5+ T cells were present in Mtb-infected lungs. In addition, we found that in experimental Mtb infection models, the presence of CXCR5+ T cells within ectopic lymphoid structures was associated with immune control. Furthermore, in a mouse model of Mtb infection, we showed that activated CD4+CXCR5+ T cells accumulated in Mtb-infected lungs and produced proinflammatory cytokines. Mice deficient in Cxcr5 had increased susceptibility to TB due to defective T cell localization within the lung parenchyma. We demonstrated that CXCR5 expression in T cells mediated correct T cell localization within TB granulomas, promoted efficient macrophage activation, protected against Mtb infection, and facilitated lymphoid follicle formation. These data demonstrate that CD4+CXCR5+ T cells play a protective role in the immune response against TB and highlight their potential use for future TB vaccine design and therapy. PMID:23281399

  10. Molecular imaging of cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa; Martelli, Cristina; Rescigno, Maria; Clerici, Mario

    2006-09-01

    New strategies based on the activation of a patient's immune response are being sought to complement present conventional exogenous cancer therapies. Elucidating the trafficking pathways of immune cells in vivo, together with their migratory properties in relation to their differentiation and activation status, is useful for understanding how the immune system interacts with cancer. Methods based on tissue sampling to monitor immune responses are inadequate for repeatedly characterizing the responses of the immune system in different organs. A solution to this problem might come from molecular and cellular imaging - a branch of biomedical sciences that combines biotechnology and imaging methods to characterize, in vivo, the molecular and cellular processes involved in normal and pathologic states. The general concepts of noninvasive imaging of targeted cells as well as the technology and probes applied to cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy imaging are outlined in this review.

  11. The effect of adenovirus-mediated gene expression of FHIT in small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandi, Roza; Xu, Kai; Poulsen, Hans S

    2011-01-01

    or in combination with the mutant p53-reactivating molecule, PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246, in SCLC. Overexpression of FHIT by recombinant adenoviral vector (Ad-FHIT)-mediated gene transfer in SCLC cells inhibited their growth by inducing apoptosis and when combined with PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246, a synergistic cell growth...

  12. Glycosylation-mediated phenylpropanoid partitioning in Populus tremuloides cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babst Benjamin A

    2009-12-01

    identified candidate genes for glycosyltransferases that may mediate the glycosylation, and for transporters that mediate the subcellular compartmentalization of sugars and phenolic glycosides. The suspension cells appear to represent a facile system for dissecting the regulation of phenolic carbon partitioning, and in turn, its effects on growth in Populus.

  13. Site of clomazone action in tolerant-soybean and susceptible-cotton photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, M A; Liebl, R A; Widholm, J M

    1990-10-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the herbicidal site of clomazone action in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Corsoy) (SB-M) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum [L.] cv Stoneville 825) (COT-M) photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures. Although a 10 micromolar clomazone treatment did not significantly reduce the terpene or mixed terpenoid content (microgram per gram fresh weight) of the SB-M cell line, there was over a 70% reduction in the chlorophyll (Chl), carotenoid (CAR), and plastoquinone (PQ) content of the COT-M cell line. The tocopherol (TOC) content was reduced only 35.6%. Reductions in the levels of Chl, CAR, TOC, and PQ indicate that the site of clomazone action in COT-M cells is prior to geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). The clomazone treatment did not significantly reduce the flow of [(14)C]mevalonate ([(14)C]MEV) (nanocuries per gram fresh weight) into CAR and the three mixed terpenoid compounds of SB-M cells. Conversely, [(14)C]MEV incorporation into CAR and the terpene moieties of Chl, PQ, and TOC in COT-M cells was reduced at least 73%, indicating that the site of clomazone action must be after MEV. Sequestration of clomazone away from the chloroplast cannot account for soybean tolerance to clomazone since chloroplasts isolated from both cell lines incubated with [(14)C]clomazone contained a similar amount of radioactivity (disintegrations per minute per microgram of Chl). The possible site(s) of clomazone inhibition include mevalonate kinase, phosphomevalonate kinase, pyrophosphomevalonate decarboxylase, isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase, and/or a prenyl transferase.

  14. In-cell infection: a novel pathway for Epstein-Barr virus infection mediated by cell-in-cell structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Chao; Chen, Yuhui; Zeng, Musheng; Pei, Rongjuan; Du, Yong; Tang, Linquan; Wang, Mengyi; Hu, Yazhuo; Zhu, Hanyu; He, Meifang; Wei, Xiawei; Wang, Shan; Ning, Xiangkai; Wang, Manna; Wang, Jufang; Ma, Li; Chen, Xinwen; Sun, Qiang; Tang, Hong; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoning

    2015-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can infect both susceptible B lymphocytes and non-susceptible epithelial cells (ECs). Viral tropism analyses have revealed two intriguing means of EBV infection, either by a receptor-mediated infection of B cells or by a cell-to-cell contact-mediated infection of non-susceptible ECs. Herein, we report a novel "in-cell infection" mechanism for EBV infection of non-susceptible ECs through the formation of cell-in-cell structures. Epithelial CNE-2 cells were invaded by EBV-infected Akata B cells to form cell-in-cell structures in vitro. Such unique cellular structures could be readily observed in the specimens of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Importantly, the formation of cell-in-cell structures led to the autonomous activation of EBV within Akata cells and subsequent viral transmission to CNE-2 cells, as evidenced by the expression of viral genes and the presence of virion particles in CNE-2 cells. Significantly, EBV generated from in-cell infected ECs displayed altered tropism with higher infection efficacy to both B cells and ECs. In addition to CNE-2 tumor cells, cell-in-cell structure formation could also mediate EBV infection of NPEC1-Bmi1 cells, an immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cell line. Furthermore, efficient infection by this mechanism involved the activation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Thus, our study identified "in-cell infection" as a novel mechanism for EBV infection. Given the diversity of virus-infected cells and the prevalence of cell-in-cell structures during chronic infection, we speculate that "in-cell infection" is likely a general mechanism for EBV and other viruses to infect non-susceptible ECs.

  15. B cell autophagy mediates TLR7-dependent autoimmunity and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weindel, Chi G; Richey, Lauren J; Bolland, Silvia; Mehta, Abhiruchi J; Kearney, John F; Huber, Brigitte T

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease, defined by loss of B cell self-tolerance that results in production of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and chronic inflammation. While the initiating events in lupus development are not well defined, overexpression of the RNA-recognizing toll-like receptor (TLR)7 has been linked to SLE in humans and mice. We postulated that autophagy plays an essential role in TLR7 activation of B cells for the induction of SLE by delivering RNA ligands to the endosomes, where this innate immune receptor resides. To test this hypothesis, we compared SLE development in Tlr7 transgenic (Tg) mice with or without B cell-specific ablation of autophagy (Cd19-Cre Atg5(f/f)). We observed that in the absence of B cell autophagy the 2 hallmarks of SLE, ANA and inflammation, were eliminated, thus curing these mice of lupus. This was also evident in the significantly extended survival of the autophagy-deficient mice compared to Tlr7.1 Tg mice. Furthermore, glomerulonephritis was ameliorated, and the serum levels of inflammatory cytokines in the knockout (KO) mice were indistinguishable from those of control mice. These data provide direct evidence that B cells require TLR7-dependent priming through an autophagy-dependent mechanism before autoimmunity is induced, thereafter involving many cell types. Surprisingly, hyper-IgM production persisted in Tlr7.1 Tg mice in the absence of autophagy, likely involving a different activation pathway than the production of autoantibodies. Furthermore, these mice still presented with anemia, but responded with a striking increase in extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH), possibly due to the absence of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  16. Performance of a Yeast-mediated Biological Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip To

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae present in common Baker’s yeast was used in a microbial fuel cell in which glucose was the carbon source. Methylene blue was used as the electronophore in the anode compartment, while potassium ferricyanide and methylene blue were tested as electron acceptors in the cathode compartment. Microbes in a mediator-free environment were used as the control. The experiment was performed in both open and closed circuit configurations under different loads ranging from 100 kΩ to 400Ω. The eukaryotic S. cerevisiae-based fuel cell showed improved performance when methylene blue and ferricyanide were used as electron mediators, rendering a maximum power generation of 146.71±7.7 mW/m3. The fuel cell generated a maximum open circuit voltage of 383.6±1.5 mV and recorded a maximum efficiency of 28±1.8 % under 100 kΩ of external load.

  17. Selectins mediate small cell lung cancer systemic metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Heidemann

    Full Text Available Metastasis formation is the major reason for the extremely poor prognosis in small cell lung cancer (SCLC patients. The molecular interaction partners regulating metastasis formation in SCLC are largely unidentified, however, from other tumor entities it is known that tumor cells use the adhesion molecules of the leukocyte adhesion cascade to attach to the endothelium at the site of the future metastasis. Using the human OH-1 SCLC line as a model, we found that these cells expressed E- and P-selectin binding sites, which could be in part attributed to the selectin binding carbohydrate motif sialyl Lewis A. In addition, protein backbones known to carry these glycotopes in other cell lines including PSGL-1, CD44 and CEA could be detected in in vitro and in vivo grown OH1 SCLC cells. By intravital microscopy of murine mesenterial vasculature we could capture SCLC cells while rolling along vessel walls demonstrating that SCLC cells mimic leukocyte rolling behavior in terms of selectin and selectin ligand interaction in vivo indicating that this mechanism might indeed be important for SCLC cells to seed distant metastases. Accordingly, formation of spontaneous distant metastases was reduced by 50% when OH-1 cells were xenografted into E-/P-selectin-deficient mice compared with wild type mice (p = 0.0181. However, as metastasis formation was not completely abrogated in selectin deficient mice, we concluded that this adhesion cascade is redundant and that other molecules of this cascade mediate metastasis formation as well. Using several of these adhesion molecules as interaction partners presumably make SCLC cells so highly metastatic.

  18. Tolerability and toxicity of adjuvant cisplatin and gemcitabine for treating non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Fan; LI Xiao; CHEN Ke-zhong; JIANG Guan-chao; WANG Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background The combination of cisplatin and vinorelbine is an evidence-supported regimen for adjuvant chemotherapy for treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).But this doublet has considerable toxicity and unfavorable tolerability,and results in poor compliance.The cisplatin and gemcitabine regimen is one of the most active and well-tolerated regimens against advanced NSCLC,but its toxicity and tolerability has not been adequately evaluated in the adjuvant setting.Methods From a lung cancer database we retrospectively reviewed NSCLC patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy of cisplatin (75 mg/m2) and gemcitabine (1250 mg/m2) between January 2005 and December 2011.Postoperative demographics,compliance to adjuvant therapy and toxicity were retrieved from medical records.Results A total of 132 patients met the criteria and were included in the study,96 were male (72.7%) and 36 were female (27.3%).Median age was 60.5 years old,range 29-75 years,and 41.7% of patients were ≥65 years old.Overall,68.2%patients received all four planned cycles,and the cumulative dose delivered for gemcitabine was 8333 mg (83.3% of the planned dose) and cisplatin 248 mg (82.7% of the planned dose).There were no treatment-related deaths.Grade 3/4neutropenia developed in 47 patients (35.6%) and was the predominant hematologic toxicity.Common grade 3/4 nonhematologic toxicities were nausea/vomiting (22.0%),infection (12.3%),and febrile neutropenia (11.4%).Conclusion Cisplatin and gemcitabine are feasible for use in the adjuvant setting with a favorable toxicity profile and superior tolerability compared with published data on cisplatin and vinorelbine.

  19. Functional and transcriptome analysis reveals an acclimatization strategy for abiotic stress tolerance mediated by Arabidopsis NF-YA family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva-González, Marco Antonio; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Cruz-Ramírez, Alfredo; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y) is a heterotrimeric complex formed by NF-YA/NF-YB/NF-YC subunits that binds to the CCAAT-box in eukaryotic promoters. In contrast to other organisms, in which a single gene encodes each subunit, in plants gene families of over 10 members encode each of the subunits. Here we report that five members of the Arabidopsis thaliana NF-YA family are strongly induced by several stress conditions via transcriptional and miR169-related post-transcriptional mechanisms. Overexpression of NF-YA2, 7 and 10 resulted in dwarf late-senescent plants with enhanced tolerance to several types of abiotic stress. These phenotypes are related to alterations in sucrose/starch balance and cell elongation observed in NF-YA overexpressing plants. The use of transcriptomic analysis of transgenic plants that express miR169-resistant versions of NF-YA2, 3, 7, and 10 under an estradiol inducible system, as well as a dominant-repressor version of NF-YA2 revealed a set of genes, whose promoters are enriched in NF-Y binding sites (CCAAT-box) and that may be directly regulated by the NF-Y complex. This analysis also suggests that NF-YAs could participate in modulating gene regulation through positive and negative mechanisms. We propose a model in which the increase in NF-YA transcript levels in response to abiotic stress is part of an adaptive response to adverse environmental conditions in which a reduction in plant growth rate plays a key role.

  20. Know Thyself: NK cell inhibitory receptors prompt self-tolerance, education, and viral control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William eNash

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer cells (NK provide essential protection against viral infections. One of the defining features of this lymphocyte population is the expression of a wide array of variable cell surface stimulatory and inhibitory NK receptors (sNKR and iNKR respectively. The iNKR are particularly important in terms of NK cell education. As receptors specific for MHC class I (MHC I molecules, they are responsible for self-tolerance and adjusting NK cell reactivity based the expression level of self-MHC I. The end result of this education is two-fold: 1 inhibitory signaling tunes the functional capacity of the NK cell, endowing greater potency with greater education, and 2 education on self allows the NK cell to detect aberrations in MHC I expression, a common occurrence during many viral infections. Many studies have indicated an important role for iNKR and MHC I in disease, making these receptors attractive targets for manipulating NK cell reactivity in the clinic. A greater understanding of iNKR and their ability to regulate NK cells will provide a basis for future attempts at translating their potential utility into benefits for human health.

  1. Tolerance checkpoint bypass permits emergence of pathogenic T cells to neuromyelitis optica autoantigen aquaporin-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Sharon A.; Winger, Ryan C.; Cruz-Herranz, Andrés; Nelson, Patricia A.; Hagberg, Sarah; Miller, Corey N.; Spencer, Collin M.; Ho, Peggy P.; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Levy, Michael; Levin, Marc H.; Verkman, Alan S.; Steinman, Lawrence; Green, Ari J.; Anderson, Mark S.; Sobel, Raymond A.; Zamvil, Scott S.

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4)-specific T cells are expanded in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) patients and exhibit Th17 polarization. However, their pathogenic role in CNS autoimmune inflammatory disease is unclear. Although multiple AQP4 T-cell epitopes have been identified in WT C57BL/6 mice, we observed that neither immunization with those determinants nor transfer of donor T cells targeting them caused CNS autoimmune disease in recipient mice. In contrast, robust proliferation was observed following immunization of AQP4-deficient (AQP4−/−) mice with AQP4 peptide (p) 135–153 or p201–220, peptides predicted to contain I-Ab–restricted T-cell epitopes but not identified in WT mice. In comparison with WT mice, AQP4−/− mice used unique T-cell receptor repertoires for recognition of these two AQP4 epitopes. Donor T cells specific for either determinant from AQP4−/−, but not WT, mice induced paralysis in recipient WT and B-cell–deficient mice. AQP4-specific Th17-polarized cells induced more severe disease than Th1-polarized cells. Clinical signs were associated with opticospinal infiltrates of T cells and monocytes. Fluorescent-labeled donor T cells were detected in CNS lesions. Visual system involvement was evident by changes in optical coherence tomography. Fine mapping of AQP4 p201–220 and p135–153 epitopes identified peptides within p201–220 but not p135–153, which induced clinical disease in 40% of WT mice by direct immunization. Our results provide a foundation to evaluate how AQP4-specific T cells contribute to AQP4-targeted CNS autoimmunity (ATCA) and suggest that pathogenic AQP4-specific T-cell responses are normally restrained by central tolerance, which may be relevant to understanding development of AQP4-reactive T cells in NMO. PMID:27940915

  2. Response and tolerance of root border cells to aluminum toxicity in soybean seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Miao-Zhen; Wang, Fang-Mei; Li, Rong-Feng; Zhang, Shu-Na; Wang, Ning; Xu, Gen-Di

    2011-07-01

    Root border cells (RBCs) and their secreted mucilage are suggested to participate in the resistance against toxic metal cations, including aluminum (Al), in the rhizosphere. However, the mechanisms by which the individual cell populations respond to Al and their role in Al resistance still remain unclear. In this research, the response and tolerance of RBCs to Al toxicity were investigated in the root tips of two soybean cultivars [Zhechun No. 2 (Al-tolerant cultivar) and Huachun No. 18 (Al-sensitive cultivar)]. Al inhibited root elongation and increased pectin methylesterase (PME) activity in the root tip. Removal of RBCs from the root tips resulted in a more severe inhibition of root elongation, especially in Huachun No. 18. Increasing Al levels and treatment time decreased the relative percent viability of RBCs in situ and in vitro in both soybean cultivars. Al application significantly increased mucilage layer thickness around the detached RBCs of both cultivars. Additionally, a significantly higher relative percent cell viability of attached and detached RBCs and thicker mucilage layers were observed in Zhechun No. 2. The higher viability of attached and detached RBCs, as well as the thickening of the mucilage layer in separated RBCs, suggest that RBCs play an important role in protecting root apices from Al toxicity.

  3. Chitosan nanoparticles affect acid tolerance response in adhered cells of strpetococcus mutans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neilands, Julia; Sutherland, Duncan S; Resin, Anton

    2011-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of chitosan nanoparticles on the acid tolerance response (ATR) of adhered Streptococcus mutans. An ATR was induced by exposing S. mutans to pH 5.5 for 2 h and confirmed by exposing the acid-adapted cells to pH 3.5 for 30 min, with the majority of cells...... appearing viable according to the LIVE/DEAD (R) technique. However, when chitosan nanoparticles were present during the exposure to pH 5.5, no ATR occurred as most cells appeared dead after the pH 3.5 shock. We conclude that the chitosan nanoparticles tested had the ability to hinder ATR induction...

  4. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Khondoker M; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2016-01-19

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  5. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khondoker M. Akram

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  6. Epigenetically Mediated Pathogenic Effects of Phenanthrene on Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenanthrene (Phe, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH, is a major constituent of urban air pollution. There have been conflicting results regarding the role of other AhR ligands 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD and 6-formylindolo [3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ in modifying regulatory T cell populations (Treg or T helper (Th17 differentiation, and the effects of Phe have been understudied. We hypothesized that different chemical entities of PAH induce Treg to become either Th2 or Th17 effector T cells through epigenetic modification of FOXP3. To determine specific effects on T cell populations by phenanthrene, primary human Treg were treated with Phe, TCDD, or FICZ and assessed for function, gene expression, and phenotype. Methylation of CpG sites within the FOXP3 locus reduced FOXP3 expression, leading to impaired Treg function and conversion of Treg into a CD4+CD25lo Th2 phenotype in Phe-treated cells. Conversely, TCDD treatment led to epigenetic modification of IL-17A and conversion of Treg to Th17 T cells. These findings present a mechanism by which exposure to AhR-ligands mediates human T cell responses and begins to elucidate the relationship between environmental exposures, immune modulation, and initiation of human disease.

  7. Electronic modification of Pt via Ti and Se as tolerant cathodes in air-breathing methanol microfluidic fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiwei; Habrioux, Aurélien; Morais, Cláudia; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2014-07-21

    We reported herein on the use of tolerant cathode catalysts such as carbon supported Pt(x)Ti(y) and/or Pt(x)Se(y) nanomaterials in an air-breathing methanol microfluidic fuel cell. In order to show the improvement of mixed-reactant fuel cell (MRFC) performances obtained with the developed tolerant catalysts, a classical Pt/C nanomaterial was used for comparison. Using 5 M methanol concentration in a situation where the fuel crossover is 100% (MRFC-mixed reactant fuel cell application), the maximum power density of the fuel cell with a Pt/C cathodic catalyst decreased by 80% in comparison with what is observed in the laminar flow fuel cell (LFFC) configuration. With Pt(x)Ti(y)/C and Pt(x)Se(y)/C cathode nanomaterials, the performance loss was only 55% and 20%, respectively. The evaluation of the tolerant cathode catalysts in an air-breathing microfluidic fuel cell suggests the development of a novel nanometric system that will not be size restricted. These interesting results are the consequence of the high methanol tolerance of these advanced electrocatalysts via surface electronic modification of Pt. Herein we used X-ray photoelectron and in situ FTIR spectroscopies to investigate the origin of the high methanol tolerance on modified Pt catalysts.

  8. Caspase-8 acts as a molecular rheostat to limit RIPK1- and MyD88-mediated dendritic cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuda, Carla M; Misharin, Alexander V; Gierut, Angelica K; Saber, Rana; Haines, G Kenneth; Hutcheson, Jack; Hedrick, Stephen M; Mohan, Chandra; Budinger, G Scott; Stehlik, Christian; Perlman, Harris

    2014-06-15

    Caspase-8, an executioner enzyme in the death receptor pathway, was shown to initiate apoptosis and suppress necroptosis. In this study, we identify a novel, cell death-independent role for caspase-8 in dendritic cells (DCs): DC-specific expression of caspase-8 prevents the onset of systemic autoimmunity. Failure to express caspase-8 has no effect on the lifespan of DCs but instead leads to an enhanced intrinsic activation and, subsequently, more mature and autoreactive lymphocytes. Uncontrolled TLR activation in a RIPK1-dependent manner is responsible for the enhanced functionality of caspase-8-deficient DCs, because deletion of the TLR-signaling mediator, MyD88, ameliorates systemic autoimmunity induced by caspase-8 deficiency. Taken together, these data demonstrate that caspase-8 functions in a cell type-specific manner and acts uniquely in DCs to maintain tolerance.

  9. Predictive factors of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patient tolerance to high-dose cisplatin in concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano, Kenji; SATO, YASUYOSHI; TOSHIYASU, TAKASHI; SATO, YUKIKO; INAGAKI, LINA; Tomomatsu, Junichi; Sasaki, Toru; SHIMBASHI, WATARU; FUKUSHIMA, HIROFUMI; YONEKAWA, HIROYUKI; Mitani,Hiroki; Kawabata, Kazuyoshi; Takahashi, Shunji

    2015-01-01

    Although high-dose cisplatin is the standard regimen of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), varying levels of patient tolerance towards cisplatin have been reported, and the predictive factors of cisplatin tolerance remain to be elucidated. The present study retrospectively reviewed newly diagnosed HNSCC patients who received CCRT. Cisplatin (80 mg/m2) was administered every 3 weeks. The proportion of high-dose cisplatin-tole...

  10. Can Airway Tolerance be Promoted Immunopharmacologically with Aspirin in Aspirin-insensitive Allergic Bonchial Asthmatics by T Regulatory Cells (Tregs-directed Immunoregulatory Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzammal Hussain

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The pathobiology of allergic bronchial asthma is mediated by over-expressed T helper type 2 (Th2-biased immune responses to harmless environmental antigens, leading to airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness. These Th2 responses are normally suppressed by functional T regulatory cells (Tregs, which maintain the airway tolerance. However, the Tregs activity is conceived to be compromised in allergic asthmatics. The curative therapy to counteract this immune dysregulation is not available so far, and to devise such a remedy is the current research impetus in allergic asthma therapeutics. One of the novel insights is to consider a Tregs-directed immunoregulatory therapy that could harness endogenous Tregs to redress the Th2/Tregs imbalance, thus enhancing the airway tolerance. Aspirin or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA is a prototype non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that possesses intriguing immunopharmacological attributes. For example, it can enhance the number or the frequency of functional Tregs, especially natural CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Tregs, either directly or by inducing tolerogenic activity in dendritic cells (DCs. It is also considered to be beneficial for the induction of immunological tolerance in autoimmunity and graft rejection. This raises the question whether ASA, if exploited optimally, may be used to induce and harness endogenous Tregs activity for redressing Th2/Tregs imbalance in allergic asthma. In this paper, we hypothesise that ASA may help to counteract the underlying immune dysregulation in allergic asthma by promoting airway tolerance. Nevertheless, the future research in this regard will selectively need to be targeted to allergic asthma models, which are ASA insensitive, as ASA has some adverse background and is contraindicated in asthmatics who are sensitive to it.

  11. PINK1/Parkin-mediated mitophagy in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiyama, Akinori; Okamoto, Koji

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondria-specific autophagy (mitophagy) is a fundamental process critical for maintaining mitochondrial fitness in a myriad of cell types. Particularly, mitophagy contributes to mitochondrial quality control by selectively eliminating dysfunctional mitochondria. In mammalian cells, the Ser/Thr kinase PINK1 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin act cooperatively in sensing mitochondrial functional state and marking damaged mitochondria for disposal via the autophagy pathway. Notably, ubiquitin and deubiquitinases play vital roles in modulating Parkin activity and mitophagy efficiency. In this review, we highlight recent breakthroughs addressing the key issues of how PINK1 activates Parkin in response to mitochondrial malfunction, how Parkin localizes specifically to impaired mitochondria, and how ubiquitination and deubiquitination regulate PINK1/Parkin-mediated mitophagy.

  12. A Neutralizing Antibody Assay Based on a Reporter of Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuling; Li, Jia J; Kim, Hyun Jun; Liu, Xu; Liu, Weiyi; Akhgar, Ahmad; Bowen, Michael A; Spitz, Susan; Jiang, Xu-Rong; Roskos, Lorin K; White, Wendy I

    2015-11-01

    Benralizumab is a humanized anti-IL5 receptor α (IL5Rα) monoclonal antibody (mAb) with enhanced (afucosylation) antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) function. An ADCC reporter cell-based neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay was developed and characterized to detect NAb against benralizumab in human serum to support the clinical development of benralizumab. The optimal ratio of target cells to effector cells was 3:1. Neither parental benralizumab (fucosylated) nor benralizumab Fab resulted in ADCC activity, confirming the requirement for ADCC activity in the NAb assay. The serum tolerance of the cells was determined to be 2.5%. The cut point derived from normal and asthma serum samples was comparable. The effective range of benralizumab was determined, and 35 ng/mL [80% maximal effective concentration (EC80)] was chosen as the standard concentration to run in the assessment of NAb. An affinity purified goat anti-benralizumab polyclonal idiotype antibody preparation was shown to have NAb since it inhibited ADCC activity in a dose-dependent fashion. The low endogenous concentrations of IL5 and soluble IL5 receptor (sIL5R) did not demonstrate to interfere with the assay. The estimated assay sensitivities at the cut point were 1.02 and 1.10 μg/mL as determined by the surrogate neutralizing goat polyclonal and mouse monoclonal anti-drug antibody (ADA) controls, respectively. The assay can detect NAb (at 2.5 μg/mL) in the presence of 0.78 μg/mL benralizumab. The assay was not susceptible to non-specific matrix effects. This study provides an approach and feasibility of developing an ADCC cell-based NAb assay to support biopharmaceuticals with an ADCC function.

  13. Hypervirulent-host-associated Citrobacter rodentium cells have poor acid tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Allen; Bhagwat, Arvind A

    2013-05-01

    Enhanced virulence or infectivity after passage through a mammalian host has been reported for a number of enteric food-borne pathogens. Citrobacter rodentium is a mouse pathogen that mimics many aspects of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection of humans and serves as a useful model for studying virulence mechanisms. Emergence of a hyperinfectious state after passage through mouse gastrointestinal tract was reported for C. rodentium. We wanted to investigate if increased acid tolerance could explain hypervirulence status of C. rodentium. Although we were able to observe hyperinfectious state of C. rodentium upon host passage, the cells were extremely acid sensitive. Growth under mildly acidic conditions (LB-MES, pH 5.5) induced acid tolerance of C. rodentium, but did not improve the organism's ability to establish infection. Growth under anaerobic environment on fecal components also did not induce hyperinfectious state. Thus, contrary to conventional anticipation, hypervirulent C. rodentium cells were found to be acid sensitive thereby revealing limitations of the role of mouse gastric acidity by itself in elucidating the hypervirulent phenotype.

  14. TLR5 mediates CD172α(+) intestinal lamina propria dendritic cell induction of Th17 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han; Chen, Feidi; Wu, Wei; Cao, Anthony T; Xue, Xiaochang; Yao, Suxia; Evans-Marin, Heather L; Li, Yan-Qing; Cong, Yingzi

    2016-02-24

    Multiple mechanisms exist in regulation of host responses to massive challenges from microbiota to maintain immune homeostasis in the intestines. Among these is the enriched Th17 cells in the intestines, which regulates intestinal homeostasis through induction of antimicrobial peptides and secretory IgA among others. However, the means by which Th17 cells develop in response to microbiota is still not completely understood. Although both TLR5 and CD172α(+) lamina propria dendritic cells (LPDC) have been shown to promote Th17 cell development, it is still unclear whether TLR5 mediates the CD172α(+)LPDC induction of Th17 cells. By using a microbiota antigen-specific T cell reporter mouse system, we demonstrated that microbiota antigen-specific T cells developed into Th17 cells in the intestinal LP, but not in the spleen when transferred into TCRβxδ(-/-) mice. LPDCs expressed high levels of TLR5, and most CD172α(+)LPDCs also co-expressed TLR5. LPDCs produced high levels of IL-23, IL-6 and TGFβ when stimulated with commensal flagellin and promoted Th17 cell development when cultured with full-length CBir1 flagellin but not CBir1 peptide. Wild-type CD172α(+), but not CD172α(-), LPDCs induced Th17 cells, whereas TLR5-deficient LPDC did not induce Th17 cells. Our data thereby demonstrated that TLR5 mediates CD172α(+)LPDC induction of Th17 cells in the intestines.

  15. Hepatic non-parenchymal cells and extracellular matrix participate in oval cell-mediated liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Xiao-Ping Chen; Wan-Guang Zhang; Feng Zhang; Shuai Xiang; Han-Hua Dong; Lei Zhang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the interaction between nonparenchymal cells, extracellular matrix and oval cells during the restituting process of liver injury induced by partial hepatectomy (PH). METHODS: We examined the localization of oval cells, non-parenchymal cells, and the extracellular matrix components using immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescent analysis during the proliferation and differentiation of oval cells in N-2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF)/PH rat model. RESULTS: By day 2 after PH, small oval cells began to proliferate around the portal area. Most of stellate cells and laminin were present along the hepatic sinusoids in the periportal area. Kupffer cells and fibronectin markedly increased in the whole hepatic lobule. From day 4 to 9, oval cells spread further into hepatic parenchyma, closely associated with stellate cells, fibronectin and laminin. Kupffer cells admixed with oval cells by day 6 and then decreased in the periportal zone. From day 12 to 15, most of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), laminin and fibronectin located around the small hepatocyte nodus, and minority of them appeared in the nodus. Kupffer cells were mainly limited in the pericentral sinusoids. After day 18, the normal liver lobule structures began to recover.CONCLUSION: Local hepatic microenvironment may participate in the oval cell-mediated liver regeneration through the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions.

  16. Biological features of intrahepatic CD4+CD25+ T cells in the naturally tolerance of rat liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Ling; ZHANG Feng; PU Liyong; YAO Aihua; YU Yue; SUN Beicheng; LI Guoqiang

    2007-01-01

    The biological features of intrahepatic CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells in the naturally tolerance of rat liver transplantation were explored.Orthotopic liver transplantation was performed in two allogeneic rat strain combinations,one with fatal immunosuppression despite a complete major histocompatibility complex mismatch.The subjects were divided into three groups according to different donors and recipients [Tolerance group:LEW-to-DA;Rejection group:DA-to-LEW;Syngegnic group(control group):DAto-DA].The proportion of intrahepatic CD4+CD25+ T cells from three groups was determined by flow cytometry(FCM)in different time.The intrahepaitc CD4+CD25+ T cells were isolated by magnetic activated cell sorting(MACS)method and identified by FCM.The Foxp3 mRNA was detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR).And their suppression on the proliferation of CD4+CD25- T effector cells was analyzed by cell proliferation assay in vitro.Beginning immediately after transplantation,the proportion of Treg cells increased over time in both allogeneic groups but was significantly greater in the Rejection group.The proportion of Treg cells declined after day 5,and such reduction was more dramatic in the Rejection group than in the Tolerance group.Animals in the Tolerance group showed a second increase in the proportion after day 14.Intrahepatic CD4+CD25+T cells isolated from spontaneous tolerance models inhibited the proliferation of mixed lymphocyte reaction.The purity of CD4+CD25+ T cells sorted by MACS was 86%-93%.The CD4+CD25+ T cells could specifically express the Foxp3 gene compared with CD4+CD25- T cells.In vitro,the spleen cells from LEW rats can irritate the proliferation of CD4+CD25+ T cells more obviously than the syngegnic spleen cells.CD4+CD25+ Tr cells could suppress the proliferation of CD4+CD25- T cells,but the inhibition was reversed by exogenous IL-2(200 U/mL).The CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells specifically express the Foxp3 gene,which may play an

  17. Comparative Polygenic Analysis of Maximal Ethanol Accumulation Capacity and Tolerance to High Ethanol Levels of Cell Proliferation in Yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pais, Thiago M.; Foulquié-Moreno, María R.; Hubmann, Georg; Duitama, Jorge; Swinnen, Steve; Goovaerts, Annelies; Yang, Yudi; Dumortier, Françoise; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to accumulate ≥17% ethanol (v/v) by fermentation in the absence of cell proliferation. The genetic basis of this unique capacity is unknown. Up to now, all research has focused on tolerance of yeast cell proliferation to high ethanol levels. Comparison of m

  18. Alpha-adrenergic blocker mediated osteoblastic stem cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yoon Jung [Craniomaxillofacial Reconstructive Sciences Major, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jue Yeon [Craniomaxillofacial Reconstructive Sciences Major, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Jin [Department of Industrial Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chong-Pyoung [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yoon Jeong, E-mail: parkyj@snu.ac.kr [Craniomaxillofacial Reconstructive Sciences Major, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin directly up-regulated bone metabolism at a low dose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin induced osteoblastic stem cell differentiation without affecting cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This osteogenic stem cell differentiation is mediated by ERK-signal dependent pathway. -- Abstract: Recent researches have indicated a role for antihypertensive drugs including alpha- or beta-blockers in the prevention of bone loss. Some epidemiological studies reported the protective effects of those agents on fracture risk. However, there is limited information on the association with those agents especially at the mechanism of action. In the present study, we investigated the effects of doxazosin, an alpha-blocker that is clinically used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) along with antihypertensive medication, on the osteogenic stem cell differentiation. We found that doxazosin increased osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells, detected by Alizarin red S staining and calcein. Doxazosin not only induced expression of alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, osteopontin, and osteocalcin, it also resulted in increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), a MAP kinase involved in osteoblastic differentiation. Treatment with U0126, a MAP kinase inhibitor, significantly blocked doxazosin-induced osteoblastic differentiation. Unrelated to activation of osteogenic differentiation by doxazosin, we found that there were no significant changes in adipogenic differentiation or in the expression of adipose-specific genes, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}, aP2, or LPL. In this report, we suggest that doxazosin has the ability to increase osteogenic cell differentiation via ERK1/2 activation in osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells, which supports the protective effects of antihypertensive drug on fracture risk and

  19. Modification of host dendritic cells by microchimerism-derived extracellular vesicles generates split tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracamonte-Baran, William; Florentin, Jonathan; Zhou, Ying; Jankowska-Gan, Ewa; Haynes, W. John; Zhong, Weixiong; Brennan, Todd V.; Dutta, Partha; Claas, Frans H. J.; van Rood, Jon J.; Burlingham, William J.

    2017-01-01

    Maternal microchimerism (MMc) has been associated with development of allospecific transplant tolerance, antitumor immunity, and cross-generational reproductive fitness, but its mode of action is unknown. We found in a murine model that MMc caused exposure to the noninherited maternal antigens in all offspring, but in some, MMc magnitude was enough to cause membrane alloantigen acquisition (mAAQ; “cross-dressing”) of host dendritic cells (DCs). Extracellular vesicle (EV)-enriched serum fractions from mAAQ+, but not from non-mAAQ, mice reproduced the DC cross-dressing phenomenon in vitro. In vivo, mAAQ was associated with increased expression of immune modulators PD-L1 (programmed death-ligand 1) and CD86 by myeloid DCs (mDCs) and decreased presentation of allopeptide+self-MHC complexes, along with increased PD-L1, on plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). Remarkably, both serum EV-enriched fractions and membrane microdomains containing the acquired MHC alloantigens included CD86, but completely excluded PD-L1. In contrast, EV-enriched fractions and microdomains containing allopeptide+self-MHC did not exclude PD-L1. Adoptive transfer of allospecific transgenic CD4 T cells revealed a “split tolerance” status in mAAQ+ mice: T cells recognizing intact acquired MHC alloantigens proliferated, whereas those responding to allopeptide+self-MHC did not. Using isolated pDCs and mDCs for in vitro culture with allopeptide+self-MHC–specific CD4 T cells, we could replicate their normal activation in non-mAAQ mice, and PD-L1–dependent anergy in mAAQ+ hosts. We propose that EVs provide a physiologic link between microchimerism and split tolerance, with implications for tumor immunity, transplantation, autoimmunity, and reproductive success. PMID:28096390

  20. BNNT-mediated irreversible electroporatio: its potential on cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittoria Raffa, Cristina Riggio, Michael W. Smith, Kevin C. Jordan, Wei Cao, Alfred Cuschieri

    2012-10-01

    Tissue ablation, i.e., the destruction of undesirable tissues, has become an important minimally invasive technique alternative to resection surgery for the treatment of tumours. Several methods for tissue ablation are based on thermal techniques using cold, e.g. cryosurgery [1] or heat, e.g. radiofrequency [2] or high-intensity focused ultrasound [3] or nanoparticle-mediated irradiation [4]. Alternatively, irreversible electroporation (IRE) has been proposed as non thermal technique for minimally invasive tissue ablation based on the use of electrical pulses. When the electric field is applied to a cell, a change in transmembrane potential is induced, which can cause biochemical and physiological changes of the cell. When the threshold value of the transmembrane potential is exceeded, the cell membrane becomes permeable, thus allowing entrance of molecules that otherwise cannot cross the membrane [5]. A further increase in the electric field intensity may cause irreversible membrane permeabilization and cell death. These pulses create irreversible defects (pores) in the cell membrane lipid bilayer, causing cell death through loss of cell homeostasis [6]. This is desirable in tumour ablation in order to produce large cell death, without the use of cytostatic drugs. A study of Davalos, Mir and Rubinsky showed that IRE can ablate substantial volumes of tissue without inducing a thermal effect and therefore serve as an independent and new tissue ablation modality; this opened the way to the use of IRE in surgery [7]. Their finding was subsequently confirmed in studies on cells [8], small animal models [9] and in large animal models in the liver [10] and the heart [11]. The most important finding in these papers is that irreversible electroporation produces precisely delineated ablation zones with cell scale resolution between ablated and non-ablated areas, without zones in which the extent of damage changes gradually as during thermal ablation. Furthermore, it is

  1. PDGF mediates derivation of human embryonic germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Hong, Wan Xing; Lan, Baojin; Xu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yinan; Kong, Lin; Li, Yaxuan; Zhou, Shixin; Liu, Ying; Feng, Ruopeng; Jiang, Sibo; He, Qihua; Tan, Jichun

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic germ cells (hEGCs) are a valuable and underutilized source of pluripotent stem cells. Unlike embryonic stem cells, which have been extensively studied, little is known about the factors that regulate hEGC derivation and maintenance. This study demonstrates for the first time a central role for selective activation of PDGFR signaling in the derivation and maintenance of pluripotency in hEGCs. In the study, hEGCs were found to express PDGF receptor α at high levels compared to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). PDGF significantly improved formation of alkaline phosphatase (AP) positive hEGC colonies. We subsequently determined that PDGF activates the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathway as phosphorylation of AKT was up-regulated in response to PDGF. Furthermore, inhibition of PI3K signaling using small molecular inhibitor LY294002 led to significantly decreased AP positive hEGC colony formation whereas inhibition of MAPK pathway using U0126 had a negligible effect. We established a primary mechanism for PDGF mediated derivation and maintenance of hEGCs by demonstrating that OCT4 was upregulated and PTEN was suppressed in a dose dependent manner in response to PDGF.

  2. Mediators of Mast Cells in Bullous Pemphigoid and Dermatitis Herpetiformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Zebrowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bullous pemphigoid (BP and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH are skin diseases associated with inflammation. However, few findings exist concerning the role of mast cells in autoimmune blistering disease. Skin biopsies were taken from 27 BP and 14 DH patients, as well as 20 healthy individuals. Immunohistochemistry was used to identify the localization and mast cell expression of TNFα and MMP9 in skin lesions and perilesional skin. The serum concentrations of TNFα, MMP9, chymase, tryptase, PAF, and IL-4 were measured by immunoassay. TNFα and MMP9 expression in the epidermis and in inflammatory influxed cells in the dermis was detected in skin biopsies from patients. Although these mediators were found to be expressed in the perilesional skin of all patients, the level was much lower than that in lesional skin. Increased serum PAF levels were observed in BP patients. Mast cells may play an essential role in activating inflammation, which ultimately contributes to the tissue damage observed in BP and DH. Our findings suggest that differences in the pattern of cytokine expression directly contribute to variations in cellular infiltration in DH and BP.

  3. Overexpression of a maize sulfite oxidase gene in tobacco enhances tolerance to sulfite stress via sulfite oxidation and CAT-mediated H2O2 scavenging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongliang Xia

    Full Text Available Sulfite oxidase (SO plays an important role in sulfite metabolism. To date, the molecular mechanisms of sulfite metabolism in plants are largely unknown. Previously, a full-length cDNA of the putative sulfite oxidase gene from maize (ZmSO was cloned, and its response to SO(2/sulfite stress at the transcriptional level was characterized. In this study, the recombinant ZmSO protein was purified from E. coli. It exhibited sulfite-dependent activity and had strong affinity for the substrate sulfite. Over-expression (OE of ZmSO in tobacco plants enhanced their tolerance to sulfite stress. The plants showed much less damage, less sulfite accumulation, but greater amounts of sulfate. This suggests that tolerance of transgenic plants to sulfite was enhanced by increasing SO expression levels. Interestingly, H(2O(2 accumulation levels by histochemical detection and quantitative determination in the OE plants were much less than those in the wild-type upon sulfite stress. Furthermore, reductions of catalase levels detected in the OE lines were considerably less than in the wild-type plants. This indicates that SO may play an important role in protecting CAT from inhibition by excess sulfite. Collectively, these data demonstrate that transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing ZmSO enhance tolerance to excess sulfite through sulfite oxidation and catalase-mediated hydrogen peroxide scavenging. This is the first SO gene from monocots to be functionally characterized.

  4. MaJAZ1 Attenuates the MaLBD5-Mediated Transcriptional Activation of Jasmonate Biosynthesis Gene MaAOC2 in Regulating Cold Tolerance of Banana Fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Liang-jie; Kuang, Jian-fei; Chen, Jian-ye; Lu, Wang-jin

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies indicated that methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment could effectively reduce the chilling injury of many fruits, including banana, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, one lateral organ boundaries (LOB) domain (LBD) gene, designated as MaLBD5, was isolated and characterized from banana fruit. Expression analysis revealed that accumulation of MaLBD5 was induced by cold temperature and MeJA treatment. Subcellular localization and transactivation assays showed that MaLBD5 was localized to the nucleus and possessed transcriptional activation activity. Protein-protein interaction analysis demonstrated that MaLBD5 physically interacted with MaJAZ1, a potential repressor of jasmonate signaling. Furthermore, transient expression assays indicated that MaLBD5 transactivated a jasmonate biosynthesis gene, termed MaAOC2, which was also induced by cold and MeJA. More interestingly, MaJAZ1 attenuated the MaLBD5-mediated transactivation of MaAOC2. These results suggest that MaLBD5 and MaJAZ1 might act antagonistically in relation to MeJA-induced cold tolerance of banana fruit, at least partially via affecting jasmonate biosynthesis. Collectively, our findings expand the knowledge of the transcriptional regulatory network of MeJA-mediated cold tolerance of banana fruit.

  5. GsSKP21, a Glycine soja S-phase kinase-associated protein, mediates the regulation of plant alkaline tolerance and ABA sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ailin; Yu, Yang; Duan, Xiangbo; Sun, Xiaoli; Duanmu, Huizi; Zhu, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    Plant SKP1-like family proteins, components of the SCF complex E3 ligases, are involved in the regulation of plant development and stress responses. Little is known about the precise function of SKP genes in plant responses to environmental stresses. GsSKP21 was initially identified as a potential stress-responsive gene based on the transcriptome sequencing of Glycine soja. In this study, we found that GsSKP21 protein contains highly conserved SKP domains in its N terminus and an extra unidentified domain in its C terminus. The transcript abundance of GsSKP21, detected by quantitative real-time PCR, was induced under the treatment of alkali and salt stresses. Overexpression of GsSKP21 in Arabidopsis dramatically increased plant tolerance to alkali stress. Furthermore, we found that overexpression of GsSKP21 resulted in decreased ABA sensitivity during both the seed germination and early seedling growth stages. GsSKP21 mediated ABA signaling by altering the expression levels of the ABA signaling-related and ABA-induced genes. We also investigated the tissue expression specificity and subcellular localization of GsSKP21. These results suggest that GsSKP21 is important for plant tolerance to alkali stress and plays a critical regulatory role in the ABA-mediated stress response.

  6. Arsenic accumulation and tolerance in rootless macrophyte Najas indica are mediated through antioxidants, amino acids and phytochelatins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Singh, Ragini; Tripathi, Preeti; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Chauhan, Reshu; Adhikari, Bijan; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Arsenic (As) accumulation and tolerance response of a submerged rootless macrophyte Najas indica were evaluated during arsenate (As(V); 10-250 μM) and arsenite (As(III); 1-50 μM) exposure. Higher As accumulation at As(III) exposure and more tolerance upon As(V) exposure resulted in more toxicity during As(III) stress than As(V), which was evident through measurement of growth parameters and oxidative stress related parameters viz., lipid peroxidation (MDA content), electrical conductivity (EC) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels. Antioxidant enzymes and various amino acids were more prominent during moderate exposure of As(V), suggesting their possible role in As tolerance and detoxification. Various non-enzymatic antioxidant metabolites viz., ascorbic acid (ASC), glutathione (GSH), non-protein thiols (NPTs) and phytochelatins (PCs) biosynthesis involving phytochelatin synthase (PCS) activity increased more significantly during As(III) stress. However, PCs content seems inadequate in response to As accumulation leading to lower PC-SH:As molar ratio and higher As phytotoxicity during As(III) stress. N. indica may prove useful plant species for phytoremediation purpose in moderately As contaminated water bodies due to high As accumulation and tolerance potential.

  7. M1 muscarinic receptor activation mediates cell death in M1-HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, E Scott; Woo, Kerhan K; Aalderink, Miranda; Fry, Sandie; Greenwood, Jeffrey M; Glass, Michelle; Dragunow, Mike

    2013-01-01

    HEK293 cells have been used extensively to generate stable cell lines to study G protein-coupled receptors, such as muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). The activation of M1 mAChRs in various cell types in vitro has been shown to be protective. To further investigate M1 mAChR-mediated cell survival, we generated stable HEK293 cell-lines expressing the human M1 mAChR. M1 mAChRs were efficiently expressed at the cell surface and efficiently internalised within 1 h by carbachol. Carbachol also induced early signalling cascades similar to previous reports. Thus, ectopically expressed M1 receptors behaved in a similar fashion to the native receptor over short time periods of analysis. However, substantial cell death was observed in HEK293-M1 cells within 24 h after carbachol application. Death was only observed in HEK cells expressing M1 receptors and fully blocked by M1 antagonists. M1 mAChR-stimulation mediated prolonged activation of the MEK-ERK pathway and resulted in prolonged induction of the transcription factor EGR-1 (>24 h). Blockade of ERK signalling with U0126 did not reduce M1 mAChR-mediated cell-death significantly but inhibited the acute induction of EGR-1. We investigated the time-course of cell death using time-lapse microscopy and xCELLigence technology. Both revealed the M1 mAChR cytotoxicity occurs within several hours of M1 activation. The xCELLigence assay also confirmed that the ERK pathway was not involved in cell-death. Interestingly, the MEK blocker did reduce carbachol-mediated cleaved caspase 3 expression in HEK293-M1 cells. The HEK293 cell line is a widely used pharmacological tool for studying G-protein coupled receptors, including mAChRs. Our results highlight the importance of investigating the longer term fate of these cells in short term signalling studies. Identifying how and why activation of the M1 mAChR signals apoptosis in these cells may lead to a better understanding of how mAChRs regulate cell-fate decisions.

  8. Molecular basis of sidekick-mediated cell-cell adhesion and specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Kerry M.; Yamagata, Masahito; Jin, Xiangshu; Mannepalli, Seetha; Katsamba, Phinikoula S.; Ahlsén, Göran; Sergeeva, Alina P.; Honig, Barry; Sanes, Joshua R.; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2016-09-19

    Sidekick (Sdk) 1 and 2 are related immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion proteins required for appropriate synaptic connections between specific subtypes of retinal neurons. Sdks mediate cell-cell adhesion with homophilic specificity that underlies their neuronal targeting function. Here we report crystal structures of Sdk1 and Sdk2 ectodomain regions, revealing similar homodimers mediated by the four N-terminal immunoglobulin domains (Ig1–4), arranged in a horseshoe conformation. These Ig1–4 horseshoes interact in a novel back-to-back orientation in both homodimers through Ig1:Ig2, Ig1:Ig1 and Ig3:Ig4 interactions. Structure-guided mutagenesis results show that this canonical dimer is required for both Sdk-mediated cell aggregation (viatransinteractions) and Sdk clustering in isolated cells (viacisinteractions). Sdk1/Sdk2 recognition specificity is encoded across Ig1–4, with Ig1–2 conferring the majority of binding affinity and differential specificity. We suggest that competition betweencisandtransinteractions provides a novel mechanism to sharpen the specificity of cell-cell interactions.

  9. On the impact of water activity on reversal tolerant fuel cell anode performance and durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bo Ki; Mandal, Pratiti; Oh, Jong-Gil; Litster, Shawn

    2016-10-01

    Durability of polymer electrolyte fuel cells in automotive applications can be severely affected by hydrogen starvation arising due to transients during the drive-cycle. It causes individual cell voltage reversal, yielding water electrolysis and carbon corrosion reactions at the anode, ultimately leading to catastrophic cell failure. A popular material-based mitigation strategy is to employ a reversal tolerant anode (RTA) that includes oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalyst (e.g., IrO2) to promote water electrolysis over carbon corrosion. Here we report that RTA performance surprisingly drops under not only water-deficient but also water-excess conditions. This presents a significant technical challenge since the most common triggers for cell reversal involve excess liquid water. Our findings from detailed electrochemical diagnostics and nano-scale X-ray computed tomography provide insight into how automotive fuel cells can overcome critical vulnerabilities using material-based solutions. Our work also highlights the need for improved materials, electrode designs, and operation strategies for robust RTAs.

  10. Glutathione plays an essential role in nitric oxide-mediated iron-deficiency signaling and iron-deficiency tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Varanavasiappan; Wang, Yi-Wen; Tsednee, Munkhtsetseg; Karunakaran, Krithika; Yeh, Kuo-Chen

    2015-11-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a common agricultural problem that affects both the productivity and nutritional quality of plants. Thus, identifying the key factors involved in the tolerance of Fe deficiency is important. In the present study, the zir1 mutant, which is glutathione deficient, was found to be more sensitive to Fe deficiency than the wild type, and grew poorly in alkaline soil. Other glutathione-deficient mutants also showed various degrees of sensitivity to Fe-limited conditions. Interestingly, we found that the glutathione level was increased under Fe deficiency in the wild type. By contrast, blocking glutathione biosynthesis led to increased physiological sensitivity to Fe deficiency. On the other hand, overexpressing glutathione enhanced the tolerance to Fe deficiency. Under Fe-limited conditions, glutathione-deficient mutants, zir1, pad2 and cad2 accumulated lower levels of Fe than the wild type. The key genes involved in Fe uptake, including IRT1, FRO2 and FIT, are expressed at low levels in zir1; however, a split-root experiment suggested that the systemic signals that govern the expression of Fe uptake-related genes are still active in zir1. Furthermore, we found that zir1 had a lower accumulation of nitric oxide (NO) and NO reservoir S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Although NO is a signaling molecule involved in the induction of Fe uptake-related genes during Fe deficiency, the NO-mediated induction of Fe-uptake genes is dependent on glutathione supply in the zir1 mutant. These results provide direct evidence that glutathione plays an essential role in Fe-deficiency tolerance and NO-mediated Fe-deficiency signaling in Arabidopsis.

  11. Exposure of FVIII in the Presence of Phosphatidyl Serine Reduces Generation of Memory B-Cells and Induces Regulatory T-Cell-Mediated Hyporesponsiveness in Hemophilia A Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Radha; Davidowitz, Andrew; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V

    2015-08-01

    A major complication of replacement therapy with Factor VIII (FVIII) for hemophilia A (HA) is the development of unwanted immune responses. Previous studies showed that administration of FVIII in the presence of phosphatidyl serine (PS) reduced the development of anti-FVIII antibodies in HA mice. However, the impact of PS-mediated effects on immunological memory, such as generation of memory B-cells, is not clear. The effect of PS on memory B-cells was therefore investigated using adoptive transfer approach in FVIII(-/-) HA mice. Adoptive transfer of memory B-cells from a PS-FVIII-treated group to naïve mice followed by challenge of the recipient mice with FVIII showed a significantly reduced anti-FVIII antibody response in the recipient mice, compared with animals that received memory B-cells from free FVIII and FVIII-charge matched phosphatidyl glycerol (PG) group. The decrease in memory B-cell response is accompanied by an increase in FoxP3 expressing regulatory T-cells (Tregs). Flow cytometry studies showed that the generation of Tregs is higher in PS-treated animals as compared with FVIII and FVIII-PG treated animals. The PS-mediated hyporesponsiveness was found to be antigen-specific. The PS-FVIII immunization showed hyporesponsiveness toward FVIII rechallenge but not against ovalbumin (OVA) rechallenge, an unrelated antigen. This demonstrates that PS reduces immunologic memory of FVIII and induces antigen-specific peripheral tolerance in HA mice.

  12. Regulation of VH replacement by B cell receptor-mediated signaling in human immature B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Lange, Miles D; Hong, Sang Yong; Xie, Wanqin; Xu, Kerui; Huang, Lin; Yu, Yangsheng; Ehrhardt, Götz R A; Zemlin, Michael; Burrows, Peter D; Su, Kaihong; Carter, Robert H; Zhang, Zhixin

    2013-06-01

    VH replacement provides a unique RAG-mediated recombination mechanism to edit nonfunctional IgH genes or IgH genes encoding self-reactive BCRs and contributes to the diversification of Ab repertoire in the mouse and human. Currently, it is not clear how VH replacement is regulated during early B lineage cell development. In this article, we show that cross-linking BCRs induces VH replacement in human EU12 μHC(+) cells and in the newly emigrated immature B cells purified from peripheral blood of healthy donors or tonsillar samples. BCR signaling-induced VH replacement is dependent on the activation of Syk and Src kinases but is inhibited by CD19 costimulation, presumably through activation of the PI3K pathway. These results show that VH replacement is regulated by BCR-mediated signaling in human immature B cells, which can be modulated by physiological and pharmacological treatments.

  13. Studies of tolerance induction through mixed chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys. Method for detection of chimeric cells and effect of thymic irradiation on induction of tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tatsuo; Ota, Kazuo [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    To establish the method for the detection of chimerism in cynomologus monkeys, we tested cross reactivity of various anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to cynomolgus monkeys. In 29 mAb we tested, only three monoclonal anti-HLA antibodies crossreacted with lymphocytes of monkeys. With these mAb, chimeric cell can be detected up to 1% by flow cytometric analysis (study 1). Utilizing the method we developed in study 1, we applied the regimen that induces mixed chimerism and skin graft tolerance in mice to renal allotransplantation of cynomolgus monkey. Regimen A includes non-lethal dose of total body irradiation (TBI), administration of anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) for 3 days, donor bone marrow infusion and 45 days course of cyclosporine (CYA) administration. We added 7 Gy of thymic irradiation on day-6 in regimen B and on day-1 in regimen C. Although all monkeys in regimen A and B consistently developed chimerism, they rejected kidney allografts soon after stopping CYA. In contrast, 4 monkeys out of 5 failed to develop chimerism in regimen C, but renal allograft tolerance was induced in one monkey who developed chimerism in regimen C. In conclusion, the induction of chimerism is considered necessary but not sufficient for tolerance induction. (author)

  14. DJ-1 Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells from Cytokine- and Streptozotocin-Mediated Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Deepak Jain; Gesine Weber; Daniel Eberhard; Mehana, Amir E; Jan Eglinger; Alena Welters; Barbara Bartosinska; Kay Jeruschke; Jürgen Weiss; Günter Päth; Hiroyoshi Ariga; Jochen Seufert; Eckhard Lammert

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark feature of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus is the progressive dysfunction and loss of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, and inflammatory cytokines are known to trigger beta cell death. Here we asked whether the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 encoded by the Parkinson's disease gene PARK7 protects islet cells from cytokine- and streptozotocin-mediated cell death. Wild type and DJ-1 knockout mice (KO) were treated with multiple low doses of streptozotocin (MLDS) to induce inflam...

  15. Plant Cell Division Analyzed by Transient Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The continuing analysis of plant cell division will require additional protein localization studies. This is greatly aided by GFP-technology, but plant transformation and the maintenance of transgenic lines can present a significant technical bottleneck. In this chapter I describe a method for the Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of tobacco BY-2 cells. The method allows for the microscopic analysis of fluorescence-tagged proteins in dividing cells in within 2 days after starting a coculture. This transient transformation procedure requires only standard laboratory equipment. It is hoped that this rapid method would aid researchers conducting live-cell localization studies in plant mitosis and cytokinesis.

  16. Autophagy as a Survival Mechanism for Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells in Endonuclease G-Mediated Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masui, Atsushi; Hamada, Masakazu; Kameyama, Hiroyasu; Wakabayashi, Ken; Takasu, Ayako; Imai, Tomoaki; Iwai, Soichi; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Safingol, L- threo-dihydrosphingosine, induces cell death in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells through an endonuclease G (endoG) -mediated pathway. We herein determined whether safingol induced apoptosis and autophagy in oral SCC cells. Safingol induced apoptotic cell death in oral SCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. In safingol-treated cells, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-I was changed to LC3-II and the cytoplasmic expression of LC3, amount of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) stained by acridine orange and autophagic vacuoles were increased, indicating the occurrence of autophagy. An inhibitor of autophagy, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), enhanced the suppressive effects of safingol on cell viability, and this was accompanied by an increase in the number of apoptotic cells and extent of nuclear fragmentation. The nuclear translocation of endoG was minimal at a low concentration of safingol, but markedly increased when combined with 3-MA. The suppressive effects of safingol and 3-MA on cell viability were reduced in endoG siRNA- transfected cells. The scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) prevented cell death induced by the combinational treatment, whereas a pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not. These results indicated that safingol induced apoptosis and autophagy in SCC cells and that the suppression of autophagy by 3-MA enhanced apoptosis. Autophagy supports cell survival, but not cell death in the SCC cell system in which apoptosis occurs in an endoG-mediated manner. PMID:27658240

  17. High cell density propionic acid fermentation with an acid tolerant strain of Propionibacterium acidipropionici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongqiang; Jin, Ying; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2015-03-01

    Propionic acid is an important chemical with wide applications and its production via fermentation is of great interest. However, economic production of bio-based propionic acid requires high product titer, yield, and productivity in the fermentation. A highly efficient and stable high cell density (HCD) fermentation process with cell recycle by centrifugation was developed for propionic acid production from glucose using an acid-tolerant strain of Propionibacterium acidipropionici, which had a higher specific growth rate, productivity, and acid tolerance compared to the wild type ATCC 4875. The sequential batch HCD fermentation at pH 6.5 produced propionic acid at a high titer of ∼40 g/L and productivity of 2.98 g/L h, with a yield of ∼0.44 g/g. The product yield increased to 0.53-0.62 g/g at a lower pH of 5.0-5.5, which, however, decreased the productivity to 1.28 g/L h. A higher final propionic acid titer of >55 g/L with a productivity of 2.23 g/L h was obtained in fed-batch HCD fermentation at pH 6.5. A 3-stage simulated fed-batch process in serum bottles produced 49.2 g/L propionic acid with a yield of 0.53 g/g and productivity of 0.66 g/L h. These productivities, yields and propionic acid titers were among the highest ever obtained in free-cell propionic acid fermentation.

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells induce T-cell tolerance and protect the preterm brain after global hypoxia-ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reint K Jellema

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE in preterm infants is a severe disease for which no curative treatment is available. Cerebral inflammation and invasion of activated peripheral immune cells have been shown to play a pivotal role in the etiology of white matter injury, which is the clinical hallmark of HIE in preterm infants. The objective of this study was to assess the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of intravenously delivered mesenchymal stem cells (MSC in an ovine model of HIE. In this translational animal model, global hypoxia-ischemia (HI was induced in instrumented preterm sheep by transient umbilical cord occlusion, which closely mimics the clinical insult. Intravenous administration of 2 x 10(6 MSC/kg reduced microglial proliferation, diminished loss of oligodendrocytes and reduced demyelination, as determined by histology and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI, in the preterm brain after global HI. These anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects of MSC were paralleled by reduced electrographic seizure activity in the ischemic preterm brain. Furthermore, we showed that MSC induced persistent peripheral T-cell tolerance in vivo and reduced invasion of T-cells into the preterm brain following global HI. These findings show in a preclinical animal model that intravenously administered MSC reduced cerebral inflammation, protected against white matter injury and established functional improvement in the preterm brain following global HI. Moreover, we provide evidence that induction of T-cell tolerance by MSC might play an important role in the neuroprotective effects of MSC in HIE. This is the first study to describe a marked neuroprotective effect of MSC in a translational animal model of HIE.

  19. Tolerância à salinidade em feijão (Phaseolus vulgaris L Salt tolerance in bean (Paseolus vulgaris cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Broetto

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Uma das aplicações das técnicas da cultura de tecidos no melhoramento é a identificação de linhas de células que apresentam tolerância à salinidade. Vários autores obtiveram linhas de células tolerantes ao estresse salino; e estudo de mecanismos bioquímicos da tolerância a sais em plantas tem demonstrado altas correlações entre estes e o acúmulo de macromoléculas em tecido de plantas superiores. Para verificar essas correlações em feijão (Phaseolus vulgaris cv IAC carioca, calos oriundos de eixos embrionários foram cultivados em meio sólido, suplementado com NaCl nas concentrações de 0 a 60 mM. Após 13 dias de incubação, os calos foram coletados e analisados quanto ao crescimento relativo, teor de proteínas, teor de prolina e atividade da peroxidase. Os parâmetros analisados mostraram decréscimo no crescimento relativo e no de proteínas em resposta ao NaCl. Paralelamente, observou-se aumento significativo no conteúdo de prolina e atividade da enzima peroxidase.One of the applications of the tissue culture technique in plant improvement is the identification of cell lines which show salinity tolerance. Several authors were able to obtain saline stress-tolerant cell lines and show that mechanisms of tolerance to salts have a strong correlation between this phenomenon and a high macromolecule concentration in plant tissues. Callus obtained from embrionic axis of Phaseolus vulgarís cv. IAC carioca in solid medium, supplemented with 0 to 60 mM NaCl, as the salt treatment, were used. Callus harvesting was done on the 13th day, when they were processed for relative growth, protein, proline content and peroxidase acivity. The results show both, a decrease of the relative growth and of protein content in response to the NaCl treatment, as compared to controls. However, there was a significant increase on the proline content and on the peroxidase activity.

  20. Mast cell mediators and peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, J C; Liebman, S M; Monk, P K; Pelletier, G J

    1995-09-01

    We have previously shown that mast cell stabilization attenuates peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat. The present study investigated the mechanism of this protection. Adhesions were created in weanling rats using cecal scraping and application of 95% ethanol. Rats received specific blockers for the mast cell products histamine, serotonin (5HT), leukotriene D4, and platelet activating factor intraperitoneally 30 min before laparotomy and at the time of abdominal closure. Control animals received saline. Adhesions were assessed blindly 1 week later using a standardized scale. Adhesion formation was not affected by histamine blockade using combined mepyramine and ranitidine, 5-HT1 blockade using methysergide, 5-HT3 blockade using ondansetron, leukotriene D4 blockade using MK-571, or platelet activating factor blockade using WEB-2086. However, blockade of the 5-HT2 receptor using ketanserin resulted in significant dose-dependent attenuation of adhesions compared to saline. These data suggest that mast cells mediate peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat through release of serotonin acting on 5HT2 receptors. Further understanding of this process may lead to new strategies for the prevention of postoperative adhesions.

  1. Cell mediated immune response in human antirabies revaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Regina Veiga

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of secondary cell mediated immune response (CMI in human antirabies immunization was studied. The Puenzalida & Palácios vaccine was used because it is routinely used in Brazil. CMI was evaluated by lymphoblastic transformation indices obtained in whole blood culture in the presence of rabies and control (nervous tissue antigens. Eleven volunteers submitted to revaccination constituted the group under study, while three other volunteers submitted primo vaccination were utilized as control group. A clear secondary CMI to rabies antigen was detected in all the revaccinated volunteers who showed earlier and more intense response than the control group. Response to the control antigen, however, present in all the components of the first group was not detectable in two out of the three primovaccinated and very low in the third one.

  2. CRISPR mediated somatic cell genome engineering in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Véron, Nadège; Qu, Zhengdong; Kipen, Phoebe A S; Hirst, Claire E; Marcelle, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    Gene-targeted knockout technologies are invaluable tools for understanding the functions of genes in vivo. CRISPR/Cas9 system of RNA-guided genome editing is revolutionizing genetics research in a wide spectrum of organisms. Here, we combined CRISPR with in vivo electroporation in the chicken embryo to efficiently target the transcription factor PAX7 in tissues of the developing embryo. This approach generated mosaic genetic mutations within a wild-type cellular background. This series of proof-of-principle experiments indicate that in vivo CRISPR-mediated cell genome engineering is an effective method to achieve gene loss-of-function in the tissues of the chicken embryo and it completes the growing genetic toolbox to study the molecular mechanisms regulating development in this important animal model.

  3. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascalló, Manel; Alemany, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Cell transduction in vitro is only the first step toward proving that a genetherapy vector can be useful to treat tumors. However, tumor targeting in vivo is now the milestone for gene therapy to succeed against disseminated cancer. Therefore, most valuable information is obtained from studies of vector biodistribution. Owing to the hepatotropism of adenoviral vectors, a particularly important parameter is the tumor/liver ratio. This ratio can be given at the level of gene expression if the amount of transgene expression is measured. To optimize the targeting, however, the levels of viral particles that reach the tumor compared to other organs must be studied. Most of this chapter deals with methods to quantify the virus fate in tumor-bearing animals. We present a radioactive labeling method that can be used to study biodistribution. After a small section dealing with tumor models, we describe methods to quantify different parameters related to adenovirus-mediated tumor targeting.

  4. Experimental factors that influence carbon monoxide tolerance of high-temperature proton-exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kyungjung; Yoo, Duck Young; Park, Jung Ock

    The poisoning effect of carbon monoxide (CO) on high-temperature proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is investigated with respect to CO concentration, operating temperature, fuel feed mode, and anode Pt loading. The loss in cell voltage when CO is added to pure hydrogen anode gas is a function of fuel utilization and anode Pt loading as well as obvious factors such as CO concentration, temperature and current density. The tolerance to CO can be varied significantly using a different experimental design of fuel utilization and anode Pt loading. A difference in cell performance with CO-containing hydrogen is observed when two cells with different flow channel geometries are used, although the two cells show similar cell performance with pure hydrogen. A different combination of fuel utilization, anode Pt loading and flow channel design can cause an order of magnitude difference in CO tolerance under identical experimental conditions of temperature and current density.

  5. Experimental factors that influence carbon monoxide tolerance of high-temperature proton-exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kyungjung; Yoo, Duck Young; Park, Jung Ock [Energy and Environment Lab, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Nongseo-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-712 (Korea)

    2008-10-15

    The poisoning effect of carbon monoxide (CO) on high-temperature proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is investigated with respect to CO concentration, operating temperature, fuel feed mode, and anode Pt loading. The loss in cell voltage when CO is added to pure hydrogen anode gas is a function of fuel utilization and anode Pt loading as well as obvious factors such as CO concentration, temperature and current density. The tolerance to CO can be varied significantly using a different experimental design of fuel utilization and anode Pt loading. A difference in cell performance with CO-containing hydrogen is observed when two cells with different flow channel geometries are used, although the two cells show similar cell performance with pure hydrogen. A different combination of fuel utilization, anode Pt loading and flow channel design can cause an order of magnitude difference in CO tolerance under identical experimental conditions of temperature and current density. (author)

  6. IFNγ Regulates Activated Vδ2+ T Cells through a Feedback Mechanism Mediated by Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechter, Karoline; Dorronsoro, Akaitz; Jakobsson, Emma; Ferrin, Izaskun; Lang, Valérie; Sepulveda, Pilar; Pennington, Daniel J.; Trigueros, César

    2017-01-01

    γδ T cells play a role in a wide range of diseases such as autoimmunity and cancer. The majority of circulating human γδ T lymphocytes express a Vγ9Vδ2+ (Vδ2+) T cell receptor (TCR) and following activation release pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we show that IFNγ, produced by Vδ2+ cells, activates mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-mediated immunosupression, which in turn exerts a negative feedback mechanism on γδ T cell function ranging from cytokine production to proliferation. Importantly, this modulatory effect is limited to a short period of time (cell activation, after which MSCs can no longer exert their immunoregulatory capacity. Using genetically modified MSCs with the IFNγ receptor 1 constitutively silenced, we demonstrate that IFNγ is essential to this process. Activated γδ T cells induce expression of several factors by MSCs that participate in the depletion of amino acids. In particular, we show that indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an enzyme involved in L-tryptophan degradation, is responsible for MSC-mediated immunosuppression of Vδ2+ T cells. Thus, our data demonstrate that γδ T cell responses can be immuno-modulated by different signals derived from MSC. PMID:28076364

  7. Weight cycling increases T-cell accumulation in adipose tissue and impairs systemic glucose tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Emily K; Gutierrez, Dario A; Kennedy, Arion; Hasty, Alyssa H

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is one of the leading causes of morbidity in the U.S. Accumulation of proinflammatory immune cells in adipose tissue (AT) contributes to the development of obesity-associated disorders. Weight loss is the ideal method to counteract the negative consequences of obesity; however, losses are rarely maintained, leading to bouts of weight cycling. Fluctuations in weight have been associated with worsened metabolic and cardiovascular outcomes; yet, the mechanisms explaining this potential correlation are not known. For determination of whether weight cycling modulates AT immune cell populations, inflammation, and insulin resistance, mice were subjected to a diet-switch protocol designed to induce weight cycling. Weight-cycled mice displayed decreased systemic glucose tolerance and impaired AT insulin sensitivity when compared with mice that gained weight but did not cycle. AT macrophage number and polarization were not modulated by weight cycling. However, weight cycling did increase the number of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in AT. Expression of multiple T helper 1-associated cytokines was also elevated subsequent to weight cycling. Additionally, CD8(+) effector memory T cells were present in AT of both obese and weight-cycled mice. These studies indicate that an exaggerated adaptive immune response in AT may contribute to metabolic dysfunction during weight cycling.

  8. Cell-mediated infection of cervix derived epithelial cells with primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, X; Phillips, D M

    1996-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that HIV-infected transformed T-cells or monocytes adhere to monolayers of CD4-negative epithelial cells. Adhesion is soon followed by budding of HIV from infected mononuclear cells onto the surface of epithelial cells. Epithelial cells subsequently take up virus and become productively infected. Based on these findings, we proposed that sexual transmission of HIV may involve cell-mediated infection of intact mucosal epithelia of the urogenital tract. However, it has become increasingly clear that primary cells and HIV strains isolated from patients are more appropriate models for HIV infection than established cell lines and lab strains of virus. In the studies described here, we infected cervix-derived epithelial monolayers with primary monocytes infected with patient isolates of non-syncytial inducing (NSI) macrophage-tropic strains of HIV. Under the culture conditions employed, HIV-infected primary monocytes do not remain adherent to the apical surface of the epithelium, as did HIV-infected transformed cells. Instead, following adherence, the primary cells migrate between epithelial cells. Virus is secreted from a pseudopod as HIV-infected primary monocytes pass between cells of the epithelium. Productive infection of the epithelium was detected by p24 ELISA and PCR Southern blot analysis. Infection can be blocked by sera from HIV-seropositive individuals or by certain sulfated polysaccharides. These findings support the supposition that transmission of HIV may occur via cell-mediated infection of intact epithelia. The observations also hint at the possibility that-HIV-infected monocyte/macrophages in semen or cervical-vaginal secretions could cross intact epithelia by passing between epithelial cells. Blocking studies suggest that it may be possible to inhibit sexual transmission of HIV either by antibodies in genital tract secretions or by a topical formulation containing certain sulfated polysaccharides.

  9. Hsp70 and the Cochaperone StiA (Hop) Orchestrate Hsp90-Mediated Caspofungin Tolerance in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoth, Frédéric; Juvvadi, Praveen R; Soderblom, Erik J; Moseley, M Arthur; Steinbach, William J

    2015-08-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the primary etiologic agent of invasive aspergillosis (IA), a major cause of death among immunosuppressed patients. Echinocandins (e.g., caspofungin) are increasingly used as second-line therapy for IA, but their activity is only fungistatic. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) was previously shown to trigger tolerance to caspofungin and the paradoxical effect (i.e., decreased efficacy of caspofungin at higher concentrations). Here, we demonstrate the key role of another molecular chaperone, Hsp70, in governing the stress response to caspofungin via Hsp90 and their cochaperone Hop/Sti1 (StiA in A. fumigatus). Mutation of the StiA-interacting domain of Hsp70 (C-terminal EELD motif) impaired thermal adaptation and caspofungin tolerance with loss of the caspofungin paradoxical effect. Impaired Hsp90 function and increased susceptibility to caspofungin were also observed following pharmacologic inhibition of the C-terminal domain of Hsp70 by pifithrin-μ or after stiA deletion, further supporting the links among Hsp70, StiA, and Hsp90 in governing caspofungin tolerance. StiA was not required for the physical interaction between Hsp70 and Hsp90 but had distinct roles in the regulation of their function in caspofungin and heat stress responses. In conclusion, this study deciphering the physical and functional interactions of the Hsp70-StiA-Hsp90 complex provided new insights into the mechanisms of tolerance to caspofungin in A. fumigatus and revealed a key C-terminal motif of Hsp70, which can be targeted by specific inhibitors, such as pifithrin-μ, to enhance the antifungal activity of caspofungin against A. fumigatus.

  10. IL-33 Enhances Host Tolerance to Candida albicans Kidney Infections through Induction of IL-13 Production by CD4+ T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Vuvi G; Kim, Hye J; Kim, Juyang; Kang, Sang W; Moon, U J; Cho, Hong R; Kwon, Byungsuk

    2015-05-15

    Susceptibility to systemic Candida albicans infection is determined by immune resistance, as well as by the ability to control Candida-induced immunopathologies. We showed previously that exogenous IL-33 can increase resistance to peritoneal C. albicans infection by regulating multiple steps of the neutrophil anti-Candida response. In this study, using a mouse model of systemic candidiasis, we observed that IL-33 administration limited fungal burden and inflammation and increased survival. In kidneys, IL-33 seemed to directly act on neutrophils and CD4(+) T cells: IL-33 administration enhanced fungal clearance by increasing neutrophil phagocytic activity without which Candida proliferation was uncontrollable. In contrast, IL-33 stimulated CD4(+) T cells to produce IL-13, which, in turn, drove the polarization of macrophages toward the M2 type. Furthermore, the absence of IL-13 abolished IL-33-mediated polarization of M2 macrophages and renal functional recovery. In addition, IL-33 and IL-13 acted synergistically to increase M2 macrophage polarization and its phagocytic activity. Overall, this study identifies IL-33 as a cytokine that is able to induce resistance and tolerance and suggests that targeting resistance and tolerance simultaneously with therapeutic IL-33 may benefit patients with systemic candidiasis.

  11. Control of the B cell-intrinsic tolerance programs by ubiquitin ligases Cbl and Cbl-b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Jang, Ihn Kyung; Wang, Yan; Han, Yoon-Chi; Inazu, Tetsuya; Cadera, Emily J; Schlissel, Mark; Hardy, Richard R; Gu, Hua

    2007-05-01

    B cell receptor (BCR) signaling plays a critical role in B cell tolerance and activation. Here, we show that mice with B cell-specific ablation of both Cbl and Cbl-b (Cbl-/-Cblb-/-) manifested systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like autoimmune disease. The Cbl double deficiency resulted in a substantial increase in marginal zone (MZ) and B1 B cells. The mutant B cells were not hyperresponsive in terms of proliferation and antibody production upon BCR stimulation; however, B cell anergy to protein antigen appeared to be impaired. Concomitantly, BCR-proximal signaling, including tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk tyrosine kinase, Phospholipase C-gamma2 (PLC-gamma2), and Rho-family GTP-GDP exchange factor Vav, and Ca2+ mobilization were enhanced, whereas tyrosine phosphorylation of adaptor protein BLNK was substantially attenuated in the mutant B cells. These results suggested that the loss of coordination between these pathways was responsible for the impaired B cell tolerance induction. Thus, Cbl proteins control B cell-intrinsic checkpoint of immune tolerance, possibly through coordinating multiple BCR-proximal signaling pathways during anergy induction.

  12. Quinone-mediated decolorization of sulfonated azo dyes by cells and cell extracts from Sphingomonas xenophaga

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Ling; LU Hong; ZHOU Jiti; WANG Jing

    2009-01-01

    The effects of various quinone compounds on the decolorization rates of sulfonated azo dyes by Sphingomonas xenophaga QYY were investigated. The results showed that anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS) was the most effective redox mediator and AQS reduction was the rate-limited step of AQS-mediated decolorization of sulfonated azo dyes. Based on AQS biological toxicity tests, it was assumed that AQS might enter the cells to kill them. In the cytoplasmic extracts from strain QYY, AQS effectively increased decolorization rates of sulfonated azo dyes than other quinone compounds. In addition, we found a NADH/FMN-dependent AQS reductase using nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (Native-PAGE).

  13. The effect of adenovirus-mediated gene expression of FHIT in small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandi, Roza; Xu, Kai; Poulsen, Hans S

    2011-01-01

    The candidate tumor suppressor fragile histidine traid (FHIT) is frequently inactivated in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Mutations in the p53 gene also occur in the majority of SCLC leading to the accumulation of the mutant protein. Here we evaluated the effect of FHIT gene therapy alone...... or in combination with the mutant p53-reactivating molecule, PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246, in SCLC. Overexpression of FHIT by recombinant adenoviral vector (Ad-FHIT)-mediated gene transfer in SCLC cells inhibited their growth by inducing apoptosis and when combined with PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246, a synergistic cell growth...

  14. NF-κB Mediated Transcription in Human Monocytic Cells and Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, G C; Mackman, N

    1998-04-01

    Monocytes and endothelial cells become activated at sites of inflammation and contribute to the pathology of many diseases, including septic shock and atherosclerosis. In these cells, induction of genes expressing various inflammatory mediators, such as adhesion molecules, cytokines, and growth factors, is regulated by NF-κB/Rel transcription factors. Recent studies have identified components of the signal transduction pathways leading to the activation of NF-κB/Rel proteins. Inhibition of these signaling pathways provides a novel therapeutic approach to prevent inducible gene expression in both monocytes and endothelial cells. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1998;8:138-142). © 1998, Elsevier Science Inc.

  15. Calcium signaling as a mediator of cell energy demand and a trigger to cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Gauri; Sharpe, Jenny A; Sundier, Stephanie Y; Duchen, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    Calcium signaling is pivotal to a host of physiological pathways. A rise in calcium concentration almost invariably signals an increased cellular energy demand. Consistent with this, calcium signals mediate a number of pathways that together serve to balance energy supply and demand. In pathological states, calcium signals can precipitate mitochondrial injury and cell death, especially when coupled to energy depletion and oxidative or nitrosative stress. This review explores the mechanisms that couple cell signaling pathways to metabolic regulation or to cell death. The significance of these pathways is exemplified by pathological case studies, such as those showing loss of mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 in patients and ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  16. Epac1 increases migration of endothelial cells and melanoma cells via FGF2-mediated paracrine signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baljinnyam, Erdene; Umemura, Masanari; Chuang, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) regulates endothelial and melanoma cell migration. The binding of FGF2 to its receptor requires N-sulfated heparan sulfate (HS) glycosamine. We have previously reported that Epac1, an exchange protein activated by cAMP, increases N-sulfation of HS in melanoma....... Therefore, we examined whether Epac1 regulates FGF2-mediated cell-cell communication. Conditioned medium (CM) of melanoma cells with abundant expression of Epac1 increased migration of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC) and melanoma cells with poor expression of Epac1. CM-induced increase...... in migration was inhibited by antagonizing FGF2, by the removal of HS and by the knockdown of Epac1. In addition, knockdown of Epac1 suppressed the binding of FGF2 to FGF receptor in HUVEC, and in vivo angiogenesis in melanoma. Furthermore, knockdown of Epac1 reduced N-sulfation of HS chains attached...

  17. Control of the B Cell-Intrinsic Tolerance Program by c-Cbl and Cbl-b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Jang, Ihn-Kyung; Wang, Yan; Han, Yoon-Chi; Inazu, Tetsuya; Cadera, Emily J.; Schlissel, Mark; Hardy, Richard R.; Gu, Hua

    2007-01-01

    BCR signaling plays a critical role in B-cell tolerance and activation. Here, we show that mice with B cell-specific ablation of both c-Cbl and Cbl-b (Cbl-dko) manifest systemic lupus erythymatosis (SLE)-like autoimmune disease. The Cbl-dko mutation results in a significant increase in marginal zone (MZ) and B1 B cells. The mutant B cells are not hyperresponsive in terms of proliferation and antibody production upon BCR stimulation; however, B-cell anergy to protein antigen appears to be impaired. Concomitantly, BCR-proximal signaling, including tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk, PLCγ-2, and Vav and Ca2+ mobilization, are enhanced, whereas tyrosine phosphorylation of BLNK is significantly attenuated in the mutant B cells, suggesting that the loss of coordination between these pathways is responsible for the impaired B-cell tolerance induction. Thus, Cbl proteins control B cell-intrinsic checkpoint of immune tolerance, possibly through coordinating multiple BCR-proximal signaling pathways during anergy induction. PMID:17493844

  18. Cellular redox status determines sensitivity to BNIP3-mediated cell death in cardiac myocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Youngil; Kubli, Dieter A.; Hanna, Rita A.; Cortez, Melissa Q.; Lee, Hwa-Youn; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Gustafsson, Åsa B.

    2015-01-01

    The atypical BH3-only protein Bcl-2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa interacting protein 3 (BNIP3) is an important regulator of hypoxia-mediated cell death. Interestingly, the susceptibility to BNIP3-mediated cell death differs between cells. In this study we examined whether there are mechanistic differences in BNIP3-mediated cell death between neonatal and adult cardiac myocytes. We discovered that BNIP3 is a potent inducer of cell death in neonatal myocytes, whereas adult myocytes are remarkably resi...

  19. Aberrantly glycosylated MUC1 is expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells and a target for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrsen, Kirstine; Madsen, Caroline B; Rasch, Morten G

    2013-01-01

    not covered by immunological tolerance in MUC1 humanized mice and man. The objective of this study was to determine if mouse antibodies to this Tn-MUC1 epitope induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) pivotal for their potential use in cancer immunotherapy. Binding affinity of mAb 5E5 directed...... is expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells and a target for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity suggesting that antibodies targeting glycopeptide epitopes on mucins are strong candidates for cancer-specific immunotherapies.......Protein glycosylation often changes during cancer development, resulting in the expression of cancer-associated carbohydrate antigens. In particular mucins such as MUC1 are subject to these changes. We previously identified an immunodominant Tn-MUC1 (GalNAc-α-MUC1) cancer-specific epitope...

  20. Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells Resist T Cell Mediated Killing in an HLA-Recognition Independent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proff, Julia; Walterskirchen, Christian; Brey, Charlotte; Geyeregger, Rene; Full, Florian; Ensser, Armin; Lehner, Manfred; Holter, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the potential of HLA-independent T cell therapy for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed against the HCMV encoded glycoprotein B (gB), which is expressed at high levels on the surface of infected cells. T cells engineered with this anti-gB CAR recognized HCMV-infected cells and released cytokines and cytotoxic granules. Unexpectedly, and in contrast to analogous approaches for HIV, Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C virus, we found that HCMV-infected cells were resistant to killing by the CAR-modified T cells. In order to elucidate whether this phenomenon was restricted to the use of CARs, we extended our experiments to T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated recognition of infected cells. To this end we infected fibroblasts with HCMV-strains deficient in viral inhibitors of antigenic peptide presentation and targeted these HLA-class I expressing peptide-loaded infected cells with peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Despite strong degranulation and cytokine production by the T cells, we again found significant inhibition of lysis of HCMV-infected cells. Impairment of cell lysis became detectable 1 day after HCMV infection and gradually increased during the following 3 days. We thus postulate that viral anti-apoptotic factors, known to inhibit suicide of infected host cells, have evolved additional functions to directly abrogate T cell cytotoxicity. In line with this hypothesis, CAR-T cell cytotoxicity was strongly inhibited in non-infected fibroblasts by expression of the HCMV-protein UL37x1, and even more so by additional expression of UL36. Our data extend the current knowledge on Betaherpesviral evasion from T cell immunity and show for the first time that, beyond impaired antigen presentation, infected cells are efficiently protected by direct blockade of cytotoxic effector functions through viral proteins.

  1. Addressing immune tolerance issues in inflammatory bowel disease and adeno-associated virus based gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majowicz, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is focusing on cell-mediated induction of immune tolerance and consists of two parts. The studies described in Part I report the development of strategies for possible treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD). Induction of immune tolerance, in IBD mouse model, with the use of regul

  2. Studies of cell-mediated immune responses to influenza vaccination in systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holvast, Albert; Van Assen, Sander; De Haan, Aalzen; Huckriede, Anke; Benne, Cornelis A.; Westra, Johanna; Palache, Abraham; Wilschut, Jan; Kallenberg, Cornelis; Bijl, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Both antibody and cell-mediated responses are involved in the defense against influenza. In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a decreased antibody response to subunit influenza vaccine has been demonstrated, but cell-mediated responses have not yet been assessed. This stud

  3. Wdr1-mediated cell shape dynamics and cortical tension are essential for epidermal planar cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxenburg, Chen; Heller, Evan; Pasolli, H Amalia; Chai, Sophia; Nikolova, Maria; Stokes, Nicole; Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-05-01

    During mouse development, core planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins become polarized in the epidermal plane to guide angling/morphogenesis of hair follicles. How PCP is established is poorly understood. Here, we identify a key role for Wdr1 (also known as Aip1), an F-actin-binding protein that enhances cofilin/destrin-mediated F-actin disassembly. We show that cofilin and destrin function redundantly in developing epidermis, but their combined depletion perturbs cell adhesion, cytokinesis, apicobasal polarity and PCP. Although Wdr1 depletion accentuates single-loss-of-cofilin/destrin phenotypes, alone it resembles core PCP mutations. Seeking a mechanism, we find that Wdr1 and cofilin/destrin-mediated actomyosin remodelling are essential for generating or maintaining cortical tension within the developing epidermal sheet and driving the cell shape and planar orientation changes that accompany establishment of PCP in mammalian epidermis. Our findings suggest intriguing evolutionary parallels but mechanistic modifications to the distal wing hinge-mediated mechanical forces that drive cell shape change and orient PCP in the Drosophila wing disc.

  4. Beta-cell function, incretin effect, and incretin hormones in obese youth along the span of glucose tolerance from normal to prediabetes to Type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using the hyperglycemic and euglycemic clamp, we demonstrated impaired Beta-cell function in obese youth with increasing dysglycemia. Herein we describe oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-modeled Beta-cell function and incretin effect in obese adolescents spanning the range of glucose tolerance. Bet...

  5. Silencing the SpMPK1, SpMPK2, and SpMPK3 Genes in Tomato Reduces Abscisic Acid—Mediated Drought Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Drought is a major threat to agriculture production worldwide. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs play a pivotal role in sensing and converting stress signals into appropriate responses so that plants can adapt and survive. To examine the function of MAPKs in the drought tolerance of tomato plants, we silenced the SpMPK1, SpMPK2, and SpMPK3 genes in wild-type plants using the virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS method. The results indicate that silencing the individual genes or co-silencing SpMPK1, SpMPK2, and SpMPK3 reduced the drought tolerance of tomato plants by varying degrees. Co-silencing SpMPK1 and SpMPK2 impaired abscisic acid (ABA-induced and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced stomatal closure and enhanced ABA-induced H2O2 production. Similar results were observed when silencing SpMPK3 alone, but not when SpMPK1 and SpMPK2 were individually silenced. These data suggest that the functions of SpMPK1 and SpMPK2 are redundant, and they overlap with that of SpMPK3 in drought stress signaling pathways. In addition, we found that SpMPK3 may regulate H2O2 levels by mediating the expression of CAT1. Hence, SpMPK1, SpMPK2, and SpMPK3 may play crucial roles in enhancing tomato plants’ drought tolerance by influencing stomatal activity and H2O2 production via the ABA-H2O2 pathway.

  6. Effect of adrenotensin on cell proliferation is mediated by angiotensin Ⅱ in cultured rat mesangial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong XUE; Ping YUAN; Li ZHOU; Tai YAO; Yu HUANG; Li-min LU

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Both adrenomedullin (ADM) and adrenotensin (ADT) are derived from the same propeptide precursor, and both act as circulat- ing hormones and local paracrine mediators with multiple biological activities. Compared with ADM, little is known about how ADT achieves its functions. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ADT on cell proliferation and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) secretion in cultured renal mesangial cells (MCs) and determined whether angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ) was involved in mediating this process.Methods: Cell proliferation was measured by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assay, Ang Ⅱ levels were assayed using an enzyme immunoassay, and real time PCR was used to measure Ang Ⅱ type 1 (AT1) receptor, Ang Ⅱ type 2 (AT2) receptor, angiotensino-gen (AGT), renin, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and TGF-β1 mRNA levels. TGF-β1 and collagen type IV protein levels in cellmedia were measured using enzyme-linked immunoassays. Results: ADT treatment induced cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner; it also increased the levels of TGF-β1 mRNA and protein as well as collagen type Ⅳ excretion by cultured MCs. ADT treatment increased renin and AGT mRNAs as well as Ang Ⅱ protein, but did not affect the ACE mRNA level. ADT up-regulated angiotensin AT1 receptor mRNA, but not that of the AT2 receptor. The angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonist Iosartan blocked the effects of ADT-induced cell proliferation, TGF-β1 and collagen type Ⅳ synthe-sis and secretion.Conclusion: ADT has a stimulating role in cell proliferation in cultured MCs. Increases in the levels of Ang II and the AT1 receptor after ADT treatment mediate the stimulating effects of ADT on cell proliferation and extracellular matrix synthesis and secretion.

  7. MicroRNA-181b regulates endotoxin tolerance by targeting IL-6 in macrophage RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjun; Shen, Xiaojun; Xie, Luyang; Chu, Maoping; Ma, Yanmei

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is a major pro-inflammatory cytokine and dysregulation of IL-6 is relevant to many inflammatory diseases. Endotoxin induced tolerance of IL-6 is an important mechanism to avoid the excessive immune reaction. But to date, the molecular mechanisms of endotoxin tolerance of IL-6 remain unclear. Here we reported that IL-6 secretion and microRNA-181b (miR-181b) expression were inversely correlated following LPS stimulation. We also demonstrated that miR-181b targeting the 3'-UTR of IL-6 transcripts and up-regulation of miR-181b was associated with NF-kB. We further demonstrated that up-regulation of miR-181b in response to LPS was required for inducing IL-6 tolerance in macrophage. Our results suggested that the post-transcriptional control mediated by miR-181b could be involved in fine tuning the critical level of IL-6 expression in endotoxin tolerance.

  8. Th1/Th17 Plasticity Is a Marker of Advanced β Cell Autoimmunity and Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert-Hartwall, Linnea; Honkanen, Jarno; Salo, Harri M.; Nieminen, Janne K.; Luopajärvi, Kristiina; Härkönen, Taina; Veijola, Riitta; Simell, Olli; Ilonen, Jorma; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Knip, Mikael; Knip, Mikael; Koski, Katriina; Koski, Matti; Härkönen, Taina; Ryhänen, Samppa; Hämäläinen, Anu-Maaria; Ormisson, Anne; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Ulich, Valentina; Kuzmicheva, Elena; Mokurov, Sergei; Markova, Svetlana; Pylova, Svetlana; Isakova, Marina; Shakurova, Elena; Petrov, Vladimir; Dorshakova, Natalya V.; Karapetyan, Tatyana; Varlamova, Tatyana; Ilonen, Jorma; Kiviniemi, Minna; Alnek, Kristi; Janson, Helis; Uibo, Raivo; Salum, Tiit; von Mutius, Erika; Weber, Juliane; Ahlfors, Helena; Kallionpää, Henna; Laajala, Essi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Moulder, Robert; Nieminen, Janne; Ruohtula, Terhi; Vaarala, Outi; Honkanen, Hanna; Hyöty, Heikki; Kondrashova, Anita; Oikarinen, Sami; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; De Goffau, Marcus C.; Welling, Gjalt; Alahuhta, Kirsi; Virtanen, Suvi M.

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of IL-17 immunity and detrimental effects of IL-17 on human islets have been implicated in human type 1 diabetes. In animal models, the plasticity of Th1/Th17 cells contributes to the development of autoimmune diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate that the upregulation of the IL-17 pathway and Th1/Th17 plasticity in peripheral blood are markers of advanced β cell autoimmunity and impaired β cell function in human type 1 diabetes. Activated Th17 immunity was observed in the late stage of preclinical diabetes in children with β cell autoimmunity and impaired glucose tolerance, but not in children with early β cell autoimmunity. We found an increased ratio of IFN-γ/IL-17 expression in Th17 cells in children with advanced β cell autoimmunity, which correlated with HbA1c and plasma glucose concentrations in an oral glucose tolerance test, and thus impaired β cell function. Low expression of Helios was seen in Th17 cells, suggesting that Th1/Th17 cells are not converted thymus-derived regulatory T cells. Our results suggest that the development of Th1/Th17 plasticity may serve as a biomarker of disease progression from β cell autoantibody positivity to type 1 diabetes. These data in human type 1 diabetes emphasize the role of Th1/Th17 plasticity as a potential contributor to tissue destruction in autoimmune conditions. PMID:25480564

  9. Long non-coding RNA-mediated transcriptional interference of a permease gene confers drug tolerance in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ard, Ryan; Tong, Pin; Allshire, Robin C

    2014-11-27

    Most long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) encoded by eukaryotic genomes remain uncharacterized. Here we focus on a set of intergenic lncRNAs in fission yeast. Deleting one of these lncRNAs exhibited a clear phenotype: drug sensitivity. Detailed analyses of the affected locus revealed that transcription of the nc-tgp1 lncRNA regulates drug tolerance by repressing the adjacent phosphate-responsive permease gene transporter for glycerophosphodiester 1 (tgp1(+)). We demonstrate that the act of transcribing nc-tgp1 over the tgp1(+) promoter increases nucleosome density, prevents transcription factor access and thus represses tgp1(+) without the need for RNA interference or heterochromatin components. We therefore conclude that tgp1(+) is regulated by transcriptional interference. Accordingly, decreased nc-tgp1 transcription permits tgp1(+) expression upon phosphate starvation. Furthermore, nc-tgp1 loss induces tgp1(+) even in repressive conditions. Notably, drug sensitivity results directly from tgp1(+) expression in the absence of the nc-tgp1 RNA. Thus, transcription of an lncRNA governs drug tolerance in fission yeast.

  10. Ctla-4 modulates the differentiation of inducible Foxp3+ Treg cells but IL-10 mediates their function in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Verhagen

    Full Text Available In vitro induced Foxp3+ T regulatory (iTreg cells form a novel and promising target for therapeutic tolerance induction. However, the potential of these cells as a target for the treatment of various immune diseases, as well as the factors involved in their development and function, remain debated. Here, we demonstrate in a myelin basic protein (MBP-specific murine model of CNS autoimmune disease that adoptive transfer of antigen-specific iTreg cells ameliorates disease progression. Moreover, we show that the co-stimulatory molecule CTLA-4 mediates in vitro differentiation of iTreg cells. Finally, we demonstrate that the secreted, immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 controls the ability of antigen-specific iTreg cells to suppress autoimmune disease. Overall, we conclude that antigen-specific iTreg cells, which depend on various immune regulatory molecules for their differentiation and function, represent a major target for effective immunotherapy of autoimmune disease.

  11. Systemic LPS Translocation Activates Cross-Presenting Dendritic Cells but Is Dispensable for the Breakdown of CD8+ T Cell Peripheral Tolerance in Irradiated Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Carrasco, Gabriel; Villard, Marine; Le Saout, Cecile; Louis-Plence, Pascale; Vicente, Rita; Hernandez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Lymphodepletion is currently used to enhance the efficacy of cytotoxic T lymphocyte adoptive transfer immunotherapy against cancer. This beneficial effect of conditioning regimens is due, at least in part, to promoting the breakdown of peripheral CD8+ T cell tolerance. Lymphodepletion by total body irradiation induces systemic translocation of commensal bacteria LPS from the gastrointestinal tract. Since LPS is a potent activator of the innate immune system, including antigen presenting dendritic cells, we hypothesized that LPS translocation could be required for the breakdown of peripheral tolerance observed in irradiated mice. To address this issue, we have treated irradiated mice with antibiotics in order to prevent LPS translocation and utilized them in T cell adoptive transfer experiments. Surprisingly, we found that despite of completely blocking LPS translocation into the bloodstream, antibiotic treatment did not prevent the breakdown of peripheral tolerance. Although irradiation induced the activation of cross-presenting CD8+ dendritic cells in the lymphoid tissue, LPS could not solely account for this effect. Activation of dendritic cells by mechanisms other than LPS translocation is sufficient to promote the differentiation of potentially autoreactive CD8+ T cells into effectors in irradiated mice. Our data indicate that LPS translocation is dispensable for the breakdown of CD8+ T cell tolerance in irradiated mice.

  12. Systemic LPS Translocation Activates Cross-Presenting Dendritic Cells but Is Dispensable for the Breakdown of CD8+ T Cell Peripheral Tolerance in Irradiated Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Espinosa-Carrasco

    Full Text Available Lymphodepletion is currently used to enhance the efficacy of cytotoxic T lymphocyte adoptive transfer immunotherapy against cancer. This beneficial effect of conditioning regimens is due, at least in part, to promoting the breakdown of peripheral CD8+ T cell tolerance. Lymphodepletion by total body irradiation induces systemic translocation of commensal bacteria LPS from the gastrointestinal tract. Since LPS is a potent activator of the innate immune system, including antigen presenting dendritic cells, we hypothesized that LPS translocation could be required for the breakdown of peripheral tolerance observed in irradiated mice. To address this issue, we have treated irradiated mice with antibiotics in order to prevent LPS translocation and utilized them in T cell adoptive transfer experiments. Surprisingly, we found that despite of completely blocking LPS translocation into the bloodstream, antibiotic treatment did not prevent the breakdown of peripheral tolerance. Although irradiation induced the activation of cross-presenting CD8+ dendritic cells in the lymphoid tissue, LPS could not solely account for this effect. Activation of dendritic cells by mechanisms other than LPS translocation is sufficient to promote the differentiation of potentially autoreactive CD8+ T cells into effectors in irradiated mice. Our data indicate that LPS translocation is dispensable for the breakdown of CD8+ T cell tolerance in irradiated mice.

  13. Recovery from bleaching is mediated by threshold densities of background thermo-tolerant symbiont types in a reef-building coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Line K; Doyle, Jason; Logan, Murray; Berkelmans, Ray

    2016-06-01

    Sensitive molecular analyses show that most corals host a complement of Symbiodinium genotypes that includes thermo-tolerant types in low abundance. While tolerant symbiont types are hypothesized to facilitate tolerance to temperature and recovery from bleaching, empirical data on their distribution and relative abundance in corals under ambient and stress conditions are still rare. We quantified visual bleaching and mortality of coral hosts, along with relative abundance of C- and D-type Symbiodinium cells in 82 Acropora millepora colonies from three locations on the Great Barrier Reef transplanted to a central inshore site over a 13 month period. Our analyses reveal dynamic change in symbiont associations within colonies and among populations over time. Coral bleaching and declines in C- but not D-type symbionts were observed in transplanted corals. Survival and recovery of 25% of corals from one population was associated with either initial D-dominance or an increase in D-type symbionts that could be predicted by a minimum pre-stress D : C ratio of 0.003. One-third of corals from this population became D dominated at the bleached stage despite no initial detection of this symbiont type, but failed to recover and died in mid to late summer. These results provide a predictive threshold minimum density of background D-type symbionts in A. millepora, above which survival following extreme thermal stress is increased.

  14. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reversed Morphine Tolerance and Opioid-induced Hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Zhen; Liu, LiPing; Shen, Jun; Cheng, Katherine; Liu, Aijun; Yang, Jing; Wang, Lina; Qu, Tingyu; Yang, HongNa; Li, Yan; Wu, Haiyan; Narouze, John; Yin, Yan; Cheng, Jianguo

    2016-08-24

    More than 240 million opioid prescriptions are dispensed annually to treat pain in the US. The use of opioids is commonly associated with opioid tolerance (OT) and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), which limit efficacy and compromise safety. The dearth of effective way to prevent or treat OT and OIH is a major medical challenge. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) attenuate OT and OIH in rats and mice based on the understanding that MSCs possess remarkable anti-inflammatory properties and that both OT and chronic pain are associated with neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. We found that the development of OT and OIH was effectively prevented by either intravenous or intrathecal MSC transplantation (MSC-TP), which was performed before morphine treatment. Remarkably, established OT and OIH were significantly reversed by either intravenous or intrathecal MSCs when cells were transplanted after repeated morphine injections. The animals did not show any abnormality in vital organs or functions. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the treatments significantly reduced activation level of microglia and astrocytes in the spinal cord. We have thus demonstrated that MSC-TP promises to be a potentially safe and effective way to prevent and reverse two of the major problems of opioid therapy.

  15. Regulatory T cells and human myeloid dendritic cells promote tolerance via programmed death ligand-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoba Amarnath

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy using regulatory T cells (Treg has been proposed, yet cellular and molecular mechanisms of human Tregs remain incompletely characterized. Here, we demonstrate that human Tregs promote the generation of myeloid dendritic cells (DC with reduced capacity to stimulate effector T cell responses. In a model of xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD, allogeneic human DC conditioned with Tregs suppressed human T cell activation and completely abrogated posttransplant lethality. Tregs induced programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1 expression on Treg-conditioned DC; subsequently, Treg-conditioned DC induced PD-L1 expression in vivo on effector T cells. PD-L1 blockade reversed Treg-conditioned DC function in vitro and in vivo, thereby demonstrating that human Tregs can promote immune suppression via DC modulation through PD-L1 up-regulation. This identification of a human Treg downstream cellular effector (DC and molecular mechanism (PD-L1 will facilitate the rational design of clinical trials to modulate alloreactivity.

  16. IL-10 and IL-27 producing dendritic cells capable of enhancing IL-10 production of T cells are induced in oral tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiokawa, Aya; Tanabe, Kosuke; Tsuji, Noriko M; Sato, Ryuichiro; Hachimura, Satoshi

    2009-06-30

    Oral tolerance is a key feature of intestinal immunity, generating systemic tolerance to ingested antigens (Ag). Dendritic cells (DC) have been revealed as important immune regulators, however, the precise role of DC in oral tolerance induction remains unclear. We investigated the characteristics of DC in spleen, mesenteric lymph node (MLN), and Peyer's patch (PP) after oral Ag administration in a TCR-transgenic mouse model. DC from PP and MLN of tolerized mice induced IL-10 production but not Foxp3 expression in cocultured T cells. IL-10 production was markedly increased after 5-7-day Ag administration especially in PP DC. On the other hand, IL-27 production was increased after 2-5-day Ag administration. CD11b(+) DC, which increased after ingestion of Ag, prominently expressed IL-10 and IL-27 compared with CD11b(-) DC. These results suggest that IL-10 and IL-27 producing DC are increased by interaction with antigen specific T cells in PP, and these DC act as an inducer of IL-10 producing T cells in oral tolerance.

  17. Development of Transgenic Maize Plants Tolerant to Glyphosate via Pollen-mediated Transformation and Their Glyphosate Tolerance%花粉介导法获得耐草甘膦玉米植株及其耐性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨慧珍; 任志强; 肖建红; 卜华虎; 刘惠民

    2016-01-01

    为获得耐草甘膦转基因玉米植株,进而研究其除草剂耐性及外源基因的遗传特性,以质粒 pBI101-aroA-M12为外源基因供体,以玉米自交系昌‘7-2’为受体,采用花粉介导法将外源基因导入玉米自交系中。PCR 扩增、Southern 杂交分析的结果证明获得了54个转基因植株;对其后代株系的分子检测及田间生物学鉴定,结果证明目的基因可以稳定遗传给后代植株,且赋予和提高了转基因植株的除草剂耐性。目的基因在转化体中的遗传规律研究,结果显示导入的目的基因在 F2受体植株中以3∶1的比例发生遗传分离,符合孟德尔单因子显性遗传分离规律。ELISA 分析和蛋白质浓度测定的结果证实目的基因在转化植株中得到表达,表达量介于40.5-112.6 ng/g 叶片鲜重之间,目的基因表达量与该植株的除草剂耐性性状间呈极显著相关,r=0.9423(P<0.01)。最终研究获得了4个高草甘膦耐性的转基因纯合株系。%In order to develop transgenic maize plants tolerant to glyphosate and further study their herbicide tolerance and the genetic characteristics of exogenous gene in transgenic plants,plasmid pBI101-aroA-M12 harboring aroA-M12 gene was transformed into maize inbred Chang‘7-2’plants by pollen-mediated transformation method. Fifty-four transgenic plants were obtained by PCR detection and Southern blot analysis. The detection results of molecular analysis and bioassay in the field showed that target aroA-M12 gene was integrated into the genome of transgenic plants and could stably inherit to next generation. Moreover,the aroA-M12 gene conferred the glyphosate-tolerance to transgenic plants. The result of genetic rule of target gene in transgenic plants suggested that the target gene was segregated according to the ratio of 3∶1 in T2 generation transgenic plants(lines)and it was consistent with the Mendel law of single-factor heredity. The results

  18. Small CD4 Mimetics Prevent HIV-1 Uninfected Bystander CD4+ T Cell Killing Mediated by Antibody-dependent Cell-mediated Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Richard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection causes a progressive depletion of CD4+ T cells. Despite its importance for HIV-1 pathogenesis, the precise mechanisms underlying CD4+ T-cell depletion remain incompletely understood. Here we make the surprising observation that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC mediates the death of uninfected bystander CD4+ T cells in cultures of HIV-1-infected cells. While HIV-1-infected cells are protected from ADCC by the action of the viral Vpu and Nef proteins, uninfected bystander CD4+T cells bind gp120 shed from productively infected cells and are efficiently recognized by ADCC-mediating antibodies. Thus, gp120 shedding represents a viral mechanism to divert ADCC responses towards uninfected bystander CD4+ T cells. Importantly, CD4-mimetic molecules redirect ADCC responses from uninfected bystander cells to HIV-1-infected cells; therefore, CD4-mimetic compounds might have therapeutic utility in new strategies aimed at specifically eliminating HIV-1-infected cells.

  19. Yes is a central mediator of cell growth in malignant mesothelioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Ayami; Sekine, Miki; Virgona, Nantiga; Ota, Masako; Yano, Tomohiro

    2012-11-01

    The constitutive activation of the Src family kinases (SFKs) has been established as a poor prognostic factor in malignant mesothelioma (MM), however, the family member(s) which contribute to the malignancy have not been defined. This study aimed to identify the SFK member(s) contributing to cell growth using RNA interference in various MM cell lines. Silencing of Yes but not of c-Src or Fyn in MM cells leads to cell growth suppression. This suppressive effect caused by Yes silencing mainly depends on G1 cell cycle arrest and partly the induction of apoptosis. Also, the knockout of Yes induces the inactivation of β-catenin signaling and subsequently decreases the levels of cyclin D necessary for G1-S transition in the cell cycle. In addition, Yes knockout has less effect on cell growth suppression in β-catenin-deficient H28 MM cells compared to other MM cells which express the catenin. Overall, we conclude that Yes is a central mediator for MM cell growth that is not shared with other SFKs such as c-Src.

  20. Effects of chrysotherapy on cell mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorber, A; Jackson, W H; Simon, T M

    1982-01-01

    Auranofin (AF) differs significantly from gold sodium thiomalate (GSTM) in formulation, i.e., aurous gold is stabilized by dual sulfur and phosphorus ligands, hydrophobic rather than hydrophilic characteristics, and lack of ionic charge. These attributes facilitate: oral absorption of AF, plasma membrane penetration, increase in intracellular lymphocyte gold concentration; and perhaps thereby influence lymphocyte function. AF treated subjects recorded prompt and sharp declines in mitogen-induced lymphoproliferative response (LMR) greater than 80%; suppressed response to skin testing with dinitrochlorobenezene (DNCB) in 11 of 14 subjects; and blebbing of lymphocyte membranes by scanning electron microscopy. In contrast, lymphocytes from a matched group of GSTM treated subjects recorded later onset and less suppression of LMR; normal response to DNCB skin testing; and did not manifest membrane blebbing. Accordingly, the therapeutic action of AF on immune response was observed in the 16 subjects receiving 6 mg/d of an average of 45 weeks to effect primarily cell mediated rather than humoral immune response when compared with a matched group of GSTM treated patients.

  1. Perfluorooctanesulfonate Mediates Renal Tubular Cell Apoptosis through PPARgamma Inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Li Wen

    Full Text Available Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs are ubiquitously distributed in the environments including stainless pan-coating, raincoat, fire extinguisher, and semiconductor products. The PPAR family has been shown to contribute to the toxic effects of PFCs in thymus, immune and excretory systems. Herein, we demonstrated that perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS caused cell apoptosis through increasing ratio of Bcl-xS/xL, cytosolic cytochrome C, and caspase 3 activation in renal tubular cells (RTCs. In addition, PFOS increased transcription of inflammatory cytokines (i.e., TNFα, ICAM1, and MCP1 by NFκB activation. Conversely, PFOS reduced the mRNA levels of antioxidative enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase, as a result of reduced PPARγ transactivational activity by using reporter and chromatin immuoprecipitation (ChIP assays. PFOS reduced the protein interaction between PPARγ and PPARγ coactivator-1 alpha (PGC1α by PPARγ deacetylation through Sirt1 upregulation, of which the binding of PPARγ and PGC1α to a peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE in the promoter regions of these antioxidative enzymes was alleviated in the ChIP assay. Furthermore, Sirt1 also deacetylated p53 and then increased the binding of p53 to Bax, resulting in increased cytosolic cytochrome C. The effect of PPARγ inactivation by PFOS was validated using the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, whereas the adverse effects of PFOS were prevented by PPARγ overexpression and activators, rosiglitozone and L-carnitine, in RTCs. The in vitro finding of protective effect of L-carnitine was substantiated in vivo using Balb/c mice model subjected to PFOS challenge. Altogether, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for the protective mechanism of L-carnitine in eliminating PFOS-mediated renal injury, at least partially, through PPARγ activation.

  2. Physiological and proteomic changes suggest an important role of cell walls in the high tolerance to metals of Elodea nuttallii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larras, Floriane; Regier, Nicole; Planchon, Sébastien; Poté, John; Renaut, Jenny; Cosio, Claudia

    2013-12-15

    Macrophytes bioaccumulate metals, the suggestion being made that they be considered for phytoremediation. However, a thorough understanding of the mechanisms of metal tolerance in these plants is necessary to allow full optimization of this approach. The present study was undertaken to gain insight into Hg and Cd accumulation and their effects in a representative macrophyte, Elodea nuttallii. Exposure to methyl-Hg (23 ng dm(-3)) had no significant effect while inorganic Hg (70 ng dm(-3)) and Cd (281 μg dm(-3)) affected root growth but did not affect shoots growth, photosynthesis, or antioxidant enzymes. Phytochelatins were confirmed as having a role in Cd tolerance in this plant while Hg tolerance seems to rely on different mechanisms. Histology and subcellular distribution revealed a localized increase in lignification, and an increased proportion of metal accumulation in cell wall over time. Proteomics further suggested that E. nuttallii was able to efficiently adapt its energy sources and the structure of its cells during Hg and Cd exposure. Storage in cell walls to protect cellular machinery is certainly predominant at environmental concentrations of metals in this plant resulting in a high tolerance highlighted by the absence of toxicity symptoms in shoots despite the significant accumulation of metals.

  3. Programmed cell death or desiccation tolerance : two possible routes for wheat endosperm cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golovina, E.A.; Hoekstra, F.A.; Aelst, van A.C.

    2000-01-01

    The fate of cells in the endosperm of developing wheat kernels was investigated under normal conditions and upon premature slow drying on the cut ear. To follow the changes in membrane integrity and cellular ultrastructure, an electron spin resonance (ESR) spin probe technique and low temperature sc

  4. Cell mediated therapeutics for cancer treatment: Tumor homing cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balivada, Sivasai

    Many cell types were known to have migratory properties towards tumors and different research groups have shown reliable results regarding cells as delivery vehicles of therapeutics for targeted cancer treatment. Present report discusses proof of concept for 1. Cell mediated delivery of Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and targeted Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) as a cancer treatment by using in vivo mouse cancer models, 2. Cells surface engineering with chimeric proteins for targeted cancer treatment by using in vitro models. 1. Tumor homing cells can carry MNPs specifically to the tumor site and tumor burden will decrease after alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure. To test this hypothesis, first we loaded Fe/Fe3O4 bi-magnetic NPs into neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which were previously shown to migrate towards melanoma tumors. We observed that NPCs loaded with MNPs travel to subcutaneous melanoma tumors. After alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure, the targeted delivery of MNPs by the NPCs resulted in a mild decrease in tumor size (Chapter-2). Monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) are known to infiltrate tumor sites, and also have phagocytic activity which can increase their uptake of MNPs. To test Mo/Ma-mediated MHT we transplanted Mo/Ma loaded with MNPs into a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis. We observed that MNP-loaded Mo/Ma infiltrated pancreatic tumors and, after AMF treatment, significantly prolonged the lives of mice bearing disseminated intraperitoneal pancreatic tumors (Chapter-3). 2. Targeted cancer treatment could be achieved by engineering tumor homing cell surfaces with tumor proteases cleavable, cancer cell specific recombinant therapeutic proteins. To test this, Urokinase and Calpain (tumor specific proteases) cleavable; prostate cancer cell (CaP) specific (CaP1 targeting peptide); apoptosis inducible (Caspase3 V266ED3)- rCasp3V266ED3 chimeric protein was designed in silico. Hypothesized membrane anchored chimeric protein (rCasp3V

  5. APECED: Is this a model for failure of T-cell and B-cell tolerance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eKluger

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available APECED and IPEX syndromes show similarities in the clinical presentations and immunological alterations, mainly regarding regulatory T-cells function. T-cell defect may lead to tissue destruction chiefly in endocrine organs. Besides, APECED is characterized by high-titer antibodies against a wide variety of cytokines, that could partly be responsible for the clinical symptoms during APECED, mainly chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, and linked to antibodies against Th17 cells effector molecules, IL-17 and IL-22. On the other hand, the same antibodies, together with antibodies against type I interferons may be prevent from other immunological diseases, such as psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematous. The same effector Th17 cells, present in the lymphocytic infiltrate of target organs of APECED, could be responsible for the tissue destruction. Here again, the antibodies against the corresponding effector molecules, anti-IL-17 and anti-IL-22 could be protective. The occurrence of several effector mechanisms (CD4+ Th17 cell and CD8+ CTL and the effector cytokines IL-17 and IL-22, and simultaneous existence of regulatory mechanisms (CD4+ and CD8+ Treg and antibodies neutralizing the effect of the effector cytokines may explain the polymorphism of APECED. Almost all the patients develop the characteristic manifestations of the complex, but temporal course and symptoms severity vary considerably, even among siblings. The autoantibody profile does not correlate with the clinical picture. One could speculate that a secondary homeostatic balance between the harmful effector mechanisms, and the favorable regulatory mechanisms, finally define both the extent and severity of the clinical condition in the AIRE defective individuals. The proposed hypothesis that in APECED, in addition to strong tissue destructive mechanisms, a controlling regulatory mechanism does exist, allow us to conclude that APECED could be treated, and even cured, with immunological

  6. Role of mitochondria in programmed cell death mediated by arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huiyong; Zhou, Yunhua; Zhu, Mingjiang; Hou, Sarina; Li, Zi; Zhong, Huiqin; Lu, Jianhong; Meng, Tao; Wang, Junhong; Xia, Lin; Xu, Yue; Wu, Yuncheng

    2013-05-01

    Arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids from cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases, and cytochrome P450 are important lipid mediators involved in numerous homeostatic and pathophysiological processes. Most eicosanoids act primarily on their respective cell surface G-protein coupled receptors to elicit downstream signaling in an autocrine and paracrine fashion. Emerging evidence indicates that these hormones are also critical in apoptosis in a cell/tissue specific manner. In this review, we summarize the formation of eicosanoids and their roles as mediators in apoptosis, specifically on the roles of mitochondria in mediating these events and the signaling pathways involved. The biological relevance of eicosanoid-mediated apoptosis is also discussed.

  7. Uptake and metabolism of clomazone in tolerant-soybean and susceptible-cotton photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, M.A.; Liebl, R.A.; Widholm, J.M. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the uptake and metabolism of the pigment synthesis inhibiting herbicide clomazone in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv Corsoy) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum (L.) cv Stoneville 825) photomixotrophic cell suspensions. Soybean and cotton on a whole plant level are tolerant and susceptible to clomazone, respectively. Preliminary studies indicated that I{sub 50} values for growth, chlorophyll (Chl), {beta}-carotene, and lutein were, respectively, >22, 14, 19, and 23 times greater for the soybean cell line (SB-M) 8 days after treatment (DAT) compared to the cotton cell line (COT-M) 16 DAT. Differences in ({sup 14}C)clomazone uptake cannot account for selectivity since there were significantly greater levels of domazone absorbed by the SB-M cells compared to the COT-M cells for each treatment. The percentage of absorbed clomazone converted to more polar metabolite(s) was significantly greater by the SB-M cells relative to COT-M cells at 6 and 24 hours after treatment, however, only small differences existed between the cell lines by 48 hours after treatment. Nearly identical levels of parental clomazone was recovered from both cell lines for all treatments. A pooled metabolite fraction isolated from SB-M cells had no effect on the leaf pigment content of susceptible velvetleaf or soybean seedlings. Conversely, a pooled metabolite fraction from COT-M cells reduced the leaf Chl content of velvetleaf. Soybean tolerance to clomazone appears to be due to differential metabolism (bioactivation) and/or differences at the site of action.

  8. Uptake and metabolism of clomazone in tolerant-soybean and susceptible-cotton photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, M A; Liebl, R A; Widholm, J M

    1990-03-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the uptake and metabolism of the pigment synthesis inhibiting herbicide clomazone in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Corsoy) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum [L.] cv Stoneville 825) photomixotrophic cell suspensions. Soybean and cotton on a whole plant level are tolerant and susceptible to clomazone, respectively. Preliminary studies indicated that I(50) values for growth, chlorophyll (Chl), beta-carotene, and lutein were, respectively, >22, 14, 19, and 23 times greater for the soybean cell line (SB-M) 8 days after treatment (DAT) compared to the cotton cell line (COT-M) 16 DAT. Differences in [(14)C]clomazone uptake cannot account for selectivity since there were significantly greater levels of clomazone absorbed by the SB-M cells compared to the COT-M cells for each treatment. The percentage of absorbed clomazone converted to more polar metabolite(s) was significantly greater by the SB-M cells relative to COT-M cells at 6 and 24 hours after treatment, however, only small differences existed between the cell lines by 48 hours after treatment. Nearly identical levels of parental clomazone was recovered from both cell lines for all treatments. A pooled metabolite fraction isolated from SB-M cells had no effect on the leaf pigment content of susceptible velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medic.) or soybean seedlings. Conversely, a pooled metabolite fraction from COT-M cells reduced the leaf Chl content of velvetleaf. Soybean tolerance to clomazone appears to be due to differential metabolism (bioactivation) and/or differences at the site of action.

  9. Uptake and Metabolism of Clomazone in Tolerant-Soybean and Susceptible-Cotton Photomixotrophic Cell Suspension Cultures 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Michael A.; Liebl, Rex A.; Widholm, Jack M.

    1990-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the uptake and metabolism of the pigment synthesis inhibiting herbicide clomazone in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Corsoy) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum [L.] cv Stoneville 825) photomixotrophic cell suspensions. Soybean and cotton on a whole plant level are tolerant and susceptible to clomazone, respectively. Preliminary studies indicated that I50 values for growth, chlorophyll (Chl), β-carotene, and lutein were, respectively, >22, 14, 19, and 23 times greater for the soybean cell line (SB-M) 8 days after treatment (DAT) compared to the cotton cell line (COT-M) 16 DAT. Differences in [14C]clomazone uptake cannot account for selectivity since there were significantly greater levels of clomazone absorbed by the SB-M cells compared to the COT-M cells for each treatment. The percentage of absorbed clomazone converted to more polar metabolite(s) was significantly greater by the SB-M cells relative to COT-M cells at 6 and 24 hours after treatment, however, only small differences existed between the cell lines by 48 hours after treatment. Nearly identical levels of parental clomazone was recovered from both cell lines for all treatments. A pooled metabolite fraction isolated from SB-M cells had no effect on the leaf pigment content of susceptible velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medic.) or soybean seedlings. Conversely, a pooled metabolite fraction from COT-M cells reduced the leaf Chl content of velvetleaf. Soybean tolerance to clomazone appears to be due to differential metabolism (bioactivation) and/or differences at the site of action. PMID:16667349

  10. A20 is critical for the induction of Pam3CSK4-tolerance in monocytic THP-1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyue Hu

    Full Text Available A20 functions to terminate Toll-like receptor (TLR-induced immune response, and play important roles in the induction of lipopolysacchride (LPS-tolerance. However, the molecular mechanism for Pam3CSK4-tolerance is uncertain. Here we report that TLR1/2 ligand Pam3CSK4 induced tolerance in monocytic THP-1 cells. The pre-treatment of THP-1 cells with Pam3CSK4 down-regulated the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by Pam3CSK4 re-stimulation. Pam3CSK4 pre-treatment also down-regulated the signaling transduction of JNK, p38 and NF-κB induced by Pam3CSK4 re-stimulation. The activation of TLR1/2 induced a rapid and robust up-regulation of A20, suggesting that A20 may contribute to the induction of Pam3CSK4-tolerance. This hypothesis was proved by the observation that the over-expression of A20 by gene transfer down-regulated Pam3CSK4-induced inflammatory responses, and the down-regulation of A20 by RNA interference inhibited the induction of tolerance. Moreover, LPS induced a significant up-regulation of A20, which contributed to the induction of cross-tolerance between LPS and Pam3CSK4. A20 was also induced by the treatment of THP-1 cells with TNF-α and IL-1β. The pre-treatment with TNF-α and IL-1β partly down-regulated Pam3CSK4-induced activation of MAPKs. Furthermore, pharmacologic inhibition of GSK3 signaling down-regulated Pam3CSK4-induced A20 expression, up-regulated Pam3CSK4-induced inflammatory responses, and partly reversed Pam3CSK4 pre-treatment-induced tolerance, suggesting that GSK3 is involved in TLR1/2-induced tolerance by up-regulation of A20 expression. Taken together, these results indicated that A20 is a critical regulator for TLR1/2-induced pro-inflammatory responses.

  11. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) with a rice chitinase gene for improved tolerance to a fungal pathogen Sclerotium rolfsii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoling; Miyasaka, Susan C; Fitch, Maureen M M; Moore, Paul H; Zhu, Yun J

    2008-05-01

    Taro (Colocasia esculenta) is one of the most important crops in the Pacific Islands, however, taro yields have been declining in Hawaii over the past 30 years partly due to diseases caused by oomycete and fungal pathogens. In this study, an efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method for taro is first reported. In total, approximately 200 pieces (8 g) of embryogenic calluses were infected with the super-virulent A. tumefaciens strain EHA105 harboring the plant transformation plasmid pBI121/ricchi11 that contains the rice chitinase gene ricchi11. The presence and expression of the transgene ricchi11 in six independent transgenic lines was confirmed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). Southern blot analysis of the six independent lines indicated that three out of six (50%) had integrated a single copy of the transgene, and the other three lines had two or three copies of the transgene. Compared to the particle bombardment transformation of taro method, which was used in the previous studies, the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method obtained 43-fold higher transformation efficiency. In addition, these six transgenic lines via Agrobacterium may be more effective for transgene expression as a result of single-copy or low-copy insertion of the transgene than the single line with multiple copies of the transgene via particle bombardment. In a laboratory bioassay, all six transgenic lines exhibited increased tolerance to the fungal pathogen Sclerotium rolfsii, ranging from 42 to 63% reduction in lesion expansion.

  12. Role of reactive oxygen species-mediated mitochondrial dysregulation in 3-bromopyruvate induced cell death in hepatoma cells : ROS-mediated cell death by 3-BrPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Su; Ahn, Keun Jae; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Kim, Hye Mi; Lee, Jong Doo; Lee, Jae Myun; Kim, Se Jong; Park, Jeon Han

    2008-12-01

    Hexokinase type II (HK II) is the key enzyme for maintaining increased glycolysis in cancer cells where it is overexpressed. 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), an inhibitor of HK II, induces cell death in cancer cells. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of 3-BrPA-induced cell death, we used the hepatoma cell lines SNU449 (low expression of HKII) and Hep3B (high expression of HKII). 3-BrPA induced ATP depletion-dependent necrosis and apoptosis in both cell lines. 3-BrPA increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to mitochondrial dysregulation. NAC (N-acetyl-L: -cysteine), an antioxidant, blocked 3-BrPA-induced ROS production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and cell death. 3-BrPA-mediated oxidative stress not only activated poly-ADP-ribose (PAR) but also translocated AIF from the mitochondria to the nucleus. Taken together, 3-BrPA induced ATP depletion-dependent necrosis and apoptosis and mitochondrial dysregulation due to ROS production are involved in 3-BrPA-induced cell death in hepatoma cells.

  13. Impact of incretin hormones on beta-cell function in subjects with normal or impaired glucose tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muscelli, Elza; Mari, Andrea; Natali, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the enteroinsular axis influences beta-cell function have not been investigated in detail. We performed oral and isoglycemic intravenous (IV) glucose administration in subjects with normal (NGT; n = 11) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 10), using C-peptide deconvolu......The mechanisms by which the enteroinsular axis influences beta-cell function have not been investigated in detail. We performed oral and isoglycemic intravenous (IV) glucose administration in subjects with normal (NGT; n = 11) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 10), using C...... +/- 2 nmol/m(2) (32 +/- 4% of oral response), and its time course matched that of total insulin secretion. The beta-cell glucose sensitivity (OGTT/IV ratio = 1.52 +/- 0.26, P = 0.02), rate sensitivity (response to glucose rate of change, OGTT/IV ratio = 2.22 +/- 0.37, P = 0.06), and glucose...

  14. Eph/ephrin-B-mediated cell-to-cell interactions govern MTS20(+) thymic epithelial cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Herradón, Sara; García-Ceca, Javier; Sánchez Del Collado, Beatriz; Alfaro, David; Zapata, Agustín G

    2016-08-01

    Thymus development is a complex process in which cell-to-cell interactions between thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are essential to allow a proper maturation of both thymic cell components. Although signals that control thymocyte development are well known, mechanisms governing TEC maturation are poorly understood, especially those that regulate the maturation of immature TEC populations during early fetal thymus development. In this study, we show that EphB2-deficient, EphB2LacZ and EphB3-deficient fetal thymuses present a lower number of cells and delayed maturation of DN cell subsets compared to WT values. Moreover, deficits in the production of chemokines, known to be involved in the lymphoid seeding into the thymus, contribute in decreased proportions of intrathymic T cell progenitors (PIRA/B(+)) in the mutant thymuses from early stages of development. These features correlate with increased proportions of MTS20(+) cells but fewer MTS20(-) cells from E13.5 onward in the deficient thymuses, suggesting a delayed development of the first epithelial cells. In addition, in vitro the lack of thymocytes or the blockade of Eph/ephrin-B-mediated cell-to-cell interactions between either thymocytes-TECs or TECs-TECs in E13.5 fetal thymic lobes coursed with increased proportions of MTS20(+) TECs. This confirms, for the first time, that the presence of CD45(+) cells, corresponding at these stages to DN1 and DN2 cells, and Eph/ephrin-B-mediated heterotypic or homotypic cell interactions between thymocytes and TECs, or between TECs and themselves, contribute to the early maturation of MTS20(+) TECs.

  15. Suppression of Th1-mediated autoimmunity by embryonic stem cell-derived dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokunori Ikeda

    Full Text Available We herein demonstrate the immune-regulatory effect of embryonic stem cell-derived dendritic cells (ES-DCs using two models of autoimmune disease, namely non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Treatment of pre-diabetic NOD mice with ES-DCs exerted almost complete suppression of diabetes development during the observation period for more than 40 weeks. The prevention of diabetes by ES-DCs was accompanied with significant reduction of insulitis and decreased number of Th1 and Th17 cells in the spleen. Development of EAE was also inhibited by the treatment with ES-DCs, and the therapeutic effect was obtained even if ES-DCs were administrated after the onset of clinical symptoms. Treatment of EAE-induced mice with ES-DCs reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the spinal cord and suppressed the T cell response to the myelin antigen. Importantly, the ES-DC treatment did not affect T cell response to an exogenous antigen. As the mechanisms underlying the reduction of the number of infiltrating Th1 cells, we observed the inhibition of differentiation and proliferation of Th1 cells by ES-DCs. Furthermore, the expression of VLA-4α on Th1 cells was significantly inhibited by ES-DCs. Considering the recent advances in human induced pluripotent stem cell-related technologies, these results suggest a clinical application for pluripotent stem cell-derived dendritic cells as a therapy for T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases.

  16. MYSM1-dependent checkpoints in B cell lineage differentiation and B cell-mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Michael; Farrington, Kyo; Petrov, Jessica C; Belle, Jad I; Mindt, Barbara C; Witalis, Mariko; Duerr, Claudia U; Fritz, Jörg H; Nijnik, Anastasia

    2017-03-01

    MYSM1 is a chromatin-binding histone deubiquitinase. MYSM1 mutations in humans result in lymphopenia whereas loss of Mysm1 in mice causes severe hematopoietic abnormalities, including an early arrest in B cell development. However, it remains unknown whether MYSM1 is required at later checkpoints in B cell development or for B cell-mediated immune responses. We analyzed conditional mouse models Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre, Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD19-cre, and Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD21-cre with inactivation of Mysm1 at prepro-B, pre-B, and follicular B cell stages of development. We show that loss of Mysm1 at the prepro-B cell stage in Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre mice results in impaired B cell differentiation, with an ∼2-fold reduction in B cell numbers in the lymphoid organs. Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre B cells also showed increased expression of activation markers and impaired survival and proliferation. In contrast, Mysm1 was largely dispensable from the pre-B cell stage onward, with Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD19-cre and Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD21-cre mice showing no alterations in B cell numbers and largely normal responses to stimulation. MYSM1, therefore, has an essential role in B cell lineage specification but is dispensable at later stages of development. Importantly, MYSM1 activity at the prepro-B cell stage of development is important for the normal programming of B cell responses to stimulation once they complete their maturation process.

  17. Tolerating Zero Tolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian N.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of zero tolerance dates back to the mid-1990s when New Jersey was creating laws to address nuisance crimes in communities. The main goal of these neighborhood crime policies was to have zero tolerance for petty crime such as graffiti or littering so as to keep more serious crimes from occurring. Next came the war on drugs. In federal…

  18. Sox17-Mediated XEN Cell Conversion Identifies Dynamic Networks Controlling Cell-Fate Decisions in Embryo-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela C.H. McDonald

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the gene regulatory networks (GRNs distinguishing extraembryonic endoderm (ExEn stem (XEN cells from those that maintain the extensively characterized embryonic stem cell (ESC. An intriguing network candidate is Sox17, an essential transcription factor for XEN derivation and self-renewal. Here, we show that forced Sox17 expression drives ESCs toward ExEn, generating XEN cells that contribute to ExEn when placed back into early mouse embryos. Transient Sox17 expression is sufficient to drive this fate change during which time cells transit through distinct intermediate states prior to the generation of functional XEN-like cells. To orchestrate this conversion process, Sox17 acts in autoregulatory and feedforward network motifs, regulating dynamic GRNs directing cell fate. Sox17-mediated XEN conversion helps to explain the regulation of cell-fate changes and reveals GRNs regulating lineage decisions in the mouse embryo.

  19. Interactions between NKT cells and Tregs are required for tolerance to combined bone marrow and organ transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, David; Tang, Xiaobin; Dutt, Suparna; Nador, Roland G; Strober, Samuel

    2012-02-09

    We used a model of combined bone marrow and heart transplantation, in which tolerance and stable chimerism is induced after conditioning with fractionated irradiation of the lymphoid tissues and anti-T-cell antibodies. Graft acceptance and chimerism required host CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg production of IL-10 that was in-turn enhanced by host invariant natural killer (NK) T-cell production of IL-4. Up-regulation of PD-1 on host Tregs, CD4(+)CD25(-) conventional T (Tcon) cells, and CD8(+) T cells was also enhanced by NKT cell production of IL-4. Up-regulated PD-1 expression on Tregs was linked to IL-10 secretion, on CD8(+) T cells was linked to Tim-3 expression, and on CD4(+) Tcon cells was associated with reduced IFNγ secretion. Changes in the expression of PD-1 were induced by the conditioning regimen, and declined after bone marrow transplantation. In conclusion, NKT cells in this model promoted changes in expression of negative costimulatory receptors and anti-inflammatory cytokines by Tregs and other T-cell subsets in an IL-4-dependent manner that resulted in tolerance to the bone marrow and organ grafts.

  20. Macrophages play an essential role in antigen-specific immune suppression mediated by T CD8⁺ cell-derived exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Ptak, Wlodzimierz; Nowak, Bernadeta; Ptak, Maria; Askenase, Philip W; Bryniarski, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Murine contact sensitivity (CS) reaction could be antigen-specifically regulated by T CD8(+) suppressor (Ts) lymphocytes releasing microRNA-150 in antibody light-chain-coated exosomes that were formerly suggested to suppress CS through action on macrophages (Mφ). The present studies investigated the role of Mφ in Ts cell-exosome-mediated antigen-specific suppression as well as modulation of Mφ antigen-presenting function in humoral and cellular immunity by suppressive exosomes. Mice depleted of Mφ by clodronate liposomes could not be tolerized and did not produce suppressive exosomes. Moreover, isolated T effector lymphocytes transferring CS were suppressed by exosomes only in the presence of Mφ, demonstrating the substantial role of Mφ in the generation and action of Ts cell regulatory exosomes. Further, significant decrease of number of splenic B cells producing trinitrophenyl (TNP) -specific antibodies with the alteration of the ratio of serum titres of IgM to IgG was observed in recipients of exosome-treated, antigen-pulsed Mφ and the significant suppression of CS was demonstrated in recipients of exosome-treated, TNP-conjugated Mφ. Additionally, exosome-pulsed, TNP-conjugated Mφ mediated suppression of CS in mice pre-treated with a low-dose of cyclophosphamide, suggesting de novo induction of T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes. Treg cell involvement in the effector phase of the studied suppression mechanism was proved by unsuccessful tolerization of DEREG mice depleted of Treg lymphocytes. Furthermore, the inhibition of proliferation of CS effector cells cultured with exosome-treated Mφ in a transmembrane manner was observed. Our results demonstrated the essential role of Mφ in antigen-specific immune suppression mediated by Ts cell-derived exosomes and realized by induction of Treg lymphocytes and inhibition of T effector cell proliferation.

  1. In vivo tumor cell adhesion in the pulmonary microvasculature is exclusively mediated by tumor cell - endothelial cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mees Soeren T

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastasis formation is the leading cause of death among colon cancer patients. We established a new in-situ model of in vivo microscopy of the lung to analyse initiating events of metastatic tumor cell adhesion within this typical metastatic target of colon cancer. Methods Anaesthetized CD rats were mechanically ventilated and 106 human HT-29LMM and T84 colon cancer cells were injected intracardially as single cell suspensions. Quantitative in vivo microscopy of the lung was performed in 10 minute intervals for a total of 40 minutes beginning with the time of injection. Results After vehicle treatment of HT-29LMM controls 15.2 ± 5.3; 14.2 ± 7.5; 11.4 ± 5.5; and 15.4 ± 6.5 cells/20 microscopic fields were found adherent within the pulmonary microvasculature in each 10 minute interval. Similar numbers were found after injection of the lung metastasis derived T84 cell line and after treatment of HT-29LMM with unspecific mouse control-IgG. Subsequently, HT-29LMM cells were treated with function blocking antibodies against β1-, β4-, and αv-integrins wich also did not impair tumor cell adhesion in the lung. In contrast, after hydrolization of sialylated glycoproteins on the cells' surface by neuraminidase, we observed impairment of tumor cell adhesion by more than 50% (p Conclusions These results demonstrate that the initial colon cancer cell adhesion in the capillaries of the lung is predominantly mediated by tumor cell - endothelial cell interactions, possibly supported by platelets. In contrast to reports of earlier studies that metastatic tumor cell adhesion occurs through integrin mediated binding of extracellular matrix proteins in liver, in the lung, the continuously lined endothelium appears to be specifically targeted by circulating tumor cells.

  2. N-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion restricts cell proliferation in the dorsal neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalasani, Kavita; Brewster, Rachel M

    2011-05-01

    Neural progenitors are organized as a pseudostratified epithelium held together by adherens junctions (AJs), multiprotein complexes composed of cadherins and α- and β-catenin. Catenins are known to control neural progenitor division; however, it is not known whether they function in this capacity as cadherin binding partners, as there is little evidence that cadherins themselves regulate neural proliferation. We show here that zebrafish N-cadherin (N-cad) restricts cell proliferation in the dorsal region of the neural tube by regulating cell-cycle length. We further reveal that N-cad couples cell-cycle exit and differentiation, as a fraction of neurons are mitotic in N-cad mutants. Enhanced proliferation in N-cad mutants is mediated by ligand-independent activation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, possibly caused by defective ciliogenesis. Furthermore, depletion of Hh signaling results in the loss of junctional markers. We therefore propose that N-cad restricts the response of dorsal neural progenitors to Hh and that Hh signaling limits the range of its own activity by promoting AJ assembly. Taken together, these observations emphasize a key role for N-cad-mediated adhesion in controlling neural progenitor proliferation. In addition, these findings are the first to demonstrate a requirement for cadherins in synchronizing cell-cycle exit and differentiation and a reciprocal interaction between AJs and Hh signaling.

  3. Comparison of dendritic cell-mediated immune responses among canine malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Kyoichi; Arai, Hiroyoshi; Ueno, Emi; Saito, Chie; Yagihara, Hiroko; Isotani, Mayu; Ono, Kenichiro; Washizu, Tsukimi; Bonkobara, Makoto

    2007-09-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccination is one of the most attractive immunotherapies for malignancies in dogs. To examine the differences in DC-mediated immune responses from different types of malignancies in dogs, we vaccinated dogs using autologous DCs pulsed with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and cell lysate prepared from squamous cell carcinoma SCC2/88 (SCC-KLH-DC), histiocytic sarcoma CHS-5 (CHS-KLH-DC), or B cell leukemia GL-1 (GL-KLH-DC) in vitro. In vivo inductions of immune responses against these tumor cells were compared by the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test. The DTH response against SCC2/88 cells were observed in dogs vaccinated with autologous SCC-KLH-DC, while the response was undetectable against CHS-5 and GL-1 cells in dogs vaccinated with autologous CHS-KLH-DC and GL-KLH-DC. Skin biopsies taken from DTH challenge sites were then examined for immunohistochemistry, and recruitment of CD8 and CD4 T cells was detected at the site where SCC2/88 cells were inoculated in dogs vaccinated with SCC-KLH-DC. By contrast, neither CD8 nor CD4 T cell infiltration was found at the DTH challenge site in the dogs vaccinated with CHS-KLH-DC or GL-KLH-DC. These findings may reflect that the efficacy of immune induction by DC vaccination varies among tumor types and that immune responses could be inducible in squamous cell carcinoma. Our results encouraged further investigation of therapeutic vaccination for dogs with advanced squamous cell carcinoma in clinical trials.

  4. Optimizing electronic standard cell libraries for variability tolerance through the nano-CMOS grid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, James Alfred; Sinnott, Richard; Stewart, Gordon; Hilder, James A; Tyrrell, Andy M

    2010-08-28

    The project Meeting the Design Challenges of nano-CMOS Electronics (http://www.nanocmos.ac.uk) was funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council to tackle the challenges facing the electronics industry caused by the decreasing scale of transistor devices, and the inherent variability that this exposes in devices and in the circuits and systems in which they are used. The project has developed a grid-based solution that supports the electronics design process, incorporating usage of large-scale high-performance computing (HPC) resources, data and metadata management and support for fine-grained security to protect commercially sensitive datasets. In this paper, we illustrate how the nano-CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) grid has been applied to optimize transistor dimensions within a standard cell library. The goal is to extract high-speed and low-power circuits which are more tolerant of the random fluctuations that will be prevalent in future technology nodes. Using statistically enhanced circuit simulation models based on three-dimensional atomistic device simulations, a genetic algorithm is presented that optimizes the device widths within a circuit using a multi-objective fitness function exploiting the nano-CMOS grid. The results show that the impact of threshold voltage variation can be reduced by optimizing transistor widths, and indicate that a similar method could be extended to the optimization of larger circuits.

  5. Various tolerances to arsenic trioxide between human cortical neurons and leukemic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jin; MENG Ran; SUI Xinhua; LI Wenbin; YANG Baofeng

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is very effective for treatment of acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) but little can pass through the blood-brain-barrier (BBB),which limits its use in the prevention and treatment of central nervous system leukaemia (CNSL). Before creating a non-invasive method to help As2O3 's access, the safe and effective therapeutic concentration of As2O3 in the CNS ought to be known. The changes of apoptosis biomarkers, [Ca2+]i and PKC activity of both leukaemia cells and human cortical neurons, were monitored before and after being treated with As2O3 in vitro with laser confocal microscopy and Western blot. NSE concentration, the neuron invasive biomarker, was monitored by enzyme immunoassay (NSE-EIA). This study revealed that cortical neuron was more tolerable to As2O3 compared to NB4. 1.0 μmol / L As2O3 showed little influence on cortical neuron but effectively promoted apoptosis and induced differentiation of NB4.

  6. The essential role of the Deinococcus radiodurans ssb gene in cell survival and radiation tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Scott Lockhart

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has implicated single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB expression level as an important factor in microbial radiation resistance. The genome of the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans contains genes for two SSB homologs: the homodimeric, canonical Ssb, encoded by the gene ssb, and a novel pentameric protein encoded by the gene ddrB. ddrB is highly induced upon exposure to radiation, and deletions result in decreased radiation-resistance, suggesting an integral role of the protein in the extreme resistance exhibited by this organism. Although expression of ssb is also induced after irradiation, Ssb is thought to be involved primarily in replication. In this study, we demonstrate that Ssb in D. radiodurans is essential for cell survival. The lethality of an ssb deletion cannot be complemented by providing ddrB in trans. In addition, the radiation-sensitive phenotype conferred by a ddrB deletion is not alleviated by providing ssb in trans. By altering expression of the ssb gene, we also show that lower levels of transcription are required for optimal growth than are necessary for high radiation resistance. When expression is reduced to that of E. coli, ionizing radiation resistance is similarly reduced. UV resistance is also decreased under low ssb transcript levels where growth is unimpaired. These results indicate that the expression of ssb is a key component of both normal cellular metabolism as well as pathways responsible for the high radiation tolerance of D. radiodurans.

  7. Surrogate light chain is required for central and peripheral B-cell tolerance and inhibits anti-DNA antibody production by marginal zone B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Weicheng; Grimsholm, Ola; Bernardi, Angelina I; Höök, Nina; Stern, Anna; Cavallini, Nicola; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill

    2015-04-01

    Selection of the primary antibody repertoire takes place in pro-/pre-B cells, and subsequently in immature and transitional B cells. At the first checkpoint, μ heavy (μH) chains assemble with surrogate light (SL) chain into a precursor B-cell receptor. In mice lacking SL chain, μH chain selection is impaired, and serum autoantibody levels are elevated. However, whether the development of autoantibody-producing cells is due to an inability of the resultant B-cell receptors to induce central and/or peripheral B-cell tolerance or other factors is unknown. Here, we show that receptor editing is defective, and that a higher proportion of BM immature B cells are prone to undergoing apoptosis. Furthermore, transitional B cells are also more prone to undergoing apoptosis, with a stronger selection pressure to enter the follicular B-cell pool. Those that enter the marginal zone (MZ) B-cell pool escape selection and survive, possibly due to the B-lymphopenia and elevated levels of B-cell activating factor. Moreover, the MZ B cells are responsible for the elevated IgM anti-dsDNA antibody levels detected in these mice. Thus, the SL chain is required for central and peripheral B-cell tolerance and inhibits anti-DNA antibody production by MZ B cells.

  8. Strategy for eliciting antigen-specific CD8+ T cell-mediated immune response against a cryptic CTL epitope of merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez Bianca P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC is a relatively new addition to the expanding category of oncovirus-induced cancers. Although still comparably rare, the number of cases has risen dramatically in recent years. Further complicating this trend is that MCC is an extremely aggressive neoplasm with poor patient prognosis and limited treatment options for advanced disease. The causative agent of MCC has been identified as the merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV. The MCPyV-encoded large T (LT antigen is an oncoprotein that is theorized to be essential for virus-mediated tumorigenesis and is therefore, an excellent MCC antigen for the generation of antitumor immune responses. As a foreign antigen, the LT oncoprotein avoids the obstacle of immune tolerance, which normally impedes the development of antitumor immunity. Ergo, it is an excellent target for anti-MCC immunotherapy. Since tumor-specific CD8+ T cells lead to better prognosis for MCC and numerous other cancers, we have generated a DNA vaccine that is capable of eliciting LT-specific CD8+ T cells. The DNA vaccine (pcDNA3-CRT/LT encodes the LT antigen linked to a damage-associated molecular pattern, calreticulin (CRT, as it has been demonstrated that the linkage of CRT to antigens promotes the induction of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Results The present study shows that DNA vaccine-induced generation of LT-specific CD8+ T cells is augmented by linking CRT to the LT antigen. This is relevant since the therapeutic effects of the pcDNA3-CRT/LT DNA vaccine is mediated by LT-specific CD8+ T cells. Mice vaccinated with the DNA vaccine produced demonstrably more LT-specific CD8+ T cells. The DNA vaccine was also able to confer LT-specific CD8+ T cell-mediated protective and therapeutic effects to prolong the survival of mice with LT-expressing tumors. In the interest of determining the LT epitope which most MCC-specific CD8+ T cells recognize, we identified the amino acid sequence of the

  9. Multiple host-cell recombination pathways act in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestiri, Imen; Norre, Frédéric; Gallego, Maria E; White, Charles I

    2014-02-01

    Using floral-dip, tumorigenesis and root callus transformation assays of both germline and somatic cells, we present here results implicating the four major non-homologous and homologous recombination pathways in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana. All four single mutant lines showed similar mild reductions in transformability, but knocking out three of four pathways severely compromised Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Although integration of T-DNA into the plant genome is severely compromised in the absence of known DNA double-strand break repair pathways, it does still occur, suggesting the existence of other pathways involved in T-DNA integration. Our results highlight the functional redundancy of the four major plant recombination pathways in transformation, and provide an explanation for the lack of strong effects observed in previous studies on the roles of plant recombination functions in transformation.

  10. Effects of bortezomib in sensitizing human prostate cancer cell lines to NK-mediated cytotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hu; Rui-Rui Zheng; Hui-Xia Cui; Dan Yue; Yong Wang; You-Hong Jiang

    2012-01-01

    The proteasome inhibitor,bortezomib,has been demonstrated to sensitize tumor cells to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-mediated apoptosis.Natural killer (NK) cells represent potent antitumor effector cells.They also express TRAIL.Therefore.we investigated whether bortezomib could sensitize tumor cells to NK cell-mediated killing,and have the same effect in human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP and DU145).We found that bortezomib strongly inhibits proliferation in both cell lines.Furthermore,compared with LNCaP cells,DU 145 cells are more sensitive to bortezomib-induced apoptosis.However,bortezomib is unable to sensitize these two cell lines to NK cell-mediated killing in short-term assays.In long-term assays,we found that killing mediated by activated NK cells following bortezornib treatment leads to greater antitumor effects than either treatment alone.In addition,treatment with bortezomib causes these cells to upregulate apoptosis-related mRNA as well as death receptors and downregulate the major histocompatibility class (MHC)-Ⅰ molecule on the cell surface of DU145 cells.In contrast,LNCaP cells are not sensitized by this treatment.Death receptors and the MHC-Ⅰ molecule did not change in this cell line.These-data suggest that bortezomib can be used to sensitize prostate cancer cells to NK cell-mediated killing and improve current cancer therapies.This therapeutic strategy may be more effective in patients with androgen-insensitive prostate cancer.

  11. A miniature glucose/O{sub 2} biofuel cell with a high tolerance against ascorbic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.; Zhang, L. [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Graduate School of CAS, Beijing (China); Su, L. [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Ohsaka, T. [Department of Electronic Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Midori-ku, Yokohama (Japan); Mao, L.

    2009-02-15

    This study demonstrates a miniature glucose/O{sub 2} biofuel cell (BFC) with a high tolerance against physiological level of ascorbic acid (AA) by immobilising ascorbate oxidase (AAox) on both the bioanode and the biocathode. Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-modified carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) are employed as the substrate electrode for the bioanode and biocathode. Glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and bilirubin oxidase (BOD) are used as the biocatalysts for the electro-oxidation of glucose and for the electro-reduction of oxygen, respectively. SWNTs are used as the support for the both, stably confining the electrocatalyst (i.e. polymerised methylene blue, polyMB) for the oxidation of NADH co-factor for GDH and efficiently facilitating direct electrochemistry of the cathodic biocatalyst (i.e. BOD) for O{sub 2} reduction. The prepared micro-sized GDH-based bioanode and BOD-based biocathode employed for the bioelectrocatalytic oxidation of glucose and reduction of oxygen, respectively, are further over-coated with AAox to give a miniature glucose/O{sub 2} BFC with a high tolerance against AA. The maximum power density and the open circuit voltage (OCV) of the assembled glucose/O{sub 2} BFC are 52 {mu}W cm{sup -2} and 0.60 V, respectively. These values remain unchanged with the presence of AA in solution. In the human serum containing 10 mM NAD{sup +} and under ambient air, the maximum power density and the OCV of the assembled glucose/O{sub 2} BFC with AAox immobilisation on both the bioanode and the biocathode are 35 {mu}W cm{sup -2} and 0.39 V, respectively. These values are remarkably larger than those of the glucose/O{sub 2} BFC without AAox immobilisation on both the bioanode and the biocathode. This study could offer a new route to the development of enzymatic BFCs with promising application in real biological systems. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. Experimental Study on Induction of Tolerance to Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis by Immature Dendritic Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effect of immature dendritic cells (iDCs) on experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (MG), iDCs were generated in low dose of GM-CSF, and then they were pulsed with acetylcholine receptor (AchR) and transferred to allogeneic rats. After 3 weeks, all rats were immunized with AchR and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) and observed for the corresponding indices of MG for 7 weeks. Our results showed that compared with mature DCs (mDCs) generated at high dose of GM-CSF plus additional stimulation by lipopolysaccharide, iDCs expressed significantly lower levels of MHC-Ⅱ , CD80 and CD86, and their ability to uptake FITC-Dextran was stronger but the ability of stimulating proliferation of allogeneic T cells were weaker. Like controls,after immunization, all rats transferred with iDCs, mDCs and AchR-pulsed mDCs showed typical symptoms in 4 to 7 weeks. The amplitude of electromyogram wave dropped obviously, the level of serum AchRab increased and neuromuscular junction showed typical damage of MG. In contrast, no conspicuous changes were noted in rats transferred with AchR-pulsed iDCs. The results suggest that iDCs could be generated by inducing bone marrow precursors in low dose of GM-CSF, AchRpulsed iDCs could induce tolerance of EAMG. The dysfunction of DCs may play an important role in the initiation and maintenance of normal immune response in MG.

  13. Correlation between Endotoxin Tolerance in Human Monocyte Leukemia Cell Line THP-1 with Glucocorticoid Receptor-α

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Human monocyte leukemia cell line THP-1 was stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to simulate the sepsis model and the expression of human glucocorticoid receptor-α (GR-α) mRNA in montocytes with endotoxin tolerance was investigated. THP-1 cells were cultured in serum-free medium, randomly divided into groups A, B, C, D and E, and stimulated with 0, 10, 10,100, 0 ng/mL LPS for 24 h followed with 100, 100, 10, 100, 0 ng/mL LPS for another 24 h respectively. The expression of GR-α mRNA was detected by semi-quantitative reverse transcriptional polymerase chain reaction. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results showed that the A values of GR-α/β-actin in groups A,B, C, D and E was 0. 607±0. 006, 0. 368±0. 005, 0. 484±0. 008, 0. 509±0. 004 and 0. 564± 0. 014 respectively with the difference being significant among the groups (P<0. 05). The GR-α mRNA expression was negatively correlated with the TNF-α expression (P<0.01). It was concluded that the down-regulation of the expression of GR-α mRNA in endotoxin tolerance THP-1 cells might play an important role in the development of endotoxin tolerance in THP-1 cells.

  14. The lupus susceptibility locus Sle1 breaches peripheral B cell tolerance at the antibody-forming cell and germinal center checkpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuyyuru, Raja; Mohan, Chandra; Manser, Tim; Rahman, Ziaur S M

    2009-11-01

    We have described a line of V(H) knock-in mice termed HKIR in which the transgenic Igh locus partially encodes "dual-reactive" antichromatin and anti-p-azophenylarsonate (Ars) BCRs. HKIR B cells termed canonical, expressing a particular Vkappa L chain, evade central tolerance by down-regulating BCR levels. Canonical HKIR B cells can be recruited into the primary germinal center (GC) and Ab-forming cell (AFC) compartments via Ars immunization. However, their participation in the GC response rapidly wanes and they do not efficiently contribute to the memory compartment, indicating that they are regulated by a GC tolerance checkpoint. We analyzed the influence of the Sle1 genetic interval, shown to break tolerance of chromatin-reactive B cells, on the behavior of HKIR B cells during the anti-Ars response. Canonical B cells from congenic HKIR.Sle1 mice gave rise to elevated short and long-lived AFC responses, and the attenuated GC and memory responses characteristic of these B cells were relieved in adoptive, wild-type recipients. HKIR GC B cells containing Sle1 expressed increased levels of Bcl-2 and c-FLIP and decreased levels of Fas RNA compared with HKIR controls, suggesting direct alteration of the regulation of the GC response by Sle1. High titers of canonical and anti-dsDNA Abs spontaneously developed in many aged HKIR.Sle1 mice. Together, these data indicate that Sle1 perturbs the action of peripheral tolerance checkpoints operative on antinuclear Ag B cells in both the AFC and GC pathways in a cell autonomous fashion.

  15. PAX2 regulates ADAM10 expression and mediates anchorage-independent cell growth of melanoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Boyoung Lee

    Full Text Available PAX transcription factors play an important role during development and carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated PAX2 protein levels in melanocytes and melanoma cells by Western Blot and immunofluorescence analysis and characterized the role of PAX2 in the pathogenesis of melanoma. In vitro we found weak PAX2 protein expression in keratinocytes and melanocytes. Compared to melanocytes increased PAX2 protein levels were detectable in melanoma cell lines. Interestingly, in tissue sections of melanoma patients nuclear PAX2 expression strongly correlated with nuclear atypia and the degree of prominent nucleoli, indicating an association of PAX2 with a more atypical cellular phenotype. In addition, with chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, PAX2 overexpression and PAX2 siRNA we present compelling evidence that PAX2 can regulate ADAM10 expression, a metalloproteinase known to play important roles in melanoma metastasis. In human tissue samples we found co-expression of PAX2 and ADAM10 in melanocytes of benign nevi and in melanoma cells of patients with malignant melanoma. Importantly, the downregulation of PAX2 by specific siRNA inhibited the anchorage independent cell growth and decreased the migratory and invasive capacity of melanoma cells. Furthermore, the downregulation of PAX2 abrogated the chemoresistance of melanoma cells against cisplatin, indicating that PAX2 expression mediates cell survival and plays important roles during melanoma progression.

  16. Cell transformation mediated by chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid of polyoma virus-transformed cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Della Valle, G.; Fenton, R.G.; Basilico, C.

    1981-05-01

    To study the mechanism of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-mediated gene transfer, normal rat cells were transfected with total cellular DNA extracted from polyoma virus-transformed cells. This resulted in the appearance of the transformed phenotype in 1 x 10/sup -6/ to 3 x 10/sup -6/ of the transfected cells. Transformation was invariably associated with the acquisition of integrated viral DNA sequences characteristic of the donor DNA. This was caused not by the integration of free DNA molecules, but by the transfer of large DNA fragments (10 to 20 kilobases) containing linked cellular and viral sequences. Although Southern blot analysis showed that integration did not appear to occur in a homologus region of the recipient chromosome, the frequency of transformation was rather high when compared with that of purified polyoma DNA, perhaps due to ''position'' effects or to the high efficiency of recombination of large DNA fragments.

  17. Fas involvement in Ca(2+)-independent T cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvier, E; Luciani, M F; Golstein, P

    1993-01-01

    Mechanisms of T cell-mediated cytotoxicity remain poorly defined at the molecular level. To investigate some of these mechanisms, we used as target cells, on the one hand, thymocytes from lpr and gld mouse mutants, and on the other hand, L1210 cells transfected or not with the apoptosis-inducing Fas molecule. These independent mutant or transfectant-based approaches both led to the conclusion that Fas was involved in the Ca(2+)-independent component of cytotoxicity mediated by at least two sources of T cells, namely nonantigen-specific in vitro activated hybridoma cells, and antigen-specific in vivo raised peritoneal exudate lymphocytes. Thus, in these cases, T cell-mediated cytotoxicity involved transduction via Fas of the target cell death signal.

  18. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia U937 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Un-Ho; Song, Kwon-Ho; Motomura, Muneo; Suzuki, Ikukatsu; Gu, Yeun-Hwa; Kang, Yun-Jeong; Moon, Tae-Chul; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2008-03-01

    Caffeic acid phenyl ester (CAPE), a biologically active ingredient of propolis, has several interesting biological properties including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, immunostimulatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-invasive, anti-metastatic and carcinostatic activities. Recently, several groups have reported that CAPE is cytotoxic to tumor cells but not to normal cells. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of CAPE-induced apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia U937 cells. Treatment of U937 cells with CAPE decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. DNA fragmentation assay revealed the typical ladder profile of oligonucleosomal fragments in CAPE-treated U937 cells. In addition, as evidenced by the nuclear DAPI staining experiment, we observed that the nuclear condensation, a typical phenotype of apoptosis, was found in U937 cells treated with 5 microg/ml of CAPE. Therefore, it was suggested that CAPE is a potent agent inducing apoptosis in U937 cells. Apoptotic action of the CAPE was accompanied by release of cytochrome C, reduction of Bcl-2 expression, increase of Bax expression, activation/cleavage of caspase-3 and activation/cleavage of PARP in U937 cells, but not by Fas protein, an initial mediator in the death signaling, or by phospho-eIF2 alpha and CHOP, crucial mediators in ER-mediated apoptosis. From the results, it was concluded that CAPE induces the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis but not death receptors- or ER-mediated apoptosis in U937 cells.

  19. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Eucalyptus globulus using explants with shoot apex with introduction of bacterial choline oxidase gene to enhance salt tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Etsuko; Nanto, Kazuya; Oishi, Masatoshi; Ebinuma, Hiroyasu; Morishita, Yoshihiko; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shibata, Daisuke; Shimada, Teruhisa

    2012-01-01

    Eucalyptus globulus is one of the most economically important plantation hardwoods for paper making. However, its low transformation frequency has prevented genetic engineering of this species with useful genes. We found the hypocotyl section with a shoot apex has the highest regeneration ability among another hypocotyl sections, and have developed an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method using these materials. We then introduced a salt tolerance gene, namely a bacterial choline oxidase gene (codA) with a GUS reporter gene, into E. globulus. The highest frequency of transgenic shoot regeneration from hypocotyls with shoot apex was 7.4% and the average frequency in four experiments was 4.0%, 12-fold higher than that from hypocotyls without shoot apex. Using about 10,000 explants, over 250 regenerated buds were confirmed as transformants by GUS analysis. Southern blot analysis of 100 elongated shoots confirmed successful generation of stable transformants. Accumulation of glycinebetaine was investigated in 44 selected transgenic lines, which showed 1- to 12-fold higher glycinebetaine levels than non-transgenic controls. Rooting of 16 transgenic lines was successful using a photoautotrophic method under enrichment with 1,000 ppm CO(2). The transgenic whole plantlets were transplanted into potting soil and grown normally in a growth room. They showed salt tolerance to 300 mM NaCl. The points of our system are using explants with shoot apex as materials, inhibiting the elongation of the apex on the selection medium, and regenerating transgenic buds from the side opposite to the apex. This approach may also solve transformation problems in other important plants.

  20. Differentiation and distribution of colistin- and sodium dodecyl sulfate-tolerant cells in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Klausen, M; Ernst, RK

    2007-01-01

    biofilms, and the development of tolerance to the antimicrobial agents was found to be affected as well. Mutations in genes interfering with lipopolysaccharide modification (pmr) eliminated the biofilm-associated colistin tolerance phenotype. Experiments with a PAO1 strain harboring a pmr-gfp fusion showed...... that only the cap-forming subpopulation in biofilms treated with colistin expresses the pmr operon. These results suggest that increased antibiotic tolerance in biofilms may be a consequence of differentiation into distinct subpopulations with different phenotypic properties....

  1. Antigen-specific regulatory T-cell subsets in transplantation tolerance regulatory T-cell subset quality reduces the need for quantity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenen, H.J.P.M.; Joosten, I.

    2006-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are critical controllers of the immune response. Disturbed Treg function results in autoimmunity, whereas in transplantation Treg are crucial in graft survival and transplant tolerance. Hence therapeutic modalities that influence Treg numbers or function hold great clinical

  2. In vitro evaluation of inorganic and methyl mercury mediated cytotoxic effect on neural cells derived from different animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jing; Wang, Youwei; Lu, Yuanan

    2016-03-01

    To extend the current understanding of the mercury-mediated cytotoxic effect, five neural cell lines established from different animal species were comparatively analyzed using three different endpoint bioassays: thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay (MTT), neutral red uptake assay (NRU), and Coomassie blue assay (CB). Following a 24-hr exposure to selected concentrations of mercury chloride (HgCl2) and methylmercury (II) chloride (MeHgCl), the cytotoxic effect on test cells was characterized by comparing their 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) values. Experimental results indicated that both these forms of mercury were toxic to all the neural cells, but at very different degrees. The IC50 values of MeHgCl among these cell lines ranged from 1.15±0.22 to 10.31±0.70μmol/L while the IC50 values for HgCl2 were much higher, ranging from 6.44±0.36 to 160.97±19.63μmol/L, indicating the more toxic nature of MeHgCl. The IC50 ratio between HgCl2 and MeHgCl ranged from 1.75 to 96.0, which confirms that organic mercury is much more toxic to these neural cells than inorganic mercury. Among these cell lines, HGST-BR and TriG44 derived from marine sea turtles showed a significantly high tolerance to HgCl2 as compared to the three mammalian neural cells. Among these neural cells, SK-N-SH represented the most sensitive cells to both chemical forms of mercury.

  3. Integrin {beta}1-dependent invasive migration of irradiation-tolerant human lung adenocarcinoma cells in 3D collagen matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Seiichiro [Transdisciplinary Life Science Course, Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, N10-W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Haga, Hisashi, E-mail: haga@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Transdisciplinary Life Science Course, Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, N10-W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Yasuda, Motoaki [Department of Oral Pathobiological Science, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, N13-W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Mizutani, Takeomi; Kawabata, Kazushige [Transdisciplinary Life Science Course, Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, N10-W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15-W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Nishioka, Takeshi [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Engineering, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, N12-W5, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan)

    2010-06-04

    Radiotherapy is one of the effective therapies used for treating various malignant tumors. However, the emergence of tolerant cells after irradiation remains problematic due to their high metastatic ability, sometimes indicative of poor prognosis. In this study, we showed that subcloned human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549P-3) that are irradiation-tolerant indicate high invasive activity in vitro, and exhibit an integrin {beta}1 activity-dependent migratory pattern. In collagen gel overlay assay, majority of the A549P-3 cells displayed round morphology and low migration activity, whereas a considerable number of A549P-3IR cells surviving irradiation displayed a spindle morphology and high migration rate. Blocking integrin {beta}1 activity reduced the migration rate of A549P-3IR cells and altered the cell morphology allowing them to assume a round shape. These results suggest that the A549P-3 cells surviving irradiation acquire a highly invasive integrin {beta}1-dependent phenotype, and integrin {beta}1 might be a potentially effective therapeutic target in combination with radiotherapy.

  4. Tolerance and dose-volume relationship of intrathoracic stomach irradiation after esophagectomy for patients with thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Qi; Cai, Xu-Wei; Fu, Xiao-Long; Chen, Jun-Chao; Xiang, Jia-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To identify the tolerance of radiation with a high prescribed dose and predictors for the development of intrathoracic stomach toxicity in patients with thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) after esophagectomy followed by gastric conduit reconstruction. Methods and Materials From 2011 to 2013, 105 patients after esophagectomy were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. The intrathoracic stomach was outlined with the calculation of a dose-volume histogram (DVH) for the i...

  5. Hygromycin B-induced cell death is partly mediated by reactive oxygen species in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oung, Hui-Min; Lin, Ke-Chun; Wu, Tsung-Meng; Chandrika, Nulu Naga Prafulla; Hong, Chwan-Yang

    2015-12-01

    The aminoglycoside antibiotic hygromycin B (Hyg) inhibits prokaryotic, chloroplast and mitochondrial protein synthesis. Because of the toxic effect of Hyg on plant cells, the HPT gene, encoding hygromycin phosphotransferase, has become one of the most widely used selectable markers in plant transformation. Yet the mechanism behind Hyg-induced cell lethality in plants is not clearly understood. In this study, we aimed to decipher this mechanism. With Hyg treatment, rice calli exhibited cell death, and rice seedlings showed severe growth defects, leaf chlorosis and leaf shrinkage. Rice seedlings also exhibited severe lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation, for oxidative stress damage at the cellular level. The production of reactive oxygen species such as O2(·-), H2O2 and OH(·) was greatly induced in rice seedlings under Hyg stress, and pre-treatment with ascorbate increased resistance to Hyg-induced toxicity indicating the existence of oxidative stress. Overexpression of mitochondrial Alternative oxidase1a gene without HPT selection marker in rice enhanced tolerance to Hyg and attenuated the degradation of protein content, whereas the rice plastidial glutathione reductase 3 mutant showed increased sensitivity to Hyg. These results demonstrate that Hyg-induced cell lethality in rice is not only due to the inhibition of protein synthesis but also mediated by oxidative stress.

  6. Clinical Cancer Therapy by NK Cells via Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kory L. Alderson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are powerful effector cells that can be directed to eliminate tumor cells through tumor-targeted monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. Some tumor-targeted mAbs have been successfully applied in the clinic and are included in the standard of care for certain malignancies. Strategies to augment the antitumor response by NK cells have led to an increased understanding of how to improve their effector responses. Next-generation reagents, such as molecularly modified mAbs and mAb-cytokine fusion proteins (immunocytokines, ICs designed to augment NK-mediated killing, are showing promise in preclinical and some clinical settings. Continued research into the antitumor effects induced by NK cells and tumor-targeted mAbs suggests that additional intrinsic and extrinsic factors may influence the antitumor response. Therefore more research is needed that focuses on evaluating which NK cell and tumor criteria are best predictive of a clinical response and which combination immunotherapy regimens to pursue for distinct clinical settings.

  7. MFG-E8 Is Critical for Embryonic Stem Cell-Mediated T Cell Immunomodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Tan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The molecules and mechanisms pertinent to the low immunogenicity of undifferentiated embryonic stem cells (ESCs remain poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that milk fat globule epidermal growth factor 8 (MFG-E8 is a vital mediator in this phenomenon and directly suppresses T cell immune responses. MFG-E8 is enriched in undifferentiated ESCs but diminished in differentiated ESCs. Upregulation of MFG-E8 in ESCs increases the successful engraftment of both undifferentiated and differentiated ESCs across major histocompatibility complex barriers. MFG-E8 suppresses T cell activation/proliferation and inhibits Th1, Th2, and Th17 subpopulations while increasing regulatory T cell subsets. Neutralizing MFG-E8 substantially abrogates these effects, whereas addition of recombinant MFG-E8 to differentiated ESCs restores immunosuppression. Furthermore, we provide the evidence that MFG-E8 suppresses T cell activation and regulates T cell polarization by inhibiting PKCθ phosphorylation through the α3/5βV integrin receptor. Our findings offer an approach to facilitate transplantation acceptance.

  8. Inflammatory mediators and cell adhesion molecules as indicators of severity of atherosclerosis: the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.M. de Maat (Moniek); M.L. Bots (Michiel); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); J. Meijer (John); A.J. Kiliaan (Amanda); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Hofman (Albert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractInflammatory mediators and soluble cell adhesion molecules predict cardiovascular events. It is not clear whether they reflect the severity of underlying atherosclerotic disease. Within the Rotterdam Study, we investigated the associations of C-reactive protein (CRP), i

  9. Autophagic Cell Death and Apoptosis Jointly Mediate Cisatracurium Besylate-Induced Cell Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixia Zhuang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cisatracurium besylate is an ideal non-depolarizing muscle relaxant which is widely used in clinical application. However, some studies have suggested that cisatracurium besylate can affect cell proliferation. Moreover, its specific mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we found that the number of GFP-LC3 (green fluoresent protein-light chain 3 positive autophagosomes and the rate of mitochondria fracture both increased significantly in drug-treated GFP-LC3 and MitoDsRed stable HeLa cells. Moreover, cisatracurium promoted the co-localization of LC3 and mitochondria and induced formation of autolysosomes. Levels of mitochondrial proteins decreased, which were reversed by the lysosome inhibitor Bafinomycin A1. Similar results with evidence of dose-dependent effects were found in both HeLa and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs. Cisatracurium lowered HUVEC viability to 0.16 (OD490 at 100 µM and to 0.05 (OD490 after 48 h in vitro; it increased the cell death rate to 56% at 100 µM and to 60% after 24 h in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (p < 0.01. Cell proliferation decreased significantly by four fold in Atg5 WT (wildtype MEF (mouse embryonic fibroblast (p < 0.01 but was unaffected in Atg5 KO (Knockout MEF, even upon treatment with a high dose of cisatracurium. Cisatracurium induced significant increase in cell death of wild-type MEFs even in the presence of the apoptosis inhibitor zVAD. Thus, we conclude that activation of both the autophagic cell death and cell apoptosis pathways contributes to cisatracurium-mediated cell injury.

  10. Induction of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated and estrogen receptor-mediated activities, and modulation of cell proliferation by dinaphthofurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondrácek, Jan; Chramostová, Katerina; Plísková, Martina; Bláha, Ludek; Brack, Werner; Kozubík, Alois; Machala, Miroslav

    2004-09-01

    A group of heterocyclic aromatic compounds, dinaphthofurans (DNFs), recently have been identified as potentially significant contaminants in freshwater sediments. In the present study, a battery of in vitro assays was used for detection of toxic effects of DNFs that are potentially associated with endocrine disruption and tumor promotion. Dinaphthofurans were found to act as relatively potent inducers of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activity in the chemical-activated luciferase reporter gene expression DR-CALUX assay. The relative AhR-inducing potencies of DNFs were similar or even higher than relative potencies of unsubstituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), with dinaphtho[1,2-b;2'3'-d]furan being the most potent AhR agonist. Two compounds, dinaphtho[2,1-b;2'3'-d]furan and dinaphtho[1,2-b;1'2'-d]furan, induced estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated activity in the estrogen receptor-mediated CALUX (the ER-CALUX) assay. Two types of potential tumor-promoting effects of DNFs were investigated, using in vitro bioassays for detection of inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication and detection of a release from contact inhibition. Although the acute inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication was not observed, all six tested DNFs were able to release rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells from contact inhibition at concentrations as low as 100 nM. In summary, the present study indicated that DNFs can exert multiple biological effects in vitro, including induction of the AhR-mediated activity, release of cells from contact inhibition, and induction of ER-mediated activity.

  11. Adenovirus-mediated transfection with glucose transporter 3 suppresses PC12 cell apoptosis following ischemic injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junliang Li; Xinke Xu; Shanyi Zhang; Meiguang Zheng; Zhonghua Wu; Yinlun Weng; Leping Ouyang; Jian Yu; Fangcheng Li

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of adenovirus-mediated transfection of PC12 cells with glucose transporter 3 after ischemic injury. The results of flow cytometry and TUNEL showed that exogenous glucose transporter 3 significantly suppressed PC12 cell apoptosis induced by ischemic injury. The results of isotopic scintiscan and western blot assays showed that, the glucose uptake rate was significantly increased and nuclear factor kappaB expression was significantly decreased after adenovirus-mediated transfection of ischemic PC12 cells with glucose transporter 3. These results suggest that adenovirus-mediated transfection of cells with glucose transporter 3 elevates the energy metabolism of PC12 cells with ischemic injury, and inhibits cell apoptosis.

  12. The GARP/Latent TGF-β1 complex on Treg cells modulates the induction of peripherally derived Treg cells during oral tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Justin P; Hand, Timothy W; Morais da Fonseca, Denise; Glass, Deborah D; Belkaid, Yasmine; Shevach, Ethan M

    2016-06-01

    Treg cells can secrete latent TGF-β1 (LTGF-β1), but can also utilize an alternative pathway for transport and expression of LTGF-β1 on the cell surface in which LTGF-β1 is coupled to a distinct LTGF-β binding protein termed glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP)/LRRC32. The function of the GARP/LTGF-β1 complex has remained elusive. Here, we examine in vivo the roles of GARP and TGF-β1 in the induction of oral tolerance. When Foxp3(-) OT-II T cells were transferred to wild-type recipient mice followed by OVA feeding, the conversion of Foxp3(-) to Foxp3(+) OT-II cells was dependent on recipient Treg cells. Neutralization of IL-2 in the recipient mice also abrogated this conversion. The GARP/LTGF-β1 complex on recipient Treg cells, but not dendritic cell-derived TGF-β1, was required for efficient induction of Foxp3(+) T cells and for the suppression of delayed hypersensitivity. Expression of the integrin αvβ8 by Treg cells (or T cells) in the recipients was dispensable for induction of Foxp3 expression. Transient depletion of the bacterial flora enhanced the development of oral tolerance by expanding Treg cells with enhanced expression of the GARP/LTGF-β1 complex.

  13. UV laser mediated cell selective destruction by confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giangrande Angela

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Analysis of cell-cell interactions, cell function and cell lineages greatly benefits selective destruction techniques, which, at present, rely on dedicated, high energy, pulsed lasers and are limited to cells that are detectable by conventional microscopy. We present here a high resolution/sensitivity technique based on confocal microscopy and relying on commonly used UV lasers. Coupling this technique with time-lapse enables the destruction and following of any cell(s in any pattern(s in living animals as well as in cell culture systems.

  14. Mast cell mediators: Their differential release and the secretory pathways involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Chul eMoon

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells (MC are widely distributed throughout the body and are common at mucosal surfaces, a major host-environment interface. MC are functionally and phenotypically heterogeneous depending on the microenvironment in which they mature. Although MC have been classically viewed as effector cells of IgE-mediated allergic diseases, they are also recognized as important in host defense, innate and acquired immunity, homeostatic responses, and immunoregulation. MC activation can induce release of preformed mediators such as histamine from their granules, as well as release of de novo synthesized lipid mediators, cytokines and chemokines that play diverse roles, not only in allergic reactions but also in numerous physiological and pathophysiological responses. Indeed, MC release their mediators in a discriminating and chronological manner, depending upon the stimuli involved and their signaling cascades (e.g., IgE-mediated or Toll Like Receptor-mediated. However, the precise mechanisms underlying differential mediator release in response to these stimuli are poorly known. This review summarizes our knowledge of MC mediators and will focus on what is known about the discriminatory release of these mediators dependent upon diverse stimuli, MC phenotypes and species of origin, as well as on the intracellular synthesis, storage and secretory processes involved.

  15. Exercise tolerance, lung function abnormalities, anemia, and cardiothoracic ratio in sickle cell patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beers, Eduard J; van der Plas, Mart N; Nur, Erfan; Bogaard, Harm-Jan; van Steenwijk, Reindert P; Biemond, Bart J; Bresser, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Many patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) have a reduced exercise capacity and abnormal lung function. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) can identify causes of exercise limitation. Forty-four consecutive SCD patients (27 HbSS, 11 HbSC, and 6 HbS-beta thalassemia) with a median age (interquartile range) of 26 (21-41) years underwent pulmonary function tests, CPET, chest x-ray, and echocardiography to further characterize exercise limitation in SCD. Peak oxygen uptake (V'O2 -peak), expressing maximum exercise capacity, was decreased in 83% of the studied patients. V'O2 -peak correlated with hemoglobin levels (R = 0.440, P = 0.005), forced vital capacity (FVC) (R = 0.717, P anemia (n = 17), cardiovascular dysfunction (n = 2), musculoskeletal function (n = 10), pulmonary ventilatory abnormalities (n = 1), pulmonary vascular exercise limitation (n = 1), and poor effort (n = 3). In the present study we demonstrate that anemia is the most important determinant of reduced exercise tolerance observed in SCD patients without signs of pulmonary hypertension. We found a strong correlation between various parameters of lung volume and cardiothoracic ratio and we hypothesize that cardiomegaly and relative small chest size may be important causes of the impairment in pulmonary function, that is, reduced long volumes and diffusion capacity, in SCD. Taking into account anthropomorphic differences between SCD patients and controls could help to interpret lung function studies in SCD better.

  16. The location of aluminium in protoplasts and suspension cells taken from Coffea arabica L. with different tolerance of Al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Benítez, J Efraín; Hernández-Sotomayor, S M Teresa; Muñoz-Sánchez, J Armando

    2009-11-01

    Biotechnological advances in coffee research (in vitro manipulation, multiplication, generation and development of transgenic coffee plants with specific traits like high yield and good quality) have contributed to description of the metabolic pathways involved in the response mechanisms to environmental factors like abiotic stress. Coffea arabica L. plants grow in acidic soils, and therefore aluminium (Al) toxicity is a major negative impact on crop productivity. To understand Al toxicity mechanisms in cells via the Al absorption kinetic, we isolated protoplasts from two C. arabica L. suspension cell lines: Al-sensitive (L2) and Al-tolerant (LAMt). Protoplasts of LAMt line exhibited lower Al absorption levels than protoplasts of the L2 line. Use of two fluorescent tracers (morin and calcofluor white) indicated that Al interacts with internal cell structures, such as the plasma membrane and nucleus, with differences in both cell lines. Al-tolerance in the LAMt is probably associated with the cell wall as well as intracellular structures. These data will help to better understand Al toxicity in C. arabica, and Al toxicity mechanisms in plant cells.

  17. Lithium rich cathode/graphite anode combination for lithium ion cells with high tolerance to near zero volt storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, K. R.; Staub, J. W.; Hladky, M. P.; Landi, B. J.

    2017-03-01

    Management of reversible lithium is an advantageous approach to design lithium ion cells that are tolerant to near zero volt (NZV) storage under fixed resistive load towards highly controllable, enhanced user-inactive safety. Presently, the first cycle loss from a high energy density Li-rich HE5050 cathode is used to provide excess reversible lithium when paired with an appropriately capacity matched mesocarbon microbead (MCMB) anode. Cells utilizing 1.2 M LiPF6 3:7 v/v ethylene carbonate:ethyl methyl carbonate electrolyte and a lithium reference were used for 3-electrode testing. After conditioning, a fixed resistive load was applied to 3-electrode cells for 72 or 168-h during which the anode potential and electrode asymptotic potential (EAP) remained less than the copper dissolution potential. After multiple storage cycles (room temperature or 40 °C), the NZV coulombic efficiency (cell reversibility) exceeded 97% and the discharge capacity retention was >98%. Conventional 2-electrode HE5050/MCMB pouch cells stored at NZV or open circuit for 3 days had nearly identical rate capability (up to 5C) and discharge performance stability (for 500 cycles under a 30% depth of discharge low-earth-orbit regime). Thus, lithium ion cells with appropriately capacity matched HE5050/MCMB electrodes have excellent tolerance to prolonged NZV storage, which can lead to enhanced user-inactive safety.

  18. Numerical Modeling of Microbial Fuel Cell Based on Redox Electron Mediator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nanqi Ren

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the behavior of redox electron mediator and its impact to power generation of microbial fuel cell ( MFC ) , this study carries out the numerical modeling of a typical two⁃chamber MFC based on assumption of interfacial electron transfer via redox electron mediator and acetate as sole electron donor. The model simulates the development of cell voltage, current, substrate concentration, redox electron mediator concentration, polarization and power density output under defined conditions. The results demonstrate that the developed models can fit the experimental results well on a qualitative basis, and concentration of electron reduced mediator plays a dominant role in electron transfer process, and the mass transfer may constitute the limiting step when its concentration is at a relatively low level. This study not only provides a better understanding of electron redox mediator behavior during power generation, but also suggests a strategy to improve electron transfer in the anode of MFC.

  19. HipA-triggered growth arrest and β-lactam tolerance in Escherichia coli are mediated by RelA-dependent ppGpp synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokinsky, Gregory; Baidoo, Edward E K; Akella, Swetha; Burd, Helcio; Weaver, Daniel; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; García-Martín, Héctor; Lee, Taek Soon; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-07-01

    Persistence is a phenomenon whereby a subpopulation of bacterial cells enters a transient growth-arrested state that confers antibiotic tolerance. While entrance into persistence has been linked to the activities of toxin proteins, the molecular mechanisms by which toxins induce growth arrest and the persistent state remain unclear. Here, we show that overexpression of the protein kinase HipA in Escherichia coli triggers growth arrest by activating synthesis of the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) by the enzyme RelA, a signal typically associated with amino acid starvation. We further demonstrate that chemically suppressing ppGpp synthesis with chloramphenicol relieves inhibition of DNA replication initiation and RNA synthesis in HipA-arrested cells and restores vulnerability to β-lactam antibiotics. HipA-arrested cells maintain glucose uptake and oxygen consumption and accumulate amino acids as a consequence of translational inhibition. We harness the active metabolism of HipA-arrested cells to provide a bacteriophage-resistant platform for the production of biotechnologically relevant compounds, which may represent an innovative solution to the costly problem of phage contamination in industrial fermentations.

  20. T Cell-Mediated Modulation of Mast Cell Function: Heterotypic Adhesion-Induced Stimulatory or Inhibitory Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoseph A. Mekori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Close physical proximity between mast cells and T cells has been demonstrated in several T cell mediated inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis and sarcoidosis. However, the way by which mast cells are activated in these T cell-mediated immune responses has not been fully elucidated. We have identified and characterized a novel mast cell activation pathway initiated by physical contact with activated T cells, and showed that this pathway is associated with degranulation and cytokine release. The signaling events associated with this pathway of mast cell activation have also been elucidated confirming the activation of the Ras MAPK systems. More recently, we hypothesized and demonstrated that mast cells may also be activated by microparticles released from activated T cells that are considered as miniature version of a cell. By extension, microparticles might affect the activity of mast cells, which are usually not in direct contact with T cells at the inflammatory site. Recent works have also focused on the effects of regulatory T cells on mast cells. These reports highlighted the importance of the cytokines IL-2 and IL-9, produced by mast cells and T cells, respectively, in obtaining optimal immune suppression. Finally, physical contact, associated by OX40-OX40L engagement has been found to underlie the down-regulatory effects exerted by regulatory T cells on mast cell function.

  1. Novel mathematical models for cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays without applying enzyme kinetics but with combinations and probability: bystanders in bulk effector cells influence results of cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Toshiaki

    2011-07-01

    Cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays are widely implemented to evaluate cell-mediated cytotoxic activity, and some assays are analyzed using the analogy of enzyme kinetics. In the analogy, the effector cell is regarded as the enzyme, the target cell as the substrate, the effector cell-target cell conjugate as the enzyme-substrate complex and the dead target cell as the product. However, the assumptions analogous to those of enzyme kinetics are not always true in cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays, and the parameter analogous to the Michaelis-Menten constant is not constant but is dependent on the number of effector cells. Therefore I present novel mathematical models for cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays without applying enzyme kinetics. I instead use combinations and probability, because analysis of cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays by applying enzyme kinetics seems controversial. With my original models, I demonstrate simulations of the data in previously published papers. The results are exhibited in the same forms as the corresponding data. Comparing the simulation results with the published data, the results seem to agree well with the data. From simulations of cytotoxic assays with bulk effector cells, it appears that bystanders in bulk effector cells increase both the cytotoxic activity and the motility of effector cells.

  2. Monocyte-derived inflammatory Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells mediate psoriasis-like inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tej Pratap; Zhang, Howard H.; Borek, Izabela; Wolf, Peter; Hedrick, Michael N.; Singh, Satya P.; Kelsall, Brian L.; Clausen, Bjorn E.; Farber, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis but the roles for specific DC subsets are not well defined. Here we show that DCs are required for psoriasis-like changes in mouse skin induced by the local injection of IL-23. However, Flt3L-dependent DCs and resident Langerhans cells are dispensable for the inflammation. In epidermis and dermis, the critical DCs are TNF-producing and IL-1β-producing monocyte-derived DCs, including a population of inflammatory Langerhans cells. Depleting Ly6Chi blood monocytes reduces DC accumulation and the skin changes induced either by injecting IL-23 or by application of the TLR7 agonist imiquimod. Moreover, we find that IL-23-induced inflammation requires expression of CCR6 by DCs or their precursors, and that CCR6 mediates monocyte trafficking into inflamed skin. Collectively, our results imply that monocyte-derived cells are critical contributors to psoriasis through production of inflammatory cytokines that augment the activation of skin T cells. PMID:27982014

  3. Tolerance of CD8+ T cells developing in parent-->F1 chimeras prepared with supralethal irradiation: step-wise induction of tolerance in the intrathymic and extrathymic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, H; Sprent, J

    1993-02-01

    Tolerance of CD8+ cells was examined in parent-->F1 bone marrow chimeras (BMC) prepared with supralethal irradiation; host class I expression in the chimeras was limited to non-BM-derived cells. In terms of helper-independent proliferative responses in vitro and induction of graft-vs.-host disease on adoptive transfer, CD8+ cells from long-term chimeras showed profound tolerance to host antigens irrespective of whether the cells were prepared from the thymus or from spleen or lymph nodes. By limiting dilution analysis, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) precursors specific for host antigens were rare in the extrathymic lymphoid tissues. In the thymus, by contrast, host-specific CTL precursors were only slightly less frequent than in normal parental strain mice. These host-specific CD8+ cells survived when BMC thymocytes were transferred intravenously to a neutral environment, i.e., to donor strain mice. When transferred to further BMC hosts, however, most of the host-reactive cells disappeared. Collectively, the data suggest that tolerance of CD8+ cells in BMC hosts occurs in both the intrathymic and extrathymic environments. In the thymus, contact with host antigens on thymic epithelial cells deletes CD8+ cells controlling helper-independent proliferative responses and in vivo effector functions but spares typical helper-dependent CTL precursors. After export from the thymus, most of the CTL precursors are eliminated after contacting host antigens on stromal cells in the extrathymic environment.

  4. IFN-γ-mediated hematopoietic cell destruction in murine models of immune-mediated bone marrow failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jichun; Feng, Xingmin; Desierto, Marie J; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Young, Neal S

    2015-12-10

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) has been reported to have both negative and positive activity on hematopoietic cells, adding complexity to the interpretation of its pleiotropic functions. We examined the effects of IFN-γ on murine hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors in vitro and in vivo by using mouse models. IFN-γ treatment expanded bone marrow (BM) c-Kit(+)Sca1(+)Lin(-) (KSL) cell number but reduced BM KLCD150(+) and KLCD150(+)CD48(-) cells. IFN-γ-expanded KSL cells engrafted poorly when tested by competitive repopulation in vivo. KSL, KLCD150(+), and KLCD150(+)CD48(-) cells from IFN-γ-treated animals all showed significant upregulation in Fas expression. When cocultured with activated T cells in vitro, KSL and KLCD150(+) cells from IFN-γ-treated donors showed increased apoptosis relative to those from untreated animals, and infusion of activated CD8 T cells into IFN-γ-injected animals in vivo led to partial elimination of KSL cells. Exposure of BM cells or KSL cells to IFN-γ increased expression of Fas, caspases, and related proapoptotic genes and decreased expression of Ets-1 and other hematopoietic genes. In mouse models of BM failure, mice genetically deficient in IFN-γ receptor expression showed attenuation of immune-mediated marrow destruction, whereas effector lymphocytes from IFN-γ-deficient donors were much less potent in initiating BM damage. We conclude that the activity of IFN-γ on murine hematopoiesis is context dependent. IFN-γ-augmented apoptotic gene expression facilitates destruction of HSCs and progenitors in the presence of activated cytotoxic T cells, as occurs in human BM failure.

  5. Engraftment of retrovirally transduced Bet v 1-GFP expressing bone marrow cells leads to allergen-specific tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattringer, Martina; Baranyi, Ulrike; Pilat, Nina; Hock, Karin; Klaus, Christoph; Buchberger, Elisabeth; Ramsey, Haley; Iacomini, John; Valenta, Rudolf; Wekerle, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Molecular chimerism is a promising strategy to induce tolerance to disease-causing antigens expressed on genetically modified haematopoietic stem cells. The approach was employed successfully in models of autoimmunity and organ transplantation. Recently, we demonstrated that molecular chimerism induces robust and lasting tolerance towards the major grass pollen allergen Phl p 5. Since allergens are a group of antigens differing widely in their function, origin and structure we further examined the effectiveness of molecular chimerism using the Phl p 5-unrelated major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1, co-expressed with the reporter GFP. Besides, inhibition of CD26 was used to promote engraftment of modified stem cells. Retrovirus VSV-Betv1-GFP was generated to transduce 5-FU-mobilized BALB/c hematopoietic cells to express membrane-bound Bet v 1 (VSV-GFP virus was used as control). Myeloablated BALB/c mice received Betv1-GFP or GFP expressing bone marrow cells, pre-treated with a CD26 inhibitor. Chimerism was followed by flow cytometry. Tolerance was assessed by measuring allergen-specific isotype levels in sera, RBL assays and T-cell proliferation assays. Mice transplanted with transduced BMC developed multi-lineage molecular chimerism which remained stable long-term (>8 months). After repeated immunizations with Bet v 1 and Phl p 5 serum levels of Bet v 1-specific antibodies (IgE, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG3 and IgA) remained undetectable in Betv1-GFP chimeras while high levels of Phl p 5-specific antibodies developed. Likewise, basophil degranulation was induced in response to Phl p 5 but not to Bet v 1 and specific non-responsiveness to Bet v 1 was observed in proliferation assays. These data demonstrate successful tolerization towards Bet v 1 by molecular chimerism. Stable long-term chimerism was achieved under inhibition of CD26. These results provide evidence for the broad applicability of molecular chimerism as tolerance strategy in allergy.

  6. Extracellular Protein Interactions Mediated by the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule, NCAM: Heterophilic Interactions Between NCAM and Cell Adhesion Molecules, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, and Viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) mediate cell-to-cell interactions and interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), a prototypic member of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily of CAMs, mediates adhesion through homophilic and heterophilic i...

  7. Rice potassium transporter OsHAK1 is essential for maintaining potassium-mediated growth and functions in salt tolerance over low and high potassium concentration ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang; Hu, Qingdi; Luo, Le; Yang, Tianyuan; Zhang, Song; Hu, Yibing; Yu, Ling; Xu, Guohua

    2015-12-01

    Potassium (K) absorption and translocation in plants rely upon multiple K transporters for adapting varied K supply and saline conditions. Here, we report the expression patterns and physiological roles of OsHAK1, a member belonging to the KT/KUP/HAK gene family in rice (Oryza sativa L.). The expression of OsHAK1 is up-regulated by K deficiency or salt stress in various tissues, particularly in the root and shoot apical meristem, the epidermises and steles of root, and vascular bundles of shoot. Both oshak1 knockout mutants in comparison to their respective Dongjin or Manan wild types showed a dramatic reduction in K concentration and stunted root and shoot growth. Knockout of OsHAK1 reduced the K absorption rate of unit root surface area by ∼50-55 and ∼30%, and total K uptake by ∼80 and ∼65% at 0.05-0.1 and 1 mm K supply level, respectively. The root net high-affinity K uptake of oshak1 mutants was sensitive to salt stress but not to ammonium supply. Overexpression of OsHAK1 in rice increased K uptake and K/Na ratio. The positive relationship between K concentration and shoot biomass in the mutants suggests that OsHAK1 plays an essential role in K-mediated rice growth and salt tolerance over low and high K concentration ranges.

  8. Assessing humoral and cell-mediated immune response in Hawaiian green turtles, Chelonia mydas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.; Rameyer, R.A.; Chang, S.P.; Berestecky, J.

    2000-01-01

    Seven immature green turtles, Chelonia mydas, captured from Kaneohe Bay on the island of Oahu were used to evaluate methods for assessing their immune response. Two turtles each were immunized intramuscularly with egg white lysozyme (EWL) in Freunda??s complete adjuvant, Gerbu, or ISA-70; a seventh turtle was immunized with saline only and served as a control. Humoral immune response was measured with an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cell-mediated immune response was measured using in vitro cell proliferation assays (CPA) using whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) cultured with concanavalin A (ConA), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), or soluble egg EWL antigen. All turtles, except for one immunized with Gerbu and the control, produced a detectable humoral immune response by 6 weeks which persisted for at least 14 weeks after a single immunization. All turtles produced an anamnestic humoral immune response after secondary immunization. Antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in PBM was seen in all turtles either after primary or secondary immunization, but it was not as consistent as humoral immune response; antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in whole blood was rarely seen. Mononuclear cells had significantly higher stimulation indices than whole blood regardless of adjuvant, however, results with whole blood had lower variability. Both Gerbu and ISA-70 appeared to potentiate the cell-mediated immune response when PBM or whole blood were cultured with PHA. This is the first time cell proliferation assays have been compared between whole blood and PBM for reptiles. This is also the first demonstration of antigen specific cell-mediated response in reptiles. Cell proliferation assays allowed us to evaluate the cell-mediated immune response of green turtles. However, CPA may be less reliable than ELISA for detecting antigen specific immune response. Either of the three adjuvants appears suitable to safely elicit a

  9. A role for plasma cell targeting agents in immune tolerance induction in autoimmune disease and antibody responses to therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, A S; Pariser, A R; Diamond, B; Yao, L; Turka, L A; Lacana, E; Kishnani, P S

    2016-04-01

    Antibody responses to life saving therapeutic protein products, such as enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) in the setting of lysosomal storage diseases, have nullified product efficacy and caused clinical deterioration and death despite treatment with immune-suppressive therapies. Moreover, in some autoimmune diseases, pathology is mediated by a robust antibody response to endogenous proteins such as is the case in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, mediated by antibodies to Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF). In this work, we make the case that in such settings, when the antibody response is high titered, sustained, and refractory to immune suppressive treatments, the antibody response is mediated by long-lived plasma cells which are relatively unperturbed by immune suppressants including rituximab. However, long-lived plasma cells can be targeted by proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib. Recent reports of successful reversal of antibody responses with bortezomib in the settings of ERT and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) argue that the safety and efficacy of such plasma cell targeting agents should be evaluated in larger scale clinical trials to delineate the risks and benefits of such therapies in the settings of antibody-mediated adverse effects to therapeutic proteins and autoantibody mediated pathology.

  10. P-selectin-mediated platelet adhesion promotes the metastasis of murine melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Cui-Ling; Wei, Bo; Ye, Jie; Yang, Yang; Li, Bin; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Li, Jiang-Chao; He, Xiao-Dong; Lan, Tian; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Studies have indicated that the aggregation of activated platelets with cancer cells facilitates tumor metastasis; the adhesion molecule P-selectin may be an important mediator of this process, but the detailed mechanism is unclear. In the current study, we established a B16F10 (B16) cell metastatic model in P-selectin knockout (P-sel-/-) mice to determine the effect of P-selectin-mediated platelet adhesion on metastasis. Compared with C57 mice, P-sel-/- mice developed fewer metastatic foci, and cell proliferation within the metastatic tumors was inhibited by P-selectin deficiency. The platelet refusion assay demonstrated that mice with P-sel-/- platelets developed fewer lung metastatic foci (PP-selectin deficiency inhibited the metastasis of B16 cells and that wild-type platelet refusion reversed this inhibition. The P-selectin-mediated interaction between platelets and B16 cells promoted angiogenesis by up-regulating VEGF.

  11. Novel mitochondria-targeted heat-soluble proteins identified in the anhydrobiotic Tardigrade improve osmotic tolerance of human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Sae; Tanaka, Junko; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Horikawa, Daiki D; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2015-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration through transition to a metabolically inactive state, called "anhydrobiosis". Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins involved in the desiccation tolerance of many anhydrobiotic organisms. Tardigrades, Ramazzottius varieornatus, however, express predominantly tardigrade-unique heat-soluble proteins: CAHS (Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble) and SAHS (Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble) proteins, which are secreted or localized in most intracellular compartments, except the mitochondria. Although mitochondrial integrity is crucial to ensure cellular survival, protective molecules for mitochondria have remained elusive. Here, we identified two novel mitochondrial heat-soluble proteins, RvLEAM and MAHS (Mitochondrial Abundant Heat Soluble), as potent mitochondrial protectants from Ramazzottius varieornatus. RvLEAM is a group3 LEA protein and immunohistochemistry confirmed its mitochondrial localization in tardigrade cells. MAHS-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized in human mitochondria and was heat-soluble in vitro, though no sequence similarity with other known proteins was found, and one region was conserved among tardigrades. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RvLEAM protein as well as MAHS protein improved the hyperosmotic tolerance of human cells. The findings of the present study revealed that tardigrade mitochondria contain at least two types of heat-soluble proteins that might have protective roles in water-deficient environments.

  12. Novel mitochondria-targeted heat-soluble proteins identified in the anhydrobiotic Tardigrade improve osmotic tolerance of human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae Tanaka

    Full Text Available Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration through transition to a metabolically inactive state, called "anhydrobiosis". Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA proteins are heat-soluble proteins involved in the desiccation tolerance of many anhydrobiotic organisms. Tardigrades, Ramazzottius varieornatus, however, express predominantly tardigrade-unique heat-soluble proteins: CAHS (Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble and SAHS (Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble proteins, which are secreted or localized in most intracellular compartments, except the mitochondria. Although mitochondrial integrity is crucial to ensure cellular survival, protective molecules for mitochondria have remained elusive. Here, we identified two novel mitochondrial heat-soluble proteins, RvLEAM and MAHS (Mitochondrial Abundant Heat Soluble, as potent mitochondrial protectants from Ramazzottius varieornatus. RvLEAM is a group3 LEA protein and immunohistochemistry confirmed its mitochondrial localization in tardigrade cells. MAHS-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized in human mitochondria and was heat-soluble in vitro, though no sequence similarity with other known proteins was found, and one region was conserved among tardigrades. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RvLEAM protein as well as MAHS protein improved the hyperosmotic tolerance of human cells. The findings of the present study revealed that tardigrade mitochondria contain at least two types of heat-soluble proteins that might have protective roles in water-deficient environments.

  13. Novel Mitochondria-Targeted Heat-Soluble Proteins Identified in the Anhydrobiotic Tardigrade Improve Osmotic Tolerance of Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Sae; Tanaka, Junko; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Horikawa, Daiki D.; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2015-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration through transition to a metabolically inactive state, called “anhydrobiosis”. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins involved in the desiccation tolerance of many anhydrobiotic organisms. Tardigrades, Ramazzottius varieornatus, however, express predominantly tardigrade-unique heat-soluble proteins: CAHS (Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble) and SAHS (Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble) proteins, which are secreted or localized in most intracellular compartments, except the mitochondria. Although mitochondrial integrity is crucial to ensure cellular survival, protective molecules for mitochondria have remained elusive. Here, we identified two novel mitochondrial heat-soluble proteins, RvLEAM and MAHS (Mitochondrial Abundant Heat Soluble), as potent mitochondrial protectants from Ramazzottius varieornatus. RvLEAM is a group3 LEA protein and immunohistochemistry confirmed its mitochondrial localization in tardigrade cells. MAHS-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized in human mitochondria and was heat-soluble in vitro, though no sequence similarity with other known proteins was found, and one region was conserved among tardigrades. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RvLEAM protein as well as MAHS protein improved the hyperosmotic tolerance of human cells. The findings of the present study revealed that tardigrade mitochondria contain at least two types of heat-soluble proteins that might have protective roles in water-deficient environments. PMID:25675104

  14. Eicosanoids: Emerging contributors in stem cell-mediated wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Elizabeth; Liu, Yanzhou; Chen, Li; Guo, Austin M

    2016-11-05

    Eicosanoids are bioactive lipid products primarily derived from the oxidation of arachidonic acid (AA). The individual contributions of eicosanoids and stem cells to wound healing have been of great interest. This review focuses on how stem cells work in concert with eicosanoids to create a beneficial environment in the wound bed and in the promotion of wound healing. Stem cells contribute to wound healing through modulating inflammation, differentiating into skin cells or endothelial cells, and exerting paracrine effects by releasing various potent growth factors. Eicosanoids have been shown to stimulate proliferation, migration, homing, and differentiation of stem cells, all of which contribute to the process of wound healing. Increasing evidence has shown that eicosanoids improve wound healing through increasing stem cell densities, stimulating differentiation, and enhancing the angiogenic properties of stem cells. Chronic wounds have become a major problem in health care. Therefore, research regarding the effects of stem cells and eicosanoids in the promotion wound healing is of great importance.

  15. Ciprofloxacin mediates cancer stem cell phenotypes in lung cancer cells through caveolin-1-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiboonchaiyanan, Preeyaporn Plaimee; Kiratipaiboon, Chayanin; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2016-04-25

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of cancer cells with high aggressive behaviors, have been identified in many types of cancer including lung cancer as one of the key mediators driving cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we have reported for the first time that ciprofloxacin (CIP), a widely used anti-microbial drug, has a potentiating effect on CSC-like features in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. CIP treatment promoted CSC-like phenotypes, including enhanced anchorage-independent growth and spheroid formation. The known lung CSC markers: CD133, CD44, ABCG2 and ALDH1A1 were found to be significantly increased, while the factors involving in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT): Slug and Snail, were depleted. Also, self-renewal transcription factors Oct-4 and Nanog were found to be up-regulated in CIP-treated cells. The treatment of CIP on CSC-rich populations obtained from secondary spheroids resulted in the further increase of CSC markers. In addition, we have proven that the mechanistic insight of the CIP induced stemness is through Caveolin-1 (Cav-1)-dependent mechanism. The specific suppression of Cav-1 by stably transfected Cav-1 shRNA plasmid dramatically reduced the effect of CIP on CSC markers as well as the CIP-induced spheroid formation ability. Cav-1 was shown to activate protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways in CSC-rich population; however, such an effect was rarely found in the main lung cancer cells population. These findings reveal a novel effect of CIP in positively regulating CSCs in lung cancer cells via the activation of Cav-1, Akt and ERK, and may provoke the awareness of appropriate therapeutic strategy in cancer patients.

  16. UCP2- and non-UCP2-mediated electric current in eukaryotic cells exhibits different properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruihua; MoYung, K C; Zhang, M H; Poon, Karen

    2015-12-01

    Using live eukaryotic cells, including cancer cells, MCF-7 and HCT-116, normal hepatocytes and red blood cells in anode and potassium ferricyanide in cathode of MFC could generate bio-based electric current. Electrons and protons generated from the metabolic reaction in both cytosol and mitochondria contributing to the leaking would mediate the generation of electric current. Both resveratrol (RVT) and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) used to induce proton leak in mitochondria were found to promote electric current production in all cells except red blood cells without mitochondria. Proton leak might be important for electric current production by bringing the charge balance in cells to enhance the further electron leak. The induced electric current by RVT can be blocked by Genipin, an inhibitor of UCP2-mediated proton leak, while that induced by DNP cannot. RVT could reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in cells better than that of DNP. In addition, RVT increased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), while DNP decreased it. Results highly suggested the existence of at least two types of electric current that showed different properties. They included UCP2-mediated and non-UCP2-mediated electric current. UCP2-mediated electric current exhibited higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction effect per unit electric current production than that of non-UCP2-mediated electric current. Higher UCP2-mediated electric current observed in cancer cells might contribute to the mechanism of drug resistence. Correlation could not be established between electric current production with either ROS and MMP without distinguishing the types of electric current.

  17. Listeria monocytogenes alters mast cell phenotype, mediator and osteopontin secretion in a listeriolysin-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Jobbings

    Full Text Available Whilst mast cells participate in the immune defence against the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, there is conflicting evidence regarding the ability of L. monocytogenes to infect mast cells. It is known that the pore-forming toxin listeriolysin (LLO is important for mast cell activation, degranulation and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mast cells, however, are a potential source of a wide range of cytokines, chemokines and other mediators including osteopontin, which contributes to the clearing of L. monocytogenes infections in vivo, although its source is unknown. We therefore aimed to resolve the controversy of mast cell infection by L. monocytogenes and investigated the extent of mediator release in response to the bacterium. In this paper we show that the infection of bone marrow-derived mast cells by L. monocytogenes is inefficient and LLO-independent. LLO, however, is required for calcium-independent mast cell degranulation as well as for the transient and selective downregulation of cell surface CD117 (c-kit on mast cells. We demonstrate that in addition to the key pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6, mast cells release a wide range of other mediators in response to L. monocytogenes. Osteopontin, IL-2, IL-4, IL-13 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, and chemokines including CCL2, CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5 are released in a MyD88-dependent manner. The wide range of mediators released by mast cells in response to L. monocytogenes may play an important role in the recruitment and activation of a variety of immune cells in vivo. The cocktail of mediators, however, is unlikely to skew the immune response to a particular effector response. We propose that mast cells provide a hitherto unreported source of osteopontin, and may provide an important role in co-ordinating the immune response during Listeria infection.

  18. Novel methanol-tolerant Ir-S/C chalcogenide electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction in DMFC fuel cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingyu Ma; Desheng Ai; Xiaofeng Xie; Jianwei Guo

    2011-01-01

    Novel methanol-tolerant oxygen-reduction catalysts, iridium-sulphur (Ir-S) chalcogenides with differ ent Ir/S atomic ratios, were synthesized via a precipitation method using H21rCI6 and Na2SO3 as the Ir and S precursors. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the IrxSl-x/C chalcogenide catalysts. Particle size ranging from 2.5 to 2.8 nm though obvious agglomeration was found on carbon support. However, these chalcogenide catalysts showed strong catalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and high methanol tolerance, strongly suggesting these novel catalysts as promising candidates for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) cathode applications.

  19. Effects of low-intensity ultrasound on the growth, cell membrane permeability and ethanol tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chunhua; Xiong, Feng; He, Ronghai; Zhang, Weiwei; Ma, Haile

    2017-05-01

    Effects of low-intensity ultrasound (at different frequency, treatment time and power) on Saccharomyces cerevisiae in different growth phase were evaluated by the biomass in the paper. In addition, the cell membrane permeability and ethanol tolerance of sonicated Saccharomyces cerevisiae were also researched. The results revealed that the biomass of Saccharomyces cerevisiae increased by 127.03% under the optimum ultrasonic conditions such as frequency 28kHz, power 140W/L and ultrasonic time 1h when Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultured to the latent anaphase. And the membrane permeability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in latent anaphase enhanced by ultrasound, resulting in the augment of extracellular protein, nucleic acid and fructose-1,6-diphosphate (FDP) contents. In addition, sonication could accelerate the damage of high concentration alcohol to Saccharomyces cerevisiae although the ethanol tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was not affected significantly by ultrasound.

  20. Secretory phospholipase A2-mediated neuronal cell death involves glutamate ionotropic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils Henrik; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2002-01-01

    To define the significance of glutamate ionotropic receptors in sPLA -mediated neuronal cell death we used the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 and the AMPA receptor antagonist PNQX. In primary neuronal cell cultures both MK-801 and PNQX inhibited sPLA - and glutamate-induced neuronal death. [ H...... neuronal cell death. We conclude that glutamatergic synaptic activity modulates sPLA -induced neuronal cell death....

  1. Atherosclerosis: a chronic inflammatory disease mediated by mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Pio; Shaik-Dasthagirisaeb, Yazdami

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a process that plays an important role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and immune disease, involving multiple cell types, including macrophages, T-lymphocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mast cells. The fundamental damage of atherosclerosis is the atheromatous or fibro-fatty plaque which is a lesion that causes several diseases. In atherosclerosis the innate immune response, which involves macrophages, is initiated by the arterial endothelial cells which respond to modified lipoproteins and lead to Th1 cell subset activation and generation of inflammatory cytokines and chemoattractant chemokines. Other immune cells, such as CD4+ T inflammatory cells, which play a critical role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, and regulatory T cells [Treg], which have a protective effect on the development of atherosclerosis are involved. Considerable evidence indicates that mast cells and their products play a key role in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Activated mast cells can have detrimental effects, provoking matrix degradation, apoptosis, and enhancement as well as recruitment of inflammatory cells, which actively contributes to atherosclerosis and plaque formation. Here we discuss the relationship between atherosclerosis, inflammation and mast cells.

  2. Specific Btk inhibition suppresses B cell- and myeloid cell-mediated arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Paolo, Julie A.; Huang, Tao; Balazs, Mercedesz; Barbosa, James; Barck, Kai H.; Bravo, Brandon J.; Carano, Richard A.D.; Darrow, James; Davies, Douglas R.; DeForge, Laura E.; Diehl, Lauri; Ferrando, Ronald; Gallion, Steven L.; Giannetti, Anthony M.; Gribling, Peter; Hurez, Vincent; Hymowitz, Sarah G.; Jones, Randall; Kropf, Jeffrey E.; Lee, Wyne P.; Maciejewski, Patricia M.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Rong, Hong; Staker, Bart L.; Whitney, J. Andrew; Yeh, Sherry; Young, Wendy B.; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Juan; Reif, Karin; Currie, Kevin S. (CGI); (Emerald); (Genentech)

    2011-09-20

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Btk mediates inflammation are poorly understood. Here we describe the discovery of CGI1746, a small-molecule Btk inhibitor chemotype with a new binding mode that stabilizes an inactive nonphosphorylated enzyme conformation. CGI1746 has exquisite selectivity for Btk and inhibits both auto- and transphosphorylation steps necessary for enzyme activation. Using CGI1746, we demonstrate that Btk regulates inflammatory arthritis by two distinct mechanisms. CGI1746 blocks B cell receptor-dependent B cell proliferation and in prophylactic regimens reduces autoantibody levels in collagen-induced arthritis. In macrophages, Btk inhibition abolishes Fc{gamma}RIII-induced TNF{alpha}, IL-1{beta} and IL-6 production. Accordingly, in myeloid- and Fc{gamma}R-dependent autoantibody-induced arthritis, CGI1746 decreases cytokine levels within joints and ameliorates disease. These results provide new understanding of the function of Btk in both B cell- or myeloid cell-driven disease processes and provide a compelling rationale for targeting Btk in rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Immune tolerance induced by adoptive transfer of dendritic cells in an insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus routine model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-liang ZHANG; Xiao-lei ZOU; Jia-bei PENG; Ming XIANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect and underlying mechanisms of inunune-tolerance induced by the adoptive transfer of bone marrow (BM)-derived dendritic cells (DC) in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) mice. Methods: The IDDM model was established by a low dose of streptozotocin (STZ) in Balb/c mice. Two DC subpopulations were generated from the BM cells with granulocyte-macroph-age colony-stimulating factor with or without interleukin-4. The purity and the T cell stimulatory capability of DC were identified. These cells were used to modu-late autoimmune response in pre-diabetic mice. Blood glucose was examined weekly; pancreas tissues were taken for histopathological analysis, and CD4+ T cells were isolated to detect lymphocyte proliferation by MTT assay and the ratio of CD4+CD25+ T cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The cytokine secretion was determined by ELISA analysis. Results: Two DC subsets were generated from BM, which have phenotypes of mature DC (mDC) and immature DC (iDC), respectively. The level of blood glucose decreased significantly by transferring iDC (P<0.01) rather than mDC. Less lymphocyte infiltration was ob-served in the islets, and pancreatic structure was intact. In vitro, proliferation of lymphocytes decreased and the proportion of CD4+CD25+ T cells increased remarkably, compared with the mDC-treated groups (P<0.05), which were associ-ated with increased level of the Th2 cytokine and reduced level of the Th1 cytokine after iDC transfer. Conclusion: Our data showed that iDC transfer was able to confer protection to mice from STZ-induced IDDM. The immune-tolerance to IDDM may be associated with promoting the production of CD4+CD25+ T cells and inducing regulatory Th2 responses in vivo.

  4. Recipient myeloid-derived immunomodulatory cells induce PD-1 ligand-dependent donor CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cell proliferation and donor-recipient immune tolerance after murine nonmyeloablative bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, Marie; Abdelsamed, Hossam A; Seth, Aman; Ong, Taren; Vogel, Peter; Pillai, Asha B

    2013-12-01

    We showed previously that nonmyeloablative total lymphoid irradiation/rabbit anti-thymocyte serum (TLI/ATS) conditioning facilitates potent donor-recipient immune tolerance following bone marrow transplantation (BMT) across MHC barriers via recipient invariant NKT (iNKT) cell-derived IL-4-dependent expansion of donor Foxp3(+) naturally occurring regulatory T cells (nTregs). In this study, we report a more specific mechanism. Wild-type (WT) BALB/c (H-2(d)) hosts were administered TLI/ATS and BMT from WT or STAT6(-/-) C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) donors. Following STAT6(-/-) BMT, donor nTregs demonstrated no loss of proliferation in vivo, indicating that an IL-4-responsive population in the recipient, rather than the donor, drives donor nTreg proliferation. In graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) target organs, three recipient CD11b(+) cell subsets (Gr-1(high)CD11c(-), Gr-1(int)CD11c(-), and Gr-1(low)CD11c(+)) were enriched early after TLI/ATS + BMT versus total body irradiation/ATS + BMT. Gr-1(low)CD11c(+) cells induced potent H-2K(b+)CD4(+)Foxp3(+) nTreg proliferation in vitro in 72-h MLRs. Gr-1(low)CD11c(+) cells were reduced significantly in STAT6(-/-) and iNKT cell-deficient Jα18(-/-) BALB/c recipients after TLI/ATS + BMT. Depletion of CD11b(+) cells resulted in severe acute GVHD, and adoptive transfer of WT Gr-1(low)CD11c(+) cells to Jα18(-/-) BALB/c recipients of TLI/ATS + BMT restored day-6 donor Foxp3(+) nTreg proliferation and protection from CD8 effector T cell-mediated GVHD. Blockade of programmed death ligand 1 and 2, but not CD40, TGF-β signaling, arginase 1, or iNOS, inhibited nTreg proliferation in cocultures of recipient-derived Gr-1(low)CD11c(+) cells with donor nTregs. Through iNKT-dependent Th2 polarization, myeloid-derived immunomodulatory dendritic cells are expanded after nonmyeloablative TLI/ATS conditioning and allogeneic BMT, induce PD-1 ligand-dependent donor nTreg proliferation, and maintain potent graft-versus-host immune tolerance.

  5. P2 receptor-mediated signaling in mast cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, Elena; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2010-03-01

    Mast cells are widely recognized as effector cells of allergic inflammatory reactions. They contribute to the pathogenesis of different chronic inflammatory diseases, wound healing, fibrosis, thrombosis/fibrinolysis, and anti-tumor immune responses. In this paper, we summarized the role of P2X and P2Y receptors in mast cell activation and effector functions. Mast cells are an abundant source of ATP which is stored in their granules and secreted upon activation. We discuss the contribution of mast cells to the extracellular ATP release and to the maintenance of extracellular nucleotides pool. Recent publications highlight the importance of purinergic signaling for the pathogenesis of chronic airway inflammation. Therefore, the role of ATP and P2 receptors in allergic inflammation with focus on mast cells was analyzed. Finally, ATP functions as mast cell autocrine/paracrine factor and as messenger in intercellular communication between mast cells, nerves, and glia in the central nervous system.

  6. Multipotent glia-like stem cells mediate stress adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin de Celis, Maria F; Garcia-Martin, Ruben; Wittig, Dierk; Valencia, Gabriela D; Enikolopov, Grigori; Funk, Richard H; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Bornstein, Stefan R; Androutsellis-Theotokis, Andreas; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika

    2015-06-01

    The neural crest-derived adrenal medulla is closely related to the sympathetic nervous system; however, unlike neural tissue, it is characterized by high plasticity which suggests the involvement of stem cells. Here, we show that a defined pool of glia-like nestin-expressing progenitor cells in the adult adrenal medulla contributes to this plasticity. These glia-like cells have features of adrenomedullary sustentacular cells, are multipotent, and are able to differentiate into chromaffin cells and neurons. The adrenal is central to the body's response to stress making its proper adaptation critical to maintaining homeostasis. Our results from stress experiments in vivo show the activation and differentiation of these progenitors into new chromaffin cells. In summary, we demonstrate the involvement of a new glia-like multipotent stem cell population in adrenal tissue adaptation. Our data also suggest the contribution of stem and progenitor cells in the adaptation of neuroendocrine tissue function in general.

  7. Acquired pMHC I Complexes Greatly Enhance CD4+ Th Cell's Stimulatory Effect on CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Diabetes in Transgenic RIP-mOVA Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khawaja Ashfaque Ahmed; Yufeng Xie; Xueshu Zhang; Jim Xiang

    2008-01-01

    CD4+ helper T (Th) cells play pivotal roles in induction of CD8+ CTL immunity. However, the mechanism of CD4+ T cell help delivery to CD8+ T cells in vivo is still elusive. In this study, we used ovalbumin (OVA)-pulsed dendritic cells (DCovA) to activate OT-Ⅱ mouse CD4+ T cells, and then studied the help effect of these CD4+ T cells on CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. We also examined CTL mediated islet β cell destruction which leaded to diabetes in wild-type C57BL/6 mice and transgenic rat insulin promoter (RIP)-mOVA mice expressing β cell antigen OVA with self OVA-specific tolerance, respectively. In adoptive transfer experiments, we demonstrated that help, in the form of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) I acquired from DCovA by DCovA activation, was required for induction of OVA-specific CTL responses in C57BL/6 mice. However, in combination with TCR transgenic OT-I mouse CD8+ T cells, the tolerogenic dosage of CD4+ Th cells with acquired pMHC I, but not CD4+ (Kb-/-) Th cells without acquired pMHC I were able to cause diabetes in 8/10 (80%) RIP-mOVA mice.This study thus expands the current knowledge in T cell-mediated autoimmunity and provides insight into the nature of CD4+ T cell-mediated help in CD8+ CTL induction. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(6):407-415.

  8. P2 receptor-mediated signaling in mast cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Bulanova, Elena; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    Mast cells are widely recognized as effector cells of allergic inflammatory reactions. They contribute to the pathogenesis of different chronic inflammatory diseases, wound healing, fibrosis, thrombosis/fibrinolysis, and anti-tumor immune responses. In this paper, we summarized the role of P2X and P2Y receptors in mast cell activation and effector functions. Mast cells are an abundant source of ATP which is stored in their granules and secreted upon activation. We discuss the contribution of ...

  9. Schizandra arisanensis extract attenuates cytokine-mediated cytotoxicity in insulin-secreting cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Shin Hsu; Yao-Haur Kuo; Hui-Ling Cheng; Peter R Flatt; Hui-Kang Liu

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To explore the bioactivity of an ethanolic extract of Schizandra arisanensis (SA-Et) and isolated constituents against interleukin-1β and interferon-γ-mediated β cell death and abolition of insulin secretion.METHODS:By employing BRIN-BD11 cells,the effects of SA-Et administration on cytokine-mediated cell death and abolition of insulin secretion were evaluated by a viability assay,cell cycle analysis,and insulin assay.The associated gene and protein expressions were also measured.In addition,the bioactivities of several peak compounds collected from the SA-Et were tested against cytokine-mediated β cell death.RESULTS:Our results revealed that SA-Et dose-dependently ameliorated cytokine-mediated β cell death and apoptosis.Instead of suppressing inducible nitric oxide synthase/nitric oxide cascade or p38MAPK activity,suppression of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activity appeared to be the target for SA-Et against the cytokine mix.In addition,SA-Et provided some insulinotropic effects which re-activated the abolished insulin exocytosis in cytokine-treated BRIN-BD11 cells.Finally,schiarisanrin A and B isolated from the SA-Et showed a dose-dependent protective effect against cytokine-mediated β cell death.CONCLUSION:This is the first report on SA-Et ameliorating cytokine-mediated β cell death and dysfunction via anti-apoptotic and insulinotropic actions.

  10. Transient systemic inflammation does not alter the induction of tolerance to gastric autoantigens by migratory dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourges, Dorothée; Ross, Ellen M; Allen, Stacey; Read, Simon; Houghton, Fiona J; Bedoui, Sammy; Boon, Louis; Gleeson, Paul A; van Driel, Ian R

    2014-06-01

    It has been proposed that activation of dendritic cells (DCs) presenting self-antigens during inflammation may lead to activation of autoreactive T cells and the development of autoimmunity. To test this hypothesis, we examined the presentation of the autoantigen recognized in autoimmune gastritis, gastric H(+)/K(+) ATPase, which is naturally expressed in the stomach and is constitutively presented in the stomach-draining lymph nodes. Systemic administration to mice of the TLR9 agonist CpG DNA, agonist anti-CD40 Ab, or TLR4 agonist LPS all failed to abrogate the process of peripheral clonal deletion of H(+)/K(+) ATPase-specific CD4 T cells or promote the development of autoimmune gastritis. We demonstrated that migratory DCs from the stomach-draining lymph nodes are the only DC subset capable of constitutively presenting the endogenous gastric H(+)/K(+) ATPase autoantigen in its normal physiological context. Analysis of costimulatory molecules indicated that, relative to resident DCs, migratory DCs displayed a partially activated phenotype in the steady state. Furthermore, migratory DCs were refractory to stimulation by transient exposure to TLR agonists, as they failed to upregulate costimulatory molecules, secrete significant amounts of inflammatory cytokines, or induce differentiation of effector T cells. Together, these data show that transient systemic inflammation failed to break tolerance to the gastric autoantigen, as migratory DCs presenting the gastric autoantigen remain tolerogenic under such conditions, demonstrating the robust nature of peripheral tolerance.

  11. Involvement of hydrogen peroxide in safingol-induced endonuclease G-mediated apoptosis of squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Masakazu; Wakabayashi, Ken; Masui, Atsushi; Iwai, Soichi; Imai, Tomoaki; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2014-02-17

    Safingol, a L-threo-dihydrosphingosine, induced the nuclear translocation of a mitochondrial apoptogenic mediator--endonuclease G (endo G)--and apoptosis of human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells. Upstream mediators remain largely unknown. The levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in cultured oral SCC cells were measured. Treatment with safingol increased intracellular H2O2 levels but not extracellular H2O2 levels, indicating the production of H2O2. The cell killing effect of safingol and H2O2 was diminished in the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Dual staining of cells with annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) revealed that apoptotic cell death occurred by treatment with H2O2 and safingol. The number of apoptotic cells was reduced in the presence of NAC. In untreated cells, endo G distributed in the cytoplasm and an association of endo G with mitochondria was observed. After treatment with H2O2 and safingol, endo G was distributed to the nucleus and cytoplasm, indicating the nuclear translocation of the mitochondrial factor. NAC prevented the increase of apoptotic cells and the translocation of endo G. Knock down of endo G diminished the cell killing effect of H2O2 and safingol. These results suggest that H2O2 is involved in the endo G-mediated apoptosis of oral SCC cells by safingol.

  12. Role of the retinoblastoma protein in cell cycle arrest mediated by a novel cell surface proliferation inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enebo, D. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Moos, P. J.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A novel cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS-18), purified from the cell surface of bovine cerebral cortex cells has been shown to be a potent and reversible inhibitor of proliferation of a wide array of fibroblasts as well as epithelial-like cells and nontransformed and transformed cells. To investigate the possible mechanisms by which CeReS-18 exerts its inhibitory action, the effect of the inhibitor on the posttranslational regulation of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product (RB), a tumor suppressor gene, has been examined. It is shown that CeReS-18 mediated cell cycle arrest of both human diploid fibroblasts (HSBP) and mouse fibroblasts (Swiss 3T3) results in the maintenance of the RB protein in the hypophosphorylated state, consistent with a late G1 arrest site. Although their normal nontransformed counterparts are sensitive to cell cycle arrest mediated by CeReS-18, cell lines lacking a functional RB protein, through either genetic mutation or DNA tumor virus oncoprotein interaction, are less sensitive. The refractory nature of these cells is shown to be independent of specific surface receptors for the inhibitor, and another tumor suppressor gene (p53) does not appear to be involved in the CeReS-18 inhibition of cell proliferation. The requirement for a functional RB protein product, in order for CeReS-18 to mediate cell cycle arrest, is discussed in light of regulatory events associated with density-dependent growth inhibition.

  13. Role of IL-33 and Its Receptor in T Cell-Mediated Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-33 (IL-33 is a new cytokine of interleukin-1 family, whose specific receptor is ST2. IL-33 exerts its functions via its target cells and plays different roles in diseases. ST2 deletion and exclusion of IL-33/ST2 axis are accompanied by enhanced susceptibility to dominantly T cell-mediated organ-specific autoimmune diseases. It has been reported that IL-33/ST2 pathway plays a key role in host defense and immune regulation in inflammatory and infectious diseases. This review focuses on new findings in the roles of IL-33 and ST2 in several kinds of T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases.

  14. Signaling factors in stem cell-mediated repair of infarcted myocardium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandervelde, S; van Luyn, MJA; Tio, RA; Harmsen, MC

    2005-01-01

    Myocardial infarction leads to scar formation and subsequent reduced cardiac performance. The ultimate therapy after myocardial infarction would pursue stem cell-based regeneration. The aim of stem cell-mediated cardiac repair embodies restoration of cardiac function by regeneration of healthy myoca

  15. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha in T-cell-mediated immunity to viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas N; Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan P

    2003-01-01

    The immune response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) was evaluated. Generation of virus-specific effector T cells is unimpaired in MIP-1alpha-deficient mice. Furthermore, MIP-1alpha is not required for T-cell-mediated virus...

  16. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Jones, David R; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2016-08-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1-mediated (PD-1-mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB-based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies.

  17. Tolerance to the antinociceptive and hypothermic effects of morphine is mediated by multiple isoforms of c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuill, Matthew B; Zee, Michael L; Marcus, David; Morgan, Daniel J

    2016-04-13

    The abuse and overdose of opioid drugs are growing public health problems worldwide. Although progress has been made toward understanding the mechanisms governing tolerance to opioids, the exact cellular machinery involved remains unclear. However, there is growing evidence to suggest that c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) play a major role in mu-opioid receptor regulation and morphine tolerance. In this study, we aimed to determine the potential roles of different JNK isoforms in the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive and hypothermic effects of morphine. We used the hot-plate and tail-flick tests for thermal pain to measure tolerance to the antinociceptive effects of once-daily subcutaneous injections with 10 mg/kg morphine. Body temperature was also measured to determine tolerance to the hypothermic effects of morphine. Tolerance to morphine was assessed in wild-type mice and compared with single knockout mice each lacking the JNK isoforms (JNK1, JNK2, or JNK3). We found that loss of each individual JNK isoform causes impairment in tolerance for the antinociceptive and hypothermic effects of daily morphine. However, disruption of JNK2 seems to have the most profound effect on morphine tolerance. These results indicate a clear role for JNK signaling pathways in morphine tolerance. This complements previous studies suggesting that the JNK2 isoform is required for morphine tolerance, but additionally presents novel data suggesting that additional JNK isoforms also contribute toward this process.

  18. Mercury induces inflammatory mediator release from human mast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Erika

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mercury is known to be neurotoxic, but its effects on the immune system are less well known. Mast cells are involved in allergic reactions, but also in innate and acquired immunity, as well as in inflammation. Many patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD have "allergic" symptoms; moreover, the prevalence of ASD in patients with mastocytosis, characterized by numerous hyperactive mast cells in most tissues, is 10-fold higher than the general population suggesting mast cell involvement. We, therefore, investigated the effect of mercuric chloride (HgCl2 on human mast cell activation. Methods Human leukemic cultured LAD2 mast cells and normal human umbilical cord blood-derived cultured mast cells (hCBMCs were stimulated by HgCl2 (0.1-10 μM for either 10 min for beta-hexosaminidase release or 24 hr for measuring vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and IL-6 release by ELISA. Results HgCl2 induced a 2-fold increase in β-hexosaminidase release, and also significant VEGF release at 0.1 and 1 μM (311 ± 32 pg/106 cells and 443 ± 143 pg/106 cells, respectively from LAD2 mast cells compared to control cells (227 ± 17 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p 2 (0.1 μM to the proinflammatory neuropeptide substance P (SP, 0.1 μM had synergestic action in inducing VEGF from LAD2 mast cells. HgCl2 also stimulated significant VEGF release (360 ± 100 pg/106 cells at 1 μM, n = 5, p 6 cells, and IL-6 release (466 ± 57 pg/106 cells at 0.1 μM compared to untreated cells (13 ± 25 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p 2 (0.1 μM to SP (5 μM further increased IL-6 release. Conclusions HgCl2 stimulates VEGF and IL-6 release from human mast cells. This phenomenon could disrupt the blood-brain-barrier and permit brain inflammation. As a result, the findings of the present study provide a biological mechanism for how low levels of mercury may contribute to ASD pathogenesis.

  19. Development of Carbon and Sulphur Tolerant Anodes of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    applications. Hydrogen is not an energy sources and has to be produced via electrolysis or reforming of other hydrocarbon fuels. On the other hand, liquid...500h at 850oC [26]. In recent years, researchers tried to improve sulfur tolerance of SOFCs via substituting nickel with copper . For example, He et

  20. Glycosylation inhibitors efficiently inhibit P-selectin-mediated cell adhesion to endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Pushpankur; Rajendran, Mythilypriya; Odo, Nadine; Ikuta, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion molecules play a critical role in the adhesive interactions of multiple cell types in sickle cell disease (SCD). We previously showed that anti-P-selectin aptamer efficiently inhibits cell adhesion to endothelial cells (ECs) and permits SCD mice to survive hypoxic stress. In an effort to discover new mechanisms with which to inhibit P-selectin, we examined the role of glycosylation. P-selectin is a 90 kDa protein but was found to migrate as 90 and 140 kDa bands on gel electrophoresis. When P-selectin isolated from ECs was digested with peptide N-glycosidase F, but not O-glycosidase, the 140 kDa band was lost and the 90 kDa band was enhanced. Treatment of ECs with tunicamycin, an N-glycosylation inhibitor, suppressed CD62P (P-selectin) expression on the cell surface as well as the 140 kDa form in the cytoplasm. These results indicate that the 140 kDa band is N-glycosylated and glycosylation is critical for cell surface expression of P-selectin in ECs. Thrombin, which stimulates P-selectin expression on ECs, induced AKT phosphorylation, whereas tunicamycin inhibited AKT phosphorylation, suggesting that AKT signaling is involved in the tunicamycin-mediated inhibition of P-selectin expression. Importantly, the adhesion of sickle red blood cells (sRBCs) and leukocytes to ECs induced by thrombin or hypoxia was markedly inhibited by two structurally distinct glycosylation inhibitors; the levels of which were comparable to that of a P-selectin monoclonal antibody which most strongly inhibited cell adhesion in vivo. Knockdown studies of P-selectin using short-hairpin RNAs in ECs suppressed sRBC adhesion, indicating a legitimate role for P-selectin in sRBC adhesion. Together, these results demonstrate that P-selectin expression on ECs is regulated in part by glycosylation mechanisms and that glycosylation inhibitors efficiently reduce the adhesion of sRBCs and leukocytes to ECs. Glycosylation inhibitors may lead to a novel therapy which inhibits cell adhesion in SCD.

  1. Cadmium-inducible expression of the ABC-type transporter AtABCC3 increases phytochelatin-mediated cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Patrizia; Zanella, Letizia; De Paolis, Angelo; Di Litta, Davide; Cecchetti, Valentina; Falasca, Giuseppina; Barbieri, Maurizio; Altamura, Maria Maddalena; Costantino, Paolo; Cardarelli, Maura

    2015-07-01

    The heavy metal cadmium (Cd) is a widespread environmental contaminant with harmful effects on living cells. In plants, phytochelatin (PC)-dependent Cd detoxification requires that PC-Cd complexes are transported into vacuoles. Here, it is shown that Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings defective in the ABCC transporter AtABCC3 (abcc3) have an increased sensitivity to different Cd concentrations, and that seedlings overexpressing AtABCC3 (AtABCC3ox) have an increased Cd tolerance. The cellular distribution of Cd was analysed in protoplasts from abcc3 mutants and AtABCC3 overexpressors grown in the presence of Cd, by means of the Cd-specific fluorochromes 5-nitrobenzothiazole coumarin (BTC-5N) and Leadmium™ Green AM dye. This analysis revealed that Cd is mostly localized in the cytosol of abcc3 mutant protoplasts whereas there is an increase in vacuolar Cd in protoplasts from AtABCC3ox plants. Overexpression of AtABCC3 in cad1-3 mutant seedlings defective in PC production and in plants treated with l-buthionine sulphoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of PC biosynthesis, had no effect on Cd tolerance, suggesting that AtABCC3 acts via PCs. In addition, overexpression of AtABCC3 in atabcc1 atabcc2 mutant seedlings defective in the Cd transporters AtABCC1 and AtABCC2 complements the Cd sensitivity of double mutants, but not in the presence of BSO. Accordingly, the level of AtABCC3 transcript in wild type seedlings was lower than that of AtABCC1 and AtABCC2 in the absence of Cd but higher after Cd exposure, and even higher in atabcc1 atabcc2 mutants. The results point to AtABCC3 as a transporter of PC-Cd complexes, and suggest that its activity is regulated by Cd and is co-ordinated with the activity of AtABCC1/AtABCC2.

  2. Critical role of intestinal interleukin-4 modulating regulatory T cells for desensitization, tolerance, and inflammation of food allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Yoko; Takeyama, Jun; Hiraide, Erika; Kikuchi, Akira; Murakami, Hitoshi; Hosono, Akira; Nochi, Tomonori; Wakatsuki, Yoshio; Shimojo, Naoki; Kaminogawa, Shuichi; Sato, Ryuichiro; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Hachimura, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Background and objective The mechanism inducing either inflammation or tolerance to orally administered food allergens remains unclear. To investigate this we analyzed mouse models of food allergy (OVA23-3) and tolerance (DO11.10 [D10]), both of which express ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T-cell receptors. Methods OVA23-3, recombination activating gene (RAG)-2-deficient OVA23-3 (R23-3), D10, and RAG-2-deficient D10 (RD10) mice consumed a diet containing egg white (EW diet) for 2–28 days. Interleukin (IL)-4 production by CD4+ T cells was measured as a causative factor of enteropathy, and anti-IL-4 antibody was used to reveal the role of Foxp3+ OVA-specific Tregs (aiTreg) in this process. Results Unlike OVA23-3 and R23-3 mice, D10 and RD10 mice did not develop enteropathy and weight loss on the EW diet. On days 7–10, in EW-fed D10 and RD10 mice, splenic CD4+ T cells produced significantly more IL-4 than did those in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs); this is in contrast to the excessive IL-4 response in the MLNs of EW-fed OVA23-3 and R23-3 mice. EW-fed R23-3 mice had few aiTregs, whereas EW-fed RD10 mice had them in both tissues. Intravenous injections of anti-IL-4 antibody recovered the percentage of aiTregs in the MLNs of R23-3 mice. On day 28, in EW-fed OVA23-3 and R23-3 mice, expression of Foxp3 on CD4+ T cells corresponded with recovery from inflammation, but recurrence of weight loss was observed on restarting the EW diet after receiving the control-diet for 1 month. No recurrence developed in D10 mice. Conclusions Excessive IL-4 levels in the MLNs directly inhibited the induction of aiTregs and caused enteropathy. The aiTregs generated in the attenuation of T cell-dependent food allergic enteropathy may function differently than aiTregs induced in a tolerance model. Comparing the two models enables to investigate their aiTreg functions and to clarify differences between inflammation with subsequent desensitization versus tolerance. PMID:28234975

  3. RAD18 mediates resistance to ionizing radiation in human glioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Chen; Wang, Hongwei; Cheng, Hongbin; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Zhi, E-mail: drzwang@gmail.com; Yue, Wu, E-mail: drwuyue@gmail.com

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in glioma cell lines. • RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis. • The elevated expression of RAD18 is associated with recurrent GBM who underwent IR therapy. - Abstract: Radioresistance remains a major challenge in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). RAD18 a central regulator of translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), has been shown to play an important role in regulating genomic stability and DNA damage response. In the present study, we investigate the relationship between RAD18 and resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and examined the expression levels of RAD18 in primary and recurrent GBM specimens. Our results showed that RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in GBM. The expression level of RAD18 in glioma cells correlates with their resistance to IR. Ectopic expression of RAD18 in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells confers significant resistance to IR treatment. Conversely, depletion of endogenous RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells sensitized these cells to IR treatment. Moreover, RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells, whereas cells deficient in RAD18 exhibit increased apoptosis induced by IR. Furthermore, knockdown of RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells disrupts HR-mediated repair, resulting in increased accumulation of DSB. In addition, clinical data indicated that RAD18 was significantly higher in recurrent GBM samples that were exposed to IR compared with the corresponding primary GBM samples. Collectively, our findings reveal that RAD18 may serve as a key mediator of the IR response and may function as a potential target for circumventing IR resistance in human GBM.

  4. Peripheral CD8+ T cell tolerance against melanocytic self-antigens in the skin is regulated in two steps by CD4+ T cells and local inflammation: implications for the pathophysiology of vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steitz, Julia; Brück, Jürgen; Lenz, Julia; Büchs, Steffi; Tüting, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Experimental evidence has suggested a role for CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in the pathophysiology of vitiligo, a pigmentation disorder with focal loss of melanocytes in the skin. The discovery of tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP2) as a model melanocytic self-antigen recognized by CD8+ CTL in C57BL/6 mice allowed us to analyze the requirements for CD8+ T cell-mediated autoimmune destruction of melanocytes in an experimental model. Using two different genetic methods for the induction of cellular immunity in vivo, gene gun bombardment of the skin and injection of recombinant adenovirus, we show that peripheral tolerance of CD8+ T cells recognizing a single TRP2-derived H2-Kb-binding peptide is regulated in two steps. In the induction phase, stimulation and expansion of TRP2-specific CD8+ T cells in vivo depend on CD4+ T cell help. In the effector phase, autoimmune destruction of melanocytes in the skin depends on local inflammation. Our results suggest that accidental stimulation of CD8+ CTL recognizing major histocompatibility complex class I-binding peptides derived from melanocytic proteins in the context of an inflammatory skin disease may play an important role in the pathophysiology of vitiligo.

  5. Site of Clomazone Action in Tolerant-Soybean and Susceptible-Cotton Photomixotrophic Cell Suspension Cultures 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Michael A.; Liebl, Rex A.; Widholm, Jack M.

    1990-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the herbicidal site of clomazone action in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Corsoy) (SB-M) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum [L.] cv Stoneville 825) (COT-M) photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures. Although a 10 micromolar clomazone treatment did not significantly reduce the terpene or mixed terpenoid content (microgram per gram fresh weight) of the SB-M cell line, there was over a 70% reduction in the chlorophyll (Chl), carotenoid (CAR), and plastoquinone (PQ) content of the COT-M cell line. The tocopherol (TOC) content was reduced only 35.6%. Reductions in the levels of Chl, CAR, TOC, and PQ indicate that the site of clomazone action in COT-M cells is prior to geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). The clomazone treatment did not significantly reduce the flow of [14C]mevalonate ([14C]MEV) (nanocuries per gram fresh weight) into CAR and the three mixed terpenoid compounds of SB-M cells. Conversely, [14C]MEV incorporation into CAR and the terpene moieties of Chl, PQ, and TOC in COT-M cells was reduced at least 73%, indicating that the site of clomazone action must be after MEV. Sequestration of clomazone away from the chloroplast cannot account for soybean tolerance to clomazone since chloroplasts isolated from both cell lines incubated with [14C]clomazone contained a similar amount of radioactivity (disintegrations per minute per microgram of Chl). The possible site(s) of clomazone inhibition include mevalonate kinase, phosphomevalonate kinase, pyrophosphomevalonate decarboxylase, isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase, and/or a prenyl transferase. PMID:16667768

  6. CO-Tolerant Pt–BeO as a Novel Anode Electrocatalyst in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyungjung Kwon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs requires less expensive catalysts and higher operating voltage. Substantial anodic overvoltage with the usage of reformed hydrogen fuel can be minimized by using CO-tolerant anode catalysts. Carbon-supported Pt–BeO is manufactured so that Pt particles with an average diameter of 4 nm are distributed on a carbon support. XPS analysis shows that a peak value of the binding energy of Be matches that of BeO, and oxygen is bound with Be or carbon. The hydrogen oxidation current of the Pt–BeO catalyst is slightly higher than that of a Pt catalyst. CO stripping voltammetry shows that CO oxidation current peaks at ~0.85 V at Pt, whereas CO is oxidized around 0.75 V at Pt–BeO, which confirms that the desorption of CO is easier in the presence of BeO. Although the state-of-the-art PtRu anode catalyst is dominant as a CO-tolerant hydrogen oxidation catalyst, this study of Be-based CO-tolerant material can widen the choice of PEMFC anode catalyst.

  7. Detecting the nonviable and heat-tolerant bacteria in activated sludge by minimizing DNA from dead cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Zhang, Tong

    2014-05-01

    Propidium monoazide (PMA) has been used to determine viable microorganisms for clinical and environmental samples since selected naked DNA which was covalently cross-linked by this dye could not be PCR-amplified. In this study, we applied PMA to the activated sludge samples composed of complex bacterial populations to investigate the viability of human fecal bacteria and to determine the heat-tolerant bacteria by high-throughput sequencing of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) V3 region. The methodological evaluation suggested the validity, and about 2-3 magnitude signals decreasing from the stained DNA were observed. However, the nest PCR, which was previously conducted to further minimize signals from dead cells, seemed not suitable perhaps due to the limitation of the primers. On one hand, for typical human fecal bacteria, less than half of them were viable, and most genera exhibited the similar viable percentages. It was interesting that many "unclassified bacteria" showed low viability, implying their sensitivity to environmental change. On the other hand, after heating at 60 °C for 4 h, the bacteria with high survival rate in activated sludge samples included those reported thermophiles or heat-tolerant lineages, such as Anoxybacillus and diverse species in Actinobacteria, and some novel ones, such as Gp16 subdivision in Acidobacteria. In summary, our results took a glance at the fate of fecal bacteria during sewage treatment and established an example for identifying tolerant species to lethal shocks in a complex community.

  8. Mediation of autophagic cell death by type 3 ryanodine receptor (RyR3 in adult hippocampal neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Min eChung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic Ca2+ actively engages in diverse intracellular processes from protein synthesis, folding and trafficking to cell survival and death. Dysregulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels is observed in various neuropathological states including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs and IP3 receptors (IP3Rs, the main Ca2+ release channels located in endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes, are known to direct various cellular events such as autophagy and apoptosis. Here we investigated the intracellular Ca2+-mediated regulation of survival and death of adult hippocampal neural stem (HCN cells utilizing an insulin withdrawal model of autophagic cell death. Despite comparable expression levels of RyR and IP3R transcripts in HCN cells at normal state, the expression levels of RyRs — especially RyR3 — were markedly upregulated upon insulin withdrawal. While treatment with the RyR agonist caffeine significantly promoted the autophagic death of insulin-deficient HCN cells, treatment with its inhibitor dantrolene prevented the induction of autophagy following insulin withdrawal. Furthermore, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of the RyR3 gene abolished autophagic cell death of HCN cells. This study delineates a distinct, RyR3-mediated ER Ca2+ regulation of autophagy and programmed cell death in neural stem cells. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical, yet understudied mechanisms underlying the regulatory function of ER Ca2+ in neural stem cell biology.

  9. Nanoshell-mediated photothermal therapy can enhance chemotherapy in inflammatory breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Brittany L; Melamed, Jilian R; Day, Emily S

    2015-01-01

    Nanoshell-mediated photothermal therapy (PTT) is currently being investigated as a standalone therapy for the treatment of cancer. The cellular effects of PTT include loss of membrane integrity, so we hypothesized that nanoshell-mediated PTT could potentiate the cytotoxicity of chemotherapy by improving drug accumulation in cancer cells. In this work, we validated our hypothesis using doxorubicin as a model drug and SUM149 inflammatory breast cancer cells as a model cancer subtype. In initial studies, SUM149 cells were exposed to nano-shells and near-infrared light and then stained with ethidium homodimer-1, which is excluded from cells with an intact plasma membrane. The results confirmed that nanoshell-mediated PTT could increase membrane permeability in SUM149 cells. In complementary experiments, SUM149 cells treated with nanoshells, near-infrared light, or a combination of the two to yield low-dose PTT were exposed to fluorescent rhodamine 123. Analyzing rhodamine 123 fluorescence in cells via flow cytometry confirmed that increased membrane permeability caused by PTT could enhance drug accumulation in cells. This was validated using fluorescence microscopy to assess intracellular distribution of doxorubicin. In succeeding experiments, SUM149 cells were exposed to subtherapeutic levels of doxorubicin, low-dose PTT, or a combination of the two treatments to determine whether the additional drug uptake induced by PTT is sufficient to enhance cell death. Analysis revealed minimal loss of viability relative to controls in cells exposed to subtherapeutic levels of doxorubicin, 15% loss of viability in cells exposed to low-dose PTT, and 35% loss of viability in cells exposed to combination therapy. These data indicate that nanoshell-mediated PTT is a viable strategy to potentiate the effects of chemotherapy and warrant further investigation of this approach using other drugs and cancer subtypes.

  10. Nanoshell-mediated photothermal therapy can enhance chemotherapy in inflammatory breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fay BL

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Brittany L Fay, Jilian R Melamed, Emily S Day Biomedical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA Abstract: Nanoshell-mediated photothermal therapy (PTT is currently being investigated as a standalone therapy for the treatment of cancer. The cellular effects of PTT include loss of membrane integrity, so we hypothesized that nanoshell-mediated PTT could potentiate the cytotoxicity of chemotherapy by improving drug accumulation in cancer cells. In this work, we validated our hypothesis using doxorubicin as a model drug and SUM149 inflammatory breast cancer cells as a model cancer subtype. In initial studies, SUM149 cells were exposed to nanoshells and near-infrared light and then stained with ethidium homodimer-1, which is excluded from cells with an intact plasma membrane. The results confirmed that nanoshell-mediated PTT could increase membrane permeability in SUM149 cells. In complementary experiments, SUM149 cells treated with nanoshells, near-infrared light, or a combination of the two to yield low-dose PTT were exposed to fluorescent rhodamine 123. Analyzing rhodamine 123 fluorescence in cells via flow cytometry confirmed that increased membrane permeability caused by PTT could enhance drug accumulation in cells. This was validated using fluorescence microscopy to assess intracellular distribution of doxorubicin. In succeeding experiments, SUM149 cells were exposed to subtherapeutic levels of doxorubicin, low-dose PTT, or a combination of the two treatments to determine whether the additional drug uptake induced by PTT is sufficient to enhance cell death. Analysis revealed minimal loss of viability relative to controls in cells exposed to subtherapeutic levels of doxorubicin, 15% loss of viability in cells exposed to low-dose PTT, and 35% loss of viability in cells exposed to combination therapy. These data indicate that nanoshell-mediated PTT is a viable strategy to potentiate the effects of chemotherapy and warrant further

  11. Adaptive and innate immune reactions regulating mast cell activation: from receptor-mediated signaling to responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tkaczyk, Christine; Jensen, Bettina M; Iwaki, Shoko

    2006-01-01

    differentially activate multiple signaling pathways within the mast cells required for the generation and/or release of inflammatory mediators. Thus, the composition of the suite of mediators released and the physiologic ramifications of these responses are dependent on the stimuli and the microenvironment...... activation. The exact interconnections between the signaling pathways initiated by the surface receptors described in this article remain to be completely worked out; thus, this remains a topic for future investigation....

  12. Nanoshell-mediated photothermal therapy can enhance chemotherapy in inflammatory breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fay BL; Melamed JR; Day ES

    2015-01-01

    Brittany L Fay, Jilian R Melamed, Emily S Day Biomedical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA Abstract: Nanoshell-mediated photothermal therapy (PTT) is currently being investigated as a standalone therapy for the treatment of cancer. The cellular effects of PTT include loss of membrane integrity, so we hypothesized that nanoshell-mediated PTT could potentiate the cytotoxicity of chemotherapy by improving drug accumulation in cancer cells. In this work, we validated our hypo...

  13. Function of Helper T Cells in the Memory CTL-mediated Anti-tumor Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高丰光; GermainJ.P.Fernendo; 刘文军

    2004-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the role of CD4+ helper T (Th) cells in the memory CTL-mediated anti-tumor immunity, the RAG-1 gene knock out mice were adoptively transferred with OT-1 cells to generate the memory CTL, the C57B1/6 mice immunized with the epitope peptide of OVA specific Th cells and with different adjuvants were adopfively transferred with these memory-CTLs, and then the animals were challenged with tumor cells EGT. It was found that although the simple immunization of mice with the epitope peptide of the OVA specific Th cells could generate more effect CTL, but this effect was not so strong enough to resist completely the challenges with tumor cells. Nevertheless, the memory CTL-mediated anti-tumor immune effect required the helps of Th1 and Th2 cells. The cross-regulation between Thl and Th2 cells seemed to be beneficial for the host to generate more effector CTL for mounting an efficient anti-tumor response. It concluded that the interaction between Thl and Th2 cells might be more important than the single subset of Th cells in the memory CTL-mediated anti-tumor immune response. More attention should be paid in this regard for the future studies.

  14. Bone marrow stromal cell : mediated neuroprotection for spinal cord repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, Gaby Jane

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no treatment available that restores anatomy and function after spinal cord injury. This thesis explores transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bone marrow stromal cells; BMSCs) as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. BMSCs secrete neurotrophic f

  15. CDK8-Mediated STAT1-S727 Phosphorylation Restrains NK Cell Cytotoxicity and Tumor Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Putz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor STAT1 is important in natural killer (NK cells, which provide immediate defense against tumor and virally infected cells. We show that mutation of a single phosphorylation site (Stat1-S727A enhances NK cell cytotoxicity against a range of tumor cells, accompanied by increased expression of perforin and granzyme B. Stat1-S727A mice display significantly delayed disease onset in NK cell-surveilled tumor models including melanoma, leukemia, and metastasizing breast cancer. Constitutive phosphorylation of S727 depends on cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8. Inhibition of CDK8-mediated STAT1-S727 phosphorylation may thus represent a therapeutic strategy for stimulating NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance.

  16. Effect Of Free Radical Quenchers On Dye-Mediated Laser Light Induced Photosensitization Of Leukemic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Matthews, James L.; Fay, Joseph W.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1988-02-01

    The effect of free radical quenchers (ascorbate, catalase, and mannitol) on merocyanine 540 (MC540) mediated, laser light induced photolysis of human acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line (HL-60) was investigated. Results show that in the presence of human albumin (0.25%), dye-mediated (2014/m1), laser light induced photolysis of leukemic cells resulted in a 99.9999% cell kill. Seventy percent of the normal bone marrow cells survived the treatment. The addition of free radical quenchers prior to laser irradiation procedure increases the HL-60 cell survival. Increases of 5.5% and 4.4%, respectively, were observed in the presence of catalase and ascorbate or mannitol. In the presence of a mixture of catalase and mannitol or catalase and ascorbate, this increase in viability was not observed. However, the viability of normal bone marrow cells under these conditions also decreased from 70% to 63%. These findings may be useful in ex-vivo bone marrow purging.

  17. The serine/threonine phosphatase DhSIT4 modulates cell cycle, salt tolerance and cell wall integrity in halo tolerant yeast Debaryomyces hansenii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Srishti; Kundu, Debasree; Randhawa, Anmoldeep; Mondal, Alok K

    2017-03-30

    The highly conserved family of Phosphoprotein phosphatases (PPP) regulates several major physiological processes in yeast. However, very little is known about the PPP orthologs from the yeast species inhabiting extreme environmental niches. In the present study we have identified DhSIT4, a member of PPP6 class of serine threonine phosphatases from the halotolerant yeast Debaryomyces hansenii. Deletion of DhSIT4 in D. hansenii was not lethal but the mutant exhibited reduced growth due to its effect on the cell cycle. The knock out mutant Dhsit4Δ showed sensitivity towards Li(+), Na(+) and cell wall damaging agents. The expression of DhSit4p rescued salt, caffeine and calcofluor white sensitivity of Dhmpk1Δ strain and thereby indicating a genetic interaction of this phosphatase with the cell wall integrity pathway in this species. Our study also demonstrated the antagonistic roles of DhSit4p and DhPpz1p in maintaining the cell cycle and ion homeostasis in D. hansenii.

  18. Oral-nasopharyngeal dendritic cells mediate T cell-independent IgA class switching on B-1 B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Kataoka

    Full Text Available Native cholera toxin (nCT as a nasal adjuvant was shown to elicit increased levels of T-independent S-IgA antibody (Ab responses through IL-5- IL-5 receptor interactions between CD4+ T cells and IgA+ B-1 B cells in murine submandibular glands (SMGs and nasal passages (NPs. Here, we further investigate whether oral-nasopharyngeal dendritic cells (DCs play a central role in the induction of B-1 B cell IgA class switch recombination (CSR for the enhancement of T cell-independent (TI mucosal S-IgA Ab responses. High expression levels of activation-induced cytidine deaminase, Iα-Cμ circulation transcripts and Iμ-Cα transcripts were seen on B-1 B cells purified from SMGs and NPs of both TCRβ⁻/⁻ mice and wild-type mice given nasal trinitrophenyl (TNP-LPS plus nCT, than in the same tissues of mice given nCT or TNP-LPS alone. Further, DCs from SMGs, NPs and NALT of mice given nasal TNP-LPS plus nCT expressed significantly higher levels of a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL than those in mice given TNP-LPS or nCT alone, whereas the B-1 B cells in SMGs and NPs showed elevated levels of transmembrane activator and calcium modulator cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI expression. Interestingly, high frequencies of IgA+ B-1 B cells were induced when peritoneal IgA⁻ IgM+ B cells were stimulated with mucosal DCs from mice given nasal TNP-LPS plus nCT. Taken together, these findings show that nasal nCT plays a key role in the enhancement of mucosal DC-mediated TI IgA CSR by B-1 B cells through their interactions with APRIL and TACI.

  19. Oral-nasopharyngeal dendritic cells mediate T cell-independent IgA class switching on B-1 B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Kosuke; Fujihashi, Keiko; Terao, Yutaka; Gilbert, Rebekah S; Sekine, Shinichi; Kobayashi, Ryoki; Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Kawabata, Shigetada; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2011-01-01

    Native cholera toxin (nCT) as a nasal adjuvant was shown to elicit increased levels of T-independent S-IgA antibody (Ab) responses through IL-5- IL-5 receptor interactions between CD4+ T cells and IgA+ B-1 B cells in murine submandibular glands (SMGs) and nasal passages (NPs). Here, we further investigate whether oral-nasopharyngeal dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in the induction of B-1 B cell IgA class switch recombination (CSR) for the enhancement of T cell-independent (TI) mucosal S-IgA Ab responses. High expression levels of activation-induced cytidine deaminase, Iα-Cμ circulation transcripts and Iμ-Cα transcripts were seen on B-1 B cells purified from SMGs and NPs of both TCRβ⁻/⁻ mice and wild-type mice given nasal trinitrophenyl (TNP)-LPS plus nCT, than in the same tissues of mice given nCT or TNP-LPS alone. Further, DCs from SMGs, NPs and NALT of mice given nasal TNP-LPS plus nCT expressed significantly higher levels of a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) than those in mice given TNP-LPS or nCT alone, whereas the B-1 B cells in SMGs and NPs showed elevated levels of transmembrane activator and calcium modulator cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI) expression. Interestingly, high frequencies of IgA+ B-1 B cells were induced when peritoneal IgA⁻ IgM+ B cells were stimulated with mucosal DCs from mice given nasal TNP-LPS plus nCT. Taken together, these findings show that nasal nCT plays a key role in the enhancement of mucosal DC-mediated TI IgA CSR by B-1 B cells through their interactions with APRIL and TACI.

  20. Biocontrol agents-mediated suppression of oxalic acid induced cell death during Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-pea interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Akansha; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, Surendra; Sarma, Birinchi Kumar; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur

    2015-05-01

    Oxalic acid (OA) is an important pathogenic factor during early Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-host interaction and might work by reducing hydrogen peroxide production (H2 O2 ). In the present investigation, oxalic acid-induced cell death in pea was studied. Pea plants treated with biocontrol agents (BCAs) viz., Pseudomonas aeruginosa PJHU15, Bacillus subtilis BHHU100, and Trichoderma harzianum TNHU27 either singly and/or in consortium acted on S. sclerotiorum indirectly by enabling plants to inhibit the OA-mediated suppression of oxidative burst via induction of H2 O2 . Our results showed that BCA treated plants upon treatment with culture filtrate of the pathogen, conferred the resistance via. significantly decreasing relative cell death of pea against S. sclerotiorum compared to control plants without BCA treatment but treated with the culture filtrate of the pathogen. The results obtained from the present study indicate that the microbes especially in consortia play significant role in protection against S. sclerotiorum by modulating oxidative burst and partially enhancing tolerance by increasing the H2 O2 generation, which is otherwise suppressed by OA produced by the pathogen.

  1. Zinc up-regulated the expression of the rice metallonthionein gene family and enhanced the zinc tolerance of yeast cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Northern blot and functional complementation assay were employed to analyze the effects of zinc on expression of ten rice metallothionein genes (OsMT-Is) in rice seedlings and the growth of yeast cells transformed with OsMT-Is. Northern blot revealed that in shoots of the rice seedlings treated with different Zn2+ concentrations, expression of most members of OsMT-I family was increased, except the type 4 OsMT-Is (OsMT-I-4a, 4b and 4c). In roots, Zn2+ significantly increased the transcription of OsMT-I-1b and OsMT-I-2c, but reduced the trascription of OsMT-I-1a and OsMT-I-3a. When these ten cDNAs were heterologously expressed in zinc sensitive yeast mutant, all transgenic yeasts showed increased tolerance to Zn2+, and zinc accumulation in these yeast cells also increased.These indicated that OsMT-I family members might respond to extra Zn2+, and they could enhance Zn2+ tolerance of cells by direct binding Zn2+.

  2. Performance Factors and Sulfur Tolerance of Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells with Nanostructured Ni:GDC Infiltrated Anodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Persson, Åsa Helen; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy;

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in developing metal supported solid oxide fuel cells (MS-SOFCs). MS-SOFCs are interesting as they potentially offer some advantages compared to conventional electrode and electrolyte supported SOFCs, such as low materials cost, better thermal...... conductivity and ductility of the support. The two later aspects improve the shock resistance and lower internal gradients within the stacks. This enables fast start-up and provides higher tolerance towards operation under transient conditions that are particularly desirable for APU applications. Today...

  3. Retrovirus-Mediated Gene Transfer in Immortalization of Progenitor Hair Cell Lines in Newborn Rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yuan; ZHAI Suo-qiang; SONG Wei; GUO Wei; ZHENG Gui-liang; HU Yin-yan

    2008-01-01

    Objective To present an experimental method that allows isolation of greater epithelial ridge (GER) and lesser epithelial ridge(LER) cells from postnatal rat cochleae using a combinatorial approach of enzymatic digestion and mechanical separation and to investigate a retrovirus-mediated gene transfer technique for its possibl utility in immortalization of the GER and LER cell lines, in an effort to establish an in vitro model system of hair cell differentiation. Methods GER and LER cells were dissected from postnatal rat cochleae and immortalized by transferring the SV40 large T antigen using a retrovirus. The established cell lines were confirmed through morphology observation, immunnocytochemical staining and RT-PCR analysis. The Hathl gene was transferred into the cell lines using adenovirus-mediated techniques to explore their potential to differentiate into hair cells. Results The established cell lines were stably maintained for more than 20 passages and displayed many features similar to primary GER and LER cells. They grew in patches and assumed a polygonal morphology. Immunostaining showed labeling by SV40 large T antigen and Islet1 (a specific marker for GER and LER). All passages of the cell lines expressed SV40 large T antigen on RT-PCR analysis. The cells also showed the capability to differenti-ate into hair cell-like cells when forced to express Hathl. Conclusion Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer can be used in establishing immortalized progenitor hair cell lines in newborn rat, which may provide an invaluable system for studying hair cell differentiation and regeneration for new treatment of sensory hearing loss caused by hair cell loss.

  4. TAT-mediated intracellular protein delivery to primary brain cells is dependent on glycosaminoglycan expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Melissa J; Gao, Shan; Kang, Woo Hyeun; Banta, Scott; Morrison, Barclay

    2009-09-01

    Although some studies have shown that the cell penetrating peptide (CPP) TAT can enter a variety of cell lines with high efficiency, others have observed little or no transduction in vivo or in vitro under conditions mimicking the in vivo environment. The mechanisms underlying TAT-mediated transduction have been investigated in cell lines, but not in primary brain cells. In this study we demonstrate that transduction of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-TAT fusion protein is dependent on glycosaminoglycan (GAG) expression in both the PC12 cell line and primary astrocytes. GFP-TAT transduced PC12 cells and did so with even higher efficiency following NGF differentiation. In cultures of primary brain cells, TAT significantly enhanced GFP delivery into astrocytes grown under different conditions: (1) monocultures grown in serum-containing medium; (2) monocultures grown in serum-free medium; (3) cocultures with neurons in serum-free medium. The efficiency of GFP-TAT transduction was significantly higher in the monocultures than in the cocultures. The GFP-TAT construct did not significantly enter neurons. Experimental modulation of GAG content correlated with alterations in TAT transduction in PC12 cells and astrocyte monocultures grown in the presence of serum. In addition, this correlation was predictive of TAT-mediated transduction in astrocyte monocultures grown in serum free medium and in coculture. We conclude that culture conditions affect cellular GAG expression, which in turn dictates TAT-mediated transduction efficiency, extending previous results from cell lines to primary cells. These results highlight the cell-type and phenotype-dependence of TAT-mediated transduction, and underscore the necessity of controlling the phenotype of the target cell in future protein engineering efforts aimed at creating more efficacious CPPs.

  5. Enterotoxin preconditioning restores calcium-sensing receptor-mediated cytostasis in colon cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pitari, Giovanni M.; Lin, Jieru E.; Shah, Fawad J.; Lubbe, Wilhelm J.; Zuzga, David S.; Li, Peng; Schulz, Stephanie; Waldman, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Guanylyl cyclase C (GCC), the receptor for diarrheagenic bacterial heat-stable enterotoxins (STs), inhibits colorectal cancer cell proliferation by co-opting Ca2+ as the intracellular messenger. Similarly, extracellular Ca2+ (Ca2+o) opposes proliferation and induces terminal differentiation in intestinal epithelial cells. In that context, human colon cancer cells develop a phenotype characterized by insensitivity to cytostasis imposed by Ca2+o. Here, preconditioning with ST, mediated by GCC s...

  6. Regulation of Noxa-mediated apoptosis in Helicobacter pylori–infected gastric epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori induces the antiapoptotic protein myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl1) in human gastric epithelial cells (GECs). Apoptosis of oncogenic protein Mcl1-expressing cells is mainly regulated by Noxa-mediated degradation of Mcl1. We wanted to elucidate the status of Noxa in H. pylori–infected GECs. For this, various GECs such as AGS, MKN45, and KATO III were either infected with H. pylori or left uninfected. The effect of infection was examined by immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, ...

  7. Conversion of embryonic stem cells into extraembryonic lineages by CRISPR-mediated activators

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The recently emerged CRISPR/Cas9 technique has opened a new perspective on readily editing specific genes. When combined with transcription activators, it can precisely manipulate endogenous gene expression. Here, we enhanced the expression of endogenous Cdx2 and Gata6 genes by CRISPR-mediated activators, thus mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were directly converted into two extraembryonic lineages, i.e., typical trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) and extraembryonic endoderm cells (XENCs), which ...

  8. DJ-1 mediates paraquat-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyun Joo; Heo, Jun Young; Shim, Jung Hee; Park, Ji Hoon; Seo, Kang Sik; Ryu, Min Jeong; Han, Jeong Su; Shong, Minho; Son, Jin H; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2011-04-25

    There are two causes of Parkinson's disease (PD): environmental insults and genetic mutations of PD-associated genes. Environmental insults and genetic mutations lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, and a combination of mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress in dopaminergic neurons is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of PD. Among the PD-associated genes, DJ-1 acts as a redox sensor for oxidative stress and has been also proposed to maintain mitochondrial complex I activity. To understand molecular functions of DJ-1 in the cell, we have generated DJ-1 null cells from the DJ-1(-/-) mouse embryos. Using these null cells, we investigated the susceptibility to an environmental toxin, paraquat, which is known to inhibit mitochondrial complex I. Interestingly, we found that DJ-1 null cells showed a resistance to paraquat-induced apoptosis, including reduced poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and procaspase-3. Also DJ-1 null cells generated less superoxide than SN4741 cells by paraquat treatment. Consistent with the reduced paraquat sensitivity, DJ-1 null cells showed reduced complex I activity, which was partially rescued by ectopic DJ-I expression. In summary, our results suggest that DJ-1 is critical to maintain mitochondrial complex I and complex I could be a key target in interaction of paraquat toxicity and DJ-1 for giving rise to PD.

  9. High glucose-mediated oxidative stress impairs cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo L Lamers

    Full Text Available Deficient wound healing in diabetic patients is very frequent, but the cellular and molecular causes are poorly defined. In this study, we evaluate the hypothesis that high glucose concentrations inhibit cell migration. Using CHO.K1 cells, NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, mouse embryonic fibroblasts and primary skin fibroblasts from control and diabetic rats cultured in 5 mM D-glucose (low glucose, LG, 25 mM D-glucose (high glucose, HG or 25 mM L-glucose medium (osmotic control--OC, we analyzed the migration speed, protrusion stability, cell polarity, adhesion maturation and the activity of the small Rho GTPase Rac1. We also analyzed the effects of reactive oxygen species by incubating cells with the antioxidant N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC. We observed that HG conditions inhibited cell migration when compared to LG or OC. This inhibition resulted from impaired cell polarity, protrusion destabilization and inhibition of adhesion maturation. Conversely, Rac1 activity, which promotes protrusion and blocks adhesion maturation, was increased in HG conditions, thus providing a mechanistic basis for the HG phenotype. Most of the HG effects were partially or completely rescued by treatment with NAC. These findings demonstrate that HG impairs cell migration due to an increase in oxidative stress that causes polarity loss, deficient adhesion and protrusion. These alterations arise, in large part, from increased Rac1 activity and may contribute to the poor wound healing observed in diabetic patients.

  10. Chaperone-rich tumor cell lysate-mediated activation of antigen-presenting cells resists regulatory T cell suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmonier, Nicolas; Cantrell, Jessica; Lacasse, Collin; Li, Gang; Janikashvili, Nona; Situ, Elaine; Sepassi, Marjan; Andreansky, Samita; Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2008-04-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) critically contribute to the mechanisms of cancer-induced tolerance. These cells suppress anti-tumoral CD8(+) and CD4(+) T lymphocytes and can also restrain the function of APCs. We have previously documented the immunostimulatory effects of a chaperone-rich cell lysate (CRCL) anti-cancer vaccine. Tumor-derived CRCL induces tumor immunity in vivo, partly by promoting dendritic cell (DC) and macrophage activation. In the current study, we evaluated the effects of CD4(+)CD25(+)forkhead box P3(+) Tregs isolated from mice bearing 12B1 bcr-abl(+) leukemia on DC and macrophages that had been activated by 12B1-derived CRCL. CRCL-activated DC and macrophages resisted Treg suppression, as the production of proinflammatory cytokines, the activation of transcription factor NF-kappaB, and their immunostimulatory potential was unaffected by Tregs. Our results thus highlight CRCL as a powerful adjuvant endowed with the capacity to overcome tumor-induced Treg-inhibitory effects on APCs.

  11. Antifreeze protein modulates cell survival during cryopreservation: mediation through influence on ice crystal growth.

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter, J F; Hansen, T N

    1992-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are extremely efficient at inhibiting ice recrystallization in frozen solutions. Knight and Duman [Knight, C. A. & Duman, J. G. (1986) Cryobiology 23, 256-263] have proposed that this may be an important function of the proteins in freeze-tolerant organisms. We have tested this proposal in vitro by characterizing the influence of AFP on the recovery of cryopreserved cells, which often can survive cooling and yet subsequently be damaged by ice crystal growth during w...

  12. MFG-E8 regulates the immunogenic potential of dendritic cells primed with necrotic cell-mediated inflammatory signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Baghdadi

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC manipulate tissue homeostasis by recognizing dying cells and controlling immune functions. However, the precise mechanisms by which DC recognize different types of dying cells and devise distinct immunologic consequences remain largely obscure. Herein, we demonstrate that Milk-fat globule-EGF VIII (MFG-E8 is a critical mediator controlling DC immunogenicity in inflammatory microenvironments. MFG-E8 restrains DC-mediated uptake and recognition of necrotic cells. The MFG-E8-mediated suppression of necrotic cell uptake by DC resulted in the decreased proinflammatory cytokines production and activated signal components such as STAT3 and A20, which are critical to maintain tolerogenic properties of DC. Furthermore, the DC-derived MFG-E8 negatively regulates the cross-priming and effector functions of antigen-specific T cells upon recognition of necrotic cells. MFG-E8 deficiency enhances an ability of necrotic cell-primed DC to stimulate antitumor immune responses against established tumors. Our findings define what we believe to a novel mechanism whereby MFG-E8 regulates the immunogenicity of DC by modulating the modes of recognition of dying cells. Manipulating MFG-E8 levels in DC may serve as a useful strategy for controlling inflammatory microenvironments caused by various pathological conditions including cancer and autoimmunity.

  13. Methadone induces CAD degradation and AIF-mediated necrotic-like cell death in neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Alvarez, Sergio; Iglesias-Guimarais, Victoria; Solesio, María E; Melero-Fernandez de Mera, Raquel María; Yuste, Víctor J; Galindo, María F; Jordán, Joaquín

    2011-04-01

    Methadone (d,l-methadone hydrochloride) is a full-opioid agonist, originally developed as a substitution for heroin or other opiates abusers. Nowadays methadone is also being applied as long-lasting analgesics in cancer, and it is proposed as a promising agent for leukemia therapy. Previously, we have demonstrated that high concentrations of methadone (0.5mM) induced necrotic-like cell death in SH-SY5Y cells. The pathway involved is caspase-independent but involves impairment of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and mitochondrial cytochrome c release. However, the downstream mitochondrial pathways remained unclear. Here, we studied the participation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) in methadone-induced cell death. Methadone resulted in a translocation of AIF from mitochondria to the nucleus. Translocation was inhibited by cyclosporine A, but not by lack of Bax protein. Therefore the effect seems mediated by the formation of the mitochondrial transition pore, but is apparently independent of Bax. Furthermore, methadone-treated SH-SY5Y nuclei show characteristics that are typical for stage I nuclear condensation. Methadone did not induce degradation of DNA into oligonucleosomal fragments or into high molecular weight DNA fragments. Absence of DNA fragmentation coincided with a considerable decrease in the levels of the caspase-actived endonuclase DNase and its chaperone-inhibitor ICAD. In conclusion, our results provide mechanistic insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie methadone-induced cell death. This knowledge may prove useful to develop novel strategies to prevent toxic side-effects of methadone thereby sustaining its use as therapeutical agent against tumors.

  14. FLIP switches Fas-mediated glucose signaling in human pancreatic β cells from apoptosis to cell replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maedler, Kathrin; Fontana, Adriano; Ris, Frédéric; Sergeev, Pavel; Toso, Christian; Oberholzer, José; Lehmann, Roger; Bachmann, Felix; Tasinato, Andrea; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Halban, Philippe A.; Donath, Marc Y.

    2002-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus results from an inadequate adaptation of the functional pancreatic β cell mass in the face of insulin resistance. Changes in the concentration of glucose play an essential role in the regulation of β cell turnover. In human islets, elevated glucose concentrations impair β cell proliferation and induce β cell apoptosis via up-regulation of the Fas receptor. Recently, it has been shown that the caspase-8 inhibitor FLIP may divert Fas-mediated death signals into those for cell proliferation in lymphatic cells. We observed expression of FLIP in human pancreatic β cells of nondiabetic individuals, which was decreased in tissue sections of type 2 diabetic patients. In vitro exposure of islets from nondiabetic organ donors to high glucose levels decreased FLIP expression and increased the percentage of apoptotic terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated UTP end labeling (TUNEL)-positive β cells; FLIP was no longer detectable in such TUNEL-positive β cells. Up-regulation of FLIP, by incubation with transforming growth factor β or by transfection with an expression vector coding for FLIP, protected β cells from glucose-induced apoptosis, restored β cell proliferation, and improved β cell function. The beneficial effects of FLIP overexpression were blocked by an antagonistic anti-Fas antibody, indicating their dependence on Fas receptor activation. The present data provide evidence for expression of FLIP in the human β cell and suggest a novel approach to prevent and treat diabetes by switching Fas signaling from apoptosis to proliferation. PMID:12060768

  15. Lipoprotein metabolism mediates the association of MTP polymorphism with beta-cell dysfunction in healthy subjects and in nondiabetic normolipidemic patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Giovanni; Gambino, Roberto; Cassader, Maurizio

    2010-09-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) predicts incident diabetes independently of insulin resistance, adiposity and metabolic syndrome through unclear mechanisms. Dietary fat consumption and lipoperoxidative stress predispose to diabetes in the general population and to liver injury in NASH. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) polymorphism modulates lipoprotein metabolism in the general population and liver disease in NASH; a functional MTP polymorphism recently predicted incident diabetes independently of insulin resistance in the general population. We simultaneously assessed the impact of MTP polymorphism, diet, adipokines and lipoprotein metabolism, on glucose homeostasis in NASH. MTP -493G/T polymorphism, dietary habits, adipokines and postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) responses to an oral fat load, were cross-sectionally correlated to oral glucose tolerance test- and frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test-derived Minimal Model indexes of glucose homeostasis in 40 nondiabetic normolipidemic patients with NASH and 40 age-,sex- and body mass index-matched healthy controls. Despite comparable insulin resistance, fasting lipids, adipokines and dietary habits, MTP GG genotype had significantly more severe beta-cell dysfunction; higher plasma Tg, FFA, intestinal and hepatic very low-density lipoprotein 1 subfractions and oxLDL responses and deeper HDL-C fall than GT/TT carriers in patients and controls. Postprandial HDL-C and oxLDL responses independently predicted beta-cell dysfunction and mediated the effect of MTP polymorphism on beta-cell function. In nondiabetic normolipidemic NASH, MTP -493G/T polymorphism modulates beta-cell function, an effect mediated by postprandial HDL-C and oxLDL metabolism. The impact of this polymorphism on the risk of diabetes and the efficacy of lipid-lowering therapies in restoring beta-cell function in NASH

  16. Slit2 involvement in glioma cell migration is mediated by Robo1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsch, Sonja; Schmitz, Nicole; Jeibmann, Astrid; Geng, Jian-Guo; Paulus, Werner; Senner, Volker

    2008-03-01

    Slit and Robo proteins are evolutionarily conserved molecules whose interaction underlies axon guidance and neuronal precursor cell migration. During development secreted Slit proteins mediate chemorepulsive signals on cells expressing Robo receptors. Because similar molecular mechanisms may be utilized in glioma cell invasion and neuroblast migration, we studied the expression of Slit2 and its transmembrane receptor Robo1 as well as their functional role in migration in glioma cells. qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry of human specimens revealed that Slit2 was distinctly expressed by non-neoplastic neurons, but at only very low levels in fibrillary astrocytoma and glioblastoma. Robo1 also was mainly restricted to neurons in the normal brain, whereas astrocytic tumor cells in situ as well as glioblastoma cell lines overexpressed Robo1 at mRNA and protein levels. Recombinant human Slit2 in a concentration of 0.45 nM was repulsive for glioma cell lines in a modified Boyden chamber assay. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Robo1 in glioma cell lines neutralized the repulsive effect of Slit2, demonstrating that Robo1 served as the major Slit2 receptor. Our findings suggest that a chemorepulsive effect mediated by interaction of Slit2 and Robo1 participates in glioma cell guidance in the brain.

  17. Effect of disodium cromoglycate on mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hye-Young; Kim, Jung-Sook; An, Nyeon-Hyoung; Park, Rae-Kil; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-04-23

    We investigated the effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on mast cell-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity. DSCG inhibited systemic allergic reaction induced by compound 48/80 dose-dependently. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis was inhibited by 71.6% by oral administration of DSCG (1 g/kg). When DSCG was pretreated at concentration rang from 0.01-1000 g/kg, the serum histamine levels were reduced in a dose dependent manner. DSCG also significantly inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cell (RPMC) by compound 48/80. We confirmed that DSCG inhibited compound 48/80-induced degranulation of RPMC by alcian blue/nuclear fast red staining. In addition, DSCG showed a significant inhibitory effect on anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-mediated tumor necrosis factor-alpha production. These results indicate that DSCG inhibits mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reaction.

  18. Towards Future T Cell-Mediated Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi H. O. Nguyen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAVs infections impact significantly on global health, being particularly problematic in children, the elderly, pregnant women, indigenous populations and people with co-morbidities. Antibody-based vaccines require annual administration to combat rapidly acquired mutations modifying the surface haemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA glycoproteins. Conversely, influenza-specific CD8+ T cell responses directed at peptides derived from the more conserved internal virus proteins are known to be protective, suggesting that T cell-based vaccines may provide long-lasting cross-protection. This review outlines the importance of CD8+ T cell immunity to seasonal influenza and pandemic IAVs and summarises current vaccination strategies for inducing durable CD8+ T cell memory. Aspects of future IAV vaccine design and the use of live virus challenge in humans to establish proof of principle are also discussed.