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Sample records for cell mediated tolerance

  1. Transplantation tolerance mediated by regulatory T cells in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯宁翰; 吴宏飞; 吴军; 张炜; 眭元庚; 贺厚光; 张春雷; 郑峻松

    2004-01-01

    Background With potent suppressive effect on responder T cells, CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells have become the focus of attention only recently and they may play an important role in transplantation tolerance. However, the mechanism of action is not clear. This study was designed to assess the possibility of using CD4+CD25+ Treg cells to induce transplantation tolerance and to investigate their mechanism of action.Methods CD4+CD25+ Treg cells were isolated using magnetic cell separation techniques. Mixed lymphocyte reactions were used to assess the ability of Treg cells to suppress effector T cells. Before skin transplantation, various numbers of CD4+CD25+Treg cells, which have been induced using complex skin antigens from the donor, were injected into the host mice either intraperitoneally (0.5×105, 1×105, 2×105, 3×105, 4×105, or 5×105) or by injection through the tail vein (5×103, 1×104, 2×104, 5×104, 1×105, 2×105). Skin grafts from two different donor types were used to assess whether the induced Treg cells were antigen-specific. The survival time of the allografts were observed. Single photon emission computed tomography was also used to determine the distribution of Treg cells before and after transplantation.Results Treg cells have suppressive effect on mixed lymphocyte reactions. Grafts survived longer in mice receiving CD4+CD25+ Treg cell injections than in control mice. There was a significant difference between groups receiving intraperitoneal injection of either 2×105 or 3×105 CD4+CD25+Treg cells and the control group (P<0.05, respectively). Better results were achieved when Treg cells were injected via the tail vein than when injected intraperitoneally. The transplantation tolerance induced by CD4+CD25+ Treg cells was donor-specific. Analysis of the localization of Treg cells revealed that Treg cells mainly migrated from the liver to the allografts and the spleen.Conclusions CD4+CD25+Treg cells can induce donor

  2. Cutting edge: Human regulatory T cells require IL-35 to mediate suppression and infectious tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Vandana; Collison, Lauren W; Guy, Clifford S; Workman, Creg J; Vignali, Dario A A

    2011-06-15

    Human regulatory T cells (T(reg)) are essential for the maintenance of immune tolerance. However, the mechanisms they use to mediate suppression remain controversial. Although IL-35 has been shown to play an important role in T(reg)-mediated suppression in mice, recent studies have questioned its relevance in human T(reg). In this study, we show that human T(reg) express and require IL-35 for maximal suppressive capacity. Substantial upregulation of EBI3 and IL12A, but not IL10 and TGFB, was observed in activated human T(reg) compared with conventional T cells (T(conv)). Contact-independent T(reg)-mediated suppression was IL-35 dependent and did not require IL-10 or TGF-β. Lastly, human T(reg)-mediated suppression led to the conversion of the suppressed T(conv) into iTr35 cells, an IL-35-induced T(reg) population, in an IL-35-dependent manner. Thus, IL-35 contributes to human T(reg)-mediated suppression, and its conversion of suppressed target T(conv) into IL-35-induced T(reg) may contribute to infectious tolerance.

  3. Antibody-targeting of steady state dendritic cells induces tolerance mediated by regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten eMahnke

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are often defined as pivotal inducers of immunity, but these proinflammatory properties only develop after stimulation or ex vivo manipulation of DCs. Under non-inflammatory conditions in vivo, DCs are embedded into a tissue environment and encounter a plethora of self-antigens derived from apoptotic material. This material is transported to secondary lymphoid organs. As DCs maintain their non-activated phenotype in a sterile tissue environment, interaction with T cells will induce rather regulatory T cells (Treg than effector T cells. Thus, DCs are not only inducers of immunity but are also critical for maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Therapeutical intervention for the induction of long lasting tolerance in several autoimmune conditions may therefore be possible by manipulating DC activation and/or targeting of DCs in their natural tissue environment.

  4. Cell Therapy for Prophylactic Tolerance in Immunoglobulin E-mediated Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Baranyi

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion: This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that allergen-specific immunological tolerance preventing occurrence of allergy can be established through a cell-based therapy employing allergen-expressing leukocytes.

  5. Endopeptidase-Mediated Beta Lactam Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Dörr, Tobias; Davis, Brigid M.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    In many bacteria, inhibition of cell wall synthesis leads to cell death and lysis. The pathways and enzymes that mediate cell lysis after exposure to cell wall-acting antibiotics (e.g. beta lactams) are incompletely understood, but the activities of enzymes that degrade the cell wall (‘autolysins’) are thought to be critical. Here, we report that Vibrio cholerae, the cholera pathogen, is tolerant to antibiotics targeting cell wall synthesis. In response to a wide variety of cell wall- acting ...

  6. TSCOT+ thymic epithelial cell-mediated sensitive CD4 tolerance by direct presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejin Ahn

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Although much effort has been directed at dissecting the mechanisms of central tolerance, the role of thymic stromal cells remains elusive. In order to further characterize this event, we developed a mouse model restricting LacZ to thymic stromal cotransporter (TSCOT-expressing thymic stromal cells (TDLacZ. The thymus of this mouse contains approximately 4,300 TSCOT+ cells, each expressing several thousand molecules of the LacZ antigen. TSCOT+ cells express the cortical marker CDR1, CD40, CD80, CD54, and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII. When examining endogenous responses directed against LacZ, we observed significant tolerance. This was evidenced in a diverse T cell repertoire as measured by both a CD4 T cell proliferation assay and an antigen-specific antibody isotype analysis. This tolerance process was at least partially independent of Autoimmune Regulatory Element gene expression. When TDLacZ mice were crossed to a novel CD4 T cell receptor (TCR transgenic reactive against LacZ (BgII, there was a complete deletion of double-positive thymocytes. Fetal thymic reaggregate culture of CD45- and UEA-depleted thymic stromal cells from TDLacZ and sorted TCR-bearing thymocytes excluded the possibility of cross presentation by thymic dendritic cells and medullary epithelial cells for the deletion. Overall, these results demonstrate that the introduction of a neoantigen into TSCOT-expressing cells can efficiently establish complete tolerance and suggest a possible application for the deletion of antigen-specific T cells by antigen introduction into TSCOT+ cells.

  7. Tolerance to the Intestinal Microbiota Mediated by ROR(γt)(+) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnmacht, Caspar

    2016-07-01

    Harmless microbes colonizing the gut require the establishment of a well-equilibrated symbiosis between this microbiota and its host. However, the immune system is primed to recognize both conserved microbial patterns and foreign antigens, and therefore developed strong tolerance mechanisms to prevent potential fatal immune reactivity to symbiotic microbes. The transcription factor RAR-related orphan-like γt [ROR(γt); encoded by Rorc] plays a key role in the gut for lymphoid tissue organogenesis, development of innate lymphoid cells type 3 (ILC3s) and proinflammatory type 17 T helper (Th17) cells. Surprisingly, recent research has revealed a contribution of ROR(γt)-expressing cells in a variety of tolerance mechanisms in both the innate and adaptive immune system. PMID:27255270

  8. Regulation of reactive oxygen species-mediated abscisic acid signaling in guard cells and drought tolerance by glutathione

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintaro eMunemasa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA induces stomatal closure in response to drought stress, leading to reduction of transpirational water loss. A thiol tripeptide glutathione (GSH is an important regulator of cellular redox homeostasis in plants. Although it has been shown that cellular redox state of guard cells controls ABA-mediated stomatal closure, roles of GSH in guard cell ABA signaling were largely unknown. Recently we demonstrated that GSH functions as a negative regulator of ABA signaling in guard cells. In this study we performed more detailed analyses to reveal how GSH regulates guard cell ABA signaling using the GSH-deficient Arabidopsis mutant cad2-1. The cad2-1 mutant exhibited reduced water loss from rosette leaves. Whole-cell current recording using patch clamp technique revealed that the cad2-1 mutation did not affect ABA regulation of S-type anion channels. We found enhanced activation of Ca2+ permeable channels by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in cad2-1 guard cells. The cad2-1 mutant showed enhanced H2O2-induced stomatal closure and significant increase of ROS accumulation in whole leaves in response to ABA. Our findings provide a new understanding of guard cell ABA signaling and a new strategy to improve plant drought tolerance.

  9. RSK2-induced stress tolerance enhances cell survival signals mediated by inhibition of GSK3β activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Cheol-Jung; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Lee, Ji-Young; Song, Ji Hong; Lee, Hye Suk; Cho, Yong-Yeon, E-mail: yongyeon@catholic.ac.kr

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •We demonstrated a novel function of RSK2 in stress tolerance. •RSK2 deficiency enhanced apoptosis by calcium stress. •RSK2-mediated GSK3β phosphorylation at serine 9 increased calcium-induced stress tolerance. •Calcium stress-induced apoptosis inhibited by adding back of RSK2 into RSK2{sup −/−} MEFs. -- Abstract: Our previous studies demonstrated that RSK2 plays a key role in cell proliferation and transformation induced by tumor promoters such as epidermal growth factor (EGF) in mouse and human skin cells. However, no direct evidence has been found regarding the relationship of RSK2 and cell survival. In this study, we found that RSK2 interacted and phosphorylated GSK3β at Ser9. Notably, GSK3β phosphorylation at Ser9 was suppressed in RSK2{sup −/−} MEFs compared with RSK2{sup +/+} MEFs by stimulation of EGF and calcium ionophore A23187, a cellular calcium stressor. In proliferation, we found that RSK2 deficiency suppressed cell proliferation compared with RSK2{sup +/+} MEFs. In contrast, GSK3β{sup −/−} MEFs induced the cell proliferation compared with GSK3β{sup +/+} MEFs. Importantly, RSK2{sup −/−} MEFs were induced severe cellular morphology change by A23187 and enhanced G1/G0 and sub-G1 accumulation of the cell cycle phase compared with RSK2{sup +/+} MEFs. The sub-G1 induction in RSK2{sup −/−} MEFs by A23187 was correlated with increase of cytochrome c release, caspase-3 cleavage and apoptotic DNA fragmentation compared with RSK2{sup +/+} MEFs. Notably, return back of RSK2 into RSK2{sup −/−} MEFs restored A23187-induced morphological change, and decreased apoptosis, apoptotic DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 induction compared with RSK2{sup −/−}/mock MEFs. Taken together, our results demonstrated that RSK2 plays an important role in stress-tolerance and cell survival, resulting in cell proliferation and cancer development.

  10. TIM-4, expressed by medullary macrophages, regulates respiratory tolerance by mediating phagocytosis of antigen-specific T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Albacker, Lee A; Yu, Sanhong; Bedoret, Denis; Lee, Wan-Ling; Umetsu, Sarah E.; Monahan, Sheena; Freeman, Gordon J.; Umetsu, Dale T.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory exposure to antigen induces T cell tolerance via several overlapping mechanisms that limit the immune response. While the mechanisms involved in the development of Treg cells have received much attention, those that result in T cell deletion are largely unknown. Herein, we show that F4/80+ lymph node medullary macrophages expressing TIM-4, a phosphatidylserine receptor, remove antigen-specific T cells during respiratory tolerance, thereby reducing secondary T cell responses. Block...

  11. The E3 ubiquitin ligase GRAIL regulates T cell tolerance and regulatory T cell function by mediating T cell receptor-CD3 degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Nurieva, Roza I.; Zheng, Shuling; Jin, Wei; Chung, Yeonseok; Zhang, Yongliang; Martinez, Gustavo J.; Reynolds, Joseph M.; Wang, Sung-Ling; Lin, Xin; Sun, Shao-Cong; Lozano, Guillermina; Dong, Chen

    2010-01-01

    T cell activation is tightly regulated to avoid autoimmunity. Gene related to anergy in lymphocytes (GRAIL, encoded by Rnf128) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase associated with T cell tolerance. Here we generated and analyzed GRAIL-deficient mice and found they were resistant to immune tolerance induction and exhibited greater susceptibility to autoimmune diseases than wild-type mice. GRAIL-deficient naïve T cells, after activation, exhibited increased proliferation and cytokine expression than contr...

  12. Two small (p)ppGpp synthases in Staphylococcus aureus mediate tolerance against cell envelope stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Tobias; Kästle, Benjamin; Gratani, Fabio Lino; Goerke, Christiane; Wolz, Christiane

    2014-02-01

    The stringent response is a conserved global regulatory mechanism that is related to the synthesis of (p)ppGpp nucleotides. Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, possess three (p)ppGpp synthases: the bifunctional RSH (RelA/SpoT homolog) protein, which consists of a (p)ppGpp synthase and a (p)ppGpp hydrolase domain, and two truncated (p)ppGpp synthases, designated RelP and RelQ. Here, we characterized these two small (p)ppGpp synthases. Biochemical analyses of purified proteins and in vivo studies revealed a stronger synthetic activity for RelP than for RelQ. However, both enzymes prefer GDP over GTP as the pyrophosphate recipient to synthesize ppGpp. Each of the enzymes was shown to be responsible for the essentiality of the (p)ppGpp hydrolase domain of the RSH protein. The staphylococcal RSH-hydrolase is an efficient enzyme that prevents the toxic accumulation of (p)ppGpp. Expression of (p)ppGpp synthases in a hydrolase-negative background leads not only to growth arrest but also to cell death. Transcriptional analyses showed that relP and relQ are strongly induced upon vancomycin and ampicillin treatments. Accordingly, mutants lacking relP and relQ showed a significantly reduced survival rate upon treatments with cell wall-active antibiotics. Thus, RelP and RelQ are active (p)ppGpp synthases in S. aureus that are induced under cell envelope stress to mediate tolerance against these conditions.

  13. Mast cell degranulation breaks peripheral tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    De Vries, V. C.; Wasiuk, A.; Bennett, K A; Benson, M. J.; Elgueta, R.; Waldschmidt, T. J.; Noelle, R J

    2009-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) have been shown to mediate regulatory T-cell (T(reg))-dependent, peripheral allograft tolerance in both skin and cardiac transplants. Furthermore, T(reg) have been implicated in mitigating IgE-mediated MC degranulation, establishing a dynamic, reciprocal relationship between MC and T(reg) in controlling inflammation. In an allograft tolerance model, it is now shown that intragraft or systemic MC degranulation results in the transient loss of T(reg) suppressor activities with t...

  14. Th17 Responses in Chronic Allergic Airway Inflammation Abrogate Regulatory T cell-mediated Tolerance and Contribute to Airway Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jingyue; Lloyd, Clare M.; Noble, Alistair

    2012-01-01

    The role of Th17 responses in airway remodeling in asthma is currently unknown. We demonstrate that both parenteral and mucosal allergen sensitization followed by allergen inhalation leads to Th17-biased lung immune responses. Unlike Th17 cells generated in vitro, lung Th17 cells did not produce TNF-α or IL-22. Eosinophilia predominated in acute inflammation while neutrophilia and IL-17 increased in chronic disease. Allergen-induced tolerance involved Foxp3, Helios and GARP expressing regulat...

  15. Tolerance of Mice to Lipopolysaccharide is Correlated with Inhibition of Caspase-3-mediated Apoptosis in Mouse Liver Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie LUAN; Bingrong ZHOU; Hui DING; Zhongtian QI

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) often results in multiple organ failure. However,pre-exposure of mice to a sublethal dose of LPS renders the animal tolerant to a lethal dose of LPS. This study was designed to determine whether pre-exposure of a small dose of LPS was able to suppress apoptosis in mice when challenged with LPS in combination with D-galactosamine, and to investigate the expression changes of the apoptosis-associated molecules. The results showed that a characteristic apoptotic DNA fragmentation existed in mouse livers of the LPS-naive group, but not in control groups; and the mice of the LPS-naive group were all dead after 2 d. However, in the LPS-tolerance groups, both the lethal rate and apoptotic DNA fragmentation were suppressed after the mice were challenged with LPS/D-galactosamine,and the protection against the lethality and apoptotic reaction could be maintained for up to 7 d. In this period, significantly lower levels of caspase-3 and its mRNA appeared in LPS-tolerant groups compared to those of the LPS-naive group (P<0.05), and the caspase-3 activities gradually recovered as the observation was prolonged. Our findings suggest that LPS tolerance could suppress apoptosis in mouse liver cells, and the expression and activity of caspase-3 could be down-regulated.

  16. Limitation of immune tolerance-inducing thymic epithelial cell development by Spi-B-mediated negative feedback regulation.

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    Akiyama, Nobuko; Shinzawa, Miho; Miyauchi, Maki; Yanai, Hiromi; Tateishi, Ryosuke; Shimo, Yusuke; Ohshima, Daisuke; Matsuo, Koichi; Sasaki, Izumi; Hoshino, Katsuaki; Wu, Guoying; Yagi, Shintaro; Inoue, Jun-ichiro; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Akiyama, Taishin

    2014-11-17

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) expressing the autoimmune regulator AIRE and various tissue-specific antigens (TSAs) are critical for preventing the onset of autoimmunity and may attenuate tumor immunity. However, molecular mechanisms controlling mTEC development remain elusive. Here, we describe the roles of the transcription factor Spi-B in mTEC development. Spi-B is rapidly up-regulated by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) cytokine signaling, which triggers mTEC differentiation, and in turn up-regulates CD80, CD86, some TSAs, and the natural inhibitor of RANKL signaling, osteoprotegerin (OPG). Spi-B-mediated OPG expression limits mTEC development in neonates but not in embryos, suggesting developmental stage-specific negative feedback regulation. OPG-mediated negative regulation attenuates cellularity of thymic regulatory T cells and tumor development in vivo. Hence, these data suggest that this negative RANKL-Spi-B-OPG feedback mechanism finely tunes mTEC development and function and may optimize the trade-off between prevention of autoimmunity and induction of antitumor immunity.

  17. Autophagy mediates tolerance to Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Katie; Reyes-Robles, Tamara; Alonzo, Francis; Durbin, Joan; Torres, Victor J; Cadwell, Ken

    2015-04-01

    Resistance and tolerance are two defense strategies employed by the host against microbial threats. Autophagy-mediated degradation of bacteria has been extensively described as a major resistance mechanism. Here we find that the dominant function of autophagy proteins during infections with the epidemic community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 is to mediate tolerance rather than resistance. Atg16L1 hypomorphic mice (Atg16L1(HM)), which have reduced autophagy, were highly susceptible to lethality in both sepsis and pneumonia models of USA300 infection. Autophagy confers protection by limiting the damage caused by α-toxin, particularly to endothelial cells. Remarkably, Atg16L1(HM) mice display enhanced survival rather than susceptibility upon infection with α-toxin-deficient S. aureus. These results identify an essential role for autophagy in tolerance to Staphylococcal disease and highlight how a single virulence factor encoded by a pathogen can determine whether a given host factor promotes tolerance or resistance.

  18. CD4 T Cell Tolerance to Human C-reactive Protein, an Inducible Serum Protein, Is Mediated by Medullary Thymic Epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Ludger; Klein, Thomas; Rüther, Ulrich; Kyewski, Bruno

    1998-01-01

    Inducible serum proteins whose concentrations oscillate between nontolerogenic and tolerogenic levels pose a particular challenge to the maintenance of self-tolerance. Temporal restrictions of intrathymic antigen supply should prevent continuous central tolerization of T cells, in analogy to the spatial limitation imposed by tissue-restricted antigen expression. Major acute-phase proteins such as human C-reactive protein (hCRP) are typical examples for such inducible self-antigens. The circul...

  19. Airway epithelial cell tolerance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verghese Margrith W

    2005-04-01

    activity. Conclusion The airway epithelial cell response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa entails adaptation and tolerance likely mediated, in part, by down-regulation of IRAK1.

  20. Tolerization with BLP down-regulates HMGB1 a critical mediator of sepsis-related lethality.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coffey, J Calvin

    2012-02-03

    Tolerization with bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) affords a significant survival benefit in sepsis. Given that high mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB1) is a recognized mediator of sepsis-related lethality, we determined if tolerization with BLP leads to alterations in HMGB1. In vitro, BLP tolerization led to a reduction in HMGB1 gene transcription. This was mirrored at the protein level, as HMGB1 protein expression and release were reduced significantly in BLP-tolerized human THP-1 monocytic cells. BLP tolerance in vivo led to a highly significant, long-term survival benefit following challenge with lethal dose BLP in C57BL\\/6 mice. This was associated with an attenuation of HMGB1 release into the circulation, as evidenced by negligible serum HMGB1 levels in BLP-tolerized mice. Moreover, HMGB1 levels in peritoneal macrophages from BLP-tolerized mice were reduced significantly. Hence, tolerization with BLP leads to a down-regulation of HMGB1 protein synthesis and release. The improved survival associated with BLP tolerance could thus be explained by a reduction in HMGB1, were the latter associated with lethality in BLP-related sepsis. In testing this hypothesis, it was noted that neutralization of HMGB1, using anti-HMGB1 antibodies, abrogated BLP-associated lethality almost completely. To conclude, tolerization with BLP leads to a down-regulation of HMGB1, thus offering a novel means of targeting the latter. HMGB1 is also a mediator of lethality in BLP-related sepsis.

  1. Possible new roles for tolerable risk mediators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In his report on the Sizewell B Inquiry, the Inspector, Sir Frank Layfield, Q.C. introduced the term ''tolerable risk''. He regarded this as a better concept than the much abused and mis-interpreted phrase ''acceptable risk''. The application of tolerable risk implies that, even after regulation and incorporation of appropriate design safety criteria, there will always be a residual risk over which elements of the public will remain uneasy. They may tolerate, but they do not accept. They only tolerate because they have come to trust the process by which safety is assessed and delivered. This interpretation also implies that no safety target, the central theme of this meeting, should ever be regarded as stable or final. Such targets should continually be argued about and subject to regular searching review. Above all, such targets need to be re-justified to a doubting public so that they can be assured that the safety delivery process, namely the principles and management methods to ensure safety levels are actually met, is accountable and open for them to inspect. Thus the ''tolerable zone'' of nuclear plant safety is the product of procedures not simply assessments. These procedures need to be robust and adaptable. They need to be able to incorporate diversity of viewpoints and have a capacity to enable all who are involved to learn from each other's viewpoints and experience. In short the safety determination process needs to be more participatory and creative. (author)

  2. Anti-CD154 mAb and rapamycin induce T regulatory cell mediated tolerance in rat-to-mouse islet transplantation.

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    Yannick D Muller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anti-CD154 (MR1 monoclonal antibody (mAb and rapamycin (RAPA treatment both improve survival of rat-to-mouse islet xenograft. The present study investigated the effect of combined RAPA/MR1 treatment on rat-to-mouse islet xenograft survival and analyzed the role of CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ T regulatory cells (Treg in the induction and maintenance of the ensuing tolerance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: C57BL/6 mice were treated with MR1/RAPA and received additional monoclonal anti-IL2 mAb or anti CD25 mAb either early (0-28 d or late (100-128 d post-transplantation. Treg were characterised in the blood, spleen, draining lymph nodes and within the graft of tolerant and rejecting mice by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Fourteen days of RAPA/MR1 combination therapy allowed indefinite islet graft survival in >80% of the mice. Additional administration of anti-IL-2 mAb or depleting anti-CD25 mAb at the time of transplantation resulted in rejection (100% and 89% respectively, whereas administration at 100 days post transplantation lead to lower rejection rates (25% and 40% respectively. Tolerant mice showed an increase of Treg within the graft and in draining lymph nodes early post transplantation, whereas 100 days post transplantation no significant increase of Treg was observed. Rejecting mice showed a transient increase of Treg in the xenograft and secondary lymphoid organs, which disappeared within 7 days after rejection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCES: These results suggest a critical role for Treg in the induction phase of tolerance early after islet xenotransplantation. These encouraging data support the need of developing further Treg therapy for overcoming the species barrier in xenotransplantation.

  3. Novel process of intrathymic tumor-immune tolerance through CCR2-mediated recruitment of Sirpα+ dendritic cells: a murine model.

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    Tomohisa Baba

    Full Text Available Immune surveillance system can detect more efficiently secretory tumor-specific antigens, which are superior as a target for cancer immunotherapy. On the contrary, immune tolerance can be induced in the thymus when a tumor antigen is massively secreted into circulation. Thus, the secretion of tumor-specific antigen may have contradictory roles in tumor immunity in a context-dependent manner. However, it remains elusive on the precise cellular mechanism of intrathymic immune tolerance against tumor antigens. We previously demonstrated that a minor thymic conventional dendritic cell (cDC subset, CD8α(-Sirpα(+ cDCs, but not the major subset, CD8α(+Sirpα(- cDCs can selectively capture blood-borne antigens and crucially contribute to the self-tolerance. In the present study, we further demonstrated that Sirpα(+ cDCs can capture a blood-borne antigen leaking inside the interlobular vascular-rich regions (IVRs. Blood-borne antigen selectively captured by Sirpα(+ cDCs can induce antigen-specific Treg generation or negative selection, depending on the immunogenicity of the presented antigen. Furthermore, CCR2 expression by thymic Sirpα(+ cDCs and abundant expression of its ligands, particularly, CCL2 by tumor-bearing mice prompted us to examine the function of thymic Sirpα(+ cDCs in tumor-bearing mice. Interestingly, tumor-bearing mice deposited CCL2 inside IVRs in the thymus. Moreover, tumor formation induced the accumulation of Sirpα(+ cDCs in IVRs under the control of CCR2-CCL2 axis and enhanced their capacity to take up antigens, resulting in the shift from Treg differentiation to negative selection. Finally, intrathymic negative selection similarly ensued in CCR2-competent mice once the tumor-specific antigen was secreted into bloodstream. Thus, we demonstrated that thymic Sirpα(+ cDCs crucially contribute to this novel process of intrathymic tumor immune tolerance.

  4. Dendritic cells in peripheral tolerance and immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells capable of influencing immunity exist as functionally distinct subsets, T cell-tolerizing and T cell-immunizing subsets. The present paper reviews how these subsets of DCs develop, differentiate and function in vivo and in vitro at the cellular and molecular level. In particular, ...

  5. Studying mast cells in peripheral tolerance by using a skin transplantation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Victor C; Le Mercier, Isabelle; Nowak, Elizabeth C; Noelle, Randolph J

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) play an important role in both inflammatory and immunosuppressive responses [1]. The importance of MCs in maintaining peripheral tolerance was discovered in a FoxP3(+) regulatory T-cell (Treg)-mediated skin transplant model [2]. MCs can directly mediate tolerance by releasing anti-inflammatory mediators (reviewed in ref. 3) or by interacting with other immune cells in the graft. Here we will present protocols used to study the role of MCs in peripheral tolerance with the emphasis on how MCs can regulate T-cell functionality. First we will introduce the skin transplant model followed by reconstitution of mast cell-deficient mice (B6.Cg-Kit (W-sh) ). This includes the preparation of MCs from the bone marrow. Finally the methods used to study the influence of MCs on T-cell responses and Treg functionality will be presented by modulating the balance between tolerance and inflammation. PMID:25388268

  6. How some T cells escape tolerance induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, G; Sercarz, E

    1989-11-01

    A feature common to many animal models of autoimmune disease, for example, experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis and collagen-induced arthritis, is the presence of self-reactive T cells in healthy animals, which are activated to produce disease by immunization with exogenous antigen. It is unclear why these T cells are not deleted during ontogeny in the thymus and, having escaped tolerance induction, why they are not spontaneously activated by self-antigen. To investigate these questions, we have examined an experimental model in which mice are tolerant to an antigen despite the presence of antigen-reactive T cells. We find that the T cells that escape tolerance induction are specific for minor determinants on the antigen. We propose that these T cells evade tolerance induction because some minor determinants are only available in relatively low amounts after in vivo processing of the whole antigen. For the same reason, these T cells are not normally activated but can be stimulated under special circumstances to circumvent tolerance. PMID:2478888

  7. Creation of the herbicide tolerant rice plants via T-DNA mediated gene targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise modification of the plant genome is important both for the study of gene function in vivo and for producing publicly acceptable transgenic plants. Thus establishment of an efficient gene targeting (GT) system in plant is a significant goal. Here, we report a successful introduction of point mutations into an endogenous rice gene by T-DNA mediated GT. ALS is the primary target for at least four structurally distinct classes of herbicides. Recently, Shimizu et al. screened an ALS-inhibiting herbicide, bispyribac-sodium (BS) tolerant rice cells. BS tolerance was linked to two point mutations in ALS gene: a tryptophan (TGG) to leucine (TTG) change at amino acid 548 (W548L), and serine (AGT) to isoleucine (ATT) change at amino acide 627 (S627I). However, no plants could be recovered from the BS-tolerant rice cells due to prolonged tissue culture. Then we tried to produce BS tolerant rice plants containing these double mutations in ALS by T-DNA mediated GT. We obtained 70 GT plants from 1500 rice scutellum-derived calli infected with Agrobacterium horboring GT vector. GT rice homozygous for the modified ALS locus showed hyper tolerance to BS as compared to BS tolerant plants, which overexpressed W548L/S627I mutating ALS produced by a conventional transgenic system. This result indicates that exclusion of the BS sensitive wild-type ALS allele is important to confer high levels of BS tolerance. Not only selectable two point mutations, which confer BS tolerance but also non-selectable silent mutations on the targeting vector were incorporated into the GT plants. This result indicates that T-DNA mediated GT system is available for introduction of several point mutations to the target gene. Furthermore, point mutations on the targeting vector were incorporated into the genome with a mosaic manner in 3 plants out of 70 GT plants, suggesting the involvement of DNA mismatch repair system in the course of T-DNA mediated GT in these plants. (author)

  8. Thymic CCL2 influences induction of T-cell tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cédile, O; Løbner, M; Toft-Hansen, H;

    2014-01-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TEC) and dendritic cells (DC) play a role in T cell development by controlling the selection of the T cell receptor repertoire. DC have been described to take up antigens in the periphery and migrate into the thymus where they mediate tolerance via deletion of autoreactive...... T cells, or by induction of natural regulatory T cells. Migration of DC to thymus is driven by chemokine receptors. CCL2, a major ligand for the chemokine receptor CCR2, is an inflammation-associated chemokine that induces the recruitment of immune cells in tissues. CCL2 and CCR2 are implicated...... in promoting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model for multiple sclerosis. We here show that CCL2 is constitutively expressed by endothelial cells and TEC in the thymus. Transgenic mice overexpressing CCL2 in the thymus showed an increased number of thymic plasmacytoid DC...

  9. Assay of mast cell mediators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rådinger, Madeleine; Jensen, Bettina M; Swindle, Emily;

    2015-01-01

    Mediator release from activated mast cells is a major initiator of the symptomology associated with allergic disorders such as anaphylaxis and asthma. Thus, methods to monitor the generation and release of such mediators have widespread applicability in studies designed to understand the processes...... regulating mast cell activation and for the identification of therapeutic approaches to block mast cell-driven disease. In this chapter, we discuss approaches used for the determination of mast cell degranulation, lipid-derived inflammatory mediator production, and cytokine/chemokine gene expression as well...

  10. Micro-RNA-155-mediated control of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is required for restoring adaptively tolerant CD4+ T-cell function in rodents.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jinyu; Vandevenne, Patricia; Hamdi, Haifa; Van Puyvelde, Merry; Zucchi, Alessandro; Bettonville, Marie; Weatherly, Kathleen; Braun, Michel Y

    2015-01-01

    T cells chronically stimulated by a persistent antigen often become dysfunctional and lose effector functions and proliferative capacity. To identify the importance of micro-RNA-155 (miR-155) in this phenomenon, we analyzed mouse miR-155-deficient CD4(+) T cells in a model where the chronic exposure to a systemic antigen led to T-cell functional unresponsiveness. We found that miR-155 was required for restoring function of T cells after programmed death receptor 1 blockade. Heme oxygenase 1 (...

  11. The enigmatic role of mast cells in dominant tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    de Vries, Victor C.; Pino-Lagos, Karina; Elgueta, Raul; Noelle, Randolph J.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The role of regulatory T cells (Treg) in peripheral tolerance has been studied extensively in transplantation research. Recently, mast cells have been shown to play an indispensable role in allograft tolerance. The purpose of this review is to inform the reader on the current standings of the role of mast cells in dominant tolerance with an emphasis on the interaction of mast cells with Treg.RECENT FINDINGS: Mast cells are required to sustain peripheral tolerance via Treg. ...

  12. [Dendritic cells and interaction with other cell types. Immune tolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerder, S

    2001-07-01

    T cell tolerance to self antigen is mainly established in the thymus were self-reactive T cells are deleted. Interdigitating dendritic cells and medulary epithelial cells are directly involved in the deletion process. Some self-reactive T cells escape, however this thymic censorship and enter the peripheral pool of naive T cells. Multiple mechanisms are also at play in the periphery to control this potentially armfull T cells, this include deletion and immune deviation.

  13. B Cell Tolerance in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Gururajan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available B lymphocyte receptors are generated randomly during the bone marrow developmental phase of B cells. Hence, the B cell repertoire consists of both self and foreign antigen specificities necessitating specific tolerance mechanisms to eliminate self-reactive B cells. This review summarizes the major mechanisms of B cell tolerance, which include clonal deletion, anergy and receptor editing. In the bone marrow presentation of antigen in membrane bound form is more effective than soluble form and the role of dendritic cells in this process is discussed. Toll like receptor derived signals affect activation of B cells by certain ligands such as nucleic acids and have been shown to play crucial roles in the development of autoimmunity in several animal models. In the periphery availability of BAFF, a B cell survival factor plays a critical role in the survival of self-reactive B cells. Antibodies against BAFF have been found to be effective therapeutic agents in lupus like autoimmune diseases. Recent developments are targeting anergy to control the growth of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

  14. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Expression in Human B Cell Precursors Is Essential for Central B Cell Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantaert, Tineke; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Bannock, Jason M; Ng, Yen-Shing; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Wu, Renee; Lavoie, Aubert; Walter, Jolan E; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Ochs, Hans D; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Durandy, Anne; Meffre, Eric

    2015-11-17

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme-mediating class-switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin genes, is essential for the removal of developing autoreactive B cells. How AID mediates central B cell tolerance remains unknown. We report that AID enzymes were produced in a discrete population of immature B cells that expressed recombination-activating gene 2 (RAG2), suggesting that they undergo secondary recombination to edit autoreactive antibodies. However, most AID+ immature B cells lacked anti-apoptotic MCL-1 and were deleted by apoptosis. AID inhibition using lentiviral-encoded short hairpin (sh)RNA in B cells developing in humanized mice resulted in a failure to remove autoreactive clones. Hence, B cell intrinsic AID expression mediates central B cell tolerance potentially through its RAG-coupled genotoxic activity in self-reactive immature B cells.

  15. Verapamil, and Its Metabolite Norverapamil, Inhibit Macrophage-induced, Bacterial Efflux Pump-mediated Tolerance to Multiple Anti-tubercular Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Kristin N.; Szumowski, John D.; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2014-01-01

    Drug tolerance likely represents an important barrier to tuberculosis treatment shortening. We previously implicated the Mycobacterium tuberculosis efflux pump Rv1258c as mediating macrophage-induced tolerance to rifampicin and intracellular growth. In this study, we infected the human macrophage-like cell line THP-1 with drug-sensitive and drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains and found that tolerance developed to most antituberculosis drugs, including the newer agents moxifloxacin, PA-824,...

  16. Mast cells contribute to peripheral tolerance and attenuate autoimmune vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Poh-Yi; Summers, Shaun A; Ooi, Joshua D; O'Sullivan, Kim M; Tan, Diana S Y; Muljadi, Ruth C M; Odobasic, Dragana; Kitching, A Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R

    2012-12-01

    Mast cells contribute to the modulation of the immune response, but their role in autoimmune renal disease is not well understood. Here, we induced autoimmunity resulting in focal necrotizing GN by immunizing wild-type or mast cell-deficient (Kit(W-sh/W-sh)) mice with myeloperoxidase. Mast cell-deficient mice exhibited more antimyeloperoxidase CD4+ T cells, enhanced dermal delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to myeloperoxidase, and more severe focal necrotizing GN. Furthermore, the lymph nodes draining the sites of immunization had fewer Tregs and reduced production of IL-10 in mice lacking mast cells. Reconstituting these mice with mast cells significantly increased the numbers of Tregs in the lymph nodes and attenuated both autoimmunity and severity of disease. After immunization with myeloperoxidase, mast cells migrated from the skin to the lymph nodes to contact Tregs. In an ex vivo assay, mast cells enhanced Treg suppression through IL-10. Reconstitution of mast cell-deficient mice with IL-10-deficient mast cells led to enhanced autoimmunity to myeloperoxidase and greater disease severity compared with reconstitution with IL-10-intact mast cells. Taken together, these studies establish a role for mast cells in mediating peripheral tolerance to myeloperoxidase, protecting them from the development of focal necrotizing GN in ANCA-associated vasculitis. PMID:23138486

  17. CO tolerance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubler, L.; Scherer, G.G.; Wokaun, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Reformed methanol can be used as a fuel for polymer electrolyte fuel cells instead of pure hydrogen. The reformate gas contains mainly H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} in the order of 20% and low levels of CO in the order of 100 ppm. CO causes severe voltage losses due to poisoning of the anode catalyst. The effect of CO on cell performance was investigated at different CO levels up to 100 ppm. Various options to improve the CO tolerance of the fuel cell were assessed thereafter, of which the injection of a few percents of oxygen into the fuel feed stream proved to be most effective. By mixing 1% of oxygen with hydrogen containing 100 ppm CO, complete recovery of the cell performance could be attained. (author) 2 figs., 2 tabs., 3 refs.

  18. Interleukin 35: A Key Mediator of Suppression and the Propagation of Infectious Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian M Olson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The importance of regulatory T cells in balancing the effector arm of the immune system is well documented, playing a central role in preventing autoimmunity, facilitating graft tolerance following organ transplantation, and having a detrimental impact on the development of anti-tumor immunity. These regulatory responses use a variety of mechanisms to mediate suppression, including soluble factors. While IL-10 and TGF-β are the most commonly studied immunosuppressive cytokines, the recently identified IL-35 has been shown to have potent suppressive function in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, not only does IL-35 have the ability to directly suppress effector T cell responses, it is also able to expand regulatory responses by propagating infectious tolerance and generating a potent population of IL-35-expressing inducible regulatory T cells. In this review, we summarize research characterizing the structure and function of IL-35, examine its role in disease, and discuss how it can contribute to the induction of a distinct population of inducible regulatory T cells.

  19. Neuropilin-1 expression is induced on tolerant self-reactive CD8+ T cells but is dispensable for the tolerant phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie R Jackson

    Full Text Available Establishing peripheral CD8(+ T cell tolerance is vital to avoid immune mediated destruction of healthy self-tissues. However, it also poses a major impediment to tumor immunity since tumors are derived from self-tissue and often induce T cell tolerance and dysfunction. Thus, understanding the mechanisms that regulate T cell tolerance versus immunity has important implications for human health. Signals received from the tissue environment largely dictate whether responding T cells become activated or tolerant. For example, induced expression and subsequent ligation of negative regulatory receptors on the surface of self-reactive CD8(+ T cells are integral in the induction of tolerance. We utilized a murine model of T cell tolerance to more completely define the molecules involved in this process. We discovered that, in addition to other known regulatory receptors, tolerant self-reactive CD8(+ T cells distinctly expressed the surface receptor neuropilin-1 (Nrp1. Nrp1 was highly induced in response to self-antigen, but only modestly when the same antigen was encountered under immune conditions, suggesting a possible mechanistic link to T cell tolerance. We also observed a similar Nrp1 expression profile on human tumor infiltrating CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. Despite high expression on tolerant CD8(+ T cells, our studies revealed that Nrp1 had no detectable role in the tolerant phenotype. Specifically, Nrp1-deficient T cells displayed the same functional defects as wild-type self-reactive T cells, lacking in vivo cytolytic potential, IFNγ production, and antitumor responses. While reporting mostly negative data, our findings have therapeutic implications, as Nrp1 is now being targeted for human cancer therapy in clinical trials, but the precise molecular pathways and immune cells being engaged during treatment remain incompletely defined.

  20. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Akihiko Murata; Shin-Ichi Hayashi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of...

  1. Putative mechanisms mediating tolerance for audiovisual stimulus onset asynchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Jyoti; Miller, Lee M; Pitt, Mark A; Shahin, Antoine J

    2015-03-01

    Audiovisual (AV) speech perception is robust to temporal asynchronies between visual and auditory stimuli. We investigated the neural mechanisms that facilitate tolerance for audiovisual stimulus onset asynchrony (AVOA) with EEG. Individuals were presented with AV words that were asynchronous in onsets of voice and mouth movement and judged whether they were synchronous or not. Behaviorally, individuals tolerated (perceived as synchronous) longer AVOAs when mouth movement preceded the speech (V-A) stimuli than when the speech preceded mouth movement (A-V). Neurophysiologically, the P1-N1-P2 auditory evoked potentials (AEPs), time-locked to sound onsets and known to arise in and surrounding the primary auditory cortex (PAC), were smaller for the in-sync than the out-of-sync percepts. Spectral power of oscillatory activity in the beta band (14-30 Hz) following the AEPs was larger during the in-sync than out-of-sync perception for both A-V and V-A conditions. However, alpha power (8-14 Hz), also following AEPs, was larger for the in-sync than out-of-sync percepts only in the V-A condition. These results demonstrate that AVOA tolerance is enhanced by inhibiting low-level auditory activity (e.g., AEPs representing generators in and surrounding PAC) that code for acoustic onsets. By reducing sensitivity to acoustic onsets, visual-to-auditory onset mapping is weakened, allowing for greater AVOA tolerance. In contrast, beta and alpha results suggest the involvement of higher-level neural processes that may code for language cues (phonetic, lexical), selective attention, and binding of AV percepts, allowing for wider neural windows of temporal integration, i.e., greater AVOA tolerance. PMID:25505102

  2. Sialylation regulates peripheral tolerance in CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Patrick J; Saouaf, Sandra J; Van Dyken, Steve; Marth, Jamey D; Li, Bin; Bhandoola, Avinash; Greene, Mark I

    2006-05-01

    Decreased binding by the 6C10 auto-antibody serves as a unique marker for CD4+ T cell unresponsiveness after the induction of T cell tolerance in Vbeta8.1 TCR transgenic mice. We further define the nature of the epitope recognized by the 6C10 antibody to be a subset of Thy-1 bearing incompletely sialylated N-linked glycans, and furthermore, we demonstrate that tolerant CD4+ T cells have an increased degree of cell-surface sialylation. To test the significance of the altered glycosylation state identified by the 6C10 auto-antibody in the tolerant CD4+ T cell population, surface sialic acid was cleaved enzymatically. Treatment of purified peripheral CD4+ T cells with Vibrio cholerae sialidase (VCS) leads to increased 6C10 binding, significantly enhances proliferation in the tolerant CD4+ population and corrects defects in phosphotyrosine signaling observed in the tolerant CD4+ T cell. Furthermore, in vivo administration of VCS enhances proliferation in both tolerant and naive CD4+ T cell subsets. These studies suggest that sialylation of glycoproteins on the surface of the CD4+ T cell contributes to the regulation of T cell responsiveness in the tolerant state. PMID:16291658

  3. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis-mediated tomato tolerance to drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitarra, Walter; Maserti, Biancaelena; Gambino, Giorgio; Guerrieri, Emilio; Balestrini, Raffaella

    2016-07-01

    A multidisciplinary approach, involving eco-physiological, morphometric, biochemical and molecular analyses, has been used to study the impact of two different AM fungi, i.e. Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus intraradices, on tomato response to water stress. Overall, results show that AM symbiosis positively affects the tolerance to drought in tomato with a different plant response depending on the involved AM fungal species. PMID:27359066

  4. Specific Osmolyte Transporters Mediate Bile Tolerance in Listeria monocytogenes▿

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Debbie; Sleator, Roy D.; Casey, Pat G.; Hill, Colin; Gahan, Cormac G. M.

    2009-01-01

    The food-borne pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes has the potential to adapt to an array of suboptimal growth environments encountered within the host. The pathogen is relatively bile tolerant and has the capacity to survive and grow within both the small intestine and the gallbladder in murine models of oral infection. We have previously demonstrated a role for the principal carnitine transport system of L. monocytogenes (OpuC) in gastrointestinal survival of the pathogen (R. Sleato...

  5. Polyphosphate Kinase Mediates Antibiotic Tolerance in Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli PCN033.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Su, Lijie; Wang, Xiangru; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Feng; Chen, Huanchun; Tan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) causes a variety of acute infections in its hosts, and multidrug-resistant strains present significant challenges to public health and animal husbandry. Therefore, it is necessary to explore new drug targets to control E. coli epidemics. Previous studies have reported that ppk mutants of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Mycobacterium tuberculosis are more susceptible than the wild types (WTs) to stress. Therefore, we investigated the stress response to antibiotics mediated by polyphosphate kinase (PPK) in ExPEC strain PCN033. We observed that planktonic cells of a ppk knockout strain (Δppk) were more susceptible to antibiotics than was WT. However, biofilm-grown Δppk cells showed similar susceptibility to that of the WT and were more tolerant than the planktonic cells. During the planktonic lifestyle, the expression of genes involved in antibiotic tolerance (including resistance-conferring genes, and antibiotic influx, and efflux genes) did not change in the Δppk mutant without antibiotic treatment. However, the resistance-conferring gene bla and efflux genes were upregulated more in the WT than in the Δppk mutant by treatment with tazobactam. After treatment with gentamycin, the efflux genes and influx genes were upregulated and downregulated, respectively, more in the WT than in the Δppk mutant. The expression of genes involved in biofilm regulation also changed after treatment with tazobactam or gentamycin, and which is consistent with the results of the biofilm formation. Together, these observations indicate that PPK is important for the antibiotic stress response during the planktonic growth of ExPEC and might be a potential drug target in bacteria. PMID:27242742

  6. Polyphosphate Kinase Mediates Antibiotic Tolerance in Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli PCN033

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eChen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC causes a variety of acute infections in its hosts, and multidrug-resistant strains present significant challenges to public health and animal husbandry. Therefore, it is necessary to explore new drug targets to control E. coli epidemics. Previous studies have reported that ppk mutants of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Mycobacterium tuberculosis are more susceptible than the wild types (WTs to stress. Therefore, we investigated the stress response to antibiotics mediated by polyphosphate kinase (PPK in ExPEC strain PCN033. We observed that planktonic cells of a ppk knockout strain (Δppk were more susceptible to antibiotics than was WT. However, biofilm-grown Δppk cells showed similar susceptibility to that of the WT and were more tolerant than the planktonic cells. During the planktonic lifestyle, the expression of genes involved in antibiotic tolerance (including resistance-conferring genes,and antibiotic influx and efflux genes did not change in the Δppk mutant without antibiotic treatment. However, the resistance-conferring gene bla and efflux genes were upregulated more in the WT than in the Δppk mutant by treatment with tazobactam. After treatment with gentamycin, the efflux genes and influx genes were upregulated and downregulated, respectively, more in the WT than in the Δppk mutant. The expression of genes involved in biofilm regulation also changed after treatment with tazobactam or gentamycin, and which is consistent with the results of the biofilm formation. Together, these observations indicate that PPK is important for the antibiotic stress response during the planktonic growth of ExPEC and might be a potential drug target in bacteria.

  7. Suppressor cells in transplantation tolerance: the mechanisms of tolerance in radiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Histoincompatible-complete radiation chimeras, after resolving acute graft-vs-host (GVHD), establish specific tolerance to host and donor alloantigens. This tolerance can be perturbed with immunosuppressive agents and infusions of small numbers of donor-type cells with infusions of massive numbers of donor-type cells, or with infusions of a small number of donor-type cells, that were sensitized against host antigens prior to transfer. These chimeras possess T lymphocytes in the spleen that specifically suppress donor to host mixed lymphocyte reactions and adoptively transfer suppression of GVHD to secondary hosts. Nylon-wool fractionation of chimeric spleen cells restores the response of chimeric lymphocytes to host alloantigens, suggesting that transplantation tolerance is not attributable to clonal deletion but the activity of nylon-wool-adherent T suppressor spleen cells

  8. Cytokinin Determines Thiol-Mediated Arsenic Tolerance and Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Thotegowdanapalya C; Castrillo, Gabriel; Navarro, Cristina; Zarco-Fernández, Sonia; Ramireddy, Eswarayya; Mateo, Cristian; Zamarreño, Angel M; Paz-Ares, Javier; Muñoz, Riansares; García-Mina, Jose M; Hernández, Luis E; Schmülling, Thomas; Leyva, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    The presence of arsenic in soil and water is a constant threat to plant growth in many regions of the world. Phytohormones act in the integration of growth control and stress response, but their role in plant responses to arsenic remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that arsenate [As(V)], the most prevalent arsenic chemical species in nature, causes severe depletion of endogenous cytokinins (CKs) in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that CK signaling mutants and transgenic plants with reduced endogenous CK levels showed an As(V)-tolerant phenotype. Our data indicate that in CK-depleted plants exposed to As(V), transcript levels of As(V)/phosphate-transporters were similar or even higher than in wild-type plants. In contrast, CK depletion provoked the coordinated activation of As(V) tolerance mechanisms, leading to the accumulation of thiol compounds such as phytochelatins and glutathione, which are essential for arsenic sequestration. Transgenic CK-deficient Arabidopsis and tobacco lines show a marked increase in arsenic accumulation. Our findings indicate that CK is an important regulatory factor in plant adaptation to arsenic stress.

  9. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H; Croft, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, but whether these possess the attributes required to directly promote the development of Foxp3(+) iTreg cells is unclear. Here, we show that lung-resident tissue MØs coexpress TGF-β and retinal dehydrogenases (RALDH1 and RALDH 2) under steady-state conditions and that their sampling of harmless airborne antigen and presentation to antigen-specific CD4 T cells resulted in the generation of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Treg cell induction in this model depended on both TGF-β and retinoic acid. Transfer of the antigen-pulsed tissue MØs into the airways correspondingly prevented the development of asthmatic lung inflammation upon subsequent challenge with antigen. Moreover, exposure of lung tissue MØs to allergens suppressed their ability to generate iTreg cells coincident with blocking airway tolerance. Suppression of Treg cell generation required proteases and TLR-mediated signals. Therefore, lung-resident tissue MØs have regulatory functions, and strategies to target these cells might hold promise for prevention or treatment of allergic asthma.

  10. Cutting edge: TNFR-shedding by CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells inhibits the induction of inflammatory mediators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mierlo, G.J. van; Scherer, H.U.; Hameetman, M.; Morgan, M.E.; Flierman, R.; Huizinga, T.W.J.; Toes, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play an essential role in maintaining tolerance to self and nonself. In several models of T cell-mediated (auto) immunity, Treg cells exert protective effects by the inhibition of pathogenic T cell responses. In addition, Treg cells can modulate T cell-independent

  11. Tolerance induction to human stem cell transplants with extension to their differentiated progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Kathy O; Howie, Duncan; Ng, Shu-Wing; Liu, Shubai; Chien, Kenneth R; Waldmann, Herman

    2014-12-01

    There is increasing interest in transplantation of human stem cells for therapeutic purposes. It would benefit future application if one could achieve their long-term acceptance and functional differentiation in allogeneic hosts using minimal immunosuppression. Allogeneic stem cell transplants differ from conventional tissue transplants insofar as not all alloantigens are revealed during tolerance induction. This risks that the immune system tolerized to antigens expressed by progenitors may still remain responsive to antigens expressed later during differentiation. Here we show that brief induction with monoclonal antibody-mediated coreceptor and costimulation blockade enables long-term engraftment and tolerance towards murine ESCs, hESCs, human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and hESC-derived progenitors in outbred murine recipients. Tolerance induced to PSC-derived progenitors extends to their differentiated progenies, and sometimes even to different tissues derived from the same donor. Global gene expression profiling identifies clear features in T cells from tolerized grafts that are distinct from those involved in rejection.

  12. Autophagy activation by novel inducers prevents BECN2-mediated drug tolerance to cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramoto, Kenta; Wang, Nan; Fan, Yuying; Zhang, Weiran; Schoenen, Frank J; Frankowski, Kevin J; Marugan, Juan; Zhou, Yifa; Huang, Sui; He, Congcong

    2016-09-01

    Cannabinoids and related drugs generate profound behavioral effects (such as analgesic effects) through activating CNR1 (cannabinoid receptor 1 [brain]). However, repeated cannabinoid administration triggers lysosomal degradation of the receptor and rapid development of drug tolerance, limiting the medical use of marijuana in chronic diseases. The pathogenic mechanisms of cannabinoid tolerance are not fully understood, and little is known about its prevention. Here we show that a protein involved in macroautophagy/autophagy (a conserved lysosomal degradation pathway), BECN2 (beclin 2), mediates cannabinoid tolerance by preventing CNR1 recycling and resensitization after prolonged agonist exposure, and deletion of Becn2 rescues CNR1 activity in mouse brain and conveys resistance to analgesic tolerance to chronic cannabinoids. To target BECN2 therapeutically, we established a competitive recruitment model of BECN2 and identified novel synthetic, natural or physiological stimuli of autophagy that sequester BECN2 from its binding with GPRASP1, a receptor protein for CNR1 degradation. Co-administration of these autophagy inducers effectively restores the level and signaling of brain CNR1 and protects mice from developing tolerance to repeated cannabinoid usage. Overall, our findings demonstrate the functional link among autophagy, receptor signaling and animal behavior regulated by psychoactive drugs, and develop a new strategy to prevent tolerance and improve medical efficacy of cannabinoids by modulating the BECN2 interactome and autophagy activity. PMID:27305347

  13. Tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van M.

    2012-01-01

    Tolerance entails acceptance of the very things one disagrees with, disapproves of or dislikes. Tolerance can be seen as ‘a flawed virtue’ (Schuyt, 2001), because it concerns acceptance of the differences between others and ourselves we would rather fight, ignore or overcome. Although tolerance carr

  14. Desiccation tolerance of prokaryotes: application of principles to human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Malcolm; Slaughter, Stephen M; Hunneke, Frank-U; Garst, James F; Helm, Richard F

    2005-11-01

    The loss of water from cells is a stress that was likely imposed very early in evolution. An understanding of the sensitivity or tolerance of cells to depletion of intracellular water is relevant to the study of quiescence, longevity and aging, because one consequence of air-drying is full metabolic arrest, sometimes for extended periods. When considering the adaptation of cells to physiological extremes of pH, temperature or pressure, it is generally assumed that evolution is driven toward optimum function rather than maximum stability. However, adaptation to desiccation has the singular and crucial distinction that dried cells do not grow, and the time the cell is dried may represent the greater part of the life (the time the cell remains viable) of that cell and its component macromolecules. Is a consideration of "function" relevant in the context of desiccated cells? The response of prokaryotic cells to desiccation, and the mechanisms they employ to tolerate this stress at the level of the cell, genome and proteome are considered. Fundamental principles were then implemented in the design of strategies to achieve air-dry stabilization of sensitive eukaryotic (human) cells. The responses of the transcriptomes and proteomes of prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells (yeast and human) to drying in air are compared and contrasted to achieve an evolutionary context. The concept of the "desiccome" is developed to question whether there is common set of structural, physiological and molecular mechanisms that constitute desiccation tolerance. PMID:21676831

  15. Adenoviral-mediated localized CTLA-4Ig gene expression induces long-term allograft pancreas survival and donor-specific immune tolerance in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    T cell activation following alloantigen recognition plays a critical role in the development of the rejection in all solid organ, tissue and cell transplantation. A recombinant molecule, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 antibody (CTLA-4Ig), is known to induce to T-cell into "anergy" by blocking the costimulatory B7-CD28 interaction. Either systemic or localized administration of CTLA-Ig has been shown to prolong allograft survival and induce donor-specific tolerance in some transplant models. In this study, we characterized the expression and immunosuppressive effectiveness of adenoviral-mediated CTLA-4Ig gene transfer. We demonstrated transduction of the allografts with AdCTLA-41g resulted in localized expression, permanent graft survival and stable donor-specific tolerance. In addition, by performing simultaneous dual-organ transplantation, we targeted on immunosuppression through a local expression of CTLA-4Ig via adenoviral-mediated gene transfer into pancreatic allografts.

  16. Ethanol tolerance of immobilized brewers' yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, S; Watson, K; D'Amore, T

    1995-04-01

    A method based on the survival of yeast cells subjected to an ethanol or heat shock was utilized to compare the stress resistance of free and carrageenan-immobilized yeast cells. Results demonstrated a significant increase of yeast survival against ethanol for immobilized cells as compared to free cells, while no marked difference in heat resistance was observed. When entrapped cells were released by mechanical disruption of the gel beads and submitted to the same ethanol stress, they exhibited a lower survival rate than entrapped cells, but a similar or slightly higher survival rate than free cells. The incidence of ethanol- or heat-induced respiratory-deficient mutants of entrapped cells was equivalent to that of control or non-stressed cells (1.3 +/- 0.5%) whereas ethanol- and heat-shocked free and released cells exhibited between 4.4% and 10.9% average incidence of respiration-deficient mutants. It was concluded that the carrageenan gel matrix provided a protection against ethanol, and that entrapped cells returned to normal physiological behaviour as soon as they were released. The cell growth rate was a significant factor in the resistance of yeast to high ethanol concentrations. The optimum conditions to obtain reliable and reproducible results involved the use of slow-growing cells after exhaustion of the sugar substrate.

  17. Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønder, Lars

    Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics is an experiment in re-orientation. The book is based on the wager that tolerance exceeds the more prevalent images of self-restraint and repressive benevolence because neither precludes the possibility of a more “active tolerance” motivated by the d...... these alternatives by returning to the notion of tolerance as the endurance of pain, linking this notion to exemplars and theories relevant to the politics of multiculturalism, religious freedom, and free speech.......Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics is an experiment in re-orientation. The book is based on the wager that tolerance exceeds the more prevalent images of self-restraint and repressive benevolence because neither precludes the possibility of a more “active tolerance” motivated...... by the desire to experiment and to become otherwise. The objective is to discuss what gets lost, conceptually as well as politically, when we neglect the subsistence of active tolerance within other practices of tolerance, and to develop a theory of active tolerance in which tolerance's mobilizing character...

  18. B-cell-mediated strategies to fight chronic allograft rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali H Dalloul

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Solid organs have been transplanted for decades. Since the improvement in graft selection and in medical and surgical procedures, the likelihood of graft function after one year is now close to 90%. Nonetheless even well-matched recipients continue to need medications for the rest of their lives hence adverse side effects and enhanced morbidity. Understanding Immune rejection mechanisms, is of increasing importance since the greater use of living-unrelated donors and genetically unmatched individuals. Chronic rejection is devoted to T-cells, however the role of B-cells in rejection has been appreciated recently by the observation that B-cell depletion improve graft survival. By contrast however, B-cells can be beneficial to the grafted tissue. This protective effect is secondary to either the secretion of protective antibodies or the induction of B-cells that restrain excessive inflammatory responses, chiefly by local provision of IL-10, or inhibit effector T-cells by direct cellular interactions. As a proof of concept B-cell-mediated infectious transplantation tolerance could be achieved in animal models, and evidence emerged that the presence of such B-cells in transplanted patients correlate with a favorable outcome. Among these populations, regulatory B-cells constitute a recently described population. These cells may develop as a feedback mechanism to prevent uncontrolled reactivity to antigens and inflammatory stimuli. The difficult task for the clinician, is to quantify the respective ratios and functions of tolerant vs effector B-cells within a transplanted organ, at a given time point in order to modulate B-cell-directed therapy. Several receptors at the B-cell membrane as well as signaling molecules, can now be targeted for this purpose. Understanding the temporal expansion of regulatory B-cells in grafted patients and the stimuli that activate them will help in the future to implement specific strategies aimed at fighting chronic

  19. The effects of an anxiety sensitivity intervention on anxiety, depression, and worry: mediation through affect tolerances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norr, Aaron M; Allan, Nicholas P; Macatee, Richard J; Keough, Meghan E; Schmidt, Norman B

    2014-08-01

    Recently there has been increased interest in emotional and physical tolerance risk factors for mood and anxiety disorders. Three tolerance risk factors that have been shown to be related are anxiety sensitivity (AS), distress tolerance (DT), and discomfort intolerance (DI). Although previous research has demonstrated these constructs are malleable, no research has investigated the effects of an AS intervention on DT or DI. Further, no studies have investigated whether changes in DT or DI play a role in mood and anxiety symptom amelioration due to an AS intervention. Participants (N = 104), who were selected for elevated levels of AS, completed a single-session computer-assisted AS intervention or a control intervention and follow-up assessments at 1-week and 1-month post intervention. Results revealed that the intervention reduced AS and increased DT, but did not affect DI at the 1-week follow-up. Mediation analyses revealed that changes in AS and DT both mediated changes in symptoms (depression, anxiety, worry) due to the intervention at 1-month follow-up, however, when AS and DT were considered in the same model only the effect via AS remained significant. These results have important implications for the nature of the relationships between AS, DT, and DI as well as the specific mechanistic pathways through which an AS intervention ameliorates symptoms.

  20. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H; Croft, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, but whether these possess the attributes required to directly promote the development of Foxp3(+) iTreg cells is unclear. Here, we show that lung-resident tissue MØs coexpress TGF-β and retinal dehydrogenases (RALDH1 and RALDH 2) under steady-state conditions and that their sampling of harmless airborne antigen and presentation to antigen-specific CD4 T cells resulted in the generation of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Treg cell induction in this model depended on both TGF-β and retinoic acid. Transfer of the antigen-pulsed tissue MØs into the airways correspondingly prevented the development of asthmatic lung inflammation upon subsequent challenge with antigen. Moreover, exposure of lung tissue MØs to allergens suppressed their ability to generate iTreg cells coincident with blocking airway tolerance. Suppression of Treg cell generation required proteases and TLR-mediated signals. Therefore, lung-resident tissue MØs have regulatory functions, and strategies to target these cells might hold promise for prevention or treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:23547101

  1. Functional clonal deletion versus suppressor cell-induced transplantation tolerance in chimeras prepared with a short course of total-lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allogeneic bone marrow (BM) chimeras induced by infusion of BM cells into recipients conditioned with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) were shown to develop humoral and cell-mediated tolerance to host and donor-type alloantigens by a number of in vitro and in vivo assays. Spleen cells of tolerant chimeras exhibited suppressive activity of mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). MLR suppression was not abrogated by depletion of Lyt-2 cells, and neither could Lyt-2-positive cells sorted from the spleens of tolerant chimeras suppress MLR or attenuate graft-versus-host reactivity in vivo. Likewise, specifically unresponsive spleen cells obtained from chimeras could not be induced to respond in MLR against tolerizing host-type cells following depletion of Lyt-2 or passage through a nylon-wool column. Tolerance of chimera spleen cells to host alloantigens, best documented by permanent survival of donor-type skin allografts, could be adoptively transferred into syngeneic recipients treated by heavy irradiation but not into untreated or mildly irradiated recipients. Adoptive transfer of tolerance seemed to be associated with experimental conditions favoring engraftment of tolerant cells rather than suppression of host reactivity. We speculate that although host and/or donor-derived suppressor cells may be operating in reducing the pool of specific alloreactive clones by blocking cell proliferation in response to allogeneic challenge, the final outcome in tolerant chimeras is actual or functional deletion of alloreactive clones

  2. STAT4-associated natural killer cell tolerance following liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Jamil, K M; Hydes, T.J.; Cheent, K.S.; Cassidy, S A; Traherne, J. A.; Jayaraman, J.; Trowsdale, J.; Alexander, G J; Little, A M; McFarlane, H.; Heneghan, M. A.; Purbhoo, M.A.; Khakoo, S I

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Natural killer (NK) cells are important mediators of liver inflammation in chronic liver disease. The aim of this study was to investigate why liver transplants (LTs) are not rejected by NK cells in the absence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching, and to identify a tolerogenic NK cell phenotype. Design: Phenotypic and functional analyses on NK cells from 54 LT recipients were performed, and comparisons made with healthy controls. Further investigation was performed using ...

  3. Transgenic sugar beet tolerant to imidazolinone obtained by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishchenko, E M; Komarnitskii, I K; Kuchuk, N V

    2011-01-01

    Sugar beet is highly sensitive to imidazolinone herbicides thus rotational restrictions exist. In order to develop imidazolinone tolerant sugar beets als gene from Arabidopsis thaliana encoding acetolactate synthase with S653N mutation was used for genetic transformation. Transgenic sugar beet plants were obtained by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of aseptic seedlings using vacuum-infiltration. The efficiency of genetic transformation was 5.8%. RT-PCR analysis of obtained plants revealed accumulation of specific als transcript. The resistance to imidazolinone was proved for developed transgenic sugar beet plants in vitro and in greenhouse conditions after spraying with imazethapyr (Pursuit, BASF).

  4. Identification of an arsenic tolerant double mutant with a thiol-mediated component and increased arsenic tolerance in phyA mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Dong-Yul; Lee, David; Harris, Hugh; Raab, Andrea; Feldmann, Jörg; Meharg, Andrew; Kumabe, Bryan; Komives, Elizabeth A; Schroeder, Julian I

    2007-03-01

    A genetic screen was performed to isolate mutants showing increased arsenic tolerance using an Arabidopsis thaliana population of activation tagged lines. The most arsenic-resistant mutant shows increased arsenate and arsenite tolerance. Genetic analyses of the mutant indicate that the mutant contains two loci that contribute to arsenic tolerance, designated ars4 and ars5. The ars4ars5 double mutant contains a single T-DNA insertion, ars4, which co-segregates with arsenic tolerance and is inserted in the Phytochrome A (PHYA) gene, strongly reducing the expression of PHYA. When grown under far-red light conditions ars4ars5 shows the same elongated hypocotyl phenotype as the previously described strong phyA-211 allele. Three independent phyA alleles, ars4, phyA-211 and a new T-DNA insertion allele (phyA-t) show increased tolerance to arsenate, although to a lesser degree than the ars4ars5 double mutant. Analyses of the ars5 single mutant show that ars5 exhibits stronger arsenic tolerance than ars4, and that ars5 is not linked to ars4. Arsenic tolerance assays with phyB-9 and phot1/phot2 mutants show that these photoreceptor mutants do not exhibit phyA-like arsenic tolerance. Fluorescence HPLC analyses show that elevated levels of phytochelatins were not detected in ars4, ars5 or ars4ars5, however increases in the thiols cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine and glutathione were observed. Compared with wild type, the total thiol levels in ars4, ars5 and ars4ars5 mutants were increased up to 80% with combined buthionine sulfoximine and arsenic treatments, suggesting the enhancement of mechanisms that mediate thiol synthesis in the mutants. The presented findings show that PHYA negatively regulates a pathway conferring arsenic tolerance, and that an enhanced thiol synthesis mechanism contributes to the arsenic tolerance of ars4ars5.

  5. Identification of An Arsenic Tolerant Double Mutant With a Thiol-Mediated Component And Increased Arsenic Tolerance in PhyA Mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, D.Y.; Lee, D.; Harris, H.; Raab, A.; Feldmann, J.; Meharg, A.; Kumabe, B.; Komives, E.A.; Schroeder, J.I.; /SLAC, SSRL /Sydney U. /Aberdeen U. /UC, San Diego

    2007-04-06

    A genetic screen was performed to isolate mutants showing increased arsenic tolerance using an Arabidopsis thaliana population of activation tagged lines. The most arsenic-resistant mutant shows increased arsenate and arsenite tolerance. Genetic analyses of the mutant indicate that the mutant contains two loci that contribute to arsenic tolerance, designated ars4 and ars5. The ars4ars5 double mutant contains a single T-DNA insertion, ars4, which co-segregates with arsenic tolerance and is inserted in the Phytochrome A (PHYA) gene, strongly reducing the expression of PHYA. When grown under far-red light conditions ars4ars5 shows the same elongated hypocotyl phenotype as the previously described strong phyA-211 allele. Three independent phyA alleles, ars4, phyA-211 and a new T-DNA insertion allele (phyA-t) show increased tolerance to arsenate, although to a lesser degree than the ars4ars5 double mutant. Analyses of the ars5 single mutant show that ars5 exhibits stronger arsenic tolerance than ars4, and that ars5 is not linked to ars4. Arsenic tolerance assays with phyB-9 and phot1/phot2 mutants show that these photoreceptor mutants do not exhibit phyA-like arsenic tolerance. Fluorescence HPLC analyses show that elevated levels of phytochelatins were not detected in ars4, ars5 or ars4ars5, however increases in the thiols cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine and glutathione were observed. Compared with wild type, the total thiol levels in ars4, ars5 and ars4ars5 mutants were increased up to 80% with combined buthionine sulfoximine and arsenic treatments, suggesting the enhancement of mechanisms that mediate thiol synthesis in the mutants. The presented findings show that PHYA negatively regulates a pathway conferring arsenic tolerance, and that an enhanced thiol synthesis mechanism contributes to the arsenic tolerance of ars4ars5.

  6. Experimental evolution and gene knockout studies reveal AcrA-mediated isobutanol tolerance in Ralstonia eutropha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Amanda C; Gai, Claudia S; Lu, Jingnan; Sinskey, Anthony J; Brigham, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    Isobutanol (IBT) has attracted much attention from researchers as a next generation drop-in biofuel. Ralstonia eutropha is a gram-negative bacterium which naturally produces polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), and has been reported to produce IBT after metabolic engineering. Similar to other microbes, R. eutropha experiences toxicity from branched-chain alcohols and is unable to grow in the presence of IBT concentrations higher than 0.5% (v v(-1)). Such low tolerance greatly limits the ability of R. eutropha to grow and produce IBT. In order to study toxicity to the cells, IBT-tolerant strains were developed by experimental evolution, revealing that two genes, previously described as being related to IBT tolerance in Escherichia coli (acrA and acrA6), also presented mutations in R. eutropha evolved strains. The effect on the physiology of the cells of in-frame deletions of each of these genes was assessed in wild type and engineered IBT-producing strains in an attempt to reproduce a tolerant phenotype. The mutant strains' ability to tolerate, consume, and produce IBT were also analyzed. Although deletions of acrA6 and acrA did not significantly improve R. eutropha growth in the presence of IBT, these deletions improved cell survival in the presence of high concentrations of IBT in the extracellular milieu. Moreover, an in-frame acrA deletion in an engineered IBT-producing R. eutropha enhanced the strain's ability to produce IBT, which could potentially be associated with enhanced survival at high IBT concentrations. PMID:26811221

  7. Rice Phospholipase Dα is Involved in Salt Tolerance by the Mediation of H+-ATPase Activity and Transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Shen; Rong Wang; Wen Jing; Wenhua Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipase Dα (PLDα) is involved in plant response to salt stress, but the mechanisms remain unclear.We investigated rice PLDα (OsPLDα) localization and its effect on tonoplast (TP) and plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase activity and transcription in response to NaCl. When rice suspension-cultured cells were treated with 100 mM NaCI, PLDα activity in cell extracts showed a transient activation with a threefold increase at 1 h. The amount of OsPLDα protein decreased slightly in the cytosolic fractions, whereas it increased significantly in the TP after NaCI treatment. OsPLDα1 knockdown cells were developed using RNA interference (RNAi) methods. The increase in TP and PM H+-ATPase activity induced by NaCl was significantly inhibited in OsPLDα1-RNAi cells. Knockdown of OsPLDα1 prevented the NaCl-induced increase in the transcript level of OsVHA-A (encodes TP H+-ATPase) and OSA2 (encodes PM H+-ATPase),as well as OsNHX1 (encodes TP Na+/H+ antiporter). The cells died more in OsPLDα1-RNAi mutant than in wild type when they were treated with NaCl. These results suggest that OsPLDα is involved in salt tolerance in rice through the mediation of H+-ATPase activity and transcription.

  8. Transcriptional and metabolomic analysis of Ascophyllum nodosum mediated freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Prasanth

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously shown that lipophilic components (LPC of the brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum (ANE improved freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the mechanism(s of this induced freezing stress tolerance is largely unknown. Here, we investigated LPC induced changes in the transcriptome and metabolome of A. thaliana undergoing freezing stress. Results Gene expression studies revealed that the accumulation of proline was mediated by an increase in the expression of the proline synthesis genes P5CS1 and P5CS2 and a marginal reduction in the expression of the proline dehydrogenase (ProDH gene. Moreover, LPC application significantly increased the concentration of total soluble sugars in the cytosol in response to freezing stress. Arabidopsis sfr4 mutant plants, defective in the accumulation of free sugars, treated with LPC, exhibited freezing sensitivity similar to that of untreated controls. The 1H NMR metabolite profile of LPC-treated Arabidopsis plants exposed to freezing stress revealed a spectrum dominated by chemical shifts (δ representing soluble sugars, sugar alcohols, organic acids and lipophilic components like fatty acids, as compared to control plants. Additionally, 2D NMR spectra suggested an increase in the degree of unsaturation of fatty acids in LPC treated plants under freezing stress. These results were supported by global transcriptome analysis. Transcriptome analysis revealed that LPC treatment altered the expression of 1113 genes (5% in comparison with untreated plants. A total of 463 genes (2% were up regulated while 650 genes (3% were down regulated. Conclusion Taken together, the results of the experiments presented in this paper provide evidence to support LPC mediated freezing tolerance enhancement through a combination of the priming of plants for the increased accumulation of osmoprotectants and alteration of cellular fatty acid composition.

  9. Multilevel Gain Cell Arrays for Fault-Tolerant VLSI Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid, Muhammad Umer

    2011-01-01

    Embedded memories dominate area, power and cost of modern very large scale integrated circuits system on chips ( VLSI SoCs). Furthermore, due to process variations, it becomes challenging to design reliable energy efficient systems. Therefore, fault-tolerant designs will be area efficient, cost effective and have low power consumption. The idea of this project is to design embedded memories where reliability is intentionally compromised to increase storage density. Gain cell memories are smal...

  10. A Low Cost Rad-Tolerant Standard Cell Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambles, Jody W.; Maki, Gary K.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes circuit design techniques developed at the NASA Institute of Advanced Microelectronics that have been shown to protect CMOS circuits from the deleterious effects of the natural space radiation environment. The IAuE is leading a program to incorporate these radiation-tolerance providing design techniques into a commercial standard cell library that will be used in conjunction with available Electronic Design Automation tools to produce space flight qualified microelectronics fabricated at modern commercial CMOS foundries.

  11. Salt tolerance in cultured cells of Spartina pectinata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, R S; Baird, L M; Thompson, A K

    1985-04-01

    Suspension cultures with cell doubling times of ca. 2 days were developed from the halophytic grass Spartina pectinata. Maximum rates of exponential growth measured by direct cell counts and by total culture packed-cell-volume were not significantly reduced by NaCl up to 200 mM but dropped beyond this point. In contrast, total cell production over a one week culture cycle, by both measures, was reduced in a roughly linear fashion between 0 and 500 mM NaCl. The pattern of growth in relation to NaCl is very similar to that of previously described cell suspensions derived from another halophyte, Distichlis spicata. In the field the latter is much more salt tolerant. The basis for the whole plant differences is not clear. They do not appear to reflect effectiveness of cell based salt tolerance or the presence of salt glands, which are reported here for the first time in S. pectinata and are found on the leaves of both species.

  12. Posttraumatic Stress and Alcohol Use Motives: A Test of the Incremental and Mediating Role of Distress Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Vujanovic, Anka A.; Marshall-Berenz, Erin C.; Zvolensky, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    This investigation first examined the incremental validity of distress tolerance in terms of alcohol use coping motives within a trauma-exposed community sample of adults, beyond the variance contributed by posttraumatic stress symptom severity, difficulties in emotion regulation, alcohol consumption, and other (noncriterion) alcohol use motives. Secondly, the potential mediating role of distress tolerance in the association between posttraumatic stress symptom severity and alcohol use coping...

  13. Tolerant chalcogenide cathodes of membraneless micro fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago, Aldo Saul; Gochi-Ponce, Yadira; Feng, Yong-Jun; Esquivel, Juan Pablo; Sabaté, Neus; Santander, Joaquin; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2012-08-01

    The most critical issues to overcome in micro direct methanol fuel cells (μDMFCs) are the lack of tolerance of the platinum cathode and fuel crossover through the polymer membrane. Thus, two novel tolerant cathodes of a membraneless microlaminar-flow fuel cell (μLFFC), Pt(x)S(y) and CoSe(2), were developed. The multichannel structure of the system was microfabricated in SU-8 polymer. A commercial platinum cathode served for comparison. When using 5 M CH(3)OH as the fuel, maximum power densities of 6.5, 4, and 0.23 mW cm(-2) were achieved for the μLFFC with Pt, Pt(x)S(y), and CoSe(2) cathodes, respectively. The Pt(x)S(y) cathode outperformed Pt in the same fuel cell when using CH(3)OH at concentrations above 10 M. In a situation where fuel crossover is 100 %, that is, mixing the fuel with the reactant, the maximum power density of the micro fuel cell with Pt decreased by 80 %. However, for Pt(x)S(y) this decrease corresponded to 35 % and for CoSe(2) there was no change in performance. This result is the consequence of the high tolerance of the chalcogenide-based cathodes. When using 10 M HCOOH and a palladium-based anode, the μLFFC with a CoSe(2) cathode achieved a maxiumum power density of 1.04 mW cm(-2). This micro fuel cell does not contain either Nafion membrane or platinum. We report, for the first time, the evaluation of Pt(x)S(y)- and CoSe(2)-based cathodes in membraneless micro fuel cells. The results suggest the development of a novel system that is not size restricted and its operation is mainly based on the selectivity of its electrodes.

  14. Vibrio cholerae porin OmpU induces LPS tolerance by attenuating TLR-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharwade, Sanica C; Mukhopadhaya, Arunika

    2015-12-01

    Porins can act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns, can be recognized by the host immune system and modulate immune responses. Vibrio choleraeporin OmpU aids in bacterial survival in the human gut by increasing resistance against bile acids and anti-microbial peptides. V. choleraeOmpU is pro-inflammatory in nature. However, interestingly, it can also down-regulate LPS-mediated pro-inflammatory responses. In this study, we have explored how OmpU-pretreatment affects LPS-mediated responses. Our study indicates that OmpU-pretreatment followed by LPS-activation does not induce M2-polarization of macrophages/monocytes. Further, OmpU attenuates LPS-mediated TLR2/TLR6 signaling by decreasing the association of TLRs along with recruitment of MyD88 and IRAKs to the receptor complex. This results in decreased translocation of NFκB in the nucleus. Additionally, OmpU-pretreatment up-regulates expression of IRAK-M, a negative regulator of TLR signaling, in RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage cells upon LPS-stimulation. Suppressor cytokine IL-10 is partially involved in OmpU-induced down-regulation of LPS-mediated TNFα production in human PBMCs. Furthermore, OmpU-pretreatment also affects macrophage function, by enhancing phagocytosis in LPS-treated RAW 264.7 cells, and down-regulates LPS-induced cell surface expression of co-stimulatory molecules. Altogether, OmpU causes suppression of LPS-mediated responses by attenuating the LPS-mediated TLR signaling pathway.

  15. Identification of a mutant PfCRT-mediated chloroquine tolerance phenotype in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie G Valderramos

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutant forms of the Plasmodium falciparum transporter PfCRT constitute the key determinant of parasite resistance to chloroquine (CQ, the former first-line antimalarial, and are ubiquitous to infections that fail CQ treatment. However, treatment can often be successful in individuals harboring mutant pfcrt alleles, raising questions about the role of host immunity or pharmacokinetics vs. the parasite genetic background in contributing to treatment outcomes. To examine whether the parasite genetic background dictates the degree of mutant pfcrt-mediated CQ resistance, we replaced the wild type pfcrt allele in three CQ-sensitive strains with mutant pfcrt of the 7G8 allelic type prevalent in South America, the Oceanic region and India. Recombinant clones exhibited strain-dependent CQ responses that ranged from high-level resistance to an incremental shift that did not meet CQ resistance criteria. Nonetheless, even in the most susceptible clones, 7G8 mutant pfcrt enabled parasites to tolerate CQ pressure and recrudesce in vitro after treatment with high concentrations of CQ. 7G8 mutant pfcrt was found to significantly impact parasite responses to other antimalarials used in artemisinin-based combination therapies, in a strain-dependent manner. We also report clinical isolates from French Guiana that harbor mutant pfcrt, identical or related to the 7G8 haplotype, and manifest a CQ tolerance phenotype. One isolate, H209, harbored a novel PfCRT C350R mutation and demonstrated reduced quinine and artemisinin susceptibility. Our data: 1 suggest that high-level CQR is a complex biological process dependent on the presence of mutant pfcrt; 2 implicate a role for variant pfcrt alleles in modulating parasite susceptibility to other clinically important antimalarials; and 3 uncover the existence of a phenotype of CQ tolerance in some strains harboring mutant pfcrt.

  16. Root-targeted biotechnology to mediate hormonal signalling and improve crop stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Michel Edmond; Hichri, Imène; Smigocki, Ann C; Albacete, Alfonso; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure; Diatloff, Eugene; Martinez-Andujar, Cristina; Lutts, Stanley; Dodd, Ian C; Pérez-Alfocea, Francisco

    2011-05-01

    Since plant root systems capture both water and nutrients essential for the formation of crop yield, there has been renewed biotechnological focus on root system improvement. Although water and nutrient uptake can be facilitated by membrane proteins known as aquaporins and nutrient transporters, respectively, there is a little evidence that root-localised overexpression of these proteins improves plant growth or stress tolerance. Recent work suggests that the major classes of phytohormones are involved not only in regulating aquaporin and nutrient transporter expression and activity, but also in sculpting root system architecture. Root-specific expression of plant and bacterial phytohormone-related genes, using either root-specific or root-inducible promoters or grafting non-transformed plants onto constitutive hormone producing rootstocks, has examined the role of root hormone production in mediating crop stress tolerance. Root-specific traits such as root system architecture, sensing of edaphic stress and root-to-shoot communication can be exploited to improve resource (water and nutrients) capture and plant development under resource-limited conditions. Thus, root system engineering provides new opportunities to maintain sustainable crop production under changing environmental conditions.

  17. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner. PMID:26690128

  18. IL-35-mediated induction of a potent regulatory T cell population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, Lauren W; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Henderson, Abigail L; Giacomin, Paul R; Guy, Cliff; Bankoti, Jaishree; Finkelstein, David; Forbes, Karen; Workman, Creg J; Brown, Scott A; Rehg, Jerold E; Jones, Michael L; Ni, Hsiao-Tzu; Artis, David; Turk, Mary Jo; Vignali, Dario A A

    2010-12-01

    Regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) have a critical role in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance. Here we show that treatment of naive human or mouse T cells with IL-35 induced a regulatory population, which we call 'iT(R)35 cells', that mediated suppression via IL-35 but not via the inhibitory cytokines IL-10 or transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). We found that iT(R)35 cells did not express or require the transcription factor Foxp3, and were strongly suppressive and stable in vivo. T(reg) cells induced the generation of iT(R)35 cells in an IL-35- and IL-10-dependent manner in vitro and induced their generation in vivo under inflammatory conditions in intestines infected with Trichuris muris and within the tumor microenvironment (B16 melanoma and MC38 colorectal adenocarcinoma), where they contributed to the regulatory milieu. Thus, iT(R)35 cells constitute a key mediator of infectious tolerance and contribute to T(reg) cell-mediated tumor progression. Furthermore, iT(R)35 cells generated ex vivo might have therapeutic utility.

  19. Tolerance of yeast biofilm cells towards systemic antifungals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Rasmus Kenneth

    Fungal infections have become a major problem in the hospital sector in the past decades due to the increased number of immune compromised patients susceptible to mycosis. Most human infections are believed to be associated with biofilm forming cells that are up to 1000-fold more tolerant to anti...... that complex sphingolipids were involved in fungicidal activity of LTX-109. The sphingolipids may therefore represent a unique antifungal target with therapeutic potential for future drug development....... to antimicrobial agents compared to their planktonic counterparts. Antifungal treatment of biofilms will therefore often result in treatment failure. Consequently, there is a basic requirement to understand the underlying tolerance mechanisms and to development of novel anti-biofilm treatment strategies. The focus...... of this thesis has been to explore the tolerance mechanisms of yeast biofilms to systemic antifungal agents and to identify the molecular target of a novel peptidomimetic with anti-biofilm activity. The genetic tractable S. cerevisiae was used as biofilm model system for the pathogenic Candida species...

  20. Prenatal tolerance--a role for regulatory T cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izcue, Ana; Powrie, Fiona

    2005-02-01

    Regulatory T cells (TR cells) play a major role in controlling immune self reactivity. However, little is known about their occurrence and functions in early developmental stages. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Cupedo et al. report the presence of functional CD4+CD25+ TR cells in the human fetus. In contrast to previous studies, the analysis is performed on fetal thymus, spleen and lymph node samples in addition to cord blood cells. Interestingly, TR cells are present in all these organs from 14 weeks of gestation, along with FoxP3 (forkhead box protein 3) RNA, a marker for naturally arising TR cells. The fetal TR cells show, however, phenotypic differences depending on their location, possibly because of variations in their activation state. The emergence of TR cells so early in fetal development raises a number of questions about the mechanisms of self reactivity and tolerance in the prenatal stages, which may have important implications for our understanding of childhood pathologies. PMID:15682452

  1. Ectopic expression of a tobacco vacuolar invertase inhibitor in guard cells confers drought tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Su-Fen; Liang, Ke; Yin, Dong-Mei; Ni, Di-An; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Ruan, Yong-Ling

    2016-12-01

    There are several hypotheses that explain stomatal behavior. These include the concept of osmoregulation mediated by potassium and its counterions malate and chlorine and the more recent starch-sugar hypothesis. We have previously reported that the activity of the sucrose cleavage enzyme, vacuolar invertase (VIN), is significantly higher in guard cells than in other leaf epidermal cells and its activity is correlated with stomatal aperture. Here, we examined whether VIN indeed controls stomatal movement under normal and drought conditions by transforming Arabidopsis with a tobacco vacuolar invertase inhibitor homolog (Nt-inhh) under the control of an abscisic acid-sensitive and guard cell-specific promoter (AtRab18). The data obtained showed that guard cells of transgenic Arabidopsis plants had lower VIN activity, stomatal aperture and conductance than that of wild-type plants. Moreover, the transgenic plants also displayed higher drought tolerance than wild-type plants. The data indicate that VIN is a promising target for manipulating stomatal function to increase drought tolerance. PMID:26899912

  2. MicroRNA-mediated somatic cell reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chih-Hao; Ying, Shao-Yao

    2013-02-01

    Since the first report of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), much focus has been placed on iPSCs due to their great therapeutic potential for diseases such as abnormal development, degenerative disorders, and even cancers. Subsequently, Takahashi and Yamanaka took a novel approach by using four defined transcription factors to generate iPSCs in mice and human fibroblast cells. Scientists have since been trying to refine or develop better approaches to reprogramming, either by using different combinations of transcription factors or delivery methods. However, recent reports showed that the microRNA expression pattern plays a crucial role in somatic cell reprogramming and ectopic introduction of embryonic stem cell-specific microRNAs revert cells back to an ESC-like state, although, the exact mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. This review describes recent work that has focused on microRNA-mediated approaches to somatic cell reprogramming as well as some of the pros and cons to these approaches and a possible mechanism of action. Based on the pivotal role of microRNAs in embryogenesis and somatic cell reprogramming, studies in this area must continue in order to gain a better understanding of the role of microRNAs in stem cells regulation and activity. PMID:22961769

  3. Avoiding horror autotoxicus: the importance of dendritic cells in peripheral T cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Ralph Marvin; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2002-01-01

    The immune system generally avoids horror autotoxicus or autoimmunity, an attack against the body's own constituents. This avoidance requires that self-reactive T cells be actively silenced or tolerized. We propose that dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in establishing tolerance, especially in the periphery, after functioning T cells have been produced in the thymus. In the steady state, meaning in the absence of acute infection and inflammation, DCs are in an immature state and not fully differentiated to carry out their known roles as inducers of immunity. Nevertheless, immature DCs continuously circulate through tissues and into lymphoid organs, capturing self antigens as well as innocuous environmental proteins. Recent experiments have provided direct evidence that antigen-loaded immature DCs silence T cells either by deleting them or by expanding regulatory T cells. This capacity of DCs to induce peripheral tolerance can work in two opposing ways in the context of infection. In acute infection, a beneficial effect should occur. The immune system would overcome the risk of developing autoimmunity and chronic inflammation if, before infection, tolerance were induced to innocuous environmental proteins as well as self antigens captured from dying infected cells. For chronic or persistent pathogens, a second but dire potential could take place. Continuous presentation of a pathogen by immature DCs, HIV-1 for example, may lead to tolerance and active evasion of protective immunity. The function of DCs in defining immunologic self provides a new focus for the study of autoimmunity and chronic immune-based diseases.

  4. Aquaporin-mediated improvement of freeze tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is restricted to rapid freezing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanghe, An; Van Dijck, Patrick; Colavizza, Didier; Thevelein, Johan M

    2004-06-01

    Previous observations that aquaporin overexpression increases the freeze tolerance of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) without negatively affecting the growth or fermentation characteristics held promise for the development of commercial baker's yeast strains used in frozen dough applications. In this study we found that overexpression of the aquaporin-encoding genes AQY1-1 and AQY2-1 improves the freeze tolerance of industrial strain AT25, but only in small doughs under laboratory conditions and not in large doughs under industrial conditions. We found that the difference in the freezing rate is apparently responsible for the difference in the results. We tested six different cooling rates and found that at high cooling rates aquaporin overexpression significantly improved the survival of yeast cells, while at low cooling rates there was no significant effect. Differences in the cultivation conditions and in the thawing rate did not influence the freeze tolerance under the conditions tested. Survival after freezing is determined mainly by two factors, cellular dehydration and intracellular ice crystal formation, which depend in an inverse manner on the cooling velocity. In accordance with this so-called two-factor hypothesis of freezing injury, we suggest that water permeability is limiting, and therefore that aquaporin function is advantageous, only under rapid freezing conditions. If this hypothesis is correct, then aquaporin overexpression is not expected to affect the leavening capacity of yeast cells in large, industrial frozen doughs, which do not freeze rapidly. Our results imply that aquaporin-overexpressing strains have less potential for use in frozen doughs than originally thought. PMID:15184134

  5. Neurons and astroglia govern microglial endotoxin tolerance through macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor-mediated ERK1/2 signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chun-Hsien; Wang, Shijun; Li, Chia-Ling; Chen, Shih-Heng; Hu, Chih-Fen; Chung, Yi-Lun; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Wang, Qingshan; Lu, Ru-Band; Gao, Hui-Ming; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2016-07-01

    Endotoxin tolerance (ET) is a reduced responsiveness of innate immune cells like macrophages/monocytes to an endotoxin challenge following a previous encounter with the endotoxin. Although ET in peripheral systems has been well studied, little is known about ET in the brain. The present study showed that brain immune cells, microglia, being different from peripheral macrophages, displayed non-cell autonomous mechanisms in ET formation. Specifically, neurons and astroglia were indispensable for microglial ET. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) secreted from these non-immune cells was essential for governing microglial ET. Neutralization of M-CSF deprived the neuron-glia conditioned medium of its ability to enable microglia to form ET when microglia encountered two lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatments. Recombinant M-CSF protein rendered enriched microglia refractory to the second LPS challenge leading to microglial ET. Activation of microglial M-CSF receptor (M-CSFR; also known as CSF1R) and the downstream ERK1/2 signals was responsible for M-CSF-mediated microglial ET. Endotoxin-tolerant microglia in neuron-glia cultures displayed M2-like polarized phenotypes, as shown by upregulation of M2 marker Arg-1, elevated production of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10, and decreased secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators (tumor necrosis factor α, nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2 and interleukin 1β). Endotoxin-tolerant microglia protected neurons against LPS-elicited inflammatory insults, as shown by reduced neuronal damages in LPS pre-treatment group compared with the group without LPS pre-treatment. Moreover, while neurons and astroglia became injured during chronic neuroinflammation, microglia failed to form ET. Thus, this study identified a distinct non-cell autonomous mechanism of microglial ET. Interactions of M-CSF secreted by neurons and astroglia with microglial M-CSFR programed microglial ET. Loss of microglial ET could be an important

  6. Impact of incretin hormones on beta-cell function in subjects with normal or impaired glucose tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muscelli, Elza; Mari, Andrea; Natali, Andrea;

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the enteroinsular axis influences beta-cell function have not been investigated in detail. We performed oral and isoglycemic intravenous (IV) glucose administration in subjects with normal (NGT; n = 11) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 10), using C-peptide deconvolu......The mechanisms by which the enteroinsular axis influences beta-cell function have not been investigated in detail. We performed oral and isoglycemic intravenous (IV) glucose administration in subjects with normal (NGT; n = 11) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 10), using C......-like peptide 1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide responses, total insulin secretion, and enhancement of beta-cell glucose sensitivity (OGTT/IV ratio = 1.73 +/- 0.24, P = NS vs. NGT). However, the time courses of incretin-mediated insulin secretion and potentiation were altered......, with a predominance of glucose-induced vs. incretin-mediated stimulation. We conclude that, under physiological circumstances, incretin-mediated stimulation of insulin secretion results from an enhancement of all dynamic aspects of beta-cell function, particularly beta-cell glucose sensitivity. In IGT, beta...

  7. Anergy and suppression as coexistent mechanisms for the maintenance of peripheral T cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Patrick J; Saouaf, Sandra J; Greene, Mark I; Shen, Yuan

    2003-01-01

    Using T cell receptor (TCR) V(beta)8.1 transgenic mice, we have developed an in vivo system for the study of peripheral T cell tolerance, in which two distinct mechanisms of peripheral tolerance are observed to act simultaneously during the maintenance phase of the nonresponsive state. These two mechanisms, anergy and suppression, have been studied using the CD4+ T cell lineage markers 6C10 and CD25, which can be employed to purify the cells involved in each form of tolerance. Findings and perspectives gained through the study of peripheral tolerance in our model, as well as relevant observations from the literature, will be reviewed. PMID:12857976

  8. Cell-cycle dependent expression of a translocation-mediated fusion oncogene mediates checkpoint adaptation in rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Ken; Hettmer, Simone; Aslam, M Imran; Michalek, Joel E; Laub, Wolfram; Wilky, Breelyn A; Loeb, David M; Rubin, Brian P; Wagers, Amy J; Keller, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most commonly occurring soft-tissue sarcoma in childhood. Most rhabdomyosarcoma falls into one of two biologically distinct subgroups represented by alveolar or embryonal histology. The alveolar subtype harbors a translocation-mediated PAX3:FOXO1A fusion gene and has an extremely poor prognosis. However, tumor cells have heterogeneous expression for the fusion gene. Using a conditional genetic mouse model as well as human tumor cell lines, we show that that Pax3:Foxo1a expression is enriched in G2 and triggers a transcriptional program conducive to checkpoint adaptation under stress conditions such as irradiation in vitro and in vivo. Pax3:Foxo1a also tolerizes tumor cells to clinically-established chemotherapy agents and emerging molecularly-targeted agents. Thus, the surprisingly dynamic regulation of the Pax3:Foxo1a locus is a paradigm that has important implications for the way in which oncogenes are modeled in cancer cells. PMID:24453992

  9. Cell-cycle dependent expression of a translocation-mediated fusion oncogene mediates checkpoint adaptation in rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Kikuchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most commonly occurring soft-tissue sarcoma in childhood. Most rhabdomyosarcoma falls into one of two biologically distinct subgroups represented by alveolar or embryonal histology. The alveolar subtype harbors a translocation-mediated PAX3:FOXO1A fusion gene and has an extremely poor prognosis. However, tumor cells have heterogeneous expression for the fusion gene. Using a conditional genetic mouse model as well as human tumor cell lines, we show that that Pax3:Foxo1a expression is enriched in G2 and triggers a transcriptional program conducive to checkpoint adaptation under stress conditions such as irradiation in vitro and in vivo. Pax3:Foxo1a also tolerizes tumor cells to clinically-established chemotherapy agents and emerging molecularly-targeted agents. Thus, the surprisingly dynamic regulation of the Pax3:Foxo1a locus is a paradigm that has important implications for the way in which oncogenes are modeled in cancer cells.

  10. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A.; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H.; Croft, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, b...

  11. Fault tolerance control for proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Boyang

    2016-08-01

    Fault diagnosis and controller design are two important aspects to improve proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system durability. However, the two tasks are often separately performed. For example, many pressure and voltage controllers have been successfully built. However, these controllers are designed based on the normal operation of PEMFC. When PEMFC faces problems such as flooding or membrane drying, a controller with a specific design must be used. This paper proposes a unique scheme that simultaneously performs fault diagnosis and tolerance control for the PEMFC system. The proposed control strategy consists of a fault diagnosis, a reconfiguration mechanism and adjustable controllers. Using a back-propagation neural network, a model-based fault detection method is employed to detect the PEMFC current fault type (flooding, membrane drying or normal). According to the diagnosis results, the reconfiguration mechanism determines which backup controllers to be selected. Three nonlinear controllers based on feedback linearization approaches are respectively built to adjust the voltage and pressure difference in the case of normal, membrane drying and flooding conditions. The simulation results illustrate that the proposed fault tolerance control strategy can track the voltage and keep the pressure difference at desired levels in faulty conditions.

  12. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 protects human umbilical vein endothelial cells against oxidative damage and increases endothelial nitric oxide production to reverse nitroglycerin tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X Y; Fang, Q; Ma, D; Jiang, L; Yang, Y; Sun, J; Yang, C; Wang, J S

    2016-06-10

    Medical nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate, GTN) use is limited principally by tolerance typified by a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) produced by biotransformation. Such tolerance may lead to endothelial dysfunction by inducing oxidative stress. In vivo studies have demonstrated that aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) plays important roles in GTN biotransformation and tolerance. Thus, modification of ALDH2 expression represents a potentially effective strategy to prevent and reverse GTN tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. In this study, a eukaryotic expression vector containing the ALDH2 gene was introduced into human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by liposome-mediated transfection. An indirect immunofluorescence assay showed that ALDH2 expression increased 24 h after transfection. Moreover, real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting revealed significantly higher ALDH2 mRNA and protein expression in the gene-transfected group than in the two control groups. GTN tolerance was induced by treating HUVECs with 10 mM GTN for 16 h + 10 min, which significantly decreased NO levels in control cells, but not in those transfected with ALDH2. Overexpression of ALDH2 increased cell survival against GTN-induced cytotoxicity and conferred protection from oxidative damage resulting from nitrate tolerance, accompanied by decreased production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and reduced expression of heme oxygenase 1. Furthermore, ALDH2 overexpression promoted Akt phosphorylation under GTN tolerance conditions. ALDH2 gene transfection can reverse and prevent tolerance to GTN through its bioactivation and protect against oxidative damage, preventing the development of endothelial dysfunction.

  13. Flagellin-induced tolerance of the Toll-like receptor 5 signaling pathway in polarized intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun; Fegan, Pamela E; Desai, Anjali S; Madara, James L; Hobert, Michael E

    2007-03-01

    Salmonella typhimurium is a gram-negative enteric pathogen that invades the mucosal epithelium and is associated with diarrheal illness in humans. Flagellin from S. typhimurium and other gram-negative bacteria has been shown to be the predominant proinflammatory mediator through activation of the basolateral Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5). Recent evidence has shown that prior exposure can render immune cells tolerant to subsequent challenges by TLR ligands. Accordingly, we examined whether prior exposure to purified flagellin would render human intestinal epithelial cells insensitive to future contact. We found that flagellin-induced tolerance is common to polarized epithelial cells and prevents further activation of proinflammatory signaling cascades by both purified flagellin and Salmonella bacteria but does not affect TNF-alpha stimulation of the same pathways. Flagellin tolerance is a rapid process that does not require protein synthesis, and that occurs within 1 to 2 h of flagellin exposure. Prolonged flagellin exposure blocks activation of the NF-kappaB, MAPK, and phosphoinositol 3-kinase signaling pathways and results in the internalization of a fraction of the basolateral TLR5 without affecting the polarity or total expression of TLR5. After removal of flagellin, cells require more than 24 h to fully recover their ability to mount a normal proinflammatory response. We have found that activation of phosphoinositol 3-kinase and Akt by flagellin has a small damping effect in the early stages of flagellin signaling but is not responsible for tolerance. Our study indicates that inhibition of TLR5-associated IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 activity occurs during the development of flagellin tolerance and is likely to be the cause of tolerance. PMID:17138965

  14. Control of Th2-Mediated Inflammation by Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Poojary, K. Venuprasad; Kong, Yi-chi M.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Allergic diseases and asthma are caused by dysregulated Th2-type immune responses, which drive disease development in susceptible individuals. Immune tolerance to allergens prevents inflammatory symptoms in the respiratory mucosa and provides protection against inflammation in the airways. Increasing evidence indicates that Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in immune tolerance and control Th2-biased responses. Tregs develop in the thymus from CD4+ T cells (natural Tregs) ...

  15. Mediated Electrochemical Measurements of Intracellular Catabolic Activities of Yeast Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Sheng ZHAO; Zhen Yu YANG; Yao LU; Zheng Yu YANG

    2005-01-01

    Coupling with the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide, microelectrode voltammetric measurements were undertaken to detect the ferrocyanide accumulations arising from the mediated reduction of ferricyanide by yeast cells. The results indicate that the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide could be used as a probe to detect cellular catabolic activities in yeast cells and the electrochemical response has a positive relationship with the specific growth rate of yeast cells.

  16. Alveolar epithelial type II cells induce T cell tolerance to specific antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Bernice; Hansen, Søren; Evans, Kathy;

    2008-01-01

    The lungs face the immunologic challenge of rapidly eliminating inhaled pathogens while maintaining tolerance to innocuous Ags. A break in this immune homeostasis may result in pulmonary inflammatory diseases, such as allergies or asthma. The observation that alveolar epithelial type II cells (Type...... II) constitutively express the class II MHC led us to hypothesize that Type II cells play a role in the adaptive immune response. Because Type II cells do not express detectable levels of the costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, we propose that Type II cells suppress activation of naive T cells...

  17. Native cellulose nanofibrills induce immune tolerance in vitro by acting on dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomić, Sergej; Kokol, Vanja; Mihajlović, Dušan; Mirčić, Aleksandar; Čolić, Miodrag

    2016-08-01

    Cellulose nanofibrills (CNFs) are attractive biocompatible, natural nanomaterials for wide biomedical applications. However, the immunological mechanisms of CNFs have been poorly investigated. Considering that dendritic cells (DCs) are the key immune regulatory cells in response to nanomaterials, our aim was to investigate the immunological mechanisms of CNFs in a model of DC-mediated immune response. We found that non-toxic concentrations of CNFs impaired the differentiation, and subsequent maturation of human monocyte-derived (mo)-DCs. In a co-culture with CD4+T cells, CNF-treated mo-DCs possessed a weaker allostimulatory and T helper (Th)1 and Th17 polarizing capacity, but a stronger capacity to induce Th2 cells and CD4+CD25hiFoxP3hi regulatory T cells. This correlated with an increased immunoglobulin-like transcript-4 and indolamine dioxygenase-1 expression by CNF-treated mo-DCs, following the partial internalization of CNFs and the accumulation of CD209 and actin bundles at the place of contacts with CNFs. Cumulatively, we showed that CNFs are able to induce an active immune tolerance by inducing tolerogenic DCs, which could be beneficial for the application of CNFs in wound healing and chronic inflammation therapies.

  18. Starvation, together with the SOS response, mediates high biofilm-specific tolerance to the fluoroquinolone ofloxacin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve P Bernier

    Full Text Available High levels of antibiotic tolerance are a hallmark of bacterial biofilms. In contrast to well-characterized inherited antibiotic resistance, molecular mechanisms leading to reversible and transient antibiotic tolerance displayed by biofilm bacteria are still poorly understood. The physiological heterogeneity of biofilms influences the formation of transient specialized subpopulations that may be more tolerant to antibiotics. In this study, we used random transposon mutagenesis to identify biofilm-specific tolerant mutants normally exhibited by subpopulations located in specialized niches of heterogeneous biofilms. Using Escherichia coli as a model organism, we demonstrated, through identification of amino acid auxotroph mutants, that starved biofilms exhibited significantly greater tolerance towards fluoroquinolone ofloxacin than their planktonic counterparts. We demonstrated that the biofilm-associated tolerance to ofloxacin was fully dependent on a functional SOS response upon starvation to both amino acids and carbon source and partially dependent on the stringent response upon leucine starvation. However, the biofilm-specific ofloxacin increased tolerance did not involve any of the SOS-induced toxin-antitoxin systems previously associated with formation of highly tolerant persisters. We further demonstrated that ofloxacin tolerance was induced as a function of biofilm age, which was dependent on the SOS response. Our results therefore show that the SOS stress response induced in heterogeneous and nutrient-deprived biofilm microenvironments is a molecular mechanism leading to biofilm-specific high tolerance to the fluoroquinolone ofloxacin.

  19. How do yeast cells become tolerant to high ethanol concentrations?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoek, Tim; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Voordeckers, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The brewer’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae displays a much higher ethanol tolerance compared to most other organisms, and it is therefore commonly used for the industrial production of bioethanol and alcoholic beverages. However, the genetic determinants underlying this yeast’s exceptional ethanol...... tolerance have proven difficult to elucidate. In this perspective, we discuss how different types of experiments have contributed to our understanding of the toxic effects of ethanol and the mechanisms and complex genetics underlying ethanol tolerance. In a second part, we summarize the different routes...... and challenges involved in obtaining superior industrial yeasts with improved ethanol tolerance....

  20. How do yeast cells become tolerant to high ethanol concentrations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoek, Tim; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Voordeckers, Karin

    2016-08-01

    The brewer's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae displays a much higher ethanol tolerance compared to most other organisms, and it is therefore commonly used for the industrial production of bioethanol and alcoholic beverages. However, the genetic determinants underlying this yeast's exceptional ethanol tolerance have proven difficult to elucidate. In this perspective, we discuss how different types of experiments have contributed to our understanding of the toxic effects of ethanol and the mechanisms and complex genetics underlying ethanol tolerance. In a second part, we summarize the different routes and challenges involved in obtaining superior industrial yeasts with improved ethanol tolerance. PMID:26758993

  1. Salt tolerance at single cell level in giant-celled Characeae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jane eBeilby

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Characean plants provide an excellent experimental system for electrophysiology and physiology due to: (i very large cell size, (ii position on phylogenetic tree near the origin of land plants and (iii continuous spectrum from very salt sensitive to very salt tolerant species. A range of experimental techniques is described, some unique to characean plants. Application of these methods provided electrical characteristics of membrane transporters, which dominate the membrane conductance under different outside conditions. With this considerable background knowledge the electrophysiology of salt sensitive and salt tolerant genera can be compared under salt and/or osmotic stress. Both salt tolerant and salt sensitive Characeae show a rise in membrane conductance and simultaneous increase in Na+ influx upon exposure to saline medium. Salt tolerant Chara longifolia and Lamprothamnium sp. exhibit proton pump stimulation upon both turgor decrease and salinity increase, allowing the membrane PD to remain negative. The turgor is regulated through the inward K+ rectifier and 2H+/Cl- symporter. Lamprothamnium plants can survive in hypersaline media up to twice seawater strength and withstand large sudden changes in salinity. Salt-sensitive Chara australis succumbs to 50 - 100 mM NaCl in few days. Cells exhibit no pump stimulation upon turgor decrease and at best transient pump stimulation upon salinity increase. Turgor is not regulated. The membrane PD exhibits characteristic noise upon exposure to salinity. Depolarization of membrane PD to excitation threshold sets off trains of action potentials, leading to further loses of K+ and Cl-. In final stages of salt damage the H+/OH- channels are thought to become the dominant transporter, dissipating the proton gradient and bringing the cell PD close to 0. The differences in transporter electrophysiology and their synergy under osmotic and/or saline stress in salt sensitive and salt tolerant characean cells

  2. Oncogenic BRAF-Mediated Melanoma Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hezhe Lu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma patients with oncogenic BRAFV600E mutation have poor prognoses. While the role of BRAFV600E in tumorigenesis is well established, its involvement in metastasis that is clinically observed in melanoma patients remains a topic of debate. Here, we show that BRAFV600E melanoma cells have extensive invasion activity as assayed by the generation of F-actin and cortactin foci that mediate membrane protrusion, and degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM. Inhibition of BRAFV600E blocks melanoma cell invasion. In a BRAFV600E-driven murine melanoma model or in patients’ tumor biopsies, cortactin foci decrease upon inhibitor treatment. In addition, genome-wide expression analysis shows that a number of invadopodia-related genes are downregulated after BRAFV600E inhibition. Mechanistically, BRAFV600E induces phosphorylation of cortactin and the exocyst subunit Exo70 through ERK, which regulates actin dynamics and matrix metalloprotease secretion, respectively. Our results provide support for the role of BRAFV600E in metastasis and suggest that inhibiting invasion is a potential therapeutic strategy against melanoma.

  3. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells precondition lung monocytes/macrophages to produce tolerance against allo- and autoimmunity in the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Hwa; Lee, Hyun Ju; Jeong, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Mee Kum; Wee, Won Ryang; Yoon, Sun-Ok; Choi, Hosoon; Prockop, Darwin J; Oh, Joo Youn

    2016-01-01

    Intravenously administered mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) engraft only transiently in recipients, but confer long-term therapeutic benefits in patients with immune disorders. This suggests that MSCs induce immune tolerance by long-lasting effects on the recipient immune regulatory system. Here, we demonstrate that i.v. infusion of MSCs preconditioned lung monocytes/macrophages toward an immune regulatory phenotype in a TNF-α-stimulated gene/protein (TSG)-6-dependent manner. As a result, mice were protected against subsequent immune challenge in two models of allo- and autoimmune ocular inflammation: corneal allotransplantation and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). The monocytes/macrophages primed by MSCs expressed high levels of MHC class II, B220, CD11b, and IL-10, and exhibited T-cell-suppressive activities independently of FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. Adoptive transfer of MSC-induced B220(+)CD11b(+) monocytes/macrophages prevented corneal allograft rejection and EAU. Deletion of monocytes/macrophages abrogated the MSC-induced tolerance. However, MSCs with TSG-6 knockdown did not induce MHC II(+)B220(+)CD11b(+) cells, and failed to attenuate EAU. Therefore, the results demonstrate a mechanism of the MSC-mediated immune modulation through induction of innate immune tolerance that involves monocytes/macrophages.

  4. CO tolerance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells with Pt/C and PtMo/C anodes operating at high temperatures: A mass spectrometry investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► CO tolerance of Pt/C and PtMo/C PEMFC anodes is investigated by on line mass spectrometry. ► High CO tolerance is observed for high PEMFC temperatures. ► Increase of tolerance for Pt/C is due to thermal desorption, reduced CO oxidation potentials, and CO oxidation by O2 crossover. ► PtMo/C presents increased CO tolerance due the occurrence of a MoOx-mediated was gas shift reaction. -- Abstract: The performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) with Pt/C and PtMo/C anodes has been investigated using single cell polarization and on line mass spectrometry (OLMS) measurements in a wide range of temperature (70–105 °C) for the system supplied with hydrogen containing different amounts of CO. As expected a higher CO tolerance is observed at higher temperatures for both catalysts. The anode exit gas analysis revealed that CO2 is produced already at the cell open circuit potential, and it increases with the increase of the anode overpotential. The CO tolerance phenomena are assigned to different processes depending on the catalyst nature. For the Pt/C containing anodes, at temperatures above 80 °C, thermal desorption, reduced CO oxidation potential and CO oxidation by O2 crossover are responsible for enhanced tolerance, whilst PtMo/C shows greater tolerance due the occurrence of a MoOx-mediated water gas shift reaction (WGS), which is activated at high temperatures. Although the occurrence of WGS leads to the anode poisoning in the presence of CO2, the polarization results show that only small additive contamination effect occurs by the combined presence of CO + CO2 in the hydrogen stream

  5. Suppressor cells in transplantation tolerance II. Maturation of suppressor cells in the bone marrow chimera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Histoincompatible bone marrow allografts were established in lethally irradiated rats. At various times after transplantation, the spleen cells were harvested, subjected to mixed lymphocyte cultures, and assayed for suppressor cells in vitro and in vivo by adoptive transfer studies. Alloantigen-nonspecific suppressor cells appeared in the chimera at 40 days after grafting, coinciding with the resolution of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). At 250 days the nonspecific suppressor cells were replaced by suppressor cells specifically suppressing donor-versus-host alloantigen responses. At 720 days suppressor cells could no longer be identified by in vitro methods but were identified by in vivo adoptive transfer of transplantation tolerance. After injection of host-type antigen into chimeras, the suppressor cells could be again demonstrated by in vitro methods

  6. Suppressor cells in transplantation tolerance. II. maturation of suppressor cells in the bone marrow chimera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Histoincompatible bone marrow allografts were established in lethally irradiated rats. At various times after transplantation, the spleen cells were harvested, subjected to mixed lymphocyte cultures, and assayed for suppressor cells in vitro and in vivo by adoptive transfer studies. Alloantigen-nonspecific suppressor cells appeared in the chimera at 40 days after grafting, coinciding with the resolution of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). At 250 days the nonspecific suppressor cells were replaced by suppressor cells specifically suppressing donor-versus-host alloantigen responses. At 720 days suppressor cells could no longer be identified by in vitro methods but were identified by in vivo adoptive transfer of transplantation tolerance. After injection of host-type antigen into chimeras, the suppressor cells could be again demonstrated by in vitro methods

  7. Elevated levels of interferon-γ production by memory T cells do not promote transplant tolerance resistance in aged recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James I Kim

    Full Text Available Immunosenescence predisposes the elderly to infectious and autoimmune diseases and impairs the response to vaccination. We recently demonstrated that ageing also impedes development of transplantation tolerance. Unlike their young counterparts (8-12 weeks of age aged male recipients (greater than 12 months of age transplanted with a full MHC-mismatched heart are resistant to tolerance mediated by anti-CD45RB antibody. Surprisingly, either chemical or surgical castration restored tolerance induction to levels observed using young recipients. Based on the strong impact of endocrine modulation on transplant tolerance, we explored the impact of ageing and castration on the immune system. Here we report a significant increase in the percentage of T cells that produce interferon-γ (IFN-γ in aged male versus young male animals and that the overall increase in IFN-γ production was due to an expansion of IFN-γ-producing memory T cells in aged animals. In contrast to IFN-γ production, we did not observe differences in IL-10 expression in young versus old male mice. We hypothesized that endocrine modulation would diminish the elevated levels of IFN-γ production in aged recipients, however, we observed no significant reduction in the percentage of IFN-γ+ T cells upon castration. Furthermore, we neutralized interferon-γ by antibody and did not observe an effect on graft survival. We conclude that while elevated levels of interferon-γ serves as a marker of tolerance resistance in aged mice, other as yet to be identified factors are responsible for its cause. Defining these factors may be relevant to design of tolerogenic strategies for aged recipients.

  8. Transient B cell depletion or improved transgene expression by codon optimization promote tolerance to factor VIII in gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon K Sack

    Full Text Available The major complication in the treatment of hemophilia A is the development of neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors against factor VIII (FVIII. The current method for eradicating inhibitors, termed immune tolerance induction (ITI, is costly and protracted. Clinical protocols that prevent rather than treat inhibitors are not yet established. Liver-directed gene therapy hopes to achieve long-term correction of the disease while also inducing immune tolerance. We sought to investigate the use of adeno-associated viral (serotype 8 gene transfer to induce tolerance to human B domain deleted FVIII in hemophilia A mice. We administered an AAV8 vector with either human B domain deleted FVIII or a codon-optimized transgene, both under a liver-specific promoter to two strains of hemophilia A mice. Protein therapy or gene therapy was given either alone or in conjunction with anti-CD20 antibody-mediated B cell depletion. Gene therapy with a low-expressing vector resulted in sustained near-therapeutic expression. However, supplementary protein therapy revealed that gene transfer had sensitized mice to hFVIII in a high-responder strain but not in mice of a low-responding strain. This heightened response was ameliorated when gene therapy was delivered with anti-murine CD20 treatment. Transient B cell depletion prevented inhibitor formation in protein therapy, but failed to achieve a sustained hypo-responsiveness. Importantly, use of a codon-optimized hFVIII transgene resulted in sustained therapeutic expression and tolerance without a need for B cell depletion. Therefore, anti-CD20 may be beneficial in preventing vector-induced immune priming to FVIII, but higher levels of liver-restricted expression are preferred for tolerance.

  9. Tolerance to the antimicrobial peptide colistin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is linked to metabolically active cells, and depends on the pmr and mexAB-oprM genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pamp, Sünje Johanna; Gjermansen, Morten; Johansen, Helle Krogh;

    2008-01-01

    antimicrobial peptide colistin. On the contrary, biofilm cells exhibiting low metabolic activity were killed by colistin. We demonstrate that the subpopulation of metabolically active cells is able to adapt to colistin by inducing a specific adaptation mechanism mediated by the pmr operon, as well as an...... unspecific adaptation mechanism mediated by the mexAB-oprM genes. Mutants defective in either pmr-mediated lipopolysaccharide modification or in mexAB-oprM-mediated antimicrobial efflux were not able to develop a tolerant subpopulation in biofilms. In contrast to the observed pattern of colistin...... physiologically distinct subpopulations by combined antimicrobial treatment with either ciprofloxacin and colistin or tetracycline and colistin almost completely eradicated all biofilm cells....

  10. The moderating and mediating roles of self-acceptance and tolerance to others in the relationship between mindfulness and subjective well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Oei, Tian Ps; Liu, Xinghua; Wang, Xiaoming; Ding, Chen

    2016-07-01

    This study explored the moderating and mediating influences of self-acceptance and tolerance to others in the relationship between mindfulness and subjective well-being. In total, 301 (130 males) university students completed the Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire, Index of Well-being, Self-acceptance Questionnaire, and Tolerance Scale. The results showed that the positive link between mindfulness and subjective well-being was significantly mediated by self-acceptance only. Tolerance played a moderating role. The implications of the results for relevant research and mindfulness training were discussed. PMID:25395155

  11. Nanomedicine-mediated cancer stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Song; Xia, Jin-Xing; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Circumstantial evidence suggests that most tumours are heterogeneous and contain a small population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that exhibit distinctive self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation capabilities, which are believed to play a crucial role in tumour progression, drug resistance, recurrence and metastasis in multiple malignancies. Given that the existence of CSCs is a primary obstacle to cancer therapy, a tremendous amount of effort has been put into the development of anti-CSC strategies, and several potential approaches to kill therapeutically-resistant CSCs have been explored, including inhibiting ATP-binding cassette transporters, blocking essential signalling pathways involved in self-renewal and survival of CSCs, targeting CSCs surface markers and destroying the tumour microenvironment. Meanwhile, an increasing number of therapeutic agents (e.g. small molecule drugs, nucleic acids and antibodies) to selectively target CSCs have been screened or proposed in recent years. Drug delivery technology-based approaches hold great potential for tackling the limitations impeding clinical applications of CSC-specific agents, such as poor water solubility, short circulation time and inconsistent stability. Properly designed nanocarrier-based therapeutic agents (or nanomedicines) offer new possibilities of penetrating CSC niches and significantly increasing therapeutic drug accumulation in CSCs, which are difficult for free drug counterparts. In addition, intelligent nanomedicine holds great promise to overcome pump-mediated multidrug resistance which is driven by ATP and to decrease detrimental effects on normal somatic stem cells. In this review, we summarise the distinctive biological processes related to CSCs to highlight strategies against inherently drug-resistant CSCs. We then focus on some representative examples that give a glimpse into state-of-the-art nanomedicine approaches developed for CSCs elimination. A perspective on innovative therapeutic

  12. Mechanisms of tolerance in murine radiation bone marrow chimeras. I. Nonspecific suppression of alloreactivity by spleen cells from early, but not late, chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allogeneic chimeras were prepared using lethally irradiated B6 hosts and untreated marrow from exsanguinated BALB/c donors. For about two months after reconstitution, chimeras had very weak antihost cell-mediated lymphocytotoxicity (CML) reactivity and little third-party alloreactivity. During this time a cell population capable of suppressing CML reactivity against both host and third-party alloantigens (i.e., antigen-nonspecific) was demonstrated in chimera spleens by in vitro mixing experiments. The putative suppressor cells were Thy-1-negative and radiation-sensitive. Subsequently, mature chimeras showed host tolerance and strong third-party alloreactivity. At this point suppressor mechanisms could no longer be demonstrated. These data are consistent with a clonal elimination hypothesis in that they do not provide evidence to indicate that maintenance of specific immune tolerance is mediated by an active suppressor mechanism

  13. Thymic epithelial cells use macroautophagy to turn their inside out for CD4 T cell tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Chunyan; Aichinger, Martin; Nedjic, Jelena; Klein, Ludger

    2013-01-01

    During development in the thymus, each T lymphocyte is equipped with one, essentially unique, T cell receptor (TCR)-specificity. Due to its random nature, this process inevitably also leads to the emergence of potentially dangerous T lymphocytes that may recognize ‘self.’ Nevertheless, autoimmune tissue destruction, the cause of diseases such as multiple sclerosis and diabetes, is the exception rather than the rule. This state of immunological self-tolerance is to a large degree based upon a ...

  14. The transcriptional activator LdtR from 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' mediates osmotic stress tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando A Pagliai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The causal agent of Huanglongbing disease, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', is a non-culturable, gram negative, phloem-limited α-proteobacterium. Current methods to control the spread of this disease are still limited to the removal and destruction of infected trees. In this study, we identified and characterized a regulon from 'Ca. L. asiaticus' involved in cell wall remodeling, that contains a member of the MarR family of transcriptional regulators (ldtR, and a predicted L,D-transpeptidase (ldtP. In Sinorhizobium meliloti, mutation of ldtR resulted in morphological changes (shortened rod-type phenotype and reduced tolerance to osmotic stress. A biochemical approach was taken to identify small molecules that modulate LdtR activity. The LdtR ligands identified by thermal shift assays were validated using DNA binding methods. The biological impact of LdtR inactivation by the small molecules was then examined in Sinorhizobium meliloti and Liberibacter crescens, where a shortened-rod phenotype was induced by growth in presence of the ligands. A new method was also developed to examine the effects of small molecules on the viability of 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus', using shoots from HLB-infected orange trees. Decreased expression of ldtRLas and ldtPLas was observed in samples taken from HLB-infected shoots after 6 h of incubation with the LdtR ligands. These results provide strong proof of concept for the use of small molecules that target LdtR, as a potential treatment option for Huanglongbing disease.

  15. Distinct T cell dynamics in lymph nodes during the induction of tolerance and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugues, Stéphanie; Fetler, Luc; Bonifaz, Laura; Helft, Julie; Amblard, François; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2004-12-01

    Induction of immunity and peripheral tolerance requires contacts between antigen-bearing dendritic cells (DCs) and cognate T cells. Using real-time two-photon microscopy, we have analyzed the dynamics of CD8(+) T cells in lymph nodes during the induction of antigen-specific immunity or tolerance. At 15-20 h after the induction of immunity, T cells stopped moving and established prolonged interactions with DCs. In tolerogenic conditions, despite effective initial T cell activation and proliferation, naive T cells remained motile and established serial brief contacts with multiple DCs. Thus, stable DC-T cell interactions occur during the induction of priming, whereas brief contacts may contribute to the induction of T cell tolerance.

  16. Inflammatory mediators: Parallels between cancer biology and stem cell therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Shyam A; Heinrich, Andrew C; Bobby Y. Reddy; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation encompasses diverse molecular pathways, and it is intertwined with a wide array of biological processes. Recently, there has been an upsurge of interest in the interactions between mediators of inflammation and other cells such as stem cells and cancer cells. Since tissue injuries are associated with the release of inflammatory mediators, it would be difficult to address this subject without considering the implications of their systemic effects. In this review, we discuss the ef...

  17. Fibronectin-Mononuclear Cell Interactions Regulate Type 1 Helper T Cell Cytokine Network in Tolerant Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Coito, Ana J.; Onodera, Kazuhiko; Kato, Hirohisa; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W.

    2000-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN), expressed primarily by macrophages, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells, represents an integral feature of the rejection response in transplant recipients. Here we demonstrate a unique pattern of cellular FN expression in rat recipients of cardiac allografts rendered tolerant in an infectious manner with either nondepleting CD4 mAb or regulatory spleen cells. Unlike in rejecting controls, cellular FN in tolerant hosts was restricted to the graft vessels and no vascula...

  18. Low temperature tolerance of human embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boon Chin Heng, Kumar Jayaseelan Vinoth, Hua Liu, Manoor Prakash Hande, Tong Cao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of exposing human embryonic stem cells (hESC to 4oC and 25oC for extended durations of 24h and 48h respectively. Cell survivability after low temperature exposure was assessed through the MTT assay. The results showed that hESC survivability after exposure to 25oC and 4oC for 24h was 77.3 ± 4.8 % and 64.4 ± 4.4 % respectively (significantly different, P < 0.05. The corresponding survival rates after 48h exposure to 25oC and 4oC was 71.0 ± 0.5 % and 69.0 ± 2.3 % respectively (not significantly different, P > 0.05. Spontaneous differentiation of hESC after low temperature exposure was assessed by morphological observations under bright-field and phase-contrast microscopy, and by immunocytochemical staining for the pluripotency markers SSEA-3 and TRA-1-81. hESC colonies were assigned into 3 grades according to their degree of spontaneous differentiation: (1 Grade A which was completely or mostly undifferentiated, (2 Grade B which was partially differentiated, and (3 Grade C which was mostly differentiated. In all low temperature exposed groups, about 95% of colonies remain undifferentiated (Grade A, which was not significantly different (P > 0.05 from the unexposed control group maintained at 37oC. Additionally, normal karyotype was maintained in all low temperature-exposed groups, as assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH of metaphase spreads with telomere and centromere-specific PNA probes. Further analysis with m-FISH showed that chromosomal translocations were absent in all experimental groups. Hence, hESC possess relatively high-tolerance to extended durations of low temperature exposure, which could have useful implications for the salvage of hESC culture during infrequent occurrences of incubator break-down and power failure.

  19. Mechanistic Assessment of PD-1H Coinhibitory Receptor-Induced T Cell Tolerance to Allogeneic Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flies, Dallas B; Higuchi, Tomoe; Chen, Lieping

    2015-06-01

    PD-1H is a recently identified cell surface coinhibitory molecule of the B7/CD28 immune modulatory gene family. We showed previously that single injection of a PD-1H agonistic mAb protected mice from graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In this study, we report two distinct mechanisms operate in PD-1H-induced T cell tolerance. First, signaling via PD-1H coinhibitory receptor potently arrests alloreactive donor T cells from activation and expansion in the initiation phase. Second, donor regulatory T cells are subsequently expanded to maintain long-term tolerance and GVHD suppression. Our study reveals the crucial function of PD-1H as a coinhibitory receptor on alloreactive T cells and its function in the regulation of T cell tolerance. Therefore, PD-1H may be a target for the modulation of alloreactive T cells in GVHD and transplantation. PMID:25917101

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Sonoyama

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla. Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  1. Dendritic cells in rheumatoid arthritis: Which subset should be used as a tool to induce tolerance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Lebre; P.P. Tak

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) comprise a complex network of heterogeneous antigen-presenting cells (APC) that are critical not only to the initiation and regulation of adaptive immunity (Th1/Th2/Th17 responses), but also to the maintenance of both central and peripheral tolerance (regulatory T cells, periphe

  2. Natural suppressor (NS) cells, neonatal tolerance, and total lymphoid irradiation: exploring obscure relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although several laboratories have shown that the appearance of naturally occurring suppressor cells in the spleens of neonatal or irradiated mice is temporarily related to the ease of induction of tolerance, the characteristics of these cells and their regulatory functions have been poorly understood until recently. The experimental data reviewed herein suggests that these cells are related to NK cells with regard to surface phenotype but differ with regard to function. The natural suppressor (NS) cells appear only briefly during the early maturation of the lymphoid tissues but can be induced in adults by manipulation of the lymphoid tissues with certain treatment regimens such as total lymphoid irradiation (TLI). In addition, the NS cells can be propagated and cloned in long-term tissue culture, thereby allowing a more detailed investigation of their properties. The cells have the unique feature of inhibiting the antigen-specific cytolytic arm of alloreactive immune responses but leaving intact the antigen-specific suppressive arm. In this way, alloreactions in the regulatory milieu of NS cells generate large numbers of antigen-specific suppressor cells that can maintain tolerance in vivo. Thus the NS cells may play an important role in the development of host-vs-graft and graft-vs-host tolerance in allogeneic bone marrow chimeras during the ''window'' of tolerance in which neonate and TLI-treated mice accept the infused allogeneic cells. 70 references

  3. Overexpression of the Mg-chelatase H subunit in guard cells confers drought tolerance via promotion of stomatal closure in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomo eTsuzuki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Mg-chelatase H subunit (CHLH has been shown to mediate chlorophyll biosynthesis, as well as plastid-to-nucleus and abscisic acid (ABA-mediated signaling. A recent study using a novel CHLH mutant, rtl1, indicated that CHLH specifically affects ABA-induced stomatal closure, but also that CHLH did not serve as an ABA receptor in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the molecular mechanism by which CHLH engages in ABA-mediated signaling in guard cells remains largely unknown. In the present study, we examined CHLH function in guard cells and explored whether CHLH expression might influence stomatal aperture. Incubation of rtl1 guard cell protoplasts with ABA induced expression of the ABA-responsive genes RAB18 and RD29B, as also observed in wild-type (WT cells, indicating that CHLH did not affect the expression of ABA-responsive genes. Earlier, ABA was reported to inhibit blue light (BL-mediated stomatal opening, at least in part through dephosphorylating/inhibiting guard cell H+-ATPase (which drives opening. Therefore, we immunohistochemically examined the phosphorylation status of guard cell H+-ATPase. Notably, ABA inhibition of BL-induced phosphorylation of H+-ATPase was impaired in rtl1 cells, suggesting that CHLH influences not only ABA-induced stomatal closure but also inhibition of BL-mediated stomatal opening by ABA. Next, we generated CHLH-GFP-overexpressing plants using CER6 promoter, which induces gene expression in the epidermis including guard cells. CHLH-transgenic plants exhibited a closed stomata phenotype even when brightly illuminated. Moreover, plant growth experiments conducted under water-deficient conditions showed that CHLH transgenic plants were more tolerant of drought than WT plants. In summary, we show that CHLH is involved in the regulation of stomatal aperture in response to ABA, but not in ABA-induced gene expression, and that manipulation of stomatal aperture via overexpression of CHLH in guard cells improves plant

  4. A Central Role for Induced Regulatory T Cells in Tolerance Induction in Experimental Colitis1

    OpenAIRE

    Haribhai, Dipica; Lin, Wen; Edwards, Brandon; Ziegelbauer, Jennifer; Salzman, Nita H.; Carlson, Marc R.; Li, Shun-Hwa; Simpson, Pippa M.; Chatila, Talal A; Williams, Calvin B.

    2009-01-01

    In addition to thymus-derived or natural T regulatory (nTreg) cells, a second subset of induced T regulatory (iTreg) cells arises de novo from conventional CD4+ T cells in the periphery. The function of iTreg cells in tolerance was examined in a CD45RBhighCD4+ T cell transfer model of colitis. In situ-generated iTreg cells were similar to nTreg cells in their capacity to suppress T cell proliferation in vitro and their absence in vivo accelerated bowel disease. Treatment with nTreg cells reso...

  5. Peripheral tolerance through clonal deletion of mature CD4-CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlow, D A; Teh, S J; van Oers, N S; Miller, R G; Teh, H S

    1992-05-01

    Transgenic mice bearing the alpha beta transgenes encoding a defined T cell receptor specific for the male (H-Y) antigen presented by the H-2Db class I MHC molecule were used to study mechanisms of peripheral tolerance. Female transgenic mice produce large numbers of functionally homogeneous CD8+ male antigen-reactive T cells in the thymus that subsequently accumulate in the peripheral lymphoid organs. We have used three experimental approaches to show that male reactive CD8+ T cells can be eliminated from peripheral lymphoid organs after exposure to male antigen. (i) In female transgenic mice that were neonatally tolerized with male spleen cells, male reactive CD8+ T cells continued to be produced in large numbers in the thymus but were virtually absent in the lymph nodes. (ii) Injection of thymocytes from female transgenic mice into female mice neonatally tolerized with the male antigen, or into normal male mice, led to the specific elimination of male-reactive CD8+ T cells in the lymph nodes. (iii) Four days after male lymphoid cells were injected intravenously into female transgenic mice, male antigen-reactive CD8+ T cells recovered from the lymph nodes of recipient mice were highly apoptotic when compared to CD4+ (non-male reactive) T cells. These data indicate that tolerance to extrathymic antigen can be achieved through elimination of mature T cells in the peripheral lymphoid organs.

  6. Changes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell membrane components and promotion to ethanol tolerance during the bioethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shi-Jun; Yi, Chen-Feng; Li, Hao

    2015-12-01

    During bioethanol fermentation process, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell membrane might provide main protection to tolerate accumulated ethanol, and S. cerevisiae cells might also remodel their membrane compositions or structure to try to adapt to or tolerate the ethanol stress. However, the exact changes and roles of S. cerevisiae cell membrane components during bioethanol fermentation still remains poorly understood. This study was performed to clarify changes and roles of S. cerevisiae cell membrane components during bioethanol fermentation. Both cell diameter and membrane integrity decreased as fermentation time lasting. Moreover, compared with cells at lag phase, cells at exponential and stationary phases had higher contents of ergosterol and oleic acid (C18:1) but lower levels of hexadecanoic (C16:0) and palmitelaidic (C16:1) acids. Contents of most detected phospholipids presented an increase tendency during fermentation process. Increased contents of oleic acid and phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acids might indicate enhanced cell membrane fluidity. Compared with cells at lag phase, cells at exponential and stationary phases had higher expressions of ACC1 and HFA1. However, OLE1 expression underwent an evident increase at exponential phase but a decrease at following stationary phase. These results indicated that during bioethanol fermentation process, yeast cells remodeled membrane and more changeable cell membrane contributed to acquiring higher ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae cells. These results highlighted our knowledge about relationship between the variation of cell membrane structure and compositions and ethanol tolerance, and would contribute to a better understanding of bioethanol fermentation process and construction of industrial ethanologenic strains with higher ethanol tolerance.

  7. Production of Transgenic Tall Fescue Plants with Enhanced Stress Tolerances by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-Mediated Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Guan-ting; CHEN Jin-qing; HU Zhang-hua; LANG Chun-xiu; CHEN Xiao-yun; WANG Fu-lin; JIN Wei; XIA Ying-wu

    2006-01-01

    In order to improve stress tolerances of turf-type tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105 carrying plasmid pCMD containing stress tolerance-related CBF1 gene from Arabidopsis thaliana was used to transform mature seeds-derived embryogenic calli of four cultivars. A total of 112 transgenic plants were regenerated from 32 independent lines and verified by histochemical detection of GUS activity, PCR assay and Southern hybridization analysis. The transformation frequency ranged from 0.92 to 2.87% with apparent differences among the cultivars. Stress tolerances of transgenic plants were enhanced, which was shown by the facts that transgenic plants had distinct growth superiority and significantly higher survival rate than non-transformed ones under high salinity and high osmosis stresses,and that relative electronic conductivity of in vitro leaves treated with low and high temperatures, dehydration and high salinity stresses was 25-30% lower in transgenic plants than in control plants. In addition, it was observed that growth of transgenic plants was inhibited due to constitutive overexpression of CBF1 gene under normal environmental conditions.

  8. Adenovirus-mediated CTLA4Ig gene inhibits infiltration of immune cells and cell apoptosis in rats after liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Ping Jiang; Zhen-Hua Hu; Shu-Sen Zheng; Chang-Ku Jia; Ai-Bin Zhang; Wei-Lin Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of adenovirus-mediated CTLA4Ig gene therapy in inhibiting the infiltration of macrophages and CD8+T cells and cell apoptosis after liver transplantation.METHODS: The rat orthotopic liver transplantation model was applied. The rats were divided into three groups:group Ⅰ: rejection control (SD-to-Wistar); group Ⅱ: acute rejection treated with intramuscular injection of CsA injection of 1× 109 PFU adenovirus-mediated CTLA4Ig gene liquor in dorsal vein of penis 7 d before liver transplantation(SD-to-Wistar+CTLA4Ig). Immunohistochemistry and transferase-mediated dUTPnick-end labeling (TUNEL)were used to analyze the expression of CTLA4Ig gene in liver, infiltration of macrophages and CD8+T cells, cell apoptosis in grafts at different time-points after liver transplantation. Histopathological examination was done.RESULTS: CTLA4Ig gene expression was positive in liver on d 7 after administering adenovirus-mediated CTLA4Ig gene via vein, and remained positive until day 60 after liver transplantation. Infiltration of macrophages and CD8+T cells in CTLA4Ig-treated group was less than in rejection control group and CsA-treated group. The apoptotic index of rejection group on d 3, 5, and 7 were significantly higher than that of CTLA4Ig-treated group. A good correlation was found between severity of rejection reaction and infiltration of immune activator cells or cell apoptotic index in grafts.CONCLUSION: CTLA4Ig gene is constantly expressed in liver and plays an important role in inducing immune tolerance.

  9. CD11c⁺ cells partially mediate the renoprotective effect induced by bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Gyu Kim

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that induction of immune tolerance by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is partially mediated via monocytes or dendritic cells (DCs. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of CD11c⁺ cells in MSC-induced effects on ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI. IRI was induced in wildtype (WT mice and CD11c⁺-depleted mice following pretreatment with or without MSCs. In the in-vitro experiments, the MSC-treated CD11c⁺ cells acquired regulatory phenotype with increased intracellular IL-10 production. Although splenocytes cocultured with MSCs showed reduced T cell proliferation and expansion of CD4⁺FoxP3⁺ regulatory T cells (Tregs, depletion of CD11c⁺ cells was associated with partial loss of MSCs effect on T cells. In in-vivo experiment, MSCs' renoprotective effect was also associated with induction of more immature CD11c⁺ cells and increased FoxP3 expression in I/R kidneys. However all these effects induced by the MSCs were partially abrogated when CD11c⁺ cells were depleted in the CD11c⁺-DTR transgenic mice. In addition, the observation that adoptive transfer of WT CD11c⁺ cells partially restored the beneficial effect of the MSCs, while transferring IL-10 deficient CD11c⁺ cells did not, strongly suggest the important contribution of IL-10 producing CD11c⁺ cells in attenuating kidney injury by MSCs. Our results suggest that the CD11c⁺ cell-Tregs play critical role in mediating renoprotective effect of MSCs.

  10. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Mediated Functional Tooth Regeneration in Swine

    OpenAIRE

    Wataru Sonoyama; Yi Liu; Dianji Fang; Takayoshi Yamaza; Byoung-Moo Seo; Chunmei Zhang; He Liu; Stan Gronthos; Cun-Yu Wang; Songlin Wang; Songtao Shi

    2006-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla). Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This wo...

  11. The growth threshold conjecture: a theoretical framework for understanding T-cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Clemente F; Herrero, Miguel A; Cuesta, José A; Acosta, Francisco J; Fernández-Arias, Cristina

    2015-07-01

    Adaptive immune responses depend on the capacity of T cells to target specific antigens. As similar antigens can be expressed by pathogens and host cells, the question naturally arises of how can T cells discriminate friends from foes. In this work, we suggest that T cells tolerate cells whose proliferation rates remain below a permitted threshold. Our proposal relies on well-established facts about T-cell dynamics during acute infections: T-cell populations are elastic (they expand and contract) and they display inertia (contraction is delayed relative to antigen removal). By modelling inertia and elasticity, we show that tolerance to slow-growing populations can emerge as a population-scale feature of T cells. This result suggests a theoretical framework to understand immune tolerance that goes beyond the self versus non-self dichotomy. It also accounts for currently unexplained observations, such as the paradoxical tolerance to slow-growing pathogens or the presence of self-reactive T cells in the organism.

  12. Polycation-mediated integrated cell death processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parhamifar, Ladan; Andersen, Helene; Wu, Linping;

    2014-01-01

    standard. PEIs are highly efficient transfectants, but depending on their architecture and size they induce cytotoxicity through different modes of cell death pathways. Here, we briefly review dynamic and integrated cell death processes and pathways, and discuss considerations in cell death assay design...

  13. Hydrogen sulfide donor sodium hydrosulfide-induced heat tolerance in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) suspension cultured cells and involvement of Ca(2+) and calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-Guang; Gong, Ming; Xie, Hong; Yang, Lan; Li, Jing

    2012-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is considered as a new emerging cell signal in higher plants. Hydrogen sulfide donor, sodium hydrosulfide, pretreatment significantly increased survival percentage of tobacco suspension cultured cells under heat stress and regrowth ability after heat stress, and alleviated decrease in vitality of cells, increase in electrolyte leakage and accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA). In addition, sodium hydrosulfide-induced heat tolerance was markedly strengthened by application of exogenous Ca(2+) and its ionophore A23187, respectively, while this heat tolerance was weakened by addition of Ca(2+) chelator ethylene glycol-bis(b-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), plasma membrane channel blocker La(3+), as well as calmodulin (CaM) antagonists chlorpromazine (CPZ) and trifluoperazine (TFP), respectively, but intracellular channel blocker ruthenium red (RR) did not. These results suggested that sodium hydrosulfide pretreatment could improve heat tolerance in tobacco suspension cultured cells and the acquisition of this heat tolerance requires the entry of extracellular Ca(2+) into cells across the plasma membrane and the mediation of intracellular CaM.

  14. Induced regulatory T cells in allograft tolerance via transient mixed chimerism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Kiyohiko; Aoyama, Akihiro; Oura, Tetsu; Yamada, Yohei; Tonsho, Makoto; Huh, Kyu Ha; Kawai, Kento; Schoenfeld, David; Allan, James S.; Madsen, Joren C.; Benichou, Gilles; Smith, Rex-Neal; Colvin, Robert B.; Sachs, David H.; Cosimi, A. Benedict; Kawai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Successful induction of allograft tolerance has been achieved in nonhuman primates (NHPs) and humans via induction of transient hematopoietic chimerism. Since allograft tolerance was achieved in these recipients without durable chimerism, peripheral mechanisms are postulated to play a major role. Here, we report our studies of T cell immunity in NHP recipients that achieved long-term tolerance versus those that rejected the allograft (AR). All kidney, heart, and lung transplant recipients underwent simultaneous or delayed donor bone marrow transplantation (DBMT) following conditioning with a nonmyeloablative regimen. After DBMT, mixed lymphocyte culture with CFSE consistently revealed donor-specific loss of CD8+ T cell responses in tolerant (TOL) recipients, while marked CD4+ T cell proliferation in response to donor antigens was found to persist. Interestingly, a significant proportion of the proliferated CD4+ cells were FOXP3+ in TOL recipients, but not in AR or naive NHPs. In TOL recipients, CD4+FOXP3+ cell proliferation against donor antigens was greater than that observed against third-party antigens. Finally, the expanded Tregs appeared to be induced Tregs (iTregs) that were converted from non-Tregs. These data provide support for the hypothesis that specific induction of iTregs by donor antigens is key to long-term allograft tolerance induced by transient mixed chimerism. PMID:27446989

  15. Cell therapy to induce allograft tolerance: Time to switch to plan B?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine eSicard

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Organ transplantation is widely acknowledged as the best option for end stage failure of vital organs. Long-term graft survival is however limited by graft rejection, a destructive process resulting from the response of recipient’s immune system against donor-specific alloantigens. Prevention of rejection currently relies exclusively on immunosuppressive drugs that lack antigen specificity and therefore increase the risk for infections and cancers. Induction of donor-specific tolerance would provide indefinite graft survival without morbidity and therefore represents the Grail of transplant immunologists.Progresses in the comprehension of immunoregulatory mechanisms over the last decades have paved the way for cell therapies to induce allograft tolerance. The first part of the present article reviews the promising results obtained in experimental models with adoptive transfer of ex vivo-expanded regulatory CD4+ T cells (CD4+ Tregs and discuss which source and specificity should be preferred for transferred CD4+ Tregs. Interestingly, B cells have recently emerged as potent regulatory cells, able to establish a privileged crosstalk with CD4+ T cells. The second part of the present article reviews the evidences demonstrating the crucial role of regulatory B cells in transplantation tolerance. We propose the possibility to harness B cell regulatory functions to improve cell-based therapies aiming at inducing allograft tolerance.

  16. Proglucagon Promoter Cre-Mediated AMPK Deletion in Mice Increases Circulating GLP-1 Levels and Oral Glucose Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie R Sayers

    Full Text Available Enteroendocrine L-cells synthesise and release the gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 in response to food transit. Deletion of the tumour suppressor kinase LKB1 from proglucagon-expressing cells leads to the generation of intestinal polyps but no change in circulating GLP-1 levels. Here, we explore the role of the downstream kinase AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in these cells.Loss of AMPK from proglucagon-expressing cells was achieved using a preproglucagon promoter-driven Cre (iGluCre to catalyse recombination of floxed alleles of AMPKα1 and α2. Oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance were measured using standard protocols. L-cell mass was measured by immunocytochemistry. Hormone and peptide levels were measured by electrochemical-based luminescence detection or radioimmunoassay.Recombination with iGluCre led to efficient deletion of AMPK from intestinal L- and pancreatic alpha-cells. In contrast to mice rendered null for LKB1 using the same strategy, mice deleted for AMPK displayed an increase (WT: 0.05 ± 0.01, KO: 0.09±0.02%, p<0.01 in L-cell mass and elevated plasma fasting (WT: 5.62 ± 0.800 pg/ml, KO: 14.5 ± 1.870, p<0.01 and fed (WT: 15.7 ± 1.48pg/ml, KO: 22.0 ± 6.62, p<0.01 GLP-1 levels. Oral, but not intraperitoneal, glucose tolerance was significantly improved by AMPK deletion, whilst insulin and glucagon levels were unchanged despite an increase in alpha to beta cell ratio (WT: 0.23 ± 0.02, KO: 0.33 ± 0.03, p<0.01.AMPK restricts L-cell growth and GLP-1 secretion to suppress glucose tolerance. Targeted inhibition of AMPK in L-cells may thus provide a new therapeutic strategy in some forms of type 2 diabetes.

  17. Cdc42-mediated tubulogenesis controls cell specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesavan, Gokul; Sand, Fredrik Wolfhagen; Greiner, Thomas Uwe;

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how cells polarize and coordinate tubulogenesis during organ formation is a central question in biology. Tubulogenesis often coincides with cell-lineage specification during organ development. Hence, an elementary question is whether these two processes are independently controlled......, or whether proper cell specification depends on formation of tubes. To address these fundamental questions, we have studied the functional role of Cdc42 in pancreatic tubulogenesis. We present evidence that Cdc42 is essential for tube formation, specifically for initiating microlumen formation and later...... for maintaining apical cell polarity. Finally, we show that Cdc42 controls cell specification non-cell-autonomously by providing the correct microenvironment for proper control of cell-fate choices of multipotent progenitors. For a video summary of this article, see the PaperFlick file with the Supplemental Data...

  18. Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells and Central Tolerance in Autoimmune Hepatitis Development: Novel Perspective from a New Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina Alexandropoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH is an immune-mediated disorder that affects the liver parenchyma. Diagnosis usually occurs at the later stages of the disease, complicating efforts towards understanding the causes of disease development. While animal models are useful for studying the etiology of autoimmune disorders, most of the existing animal models of AIH do not recapitulate the chronic course of the human condition. In addition, approaches to mimic AIH-associated liver inflammation have instead led to liver tolerance, consistent with the high tolerogenic capacity of the liver. Recently, we described a new mouse model that exhibited spontaneous and chronic liver inflammation that recapitulated the known histopathological and immunological parameters of AIH. The approach involved liver-extrinsic genetic engineering that interfered with the induction of T-cell tolerance in the thymus, the very process thought to inhibit AIH induction by liver-specific expression of exogenous antigens. The mutation led to depletion of specialized thymic epithelial cells that present self-antigens and eliminate autoreactive T-cells before they exit the thymus. Based on our findings, which are summarized below, we believe that this mouse model represents a relevant experimental tool towards elucidating the cellular and molecular aspects of AIH development and developing novel therapeutic strategies for treating this disease.

  19. Multifactorial aspects of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Kapur

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on diseases of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction via FcγRs on phagocytes, in particular regarding platelets in fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and red blood cells (RBC) in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). Di

  20. Sialic acid-modified antigens impose tolerance via inhibition of T-cell proliferation and de novo induction of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdicchio, Maurizio; Ilarregui, Juan M; Verstege, Marleen I; Cornelissen, Lenneke A M; Schetters, Sjoerd T T; Engels, Steef; Ambrosini, Martino; Kalay, Hakan; Veninga, Henrike; den Haan, Joke M M; van Berkel, Lisette A; Samsom, Janneke N; Crocker, Paul R; Sparwasser, Tim; Berod, Luciana; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; van Kooyk, Yvette; Unger, Wendy W J

    2016-03-22

    Sialic acids are negatively charged nine-carbon carboxylated monosaccharides that often cap glycans on glycosylated proteins and lipids. Because of their strategic location at the cell surface, sialic acids contribute to interactions that are critical for immune homeostasis via interactions with sialic acid-binding Ig-type lectins (siglecs). In particular, these interactions may be of importance in cases where sialic acids may be overexpressed, such as on certain pathogens and tumors. We now demonstrate that modification of antigens with sialic acids (Sia-antigens) regulates the generation of antigen-specific regulatory T (Treg) cells via dendritic cells (DCs). Additionally, DCs that take up Sia-antigen prevent formation of effector CD4(+) and CD8(+)T cells. Importantly, the regulatory properties endowed on DCs upon Sia-antigen uptake are antigen-specific: only T cells responsive to the sialylated antigen become tolerized. In vivo, injection of Sia-antigen-loaded DCs increased de novo Treg-cell numbers and dampened effector T-cell expansion and IFN-γ production. The dual tolerogenic features that Sia-antigen imposed on DCs are Siglec-E-mediated and maintained under inflammatory conditions. Moreover, loading DCs with Sia-antigens not only inhibited the function of in vitro-established Th1 and Th17 effector T cells but also significantly dampened ex vivo myelin-reactive T cells, present in the circulation of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data indicate that sialic acid-modified antigens instruct DCs in an antigen-specific tolerogenic programming, enhancing Treg cells and reducing the generation and propagation of inflammatory T cells. Our data suggest that sialylation of antigens provides an attractive way to induce antigen-specific immune tolerance. PMID:26941238

  1. Behavioural and morphological evidence for the involvement of glial cell activation in delta opioid receptor function: implications for the development of opioid tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Anna MW

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previous studies have demonstrated that prolonged morphine treatment in vivo induces the translocation of delta opioid receptors (δORs from intracellular compartments to neuronal plasma membranes and this trafficking event is correlated with an increased functional competence of the receptor. The mechanism underlying this phenomenon is unknown; however chronic morphine treatment has been shown to involve the activation and hypertrophy of spinal glial cells. In the present study we have examined whether activated glia may be associated with the enhanced δOR-mediated antinociception observed following prolonged morphine treatment. Accordingly, animals were treated with morphine with or without concomitant administration of propentofylline, an inhibitor of glial activation that was previously shown to block the development of morphine antinociceptive tolerance. The morphine regimen previously demonstrated to initiate δOR trafficking induced the activation of both astrocytes and microglia in the dorsal spinal cord as indicated by a significant increase in cell volume and cell surface area. Consistent with previous data, morphine-treated rats displayed a significant augmentation in δOR-mediated antinociception. Concomitant spinal administration of propentofylline with morphine significantly attenuated the spinal immune response as well as the morphine-induced enhancement of δOR-mediated effects. These results complement previous reports that glial activation contributes to a state of opioid analgesic tolerance, and also suggest that neuro-glial communication is likely responsible in part for the altered functional competence in δOR-mediated effects following morphine treatment.

  2. Physiological and proteomic analysis of selenium-mediated tolerance to Cd stress in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongyan; Dai, Huaxin; Wang, Xiaoyun; Wang, Guohui

    2016-11-01

    Selenium can mitigate cadmium toxicity in plants. However, the mechanism of this alleviation has not been fully understood. In the present study, the role of Se in inducing tolerance to Cd stress in cucumber was elucidated. Results showed that Se significantly alleviated Cd-induced growth inhibition, reduced Cd concentration, increased SPAD value and improved photosynthetic performance. Through proteomic analysis by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with mass spectrometry, 26 protein spots were identified, which were significantly influenced by Cd stress and/or Se application. Among these proteins, the abundance of 21 spots (10 in leaves and 11 in roots) were repressed in Cd-treated and up-accumulated or no-changed in Cd+Se-treated cucumber. These altered proteins were involved in the response to stress, metabolism, photosynthesis and storage, they were including glutathione S-transferase F8, heat shock protein STI-like, peroxidase, ascorbate oxidase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase 2, NiR, Rieske type ion sulfur subunit and PsbP domain-containing protein 6. Furthermore, we identified five proteins with an increase in relative abundance after Cd treatment, they were involved in the functional groups active in response to stress and transport. The present study provided novel insights into Se-mediated tolerance of cucumber seedlings against Cd toxicity at the proteome level.

  3. Trichoderma species mediated differential tolerance against biotic stress of phytopathogens in Cicer arietinum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Amrita; Raghuwanshi, Richa; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur

    2015-02-01

    Trichoderma spp. have been reported to aid in imparting biotic as well as abiotic tolerance to plants. However, there are only few reports unfolding the differential ability of separate species of Trichoderma genera generally exploited for their biocontrol potential in this framework. A study was undertaken to evaluate the biocontrol potential of different Trichoderma species namely T. harzianum, T. asperellum, T. koningiopsis, T. longibrachiatum, and T. aureoviride as identified in the group of indigenous isolates from the agricultural soils of Eastern Uttar Pradesh, India. Their biocontrol potential against three major soilborne phytopathogens, i.e., Sclerotium rolfsii, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and Colletotrichum capsici was confirmed by dual culture plate technique. Efficient mycoparasitic ability was further assessed in all the isolates in relation to chitinase, β-1,3 glucanase, pectinase, lipase, amylase, and cellulase production while equally consistent results were obtained for their probable phosphate solubilization and indole acetic acid (IAA) production abilities. The selected isolates were further subjected to test their ability to promote plant growth, to reduce disease incidence and to tolerate biotic stress in terms of lignification pattern against S. rolfsii in chickpea plants. Among the identified Trichoderma species, excellent results were observed for T. harzianum and T. koningiopsis indicating better biocontrol potential of these species in the group and thus exhibiting perspective for their commercial exploitation.

  4. Trichoderma species mediated differential tolerance against biotic stress of phytopathogens in Cicer arietinum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Amrita; Raghuwanshi, Richa; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur

    2015-02-01

    Trichoderma spp. have been reported to aid in imparting biotic as well as abiotic tolerance to plants. However, there are only few reports unfolding the differential ability of separate species of Trichoderma genera generally exploited for their biocontrol potential in this framework. A study was undertaken to evaluate the biocontrol potential of different Trichoderma species namely T. harzianum, T. asperellum, T. koningiopsis, T. longibrachiatum, and T. aureoviride as identified in the group of indigenous isolates from the agricultural soils of Eastern Uttar Pradesh, India. Their biocontrol potential against three major soilborne phytopathogens, i.e., Sclerotium rolfsii, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and Colletotrichum capsici was confirmed by dual culture plate technique. Efficient mycoparasitic ability was further assessed in all the isolates in relation to chitinase, β-1,3 glucanase, pectinase, lipase, amylase, and cellulase production while equally consistent results were obtained for their probable phosphate solubilization and indole acetic acid (IAA) production abilities. The selected isolates were further subjected to test their ability to promote plant growth, to reduce disease incidence and to tolerate biotic stress in terms of lignification pattern against S. rolfsii in chickpea plants. Among the identified Trichoderma species, excellent results were observed for T. harzianum and T. koningiopsis indicating better biocontrol potential of these species in the group and thus exhibiting perspective for their commercial exploitation. PMID:25205162

  5. Tolerogenic nanoparticles inhibit T cell-mediated autoimmunity through SOCS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeste, Ada; Takenaka, Maisa C; Mascanfroni, Ivan D; Nadeau, Meghan; Kenison, Jessica E; Patel, Bonny; Tukpah, Ann-Marcia; Babon, Jenny Aurielle B; DeNicola, Megan; Kent, Sally C; Pozo, David; Quintana, Francisco J

    2016-06-21

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell-dependent autoimmune disease that is characterized by the destruction of insulin-producing β cells in the pancreas. The administration to patients of ex vivo-differentiated FoxP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells or tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) that promote Treg cell differentiation is considered a potential therapy for T1D; however, cell-based therapies cannot be easily translated into clinical practice. We engineered nanoparticles (NPs) to deliver both a tolerogenic molecule, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE), and the β cell antigen proinsulin (NPITE+Ins) to induce a tolerogenic phenotype in DCs and promote Treg cell generation in vivo. NPITE+Ins administration to 8-week-old nonobese diabetic mice suppressed autoimmune diabetes. NPITE+Ins induced a tolerogenic phenotype in DCs, which was characterized by a decreased ability to activate inflammatory effector T cells and was concomitant with the increased differentiation of FoxP3(+) Treg cells. The induction of a tolerogenic phenotype in DCs by NPs was mediated by the AhR-dependent induction of Socs2, which resulted in inhibition of nuclear factor κB activation and proinflammatory cytokine production (properties of tolerogenic DCs). Together, these data suggest that NPs constitute a potential tool to reestablish tolerance in T1D and potentially other autoimmune disorders.

  6. Tolerogenic nanoparticles inhibit T cell-mediated autoimmunity through SOCS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeste, Ada; Takenaka, Maisa C; Mascanfroni, Ivan D; Nadeau, Meghan; Kenison, Jessica E; Patel, Bonny; Tukpah, Ann-Marcia; Babon, Jenny Aurielle B; DeNicola, Megan; Kent, Sally C; Pozo, David; Quintana, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell-dependent autoimmune disease that is characterized by the destruction of insulin-producing β cells in the pancreas. The administration to patients of ex vivo-differentiated FoxP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells or tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) that promote Treg cell differentiation is considered a potential therapy for T1D; however, cell-based therapies cannot be easily translated into clinical practice. We engineered nanoparticles (NPs) to deliver both a tolerogenic molecule, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE), and the β cell antigen proinsulin (NPITE+Ins) to induce a tolerogenic phenotype in DCs and promote Treg cell generation in vivo. NPITE+Ins administration to 8-week-old nonobese diabetic mice suppressed autoimmune diabetes. NPITE+Ins induced a tolerogenic phenotype in DCs, which was characterized by a decreased ability to activate inflammatory effector T cells and was concomitant with the increased differentiation of FoxP3(+) Treg cells. The induction of a tolerogenic phenotype in DCs by NPs was mediated by the AhR-dependent induction of Socs2, which resulted in inhibition of nuclear factor κB activation and proinflammatory cytokine production (properties of tolerogenic DCs). Together, these data suggest that NPs constitute a potential tool to reestablish tolerance in T1D and potentially other autoimmune disorders. PMID:27330188

  7. Introduction of Pea DNA Helicase 45 Into Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. Hybrid) Enhances Cell Membrane Thermostability And Upregulation Of Stress-responsive Genes Leads To Abiotic Stress Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Sruthy Maria; Ashwin Narayan, J; Syamaladevi, Divya P; Appunu, C; Chakravarthi, M; Ravichandran, V; Tuteja, Narendra; Subramonian, N

    2015-05-01

    DNA helicases are motor proteins that play an essential role in nucleic acid metabolism, by providing a duplex-unwinding function. To improve the drought and salinity tolerance of sugarcane, a DEAD-box helicase gene isolated from pea with a constitutive promoter, Port Ubi 2.3 was transformed into the commercial sugarcane variety Co 86032 through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and the transgenics were screened for tolerance to soil moisture stress and salinity. The transgene integration was confirmed through polymerase chain reaction, and the V 0 transgenic events showed significantly higher cell membrane thermostability under normal irrigated conditions. The V 1 transgenic events were screened for tolerance to soil moisture stress and exhibited significantly higher cell membrane thermostability, transgene expression, relative water content, gas exchange parameters, chlorophyll content, and photosynthetic efficiency under soil moisture stress compared to wild-type (WT). The overexpression of PDH45 transgenic sugarcane also led to the upregulation of DREB2-induced downstream stress-related genes. The transgenic events demonstrated higher germination ability and better chlorophyll retention than WT under salinity stress. Our results suggest the possibility for development of increased abiotic stress tolerant sugarcane cultivars through overexpression of PDH45 gene. Perhaps this is the first report, which provides evidence for increased drought and salinity tolerance in sugarcane through overexpression of PDH45.

  8. Mast Cells Contribute to Peripheral Tolerance and Attenuate Autoimmune Vasculitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gan, Poh-Yi; Summers, Shaun A.; Ooi, Joshua D.; O’Sullivan, Kim M.; Tan, Diana S.Y.; Muljadi, Ruth C.M.; Odobasic, Dragana; Kitching, A. Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells contribute to the modulation of the immune response, but their role in autoimmune renal disease is not well understood. Here, we induced autoimmunity resulting in focal necrotizing GN by immunizing wild-type or mast cell-deficient (KitW-sh/W-sh) mice with myeloperoxidase. Mast cell-deficient mice exhibited more antimyeloperoxidase CD4+ T cells, enhanced dermal delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to myeloperoxidase, and more severe focal necrotizing GN. Furthermore, the lymph no...

  9. Bone marrow stromal cell: mediated neuroprotection for spinal cord repair

    OpenAIRE

    Ritfeld, Gaby Jane

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no treatment available that restores anatomy and function after spinal cord injury. This thesis explores transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bone marrow stromal cells; BMSCs) as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. BMSCs secrete neurotrophic factors, enabling neuroprotection/tissue sparing in a rat model of spinal cord injury. In this model system, bone marrow stromal cell-mediated tissue sparing leads to motor and sensory function impr...

  10. The human fetal placenta promotes tolerance against the semiallogeneic fetus by inducing regulatory T cells and homeostatic M2 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson-Arvelund, Judit; Mehta, Ratnesh B; Lindau, Robert; Mirrasekhian, Elahe; Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto; Berg, Göran; Lash, Gendie E; Jenmalm, Maria C; Ernerudh, Jan

    2015-02-15

    A successful pregnancy requires that the maternal immune system is instructed to a state of tolerance to avoid rejection of the semiallogeneic fetal-placental unit. Although increasing evidence supports that decidual (uterine) macrophages and regulatory T cells (Tregs) are key regulators of fetal tolerance, it is not known how these tolerogenic leukocytes are induced. In this article, we show that the human fetal placenta itself, mainly through trophoblast cells, is able to induce homeostatic M2 macrophages and Tregs. Placental-derived M-CSF and IL-10 induced macrophages that shared the CD14(+)CD163(+)CD206(+)CD209(+) phenotype of decidual macrophages and produced IL-10 and CCL18 but not IL-12 or IL-23. Placental tissue also induced the expansion of CD25(high)CD127(low)Foxp3(+) Tregs in parallel with increased IL-10 production, whereas production of IFN-γ (Th1), IL-13 (Th2), and IL-17 (Th17) was not induced. Tregs expressed the suppressive markers CTLA-4 and CD39, were functionally suppressive, and were induced, in part, by IL-10, TGF-β, and TRAIL. Placental-derived factors also limited excessive Th cell activation, as shown by decreased HLA-DR expression and reduced secretion of Th1-, Th2-, and Th17-associated cytokines. Thus, our data indicate that the fetal placenta has a central role in promoting the homeostatic environment necessary for successful pregnancy. These findings have implications for immune-mediated pregnancy complications, as well as for our general understanding of tissue-induced tolerance. PMID:25560409

  11. Regulatory T cells: serious contenders in the promise for immunological tolerance in transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloufar eSafinia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs play an important role in immunoregulation and have been shown in animal models to promote transplantation tolerance and curb autoimmunity following their adoptive transfer. The safety and potential therapeutic efficacy of these cells has already been reported in Phase I trials of bone marrow transplantation and type I diabetes, the success of which has motivated the broadened application of these cells in solid organ transplantation. Despite major advances in the clinical translation of these cells, there are still key questions to be addressed to ensure that Tregs attest their reputation as ideal candidates for tolerance induction. In this review, we will discuss the unique traits of Tregs that have attracted such fame in the arena of tolerance induction. We will outline the protocols used for their ex vivo expansion and discuss the future directions of Treg cell therapy. In this regard, we will review the concept of Treg heterogeneity, the desire to isolate and expand a functionally superior Treg population and report on the effect of differing culture conditions. The relevance of Treg migratory capacity will also be discussed together with methods of in vivo visualization of the infused cells. Moreover, we will highlight key advances in the identification and expansion of antigen specific Tregs and discuss their significance for cell therapy application. We will also summarize the clinical parameters that are of importance, alongside cell manufacture, from the choice of immunosuppression regimens to the number of injections in order to direct the success of future efficacy trials of Treg cell therapy.Years of research in the field of tolerance have seen an accumulation of knowledge and expertise in the field of Treg biology. This perpetual progression has been the driving force behind the many successes to date and has put us now within touching distance of our ultimate success, immunological tolerance.

  12. Thrombospondin-1-N-Terminal Domain Induces a Phagocytic State and Thrombospondin-1-C-Terminal Domain Induces a Tolerizing Phenotype in Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabib, Adi; Krispin, Alon; Trahtemberg, Uriel; Verbovetski, Inna; Lebendiker, Mario; Danieli, Tsafi; Mevorach, Dror

    2009-01-01

    In our previous study, we have found that thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is synthesized de novo upon monocyte and neutrophil apoptosis, leading to a phagocytic and tolerizing phenotype of dendritic cells (DC), even prior to DC-apoptotic cell interaction. Interestingly, we were able to show that heparin binding domain (HBD), the N-terminal portion of TSP-1, was cleaved and secreted simultaneously in a caspase- and serine protease- dependent manner. In the current study we were interested to examine the role of HBD in the clearance of apoptotic cells, and whether the phagocytic and tolerizing state of DCs is mediated by the HBD itself, or whether the entire TSP-1 is needed. Therefore, we have cloned the human HBD, and compared its interactions with DC to those with TSP-1. Here we show that rHBD by itself is not directly responsible for immune paralysis and tolerizing phenotype of DCs, at least in the monomeric form, but has a significant role in rendering DCs phagocytic. Binding of TSP-1-C-terminal domain on the other hand induces a tolerizing phenotype in dendritic cells. PMID:19721725

  13. The phytochelatin transporters AtABCC1 and AtABCC2 mediate tolerance to cadmium and mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jiyoung; Song, Won-Yong; Ko, Donghwi; Eom, Yujin; Hansen, Thomas H; Schiller, Michaela; Lee, Tai Gyu; Martinoia, Enrico; Lee, Youngsook

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metals such as cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg) are toxic pollutants that are detrimental to living organisms. Plants employ a two-step mechanism to detoxify toxic ions. First, phytochelatins bind to the toxic ion, and then the metal-phytochelatin complex is sequestered in the vacuole. Two ABCC-type transporters, AtABCC1 and AtABCC2, that play a key role in arsenic detoxification, have recently been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it is unclear whether these transporters are also implicated in phytochelatin-dependent detoxification of other heavy metals such as Cd(II) and Hg(II). Here, we show that atabcc1 single or atabcc1 atabcc2 double knockout mutants exhibit a hypersensitive phenotype in the presence of Cd(II) and Hg(II). Microscopic analysis using a Cd-sensitive probe revealed that Cd is mostly located in the cytosol of protoplasts of the double mutant, whereas it occurs mainly in the vacuole of wild-type cells. This suggests that the two ABCC transporters are important for vacuolar sequestration of Cd. Heterologous expression of the transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confirmed their role in heavy metal tolerance. Over-expression of AtABCC1 in Arabidopsis resulted in enhanced Cd(II) tolerance and accumulation. Together, these results demonstrate that AtABCC1 and AtABCC2 are important vacuolar transporters that confer tolerance to cadmium and mercury, in addition to their role in arsenic detoxification. These transporters provide useful tools for genetic engineering of plants with enhanced metal tolerance and accumulation, which are desirable characteristics for phytoremediation.

  14. Ion mediated targeting of cells with nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Vivek; Fu, Jinlong

    2010-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, Ca^2+ ions are necessary for intracellular signaling, in activity of mitochondria and a variety of other cellular process that have been linked to cell apoptosis, proteins synthesis and cell-cycle regulation. Here we show that Ca^2+ ions, serving as the bio-compatible interface can be used to target Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SaC, baker's yeast), a model eukaryotic cell, with Au nanoparticles (10 nm). The Ca^2+ ions bind to the carboxylic acid groups in the citrate functionalized Au nanoparticles. This transforms the nanoparticles into micron long 1-D branched chain assemblies due to inter-particle dipole-dipole interaction and inter-particle bonding due to the divalent nature of the Ca^2+ ion. A similar transformation is observed with the use of divalent ions Mg^2+, Cd^2+ and Fe^2+. The 1-D assembly aids the interfacing of ion-nanoparticles on the cell by providing multiple contact points. Further monovalent ions such as Na^+ are also effective for the targeting of the cell with nanoparticles. However Na-Au nanoparticles are limited in their deposition as they exist in solution as single particles. The cells remain alive after the deposition process and their vitality is unaffected by the interfacing with ion-nanoparticles.

  15. Laser-mediated perforation of plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Martin; Jacobs, Philipp; Esser, Dominik; Schinkel, Helga; Schillberg, Stefan

    2007-07-01

    The functional analysis of plant cells at the cellular and subcellular levels requires novel technologies for the directed manipulation of individual cells. Lasers are increasingly exploited for the manipulation of plant cells, enabling the study of biological processes on a subcellular scale including transformation to generate genetically modified plants. In our setup either a picosecond laser operating at 1064 nm wavelength or a continuous wave laser diode emitting at 405 nm are coupled into an inverse microscope. The beams are focused to a spot size of about 1.5 μm and the tobacco cell protoplasts are irradiated. Optoporation is achieved when targeting the laser focal spot at the outermost edge of the plasma membrane. In case of the picosecond laser a single pulse with energy of about 0.4 μJ was sufficient to perforate the plasma membrane enabling the uptake of dye or DNA from the surrounding medium into the cytosol. When the ultraviolet laser diode at a power level of 17 mW is employed an irradiation time of 200 - 500 milliseconds is necessary to enable the uptake of macromolecules. In the presence of an EYFP encoding plasmid with a C-terminal peroxisomal signal sequence in the surrounding medium transient transformation of tobacco protoplasts could be achieved in up to 2% of the optoporated cells. Single cell perforation using this novel optoporation method shows that isolated plant cells can be permeabilized without direct manipulation. This is a valuable procedure for cell-specific applications, particularly where the import of specific molecules into plant cells is required for functional analysis.

  16. Natural Killer Cells and Liver Transplantation: Orchestrators of Rejection or Tolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, C; Sanchez-Fueyo, A; O'Farrelly, C; Houlihan, D D

    2016-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are highly heterogeneous innate lymphocytes with a diverse repertoire of phenotypes and functions. Their role in organ transplantation has been poorly defined due to conflicting clinical and experimental data. There is evidence that NK cells can contribute to graft rejection and also to tolerance induction. In most solid organ transplantation settings, the role of NK cells is only considered from the perspective of the recipient immune system. In contrast to other organs, the liver contains major resident populations of immune cells, particularly enriched with innate lymphocytes such as NK cells, NKT cells, and gamma-delta T cells. Liver transplantation therefore results in a unique meeting of donor and recipient immune systems. The unusual immune repertoire and tolerogenic environment of the liver may explain why this potentially inflammatory "meeting" often results in attenuated immune responses and reduced requirement for immunosuppression. Recent trials of immunosuppression withdrawal in liver transplant patients have identified NK cell features as possible predictors of tolerance. Here we propose that hepatic NK cells play a key role in the induction of tolerance post-liver transplant and examine potential mechanisms by which these cells influence liver transplant outcome.

  17. Lymphatic endothelial cells induce tolerance via PD-L1 and lack of costimulation leading to high-level PD-1 expression on CD8 T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewalt, Eric F.; Cohen, Jarish N.; Rouhani, Sherin J.; Guidi, Cynthia J.; Qiao, Hui; Fahl, Shawn P.; Conaway, Mark R.; Bender, Timothy P.; Tung, Kenneth S.; Vella, Anthony T.; Adler, Adam J.; Chen, Lieping

    2012-01-01

    Lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) induce peripheral tolerance by direct presentation to CD8 T cells (TCD8). We demonstrate that LECs mediate deletion only via programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) ligand 1, despite expressing ligands for the CD160, B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator, and lymphocyte activation gene-3 inhibitory pathways. LECs induce activation and proliferation of TCD8, but lack of costimulation through 4-1BB leads to rapid high-level expression of PD-1, which in turn inhibits up-regulation of the high-affinity IL-2 receptor that is necessary for TCD8 survival. Rescue of tyrosinase-specific TCD8 by interference with PD-1 or provision of costimulation results in autoimmune vitiligo, demonstrating that LECs are significant, albeit suboptimal, antigen-presenting cells. Because LECs express numerous peripheral tissue antigens, lack of costimulation coupled to rapid high-level up-regulation of inhibitory receptors may be generally important in systemic peripheral tolerance. PMID:22993390

  18. Arsenic tolerance in Arabidopsis is mediated by two ABCC-type phytochelatin transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Won-Yong; Park, Jiyoung; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Suter-Grotemeyer, Marianne; Shim, Donghwan; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; Geisler, Markus; Weder, Barbara; Rea, Philip A; Rentsch, Doris; Schroeder, Julian I; Lee, Youngsook; Martinoia, Enrico

    2010-12-01

    Arsenic is an extremely toxic metalloid causing serious health problems. In Southeast Asia, aquifers providing drinking and agricultural water for tens of millions of people are contaminated with arsenic. To reduce nutritional arsenic intake through the consumption of contaminated plants, identification of the mechanisms for arsenic accumulation and detoxification in plants is a prerequisite. Phytochelatins (PCs) are glutathione-derived peptides that chelate heavy metals and metalloids such as arsenic, thereby functioning as the first step in their detoxification. Plant vacuoles act as final detoxification stores for heavy metals and arsenic. The essential PC-metal(loid) transporters that sequester toxic metal(loid)s in plant vacuoles have long been sought but remain unidentified in plants. Here we show that in the absence of two ABCC-type transporters, AtABCC1 and AtABCC2, Arabidopsis thaliana is extremely sensitive to arsenic and arsenic-based herbicides. Heterologous expression of these ABCC transporters in phytochelatin-producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae enhanced arsenic tolerance and accumulation. Furthermore, membrane vesicles isolated from these yeasts exhibited a pronounced arsenite [As(III)]-PC(2) transport activity. Vacuoles isolated from atabcc1 atabcc2 double knockout plants exhibited a very low residual As(III)-PC(2) transport activity, and interestingly, less PC was produced in mutant plants when exposed to arsenic. Overexpression of AtPCS1 and AtABCC1 resulted in plants exhibiting increased arsenic tolerance. Our findings demonstrate that AtABCC1 and AtABCC2 are the long-sought and major vacuolar PC transporters. Modulation of vacuolar PC transporters in other plants may allow engineering of plants suited either for phytoremediation or reduced accumulation of arsenic in edible organs.

  19. Reduction of methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress tolerance in antisense transgenic tobacco seedlings through restricted expression of StAPX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei-Hong; Wang, Yong; He, Hua-Gang; Li, Xue; Song, Wan; Du, Bin; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2013-07-01

    Ascorbate peroxidases are directly involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging by reducing hydrogen peroxide to water. The tomato thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase gene (StAPX) was introduced into tobacco. RNA gel blot analysis confirmed that StAPX in tomato leaves was induced by methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress. The sense transgenic seedlings exhibited higher tAPX activity than that of the wild type (WT) plants under oxidative stress conditions, while the antisense seedlings exhibited lower tAPX activity. Lower APX activities of antisense transgenic seedlings caused higher malondialdehyde contents and relative electrical conductivity. The sense transgenic seedlings with higher tAPX activity maintained higher chlorophyll content and showed the importance of tAPX in maintaining the optimal chloroplast development under methylviologen stress conditions, whereas the antisense lines maintained lower chlorophyll content than WT seedlings. Results indicated that the over-expression of StAPX enhanced tolerance to methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress in sense transgenic tobacco early seedlings, whereas the suppression of StAPX in antisense transgenic seedlings showed high sensitivity to oxidative stress.

  20. Reduction of methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress tolerance in antisense transgenic tobacco seedlings through restricted expression of StAPX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-hong SUN; Yong WANG; Hua-gang HE; Xue LI; Wan SONG; Bin DU; Qing-wei MENG

    2013-01-01

    Ascorbate peroxidases are directly involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging by reducing hydrogen peroxide to water.The tomato thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase gene (StAPX) was introduced into tobacco.RNA gel blot analysis confirmed that StAPX in tomato leaves was induced by methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress.The sense transgenic seedlings exhibited higher tAPX activity than that of the wild type (WT) plants under oxidative stress conditions,while the antisense seedlings exhibited lower tAPX activity.Lower APX activities of antisense transgenic seedlings caused higher malondialdehyde contents and relative electrical conductivity.The sense transgenic seedlings with higher tAPX activity maintained higher chlorophyll content and showed the importance of tAPX in maintaining the optimal chloroplast development under methylviologen stress conditions,whereas the antisense lines maintained lower chlorophyll content than WT seedlings.Results indicated that the over-expression of StAPX enhanced tolerance to methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress in sense transgenic tobacco early seedlings,whereas the suppression of StAPX in antisense transgenic seedlings showed high sensitivity to oxidative stress.

  1. Gz mediates the long-lasting desensitization of brain CB1 receptors and is essential for cross-tolerance with morphine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Muñoz María

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the systemic administration of cannabinoids produces antinociception, their chronic use leads to analgesic tolerance as well as cross-tolerance to morphine. These effects are mediated by cannabinoids binding to peripheral, spinal and supraspinal CB1 and CB2 receptors, making it difficult to determine the relevance of each receptor type to these phenomena. However, in the brain, the CB1 receptors (CB1Rs are expressed at high levels in neurons, whereas the expression of CB2Rs is marginal. Thus, CB1Rs mediate the effects of smoked cannabis and are also implicated in emotional behaviors. We have analyzed the production of supraspinal analgesia and the development of tolerance at CB1Rs by the direct injection of a series of cannabinoids into the brain. The influence of the activation of CB1Rs on supraspinal analgesia evoked by morphine was also evaluated. Results Intracerebroventricular (icv administration of cannabinoid receptor agonists, WIN55,212-2, ACEA or methanandamide, generated a dose-dependent analgesia. Notably, a single administration of these compounds brought about profound analgesic tolerance that lasted for more than 14 days. This decrease in the effect of cannabinoid receptor agonists was not mediated by depletion of CB1Rs or the loss of regulated G proteins, but, nevertheless, it was accompanied by reduced morphine analgesia. On the other hand, acute morphine administration produced tolerance that lasted only 3 days and did not affect the CB1R. We found that both neural mu-opioid receptors (MORs and CB1Rs interact with the HINT1-RGSZ module, thereby regulating pertussis toxin-insensitive Gz proteins. In mice with reduced levels of these Gz proteins, the CB1R agonists produced no such desensitization or morphine cross-tolerance. On the other hand, experimental enhancement of Gz signaling enabled an acute icv administration of morphine to produce a long-lasting tolerance at MORs that persisted for more than

  2. Absence of Amphotericin B-Tolerant Persister Cells in Biofilms of Some Candida Species▿

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Dhaheri, Rawya S.; Douglas, L. Julia

    2008-01-01

    Biofilms and planktonic cells of five Candida species were surveyed for the presence of persister (drug-tolerant) cell populations after exposure to amphotericin B. None of the planktonic cultures (exponential or stationary phase) contained persister cells. However, persisters were found in biofilms of one of two strains of Candida albicans tested and in biofilms of Candida krusei and Candida parapsilosis, but not in biofilms of Candida glabrata or Candida tropicalis. These results suggest th...

  3. Antigen dynamics govern the induction of CD4(+) T cell tolerance during autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challa, Dilip K; Mi, Wentao; Lo, Su-Tang; Ober, Raimund J; Ward, E Sally

    2016-08-01

    Antigen-specific T cell tolerance holds great promise for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, strategies to induce durable tolerance using high doses of soluble antigen have to date been unsuccessful, due to lack of efficacy and the risk of hypersensitivity. In the current study we have overcome these limitations by developing a platform for tolerance induction based on engineering the immunoglobulin Fc region to modulate the dynamic properties of low doses (1 μg/mouse; ∼50 μg/kg) of Fc-antigen fusions. Using this approach, we demonstrate that antigen persistence is a dominant factor governing the elicitation of tolerance in the model of multiple sclerosis (MS), experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), induced by immunizing B10.PL mice with the N-terminal epitope of myelin basic protein. Unexpectedly, our analyses reveal a stringent threshold of antigen persistence for both prophylactic and therapeutic treatments, although distinct mechanisms lead to tolerance in these two settings. Importantly, the delivery of tolerogenic Fc-antigen fusions during ongoing disease results in the downregulation of T-bet and CD40L combined with amplification of Foxp3(+) T cell numbers. The generation of effective, low dose tolerogens using Fc engineering has potential for the regulation of autoreactive T cells. PMID:27236506

  4. Oral tolerance to cancer can be abrogated by T regulatory cell inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C Whelan

    Full Text Available Oral administration of tumour cells induces an immune hypo-responsiveness known as oral tolerance. We have previously shown that oral tolerance to a cancer is tumour antigen specific, non-cross-reactive and confers a tumour growth advantage. We investigated the utilisation of regulatory T cell (Treg depletion on oral tolerance to a cancer and its ability to control tumour growth. Balb/C mice were gavage fed homogenised tumour tissue--JBS fibrosarcoma (to induce oral tolerance to a cancer, or PBS as control. Growth of subcutaneous JBS tumours were measured; splenic tissue excised and flow cytometry used to quantify and compare systemic Tregs and T effector (Teff cell populations. Prior to and/or following tumour feeding, mice were intraperitoneally administered anti-CD25, to inactivate systemic Tregs, or given isotype antibody as a control. Mice which were orally tolerised prior to subcutaneous tumour induction, displayed significantly higher systemic Treg levels (14% vs 6% and faster tumour growth rates than controls (p<0.05. Complete regression of tumours were only seen after Treg inactivation and occurred in all groups--this was not inhibited by tumour feeding. The cure rates for Treg inactivation were 60% during tolerisation, 75% during tumour growth and 100% during inactivation for both tolerisation and tumour growth. Depletion of Tregs gave rise to an increased number of Teff cells. Treg depletion post-tolerisation and post-tumour induction led to the complete regression of all tumours on tumour bearing mice. Oral administration of tumour tissue, confers a tumour growth advantage and is accompanied by an increase in systemic Treg levels. The administration of anti-CD25 Ab decreased Treg numbers and caused an increase in Teffs. Most notably Treg cell inhibition overcame established oral tolerance with consequent tumor regression, especially relevant to foregut cancers where oral tolerance is likely to be induced by the shedding of tumour

  5. Acquired cancer stem cell phenotypes through Oct4-mediated dedifferentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh M.; Liu, Shujing; Lu, Hezhe; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhang, Paul J.; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Guerra, Matthew; Guo, Wei; Xu, Xiaowei

    2012-01-01

    There is enormous interest to target cancer stem cells (CSCs) for clinical treatment because these cells are highly tumorigenic and resistant to chemotherapy. Oct4 is expressed by CSC-like cells in different types of cancer. However, function of Oct4 in tumor cells is unclear. In this study, we showed that expression of Oct4 gene or transmembrane delivery of Oct4 protein promoted dedifferentiation of melanoma cells to CSC-like cells. The dedifferentiated melanoma cells showed significantly decreased expression of melanocytic markers and acquired the ability to form tumor spheroids. They showed markedly increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and hypoxic injury. In the subcutaneous xenograft and tail vein injection assays, these cells had significantly increased tumorigenic capacity. The dedifferentiated melanoma cells acquired features associated with CSCs such as multipotent differentiation capacity and expression of melanoma CSC markers such as ABCB5 and CD271. Mechanistically, Oct4 induced dedifferentiation was associated with increased expression of endogenous Oct4, Nanog and Klf4, and global gene expression changes that enriched for transcription factors. RNAi mediated knockdown of Oct4 in dedifferentiated cells led to diminished CSC phenotypes. Oct4 expression in melanoma was regulated by hypoxia and its expression was detected in a subpopulation of melanoma cells in clinical samples. Our data indicate that Oct4 is a positive regulator of tumor dedifferentiation. The results suggest that CSC phenotype is dynamic and may be acquired through dedifferentiation. Oct4 mediated tumor cell dedifferentiation may play an important role during tumor progression. PMID:22286766

  6. Cortactin mediated morphogenic cell movements during zebrafish (Danio rerio) gastrulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Dan; ZHANG Peijun; ZHAN Xi

    2005-01-01

    Cell migration is essential to direct embryonic cells to specific sites at which their developmental fates are ultimately determined. However, the mechanism by which cell motility is regulated in embryonic development is largely unknown. Cortactin, a filamentous actin binding protein, is an activator of Arp2/3 complex in the nucleation of actin cytoskeleton at the cell leading edge and acts directly on the machinery of cell motility. To determine whether cortactin and Arp2/3 mediated actin assembly plays a role in the morphogenic cell movements during the early development of zebrafish, we initiated a study of cortactin expression in zebrafish embryos at gastrulating stages when massive cell migrations occur. Western blot analysis using a cortactin specific monoclonal antibody demonstrated that cortactin protein is abundantly present in embryos at the most early developmental stages. Immunostaining of whole-mounted embryo showed that cortactin immunoreactivity was associated with the embryonic shield, predominantly at the dorsal side of the embryos during gastrulation. In addition, cortactin was detected in the convergent cells of the epiblast and hypoblast, and later in the central nervous system. Immunofluorescent staining with cortactin and Arp3 antibodies also revealed that cortactin and Arp2/3 complex colocalized at the periphery and many patches associated with the cell-to-cell junction in motile embryonic cells. Therefore, our data suggest that cortactin and Arp2/3 mediated actin polymerization is implicated in the cell movement during gastrulation and perhaps the development of the central neural system as well.

  7. Immunological tolerance to muscle autoantigens involves peripheral deletion of autoreactive CD8+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Franck

    Full Text Available Muscle potentially represents the most abundant source of autoantigens of the body and can be targeted by a variety of severe autoimmune diseases. Yet, the mechanisms of immunological tolerance toward muscle autoantigens remain mostly unknown. We investigated this issue in transgenic SM-Ova mice that express an ovalbumin (Ova neo-autoantigen specifically in skeletal muscle. We previously reported that antigen specific CD4(+ T cell are immunologically ignorant to endogenous Ova in this model but can be stimulated upon immunization. In contrast, Ova-specific CD8(+ T cells were suspected to be either unresponsive to Ova challenge or functionally defective. We now extend our investigations on the mechanisms governing CD8(+ tolerance in SM-Ova mice. We show herein that Ova-specific CD8(+ T cells are not detected upon challenge with strongly immunogenic Ova vaccines even after depletion of regulatory T cells. Ova-specific CD8(+ T cells from OT-I mice adoptively transferred to SM-Ova mice started to proliferate in vivo, acquired CD69 and PD-1 but subsequently down-regulated Bcl-2 and disappeared from the periphery, suggesting a mechanism of peripheral deletion. Peripheral deletion of endogenous Ova-specific cells was formally demonstrated in chimeric SM-Ova mice engrafted with bone marrow cells containing T cell precursors from OT-I TCR-transgenic mice. Thus, the present findings demonstrate that immunological tolerance to muscle autoantigens involves peripheral deletion of autoreactive CD8(+ T cells.

  8. Tolerance induction and reversal of diabetes in mice transplanted with human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szot, Gregory L; Yadav, Mahesh; Lang, Jiena; Kroon, Evert; Kerr, Justin; Kadoya, Kuniko; Brandon, Eugene P; Baetge, Emmanuel E; Bour-Jordan, Hélène; Bluestone, Jeffrey A

    2015-02-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease caused by T cell-mediated destruction of insulin-producing β cells in the islets of Langerhans. In most cases, reversal of disease would require strategies combining islet cell replacement with immunotherapy that are currently available only for the most severely affected patients. Here, we demonstrate that immunotherapies that target T cell costimulatory pathways block the rejection of xenogeneic human embryonic-stem-cell-derived pancreatic endoderm (hESC-PE) in mice. The therapy allowed for long-term development of hESC-PE into islet-like structures capable of producing human insulin and maintaining normoglycemia. Moreover, short-term costimulation blockade led to robust immune tolerance that could be transferred independently of regulatory T cells. Importantly, costimulation blockade prevented the rejection of allogeneic hESC-PE by human PBMCs in a humanized model in vivo. These results support the clinical development of hESC-derived therapy, combined with tolerogenic treatments, as a sustainable alternative strategy for patients with T1D.

  9. Liver type I regulatory T cells suppress germinal center formation in HBV-tolerant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Long; Yin, Wenwei; Sun, Rui; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2013-10-15

    The liver plays a critical role in inducing systemic immune tolerance, for example, during limiting hypersensitivity to food allergy and in rendering acceptance of allotransplant or even hepatotropic pathogens. We investigated the unknown mechanisms of liver tolerance by using an established hepatitis B virus (HBV)-carrier mouse model, and found that these mice exhibited an antigen-specific tolerance toward peripheral HBsAg vaccination, showing unenlarged draining lymph node (DLN), lower number of germinal centers (GC), and inactivation of GC B cells and follicular T helper (Tfh) cells. Both in vivo and in vitro immune responses toward HBsAg were suppressed by mononuclear cells from HBV-carrier mice, which were CD4(+) Foxp3(-) type 1 regulatory T (Tr1)-like cells producing IL-10. Using recipient Rag1(-/-) mice, hepatic Tr1-like cells from day 7 of HBV-persistent mice acquired the ability to inhibit anti-HBV immunity 3 d earlier than splenic Tr1-like cells, implying that hepatic Tr1-like cells were generated before those in spleen. Kupffer cell depletion or IL-10 deficiency led to impairment of Tr1-like cell generation, along with breaking HBV persistence. The purified EGFP(+)CD4(+) T cells (containing Tr1-like cells) from HBV-carrier mice trafficked in higher numbers to DLN in recipient mice after HBsAg vaccination, and subsequently inactivated both Tfh cells and GC B cells via secreting IL-10, resulting in impaired GC formation and anti-HB antibody production. Thus, our results indicate Tr1-like cells migrate from the liver to the DLN and inhibit peripheral anti-HBV immunity by negatively regulating GC B cells and Tfh cells. PMID:24089450

  10. Glioma cell dispersion is driven by α5 integrin-mediated cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandin, Anne-Florence; Noulet, Fanny; Renner, Guillaume; Mercier, Marie-Cécile; Choulier, Laurence; Vauchelles, Romain; Ronde, Philippe; Carreiras, Franck; Etienne-Selloum, Nelly; Vereb, Gyorgy; Lelong-Rebel, Isabelle; Martin, Sophie; Dontenwill, Monique; Lehmann, Maxime

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive primary brain tumor. The fibronectin receptor, α5 integrin is a pertinent novel therapeutic target. Despite numerous data showing that α5 integrin support tumor cell migration and invasion, it has been reported that α5 integrin can also limit cell dispersion by increasing cell-cell interaction. In this study, we showed that α5 integrin was involved in cell-cell interaction and gliomasphere formation. α5-mediated cell-cell cohesion limited cell dispersion from spheroids in fibronectin-poor microenvironment. However, in fibronectin-rich microenvironment, α5 integrin promoted cell dispersion. Ligand-occupied α5 integrin and fibronectin were distributed in fibril-like pattern at cell-cell junction of evading cells, forming cell-cell fibrillar adhesions. Activated focal adhesion kinase was not present in these adhesions but was progressively relocalized with α5 integrin as cell migrates away from the spheroids. α5 integrin function in GBM appears to be more complex than previously suspected. As GBM overexpressed fibronectin, it is most likely that in vivo, α5-mediated dissemination from the tumor mass overrides α5-mediated tumor cell cohesion. In this respect, α5-integrin antagonists may be useful to limit GBM invasion in brain parenchyma. PMID:27063097

  11. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation of mammalian cells by chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a cell-mediated mutagenesis assay in which cells with the appropriate markers for mutagenesis are co-cultivated with either lethally irradiated rodent embryonic cells that can metabolize carcinogenic hydrocarbons or with primary rat liver cells that can metabolize chemicals carcinogenic to the liver. During co-cultivation, the reactive metabolites of the procarcinogen appear to be transmitted to the mutable cells and induce mutations in them. Assays of this type make it possible to demonstrate a relationship between carcinogenic potency of the chemicals and their ability to induce mutations in mammalian cells. In addition, by simultaneously comparing the frequencies of transformation and mutation induced in normal diploid hamster cells by benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and one of its metabolites, it is possible to estimate the genetic target size for cell transformation in vitro

  12. Parathyroid hormone mediates hematopoietic cell expansion through interleukin-6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Q Pirih

    Full Text Available Parathyroid hormone (PTH stimulates hematopoietic cells through mechanisms of action that remain elusive. Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is upregulated by PTH and stimulates hematopoiesis. The purpose of this investigation was to identify actions of PTH and IL-6 in hematopoietic cell expansion. Bone marrow cultures from C57B6 mice were treated with fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand (Flt-3L, PTH, Flt-3L plus PTH, or vehicle control. Flt-3L alone increased adherent and non-adherent cells. PTH did not directly impact hematopoietic or osteoclastic cells but acted in concert with Flt-3L to further increase cell numbers. Flt-3L alone stimulated proliferation, while PTH combined with Flt-3L decreased apoptosis. Flt-3L increased blasts early in culture, and later increased CD45(+ and CD11b(+ cells. In parallel experiments, IL-6 acted additively with Flt-3L to increase cell numbers and IL-6-deficient bone marrow cultures (compared to wildtype controls but failed to amplify in response to Flt-3L and PTH, suggesting that IL-6 mediated the PTH effect. In vivo, PTH increased Lin(- Sca-1(+c-Kit(+ (LSK hematopoietic progenitor cells after PTH treatment in wildtype mice, but failed to increase LSKs in IL-6-deficient mice. In conclusion, PTH acts with Flt-3L to maintain hematopoietic cells by limiting apoptosis. IL-6 is a critical mediator of bone marrow cell expansion and is responsible for PTH actions in hematopoietic cell expansion.

  13. Stem cell  mediated liver regeneration:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Peter

    udformet en strategi som involverede isolering af HPCr vha. Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). Isolerede celler skulle efterfølgende undersøges ved in vitro studier som implicerede tilsætning af specifikke immunrespons relaterede faktorer. Kun få specifikke overflade HPC markører er blevet...

  14. Intratumoral oxygen gradients mediate sarcoma cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Daniel M; Park, Kyung Min; Tang, Vitor; Xu, Yu; Pak, Koreana; Eisinger-Mathason, T S Karin; Simon, M Celeste; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-08-16

    Hypoxia is a critical factor in the progression and metastasis of many cancers, including soft tissue sarcomas. Frequently, oxygen (O2) gradients develop in tumors as they grow beyond their vascular supply, leading to heterogeneous areas of O2 depletion. Here, we report the impact of hypoxic O2 gradients on sarcoma cell invasion and migration. O2 gradient measurements showed that large sarcoma mouse tumors (>300 mm(3)) contain a severely hypoxic core [≤0.1% partial pressure of O2 (pO2)] whereas smaller tumors possessed hypoxic gradients throughout the tumor mass (0.1-6% pO2). To analyze tumor invasion, we used O2-controllable hydrogels to recreate the physiopathological O2 levels in vitro. Small tumor grafts encapsulated in the hydrogels revealed increased invasion that was both faster and extended over a longer distance in the hypoxic hydrogels compared with nonhypoxic hydrogels. To model the effect of the O2 gradient accurately, we examined individual sarcoma cells embedded in the O2-controllable hydrogel. We observed that hypoxic gradients guide sarcoma cell motility and matrix remodeling through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activation. We further found that in the hypoxic gradient, individual cells migrate more quickly, across longer distances, and in the direction of increasing O2 tension. Treatment with minoxidil, an inhibitor of hypoxia-induced sarcoma metastasis, abrogated cell migration and matrix remodeling in the hypoxic gradient. Overall, we show that O2 acts as a 3D physicotactic agent during sarcoma tumor invasion and propose the O2-controllable hydrogels as a predictive system to study early stages of the metastatic process and therapeutic targets. PMID:27486245

  15. Interferon-α abrogates tolerance induction by human tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Bacher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Administration of interferon-α (IFN-α represents an approved adjuvant therapy as reported for malignancies like melanoma and several viral infections. In malignant diseases, tolerance processes are critically involved in tumor progression. In this study, the effect of IFN-α on tolerance induction by human tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC was analyzed. We focussed on tolerogenic IL-10-modulated DC (IL-10 DC that are known to induce anergic regulatory T cells (iTregs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: IFN-α promoted an enhanced maturation of IL-10 DC as demonstrated by upregulation of the differentiation marker CD83 as well as costimulatory molecules. IFN-α treatment resulted in an increased capacity of DC to stimulate T cell activation compared to control tolerogenic DC. We observed a strengthened T cell proliferation and increased IFN-γ production of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells stimulated by IFN-α-DC, demonstrating a restoration of the immunogenic capacity of tolerogenic DC in the presence of IFN-α. Notably, restimulation experiments revealed that IFN-α treatment of tolerogenic DC abolished the induction of T cell anergy and suppressor function of iTregs. In contrast, IFN-α neither affected the priming of iTregs nor converted iTregs into effector T cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: IFN-α inhibits the induction of T cell tolerance by reversing the tolerogenic function of human DC.

  16. Antisense-Mediated Depletion of Tomato Chloroplast Omega-3 Fatty Acid Desaturase Enhances Thermal Tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xun-Yan Liu; Jing-Hua Yang; Bin Li; Xiu-Mei Yang; Qing-Wei Meng

    2006-01-01

    A chloroplast-localized tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) ω-3 fatty acid desaturase gene (LeFAD7) was isolated and characterized with regard to its sequence, response to various temperatures, and function in antisense transgenic tomato plants. The deduced amino acid sequence had four histidine-rich regions, of which three regions were highly conserved throughout the whole ω-3 fatty acid desaturase gene family.Southern blotting analysis showed that LeFAD7was encoded by a single copy gene and had two homologous genes in the tomato genome. Northern blot showed that LeFAD7was expressed in all organs and was especially abundant in leaf tissue. Meanwhile, expression of LeFAD7was induced by chilling stress (4 ℃),but was inhibited by high temperature (45 ℃), in leaves. Transgenic tomato plants were produced by integration of the antisense LeFAD7 DNA under the control of a CaMV35S promoter into the genome. Antisense transgenic plants with lower 18: 3 content could maintain a higher maximal photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm)and O2 evolution rate than wild-type plants. These results suggested that silence of the LeFAD7 gene alleviated high-temperature stress. There was also a correlation between the low content of 18: 3 resulting from silence of the LeFAD7 gene and tolerance to high-temperature stress.

  17. A Requisite Role for Induced Regulatory T cells in Tolerance Based on Expanding Antigen Receptor Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Haribhai, Dipica; Williams, Jason B; Jia, Shuang; Nickerson, Derek; Schmitt, Erica G.; Edwards, Brandon; Ziegelbauer, Jennifer; Yassai, Maryam; Li, Shun-Hwa; Relland, Lance M.; Wise, Petra M; Chen, Andrew; Zheng, Yu-Qian; Simpson, Pippa M.; Gorski, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Although both natural and induced regulatory T (nTreg and iTreg) cells can enforce tolerance, the mechanisms underlying their synergistic actions have not been established. We examined the functions of nTreg and iTreg cells by adoptive transfer immunotherapy of newborn Foxp3-deficient mice. As monotherapy, only nTreg cells prevented disease lethality, but did not suppress chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. Provision of Foxp3-sufficient conventional T cells with nTreg cells reconstituted t...

  18. Cell mediated immunity to fungi: a reassessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Luigina

    2008-09-01

    Protective immunity against fungal pathogens is achieved by the integration of two distinct arms of the immune system, the innate and adaptive responses. Innate and adaptive immune responses are intimately linked and controlled by sets of molecules and receptors that act to generate the most effective form of immunity for protection against fungal pathogens. The decision of how to respond will still be primarily determined by interactions between pathogens and cells of the innate immune system, but the actions of T cells will feed back into this dynamic equilibrium to regulate the balance between tolerogenic and inflammatory responses. In the last two decades, the immunopathogenesis of fungal infections and fungal diseases was explained primarily in terms of Th1/Th2 balance. Although Th1 responses driven by the IL-12/IFN-gamma axis are central to protection against fungi, other cytokines and T cell-dependent pathways have come of age. The newly described Th17 developmental pathway may play an inflammatory role previously attributed to uncontrolled Th1 responses and serves to accommodate the seemingly paradoxical association of chronic inflammatory responses with fungal persistence in the face of an ongoing inflammation. Regulatory T cells in their capacity to inhibit aspects of innate and adaptive antifungal immunity have become an integral component of immune resistance to fungi, and provide the host with immune defense mechanisms adequate for protection, without necessarily eliminating fungal pathogens which would impair immune memory--or causing an unacceptable level of tissue damage. The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and tryptophan metabolites contribute to immune homeostasis by inducing Tregs and taming overzealous or heightened inflammatory responses.

  19. Tolerization of an established αb-crystallin-reactive T-cell response by intravenous antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, R.; Mark, K. van der; Wawrousek, E.F.; Plomp, A.C.; Noort, J.M. van

    2007-01-01

    Tolerance induction to prevent activation of a naïve T-cell repertoire has been well documented in rodents and can be readily achieved by intravenous, oral or intranasal administration of antigen in the absence of adjuvants. In autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) the presence of an e

  20. Modulation of experimental T cell autoimmunity in the nervous system with emphasis on nasal tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Xue-Feng

    1998-01-01

    MODULATION OF EXPERIMENTAL T CELL AUTOIMMUNITY IN THE NERVOUSSYSTEM WITH EMPHASIS ON NASAL TOLERANCE Xue-Feng Bai Doctoral thesis from Division of Neurology, Department of ClinicalNeuroscience and Family Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital,Stockholm, Sweden Experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) and encephalomyelitis (EAE) are animalmodels of Guillian-Barre syndrome (GBS) and multiple sclerosis (MS), representinghuman demyelinating diseases ...

  1. Characteristics of cadmium tolerance in 'Hermes' flax seedlings: contribution of cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douchiche, Olfa; Soret-Morvan, Odile; Chaïbi, Wided; Morvan, Claudine; Paynel, Florence

    2010-12-01

    Most flax (Linum usitatissimum) varieties are described as tolerant to high concentrations of Cd. The aim of the present paper was to better characterize this tolerance, by studying the responses of flax plantlets, cv Hermes, to 18d growth on 0.5mM Cd. In Cd-treated seedlings, the majority of Cd was compartmentalized in the roots. Analysis of other elements showed that only Fe concentration was reduced, while Mn increased. Growth parameters of Cd treated flax were only moderately altered, with similar mass tolerance-indices for roots and shoots. Tissue anatomy was unaffected by treatment. The effect on lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and antioxidative activities appeared low but slightly higher in roots. The most important impacts of Cd were, in all organs, cell expansion, cell-wall thickening, pectin cross-linking and increase of cell-wall enzymatic activities (pectin methylesterase and peroxidase). Thus, the role of the cell wall in Cd tolerance might be important at two levels: (i) in the reinforcement of the tissue cohesion and (ii) in the sequestration of Cd. PMID:20884040

  2. Biomarkers of CD4+ CTL cell Mediated Immunity to Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The immune responses mediated by interactions between T-lymphocyte subsets and mycobacteria-infected macrophages are critical for control of tuberculosis. In these studies, the bovine model was used to characterize the cytolytic and mycobactericidal CD4+ T cell response induced by BCG vaccination. ...

  3. H(2 enhances arabidopsis salt tolerance by manipulating ZAT10/12-mediated antioxidant defence and controlling sodium exclusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjie Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The metabolism of hydrogen gas (H(2 in bacteria and algae has been extensively studied for the interesting of developing H(2-based fuel. Recently, H(2 is recognized as a therapeutic antioxidant and activates several signalling pathways in clinical trials. However, underlying physiological roles and mechanisms of H(2 in plants as well as its signalling cascade remain unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this report, histochemical, molecular, immunological and genetic approaches were applied to characterize the participation of H(2 in enhancing Arabidopsis salt tolerance. An increase of endogenous H(2 release was observed 6 hr after exposure to 150 mM NaCl. Arabidopsis pretreated with 50% H(2-saturated liquid medium, mimicking the induction of endogenous H(2 release when subsequently exposed to NaCl, effectively decreased salinity-induced growth inhibition. Further results showed that H(2 pretreatment modulated genes/proteins of zinc-finger transcription factor ZAT10/12 and related antioxidant defence enzymes, thus significantly counteracting the NaCl-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS overproduction and lipid peroxidation. Additionally, H(2 pretreatment maintained ion homeostasis by regulating the antiporters and H(+ pump responsible for Na(+ exclusion (in particular and compartmentation. Genetic evidence suggested that SOS1 and cAPX1 might be the target genes of H(2 signalling. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, our findings indicate that H(2 acts as a novel and cytoprotective regulator in coupling ZAT10/12-mediated antioxidant defence and maintenance of ion homeostasis in the improvement of Arabidopsis salt tolerance.

  4. Potential for thermal tolerance to mediate climate change effects on three members of a cool temperate lizard genus, Niveoscincus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Amanda J; While, Geoffrey M; Beeton, Nicholas J; Wapstra, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Climatic changes are predicted to be greater in higher latitude and mountainous regions but species specific impacts are difficult to predict. This is partly due to inter-specific variance in the physiological traits which mediate environmental temperature effects at the organismal level. We examined variation in the critical thermal minimum (CTmin), critical thermal maximum (CTmax) and evaporative water loss rates (EWL) of a widespread lowland (Niveoscincus ocellatus) and two range restricted highland (N. microlepidotus and N. greeni) members of a cool temperate Tasmanian lizard genus. The widespread lowland species had significantly higher CTmin and CTmax and significantly lower EWL than both highland species. Implications of inter-specific variation in thermal tolerance for activity were examined under contemporary and future climate change scenarios. Instances of air temperatures below CTmin were predicted to decline in frequency for the widespread lowland and both highland species. Air temperatures of high altitude sites were not predicted to exceed the CTmax of either highland species throughout the 21st century. In contrast, the widespread lowland species is predicted to experience air temperatures in excess of CTmax on 1 or 2 days by three of six global circulation models from 2068-2096. To estimate climate change effects on activity we reran the thermal tolerance models using minimum and maximum temperatures selected for activity. A net gain in available activity time was predicted under climate change for all three species; while air temperatures were predicted to exceed maximum temperatures selected for activity with increasing frequency, the change was not as great as the predicted decline in air temperatures below minimum temperatures selected for activity. We hypothesise that the major effect of rising air temperatures under climate change is an increase in available activity period for both the widespread lowland and highland species. The

  5. Multifactorial aspects of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction

    OpenAIRE

    Schoot, van der, B.H.; Vidarsson, G.; Kapur, R.

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on diseases of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction via FcγRs on phagocytes, in particular regarding platelets in fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and red blood cells (RBC) in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). Diagnostically, for HDFN laboratory tests are in place in order to predict risk for severe fetal RBC destruction and thereby initiate appropriate treatments. This test is sensitive, but has relativel...

  6. Defective cell mediated immunity in sarcoidosis: effect of interleukin-2.

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, D J; Gao, L.; Mitchell, E B; Mitchell, D. N.

    1988-01-01

    Interleukin-2 has been reported to enhance the immune response in diseases characterised by defective cell mediated immunity. The effect of exogenous recombinant interleukin-2 was studied on the proliferative and cytotoxic responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 39 patients with sarcoidosis and 14 healthy control subjects. The proliferative response to purified protein derivative was smaller in patients than in control subjects (p less than 0.001) whereas the response to 80 U int...

  7. Gene expression and functional analyses in brassinosteroid-mediated stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divi, Uday K; Rahman, Tawhidur; Krishna, Priti

    2016-01-01

    The plant hormone brassinosteroid (BR) plays essential roles in plant growth and development, while also controlling plant stress responses. This dual ability of BR is intriguing from a mechanistic point of view and as a viable solution for stabilizing crop yields under the changing climatic conditions. Here we report a time course analysis of BR responses under both stress and no-stress conditions, the results of which establish that BR incorporates many stress-related features even under no-stress conditions, which are then accompanied by a dynamic stress response under unfavourable conditions. Found within the BR transcriptome were distinct molecular signatures of two stress hormones, abscisic acid and jasmonic acid, which were correlated with enhanced endogenous levels of the two hormones in BR-treated seedlings. The marked presence of genes related to protein metabolism and modification, defence responses and calcium signalling highlights the significance of their associated mechanisms and roles in BR processes. Functional analysis of loss-of-function mutants of a subset of genes selected from the BR transcriptome identified abiotic stress-related roles for ACID PHOSPHATASE5 (ACP5), WRKY33, JACALIN-RELATED LECTIN1-3 (JAC-LEC1-3) and a BR-RESPONSIVE-RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE (BRRLK). Overall, the results of this study provide a clear link between the molecular changes impacted by BR and its ability to confer broad-range stress tolerance, emphasize the importance of post-translational modification and protein turnover as BR regulatory mechanisms and demonstrate the BR transcriptome as a repertoire of new stress-related regulatory and structural genes.

  8. Inflammatory mediators: Parallels between cancer biology and stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Patel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Shyam A Patel1,2,3, Andrew C Heinrich2,3, Bobby Y Reddy2, Pranela Rameshwar21Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ, USA; 2Department of Medicine – Division of Hematology/Oncology, New Jersey Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ, USA; 3These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Inflammation encompasses diverse molecular pathways, and it is intertwined with a wide array of biological processes. Recently, there has been an upsurge of interest in the interactions between mediators of inflammation and other cells such as stem cells and cancer cells. Since tissue injuries are associated with the release of inflammatory mediators, it would be difficult to address this subject without considering the implications of their systemic effects. In this review, we discuss the effects of inflammatory reactions on stem cells and extrapolate on information pertaining to cancer biology. The discussion focuses on integrins and cytokines, and identifies the transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB as central to the inflammatory response. Since stem cell therapy has been proposed for type II diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, pulmonary edema, these disorders are used as examples to discuss the roles of inflammatory mediators. We propose prospects for future research on targeting the NFκB signaling pathway. Finally, we explore the bridge between inflammation and stem cells, including neural stem cells and adult stem cells from the bone marrow. The implications of mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative medicine as pertaining to inflammation are vast based on their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. Such features of stem cells offer great potential for therapy in graft-versus-host disease, conditions with a significant inflammatory component, and tissue regeneration.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, cancer, cytokines

  9. Neural stem cell-derived exosomes mediate viral entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sims B

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Brian Sims,1,2,* Linlin Gu,3,* Alexandre Krendelchtchikov,3 Qiana L Matthews3,4 1Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, 2Department of Cell, Developmental, and Integrative Biology, 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, 4Center for AIDS Research, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Viruses enter host cells through interactions of viral ligands with cellular receptors. Viruses can also enter cells in a receptor-independent fashion. Mechanisms regarding the receptor-independent viral entry into cells have not been fully elucidated. Exosomal trafficking between cells may offer a mechanism by which viruses can enter cells.Methods: To investigate the role of exosomes on cellular viral entry, we employed neural stem cell-derived exosomes and adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 for the proof-of-principle study. Results: Exosomes significantly enhanced Ad5 entry in Coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR-deficient cells, in which Ad5 only had very limited entry. The exosomes were shown to contain T-cell immunoglobulin mucin protein 4 (TIM-4, which binds phosphatidylserine. Treatment with anti-TIM-4 antibody significantly blocked the exosome-mediated Ad5 entry.Conclusion: Neural stem cell-derived exosomes mediated significant cellular entry of Ad5 in a receptor-independent fashion. This mediation may be hampered by an antibody specifically targeting TIM-4 on exosomes. This set of results will benefit further elucidation of virus/exosome pathways, which would contribute to reducing natural viral infection by developing therapeutic agents or vaccines. Keywords: neural stem cell-derived exosomes, adenovirus type 5, TIM-4, viral entry, phospholipids

  10. Mast cell-derived histamine mediates cystitis pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles N Rudick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mast cells trigger inflammation that is associated with local pain, but the mechanisms mediating pain are unclear. Interstitial cystitis (IC is a bladder disease that causes debilitating pelvic pain of unknown origin and without consistent inflammation, but IC symptoms correlate with elevated bladder lamina propria mast cell counts. We hypothesized that mast cells mediate pelvic pain directly and examined pain behavior using a murine model that recapitulates key aspects of IC. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Infection of mice with pseudorabies virus (PRV induces a neurogenic cystitis associated with lamina propria mast cell accumulation dependent upon tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF, TNF-mediated bladder barrier dysfunction, and pelvic pain behavior, but the molecular basis for pelvic pain is unknown. In this study, both PRV-induced pelvic pain and bladder pathophysiology were abrogated in mast cell-deficient mice but were restored by reconstitution with wild type bone marrow. Pelvic pain developed normally in TNF- and TNF receptor-deficient mice, while bladder pathophysiology was abrogated. Conversely, genetic or pharmacologic disruption of histamine receptor H1R or H2R attenuated pelvic pain without altering pathophysiology. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that mast cells promote cystitis pain and bladder pathophysiology through the separable actions of histamine and TNF, respectively. Therefore, pain is independent of pathology and inflammation, and histamine receptors represent direct therapeutic targets for pain in IC and other chronic pain conditions.

  11. Specific blockade by CD54 and MHC II of CD40-mediated signaling for B cell proliferation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doyle, I S; Hollmann, C A; Crispe, I N;

    2001-01-01

    Regulation of B lymphocyte proliferation is critical to maintenance of self-tolerance, and intercellular interactions are likely to signal such regulation. Here, we show that coligation of either the adhesion molecule ICAM-1/CD54 or MHC II with CD40 inhibited cell cycle progression and promoted...... these effects. Addition of BCR or IL-4 signals did not overcome the effect of ICAM-1 or MHC II on CD40-induced proliferation. FasL expression was not detected in B cell populations. These results show that MHC II and ICAM-1 specifically modulate CD40-mediated signaling, so inhibiting proliferation...

  12. Cyclic AMP represents a crucial component of Treg cell-mediated immune regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Bopp

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available T regulatory (Treg cells are one of the key players in the immune tolerance network (ITN and a plethora of manuscripts has described their development and function in the course of the last two decades. Nevertheless, it is still a matter of debate which mechanisms and agents are employed by Treg cells, providing the basis of their suppressive potency. One of the important candidates is cyclic AMP (cAMP which is long known as a potent suppressor at least of T cell activation and function. While this suppressive function by itself is widely accepted the source and the mechanism of action of cAMP are less clear and a multitude of seemingly contradictory data allow for in principle two different scenarios of cAMP-mediated suppression. In one scenario Treg cells contain high amounts of cAMP and convey this small molecule via gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC directly to the effector T cells (Teff leading to their suppression. Alternatively, it was shown that Treg cells represent the origin of considerable amounts of adenosine which trigger the adenylate cyclases (AC in Teff via A2A and A2B receptors thus strongly increasing intracellular cAMP. This review will present and discuss initial findings and recent developments concerning the function of cAMP for Treg cells and its impact on immune regulation.

  13. Cell-Cell Interactions Mediate the Response of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells to Substrate Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Olga V.; Lee, Kristen L.; Isenberg, Brett C.; Rich, Celeste B.; Nugent, Matthew A.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2011-01-01

    The vessel wall experiences progressive stiffening with age and the development of cardiovascular disease, which alters the micromechanical environment experienced by resident vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In vitro studies have shown that VSMCs are sensitive to substrate stiffness, but the exact molecular mechanisms of their response to stiffness remains unknown. Studies have also shown that cell-cell interactions can affect mechanotransduction at the cell-substrate interface. Using flexible substrates, we show that the expression of proteins associated with cell-matrix adhesion and cytoskeletal tension is regulated by substrate stiffness, and that an increase in cell density selectively attenuates some of these effects. We also show that cell-cell interactions exert a strong effect on cell morphology in a substrate-stiffness dependent manner. Collectively, the data suggest that as VSMCs form cell-cell contacts, substrate stiffness becomes a less potent regulator of focal adhesion signaling. This study provides insight into the mechanisms by which VSMCs respond to the mechanical environment of the blood vessel wall, and point to cell-cell interactions as critical mediators of VSMC response to vascular injury. PMID:21806930

  14. Single cell migration dynamics mediated by geometric confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Hou, Ruixia; Xiao, Peng; Xing, Rubo; Chen, Tao; Han, Yanchun; Ren, Penggang; Fu, Jun

    2016-09-01

    The migration dynamics of cells plays a key role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Previous studies mostly focus on regulating stem cell fate and phenotype by biophysical cues. In contrast, less is known about how the geometric cues mediate the migration dynamics of cells. Here, we fabricate graphene oxide (GO) microstripes on cell non-adhesive PEG substrate by using micromolding in capillary (MIMIC) method. Such micropatterns with alternating cell adhesion and cell resistance enable an effective control of selective adhesion and migration of single cells. The sharp contrast in cell adhesion minimizes the invasion of cells into the PEG patterns, and thereby strongly confines the cells on GO microstripes. As a result, the cells are forced to adapt highly polarized, elongated, and oriented geometry to fit the patterns. A series of pattern widths have been fabricated to modulate the extent of cell deformation and polarization. Under strong confinement, the cytoskeleton contractility, intracellular traction, and actin filament elongation are highly promoted, which result in enhanced cell migration along the patterns. This work provides an important insight into developing combinatorial graphene-based patterns for the control of cell migration dynamics, which is of great significance for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:27137805

  15. Antigen-oriented T cell migration contributes to myelin peptide induced-EAE and immune tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peiguo; Fu, Hanxiao; Wei, Gaohui; Wei, Zhongwei; Zhang, Junhua; Ma, Xuehan; Rui, Dong; Meng, Xianchun; Ming, Liang

    2016-08-01

    Treatment with soluble myelin peptide can efficiently and specifically induce tolerance to demyelination autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, however the mechanism underlying this therapeutic effect remains to be elucidated. In actively induced mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) we analyzed T cell and innate immune cell responses in the central nervous system (CNS) and spleen after intraperitoneal (i.p.) infusion of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). We found that i.p. MOG infusion blocked effector T cell recruitment to the CNS and protected mice from EAE and lymphoid organ atrophy. Innate immune CD11b(+) cells preferentially recruited MOG-specific effector T cells, particularly when activated to become competent antigen presenting cells (APCs). During EAE development, mature APCs were enriched in the CNS rather than in the spleen, attracting effector T cells to the CNS. Increased myelin antigen exposure induced CNS-APC maturation, recruiting additional effector T cells to the CNS, causing symptoms of disease. MOG triggered functional maturation of splenic APCs. MOG presenting APCs interacted with MOG-specific T cells in the spleen, aggregating to cluster around CD11b(+) cells, and were trapped in the periphery. This process was MHC II dependent as an MHC II directed antibody blocked CD4(+) T cell cluster formation. These findings highlight the role of myelin peptide-loaded APCs in myelin peptide-induced EAE and immune tolerance. PMID:27327113

  16. Immune tolerance maintained by cooperative interactions between T cells and antigen presenting cells shapes a diverse TCR repertoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine eBest

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The T cell population in an individual needs to avoid harmful activation by self-peptides while maintaining the ability to respond to an unknown set of foreign peptides. This property is acquired by a combination of thymic and extra-thymic mechanisms. We extend current models for the development of self/non-self discrimination to consider the acquisition of self-tolerance as an emergent system level property of the overall T cell receptor repertoire. We propose that tolerance is established at the level of the antigen presenting cell/T cell cluster, which facilitates and integrates co-operative interactions between T cells of different specificity. The threshold for self-reactivity is therefore imposed at a population level, and not at the level of the individual T cell/antigen encounter. Mathematically, the model can be formulated as a linear programming optimisation problem, which can be implemented as a multiplicative update algorithm which shows a rapid convergence to a stable state. The model constrains self-reactivity within a predefined threshold, but maintains the diversity and cross reactivity which are key characteristics of human T cell immunity. We show further that the size of individual clones in the model repertoire remains heterogeneous, and that new clones can establish themselves even when the repertoire is stable. Our study combines the salient features of the danger model of self/non-self discrimination with the concepts of quorum sensing, and extends repertoire generation models to encompass the establishment of tolerance. Furthermore, the dynamic and continuous repertoire reshaping which underlies tolerance in this model suggests opportunities for therapeutic intervention to achieve long-term tolerance following transplantation.

  17. Role of Unusual P Loop Ejection and Autophosphorylation in HipA-Mediated Persistence and Multidrug Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Schumacher

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available HipA is a bacterial serine/threonine protein kinase that phosphorylates targets, bringing about persistence and multidrug tolerance. Autophosphorylation of residue Ser150 is a critical regulatory mechanism of HipA function. Intriguingly, Ser150 is not located on the activation loop, as are other kinases; instead, it is in the protein core, where it forms part of the ATP-binding “P loop motif.” How this buried residue is phosphorylated and regulates kinase activity is unclear. Here, we report multiple structures that reveal the P loop motif's exhibition of a remarkable “in-out” conformational equilibrium, which allows access to Ser150 and its intermolecular autophosphorylation. Phosphorylated Ser150 stabilizes the “out state,” which inactivates the kinase by disrupting the ATP-binding pocket. Thus, our data reveal a mechanism of protein kinase regulation that is vital for multidrug tolerance and persistence, as kinase inactivation provides the critical first step in allowing dormant cells to revert to the growth phenotype and to reinfect the host.

  18. Cytolysis of oligodendrocytes is mediated by killer (K) cells but not by natural killer (NK) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, J; Kim, S U; Kastrukoff, L F

    1991-03-01

    The cytotoxic activity of killer (K) cells against enriched cultures of bovine oligodendrocytes (BOL) was investigated in multiple sclerosis (MS) and controls. Human K cells mediated cytotoxicity to primary cultures of BOL in the presence of anti-BOL antiserum in all study groups, while BOL were resistant to human natural killer (NK) cells. Cytotoxic activity was significantly reduced in MS when compared to age-matched normal controls but not when compared to other neurologic disease (OND) patients. K cell-mediated lysis of BOL could also be induced with anti-galactocerebroside antibody but not with other antibodies including those specific for OL antigens (myelin basic protein, proteolipid apoprotein, and 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase). Enrichment of the effector population indicated that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) to BOL was mediated by large granular lymphocytes, and the effector population was further characterized by flow cytometry. The effector cells mediating ADCC could be inhibited by protein A of Staphylococcus aureus, and by K562 cells in cold competition assay. These observations indicate that oligodendrocytes are resistant to NK cells but are susceptible to cytolysis mediated by K cells. This may represent a potentially important immune mechanism in the pathogenesis of MS.

  19. Flooding tolerance and cell wall alterations in maize mesocotyl during hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitorino Patrícia Goulart

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to characterize the tolerance to flooding and alterations in pectic and hemicellulose fractions from mesocotyl of maize tolerant to flooding when submitted to hypoxia. In order to characterize tolerance seeds from maize cultivars Saracura BRS-4154 and BR 107 tolerant and sensitive to low oxygen levels, respectively, were set to germinate. Plantlet survival was evaluated during five days after having been submitted to hypoxia. After fractionation with ammonium oxalate 0.5% (w/v and KOH 2M and 4M, Saracura BRS-4154 cell wall was obtained from mesocotyl segments with different damage intensities caused by oxygen deficiency exposure. The cell wall fractions were analyzed by gel filtration and gas chromatography, and also by Infrared Spectrum with Fourrier Transformation (FTIR. The hypoxia period lasting three days or longer caused cell lysis and in advanced stages plant death. The gelic profile from pectic, hemicellulose 2M and 4M fractions from samples with translucid and constriction zone showed the appearance of low molecular weight compounds, similar to glucose. The main neutral sugars in pectic and hemicellulose fractions were arabinose, xilose and mannose. The FTIR spectrum showed a gradual decrease in pectic substances from mesocotyl with normal to translucid and constriction appearance respectively.

  20. MAR characteristic motifs mediate episomal vector in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Li, Zhaoxi; Wang, Tianyun; Wang, Xiaoyin; Wang, Li; Dong, Weihua; Jing, Changqin; Yang, Xianjun

    2015-04-01

    An ideal gene therapy vector should enable persistent transgene expression without limitations in safety and reproducibility. Recent researches' insight into the ability of chromosomal matrix attachment regions (MARs) to mediate episomal maintenance of genetic elements allowed the development of a circular episomal vector. Although a MAR-mediated engineered vector has been developed, little is known on which motifs of MAR confer this function during interaction with the host genome. Here, we report an artificially synthesized DNA fragment containing only characteristic motif sequences that served as an alternative to human beta-interferon matrix attachment region sequence. The potential of the vector to mediate gene transfer in CHO cells was investigated. The short synthetic MAR motifs were found to mediate episomal vector at a low copy number for many generations without integration into the host genome. Higher transgene expression was maintained for at least 4 months. In addition, MAR was maintained episomally and conferred sustained EGFP expression even in nonselective CHO cells. All the results demonstrated that MAR characteristic sequence-based vector can function as stable episomes in CHO cells, supporting long-term and effective transgene expression.

  1. Regulatory B cells and tolerance in transplantation: from animal models to human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie eChesneau

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the role of B cells in transplantation was thought to be restricted to producing antibodies that have been clearly shown to be deleterious in the long term, but, in fact, B cells are also able to produce cytokine and to present antigen. Their role as regulatory cells in various pathological situations has also been highlighted, and their role in transplantation is beginning to emerge in animal, and also in human, models. This review summarizes the different studies in animals and humans that suggest a B-cell regulatory role in the transplant tolerance mechanisms.

  2. Mast cell mediated and associated disorders in pregnancy: a risky game with an uncertain outcome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja eWoidacki

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available During pregnancy the maternal organism is under the influence of tremendous endocrine as well as immunological changes as an adaption to the implanted and developing fetus. In most cases, the maternal adaptations to pregnancy ensure both, the protection against harmful pathogens and the tolerance towards the growing semi-allogeneic fetus. However, under certain circumstances the unique hormonal milieu during pregnancy is causative of a shift into an unfavorable direction. Of particular importance are cellular disorders previous to pregnancy that involve cell types known for their susceptibility to hormones. One interesting cell type is the mast cell (MC, one of the key figures in allergic disorders. While physiological numbers of MCs were shown to positively influence pregnancy outcome, at least in mouse models, uncontrolled augmentations in quantity and/or activation can lead to pregnancy complications. Women that have the desire of getting pregnant and been diagnosed with MC mediated disorders such as urticaria and mastocytosis or chronic inflammatory diseases in which MCs are involved, including atopic dermatitis, asthma or psoriasis, may benefit from specialized medical assistance to ensure a positive pregnancy outcome. In the present review we address the course of pregnancy in women affected by MC mediated or associated disorders.

  3. Dendritic cell function in vivo during the steady state: a role in peripheral tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Ralph M; Hawiger, Daniel; Liu, Kang; Bonifaz, Laura; Bonnyay, David; Mahnke, Karsten; Iyoda, Tomonori; Ravetch, Jeffrey; Dhodapkar, Madhav; Inaba, Kayo; Nussenzweig, Michel

    2003-04-01

    The avoidance of autoimmunity requires mechanisms to actively silence or tolerize self reactive T cells in the periphery. During infection, dendritic cells are not only capturing microbial antigens, but also are processing self antigens from dying cells as well as innocuous environmental proteins. Since the dendritic cells are maturing in response to microbial and other stimuli, peptides will be presented from both noxious and innocuous antigens. Therefore it would be valuable to have mechanisms whereby dendritic cells, prior to infection, establish tolerance to those self and environmental antigens that can be processed upon pathogen encounter. In the steady state, prior to acute infection and inflammation, dendritic cells are in an immature state and not fully differentiated to carry out their known roles as inducers of immunity. These immature cells are not inactive, however. They continuously circulate through tissues and into lymphoid organs, capturing self antigens as well as innocuous environmental proteins. Recent experiments have provided direct evidence that antigen-loaded immature dendritic in vivo silence T cells either by deleting them or by expanding regulatory T cells. In this way, it is proposed that the immune system overcomes at least some of the risk of developing autoimmunity and chronic inflammation. It is proposed that dendritic cells play a major role in defining immunologic self, not only centrally in the thymus but also in the periphery.

  4. HIGH EFFICIENCY RETROVIRUS-MEDIATED GENE TRANSFER TO LEUKEMIA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jian-xin; CHEN Zi-xing; CEN Jian-nong; WANG Wei; RUAN Chang-geng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To establish an efficient and safe gene transfer system mediated by retrovirus for gene marking and gene therapy of human leukemia. Method: The retroviral vector LXSN, containing the neomycin resistance (NeoR) gene, was transferred into amphotropic packaging cells GP+envAm12 by liposome transfection or by ecotropic retrovirus transduction. Amphotropic retrovirus in supernatants with higher titer was used to infect human leukemic cell lines NB4, U937, and THP-1.The efficiency of gene transfer was assayed on colonies formed by transduced K562 cells. Results: The titer of DOSPER directly transfected GP+envAm12 cells determined on NIH3T3 cells was 8.0×105 CFU/ml, while that of producer infected with retrovirus was 1.6×107CFU/ml. Integration of NeoR gene into all leukemia cells was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Absence of replication-competent virus was proved by both nested PCR for env gene and marker gene rescue assay. Gene transfer with the efficiency as high as 93.3 to 100% in K562 cells was verified by seminested PCR for integrated NeoR gene on colonies after 7 days' culture.Conclusion: The efficiency and safety of retrovirus mediated gene transfer system might provide an optimal system in gene therapy for leukemia or genetic diseases.

  5. Dendritic Cells and Multiple Sclerosis: Disease, Tolerance and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad G. Mohammad

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a devastating neurological disease that predominantly affects young adults resulting in severe personal and economic impact. The majority of therapies for this disease were developed in, or are beneficial in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the animal model of MS. While known to target adaptive anti-CNS immune responses, they also target, the innate immune arm. This mini-review focuses on the role of dendritic cells (DCs, the professional antigen presenting cells of the innate immune system. The evidence for a role for DCs in the appropriate regulation of anti-CNS autoimmune responses and their role in MS disease susceptibility and possible therapeutic utility are discussed. Additionally, the current controversy regarding the evidence for the presence of functional DCs in the normal CNS is reviewed. Furthermore, the role of CNS DCs and potential routes of their intercourse between the CNS and cervical lymph nodes are considered. Finally, the future role that this nexus between the CNS and the cervical lymph nodes might play in site directed molecular and cellular therapy for MS is outlined.

  6. Stress-mediated p38 activation promotes somatic cell reprogramming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinxiu Xu; Quan Wang; Yuan Long; Ru Zhang; Xiaoyuan Wei; Mingzhe Xing; Haifeng Gu

    2013-01-01

    Environmental stress-mediated adaptation plays essential roles in the evolution of life.Cellular adaptation mechanisms usually involve the regulation of chromatin structure,transcription,mRNA stability and translation,which eventually lead to efficient changes in gene expression.Global epigenetic change is also involved in the reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells by defined factors.Here we report that environmental stress such as hyperosmosis not only facilitates four factor-mediated reprogramming,but also enhances two or one factor-induced iPS cell generation.Hyperosmosis-induced p38 activation plays a critical role in this process.Constitutive active p38 mimics the positive effect of hyperosmosis,while dominant negative p38 and p38 inhibitor block the effect of hyperosmosis.Further study indicates stress-mediated p38 activation may promote reprogramming by reducing the global DNA methylation level and enhancing the expression of pluripotency genes.Our results demonstrate how simple environmental stress like hyperosmosis helps to alter the fate of cells via intracellular signaling and epigenetic modulation.

  7. Tracking antigen-specific T-cells during clinical tolerance induction in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamir Aslam

    Full Text Available Allergen immunotherapy presents an opportunity to define mechanisms of induction of clinical tolerance in humans. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of changes in T cell responses during immunotherapy, but existing work has largely been based on functional T cell assays. HLA-peptide-tetrameric complexes allow the tracking of antigen-specific T-cell populations based on the presence of specific T-cell receptors and when combined with functional assays allow a closer assessment of the potential roles of T-cell anergy and clonotype evolution. We sought to develop tools to facilitate tracking of antigen-specific T-cell populations during wasp-venom immunotherapy in people with wasp-venom allergy. We first defined dominant immunogenic regions within Ves v 5, a constituent of wasp venom that is known to represent a target antigen for T-cells. We next identified HLA-DRB1*1501 restricted epitopes and used HLA class II tetrameric complexes alongside cytokine responses to Ves v 5 to track T-cell responses during immunotherapy. In contrast to previous reports, we show that there was a significant initial induction of IL-4 producing antigen-specific T-cells within the first 3-5 weeks of immunotherapy which was followed by reduction of circulating effector antigen-specific T-cells despite escalation of wasp-venom dosage. However, there was sustained induction of IL-10-producing and FOXP3 positive antigen-specific T cells. We observed that these IL-10 producing cells could share a common precursor with IL-4-producing T cells specific for the same epitope. Clinical tolerance induction in humans is associated with dynamic changes in frequencies of antigen-specific T-cells, with a marked loss of IL-4-producing T-cells and the acquisition of IL-10-producing and FOXP3-positive antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells that can derive from a common shared precursor to pre-treatment effector T-cells. The development of new approaches to track antigen

  8. Regulatory T cells in immune-mediated renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Joanna R; Wang, Yuan Min; Holdsworth, Stephen R; Kitching, A Richard

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are CD4+ T cells that can suppress immune responses by effector T cells, B cells and innate immune cells. This review discusses the role that Tregs play in murine models of immune-mediated renal diseases and acute kidney injury and in human autoimmune kidney disease (such as systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis). Current research suggests that Tregs may be reduced in number and/or have impaired regulatory function in these diseases. Tregs possess several mechanisms by which they can limit renal and systemic inflammatory immune responses. Potential therapeutic applications involving Tregs include in vivo induction of Tregs or inducing Tregs from naïve CD4+ T cells or expanding natural Tregs ex vivo, to use as a cellular therapy. At present, the optimal method of generating a phenotypically stable pool of Tregs with long-lasting suppressive effects is not established, but human studies in renal transplantation are underway exploring the therapeutic potential of Tregs as a cellular therapy, and if successful may have a role as a novel therapy in immune-mediated renal diseases. PMID:26206106

  9. The role of cell-mediated immunity in typhoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabel, T J; Paniker, C K

    1979-06-01

    The cell-mediated immunity in typhoid was assessed by the leukocyte migration inhibition test and delayed hypersensitivity skin test in 60 clinical typhoid patients. The property of leukocyte migration inhibition appeared first and was positive in 28 of 60 (46.7%) patients on admission and 45 of 60 (75%) at the time of discharge. This difference was definitely more in blood culture positive patients. The delayed hypersensitivity appeared later and was positive in 18 of 60 (30%) on admission and 31 of 60 (51.7%) at the time of discharge. Patients with positive cellular-immune response against typhoid antigen did not develop relapse. On the whole cell-mediated immunity seems to play an important role in typoid. The control groups--the medical and surgical patients, doctors, clinical students and preclinical students--showed positive cellular immune response of 43.3 81.3, 40.7 and 25% respectively. The significance of these results is discussed.

  10. Nanodrug-Mediated Thermotherapy of Cancer Stem-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Wei; Wang, Hai; Zhong, Allison; Yu, Jianhua; Lu, Xiongbin; He, Xiaoming

    2016-03-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are rare subpopulations of cancer cells that are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy and contribute to cancer metastases and tumor recurrence. Therefore, it is of significance to develop an effective therapy to eliminate the CSCs. Cancer thermotherapy realized by depositing heat into tumor in a minimally invasive way is a promising alternative to the conventional therapies for cancer treatment. However, this method is limited by its inability to target CSCs, potentially allowing the CSCs to survive and re-initiate tumor growth. More recently, nanodrug-mediated thermotherapy has been explored to selectively eliminate CSCs and specifically deposit heat in tumor to spare healthy tissue. Here, we provide a brief overview of the targeting moieties and nanoplatforms used in developing nanodrug-mediated thermotherapy of cancer with particular emphasis on the CSCs, as well as the challenges and potential directions for future research in this emerging field. PMID:27455612

  11. Roles of Cortactin, an Actin Polymerization Mediator, in Cell Endocytosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li CHEN; Zhi-Wei WANG; Jian-wei ZHU; Xi ZHAN

    2006-01-01

    Cortactin, an actin-binding protein and a substrate of Src, is encoded by the EMS 1 oncogene.Cortactin is known to activate Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization and interact with dynamin, a large GTPase and proline rich domain-containing protein. Transferrin endocytosis was significantly reduced in cells by knock-down of cortactin expression as well as in vivo introduction of cortactin immunoreagents.Cortactin-dynamin interaction displayed morphologically dynamic co-distribution with a change in the endocytosis level in cells treated with an actin depolymerization reagent, cytochalasin D. In an in vitro beads assay, a branched actin network was recruited onto dynamin-coated beads in a cortactin Src homology domain 3 (SH3)-dependent manner. In addition, cortactin was found to function in the late stage of clathrin coated vesicle formation.Taken together, cortactin is required for optimal clathrin mediated endocytosis in a dynamin directed manner.

  12. Regulatory T cell reprogramming towards a Th2 cell-like lineage impairs oral tolerance and promotes food allergy

    OpenAIRE

    Rivas, Magali Noval; Burton, Oliver T.; Wise, Petra; Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Georgiev, Peter; Oettgen, Hans C.; Rachid, Rima; Chatila, Talal

    2015-01-01

    Oral immunotherapy has had limited success in establishing tolerance in food allergy, reflecting failure to elicit an effective regulatory T (Treg) cell response. We show that disease-susceptible mice (Il4raF709) with enhanced IL-4 receptor (IL-4R) signaling exhibited STAT6-dependent impaired generation and function of mucosal allergen-specific Treg cells. This failure was associated with the acquisition by Treg cells of T helper 2 (Th2) cell-like phenotype, also found in peripheral blood all...

  13. Potential for thermal tolerance to mediate climate change effects on three members of a cool temperate lizard genus, Niveoscincus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Amanda J; While, Geoffrey M; Beeton, Nicholas J; Wapstra, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Climatic changes are predicted to be greater in higher latitude and mountainous regions but species specific impacts are difficult to predict. This is partly due to inter-specific variance in the physiological traits which mediate environmental temperature effects at the organismal level. We examined variation in the critical thermal minimum (CTmin), critical thermal maximum (CTmax) and evaporative water loss rates (EWL) of a widespread lowland (Niveoscincus ocellatus) and two range restricted highland (N. microlepidotus and N. greeni) members of a cool temperate Tasmanian lizard genus. The widespread lowland species had significantly higher CTmin and CTmax and significantly lower EWL than both highland species. Implications of inter-specific variation in thermal tolerance for activity were examined under contemporary and future climate change scenarios. Instances of air temperatures below CTmin were predicted to decline in frequency for the widespread lowland and both highland species. Air temperatures of high altitude sites were not predicted to exceed the CTmax of either highland species throughout the 21st century. In contrast, the widespread lowland species is predicted to experience air temperatures in excess of CTmax on 1 or 2 days by three of six global circulation models from 2068-2096. To estimate climate change effects on activity we reran the thermal tolerance models using minimum and maximum temperatures selected for activity. A net gain in available activity time was predicted under climate change for all three species; while air temperatures were predicted to exceed maximum temperatures selected for activity with increasing frequency, the change was not as great as the predicted decline in air temperatures below minimum temperatures selected for activity. We hypothesise that the major effect of rising air temperatures under climate change is an increase in available activity period for both the widespread lowland and highland species. The

  14. Multifaceted effects of synthetic TLR2 ligand and Legionella pneumophilia on Treg-mediated suppression of T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutmuller Roger PM

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory T cells (Treg play a crucial role in maintaining immune homeostasis and self-tolerance. The immune suppressive effects of Tregs should however be limited in case effective immunity is required against pathogens or cancer cells. We previously found that the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 agonist, Pam3CysSK4, directly stimulated Tregs to expand and temporarily abrogate their suppressive capabilities. In this study, we evaluate the effect of Pam3CysSK4 and Legionella pneumophila, a natural TLR2 containing infectious agent, on effector T (Teff cells and dendritic cells (DCs individually and in co-cultures with Tregs. Results TLR2 agonists can directly provide a co-stimulatory signal inducing enhanced proliferation and cytokine production of naive CD4+ Teff cells. With respect to cytokine production, DCs appear to be most sensitive to low amounts of TLR agonists. Using wild type and TLR2-deficient cells in Treg suppression assays, we accordingly show that all cells (e.g. Treg, Teff cells and DCs contributed to overcome Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cell proliferation. Furthermore, while TLR2-stimulated Tregs readily lost their ability to suppress Teff cell proliferation, cytokine production by Teff cells was still suppressed. Similar results were obtained upon stimulation with TLR2 ligand containing bacteria, Legionella pneumophila. Conclusions These findings indicate that both synthetic and natural TLR2 agonists affect DCs, Teff cells and Treg directly, resulting in multi-modal modulation of Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cells. Moreover, Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cell proliferation is functionally distinct from suppression of cytokine secretion.

  15. Molecular Signaling Pathways Mediating Osteoclastogenesis Induced by Prostate Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced prostate cancer commonly metastasizes to bone leading to osteoblastic and osteolytic lesions. Although an osteolytic component governed by activation of bone resorbing osteoclasts is prominent in prostate cancer metastasis, the molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis are not well-understood. We studied the effect of soluble mediators released from human prostate carcinoma cells on osteoclast formation from mouse bone marrow and RAW 264.7 monocytes. Soluble factors released from human prostate carcinoma cells significantly increased viability of naïve bone marrow monocytes, as well as osteoclastogenesis from precursors primed with receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL). The prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis was not mediated by RANKL as it was not inhibited by osteoprotegerin (OPG). However inhibition of TGFβ receptor I (TβRI), or macrophage-colony stimulating factor (MCSF) resulted in attenuation of prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis. We characterized the signaling pathways induced in osteoclast precursors by soluble mediators released from human prostate carcinoma cells. Prostate cancer factors increased basal calcium levels and calcium fluctuations, induced nuclear localization of nuclear factor of activated t-cells (NFAT)c1, and activated prolonged phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in RANKL-primed osteoclast precursors. Inhibition of calcium signaling, NFATc1 activation, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation significantly reduced the ability of prostate cancer mediators to stimulate osteoclastogenesis. This study reveals the molecular mechanisms underlying the direct osteoclastogenic effect of prostate cancer derived factors, which may be beneficial in developing novel osteoclast-targeting therapeutic approaches

  16. Factors influencing ER subtype-mediated cell proliferation and apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Evers, N.M.

    2014-01-01

      The aim of the current thesis is to elucidate the role of estrogen receptor (ER)αand ERβin cell proliferation and apoptosis induced by estrogenic compounds. Special attention is paid to the importance of the receptor preference of the estrogenic compounds, the cellular ERα/ERβratio, the role of coregulators, and ER-mediated induction of protein expression. In chapter 1 estrogenic compounds and their interaction with estrogen receptors are described and the two dif...

  17. EAF2 mediates germinal centre B-cell apoptosis to suppress excessive immune responses and prevent autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingqian; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Fujii, Shin-ichiro; Zhou, Yang; Hong, Rongjian; Suzuki, Akari; Tsubata, Takeshi; Hase, Koji; Wang, Ji-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Regulated apoptosis of germinal centre (GC) B cells is critical for normal humoral immune responses. ELL-associated factor 2 (EAF2) regulates transcription elongation and has been shown to be an androgen-responsive potential tumour suppressor in prostate by inducing apoptosis. Here we show that EAF2 is selectively upregulated in GC B cells among various immune cell types and promotes apoptosis of GC B cells both in vitro and in vivo. EAF2 deficiency results in enlarged GCs and elevated antibody production during a T-dependent immune response. After immunization with type II collagen, mice lacking EAF2 produce high levels of collagen-specific autoantibodies and rapidly develop severe arthritis. Moreover, the mutant mice spontaneously produce anti-dsDNA, rheumatoid factor and anti-nuclear antibodies as they age. These results demonstrate that EAF2-mediated apoptosis in GC B cells limits excessive humoral immune responses and is important for maintaining self-tolerance. PMID:26935903

  18. Phenotypic characterization of autoreactive B cells--checkpoints of B cell tolerance in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett M Jacobi

    Full Text Available DNA-reactive B cells play a central role in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; DNA antibodies precede clinical disease and in established disease correlate with renal inflammation and contribute to dendritic cell activation and high levels of type 1 interferon. A number of central and peripheral B cell tolerance mechanisms designed to control the survival, differentiation and activation of autoreactive B cells are thought to be disturbed in patients with SLE. The characterization of DNA-reactive B cells has, however, been limited by their low frequency in peripheral blood. Using a tetrameric configuration of a peptide mimetope of DNA bound by pathogenic anti-DNA antibodies, we can identify B cells producing potentially pathogenic DNA-reactive antibodies. We, therefore, characterized the maturation and differentiation states of peptide, (ds double stranded DNA cross-reactive B cells in the peripheral blood of lupus patients and correlated these with clinical disease activity. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated a significantly higher frequency of tetramer-binding B cells in SLE patients compared to healthy controls. We demonstrated the existence of a novel tolerance checkpoint at the transition of antigen-naïve to antigen-experienced. We further demonstrate that patients with moderately active disease have more autoreactive B cells in both the antigen-naïve and antigen-experienced compartments consistent with greater impairment in B cell tolerance in both early and late checkpoints in these patients than in patients with quiescent disease. This methodology enables us to gain insight into the development and fate of DNA-reactive B cells in individual patients with SLE and paves the way ultimately to permit better and more customized therapies.

  19. Role of T-cell-mediated inflammation in psoriasis: pathogenesis and targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flatz L

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lukas Flatz, Curdin ConradDepartment of Dermatology, University Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV, Lausanne, SwitzerlandAbstract: Psoriasis is one of the most common chronic, inflammatory, T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Over the past decade, increased knowledge of disease pathogenesis has fundamentally changed psoriasis treatment, with the introduction of biologics, and this has led to a multitude of improved selective targets providing potential therapeutic options. Indeed, numerous pathogenesis-based treatments are currently in development, as psoriasis has also become increasingly relevant for proof-of-concept studies. The purpose of this review was to summarize current knowledge of psoriasis immunopathogenesis, focusing on the T-cell-mediated immune response and its initiation. The authors describe recent advances in psoriasis treatment and discuss pathogenesis-based therapies that are currently in development or which could be envisioned for the future. Although current biologics are well tolerated, several issues such as long-term efficacy, long-term safety, and high costs keep driving the search for new and better therapies. With further advances in understanding disease pathogenesis, more genomic data from psoriasis patients becoming available, and potentially the identification of autoantigens in psoriasis, current research should lead to the development of a growing arsenal of improved targeted treatments and to further breakthrough immunotherapies.Keywords: autoimmunity, autoimmune disease, immune response, immunopathogenesis

  20. Fibronectin on the Surface of Myeloma Cell-derived Exosomes Mediates Exosome-Cell Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Bandari, Shyam Kumar; Liu, Jian; Mobley, James A; Brown, Elizabeth E; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-22

    Exosomes regulate cell behavior by binding to and delivering their cargo to target cells; however, the mechanisms mediating exosome-cell interactions are poorly understood. Heparan sulfates on target cell surfaces can act as receptors for exosome uptake, but the ligand for heparan sulfate on exosomes has not been identified. Using exosomes isolated from myeloma cell lines and from myeloma patients, we identify exosomal fibronectin as a key heparan sulfate-binding ligand and mediator of exosome-cell interactions. We discovered that heparan sulfate plays a dual role in exosome-cell interaction; heparan sulfate on exosomes captures fibronectin, and on target cells it acts as a receptor for fibronectin. Removal of heparan sulfate from the exosome surface releases fibronectin and dramatically inhibits exosome-target cell interaction. Antibody specific for the Hep-II heparin-binding domain of fibronectin blocks exosome interaction with tumor cells or with marrow stromal cells. Regarding exosome function, fibronectin-mediated binding of exosomes to myeloma cells activated p38 and pERK signaling and expression of downstream target genes DKK1 and MMP-9, two molecules that promote myeloma progression. Antibody against fibronectin inhibited the ability of myeloma-derived exosomes to stimulate endothelial cell invasion. Heparin or heparin mimetics including Roneparstat, a modified heparin in phase I trials in myeloma patients, significantly inhibited exosome-cell interactions. These studies provide the first evidence that fibronectin binding to heparan sulfate mediates exosome-cell interactions, revealing a fundamental mechanism important for exosome-mediated cross-talk within tumor microenvironments. Moreover, these results imply that therapeutic disruption of fibronectin-heparan sulfate interactions will negatively impact myeloma tumor growth and progression.

  1. Efficacy and Tolerability of Anthracycline-Based Therapy in Elderly Patients With Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Christine C.; Cohen, Jonathon B.; Shah, Katherine S.; Hutcherson, Don A.; Surati, Minal J.; Valla, Kelly; Panjic, Elyse H.; Handler, Caitlin E.; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Flowers, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    We examined treatment with or without anthracyclines in 72 eldery diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients (age ≥ 65 years) in a retrospective cohort analysis. Factors leading to treatment without an anthracycline included age and ejection fraction, whereas markers of tolerability were similar between groups. This study highlights the details of anthracycline tolerability in elderly lymphoma patients.

  2. Differentiation and distribution of colistin- and sodium dodecyl sulfate-tolerant cells in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Klausen, M; Ernst, RK;

    2007-01-01

    During Pseudomonas aeruginosa flow cell biofilm development, the cell population differentiates into a nonmotile subpopulation which forms microcolonies and a migrating subpopulation which eventually colonizes the top of the microcolonies, resulting in the development of mushroom-shaped multicell......During Pseudomonas aeruginosa flow cell biofilm development, the cell population differentiates into a nonmotile subpopulation which forms microcolonies and a migrating subpopulation which eventually colonizes the top of the microcolonies, resulting in the development of mushroom......-targeting antibacterial agents. All biofilm-associated cells were sensitive to the antibacterial agents when tested in standard plate assays. A mutation eliminating the production of type IV pili, and hence surface-associated motility, prevented the formation of regular mushroom-shaped structures in the flow cell...... that only the cap-forming subpopulation in biofilms treated with colistin expresses the pmr operon. These results suggest that increased antibiotic tolerance in biofilms may be a consequence of differentiation into distinct subpopulations with different phenotypic properties....

  3. Nitroglycerin induces DNA damage and vascular cell death in the setting of nitrate tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhed, Yuliya; Fahrer, Jörg; Oelze, Matthias; Kröller-Schön, Swenja; Steven, Sebastian; Welschof, Philipp; Zinßius, Elena; Stamm, Paul; Kashani, Fatemeh; Roohani, Siyer; Kress, Joana Melanie; Ullmann, Elisabeth; Tran, Lan P; Schulz, Eberhard; Epe, Bernd; Kaina, Bernd; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Nitroglycerin (GTN) and other organic nitrates are widely used vasodilators. Their side effects are development of nitrate tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. Given the potential of GTN to induce nitro-oxidative stress, we investigated the interaction between nitro-oxidative DNA damage and vascular dysfunction in experimental nitrate tolerance. Cultured endothelial hybridoma cells (EA.hy 926) and Wistar rats were treated with GTN (ex vivo: 10-1000 µM; in vivo: 10, 20 and 50 mg/kg/day for 3 days, s.c.). The level of DNA strand breaks, 8-oxoguanine and O (6)-methylguanine DNA adducts was determined by Comet assay, dot blot and immunohistochemistry. Vascular function was determined by isometric tension recording. DNA adducts and strand breaks were induced by GTN in cells in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. GTN in vivo administration leads to endothelial dysfunction, nitrate tolerance, aortic and cardiac oxidative stress, formation of DNA adducts, stabilization of p53 and apoptotic death of vascular cells in a dose-dependent fashion. Mice lacking O (6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase displayed more vascular O (6)-methylguanine adducts and oxidative stress under GTN therapy than wild-type mice. Although we were not able to prove a causal role of DNA damage in the etiology of nitrate tolerance, the finding of GTN-induced DNA damage such as the mutagenic and toxic adduct O (6)-methylguanine, and cell death supports the notion that GTN based therapy may provoke adverse side effects, including endothelial function. Further studies are warranted to clarify whether GTN pro-apoptotic effects are related to an impaired recovery of patients upon myocardial infarction. PMID:27357950

  4. Nitroglycerin induces DNA damage and vascular cell death in the setting of nitrate tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhed, Yuliya; Fahrer, Jörg; Oelze, Matthias; Kröller-Schön, Swenja; Steven, Sebastian; Welschof, Philipp; Zinßius, Elena; Stamm, Paul; Kashani, Fatemeh; Roohani, Siyer; Kress, Joana Melanie; Ullmann, Elisabeth; Tran, Lan P; Schulz, Eberhard; Epe, Bernd; Kaina, Bernd; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Nitroglycerin (GTN) and other organic nitrates are widely used vasodilators. Their side effects are development of nitrate tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. Given the potential of GTN to induce nitro-oxidative stress, we investigated the interaction between nitro-oxidative DNA damage and vascular dysfunction in experimental nitrate tolerance. Cultured endothelial hybridoma cells (EA.hy 926) and Wistar rats were treated with GTN (ex vivo: 10-1000 µM; in vivo: 10, 20 and 50 mg/kg/day for 3 days, s.c.). The level of DNA strand breaks, 8-oxoguanine and O (6)-methylguanine DNA adducts was determined by Comet assay, dot blot and immunohistochemistry. Vascular function was determined by isometric tension recording. DNA adducts and strand breaks were induced by GTN in cells in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. GTN in vivo administration leads to endothelial dysfunction, nitrate tolerance, aortic and cardiac oxidative stress, formation of DNA adducts, stabilization of p53 and apoptotic death of vascular cells in a dose-dependent fashion. Mice lacking O (6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase displayed more vascular O (6)-methylguanine adducts and oxidative stress under GTN therapy than wild-type mice. Although we were not able to prove a causal role of DNA damage in the etiology of nitrate tolerance, the finding of GTN-induced DNA damage such as the mutagenic and toxic adduct O (6)-methylguanine, and cell death supports the notion that GTN based therapy may provoke adverse side effects, including endothelial function. Further studies are warranted to clarify whether GTN pro-apoptotic effects are related to an impaired recovery of patients upon myocardial infarction.

  5. Cell wall and phospholipid composition and their contribution to the salt tolerance of Halomonas elongata.

    OpenAIRE

    Vreeland, R H; Anderson, R; Murray, R G

    1984-01-01

    The salt-tolerant bacterium Halomonas elongata makes a variety of physiological adaptations in response to increases in the salt concentration of its growth medium. The cell walls become more compact and internally coherent. The overall lipid pattern shows an increased amount of negatively charged lipids. In addition, the peptidoglycan composition of H. elongata, although not changing in response to increased NaCl, contains the hydrophobic amino acid leucine which is unique among bacterial sp...

  6. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Claire [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Lafosse, Jean-Michel [CHU Toulouse, Hopital Rangueil, Service d' orthopedie et Traumatologie, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Malavaud, Bernard [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France); CHU Toulouse, Hopital Rangueil, Service d' Urologie et de Transplantation Renale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Cuvillier, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.cuvillier@ipbs.fr [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France)

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  7. DNA-mediated gene transfer into ataxia-telangiectasia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complete description of the genetic lesion(s) underlying the AT mutation might, therefore, highlight not only a DNA-repair pathwa, but also an important aspect of the physiology of lymphocytes. DNA-mediated gene transfer into eukaryotic cells has proved a powerful tool for the molecular cloning of certain mammalian genes. The possibility to clone a given gene using this technology depends, basically, on the availability of a selectable marker associated with the expression of the transfected gene in the recipient cell. Recently, a human DNA repair gene has been cloned in CHO mutant cells by taking advantage of the increased resistance to ultraviolet radiation of the transformants. As a preliminary step toward the molecular cloning of the AT gene(s), the authors have attempted to confer radioresistance to AT cells by transfection with normal human DNA

  8. Imaging Tolerance Induction in the Classic Medawar Neonatal Mouse Model: Active Roles of Multiple F1-Donor Cell Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascom, R A; Tao, K S; Tollenaar, S L; West, L J

    2015-09-01

    The immature immune system is uniquely susceptible to tolerance induction and thus an attractive target for immunomodulation strategies for organ transplantation. Newborn mice injected with adult semi-allogeneic lymphohematopoietic cells accept transplants without immunosuppressive drugs. Early in vivo/in situ events leading to neonatal tolerance remain poorly understood. Here, we show by whole body/organ imaging that injected cells home to lymphoid organs and liver where various F1-donor cell types selectively alter neonatal immunity. In host thymus, F1-donor dendritic cells (DC) interact with developing thymocytes and regulatory T cells suggesting a role in negative selection. In spleen and lymph nodes, F1-donor regulatory T/B cells associate with host alloreactive cells and by themselves prolong cardiac allograft survival. In liver, F1-donor cells give rise to albumin-containing hepatocyte-like cells. The neonatal immune system is lymphopenic, Th-2 immunodeviated and contains immature DC, suggesting susceptibility to regulation by adult F1-donor cells. CD8a T cell inactivation greatly enhances chimerism, suggesting that variable emerging neonatal alloreactivity becomes a barrier to tolerance induction. This comprehensive qualitative imaging study systematically shows contribution of multiple in vivo processes leading simultaneously to robust tolerance. These insights into robust tolerance induction have important implications for development of strategies for clinical application. PMID:25962413

  9. Mechanistic Assessment of PD-1H Coinhibitory Receptor-Induced T-Cell Tolerance to Allogeneic Antigens1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flies, Dallas B.; Higuchi, Tomoe; Chen, Lieping

    2015-01-01

    PD-1H is a recently identified cell surface co-inhibitory molecule of the B7/CD28 immune modulatory gene family. We showed previously that single injection of a PD-1H agonistic monoclonal antibody (mAb) protected mice from graft versus host disease (GVHD). We report here two distinct mechanisms operate in PD-1H-induced T cell tolerance. First, signaling via PD-1H co-inhibitory receptor potently arrests allo-reactive donor T cells from activation and expansion in the initiation phase. Second, donor regulatory T cells are subsequently expanded to maintain long-term tolerance and GVHD suppression. Our study reveals the crucial function of PD-1H as a co-inhibitory receptor on allo-reactive T cells and its function in the regulation of T cell tolerance. Therefore, PD-1H may be a target for the modulation of allo-reactive T cells in GVHD and transplantation. PMID:25917101

  10. Regulatory T cell reprogramming toward a Th2-cell-like lineage impairs oral tolerance and promotes food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noval Rivas, Magali; Burton, Oliver T; Wise, Petra; Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Georgiev, Peter; Oettgen, Hans C; Rachid, Rima; Chatila, Talal A

    2015-03-17

    Oral immunotherapy has had limited success in establishing tolerance in food allergy, reflecting failure to elicit an effective regulatory T (Treg) cell response. We show that disease-susceptible (Il4ra(F709)) mice with enhanced interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R) signaling exhibited STAT6-dependent impaired generation and function of mucosal allergen-specific Treg cells. This failure was associated with the acquisition by Treg cells of a T helper 2 (Th2)-cell-like phenotype, also found in peripheral-blood allergen-specific Treg cells of food-allergic children. Selective augmentation of IL-4R signaling in Treg cells induced their reprogramming into Th2-like cells and disease susceptibility, whereas Treg-cell-lineage-specific deletion of Il4 and Il13 was protective. IL-4R signaling impaired the capacity of Treg cells to suppress mast cell activation and expansion, which in turn drove Th2 cell reprogramming of Treg cells. Interruption of Th2 cell reprogramming of Treg cells might thus provide candidate therapeutic strategies in food allergy. PMID:25769611

  11. Cecum lymph node dendritic cells harbor slow-growing bacteria phenotypically tolerant to antibiotic treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Kaiser

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In vivo, antibiotics are often much less efficient than ex vivo and relapses can occur. The reasons for poor in vivo activity are still not completely understood. We have studied the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin in an animal model for complicated Salmonellosis. High-dose ciprofloxacin treatment efficiently reduced pathogen loads in feces and most organs. However, the cecum draining lymph node (cLN, the gut tissue, and the spleen retained surviving bacteria. In cLN, approximately 10%-20% of the bacteria remained viable. These phenotypically tolerant bacteria lodged mostly within CD103⁺CX₃CR1⁻CD11c⁺ dendritic cells, remained genetically susceptible to ciprofloxacin, were sufficient to reinitiate infection after the end of the therapy, and displayed an extremely slow growth rate, as shown by mathematical analysis of infections with mixed inocula and segregative plasmid experiments. The slow growth was sufficient to explain recalcitrance to antibiotics treatment. Therefore, slow-growing antibiotic-tolerant bacteria lodged within dendritic cells can explain poor in vivo antibiotic activity and relapse. Administration of LPS or CpG, known elicitors of innate immune defense, reduced the loads of tolerant bacteria. Thus, manipulating innate immunity may augment the in vivo activity of antibiotics.

  12. [Regulatory T-cells in systemic lupus erythematosus. IL-2 is decisive for loss of tolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, K; Tenbrock, K

    2016-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) results from loss of immunological tolerance. Regulatory T‑cells (Treg) are major gatekeepers of peripheral tolerance by suppression of autoreactive lymphocytes. Defects in Treg function are therefore possible pathogenetic mechanisms of SLE. Despite this fact published work about numbers and functions of Tregs in SLE are contradictory and the definitive role of Treg in SLE remains unclear. In this review we summarize the current literature about Treg subtypes and the phenotypic markers in human SLE. We also discuss data from mouse models and ex vivo experiments, which provide indications for possible mechanisms that contribute to loss of tolerance. We also discuss the role of interleukin 2 (IL-2), which is decisive for the function of Treg and has been used therapeutically in preliminary trials in human SLE. The identification of novel Treg markers and the development of novel therapeutic approaches, which restore the balance between Treg and autoreactive T‑cells are future goals for research in SLE. PMID:26975190

  13. The Role of Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity in Insulin Sensitivity, Beta Cell Function, and Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lou Rose Malamug

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection, for example, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, has been thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Our aim was to determine the role of H. pylori infection in glucose metabolism in an American cohort. We examined data from 4,136 non-Hispanic white (NHW, non-Hispanic black (NHB, and Mexican Americans (MA aged 18 and over from the NHANES 1999-2000 cohort. We calculated the odds ratios for states of glucose tolerance based on the H. pylori status. We calculated and compared homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and beta cell function (HOMA-B in subjects without diabetes based on the H. pylori status. The results were adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI, poverty index, education, alcohol consumption, tobacco use, and physical activity. The H. pylori status was not a risk factor for abnormal glucose tolerance. After adjustment for age and BMI and also adjustment for all covariates, no difference was found in either HOMA-IR or HOMA-B in all ethnic and gender groups except for a marginally significant difference in HOMA-IR in NHB females. H. pylori infection was not a risk factor for abnormal glucose tolerance, nor plays a major role in insulin resistance or beta cell dysfunction.

  14. PPARα Agonist Fenofibrate Reduced the Secreting Load of β-Cells in Hypertriglyceridemia Patients with Normal Glucose Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Jia Liu; Rui Lu; Ying Wang; Yanjin Hu; Yumei Jia; Ning Yang; Jing Fu; Guang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is an important risk factor associated with insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction. This study investigated the effects of hypertriglyceridemia and fenofibrate treatment on insulin sensitivity and β-cell function in subjects with normal glucose tolerance. A total of 1974 subjects with normal glucose tolerance were divided into the normal TG group (NTG group, n = 1302) and hypertriglyceridemia group (HTG group, n = 672). Next, 92 patients selected randomly from 672 pati...

  15. Protein Kinase G facilitates EGFR-mediated cell death in MDA-MB-468 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Nicole M; Ceresa, Brian P

    2016-08-15

    The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase with critical implications in cell proliferation, migration, wound healing and the regulation of apoptosis. However, the EGFR has been shown to be hyper-expressed in a number of human malignancies. The MDA-MB-468 metastatic breast cell line is one example of this. This particular cell line hyper-expresses the EGFR and undergoes EGFR-mediated apoptosis in response to EGF ligand. The goal of this study was to identify the kinases that could be potential intermediates for the EGFR-mediated induction of apoptosis intracellularly. After identifying Cyclic GMP-dependent Protein Kinase G (PKG) as a plausible intermediate, we wanted to determine the temporal relationship of these two proteins in the induction of apoptosis. We observed a dose-dependent decrease in MDA-MB-468 cell viability, which was co-incident with increased PKG activity as measured by VASPSer239 phosphorylation. In addition, we observed a dose dependent decrease in cell viability, as well as an increase in apoptosis, in response to two different PKG agonists, 8-Bromo-cGMP and 8-pCPT-cGMP. MDA-MB-468 cells with reduced PKG activity had attenuated EGFR-mediated apoptosis. These findings indicate that PKG does not induce cell death via transphosphorylation of the EGFR. Instead, PKG activity occurs following EGFR activation. Together, these data indicate PKG as an intermediary in EGFR-mediated cell death, likely via apoptotic pathway. PMID:27381222

  16. Integration of principles of systems biology and radiation biology: toward development of in silico models to optimize IUdR-mediated radiosensitization of DNA mismatch repair-deficient (damage tolerant human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy James Kinsella

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 7 years, we have focused our experimental and computational research efforts on improving our understanding of the biochemical, molecular, and cellular processing of iododeoxyuridine (IUdR and ionizing radiation (IR induced DNA base damage by DNA mismatch repair (MMR. These coordinated research efforts, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP, brought together system scientists with expertise in engineering, mathematics, and complex systems theory and translational cancer researchers with expertise in radiation biology. Our overall goal was to begin to develop computational models of IUdR- and/or IR- induced base damage processing by MMR that may provide new clinical strategies to optimize IUdR-mediated radiosensitiztion in MMR deficient (MMR- damage tolerant human cancers. Using multiple scales of experimental testing, ranging from purified protein systems to in vitro (cellular and to in vivo (human tumor xenografts in athymic mice models, we have begun to integrate and interpolate these experimental data with hybrid stochastic biochemical models of MMR damage processing and probabilistic cell cycle regulation models through a systems biology approach. In this article, we highlight the results and current status of our integration of radiation biology approaches and computational modeling to enhance IUdR-mediated radiosensitization in MMR- damage tolerant cancers.

  17. Glycosylation-mediated phenylpropanoid partitioning in Populus tremuloides cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babst Benjamin A

    2009-12-01

    identified candidate genes for glycosyltransferases that may mediate the glycosylation, and for transporters that mediate the subcellular compartmentalization of sugars and phenolic glycosides. The suspension cells appear to represent a facile system for dissecting the regulation of phenolic carbon partitioning, and in turn, its effects on growth in Populus.

  18. FOXP3 and CTLA-4 : how isoforms regulate immunological tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Sang

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of immunological tolerance is vital for preventing the immune system to damage normal tissues and physiological function of the body. CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells can suppress immune responses in a dominant manner and are essential for immunological tolerance. Although many pathways and molecules have been attributed to the suppressive function of Treg cells, the exact nature of the Treg cell-mediated suppression program is still elusive. In this ...

  19. Role of Arabidopsis RAP2.4 in Regulating Light-and Ethylene-Mediated Developmental Processes and Drought Stress Tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-Cheng Lin; Hee-Jin Park; Hai-Yang Wang

    2008-01-01

    Light and the plant hormone ethylene regulate many aspects of plant growth and development in an overlapping and interdependent fashion. Little is known regarding how their signal transduction pathways cross-talk to regulate plant development in a coordinated manner. Here, we report functional characterization of an AP2/DREB-type transcription factor, Arabidopsis RAP2.4, in mediating light and ethylene signaling. Expression of the RAP2.4 gene is down-regulated by light but up-regulated by salt and drought stresses. RAP2.4 protein is constitutively targeted to the nucleus and it can bind to both the ethylene-responsive GCC-box and the dehydration-responsive element (DRE).We show that RAP2.4 protein possesses an intrinsic transcriptional activation activity in yeast cells and that it can activate a reporter gene driven by the DRE cis-element in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Overexpression of RAP2.4 or mutation in RAP2.4 cause altered expression of representative light-, ethylene-, and drought-responsive genes. Although no salient phenotype was observed with a rap2.4 loss-of-function mutant, constitutive overexpression of RAP2.4 results in defects in multiple developmental processes regulated by light and ethylene, including hypocotyl elongation and gravitropism, apical hook formation and cotyledon expansion, flowering time, root elongation, root hair formation, and drought tolerance.Based on these observations, we propose that RAP2.4 acts at or downstream of a converging point of light and ethylene signaling pathways to coordinately regulate multiple developmental processes and stress responses.

  20. Integrin Receptors on Tumor Cells Facilitate NK cell-mediated Antibody-dependent Cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Anikeeva, Nadia; Steblyanko, Maria; Fayngerts, Svetlana; Kopylova, Natalya; Marshall, Deborah J.; Powers, Gordon D.; Sato, Takami; Campbell, Kerry S.; Sykulev, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    NK cells that mediate ADCC play an important role in tumor-specific immunity. We have examined factors limiting specific lysis of tumor cells by CD16.NK-92 cells induced by CNTO 95LF antibodies recognizing αV integrins that are overexpressed on many tumor cells. Although all tested tumor cells were killed by CD16.NK-92 effectors in the presence of the antibodies, the killing of target cells with a low level of ICAM-1 expression revealed a dramatic decrease in their specific lysis at high anti...

  1. Downregulation of miR-219 enhances brain-derived neurotrophic factor production in mouse dorsal root ganglia to mediate morphine analgesic tolerance by upregulating CaMKIIγ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xue-Ming; Cao, Shou-Bin; Zhang, Hai-Long; Lyu, Dong-Mei; Chen, Li-Ping; Xu, Heng; Pan, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that microRNAs are functionally involved in the initiation and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity, including chronic morphine analgesic tolerance, through the posttranscriptional regulation of pain-related genes. We have previously demonstrated that miR-219 regulates inflammatory pain in the spinal cord by targeting calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II gamma (CaMKIIγ). However, whether miR-219 regulates CaMKIIγ expression in the dorsal root ganglia to mediate morphine tolerance remains unclear. Results MiR-219 expression was downregulated and CaMKIIγ expression was upregulated in mouse dorsal root ganglia following chronic morphine treatment. The changes in miR-219 and CaMKIIγ expression closely correlated with the development of morphine tolerance, which was measured using the reduction of percentage of maximum potential efficiency to thermal stimuli. Morphine tolerance was markedly delayed by upregulating miR-219 expression using miR-219 mimics or downregulating CaMKIIγ expression using CaMKIIγ small interfering RNA. The protein and mRNA expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor were also induced in dorsal root ganglia by prolonged morphine exposure in a time-dependent manner, which were transcriptionally regulated by miR-219 and CaMKIIγ. Scavenging brain-derived neurotrophic factor via tyrosine receptor kinase B-Fc partially attenuated morphine tolerance. Moreover, functional inhibition of miR-219 via miR-219-sponge in naive mice elicited thermal hyperalgesia and spinal neuronal sensitization, which were both suppressed by CaMKIIγ small interfering RNA or tyrosine receptor kinase B-Fc. Conclusions These results demonstrate that miR-219 contributes to the development of chronic tolerance to morphine analgesia in mouse dorsal root ganglia by targeting CaMKIIγ and enhancing CaMKIIγ-dependent brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression. PMID:27599867

  2. Establishment, Growth kinetics, and Susceptibility to AcMNPV of Heat Tolerant Lepidop teran Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-lei Wu; Lei Jiang; Yoshifumi Hashimoto; Robert R.Granados; Guo-xun Li

    2011-01-01

    Lepidopteran heat-tolerant(ht)cell lines have been obtained with sf-9,sf-21 and several Bombyx cells.They have a distinct karyotype,membrane lipid composition,morphology and growth kinetics from the parental cell lines.In this paper,we report the development of ht cell lines from other insect species and examination of their growth characteristics and virus susceptibility.Adaptation of cell lines sf-9,BTI-TN-5131-4(High5)and BTI-TN-MG1(MG 1)to 33℃ and 35℃ was carried out by shifting the culture temperature between 28℃ and higher temperatures by a gradual stepwise increase in temperature.The process of adaption to a higher culture temperature was accomplished over a period of 2 months.The cell lines with the temperature adaption were designated as sf9-ht33,sf9-ht35,High5-ht33,High5-ht35,MG1-ht33,MG1-ht35.These cell lines have been subcultured over 70 passages.Adaption to high temperatures was confirmed by a constant population doubling time with individual cell lines.The population doubling time of heat adapted cell lines were 1-4 h less than these of parental cell lines.Cell shapes did not show obvious change,however,the cell size of sf9-ht cells was enlarged and those of High5 and MG1 ht cells were reduced after heat adaption.When the cell lines were infected with Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus(AcMNPV)at 28℃,33℃,35℃ and 37℃,production of budded virus and occlusion bodies in each cell line was optimum at its own adapted temperature.

  3. Selectins mediate small cell lung cancer systemic metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Heidemann

    Full Text Available Metastasis formation is the major reason for the extremely poor prognosis in small cell lung cancer (SCLC patients. The molecular interaction partners regulating metastasis formation in SCLC are largely unidentified, however, from other tumor entities it is known that tumor cells use the adhesion molecules of the leukocyte adhesion cascade to attach to the endothelium at the site of the future metastasis. Using the human OH-1 SCLC line as a model, we found that these cells expressed E- and P-selectin binding sites, which could be in part attributed to the selectin binding carbohydrate motif sialyl Lewis A. In addition, protein backbones known to carry these glycotopes in other cell lines including PSGL-1, CD44 and CEA could be detected in in vitro and in vivo grown OH1 SCLC cells. By intravital microscopy of murine mesenterial vasculature we could capture SCLC cells while rolling along vessel walls demonstrating that SCLC cells mimic leukocyte rolling behavior in terms of selectin and selectin ligand interaction in vivo indicating that this mechanism might indeed be important for SCLC cells to seed distant metastases. Accordingly, formation of spontaneous distant metastases was reduced by 50% when OH-1 cells were xenografted into E-/P-selectin-deficient mice compared with wild type mice (p = 0.0181. However, as metastasis formation was not completely abrogated in selectin deficient mice, we concluded that this adhesion cascade is redundant and that other molecules of this cascade mediate metastasis formation as well. Using several of these adhesion molecules as interaction partners presumably make SCLC cells so highly metastatic.

  4. Establishment of Stable, Cell-Mediated Immunity that Makes "Susceptible" Mice Resistant to Leishmania major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretscher, Peter A.; Wei, Guojian; Menon, Juthika N.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    1992-07-01

    Cell-mediated, but not antibody-mediated, immune responses protect humans against certain pathogens that produce chronic diseases such as leishmaniasis. Effective vaccination against such pathogens must therefore produce an immunological "imprint" so that stable, cell-mediated immunity is induced in all individuals after natural infection. BALB/c mice "innately susceptible" to Leishmania major produce antibodies after substantial infection. In the present study, "susceptible" mice injected with a small number of parasites mounted a cell-mediated response and acquired resistance to a larger, normally pathogenic, challenge. This vaccination strategy may be applicable in diseases in which protection is dependent on cell-mediated immunity.

  5. T Cell-Mediated Modulation of Mast Cell Function: Heterotypic Adhesion-Induced Stimulatory or Inhibitory Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Mekori, Yoseph A.; Hershko, Alon Y.

    2012-01-01

    Close physical proximity between mast cells and T cells has been demonstrated in several T cell mediated inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis and sarcoidosis. However, the way by which mast cells are activated in these T cell-mediated immune responses has not been fully elucidated. We have identified and characterized a novel mast cell activation pathway initiated by physical contact with activated T cells, and showed that this pathway is associated with degranulation and cytok...

  6. B cell autophagy mediates TLR7-dependent autoimmunity and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weindel, Chi G; Richey, Lauren J; Bolland, Silvia; Mehta, Abhiruchi J; Kearney, John F; Huber, Brigitte T

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease, defined by loss of B cell self-tolerance that results in production of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and chronic inflammation. While the initiating events in lupus development are not well defined, overexpression of the RNA-recognizing toll-like receptor (TLR)7 has been linked to SLE in humans and mice. We postulated that autophagy plays an essential role in TLR7 activation of B cells for the induction of SLE by delivering RNA ligands to the endosomes, where this innate immune receptor resides. To test this hypothesis, we compared SLE development in Tlr7 transgenic (Tg) mice with or without B cell-specific ablation of autophagy (Cd19-Cre Atg5(f/f)). We observed that in the absence of B cell autophagy the 2 hallmarks of SLE, ANA and inflammation, were eliminated, thus curing these mice of lupus. This was also evident in the significantly extended survival of the autophagy-deficient mice compared to Tlr7.1 Tg mice. Furthermore, glomerulonephritis was ameliorated, and the serum levels of inflammatory cytokines in the knockout (KO) mice were indistinguishable from those of control mice. These data provide direct evidence that B cells require TLR7-dependent priming through an autophagy-dependent mechanism before autoimmunity is induced, thereafter involving many cell types. Surprisingly, hyper-IgM production persisted in Tlr7.1 Tg mice in the absence of autophagy, likely involving a different activation pathway than the production of autoantibodies. Furthermore, these mice still presented with anemia, but responded with a striking increase in extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH), possibly due to the absence of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  7. Arsenic trioxide inhibits accelerated allograft rejection mediated by alloreactive CD8(+) memory T cells and prolongs allograft survival time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Guan, Tianjun; Gao, Chang; Lin, Yingying; Yan, Guoliang; Zhu, Maoshu; Lv, Chongshan; Xia, Junjie; Qi, Zhongquan

    2015-09-01

    CD8(+) memory T (Tm) cells are a significant barrier to transplant tolerance induction in alloantigen-primed recipients, and are insensitive to existing clinical immunosuppressants. Here, we studied the inhibition of CD8(+) Tm cells by arsenic trioxide (As2O3) for the first time. Alloantigen-primed CD8(+) Tm cells were transferred to T cell immunodeficient nude mice. The mice were subjected to heart allotransplantation, and treated with As2O3. The transplant survival time was determined, and the inhibitory effects of As2O3 on CD8(+) Tm cell-mediated immune rejection were assessed through serological studies and inspection of the transplanted heart and lymphoid organs. We found that As2O3 treatment prolonged the mean survival time of the graft and reduced the number of CD8(+) Tm cells in the spleen and lymph nodes. The expression of the genes encoding interleukin (IL)-2, and IFN-γ was reduced, while expression of IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β was increased in the transplant. Our findings show that As2O3 treatment inhibits allograft rejection mediated by alloreactive CD8(+) Tm cells in the mouse heart transplantation model.

  8. Epigenetically Mediated Pathogenic Effects of Phenanthrene on Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenanthrene (Phe, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH, is a major constituent of urban air pollution. There have been conflicting results regarding the role of other AhR ligands 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD and 6-formylindolo [3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ in modifying regulatory T cell populations (Treg or T helper (Th17 differentiation, and the effects of Phe have been understudied. We hypothesized that different chemical entities of PAH induce Treg to become either Th2 or Th17 effector T cells through epigenetic modification of FOXP3. To determine specific effects on T cell populations by phenanthrene, primary human Treg were treated with Phe, TCDD, or FICZ and assessed for function, gene expression, and phenotype. Methylation of CpG sites within the FOXP3 locus reduced FOXP3 expression, leading to impaired Treg function and conversion of Treg into a CD4+CD25lo Th2 phenotype in Phe-treated cells. Conversely, TCDD treatment led to epigenetic modification of IL-17A and conversion of Treg to Th17 T cells. These findings present a mechanism by which exposure to AhR-ligands mediates human T cell responses and begins to elucidate the relationship between environmental exposures, immune modulation, and initiation of human disease.

  9. Signals mediating Klotho-induced neuroprotection in hippocampal neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Meng-Fu; Chen, Li-Jen; Niu, Ho-Shan; Yang, Ting-Ting; Lin, Kao-Chang; Cheng, Juei-Tang

    2015-01-01

    The erythropoietin (Epo) receptor (EpoR) is expressed in the brain and was shown to have neuroprotective effects against brain damage in animal models. A recent study indicated that EpoR and its activity are the downstream effectors of Klotho for cytoprotection in the kidney. Thus, we propose that Klotho can stimulate the expression of EpoR in neuronal cells to enhance Epo-mediated protection. H19-7 hippocampal neuronal cells were treated with recombinant Klotho. In H19-7 cells, Klotho increased the expression of both the EpoR protein and mRNA. Klotho also enhanced the transcription activity of the EpoR promoter in H19-7 cells. Moreover, Klotho augmented the Epo-triggered phosphorylation of Jak2 and Stat5 and protected H19-7 cells from hydrogen peroxide cytotoxicity. The silencing of EpoR abolished the protective effect of Klotho against peroxide-induced cytotoxicity. Finally, the silencing of GATA1 diminished the Klotho-induced increase in EpoR protein and mRNA expression as well as its promoter activity. In conclusion, Klotho increased EpoR expression in neuronal cells through GATA1, thereby enabling EpoR to function as a cytoprotective protein against oxidative injury. PMID:25856523

  10. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khondoker M. Akram

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  11. Hyperlipidemia Alters Regulatory T Cell Function and Promotes Resistance to Tolerance Induction Through Costimulatory Molecule Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, J; Yuan, J; Chandrakar, A; Iacomini, J

    2015-09-01

    Recent work from our laboratory has shown that hyperlipidemia promotes accelerated rejection of vascularized cardiac allografts in mice by inducing anti-donor Th17 reactivity and production of IL-17. Here, we show that hyperlipidemia also affects FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). Hyperlipidemia promotes the development of Tregs that express low levels of CD25. Hyperlipidemia also promotes a decrease in central Tregs and an increase in effector Tregs that appears to account for the increase in the frequency of CD25(low) Tregs. Alterations in Treg subsets also appear to lead to alterations in Treg function. The ability of FoxP3(+) , CD25(high) , CD4(+) Tregs from hyperlipidemic mice to inhibit proliferation of effector T cells stimulated with anti-CD3 and CD28 was reduced when compared with Tregs from control mice. Regulatory T cells isolated from hyperlipidemic recipients exhibit increased activation of Akt, and a reduction in Bim levels that permits the expansion of FoxP3(+) CD25(low) CD4(+) T cells. Hyperlipidemic mice were also resistant to tolerance induction using costimulatory molecule blockade consisting of anti-CD154 and CTLA4Ig, a strategy that requires Tregs. Together, our data suggest that hyperlipidemia profoundly affects Treg subsets and function as well as the ability to induce tolerance.

  12. The fatty acid profile of rainbow trout liver cells modulates their tolerance to methylmercury and cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferain, Aline; Bonnineau, Chloé; Neefs, Ineke; Rees, Jean François; Larondelle, Yvan; Schamphelaere, Karel A C De; Debier, Cathy

    2016-08-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition of fish tissues, which generally reflects that of the diet, affects various cellular properties such as membrane structure and fluidity, energy metabolism and susceptibility to oxidative stress. Since these cellular parameters can play an important role in the cellular response to organic and inorganic pollutants, a variation of the PUFA supply might modify the toxicity induced by such xenobiotics. In this work, we investigated whether the cellular fatty acid profile has an impact on the in vitro cell sensitivity to two environmental pollutants: methylmercury and cadmium. Firstly, the fatty acid composition of the rainbow trout liver cell line RTL-W1 was modified by enriching the growth medium with either alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6), arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) or docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5n-6). These modified cells and their control (no PUFA enrichment) were then challenged for 24h with increasing concentrations of methylmercury or cadmium. We observed that (i) the phospholipid composition of the RTL-W1 cells was profoundly modulated by changing the PUFA content of the growth medium: major modifications were a high incorporation of the supplemented PUFA in the cellular phospholipids, the appearance of direct elongation and desaturation metabolites in the cellular phospholipids as well as a change in the gross phospholipid composition (PUFA and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) levels and n-3/n-6 ratio); (ii) ALA, EPA and DPA enrichment significantly protected the RTL-W1 cells against both methylmercury and cadmium; (iv) DHA enrichment significantly protected the cells against cadmium but not methylmercury; (v) AA and LA enrichment had no impact on the cell tolerance to both methylmercury and cadmium; (vi) the abundance of 20:3n-6, a metabolite of the n-6 biotransformation pathway, in

  13. β-Cell Regeneration Mediated by Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Milanesi; Jang-Won Lee; Zhenhua Li; Stefano Da Sacco; Valentina Villani; Vanessa Cervantes; Laura Perin; Yu, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been shown to ameliorate diabetes in animal models. The mechanism, however, remains largely unknown. An unanswered question is whether BMSCs are able to differentiate into β-cells in vivo, or whether BMSCs are able to mediate recovery and/or regeneration of endogenous β-cells. Here we examined these questions by testing the ability of hBMSCs genetically modified to transiently express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or pancreatic-duode...

  14. Site of clomazone action in tolerant-soybean and susceptible-cotton photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, M A; Liebl, R A; Widholm, J M

    1990-10-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the herbicidal site of clomazone action in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Corsoy) (SB-M) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum [L.] cv Stoneville 825) (COT-M) photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures. Although a 10 micromolar clomazone treatment did not significantly reduce the terpene or mixed terpenoid content (microgram per gram fresh weight) of the SB-M cell line, there was over a 70% reduction in the chlorophyll (Chl), carotenoid (CAR), and plastoquinone (PQ) content of the COT-M cell line. The tocopherol (TOC) content was reduced only 35.6%. Reductions in the levels of Chl, CAR, TOC, and PQ indicate that the site of clomazone action in COT-M cells is prior to geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). The clomazone treatment did not significantly reduce the flow of [(14)C]mevalonate ([(14)C]MEV) (nanocuries per gram fresh weight) into CAR and the three mixed terpenoid compounds of SB-M cells. Conversely, [(14)C]MEV incorporation into CAR and the terpene moieties of Chl, PQ, and TOC in COT-M cells was reduced at least 73%, indicating that the site of clomazone action must be after MEV. Sequestration of clomazone away from the chloroplast cannot account for soybean tolerance to clomazone since chloroplasts isolated from both cell lines incubated with [(14)C]clomazone contained a similar amount of radioactivity (disintegrations per minute per microgram of Chl). The possible site(s) of clomazone inhibition include mevalonate kinase, phosphomevalonate kinase, pyrophosphomevalonate decarboxylase, isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase, and/or a prenyl transferase.

  15. Nuclear Factor κB1/RelA Mediates Inflammation in Human Lung Epithelial Cells at Atmospheric Oxygen Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Lakshmanan; Jose, Cynthia C; Arita, Adriana; Kluz, Thomas; Sun, Hong; Zhang, Xiaoru; Yao, Yixin; Kartashov, Andrey V; Barski, Artem; Costa, Max; Cuddapah, Suresh

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen levels range from 2% to 9% in vivo. Atmospheric O2 levels (21%) are known to induce cell proliferation defects and cellular senescence in primary cell cultures. However, the mechanistic basis of the deleterious effects of higher O2 levels is not fully understood. On the other hand, immortalized cells including cancer cell lines, which evade cellular senescence are normally cultured at 21% O2 and the effects of higher O2 on these cells are understudied. Here, we addressed this problem by culturing immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells at ambient atmospheric, 21% O2 and lower, 10% O2. Our results show increased inflammatory response at 21% O2 but not at 10% O2. We found higher RelA binding at the NF-κB1/RelA target gene promoters as well as upregulation of several pro-inflammatory cytokines in cells cultured at 21% O2. RelA knockdown prevented the upregulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines at 21% O2, suggesting NF-κB1/RelA as a major mediator of inflammatory response in cells cultured at 21% O2. Interestingly, unlike the 21% O2 cultured cells, exposure of 10% O2 cultured cells to H2O2 did not elicit inflammatory response, suggesting increased ability to tolerate oxidative stress in cells cultured at lower O2 levels. PMID:26588041

  16. NKG2D ligands mediate immunosurveillance of senescent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagiv, Adi; Burton, Dominick G A; Moshayev, Zhana; Vadai, Ezra; Wensveen, Felix; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Golani, Ofra; Polic, Bojan; Krizhanovsky, Valery

    2016-02-01

    Cellular senescence is a stress response mechanism that limits tumorigenesis and tissue damage. Induction of cellular senescence commonly coincides with an immunogenic phenotype that promotes self-elimination by components of the immune system, thereby facilitating tumor suppression and limiting excess fibrosis during wound repair. The mechanisms by which senescent cells regulate their immune surveillance are not completely understood. Here we show that ligands of an activating Natural Killer (NK) cell receptor (NKG2D), MICA and ULBP2 are consistently up-regulated following induction of replicative senescence, oncogene-induced senescence and DNA damage - induced senescence. MICA and ULBP2 proteins are necessary for efficient NK-mediated cytotoxicity towards senescent fibroblasts. The mechanisms regulating the initial expression of NKG2D ligands in senescent cells are dependent on a DNA damage response, whilst continuous expression of these ligands is regulated by the ERK signaling pathway. In liver fibrosis, the accumulation of senescent activated stellate cells is increased in mice lacking NKG2D receptor leading to increased fibrosis. Overall, our results provide new insights into the mechanisms regulating the expression of immune ligands in senescent cells and reveal the importance of NKG2D receptor-ligand interaction in protecting against liver fibrosis. PMID:26878797

  17. In vitro opioid induced proliferation of peripheral blood immune cells correlates with in vivo cold pressor pain tolerance in humans: a biological marker of pain tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Mark R; La Vincente, Sophie F; Somogyi, Andrew A

    2004-08-01

    There is substantial evidence for bidirectional communication between the immune system and the central nervous system, as the cells and signalling molecules of the immune system influence many central nervous system functions, for instance nociception. Opioids, such as morphine, produce analgesia and numerous other central and peripheral effects including sedation and euphoria, while their effects on the immune system are wide-ranging. There is considerable interindividual variability in basal nociception and response to opioids, however, the physiological and biological mechanisms underlying this are unclear. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between the immune system and basal nociceptive thresholds, using the proliferative response of isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cold pressor pain tolerance. Here we show that the percent increase in proliferation of peripheral immune cells from 13 healthy subjects incubated with morphine ex vivo is highly correlated with the subjects' tolerance to noxious cold stimuli (Pearson r = 0.92, P humans, which also links the immune and opioid systems with basal pain tolerance.

  18. Interstitial cells of Cajal mediate mechanosensitive responses in the stomach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Kyung-Jong; Sanders, Kenton M.; Ward, Sean M.

    2005-10-01

    Changes in motor activity are a basic response to filling of smooth muscle organs. Responses to gastric filling, for example, are thought to be regulated by neural reflexes. Here, we demonstrate a previously uncharacterized aspect of stretch-dependent responses in visceral smooth muscles that is mediated by mechanosensitive interstitial cells of Cajal. Length ramps were applied to the murine antral muscles while recording intracellular electrical activity and isometric force. Stretching muscles by an average of 27 ± 1% of resting length resulted in 5 mN of force. Increasing length caused membrane depolarization and increased slow-wave frequency. The responses were dependent on the rate of stretch. Stretch-dependent responses were not inhibited by neuronal antagonists or nifedipine. Increases in slow-wave frequency, but not membrane depolarization, were inhibited by reducing external Ca2+ (100 μM) and by Ni2+ (250 μM). Responses to stretch were inhibited by indomethacin (1 μM) and were absent in cyclooxygenase II-deficient mice, suggesting that cyclooxygenase II-derived eicosanoids may mediate these responses. Dual microelectrode impalements of muscle cells within the corpus and antrum showed that stretch-induced changes in slow-wave frequency uncoupled proximal-to-distal propagation of slow waves. This uncoupling could interfere with gastric peristalsis and impede gastric emptying. Stretch of antral muscles of W/WV mice, which lack intramuscular interstitial cells of Cajal, did not affect membrane depolarization or slow-wave frequency. These data demonstrate a previously uncharacterized nonneural stretch reflex in gastric muscles and provide physiological evidence demonstrating a mechanosensitive role for interstitial cells of Cajal in smooth muscle tissues. gastric compliance | pacemaker | stretch | slow waves | propagation

  19. A Neutralizing Antibody Assay Based on a Reporter of Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuling; Li, Jia J; Kim, Hyun Jun; Liu, Xu; Liu, Weiyi; Akhgar, Ahmad; Bowen, Michael A; Spitz, Susan; Jiang, Xu-Rong; Roskos, Lorin K; White, Wendy I

    2015-11-01

    Benralizumab is a humanized anti-IL5 receptor α (IL5Rα) monoclonal antibody (mAb) with enhanced (afucosylation) antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) function. An ADCC reporter cell-based neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay was developed and characterized to detect NAb against benralizumab in human serum to support the clinical development of benralizumab. The optimal ratio of target cells to effector cells was 3:1. Neither parental benralizumab (fucosylated) nor benralizumab Fab resulted in ADCC activity, confirming the requirement for ADCC activity in the NAb assay. The serum tolerance of the cells was determined to be 2.5%. The cut point derived from normal and asthma serum samples was comparable. The effective range of benralizumab was determined, and 35 ng/mL [80% maximal effective concentration (EC80)] was chosen as the standard concentration to run in the assessment of NAb. An affinity purified goat anti-benralizumab polyclonal idiotype antibody preparation was shown to have NAb since it inhibited ADCC activity in a dose-dependent fashion. The low endogenous concentrations of IL5 and soluble IL5 receptor (sIL5R) did not demonstrate to interfere with the assay. The estimated assay sensitivities at the cut point were 1.02 and 1.10 μg/mL as determined by the surrogate neutralizing goat polyclonal and mouse monoclonal anti-drug antibody (ADA) controls, respectively. The assay can detect NAb (at 2.5 μg/mL) in the presence of 0.78 μg/mL benralizumab. The assay was not susceptible to non-specific matrix effects. This study provides an approach and feasibility of developing an ADCC cell-based NAb assay to support biopharmaceuticals with an ADCC function. PMID:26205082

  20. Tolerability and toxicity of adjuvant cisplatin and gemcitabine for treating non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Fan; LI Xiao; CHEN Ke-zhong; JIANG Guan-chao; WANG Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background The combination of cisplatin and vinorelbine is an evidence-supported regimen for adjuvant chemotherapy for treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).But this doublet has considerable toxicity and unfavorable tolerability,and results in poor compliance.The cisplatin and gemcitabine regimen is one of the most active and well-tolerated regimens against advanced NSCLC,but its toxicity and tolerability has not been adequately evaluated in the adjuvant setting.Methods From a lung cancer database we retrospectively reviewed NSCLC patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy of cisplatin (75 mg/m2) and gemcitabine (1250 mg/m2) between January 2005 and December 2011.Postoperative demographics,compliance to adjuvant therapy and toxicity were retrieved from medical records.Results A total of 132 patients met the criteria and were included in the study,96 were male (72.7%) and 36 were female (27.3%).Median age was 60.5 years old,range 29-75 years,and 41.7% of patients were ≥65 years old.Overall,68.2%patients received all four planned cycles,and the cumulative dose delivered for gemcitabine was 8333 mg (83.3% of the planned dose) and cisplatin 248 mg (82.7% of the planned dose).There were no treatment-related deaths.Grade 3/4neutropenia developed in 47 patients (35.6%) and was the predominant hematologic toxicity.Common grade 3/4 nonhematologic toxicities were nausea/vomiting (22.0%),infection (12.3%),and febrile neutropenia (11.4%).Conclusion Cisplatin and gemcitabine are feasible for use in the adjuvant setting with a favorable toxicity profile and superior tolerability compared with published data on cisplatin and vinorelbine.

  1. Chitosan nanoparticles affect acid tolerance response in adhered cells of strpetococcus mutans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neilands, Julia; Sutherland, Duncan S; Resin, Anton;

    2011-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of chitosan nanoparticles on the acid tolerance response (ATR) of adhered Streptococcus mutans. An ATR was induced by exposing S. mutans to pH 5.5 for 2 h and confirmed by exposing the acid-adapted cells to pH 3.5 for 30 min, with the majority of cells...... appearing viable according to the LIVE/DEAD (R) technique. However, when chitosan nanoparticles were present during the exposure to pH 5.5, no ATR occurred as most cells appeared dead after the pH 3.5 shock. We conclude that the chitosan nanoparticles tested had the ability to hinder ATR induction...

  2. Response and tolerance of root border cells to aluminum toxicity in soybean seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Miao-Zhen; Wang, Fang-Mei; Li, Rong-Feng; Zhang, Shu-Na; Wang, Ning; Xu, Gen-Di

    2011-07-01

    Root border cells (RBCs) and their secreted mucilage are suggested to participate in the resistance against toxic metal cations, including aluminum (Al), in the rhizosphere. However, the mechanisms by which the individual cell populations respond to Al and their role in Al resistance still remain unclear. In this research, the response and tolerance of RBCs to Al toxicity were investigated in the root tips of two soybean cultivars [Zhechun No. 2 (Al-tolerant cultivar) and Huachun No. 18 (Al-sensitive cultivar)]. Al inhibited root elongation and increased pectin methylesterase (PME) activity in the root tip. Removal of RBCs from the root tips resulted in a more severe inhibition of root elongation, especially in Huachun No. 18. Increasing Al levels and treatment time decreased the relative percent viability of RBCs in situ and in vitro in both soybean cultivars. Al application significantly increased mucilage layer thickness around the detached RBCs of both cultivars. Additionally, a significantly higher relative percent cell viability of attached and detached RBCs and thicker mucilage layers were observed in Zhechun No. 2. The higher viability of attached and detached RBCs, as well as the thickening of the mucilage layer in separated RBCs, suggest that RBCs play an important role in protecting root apices from Al toxicity.

  3. The flavoprotein Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Akira; Kawahara, Nobuhiro [Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Takagi, Hiroshi, E-mail: hiro@bs.naist.jp [Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NO is produced from L-arginine in response to elevated temperature in yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tah18 was first identified as the yeast protein involved in NO synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers tolerance to high-temperature on yeast cells. -- Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule involved in the regulation of a large number of cellular functions. In the unicellular eukaryote yeast, NO may be involved in stress response pathways, but its role is poorly understood due to the lack of mammalian NO synthase (NOS) orthologues. Previously, we have proposed the oxidative stress-induced L-arginine synthesis and its physiological role under stress conditions in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, our experimental results indicated that increased conversion of L-proline into L-arginine led to NO production in response to elevated temperature. We also showed that the flavoprotein Tah18, which was previously reported to transfer electrons to the Fe-S cluster protein Dre2, was involved in NO synthesis in yeast. Gene knockdown analysis demonstrated that Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells. As it appears that such a unique cell protection mechanism is specific to yeasts and fungi, it represents a promising target for antifungal activity.

  4. Hepatic non-parenchymal cells and extracellular matrix participate in oval cell-mediated liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Xiao-Ping Chen; Wan-Guang Zhang; Feng Zhang; Shuai Xiang; Han-Hua Dong; Lei Zhang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the interaction between nonparenchymal cells, extracellular matrix and oval cells during the restituting process of liver injury induced by partial hepatectomy (PH). METHODS: We examined the localization of oval cells, non-parenchymal cells, and the extracellular matrix components using immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescent analysis during the proliferation and differentiation of oval cells in N-2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF)/PH rat model. RESULTS: By day 2 after PH, small oval cells began to proliferate around the portal area. Most of stellate cells and laminin were present along the hepatic sinusoids in the periportal area. Kupffer cells and fibronectin markedly increased in the whole hepatic lobule. From day 4 to 9, oval cells spread further into hepatic parenchyma, closely associated with stellate cells, fibronectin and laminin. Kupffer cells admixed with oval cells by day 6 and then decreased in the periportal zone. From day 12 to 15, most of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), laminin and fibronectin located around the small hepatocyte nodus, and minority of them appeared in the nodus. Kupffer cells were mainly limited in the pericentral sinusoids. After day 18, the normal liver lobule structures began to recover.CONCLUSION: Local hepatic microenvironment may participate in the oval cell-mediated liver regeneration through the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions.

  5. Amphiregulin mediates self-renewal in an immortal mammary epithelial cell line with stem cell characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, Brian W., E-mail: brbooth@clemson.edu [Mammary Biology and Tumorigenesis Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Institute for Biological Interfaces of Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Boulanger, Corinne A.; Anderson, Lisa H. [Mammary Biology and Tumorigenesis Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Jimenez-Rojo, Lucia; Brisken, Cathrin [Ecole polytechnique federale de Lausanne (EPFL), ISREC-Swiss Institute for Experimental Research, NCCR Molecular Oncology, SV.832 Station 19 CH-1015, Lausanne (Switzerland); Smith, Gilbert H., E-mail: gs4d@nih.gov [Mammary Biology and Tumorigenesis Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Amphiregulin (AREG), a ligand for epidermal growth factor receptor, is required for mammary gland ductal morphogenesis and mediates estrogen actions in vivo, emerging as an essential growth factor during mammary gland growth and differentiation. The COMMA-D {beta}-geo (CD{beta}geo) mouse mammary cell line displays characteristics of normal mammary progenitor cells including the ability to regenerate a mammary gland when transplanted into the cleared fat pad of a juvenile mouse, nuclear label retention, and the capacity to form anchorage-independent mammospheres. We demonstrate that AREG is essential for formation of floating mammospheres by CD{beta}geo cells and that the mitogen activated protein kinase signaling pathway is involved in AREG-mediated mammosphere formation. Addition of exogenous AREG promotes mammosphere formation in cells where AREG expression is knocked down by siRNA and mammosphere formation by AREG{sup -/-} mammary epithelial cells. AREG knockdown inhibits mammosphere formation by duct-limited mammary progenitor cells but not lobule-limited mammary progenitor cells. These data demonstrate AREG mediates the function of a subset of mammary progenitor cells in vitro.

  6. β-Cell regeneration mediated by human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Milanesi

    Full Text Available Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs have been shown to ameliorate diabetes in animal models. The mechanism, however, remains largely unknown. An unanswered question is whether BMSCs are able to differentiate into β-cells in vivo, or whether BMSCs are able to mediate recovery and/or regeneration of endogenous β-cells. Here we examined these questions by testing the ability of hBMSCs genetically modified to transiently express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF or pancreatic-duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1 to reverse diabetes and whether these cells were differentiated into β-cells or mediated recovery through alternative mechanisms. Human BMSCs expressing VEGF and PDX1 reversed hyperglycemia in more than half of the diabetic mice and induced overall improved survival and weight maintenance in all mice. Recovery was sustained only in the mice treated with hBMSCs-VEGF. However, de novo β-cell differentiation from human cells was observed in mice in both cases, treated with either hBMSCs-VEGF or hBMSCs- PDX1, confirmed by detectable level of serum human insulin. Sustained reversion of diabetes mediated by hBMSCs-VEGF was secondary to endogenous β-cell regeneration and correlated with activation of the insulin/IGF receptor signaling pathway involved in maintaining β-cell mass and function. Our study demonstrated the possible benefit of hBMSCs for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes and gives new insight into the mechanism of β-cell recovery after injury mediated by hBMSC therapy.

  7. Genomic and physiological analysis of oxygen sensitivity and hypoxia tolerance in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seta, Karen; Kim, Hie-Won; Ferguson, Tsuneo; Kim, Richard; Pathrose, Peterson; Yuan, Yong; Lu, Gang; Spicer, Zachary; Millhorn, David E

    2002-10-01

    The mechanisms by which cells adapt and respond to changes in oxygen tension remain largely unknown. Our laboratory has used the PC12 cell line to study both biophysical and molecular responses to hypoxia. This chapter summarizes our findings. We found that membrane depolarization that occurred when PC12 cells were exposed to reduced O(2) was mediated by a specific potassium channel, the Kv1.2 channel. The membrane depolarization leads to increased Ca(2+) conductance through a voltage-sensitive channel, which in turn mediates the release of the neurotransmitters dopamine, adenosine, glutamate, and GABA. In addition, increased intracellular Ca(2+) and other signaling systems regulate hypoxia-induced gene expression, which contributes to the adaptive response to reduced O(2+). We identified several critical signaling pathways that regulate a complex gene expression profile in PC12 cells during hypoxia. These include the cAMP-protein kinase A, Ca(2+)-calmodulin, p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK; p38 kinase), and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT as regulators of gene expression. Several of these pathways regulate hypoxia-specific transcription factors that are members of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) family. Recently, we have successfully used subtractive cDNA libraries and microarray analysis to identify the genomic profile that mediates the cellular response to hypoxia. PMID:12438156

  8. Alpha-adrenergic blocker mediated osteoblastic stem cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yoon Jung [Craniomaxillofacial Reconstructive Sciences Major, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jue Yeon [Craniomaxillofacial Reconstructive Sciences Major, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Jin [Department of Industrial Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chong-Pyoung [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yoon Jeong, E-mail: parkyj@snu.ac.kr [Craniomaxillofacial Reconstructive Sciences Major, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin directly up-regulated bone metabolism at a low dose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin induced osteoblastic stem cell differentiation without affecting cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This osteogenic stem cell differentiation is mediated by ERK-signal dependent pathway. -- Abstract: Recent researches have indicated a role for antihypertensive drugs including alpha- or beta-blockers in the prevention of bone loss. Some epidemiological studies reported the protective effects of those agents on fracture risk. However, there is limited information on the association with those agents especially at the mechanism of action. In the present study, we investigated the effects of doxazosin, an alpha-blocker that is clinically used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) along with antihypertensive medication, on the osteogenic stem cell differentiation. We found that doxazosin increased osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells, detected by Alizarin red S staining and calcein. Doxazosin not only induced expression of alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, osteopontin, and osteocalcin, it also resulted in increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), a MAP kinase involved in osteoblastic differentiation. Treatment with U0126, a MAP kinase inhibitor, significantly blocked doxazosin-induced osteoblastic differentiation. Unrelated to activation of osteogenic differentiation by doxazosin, we found that there were no significant changes in adipogenic differentiation or in the expression of adipose-specific genes, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}, aP2, or LPL. In this report, we suggest that doxazosin has the ability to increase osteogenic cell differentiation via ERK1/2 activation in osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells, which supports the protective effects of antihypertensive drug on fracture risk and

  9. Reversal of tolerance induced by transplantation of skin expressing the immunodominant T cell epitope of rat type II collagen entitles development of collagen-induced arthritis but not graft rejection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäcklund, Johan; Treschow, Alexandra; Firan, Mihail;

    2002-01-01

    rejection or instead to tolerance and arthritis protection. Interestingly, TSC grafts were accepted and not even immunization of recipient mice with CII in adjuvant induced graft rejection. Instead, TSC skin recipients displayed a reduced T and B cell response to CII and were also protected from arthritis....... However, additional priming could break arthritis protection and was accompanied by an increased T cell response to the grafted epitope. Strikingly, despite the regained T cell response, development of arthritis was not accompanied by graft rejection, showing that these immune-mediated inflammatory...... collagen (CI), e.g. in skin, are tolerized against rat CII and resistant to CIA. In this study we transplanted skin from TSC transgenic mice onto non-transgenic CIA-susceptible littermates to investigate whether introduction of this epitope to a naïve immune system would lead to T cell priming and graft...

  10. Electronic modification of Pt via Ti and Se as tolerant cathodes in air-breathing methanol microfluidic fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiwei; Habrioux, Aurélien; Morais, Cláudia; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2014-07-21

    We reported herein on the use of tolerant cathode catalysts such as carbon supported Pt(x)Ti(y) and/or Pt(x)Se(y) nanomaterials in an air-breathing methanol microfluidic fuel cell. In order to show the improvement of mixed-reactant fuel cell (MRFC) performances obtained with the developed tolerant catalysts, a classical Pt/C nanomaterial was used for comparison. Using 5 M methanol concentration in a situation where the fuel crossover is 100% (MRFC-mixed reactant fuel cell application), the maximum power density of the fuel cell with a Pt/C cathodic catalyst decreased by 80% in comparison with what is observed in the laminar flow fuel cell (LFFC) configuration. With Pt(x)Ti(y)/C and Pt(x)Se(y)/C cathode nanomaterials, the performance loss was only 55% and 20%, respectively. The evaluation of the tolerant cathode catalysts in an air-breathing microfluidic fuel cell suggests the development of a novel nanometric system that will not be size restricted. These interesting results are the consequence of the high methanol tolerance of these advanced electrocatalysts via surface electronic modification of Pt. Herein we used X-ray photoelectron and in situ FTIR spectroscopies to investigate the origin of the high methanol tolerance on modified Pt catalysts.

  11. Interferon-γ facilitates hepatic antiviral T cell retention for the maintenance of liver-induced systemic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhutian; Li, Lu; Chen, Yongyan; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-05-30

    Persistent exposure to liver pathogens leads to systemic antigen-specific tolerance, a major cause of chronicity during hepatotropic infection. The mechanism regarding how this systemic tolerance is maintained remains poorly elucidated. In a well established mouse model of hepatitis B virus (HBV) persistence-induced systemic tolerance, we observed that interferon-γ (IFN-γ) deficiency led to complete loss of tolerance, resulting in robust anti-HBV responses upon peripheral vaccination. The recovery of vaccine-induced anti-HBV responses was mainly caused by the retained antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells rather than decreased functional inhibitory cells in the periphery. Mechanistically, HBV persistence induced sustained hepatic CD4(+) T cell-derived IFN-γ production. IFN-γ was found to promote CXCL9 secretion from liver-resident macrophages. This T cell chemokine facilitated the retention of antiviral CD4(+) T cells in the liver in a CXCR3-dependent manner. Hepatic sequestrated antiviral CD4(+) T cells subsequently underwent local apoptotic elimination partially via cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 ligation. These findings reveal an unexpected tolerogenic role for IFN-γ during viral persistence in the liver, providing new mechanistic insights regarding the maintenance of systemic antigen-specific tolerance during HBV persistence. PMID:27139489

  12. p-Cresol mediates autophagic cell death in renal proximal tubular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Hung; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Lin, Tze-Yi; Lin, Ching-Yuang

    2015-04-01

    Higher serum level of p-cresol (PC) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients has been linked with CKD progression. The toxic effect of PC on diverse cells has been reported by prior studies, except for renal tubular cells. Both autophagy and apoptosis contribute to renal tubular cell death, yet evidence of its response to PC is limited and their crosstalk is still unclear. Autophagy is an important cellular process involved in toxin-induced cell death. Renal tubular cell death in tubular injury is thought to be one of the key events causing the progression of CKD. Thus, we treated rat (NRK-52E) and human (HRPTEC) renal proximal tubular cells (RPTC) with PC and found the cell proliferation was significantly decreased. Cell apoptosis was significantly increased and accompanied with the activation of autophagy as evidenced by increases in LC3-II, beclin 1 and Atg 4. We also found an increase of p62 by c-Jun activation. p62 accumulation could mediate the activation of caspase 8-dependent cell apoptosis. Conversely, knockdown of p62 by siRNA of p62 had the opposite effect by arresting LC3-II accumulation and promoting increasing cell viability. We conclude that PC triggered autophagic RPTC death via JNK-mediated p62 accumulation and then activated caspase 8-dependent cell death pathway. PC can be considered as one of the key events causing progression of CKD, which might affect drug disposition in CKD cases. PMID:25668154

  13. BNNT-mediated irreversible electroporatio: its potential on cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittoria Raffa, Cristina Riggio, Michael W. Smith, Kevin C. Jordan, Wei Cao, Alfred Cuschieri

    2012-10-01

    Tissue ablation, i.e., the destruction of undesirable tissues, has become an important minimally invasive technique alternative to resection surgery for the treatment of tumours. Several methods for tissue ablation are based on thermal techniques using cold, e.g. cryosurgery [1] or heat, e.g. radiofrequency [2] or high-intensity focused ultrasound [3] or nanoparticle-mediated irradiation [4]. Alternatively, irreversible electroporation (IRE) has been proposed as non thermal technique for minimally invasive tissue ablation based on the use of electrical pulses. When the electric field is applied to a cell, a change in transmembrane potential is induced, which can cause biochemical and physiological changes of the cell. When the threshold value of the transmembrane potential is exceeded, the cell membrane becomes permeable, thus allowing entrance of molecules that otherwise cannot cross the membrane [5]. A further increase in the electric field intensity may cause irreversible membrane permeabilization and cell death. These pulses create irreversible defects (pores) in the cell membrane lipid bilayer, causing cell death through loss of cell homeostasis [6]. This is desirable in tumour ablation in order to produce large cell death, without the use of cytostatic drugs. A study of Davalos, Mir and Rubinsky showed that IRE can ablate substantial volumes of tissue without inducing a thermal effect and therefore serve as an independent and new tissue ablation modality; this opened the way to the use of IRE in surgery [7]. Their finding was subsequently confirmed in studies on cells [8], small animal models [9] and in large animal models in the liver [10] and the heart [11]. The most important finding in these papers is that irreversible electroporation produces precisely delineated ablation zones with cell scale resolution between ablated and non-ablated areas, without zones in which the extent of damage changes gradually as during thermal ablation. Furthermore, it is

  14. Can Airway Tolerance be Promoted Immunopharmacologically with Aspirin in Aspirin-insensitive Allergic Bonchial Asthmatics by T Regulatory Cells (Tregs-directed Immunoregulatory Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzammal Hussain

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The pathobiology of allergic bronchial asthma is mediated by over-expressed T helper type 2 (Th2-biased immune responses to harmless environmental antigens, leading to airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness. These Th2 responses are normally suppressed by functional T regulatory cells (Tregs, which maintain the airway tolerance. However, the Tregs activity is conceived to be compromised in allergic asthmatics. The curative therapy to counteract this immune dysregulation is not available so far, and to devise such a remedy is the current research impetus in allergic asthma therapeutics. One of the novel insights is to consider a Tregs-directed immunoregulatory therapy that could harness endogenous Tregs to redress the Th2/Tregs imbalance, thus enhancing the airway tolerance. Aspirin or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA is a prototype non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that possesses intriguing immunopharmacological attributes. For example, it can enhance the number or the frequency of functional Tregs, especially natural CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Tregs, either directly or by inducing tolerogenic activity in dendritic cells (DCs. It is also considered to be beneficial for the induction of immunological tolerance in autoimmunity and graft rejection. This raises the question whether ASA, if exploited optimally, may be used to induce and harness endogenous Tregs activity for redressing Th2/Tregs imbalance in allergic asthma. In this paper, we hypothesise that ASA may help to counteract the underlying immune dysregulation in allergic asthma by promoting airway tolerance. Nevertheless, the future research in this regard will selectively need to be targeted to allergic asthma models, which are ASA insensitive, as ASA has some adverse background and is contraindicated in asthmatics who are sensitive to it.

  15. Effects of exogenous salicylic acid on cell wall polysaccharides and aluminum tolerance of trichosanthes kirilowii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hydroponic experiment was conducted to study the effects of exogenous salicylic acid (SA) on root length, relative aluminum content in the apical cell wall, acid phosphatase (APA) and pectin methyl esterase (PME) activity, root pectin, hemicellulose 1(HC1), and hemicellulose 2 (HC2) contents of Anguo Trichosanthes kirilowii (Al-tolerant genotype) and Pujiang T. kirilowii (Al-sensitive genotype) under 800 micro mol/L of aluminum stress. The results showed that the growth of Al-tolerant Anguo T. kirilowii and Al-sensitive Pujiang T. kirilowii was inhibited when exposed to 800 micro mol/L of aluminum solution. APA and PME activities were also enhanced for both genotypes. The contents of relative aluminum, pectin, HC1, and HC2, as well as Al accumulation in the root tips were increased under aluminum toxicity. Pujiang T. kirilowii showed higher enzyme activity and cell wall polysaccharide contents than Anguo T. kirilowii. In addition, the root cell wall pectin, HC1, and HC2 contents of Pujiang T. kirilowii were increased by a large margin, showing its greater sensitivity to aluminum toxicity. Root length is an important indicator of aluminum toxicity, and has an important relationship with cell wall polysaccharide content. Aluminum toxicity led to the accumulation of pectin and high PME activity, and also increased the number of free carboxyl groups, which have more aluminum binding sites. Membrane skim increased extensively with the increase in APA activity, damaging membrane structure and function. Different SA concentrations can decrease enzyme activity and cell wall polysaccharide content to some extent. With the addition of different SA concentrations, the root relative aluminum content, cell wall polysaccharide content, APA and PME activities decreased. Aluminum toxicity to both genotypes of T. kirilowii was relieved in different degrees as exogenous SA concentration increased. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) marker was used to examine the genetic distance

  16. Mast cell mediator tryptase levels after inhalation or intravenous administration of high doses pharmaceutically prepared heroin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Rook; A.P. van Zanten; W. van den Brink; J.M. van Ree; J.H. Beijnen

    2006-01-01

    Background: Opioids like morphine and heroin induce mast cell degranulation in vitro. The release of mast cell mediators like histamine and tryptase may lead to allergic symptoms. In this study it was investigated whether mast cell mediator release also occurs in vivo in addicted patients who partic

  17. Molecular basis of sidekick-mediated cell-cell adhesion and specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Kerry M.; Yamagata, Masahito; Jin, Xiangshu; Mannepalli, Seetha; Katsamba, Phinikoula S.; Ahlsén, Göran; Sergeeva, Alina P.; Honig, Barry; Sanes, Joshua R.; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2016-09-19

    Sidekick (Sdk) 1 and 2 are related immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion proteins required for appropriate synaptic connections between specific subtypes of retinal neurons. Sdks mediate cell-cell adhesion with homophilic specificity that underlies their neuronal targeting function. Here we report crystal structures of Sdk1 and Sdk2 ectodomain regions, revealing similar homodimers mediated by the four N-terminal immunoglobulin domains (Ig1–4), arranged in a horseshoe conformation. These Ig1–4 horseshoes interact in a novel back-to-back orientation in both homodimers through Ig1:Ig2, Ig1:Ig1 and Ig3:Ig4 interactions. Structure-guided mutagenesis results show that this canonical dimer is required for both Sdk-mediated cell aggregation (viatransinteractions) and Sdk clustering in isolated cells (viacisinteractions). Sdk1/Sdk2 recognition specificity is encoded across Ig1–4, with Ig1–2 conferring the majority of binding affinity and differential specificity. We suggest that competition betweencisandtransinteractions provides a novel mechanism to sharpen the specificity of cell-cell interactions.

  18. M1 muscarinic receptor activation mediates cell death in M1-HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, E Scott; Woo, Kerhan K; Aalderink, Miranda; Fry, Sandie; Greenwood, Jeffrey M; Glass, Michelle; Dragunow, Mike

    2013-01-01

    HEK293 cells have been used extensively to generate stable cell lines to study G protein-coupled receptors, such as muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). The activation of M1 mAChRs in various cell types in vitro has been shown to be protective. To further investigate M1 mAChR-mediated cell survival, we generated stable HEK293 cell-lines expressing the human M1 mAChR. M1 mAChRs were efficiently expressed at the cell surface and efficiently internalised within 1 h by carbachol. Carbachol also induced early signalling cascades similar to previous reports. Thus, ectopically expressed M1 receptors behaved in a similar fashion to the native receptor over short time periods of analysis. However, substantial cell death was observed in HEK293-M1 cells within 24 h after carbachol application. Death was only observed in HEK cells expressing M1 receptors and fully blocked by M1 antagonists. M1 mAChR-stimulation mediated prolonged activation of the MEK-ERK pathway and resulted in prolonged induction of the transcription factor EGR-1 (>24 h). Blockade of ERK signalling with U0126 did not reduce M1 mAChR-mediated cell-death significantly but inhibited the acute induction of EGR-1. We investigated the time-course of cell death using time-lapse microscopy and xCELLigence technology. Both revealed the M1 mAChR cytotoxicity occurs within several hours of M1 activation. The xCELLigence assay also confirmed that the ERK pathway was not involved in cell-death. Interestingly, the MEK blocker did reduce carbachol-mediated cleaved caspase 3 expression in HEK293-M1 cells. The HEK293 cell line is a widely used pharmacological tool for studying G-protein coupled receptors, including mAChRs. Our results highlight the importance of investigating the longer term fate of these cells in short term signalling studies. Identifying how and why activation of the M1 mAChR signals apoptosis in these cells may lead to a better understanding of how mAChRs regulate cell-fate decisions.

  19. Intraspecific variability of cadmium tolerance and accumulation, and cadmium-induced cell wall modifications in the metal hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Claire-Lise; Juraniec, Michal; Huguet, Stéphanie; Chaves-Rodriguez, Elena; Salis, Pietro; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Certain molecular mechanisms of Cd tolerance and accumulation have been identified in the model species Arabidopsis halleri, while intraspecific variability of these traits and the mechanisms of shoot detoxification were little addressed. The Cd tolerance and accumulation of metallicolous and non-metallicolous A. halleri populations from different genetic units were tested in controlled conditions. In addition, changes in shoot cell wall composition were investigated using Fourier transform i...

  20. Freezing tolerance of sea urchin embryonic cells: Differentiation commitment and cytoskeletal disturbances in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odintsova, Nelly A; Ageenko, Natalya V; Kipryushina, Yulia O; Maiorova, Mariia A; Boroda, Andrey V

    2015-08-01

    This study focuses on the freezing tolerance of sea urchin embryonic cells. To significantly reduce the loss of physiological activity of these cells that occurs after cryopreservation and to study the effects of ultra-low temperatures on sea urchin embryonic cells, we tested the ability of the cells to differentiate into spiculogenic or pigment directions in culture, including an evaluation of the expression of some genes involved in pigment differentiation. A morphological analysis of cytoskeletal disturbances after freezing in a combination of penetrating (dimethyl sulfoxide and ethylene glycol) and non-penetrating (trehalose and polyvinylpyrrolidone) cryoprotectants revealed that the distribution pattern of filamentous actin and tubulin was similar to that in the control cultures. In contrast, very rare spreading cells and a small number of cells with filamentous actin and tubulin were detected after freezing in the presence of only non-penetrating cryoprotectants. The largest number of pigment cells was found in cultures frozen with trehalose or trehalose and dimethyl sulfoxide. The ability to induce the spicule formation was lost in the cells frozen only with non-penetrating cryoprotectants, while it was maximal in cultures frozen in a cryoprotective mixture containing both non-penetrating and penetrating cryoprotectants (particularly, when ethylene glycol was present). Using different markers for cell state assessment, an effective cryopreservation protocol for sea urchin cells was developed: three-step freezing with a low cooling rate (1-2°C/min) and a combination of non-penetrating and penetrating cryoprotectants made it possible to obtain a high level of cell viability (up to 65-80%). PMID:26049089

  1. Intraspecific variability of cadmium tolerance and accumulation, and cadmium-induced cell wall modifications in the metal hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Claire-Lise; Juraniec, Michal; Huguet, Stéphanie; Chaves-Rodriguez, Elena; Salis, Pietro; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    2015-06-01

    Certain molecular mechanisms of Cd tolerance and accumulation have been identified in the model species Arabidopsis halleri, while intraspecific variability of these traits and the mechanisms of shoot detoxification were little addressed. The Cd tolerance and accumulation of metallicolous and non-metallicolous A. halleri populations from different genetic units were tested in controlled conditions. In addition, changes in shoot cell wall composition were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Indeed, recent works on A. halleri suggest Cd sequestration both inside cells and in the cell wall/apoplast. All A. halleri populations tested were hypertolerant to Cd, and the metallicolous populations were on average the most tolerant. Accumulation was highly variable between and within populations, and populations that were non-accumulators of Cd were identified. The effect of Cd on the cell wall composition was quite similar in the sensitive species A. lyrata and in A. halleri individuals; the pectin/polysaccharide content of cell walls seems to increase after Cd treatment. Nevertheless, the changes induced by Cd were more pronounced in the less tolerant individuals, leading to a correlation between the level of tolerance and the extent of modifications. This work demonstrated that Cd tolerance and accumulation are highly variable traits in A. halleri, suggesting adaptation at the local scale and involvement of various molecular mechanisms. While in non-metallicolous populations drastic modifications of the cell wall occur due to higher Cd toxicity and/or Cd immobilization in this compartment, the increased tolerance of metallicolous populations probably involves other mechanisms such as vacuolar sequestration. PMID:25873677

  2. Interleukin-2, Interleukin-7, T cell mediated autoimmunity and N-glycosylation

    OpenAIRE

    Grigorian, Ani; Mkhikian, Haik; Demetriou, Michael

    2012-01-01

    T cell activation and self-tolerance are tightly regulated to provide effective host defense against foreign pathogens while deflecting inappropriate autoimmune responses. Golgi Asn (N)-linked protein glycosylation co-regulates homeostatic set points for T cell growth, differentiation and self-tolerance to influence risk of autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Human autoimmunity is a complex trait that develops from intricate and poorly understood interactions between an indi...

  3. Distinct gut-derived lactic acid bacteria elicit divergent dendritic cell-mediated NK cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Zeuthen, Louise Hjerrild; Christensen, Hanne;

    2007-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are abundant in the gastrointestinal tract where they continuously regulate the immune system. NK cells are potently activated by dendritic cells (DCs) matured by inflammatory stimuli, and NK cells are present in the gut epithelium and in mesenteric lymph nodes...... in their ability to induce DC-dependent IFN-gamma production by NK cells. This suggests that DCs stimulated by gut LAB may expand the pool of NK cells and increase their cytotoxic potential. Specific LAB, inducing high levels of IL-12 in DCs, may promote amplification of a type-1 response via potent stimulation...... of IFN-gamma production in NK cells. Combining IFN-gamma-inducing and non-inducing LAB completely abrogates DC-mediated IFN-gamma production by NK cells, and therefore LAB modulating IFN-gamma production in NK cells may be important regulators of the immune response....

  4. Regulation of VH replacement by B cell receptor-mediated signaling in human immature B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Lange, Miles D; Hong, Sang Yong; Xie, Wanqin; Xu, Kerui; Huang, Lin; Yu, Yangsheng; Ehrhardt, Götz R A; Zemlin, Michael; Burrows, Peter D; Su, Kaihong; Carter, Robert H; Zhang, Zhixin

    2013-06-01

    VH replacement provides a unique RAG-mediated recombination mechanism to edit nonfunctional IgH genes or IgH genes encoding self-reactive BCRs and contributes to the diversification of Ab repertoire in the mouse and human. Currently, it is not clear how VH replacement is regulated during early B lineage cell development. In this article, we show that cross-linking BCRs induces VH replacement in human EU12 μHC(+) cells and in the newly emigrated immature B cells purified from peripheral blood of healthy donors or tonsillar samples. BCR signaling-induced VH replacement is dependent on the activation of Syk and Src kinases but is inhibited by CD19 costimulation, presumably through activation of the PI3K pathway. These results show that VH replacement is regulated by BCR-mediated signaling in human immature B cells, which can be modulated by physiological and pharmacological treatments.

  5. Plant Cell Division Analyzed by Transient Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The continuing analysis of plant cell division will require additional protein localization studies. This is greatly aided by GFP-technology, but plant transformation and the maintenance of transgenic lines can present a significant technical bottleneck. In this chapter I describe a method for the Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of tobacco BY-2 cells. The method allows for the microscopic analysis of fluorescence-tagged proteins in dividing cells in within 2 days after starting a coculture. This transient transformation procedure requires only standard laboratory equipment. It is hoped that this rapid method would aid researchers conducting live-cell localization studies in plant mitosis and cytokinesis.

  6. Autophagy as a Survival Mechanism for Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells in Endonuclease G-Mediated Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masui, Atsushi; Hamada, Masakazu; Kameyama, Hiroyasu; Wakabayashi, Ken; Takasu, Ayako; Imai, Tomoaki; Iwai, Soichi; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Safingol, L- threo-dihydrosphingosine, induces cell death in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells through an endonuclease G (endoG) -mediated pathway. We herein determined whether safingol induced apoptosis and autophagy in oral SCC cells. Safingol induced apoptotic cell death in oral SCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. In safingol-treated cells, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-I was changed to LC3-II and the cytoplasmic expression of LC3, amount of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) stained by acridine orange and autophagic vacuoles were increased, indicating the occurrence of autophagy. An inhibitor of autophagy, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), enhanced the suppressive effects of safingol on cell viability, and this was accompanied by an increase in the number of apoptotic cells and extent of nuclear fragmentation. The nuclear translocation of endoG was minimal at a low concentration of safingol, but markedly increased when combined with 3-MA. The suppressive effects of safingol and 3-MA on cell viability were reduced in endoG siRNA- transfected cells. The scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) prevented cell death induced by the combinational treatment, whereas a pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not. These results indicated that safingol induced apoptosis and autophagy in SCC cells and that the suppression of autophagy by 3-MA enhanced apoptosis. Autophagy supports cell survival, but not cell death in the SCC cell system in which apoptosis occurs in an endoG-mediated manner. PMID:27658240

  7. Exposure of FVIII in the Presence of Phosphatidyl Serine Reduces Generation of Memory B-Cells and Induces Regulatory T-Cell-Mediated Hyporesponsiveness in Hemophilia A Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Radha; Davidowitz, Andrew; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V

    2015-08-01

    A major complication of replacement therapy with Factor VIII (FVIII) for hemophilia A (HA) is the development of unwanted immune responses. Previous studies showed that administration of FVIII in the presence of phosphatidyl serine (PS) reduced the development of anti-FVIII antibodies in HA mice. However, the impact of PS-mediated effects on immunological memory, such as generation of memory B-cells, is not clear. The effect of PS on memory B-cells was therefore investigated using adoptive transfer approach in FVIII(-/-) HA mice. Adoptive transfer of memory B-cells from a PS-FVIII-treated group to naïve mice followed by challenge of the recipient mice with FVIII showed a significantly reduced anti-FVIII antibody response in the recipient mice, compared with animals that received memory B-cells from free FVIII and FVIII-charge matched phosphatidyl glycerol (PG) group. The decrease in memory B-cell response is accompanied by an increase in FoxP3 expressing regulatory T-cells (Tregs). Flow cytometry studies showed that the generation of Tregs is higher in PS-treated animals as compared with FVIII and FVIII-PG treated animals. The PS-mediated hyporesponsiveness was found to be antigen-specific. The PS-FVIII immunization showed hyporesponsiveness toward FVIII rechallenge but not against ovalbumin (OVA) rechallenge, an unrelated antigen. This demonstrates that PS reduces immunologic memory of FVIII and induces antigen-specific peripheral tolerance in HA mice.

  8. Antigen-specific tolerance induced by IL-10 gene modified immature dendritic cells in experimental autoimmune myocarditis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei-min; LI Yue; LIU Wei; GAO Cheng; ZHOU Bao-guo; YANG Shu-sen; WANG Zheng; ZHANG Rui-hong; GAN Run-tao; KONG Yi-hui

    2006-01-01

    Background Experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) in rats is a T-cell-mediated disorder. The initiation and maintenance of autoimmune responses in EAM depend on the maturation state of dendritic cells. IL-10 is a pleiotrophic immunomodulatory cytokine that functions at different levels of the immune response, so it has emerged as a promising therapeutic factor for the treatment of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that IL-10 gene modified bone marrow-derived immature dendritic cells (iDCs) ameliorate EAM and to explore the underlying mechanisms.Methods EAM was induced using the methods of cardiac myosin immunization on day 0 and day 7. Immature and mature bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) were generated without or with the stimulation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the phenotype was analyzed by flow cytometry. Some of the iDCs were transfected by pcDNA3-IL-10 plasmid. 2 × 106/per rat mature DC (mDC), immature DC (iDC), pcDNA3 transfected iDC,pcDNA3-IL-10 transfected iDC or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were injected intravenously for treatment 5 days after the first immunization. On day 21, HE staining was performed to detect the myocardial inflammation and T lymphocyte proliferation assay was used to determine the effects of IL-10 gene transfected iDC on autoreactive T cell proliferation. Expression of IκB, the inhibitor of NF-κB pathway, was determined by Western blot. Results BMDCs generated in a medium supplemented with granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were relatively immature, as determined by flow cytometry. However, stimulation with LPS induced these cells to become mature (m)DCs with higher levels of surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-Ⅱ and costimulatory molecules. Intravenous administration of iDCs, especially pcDNA3-IL-10 transfected iDC,ameliorated the histopathological severity of the myosin induced-EAM, and the effect was lost after the DCs

  9. Biological features of intrahepatic CD4+CD25+ T cells in the naturally tolerance of rat liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Ling; ZHANG Feng; PU Liyong; YAO Aihua; YU Yue; SUN Beicheng; LI Guoqiang

    2007-01-01

    The biological features of intrahepatic CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells in the naturally tolerance of rat liver transplantation were explored.Orthotopic liver transplantation was performed in two allogeneic rat strain combinations,one with fatal immunosuppression despite a complete major histocompatibility complex mismatch.The subjects were divided into three groups according to different donors and recipients [Tolerance group:LEW-to-DA;Rejection group:DA-to-LEW;Syngegnic group(control group):DAto-DA].The proportion of intrahepatic CD4+CD25+ T cells from three groups was determined by flow cytometry(FCM)in different time.The intrahepaitc CD4+CD25+ T cells were isolated by magnetic activated cell sorting(MACS)method and identified by FCM.The Foxp3 mRNA was detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR).And their suppression on the proliferation of CD4+CD25- T effector cells was analyzed by cell proliferation assay in vitro.Beginning immediately after transplantation,the proportion of Treg cells increased over time in both allogeneic groups but was significantly greater in the Rejection group.The proportion of Treg cells declined after day 5,and such reduction was more dramatic in the Rejection group than in the Tolerance group.Animals in the Tolerance group showed a second increase in the proportion after day 14.Intrahepatic CD4+CD25+T cells isolated from spontaneous tolerance models inhibited the proliferation of mixed lymphocyte reaction.The purity of CD4+CD25+ T cells sorted by MACS was 86%-93%.The CD4+CD25+ T cells could specifically express the Foxp3 gene compared with CD4+CD25- T cells.In vitro,the spleen cells from LEW rats can irritate the proliferation of CD4+CD25+ T cells more obviously than the syngegnic spleen cells.CD4+CD25+ Tr cells could suppress the proliferation of CD4+CD25- T cells,but the inhibition was reversed by exogenous IL-2(200 U/mL).The CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells specifically express the Foxp3 gene,which may play an

  10. Comparative Polygenic Analysis of Maximal Ethanol Accumulation Capacity and Tolerance to High Ethanol Levels of Cell Proliferation in Yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pais, Thiago M.; Foulquié-Moreno, María R.; Hubmann, Georg; Duitama, Jorge; Swinnen, Steve; Goovaerts, Annelies; Yang, Yudi; Dumortier, Françoise; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to accumulate ≥17% ethanol (v/v) by fermentation in the absence of cell proliferation. The genetic basis of this unique capacity is unknown. Up to now, all research has focused on tolerance of yeast cell proliferation to high ethanol levels. Comparison of m

  11. E3 ubiquitin ligase GRAIL controls primary T cell activation and oral tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Kriegel, Martin A.; Rathinam, Chozhavendan; Richard A Flavell

    2009-01-01

    T cell unresponsiveness or anergy is one of the mechanisms that maintain inactivity of self-reactive lymphocytes. E3 ubiquitin ligases are important mediators of the anergic state. The RING finger E3 ligase GRAIL is thought to selectively function in anergic T cells but its mechanism of action and its role in vivo are largely unknown. We show here that genetic deletion of Grail in mice leads not only to loss of an anergic phenotype in various models but also to hyperactivation of primary CD4+...

  12. Rare earth metal oxides as BH4-tolerance cathode electrocatalysts for direct borohydride fuel cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Xuemin; WANG Yadong; GUO Feng; YAO Pei; PAN Mu

    2012-01-01

    Rare earth metal oxides (REMO) as cathode electrocatalysts in direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) were investigated.The REMO electrocatalysts tested showed favorable activity to the oxygen electro-reduction reaction and strong tolerance to the attack of BH4- in alkaline electrolytes.The simple membraneless DBFCs using REMO as cathode electrocatalyst and using hydrogen storage alloy as anodic electrocatalyst exhibited an open circuit of about 1 V and peak power of above 60 mW/cm2.The DBFC using Sm2O3 as cathode electrocatalyst showed a relatively better performance.The maximal power density of 76.2 mW/cm2 was obtained at the cell voltage of 0.52 V.

  13. Cell mediated immune response in human antirabies revaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Regina Veiga

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of secondary cell mediated immune response (CMI in human antirabies immunization was studied. The Puenzalida & Palácios vaccine was used because it is routinely used in Brazil. CMI was evaluated by lymphoblastic transformation indices obtained in whole blood culture in the presence of rabies and control (nervous tissue antigens. Eleven volunteers submitted to revaccination constituted the group under study, while three other volunteers submitted primo vaccination were utilized as control group. A clear secondary CMI to rabies antigen was detected in all the revaccinated volunteers who showed earlier and more intense response than the control group. Response to the control antigen, however, present in all the components of the first group was not detectable in two out of the three primovaccinated and very low in the third one.

  14. MaJAZ1 Attenuates the MaLBD5-Mediated Transcriptional Activation of Jasmonate Biosynthesis Gene MaAOC2 in Regulating Cold Tolerance of Banana Fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Liang-jie; Kuang, Jian-fei; Chen, Jian-ye; Lu, Wang-jin

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies indicated that methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment could effectively reduce the chilling injury of many fruits, including banana, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, one lateral organ boundaries (LOB) domain (LBD) gene, designated as MaLBD5, was isolated and characterized from banana fruit. Expression analysis revealed that accumulation of MaLBD5 was induced by cold temperature and MeJA treatment. Subcellular localization and transactivation assays showed that MaLBD5 was localized to the nucleus and possessed transcriptional activation activity. Protein-protein interaction analysis demonstrated that MaLBD5 physically interacted with MaJAZ1, a potential repressor of jasmonate signaling. Furthermore, transient expression assays indicated that MaLBD5 transactivated a jasmonate biosynthesis gene, termed MaAOC2, which was also induced by cold and MeJA. More interestingly, MaJAZ1 attenuated the MaLBD5-mediated transactivation of MaAOC2. These results suggest that MaLBD5 and MaJAZ1 might act antagonistically in relation to MeJA-induced cold tolerance of banana fruit, at least partially via affecting jasmonate biosynthesis. Collectively, our findings expand the knowledge of the transcriptional regulatory network of MeJA-mediated cold tolerance of banana fruit.

  15. GsSKP21, a Glycine soja S-phase kinase-associated protein, mediates the regulation of plant alkaline tolerance and ABA sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ailin; Yu, Yang; Duan, Xiangbo; Sun, Xiaoli; Duanmu, Huizi; Zhu, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    Plant SKP1-like family proteins, components of the SCF complex E3 ligases, are involved in the regulation of plant development and stress responses. Little is known about the precise function of SKP genes in plant responses to environmental stresses. GsSKP21 was initially identified as a potential stress-responsive gene based on the transcriptome sequencing of Glycine soja. In this study, we found that GsSKP21 protein contains highly conserved SKP domains in its N terminus and an extra unidentified domain in its C terminus. The transcript abundance of GsSKP21, detected by quantitative real-time PCR, was induced under the treatment of alkali and salt stresses. Overexpression of GsSKP21 in Arabidopsis dramatically increased plant tolerance to alkali stress. Furthermore, we found that overexpression of GsSKP21 resulted in decreased ABA sensitivity during both the seed germination and early seedling growth stages. GsSKP21 mediated ABA signaling by altering the expression levels of the ABA signaling-related and ABA-induced genes. We also investigated the tissue expression specificity and subcellular localization of GsSKP21. These results suggest that GsSKP21 is important for plant tolerance to alkali stress and plays a critical regulatory role in the ABA-mediated stress response.

  16. Integrin receptors on tumor cells facilitate NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikeeva, Nadia; Steblyanko, Maria; Fayngerts, Svetlana; Kopylova, Natalya; Marshall, Deborah J; Powers, Gordon D; Sato, Takami; Campbell, Kerry S; Sykulev, Yuri

    2014-08-01

    NK cells that mediate ADCC play an important role in tumor-specific immunity. We have examined factors limiting specific lysis of tumor cells by CD16.NK-92 cells induced by CNTO 95LF antibodies recognizing αV integrins that are overexpressed on many tumor cells. Although all tested tumor cells were killed by CD16.NK-92 effectors in the presence of the antibodies, the killing of target cells with a low level of ICAM-1 expression revealed a dramatic decrease in their specific lysis at high antibody concentration, revealing a dose limiting effect. A similar effect was also observed with primary human NK cells. The effect was erased after IFN-γ treatment of tumor cells resulting in upregulation of ICAM-1. Furthermore, killing of the same tumor cells induced by Herceptin antibody was significantly impaired in the presence of CNTO 95Ala-Ala antibody variant that blocks αV integrins but is incapable of binding to CD16. These data suggest that αV integrins on tumor cells could compensate for the loss of ICAM-1 molecules, thereby facilitating ADCC by NK cells. Thus, NK cells could exercise cytolytic activity against ICAM-1 deficient tumor cells in the absence of proinflammatory cytokines, emphasizing the importance of NK cells in tumor-specific immunity at early stages of cancer. PMID:24810893

  17. Arsenic accumulation and tolerance in rootless macrophyte Najas indica are mediated through antioxidants, amino acids and phytochelatins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Singh, Ragini; Tripathi, Preeti; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Chauhan, Reshu; Adhikari, Bijan; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Arsenic (As) accumulation and tolerance response of a submerged rootless macrophyte Najas indica were evaluated during arsenate (As(V); 10-250 μM) and arsenite (As(III); 1-50 μM) exposure. Higher As accumulation at As(III) exposure and more tolerance upon As(V) exposure resulted in more toxicity during As(III) stress than As(V), which was evident through measurement of growth parameters and oxidative stress related parameters viz., lipid peroxidation (MDA content), electrical conductivity (EC) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels. Antioxidant enzymes and various amino acids were more prominent during moderate exposure of As(V), suggesting their possible role in As tolerance and detoxification. Various non-enzymatic antioxidant metabolites viz., ascorbic acid (ASC), glutathione (GSH), non-protein thiols (NPTs) and phytochelatins (PCs) biosynthesis involving phytochelatin synthase (PCS) activity increased more significantly during As(III) stress. However, PCs content seems inadequate in response to As accumulation leading to lower PC-SH:As molar ratio and higher As phytotoxicity during As(III) stress. N. indica may prove useful plant species for phytoremediation purpose in moderately As contaminated water bodies due to high As accumulation and tolerance potential.

  18. Glutathione plays an essential role in nitric oxide-mediated iron-deficiency signaling and iron-deficiency tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Varanavasiappan; Wang, Yi-Wen; Tsednee, Munkhtsetseg; Karunakaran, Krithika; Yeh, Kuo-Chen

    2015-11-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a common agricultural problem that affects both the productivity and nutritional quality of plants. Thus, identifying the key factors involved in the tolerance of Fe deficiency is important. In the present study, the zir1 mutant, which is glutathione deficient, was found to be more sensitive to Fe deficiency than the wild type, and grew poorly in alkaline soil. Other glutathione-deficient mutants also showed various degrees of sensitivity to Fe-limited conditions. Interestingly, we found that the glutathione level was increased under Fe deficiency in the wild type. By contrast, blocking glutathione biosynthesis led to increased physiological sensitivity to Fe deficiency. On the other hand, overexpressing glutathione enhanced the tolerance to Fe deficiency. Under Fe-limited conditions, glutathione-deficient mutants, zir1, pad2 and cad2 accumulated lower levels of Fe than the wild type. The key genes involved in Fe uptake, including IRT1, FRO2 and FIT, are expressed at low levels in zir1; however, a split-root experiment suggested that the systemic signals that govern the expression of Fe uptake-related genes are still active in zir1. Furthermore, we found that zir1 had a lower accumulation of nitric oxide (NO) and NO reservoir S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Although NO is a signaling molecule involved in the induction of Fe uptake-related genes during Fe deficiency, the NO-mediated induction of Fe-uptake genes is dependent on glutathione supply in the zir1 mutant. These results provide direct evidence that glutathione plays an essential role in Fe-deficiency tolerance and NO-mediated Fe-deficiency signaling in Arabidopsis.

  19. On the impact of water activity on reversal tolerant fuel cell anode performance and durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bo Ki; Mandal, Pratiti; Oh, Jong-Gil; Litster, Shawn

    2016-10-01

    Durability of polymer electrolyte fuel cells in automotive applications can be severely affected by hydrogen starvation arising due to transients during the drive-cycle. It causes individual cell voltage reversal, yielding water electrolysis and carbon corrosion reactions at the anode, ultimately leading to catastrophic cell failure. A popular material-based mitigation strategy is to employ a reversal tolerant anode (RTA) that includes oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalyst (e.g., IrO2) to promote water electrolysis over carbon corrosion. Here we report that RTA performance surprisingly drops under not only water-deficient but also water-excess conditions. This presents a significant technical challenge since the most common triggers for cell reversal involve excess liquid water. Our findings from detailed electrochemical diagnostics and nano-scale X-ray computed tomography provide insight into how automotive fuel cells can overcome critical vulnerabilities using material-based solutions. Our work also highlights the need for improved materials, electrode designs, and operation strategies for robust RTAs.

  20. The application of the haploid cell culture system to obtain the variants with tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The different genotypes of rape haploid cells /tissue tolerated to the oxalic acid were correlated with the tolerance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in the plant level through the researches. And this phenomenon also occurred in the tolerance to NaCl between the different genotypes of rape haploid cells and the diploid cells, but the diploid cells were generally more tolerant to the haploid ones. In addition, there were similar situations in barely on NaCl tolerance, aluminum tolerance and resistance to scab. So the above results indicated that the haploid cells/tissue tolerant to the stresses could reflect the situations in the plant level in the certain degree. The technology of inducing and screening the variants of the tolerance to rape Sclerotinia sclerotiorum by in vitro culture of haploid tissue was established. This technical system includes the in vitro microspore culture, the regeneration from the haploid cells to plants and the expanding propagation of the haploids populations. A set of oxalic acid tolerance variants was screened through the treatments of pingyangmycin and oxalic acid in stem apexes culture of haploid plants. After the field identification, 3 individuals with the improved tolerance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum was obtained. The technology of inducing and screening the variants with heat tolerance by in vitro culture of haploid tissue was established in broccoli. A set of variants with the improved heat tolerance was obtained through the treatment of pingyangmycin and the 45 deg C heat treatment and 9 variants with higher stability of cell membrane to heat stress than the original varieties was selected. In addition, the technical systems for inducing and screening barley variants tolerant to aluminum and scab stresses according to the above rules were established. And the relevant resistance variants were obtained. Then 1 aluminum tolerance material and 3 scab resistance materials under the field experiments in the plant level were selected

  1. Ezrin dephosphorylation/downregulation contributes to ursolic acid-mediated cell death in human leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezrin links the actin filaments with the cell membrane and has a functional role in the apoptotic process. It appears clear that ezrin is directly associated with Fas, leading to activation of caspase cascade and cell death. However, the exact role of ezrin in ursolic acid (UA)-induced apoptosis remains unclear. In this study, we show for the first time that UA induces apoptosis in both transformed and primary leukemia cells through dephosphorylation/downregulation of ezrin, association and polarized colocalization of Fas and ezrin, as well as formation of death-inducing signaling complex. These events are dependent on Rho-ROCK1 signaling pathway. Knockdown of ezrin enhanced cell death mediated by UA, whereas overexpression of ezrin attenuated UA-induced apoptosis. Our in vivo study also showed that UA-mediated inhibition of tumor growth of mouse leukemia xenograft model is in association with the dephosphorylation/downregulation of ezrin. Such findings suggest that the cytoskeletal protein ezrin may represent an attractive target for UA-mediated lethality in human leukemia cells

  2. Langerhans Cells Suppress CD49a+ NK Cell-Mediated Skin Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Felix; Naik, Shruti; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S; Kaplan, Daniel H

    2015-09-01

    Recruitment of innate immune effector cells into sites of infection is a critical component of resistance to pathogen infection. Using a model of intradermal footpad injection of Candida albicans, we observed that inflammation as measured by footpad thickness and neutrophil recruitment occurred independent of adoptive immunity but was significantly reduced in MyD88(-/-) and IL-6(-/-) mice. Unexpectedly, huLangerin-DTA mice (ΔLC) that lack Langerhans cells (LC) developed increased skin inflammation and expressed higher amounts of IL-6, suggesting a suppressive role for LC. Increased inflammation also occurred in Rag1(-/-) ΔLC mice but was reversed by Ab-mediated ablation of NK cells. CXCR6(+)CD49a(+) NK cells are a liver-resident subset that can mediate inflammatory skin responses. We found that exaggerated skin inflammation was absent in ΔLC × CXCR6(-/-) mice. Moreover, the exaggerated response in ΔLC mice could be adoptively transferred with liver CD49a(+) NK cells. Finally, CD49a(+) NK cells in ΔLC but not control mice were recruited to the skin, and inhibition of their recruitment prevented the exaggerated response. Thus, in the absence of LC, CD49a(+) liver NK cells display an inappropriately proinflammatory phenotype that results in increased local skin inflammation. These data reveal a novel function for LC in the regulation of this recently described subset of skin tropic NK cells. PMID:26209621

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells induce T-cell tolerance and protect the preterm brain after global hypoxia-ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reint K Jellema

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE in preterm infants is a severe disease for which no curative treatment is available. Cerebral inflammation and invasion of activated peripheral immune cells have been shown to play a pivotal role in the etiology of white matter injury, which is the clinical hallmark of HIE in preterm infants. The objective of this study was to assess the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of intravenously delivered mesenchymal stem cells (MSC in an ovine model of HIE. In this translational animal model, global hypoxia-ischemia (HI was induced in instrumented preterm sheep by transient umbilical cord occlusion, which closely mimics the clinical insult. Intravenous administration of 2 x 10(6 MSC/kg reduced microglial proliferation, diminished loss of oligodendrocytes and reduced demyelination, as determined by histology and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI, in the preterm brain after global HI. These anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects of MSC were paralleled by reduced electrographic seizure activity in the ischemic preterm brain. Furthermore, we showed that MSC induced persistent peripheral T-cell tolerance in vivo and reduced invasion of T-cells into the preterm brain following global HI. These findings show in a preclinical animal model that intravenously administered MSC reduced cerebral inflammation, protected against white matter injury and established functional improvement in the preterm brain following global HI. Moreover, we provide evidence that induction of T-cell tolerance by MSC might play an important role in the neuroprotective effects of MSC in HIE. This is the first study to describe a marked neuroprotective effect of MSC in a translational animal model of HIE.

  4. Studies of tolerance induction through mixed chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys. Method for detection of chimeric cells and effect of thymic irradiation on induction of tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tatsuo; Ota, Kazuo [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    To establish the method for the detection of chimerism in cynomologus monkeys, we tested cross reactivity of various anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to cynomolgus monkeys. In 29 mAb we tested, only three monoclonal anti-HLA antibodies crossreacted with lymphocytes of monkeys. With these mAb, chimeric cell can be detected up to 1% by flow cytometric analysis (study 1). Utilizing the method we developed in study 1, we applied the regimen that induces mixed chimerism and skin graft tolerance in mice to renal allotransplantation of cynomolgus monkey. Regimen A includes non-lethal dose of total body irradiation (TBI), administration of anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) for 3 days, donor bone marrow infusion and 45 days course of cyclosporine (CYA) administration. We added 7 Gy of thymic irradiation on day-6 in regimen B and on day-1 in regimen C. Although all monkeys in regimen A and B consistently developed chimerism, they rejected kidney allografts soon after stopping CYA. In contrast, 4 monkeys out of 5 failed to develop chimerism in regimen C, but renal allograft tolerance was induced in one monkey who developed chimerism in regimen C. In conclusion, the induction of chimerism is considered necessary but not sufficient for tolerance induction. (author)

  5. High cell density propionic acid fermentation with an acid tolerant strain of Propionibacterium acidipropionici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongqiang; Jin, Ying; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2015-03-01

    Propionic acid is an important chemical with wide applications and its production via fermentation is of great interest. However, economic production of bio-based propionic acid requires high product titer, yield, and productivity in the fermentation. A highly efficient and stable high cell density (HCD) fermentation process with cell recycle by centrifugation was developed for propionic acid production from glucose using an acid-tolerant strain of Propionibacterium acidipropionici, which had a higher specific growth rate, productivity, and acid tolerance compared to the wild type ATCC 4875. The sequential batch HCD fermentation at pH 6.5 produced propionic acid at a high titer of ∼40 g/L and productivity of 2.98 g/L h, with a yield of ∼0.44 g/g. The product yield increased to 0.53-0.62 g/g at a lower pH of 5.0-5.5, which, however, decreased the productivity to 1.28 g/L h. A higher final propionic acid titer of >55 g/L with a productivity of 2.23 g/L h was obtained in fed-batch HCD fermentation at pH 6.5. A 3-stage simulated fed-batch process in serum bottles produced 49.2 g/L propionic acid with a yield of 0.53 g/g and productivity of 0.66 g/L h. These productivities, yields and propionic acid titers were among the highest ever obtained in free-cell propionic acid fermentation.

  6. Neonatal transplantation tolerance is associated with a systemic reduction in memory cells, altered chimeric cell phenotype, and modified eicosanoid and cytokine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, P; Nassiri, M; Gregorian, S; Viciana, A L; Streilein, J W

    1996-04-27

    Certain B10 background mice are resistant to tolerance induction following a neonatal inoculation of semiallogeneic class I/II MHC-disparate cells despite early thymic clonal deletion of alloreactive cells. The emergence of memory T cells and persistence of particular chimeric cells in the thymus has an association with this resistance. In these studies, we utilized a hemisplenectomy technique to examine systemic cell populations of adult Bl0.S (H2s, H2E-) mice that received (Bl0.S x B10.A)F1 cells at birth and before and following application (and rejection or acceptance) of Bl0.A (H2k/d, H2E+) skin grafts. Prior to skin graft challenge, tolerant mice had reduced splenic levels of memory (CD45hi, PgP-1hi, Mel-14neg) T cells as compared with the rejecting recipients and following B10.A graft challenge, the nontolerant mice showed a further increase in these cells. Elevated pretransplant levels of donor H2Kk+ cells coexpressing B220, CD11b, or CD3 were seen in the tolerant mice. Following skin grafting, splenic chimerism was reduced with differing chimeric cell phenotypes between the tolerant and nontolerant mice. In vitro production of PGE2 in a MLC was delayed in the tolerant mice with minimal production of IL-2 and IL-4. Nontolerant mice made high levels of TxB2 and heightened, early production of IL-2 and IL-4 during the MLC. Thus, tolerance induction is associated with increased numbers of particular chimeric cells, fewer peripheral lymphoid immunocompetant memory T cells, impaired eicosanoid secretion, and reduced alloreactivity and alloantigen-driven IL-2/IL-4 production. It appears that alloreactive cells necessary to break tolerance are generated when fewer class II+ (e.g., B220+, CD11b+) chimeric cells are present and that there is a coexistence of effector and regulatory T cell subpopulations in the nontolerant mice. By comparison, tolerance acquisition does not appear associated with the presence or generation of a predominant subtype of T cell but

  7. Calcium signaling as a mediator of cell energy demand and a trigger to cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Gauri; Sharpe, Jenny A; Sundier, Stephanie Y; Duchen, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    Calcium signaling is pivotal to a host of physiological pathways. A rise in calcium concentration almost invariably signals an increased cellular energy demand. Consistent with this, calcium signals mediate a number of pathways that together serve to balance energy supply and demand. In pathological states, calcium signals can precipitate mitochondrial injury and cell death, especially when coupled to energy depletion and oxidative or nitrosative stress. This review explores the mechanisms that couple cell signaling pathways to metabolic regulation or to cell death. The significance of these pathways is exemplified by pathological case studies, such as those showing loss of mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 in patients and ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  8. The effect of adenovirus-mediated gene expression of FHIT in small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandi, Roza; Xu, Kai; Poulsen, Hans S;

    2011-01-01

    The candidate tumor suppressor fragile histidine traid (FHIT) is frequently inactivated in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Mutations in the p53 gene also occur in the majority of SCLC leading to the accumulation of the mutant protein. Here we evaluated the effect of FHIT gene therapy alone...... or in combination with the mutant p53-reactivating molecule, PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246, in SCLC. Overexpression of FHIT by recombinant adenoviral vector (Ad-FHIT)-mediated gene transfer in SCLC cells inhibited their growth by inducing apoptosis and when combined with PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246, a synergistic cell growth...

  9. A cotton Raf-like MAP3K gene, GhMAP3K40, mediates reduced tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress in Nicotiana benthamiana by negatively regulating growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaobo; Wang, Ji; Zhu, Ming; Jia, Haihong; Liu, Dongdong; Hao, Lili; Guo, Xingqi

    2015-11-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades mediate various responses in plants. As the top component, MAP3Ks deserve more attention; however, little is known about the role of MAP3Ks, especially in cotton, a worldwide economic crop. In this study, a gene encoding a putative Raf-like MAP3K, GhMAP3K40, was isolated. GhMAP3K40 expression was induced by stress and multiple signal molecules. The plants overexpressing GhMAP3K40 had an enhanced tolerance to drought and salt stress at the germination stage. However, at the seedling stage, the transgenic plants suffered more severe damage after drought, exposure to pathogens and oxidative stress. The defence-related genes and the antioxidant system were activated in transgenic palnts, suggesting that GhMAP3K40 positively regulate the defence response. The transgenic plants were less able to prevent pathogenic invasion, which was due to defects in the cell structure of the leaves. The root system of the control plants were stronger compared with the transgenic plants. These results indicated a negative role of GhMAP3K40 in growth and development and GhMAP3K40 possibly caused the defects by down-regulating the lignin biosynthesis. Overall, these results suggest that GhMAP3K40 may positively regulate defence response but cause reduced tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress by negatively regulating growth and development.

  10. Tolerância à salinidade em feijão (Phaseolus vulgaris L Salt tolerance in bean (Paseolus vulgaris cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Broetto

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Uma das aplicações das técnicas da cultura de tecidos no melhoramento é a identificação de linhas de células que apresentam tolerância à salinidade. Vários autores obtiveram linhas de células tolerantes ao estresse salino; e estudo de mecanismos bioquímicos da tolerância a sais em plantas tem demonstrado altas correlações entre estes e o acúmulo de macromoléculas em tecido de plantas superiores. Para verificar essas correlações em feijão (Phaseolus vulgaris cv IAC carioca, calos oriundos de eixos embrionários foram cultivados em meio sólido, suplementado com NaCl nas concentrações de 0 a 60 mM. Após 13 dias de incubação, os calos foram coletados e analisados quanto ao crescimento relativo, teor de proteínas, teor de prolina e atividade da peroxidase. Os parâmetros analisados mostraram decréscimo no crescimento relativo e no de proteínas em resposta ao NaCl. Paralelamente, observou-se aumento significativo no conteúdo de prolina e atividade da enzima peroxidase.One of the applications of the tissue culture technique in plant improvement is the identification of cell lines which show salinity tolerance. Several authors were able to obtain saline stress-tolerant cell lines and show that mechanisms of tolerance to salts have a strong correlation between this phenomenon and a high macromolecule concentration in plant tissues. Callus obtained from embrionic axis of Phaseolus vulgarís cv. IAC carioca in solid medium, supplemented with 0 to 60 mM NaCl, as the salt treatment, were used. Callus harvesting was done on the 13th day, when they were processed for relative growth, protein, proline content and peroxidase acivity. The results show both, a decrease of the relative growth and of protein content in response to the NaCl treatment, as compared to controls. However, there was a significant increase on the proline content and on the peroxidase activity.

  11. Role of the H-2 complex in the induction of T cell tolerance to self minor histocompatibility antigens

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    The present study has utilized cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses specific for minor histocompatibility (minor H) antigens as an experimental approach to determining whether recognition of self MHC determinants is involved in the induction of T cell tolerance to self antigens. It was observed that C3H.SW splenic T cells from C3H.SW leads to B10 X B10.BR radiation bone marrow chimeras contained CTL precursors (pCTL) reactive against self C3H minor H antigens + H-2k but were tolerant to sel...

  12. Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells Resist T Cell Mediated Killing in an HLA-Recognition Independent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proff, Julia; Walterskirchen, Christian; Brey, Charlotte; Geyeregger, Rene; Full, Florian; Ensser, Armin; Lehner, Manfred; Holter, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the potential of HLA-independent T cell therapy for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed against the HCMV encoded glycoprotein B (gB), which is expressed at high levels on the surface of infected cells. T cells engineered with this anti-gB CAR recognized HCMV-infected cells and released cytokines and cytotoxic granules. Unexpectedly, and in contrast to analogous approaches for HIV, Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C virus, we found that HCMV-infected cells were resistant to killing by the CAR-modified T cells. In order to elucidate whether this phenomenon was restricted to the use of CARs, we extended our experiments to T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated recognition of infected cells. To this end we infected fibroblasts with HCMV-strains deficient in viral inhibitors of antigenic peptide presentation and targeted these HLA-class I expressing peptide-loaded infected cells with peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Despite strong degranulation and cytokine production by the T cells, we again found significant inhibition of lysis of HCMV-infected cells. Impairment of cell lysis became detectable 1 day after HCMV infection and gradually increased during the following 3 days. We thus postulate that viral anti-apoptotic factors, known to inhibit suicide of infected host cells, have evolved additional functions to directly abrogate T cell cytotoxicity. In line with this hypothesis, CAR-T cell cytotoxicity was strongly inhibited in non-infected fibroblasts by expression of the HCMV-protein UL37x1, and even more so by additional expression of UL36. Our data extend the current knowledge on Betaherpesviral evasion from T cell immunity and show for the first time that, beyond impaired antigen presentation, infected cells are efficiently protected by direct blockade of cytotoxic effector functions through viral proteins.

  13. Measurement of cell mediated cytotoxicity by post-labeling surviving target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 51Cr release assay (CRA) is the commonly accepted technique for measurement of cell mediated cytotoxicity. This assay shows some disadvantages when mononucleated cells of human peripheral blood (MNC) are used as effector and target cells. The uptake of 51Cr by PHA stimulated lymphocytes is low compared to the spontaneous release. In an attempt to develop a cytotoxicity assay suitable for human lymphocytes we used 14C-TdR to label target cells surviving after contact with effector cells. Cytotoxic lymphocytes were generated by incubation of MNC with irradiated allogeneic MNC for 6 days. On day 6 the effector cells are irradiated and cocultured with PHA stimulated target cells. Twenty-four hours later 14C-TdR is added. After an additional 24 h the cultures are harvested and 14C-TdR taken up by target cells is measured. It is shown that the effector cells are still cytotoxic after irradiation. These cells do not take up 14C-TdR. Cell-free supernatants do not influence the uptake of 14C-TdR by target cells. The results obtained with this assay correlate very well those obtained by the CRA, if the spontaneous release does not exceed 30%. (author)

  14. MURINE MOBILIZED PERIPHERAL BLOOD STEM CELLS HAVE A LOWER CAPACITY THAN BONE MARROW TO INDUCE MIXED CHIMERISM AND TOLERANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Koporc, Zvonimir; Pilat, Nina; Nierlich, Patrick; Blaha, Peter; Bigenzahn, Sinda; Pree, Ines; Selzer, Edgar; Sykes, Megan; Muehlbacher, Ferdinand; Wekerle, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) under costimulation blockade allows induction of mixed chimerism and tolerance without global T cell depletion. The mildest such protocols without recipient cytoreduction, however, require clinically impracticable bone marrow (BM) doses. The successful use of mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) instead of BM in such regimens would provide a substantial advance, allowing transplantation of higher doses of hematopoietic donor cells. We thus ...

  15. Neutrophil mediated smooth muscle cell loss precedes allograft vasculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Timothy DG

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (AV is a pathological process of vascular remodeling leading to late graft loss following cardiac transplantation. While there is consensus that AV is alloimmune mediated, and evidence that the most important alloimmune target is medial smooth muscle cells (SMC, the role of the innate immune response in the initiation of this disease is still being elucidated. As ischemia reperfusion (IR injury plays a pivotal role in the initiation of AV, we hypothesize that IR enhances the early innate response to cardiac allografts. Methods Aortic transplants were performed between fully disparate mouse strains (C3H/HeJ and C57BL/6, in the presence of therapeutic levels of Cyclosporine A, as a model for cardiac AV. Neutrophils were depleted from some recipients using anti-PMN serum. Grafts were harvested at 1,2,3,5d and 1,2wk post-transplant. Ultrastructural integrity was examined by transmission electron microscopy. SMC and neutrophils were quantified from histological sections in a blinded manner. Results Grafts exposed to cold ischemia, but not transplanted, showed no medial SMC loss and normal ultrastructural integrity. In comparison, allografts harvested 1d post-transplant exhibited > 90% loss of SMC (p Conclusions These novel data show that there is extensive damage to medial SMC at 1d post-transplant. By depleting neutrophils from recipients it was demonstrated that a portion of the SMC loss was mediated by neutrophils. These results provide evidence that IR activation of early innate events contributes to the etiology of AV.

  16. Comparison of induced versus natural regulatory T cells of the same TCR specificity for induction of tolerance to an environmental antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Ma, Yanna; Dawicki, Wojciech; Zhang, Xiaobei; Gordon, John R

    2013-08-01

    Recent evidence shows that natural CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (nTreg) and induced CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (iTreg) both contribute to tolerance in mouse models of colitis and asthma, but there is little evidence regarding their relative contributions to this tolerance. We compared the abilities of nTreg and iTreg, both from OVA-TCR-transgenic OTII mice, to mediate tolerance in OVA-asthmatic C57BL/6 mice. The iTreg were differentiated from Th2 effector T cells by exposure to IL-10-differentiated dendritic cells (DC10) in vitro or in vivo, whereas we purified nTreg from allergen-naive mice and exposed them to DC10 before use. Each Treg population was subsequently repurified and tested for its therapeutic efficacy in vitro and in vivo. DC10 engaged the nTreg in a cognate fashion in Forster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer assays, and these nTreg reduced in vitro OVA-asthmatic Th2 effector T cell responses by 41-56%, whereas the comparator iTreg reduced these responses by 72-86%. Neutralization of IL-10, but not TGF-β, eliminated the suppressive activities of iTreg but not nTreg. Delivery of 5 × 10(5) purified nTreg reduced allergen challenge-induced airway IL-4 (p ≤ 0.03) and IL-5 (p ≤ 0.001) responses of asthmatic recipients by ≤ 23% but did not affect airway hyperresponsiveness or IgE levels, whereas equal numbers of iTreg of identical TCR specificity reduced all airway responses to allergen challenge by 82-96% (p ≤ 0.001) and fully normalized airway hyperresponsiveness. These data confirm that allergen-specific iTreg and nTreg have active roles in asthma tolerance and that iTreg are substantially more tolerogenic in this setting. PMID:23817420

  17. Roscovitine suppresses CD4+ T cells and T cell-mediated experimental uveitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zili Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: T cells are essential for the development of uveitis and other autoimmune diseases. After initial activation, CD4+ lymphocytes express the co-stimulatory molecule OX40 that plays an important role in T cell proliferation. Cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CdK2 plays a pivotal role in the cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase. In addition, recent research has implicated CdK2 in T cell activation. Thus, we sought to test the immunosuppressive effect of roscovitine, a potent CdK2 inhibitor, on CD4+ T cell activation, proliferation, and function. DESIGN AND METHODS: Mouse CD4+ T cells were activated by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies. The expression of OX40, CD44, and CdK2 were analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, cell cycle progression and apoptosis of control and roscovitine-treated T lymphocytes were measured by BrdU incorporation and annexin V assay, respectively. Furthermore, the immunoregulatory effect of roscovitine was evaluated in both ovalbumin-induced uveitis and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU models. RESULTS: In this study, we found that T cell activation induced OX40 expression. Cell cycle analysis showed that more CD4+OX40+ cells entered S phase than OX40- T cells. Concurrently, CD4+OX40+ cells had a higher level of CdK2 expression. Roscovitine treatment blocked activated CD4+ cells from entering S phase. In addition, roscovitine not only reduced the viability of CD4+ lymphocytes but also suppressed T cell activation and cytokine production. Finally, roscovitine significantly attenuated the severity of T cell-dependent, OX40-enhanced uveitis. CONCLUSION: These results implicate CdK2 in OX40-augmented T cell response and expansion. Furthermore, this study suggests that roscovitine is a novel, promising, therapeutic agent for treating T cell-mediated diseases such as uveitis.

  18. Breakdown of Immune Tolerance in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus by Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaofeng; Reihl, Alec M; Luo, Xin M

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play an important role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease with multiple tissue manifestations. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of conventional DC and plasmacytoid DC in the development of both murine lupus and human SLE. In the past decade, studies using selective DC depletions have demonstrated critical roles of DC in lupus progression. Comprehensive in vitro and in vivo studies suggest activation of DC by self-antigens in lupus pathogenesis, followed by breakdown of immune tolerance to self. Potential treatment strategies targeting DC have been developed. However, many questions remain regarding the mechanisms by which DC modulate lupus pathogenesis that require further investigations. PMID:27034965

  19. Effect of adrenotensin on cell proliferation is mediated by angiotensin Ⅱ in cultured rat mesangial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong XUE; Ping YUAN; Li ZHOU; Tai YAO; Yu HUANG; Li-min LU

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Both adrenomedullin (ADM) and adrenotensin (ADT) are derived from the same propeptide precursor, and both act as circulat- ing hormones and local paracrine mediators with multiple biological activities. Compared with ADM, little is known about how ADT achieves its functions. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ADT on cell proliferation and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) secretion in cultured renal mesangial cells (MCs) and determined whether angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ) was involved in mediating this process.Methods: Cell proliferation was measured by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assay, Ang Ⅱ levels were assayed using an enzyme immunoassay, and real time PCR was used to measure Ang Ⅱ type 1 (AT1) receptor, Ang Ⅱ type 2 (AT2) receptor, angiotensino-gen (AGT), renin, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and TGF-β1 mRNA levels. TGF-β1 and collagen type IV protein levels in cellmedia were measured using enzyme-linked immunoassays. Results: ADT treatment induced cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner; it also increased the levels of TGF-β1 mRNA and protein as well as collagen type Ⅳ excretion by cultured MCs. ADT treatment increased renin and AGT mRNAs as well as Ang Ⅱ protein, but did not affect the ACE mRNA level. ADT up-regulated angiotensin AT1 receptor mRNA, but not that of the AT2 receptor. The angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonist Iosartan blocked the effects of ADT-induced cell proliferation, TGF-β1 and collagen type Ⅳ synthe-sis and secretion.Conclusion: ADT has a stimulating role in cell proliferation in cultured MCs. Increases in the levels of Ang II and the AT1 receptor after ADT treatment mediate the stimulating effects of ADT on cell proliferation and extracellular matrix synthesis and secretion.

  20. Toll-Like Receptor 2- and 6-Mediated Stimulation by Macrophage-Activating Lipopeptide 2 Induces Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Cross Tolerance in Mice, Which Results in Protection from Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha but in Only Partial Protection from Lethal LPS Doses

    OpenAIRE

    Deiters, Ursula; Gumenscheimer, Marina; Galanos, Chris; Mühlradt, Peter F.

    2003-01-01

    Patients or experimental animals previously exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) become tolerant to further LPS challenge. We investigated the potential of the macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 (MALP-2) to induce in vivo cross tolerance to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and LPS. MALP-2-induced tolerance could be of practical interest, as MALP-2 proved much less pyrogenic in rabbits than LPS. Whereas LPS signals via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), MALP-2 uses TLR2 and TLR6. LPS-mediated cyt...

  1. Performance Factors and Sulfur Tolerance of Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells with Nanostructured Ni:GDC Infiltrated Anodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Hagen, Anke;

    2016-01-01

    Two metal supported solid oxide fuel cells (active area 16 cm2) with nanostructured Ni:GDC infiltrated anodes, possessing different anode and support microstructures were studied in respect to sulfur tolerance at an operating temperature of 650°C. The studied MS-SOFCs are based on ferretic...... stainless steel (FeCr) and showed excellent performance characteristics at 650°C with fuel utilization corrected area specific resistances of 0.35 Ωcm2 and 0.7 Ωcm2 respectively. The sulfur tolerance testing was performed by periodic addition of 2, 5, and 10 ppm H2S in hydrogen based fuel under...... galvanostatic operation at a current load of 0.25 Acm−2. The results were compared with literature on the sulfur tolerance of conventional SOFC Ni/YSZ cermet anode. The comparison in terms of absolute cell resistance increase and relative anode polarization resistance increase indicates, that the nanostructured...

  2. Spindle checkpoint deficiency is tolerated by murine epidermal cells but not hair follicle stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foijer, Floris; DiTommaso, Tia; Donati, Giacomo; Hautaviita, Katta; Xie, Stephanie Z.; Heath, Emma; Smyth, Ian; Watt, Fiona M.; Sorger, Peter K.; Bradley, Allan

    2013-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures correct chromosome segregation during mitosis by preventing aneuploidy, an event that is detrimental to the fitness and survival of normal cells but oncogenic in tumor cells. Deletion of SAC genes is incompatible with early mouse development, and RNAi-me

  3. Incorporation of [14C]-palmitate into lipids of Brassica cells during the induction of freezing tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in plasma membrane lipid composition have been causally related to increased freezing tolerance. Studies of lipid metabolism during ABA induction of freezing tolerance in Brassica napus suspension cultures were undertaken. Cells were labeled with [14C]-palmitate four days after transfer to fresh medium (control) or medium containing ABA (which increases freezing tolerance). At times between one and 20 hrs after labeling, ABA-treated cells incorporated almost twice the amount of label as controls cells. Approximately 80% of the radioactivity was associated with neutral lipids in ABA-treated cells and controls. Incorporation of label into total cellular polar lipids was 4.9 x 105 dpm/mg protein for control cells and 1 x 106 dpm/mg protein for cells transferred to medium containing ABA. Analysis of lipids following alkaline hydrolysis indicated that incorporation of [14C]-palmitate into glucosylceramide of ABA-treated cells was less than 60% of control values when expressed relative to that of the total polar lipids. Incorporation into ceramides was also depressed in ABA-treated cells

  4. Cell surface molecules and fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion: effect of proteolytic digestion of membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    Proteases have been used as a tool to investigate the role of surface molecules in fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion. Proteolytic digestion of membrane-proteins by pronase (1 mg/ml for 20 min at 37 degrees C) completely inhibited adhesion of baby hamster kidney (BHK) fibroblasts on fibronectin-coated plastic dishes. Various degrees of inhibition were also obtained after treatment with proteinase K, chymotrypsin, papain, subtilopeptidase A, and thermolysin. Protein synthesis was required to r...

  5. Identification of a ferritin-like protein of Listeria monocytogenes as a mediator of β-lactam tolerance and innate resistance to cephalosporins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krawczyk-Balska Agata

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of listeriosis. The β-lactam antibiotics penicillin G and ampicillin are the current drugs of choice for the treatment of listerial infections. While isolates of L. monocytogenes are susceptible to these antibiotics, their action is only bacteriostatic and consequently, this bacterium is regarded as tolerant to β-lactams. In addition, L. monocytogenes has a high level of innate resistance to the cephalosporin family of β-lactams frequently used to treat sepsis of unknown etiology. Given the high mortality rate of listeriosis despite rational antibiotic therapy, it is important to identify genes that play a role in the susceptibility and tolerance of L. monocytogenes to β-lactams. Results The hly-based promoter trap system was applied to identify penicillin G-inducible genes of L. monocytogenes. The results of reporter system studies, verified by transcriptional analysis, identified ten penicillin G-inducible genes. The contribution of three of these genes, encoding a ferritin-like protein (fri, a two-component phosphate-response regulator (phoP and an AraC/XylS family transcriptional regulator (axyR, to the susceptibility and tolerance of L. monocytogenes to β-lactams was examined by analysis of nonpolar deletion mutants. The absence of PhoP or AxyR resulted in more rapid growth of the strains in the presence of sublethal concentration of β-lactams, but had no effect on the MIC values or the ability to survive a lethal dose of these antibiotics. However, the Δfri strain showed impaired growth in the presence of sublethal concentrations of penicillin G and ampicillin and a significantly reduced ability to survive lethal concentrations of these β-lactams. A lack of Fri also caused a 2-fold increase in the sensitivity of L. monocytogenes to cefalotin and cephradine. Conclusions The present study has identified Fri as an important mediator of

  6. Ctla-4 modulates the differentiation of inducible Foxp3+ Treg cells but IL-10 mediates their function in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Verhagen

    Full Text Available In vitro induced Foxp3+ T regulatory (iTreg cells form a novel and promising target for therapeutic tolerance induction. However, the potential of these cells as a target for the treatment of various immune diseases, as well as the factors involved in their development and function, remain debated. Here, we demonstrate in a myelin basic protein (MBP-specific murine model of CNS autoimmune disease that adoptive transfer of antigen-specific iTreg cells ameliorates disease progression. Moreover, we show that the co-stimulatory molecule CTLA-4 mediates in vitro differentiation of iTreg cells. Finally, we demonstrate that the secreted, immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 controls the ability of antigen-specific iTreg cells to suppress autoimmune disease. Overall, we conclude that antigen-specific iTreg cells, which depend on various immune regulatory molecules for their differentiation and function, represent a major target for effective immunotherapy of autoimmune disease.

  7. The nature of tolerance in adult recipient mice made tolerant of alloantigens with supralethal irradiation followed by syngeneic bone marrow cell transplantation plus injection of F1 spleen cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The length of time after syngeneic bone marrow reconstitution when tolerance to alloantigens can be induced in adult mice during T cell differentiation from bone marrow cells was studied by exposing those T cells to (recipient x donor)F1 spleen cells. Supralethally irradiated C3H/He Slc(C3H; H-2k) mice were reconstituted with 1 x 10(7) syngeneic T cell-depleted bone marrow cells and then injected intravenously with 5 x 10(7) (C3H x C57BL/6[B6])F1 (B6C3F1; H-2bxk) or (C3H x AKR/J[AKR])F1 (AKC3F1; H-2kxk) spleen cells at various intervals. In the fully allogeneic combination of B6C3F1----C3H, EL-4 tumor originating from B6 was accepted, and survival of grafted B6 skin was significantly prolonged in the tolerant C3H mice treated with irradiation on day -1 followed by injection of syngeneic bone marrow cells on day 0 plus B6C3F1 spleen cells on days 0, 5, or 10, in a tolerogen-specific manner. In the multiminor histocompatibility antigen-disparate combination of AKC3F1----C3H, AKR skin grafts were permanently accepted in the tolerant C3H mice treated with AKC3F1 spleen cells on days 0, 5, 10, or 15. Immunological parameters, including cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity and delayed foot-pad reaction (DFR), were almost completely suppressed in C3H mice made tolerant of B6 or AKR antigens. A chimeric assay using a direct immunofluorescence method revealed that the tolerant C3H mice given B6C3F1 spleen cells on day 0 were mixed-chimeric for at least 8 weeks after syngeneic bone marrow reconstitution, but not definitely chimeric thereafter. The C3H mice given AKC3F1 spleen cells on day 0 were chimeric even 43 weeks after syngeneic bone marrow reconstitution, but the C3H mice given AKC3F1 spleen cells on day 15 showed temporal chimerism that disappeared within 43 weeks. The untolerant mice were never detectably chimeric

  8. Perfluorooctanesulfonate Mediates Renal Tubular Cell Apoptosis through PPARgamma Inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Li Wen

    Full Text Available Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs are ubiquitously distributed in the environments including stainless pan-coating, raincoat, fire extinguisher, and semiconductor products. The PPAR family has been shown to contribute to the toxic effects of PFCs in thymus, immune and excretory systems. Herein, we demonstrated that perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS caused cell apoptosis through increasing ratio of Bcl-xS/xL, cytosolic cytochrome C, and caspase 3 activation in renal tubular cells (RTCs. In addition, PFOS increased transcription of inflammatory cytokines (i.e., TNFα, ICAM1, and MCP1 by NFκB activation. Conversely, PFOS reduced the mRNA levels of antioxidative enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase, as a result of reduced PPARγ transactivational activity by using reporter and chromatin immuoprecipitation (ChIP assays. PFOS reduced the protein interaction between PPARγ and PPARγ coactivator-1 alpha (PGC1α by PPARγ deacetylation through Sirt1 upregulation, of which the binding of PPARγ and PGC1α to a peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE in the promoter regions of these antioxidative enzymes was alleviated in the ChIP assay. Furthermore, Sirt1 also deacetylated p53 and then increased the binding of p53 to Bax, resulting in increased cytosolic cytochrome C. The effect of PPARγ inactivation by PFOS was validated using the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, whereas the adverse effects of PFOS were prevented by PPARγ overexpression and activators, rosiglitozone and L-carnitine, in RTCs. The in vitro finding of protective effect of L-carnitine was substantiated in vivo using Balb/c mice model subjected to PFOS challenge. Altogether, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for the protective mechanism of L-carnitine in eliminating PFOS-mediated renal injury, at least partially, through PPARγ activation.

  9. Mechanisms of tolerance in murine radiation bone marrow chimeras. II. Absence of nonspecific suppression in mature chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spleen cells from a series of allogeneic bone marrow chimeras were sensitized in vitro with stimulator cells from major histocompatibility complex recombinant strains of mice. The combinations were chosen such that both tolerated (host or donor) and nontolerated (third-party) antigens were present on the same stimulator cells in order to determine whether the tolerated host antigens might elicit nonspecific suppressor mechanisms affecting the cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) response to the nontolerated antigens. No evidence for such nonspecific suppression was obtained in several types of assays. Therefore, if suppressor mechanisms exist that mediate such tolerance in mature allogeneic chimeras then these mechanisms must be highly antigen-specific

  10. Cell mediated therapeutics for cancer treatment: Tumor homing cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balivada, Sivasai

    Many cell types were known to have migratory properties towards tumors and different research groups have shown reliable results regarding cells as delivery vehicles of therapeutics for targeted cancer treatment. Present report discusses proof of concept for 1. Cell mediated delivery of Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and targeted Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) as a cancer treatment by using in vivo mouse cancer models, 2. Cells surface engineering with chimeric proteins for targeted cancer treatment by using in vitro models. 1. Tumor homing cells can carry MNPs specifically to the tumor site and tumor burden will decrease after alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure. To test this hypothesis, first we loaded Fe/Fe3O4 bi-magnetic NPs into neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which were previously shown to migrate towards melanoma tumors. We observed that NPCs loaded with MNPs travel to subcutaneous melanoma tumors. After alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure, the targeted delivery of MNPs by the NPCs resulted in a mild decrease in tumor size (Chapter-2). Monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) are known to infiltrate tumor sites, and also have phagocytic activity which can increase their uptake of MNPs. To test Mo/Ma-mediated MHT we transplanted Mo/Ma loaded with MNPs into a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis. We observed that MNP-loaded Mo/Ma infiltrated pancreatic tumors and, after AMF treatment, significantly prolonged the lives of mice bearing disseminated intraperitoneal pancreatic tumors (Chapter-3). 2. Targeted cancer treatment could be achieved by engineering tumor homing cell surfaces with tumor proteases cleavable, cancer cell specific recombinant therapeutic proteins. To test this, Urokinase and Calpain (tumor specific proteases) cleavable; prostate cancer cell (CaP) specific (CaP1 targeting peptide); apoptosis inducible (Caspase3 V266ED3)- rCasp3V266ED3 chimeric protein was designed in silico. Hypothesized membrane anchored chimeric protein (rCasp3V

  11. ASSOCIATION OF HSP72 WITH THE NUCLEAR (TX-100-INSOLUBLE) FRACTION UPON HEATING TOLERANT AND NONTOLERANT HELA S3 CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KAMPINGA, HH; MULLER, E; BRUNSTING, JF; HEINE, L; KONINGS, AWT; ISSELS, RD

    1993-01-01

    HSP72 levels in the cellular and the nuclear (TX-insoluble) fraction before and after heating of heat- and sodium arsenite-induced thermotolerant and non-tolerant HeLa S3 cells have been investigated by ID- and 2D-electrophoresis, followed by Western blotting and immunostaining, using a newly develo

  12. Beta-cell function, incretin effect, and incretin hormones in obese youth along the span of glucose tolerance from normal to prediabetes to Type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using the hyperglycemic and euglycemic clamp, we demonstrated impaired Beta-cell function in obese youth with increasing dysglycemia. Herein we describe oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-modeled Beta-cell function and incretin effect in obese adolescents spanning the range of glucose tolerance. Bet...

  13. Lymphoid tissue inducer cells: pivotal cells in the evolution of CD4 immunity and tolerance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter John Lane

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Phylogeny suggests that the evolution of placentation in mammals was accompanied by substantial changes in the mammalian immune system: in particular lymph nodes and CD4 high affinity memory antibody responses co-evolved during the same period. Lymphoid tissue inducer cells (LTi are members of an emerging family of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs that are crucial for lymph node development, but our studies have indicated that they also play a pivotal role in the long-term maintenance of memory CD4 T cells in adult mammals through their expression of the tumor necrosis family members, OX40- and CD30-ligands. Additionally, our studies have shown that these two molecules are also key operators in CD4 effector function, as their absence obviates the need for the FoxP3-dependent regulatory T cells (Tregs that prevent CD4 driven autoimmune responses. In this perspective article, we summarize findings from our group over the last 10 years, and focus specifically on the role of LTi in thymus. We suggest that like memory CD4 T cells, LTi also play a role in the selection and maintenance of the Tregs that under normal circumstances are absolutely required to regulate CD4 effector cells.

  14. Silencing the SpMPK1, SpMPK2, and SpMPK3 Genes in Tomato Reduces Abscisic Acid—Mediated Drought Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Drought is a major threat to agriculture production worldwide. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs play a pivotal role in sensing and converting stress signals into appropriate responses so that plants can adapt and survive. To examine the function of MAPKs in the drought tolerance of tomato plants, we silenced the SpMPK1, SpMPK2, and SpMPK3 genes in wild-type plants using the virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS method. The results indicate that silencing the individual genes or co-silencing SpMPK1, SpMPK2, and SpMPK3 reduced the drought tolerance of tomato plants by varying degrees. Co-silencing SpMPK1 and SpMPK2 impaired abscisic acid (ABA-induced and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced stomatal closure and enhanced ABA-induced H2O2 production. Similar results were observed when silencing SpMPK3 alone, but not when SpMPK1 and SpMPK2 were individually silenced. These data suggest that the functions of SpMPK1 and SpMPK2 are redundant, and they overlap with that of SpMPK3 in drought stress signaling pathways. In addition, we found that SpMPK3 may regulate H2O2 levels by mediating the expression of CAT1. Hence, SpMPK1, SpMPK2, and SpMPK3 may play crucial roles in enhancing tomato plants’ drought tolerance by influencing stomatal activity and H2O2 production via the ABA-H2O2 pathway.

  15. Th1/Th17 Plasticity Is a Marker of Advanced β Cell Autoimmunity and Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert-Hartwall, Linnea; Honkanen, Jarno; Salo, Harri M.; Nieminen, Janne K.; Luopajärvi, Kristiina; Härkönen, Taina; Veijola, Riitta; Simell, Olli; Ilonen, Jorma; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Knip, Mikael; Knip, Mikael; Koski, Katriina; Koski, Matti; Härkönen, Taina; Ryhänen, Samppa; Hämäläinen, Anu-Maaria; Ormisson, Anne; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Ulich, Valentina; Kuzmicheva, Elena; Mokurov, Sergei; Markova, Svetlana; Pylova, Svetlana; Isakova, Marina; Shakurova, Elena; Petrov, Vladimir; Dorshakova, Natalya V.; Karapetyan, Tatyana; Varlamova, Tatyana; Ilonen, Jorma; Kiviniemi, Minna; Alnek, Kristi; Janson, Helis; Uibo, Raivo; Salum, Tiit; von Mutius, Erika; Weber, Juliane; Ahlfors, Helena; Kallionpää, Henna; Laajala, Essi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Moulder, Robert; Nieminen, Janne; Ruohtula, Terhi; Vaarala, Outi; Honkanen, Hanna; Hyöty, Heikki; Kondrashova, Anita; Oikarinen, Sami; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; De Goffau, Marcus C.; Welling, Gjalt; Alahuhta, Kirsi; Virtanen, Suvi M.

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of IL-17 immunity and detrimental effects of IL-17 on human islets have been implicated in human type 1 diabetes. In animal models, the plasticity of Th1/Th17 cells contributes to the development of autoimmune diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate that the upregulation of the IL-17 pathway and Th1/Th17 plasticity in peripheral blood are markers of advanced β cell autoimmunity and impaired β cell function in human type 1 diabetes. Activated Th17 immunity was observed in the late stage of preclinical diabetes in children with β cell autoimmunity and impaired glucose tolerance, but not in children with early β cell autoimmunity. We found an increased ratio of IFN-γ/IL-17 expression in Th17 cells in children with advanced β cell autoimmunity, which correlated with HbA1c and plasma glucose concentrations in an oral glucose tolerance test, and thus impaired β cell function. Low expression of Helios was seen in Th17 cells, suggesting that Th1/Th17 cells are not converted thymus-derived regulatory T cells. Our results suggest that the development of Th1/Th17 plasticity may serve as a biomarker of disease progression from β cell autoantibody positivity to type 1 diabetes. These data in human type 1 diabetes emphasize the role of Th1/Th17 plasticity as a potential contributor to tissue destruction in autoimmune conditions. PMID:25480564

  16. Lentivirus-Mediated Knockdown of Myosin VI Inhibits Cell Proliferation of Breast Cancer Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Biyun; Zhu, Wei; Yang, Ziang

    2015-10-01

    Myosin VI (MYO6) is a unique member of the myosin superfamily, and almost no experimental studies link MYO6 to tumorigenesis of breast cancer. However, previous microarray data demonstrated that MYO6 was frequently overexpressed in breast cancer tissues. In this study, to further develop its role in breast cancer, endogenous expression of MYO6 was significantly inhibited in breast cancer ZR-75-30 and MDA-MB-231 cells using lentivirus-mediated RNA interference. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot were applied to detect the expression level of MYO6. Cell viability of both cell lines was measured by methylthiazol tetrazolium and colony formation assays. Besides, cell cycle assay was utilized to acquire the distribution information of cell phase. The results demonstrated that knockdown of MYO6 markedly reduced cell viability and colony formation, as well as suppressed cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. The results suggested that MYO6 played a vital role in breast cancer cells and might provide useful information for diagnosis and therapy of human breast cancer in future. PMID:26407123

  17. Dynamic Regulation of Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule–mediated Homotypic Cell Adhesion through the Actin CytoskeletonV⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Nelissen, Judith M. D. T.; Peters, Inge M.; de Grooth, Bart G.; Van Kooyk, Yvette; Figdor, Carl G.

    2000-01-01

    Restricted expression of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) by hematopoietic cells suggests an important role in the immune system and hematopoiesis. To get insight into the mechanisms that control ALCAM-mediated adhesion we have investigated homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions. Here, we demonstrate that the cytoskeleton regulates ALCAM-mediated cell adhesion because inhibition of actin polymerization by cytochalasin D (CytD) strongly induces homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions....

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Immune-Mediated Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Maria-Christina Kastrinaki; Konstantia Pavlaki; Batsali, Aristea K.; Elisavet Kouvidi; Irene Mavroudi; Charalampos Pontikoglou; Papadaki, Helen A

    2013-01-01

    Immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFS) are characterized by ineffective marrow haemopoiesis and subsequent peripheral cytopenias. Ineffective haemopoiesis is the result of a complex marrow deregulation including genetic, epigenetic, and immune-mediated alterations in haemopoietic stem/progenitor cells, as well as abnormal haemopoietic-to-stromal cell interactions, with abnormal release of haemopoietic growth factors, chemokines, and inhibitors. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MS...

  19. Systemic LPS Translocation Activates Cross-Presenting Dendritic Cells but Is Dispensable for the Breakdown of CD8+ T Cell Peripheral Tolerance in Irradiated Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Espinosa-Carrasco

    Full Text Available Lymphodepletion is currently used to enhance the efficacy of cytotoxic T lymphocyte adoptive transfer immunotherapy against cancer. This beneficial effect of conditioning regimens is due, at least in part, to promoting the breakdown of peripheral CD8+ T cell tolerance. Lymphodepletion by total body irradiation induces systemic translocation of commensal bacteria LPS from the gastrointestinal tract. Since LPS is a potent activator of the innate immune system, including antigen presenting dendritic cells, we hypothesized that LPS translocation could be required for the breakdown of peripheral tolerance observed in irradiated mice. To address this issue, we have treated irradiated mice with antibiotics in order to prevent LPS translocation and utilized them in T cell adoptive transfer experiments. Surprisingly, we found that despite of completely blocking LPS translocation into the bloodstream, antibiotic treatment did not prevent the breakdown of peripheral tolerance. Although irradiation induced the activation of cross-presenting CD8+ dendritic cells in the lymphoid tissue, LPS could not solely account for this effect. Activation of dendritic cells by mechanisms other than LPS translocation is sufficient to promote the differentiation of potentially autoreactive CD8+ T cells into effectors in irradiated mice. Our data indicate that LPS translocation is dispensable for the breakdown of CD8+ T cell tolerance in irradiated mice.

  20. Suppression of Th1-mediated autoimmunity by embryonic stem cell-derived dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokunori Ikeda

    Full Text Available We herein demonstrate the immune-regulatory effect of embryonic stem cell-derived dendritic cells (ES-DCs using two models of autoimmune disease, namely non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Treatment of pre-diabetic NOD mice with ES-DCs exerted almost complete suppression of diabetes development during the observation period for more than 40 weeks. The prevention of diabetes by ES-DCs was accompanied with significant reduction of insulitis and decreased number of Th1 and Th17 cells in the spleen. Development of EAE was also inhibited by the treatment with ES-DCs, and the therapeutic effect was obtained even if ES-DCs were administrated after the onset of clinical symptoms. Treatment of EAE-induced mice with ES-DCs reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the spinal cord and suppressed the T cell response to the myelin antigen. Importantly, the ES-DC treatment did not affect T cell response to an exogenous antigen. As the mechanisms underlying the reduction of the number of infiltrating Th1 cells, we observed the inhibition of differentiation and proliferation of Th1 cells by ES-DCs. Furthermore, the expression of VLA-4α on Th1 cells was significantly inhibited by ES-DCs. Considering the recent advances in human induced pluripotent stem cell-related technologies, these results suggest a clinical application for pluripotent stem cell-derived dendritic cells as a therapy for T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases.

  1. Improved salinity tolerance of rice through cell type-specific expression of AtHKT1;1

    OpenAIRE

    Darren Plett; Gehan Safwat; Matthew Gilliham; Inge Skrumsager Møller; Stuart Roy; Neil Shirley; Andrew Jacobs; Alexander Johnson; Mark Tester

    2010-01-01

    Previously, cell type-specific expression of AtHKT1;1, a sodium transporter, improved sodium (Na(+)) exclusion and salinity tolerance in Arabidopsis. In the current work, AtHKT1;1, was expressed specifically in the root cortical and epidermal cells of an Arabidopsis GAL4-GFP enhancer trap line. These transgenic plants were found to have significantly improved Na(+) exclusion under conditions of salinity stress. The feasibility of a similar biotechnological approach in crop plants was explored...

  2. Recovery from bleaching is mediated by threshold densities of background thermo-tolerant symbiont types in a reef-building coral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Line K.; Doyle, Jason; Logan, Murray; Berkelmans, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive molecular analyses show that most corals host a complement of Symbiodinium genotypes that includes thermo-tolerant types in low abundance. While tolerant symbiont types are hypothesized to facilitate tolerance to temperature and recovery from bleaching, empirical data on their distribution and relative abundance in corals under ambient and stress conditions are still rare. We quantified visual bleaching and mortality of coral hosts, along with relative abundance of C- and D-type Symbiodinium cells in 82 Acropora millepora colonies from three locations on the Great Barrier Reef transplanted to a central inshore site over a 13 month period. Our analyses reveal dynamic change in symbiont associations within colonies and among populations over time. Coral bleaching and declines in C- but not D-type symbionts were observed in transplanted corals. Survival and recovery of 25% of corals from one population was associated with either initial D-dominance or an increase in D-type symbionts that could be predicted by a minimum pre-stress D : C ratio of 0.003. One-third of corals from this population became D dominated at the bleached stage despite no initial detection of this symbiont type, but failed to recover and died in mid to late summer. These results provide a predictive threshold minimum density of background D-type symbionts in A. millepora, above which survival following extreme thermal stress is increased. PMID:27429786

  3. Recovery from bleaching is mediated by threshold densities of background thermo-tolerant symbiont types in a reef-building coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Line K; Doyle, Jason; Logan, Murray; Berkelmans, Ray

    2016-06-01

    Sensitive molecular analyses show that most corals host a complement of Symbiodinium genotypes that includes thermo-tolerant types in low abundance. While tolerant symbiont types are hypothesized to facilitate tolerance to temperature and recovery from bleaching, empirical data on their distribution and relative abundance in corals under ambient and stress conditions are still rare. We quantified visual bleaching and mortality of coral hosts, along with relative abundance of C- and D-type Symbiodinium cells in 82 Acropora millepora colonies from three locations on the Great Barrier Reef transplanted to a central inshore site over a 13 month period. Our analyses reveal dynamic change in symbiont associations within colonies and among populations over time. Coral bleaching and declines in C- but not D-type symbionts were observed in transplanted corals. Survival and recovery of 25% of corals from one population was associated with either initial D-dominance or an increase in D-type symbionts that could be predicted by a minimum pre-stress D : C ratio of 0.003. One-third of corals from this population became D dominated at the bleached stage despite no initial detection of this symbiont type, but failed to recover and died in mid to late summer. These results provide a predictive threshold minimum density of background D-type symbionts in A. millepora, above which survival following extreme thermal stress is increased.

  4. Recovery from bleaching is mediated by threshold densities of background thermo-tolerant symbiont types in a reef-building coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Line K; Doyle, Jason; Logan, Murray; Berkelmans, Ray

    2016-06-01

    Sensitive molecular analyses show that most corals host a complement of Symbiodinium genotypes that includes thermo-tolerant types in low abundance. While tolerant symbiont types are hypothesized to facilitate tolerance to temperature and recovery from bleaching, empirical data on their distribution and relative abundance in corals under ambient and stress conditions are still rare. We quantified visual bleaching and mortality of coral hosts, along with relative abundance of C- and D-type Symbiodinium cells in 82 Acropora millepora colonies from three locations on the Great Barrier Reef transplanted to a central inshore site over a 13 month period. Our analyses reveal dynamic change in symbiont associations within colonies and among populations over time. Coral bleaching and declines in C- but not D-type symbionts were observed in transplanted corals. Survival and recovery of 25% of corals from one population was associated with either initial D-dominance or an increase in D-type symbionts that could be predicted by a minimum pre-stress D : C ratio of 0.003. One-third of corals from this population became D dominated at the bleached stage despite no initial detection of this symbiont type, but failed to recover and died in mid to late summer. These results provide a predictive threshold minimum density of background D-type symbionts in A. millepora, above which survival following extreme thermal stress is increased. PMID:27429786

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reversed Morphine Tolerance and Opioid-induced Hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Zhen; Liu, LiPing; Shen, Jun; Cheng, Katherine; Liu, Aijun; Yang, Jing; Wang, Lina; Qu, Tingyu; Yang, HongNa; Li, Yan; Wu, Haiyan; Narouze, John; Yin, Yan; Cheng, Jianguo

    2016-08-24

    More than 240 million opioid prescriptions are dispensed annually to treat pain in the US. The use of opioids is commonly associated with opioid tolerance (OT) and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), which limit efficacy and compromise safety. The dearth of effective way to prevent or treat OT and OIH is a major medical challenge. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) attenuate OT and OIH in rats and mice based on the understanding that MSCs possess remarkable anti-inflammatory properties and that both OT and chronic pain are associated with neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. We found that the development of OT and OIH was effectively prevented by either intravenous or intrathecal MSC transplantation (MSC-TP), which was performed before morphine treatment. Remarkably, established OT and OIH were significantly reversed by either intravenous or intrathecal MSCs when cells were transplanted after repeated morphine injections. The animals did not show any abnormality in vital organs or functions. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the treatments significantly reduced activation level of microglia and astrocytes in the spinal cord. We have thus demonstrated that MSC-TP promises to be a potentially safe and effective way to prevent and reverse two of the major problems of opioid therapy.

  6. Sox17-Mediated XEN Cell Conversion Identifies Dynamic Networks Controlling Cell-Fate Decisions in Embryo-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela C.H. McDonald

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the gene regulatory networks (GRNs distinguishing extraembryonic endoderm (ExEn stem (XEN cells from those that maintain the extensively characterized embryonic stem cell (ESC. An intriguing network candidate is Sox17, an essential transcription factor for XEN derivation and self-renewal. Here, we show that forced Sox17 expression drives ESCs toward ExEn, generating XEN cells that contribute to ExEn when placed back into early mouse embryos. Transient Sox17 expression is sufficient to drive this fate change during which time cells transit through distinct intermediate states prior to the generation of functional XEN-like cells. To orchestrate this conversion process, Sox17 acts in autoregulatory and feedforward network motifs, regulating dynamic GRNs directing cell fate. Sox17-mediated XEN conversion helps to explain the regulation of cell-fate changes and reveals GRNs regulating lineage decisions in the mouse embryo.

  7. Clonal deletion of self-reactive T cells in irradiation bone marrow chimeras and neonatally tolerant mice. Evidence for intercellular transfer of Mlsa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolerance to Mlsa has been shown to be associated with clonal deletion of cells carrying TCR beta chain variable regions V beta 6 or V beta 8.1 in mice possessing I-E antigens. To evaluate the rules of tolerance induction to Mlsa we prepared irradiation bone marrow chimeras expressing Mlsa or Mlsb and I-E by different cell types. Deletion of V beta 6+, Mlsa-reactive T cells required the presence of Mlsa and I-E products either on bone marrow-derived cells or on irradiated recipient cells. Tolerance was induced when Mlsa and I-E were expressed by distinct cells of the chimera. Also neonatally tolerized mice exhibited depletion of V beta 6+ cells after injection of I-E- Mlsa spleen cells (DBA/1) into newborn I-E+ Mlsb mice (BALB/c x B10.G)F1. These results suggest that the product of the Mlsa locus is soluble and/or may be transferred from cell to cell and bound to I-E antigens. The chimera experiments also showed that tolerance to Mlsa is H-2 allele independent, i.e., is apparently unrestricted. Differentiation of chimeric (H-2d/Mlsa x H-2q/Mlsb)F1 stem cells in either an H-2d or an H-2q thymus revealed that tolerance assessed by absence of V beta 6+ T cells is not dependent on the thymically determined restriction specificity of T cells

  8. Regulatory T cells and immune tolerance after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Bruinsma (Marieke)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe story of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) begins after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. It was observed that fallout radiation caused dose-dependent depression of hematopoiesis 1. Research first focused on how to protect the hematopo

  9. Programmed cell death or desiccation tolerance : two possible routes for wheat endosperm cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golovina, E.A.; Hoekstra, F.A.; Aelst, van A.C.

    2000-01-01

    The fate of cells in the endosperm of developing wheat kernels was investigated under normal conditions and upon premature slow drying on the cut ear. To follow the changes in membrane integrity and cellular ultrastructure, an electron spin resonance (ESR) spin probe technique and low temperature sc

  10. N-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion restricts cell proliferation in the dorsal neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalasani, Kavita; Brewster, Rachel M

    2011-05-01

    Neural progenitors are organized as a pseudostratified epithelium held together by adherens junctions (AJs), multiprotein complexes composed of cadherins and α- and β-catenin. Catenins are known to control neural progenitor division; however, it is not known whether they function in this capacity as cadherin binding partners, as there is little evidence that cadherins themselves regulate neural proliferation. We show here that zebrafish N-cadherin (N-cad) restricts cell proliferation in the dorsal region of the neural tube by regulating cell-cycle length. We further reveal that N-cad couples cell-cycle exit and differentiation, as a fraction of neurons are mitotic in N-cad mutants. Enhanced proliferation in N-cad mutants is mediated by ligand-independent activation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, possibly caused by defective ciliogenesis. Furthermore, depletion of Hh signaling results in the loss of junctional markers. We therefore propose that N-cad restricts the response of dorsal neural progenitors to Hh and that Hh signaling limits the range of its own activity by promoting AJ assembly. Taken together, these observations emphasize a key role for N-cad-mediated adhesion in controlling neural progenitor proliferation. In addition, these findings are the first to demonstrate a requirement for cadherins in synchronizing cell-cycle exit and differentiation and a reciprocal interaction between AJs and Hh signaling.

  11. Physiological and proteomic changes suggest an important role of cell walls in the high tolerance to metals of Elodea nuttallii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larras, Floriane; Regier, Nicole; Planchon, Sébastien; Poté, John; Renaut, Jenny; Cosio, Claudia

    2013-12-15

    Macrophytes bioaccumulate metals, the suggestion being made that they be considered for phytoremediation. However, a thorough understanding of the mechanisms of metal tolerance in these plants is necessary to allow full optimization of this approach. The present study was undertaken to gain insight into Hg and Cd accumulation and their effects in a representative macrophyte, Elodea nuttallii. Exposure to methyl-Hg (23 ng dm(-3)) had no significant effect while inorganic Hg (70 ng dm(-3)) and Cd (281 μg dm(-3)) affected root growth but did not affect shoots growth, photosynthesis, or antioxidant enzymes. Phytochelatins were confirmed as having a role in Cd tolerance in this plant while Hg tolerance seems to rely on different mechanisms. Histology and subcellular distribution revealed a localized increase in lignification, and an increased proportion of metal accumulation in cell wall over time. Proteomics further suggested that E. nuttallii was able to efficiently adapt its energy sources and the structure of its cells during Hg and Cd exposure. Storage in cell walls to protect cellular machinery is certainly predominant at environmental concentrations of metals in this plant resulting in a high tolerance highlighted by the absence of toxicity symptoms in shoots despite the significant accumulation of metals.

  12. Lipophilic Contaminants Influence Cold Tolerance of Invertebrates through Changes in Cell Membrane Fluidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Martin; Bouvrais, Hélène; Westh, Peter;

    2014-01-01

    Contaminants taken up by living organisms in the environment as a result of anthropogenic contamination can reduce the tolerance of natural stressors, e.g., low temperatures, but the physiological mechanisms behind these interactions of effects are poorly understood. The tolerance to low temperat...... present. Contaminants of varying chemical structures can alter the membrane fluidity in either direction and correspondingly modulate the cold tolerance of intact animals....

  13. DNA bending facilitates the error-free DNA damage tolerance pathway and upholds genome integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez-Huici, V.; Szakal, B.; Urulangodi, M.; Psakhye, I.; Castellucci, F.; Menolfi, D.; Rajakumara, E.; Fumasoni, M.; Bermejo, R; Jentsch, S; Branzei, D.

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is sensitive to damage in the template. To bypass lesions and complete replication, cells activate recombination mediated (error-free) and translesion synthesis-mediated (errorprone) DNA damage tolerance pathways. Crucial for error-free DNA damage tolerance is template switching, which depends on the formation and resolution of damage-bypass intermediates consisting of sister chromatid junctions. Here we show that a chromatin architectural pathway involving the high mobility g...

  14. APECED: Is this a model for failure of T-cell and B-cell tolerance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eKluger

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available APECED and IPEX syndromes show similarities in the clinical presentations and immunological alterations, mainly regarding regulatory T-cells function. T-cell defect may lead to tissue destruction chiefly in endocrine organs. Besides, APECED is characterized by high-titer antibodies against a wide variety of cytokines, that could partly be responsible for the clinical symptoms during APECED, mainly chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, and linked to antibodies against Th17 cells effector molecules, IL-17 and IL-22. On the other hand, the same antibodies, together with antibodies against type I interferons may be prevent from other immunological diseases, such as psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematous. The same effector Th17 cells, present in the lymphocytic infiltrate of target organs of APECED, could be responsible for the tissue destruction. Here again, the antibodies against the corresponding effector molecules, anti-IL-17 and anti-IL-22 could be protective. The occurrence of several effector mechanisms (CD4+ Th17 cell and CD8+ CTL and the effector cytokines IL-17 and IL-22, and simultaneous existence of regulatory mechanisms (CD4+ and CD8+ Treg and antibodies neutralizing the effect of the effector cytokines may explain the polymorphism of APECED. Almost all the patients develop the characteristic manifestations of the complex, but temporal course and symptoms severity vary considerably, even among siblings. The autoantibody profile does not correlate with the clinical picture. One could speculate that a secondary homeostatic balance between the harmful effector mechanisms, and the favorable regulatory mechanisms, finally define both the extent and severity of the clinical condition in the AIRE defective individuals. The proposed hypothesis that in APECED, in addition to strong tissue destructive mechanisms, a controlling regulatory mechanism does exist, allow us to conclude that APECED could be treated, and even cured, with immunological

  15. Macrophages play an essential role in antigen-specific immune suppression mediated by T CD8⁺ cell-derived exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Ptak, Wlodzimierz; Nowak, Bernadeta; Ptak, Maria; Askenase, Philip W; Bryniarski, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Murine contact sensitivity (CS) reaction could be antigen-specifically regulated by T CD8(+) suppressor (Ts) lymphocytes releasing microRNA-150 in antibody light-chain-coated exosomes that were formerly suggested to suppress CS through action on macrophages (Mφ). The present studies investigated the role of Mφ in Ts cell-exosome-mediated antigen-specific suppression as well as modulation of Mφ antigen-presenting function in humoral and cellular immunity by suppressive exosomes. Mice depleted of Mφ by clodronate liposomes could not be tolerized and did not produce suppressive exosomes. Moreover, isolated T effector lymphocytes transferring CS were suppressed by exosomes only in the presence of Mφ, demonstrating the substantial role of Mφ in the generation and action of Ts cell regulatory exosomes. Further, significant decrease of number of splenic B cells producing trinitrophenyl (TNP) -specific antibodies with the alteration of the ratio of serum titres of IgM to IgG was observed in recipients of exosome-treated, antigen-pulsed Mφ and the significant suppression of CS was demonstrated in recipients of exosome-treated, TNP-conjugated Mφ. Additionally, exosome-pulsed, TNP-conjugated Mφ mediated suppression of CS in mice pre-treated with a low-dose of cyclophosphamide, suggesting de novo induction of T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes. Treg cell involvement in the effector phase of the studied suppression mechanism was proved by unsuccessful tolerization of DEREG mice depleted of Treg lymphocytes. Furthermore, the inhibition of proliferation of CS effector cells cultured with exosome-treated Mφ in a transmembrane manner was observed. Our results demonstrated the essential role of Mφ in antigen-specific immune suppression mediated by Ts cell-derived exosomes and realized by induction of Treg lymphocytes and inhibition of T effector cell proliferation. PMID:25808106

  16. Macrophages play an essential role in antigen-specific immune suppression mediated by T CD8⁺ cell-derived exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Ptak, Wlodzimierz; Nowak, Bernadeta; Ptak, Maria; Askenase, Philip W; Bryniarski, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Murine contact sensitivity (CS) reaction could be antigen-specifically regulated by T CD8(+) suppressor (Ts) lymphocytes releasing microRNA-150 in antibody light-chain-coated exosomes that were formerly suggested to suppress CS through action on macrophages (Mφ). The present studies investigated the role of Mφ in Ts cell-exosome-mediated antigen-specific suppression as well as modulation of Mφ antigen-presenting function in humoral and cellular immunity by suppressive exosomes. Mice depleted of Mφ by clodronate liposomes could not be tolerized and did not produce suppressive exosomes. Moreover, isolated T effector lymphocytes transferring CS were suppressed by exosomes only in the presence of Mφ, demonstrating the substantial role of Mφ in the generation and action of Ts cell regulatory exosomes. Further, significant decrease of number of splenic B cells producing trinitrophenyl (TNP) -specific antibodies with the alteration of the ratio of serum titres of IgM to IgG was observed in recipients of exosome-treated, antigen-pulsed Mφ and the significant suppression of CS was demonstrated in recipients of exosome-treated, TNP-conjugated Mφ. Additionally, exosome-pulsed, TNP-conjugated Mφ mediated suppression of CS in mice pre-treated with a low-dose of cyclophosphamide, suggesting de novo induction of T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes. Treg cell involvement in the effector phase of the studied suppression mechanism was proved by unsuccessful tolerization of DEREG mice depleted of Treg lymphocytes. Furthermore, the inhibition of proliferation of CS effector cells cultured with exosome-treated Mφ in a transmembrane manner was observed. Our results demonstrated the essential role of Mφ in antigen-specific immune suppression mediated by Ts cell-derived exosomes and realized by induction of Treg lymphocytes and inhibition of T effector cell proliferation.

  17. Multiple host-cell recombination pathways act in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestiri, Imen; Norre, Frédéric; Gallego, Maria E; White, Charles I

    2014-02-01

    Using floral-dip, tumorigenesis and root callus transformation assays of both germline and somatic cells, we present here results implicating the four major non-homologous and homologous recombination pathways in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana. All four single mutant lines showed similar mild reductions in transformability, but knocking out three of four pathways severely compromised Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Although integration of T-DNA into the plant genome is severely compromised in the absence of known DNA double-strand break repair pathways, it does still occur, suggesting the existence of other pathways involved in T-DNA integration. Our results highlight the functional redundancy of the four major plant recombination pathways in transformation, and provide an explanation for the lack of strong effects observed in previous studies on the roles of plant recombination functions in transformation.

  18. Effects of bortezomib in sensitizing human prostate cancer cell lines to NK-mediated cytotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hu; Rui-Rui Zheng; Hui-Xia Cui; Dan Yue; Yong Wang; You-Hong Jiang

    2012-01-01

    The proteasome inhibitor,bortezomib,has been demonstrated to sensitize tumor cells to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-mediated apoptosis.Natural killer (NK) cells represent potent antitumor effector cells.They also express TRAIL.Therefore.we investigated whether bortezomib could sensitize tumor cells to NK cell-mediated killing,and have the same effect in human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP and DU145).We found that bortezomib strongly inhibits proliferation in both cell lines.Furthermore,compared with LNCaP cells,DU 145 cells are more sensitive to bortezomib-induced apoptosis.However,bortezomib is unable to sensitize these two cell lines to NK cell-mediated killing in short-term assays.In long-term assays,we found that killing mediated by activated NK cells following bortezornib treatment leads to greater antitumor effects than either treatment alone.In addition,treatment with bortezomib causes these cells to upregulate apoptosis-related mRNA as well as death receptors and downregulate the major histocompatibility class (MHC)-Ⅰ molecule on the cell surface of DU145 cells.In contrast,LNCaP cells are not sensitized by this treatment.Death receptors and the MHC-Ⅰ molecule did not change in this cell line.These-data suggest that bortezomib can be used to sensitize prostate cancer cells to NK cell-mediated killing and improve current cancer therapies.This therapeutic strategy may be more effective in patients with androgen-insensitive prostate cancer.

  19. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) with a rice chitinase gene for improved tolerance to a fungal pathogen Sclerotium rolfsii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoling; Miyasaka, Susan C; Fitch, Maureen M M; Moore, Paul H; Zhu, Yun J

    2008-05-01

    Taro (Colocasia esculenta) is one of the most important crops in the Pacific Islands, however, taro yields have been declining in Hawaii over the past 30 years partly due to diseases caused by oomycete and fungal pathogens. In this study, an efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method for taro is first reported. In total, approximately 200 pieces (8 g) of embryogenic calluses were infected with the super-virulent A. tumefaciens strain EHA105 harboring the plant transformation plasmid pBI121/ricchi11 that contains the rice chitinase gene ricchi11. The presence and expression of the transgene ricchi11 in six independent transgenic lines was confirmed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). Southern blot analysis of the six independent lines indicated that three out of six (50%) had integrated a single copy of the transgene, and the other three lines had two or three copies of the transgene. Compared to the particle bombardment transformation of taro method, which was used in the previous studies, the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method obtained 43-fold higher transformation efficiency. In addition, these six transgenic lines via Agrobacterium may be more effective for transgene expression as a result of single-copy or low-copy insertion of the transgene than the single line with multiple copies of the transgene via particle bombardment. In a laboratory bioassay, all six transgenic lines exhibited increased tolerance to the fungal pathogen Sclerotium rolfsii, ranging from 42 to 63% reduction in lesion expansion.

  20. Uptake and metabolism of clomazone in tolerant-soybean and susceptible-cotton photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, M.A.; Liebl, R.A.; Widholm, J.M. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the uptake and metabolism of the pigment synthesis inhibiting herbicide clomazone in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv Corsoy) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum (L.) cv Stoneville 825) photomixotrophic cell suspensions. Soybean and cotton on a whole plant level are tolerant and susceptible to clomazone, respectively. Preliminary studies indicated that I{sub 50} values for growth, chlorophyll (Chl), {beta}-carotene, and lutein were, respectively, >22, 14, 19, and 23 times greater for the soybean cell line (SB-M) 8 days after treatment (DAT) compared to the cotton cell line (COT-M) 16 DAT. Differences in ({sup 14}C)clomazone uptake cannot account for selectivity since there were significantly greater levels of domazone absorbed by the SB-M cells compared to the COT-M cells for each treatment. The percentage of absorbed clomazone converted to more polar metabolite(s) was significantly greater by the SB-M cells relative to COT-M cells at 6 and 24 hours after treatment, however, only small differences existed between the cell lines by 48 hours after treatment. Nearly identical levels of parental clomazone was recovered from both cell lines for all treatments. A pooled metabolite fraction isolated from SB-M cells had no effect on the leaf pigment content of susceptible velvetleaf or soybean seedlings. Conversely, a pooled metabolite fraction from COT-M cells reduced the leaf Chl content of velvetleaf. Soybean tolerance to clomazone appears to be due to differential metabolism (bioactivation) and/or differences at the site of action.

  1. Uptake and metabolism of clomazone in tolerant-soybean and susceptible-cotton photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, M A; Liebl, R A; Widholm, J M

    1990-03-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the uptake and metabolism of the pigment synthesis inhibiting herbicide clomazone in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Corsoy) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum [L.] cv Stoneville 825) photomixotrophic cell suspensions. Soybean and cotton on a whole plant level are tolerant and susceptible to clomazone, respectively. Preliminary studies indicated that I(50) values for growth, chlorophyll (Chl), beta-carotene, and lutein were, respectively, >22, 14, 19, and 23 times greater for the soybean cell line (SB-M) 8 days after treatment (DAT) compared to the cotton cell line (COT-M) 16 DAT. Differences in [(14)C]clomazone uptake cannot account for selectivity since there were significantly greater levels of clomazone absorbed by the SB-M cells compared to the COT-M cells for each treatment. The percentage of absorbed clomazone converted to more polar metabolite(s) was significantly greater by the SB-M cells relative to COT-M cells at 6 and 24 hours after treatment, however, only small differences existed between the cell lines by 48 hours after treatment. Nearly identical levels of parental clomazone was recovered from both cell lines for all treatments. A pooled metabolite fraction isolated from SB-M cells had no effect on the leaf pigment content of susceptible velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medic.) or soybean seedlings. Conversely, a pooled metabolite fraction from COT-M cells reduced the leaf Chl content of velvetleaf. Soybean tolerance to clomazone appears to be due to differential metabolism (bioactivation) and/or differences at the site of action.

  2. Uptake and Metabolism of Clomazone in Tolerant-Soybean and Susceptible-Cotton Photomixotrophic Cell Suspension Cultures 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Michael A.; Liebl, Rex A.; Widholm, Jack M.

    1990-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the uptake and metabolism of the pigment synthesis inhibiting herbicide clomazone in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Corsoy) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum [L.] cv Stoneville 825) photomixotrophic cell suspensions. Soybean and cotton on a whole plant level are tolerant and susceptible to clomazone, respectively. Preliminary studies indicated that I50 values for growth, chlorophyll (Chl), β-carotene, and lutein were, respectively, >22, 14, 19, and 23 times greater for the soybean cell line (SB-M) 8 days after treatment (DAT) compared to the cotton cell line (COT-M) 16 DAT. Differences in [14C]clomazone uptake cannot account for selectivity since there were significantly greater levels of clomazone absorbed by the SB-M cells compared to the COT-M cells for each treatment. The percentage of absorbed clomazone converted to more polar metabolite(s) was significantly greater by the SB-M cells relative to COT-M cells at 6 and 24 hours after treatment, however, only small differences existed between the cell lines by 48 hours after treatment. Nearly identical levels of parental clomazone was recovered from both cell lines for all treatments. A pooled metabolite fraction isolated from SB-M cells had no effect on the leaf pigment content of susceptible velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medic.) or soybean seedlings. Conversely, a pooled metabolite fraction from COT-M cells reduced the leaf Chl content of velvetleaf. Soybean tolerance to clomazone appears to be due to differential metabolism (bioactivation) and/or differences at the site of action. PMID:16667349

  3. Strategy for eliciting antigen-specific CD8+ T cell-mediated immune response against a cryptic CTL epitope of merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez Bianca P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC is a relatively new addition to the expanding category of oncovirus-induced cancers. Although still comparably rare, the number of cases has risen dramatically in recent years. Further complicating this trend is that MCC is an extremely aggressive neoplasm with poor patient prognosis and limited treatment options for advanced disease. The causative agent of MCC has been identified as the merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV. The MCPyV-encoded large T (LT antigen is an oncoprotein that is theorized to be essential for virus-mediated tumorigenesis and is therefore, an excellent MCC antigen for the generation of antitumor immune responses. As a foreign antigen, the LT oncoprotein avoids the obstacle of immune tolerance, which normally impedes the development of antitumor immunity. Ergo, it is an excellent target for anti-MCC immunotherapy. Since tumor-specific CD8+ T cells lead to better prognosis for MCC and numerous other cancers, we have generated a DNA vaccine that is capable of eliciting LT-specific CD8+ T cells. The DNA vaccine (pcDNA3-CRT/LT encodes the LT antigen linked to a damage-associated molecular pattern, calreticulin (CRT, as it has been demonstrated that the linkage of CRT to antigens promotes the induction of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Results The present study shows that DNA vaccine-induced generation of LT-specific CD8+ T cells is augmented by linking CRT to the LT antigen. This is relevant since the therapeutic effects of the pcDNA3-CRT/LT DNA vaccine is mediated by LT-specific CD8+ T cells. Mice vaccinated with the DNA vaccine produced demonstrably more LT-specific CD8+ T cells. The DNA vaccine was also able to confer LT-specific CD8+ T cell-mediated protective and therapeutic effects to prolong the survival of mice with LT-expressing tumors. In the interest of determining the LT epitope which most MCC-specific CD8+ T cells recognize, we identified the amino acid sequence of the

  4. A20 is critical for the induction of Pam3CSK4-tolerance in monocytic THP-1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyue Hu

    Full Text Available A20 functions to terminate Toll-like receptor (TLR-induced immune response, and play important roles in the induction of lipopolysacchride (LPS-tolerance. However, the molecular mechanism for Pam3CSK4-tolerance is uncertain. Here we report that TLR1/2 ligand Pam3CSK4 induced tolerance in monocytic THP-1 cells. The pre-treatment of THP-1 cells with Pam3CSK4 down-regulated the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by Pam3CSK4 re-stimulation. Pam3CSK4 pre-treatment also down-regulated the signaling transduction of JNK, p38 and NF-κB induced by Pam3CSK4 re-stimulation. The activation of TLR1/2 induced a rapid and robust up-regulation of A20, suggesting that A20 may contribute to the induction of Pam3CSK4-tolerance. This hypothesis was proved by the observation that the over-expression of A20 by gene transfer down-regulated Pam3CSK4-induced inflammatory responses, and the down-regulation of A20 by RNA interference inhibited the induction of tolerance. Moreover, LPS induced a significant up-regulation of A20, which contributed to the induction of cross-tolerance between LPS and Pam3CSK4. A20 was also induced by the treatment of THP-1 cells with TNF-α and IL-1β. The pre-treatment with TNF-α and IL-1β partly down-regulated Pam3CSK4-induced activation of MAPKs. Furthermore, pharmacologic inhibition of GSK3 signaling down-regulated Pam3CSK4-induced A20 expression, up-regulated Pam3CSK4-induced inflammatory responses, and partly reversed Pam3CSK4 pre-treatment-induced tolerance, suggesting that GSK3 is involved in TLR1/2-induced tolerance by up-regulation of A20 expression. Taken together, these results indicated that A20 is a critical regulator for TLR1/2-induced pro-inflammatory responses.

  5. Remarkable heterogeneity displayed by oval cells in rat and mouse models of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Peter; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Rasmussen, Morten;

    2007-01-01

    the molecular phenotypes of oval cells in several of the most commonly used protocols of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration-namely, treatment with 2-acetylaminofluorene and partial (70%) hepatectomy (AAF/PHx); a choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet; a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydro......The experimental protocols used in the investigation of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration in rodents are characterized by activation of the hepatic stem cell compartment in the canals of Hering followed by transit amplification of oval cells and their subsequent differentiation along hepatic...... remarkable phenotypic discrepancies exhibited by oval cells in stem cell-mediated liver regeneration between rats and mice and underline the importance of careful extrapolation between individual species....

  6. Efficient Oxygen Evolution Reaction Catalysts for Cell Reversal and Start/Stop Tolerance in Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atanasoski, Radoslav [3M Industrial Mineral Products; Atanasoska, Liliana [3M Industrial Mineral Products; Cullen, David A [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Minute amounts of ruthenium and iridium on platinum nanostructured thin films have been evaluated in an effort to reduce carbon corrosion and Pt dissolution during transient conditions in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Electrochemical tests showed the catalysts had a remarkable oxygen evolution reaction (OER) activity, even greater than that of bulk, metallic thin films. Stability tests within a fuel cell environment showed that rapid Ru dissolution could be managed with the addition of Ir. Membrane electrode assemblies containing a Ru to Ir atomic ratio of 1:9 were evaluated under startup/shutdown and cell reversal conditions for OER catalyst loadings ranging from 1 to 10 g/cm2. These tests affirmed that electrode potentials can be controlled through the addition of OER catalysts without impacting the oxygen reduction reaction on the cathode or the hydrogen oxidation reaction on the anode. The morphology and chemical structure of the thin OER layers were characterized by scanning transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in an effort to establish a correlation between interfacial properties and electrochemical behavior.

  7. Polyol-mediated Synthesis of Chalcogenide Nanoparticles for Thin-film Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Hailong

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was polyol-mediated syntheses of chalcogenide nanoparticles for printable thin-film solar cells. In this thesis, chalcogenide nanoparticles, such as Cu2Se, In2Se3, CZTS, Se@CuSe and Te@Bi2Te3, have been successfully synthesized via a polyol-mediated method.

  8. Decreased drug accumulation and increased tolerance to DNA damage in tumor cells with a low level of cisplatin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzi, C; Perego, P; Supino, R; Romanelli, S; Pensa, T; Carenini, N; Viano, I; Colangelo, D; Leone, R; Apostoli, P; Cassinelli, G; Gambetta, R A; Zunino, F

    1998-04-15

    In an attempt to examine the cellular changes associated with cisplatin resistance, we selected a cisplatin-resistant (A43 1/Pt) human cervix squamous cell carcinoma cell line following continuous in vitro drug exposure. The resistant subline was characterized by a 2.5-fold degree of resistance. In particular, we investigated the expression of cellular defence systems and other cellular factors probably involved in dealing with cisplatin-induced DNA damage. Resistant cells exhibited decreased platinum accumulation and reduced levels of DNA-bound platinum and interstrand cross-link frequency after short-term drug exposure. Analysis of the effect of cisplatin on cell cycle progression revealed a cisplatin-induced G2M arrest in sensitive and resistant cells. Interestingly, a slowdown in S-phase transit was found in A431/Pt cells. A comparison of the ability of sensitive and resistant cells to repair drug-induced DNA damage suggested that resistant cells were able to tolerate higher levels of cisplatin-induced DNA damage than their parental counterparts. Analysis of the expression of proteins involved in DNA mismatch repair showed a decreased level of MSH2 in resistant cells. Since MSH2 seems to be involved in recognition of drug-induced DNA damage, this change may account for the increased tolerance to DNA damage observed in the resistant subline. In conclusion, the involvement of accumulation defects and the increased tolerance to cisplatin-induced DNA damage in these cisplatin-resistant cells support the notion that multiple changes contribute to confer a low level of cisplatin resistance. PMID:9719480

  9. Surrogate light chain is required for central and peripheral B-cell tolerance and inhibits anti-DNA antibody production by marginal zone B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Weicheng; Grimsholm, Ola; Bernardi, Angelina I; Höök, Nina; Stern, Anna; Cavallini, Nicola; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill

    2015-04-01

    Selection of the primary antibody repertoire takes place in pro-/pre-B cells, and subsequently in immature and transitional B cells. At the first checkpoint, μ heavy (μH) chains assemble with surrogate light (SL) chain into a precursor B-cell receptor. In mice lacking SL chain, μH chain selection is impaired, and serum autoantibody levels are elevated. However, whether the development of autoantibody-producing cells is due to an inability of the resultant B-cell receptors to induce central and/or peripheral B-cell tolerance or other factors is unknown. Here, we show that receptor editing is defective, and that a higher proportion of BM immature B cells are prone to undergoing apoptosis. Furthermore, transitional B cells are also more prone to undergoing apoptosis, with a stronger selection pressure to enter the follicular B-cell pool. Those that enter the marginal zone (MZ) B-cell pool escape selection and survive, possibly due to the B-lymphopenia and elevated levels of B-cell activating factor. Moreover, the MZ B cells are responsible for the elevated IgM anti-dsDNA antibody levels detected in these mice. Thus, the SL chain is required for central and peripheral B-cell tolerance and inhibits anti-DNA antibody production by MZ B cells.

  10. Performance Factors and Sulfur Tolerance of Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells with Nanostructured Ni:GDC Infiltrated Anodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Hagen, Anke;

    2015-01-01

    Two metal supported solid oxide fuel cells (active area 16 cm2) with nanostructured Ni:GDC infiltrated anodes, but different anode and support microstructures were studied in respect to sulfur tolerance at the aimed operating temperature of 650ºC. The studied MS-SOFCs are based on ferretic stainl...... anode is significantly more sulfur tolerant than the conventional Ni/YSZ cermet anode. © 2015 ECS - The Electrochemical Society......Two metal supported solid oxide fuel cells (active area 16 cm2) with nanostructured Ni:GDC infiltrated anodes, but different anode and support microstructures were studied in respect to sulfur tolerance at the aimed operating temperature of 650ºC. The studied MS-SOFCs are based on ferretic...... stainless steel (FeCr) and showed excellent performance characteristics at 650ºC with area specific resistances (ASR) of 0.35 Ωcm2 and 0.7 Ωcm2 respectively. The sulfur tolerance testing was performed by addition/removal of 2, 5, and 10 ppm H2S in hydrogen based fuel under galvanostatic operation...

  11. Inflammatory mediators and cell adhesion molecules as indicators of severity of atherosclerosis: the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.M. de Maat (Moniek); M.L. Bots (Michiel); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); J. Meijer (John); A.J. Kiliaan (Amanda); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Hofman (Albert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractInflammatory mediators and soluble cell adhesion molecules predict cardiovascular events. It is not clear whether they reflect the severity of underlying atherosclerotic disease. Within the Rotterdam Study, we investigated the associations of C-reactive protein (CRP), i

  12. The essential role of the Deinococcus radiodurans ssb gene in cell survival and radiation tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Scott Lockhart

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has implicated single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB expression level as an important factor in microbial radiation resistance. The genome of the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans contains genes for two SSB homologs: the homodimeric, canonical Ssb, encoded by the gene ssb, and a novel pentameric protein encoded by the gene ddrB. ddrB is highly induced upon exposure to radiation, and deletions result in decreased radiation-resistance, suggesting an integral role of the protein in the extreme resistance exhibited by this organism. Although expression of ssb is also induced after irradiation, Ssb is thought to be involved primarily in replication. In this study, we demonstrate that Ssb in D. radiodurans is essential for cell survival. The lethality of an ssb deletion cannot be complemented by providing ddrB in trans. In addition, the radiation-sensitive phenotype conferred by a ddrB deletion is not alleviated by providing ssb in trans. By altering expression of the ssb gene, we also show that lower levels of transcription are required for optimal growth than are necessary for high radiation resistance. When expression is reduced to that of E. coli, ionizing radiation resistance is similarly reduced. UV resistance is also decreased under low ssb transcript levels where growth is unimpaired. These results indicate that the expression of ssb is a key component of both normal cellular metabolism as well as pathways responsible for the high radiation tolerance of D. radiodurans.

  13. Various tolerances to arsenic trioxide between human cortical neurons and leukemic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jin; MENG Ran; SUI Xinhua; LI Wenbin; YANG Baofeng

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is very effective for treatment of acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) but little can pass through the blood-brain-barrier (BBB),which limits its use in the prevention and treatment of central nervous system leukaemia (CNSL). Before creating a non-invasive method to help As2O3 's access, the safe and effective therapeutic concentration of As2O3 in the CNS ought to be known. The changes of apoptosis biomarkers, [Ca2+]i and PKC activity of both leukaemia cells and human cortical neurons, were monitored before and after being treated with As2O3 in vitro with laser confocal microscopy and Western blot. NSE concentration, the neuron invasive biomarker, was monitored by enzyme immunoassay (NSE-EIA). This study revealed that cortical neuron was more tolerable to As2O3 compared to NB4. 1.0 μmol / L As2O3 showed little influence on cortical neuron but effectively promoted apoptosis and induced differentiation of NB4.

  14. MFG-E8 Is Critical for Embryonic Stem Cell-Mediated T Cell Immunomodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Tan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The molecules and mechanisms pertinent to the low immunogenicity of undifferentiated embryonic stem cells (ESCs remain poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that milk fat globule epidermal growth factor 8 (MFG-E8 is a vital mediator in this phenomenon and directly suppresses T cell immune responses. MFG-E8 is enriched in undifferentiated ESCs but diminished in differentiated ESCs. Upregulation of MFG-E8 in ESCs increases the successful engraftment of both undifferentiated and differentiated ESCs across major histocompatibility complex barriers. MFG-E8 suppresses T cell activation/proliferation and inhibits Th1, Th2, and Th17 subpopulations while increasing regulatory T cell subsets. Neutralizing MFG-E8 substantially abrogates these effects, whereas addition of recombinant MFG-E8 to differentiated ESCs restores immunosuppression. Furthermore, we provide the evidence that MFG-E8 suppresses T cell activation and regulates T cell polarization by inhibiting PKCθ phosphorylation through the α3/5βV integrin receptor. Our findings offer an approach to facilitate transplantation acceptance.

  15. Clinical Cancer Therapy by NK Cells via Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kory L. Alderson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are powerful effector cells that can be directed to eliminate tumor cells through tumor-targeted monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. Some tumor-targeted mAbs have been successfully applied in the clinic and are included in the standard of care for certain malignancies. Strategies to augment the antitumor response by NK cells have led to an increased understanding of how to improve their effector responses. Next-generation reagents, such as molecularly modified mAbs and mAb-cytokine fusion proteins (immunocytokines, ICs designed to augment NK-mediated killing, are showing promise in preclinical and some clinical settings. Continued research into the antitumor effects induced by NK cells and tumor-targeted mAbs suggests that additional intrinsic and extrinsic factors may influence the antitumor response. Therefore more research is needed that focuses on evaluating which NK cell and tumor criteria are best predictive of a clinical response and which combination immunotherapy regimens to pursue for distinct clinical settings.

  16. Efficacy and tolerability of different brands of intravenous immunoglobulin in the maintenance treatment of chronic immune-mediated neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallia, Francesca; Balducci, Claudia; Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is effective in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). Not all brands of IVIg are however licensed for these neuropathies. We reviewed six patients with CIDP and seven with MMN treated with maintenance therapy with IVIg from 2009 to 2013. In all patients, we measured the Medical Research Council (MRC) and Overall Neuropathy Limitation Scale (ONLS) scores before each infusion, registered the monthly dose and brand of IVIg, and recorded adverse events. Patients were treated for 25-60 months (mean 49 months) alternating different brands of IVIg including IgVena, Gammagard, Kiovig, and Flebogamma. Minor and transient side effects were equally observed with each brand. No difference in the MRC or ONLS scores was observed in relation to the brand of IVIg used. Chronic maintenance treatment with IVIg in patients with MMN and CIDP was not associated with a different tolerability or efficacy despite the use of different brands of IVIg. PMID:26817673

  17. Superantigen-induced CD4+ T cell tolerance is associated with DNA methylation and histone hypo-acetylation at cytokine gene loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R M; Saouaf, S J; Wells, A D

    2007-10-01

    Anergy is an important mechanism of peripheral tolerance in which T cells lose the capacity to produce proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFNgamma). To determine whether the induction of T-cell anergy in vivo is associated with epigenetic changes that oppose cytokine gene expression, we measured DNA methylation and histone acetylation at the IL2 and IFNgamma loci in CD4+ T cells from mice tolerant to a viral superantigen. Tolerant T cells exhibited more DNA methylation and less histone acetylation at the regulatory regions of the IL2 and IFNgamma genes than effector T cells, which are able to produce IL-2 and IFNgamma. These data show that T-cell anergy in this model is associated with epigenetic modifications that oppose gene expression, and suggest that these mechanisms may be important in the maintenance of tolerance. PMID:17671507

  18. NK cell survival mediated through the regulatory synapse with human DCs requires IL-15Rα

    OpenAIRE

    Brilot, Fabienne; Strowig, Till; Roberts, Susanne M.; Arrey, Frida; Münz, Christian

    2007-01-01

    DCs activate NK cells during innate immune responses to viral infections. However, the composition and kinetics of the immunological synapse mediating this interaction are largely unknown. Here, we report the rapid formation of an immunological synapse between human resting NK cells and mature DCs. Although inhibitory NK cell receptors were polarized to this synapse, where they are known to protect mature DCs from NK cell lysis, the NK cell also received activation signals that induced mobili...

  19. Lis1 mediates planar polarity of auditory hair cells through regulation of microtubule organization

    OpenAIRE

    Sipe, Conor W.; Liu, Lixia; Lee, Jianyi; Grimsley-Myers, Cynthia; Lu, Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    The V-shaped hair bundles atop auditory hair cells and their uniform orientation are manifestations of epithelial planar cell polarity (PCP) required for proper perception of sound. PCP is regulated at the tissue level by a conserved core Wnt/PCP pathway. However, the hair cell-intrinsic polarity machinery is poorly understood. Recent findings implicate hair cell microtubules in planar polarization of hair cells. To elucidate the microtubule-mediated polarity pathway, we analyzed Lis1 functio...

  20. Tolerating Zero Tolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian N.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of zero tolerance dates back to the mid-1990s when New Jersey was creating laws to address nuisance crimes in communities. The main goal of these neighborhood crime policies was to have zero tolerance for petty crime such as graffiti or littering so as to keep more serious crimes from occurring. Next came the war on drugs. In federal…

  1. Hygromycin B-induced cell death is partly mediated by reactive oxygen species in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oung, Hui-Min; Lin, Ke-Chun; Wu, Tsung-Meng; Chandrika, Nulu Naga Prafulla; Hong, Chwan-Yang

    2015-12-01

    The aminoglycoside antibiotic hygromycin B (Hyg) inhibits prokaryotic, chloroplast and mitochondrial protein synthesis. Because of the toxic effect of Hyg on plant cells, the HPT gene, encoding hygromycin phosphotransferase, has become one of the most widely used selectable markers in plant transformation. Yet the mechanism behind Hyg-induced cell lethality in plants is not clearly understood. In this study, we aimed to decipher this mechanism. With Hyg treatment, rice calli exhibited cell death, and rice seedlings showed severe growth defects, leaf chlorosis and leaf shrinkage. Rice seedlings also exhibited severe lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation, for oxidative stress damage at the cellular level. The production of reactive oxygen species such as O2(·-), H2O2 and OH(·) was greatly induced in rice seedlings under Hyg stress, and pre-treatment with ascorbate increased resistance to Hyg-induced toxicity indicating the existence of oxidative stress. Overexpression of mitochondrial Alternative oxidase1a gene without HPT selection marker in rice enhanced tolerance to Hyg and attenuated the degradation of protein content, whereas the rice plastidial glutathione reductase 3 mutant showed increased sensitivity to Hyg. These results demonstrate that Hyg-induced cell lethality in rice is not only due to the inhibition of protein synthesis but also mediated by oxidative stress.

  2. Childhood adversity and cell-mediated immunity in young adulthood: Does type and timing matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Slopen, Natalie; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Erin C Dunn; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood adversity can have powerful effects on health over the life course. Persistent changes in cell-mediated immune function may be one pathway linking adverse childhood experiences with later disease risk. However, limited research has examined childhood adversity in relation to cell-mediated immune function, and in particular, immune response to latent viruses in adulthood. The present study investigated the association of two types of childhood adversity, socioeconomic disadvantage du...

  3. Autophagic Cell Death and Apoptosis Jointly Mediate Cisatracurium Besylate-Induced Cell Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixia Zhuang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cisatracurium besylate is an ideal non-depolarizing muscle relaxant which is widely used in clinical application. However, some studies have suggested that cisatracurium besylate can affect cell proliferation. Moreover, its specific mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we found that the number of GFP-LC3 (green fluoresent protein-light chain 3 positive autophagosomes and the rate of mitochondria fracture both increased significantly in drug-treated GFP-LC3 and MitoDsRed stable HeLa cells. Moreover, cisatracurium promoted the co-localization of LC3 and mitochondria and induced formation of autolysosomes. Levels of mitochondrial proteins decreased, which were reversed by the lysosome inhibitor Bafinomycin A1. Similar results with evidence of dose-dependent effects were found in both HeLa and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs. Cisatracurium lowered HUVEC viability to 0.16 (OD490 at 100 µM and to 0.05 (OD490 after 48 h in vitro; it increased the cell death rate to 56% at 100 µM and to 60% after 24 h in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (p < 0.01. Cell proliferation decreased significantly by four fold in Atg5 WT (wildtype MEF (mouse embryonic fibroblast (p < 0.01 but was unaffected in Atg5 KO (Knockout MEF, even upon treatment with a high dose of cisatracurium. Cisatracurium induced significant increase in cell death of wild-type MEFs even in the presence of the apoptosis inhibitor zVAD. Thus, we conclude that activation of both the autophagic cell death and cell apoptosis pathways contributes to cisatracurium-mediated cell injury.

  4. Thymoquinone inhibits autophagy and induces cathepsin-mediated, caspase-independent cell death in glioblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira O Racoma

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most aggressive and common type of malignant brain tumor in humans, with a median survival of 15 months. There is a great need for more therapies for the treatment of glioblastoma. Naturally occurring phytochemicals have received much scientific attention because many exhibit potent tumor killing action. Thymoquinone (TQ is the bioactive compound of the Nigella sativa seed oil. TQ has anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic actions with selective cytotoxicity for human cancer cells compared to normal cells. Here, we show that TQ selectively inhibits the clonogenicity of glioblastoma cells as compared to normal human astrocytes. Also, glioblastoma cell proliferation could be impaired by chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, suggesting that glioblastoma cells may be dependent on the autophagic pathway for survival. Exposure to TQ caused an increase in the recruitment and accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II (LC3-II. TQ also caused an accumulation of the LC3-associated protein p62, confirming the inhibition of autophagy. Furthermore, the levels of Beclin-1 protein expression were unchanged, indicating that TQ interferes with a later stage of autophagy. Finally, treatment with TQ induces lysosome membrane permeabilization, as determined by a specific loss of red acridine orange staining. Lysosome membrane permeabilization resulted in a leakage of cathepsin B into the cytosol, which mediates caspase-independent cell death that can be prevented by pre-treatment with a cathepsin B inhibitor. TQ induced apoptosis, as determined by an increase in PI and Annexin V positive cells. However, apoptosis appears to be caspase-independent due to failure of the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-FMK to prevent cell death and absence of the typical apoptosis related signature DNA fragmentation. Inhibition of autophagy is an exciting and emerging strategy in cancer therapy. In this vein, our results describe a

  5. Adenovirus-mediated transfection with glucose transporter 3 suppresses PC12 cell apoptosis following ischemic injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junliang Li; Xinke Xu; Shanyi Zhang; Meiguang Zheng; Zhonghua Wu; Yinlun Weng; Leping Ouyang; Jian Yu; Fangcheng Li

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of adenovirus-mediated transfection of PC12 cells with glucose transporter 3 after ischemic injury. The results of flow cytometry and TUNEL showed that exogenous glucose transporter 3 significantly suppressed PC12 cell apoptosis induced by ischemic injury. The results of isotopic scintiscan and western blot assays showed that, the glucose uptake rate was significantly increased and nuclear factor kappaB expression was significantly decreased after adenovirus-mediated transfection of ischemic PC12 cells with glucose transporter 3. These results suggest that adenovirus-mediated transfection of cells with glucose transporter 3 elevates the energy metabolism of PC12 cells with ischemic injury, and inhibits cell apoptosis.

  6. Performance, methanol tolerance and stability of Fe-aminobenzimidazole derived catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián, David; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Aricò, Antonino S.; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2016-07-01

    Highly active and durable non-platinum group metals (non-PGM) catalyst based on iron-nitrogen-carbon (Fe-N-C) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) derived from pyrolyzed Fe-aminobenzimidazole (Fe-ABZIM) was synthesized by sacrificial support method (SSM), and characterized by several physical-chemical techniques: scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In half-cell electrochemical configuration, the Fe-ABZIM catalyst presented a significant improvement of ORR activity with respect to a recently reported non-PGM formulation based on Fe-aminoantipyrine, with an enhancement of half-wave potential of about 85 mV in O2-saturated sulfuric acid solution. To the moment, the gap with respect to a benchmark Pt/C catalyst was about 90 mV. The Fe-ABZIM catalyst showed a remarkably high tolerance to methanol, resulting in superior ORR performance compared to Pt/C at methanol concentrations higher than 0.02 M. In direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) good performances were also obtained. A durability test (100 h) at 90 °C, feeding 5 M methanol, was carried out. A certain decrease of performance was recorded, amounting to -0.20 mW cm-2 h-1 at the very beginning of test and -0.05 mW cm-2 h-1 at the end. However, the Fe-ABZIM is more adequate than previously reported formulations in terms of both ORR activity and stability.

  7. Enhanced Methanol Tolerance of Highly Pd rich Pd-Pt Cathode Electrocatalysts in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methanol crossover critically restricts the practical application of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). To resolve this crucial difficulty from the standpoint of electrocatalysis, an electrode material having high activity for the oxygen reduction reaction and low activity for the methanol oxidation reaction compared to widely used Pt-based electrodes is needed for DMFC cathodes. In this research carbon-supported Pd-rich Pd–Pt bimetallic nanoparticle electrocatalysts with 60 wt.% metal content were prepared for this purpose by sodium borohydride reduction of metal chlorides. The physical features of the prepared nanoparticles were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy. Methanol tolerance was tested by means of rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry using oxygen-saturated methanol-containing electrolyte solutions as the anode fuel for DMFC unit cell performance tests. In the RDE measurements, Pd-rich electrocatalysts (carbon-supported Pd19Pt1 nanoparticles) showed excellent methanol tolerance compared with Pd-free Pt electrocatalyst. When Pd19Pt1 nanoparticles were used as a DMFC cathode catalyst, unit cell performance tests showed that the i-V curves of the Pd19Pt1 electrocatalyst decreased slightly with increasing methanol concentration, while that of the Pt electrocatalyst decreased rapidly. The results in a liquid-feed DMFC unit cell test were in good agreement with the methanol tolerant characteristics identified in the RDE measurements

  8. A miniature glucose/O{sub 2} biofuel cell with a high tolerance against ascorbic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.; Zhang, L. [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Graduate School of CAS, Beijing (China); Su, L. [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Ohsaka, T. [Department of Electronic Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Midori-ku, Yokohama (Japan); Mao, L.

    2009-02-15

    This study demonstrates a miniature glucose/O{sub 2} biofuel cell (BFC) with a high tolerance against physiological level of ascorbic acid (AA) by immobilising ascorbate oxidase (AAox) on both the bioanode and the biocathode. Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-modified carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) are employed as the substrate electrode for the bioanode and biocathode. Glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and bilirubin oxidase (BOD) are used as the biocatalysts for the electro-oxidation of glucose and for the electro-reduction of oxygen, respectively. SWNTs are used as the support for the both, stably confining the electrocatalyst (i.e. polymerised methylene blue, polyMB) for the oxidation of NADH co-factor for GDH and efficiently facilitating direct electrochemistry of the cathodic biocatalyst (i.e. BOD) for O{sub 2} reduction. The prepared micro-sized GDH-based bioanode and BOD-based biocathode employed for the bioelectrocatalytic oxidation of glucose and reduction of oxygen, respectively, are further over-coated with AAox to give a miniature glucose/O{sub 2} BFC with a high tolerance against AA. The maximum power density and the open circuit voltage (OCV) of the assembled glucose/O{sub 2} BFC are 52 {mu}W cm{sup -2} and 0.60 V, respectively. These values remain unchanged with the presence of AA in solution. In the human serum containing 10 mM NAD{sup +} and under ambient air, the maximum power density and the OCV of the assembled glucose/O{sub 2} BFC with AAox immobilisation on both the bioanode and the biocathode are 35 {mu}W cm{sup -2} and 0.39 V, respectively. These values are remarkably larger than those of the glucose/O{sub 2} BFC without AAox immobilisation on both the bioanode and the biocathode. This study could offer a new route to the development of enzymatic BFCs with promising application in real biological systems. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. UV laser mediated cell selective destruction by confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giangrande Angela

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Analysis of cell-cell interactions, cell function and cell lineages greatly benefits selective destruction techniques, which, at present, rely on dedicated, high energy, pulsed lasers and are limited to cells that are detectable by conventional microscopy. We present here a high resolution/sensitivity technique based on confocal microscopy and relying on commonly used UV lasers. Coupling this technique with time-lapse enables the destruction and following of any cell(s in any pattern(s in living animals as well as in cell culture systems.

  10. Numerical Modeling of Microbial Fuel Cell Based on Redox Electron Mediator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nanqi Ren

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the behavior of redox electron mediator and its impact to power generation of microbial fuel cell ( MFC ) , this study carries out the numerical modeling of a typical two⁃chamber MFC based on assumption of interfacial electron transfer via redox electron mediator and acetate as sole electron donor. The model simulates the development of cell voltage, current, substrate concentration, redox electron mediator concentration, polarization and power density output under defined conditions. The results demonstrate that the developed models can fit the experimental results well on a qualitative basis, and concentration of electron reduced mediator plays a dominant role in electron transfer process, and the mass transfer may constitute the limiting step when its concentration is at a relatively low level. This study not only provides a better understanding of electron redox mediator behavior during power generation, but also suggests a strategy to improve electron transfer in the anode of MFC.

  11. Separation of effector cells mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADC) to erythrocyte targets from those mediating ADC to tumor targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, S B; Nelson, K; Grausz, J D

    1976-04-01

    Murine spleen cells mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADC) both to erythrocyte targets in a 51Cr release assay and to syngeneic tumor targets in a microcytotoxicity assay. The effector cells active in the two ADC assays can be separated by passage of the spleen cells through columns of Sephadex G-10 at 37 degrees C. Cells mediating ADC to sarcoma cells did not adhere to the G-10 and were recovered in the column effluent. These nonadherent cells were not cytotoxic to antibody-coated chicken red blood cells. Spleen cells which mediated ADC in a 51Cr release assay to the red cell targets adhered to G-10. Adherent effector cells could subsequently be recovered from the columns by elution with 5 X 10(-4) M EDTA. PMID:815438

  12. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Eucalyptus globulus using explants with shoot apex with introduction of bacterial choline oxidase gene to enhance salt tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Etsuko; Nanto, Kazuya; Oishi, Masatoshi; Ebinuma, Hiroyasu; Morishita, Yoshihiko; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shibata, Daisuke; Shimada, Teruhisa

    2012-01-01

    Eucalyptus globulus is one of the most economically important plantation hardwoods for paper making. However, its low transformation frequency has prevented genetic engineering of this species with useful genes. We found the hypocotyl section with a shoot apex has the highest regeneration ability among another hypocotyl sections, and have developed an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method using these materials. We then introduced a salt tolerance gene, namely a bacterial choline oxidase gene (codA) with a GUS reporter gene, into E. globulus. The highest frequency of transgenic shoot regeneration from hypocotyls with shoot apex was 7.4% and the average frequency in four experiments was 4.0%, 12-fold higher than that from hypocotyls without shoot apex. Using about 10,000 explants, over 250 regenerated buds were confirmed as transformants by GUS analysis. Southern blot analysis of 100 elongated shoots confirmed successful generation of stable transformants. Accumulation of glycinebetaine was investigated in 44 selected transgenic lines, which showed 1- to 12-fold higher glycinebetaine levels than non-transgenic controls. Rooting of 16 transgenic lines was successful using a photoautotrophic method under enrichment with 1,000 ppm CO(2). The transgenic whole plantlets were transplanted into potting soil and grown normally in a growth room. They showed salt tolerance to 300 mM NaCl. The points of our system are using explants with shoot apex as materials, inhibiting the elongation of the apex on the selection medium, and regenerating transgenic buds from the side opposite to the apex. This approach may also solve transformation problems in other important plants.

  13. Analysis of APC types involved in CD4 tolerance and regulatory T cell generation using reaggregated thymic organ cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerri, Lucia; Peguillet, Isabelle; Geraldo, Yvette; Nabti, Sabrina; Premel, Virginie; Lantz, Olivier

    2013-03-01

    Tolerance to self-Ags is generated in the thymus. Both epithelial and hematopoietic thymic stromal cells play an active and essential role in this process. However, the role of each of the various stromal cell types remains unresolved. To our knowledge, we describe the first comparative analysis of several types of thymic hematopoietic stromal cells (THSCs) for their ability to induce CD4 tolerance to self, in parallel with the thymic epithelium. The THSCs--two types of conventional dendritic cells (cDCs), plasmacytoid dendritic cells, macrophages (MΦs), B lymphocytes, and eosinophils--were first characterized and quantified in adult mouse thymus. They were then examined in reaggregated thymic organ cultures containing mixtures of monoclonal and polyclonal thymocytes. This thymocyte mixture allows for the analysis of Ag-specific events while avoiding the extreme skewing frequently seen in purely monoclonal systems. Our data indicate that thymic epithelium alone is capable of promoting self-tolerance by eliminating autoreactive CD4 single-positive thymocytes and by supporting regulatory T cell (Treg) development. We also show that both non-Treg CD4 single-positive thymocytes and Tregs are efficiently deleted by the two populations of cDCs present in the thymus, as well as to a lesser extent by MΦs. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells, B lymphocytes, and eosinophils were not able to do so. Finally, cDCs were also the most efficient THSCs at supporting Treg development in the thymus, suggesting that although they may share some characteristics required for negative selection with MΦs, they do not share those required for the support of Treg development, making cDCs a unique cell subset in the thymus. PMID:23365074

  14. Antigen-specific regulatory T-cell subsets in transplantation tolerance regulatory T-cell subset quality reduces the need for quantity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenen, H.J.P.M.; Joosten, I.

    2006-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are critical controllers of the immune response. Disturbed Treg function results in autoimmunity, whereas in transplantation Treg are crucial in graft survival and transplant tolerance. Hence therapeutic modalities that influence Treg numbers or function hold great clinical

  15. T Cell-Mediated Modulation of Mast Cell Function: Heterotypic Adhesion-Induced Stimulatory or Inhibitory Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoseph A. Mekori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Close physical proximity between mast cells and T cells has been demonstrated in several T cell mediated inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis and sarcoidosis. However, the way by which mast cells are activated in these T cell-mediated immune responses has not been fully elucidated. We have identified and characterized a novel mast cell activation pathway initiated by physical contact with activated T cells, and showed that this pathway is associated with degranulation and cytokine release. The signaling events associated with this pathway of mast cell activation have also been elucidated confirming the activation of the Ras MAPK systems. More recently, we hypothesized and demonstrated that mast cells may also be activated by microparticles released from activated T cells that are considered as miniature version of a cell. By extension, microparticles might affect the activity of mast cells, which are usually not in direct contact with T cells at the inflammatory site. Recent works have also focused on the effects of regulatory T cells on mast cells. These reports highlighted the importance of the cytokines IL-2 and IL-9, produced by mast cells and T cells, respectively, in obtaining optimal immune suppression. Finally, physical contact, associated by OX40-OX40L engagement has been found to underlie the down-regulatory effects exerted by regulatory T cells on mast cell function.

  16. Chronically Elevated Levels of Short-Chain Fatty Acids Induce T Cell-Mediated Ureteritis and Hydronephrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeongho; Goergen, Craig J; HogenEsch, Harm; Kim, Chang H

    2016-03-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are major products of gut microbial fermentation and profoundly affect host health and disease. SCFAs generate IL-10(+) regulatory T cells, which may promote immune tolerance. However, SCFAs can also induce Th1 and Th17 cells upon immunological challenges and, therefore, also have the potential to induce inflammatory responses. Because of the seemingly paradoxical SCFA activities in regulating T cells, we investigated, in depth, the impact of elevated SCFA levels on T cells and tissue inflammation in mice. Orally administered SCFAs induced effector (Th1 and Th17) and regulatory T cells in ureter and kidney tissues, and they induced T cell-mediated ureteritis, leading to kidney hydronephrosis (hereafter called acetate-induced renal disease, or C2RD). Kidney hydronephrosis in C2RD was caused by ureteral obstruction, which was, in turn, induced by SCFA-induced inflammation in the ureteropelvic junction and proximal ureter. Oral administration of all major SCFAs, such as acetate, propionate, and butyrate, induced the disease. We found that C2RD development is dependent on mammalian target of rapamycin activation, T cell-derived inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ and IL-17, and gut microbiota. Young or male animals were more susceptible than old or female animals, respectively. However, SCFA receptor (GPR41 or GPR43) deficiency did not affect C2RD development. Thus, SCFAs, when systemically administered at levels higher than physiological levels, cause dysregulated T cell responses and tissue inflammation in the renal system. The results provide insights into the immunological and pathological effects of chronically elevated SCFAs. PMID:26819206

  17. Extracellular Protein Interactions Mediated by the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule, NCAM: Heterophilic Interactions Between NCAM and Cell Adhesion Molecules, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, and Viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) mediate cell-to-cell interactions and interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), a prototypic member of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily of CAMs, mediates adhesion through homophilic and heterophilic i...

  18. The B-cell receptor orchestrates environment-mediated lymphoma survival and drug resistance in B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shain, K H; Tao, J

    2014-08-01

    Specific niches within the lymphoma tumor microenvironment (TME) provide sanctuary for subpopulations of tumor cells through stromal cell-tumor cell interactions. These interactions notably dictate growth, response to therapy and resistance of residual malignant B cells to therapeutic agents. This minimal residual disease (MRD) remains a major challenge in the treatment of B-cell malignancies and contributes to subsequent disease relapse. B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling has emerged as essential mediator of B-cell homing, survival and environment-mediated drug resistance (EMDR). Central to EMDR are chemokine- and integrin-mediated interactions between lymphoma and the TME. Further, stromal cell-B cell adhesion confers a sustained BCR signaling leading to chemokine and integrin activation. Recently, the inhibitors of BCR signaling have garnered a substantial clinical interest because of their effectiveness in B-cell disorders. The efficacy of these agents is, at least in part, attributed to attenuation of BCR-dependent lymphoma-TME interactions. In this review, we discuss the pivotal role of BCR signaling in the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of TME-mediated lymphoma survival and drug resistance. PMID:24037527

  19. T cell-mediated modulation of mast cell function: heterotypic adhesion-induced stimulatory or inhibitory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekori, Yoseph A; Hershko, Alon Y

    2012-01-01

    Close physical proximity between mast cells and T cells has been demonstrated in several T cell mediated inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis and sarcoidosis. However, the way by which mast cells are activated in these T cell-mediated immune responses has not been fully elucidated. We have identified and characterized a novel mast cell activation pathway initiated by physical contact with activated T cells, and showed that this pathway is associated with degranulation and cytokine release. The signaling events associated with this pathway of mast cell activation have also been elucidated confirming the activation of the Ras mitogen-activated protein kinase systems. More recently, we hypothesized and demonstrated that mast cells may also be activated by microparticles released from activated T cells that are considered as miniature version of a cell. By extension, microparticles might affect the activity of mast cells, which are usually not in direct contact with T cells at the inflammatory site. Recent works have also focused on the effects of regulatory T cells (Treg) on mast cells. These reports highlighted the importance of the cytokines IL-2 and IL-9, produced by mast cells and T cells, respectively, in obtaining optimal immune suppression. Finally, physical contact, associated by OX40-OX40L engagement has been found to underlie the down-regulatory effects exerted by Treg on mast cell function. PMID:22566892

  20. Phenotype and function of regulatory T cells in Th1- and Th2-mediated inflammatory diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Nowakowska, Dominika Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are critical to the maintenance of immune tolerance, partly by controlling the unwanted activation of effector T cells (Teff) and thereby enhancing the resolution of autoimmune and allergic inflammation. Recent data suggest that Treg can specialize to better control different types of inflammation by using transcriptional machinery which controls differentiation and function of Teff. This thesis addresses questions related to the efficacious use of Tre...

  1. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 Mediates Human Embryonic Germ Cell Derivation

    OpenAIRE

    Hiller, Marc; Liu, Cyndi; Blumenthal, Paul D; John D Gearhart; Kerr, Candace L.

    2010-01-01

    Human primordial germ cells (PGCs) have proven to be a source of pluripotent stem cells called embryonic germ cells (EGCs). Unlike embryonic stem cells, virtually little is known regarding the factors that regulate EGC survival and maintenance. In mice, the growth factor bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) has been shown to be required for maintaining mouse embryonic stem cells, and disruptions in this gene lead to defects in mouse PGC specification. Here, we sought to determine whether recom...

  2. Tolerance Induction in Liver

    OpenAIRE

    M.H Karimi; Geramizadeh, B; Malek-Hosseini, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Liver is an exclusive anatomical and immunological organ that displays a considerable tolerance effect. Liver allograft acceptance is shown to occur spontaneously within different species. Although in human transplant patients tolerance is rarely seen, the severity level and cellular mechanisms of transplant rejection vary. Non-paranchymal liver cells, including Kupffer cells, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, hepatic stellate cells, and resident dendritic cells may participate in liver tol...

  3. P-selectin-mediated platelet adhesion promotes the metastasis of murine melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Cui-Ling; Wei, Bo; Ye, Jie; Yang, Yang; Li, Bin; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Li, Jiang-Chao; He, Xiao-Dong; Lan, Tian; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Studies have indicated that the aggregation of activated platelets with cancer cells facilitates tumor metastasis; the adhesion molecule P-selectin may be an important mediator of this process, but the detailed mechanism is unclear. In the current study, we established a B16F10 (B16) cell metastatic model in P-selectin knockout (P-sel-/-) mice to determine the effect of P-selectin-mediated platelet adhesion on metastasis. Compared with C57 mice, P-sel-/- mice developed fewer metastatic foci, and cell proliferation within the metastatic tumors was inhibited by P-selectin deficiency. The platelet refusion assay demonstrated that mice with P-sel-/- platelets developed fewer lung metastatic foci (PP-selectin deficiency inhibited the metastasis of B16 cells and that wild-type platelet refusion reversed this inhibition. The P-selectin-mediated interaction between platelets and B16 cells promoted angiogenesis by up-regulating VEGF.

  4. Methylanthraquinone from Hedyotis diffusa WILLD induces Ca(2+)-mediated apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Liu, Ming; Liu, Miao; Li, Jianchun

    2010-02-01

    Methylanthraquinone from Hedyotis diffusa WILLD exhibited potent anticancer activity in many kinds of cancer cells. However, the exact mechanism and signaling pathway involved in methylanthraquinone-induced apoptosis have not been fully elucidated. Therefore, we explored the mechanisms of methylanthraquinone-mediated apoptosis in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. When MCF-7 cells were co-incubated with methylanthraquinone, the percentage of apoptotic cell and S phase of cell cycle was markedly increased. In addition, a rise in intracellular calcium levels, phosphorylation of JNK and activation of calpain were found in MCF-7 cells after exposure to methylanthraquinone. With the methylanthraquinone-mediated reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c was released from mitochondria to cytosol. Moreover, methylanthraquinone strongly induced cleavage of caspase-4, caspase-9 and caspase-7 in MCF-7 cells. These results suggested that methylanthraquinone from Hedyotis diffusa WILLD induced MCF-7 cells apoptosis via Ca(2+)/calpain/caspase-4 pathway. PMID:19686834

  5. UCP2- and non-UCP2-mediated electric current in eukaryotic cells exhibits different properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruihua; MoYung, K C; Zhang, M H; Poon, Karen

    2015-12-01

    Using live eukaryotic cells, including cancer cells, MCF-7 and HCT-116, normal hepatocytes and red blood cells in anode and potassium ferricyanide in cathode of MFC could generate bio-based electric current. Electrons and protons generated from the metabolic reaction in both cytosol and mitochondria contributing to the leaking would mediate the generation of electric current. Both resveratrol (RVT) and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) used to induce proton leak in mitochondria were found to promote electric current production in all cells except red blood cells without mitochondria. Proton leak might be important for electric current production by bringing the charge balance in cells to enhance the further electron leak. The induced electric current by RVT can be blocked by Genipin, an inhibitor of UCP2-mediated proton leak, while that induced by DNP cannot. RVT could reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in cells better than that of DNP. In addition, RVT increased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), while DNP decreased it. Results highly suggested the existence of at least two types of electric current that showed different properties. They included UCP2-mediated and non-UCP2-mediated electric current. UCP2-mediated electric current exhibited higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction effect per unit electric current production than that of non-UCP2-mediated electric current. Higher UCP2-mediated electric current observed in cancer cells might contribute to the mechanism of drug resistence. Correlation could not be established between electric current production with either ROS and MMP without distinguishing the types of electric current.

  6. Ciprofloxacin mediates cancer stem cell phenotypes in lung cancer cells through caveolin-1-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiboonchaiyanan, Preeyaporn Plaimee; Kiratipaiboon, Chayanin; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2016-04-25

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of cancer cells with high aggressive behaviors, have been identified in many types of cancer including lung cancer as one of the key mediators driving cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we have reported for the first time that ciprofloxacin (CIP), a widely used anti-microbial drug, has a potentiating effect on CSC-like features in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. CIP treatment promoted CSC-like phenotypes, including enhanced anchorage-independent growth and spheroid formation. The known lung CSC markers: CD133, CD44, ABCG2 and ALDH1A1 were found to be significantly increased, while the factors involving in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT): Slug and Snail, were depleted. Also, self-renewal transcription factors Oct-4 and Nanog were found to be up-regulated in CIP-treated cells. The treatment of CIP on CSC-rich populations obtained from secondary spheroids resulted in the further increase of CSC markers. In addition, we have proven that the mechanistic insight of the CIP induced stemness is through Caveolin-1 (Cav-1)-dependent mechanism. The specific suppression of Cav-1 by stably transfected Cav-1 shRNA plasmid dramatically reduced the effect of CIP on CSC markers as well as the CIP-induced spheroid formation ability. Cav-1 was shown to activate protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways in CSC-rich population; however, such an effect was rarely found in the main lung cancer cells population. These findings reveal a novel effect of CIP in positively regulating CSCs in lung cancer cells via the activation of Cav-1, Akt and ERK, and may provoke the awareness of appropriate therapeutic strategy in cancer patients.

  7. Listeria monocytogenes alters mast cell phenotype, mediator and osteopontin secretion in a listeriolysin-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Jobbings

    Full Text Available Whilst mast cells participate in the immune defence against the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, there is conflicting evidence regarding the ability of L. monocytogenes to infect mast cells. It is known that the pore-forming toxin listeriolysin (LLO is important for mast cell activation, degranulation and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mast cells, however, are a potential source of a wide range of cytokines, chemokines and other mediators including osteopontin, which contributes to the clearing of L. monocytogenes infections in vivo, although its source is unknown. We therefore aimed to resolve the controversy of mast cell infection by L. monocytogenes and investigated the extent of mediator release in response to the bacterium. In this paper we show that the infection of bone marrow-derived mast cells by L. monocytogenes is inefficient and LLO-independent. LLO, however, is required for calcium-independent mast cell degranulation as well as for the transient and selective downregulation of cell surface CD117 (c-kit on mast cells. We demonstrate that in addition to the key pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6, mast cells release a wide range of other mediators in response to L. monocytogenes. Osteopontin, IL-2, IL-4, IL-13 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, and chemokines including CCL2, CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5 are released in a MyD88-dependent manner. The wide range of mediators released by mast cells in response to L. monocytogenes may play an important role in the recruitment and activation of a variety of immune cells in vivo. The cocktail of mediators, however, is unlikely to skew the immune response to a particular effector response. We propose that mast cells provide a hitherto unreported source of osteopontin, and may provide an important role in co-ordinating the immune response during Listeria infection.

  8. Antagonism of airway tolerance by endotoxin/lipopolysaccharide through promoting OX40L and suppressing antigen-specific Foxp3+ T regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wei; So, Takanori; Croft, Michael

    2008-12-15

    Respiratory exposure to allergens can lead to airway tolerance. Factors that antagonize tolerance mechanisms in the lung might result in susceptibility to diseases such as asthma. We show that inhalation of endotoxin/LPS with Ag prevented airway tolerance and abolished protection from T cell-driven asthmatic lung inflammation. Under conditions leading to tolerance, adaptive Ag-specific CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells (Treg) were generated following exposure to intranasal Ag and outnumbered IL-4- and IFN-gamma-producing CD4 T cells by 100:1 or greater. Inhaled LPS altered the ratio of Treg to IL-4(+) or IFN-gamma(+) T cells by concomitantly suppressing Treg generation and promoting effector T cell generation. LPS induced OX40L expression on dendritic cells and B cells that resulted in a synergistic activity between TLR4 and OX40 signals, leading to production of IL-4, IFN-gamma, and IL-6, which blocked Treg development. Furthermore, inhibiting OX40/OX40L interactions prevented LPS from suppressing tolerance, and resulted in the generation of greater numbers of adaptive Treg. Thus, cooperation between TLR4 and OX40 controls susceptibility to developing airway disease via modulating the balance between adaptive Treg and IL-4(+) or IFN-gamma(+) T cells. Targeting OX40L then has the potential to improve the efficacy of Ag immunotherapy to promote tolerance. PMID:19050285

  9. Identification and functional expression of the pepper RING type E3 ligase, CaDTR1, involved in drought stress tolerance via ABA-mediated signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Hyunhee; Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Sung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Drought negatively affects plant growth and development, thereby leading to loss of crop productivity. Several plant E3 ubiquitin ligases act as positive or negative regulators of abscisic acid (ABA) and thus play important roles in the drought stress response. Here, we show that the C3HC4-type RING finger E3 ligase, CaDTR1, regulates the drought stress response via ABA-mediated signalling. CaDTR1 contains an amino-terminal RING finger motif and two carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic regions; the RING finger motif functions during attachment of ubiquitins to the target proteins, and the carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic regions function during subcellular localisation. The expression of CaDTR1 was induced by ABA, drought, and NaCl treatments. CaDTR1 localised in the nucleus and displayed in vitro E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. CaDTR1-silenced pepper plants exhibited a drought-sensitive phenotype characterised by high levels of transpirational water loss. On the other hand, CaDTR1-overexpressing (OX) Arabidopsis plants exhibited an ABA-hypersensitive phenotype during the germinative and post-germinative growth stages. Moreover, in contrast to CaDTR1-silenced pepper plants, CaDTR1-OX plants exhibited a drought-tolerant phenotype characterised by low levels of transpirational water loss via increased stomatal closure and high leaf temperatures. Our data indicate that CaDTR1 functions as a positive regulator of the drought stress response via ABA-mediated signalling. PMID:27439598

  10. Phorbol ester modulation of integrin-mediated cell adhesion: a postreceptor event

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) suspension culture cells adhere readily to substrata coated with extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin, vitronectin, or laminin. In the case of fibronectin, it is known that adhesion is mediated by an integrin-type, cell surface fibronectin receptor (FnR). We demonstrate here that treatment of CHO cells with submicromolar concentrations of phorbol ester produces a remarkable increase in the ability of these cells to adhere to fibronectin. Both the rate ...

  11. Specific Btk inhibition suppresses B cell- and myeloid cell-mediated arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Paolo, Julie A.; Huang, Tao; Balazs, Mercedesz; Barbosa, James; Barck, Kai H.; Bravo, Brandon J.; Carano, Richard A.D.; Darrow, James; Davies, Douglas R.; DeForge, Laura E.; Diehl, Lauri; Ferrando, Ronald; Gallion, Steven L.; Giannetti, Anthony M.; Gribling, Peter; Hurez, Vincent; Hymowitz, Sarah G.; Jones, Randall; Kropf, Jeffrey E.; Lee, Wyne P.; Maciejewski, Patricia M.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Rong, Hong; Staker, Bart L.; Whitney, J. Andrew; Yeh, Sherry; Young, Wendy B.; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Juan; Reif, Karin; Currie, Kevin S. (CGI); (Emerald); (Genentech)

    2011-09-20

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Btk mediates inflammation are poorly understood. Here we describe the discovery of CGI1746, a small-molecule Btk inhibitor chemotype with a new binding mode that stabilizes an inactive nonphosphorylated enzyme conformation. CGI1746 has exquisite selectivity for Btk and inhibits both auto- and transphosphorylation steps necessary for enzyme activation. Using CGI1746, we demonstrate that Btk regulates inflammatory arthritis by two distinct mechanisms. CGI1746 blocks B cell receptor-dependent B cell proliferation and in prophylactic regimens reduces autoantibody levels in collagen-induced arthritis. In macrophages, Btk inhibition abolishes Fc{gamma}RIII-induced TNF{alpha}, IL-1{beta} and IL-6 production. Accordingly, in myeloid- and Fc{gamma}R-dependent autoantibody-induced arthritis, CGI1746 decreases cytokine levels within joints and ameliorates disease. These results provide new understanding of the function of Btk in both B cell- or myeloid cell-driven disease processes and provide a compelling rationale for targeting Btk in rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. The location of aluminium in protoplasts and suspension cells taken from Coffea arabica L. with different tolerance of Al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Benítez, J Efraín; Hernández-Sotomayor, S M Teresa; Muñoz-Sánchez, J Armando

    2009-11-01

    Biotechnological advances in coffee research (in vitro manipulation, multiplication, generation and development of transgenic coffee plants with specific traits like high yield and good quality) have contributed to description of the metabolic pathways involved in the response mechanisms to environmental factors like abiotic stress. Coffea arabica L. plants grow in acidic soils, and therefore aluminium (Al) toxicity is a major negative impact on crop productivity. To understand Al toxicity mechanisms in cells via the Al absorption kinetic, we isolated protoplasts from two C. arabica L. suspension cell lines: Al-sensitive (L2) and Al-tolerant (LAMt). Protoplasts of LAMt line exhibited lower Al absorption levels than protoplasts of the L2 line. Use of two fluorescent tracers (morin and calcofluor white) indicated that Al interacts with internal cell structures, such as the plasma membrane and nucleus, with differences in both cell lines. Al-tolerance in the LAMt is probably associated with the cell wall as well as intracellular structures. These data will help to better understand Al toxicity in C. arabica, and Al toxicity mechanisms in plant cells.

  13. HipA-triggered growth arrest and β-lactam tolerance in Escherichia coli are mediated by RelA-dependent ppGpp synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokinsky, Gregory; Baidoo, Edward E K; Akella, Swetha; Burd, Helcio; Weaver, Daniel; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; García-Martín, Héctor; Lee, Taek Soon; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-07-01

    Persistence is a phenomenon whereby a subpopulation of bacterial cells enters a transient growth-arrested state that confers antibiotic tolerance. While entrance into persistence has been linked to the activities of toxin proteins, the molecular mechanisms by which toxins induce growth arrest and the persistent state remain unclear. Here, we show that overexpression of the protein kinase HipA in Escherichia coli triggers growth arrest by activating synthesis of the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) by the enzyme RelA, a signal typically associated with amino acid starvation. We further demonstrate that chemically suppressing ppGpp synthesis with chloramphenicol relieves inhibition of DNA replication initiation and RNA synthesis in HipA-arrested cells and restores vulnerability to β-lactam antibiotics. HipA-arrested cells maintain glucose uptake and oxygen consumption and accumulate amino acids as a consequence of translational inhibition. We harness the active metabolism of HipA-arrested cells to provide a bacteriophage-resistant platform for the production of biotechnologically relevant compounds, which may represent an innovative solution to the costly problem of phage contamination in industrial fermentations.

  14. Atherosclerosis: a chronic inflammatory disease mediated by mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Pio; Shaik-Dasthagirisaeb, Yazdami

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a process that plays an important role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and immune disease, involving multiple cell types, including macrophages, T-lymphocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mast cells. The fundamental damage of atherosclerosis is the atheromatous or fibro-fatty plaque which is a lesion that causes several diseases. In atherosclerosis the innate immune response, which involves macrophages, is initiated by the arterial endothelial cells which respond to modified lipoproteins and lead to Th1 cell subset activation and generation of inflammatory cytokines and chemoattractant chemokines. Other immune cells, such as CD4+ T inflammatory cells, which play a critical role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, and regulatory T cells [Treg], which have a protective effect on the development of atherosclerosis are involved. Considerable evidence indicates that mast cells and their products play a key role in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Activated mast cells can have detrimental effects, provoking matrix degradation, apoptosis, and enhancement as well as recruitment of inflammatory cells, which actively contributes to atherosclerosis and plaque formation. Here we discuss the relationship between atherosclerosis, inflammation and mast cells. PMID:26648785

  15. "Infectious" Transplantation Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shixin; Cobbold, Stephen P.; Pope, Heather; Elliott, James; Kioussis, Dimitris; Davies, Joanna; Waldmann, Herman

    1993-02-01

    The maintenance of transplantation tolerance induced in adult mice after short-term treatment with nonlytic monoclonal antibodies to CD4 and CD8 was investigated. CD4^+ T cells from tolerant mice disabled naive lymphocytes so that they too could not reject the graft. The naive lymphocytes that had been so disabled also became tolerant and, in turn, developed the capacity to specifically disable other naive lymphocytes. This process of "infectious" tolerance explains why no further immunosuppression was needed to maintain long-term transplantation tolerance.

  16. TRAIL restores DCA/metformin-mediated cell death in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang Soon; An, Sungkwan; Kim, Hyun-Ah; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Song, Jie-Young; Lee, Jin Kyung; Hong, Jungil; Kim, Jong-Il; Noh, Woo Chul; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Park, In-Chul

    2016-09-23

    Previous studies have shown that hypoxia can reverse DCA/metformin-induced cell death in breast cancer cells. Therefore, targeting hypoxia is necessary for therapies targeting cancer metabolism. In the present study, we found that TRAIL can overcome the effect of hypoxia on the cell death induced by treatment of DCA and metformin in breast cancer cells. Unexpectedly, DR5 is upregulated in the cells treated with DCA/metformin, and sustained under hypoxia. Blocking DR5 by siRNA inhibited DCA/metformin/TRAIL-induced cell death, indicating that DR5 upregulation plays an important role in sensitizing cancer cells to TRAIL-induced cell death. Furthermore, we found that activation of JNK and c-Jun is responsible for upregulation of DR5 induced by DCA/metformin. These findings support the potential application of combining TRAIL and metabolism-targeting drugs in the treatment of cancers under hypoxia. PMID:27569287

  17. A role for plasma cell targeting agents in immune tolerance induction in autoimmune disease and antibody responses to therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, A S; Pariser, A R; Diamond, B; Yao, L; Turka, L A; Lacana, E; Kishnani, P S

    2016-04-01

    Antibody responses to life saving therapeutic protein products, such as enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) in the setting of lysosomal storage diseases, have nullified product efficacy and caused clinical deterioration and death despite treatment with immune-suppressive therapies. Moreover, in some autoimmune diseases, pathology is mediated by a robust antibody response to endogenous proteins such as is the case in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, mediated by antibodies to Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF). In this work, we make the case that in such settings, when the antibody response is high titered, sustained, and refractory to immune suppressive treatments, the antibody response is mediated by long-lived plasma cells which are relatively unperturbed by immune suppressants including rituximab. However, long-lived plasma cells can be targeted by proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib. Recent reports of successful reversal of antibody responses with bortezomib in the settings of ERT and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) argue that the safety and efficacy of such plasma cell targeting agents should be evaluated in larger scale clinical trials to delineate the risks and benefits of such therapies in the settings of antibody-mediated adverse effects to therapeutic proteins and autoantibody mediated pathology. PMID:26928739

  18. Atherosclerosis: a chronic inflammatory disease mediated by mast cells

    OpenAIRE

    Conti, Pio; Shaik-Dasthagirisaeb, Yazdami

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a process that plays an important role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and immune disease, involving multiple cell types, including macrophages, T-lymphocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mast cells. The fundamental damage of atherosclerosis is the atheromatous or fibro-fatty plaque which is a lesion that causes several diseases. In atherosclerosis the innate immune response, which involves macrophages, is initiated by the arterial endotheli...

  19. Neuronal inhibition of astroglial cell proliferation is membrane mediated

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Previously we have used a microwell tissue culture assay to show that early postnatal mouse cerebellar astroglia have a flattened morphology and proliferate rapidly when they are cultured in the absence of neurons, but develop specific cell-cell contacts and undergo morphological differentiation when they are co-cultured with purified granule neurons (Hatten, M. E., 1985, J. Cell Biol., 100:384-396). In these studies of cell binding between neurons and astroglia, measurement with light and fl...

  20. The impact of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibition on incretin effect, glucose tolerance, and gastrointestinal-mediated glucose disposal in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhee, Nicolai Alexander; Østoft, Signe Harring; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2014-01-01

    Objective Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4), is thought to intensify the physiological effects of the incretin hormones. We investigated the effects of DPP-4 inhibition on plasma levels of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), the incretin...... effect, glucose tolerance, gastrointestinal-mediated glucose disposal (GIGD) and gastric emptying in healthy subjects. Design Randomised, controlled, open-label. Methods Ten healthy subjects (6 women) (age: 40±5 years (mean±SEM); BMI: 24±3 kg/m2, fasting plasma glucose: 5.1±0.2 mmol/l; HbA1c: 34±1 mmol......±26 mmol/l×min, p=0.7) or peak plasma glucose during OGTT (8.5±0.4 vs 8.1±0.3 mmol/l, p=0.3) was observed. Neither incretin effect (40±9 (without DPP-4 inhibitor) vs 40±7% (with DPP-4 inhibitor), p=1.0), glucagon responses (1,395±165 vs 1,223±195 pmol/l×min, p=0.41), GIGD (52±4 vs 56±5%, p=0.40) nor...

  1. Rice potassium transporter OsHAK1 is essential for maintaining potassium-mediated growth and functions in salt tolerance over low and high potassium concentration ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang; Hu, Qingdi; Luo, Le; Yang, Tianyuan; Zhang, Song; Hu, Yibing; Yu, Ling; Xu, Guohua

    2015-12-01

    Potassium (K) absorption and translocation in plants rely upon multiple K transporters for adapting varied K supply and saline conditions. Here, we report the expression patterns and physiological roles of OsHAK1, a member belonging to the KT/KUP/HAK gene family in rice (Oryza sativa L.). The expression of OsHAK1 is up-regulated by K deficiency or salt stress in various tissues, particularly in the root and shoot apical meristem, the epidermises and steles of root, and vascular bundles of shoot. Both oshak1 knockout mutants in comparison to their respective Dongjin or Manan wild types showed a dramatic reduction in K concentration and stunted root and shoot growth. Knockout of OsHAK1 reduced the K absorption rate of unit root surface area by ∼50-55 and ∼30%, and total K uptake by ∼80 and ∼65% at 0.05-0.1 and 1 mm K supply level, respectively. The root net high-affinity K uptake of oshak1 mutants was sensitive to salt stress but not to ammonium supply. Overexpression of OsHAK1 in rice increased K uptake and K/Na ratio. The positive relationship between K concentration and shoot biomass in the mutants suggests that OsHAK1 plays an essential role in K-mediated rice growth and salt tolerance over low and high K concentration ranges.

  2. Interleukin-33-dependent Innate Lymphoid Cells Mediate Hepatic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mchedlidze, Tamar; Waldner, Maximilian; Zopf, Steffen; Walker, Jennifer; Rankin, Andrew L.; Schuchmann, Marcus; Voehringer, David; McKenzie, Andrew N.J.; Neurath, Markus F.; Pflanz, Stefan; Wirtz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a consequence of chronic liver diseases and thus a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Clinical evidence and animal studies suggest that local tissue homeostasis is disturbed due to immunological responses to chronic hepatocellular stress. Poorly defined stress-associated inflammatory networks are thought to mediate gradual accumulation of extracellular-matrix-components, ultimately leading to fibrosis and liver-failure. Here we have reported that hepatic expression of i...

  3. HaloTag protein-mediated specific labeling of living cells with quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum dots emerge as an attractive alternative to small molecule fluorophores as fluorescent tags for in vivo cell labeling and imaging. This communication presents a method for specific labeling of live cells using quantum dots. The labeling is mediated by HaloTag protein expressed at the cell surface which forms a stable covalent adduct with its ligand (HaloTag ligand). The labeling can be performed in one single step with quantum dot conjugates that are functionalized with HaloTag ligand, or in two steps with biotinylated HaloTag ligand first and followed by streptavidin coated quantum dots. Live cell fluorescence imaging indicates that the labeling is specific and takes place at the cell surface. This HaloTag protein-mediated cell labeling method should facilitate the application of quantum dots for live cell imaging

  4. TRAIL-mediated killing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia by plasmacytoid dendritic cell-activated natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelaidier, Martin; Dìaz-Rodriguez, Yildian; Cordeau, Martine; Cordeiro, Paulo; Haddad, Elie; Herblot, Sabine; Duval, Michel

    2015-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) still frequently recurs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), underscoring the need to improve the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect. Natural killer (NK) cells reconstitute in the first months following HSCT when leukemia burden is at its lowest, but ALL cells have been shown to be resistant to NK cell-mediated killing. We show here that this resistance is overcome by NK cell stimulation with TLR-9-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). NK cell priming with activated pDCs resulted in TRAIL and CD69 up-regulation on NK cells and IFN-γ production. NK cell activation was dependent on IFN-α produced by pDCs, but was not reproduced by IFN-α alone. ALL killing was further enhanced by inhibition of KIR engagement. We showed that ALL lysis was mainly mediated by TRAIL engagement, while the release of cytolytic granules was involved when ALL expressed NK cell activating receptor ligands. Finally, adoptive transfers of activated-pDCs in ALL-bearing humanized mice delayed the leukemia onset and cure 30% of mice. Our data therefore demonstrate that TLR-9 activated pDCs are a powerful tool to overcome ALL resistance to NK cell-mediated killing and to reinforce the GvL effect of HSCT. These results open new therapeutic avenues to prevent relapse in children with ALL.

  5. Role of the retinoblastoma protein in cell cycle arrest mediated by a novel cell surface proliferation inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enebo, D. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Moos, P. J.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A novel cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS-18), purified from the cell surface of bovine cerebral cortex cells has been shown to be a potent and reversible inhibitor of proliferation of a wide array of fibroblasts as well as epithelial-like cells and nontransformed and transformed cells. To investigate the possible mechanisms by which CeReS-18 exerts its inhibitory action, the effect of the inhibitor on the posttranslational regulation of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product (RB), a tumor suppressor gene, has been examined. It is shown that CeReS-18 mediated cell cycle arrest of both human diploid fibroblasts (HSBP) and mouse fibroblasts (Swiss 3T3) results in the maintenance of the RB protein in the hypophosphorylated state, consistent with a late G1 arrest site. Although their normal nontransformed counterparts are sensitive to cell cycle arrest mediated by CeReS-18, cell lines lacking a functional RB protein, through either genetic mutation or DNA tumor virus oncoprotein interaction, are less sensitive. The refractory nature of these cells is shown to be independent of specific surface receptors for the inhibitor, and another tumor suppressor gene (p53) does not appear to be involved in the CeReS-18 inhibition of cell proliferation. The requirement for a functional RB protein product, in order for CeReS-18 to mediate cell cycle arrest, is discussed in light of regulatory events associated with density-dependent growth inhibition.

  6. Bacterial-mediated DNA delivery to tumour associated phagocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, W L; Murphy, C T; Cronin, M; Wirth, T; Tangney, M

    2014-12-28

    Phagocytic cells including macrophages, dendritic cells and neutrophils are now recognised as playing a negative role in many disease settings including cancer. In particular, macrophages are known to play a pathophysiological role in multiple diseases and present a valid and ubiquitous therapeutic target. The technology to target these phagocytic cells in situ, both selectively and efficiently, is required in order to translate novel therapeutic modalities into clinical reality. We present a novel delivery strategy using non-pathogenic bacteria to effect gene delivery specifically to tumour-associated phagocytic cells. Non-invasive bacteria lack the ability to actively enter host cells, except for phagocytic cells. We exploit this natural property to effect 'passive transfection' of tumour-associated phagocytic cells following direct administration of transgene-loaded bacteria to tumour regions. Using an in vitro-differentiated human monocyte cell line and two in vivo mouse models (an ovarian cancer ascites and a solid colon tumour model) proof of delivery is demonstrated with bacteria carrying reporter constructs. The results confirm that the delivery strategy is specific for phagocytic cells and that the bacterial vector itself recruits more phagocytic cells to the tumour. While proof of delivery to phagocytic cells is demonstrated in vivo for solid and ascites tumour models, this strategy may be applied to other settings, including non-cancer related disease. PMID:25466954

  7. Effects of verteporfin-mediated photodynamic therapy on endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Daniel; Chen, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality in which cytotoxic reactive oxygen species are generated from oxygen and other biological molecules when a photosensitizer is activated by light. PDT has been approved for the treatment of cancers and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) due to its effectiveness in cell killing and manageable normal tissue complications. In this study, we characterized the effects of verteporfin-PDT on SVEC mouse endothelial cells and determined its underlying cell death mechanisms. We found that verteporfin was primarily localized in mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in SVEC cells. Light treatment of photosensitized SVEC cells induced a rapid onset of cell apoptosis. In addition to significant structural damages to mitochondria and ER, verteporfin-PDT caused substantial degradation of ER signaling molecules, suggesting ER stress. These results demonstrate that verteporfin-PDT triggered SVEC cell apoptosis by both mitochondrial and ER stress pathways. Results from this study may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to enhance PDT outcome.

  8. Secretory phospholipase A2-mediated neuronal cell death involves glutamate ionotropic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils Henrik; Bazan, Nicolas G;

    2002-01-01

    To define the significance of glutamate ionotropic receptors in sPLA -mediated neuronal cell death we used the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 and the AMPA receptor antagonist PNQX. In primary neuronal cell cultures both MK-801 and PNQX inhibited sPLA - and glutamate-induced neuronal death. [ H]A...

  9. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha in T-cell-mediated immunity to viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas N; Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan P;

    2003-01-01

    The immune response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) was evaluated. Generation of virus-specific effector T cells is unimpaired in MIP-1alpha-deficient mice. Furthermore, MIP-1alpha is not required for T-cell-mediated virus...

  10. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Jones, David R; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2016-08-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1-mediated (PD-1-mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB-based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies.

  11. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Jones, David R; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2016-08-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1-mediated (PD-1-mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB-based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies. PMID:27454297

  12. Aptamer-mediated indirect quantum dot labeling and fluorescent imaging of target proteins in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein labeling for dynamic living cell imaging plays a significant role in basic biological research, as well as in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. We have developed a novel strategy in which the dynamic visualization of proteins within living cells is achieved by using aptamers as mediators for indirect protein labeling of quantum dots (QDs). With this strategy, the target protein angiogenin was successfully labeled with fluorescent QDs in a minor intactness model, which was mediated by the aptamer AL6-B. Subsequent living cell imaging analyses indicated that the QDs nanoprobes were selectively bound to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, gradually internalized into the cytoplasm, and mostly localized in the lysosome organelle, indicating that the labeled protein retained high activity. Compared with traditional direct protein labeling methods, the proposed aptamer-mediated strategy is simple, inexpensive, and provides a highly selective, stable, and intact labeling platform that has shown great promise for future biomedical labeling and intracellular protein dynamic analyses. (paper)

  13. The Biological Effects of IL-21 Signaling on B-Cell-Mediated Responses in Organ Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yongkang; van Besouw, Nicole M.; Shi, Yunying; Hoogduijn, Martin J.; Wang, Lanlan; Baan, Carla C.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has emerged as one of the major issues limiting the success of organ transplantation. It exerts a highly negative impact on graft function and outcome, and effective treatment is lacking. The triggers for antibody development, and the mechanisms leading to graft dysfunction and failure, are incompletely understood. The production of antibodies is dependent on instructions from various immunocytes including CD4 T-helper cells that secrete interleukin (IL)-21 and interact with antigen-specific B-cells via costimulatory molecules. In this article, we discuss the role of IL-21 in the activation and differentiation of B-cells and consider the mechanisms of IL-21 and B-cell interaction. An improved understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in antibody-mediated complications after organ transplantation could lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies, which control humoral alloreactivity, potentially preventing and treating graft-threatening antibody-mediated rejection. PMID:27602031

  14. The Biological Effects of IL-21 Signaling on B-Cell-Mediated Responses in Organ Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yongkang; van Besouw, Nicole M; Shi, Yunying; Hoogduijn, Martin J; Wang, Lanlan; Baan, Carla C

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has emerged as one of the major issues limiting the success of organ transplantation. It exerts a highly negative impact on graft function and outcome, and effective treatment is lacking. The triggers for antibody development, and the mechanisms leading to graft dysfunction and failure, are incompletely understood. The production of antibodies is dependent on instructions from various immunocytes including CD4 T-helper cells that secrete interleukin (IL)-21 and interact with antigen-specific B-cells via costimulatory molecules. In this article, we discuss the role of IL-21 in the activation and differentiation of B-cells and consider the mechanisms of IL-21 and B-cell interaction. An improved understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in antibody-mediated complications after organ transplantation could lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies, which control humoral alloreactivity, potentially preventing and treating graft-threatening antibody-mediated rejection. PMID:27602031

  15. Polycystin-1 promotes PKCα-mediated NF-κB activation in kidney cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycystin-1 (PC1), the PKD1 gene product, is a membrane receptor which regulates many cell functions, including cell proliferation and apoptosis, both typically increased in cyst lining cells in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Here we show that PC1 upregulates the NF-κB signalling pathway in kidney cells to prevent cell death. Human embryonic kidney cell lines (HEK293CTT), stably expressing a PC1 cytoplasmic terminal tail (CTT), presented increased NF-κB nuclear levels and NF-κB-mediated luciferase promoter activity. This, consistently, was reduced in HEK293 cells in which the endogenous PC1 was depleted by RNA interference. CTT-dependent NF-κB promoter activation was mediated by PKCα because it was blocked by its specific inhibitor Ro-320432. Furthermore, it was observed that apoptosis, which was increased in PC1-depleted cells, was reduced in HEK293CTT cells and in porcine kidney LtTA cells expressing a doxycycline-regulated CTT. Staurosporine, a PKC inhibitor, and parthenolide, a NF-κB inhibitor, significantly reduced the CTT-dependent antiapoptotic effect. These data reveal, therefore, a novel pathway by which polycystin-1 activates a PKCα-mediated NF-κB signalling and cell survival

  16. The 3 major types of innate and adaptive cell-mediated effector immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziato, Francesco; Romagnani, Chiara; Romagnani, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    The immune system has tailored its effector functions to optimally respond to distinct species of microbes. Based on emerging knowledge on the different effector T-cell and innate lymphoid cell (ILC) lineages, it is clear that the innate and adaptive immune systems converge into 3 major kinds of cell-mediated effector immunity, which we propose to categorize as type 1, type 2, and type 3. Type 1 immunity consists of T-bet(+) IFN-γ-producing group 1 ILCs (ILC1 and natural killer cells), CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells (TC1), and CD4(+) TH1 cells, which protect against intracellular microbes through activation of mononuclear phagocytes. Type 2 immunity consists of GATA-3(+) ILC2s, TC2 cells, and TH2 cells producing IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, which induce mast cell, basophil, and eosinophil activation, as well as IgE antibody production, thus protecting against helminthes and venoms. Type 3 immunity is mediated by retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt(+) ILC3s, TC17 cells, and TH17 cells producing IL-17, IL-22, or both, which activate mononuclear phagocytes but also recruit neutrophils and induce epithelial antimicrobial responses, thus protecting against extracellular bacteria and fungi. On the other hand, type 1 and 3 immunity mediate autoimmune diseases, whereas type 2 responses can cause allergic diseases. PMID:25528359

  17. Novel mitochondria-targeted heat-soluble proteins identified in the anhydrobiotic Tardigrade improve osmotic tolerance of human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Sae; Tanaka, Junko; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Horikawa, Daiki D; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2015-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration through transition to a metabolically inactive state, called "anhydrobiosis". Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins involved in the desiccation tolerance of many anhydrobiotic organisms. Tardigrades, Ramazzottius varieornatus, however, express predominantly tardigrade-unique heat-soluble proteins: CAHS (Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble) and SAHS (Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble) proteins, which are secreted or localized in most intracellular compartments, except the mitochondria. Although mitochondrial integrity is crucial to ensure cellular survival, protective molecules for mitochondria have remained elusive. Here, we identified two novel mitochondrial heat-soluble proteins, RvLEAM and MAHS (Mitochondrial Abundant Heat Soluble), as potent mitochondrial protectants from Ramazzottius varieornatus. RvLEAM is a group3 LEA protein and immunohistochemistry confirmed its mitochondrial localization in tardigrade cells. MAHS-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized in human mitochondria and was heat-soluble in vitro, though no sequence similarity with other known proteins was found, and one region was conserved among tardigrades. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RvLEAM protein as well as MAHS protein improved the hyperosmotic tolerance of human cells. The findings of the present study revealed that tardigrade mitochondria contain at least two types of heat-soluble proteins that might have protective roles in water-deficient environments. PMID:25675104

  18. Novel mitochondria-targeted heat-soluble proteins identified in the anhydrobiotic Tardigrade improve osmotic tolerance of human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae Tanaka

    Full Text Available Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration through transition to a metabolically inactive state, called "anhydrobiosis". Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA proteins are heat-soluble proteins involved in the desiccation tolerance of many anhydrobiotic organisms. Tardigrades, Ramazzottius varieornatus, however, express predominantly tardigrade-unique heat-soluble proteins: CAHS (Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble and SAHS (Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble proteins, which are secreted or localized in most intracellular compartments, except the mitochondria. Although mitochondrial integrity is crucial to ensure cellular survival, protective molecules for mitochondria have remained elusive. Here, we identified two novel mitochondrial heat-soluble proteins, RvLEAM and MAHS (Mitochondrial Abundant Heat Soluble, as potent mitochondrial protectants from Ramazzottius varieornatus. RvLEAM is a group3 LEA protein and immunohistochemistry confirmed its mitochondrial localization in tardigrade cells. MAHS-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized in human mitochondria and was heat-soluble in vitro, though no sequence similarity with other known proteins was found, and one region was conserved among tardigrades. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RvLEAM protein as well as MAHS protein improved the hyperosmotic tolerance of human cells. The findings of the present study revealed that tardigrade mitochondria contain at least two types of heat-soluble proteins that might have protective roles in water-deficient environments.

  19. Carbon-tolerant solid oxide fuel cells using NiTiO3 as an anode internal reforming layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiquan; Wang, Zhenbin; Yang, Wenqiang; Peng, Ranran; Lu, Yalin

    2014-06-01

    In this work, adding a NiTiO3 (NTO) reforming layer is firstly adopted as a low cost method to improve the carbon tolerance in solid oxide fuel cells. XRD patterns suggest that NTO has a good chemical compatibility with the YSZ electrolyte, and NTO can be totally reduced to Ni and TiO2 when exposing to the H2 atmosphere. Maximum power densities for the cells with the NTO layers at 700 °C are 270 mWcm-2 with wet H2 fuel, and 236 mWcm-2 with wet methane fuel, respectively. Improved discharging stability for the cells with NTO layers has also been observed. The current density remains unchanged for the cells with NTO layers during a 26 h test, while it drops to zero within 1 h for the cells without NTO. Above electro-performance and long term stability tests suggest that fabricating a NTO reforming layer on the anode surface is an efficient and inexpensive method to realize highly carbon tolerant SOFCs.

  20. Glycosylation inhibitors efficiently inhibit P-selectin-mediated cell adhesion to endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Pushpankur; Rajendran, Mythilypriya; Odo, Nadine; Ikuta, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion molecules play a critical role in the adhesive interactions of multiple cell types in sickle cell disease (SCD). We previously showed that anti-P-selectin aptamer efficiently inhibits cell adhesion to endothelial cells (ECs) and permits SCD mice to survive hypoxic stress. In an effort to discover new mechanisms with which to inhibit P-selectin, we examined the role of glycosylation. P-selectin is a 90 kDa protein but was found to migrate as 90 and 140 kDa bands on gel electrophoresis. When P-selectin isolated from ECs was digested with peptide N-glycosidase F, but not O-glycosidase, the 140 kDa band was lost and the 90 kDa band was enhanced. Treatment of ECs with tunicamycin, an N-glycosylation inhibitor, suppressed CD62P (P-selectin) expression on the cell surface as well as the 140 kDa form in the cytoplasm. These results indicate that the 140 kDa band is N-glycosylated and glycosylation is critical for cell surface expression of P-selectin in ECs. Thrombin, which stimulates P-selectin expression on ECs, induced AKT phosphorylation, whereas tunicamycin inhibited AKT phosphorylation, suggesting that AKT signaling is involved in the tunicamycin-mediated inhibition of P-selectin expression. Importantly, the adhesion of sickle red blood cells (sRBCs) and leukocytes to ECs induced by thrombin or hypoxia was markedly inhibited by two structurally distinct glycosylation inhibitors; the levels of which were comparable to that of a P-selectin monoclonal antibody which most strongly inhibited cell adhesion in vivo. Knockdown studies of P-selectin using short-hairpin RNAs in ECs suppressed sRBC adhesion, indicating a legitimate role for P-selectin in sRBC adhesion. Together, these results demonstrate that P-selectin expression on ECs is regulated in part by glycosylation mechanisms and that glycosylation inhibitors efficiently reduce the adhesion of sRBCs and leukocytes to ECs. Glycosylation inhibitors may lead to a novel therapy which inhibits cell adhesion in SCD.

  1. Recipient myeloid-derived immunomodulatory cells induce PD-1 ligand-dependent donor CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cell proliferation and donor-recipient immune tolerance after murine nonmyeloablative bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, Marie; Abdelsamed, Hossam A; Seth, Aman; Ong, Taren; Vogel, Peter; Pillai, Asha B

    2013-12-01

    We showed previously that nonmyeloablative total lymphoid irradiation/rabbit anti-thymocyte serum (TLI/ATS) conditioning facilitates potent donor-recipient immune tolerance following bone marrow transplantation (BMT) across MHC barriers via recipient invariant NKT (iNKT) cell-derived IL-4-dependent expansion of donor Foxp3(+) naturally occurring regulatory T cells (nTregs). In this study, we report a more specific mechanism. Wild-type (WT) BALB/c (H-2(d)) hosts were administered TLI/ATS and BMT from WT or STAT6(-/-) C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) donors. Following STAT6(-/-) BMT, donor nTregs demonstrated no loss of proliferation in vivo, indicating that an IL-4-responsive population in the recipient, rather than the donor, drives donor nTreg proliferation. In graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) target organs, three recipient CD11b(+) cell subsets (Gr-1(high)CD11c(-), Gr-1(int)CD11c(-), and Gr-1(low)CD11c(+)) were enriched early after TLI/ATS + BMT versus total body irradiation/ATS + BMT. Gr-1(low)CD11c(+) cells induced potent H-2K(b+)CD4(+)Foxp3(+) nTreg proliferation in vitro in 72-h MLRs. Gr-1(low)CD11c(+) cells were reduced significantly in STAT6(-/-) and iNKT cell-deficient Jα18(-/-) BALB/c recipients after TLI/ATS + BMT. Depletion of CD11b(+) cells resulted in severe acute GVHD, and adoptive transfer of WT Gr-1(low)CD11c(+) cells to Jα18(-/-) BALB/c recipients of TLI/ATS + BMT restored day-6 donor Foxp3(+) nTreg proliferation and protection from CD8 effector T cell-mediated GVHD. Blockade of programmed death ligand 1 and 2, but not CD40, TGF-β signaling, arginase 1, or iNOS, inhibited nTreg proliferation in cocultures of recipient-derived Gr-1(low)CD11c(+) cells with donor nTregs. Through iNKT-dependent Th2 polarization, myeloid-derived immunomodulatory dendritic cells are expanded after nonmyeloablative TLI/ATS conditioning and allogeneic BMT, induce PD-1 ligand-dependent donor nTreg proliferation, and maintain potent graft-versus-host immune tolerance.

  2. B cells mediate chronic allograft rejection independently of antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiang; Ng, Yue-Harn; Singh, Tripti; Jiang, Ke; Sheriff, Khaleefathullah A; Ippolito, Renee; Zahalka, Salwa; Li, Qi; Randhawa, Parmjeet; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Ramaswami, Balathiripurasundari; Lund, Frances E; Chalasani, Geetha

    2014-03-01

    Chronic rejection is the primary cause of long-term failure of transplanted organs and is often viewed as an antibody-dependent process. Chronic rejection, however, is also observed in mice and humans with no detectable circulating alloantibodies, suggesting that antibody-independent pathways may also contribute to pathogenesis of transplant rejection. Here, we have provided direct evidence that chronic rejection of vascularized heart allografts occurs in the complete absence of antibodies, but requires the presence of B cells. Mice that were deficient for antibodies but not B cells experienced the same chronic allograft vasculopathy (CAV), which is a pathognomonic feature of chronic rejection, as WT mice; however, mice that were deficient for both B cells and antibodies were protected from CAV. B cells contributed to CAV by supporting splenic lymphoid architecture, T cell cytokine production, and infiltration of T cells into graft vessels. In chimeric mice, in which B cells were present but could not present antigen, both T cell responses and CAV were markedly reduced. These findings establish that chronic rejection can occur in the complete absence of antibodies and that B cells contribute to this process by supporting T cell responses through antigen presentation and maintenance of lymphoid architecture.

  3. B cells mediate chronic allograft rejection independently of antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiang; Ng, Yue-Harn; Singh, Tripti; Jiang, Ke; Sheriff, Khaleefathullah A; Ippolito, Renee; Zahalka, Salwa; Li, Qi; Randhawa, Parmjeet; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Ramaswami, Balathiripurasundari; Lund, Frances E; Chalasani, Geetha

    2014-03-01

    Chronic rejection is the primary cause of long-term failure of transplanted organs and is often viewed as an antibody-dependent process. Chronic rejection, however, is also observed in mice and humans with no detectable circulating alloantibodies, suggesting that antibody-independent pathways may also contribute to pathogenesis of transplant rejection. Here, we have provided direct evidence that chronic rejection of vascularized heart allografts occurs in the complete absence of antibodies, but requires the presence of B cells. Mice that were deficient for antibodies but not B cells experienced the same chronic allograft vasculopathy (CAV), which is a pathognomonic feature of chronic rejection, as WT mice; however, mice that were deficient for both B cells and antibodies were protected from CAV. B cells contributed to CAV by supporting splenic lymphoid architecture, T cell cytokine production, and infiltration of T cells into graft vessels. In chimeric mice, in which B cells were present but could not present antigen, both T cell responses and CAV were markedly reduced. These findings establish that chronic rejection can occur in the complete absence of antibodies and that B cells contribute to this process by supporting T cell responses through antigen presentation and maintenance of lymphoid architecture. PMID:24509079

  4. RAD18 mediates resistance to ionizing radiation in human glioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Chen; Wang, Hongwei; Cheng, Hongbin; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Zhi, E-mail: drzwang@gmail.com; Yue, Wu, E-mail: drwuyue@gmail.com

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in glioma cell lines. • RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis. • The elevated expression of RAD18 is associated with recurrent GBM who underwent IR therapy. - Abstract: Radioresistance remains a major challenge in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). RAD18 a central regulator of translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), has been shown to play an important role in regulating genomic stability and DNA damage response. In the present study, we investigate the relationship between RAD18 and resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and examined the expression levels of RAD18 in primary and recurrent GBM specimens. Our results showed that RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in GBM. The expression level of RAD18 in glioma cells correlates with their resistance to IR. Ectopic expression of RAD18 in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells confers significant resistance to IR treatment. Conversely, depletion of endogenous RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells sensitized these cells to IR treatment. Moreover, RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells, whereas cells deficient in RAD18 exhibit increased apoptosis induced by IR. Furthermore, knockdown of RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells disrupts HR-mediated repair, resulting in increased accumulation of DSB. In addition, clinical data indicated that RAD18 was significantly higher in recurrent GBM samples that were exposed to IR compared with the corresponding primary GBM samples. Collectively, our findings reveal that RAD18 may serve as a key mediator of the IR response and may function as a potential target for circumventing IR resistance in human GBM.

  5. Betamethasone, but Not Tacrolimus, Suppresses the Development of Th2 Cells Mediated by Langerhans Cell-Like Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Katsuhiko; Tamai, Saki; Ikeda, Reiko

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that Langerhans cells (LCs) work as the primary orchestrators in the polarization of the immune milieu towards a T helper type 1 (Th1) or T helper type 2 (Th2) response. In this study, we investigated the effects of tacrolimus and betamethasone, each used as topical applications in atopic dermatitis (AD), on Th2 cell development mediated by LCs. LC-like dendritic cells (LDCs) were generated from mouse bone marrow cells and used as substitutes for LCs. Mice were primed with ovalbumin (OVA) peptide-pulsed LDCs, which had been treated with tacrolimus or betamethasone, via the hind footpad. After 5 d, the cytokine response in the popliteal lymph nodes was investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of cell surface molecules on LDCs was investigated via reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Administration of OVA peptide-pulsed LDCs, which had been treated with betamethasone, inhibited Th2 cell development, as represented by the down-regulation of interleukin-4 production, and also inhibited Th1 cell development, represented by the down-regulation of interferon-γ production. However, tacrolimus-treated LDCs did not induce such inhibition of the development of Th1 and Th2 cells. The inhibition of Th1 and Th2 cell development was associated with the suppression of CD40 and T-cell immunoglobulin, and mucin domain-containing protein (TIM)-4 expression, respectively, in LDCs. These results suggest that the topical application of betamethasone to skin lesions of patients with AD acts on epidermal LCs, and may inhibit the development of Th2 cells, thus being of benefit for the control of AD. PMID:27374298

  6. Cell-cell contact and anatomical compatibility in stromal cell-mediated HSC support during development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Harvey (Kirsten); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractHematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are able to generate the wide variety of blood cells found in the adult and are maintained in the bone marrow (BM) stromal microenvironment. In the aorta-gonads-mesonephros (AGM), which autonomously generates the first HSCs, the stromal m

  7. Mechanisms of KGF mediated signaling in pancreatic duct cell proliferation and differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Uzan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF; palifermin is a growth factor with a high degree of specificity for epithelial cells. KGF is an important effector of epithelial growth and tissue homeostasis in various organs including the pancreas. Here we investigated the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the mediation of pancreatic ductal cell proliferation and differentiation induced by exogenous KGF during beta-cell regeneration in diabetic rat. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: In vitro and in vivo duct cell proliferation was measured by BrdU incorporation assay. The implication of MAPK-ERK1/2 in the mediation of KGF-induced cell proliferation was determined by inactivation of this pathway, using the pharmacological inhibitor or antisense morpholino-oligonucleotides against MEK1. In vivo KGF-induced duct cell differentiation was assessed by the immunolocalization of PDX1 and Glut2 in ductal cells and the implication of PI3K/AKT in this process was investigated. We showed that KGF exerted a potent mitogenic effect on ductal cells. Both in vitro and in vivo, its effect on cell proliferation was mediated through the activation of ERK1/2 as evidenced by the abolition of duct cell proliferation in the context of MEK/ERK inactivation. In vivo, KGF treatment triggered ductal cell differentiation as revealed by the expression of PDX1 and Glut2 in a subpopulation of ductal cells via a PI3K-dependent mechanism. CONCLUSION: Here we show that KGF promotes beta-cell regeneration by stimulating duct cell proliferation in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated for the first time that KGF directly induces the expression of PDX1 in some ductal cells thus inducing beta-cell neogenesis. We further explored the molecular mechanisms involved in these processes and showed that the effects of KGF on duct cell proliferation are mediated by the MEK-ERK1/2 pathway, while the KGF-induced cell differentiation is mediated by the PI3K/AKT pathway. These findings might have

  8. Immune tolerance induced by adoptive transfer of dendritic cells in an insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus routine model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-liang ZHANG; Xiao-lei ZOU; Jia-bei PENG; Ming XIANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect and underlying mechanisms of inunune-tolerance induced by the adoptive transfer of bone marrow (BM)-derived dendritic cells (DC) in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) mice. Methods: The IDDM model was established by a low dose of streptozotocin (STZ) in Balb/c mice. Two DC subpopulations were generated from the BM cells with granulocyte-macroph-age colony-stimulating factor with or without interleukin-4. The purity and the T cell stimulatory capability of DC were identified. These cells were used to modu-late autoimmune response in pre-diabetic mice. Blood glucose was examined weekly; pancreas tissues were taken for histopathological analysis, and CD4+ T cells were isolated to detect lymphocyte proliferation by MTT assay and the ratio of CD4+CD25+ T cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The cytokine secretion was determined by ELISA analysis. Results: Two DC subsets were generated from BM, which have phenotypes of mature DC (mDC) and immature DC (iDC), respectively. The level of blood glucose decreased significantly by transferring iDC (P<0.01) rather than mDC. Less lymphocyte infiltration was ob-served in the islets, and pancreatic structure was intact. In vitro, proliferation of lymphocytes decreased and the proportion of CD4+CD25+ T cells increased remarkably, compared with the mDC-treated groups (P<0.05), which were associ-ated with increased level of the Th2 cytokine and reduced level of the Th1 cytokine after iDC transfer. Conclusion: Our data showed that iDC transfer was able to confer protection to mice from STZ-induced IDDM. The immune-tolerance to IDDM may be associated with promoting the production of CD4+CD25+ T cells and inducing regulatory Th2 responses in vivo.

  9. Novel methanol-tolerant Ir-S/C chalcogenide electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction in DMFC fuel cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingyu Ma; Desheng Ai; Xiaofeng Xie; Jianwei Guo

    2011-01-01

    Novel methanol-tolerant oxygen-reduction catalysts, iridium-sulphur (Ir-S) chalcogenides with differ ent Ir/S atomic ratios, were synthesized via a precipitation method using H21rCI6 and Na2SO3 as the Ir and S precursors. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the IrxSl-x/C chalcogenide catalysts. Particle size ranging from 2.5 to 2.8 nm though obvious agglomeration was found on carbon support. However, these chalcogenide catalysts showed strong catalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and high methanol tolerance, strongly suggesting these novel catalysts as promising candidates for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) cathode applications.

  10. Mediation of autophagic cell death by type 3 ryanodine receptor (RyR3 in adult hippocampal neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Min eChung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic Ca2+ actively engages in diverse intracellular processes from protein synthesis, folding and trafficking to cell survival and death. Dysregulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels is observed in various neuropathological states including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs and IP3 receptors (IP3Rs, the main Ca2+ release channels located in endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes, are known to direct various cellular events such as autophagy and apoptosis. Here we investigated the intracellular Ca2+-mediated regulation of survival and death of adult hippocampal neural stem (HCN cells utilizing an insulin withdrawal model of autophagic cell death. Despite comparable expression levels of RyR and IP3R transcripts in HCN cells at normal state, the expression levels of RyRs — especially RyR3 — were markedly upregulated upon insulin withdrawal. While treatment with the RyR agonist caffeine significantly promoted the autophagic death of insulin-deficient HCN cells, treatment with its inhibitor dantrolene prevented the induction of autophagy following insulin withdrawal. Furthermore, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of the RyR3 gene abolished autophagic cell death of HCN cells. This study delineates a distinct, RyR3-mediated ER Ca2+ regulation of autophagy and programmed cell death in neural stem cells. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical, yet understudied mechanisms underlying the regulatory function of ER Ca2+ in neural stem cell biology.

  11. Identifying Intracellular Sites of Eicosanoid Lipid Mediator Synthesis with EicosaCell Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Bandeira-Melo, Christianne; Weller, Peter Fahey; Bozza, Patricia T.

    2011-01-01

    Eicosanoids, arachidonic acid-derived signaling lipid mediators, are newly formed and nonstorable molecules that have important roles in physiological and pathological processes. EicosaCell is a microscopic assay that enables the intracellular detection and localization of eicosanoid lipid mediator-synthesizing compartments by means of a strategy to covalently cross-link and immobilize eicosanoids at their sites of synthesis followed by immunofluorescent-based localization of the targeted eic...

  12. Targeted microbubbles for ultrasound mediated gene transfection and apoptosis induction in ovarian cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Shufang; Guo, Juan; Sun, Jiangchuan; Zhu, Shenyin; Yan, Yu; Zhu, Yi; Li, Min; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Ronald X

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) technique can be potentially used for non-viral delivery of gene therapy. Targeting wild-type p53 (wtp53) tumor suppressor gene may provide a clinically promising treatment for patients with ovarian cancer. However, UTMD mediated gene therapy typically uses non-targeted microbubbles with suboptimal gene transfection efficiency. We synthesized a targeted microbubble agent for UTMD mediated wtp53 gene therapy in ovarian cancer cells. Lipid micr...

  13. Function of Helper T Cells in the Memory CTL-mediated Anti-tumor Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高丰光; GermainJ.P.Fernendo; 刘文军

    2004-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the role of CD4+ helper T (Th) cells in the memory CTL-mediated anti-tumor immunity, the RAG-1 gene knock out mice were adoptively transferred with OT-1 cells to generate the memory CTL, the C57B1/6 mice immunized with the epitope peptide of OVA specific Th cells and with different adjuvants were adopfively transferred with these memory-CTLs, and then the animals were challenged with tumor cells EGT. It was found that although the simple immunization of mice with the epitope peptide of the OVA specific Th cells could generate more effect CTL, but this effect was not so strong enough to resist completely the challenges with tumor cells. Nevertheless, the memory CTL-mediated anti-tumor immune effect required the helps of Th1 and Th2 cells. The cross-regulation between Thl and Th2 cells seemed to be beneficial for the host to generate more effector CTL for mounting an efficient anti-tumor response. It concluded that the interaction between Thl and Th2 cells might be more important than the single subset of Th cells in the memory CTL-mediated anti-tumor immune response. More attention should be paid in this regard for the future studies.

  14. Role of the spleen in cell-mediated cardiac allograft rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, B.M.

    1982-04-01

    A quantitative adoptive transfer assay was used to investigate the role of the spleen in cell-mediated rejection of directly vascularized heart grafts. In this assay, the cell-mediated rejection response can be examined directly by testing the capacity of inocula of T cells to effect rejection of DA heart grafts in PVG rats whose own lymphocytes have been destroyed by whole body irradiation. The capacity of a variety of inocula, including lymph node cells (LNCs), spleen cells, and T cells from lymph node and spleen, to restore rejection were compared in groups of splenectomized and nonsplenectomized hosts. In both groups all inocula restored rejection toward normal. Only in experiments testing inocula equivalent to a small fraction of the naive peripheral lymphocyte pool was rejection delayed in the splenectomized hosts, and this was only a delay of a few days. These results showed that in the absence of the spleen, the primary rejection responses can be generated. In addition, it was demonstrated that the normal spleen contains only a small fraction of the T cell pool with the capacity to effect rejection. Memory T cells were also shown to mediate rejection in splenectomized hosts. It is concluded that with strongly incompatible grafts, splenectomy has only a trivial immunosuppressive effect; it removes neither a sigificant proportion of the alloreactive T cell pool nor the essential site for activation of proliferation of these cells.

  15. Tolerance of Listeria monocytogenes to Quaternary Ammonium Sanitizers Is Mediated by a Novel Efflux Pump Encoded by emrE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, Jovana; Ziegler, Jennifer; Wałecka-Zacharska, Ewa; Reimer, Aleisha; Kitts, David D; Gilmour, Matthew W

    2016-02-01

    A novel genomic island (LGI1) was discovered in Listeria monocytogenes isolates responsible for the deadliest listeriosis outbreak in Canada, in 2008. To investigate the functional role of LGI1, the outbreak strain 08-5578 was exposed to food chain-relevant stresses, and the expression of 16 LGI1 genes was measured. LGI1 genes with putative efflux (L. monocytogenes emrE [emrELm]), regulatory (lmo1851), and adhesion (sel1) functions were deleted, and the mutants were exposed to acid (HCl), cold (4°C), salt (10 to 20% NaCl), and quaternary ammonium-based sanitizers (QACs). Deletion of lmo1851 had no effect on the L. monocytogenes stress response, and deletion of sel1 did not influence Caco-2 and HeLa cell adherence/invasion, whereas deletion of emrE resulted in increased susceptibility to QACs (P monocytogenes to QACs via emrELm. Since QACs are commonly used in the food industry, there is a concern that L. monocytogenes strains possessing emrE will have an increased ability to survive this stress and thus to persist in food processing environments. PMID:26590290

  16. Macrophage-Mediated Trogocytosis Leads to Death of Antibody-Opsonized Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmurugan, Ramraj; Challa, Dilip K; Ram, Sripad; Ober, Raimund J; Ward, E Sally

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the complex behavior of effector cells such as monocytes or macrophages in regulating cancerous growth is of central importance for cancer immunotherapy. Earlier studies using CD20-specific antibodies have demonstrated that the Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated transfer of the targeted receptors from tumor cells to these effector cells through trogocytosis can enable escape from antibody therapy, leading to the viewpoint that this process is protumorigenic. In the current study, we demonstrate that persistent trogocytic attack results in the killing of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. Further, antibody engineering to increase FcγR interactions enhances this tumoricidal activity. These studies extend the complex repertoire of activities of macrophages to trogocytic-mediated cell death of HER2-overexpressing target cells and have implications for the development of effective antibody-based therapies. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1879-89. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27226489

  17. CDK8-Mediated STAT1-S727 Phosphorylation Restrains NK Cell Cytotoxicity and Tumor Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Putz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor STAT1 is important in natural killer (NK cells, which provide immediate defense against tumor and virally infected cells. We show that mutation of a single phosphorylation site (Stat1-S727A enhances NK cell cytotoxicity against a range of tumor cells, accompanied by increased expression of perforin and granzyme B. Stat1-S727A mice display significantly delayed disease onset in NK cell-surveilled tumor models including melanoma, leukemia, and metastasizing breast cancer. Constitutive phosphorylation of S727 depends on cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8. Inhibition of CDK8-mediated STAT1-S727 phosphorylation may thus represent a therapeutic strategy for stimulating NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance.

  18. Bone marrow stromal cell : mediated neuroprotection for spinal cord repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, Gaby Jane

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no treatment available that restores anatomy and function after spinal cord injury. This thesis explores transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bone marrow stromal cells; BMSCs) as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. BMSCs secrete neurotrophic f

  19. Suppression by Apoptotic Cells Defines Tumor Necrosis Factor-Mediated Induction of Glomerular Mesangial Cell Apoptosis by Activated Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Duffield, Jeremy S.; Ware, Carl F.; Ryffel, Bernhardt; Savill, John

    2001-01-01

    Activated macrophages (Mφ) isolated from inflamed glomeruli or generated by interferon-γ and lipopolysaccharide treatment in vitro induce glomerular mesangial cell apoptosis by hitherto incompletely understood mechanisms. In this report we demonstrate that nitric oxide-independent killing of co-cultured mesangial cells by interferon-γ/lipopolysaccharide-activated Mφ is suppressed by binding/ingestion of apoptotic cells and is mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Thus, soluble TNF receptor...

  20. Lysosome fusion to the cell membrane is mediated by the dysferlin C2A domain in coronary arterial endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Wei-Qing; Xia, Min; Xu, Ming; Krishna M Boini; Ritter, Joseph K.; Li, Ning-Jun; Li, Pin-Lan

    2012-01-01

    Dysferlin has recently been reported to participate in cell membrane repair in muscle and other cells through lysosome fusion. Given that lysosome fusion is a crucial mechanism that leads to membrane raft clustering, the present study attempted to determine whether dysferlin is involved in this process and its related signalling, and explores the mechanism underlying dysferlin-mediated lysosome fusion in bovine coronary arterial endothelial cells (CAECs). We found that dysferlin is clustered ...

  1. Immunological tolerance of human hepatocyte xenograft induced by adenovirus vector-mediated CTLA4Ig gene transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao-Kai Chen; Xiao-Cong Liu; Jun-Gang Li; Guo-Dong Liu; Yan Guo; Ling Cheng; Yu-Ming Wang

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Systemic administration of CTLA4Ig has been applied  in  inducing  immunological  tolerance  of  hepatocyte implants,  but  has  potential  for  systemic  immune  inhibition. This study was designed to induce hepatocyte immunological tolerance  by  locally  expressing  CTLA4Ig  in  an  attempt  to improve the effectiveness of cell transplantation. METHODS: A  normal  human  liver  cell  line  (L02)  was transfected with adenovirus vector containing the CTLA4Ig gene (Ad-CTLA4Ig-EGFP)  in vitro,  and  the  expression  of  CTLA4Ig by  transfected  cells  was  assessed  by  fluorescent  imaging  and immunocytochemical  staining.  Transfected  cells  then  were injected  into  the  spleen  of  Sprague-Dawley  rats,  the  survival of  cells  was  determined  by  immunohistochemistry,  and  the immune status was examined through CD4+ and CD69+ T cell-counts and ELISA detection of IL-2 in peripheral blood. RESULTS: L02 cells expressed CTLA4Ig in the cytoplasm for >4 weeks. Surviving L02 cells were observed in the experimental group at 3 and 4 weeks post-transplantation, while none was detected  in  the  control  group.  Furthermore,  the  percentages of  CD4+  and  CD4+CD69+  T  cells  in  the  CTLA4-transfected group  were  24.5%  and  45.1%,  markedly  lower  than  those  in the  control  group  at  4  weeks  post-transplantation  (P CONCLUSION: Adenovirus-mediated CTLA4Ig gene transfer into  human  hepatocytes  has  the  potential  to  become  an effective  method  of  inducing  immunological  tolerance  in hepatocyte transplantation.

  2. Modeling head and neck cancer stem cell-mediated tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Alexander T; Jackson, Trachette L; Nör, Jacques E

    2016-09-01

    A large body of literature has emerged supporting the importance of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in the pathogenesis of head and neck cancers. CSCs are a subpopulation of cells within a tumor that share the properties of self-renewal and multipotency with stem cells from normal tissue. Their functional relevance to the pathobiology of cancer arises from the unique properties of tumorigenicity, chemotherapy resistance, and their ability to metastasize and invade distant tissues. Several molecular profiles have been used to discriminate a stem cell from a non-stem cell. CSCs can be grown for study and further enriched using a number of in vitro techniques. An evolving option for translational research is the use of mathematical and computational models to describe the role of CSCs in complex tumor environments. This review is focused discussing the evidence emerging from modeling approaches that have clarified the impact of CSCs to the biology of cancer. PMID:27151511

  3. Retrovirus-Mediated Gene Transfer in Immortalization of Progenitor Hair Cell Lines in Newborn Rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yuan; ZHAI Suo-qiang; SONG Wei; GUO Wei; ZHENG Gui-liang; HU Yin-yan

    2008-01-01

    Objective To present an experimental method that allows isolation of greater epithelial ridge (GER) and lesser epithelial ridge(LER) cells from postnatal rat cochleae using a combinatorial approach of enzymatic digestion and mechanical separation and to investigate a retrovirus-mediated gene transfer technique for its possibl utility in immortalization of the GER and LER cell lines, in an effort to establish an in vitro model system of hair cell differentiation. Methods GER and LER cells were dissected from postnatal rat cochleae and immortalized by transferring the SV40 large T antigen using a retrovirus. The established cell lines were confirmed through morphology observation, immunnocytochemical staining and RT-PCR analysis. The Hathl gene was transferred into the cell lines using adenovirus-mediated techniques to explore their potential to differentiate into hair cells. Results The established cell lines were stably maintained for more than 20 passages and displayed many features similar to primary GER and LER cells. They grew in patches and assumed a polygonal morphology. Immunostaining showed labeling by SV40 large T antigen and Islet1 (a specific marker for GER and LER). All passages of the cell lines expressed SV40 large T antigen on RT-PCR analysis. The cells also showed the capability to differenti-ate into hair cell-like cells when forced to express Hathl. Conclusion Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer can be used in establishing immortalized progenitor hair cell lines in newborn rat, which may provide an invaluable system for studying hair cell differentiation and regeneration for new treatment of sensory hearing loss caused by hair cell loss.

  4. Telomerase reverse transcriptase expression protects transformed human cells against DNA-damaging agents, and increases tolerance to chromosomal instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisig, H B; Hukezalie, K R; Thompson, C A H; Au-Yeung, T T T; Ludlow, A T; Zhao, C R; Wong, J M Y

    2016-01-14

    Reactivation of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) expression is found in more than 85% of human cancers. The remaining cancers rely on the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), a recombination-based mechanism for telomere-length maintenance. Prevalence of TERT reactivation over the ALT mechanism was linked to secondary TERT function unrelated to telomere length maintenance. To characterize this non-canonical function, we created a panel of ALT cells with recombinant expression of TERT and TERT variants: TERT-positive ALT cells showed higher tolerance to genotoxic insults compared with their TERT-negative counterparts. We identified telomere synthesis-defective TERT variants that bestowed similar genotoxic stress tolerance, indicating that telomere synthesis activity is dispensable for this survival phenotype. TERT expression improved the kinetics of double-strand chromosome break repair and reduced DNA damage-related nuclear division abnormalities, a phenotype associated with ALT tumors. Despite this reduction in cytological abnormalities, surviving TERT-positive ALT cells were found to have gross chromosomal instabilities. We sorted TERT-positive cells with cytogenetic changes and followed their growth. We found that the chromosome-number changes persisted, and TERT-positive ALT cells surviving genotoxic events propagated through subsequent generations with new chromosome numbers. Our data confirm that telomerase expression protects against double-strand DNA (dsDNA)-damaging events, and show that this protective function is uncoupled from its role in telomere synthesis. TERT expression promotes oncogene-transformed cell growth by reducing the inhibitory effects of cell-intrinsic (telomere attrition) and cell-extrinsic (chemical- or metabolism-induced genotoxic stress) challenges. These data provide the impetus to develop new therapeutic interventions for telomerase-positive cancers through simultaneous targeting of multiple telomerase activities. PMID

  5. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation induces immunologic tolerance in renal transplant patients via modulation of inflammatory and repair processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Duojiao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inducing donor-specific tolerance in renal transplant patients could potentially prevent allograft rejection and calcineurin inhibitor nephrotoxicity. Combined kidney and hematopoietic stem cell transplant from an HLA-matched donor is an exploratory and promising therapy to induce immune tolerance. Investigtion of molecular mechanisms involved in the disease is needed to understand the potential process of cell therapy and develop strategies to prevent this immunologic rejection. Methods We enrolled nine patients in a clinical study in which cryopreserved donor hematopoietic stem cells were infused on days 2, 4, and 6 after kidney transplantation. One month post-transplant, 4 plasma samples were collected from combined transplants (C + Tx, and 8 plasma samples from patients with kidney transplantation alone (Tx. High abundance proteins in plasma were depleted and the two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with iTRAQ labeling was utilized to identify the protein profiling between the two groups. Clusters of up- and down-regulated protein profiles were submitted to MetaCore for the construction of transcriptional factors and regulation networks. Results and Discussion Among the 179 identified proteins, 65 proteins were found in C + Tx with at least a 2-fold change as compared with Tx. A subset of proteins related to the complement and coagulation cascade, including complement C3a,complement C5a, precrusors to fibrinogen alpha and beta chains,was significantly downregulated in C + Tx. Meanwhile, Apolipoprotein-A1(ApoA1, ApoC1, ApoA2, ApoE, and ApoB were significantly lower in Tx compared to C + Tx. Gene ontology analysis showed that the dominant processes of differentially expressed proteins were associated with the inflammatory response and positive regulation of plasma lipoprotein particle remodeling. Conclusions Thus, our study provides new insight into the molecular events in

  6. Mannose 6-, fructose 1-, and fructose 6-phosphates inhibit human natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Forbes, J T; Bretthauer, R. K.; Oeltmann, T N

    1981-01-01

    In vitro human natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity (NCMC) to K-562, Molt-4, and F-265 cells is inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by mannose 6-phosphate, fructose 1-phosphate and fructose 6-phosphate. This inhibition is not observed with mannose, glucose, fucose, glucose 6-phosphate, mannose 1-phosphate, galactose 1-phosphate, or galactose 6-phosphate. Preincubation of the effector cells, obtained from fresh whole blood, with mannose-6-phosphate, fructose-1-phosphate, or fructose-6-phosphate...

  7. Pokemon Silencing Leads to Bim-Mediated Anoikis of Human Hepatoma Cell QGY7703

    OpenAIRE

    Kun Liu; Feng Liu(Central China Normal University); Nannan Zhang; Shiying Liu; Yuyang Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Pokemon is an important proto-oncogene that plays a critical role in cellular oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis. Anoikis, which is regulated by Bim-mediated apoptosis, is critical to cancer cell invasion and metastasis. We investigated the role of Pokemon in anoikis, and our results show that Pokemon renders liver cells resistant to anoikis via suppression of Bim transcription. We knocked-down Pokemon in human hepatoma cells QGY7703 with small interfering RNAs (siRNA). Knockdown of P...

  8. Biocontrol agents-mediated suppression of oxalic acid induced cell death during Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-pea interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Akansha; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, Surendra; Sarma, Birinchi Kumar; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur

    2015-05-01

    Oxalic acid (OA) is an important pathogenic factor during early Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-host interaction and might work by reducing hydrogen peroxide production (H2 O2 ). In the present investigation, oxalic acid-induced cell death in pea was studied. Pea plants treated with biocontrol agents (BCAs) viz., Pseudomonas aeruginosa PJHU15, Bacillus subtilis BHHU100, and Trichoderma harzianum TNHU27 either singly and/or in consortium acted on S. sclerotiorum indirectly by enabling plants to inhibit the OA-mediated suppression of oxidative burst via induction of H2 O2 . Our results showed that BCA treated plants upon treatment with culture filtrate of the pathogen, conferred the resistance via. significantly decreasing relative cell death of pea against S. sclerotiorum compared to control plants without BCA treatment but treated with the culture filtrate of the pathogen. The results obtained from the present study indicate that the microbes especially in consortia play significant role in protection against S. sclerotiorum by modulating oxidative burst and partially enhancing tolerance by increasing the H2 O2 generation, which is otherwise suppressed by OA produced by the pathogen.

  9. High glucose-mediated oxidative stress impairs cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo L Lamers

    Full Text Available Deficient wound healing in diabetic patients is very frequent, but the cellular and molecular causes are poorly defined. In this study, we evaluate the hypothesis that high glucose concentrations inhibit cell migration. Using CHO.K1 cells, NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, mouse embryonic fibroblasts and primary skin fibroblasts from control and diabetic rats cultured in 5 mM D-glucose (low glucose, LG, 25 mM D-glucose (high glucose, HG or 25 mM L-glucose medium (osmotic control--OC, we analyzed the migration speed, protrusion stability, cell polarity, adhesion maturation and the activity of the small Rho GTPase Rac1. We also analyzed the effects of reactive oxygen species by incubating cells with the antioxidant N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC. We observed that HG conditions inhibited cell migration when compared to LG or OC. This inhibition resulted from impaired cell polarity, protrusion destabilization and inhibition of adhesion maturation. Conversely, Rac1 activity, which promotes protrusion and blocks adhesion maturation, was increased in HG conditions, thus providing a mechanistic basis for the HG phenotype. Most of the HG effects were partially or completely rescued by treatment with NAC. These findings demonstrate that HG impairs cell migration due to an increase in oxidative stress that causes polarity loss, deficient adhesion and protrusion. These alterations arise, in large part, from increased Rac1 activity and may contribute to the poor wound healing observed in diabetic patients.

  10. Cadmium-inducible expression of the ABC-type transporter AtABCC3 increases phytochelatin-mediated cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Patrizia; Zanella, Letizia; De Paolis, Angelo; Di Litta, Davide; Cecchetti, Valentina; Falasca, Giuseppina; Barbieri, Maurizio; Altamura, Maria Maddalena; Costantino, Paolo; Cardarelli, Maura

    2015-07-01

    The heavy metal cadmium (Cd) is a widespread environmental contaminant with harmful effects on living cells. In plants, phytochelatin (PC)-dependent Cd detoxification requires that PC-Cd complexes are transported into vacuoles. Here, it is shown that Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings defective in the ABCC transporter AtABCC3 (abcc3) have an increased sensitivity to different Cd concentrations, and that seedlings overexpressing AtABCC3 (AtABCC3ox) have an increased Cd tolerance. The cellular distribution of Cd was analysed in protoplasts from abcc3 mutants and AtABCC3 overexpressors grown in the presence of Cd, by means of the Cd-specific fluorochromes 5-nitrobenzothiazole coumarin (BTC-5N) and Leadmium™ Green AM dye. This analysis revealed that Cd is mostly localized in the cytosol of abcc3 mutant protoplasts whereas there is an increase in vacuolar Cd in protoplasts from AtABCC3ox plants. Overexpression of AtABCC3 in cad1-3 mutant seedlings defective in PC production and in plants treated with l-buthionine sulphoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of PC biosynthesis, had no effect on Cd tolerance, suggesting that AtABCC3 acts via PCs. In addition, overexpression of AtABCC3 in atabcc1 atabcc2 mutant seedlings defective in the Cd transporters AtABCC1 and AtABCC2 complements the Cd sensitivity of double mutants, but not in the presence of BSO. Accordingly, the level of AtABCC3 transcript in wild type seedlings was lower than that of AtABCC1 and AtABCC2 in the absence of Cd but higher after Cd exposure, and even higher in atabcc1 atabcc2 mutants. The results point to AtABCC3 as a transporter of PC-Cd complexes, and suggest that its activity is regulated by Cd and is co-ordinated with the activity of AtABCC1/AtABCC2.

  11. Slit2 involvement in glioma cell migration is mediated by Robo1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsch, Sonja; Schmitz, Nicole; Jeibmann, Astrid; Geng, Jian-Guo; Paulus, Werner; Senner, Volker

    2008-03-01

    Slit and Robo proteins are evolutionarily conserved molecules whose interaction underlies axon guidance and neuronal precursor cell migration. During development secreted Slit proteins mediate chemorepulsive signals on cells expressing Robo receptors. Because similar molecular mechanisms may be utilized in glioma cell invasion and neuroblast migration, we studied the expression of Slit2 and its transmembrane receptor Robo1 as well as their functional role in migration in glioma cells. qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry of human specimens revealed that Slit2 was distinctly expressed by non-neoplastic neurons, but at only very low levels in fibrillary astrocytoma and glioblastoma. Robo1 also was mainly restricted to neurons in the normal brain, whereas astrocytic tumor cells in situ as well as glioblastoma cell lines overexpressed Robo1 at mRNA and protein levels. Recombinant human Slit2 in a concentration of 0.45 nM was repulsive for glioma cell lines in a modified Boyden chamber assay. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Robo1 in glioma cell lines neutralized the repulsive effect of Slit2, demonstrating that Robo1 served as the major Slit2 receptor. Our findings suggest that a chemorepulsive effect mediated by interaction of Slit2 and Robo1 participates in glioma cell guidance in the brain.

  12. Effect of disodium cromoglycate on mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hye-Young; Kim, Jung-Sook; An, Nyeon-Hyoung; Park, Rae-Kil; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-04-23

    We investigated the effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on mast cell-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity. DSCG inhibited systemic allergic reaction induced by compound 48/80 dose-dependently. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis was inhibited by 71.6% by oral administration of DSCG (1 g/kg). When DSCG was pretreated at concentration rang from 0.01-1000 g/kg, the serum histamine levels were reduced in a dose dependent manner. DSCG also significantly inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cell (RPMC) by compound 48/80. We confirmed that DSCG inhibited compound 48/80-induced degranulation of RPMC by alcian blue/nuclear fast red staining. In addition, DSCG showed a significant inhibitory effect on anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-mediated tumor necrosis factor-alpha production. These results indicate that DSCG inhibits mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reaction. PMID:15050425

  13. Reg3g overexpression promotes β cell regeneration and induces immune tolerance in nonobese-diabetic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fei; Cao, Hui; Du, Jiao; Liu, Xiulan; Liu, Yang; Xiang, Ming

    2016-06-01

    The regenerating islet-derived gene was first isolated in regenerated pancreas tissues, greatly contributing to β cell regeneration. It is an anti-inflammatory in response to cellular stress. This encouraged us to investigate the exact role of a novel member of Reg family, regenerating islet-derived gene γ, in type 1 diabetes of nonobese-diabetic mice. For this, Reg3g gene was overexpressed in pancreatic islets, and conferred beneficial effects on β cell regeneration through activating the Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3/nuclear factor κB signaling pathway. Lentiviral vector-encoding regenerating islet-derived gene γ treatment also decreased lymphocyte infiltrates of the intra-islet and peri-islet by inducing both differentiation of regulatory T cell and immature dendritic cells of tolerogenic properties, which attenuated autoimmunity. This treatment further contributed to rebalanced levels of type 1/2 helper T cell cytokines and elevated α1-antitrypsin levels in the serum. These results were not observed in phosphate-buffered saline-treated mice or in lentivirus-control mice. We have shown, for the first time, to our knowledge, that regenerating islet-derived gene γ promotes β cell regeneration and preserves β cells from autoimmunity damage by increasing regulatory T cell differentiation and inducing tolerated dendritic cells. This regenerating islet-derived gene γ infusion could probably be developed into an optimal gene therapy for the prevention and reversal of type 1 diabetes. PMID:26667474

  14. T Helper Cells Fate Mapping by Co-stimulatory Molecules and its Functions in Allograft Rejection and Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli, R; Najafian, N

    2014-01-01

    T cell differentiation is dictated by a combination of T cell receptor (TCR) interaction with an antigen-bound major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and co-stimulatory molecules signal. The co-stimulatory signal can be positive or negative, and amplifying or diminishing the initial signal. However, the secondary co-stimulatory signal is not obligatory and its necessity is dictated, in part, by the stage of T cell development. In the field of transplantation, directing the T cell differentiation process can lead to therapeutic possibilities that promote allograft tolerance, and hinder unfavorable alloimmune responses. Therefore, understanding the details of T cell differentiation process, including the influence of co-stimulatory signals, is of paramount importance. It is important to note there is functional overlap between co-stimulatory molecules. It has been observed that some co-stimulatory signals have different effects on different T cell subsets. Hence, blockade of a co-stimulatory signal pathway, as part of a therapeutic regimen in transplantation, may have far reaching effects beyond the initial therapeutic intent and inhibit co-stimulatory signals necessary for desirable regulatory responses. In this review, co-stimulatory molecules involved in the differentiation of naïve T cells into T helper 1 (Th1), T helper 2 (Th2), T helper 17 (Th17), inducible regulatory T cells (iTregs), and T helper 9 (Th9) cells and their overlap are discussed.

  15. Bax translocation mediated mitochondrial apoptosis and caspase dependent photosensitizing effect of Ficus religiosa on cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jazir Haneef

    Full Text Available The main aim of the present work was to investigate the potential effect of acetone extract of Ficus religosa leaf (FAE in multiple apoptosis signalling in human breast cancer cells. FAE treatment significantly induced dose and time dependent, irreversible inhibition of breast cancer cell growth with moderate toxicity to normal breast epithelial cells. This observation was validated using Sulforhodamine B assay. Cell cycle analysis by Flow cytometry showed cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and induction of sub-G0 peak. FAE induced chromatin condensation and displayed an increase in apoptotic population in Annexin V-FITC/PI (Fluorescein isothiocyanate/Propidium iodide double staining. FAE stimulated the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in multiple breast cancer cell lines when compared to normal diploid cells. To understand the role of Bax in FAE induced apoptosis, we employed a sensitive cell based platform of MCF-7 cells expressing Bax-EGFP. Bax translocation to mitochondria was accompanied by the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and marked elevation in LEHDase activity (Caspase 9. Consistent with this data, FAE induced Caspase activation as evidenced by ratio change in FRET Caspase sensor expressing MCF-7 cell line and cleavage of prominent Caspases and PARP. Interestingly, FAE accelerated cell death in a mitochondrial dependent manner in continuous live cell imaging mode indicating its possible photosensitizing effect. Intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS by FAE played a critical role in mediating apoptotic cell death and photosensitizing activity. FAE induced dose and time dependent inhibition of cancer cell growth which was associated with Bax translocation and mitochondria mediated apoptosis with the activation of Caspase 9 dependent Caspase cascade. FAE also possessed strong photosensitizing effect on cancer cell line that was mediated through rapid mitochondrial transmembrane potential loss and

  16. Bax translocation mediated mitochondrial apoptosis and caspase dependent photosensitizing effect of Ficus religiosa on cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneef, Jazir; Parvathy, Muraleedharan; M, Parvathy; Thankayyan R, Santhosh Kumar; Sithul, Hima; Sreeharshan, Sreeja

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of the present work was to investigate the potential effect of acetone extract of Ficus religosa leaf (FAE) in multiple apoptosis signalling in human breast cancer cells. FAE treatment significantly induced dose and time dependent, irreversible inhibition of breast cancer cell growth with moderate toxicity to normal breast epithelial cells. This observation was validated using Sulforhodamine B assay. Cell cycle analysis by Flow cytometry showed cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and induction of sub-G0 peak. FAE induced chromatin condensation and displayed an increase in apoptotic population in Annexin V-FITC/PI (Fluorescein isothiocyanate/Propidium iodide) double staining. FAE stimulated the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in multiple breast cancer cell lines when compared to normal diploid cells. To understand the role of Bax in FAE induced apoptosis, we employed a sensitive cell based platform of MCF-7 cells expressing Bax-EGFP. Bax translocation to mitochondria was accompanied by the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and marked elevation in LEHDase activity (Caspase 9). Consistent with this data, FAE induced Caspase activation as evidenced by ratio change in FRET Caspase sensor expressing MCF-7 cell line and cleavage of prominent Caspases and PARP. Interestingly, FAE accelerated cell death in a mitochondrial dependent manner in continuous live cell imaging mode indicating its possible photosensitizing effect. Intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by FAE played a critical role in mediating apoptotic cell death and photosensitizing activity. FAE induced dose and time dependent inhibition of cancer cell growth which was associated with Bax translocation and mitochondria mediated apoptosis with the activation of Caspase 9 dependent Caspase cascade. FAE also possessed strong photosensitizing effect on cancer cell line that was mediated through rapid mitochondrial transmembrane potential loss and partial Caspase

  17. Cutting edge: membrane lymphotoxin regulates CD8(+) T cell-mediated intestinal allograft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Z; Wang, J; Meng, L; Wu, Q; Kim, O; Hart, J; He, G; Zhou, P; Thistlethwaite, J R; Alegre, M L; Fu, Y X; Newell, K A

    2001-11-01

    Blocking the CD28/B7 and/or CD154/CD40 costimulatory pathways promotes long-term allograft survival in many transplant models where CD4(+) T cells are necessary for rejection. When CD8(+) T cells are sufficient to mediate rejection, these approaches fail, resulting in costimulation blockade-resistant rejection. To address this problem we examined the role of lymphotoxin-related molecules in CD8(+) T cell-mediated rejection of murine intestinal allografts. Targeting membrane lymphotoxin by means of a fusion protein, mAb, or genetic mutation inhibited rejection of intestinal allografts by CD8(+) T cells. This effect was associated with decreased monokine induced by IFN-gamma (Mig) and secondary lymphoid chemokine (SLC) gene expression within allografts and spleens respectively. Blocking membrane lymphotoxin did not inhibit rejection mediated by CD4(+) T cells. Combining disruption of membrane lymphotoxin and treatment with CTLA4-Ig inhibited rejection in wild-type mice. These data demonstrate that membrane lymphotoxin is an important regulatory molecule for CD8(+) T cells mediating rejection and suggest a strategy to avoid costimulation blockade-resistant rejection. PMID:11673481

  18. HLA-G inhibits xenogenetic cytotoxicity mediated by human NK cells and T lymphocytes against PECs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate whether the non-classi-cal HLA-G classⅠmolecule protects the porcine endothelial cells (PECs) from the lysis mediated by human immune cells in pig to human discordant xenotransplantation, we have cloned HLA-G cDNA from a human placenta by RT-PCR. Mammalian expression vector, pEFG-neo, was constructed by insertion of HLA-G cDNA in pEF-neo. We obtained efficiently expressed PECs by stable transfection. Cytotoxicity assay showed that overexpression of HLA-G on PECs was sufficient to inhibit human NK-92 cell lysis. The level of lysis was equal to or less than that of the lysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells mediated by human NK-92 cells. It also indicated that HLA-G inhibited the lysis of PECs mediated by xeno-antigen specific T lymphocytes. The reduction of lysis ranged between 59.1% and 88.9%. These findings suggest that the transgenic approach to overexpress HLA-G is believed to be a new immunotherapy in overcoming the immune rejections in xenotransplantion, including delayed xenograft rejection and cell-mediated rejection.

  19. Towards Future T Cell-Mediated Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi H. O. Nguyen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAVs infections impact significantly on global health, being particularly problematic in children, the elderly, pregnant women, indigenous populations and people with co-morbidities. Antibody-based vaccines require annual administration to combat rapidly acquired mutations modifying the surface haemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA glycoproteins. Conversely, influenza-specific CD8+ T cell responses directed at peptides derived from the more conserved internal virus proteins are known to be protective, suggesting that T cell-based vaccines may provide long-lasting cross-protection. This review outlines the importance of CD8+ T cell immunity to seasonal influenza and pandemic IAVs and summarises current vaccination strategies for inducing durable CD8+ T cell memory. Aspects of future IAV vaccine design and the use of live virus challenge in humans to establish proof of principle are also discussed.

  20. Specific Btk inhibition suppresses B cell- and myeloid cell-mediated arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Paolo, Julie A; Huang, Tao; Balazs, Mercedesz; Barbosa, James; Barck, Kai H; Bravo, Brandon J; Carano, Richard A.D.; Darrow, James; Davies, Douglas R; DeForge, Laura E; Diehl, Lauri; Ferrando, Ronald; Gallion, Steven L; Giannetti, Anthony M; Gribling, Peter; Hurez, Vincent; Hymowitz, Sarah G; Jones, Randall; Kropf, Jeffrey E; Lee, Wyne P; Maciejewski, Patricia M; Mitchell, Scott A; Rong, Hong; Staker, Bart L; Whitney, J Andrew; Yeh, Sherry; Young, Wendy B; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Juan; Reif, Karin; Currie, Kevin S [CGI; (Emerald); (Genentech)

    2011-08-29

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Btk mediates inflammation are poorly understood. Here we describe the discovery of CGI1746, a small-molecule Btk inhibitor chemotype with a new binding mode that stabilizes an inactive nonphosphorylated enzyme conformation. CGI1746 has exquisite selectivity for Btk and inhibits both auto- and transphosphorylation steps necessary for enzyme activation. Using CGI1746, we demonstrate that Btk regulates inflammatory arthritis by two distinct mechanisms. CGI1746 blocks B cell receptor–dependent B cell proliferation and in prophylactic regimens reduces autoantibody levels in collagen-induced arthritis. In macrophages, Btk inhibition abolishes FcγRIII-induced TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6 production. Accordingly, in myeloid- and FcγR-dependent autoantibody-induced arthritis, CGI1746 decreases cytokine levels within joints and ameliorates disease. These results provide new understanding of the function of Btk in both B cell– or myeloid cell–driven disease processes and provide a compelling rationale for targeting Btk in rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. Site of Clomazone Action in Tolerant-Soybean and Susceptible-Cotton Photomixotrophic Cell Suspension Cultures 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Michael A.; Liebl, Rex A.; Widholm, Jack M.

    1990-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the herbicidal site of clomazone action in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Corsoy) (SB-M) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum [L.] cv Stoneville 825) (COT-M) photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures. Although a 10 micromolar clomazone treatment did not significantly reduce the terpene or mixed terpenoid content (microgram per gram fresh weight) of the SB-M cell line, there was over a 70% reduction in the chlorophyll (Chl), carotenoid (CAR), and plastoquinone (PQ) content of the COT-M cell line. The tocopherol (TOC) content was reduced only 35.6%. Reductions in the levels of Chl, CAR, TOC, and PQ indicate that the site of clomazone action in COT-M cells is prior to geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). The clomazone treatment did not significantly reduce the flow of [14C]mevalonate ([14C]MEV) (nanocuries per gram fresh weight) into CAR and the three mixed terpenoid compounds of SB-M cells. Conversely, [14C]MEV incorporation into CAR and the terpene moieties of Chl, PQ, and TOC in COT-M cells was reduced at least 73%, indicating that the site of clomazone action must be after MEV. Sequestration of clomazone away from the chloroplast cannot account for soybean tolerance to clomazone since chloroplasts isolated from both cell lines incubated with [14C]clomazone contained a similar amount of radioactivity (disintegrations per minute per microgram of Chl). The possible site(s) of clomazone inhibition include mevalonate kinase, phosphomevalonate kinase, pyrophosphomevalonate decarboxylase, isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase, and/or a prenyl transferase. PMID:16667768

  2. Heat-preconditioning confers protection from Ca2+-mediated cell toxicity in renal tubular epithelial cells (BSC-1)

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhlmann, Martin K.; Betz, Regina; Hanselmann, Rainer; Köhler, Hans

    1997-01-01

    A rise in intracellular calcium may mediate ischemic damage by phospholipid hydrolysis and proteolysis Heat shock proteins have been shown to provide protection from various forms of cell stress, but not from models of Ca2+-mediated injury. The effect of heat preconditioning in a model of ionomycin-induced injury in cultured renal tubular epitheliaal cells (BSC-1) was examined. Hsp70-mRNA expression was induced by hyperthermia (HT) (42°C, 60 min). Hsp70 protein accumulation was maximal after ...

  3. The Role of TG2 in Regulating S100A4-Mediated Mammary Tumour Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuo Wang; Martin Griffin