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Sample records for cell mediated tolerance

  1. Transplantation tolerance mediated by regulatory T cells in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯宁翰; 吴宏飞; 吴军; 张炜; 眭元庚; 贺厚光; 张春雷; 郑峻松

    2004-01-01

    Background With potent suppressive effect on responder T cells, CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells have become the focus of attention only recently and they may play an important role in transplantation tolerance. However, the mechanism of action is not clear. This study was designed to assess the possibility of using CD4+CD25+ Treg cells to induce transplantation tolerance and to investigate their mechanism of action.Methods CD4+CD25+ Treg cells were isolated using magnetic cell separation techniques. Mixed lymphocyte reactions were used to assess the ability of Treg cells to suppress effector T cells. Before skin transplantation, various numbers of CD4+CD25+Treg cells, which have been induced using complex skin antigens from the donor, were injected into the host mice either intraperitoneally (0.5×105, 1×105, 2×105, 3×105, 4×105, or 5×105) or by injection through the tail vein (5×103, 1×104, 2×104, 5×104, 1×105, 2×105). Skin grafts from two different donor types were used to assess whether the induced Treg cells were antigen-specific. The survival time of the allografts were observed. Single photon emission computed tomography was also used to determine the distribution of Treg cells before and after transplantation.Results Treg cells have suppressive effect on mixed lymphocyte reactions. Grafts survived longer in mice receiving CD4+CD25+ Treg cell injections than in control mice. There was a significant difference between groups receiving intraperitoneal injection of either 2×105 or 3×105 CD4+CD25+Treg cells and the control group (P<0.05, respectively). Better results were achieved when Treg cells were injected via the tail vein than when injected intraperitoneally. The transplantation tolerance induced by CD4+CD25+ Treg cells was donor-specific. Analysis of the localization of Treg cells revealed that Treg cells mainly migrated from the liver to the allografts and the spleen.Conclusions CD4+CD25+Treg cells can induce donor

  2. Tissue expression of PD-L1 mediates peripheral T cell tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Keir, Mary E.; Liang, Spencer C.; Guleria, Indira; Latchman, Yvette E.; Qipo, Andi; Albacker, Lee A.; Koulmanda, Maria; Freeman, Gordon J; Sayegh, Mohamed H.; Sharpe, Arlene H.

    2006-01-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1), an inhibitory receptor expressed on activated lymphocytes, regulates tolerance and autoimmunity. PD-1 has two ligands: PD-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1), which is expressed broadly on hematopoietic and parenchymal cells, including pancreatic islet cells; and PD-L2, which is restricted to macrophages and dendritic cells. To investigate whether PD-L1 and PD-L2 have synergistic or unique roles in regulating T cell activation and tolerance, we generated mice lacking PD-L1 and PD-L2...

  3. Endopeptidase-Mediated Beta Lactam Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Dörr, Tobias; Davis, Brigid M.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    In many bacteria, inhibition of cell wall synthesis leads to cell death and lysis. The pathways and enzymes that mediate cell lysis after exposure to cell wall-acting antibiotics (e.g. beta lactams) are incompletely understood, but the activities of enzymes that degrade the cell wall (‘autolysins’) are thought to be critical. Here, we report that Vibrio cholerae, the cholera pathogen, is tolerant to antibiotics targeting cell wall synthesis. In response to a wide variety of cell wall- acting ...

  4. TSCOT+ thymic epithelial cell-mediated sensitive CD4 tolerance by direct presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejin Ahn

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Although much effort has been directed at dissecting the mechanisms of central tolerance, the role of thymic stromal cells remains elusive. In order to further characterize this event, we developed a mouse model restricting LacZ to thymic stromal cotransporter (TSCOT-expressing thymic stromal cells (TDLacZ. The thymus of this mouse contains approximately 4,300 TSCOT+ cells, each expressing several thousand molecules of the LacZ antigen. TSCOT+ cells express the cortical marker CDR1, CD40, CD80, CD54, and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII. When examining endogenous responses directed against LacZ, we observed significant tolerance. This was evidenced in a diverse T cell repertoire as measured by both a CD4 T cell proliferation assay and an antigen-specific antibody isotype analysis. This tolerance process was at least partially independent of Autoimmune Regulatory Element gene expression. When TDLacZ mice were crossed to a novel CD4 T cell receptor (TCR transgenic reactive against LacZ (BgII, there was a complete deletion of double-positive thymocytes. Fetal thymic reaggregate culture of CD45- and UEA-depleted thymic stromal cells from TDLacZ and sorted TCR-bearing thymocytes excluded the possibility of cross presentation by thymic dendritic cells and medullary epithelial cells for the deletion. Overall, these results demonstrate that the introduction of a neoantigen into TSCOT-expressing cells can efficiently establish complete tolerance and suggest a possible application for the deletion of antigen-specific T cells by antigen introduction into TSCOT+ cells.

  5. Tolerance to the Intestinal Microbiota Mediated by ROR(γt)(+) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnmacht, Caspar

    2016-07-01

    Harmless microbes colonizing the gut require the establishment of a well-equilibrated symbiosis between this microbiota and its host. However, the immune system is primed to recognize both conserved microbial patterns and foreign antigens, and therefore developed strong tolerance mechanisms to prevent potential fatal immune reactivity to symbiotic microbes. The transcription factor RAR-related orphan-like γt [ROR(γt); encoded by Rorc] plays a key role in the gut for lymphoid tissue organogenesis, development of innate lymphoid cells type 3 (ILC3s) and proinflammatory type 17 T helper (Th17) cells. Surprisingly, recent research has revealed a contribution of ROR(γt)-expressing cells in a variety of tolerance mechanisms in both the innate and adaptive immune system. PMID:27255270

  6. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis reveals the mechanisms of silicon-mediated cadmium tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Sheng, Huachun; Li, Xiuli; Wang, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    Silicon (Si) can alleviate cadmium (Cd) stress in rice (Oryza sativa) plants, however, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms at the single-cell level remains limited. To address these questions, we investigated suspension cells of rice cultured in the dark environment in the absence and presence of Si with either short- (12 h) or long-term (5 d) Cd treatments using a combination of isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ), fluorescent staining, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). We identified 100 proteins differentially regulated by Si under the short- or long-term Cd stress. 70% of these proteins were down-regulated, suggesting that Si may improve protein use efficiency by maintaining cells in the normal physiological status. Furthermore, we showed two different mechanisms for Si-mediated Cd tolerance. Under the short-term Cd stress, the Si-modified cell walls inhibited the uptake of Cd ions into cells and consequently reduced the expressions of glycosidase, cell surface non-specific lipid-transfer proteins (nsLTPs), and several stress-related proteins. Under the long-term Cd stress, the amount of Cd in the cytoplasm in Si-accumulating (+Si) cells was decreased by compartmentation of Cd into vacuoles, thus leading to a lower expression of glutathione S-transferases (GST). These results provide protein-level insights into the Si-mediated Cd detoxification in rice single cells. PMID:27017433

  7. RSK2-induced stress tolerance enhances cell survival signals mediated by inhibition of GSK3β activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Cheol-Jung; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Lee, Ji-Young; Song, Ji Hong; Lee, Hye Suk; Cho, Yong-Yeon, E-mail: yongyeon@catholic.ac.kr

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •We demonstrated a novel function of RSK2 in stress tolerance. •RSK2 deficiency enhanced apoptosis by calcium stress. •RSK2-mediated GSK3β phosphorylation at serine 9 increased calcium-induced stress tolerance. •Calcium stress-induced apoptosis inhibited by adding back of RSK2 into RSK2{sup −/−} MEFs. -- Abstract: Our previous studies demonstrated that RSK2 plays a key role in cell proliferation and transformation induced by tumor promoters such as epidermal growth factor (EGF) in mouse and human skin cells. However, no direct evidence has been found regarding the relationship of RSK2 and cell survival. In this study, we found that RSK2 interacted and phosphorylated GSK3β at Ser9. Notably, GSK3β phosphorylation at Ser9 was suppressed in RSK2{sup −/−} MEFs compared with RSK2{sup +/+} MEFs by stimulation of EGF and calcium ionophore A23187, a cellular calcium stressor. In proliferation, we found that RSK2 deficiency suppressed cell proliferation compared with RSK2{sup +/+} MEFs. In contrast, GSK3β{sup −/−} MEFs induced the cell proliferation compared with GSK3β{sup +/+} MEFs. Importantly, RSK2{sup −/−} MEFs were induced severe cellular morphology change by A23187 and enhanced G1/G0 and sub-G1 accumulation of the cell cycle phase compared with RSK2{sup +/+} MEFs. The sub-G1 induction in RSK2{sup −/−} MEFs by A23187 was correlated with increase of cytochrome c release, caspase-3 cleavage and apoptotic DNA fragmentation compared with RSK2{sup +/+} MEFs. Notably, return back of RSK2 into RSK2{sup −/−} MEFs restored A23187-induced morphological change, and decreased apoptosis, apoptotic DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 induction compared with RSK2{sup −/−}/mock MEFs. Taken together, our results demonstrated that RSK2 plays an important role in stress-tolerance and cell survival, resulting in cell proliferation and cancer development.

  8. RSK2-induced stress tolerance enhances cell survival signals mediated by inhibition of GSK3β activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •We demonstrated a novel function of RSK2 in stress tolerance. •RSK2 deficiency enhanced apoptosis by calcium stress. •RSK2-mediated GSK3β phosphorylation at serine 9 increased calcium-induced stress tolerance. •Calcium stress-induced apoptosis inhibited by adding back of RSK2 into RSK2−/− MEFs. -- Abstract: Our previous studies demonstrated that RSK2 plays a key role in cell proliferation and transformation induced by tumor promoters such as epidermal growth factor (EGF) in mouse and human skin cells. However, no direct evidence has been found regarding the relationship of RSK2 and cell survival. In this study, we found that RSK2 interacted and phosphorylated GSK3β at Ser9. Notably, GSK3β phosphorylation at Ser9 was suppressed in RSK2−/− MEFs compared with RSK2+/+ MEFs by stimulation of EGF and calcium ionophore A23187, a cellular calcium stressor. In proliferation, we found that RSK2 deficiency suppressed cell proliferation compared with RSK2+/+ MEFs. In contrast, GSK3β−/− MEFs induced the cell proliferation compared with GSK3β+/+ MEFs. Importantly, RSK2−/− MEFs were induced severe cellular morphology change by A23187 and enhanced G1/G0 and sub-G1 accumulation of the cell cycle phase compared with RSK2+/+ MEFs. The sub-G1 induction in RSK2−/− MEFs by A23187 was correlated with increase of cytochrome c release, caspase-3 cleavage and apoptotic DNA fragmentation compared with RSK2+/+ MEFs. Notably, return back of RSK2 into RSK2−/− MEFs restored A23187-induced morphological change, and decreased apoptosis, apoptotic DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 induction compared with RSK2−/−/mock MEFs. Taken together, our results demonstrated that RSK2 plays an important role in stress-tolerance and cell survival, resulting in cell proliferation and cancer development

  9. TIM-4, expressed by medullary macrophages, regulates respiratory tolerance by mediating phagocytosis of antigen-specific T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Albacker, Lee A; Yu, Sanhong; Bedoret, Denis; Lee, Wan-Ling; Umetsu, Sarah E.; Monahan, Sheena; Freeman, Gordon J.; Umetsu, Dale T.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory exposure to antigen induces T cell tolerance via several overlapping mechanisms that limit the immune response. While the mechanisms involved in the development of Treg cells have received much attention, those that result in T cell deletion are largely unknown. Herein, we show that F4/80+ lymph node medullary macrophages expressing TIM-4, a phosphatidylserine receptor, remove antigen-specific T cells during respiratory tolerance, thereby reducing secondary T cell responses. Block...

  10. B cells and immunological tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjarrez-Orduño, Nataly; Quách, Tâm D; Sanz, Iñaki

    2009-02-01

    Work from multiple groups continues to provide additional evidence for the powerful and highly diverse roles, both protective and pathogenic, that B cells play in autoimmune diseases. Similarly, it has become abundantly clear that antibody-independent functions may account for the opposing influences that B cells exercise over other arms of the immune response and ultimately over autoimmunity itself. Finally, it is becoming apparent that the clinical impact of B-cell depletion therapy may be, to a large extent, determined by the functional balance between different B-cell subsets that may be generated by this therapeutic intervention. In this review, we postulate that our perspective of B-cell tolerance and our experimental approach to its understanding are fundamentally changed by this view of B cells. Accordingly, we first discuss current knowledge of B-cell tolerance conventionally defined as the censoring of autoantibody-producing B cells (with an emphasis on human B cells). Therefore, we discuss a different model that contemplates B cells not only as targets of tolerance but also as mediators of tolerance. This model is based on the notion that the onset of clinical autoimmune disease may require a B-cell gain-of-pathogenic function (or a B-cell loss-of-regulatory-function) and that accordingly, disease remission may depend on the restoration of the physiological balance between B-cell pathogenic and protective functions. PMID:19148217

  11. The E3 ubiquitin ligase GRAIL regulates T cell tolerance and regulatory T cell function by mediating T cell receptor-CD3 degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Nurieva, Roza I.; Zheng, Shuling; Jin, Wei; Chung, Yeonseok; Zhang, Yongliang; Martinez, Gustavo J.; Reynolds, Joseph M.; Wang, Sung-Ling; Lin, Xin; Sun, Shao-Cong; Lozano, Guillermina; Dong, Chen

    2010-01-01

    T cell activation is tightly regulated to avoid autoimmunity. Gene related to anergy in lymphocytes (GRAIL, encoded by Rnf128) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase associated with T cell tolerance. Here we generated and analyzed GRAIL-deficient mice and found they were resistant to immune tolerance induction and exhibited greater susceptibility to autoimmune diseases than wild-type mice. GRAIL-deficient naïve T cells, after activation, exhibited increased proliferation and cytokine expression than contr...

  12. Mast cell degranulation breaks peripheral tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    De Vries, V. C.; Wasiuk, A.; Bennett, K A; Benson, M. J.; Elgueta, R.; Waldschmidt, T. J.; Noelle, R J

    2009-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) have been shown to mediate regulatory T-cell (T(reg))-dependent, peripheral allograft tolerance in both skin and cardiac transplants. Furthermore, T(reg) have been implicated in mitigating IgE-mediated MC degranulation, establishing a dynamic, reciprocal relationship between MC and T(reg) in controlling inflammation. In an allograft tolerance model, it is now shown that intragraft or systemic MC degranulation results in the transient loss of T(reg) suppressor activities with t...

  13. Th17 Responses in Chronic Allergic Airway Inflammation Abrogate Regulatory T cell-mediated Tolerance and Contribute to Airway Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jingyue; Lloyd, Clare M.; Noble, Alistair

    2012-01-01

    The role of Th17 responses in airway remodeling in asthma is currently unknown. We demonstrate that both parenteral and mucosal allergen sensitization followed by allergen inhalation leads to Th17-biased lung immune responses. Unlike Th17 cells generated in vitro, lung Th17 cells did not produce TNF-α or IL-22. Eosinophilia predominated in acute inflammation while neutrophilia and IL-17 increased in chronic disease. Allergen-induced tolerance involved Foxp3, Helios and GARP expressing regulat...

  14. Transplantation tolerance mediated by suppressor T cells and suppressive antibody in a recipient of a renal transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, S; Mizuochi, I; Sada, M; Amemiya, H

    1985-10-01

    This is a report of a patient who underwent cadaveric renal transplantation in spite of the presence of three HLA-A, B and two DR antigen mismatches between the recipient and donor. The recipient received more than 20 units of blood before transplantation. The crossmatch between the recipient's serum and the T and B cells of the donor was negative. The patient exhibited hepatic dysfunction from the early posttransplant period, which eventually led to discontinuation of azathioprine or Bredinin at one year posttransplantation. Thereafter, only betamethasone was administered once every 3 days. The patients has maintained good renal function for more than one year following withdrawal of the immunosuppressants. It appeared that transplantation tolerance was established in this patient. Therefore, we examined the mechanisms sustaining the tolerance. Both nylon-wool-adherent, alloantigen-specific suppressor T cells and nonadherent, nonspecific suppressor T cells were observed in the lymphocytes of the patient after transplantation. It was also shown that suppressive antibody was present in the serum directed toward the clone of autologous lymphocytes that reacted with the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) antigen of the donor. In the inhibition test against various types of MLR antigens using this suppressive antibody, it was found that the reaction against the donor cells was suppressed when the responding cells shared the same class I antigen with the recipient. When the stimulating cells had the class II antigen of the donor, the reaction of the specific responding cells was also inhibited. These inhibiting effects were only seen when the responding cells were pretreated with the antibody, but not when stimulating cells were pretreated. PMID:2413592

  15. CD4 T Cell Tolerance to Human C-reactive Protein, an Inducible Serum Protein, Is Mediated by Medullary Thymic Epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Ludger; Klein, Thomas; Rüther, Ulrich; Kyewski, Bruno

    1998-01-01

    Inducible serum proteins whose concentrations oscillate between nontolerogenic and tolerogenic levels pose a particular challenge to the maintenance of self-tolerance. Temporal restrictions of intrathymic antigen supply should prevent continuous central tolerization of T cells, in analogy to the spatial limitation imposed by tissue-restricted antigen expression. Major acute-phase proteins such as human C-reactive protein (hCRP) are typical examples for such inducible self-antigens. The circul...

  16. Pyocyanin stimulates quorum sensing-mediated tolerance to oxidative stress and increases persister cell populations in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Nidhi; Sharma, Prince; Capalash, Neena

    2014-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are nosocomial pathogens with overlapping sites of infection. This work reports that the two can coexist stably in mixed-culture biofilms. In a study intended to improve our understanding of the mechanism of their coexistence, it was found that pyocyanin, produced by P. aeruginosa that generally eliminates competition from other pathogens, led to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in A. baumannii cells, which in response showed a significant (P ≤ 0.05) increase in production of enzymes, specifically, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD). This work shows for the first time that the expression of catalase and SOD is under the control of a quorum-sensing system in A. baumannii. In support of this observation, a quorum-sensing mutant of A. baumannii (abaI::Km) was found to be sensitive to pyocyanin compared to its wild type and showed significantly (P ≤ 0.001) lower levels of the antioxidant enzymes, which increased on addition of 5 μM N-(3-hydroxydodecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone. Likewise, in wild-type A. baumannii, there was a significant (P quencher of quorum sensing. In the presence of amikacin and carbenicillin, A. baumannii formed 0.07 and 0.02% persister cells, which increased 4- and 3-fold, respectively, in the presence of pyocyanin. These findings show that pyocyanin induces a protective mechanism in A. baumannii against oxidative stress and also increases its persistence against antibiotics which could be of clinical significance in the case of coinfections with A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa. PMID:24891106

  17. Airway epithelial cell tolerance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verghese Margrith W

    2005-04-01

    activity. Conclusion The airway epithelial cell response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa entails adaptation and tolerance likely mediated, in part, by down-regulation of IRAK1.

  18. Tolerization with BLP down-regulates HMGB1 a critical mediator of sepsis-related lethality.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coffey, J Calvin

    2012-02-03

    Tolerization with bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) affords a significant survival benefit in sepsis. Given that high mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB1) is a recognized mediator of sepsis-related lethality, we determined if tolerization with BLP leads to alterations in HMGB1. In vitro, BLP tolerization led to a reduction in HMGB1 gene transcription. This was mirrored at the protein level, as HMGB1 protein expression and release were reduced significantly in BLP-tolerized human THP-1 monocytic cells. BLP tolerance in vivo led to a highly significant, long-term survival benefit following challenge with lethal dose BLP in C57BL\\/6 mice. This was associated with an attenuation of HMGB1 release into the circulation, as evidenced by negligible serum HMGB1 levels in BLP-tolerized mice. Moreover, HMGB1 levels in peritoneal macrophages from BLP-tolerized mice were reduced significantly. Hence, tolerization with BLP leads to a down-regulation of HMGB1 protein synthesis and release. The improved survival associated with BLP tolerance could thus be explained by a reduction in HMGB1, were the latter associated with lethality in BLP-related sepsis. In testing this hypothesis, it was noted that neutralization of HMGB1, using anti-HMGB1 antibodies, abrogated BLP-associated lethality almost completely. To conclude, tolerization with BLP leads to a down-regulation of HMGB1, thus offering a novel means of targeting the latter. HMGB1 is also a mediator of lethality in BLP-related sepsis.

  19. Possible new roles for tolerable risk mediators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In his report on the Sizewell B Inquiry, the Inspector, Sir Frank Layfield, Q.C. introduced the term ''tolerable risk''. He regarded this as a better concept than the much abused and mis-interpreted phrase ''acceptable risk''. The application of tolerable risk implies that, even after regulation and incorporation of appropriate design safety criteria, there will always be a residual risk over which elements of the public will remain uneasy. They may tolerate, but they do not accept. They only tolerate because they have come to trust the process by which safety is assessed and delivered. This interpretation also implies that no safety target, the central theme of this meeting, should ever be regarded as stable or final. Such targets should continually be argued about and subject to regular searching review. Above all, such targets need to be re-justified to a doubting public so that they can be assured that the safety delivery process, namely the principles and management methods to ensure safety levels are actually met, is accountable and open for them to inspect. Thus the ''tolerable zone'' of nuclear plant safety is the product of procedures not simply assessments. These procedures need to be robust and adaptable. They need to be able to incorporate diversity of viewpoints and have a capacity to enable all who are involved to learn from each other's viewpoints and experience. In short the safety determination process needs to be more participatory and creative. (author)

  20. Studying mast cells in peripheral tolerance by using a skin transplantation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Victor C; Le Mercier, Isabelle; Nowak, Elizabeth C; Noelle, Randolph J

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) play an important role in both inflammatory and immunosuppressive responses [1]. The importance of MCs in maintaining peripheral tolerance was discovered in a FoxP3(+) regulatory T-cell (Treg)-mediated skin transplant model [2]. MCs can directly mediate tolerance by releasing anti-inflammatory mediators (reviewed in ref. 3) or by interacting with other immune cells in the graft. Here we will present protocols used to study the role of MCs in peripheral tolerance with the emphasis on how MCs can regulate T-cell functionality. First we will introduce the skin transplant model followed by reconstitution of mast cell-deficient mice (B6.Cg-Kit (W-sh) ). This includes the preparation of MCs from the bone marrow. Finally the methods used to study the influence of MCs on T-cell responses and Treg functionality will be presented by modulating the balance between tolerance and inflammation. PMID:25388268

  1. Dendritic cells in peripheral tolerance and immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    Dendritic cells capable of influencing immunity exist as functionally distinct subsets, T cell-tolerizing and T cell-immunizing subsets. The present paper reviews how these subsets of DCs develop, differentiate and function in vivo and in vitro at the cellular and molecular level. In particular...

  2. Creation of the herbicide tolerant rice plants via T-DNA mediated gene targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise modification of the plant genome is important both for the study of gene function in vivo and for producing publicly acceptable transgenic plants. Thus establishment of an efficient gene targeting (GT) system in plant is a significant goal. Here, we report a successful introduction of point mutations into an endogenous rice gene by T-DNA mediated GT. ALS is the primary target for at least four structurally distinct classes of herbicides. Recently, Shimizu et al. screened an ALS-inhibiting herbicide, bispyribac-sodium (BS) tolerant rice cells. BS tolerance was linked to two point mutations in ALS gene: a tryptophan (TGG) to leucine (TTG) change at amino acid 548 (W548L), and serine (AGT) to isoleucine (ATT) change at amino acide 627 (S627I). However, no plants could be recovered from the BS-tolerant rice cells due to prolonged tissue culture. Then we tried to produce BS tolerant rice plants containing these double mutations in ALS by T-DNA mediated GT. We obtained 70 GT plants from 1500 rice scutellum-derived calli infected with Agrobacterium horboring GT vector. GT rice homozygous for the modified ALS locus showed hyper tolerance to BS as compared to BS tolerant plants, which overexpressed W548L/S627I mutating ALS produced by a conventional transgenic system. This result indicates that exclusion of the BS sensitive wild-type ALS allele is important to confer high levels of BS tolerance. Not only selectable two point mutations, which confer BS tolerance but also non-selectable silent mutations on the targeting vector were incorporated into the GT plants. This result indicates that T-DNA mediated GT system is available for introduction of several point mutations to the target gene. Furthermore, point mutations on the targeting vector were incorporated into the genome with a mosaic manner in 3 plants out of 70 GT plants, suggesting the involvement of DNA mismatch repair system in the course of T-DNA mediated GT in these plants. (author)

  3. How some T cells escape tolerance induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, G; Sercarz, E

    1989-11-01

    A feature common to many animal models of autoimmune disease, for example, experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis and collagen-induced arthritis, is the presence of self-reactive T cells in healthy animals, which are activated to produce disease by immunization with exogenous antigen. It is unclear why these T cells are not deleted during ontogeny in the thymus and, having escaped tolerance induction, why they are not spontaneously activated by self-antigen. To investigate these questions, we have examined an experimental model in which mice are tolerant to an antigen despite the presence of antigen-reactive T cells. We find that the T cells that escape tolerance induction are specific for minor determinants on the antigen. We propose that these T cells evade tolerance induction because some minor determinants are only available in relatively low amounts after in vivo processing of the whole antigen. For the same reason, these T cells are not normally activated but can be stimulated under special circumstances to circumvent tolerance. PMID:2478888

  4. Promoting tolerance to proteolipid protein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis through targeting dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Stern, Joel N. H.; Keskin, Derin B.; Kato, Zenichiro; Waldner, Hanspeter; Schallenberg, Sonja; Anderson, Ana; von Boehmer, Harald; Kretschmer, Karsten; Strominger, Jack L.

    2010-01-01

    In T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, self-reactive T cells with known antigen specificity appear to be particularly promising targets for antigen-specific induction of tolerance without compromising desired protective host immune responses. Several lines of evidence suggest that delivery of antigens to antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in the steady state (i.e., to immature DCs) may represent a suitable approach to induce antigen-specific T-cell tolerance peripherally. Here, we repo...

  5. Micro-RNA-155-mediated control of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is required for restoring adaptively tolerant CD4+ T-cell function in rodents.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jinyu; Vandevenne, Patricia; Hamdi, Haifa; Van Puyvelde, Merry; Zucchi, Alessandro; Bettonville, Marie; Weatherly, Kathleen; Braun, Michel Y

    2015-01-01

    T cells chronically stimulated by a persistent antigen often become dysfunctional and lose effector functions and proliferative capacity. To identify the importance of micro-RNA-155 (miR-155) in this phenomenon, we analyzed mouse miR-155-deficient CD4(+) T cells in a model where the chronic exposure to a systemic antigen led to T-cell functional unresponsiveness. We found that miR-155 was required for restoring function of T cells after programmed death receptor 1 blockade. Heme oxygenase 1 (...

  6. The enigmatic role of mast cells in dominant tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    de Vries, Victor C.; Pino-Lagos, Karina; Elgueta, Raul; Noelle, Randolph J.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The role of regulatory T cells (Treg) in peripheral tolerance has been studied extensively in transplantation research. Recently, mast cells have been shown to play an indispensable role in allograft tolerance. The purpose of this review is to inform the reader on the current standings of the role of mast cells in dominant tolerance with an emphasis on the interaction of mast cells with Treg.RECENT FINDINGS: Mast cells are required to sustain peripheral tolerance via Treg. ...

  7. Assay of mast cell mediators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rådinger, Madeleine; Jensen, Bettina M; Swindle, Emily;

    2015-01-01

    Mediator release from activated mast cells is a major initiator of the symptomology associated with allergic disorders such as anaphylaxis and asthma. Thus, methods to monitor the generation and release of such mediators have widespread applicability in studies designed to understand the processe...

  8. Verapamil, and Its Metabolite Norverapamil, Inhibit Macrophage-induced, Bacterial Efflux Pump-mediated Tolerance to Multiple Anti-tubercular Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Kristin N.; Szumowski, John D.; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2014-01-01

    Drug tolerance likely represents an important barrier to tuberculosis treatment shortening. We previously implicated the Mycobacterium tuberculosis efflux pump Rv1258c as mediating macrophage-induced tolerance to rifampicin and intracellular growth. In this study, we infected the human macrophage-like cell line THP-1 with drug-sensitive and drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains and found that tolerance developed to most antituberculosis drugs, including the newer agents moxifloxacin, PA-824,...

  9. Mast cells contribute to peripheral tolerance and attenuate autoimmune vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Poh-Yi; Summers, Shaun A; Ooi, Joshua D; O'Sullivan, Kim M; Tan, Diana S Y; Muljadi, Ruth C M; Odobasic, Dragana; Kitching, A Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R

    2012-12-01

    Mast cells contribute to the modulation of the immune response, but their role in autoimmune renal disease is not well understood. Here, we induced autoimmunity resulting in focal necrotizing GN by immunizing wild-type or mast cell-deficient (Kit(W-sh/W-sh)) mice with myeloperoxidase. Mast cell-deficient mice exhibited more antimyeloperoxidase CD4+ T cells, enhanced dermal delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to myeloperoxidase, and more severe focal necrotizing GN. Furthermore, the lymph nodes draining the sites of immunization had fewer Tregs and reduced production of IL-10 in mice lacking mast cells. Reconstituting these mice with mast cells significantly increased the numbers of Tregs in the lymph nodes and attenuated both autoimmunity and severity of disease. After immunization with myeloperoxidase, mast cells migrated from the skin to the lymph nodes to contact Tregs. In an ex vivo assay, mast cells enhanced Treg suppression through IL-10. Reconstitution of mast cell-deficient mice with IL-10-deficient mast cells led to enhanced autoimmunity to myeloperoxidase and greater disease severity compared with reconstitution with IL-10-intact mast cells. Taken together, these studies establish a role for mast cells in mediating peripheral tolerance to myeloperoxidase, protecting them from the development of focal necrotizing GN in ANCA-associated vasculitis. PMID:23138486

  10. CO tolerance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubler, L.; Scherer, G.G.; Wokaun, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Reformed methanol can be used as a fuel for polymer electrolyte fuel cells instead of pure hydrogen. The reformate gas contains mainly H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} in the order of 20% and low levels of CO in the order of 100 ppm. CO causes severe voltage losses due to poisoning of the anode catalyst. The effect of CO on cell performance was investigated at different CO levels up to 100 ppm. Various options to improve the CO tolerance of the fuel cell were assessed thereafter, of which the injection of a few percents of oxygen into the fuel feed stream proved to be most effective. By mixing 1% of oxygen with hydrogen containing 100 ppm CO, complete recovery of the cell performance could be attained. (author) 2 figs., 2 tabs., 3 refs.

  11. Interleukin 35: A Key Mediator of Suppression and the Propagation of Infectious Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian M Olson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The importance of regulatory T cells in balancing the effector arm of the immune system is well documented, playing a central role in preventing autoimmunity, facilitating graft tolerance following organ transplantation, and having a detrimental impact on the development of anti-tumor immunity. These regulatory responses use a variety of mechanisms to mediate suppression, including soluble factors. While IL-10 and TGF-β are the most commonly studied immunosuppressive cytokines, the recently identified IL-35 has been shown to have potent suppressive function in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, not only does IL-35 have the ability to directly suppress effector T cell responses, it is also able to expand regulatory responses by propagating infectious tolerance and generating a potent population of IL-35-expressing inducible regulatory T cells. In this review, we summarize research characterizing the structure and function of IL-35, examine its role in disease, and discuss how it can contribute to the induction of a distinct population of inducible regulatory T cells.

  12. Neuropilin-1 expression is induced on tolerant self-reactive CD8+ T cells but is dispensable for the tolerant phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie R Jackson

    Full Text Available Establishing peripheral CD8(+ T cell tolerance is vital to avoid immune mediated destruction of healthy self-tissues. However, it also poses a major impediment to tumor immunity since tumors are derived from self-tissue and often induce T cell tolerance and dysfunction. Thus, understanding the mechanisms that regulate T cell tolerance versus immunity has important implications for human health. Signals received from the tissue environment largely dictate whether responding T cells become activated or tolerant. For example, induced expression and subsequent ligation of negative regulatory receptors on the surface of self-reactive CD8(+ T cells are integral in the induction of tolerance. We utilized a murine model of T cell tolerance to more completely define the molecules involved in this process. We discovered that, in addition to other known regulatory receptors, tolerant self-reactive CD8(+ T cells distinctly expressed the surface receptor neuropilin-1 (Nrp1. Nrp1 was highly induced in response to self-antigen, but only modestly when the same antigen was encountered under immune conditions, suggesting a possible mechanistic link to T cell tolerance. We also observed a similar Nrp1 expression profile on human tumor infiltrating CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. Despite high expression on tolerant CD8(+ T cells, our studies revealed that Nrp1 had no detectable role in the tolerant phenotype. Specifically, Nrp1-deficient T cells displayed the same functional defects as wild-type self-reactive T cells, lacking in vivo cytolytic potential, IFNγ production, and antitumor responses. While reporting mostly negative data, our findings have therapeutic implications, as Nrp1 is now being targeted for human cancer therapy in clinical trials, but the precise molecular pathways and immune cells being engaged during treatment remain incompletely defined.

  13. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Akihiko Murata; Shin-Ichi Hayashi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of...

  14. Transplantation Tolerance Induction: Cell Therapies and Their Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalea, Joseph R.; Tomita, Yusuke; Lindholm, Christopher R.; Burlingham, William

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based therapies have been studied extensively in the context of transplantation tolerance induction. The most successful protocols have relied on transfusion of bone marrow prior to the transplantation of a renal allograft. However, it is not clear that stem cells found in bone marrow are required in order to render a transplant candidate immunologically tolerant. Accordingly, mesenchymal stem cells, regulatory myeloid cells, T regulatory cells, and other cell types are being tested as possible routes to tolerance induction, in the absence of donor-derived stem cells. Early data with each of these cell types have been encouraging. However, the induction regimen capable of achieving consistent tolerance, while avoiding unwanted sided effects, and which is scalable to the human patient, has yet to be identified. Here, we present the status of investigations of various tolerogenic cell types and the mechanistic rationale for their use in tolerance induction protocols. PMID:27014267

  15. Type 1 regulatory T cells: a new mechanism of peripheral immune tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hanyu; Zhang, Rong; Jin, Boquan; Chen, Lihua

    2015-09-01

    The lack of immune response to an antigen, a process known as immune tolerance, is essential for the preservation of immune homeostasis. To date, two mechanisms that drive immune tolerance have been described extensively: central tolerance and peripheral tolerance. Under the new nomenclature, thymus-derived regulatory T (tT(reg)) cells are the major mediators of central immune tolerance, whereas peripherally derived regulatory T (pT(reg)) cells function to regulate peripheral immune tolerance. A third type of T(reg) cells, termed iT(reg), represents only the in vitro-induced T(reg) cells(1). Depending on whether the cells stably express Foxp3, pT(reg), and iT(reg) cells may be divided into two subsets: the classical CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T(reg) cells and the CD4(+)Foxp3(-) type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells(2). This review focuses on the discovery, associated biomarkers, regulatory functions, methods of induction, association with disease, and clinical trials of Tr1 cells. PMID:26051475

  16. Apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cells induce immune tolerance by specifically inhibiting development of CD4(+) effector memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fang; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2016-02-01

    CD4(+) memory T cells play an important role in induction of autoimmunity and chronic inflammatory responses; however, regulatory mechanisms of CD4(+) memory T cell-mediated inflammatory responses are poorly understood. Here we show that apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cells inhibit development and differentiation of CD4(+) effector memory T cells in vitro and in vivo. Simultaneously, intravenous transfer of apoptotic T cell-induced tolerogenic dendritic cells can block development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system in C57 BL/6J mouse. Our results imply that it is effector memory CD4(+) T cells, not central memory CD4(+) T cells, which play a major role in chronic inflammatory responses in mice with EAE. Intravenous transfer of tolerogenic dendritic cells induced by apoptotic T cells leads to immune tolerance by specifically blocking development of CD4(+) effector memory T cells compared with results of EAE control mice. These results reveal a new mechanism of apoptotic cell-treated dendritic cell-mediated immune tolerance in vivo. PMID:26111522

  17. AN OVERVIEW ON NON-T CELL PATHWAYS IN TRANSPLANT REJECTION AND TOLERANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wentao; Li, Xian C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent studies have demonstrated unexpected roles for non-T cells, especially innate immune cells, in the regulation of transplant outcomes. In this review, we highlight our recent understanding on the role of NK cells, dendritic cells, and macrophages in the allograft response, and discuss whether such cells can be targeted for the induction of transplant tolerance. Recent findings There are unexpected roles for non-T cells in regulating transplant outcomes, and depending on the models and tolerizing protocols, the innate immune cells contribute significantly to both graft rejection and graft acceptance. Some innate immune cells are potent inflammatory cells directly mediating graft injury, while others regulate effector programs of alloreactive T cells and ultimately determine whether the graft is rejected or accepted. Furthermore, when properly activated, some innate immune cells promote the induction of Foxp3+ Tregs whereas others efficiently kill them, thereby differentially affecting the induction of tolerance. These new findings unravel unexpected complexities of non-T cells in transplant models and may have important clinical implications. Summary The innate immune cells contribute to both graft rejection and acceptance. Thus, a detailed understanding of the exact mechanisms and pathways that govern such opposing effects in transplant models may lead to the design of new tolerance protocols. PMID:20531193

  18. Putative mechanisms mediating tolerance for audiovisual stimulus onset asynchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Jyoti; Miller, Lee M; Pitt, Mark A; Shahin, Antoine J

    2015-03-01

    Audiovisual (AV) speech perception is robust to temporal asynchronies between visual and auditory stimuli. We investigated the neural mechanisms that facilitate tolerance for audiovisual stimulus onset asynchrony (AVOA) with EEG. Individuals were presented with AV words that were asynchronous in onsets of voice and mouth movement and judged whether they were synchronous or not. Behaviorally, individuals tolerated (perceived as synchronous) longer AVOAs when mouth movement preceded the speech (V-A) stimuli than when the speech preceded mouth movement (A-V). Neurophysiologically, the P1-N1-P2 auditory evoked potentials (AEPs), time-locked to sound onsets and known to arise in and surrounding the primary auditory cortex (PAC), were smaller for the in-sync than the out-of-sync percepts. Spectral power of oscillatory activity in the beta band (14-30 Hz) following the AEPs was larger during the in-sync than out-of-sync perception for both A-V and V-A conditions. However, alpha power (8-14 Hz), also following AEPs, was larger for the in-sync than out-of-sync percepts only in the V-A condition. These results demonstrate that AVOA tolerance is enhanced by inhibiting low-level auditory activity (e.g., AEPs representing generators in and surrounding PAC) that code for acoustic onsets. By reducing sensitivity to acoustic onsets, visual-to-auditory onset mapping is weakened, allowing for greater AVOA tolerance. In contrast, beta and alpha results suggest the involvement of higher-level neural processes that may code for language cues (phonetic, lexical), selective attention, and binding of AV percepts, allowing for wider neural windows of temporal integration, i.e., greater AVOA tolerance. PMID:25505102

  19. The significance of non-T cell pathways in graft rejection--implications for transplant tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian Chang

    2010-01-01

    Both innate and adaptive immune cells are actively involved in the initiation and destruction of allotransplants, there is a true need now to look beyond T cells in the allograft response, examining various non-T cell types in transplant models and how such cell types interact with T cells in determining the fate of an allograft. Studies in this area may lead to further improvement in transplant outcomes. SUMMARY The “T cell-centric paradigm” has dominated transplant research for decades. While T cells are undeniably quintessential in allograft rejection, recent studies have demonstrated unexpected roles for non-T cells such as NK cells, B cells, macrophage and mast cells in regulating transplant outcomes. It has been shown that depending on models, context, and tolerizing protocols, the innate immune cells contribute significantly to both graft rejection and graft acceptance. Some innate immune cells are potent inflammatory cells directly mediating graft injury while others regulate effector programs of alloreactive T cells and ultimately determine whether the graft is rejected or accepted. Furthermore, when properly activated, some innate immune cells promote the induction of Foxp3+ Tregs whereas others readily kill them, thereby differentially affecting the induction of tolerance. In addition, B cells can induce graft damage by producing alloantibodies or by promoting T cell activation. However, B cells also contribute to transplant tolerance by acting as regulatory cells or by stimulating Foxp3+ Tregs. These new findings unravel unexpected complexities for non-T cells in transplant models and may have important clinical implications. In this overview, we highlight recent advances on the role of B cells, NK cells, dendritic cells, and macrophages in the allograft response, and discuss whether such cells can be therapeutically targeted for the induction of transplant tolerance. PMID:20686444

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis-mediated tomato tolerance to drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitarra, Walter; Maserti, Biancaelena; Gambino, Giorgio; Guerrieri, Emilio; Balestrini, Raffaella

    2016-07-01

    A multidisciplinary approach, involving eco-physiological, morphometric, biochemical and molecular analyses, has been used to study the impact of two different AM fungi, i.e. Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus intraradices, on tomato response to water stress. Overall, results show that AM symbiosis positively affects the tolerance to drought in tomato with a different plant response depending on the involved AM fungal species. PMID:27359066

  1. Specific Osmolyte Transporters Mediate Bile Tolerance in Listeria monocytogenes▿

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Debbie; Sleator, Roy D.; Casey, Pat G.; Hill, Colin; Gahan, Cormac G. M.

    2009-01-01

    The food-borne pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes has the potential to adapt to an array of suboptimal growth environments encountered within the host. The pathogen is relatively bile tolerant and has the capacity to survive and grow within both the small intestine and the gallbladder in murine models of oral infection. We have previously demonstrated a role for the principal carnitine transport system of L. monocytogenes (OpuC) in gastrointestinal survival of the pathogen (R. Sleato...

  2. Suppressor cells in transplantation tolerance: the mechanisms of tolerance in radiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Histoincompatible-complete radiation chimeras, after resolving acute graft-vs-host (GVHD), establish specific tolerance to host and donor alloantigens. This tolerance can be perturbed with immunosuppressive agents and infusions of small numbers of donor-type cells with infusions of massive numbers of donor-type cells, or with infusions of a small number of donor-type cells, that were sensitized against host antigens prior to transfer. These chimeras possess T lymphocytes in the spleen that specifically suppress donor to host mixed lymphocyte reactions and adoptively transfer suppression of GVHD to secondary hosts. Nylon-wool fractionation of chimeric spleen cells restores the response of chimeric lymphocytes to host alloantigens, suggesting that transplantation tolerance is not attributable to clonal deletion but the activity of nylon-wool-adherent T suppressor spleen cells

  3. Cytokinin Determines Thiol-Mediated Arsenic Tolerance and Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Thotegowdanapalya C; Castrillo, Gabriel; Navarro, Cristina; Zarco-Fernández, Sonia; Ramireddy, Eswarayya; Mateo, Cristian; Zamarreño, Angel M; Paz-Ares, Javier; Muñoz, Riansares; García-Mina, Jose M; Hernández, Luis E; Schmülling, Thomas; Leyva, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    The presence of arsenic in soil and water is a constant threat to plant growth in many regions of the world. Phytohormones act in the integration of growth control and stress response, but their role in plant responses to arsenic remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that arsenate [As(V)], the most prevalent arsenic chemical species in nature, causes severe depletion of endogenous cytokinins (CKs) in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that CK signaling mutants and transgenic plants with reduced endogenous CK levels showed an As(V)-tolerant phenotype. Our data indicate that in CK-depleted plants exposed to As(V), transcript levels of As(V)/phosphate-transporters were similar or even higher than in wild-type plants. In contrast, CK depletion provoked the coordinated activation of As(V) tolerance mechanisms, leading to the accumulation of thiol compounds such as phytochelatins and glutathione, which are essential for arsenic sequestration. Transgenic CK-deficient Arabidopsis and tobacco lines show a marked increase in arsenic accumulation. Our findings indicate that CK is an important regulatory factor in plant adaptation to arsenic stress. PMID:27208271

  4. Regulatory T Cells and Immune Tolerance in the Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Oliver J.; Powrie, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental role of the mammalian immune system is to eradicate pathogens while minimizing immunopathology. Instigating and maintaining immunological tolerance within the intestine represents a unique challenge to the mucosal immune system. Regulatory T cells are critical for continued immune tolerance in the intestine through active control of innate and adaptive immune responses. Dynamic adaptation of regulatory T-cell populations to the intestinal tissue microenvironment is key in this p...

  5. Cutting edge: TNFR-shedding by CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells inhibits the induction of inflammatory mediators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mierlo, G.J. van; Scherer, H.U.; Hameetman, M.; Morgan, M.E.; Flierman, R.; Huizinga, T.W.J.; Toes, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play an essential role in maintaining tolerance to self and nonself. In several models of T cell-mediated (auto) immunity, Treg cells exert protective effects by the inhibition of pathogenic T cell responses. In addition, Treg cells can modulate T cell-independent

  6. Cell motility and antibiotic tolerance of bacterial swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Wenlong

    Many bacteria species can move across moist surfaces in a coordinated manner known as swarming. It is reported that swarm cells show higher tolerance to a wide variety of antibiotics than planktonic cells. We used the model bacterium E. coli to study how motility affects the antibiotic tolerance of swarm cells. Our results provide new insights for the control of pathogenic invasion via regulating cell motility. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail: zwlong@live.com.

  7. The Epigenetic Regulator G9a Mediates Tolerance to RNA Virus Infection in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah H. Merkling; Bronkhorst, Alfred W.; Kramer, Jamie M.; Gijs J. Overheul; Schenck, Annette; van Rij, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Author Summary Multicellular organisms deploy various strategies to fight microbial infections. Invading pathogens may be eradicated directly by antimicrobial effectors of the immune system. Another strategy consists of increasing the tolerance of the host to infection, for example, by limiting the adverse effects of the immune response. The molecular mechanisms underlying this novel concept remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrate that the epigenetic regulator G9a mediates tolera...

  8. The Influence of Light Quality, Circadian Rhythm, and Photoperiod on the CBF-Mediated Freezing Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ho Kang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Low temperature adversely affects crop yields by restraining plant growth and productivity. Most temperate plants have the potential to increase their freezing tolerance upon exposure to low but nonfreezing temperatures, a process known as cold acclimation. Various physiological, molecular, and metabolic changes occur during cold acclimation, which suggests that the plant cold stress response is a complex, vital phenomenon that involves more than one pathway. The C-Repeat Binding Factor (CBF pathway is the most important and well-studied cold regulatory pathway that imparts freezing tolerance to plants. The regulation of freezing tolerance involves the action of phytochromes, which play an important role in light-mediated signalling to activate cold-induced gene expression through the CBF pathway. Under normal temperature conditions, CBF expression is regulated by the circadian clock through the action of a central oscillator and also day length (photoperiod. The phytochrome and phytochrome interacting factor are involved in the repression of the CBF expression under long day (LD conditions. Apart from the CBF regulon, a novel pathway involving the Z-box element also mediates the cold acclimation response in a light-dependent manner. This review provides insights into the progress of cold acclimation in relation to light quality, circadian regulation, and photoperiodic regulation and also explains the underlying molecular mechanisms of cold acclimation for introducing the engineering of economically important, cold-tolerant plants.

  9. Adenoviral-mediated localized CTLA-4Ig gene expression induces long-term allograft pancreas survival and donor-specific immune tolerance in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    T cell activation following alloantigen recognition plays a critical role in the development of the rejection in all solid organ, tissue and cell transplantation. A recombinant molecule, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 antibody (CTLA-4Ig), is known to induce to T-cell into "anergy" by blocking the costimulatory B7-CD28 interaction. Either systemic or localized administration of CTLA-Ig has been shown to prolong allograft survival and induce donor-specific tolerance in some transplant models. In this study, we characterized the expression and immunosuppressive effectiveness of adenoviral-mediated CTLA-4Ig gene transfer. We demonstrated transduction of the allografts with AdCTLA-41g resulted in localized expression, permanent graft survival and stable donor-specific tolerance. In addition, by performing simultaneous dual-organ transplantation, we targeted on immunosuppression through a local expression of CTLA-4Ig via adenoviral-mediated gene transfer into pancreatic allografts.

  10. Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønder, Lars

    Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics is an experiment in re-orientation. The book is based on the wager that tolerance exceeds the more prevalent images of self-restraint and repressive benevolence because neither precludes the possibility of a more “active tolerance” motivated by the d...... alternatives by returning to the notion of tolerance as the endurance of pain, linking this notion to exemplars and theories relevant to the politics of multiculturalism, religious freedom, and free speech....

  11. Intrathecal Lamotrigine Attenuates Antinociceptive Morphine Tolerance and Suppresses Spinal Glial Cell Activation in Morphine-Tolerant Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, In-Gu; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Yoon, Yang-In; Park, Jong-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Glial cells play a critical role in morphine tolerance, resulting from repeated administration of morphine. Both the development and the expression of tolerance are suppressed by the analgesic lamotrigine. This study investigated the relationship between the ability of lamotrigine to maintain the antinociceptive effect of morphine during tolerance development and glial cell activation in the spinal cord. In a rat model, morphine (15 µg) was intrathecally injected once daily for 7 days to indu...

  12. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H; Croft, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, but whether these possess the attributes required to directly promote the development of Foxp3(+) iTreg cells is unclear. Here, we show that lung-resident tissue MØs coexpress TGF-β and retinal dehydrogenases (RALDH1 and RALDH 2) under steady-state conditions and that their sampling of harmless airborne antigen and presentation to antigen-specific CD4 T cells resulted in the generation of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Treg cell induction in this model depended on both TGF-β and retinoic acid. Transfer of the antigen-pulsed tissue MØs into the airways correspondingly prevented the development of asthmatic lung inflammation upon subsequent challenge with antigen. Moreover, exposure of lung tissue MØs to allergens suppressed their ability to generate iTreg cells coincident with blocking airway tolerance. Suppression of Treg cell generation required proteases and TLR-mediated signals. Therefore, lung-resident tissue MØs have regulatory functions, and strategies to target these cells might hold promise for prevention or treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:23547101

  13. Tolerance of yeast biofilm cells towards systemic antifungals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Rasmus Kenneth

    of this thesis has been to explore the tolerance mechanisms of yeast biofilms to systemic antifungal agents and to identify the molecular target of a novel peptidomimetic with anti-biofilm activity. The genetic tractable S. cerevisiae was used as biofilm model system for the pathogenic Candida...... species in an attempt to take advantage of the molecular tools available for S. cerevisiae. Mature biofilms containing mainly growth arrested cells were shown to be tolerant to three out of four tested antifungals, while all drugs had inhibitory activity against proliferating biofilm cells, demonstrating...... physiological state of the cell and the mechanism of action of the drug, and this is independent of mode of growth. Based on these results, it can be suggested that future drug treatment strategies should focus on targeting growth arrested cells, rather than distinguishing between modes of growth. At last, we...

  14. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells: Natural regulators for transplant tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Boros, Peter; Ochando, Jordi C.; Chen, Shu-hsia; Bromberg, Jonathan S.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) contribute to the negative regulation of immune response in cancer patients. This review summarizes results on important issues related to MDSC biology, including expansion and activation of MDSC, phenotype, and subsets as well pathways and different mechanisms by which these cells exert their suppressive effect. Recent observations suggesting that MDSC may have roles in transplant tolerance are presented. Although therapeutic targeting and destruction ...

  15. Functional clonal deletion versus suppressor cell-induced transplantation tolerance in chimeras prepared with a short course of total-lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allogeneic bone marrow (BM) chimeras induced by infusion of BM cells into recipients conditioned with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) were shown to develop humoral and cell-mediated tolerance to host and donor-type alloantigens by a number of in vitro and in vivo assays. Spleen cells of tolerant chimeras exhibited suppressive activity of mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). MLR suppression was not abrogated by depletion of Lyt-2 cells, and neither could Lyt-2-positive cells sorted from the spleens of tolerant chimeras suppress MLR or attenuate graft-versus-host reactivity in vivo. Likewise, specifically unresponsive spleen cells obtained from chimeras could not be induced to respond in MLR against tolerizing host-type cells following depletion of Lyt-2 or passage through a nylon-wool column. Tolerance of chimera spleen cells to host alloantigens, best documented by permanent survival of donor-type skin allografts, could be adoptively transferred into syngeneic recipients treated by heavy irradiation but not into untreated or mildly irradiated recipients. Adoptive transfer of tolerance seemed to be associated with experimental conditions favoring engraftment of tolerant cells rather than suppression of host reactivity. We speculate that although host and/or donor-derived suppressor cells may be operating in reducing the pool of specific alloreactive clones by blocking cell proliferation in response to allogeneic challenge, the final outcome in tolerant chimeras is actual or functional deletion of alloreactive clones

  16. Anti-Apoptotic Effects of Lentiviral Vector Transduction Promote Increased Rituximab Tolerance in Cancerous B-Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Benyamin; Krogh, Louise Bechmann; Laursen, Maria Bach; Primo, Maria Nascimento; Marques, Sara Correia; Dybkær, Karen; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is characterized by great genetic and clinical heterogeneity which complicates prognostic prediction and influences treatment efficacy. The most common regimen, R-CHOP, consists of a combination of anthracycline- and immuno-based drugs including Rituximab. It remains elusive how and to which extent genetic variability impacts the response and potential tolerance to R-CHOP. Hence, an improved understanding of mechanisms leading to drug tolerance in B-cells is crucial, and modelling by genetic intervention directly in B-cells is fundamental in such investigations. Lentivirus-based gene vectors are widely used gene vehicles, which in B-cells are an attractive alternative to potentially toxic transfection-based methodologies. Here, we investigate the use of VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors in B-cells for exploring the impact of microRNAs on tolerance to Rituximab. Notably, we find that robust lentiviral transduction of cancerous B-cell lines markedly and specifically enhances the resistance of transduced germinal center B-cells (GCBs) to Rituximab. Although Rituximab works partially through complement-mediated cell lysis, increased tolerance is not achieved through effects of lentiviral transduction on cell death mediated by complement. Rather, reduced levels of PARP1 and persistent high levels of CD43 in Rituximab-treated GCBs demonstrate anti-apoptotic effects of lentiviral transduction that may interfere with the outcome and interpretation of Rituximab tolerance studies. Our findings stress that caution should be exercised exploiting lentiviral vectors in studies of tolerance to therapeutics in DLBCL. Importantly, however, we demonstrate the feasibility of using the lentiviral gene delivery platform in studies addressing the impact of specific microRNAs on Rituximab responsiveness. PMID:27045839

  17. STAT4-associated natural killer cell tolerance following liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Jamil, K M; Hydes, T.J.; Cheent, K.S.; Cassidy, S A; Traherne, J. A.; Jayaraman, J.; Trowsdale, J.; Alexander, G J; Little, A M; McFarlane, H.; Heneghan, M. A.; Purbhoo, M.A.; Khakoo, S I

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Natural killer (NK) cells are important mediators of liver inflammation in chronic liver disease. The aim of this study was to investigate why liver transplants (LTs) are not rejected by NK cells in the absence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching, and to identify a tolerogenic NK cell phenotype. Design: Phenotypic and functional analyses on NK cells from 54 LT recipients were performed, and comparisons made with healthy controls. Further investigation was performed using ...

  18. Fibronectin mediates mesendodermal cell fate decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Paul; Andersen, Peter; Hassel, David; Kaynak, Bogac L.; Limphong, Pattraranee; Juergensen, Lonny; Kwon, Chulan; Srivastava, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Non-cell-autonomous signals often play crucial roles in cell fate decisions during animal development. Reciprocal signaling between endoderm and mesoderm is vital for embryonic development, yet the key signals and mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we show that endodermal cells efficiently promote the emergence of mesodermal cells in the neighboring population through signals containing an essential short-range component. The endoderm-mesoderm interaction promoted precardiac mesoderm formation in mouse embryonic stem cells and involved endodermal production of fibronectin. In vivo, fibronectin deficiency resulted in a dramatic reduction of mesoderm accompanied by endodermal expansion in zebrafish embryos. This event was mediated by regulation of Wnt signaling in mesodermal cells through activation of integrin-β1. Our findings highlight the importance of the extracellular matrix in mediating short-range signals and reveal a novel function of endoderm, involving fibronectin and its downstream signaling cascades, in promoting the emergence of mesoderm. PMID:23715551

  19. Nod2 suppresses Borrelia burgdorferi mediated murine Lyme arthritis and carditis through the induction of tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Petnicki-Ocwieja

    Full Text Available The internalization of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, by phagocytes is essential for an effective activation of the immune response to this pathogen. The intracellular, cytosolic receptor Nod2 has been shown to play varying roles in either enhancing or attenuating inflammation in response to different infectious agents. We examined the role of Nod2 in responses to B. burgdorferi. In vitro stimulation of Nod2 deficient bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM resulted in decreased induction of multiple cytokines, interferons and interferon regulated genes compared with wild-type cells. However, B. burgdorferi infection of Nod2 deficient mice resulted in increased rather than decreased arthritis and carditis compared to control mice. We explored multiple potential mechanisms for the paradoxical response in in vivo versus in vitro systems and found that prolonged stimulation with a Nod2 ligand, muramyl dipeptide (MDP, resulted in tolerance to stimulation by B. burgdorferi. This tolerance was lost with stimulation of Nod2 deficient cells that cannot respond to MDP. Cytokine patterns in the tolerance model closely paralleled cytokine profiles in infected Nod2 deficient mice. We propose a model where Nod2 has an enhancing role in activating inflammation in early infection, but moderates inflammation after prolonged exposure to the organism through induction of tolerance.

  20. Experimental evolution and gene knockout studies reveal AcrA-mediated isobutanol tolerance in Ralstonia eutropha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Amanda C; Gai, Claudia S; Lu, Jingnan; Sinskey, Anthony J; Brigham, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    Isobutanol (IBT) has attracted much attention from researchers as a next generation drop-in biofuel. Ralstonia eutropha is a gram-negative bacterium which naturally produces polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), and has been reported to produce IBT after metabolic engineering. Similar to other microbes, R. eutropha experiences toxicity from branched-chain alcohols and is unable to grow in the presence of IBT concentrations higher than 0.5% (v v(-1)). Such low tolerance greatly limits the ability of R. eutropha to grow and produce IBT. In order to study toxicity to the cells, IBT-tolerant strains were developed by experimental evolution, revealing that two genes, previously described as being related to IBT tolerance in Escherichia coli (acrA and acrA6), also presented mutations in R. eutropha evolved strains. The effect on the physiology of the cells of in-frame deletions of each of these genes was assessed in wild type and engineered IBT-producing strains in an attempt to reproduce a tolerant phenotype. The mutant strains' ability to tolerate, consume, and produce IBT were also analyzed. Although deletions of acrA6 and acrA did not significantly improve R. eutropha growth in the presence of IBT, these deletions improved cell survival in the presence of high concentrations of IBT in the extracellular milieu. Moreover, an in-frame acrA deletion in an engineered IBT-producing R. eutropha enhanced the strain's ability to produce IBT, which could potentially be associated with enhanced survival at high IBT concentrations. PMID:26811221

  1. Rice Phospholipase Dα is Involved in Salt Tolerance by the Mediation of H+-ATPase Activity and Transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Shen; Rong Wang; Wen Jing; Wenhua Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipase Dα (PLDα) is involved in plant response to salt stress, but the mechanisms remain unclear.We investigated rice PLDα (OsPLDα) localization and its effect on tonoplast (TP) and plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase activity and transcription in response to NaCl. When rice suspension-cultured cells were treated with 100 mM NaCI, PLDα activity in cell extracts showed a transient activation with a threefold increase at 1 h. The amount of OsPLDα protein decreased slightly in the cytosolic fractions, whereas it increased significantly in the TP after NaCI treatment. OsPLDα1 knockdown cells were developed using RNA interference (RNAi) methods. The increase in TP and PM H+-ATPase activity induced by NaCl was significantly inhibited in OsPLDα1-RNAi cells. Knockdown of OsPLDα1 prevented the NaCl-induced increase in the transcript level of OsVHA-A (encodes TP H+-ATPase) and OSA2 (encodes PM H+-ATPase),as well as OsNHX1 (encodes TP Na+/H+ antiporter). The cells died more in OsPLDα1-RNAi mutant than in wild type when they were treated with NaCl. These results suggest that OsPLDα is involved in salt tolerance in rice through the mediation of H+-ATPase activity and transcription.

  2. A Low Cost Rad-Tolerant Standard Cell Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambles, Jody W.; Maki, Gary K.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes circuit design techniques developed at the NASA Institute of Advanced Microelectronics that have been shown to protect CMOS circuits from the deleterious effects of the natural space radiation environment. The IAuE is leading a program to incorporate these radiation-tolerance providing design techniques into a commercial standard cell library that will be used in conjunction with available Electronic Design Automation tools to produce space flight qualified microelectronics fabricated at modern commercial CMOS foundries.

  3. Posttraumatic Stress and Alcohol Use Motives: A Test of the Incremental and Mediating Role of Distress Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Vujanovic, Anka A.; Marshall-Berenz, Erin C.; Zvolensky, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    This investigation first examined the incremental validity of distress tolerance in terms of alcohol use coping motives within a trauma-exposed community sample of adults, beyond the variance contributed by posttraumatic stress symptom severity, difficulties in emotion regulation, alcohol consumption, and other (noncriterion) alcohol use motives. Secondly, the potential mediating role of distress tolerance in the association between posttraumatic stress symptom severity and alcohol use coping...

  4. Mechanism of T-cell tolerance induced by myeloid-derived suppressor cells1

    OpenAIRE

    Nagaraj, Srinivas; Schrum, Adam G.; Cho, Hyun-Il; Celis, Esteban; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2010-01-01

    Antigen-specific T-cell tolerance plays a critical role in tumor escape. Recent studies implicated myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in the induction of CD8+ T-cell tolerance in tumor-bearing hosts. However, the mechanism of this phenomenon remained unclear. We have found that incubation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, with peptide-loaded MDSC, did not induce signaling downstream of TCR. However, it prevented subsequent signaling from peptide-loaded dendritic cells. Using double TCR t...

  5. CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells confer infectious tolerance in a TGF-β–dependent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, John; Tran, Dat. Q.; Pesu, Marko; Davidson, Todd S.; Ramsey, Heather; O'Shea, John J.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2008-01-01

    CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T (T reg) cells comprise a separate lineage of T cells that are essential for maintaining immunological tolerance to self. The molecular mechanism(s) by which T reg cells mediate their suppressive effects remains poorly understood. One molecule that has been extensively studied in T reg cell suppression is transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, but its importance remains controversial. We found that TGF-β complexed to latency-associated peptide (LAP) is expressed on the cel...

  6. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner. PMID:26690128

  7. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Aich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner.

  8. Sustained suppression by Foxp3+ regulatory T cells is vital for infectious transplantation tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Kendal, Adrian R.; Chen, Ye; Regateiro, Frederico S.; Ma, Jianbo; Adams, Elizabeth; Cobbold, Stephen P.; Hori, Shohei; Waldmann, Herman

    2011-01-01

    A paradigm shift in immunology has been the recent discovery of regulatory T cells (T reg cells), of which CD4+Foxp3+ cells are proven as essential to self-tolerance. Using transgenic B6.Foxp3hCD2 mice to isolate and ablate Foxp3+ T reg cells with an anti-hCD2 antibody, we show for the first time that CD4+Foxp3+ cells are crucial for infectious tolerance induced by nonablative anti–T cell antibodies. In tolerant animals, Foxp3+ T reg cells are constantly required to suppress effector T cells ...

  9. Neurons and astroglia govern microglial endotoxin tolerance through macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor-mediated ERK1/2 signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chun-Hsien; Wang, Shijun; Li, Chia-Ling; Chen, Shih-Heng; Hu, Chih-Fen; Chung, Yi-Lun; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Wang, Qingshan; Lu, Ru-Band; Gao, Hui-Ming; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2016-07-01

    Endotoxin tolerance (ET) is a reduced responsiveness of innate immune cells like macrophages/monocytes to an endotoxin challenge following a previous encounter with the endotoxin. Although ET in peripheral systems has been well studied, little is known about ET in the brain. The present study showed that brain immune cells, microglia, being different from peripheral macrophages, displayed non-cell autonomous mechanisms in ET formation. Specifically, neurons and astroglia were indispensable for microglial ET. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) secreted from these non-immune cells was essential for governing microglial ET. Neutralization of M-CSF deprived the neuron-glia conditioned medium of its ability to enable microglia to form ET when microglia encountered two lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatments. Recombinant M-CSF protein rendered enriched microglia refractory to the second LPS challenge leading to microglial ET. Activation of microglial M-CSF receptor (M-CSFR; also known as CSF1R) and the downstream ERK1/2 signals was responsible for M-CSF-mediated microglial ET. Endotoxin-tolerant microglia in neuron-glia cultures displayed M2-like polarized phenotypes, as shown by upregulation of M2 marker Arg-1, elevated production of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10, and decreased secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators (tumor necrosis factor α, nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2 and interleukin 1β). Endotoxin-tolerant microglia protected neurons against LPS-elicited inflammatory insults, as shown by reduced neuronal damages in LPS pre-treatment group compared with the group without LPS pre-treatment. Moreover, while neurons and astroglia became injured during chronic neuroinflammation, microglia failed to form ET. Thus, this study identified a distinct non-cell autonomous mechanism of microglial ET. Interactions of M-CSF secreted by neurons and astroglia with microglial M-CSFR programed microglial ET. Loss of microglial ET could be an important

  10. Impact of incretin hormones on beta-cell function in subjects with normal or impaired glucose tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muscelli, Elza; Mari, Andrea; Natali, Andrea;

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the enteroinsular axis influences beta-cell function have not been investigated in detail. We performed oral and isoglycemic intravenous (IV) glucose administration in subjects with normal (NGT; n = 11) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 10), using C-peptide deconvolu......The mechanisms by which the enteroinsular axis influences beta-cell function have not been investigated in detail. We performed oral and isoglycemic intravenous (IV) glucose administration in subjects with normal (NGT; n = 11) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 10), using C......-like peptide 1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide responses, total insulin secretion, and enhancement of beta-cell glucose sensitivity (OGTT/IV ratio = 1.73 +/- 0.24, P = NS vs. NGT). However, the time courses of incretin-mediated insulin secretion and potentiation were altered......, with a predominance of glucose-induced vs. incretin-mediated stimulation. We conclude that, under physiological circumstances, incretin-mediated stimulation of insulin secretion results from an enhancement of all dynamic aspects of beta-cell function, particularly beta-cell glucose sensitivity. In IGT, beta...

  11. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A.; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H.; Croft, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, b...

  12. Cell-cycle dependent expression of a translocation-mediated fusion oncogene mediates checkpoint adaptation in rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Ken; Hettmer, Simone; Aslam, M Imran; Michalek, Joel E; Laub, Wolfram; Wilky, Breelyn A; Loeb, David M; Rubin, Brian P; Wagers, Amy J; Keller, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most commonly occurring soft-tissue sarcoma in childhood. Most rhabdomyosarcoma falls into one of two biologically distinct subgroups represented by alveolar or embryonal histology. The alveolar subtype harbors a translocation-mediated PAX3:FOXO1A fusion gene and has an extremely poor prognosis. However, tumor cells have heterogeneous expression for the fusion gene. Using a conditional genetic mouse model as well as human tumor cell lines, we show that that Pax3:Foxo1a expression is enriched in G2 and triggers a transcriptional program conducive to checkpoint adaptation under stress conditions such as irradiation in vitro and in vivo. Pax3:Foxo1a also tolerizes tumor cells to clinically-established chemotherapy agents and emerging molecularly-targeted agents. Thus, the surprisingly dynamic regulation of the Pax3:Foxo1a locus is a paradigm that has important implications for the way in which oncogenes are modeled in cancer cells. PMID:24453992

  13. Cell-cycle dependent expression of a translocation-mediated fusion oncogene mediates checkpoint adaptation in rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Kikuchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most commonly occurring soft-tissue sarcoma in childhood. Most rhabdomyosarcoma falls into one of two biologically distinct subgroups represented by alveolar or embryonal histology. The alveolar subtype harbors a translocation-mediated PAX3:FOXO1A fusion gene and has an extremely poor prognosis. However, tumor cells have heterogeneous expression for the fusion gene. Using a conditional genetic mouse model as well as human tumor cell lines, we show that that Pax3:Foxo1a expression is enriched in G2 and triggers a transcriptional program conducive to checkpoint adaptation under stress conditions such as irradiation in vitro and in vivo. Pax3:Foxo1a also tolerizes tumor cells to clinically-established chemotherapy agents and emerging molecularly-targeted agents. Thus, the surprisingly dynamic regulation of the Pax3:Foxo1a locus is a paradigm that has important implications for the way in which oncogenes are modeled in cancer cells.

  14. Fault tolerance control for proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Boyang

    2016-08-01

    Fault diagnosis and controller design are two important aspects to improve proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system durability. However, the two tasks are often separately performed. For example, many pressure and voltage controllers have been successfully built. However, these controllers are designed based on the normal operation of PEMFC. When PEMFC faces problems such as flooding or membrane drying, a controller with a specific design must be used. This paper proposes a unique scheme that simultaneously performs fault diagnosis and tolerance control for the PEMFC system. The proposed control strategy consists of a fault diagnosis, a reconfiguration mechanism and adjustable controllers. Using a back-propagation neural network, a model-based fault detection method is employed to detect the PEMFC current fault type (flooding, membrane drying or normal). According to the diagnosis results, the reconfiguration mechanism determines which backup controllers to be selected. Three nonlinear controllers based on feedback linearization approaches are respectively built to adjust the voltage and pressure difference in the case of normal, membrane drying and flooding conditions. The simulation results illustrate that the proposed fault tolerance control strategy can track the voltage and keep the pressure difference at desired levels in faulty conditions.

  15. Flagellin-induced tolerance of the Toll-like receptor 5 signaling pathway in polarized intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun; Fegan, Pamela E; Desai, Anjali S; Madara, James L; Hobert, Michael E

    2007-03-01

    Salmonella typhimurium is a gram-negative enteric pathogen that invades the mucosal epithelium and is associated with diarrheal illness in humans. Flagellin from S. typhimurium and other gram-negative bacteria has been shown to be the predominant proinflammatory mediator through activation of the basolateral Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5). Recent evidence has shown that prior exposure can render immune cells tolerant to subsequent challenges by TLR ligands. Accordingly, we examined whether prior exposure to purified flagellin would render human intestinal epithelial cells insensitive to future contact. We found that flagellin-induced tolerance is common to polarized epithelial cells and prevents further activation of proinflammatory signaling cascades by both purified flagellin and Salmonella bacteria but does not affect TNF-alpha stimulation of the same pathways. Flagellin tolerance is a rapid process that does not require protein synthesis, and that occurs within 1 to 2 h of flagellin exposure. Prolonged flagellin exposure blocks activation of the NF-kappaB, MAPK, and phosphoinositol 3-kinase signaling pathways and results in the internalization of a fraction of the basolateral TLR5 without affecting the polarity or total expression of TLR5. After removal of flagellin, cells require more than 24 h to fully recover their ability to mount a normal proinflammatory response. We have found that activation of phosphoinositol 3-kinase and Akt by flagellin has a small damping effect in the early stages of flagellin signaling but is not responsible for tolerance. Our study indicates that inhibition of TLR5-associated IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 activity occurs during the development of flagellin tolerance and is likely to be the cause of tolerance. PMID:17138965

  16. Aire-Overexpressing Dendritic Cells Induce Peripheral CD4+ T Cell Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongbei; Li, Haijun; Fu, Haiying; Niu, Kunwei; Guo, Yantong; Guo, Chuan; Sun, Jitong; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune regulator (Aire) can promote the ectopic expression of peripheral tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in thymic medullary epithelial cells (mTECs), which leads to the deletion of autoreactive T cells and consequently prevents autoimmune diseases. However, the functions of Aire in the periphery, such as in dendritic cells (DCs), remain unclear. This study’s aim was to investigate the effect of Aire-overexpressing DCs (Aire cells) on the functions of CD4+ T cells and the treatment of type 1 diabetes (T1D). We demonstrated that Aire cells upregulated the mRNA levels of the tolerance-related molecules CD73, Lag3, and FR4 and the apoptosis of CD4+ T cells in STZ-T1D mouse-derived splenocytes. Furthermore, following insulin stimulation, Aire cells decreased the number of CD4+ IFN-γ+ T cells in both STZ-T1D and WT mouse-derived splenocytes and reduced the expression levels of TCR signaling molecules (Ca2+ and p-ERK) in CD4+ T cells. We observed that Aire cells-induced CD4+ T cells could delay the development of T1D. In summary, Aire-expressing DCs inhibited TCR signaling pathways and decreased the quantity of CD4+IFN-γ+ autoreactive T cells. These data suggest a mechanism for Aire in the maintenance of peripheral immune tolerance and provide a potential method to control autoimmunity by targeting Aire. PMID:26729097

  17. Mediated Electrochemical Measurements of Intracellular Catabolic Activities of Yeast Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Sheng ZHAO; Zhen Yu YANG; Yao LU; Zheng Yu YANG

    2005-01-01

    Coupling with the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide, microelectrode voltammetric measurements were undertaken to detect the ferrocyanide accumulations arising from the mediated reduction of ferricyanide by yeast cells. The results indicate that the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide could be used as a probe to detect cellular catabolic activities in yeast cells and the electrochemical response has a positive relationship with the specific growth rate of yeast cells.

  18. Control of Th2-Mediated Inflammation by Regulatory T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Poojary, K. Venuprasad; Kong, Yi-chi M.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Allergic diseases and asthma are caused by dysregulated Th2-type immune responses, which drive disease development in susceptible individuals. Immune tolerance to allergens prevents inflammatory symptoms in the respiratory mucosa and provides protection against inflammation in the airways. Increasing evidence indicates that Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in immune tolerance and control Th2-biased responses. Tregs develop in the thymus from CD4+ T cells (natural Tregs) ...

  19. Alveolar epithelial type II cells induce T cell tolerance to specific antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Bernice; Hansen, Søren; Evans, Kathy; Heath, John K; Wright, Jo Rae

    2008-01-01

    The lungs face the immunologic challenge of rapidly eliminating inhaled pathogens while maintaining tolerance to innocuous Ags. A break in this immune homeostasis may result in pulmonary inflammatory diseases, such as allergies or asthma. The observation that alveolar epithelial type II cells (Ty...

  20. Calcium mediates root K+/Na+ homeostasis in poplar species differing in salt tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Dai, Songxiang; Wang, Ruigang; Chen, Shaoliang; Li, Niya; Zhou, Xiaoyang; Lu, Cunfu; Shen, Xin; Zheng, Xiaojiang; Hu, Zanmin; Zhang, Zengkai; Song, Jin; Xu, Yue

    2009-09-01

    Using the non-invasively ion-selective microelectrode technique, flux profiles of K(+), Na(+) and H(+) in mature roots and apical regions, and the effects of Ca(2+) on ion fluxes were investigated in salt-tolerant poplar species, Populus euphratica Oliver and salt-sensitive Populus simonii x (P. pyramidalis + Salix matsudana) (Populus popularis 35-44, P. popularis). Compared to P. popularis, P. euphratica roots exhibited a greater capacity to retain K(+) after exposure to a salt shock (SS, 100 mM NaCl) and a long-term (LT) salinity (50 mM NaCl, 3 weeks). Salt shock-induced K(+) efflux in the two species was markedly restricted by K(+) channel blocker, tetraethylammonium chloride, but enhanced by sodium orthovanadate, the inhibitor of plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase, suggesting that the K(+) efflux is mediated by depolarization-activated (DA) channels, e.g., KORCs (outward rectifying K(+) channels) and NSCCs (non-selective cation channels). Populus euphratica roots were more effective to exclude Na(+) than P. popularis in an LT experiment, resulting from the Na(+)/H(+) antiport across the PM. Moreover, pharmacological evidence implies that the greater ability to control K(+)/Na(+) homeostasis in salinized P. euphratica roots is associated with the higher H(+)-pumping activity, which provides an electrochemical H(+) gradient for Na(+)/H(+) exchange and simultaneously decreases the NaCl-induced depolarization of PM, thus reducing Na(+) influx via NSCCs and K(+) efflux through DA-KORCs and DA-NSCCs. Ca(2+) application markedly limited salt-induced K(+) efflux but enhanced the apparent Na(+) efflux, thus enabling the two species, especially the salt-sensitive poplar, to retain K(+)/Na(+) homeostasis in roots exposed to prolonged NaCl treatment. PMID:19638360

  1. How do yeast cells become tolerant to high ethanol concentrations?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoek, Tim; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Voordeckers, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The brewer’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae displays a much higher ethanol tolerance compared to most other organisms, and it is therefore commonly used for the industrial production of bioethanol and alcoholic beverages. However, the genetic determinants underlying this yeast’s exceptional ethanol...... tolerance have proven difficult to elucidate. In this perspective, we discuss how different types of experiments have contributed to our understanding of the toxic effects of ethanol and the mechanisms and complex genetics underlying ethanol tolerance. In a second part, we summarize the different routes and...... challenges involved in obtaining superior industrial yeasts with improved ethanol tolerance....

  2. How do yeast cells become tolerant to high ethanol concentrations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoek, Tim; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Voordeckers, Karin

    2016-08-01

    The brewer's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae displays a much higher ethanol tolerance compared to most other organisms, and it is therefore commonly used for the industrial production of bioethanol and alcoholic beverages. However, the genetic determinants underlying this yeast's exceptional ethanol tolerance have proven difficult to elucidate. In this perspective, we discuss how different types of experiments have contributed to our understanding of the toxic effects of ethanol and the mechanisms and complex genetics underlying ethanol tolerance. In a second part, we summarize the different routes and challenges involved in obtaining superior industrial yeasts with improved ethanol tolerance. PMID:26758993

  3. Salt tolerance at single cell level in giant-celled Characeae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jane eBeilby

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Characean plants provide an excellent experimental system for electrophysiology and physiology due to: (i very large cell size, (ii position on phylogenetic tree near the origin of land plants and (iii continuous spectrum from very salt sensitive to very salt tolerant species. A range of experimental techniques is described, some unique to characean plants. Application of these methods provided electrical characteristics of membrane transporters, which dominate the membrane conductance under different outside conditions. With this considerable background knowledge the electrophysiology of salt sensitive and salt tolerant genera can be compared under salt and/or osmotic stress. Both salt tolerant and salt sensitive Characeae show a rise in membrane conductance and simultaneous increase in Na+ influx upon exposure to saline medium. Salt tolerant Chara longifolia and Lamprothamnium sp. exhibit proton pump stimulation upon both turgor decrease and salinity increase, allowing the membrane PD to remain negative. The turgor is regulated through the inward K+ rectifier and 2H+/Cl- symporter. Lamprothamnium plants can survive in hypersaline media up to twice seawater strength and withstand large sudden changes in salinity. Salt-sensitive Chara australis succumbs to 50 - 100 mM NaCl in few days. Cells exhibit no pump stimulation upon turgor decrease and at best transient pump stimulation upon salinity increase. Turgor is not regulated. The membrane PD exhibits characteristic noise upon exposure to salinity. Depolarization of membrane PD to excitation threshold sets off trains of action potentials, leading to further loses of K+ and Cl-. In final stages of salt damage the H+/OH- channels are thought to become the dominant transporter, dissipating the proton gradient and bringing the cell PD close to 0. The differences in transporter electrophysiology and their synergy under osmotic and/or saline stress in salt sensitive and salt tolerant characean cells

  4. Cell-mediated immune deficiency in Hodgkin's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R K; Penny, R

    1982-10-01

    Disturbances of the immune system frequently accompany the development of lymphomas in man. In the early stages of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, abnormalities of immunological function are usually minimal, but impairment of both antibody- and cell-mediated immunity is often noted in advanced disease. In contrast, while antibody-mediated immune responses in patients with Hodgkin's disease usually remain intact until late in the course of the illness, cell-mediated immune dysfunction is an early and consistent feature. Here Rakesh Kumar and Ronald Penny discuss the abnormalities of cell-mediated immunity in Hodgkin's disease. PMID:25290229

  5. Oncogenic BRAF-Mediated Melanoma Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hezhe Lu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma patients with oncogenic BRAFV600E mutation have poor prognoses. While the role of BRAFV600E in tumorigenesis is well established, its involvement in metastasis that is clinically observed in melanoma patients remains a topic of debate. Here, we show that BRAFV600E melanoma cells have extensive invasion activity as assayed by the generation of F-actin and cortactin foci that mediate membrane protrusion, and degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM. Inhibition of BRAFV600E blocks melanoma cell invasion. In a BRAFV600E-driven murine melanoma model or in patients’ tumor biopsies, cortactin foci decrease upon inhibitor treatment. In addition, genome-wide expression analysis shows that a number of invadopodia-related genes are downregulated after BRAFV600E inhibition. Mechanistically, BRAFV600E induces phosphorylation of cortactin and the exocyst subunit Exo70 through ERK, which regulates actin dynamics and matrix metalloprotease secretion, respectively. Our results provide support for the role of BRAFV600E in metastasis and suggest that inhibiting invasion is a potential therapeutic strategy against melanoma.

  6. CO tolerance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells with Pt/C and PtMo/C anodes operating at high temperatures: A mass spectrometry investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► CO tolerance of Pt/C and PtMo/C PEMFC anodes is investigated by on line mass spectrometry. ► High CO tolerance is observed for high PEMFC temperatures. ► Increase of tolerance for Pt/C is due to thermal desorption, reduced CO oxidation potentials, and CO oxidation by O2 crossover. ► PtMo/C presents increased CO tolerance due the occurrence of a MoOx-mediated was gas shift reaction. -- Abstract: The performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) with Pt/C and PtMo/C anodes has been investigated using single cell polarization and on line mass spectrometry (OLMS) measurements in a wide range of temperature (70–105 °C) for the system supplied with hydrogen containing different amounts of CO. As expected a higher CO tolerance is observed at higher temperatures for both catalysts. The anode exit gas analysis revealed that CO2 is produced already at the cell open circuit potential, and it increases with the increase of the anode overpotential. The CO tolerance phenomena are assigned to different processes depending on the catalyst nature. For the Pt/C containing anodes, at temperatures above 80 °C, thermal desorption, reduced CO oxidation potential and CO oxidation by O2 crossover are responsible for enhanced tolerance, whilst PtMo/C shows greater tolerance due the occurrence of a MoOx-mediated water gas shift reaction (WGS), which is activated at high temperatures. Although the occurrence of WGS leads to the anode poisoning in the presence of CO2, the polarization results show that only small additive contamination effect occurs by the combined presence of CO + CO2 in the hydrogen stream

  7. Suppressor cells in transplantation tolerance II. Maturation of suppressor cells in the bone marrow chimera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Histoincompatible bone marrow allografts were established in lethally irradiated rats. At various times after transplantation, the spleen cells were harvested, subjected to mixed lymphocyte cultures, and assayed for suppressor cells in vitro and in vivo by adoptive transfer studies. Alloantigen-nonspecific suppressor cells appeared in the chimera at 40 days after grafting, coinciding with the resolution of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). At 250 days the nonspecific suppressor cells were replaced by suppressor cells specifically suppressing donor-versus-host alloantigen responses. At 720 days suppressor cells could no longer be identified by in vitro methods but were identified by in vivo adoptive transfer of transplantation tolerance. After injection of host-type antigen into chimeras, the suppressor cells could be again demonstrated by in vitro methods

  8. Suppressor cells in transplantation tolerance. II. maturation of suppressor cells in the bone marrow chimera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Histoincompatible bone marrow allografts were established in lethally irradiated rats. At various times after transplantation, the spleen cells were harvested, subjected to mixed lymphocyte cultures, and assayed for suppressor cells in vitro and in vivo by adoptive transfer studies. Alloantigen-nonspecific suppressor cells appeared in the chimera at 40 days after grafting, coinciding with the resolution of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). At 250 days the nonspecific suppressor cells were replaced by suppressor cells specifically suppressing donor-versus-host alloantigen responses. At 720 days suppressor cells could no longer be identified by in vitro methods but were identified by in vivo adoptive transfer of transplantation tolerance. After injection of host-type antigen into chimeras, the suppressor cells could be again demonstrated by in vitro methods

  9. Batf3-Dependent Dendritic Cells in the Renal Lymph Node Induce Tolerance against Circulating Antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Gottschalk, Catherine; Damuzzo, Vera; Gotot, Janine; Kroczek, Richard A.; Yagita, Hideo; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Knolle, Percy A.; Ludwig-Portugall, Isis; Kurts, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Although the spleen is a major site where immune tolerance to circulating innocuous antigens occurs, the kidney also contributes. Circulating antigens smaller than albumin are constitutively filtered and concentrated in the kidney and reach the renal lymph node by lymphatic drainage, where resident dendritic cells (DCs) capture them and induce tolerance of specific cytotoxic T cells through unknown mechanisms. Here, we found that the coinhibitory cell surface receptor programmed death 1 (PD-1...

  10. Elevated levels of interferon-γ production by memory T cells do not promote transplant tolerance resistance in aged recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James I Kim

    Full Text Available Immunosenescence predisposes the elderly to infectious and autoimmune diseases and impairs the response to vaccination. We recently demonstrated that ageing also impedes development of transplantation tolerance. Unlike their young counterparts (8-12 weeks of age aged male recipients (greater than 12 months of age transplanted with a full MHC-mismatched heart are resistant to tolerance mediated by anti-CD45RB antibody. Surprisingly, either chemical or surgical castration restored tolerance induction to levels observed using young recipients. Based on the strong impact of endocrine modulation on transplant tolerance, we explored the impact of ageing and castration on the immune system. Here we report a significant increase in the percentage of T cells that produce interferon-γ (IFN-γ in aged male versus young male animals and that the overall increase in IFN-γ production was due to an expansion of IFN-γ-producing memory T cells in aged animals. In contrast to IFN-γ production, we did not observe differences in IL-10 expression in young versus old male mice. We hypothesized that endocrine modulation would diminish the elevated levels of IFN-γ production in aged recipients, however, we observed no significant reduction in the percentage of IFN-γ+ T cells upon castration. Furthermore, we neutralized interferon-γ by antibody and did not observe an effect on graft survival. We conclude that while elevated levels of interferon-γ serves as a marker of tolerance resistance in aged mice, other as yet to be identified factors are responsible for its cause. Defining these factors may be relevant to design of tolerogenic strategies for aged recipients.

  11. Transient B cell depletion or improved transgene expression by codon optimization promote tolerance to factor VIII in gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon K Sack

    Full Text Available The major complication in the treatment of hemophilia A is the development of neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors against factor VIII (FVIII. The current method for eradicating inhibitors, termed immune tolerance induction (ITI, is costly and protracted. Clinical protocols that prevent rather than treat inhibitors are not yet established. Liver-directed gene therapy hopes to achieve long-term correction of the disease while also inducing immune tolerance. We sought to investigate the use of adeno-associated viral (serotype 8 gene transfer to induce tolerance to human B domain deleted FVIII in hemophilia A mice. We administered an AAV8 vector with either human B domain deleted FVIII or a codon-optimized transgene, both under a liver-specific promoter to two strains of hemophilia A mice. Protein therapy or gene therapy was given either alone or in conjunction with anti-CD20 antibody-mediated B cell depletion. Gene therapy with a low-expressing vector resulted in sustained near-therapeutic expression. However, supplementary protein therapy revealed that gene transfer had sensitized mice to hFVIII in a high-responder strain but not in mice of a low-responding strain. This heightened response was ameliorated when gene therapy was delivered with anti-murine CD20 treatment. Transient B cell depletion prevented inhibitor formation in protein therapy, but failed to achieve a sustained hypo-responsiveness. Importantly, use of a codon-optimized hFVIII transgene resulted in sustained therapeutic expression and tolerance without a need for B cell depletion. Therefore, anti-CD20 may be beneficial in preventing vector-induced immune priming to FVIII, but higher levels of liver-restricted expression are preferred for tolerance.

  12. Tolerance to the antimicrobial peptide colistin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is linked to metabolically active cells, and depends on the pmr and mexAB-oprM genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pamp, Sünje Johanna; Gjermansen, Morten; Johansen, Helle Krogh;

    2008-01-01

    antimicrobial peptide colistin. On the contrary, biofilm cells exhibiting low metabolic activity were killed by colistin. We demonstrate that the subpopulation of metabolically active cells is able to adapt to colistin by inducing a specific adaptation mechanism mediated by the pmr operon, as well as an...... unspecific adaptation mechanism mediated by the mexAB-oprM genes. Mutants defective in either pmr-mediated lipopolysaccharide modification or in mexAB-oprM-mediated antimicrobial efflux were not able to develop a tolerant subpopulation in biofilms. In contrast to the observed pattern of colistin...... physiologically distinct subpopulations by combined antimicrobial treatment with either ciprofloxacin and colistin or tetracycline and colistin almost completely eradicated all biofilm cells....

  13. The moderating and mediating roles of self-acceptance and tolerance to others in the relationship between mindfulness and subjective well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Oei, Tian Ps; Liu, Xinghua; Wang, Xiaoming; Ding, Chen

    2016-07-01

    This study explored the moderating and mediating influences of self-acceptance and tolerance to others in the relationship between mindfulness and subjective well-being. In total, 301 (130 males) university students completed the Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire, Index of Well-being, Self-acceptance Questionnaire, and Tolerance Scale. The results showed that the positive link between mindfulness and subjective well-being was significantly mediated by self-acceptance only. Tolerance played a moderating role. The implications of the results for relevant research and mindfulness training were discussed. PMID:25395155

  14. Mechanisms of tolerance in murine radiation bone marrow chimeras. I. Nonspecific suppression of alloreactivity by spleen cells from early, but not late, chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allogeneic chimeras were prepared using lethally irradiated B6 hosts and untreated marrow from exsanguinated BALB/c donors. For about two months after reconstitution, chimeras had very weak antihost cell-mediated lymphocytotoxicity (CML) reactivity and little third-party alloreactivity. During this time a cell population capable of suppressing CML reactivity against both host and third-party alloantigens (i.e., antigen-nonspecific) was demonstrated in chimera spleens by in vitro mixing experiments. The putative suppressor cells were Thy-1-negative and radiation-sensitive. Subsequently, mature chimeras showed host tolerance and strong third-party alloreactivity. At this point suppressor mechanisms could no longer be demonstrated. These data are consistent with a clonal elimination hypothesis in that they do not provide evidence to indicate that maintenance of specific immune tolerance is mediated by an active suppressor mechanism

  15. Thymic epithelial cells use macroautophagy to turn their inside out for CD4 T cell tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Chunyan; Aichinger, Martin; Nedjic, Jelena; Klein, Ludger

    2013-01-01

    During development in the thymus, each T lymphocyte is equipped with one, essentially unique, T cell receptor (TCR)-specificity. Due to its random nature, this process inevitably also leads to the emergence of potentially dangerous T lymphocytes that may recognize ‘self.’ Nevertheless, autoimmune tissue destruction, the cause of diseases such as multiple sclerosis and diabetes, is the exception rather than the rule. This state of immunological self-tolerance is to a large degree based upon a ...

  16. The nuclear receptor Nr4a1 mediates anti-inflammatory effects of apoptotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipseiz, Natacha; Uderhardt, Stefan; Scholtysek, Carina; Steffen, Martin; Schabbauer, Gernot; Bozec, Aline; Schett, Georg; Krönke, Gerhard

    2014-05-15

    Uptake of apoptotic cells (ACs) by macrophages ensures the nonimmunogenic clearance of dying cells, as well as the maintenance of self-tolerance to AC-derived autoantigens. Upon ingestion, ACs exert an inhibitory influence on the inflammatory signaling within the phagocyte. However, the molecular signals that mediate these immune-modulatory properties of ACs are incompletely understood. In this article, we show that the phagocytosis of apoptotic thymocytes was enhanced in tissue-resident macrophages where this process resulted in the inhibition of NF-κB signaling and repression of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-12. In parallel, ACs induced a robust expression of a panel of immediate early genes, which included the Nr4a subfamily of nuclear receptors. Notably, deletion of Nr4a1 interfered with the anti-inflammatory effects of ACs in macrophages and restored both NF-κB signaling and IL-12 expression. Accordingly, Nr4a1 mediated the anti-inflammatory properties of ACs in vivo and was required for maintenance of self-tolerance in the murine model of pristane-induced lupus. Thus, our data point toward a key role for Nr4a1 as regulator of the immune response to ACs and of the maintenance of tolerance to "dying self." PMID:24740500

  17. The transcriptional activator LdtR from 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' mediates osmotic stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliai, Fernando A; Gardner, Christopher L; Bojilova, Lora; Sarnegrim, Amanda; Tamayo, Cheila; Potts, Anastasia H; Teplitski, Max; Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Gonzalez, Claudio F; Lorca, Graciela L

    2014-04-01

    The causal agent of Huanglongbing disease, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', is a non-culturable, gram negative, phloem-limited α-proteobacterium. Current methods to control the spread of this disease are still limited to the removal and destruction of infected trees. In this study, we identified and characterized a regulon from 'Ca. L. asiaticus' involved in cell wall remodeling, that contains a member of the MarR family of transcriptional regulators (ldtR), and a predicted L,D-transpeptidase (ldtP). In Sinorhizobium meliloti, mutation of ldtR resulted in morphological changes (shortened rod-type phenotype) and reduced tolerance to osmotic stress. A biochemical approach was taken to identify small molecules that modulate LdtR activity. The LdtR ligands identified by thermal shift assays were validated using DNA binding methods. The biological impact of LdtR inactivation by the small molecules was then examined in Sinorhizobium meliloti and Liberibacter crescens, where a shortened-rod phenotype was induced by growth in presence of the ligands. A new method was also developed to examine the effects of small molecules on the viability of 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus', using shoots from HLB-infected orange trees. Decreased expression of ldtRLas and ldtPLas was observed in samples taken from HLB-infected shoots after 6 h of incubation with the LdtR ligands. These results provide strong proof of concept for the use of small molecules that target LdtR, as a potential treatment option for Huanglongbing disease. PMID:24763829

  18. The transcriptional activator LdtR from 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' mediates osmotic stress tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando A Pagliai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The causal agent of Huanglongbing disease, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', is a non-culturable, gram negative, phloem-limited α-proteobacterium. Current methods to control the spread of this disease are still limited to the removal and destruction of infected trees. In this study, we identified and characterized a regulon from 'Ca. L. asiaticus' involved in cell wall remodeling, that contains a member of the MarR family of transcriptional regulators (ldtR, and a predicted L,D-transpeptidase (ldtP. In Sinorhizobium meliloti, mutation of ldtR resulted in morphological changes (shortened rod-type phenotype and reduced tolerance to osmotic stress. A biochemical approach was taken to identify small molecules that modulate LdtR activity. The LdtR ligands identified by thermal shift assays were validated using DNA binding methods. The biological impact of LdtR inactivation by the small molecules was then examined in Sinorhizobium meliloti and Liberibacter crescens, where a shortened-rod phenotype was induced by growth in presence of the ligands. A new method was also developed to examine the effects of small molecules on the viability of 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus', using shoots from HLB-infected orange trees. Decreased expression of ldtRLas and ldtPLas was observed in samples taken from HLB-infected shoots after 6 h of incubation with the LdtR ligands. These results provide strong proof of concept for the use of small molecules that target LdtR, as a potential treatment option for Huanglongbing disease.

  19. Inflammatory mediators: Parallels between cancer biology and stem cell therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Shyam A; Heinrich, Andrew C; Bobby Y. Reddy; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation encompasses diverse molecular pathways, and it is intertwined with a wide array of biological processes. Recently, there has been an upsurge of interest in the interactions between mediators of inflammation and other cells such as stem cells and cancer cells. Since tissue injuries are associated with the release of inflammatory mediators, it would be difficult to address this subject without considering the implications of their systemic effects. In this review, we discuss the ef...

  20. Fibronectin-Mononuclear Cell Interactions Regulate Type 1 Helper T Cell Cytokine Network in Tolerant Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Coito, Ana J.; Onodera, Kazuhiko; Kato, Hirohisa; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W.

    2000-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN), expressed primarily by macrophages, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells, represents an integral feature of the rejection response in transplant recipients. Here we demonstrate a unique pattern of cellular FN expression in rat recipients of cardiac allografts rendered tolerant in an infectious manner with either nondepleting CD4 mAb or regulatory spleen cells. Unlike in rejecting controls, cellular FN in tolerant hosts was restricted to the graft vessels and no vascula...

  1. CCR4 promotes medullary entry and thymocyte-dendritic cell interactions required for central tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zicheng; Lancaster, Jessica N; Sasiponganan, Chayanit; Ehrlich, Lauren I R

    2015-10-19

    Autoimmunity results from a breakdown in central or peripheral tolerance. To establish central tolerance, developing T cells must enter the thymic medulla, where they scan antigen-presenting cells (APCs) displaying a diverse array of autoantigens. If a thymocyte is activated by a self-antigen, the cell undergoes either deletion or diversion into the regulatory T cell (T reg) lineage, thus maintaining self-tolerance. Mechanisms promoting thymocyte medullary entry and interactions with APCs are incompletely understood. CCR4 is poised to contribute to central tolerance due to its expression by post-positive selection thymocytes, and expression of its ligands by medullary thymic dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we use two-photon time-lapse microscopy to demonstrate that CCR4 promotes medullary entry of the earliest post-positive selection thymocytes, as well as efficient interactions between medullary thymocytes and DCs. In keeping with the contribution of thymic DCs to central tolerance, CCR4 is involved in regulating negative selection of polyclonal and T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic thymocytes. In the absence of CCR4, autoreactive T cells accumulate in secondary lymphoid organs and autoimmunity ensues. These studies reveal a previously unappreciated role for CCR4 in the establishment of central tolerance. PMID:26417005

  2. DNA damage tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branzei, Dana; Psakhye, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Accurate chromosomal DNA replication is fundamental for optimal cellular function and genome integrity. Replication perturbations activate DNA damage tolerance pathways, which are crucial to complete genome duplication as well as to prevent formation of deleterious double strand breaks. Cells use two general strategies to tolerate lesions: recombination to a homologous template, and trans-lesion synthesis with specialized polymerases. While key players of these processes have been outlined, much less is known on their choreography and regulation. Recent advances have uncovered principles by which DNA damage tolerance is regulated locally and temporally - in relation to replication timing and cell cycle stage -, and are beginning to elucidate the DNA dynamics that mediate lesion tolerance and influence chromosome structure during replication. PMID:27060551

  3. Low temperature tolerance of human embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boon Chin Heng, Kumar Jayaseelan Vinoth, Hua Liu, Manoor Prakash Hande, Tong Cao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of exposing human embryonic stem cells (hESC to 4oC and 25oC for extended durations of 24h and 48h respectively. Cell survivability after low temperature exposure was assessed through the MTT assay. The results showed that hESC survivability after exposure to 25oC and 4oC for 24h was 77.3 ± 4.8 % and 64.4 ± 4.4 % respectively (significantly different, P < 0.05. The corresponding survival rates after 48h exposure to 25oC and 4oC was 71.0 ± 0.5 % and 69.0 ± 2.3 % respectively (not significantly different, P > 0.05. Spontaneous differentiation of hESC after low temperature exposure was assessed by morphological observations under bright-field and phase-contrast microscopy, and by immunocytochemical staining for the pluripotency markers SSEA-3 and TRA-1-81. hESC colonies were assigned into 3 grades according to their degree of spontaneous differentiation: (1 Grade A which was completely or mostly undifferentiated, (2 Grade B which was partially differentiated, and (3 Grade C which was mostly differentiated. In all low temperature exposed groups, about 95% of colonies remain undifferentiated (Grade A, which was not significantly different (P > 0.05 from the unexposed control group maintained at 37oC. Additionally, normal karyotype was maintained in all low temperature-exposed groups, as assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH of metaphase spreads with telomere and centromere-specific PNA probes. Further analysis with m-FISH showed that chromosomal translocations were absent in all experimental groups. Hence, hESC possess relatively high-tolerance to extended durations of low temperature exposure, which could have useful implications for the salvage of hESC culture during infrequent occurrences of incubator break-down and power failure.

  4. Retuning of Mouse NK Cells after Interference with MHC Class I Sensing Adjusts Self-Tolerance but Preserves Anticancer Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Arnika Kathleen; Wickström, Stina Linnea; Tallerico, Rossana; Salam, Sadia; Lakshmikanth, Tadepally; Brauner, Hanna; Höglund, Petter; Carbone, Ennio; Johansson, Maria Helena; Kärre, Klas

    2016-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are most efficient if their targets do not express self MHC class I, because NK cells carry inhibitory receptors that interfere with activating their cytotoxic pathway. Clinicians have taken advantage of this by adoptively transferring haploidentical NK cells into patients to mediate an effective graft-versus-leukemia response. With a similar rationale, antibody blockade of MHC class I-specific inhibitory NK cell receptors is currently being tested in clinical trials. Both approaches are challenged by the emerging concept that NK cells may constantly adapt or "tune" their responsiveness according to the amount of self MHC class I that they sense on surrounding cells. Hence, these therapeutic attempts would initially result in increased killing of tumor cells, but a parallel adaptation process might ultimately lead to impaired antitumor efficacy. We have investigated this question in two mouse models: inhibitory receptor blockade in vivo and adoptive transfer to MHC class I-disparate hosts. We show that changed self-perception via inhibitory receptors in mature NK cells reprograms the reactivity such that tolerance to healthy cells is always preserved. However, reactivity against cancer cells lacking critical MHC class I molecules (missing self-reactivity) still remains or may even be increased. This dissociation between activity against healthy cells and tumor cells may provide an answer as to why NK cells mediate graft-versus-leukemia effects without causing graft-versus-host disease and may also be utilized to improve immunotherapy. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(2); 113-23. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26589766

  5. The epigenetic regulator G9a mediates tolerance to RNA virus infection in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Merkling, S.H.; Bronkhorst, A.W.; Kramer, J M; Overheul, G.J.; Schenck, A.; van Rij, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the tolerance mechanisms that reduce the negative effects of microbial infection on host fitness. Here, we demonstrate that the histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferase G9a regulates tolerance to virus infection by shaping the response of the evolutionary conserved Jak-Stat pathway in Drosophila. G9a-deficient mutants are more sensitive to RNA virus infection and succumb faster to infection than wild-type controls, which was associated with strongly increased Jak-Stat depen...

  6. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Sonoyama

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla. Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  7. Molecular phenotyping of T cell-mediated rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Anita S.; Perkins, David L.

    2014-01-01

    A new study has reported a molecular signature of T cell-mediated rejection in human kidney transplant biopsy samples that is enriched for effector T cells, interferon-γ and macrophages. Inhibitors of T cell activation, such as CTLA4 and PDL1, were also prominent, raising the possibility that these immunological constrains could be harnessed by therapies for treating rejection.

  8. Natural suppressor (NS) cells, neonatal tolerance, and total lymphoid irradiation: exploring obscure relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although several laboratories have shown that the appearance of naturally occurring suppressor cells in the spleens of neonatal or irradiated mice is temporarily related to the ease of induction of tolerance, the characteristics of these cells and their regulatory functions have been poorly understood until recently. The experimental data reviewed herein suggests that these cells are related to NK cells with regard to surface phenotype but differ with regard to function. The natural suppressor (NS) cells appear only briefly during the early maturation of the lymphoid tissues but can be induced in adults by manipulation of the lymphoid tissues with certain treatment regimens such as total lymphoid irradiation (TLI). In addition, the NS cells can be propagated and cloned in long-term tissue culture, thereby allowing a more detailed investigation of their properties. The cells have the unique feature of inhibiting the antigen-specific cytolytic arm of alloreactive immune responses but leaving intact the antigen-specific suppressive arm. In this way, alloreactions in the regulatory milieu of NS cells generate large numbers of antigen-specific suppressor cells that can maintain tolerance in vivo. Thus the NS cells may play an important role in the development of host-vs-graft and graft-vs-host tolerance in allogeneic bone marrow chimeras during the ''window'' of tolerance in which neonate and TLI-treated mice accept the infused allogeneic cells. 70 references

  9. A Central Role for Induced Regulatory T Cells in Tolerance Induction in Experimental Colitis1

    OpenAIRE

    Haribhai, Dipica; Lin, Wen; Edwards, Brandon; Ziegelbauer, Jennifer; Salzman, Nita H.; Carlson, Marc R.; Li, Shun-Hwa; Simpson, Pippa M.; Chatila, Talal A; Williams, Calvin B.

    2009-01-01

    In addition to thymus-derived or natural T regulatory (nTreg) cells, a second subset of induced T regulatory (iTreg) cells arises de novo from conventional CD4+ T cells in the periphery. The function of iTreg cells in tolerance was examined in a CD45RBhighCD4+ T cell transfer model of colitis. In situ-generated iTreg cells were similar to nTreg cells in their capacity to suppress T cell proliferation in vitro and their absence in vivo accelerated bowel disease. Treatment with nTreg cells reso...

  10. Contraction-mediated glucose uptake is increased in men with impaired glucose tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov-Jensen, Camilla; Skovbro, Mette; Flint, Anne;

    2007-01-01

    stimulation alone and with superimposed exercise. Patients with type 2 diabetes, subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), healthy controls, and endurance-trained subjects were studied. The groups were matched for age and lean body mass (LBM), and differed in peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak), body fat......Exercise superimposed on insulin stimulation is shown to increase muscle glucose metabolism and these two stimuli have synergistic effects. The objective of this study was to investigate glucose infusion rates (GIR) in groups with a wide variation in terms of insulin sensitivity during insulin...... percentage, body mass index (BMI), fasting plasma glucose concentration, and oral glucose-tolerance test (OGTT). Each subject underwent a two-step sequential hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp. During the last 30 min of the 2nd clamp step, subjects exercised on a bicycle at 43% +/- 2% of VO2 peak. In...

  11. Increased Tolerance to Artemisinin in Plasmodium falciparum Is Mediated by a Quiescence Mechanism▿

    OpenAIRE

    Witkowski, Benoit; Lelièvre, Joel; López Barragán, María José; Laurent, Victor; Su, Xin-Zhuan; Berry, Antoine; Benoit-Vical, Françoise

    2010-01-01

    Artemisinin (ART)-based combination therapies (ACTs) are the first-line drugs—and often the last treatments—that can effectively cure Plasmodium falciparum infections. Unfortunately, the decreased clinical efficacy of artesunate, one of the major ART derivatives, was recently reported along the Thailand-Cambodia border. Through long-term artemisinin pressure in vitro, we have obtained an ART-tolerant strain that can survive extremely high doses of ART. We showed that drug pressure could induc...

  12. Production of Transgenic Tall Fescue Plants with Enhanced Stress Tolerances by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-Mediated Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Guan-ting; CHEN Jin-qing; HU Zhang-hua; LANG Chun-xiu; CHEN Xiao-yun; WANG Fu-lin; JIN Wei; XIA Ying-wu

    2006-01-01

    In order to improve stress tolerances of turf-type tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105 carrying plasmid pCMD containing stress tolerance-related CBF1 gene from Arabidopsis thaliana was used to transform mature seeds-derived embryogenic calli of four cultivars. A total of 112 transgenic plants were regenerated from 32 independent lines and verified by histochemical detection of GUS activity, PCR assay and Southern hybridization analysis. The transformation frequency ranged from 0.92 to 2.87% with apparent differences among the cultivars. Stress tolerances of transgenic plants were enhanced, which was shown by the facts that transgenic plants had distinct growth superiority and significantly higher survival rate than non-transformed ones under high salinity and high osmosis stresses,and that relative electronic conductivity of in vitro leaves treated with low and high temperatures, dehydration and high salinity stresses was 25-30% lower in transgenic plants than in control plants. In addition, it was observed that growth of transgenic plants was inhibited due to constitutive overexpression of CBF1 gene under normal environmental conditions.

  13. Adenovirus-mediated CTLA4Ig gene inhibits infiltration of immune cells and cell apoptosis in rats after liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Ping Jiang; Zhen-Hua Hu; Shu-Sen Zheng; Chang-Ku Jia; Ai-Bin Zhang; Wei-Lin Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of adenovirus-mediated CTLA4Ig gene therapy in inhibiting the infiltration of macrophages and CD8+T cells and cell apoptosis after liver transplantation.METHODS: The rat orthotopic liver transplantation model was applied. The rats were divided into three groups:group Ⅰ: rejection control (SD-to-Wistar); group Ⅱ: acute rejection treated with intramuscular injection of CsA injection of 1× 109 PFU adenovirus-mediated CTLA4Ig gene liquor in dorsal vein of penis 7 d before liver transplantation(SD-to-Wistar+CTLA4Ig). Immunohistochemistry and transferase-mediated dUTPnick-end labeling (TUNEL)were used to analyze the expression of CTLA4Ig gene in liver, infiltration of macrophages and CD8+T cells, cell apoptosis in grafts at different time-points after liver transplantation. Histopathological examination was done.RESULTS: CTLA4Ig gene expression was positive in liver on d 7 after administering adenovirus-mediated CTLA4Ig gene via vein, and remained positive until day 60 after liver transplantation. Infiltration of macrophages and CD8+T cells in CTLA4Ig-treated group was less than in rejection control group and CsA-treated group. The apoptotic index of rejection group on d 3, 5, and 7 were significantly higher than that of CTLA4Ig-treated group. A good correlation was found between severity of rejection reaction and infiltration of immune activator cells or cell apoptotic index in grafts.CONCLUSION: CTLA4Ig gene is constantly expressed in liver and plays an important role in inducing immune tolerance.

  14. CD11c⁺ cells partially mediate the renoprotective effect induced by bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Gyu Kim

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that induction of immune tolerance by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is partially mediated via monocytes or dendritic cells (DCs. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of CD11c⁺ cells in MSC-induced effects on ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI. IRI was induced in wildtype (WT mice and CD11c⁺-depleted mice following pretreatment with or without MSCs. In the in-vitro experiments, the MSC-treated CD11c⁺ cells acquired regulatory phenotype with increased intracellular IL-10 production. Although splenocytes cocultured with MSCs showed reduced T cell proliferation and expansion of CD4⁺FoxP3⁺ regulatory T cells (Tregs, depletion of CD11c⁺ cells was associated with partial loss of MSCs effect on T cells. In in-vivo experiment, MSCs' renoprotective effect was also associated with induction of more immature CD11c⁺ cells and increased FoxP3 expression in I/R kidneys. However all these effects induced by the MSCs were partially abrogated when CD11c⁺ cells were depleted in the CD11c⁺-DTR transgenic mice. In addition, the observation that adoptive transfer of WT CD11c⁺ cells partially restored the beneficial effect of the MSCs, while transferring IL-10 deficient CD11c⁺ cells did not, strongly suggest the important contribution of IL-10 producing CD11c⁺ cells in attenuating kidney injury by MSCs. Our results suggest that the CD11c⁺ cell-Tregs play critical role in mediating renoprotective effect of MSCs.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Mediated Functional Tooth Regeneration in Swine

    OpenAIRE

    Wataru Sonoyama; Yi Liu; Dianji Fang; Takayoshi Yamaza; Byoung-Moo Seo; Chunmei Zhang; He Liu; Stan Gronthos; Cun-Yu Wang; Songlin Wang; Songtao Shi

    2006-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla). Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This wo...

  16. Plant-mediated RNAi of a gap gene-enhanced tobacco tolerance against the Myzus persicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jianjun; Zeng, Fanrong

    2014-02-01

    Plant-mediated RNAi has been developed as a powerful weapon in the fight against agricultural insect pests. The gap gene hunchback (hb) is of crucial importance in insect axial patterning and knockdown of hb is deforming and lethal to the next generation. The peach potato aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), has many host plants and can be found throughout the world. To investigate the effect of plant-mediated RNAi on control of this insect, the hb gene in M. persicae was cloned, plant RNAi vector was constructed, and transgenic tobacco expressing Mphb dsRNA was developed. Transgenic tobacco had a different integration pattern of the transgene. Bioassays were performed by applying neonate aphids to homozygous transgenic plants in the T2 generation. Results revealed that continuous feeding of transgenic diet reduced Mphb mRNA level in the fed aphids and inhibited insect reproduction, indicating successful knockdown of the target gene in M. persicae by plant-mediated RNAi. PMID:23949691

  17. Induced regulatory T cells in allograft tolerance via transient mixed chimerism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Kiyohiko; Aoyama, Akihiro; Oura, Tetsu; Yamada, Yohei; Tonsho, Makoto; Huh, Kyu Ha; Kawai, Kento; Schoenfeld, David; Allan, James S.; Madsen, Joren C.; Benichou, Gilles; Smith, Rex-Neal; Colvin, Robert B.; Sachs, David H.; Cosimi, A. Benedict; Kawai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Successful induction of allograft tolerance has been achieved in nonhuman primates (NHPs) and humans via induction of transient hematopoietic chimerism. Since allograft tolerance was achieved in these recipients without durable chimerism, peripheral mechanisms are postulated to play a major role. Here, we report our studies of T cell immunity in NHP recipients that achieved long-term tolerance versus those that rejected the allograft (AR). All kidney, heart, and lung transplant recipients underwent simultaneous or delayed donor bone marrow transplantation (DBMT) following conditioning with a nonmyeloablative regimen. After DBMT, mixed lymphocyte culture with CFSE consistently revealed donor-specific loss of CD8+ T cell responses in tolerant (TOL) recipients, while marked CD4+ T cell proliferation in response to donor antigens was found to persist. Interestingly, a significant proportion of the proliferated CD4+ cells were FOXP3+ in TOL recipients, but not in AR or naive NHPs. In TOL recipients, CD4+FOXP3+ cell proliferation against donor antigens was greater than that observed against third-party antigens. Finally, the expanded Tregs appeared to be induced Tregs (iTregs) that were converted from non-Tregs. These data provide support for the hypothesis that specific induction of iTregs by donor antigens is key to long-term allograft tolerance induced by transient mixed chimerism. PMID:27446989

  18. Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells and Central Tolerance in Autoimmune Hepatitis Development: Novel Perspective from a New Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina Alexandropoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH is an immune-mediated disorder that affects the liver parenchyma. Diagnosis usually occurs at the later stages of the disease, complicating efforts towards understanding the causes of disease development. While animal models are useful for studying the etiology of autoimmune disorders, most of the existing animal models of AIH do not recapitulate the chronic course of the human condition. In addition, approaches to mimic AIH-associated liver inflammation have instead led to liver tolerance, consistent with the high tolerogenic capacity of the liver. Recently, we described a new mouse model that exhibited spontaneous and chronic liver inflammation that recapitulated the known histopathological and immunological parameters of AIH. The approach involved liver-extrinsic genetic engineering that interfered with the induction of T-cell tolerance in the thymus, the very process thought to inhibit AIH induction by liver-specific expression of exogenous antigens. The mutation led to depletion of specialized thymic epithelial cells that present self-antigens and eliminate autoreactive T-cells before they exit the thymus. Based on our findings, which are summarized below, we believe that this mouse model represents a relevant experimental tool towards elucidating the cellular and molecular aspects of AIH development and developing novel therapeutic strategies for treating this disease.

  19. Cell therapy to induce allograft tolerance: Time to switch to plan B?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine eSicard

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Organ transplantation is widely acknowledged as the best option for end stage failure of vital organs. Long-term graft survival is however limited by graft rejection, a destructive process resulting from the response of recipient’s immune system against donor-specific alloantigens. Prevention of rejection currently relies exclusively on immunosuppressive drugs that lack antigen specificity and therefore increase the risk for infections and cancers. Induction of donor-specific tolerance would provide indefinite graft survival without morbidity and therefore represents the Grail of transplant immunologists.Progresses in the comprehension of immunoregulatory mechanisms over the last decades have paved the way for cell therapies to induce allograft tolerance. The first part of the present article reviews the promising results obtained in experimental models with adoptive transfer of ex vivo-expanded regulatory CD4+ T cells (CD4+ Tregs and discuss which source and specificity should be preferred for transferred CD4+ Tregs. Interestingly, B cells have recently emerged as potent regulatory cells, able to establish a privileged crosstalk with CD4+ T cells. The second part of the present article reviews the evidences demonstrating the crucial role of regulatory B cells in transplantation tolerance. We propose the possibility to harness B cell regulatory functions to improve cell-based therapies aiming at inducing allograft tolerance.

  20. Proglucagon Promoter Cre-Mediated AMPK Deletion in Mice Increases Circulating GLP-1 Levels and Oral Glucose Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Sophie R.; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M.; Parker, Helen; Zac-Varghese, Sagen; Bloom, Stephen R.; Foretz, Marc; Viollet, Benoit; Rutter, Guy A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Enteroendocrine L-cells synthesise and release the gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in response to food transit. Deletion of the tumour suppressor kinase LKB1 from proglucagon-expressing cells leads to the generation of intestinal polyps but no change in circulating GLP-1 levels. Here, we explore the role of the downstream kinase AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in these cells. Method Loss of AMPK from proglucagon-expressing cells was achieved using a preproglucagon promoter-driven Cre (iGluCre) to catalyse recombination of floxed alleles of AMPKα1 and α2. Oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance were measured using standard protocols. L-cell mass was measured by immunocytochemistry. Hormone and peptide levels were measured by electrochemical-based luminescence detection or radioimmunoassay. Results Recombination with iGluCre led to efficient deletion of AMPK from intestinal L- and pancreatic alpha-cells. In contrast to mice rendered null for LKB1 using the same strategy, mice deleted for AMPK displayed an increase (WT: 0.05 ± 0.01, KO: 0.09±0.02%, p<0.01) in L-cell mass and elevated plasma fasting (WT: 5.62 ± 0.800 pg/ml, KO: 14.5 ± 1.870, p<0.01) and fed (WT: 15.7 ± 1.48pg/ml, KO: 22.0 ± 6.62, p<0.01) GLP-1 levels. Oral, but not intraperitoneal, glucose tolerance was significantly improved by AMPK deletion, whilst insulin and glucagon levels were unchanged despite an increase in alpha to beta cell ratio (WT: 0.23 ± 0.02, KO: 0.33 ± 0.03, p<0.01). Conclusion AMPK restricts L-cell growth and GLP-1 secretion to suppress glucose tolerance. Targeted inhibition of AMPK in L-cells may thus provide a new therapeutic strategy in some forms of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27010458

  1. Proglucagon Promoter Cre-Mediated AMPK Deletion in Mice Increases Circulating GLP-1 Levels and Oral Glucose Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie R Sayers

    Full Text Available Enteroendocrine L-cells synthesise and release the gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 in response to food transit. Deletion of the tumour suppressor kinase LKB1 from proglucagon-expressing cells leads to the generation of intestinal polyps but no change in circulating GLP-1 levels. Here, we explore the role of the downstream kinase AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in these cells.Loss of AMPK from proglucagon-expressing cells was achieved using a preproglucagon promoter-driven Cre (iGluCre to catalyse recombination of floxed alleles of AMPKα1 and α2. Oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance were measured using standard protocols. L-cell mass was measured by immunocytochemistry. Hormone and peptide levels were measured by electrochemical-based luminescence detection or radioimmunoassay.Recombination with iGluCre led to efficient deletion of AMPK from intestinal L- and pancreatic alpha-cells. In contrast to mice rendered null for LKB1 using the same strategy, mice deleted for AMPK displayed an increase (WT: 0.05 ± 0.01, KO: 0.09±0.02%, p<0.01 in L-cell mass and elevated plasma fasting (WT: 5.62 ± 0.800 pg/ml, KO: 14.5 ± 1.870, p<0.01 and fed (WT: 15.7 ± 1.48pg/ml, KO: 22.0 ± 6.62, p<0.01 GLP-1 levels. Oral, but not intraperitoneal, glucose tolerance was significantly improved by AMPK deletion, whilst insulin and glucagon levels were unchanged despite an increase in alpha to beta cell ratio (WT: 0.23 ± 0.02, KO: 0.33 ± 0.03, p<0.01.AMPK restricts L-cell growth and GLP-1 secretion to suppress glucose tolerance. Targeted inhibition of AMPK in L-cells may thus provide a new therapeutic strategy in some forms of type 2 diabetes.

  2. Polycation-mediated integrated cell death processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parhamifar, Ladan; Andersen, Helene; Wu, Linping;

    2014-01-01

    standard. PEIs are highly efficient transfectants, but depending on their architecture and size they induce cytotoxicity through different modes of cell death pathways. Here, we briefly review dynamic and integrated cell death processes and pathways, and discuss considerations in cell death assay design...

  3. Sialic acid-modified antigens impose tolerance via inhibition of T-cell proliferation and de novo induction of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdicchio, Maurizio; Ilarregui, Juan M; Verstege, Marleen I; Cornelissen, Lenneke A M; Schetters, Sjoerd T T; Engels, Steef; Ambrosini, Martino; Kalay, Hakan; Veninga, Henrike; den Haan, Joke M M; van Berkel, Lisette A; Samsom, Janneke N; Crocker, Paul R; Sparwasser, Tim; Berod, Luciana; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; van Kooyk, Yvette; Unger, Wendy W J

    2016-03-22

    Sialic acids are negatively charged nine-carbon carboxylated monosaccharides that often cap glycans on glycosylated proteins and lipids. Because of their strategic location at the cell surface, sialic acids contribute to interactions that are critical for immune homeostasis via interactions with sialic acid-binding Ig-type lectins (siglecs). In particular, these interactions may be of importance in cases where sialic acids may be overexpressed, such as on certain pathogens and tumors. We now demonstrate that modification of antigens with sialic acids (Sia-antigens) regulates the generation of antigen-specific regulatory T (Treg) cells via dendritic cells (DCs). Additionally, DCs that take up Sia-antigen prevent formation of effector CD4(+) and CD8(+)T cells. Importantly, the regulatory properties endowed on DCs upon Sia-antigen uptake are antigen-specific: only T cells responsive to the sialylated antigen become tolerized. In vivo, injection of Sia-antigen-loaded DCs increased de novo Treg-cell numbers and dampened effector T-cell expansion and IFN-γ production. The dual tolerogenic features that Sia-antigen imposed on DCs are Siglec-E-mediated and maintained under inflammatory conditions. Moreover, loading DCs with Sia-antigens not only inhibited the function of in vitro-established Th1 and Th17 effector T cells but also significantly dampened ex vivo myelin-reactive T cells, present in the circulation of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data indicate that sialic acid-modified antigens instruct DCs in an antigen-specific tolerogenic programming, enhancing Treg cells and reducing the generation and propagation of inflammatory T cells. Our data suggest that sialylation of antigens provides an attractive way to induce antigen-specific immune tolerance. PMID:26941238

  4. Multifactorial aspects of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Kapur

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on diseases of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction via FcγRs on phagocytes, in particular regarding platelets in fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and red blood cells (RBC) in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). Di

  5. Cdc42-mediated tubulogenesis controls cell specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesavan, Gokul; Sand, Fredrik Wolfhagen; Greiner, Thomas Uwe;

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how cells polarize and coordinate tubulogenesis during organ formation is a central question in biology. Tubulogenesis often coincides with cell-lineage specification during organ development. Hence, an elementary question is whether these two processes are independently controlled...... later for maintaining apical cell polarity. Finally, we show that Cdc42 controls cell specification non-cell-autonomously by providing the correct microenvironment for proper control of cell-fate choices of multipotent progenitors. For a video summary of this article, see the PaperFlick file with the......, or whether proper cell specification depends on formation of tubes. To address these fundamental questions, we have studied the functional role of Cdc42 in pancreatic tubulogenesis. We present evidence that Cdc42 is essential for tube formation, specifically for initiating microlumen formation and...

  6. CD13 mediates phagocytosis in human monocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licona-Limón, Ileana; Garay-Canales, Claudia A; Muñoz-Paleta, Ofelia; Ortega, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    CD13 is a membrane-bound ectopeptidase, highly expressed on monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. CD13 is involved in diverse functions, including degradation of peptide mediators, cellular adhesion, migration, viral endocytosis, signaling, and positive modulation of phagocytosis mediated by FcγRs and other phagocytic receptors. In this work, we explored whether besides acting as an accessory receptor, CD13 by itself is a primary phagocytic receptor. We found that hCD13 mediates efficient phagocytosis of large particles (erythrocytes) modified so as to interact with the cell only through CD13 in human macrophages and THP-1 monocytic cells. The extent of this phagocytosis is comparable with the phagocytosis mediated through the canonical phagocytic receptor FcγRI. Furthermore, we demonstrated that hCD13 expression in the nonphagocytic cell line HEK293 is sufficient to enable these cells to internalize particles bound through hCD13. CD13-mediated phagocytosis is independent of other phagocytic receptors, as it occurs in the absence of FcγRs, CR3, and most phagocytic receptors. Phagocytosis through CD13 is independent of its enzymatic activity but is dependent on actin rearrangement and activation of PI3K and is partially dependent on Syk activation. Moreover, the cross-linking of CD13 with antibodies rapidly induced pSyk in human macrophages. Finally, we observed that antibody-mediated cross-linking of hCD13, expressed in the murine macrophage-like J774 cell line, induces production of ROS. These results demonstrate that CD13 is a fully competent phagocytic receptor capable of mediating internalization of large particles. PMID:25934926

  7. Mediation by the serotonergic system of U-50,488H-induced antinociception and tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Begonia Yeeman.

    1989-01-01

    The antinociceptive action of U-50,488H, a selective {kappa}-opioid receptor agonist, was attenuated by serotonergic but not by noradrenergic receptor antagonists. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered U-50,488H was antagonized by more than two fold by i.c.v. administered pindolol, methysergide, mianserin, ketanserin, pirenperone or ICS-205,930. A similar degree of antagonism of U-50,488H (i.c.v.) was found after intrathecal (i.t.) treatments with pindolol, methysergide or ICS-205,930 but not with mianserin, ketanserin or pirenperone. When U-50,488H and the antagonists were both given i.t., its antinociceptive action was attenuated by pindolol or methysergide, potentiated by mianserin, ketanserin or pirenperone and not affected by ICS-205,930. The release of serotonin was further studied directly by using a superfusion system. A naloxone reversible, concentration- and Ca{sup 2+}- dependent enhancement of release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin by U-50,488H was observed in spinal and brain tissues. Tolerance to the antinociceptive action of U-50,488H was induced in mice using slow release preparations of U-50,488H. Serotonergic receptor antagonists (pindolol or ketanserin) were co-administered with U-50,488H to test for their effects on the development of tolerance to U-50,488H.

  8. Mediation by the serotonergic system of U-50,488H-induced antinociception and tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The antinociceptive action of U-50,488H, a selective κ-opioid receptor agonist, was attenuated by serotonergic but not by noradrenergic receptor antagonists. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered U-50,488H was antagonized by more than two fold by i.c.v. administered pindolol, methysergide, mianserin, ketanserin, pirenperone or ICS-205,930. A similar degree of antagonism of U-50,488H (i.c.v.) was found after intrathecal (i.t.) treatments with pindolol, methysergide or ICS-205,930 but not with mianserin, ketanserin or pirenperone. When U-50,488H and the antagonists were both given i.t., its antinociceptive action was attenuated by pindolol or methysergide, potentiated by mianserin, ketanserin or pirenperone and not affected by ICS-205,930. The release of serotonin was further studied directly by using a superfusion system. A naloxone reversible, concentration- and Ca2+- dependent enhancement of release of [3H]serotonin by U-50,488H was observed in spinal and brain tissues. Tolerance to the antinociceptive action of U-50,488H was induced in mice using slow release preparations of U-50,488H. Serotonergic receptor antagonists (pindolol or ketanserin) were co-administered with U-50,488H to test for their effects on the development of tolerance to U-50,488H

  9. Regulation of immune responses to protein therapeutics by transplacental induction of T cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nimesh; Culina, Slobodan; Meslier, Yann; Dimitrov, Jordan; Arnoult, Christophe; Delignat, Sandrine; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Lecerf, Maxime; Justesen, Sune; Gouilleux-Gruart, Valérie; Salomon, Benoit L; Scott, David W; Kaveri, Srinivas V; Mallone, Roberto; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien

    2015-02-18

    Central tolerance plays a key role in modulating immune responses to self and exogenous antigens. The absence of self-antigen expression, as in patients with genetic deficiencies, prevents the development of antigen-specific immune tolerance. Hence, a substantial number of patients develop neutralizing antibodies to the corresponding protein therapeutics after replacement treatment. In this context, the administration of missing antigens during fetal development, a key period for self-tolerance establishment, should confer early and long-lasting antigen-specific tolerance. To this end, we exploited the physiological pathway of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) through which maternal immunoglobulins are transplacentally transferred to fetuses. We demonstrate that Fc-fused antigens administered to pregnant mice reach fetal lymphoid organs in an FcRn-dependent manner, accumulate in antigen-presenting cells of myeloid origin, and promote the generation of both thymic and peripheral antigen-specific regulatory T cells. This strategy was successfully pursued in a mouse model of hemophilia A, where maternofetal transfer of the Fc-fused immunodominant domains of coagulation factor VIII conferred antigen-specific tolerance. Transplacental tolerance induction with Fc-fused proteins may thus prove valuable to prevent alloimmunization after replacement protein therapy for congenital deficiencies. PMID:25696000

  10. Tolerogenic nanoparticles inhibit T cell-mediated autoimmunity through SOCS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeste, Ada; Takenaka, Maisa C; Mascanfroni, Ivan D; Nadeau, Meghan; Kenison, Jessica E; Patel, Bonny; Tukpah, Ann-Marcia; Babon, Jenny Aurielle B; DeNicola, Megan; Kent, Sally C; Pozo, David; Quintana, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell-dependent autoimmune disease that is characterized by the destruction of insulin-producing β cells in the pancreas. The administration to patients of ex vivo-differentiated FoxP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells or tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) that promote Treg cell differentiation is considered a potential therapy for T1D; however, cell-based therapies cannot be easily translated into clinical practice. We engineered nanoparticles (NPs) to deliver both a tolerogenic molecule, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE), and the β cell antigen proinsulin (NPITE+Ins) to induce a tolerogenic phenotype in DCs and promote Treg cell generation in vivo. NPITE+Ins administration to 8-week-old nonobese diabetic mice suppressed autoimmune diabetes. NPITE+Ins induced a tolerogenic phenotype in DCs, which was characterized by a decreased ability to activate inflammatory effector T cells and was concomitant with the increased differentiation of FoxP3(+) Treg cells. The induction of a tolerogenic phenotype in DCs by NPs was mediated by the AhR-dependent induction of Socs2, which resulted in inhibition of nuclear factor κB activation and proinflammatory cytokine production (properties of tolerogenic DCs). Together, these data suggest that NPs constitute a potential tool to reestablish tolerance in T1D and potentially other autoimmune disorders. PMID:27330188

  11. The human fetal placenta promotes tolerance against the semiallogeneic fetus by inducing regulatory T cells and homeostatic M2 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson-Arvelund, Judit; Mehta, Ratnesh B; Lindau, Robert; Mirrasekhian, Elahe; Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto; Berg, Göran; Lash, Gendie E; Jenmalm, Maria C; Ernerudh, Jan

    2015-02-15

    A successful pregnancy requires that the maternal immune system is instructed to a state of tolerance to avoid rejection of the semiallogeneic fetal-placental unit. Although increasing evidence supports that decidual (uterine) macrophages and regulatory T cells (Tregs) are key regulators of fetal tolerance, it is not known how these tolerogenic leukocytes are induced. In this article, we show that the human fetal placenta itself, mainly through trophoblast cells, is able to induce homeostatic M2 macrophages and Tregs. Placental-derived M-CSF and IL-10 induced macrophages that shared the CD14(+)CD163(+)CD206(+)CD209(+) phenotype of decidual macrophages and produced IL-10 and CCL18 but not IL-12 or IL-23. Placental tissue also induced the expansion of CD25(high)CD127(low)Foxp3(+) Tregs in parallel with increased IL-10 production, whereas production of IFN-γ (Th1), IL-13 (Th2), and IL-17 (Th17) was not induced. Tregs expressed the suppressive markers CTLA-4 and CD39, were functionally suppressive, and were induced, in part, by IL-10, TGF-β, and TRAIL. Placental-derived factors also limited excessive Th cell activation, as shown by decreased HLA-DR expression and reduced secretion of Th1-, Th2-, and Th17-associated cytokines. Thus, our data indicate that the fetal placenta has a central role in promoting the homeostatic environment necessary for successful pregnancy. These findings have implications for immune-mediated pregnancy complications, as well as for our general understanding of tissue-induced tolerance. PMID:25560409

  12. Thrombospondin-1-N-Terminal Domain Induces a Phagocytic State and Thrombospondin-1-C-Terminal Domain Induces a Tolerizing Phenotype in Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabib, Adi; Krispin, Alon; Trahtemberg, Uriel; Verbovetski, Inna; Lebendiker, Mario; Danieli, Tsafi; Mevorach, Dror

    2009-01-01

    In our previous study, we have found that thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is synthesized de novo upon monocyte and neutrophil apoptosis, leading to a phagocytic and tolerizing phenotype of dendritic cells (DC), even prior to DC-apoptotic cell interaction. Interestingly, we were able to show that heparin binding domain (HBD), the N-terminal portion of TSP-1, was cleaved and secreted simultaneously in a caspase- and serine protease- dependent manner. In the current study we were interested to examine the role of HBD in the clearance of apoptotic cells, and whether the phagocytic and tolerizing state of DCs is mediated by the HBD itself, or whether the entire TSP-1 is needed. Therefore, we have cloned the human HBD, and compared its interactions with DC to those with TSP-1. Here we show that rHBD by itself is not directly responsible for immune paralysis and tolerizing phenotype of DCs, at least in the monomeric form, but has a significant role in rendering DCs phagocytic. Binding of TSP-1-C-terminal domain on the other hand induces a tolerizing phenotype in dendritic cells. PMID:19721725

  13. Mast Cells Contribute to Peripheral Tolerance and Attenuate Autoimmune Vasculitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gan, Poh-Yi; Summers, Shaun A.; Ooi, Joshua D.; O’Sullivan, Kim M.; Tan, Diana S.Y.; Muljadi, Ruth C.M.; Odobasic, Dragana; Kitching, A. Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells contribute to the modulation of the immune response, but their role in autoimmune renal disease is not well understood. Here, we induced autoimmunity resulting in focal necrotizing GN by immunizing wild-type or mast cell-deficient (KitW-sh/W-sh) mice with myeloperoxidase. Mast cell-deficient mice exhibited more antimyeloperoxidase CD4+ T cells, enhanced dermal delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to myeloperoxidase, and more severe focal necrotizing GN. Furthermore, the lymph no...

  14. T cell mediated pathogenesis in EAE: Molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian C Kurschus

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available T cells are major initiators and mediators of disease in multiple sclerosis (MS and in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. EAE is an antigen-driven autoimmune model in which immunization against myelin autoantigens elicits strong T cell responses which initiate its pathology with CNS myelin destruction. T cells cause pathogenic events by several mechanisms; some work in a direct fashion in the CNS, such as direct cytokine-induced damage, granzyme-mediated killing, or glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, whereas most are indirect mechanisms, such as activation of other cell types like macrophages, B cells, or neutrophils. This review aims to describe and discuss the molecular effector mechanism by which T cells harm the CNS during EAE.

  15. Regulatory T cells: serious contenders in the promise for immunological tolerance in transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloufar eSafinia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs play an important role in immunoregulation and have been shown in animal models to promote transplantation tolerance and curb autoimmunity following their adoptive transfer. The safety and potential therapeutic efficacy of these cells has already been reported in Phase I trials of bone marrow transplantation and type I diabetes, the success of which has motivated the broadened application of these cells in solid organ transplantation. Despite major advances in the clinical translation of these cells, there are still key questions to be addressed to ensure that Tregs attest their reputation as ideal candidates for tolerance induction. In this review, we will discuss the unique traits of Tregs that have attracted such fame in the arena of tolerance induction. We will outline the protocols used for their ex vivo expansion and discuss the future directions of Treg cell therapy. In this regard, we will review the concept of Treg heterogeneity, the desire to isolate and expand a functionally superior Treg population and report on the effect of differing culture conditions. The relevance of Treg migratory capacity will also be discussed together with methods of in vivo visualization of the infused cells. Moreover, we will highlight key advances in the identification and expansion of antigen specific Tregs and discuss their significance for cell therapy application. We will also summarize the clinical parameters that are of importance, alongside cell manufacture, from the choice of immunosuppression regimens to the number of injections in order to direct the success of future efficacy trials of Treg cell therapy.Years of research in the field of tolerance have seen an accumulation of knowledge and expertise in the field of Treg biology. This perpetual progression has been the driving force behind the many successes to date and has put us now within touching distance of our ultimate success, immunological tolerance.

  16. Prenatal Allospecific NK Cell Tolerance Hinges on Instructive Allorecognition through the Activating Receptor during Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhajjat, Amir M; Strong, Beverly S; Lee, Amanda E; Turner, Lucas E; Wadhwani, Ram K; Ortaldo, John R; Heusel, Jonathan W; Shaaban, Aimen F

    2015-08-15

    Little is known about how the prenatal interaction between NK cells and alloantigens shapes the developing NK cell repertoire toward tolerance or immunity. Specifically, the effect on NK cell education arising from developmental corecognition of alloantigens by activating and inhibitory receptors with shared specificity is uncharacterized. Using a murine prenatal transplantation model, we examined the manner in which this seemingly conflicting input affects NK cell licensing and repertoire formation in mixed hematopoietic chimeras. We found that prenatal NK cell tolerance arose from the elimination of phenotypically hostile NK cells that express an allospecific activating receptor without coexpressing any allospecific inhibitory receptors. Importantly, the checkpoint for the system appeared to occur centrally within the bone marrow during the final stage of NK cell maturation and hinged on the instructive recognition of allogeneic ligand by the activating receptor rather than through the inhibitory receptor as classically proposed. Residual nondeleted hostile NK cells expressing only the activating receptor exhibited an immature, anergic phenotype, but retained the capacity to upregulate inhibitory receptor expression in peripheral sites. However, the potential for this adaptive change to occur was lost in developmentally mature chimeras. Collectively, these findings illuminate the intrinsic process in which developmental allorecognition through the activating receptor regulates the emergence of durable NK cell tolerance and establishes a new paradigm to fundamentally guide future investigations of prenatal NK cell-allospecific education. PMID:26136432

  17. Bone marrow stromal cell: mediated neuroprotection for spinal cord repair

    OpenAIRE

    Ritfeld, Gaby Jane

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no treatment available that restores anatomy and function after spinal cord injury. This thesis explores transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bone marrow stromal cells; BMSCs) as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. BMSCs secrete neurotrophic factors, enabling neuroprotection/tissue sparing in a rat model of spinal cord injury. In this model system, bone marrow stromal cell-mediated tissue sparing leads to motor and sensory function impr...

  18. Reduction of methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress tolerance in antisense transgenic tobacco seedlings through restricted expression of StAPX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-hong SUN; Yong WANG; Hua-gang HE; Xue LI; Wan SONG; Bin DU; Qing-wei MENG

    2013-01-01

    Ascorbate peroxidases are directly involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging by reducing hydrogen peroxide to water.The tomato thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase gene (StAPX) was introduced into tobacco.RNA gel blot analysis confirmed that StAPX in tomato leaves was induced by methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress.The sense transgenic seedlings exhibited higher tAPX activity than that of the wild type (WT) plants under oxidative stress conditions,while the antisense seedlings exhibited lower tAPX activity.Lower APX activities of antisense transgenic seedlings caused higher malondialdehyde contents and relative electrical conductivity.The sense transgenic seedlings with higher tAPX activity maintained higher chlorophyll content and showed the importance of tAPX in maintaining the optimal chloroplast development under methylviologen stress conditions,whereas the antisense lines maintained lower chlorophyll content than WT seedlings.Results indicated that the over-expression of StAPX enhanced tolerance to methylviologen-mediated oxidative stress in sense transgenic tobacco early seedlings,whereas the suppression of StAPX in antisense transgenic seedlings showed high sensitivity to oxidative stress.

  19. Gz mediates the long-lasting desensitization of brain CB1 receptors and is essential for cross-tolerance with morphine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Muñoz María

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the systemic administration of cannabinoids produces antinociception, their chronic use leads to analgesic tolerance as well as cross-tolerance to morphine. These effects are mediated by cannabinoids binding to peripheral, spinal and supraspinal CB1 and CB2 receptors, making it difficult to determine the relevance of each receptor type to these phenomena. However, in the brain, the CB1 receptors (CB1Rs are expressed at high levels in neurons, whereas the expression of CB2Rs is marginal. Thus, CB1Rs mediate the effects of smoked cannabis and are also implicated in emotional behaviors. We have analyzed the production of supraspinal analgesia and the development of tolerance at CB1Rs by the direct injection of a series of cannabinoids into the brain. The influence of the activation of CB1Rs on supraspinal analgesia evoked by morphine was also evaluated. Results Intracerebroventricular (icv administration of cannabinoid receptor agonists, WIN55,212-2, ACEA or methanandamide, generated a dose-dependent analgesia. Notably, a single administration of these compounds brought about profound analgesic tolerance that lasted for more than 14 days. This decrease in the effect of cannabinoid receptor agonists was not mediated by depletion of CB1Rs or the loss of regulated G proteins, but, nevertheless, it was accompanied by reduced morphine analgesia. On the other hand, acute morphine administration produced tolerance that lasted only 3 days and did not affect the CB1R. We found that both neural mu-opioid receptors (MORs and CB1Rs interact with the HINT1-RGSZ module, thereby regulating pertussis toxin-insensitive Gz proteins. In mice with reduced levels of these Gz proteins, the CB1R agonists produced no such desensitization or morphine cross-tolerance. On the other hand, experimental enhancement of Gz signaling enabled an acute icv administration of morphine to produce a long-lasting tolerance at MORs that persisted for more than

  20. Absence of Amphotericin B-Tolerant Persister Cells in Biofilms of Some Candida Species▿

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Dhaheri, Rawya S.; Douglas, L. Julia

    2008-01-01

    Biofilms and planktonic cells of five Candida species were surveyed for the presence of persister (drug-tolerant) cell populations after exposure to amphotericin B. None of the planktonic cultures (exponential or stationary phase) contained persister cells. However, persisters were found in biofilms of one of two strains of Candida albicans tested and in biofilms of Candida krusei and Candida parapsilosis, but not in biofilms of Candida glabrata or Candida tropicalis. These results suggest th...

  1. Laser-mediated perforation of plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Martin; Jacobs, Philipp; Esser, Dominik; Schinkel, Helga; Schillberg, Stefan

    2007-07-01

    The functional analysis of plant cells at the cellular and subcellular levels requires novel technologies for the directed manipulation of individual cells. Lasers are increasingly exploited for the manipulation of plant cells, enabling the study of biological processes on a subcellular scale including transformation to generate genetically modified plants. In our setup either a picosecond laser operating at 1064 nm wavelength or a continuous wave laser diode emitting at 405 nm are coupled into an inverse microscope. The beams are focused to a spot size of about 1.5 μm and the tobacco cell protoplasts are irradiated. Optoporation is achieved when targeting the laser focal spot at the outermost edge of the plasma membrane. In case of the picosecond laser a single pulse with energy of about 0.4 μJ was sufficient to perforate the plasma membrane enabling the uptake of dye or DNA from the surrounding medium into the cytosol. When the ultraviolet laser diode at a power level of 17 mW is employed an irradiation time of 200 - 500 milliseconds is necessary to enable the uptake of macromolecules. In the presence of an EYFP encoding plasmid with a C-terminal peroxisomal signal sequence in the surrounding medium transient transformation of tobacco protoplasts could be achieved in up to 2% of the optoporated cells. Single cell perforation using this novel optoporation method shows that isolated plant cells can be permeabilized without direct manipulation. This is a valuable procedure for cell-specific applications, particularly where the import of specific molecules into plant cells is required for functional analysis.

  2. Antigen dynamics govern the induction of CD4(+) T cell tolerance during autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challa, Dilip K; Mi, Wentao; Lo, Su-Tang; Ober, Raimund J; Ward, E Sally

    2016-08-01

    Antigen-specific T cell tolerance holds great promise for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, strategies to induce durable tolerance using high doses of soluble antigen have to date been unsuccessful, due to lack of efficacy and the risk of hypersensitivity. In the current study we have overcome these limitations by developing a platform for tolerance induction based on engineering the immunoglobulin Fc region to modulate the dynamic properties of low doses (1 μg/mouse; ∼50 μg/kg) of Fc-antigen fusions. Using this approach, we demonstrate that antigen persistence is a dominant factor governing the elicitation of tolerance in the model of multiple sclerosis (MS), experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), induced by immunizing B10.PL mice with the N-terminal epitope of myelin basic protein. Unexpectedly, our analyses reveal a stringent threshold of antigen persistence for both prophylactic and therapeutic treatments, although distinct mechanisms lead to tolerance in these two settings. Importantly, the delivery of tolerogenic Fc-antigen fusions during ongoing disease results in the downregulation of T-bet and CD40L combined with amplification of Foxp3(+) T cell numbers. The generation of effective, low dose tolerogens using Fc engineering has potential for the regulation of autoreactive T cells. PMID:27236506

  3. Oral tolerance to cancer can be abrogated by T regulatory cell inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Maria C; Casey, Garrett; Larkin, John O; Guinn, Barbara-ann; O'Sullivan, Gerald C; Tangney, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Oral administration of tumour cells induces an immune hypo-responsiveness known as oral tolerance. We have previously shown that oral tolerance to a cancer is tumour antigen specific, non-cross-reactive and confers a tumour growth advantage. We investigated the utilisation of regulatory T cell (Treg) depletion on oral tolerance to a cancer and its ability to control tumour growth. Balb/C mice were gavage fed homogenised tumour tissue--JBS fibrosarcoma (to induce oral tolerance to a cancer), or PBS as control. Growth of subcutaneous JBS tumours were measured; splenic tissue excised and flow cytometry used to quantify and compare systemic Tregs and T effector (Teff) cell populations. Prior to and/or following tumour feeding, mice were intraperitoneally administered anti-CD25, to inactivate systemic Tregs, or given isotype antibody as a control. Mice which were orally tolerised prior to subcutaneous tumour induction, displayed significantly higher systemic Treg levels (14% vs 6%) and faster tumour growth rates than controls (p<0.05). Complete regression of tumours were only seen after Treg inactivation and occurred in all groups--this was not inhibited by tumour feeding. The cure rates for Treg inactivation were 60% during tolerisation, 75% during tumour growth and 100% during inactivation for both tolerisation and tumour growth. Depletion of Tregs gave rise to an increased number of Teff cells. Treg depletion post-tolerisation and post-tumour induction led to the complete regression of all tumours on tumour bearing mice. Oral administration of tumour tissue, confers a tumour growth advantage and is accompanied by an increase in systemic Treg levels. The administration of anti-CD25 Ab decreased Treg numbers and caused an increase in Teffs. Most notably Treg cell inhibition overcame established oral tolerance with consequent tumor regression, especially relevant to foregut cancers where oral tolerance is likely to be induced by the shedding of tumour tissue into the

  4. Helios defines T cells being driven to tolerance in the periphery and thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ellen M; Bourges, Dorothée; Hogan, Thea V; Gleeson, Paul A; van Driel, Ian R

    2014-07-01

    The expression of the Ikaros transcription factor family member, Helios, has been shown to be associated with T-cell tolerance in both the thymus and the periphery. To better understand the importance of Helios in tolerance pathways, we have examined the expression of Helios in TCR-transgenic T cells specific for the gastric H(+) /K(+) ATPase, the autoantigen target in autoimmune gastritis. Analysis of H(+) /K(+) ATPase-specific T cells in mice with different patterns of H(+) /K(+) ATPase expression revealed that, in addition to the expression of Helios in CD4(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, Helios is expressed by a large proportion of CD4(+) Foxp3(-) T cells in both the thymus and the paragastric lymph node (PgLN), which drains the stomach. In the thymus, Helios was expressed by H(+) /K(+) ATPase-specific thymocytes that were undergoing negative selection. In the periphery, Helios was expressed in H(+) /K(+) ATPase-specific CD4(+) T cells following H(+) /K(+) ATPase presentation and was more highly expressed when T-cell activation occurred in the absence of inflammation. Analysis of purified H(+) /K(+) ATPase-specific CD4(+) Foxp3(-) Helios(+) T cells demonstrated that they were functionally anergic. These results demonstrate that Helios is expressed by thymic and peripheral T cells that are being driven to tolerance in response to a genuine autoantigen. PMID:24740292

  5. Immunological tolerance to muscle autoantigens involves peripheral deletion of autoreactive CD8+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Franck

    Full Text Available Muscle potentially represents the most abundant source of autoantigens of the body and can be targeted by a variety of severe autoimmune diseases. Yet, the mechanisms of immunological tolerance toward muscle autoantigens remain mostly unknown. We investigated this issue in transgenic SM-Ova mice that express an ovalbumin (Ova neo-autoantigen specifically in skeletal muscle. We previously reported that antigen specific CD4(+ T cell are immunologically ignorant to endogenous Ova in this model but can be stimulated upon immunization. In contrast, Ova-specific CD8(+ T cells were suspected to be either unresponsive to Ova challenge or functionally defective. We now extend our investigations on the mechanisms governing CD8(+ tolerance in SM-Ova mice. We show herein that Ova-specific CD8(+ T cells are not detected upon challenge with strongly immunogenic Ova vaccines even after depletion of regulatory T cells. Ova-specific CD8(+ T cells from OT-I mice adoptively transferred to SM-Ova mice started to proliferate in vivo, acquired CD69 and PD-1 but subsequently down-regulated Bcl-2 and disappeared from the periphery, suggesting a mechanism of peripheral deletion. Peripheral deletion of endogenous Ova-specific cells was formally demonstrated in chimeric SM-Ova mice engrafted with bone marrow cells containing T cell precursors from OT-I TCR-transgenic mice. Thus, the present findings demonstrate that immunological tolerance to muscle autoantigens involves peripheral deletion of autoreactive CD8(+ T cells.

  6. Sphingolipid mediators in cardiovascular cell biology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levade, T; Augé, N; Veldman, R J; Cuvillier, O; Nègre-Salvayre, A; Salvayre, R

    2001-11-23

    Sphingolipids have emerged as a new class of lipid mediators. In response to various extracellular stimuli, sphingolipid turnover can be stimulated in vascular cells and cardiac myocytes. Subsequent generation of sphingolipid molecules such as ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate, is followed by regulation of ion fluxes and activation of various signaling pathways leading to smooth muscle cell proliferation, endothelial cell differentiation or apoptotic cell death, cell contraction, retraction, or migration. The importance of sphingolipids in cardiovascular signaling is illustrated by recent observations implicating them in physiological processes such as vasculogenesis as well as in frequent pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis and its complications. PMID:11717151

  7. Liver type I regulatory T cells suppress germinal center formation in HBV-tolerant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Long; Yin, Wenwei; Sun, Rui; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2013-10-15

    The liver plays a critical role in inducing systemic immune tolerance, for example, during limiting hypersensitivity to food allergy and in rendering acceptance of allotransplant or even hepatotropic pathogens. We investigated the unknown mechanisms of liver tolerance by using an established hepatitis B virus (HBV)-carrier mouse model, and found that these mice exhibited an antigen-specific tolerance toward peripheral HBsAg vaccination, showing unenlarged draining lymph node (DLN), lower number of germinal centers (GC), and inactivation of GC B cells and follicular T helper (Tfh) cells. Both in vivo and in vitro immune responses toward HBsAg were suppressed by mononuclear cells from HBV-carrier mice, which were CD4(+) Foxp3(-) type 1 regulatory T (Tr1)-like cells producing IL-10. Using recipient Rag1(-/-) mice, hepatic Tr1-like cells from day 7 of HBV-persistent mice acquired the ability to inhibit anti-HBV immunity 3 d earlier than splenic Tr1-like cells, implying that hepatic Tr1-like cells were generated before those in spleen. Kupffer cell depletion or IL-10 deficiency led to impairment of Tr1-like cell generation, along with breaking HBV persistence. The purified EGFP(+)CD4(+) T cells (containing Tr1-like cells) from HBV-carrier mice trafficked in higher numbers to DLN in recipient mice after HBsAg vaccination, and subsequently inactivated both Tfh cells and GC B cells via secreting IL-10, resulting in impaired GC formation and anti-HB antibody production. Thus, our results indicate Tr1-like cells migrate from the liver to the DLN and inhibit peripheral anti-HBV immunity by negatively regulating GC B cells and Tfh cells. PMID:24089450

  8. Acquired cancer stem cell phenotypes through Oct4-mediated dedifferentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh M.; Liu, Shujing; Lu, Hezhe; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhang, Paul J.; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Guerra, Matthew; Guo, Wei; Xu, Xiaowei

    2012-01-01

    There is enormous interest to target cancer stem cells (CSCs) for clinical treatment because these cells are highly tumorigenic and resistant to chemotherapy. Oct4 is expressed by CSC-like cells in different types of cancer. However, function of Oct4 in tumor cells is unclear. In this study, we showed that expression of Oct4 gene or transmembrane delivery of Oct4 protein promoted dedifferentiation of melanoma cells to CSC-like cells. The dedifferentiated melanoma cells showed significantly decreased expression of melanocytic markers and acquired the ability to form tumor spheroids. They showed markedly increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and hypoxic injury. In the subcutaneous xenograft and tail vein injection assays, these cells had significantly increased tumorigenic capacity. The dedifferentiated melanoma cells acquired features associated with CSCs such as multipotent differentiation capacity and expression of melanoma CSC markers such as ABCB5 and CD271. Mechanistically, Oct4 induced dedifferentiation was associated with increased expression of endogenous Oct4, Nanog and Klf4, and global gene expression changes that enriched for transcription factors. RNAi mediated knockdown of Oct4 in dedifferentiated cells led to diminished CSC phenotypes. Oct4 expression in melanoma was regulated by hypoxia and its expression was detected in a subpopulation of melanoma cells in clinical samples. Our data indicate that Oct4 is a positive regulator of tumor dedifferentiation. The results suggest that CSC phenotype is dynamic and may be acquired through dedifferentiation. Oct4 mediated tumor cell dedifferentiation may play an important role during tumor progression. PMID:22286766

  9. Cortactin mediated morphogenic cell movements during zebrafish (Danio rerio) gastrulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Dan; ZHANG Peijun; ZHAN Xi

    2005-01-01

    Cell migration is essential to direct embryonic cells to specific sites at which their developmental fates are ultimately determined. However, the mechanism by which cell motility is regulated in embryonic development is largely unknown. Cortactin, a filamentous actin binding protein, is an activator of Arp2/3 complex in the nucleation of actin cytoskeleton at the cell leading edge and acts directly on the machinery of cell motility. To determine whether cortactin and Arp2/3 mediated actin assembly plays a role in the morphogenic cell movements during the early development of zebrafish, we initiated a study of cortactin expression in zebrafish embryos at gastrulating stages when massive cell migrations occur. Western blot analysis using a cortactin specific monoclonal antibody demonstrated that cortactin protein is abundantly present in embryos at the most early developmental stages. Immunostaining of whole-mounted embryo showed that cortactin immunoreactivity was associated with the embryonic shield, predominantly at the dorsal side of the embryos during gastrulation. In addition, cortactin was detected in the convergent cells of the epiblast and hypoblast, and later in the central nervous system. Immunofluorescent staining with cortactin and Arp3 antibodies also revealed that cortactin and Arp2/3 complex colocalized at the periphery and many patches associated with the cell-to-cell junction in motile embryonic cells. Therefore, our data suggest that cortactin and Arp2/3 mediated actin polymerization is implicated in the cell movement during gastrulation and perhaps the development of the central neural system as well.

  10. Glioma cell dispersion is driven by α5 integrin-mediated cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandin, Anne-Florence; Noulet, Fanny; Renner, Guillaume; Mercier, Marie-Cécile; Choulier, Laurence; Vauchelles, Romain; Ronde, Philippe; Carreiras, Franck; Etienne-Selloum, Nelly; Vereb, Gyorgy; Lelong-Rebel, Isabelle; Martin, Sophie; Dontenwill, Monique; Lehmann, Maxime

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive primary brain tumor. The fibronectin receptor, α5 integrin is a pertinent novel therapeutic target. Despite numerous data showing that α5 integrin support tumor cell migration and invasion, it has been reported that α5 integrin can also limit cell dispersion by increasing cell-cell interaction. In this study, we showed that α5 integrin was involved in cell-cell interaction and gliomasphere formation. α5-mediated cell-cell cohesion limited cell dispersion from spheroids in fibronectin-poor microenvironment. However, in fibronectin-rich microenvironment, α5 integrin promoted cell dispersion. Ligand-occupied α5 integrin and fibronectin were distributed in fibril-like pattern at cell-cell junction of evading cells, forming cell-cell fibrillar adhesions. Activated focal adhesion kinase was not present in these adhesions but was progressively relocalized with α5 integrin as cell migrates away from the spheroids. α5 integrin function in GBM appears to be more complex than previously suspected. As GBM overexpressed fibronectin, it is most likely that in vivo, α5-mediated dissemination from the tumor mass overrides α5-mediated tumor cell cohesion. In this respect, α5-integrin antagonists may be useful to limit GBM invasion in brain parenchyma. PMID:27063097

  11. Interferon-α abrogates tolerance induction by human tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Bacher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Administration of interferon-α (IFN-α represents an approved adjuvant therapy as reported for malignancies like melanoma and several viral infections. In malignant diseases, tolerance processes are critically involved in tumor progression. In this study, the effect of IFN-α on tolerance induction by human tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC was analyzed. We focussed on tolerogenic IL-10-modulated DC (IL-10 DC that are known to induce anergic regulatory T cells (iTregs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: IFN-α promoted an enhanced maturation of IL-10 DC as demonstrated by upregulation of the differentiation marker CD83 as well as costimulatory molecules. IFN-α treatment resulted in an increased capacity of DC to stimulate T cell activation compared to control tolerogenic DC. We observed a strengthened T cell proliferation and increased IFN-γ production of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells stimulated by IFN-α-DC, demonstrating a restoration of the immunogenic capacity of tolerogenic DC in the presence of IFN-α. Notably, restimulation experiments revealed that IFN-α treatment of tolerogenic DC abolished the induction of T cell anergy and suppressor function of iTregs. In contrast, IFN-α neither affected the priming of iTregs nor converted iTregs into effector T cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: IFN-α inhibits the induction of T cell tolerance by reversing the tolerogenic function of human DC.

  12. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation of mammalian cells by chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a cell-mediated mutagenesis assay in which cells with the appropriate markers for mutagenesis are co-cultivated with either lethally irradiated rodent embryonic cells that can metabolize carcinogenic hydrocarbons or with primary rat liver cells that can metabolize chemicals carcinogenic to the liver. During co-cultivation, the reactive metabolites of the procarcinogen appear to be transmitted to the mutable cells and induce mutations in them. Assays of this type make it possible to demonstrate a relationship between carcinogenic potency of the chemicals and their ability to induce mutations in mammalian cells. In addition, by simultaneously comparing the frequencies of transformation and mutation induced in normal diploid hamster cells by benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and one of its metabolites, it is possible to estimate the genetic target size for cell transformation in vitro

  13. A Requisite Role for Induced Regulatory T cells in Tolerance Based on Expanding Antigen Receptor Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Haribhai, Dipica; Williams, Jason B; Jia, Shuang; Nickerson, Derek; Schmitt, Erica G.; Edwards, Brandon; Ziegelbauer, Jennifer; Yassai, Maryam; Li, Shun-Hwa; Relland, Lance M.; Wise, Petra M; Chen, Andrew; Zheng, Yu-Qian; Simpson, Pippa M.; Gorski, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Although both natural and induced regulatory T (nTreg and iTreg) cells can enforce tolerance, the mechanisms underlying their synergistic actions have not been established. We examined the functions of nTreg and iTreg cells by adoptive transfer immunotherapy of newborn Foxp3-deficient mice. As monotherapy, only nTreg cells prevented disease lethality, but did not suppress chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. Provision of Foxp3-sufficient conventional T cells with nTreg cells reconstituted t...

  14. Stem cell  mediated liver regeneration:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Peter

    udformet en strategi som involverede isolering af HPCr vha. Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). Isolerede celler skulle efterfølgende undersøges ved in vitro studier som implicerede tilsætning af specifikke immunrespons relaterede faktorer. Kun få specifikke overflade HPC markører er blevet...

  15. Clostridial glucosylating toxins enter cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Zamboglou, Constantinos; Genisyuerek, Selda; Guttenberg, Gregor; Aktories, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), C. sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL) and C. novyi alpha-toxin (TcnA) are important pathogenicity factors, which represent the family of the clostridial glucosylating toxins (CGTs). Toxin A and B are associated with antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembraneous colitis. Lethal toxin is involved in toxic shock syndrome after abortion and alpha-toxin in gas gangrene development. CGTs enter cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and require an acidified endosome for translocation of the catalytic domain into the cytosol. Here we studied the endocytic processes that mediate cell internalization of the CGTs. Intoxication of cells was monitored by analyzing cell morphology, status of Rac glucosylation in cell lysates and transepithelial resistance of cell monolayers. We found that the intoxication of cultured cells by CGTs was strongly delayed when cells were preincubated with dynasore, a cell-permeable inhibitor of dynamin, or chlorpromazine, an inhibitor of the clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway. Additional evidence about the role of clathrin in the uptake of the prototypical CGT family member toxin B was achieved by expression of a dominant-negative inhibitor of the clathrin-mediated endocytosis (Eps15 DN) or by siRNA against the clathrin heavy chain. Accordingly, cells that expressed dominant-negative caveolin-1 were not protected from toxin B-induced cell rounding. In addition, lipid rafts impairment by exogenous depletion of sphingomyelin did not decelerate intoxication of HeLa cells by CGTs. Taken together, our data indicate that the endocytic uptake of the CGTs involves a dynamin-dependent process that is mainly governed by clathrin. PMID:20498856

  16. Modulation of experimental T cell autoimmunity in the nervous system with emphasis on nasal tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Xue-Feng

    1998-01-01

    MODULATION OF EXPERIMENTAL T CELL AUTOIMMUNITY IN THE NERVOUSSYSTEM WITH EMPHASIS ON NASAL TOLERANCE Xue-Feng Bai Doctoral thesis from Division of Neurology, Department of ClinicalNeuroscience and Family Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital,Stockholm, Sweden Experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) and encephalomyelitis (EAE) are animalmodels of Guillian-Barre syndrome (GBS) and multiple sclerosis (MS), representinghuman demyelinating diseases ...

  17. Characteristics of cadmium tolerance in 'Hermes' flax seedlings: contribution of cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douchiche, Olfa; Soret-Morvan, Odile; Chaïbi, Wided; Morvan, Claudine; Paynel, Florence

    2010-12-01

    Most flax (Linum usitatissimum) varieties are described as tolerant to high concentrations of Cd. The aim of the present paper was to better characterize this tolerance, by studying the responses of flax plantlets, cv Hermes, to 18d growth on 0.5mM Cd. In Cd-treated seedlings, the majority of Cd was compartmentalized in the roots. Analysis of other elements showed that only Fe concentration was reduced, while Mn increased. Growth parameters of Cd treated flax were only moderately altered, with similar mass tolerance-indices for roots and shoots. Tissue anatomy was unaffected by treatment. The effect on lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and antioxidative activities appeared low but slightly higher in roots. The most important impacts of Cd were, in all organs, cell expansion, cell-wall thickening, pectin cross-linking and increase of cell-wall enzymatic activities (pectin methylesterase and peroxidase). Thus, the role of the cell wall in Cd tolerance might be important at two levels: (i) in the reinforcement of the tissue cohesion and (ii) in the sequestration of Cd. PMID:20884040

  18. Tolerization of an established αb-crystallin-reactive T-cell response by intravenous antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, R.; Mark, K. van der; Wawrousek, E.F.; Plomp, A.C.; Noort, J.M. van

    2007-01-01

    Tolerance induction to prevent activation of a naïve T-cell repertoire has been well documented in rodents and can be readily achieved by intravenous, oral or intranasal administration of antigen in the absence of adjuvants. In autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) the presence of an e

  19. Cell mediated calcification and matrix vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication on calcification and the sequence of events directed by the cell to facilitate this process contains the following topics: New Ultrastructural Techniques for Study of Calcification; Mechanisms of Matrix Vesicle Calcification; Role of Mitochondria, Matrix Proteins and Cytokines in Calcification; Role of Phospholipids and Membranes in Calcification; Biogenesis of Matrix Vesicles in Vivo and in Vitro; Calcification and Ossification in Vitro; Calcific Diseases and Abnormal Bone Mineralization. (Auth.)

  20. Biomarkers of CD4+ CTL cell Mediated Immunity to Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The immune responses mediated by interactions between T-lymphocyte subsets and mycobacteria-infected macrophages are critical for control of tuberculosis. In these studies, the bovine model was used to characterize the cytolytic and mycobactericidal CD4+ T cell response induced by BCG vaccination. ...

  1. Multifactorial aspects of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction

    OpenAIRE

    Schoot, van der, B.H.; Vidarsson, G.; Kapur, R.

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on diseases of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction via FcγRs on phagocytes, in particular regarding platelets in fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and red blood cells (RBC) in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). Diagnostically, for HDFN laboratory tests are in place in order to predict risk for severe fetal RBC destruction and thereby initiate appropriate treatments. This test is sensitive, but has relativel...

  2. Defective cell mediated immunity in sarcoidosis: effect of interleukin-2.

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, D J; Gao, L.; Mitchell, E B; Mitchell, D. N.

    1988-01-01

    Interleukin-2 has been reported to enhance the immune response in diseases characterised by defective cell mediated immunity. The effect of exogenous recombinant interleukin-2 was studied on the proliferative and cytotoxic responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 39 patients with sarcoidosis and 14 healthy control subjects. The proliferative response to purified protein derivative was smaller in patients than in control subjects (p less than 0.001) whereas the response to 80 U int...

  3. Inflammatory mediators: Parallels between cancer biology and stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Patel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Shyam A Patel1,2,3, Andrew C Heinrich2,3, Bobby Y Reddy2, Pranela Rameshwar21Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ, USA; 2Department of Medicine – Division of Hematology/Oncology, New Jersey Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ, USA; 3These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Inflammation encompasses diverse molecular pathways, and it is intertwined with a wide array of biological processes. Recently, there has been an upsurge of interest in the interactions between mediators of inflammation and other cells such as stem cells and cancer cells. Since tissue injuries are associated with the release of inflammatory mediators, it would be difficult to address this subject without considering the implications of their systemic effects. In this review, we discuss the effects of inflammatory reactions on stem cells and extrapolate on information pertaining to cancer biology. The discussion focuses on integrins and cytokines, and identifies the transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB as central to the inflammatory response. Since stem cell therapy has been proposed for type II diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, pulmonary edema, these disorders are used as examples to discuss the roles of inflammatory mediators. We propose prospects for future research on targeting the NFκB signaling pathway. Finally, we explore the bridge between inflammation and stem cells, including neural stem cells and adult stem cells from the bone marrow. The implications of mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative medicine as pertaining to inflammation are vast based on their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. Such features of stem cells offer great potential for therapy in graft-versus-host disease, conditions with a significant inflammatory component, and tissue regeneration.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, cancer, cytokines

  4. Neural stem cell-derived exosomes mediate viral entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sims B

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Brian Sims,1,2,* Linlin Gu,3,* Alexandre Krendelchtchikov,3 Qiana L Matthews3,4 1Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, 2Department of Cell, Developmental, and Integrative Biology, 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, 4Center for AIDS Research, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Viruses enter host cells through interactions of viral ligands with cellular receptors. Viruses can also enter cells in a receptor-independent fashion. Mechanisms regarding the receptor-independent viral entry into cells have not been fully elucidated. Exosomal trafficking between cells may offer a mechanism by which viruses can enter cells.Methods: To investigate the role of exosomes on cellular viral entry, we employed neural stem cell-derived exosomes and adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 for the proof-of-principle study. Results: Exosomes significantly enhanced Ad5 entry in Coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR-deficient cells, in which Ad5 only had very limited entry. The exosomes were shown to contain T-cell immunoglobulin mucin protein 4 (TIM-4, which binds phosphatidylserine. Treatment with anti-TIM-4 antibody significantly blocked the exosome-mediated Ad5 entry.Conclusion: Neural stem cell-derived exosomes mediated significant cellular entry of Ad5 in a receptor-independent fashion. This mediation may be hampered by an antibody specifically targeting TIM-4 on exosomes. This set of results will benefit further elucidation of virus/exosome pathways, which would contribute to reducing natural viral infection by developing therapeutic agents or vaccines. Keywords: neural stem cell-derived exosomes, adenovirus type 5, TIM-4, viral entry, phospholipids

  5. ß-amylase1 mutant Arabidopsis plants show improved drought tolerance due to reduced starch breakdown in guard cells

    OpenAIRE

    Prasch, Christian Maximilian; Ott, Kirsten Verena; Bauer, Hubert; Ache, Peter; Hedrich, Rainer; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Highlight bam1 mutant plants impaired in stomatal starch degradation showed an improved drought tolerance associated with a down-regulation of guard cell-specific gene expression involved in water uptake and cell expansion.

  6. Natural killer cell mediated cytotoxic responses in the Tasmanian devil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gabriella K; Kreiss, Alexandre; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the world's largest marsupial carnivore, is under threat of extinction following the emergence of an infectious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is spread between Tasmanian devils during biting. The disease is consistently fatal and devils succumb without developing a protective immune response. The aim of this study was to determine if Tasmanian devils were capable of forming cytotoxic antitumour responses and develop antibodies against DFTD cells and foreign tumour cells. The two Tasmanian devils immunised with irradiated DFTD cells did not form cytotoxic or humoral responses against DFTD cells, even after multiple immunisations. However, following immunisation with xenogenic K562 cells, devils did produce cytotoxic responses and antibodies against this foreign tumour cell line. The cytotoxicity appeared to occur through the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in an antibody dependent manner. Classical NK cell responses, such as innate killing of DFTD and foreign cancer cells, were not observed. Cells with an NK-like phenotype comprised approximately 4 percent of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results of this study suggest that Tasmanian devils have NK cells with functional cytotoxic pathways. Although devil NK cells do not directly recognise DFTD cancer cells, the development of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity presents a potential pathway to induce cytotoxic responses against the disease. These findings have positive implications for future DFTD vaccine research. PMID:21957452

  7. Mast cell-derived histamine mediates cystitis pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles N Rudick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mast cells trigger inflammation that is associated with local pain, but the mechanisms mediating pain are unclear. Interstitial cystitis (IC is a bladder disease that causes debilitating pelvic pain of unknown origin and without consistent inflammation, but IC symptoms correlate with elevated bladder lamina propria mast cell counts. We hypothesized that mast cells mediate pelvic pain directly and examined pain behavior using a murine model that recapitulates key aspects of IC. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Infection of mice with pseudorabies virus (PRV induces a neurogenic cystitis associated with lamina propria mast cell accumulation dependent upon tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF, TNF-mediated bladder barrier dysfunction, and pelvic pain behavior, but the molecular basis for pelvic pain is unknown. In this study, both PRV-induced pelvic pain and bladder pathophysiology were abrogated in mast cell-deficient mice but were restored by reconstitution with wild type bone marrow. Pelvic pain developed normally in TNF- and TNF receptor-deficient mice, while bladder pathophysiology was abrogated. Conversely, genetic or pharmacologic disruption of histamine receptor H1R or H2R attenuated pelvic pain without altering pathophysiology. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that mast cells promote cystitis pain and bladder pathophysiology through the separable actions of histamine and TNF, respectively. Therefore, pain is independent of pathology and inflammation, and histamine receptors represent direct therapeutic targets for pain in IC and other chronic pain conditions.

  8. Antigen-oriented T cell migration contributes to myelin peptide induced-EAE and immune tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peiguo; Fu, Hanxiao; Wei, Gaohui; Wei, Zhongwei; Zhang, Junhua; Ma, Xuehan; Rui, Dong; Meng, Xianchun; Ming, Liang

    2016-08-01

    Treatment with soluble myelin peptide can efficiently and specifically induce tolerance to demyelination autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, however the mechanism underlying this therapeutic effect remains to be elucidated. In actively induced mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) we analyzed T cell and innate immune cell responses in the central nervous system (CNS) and spleen after intraperitoneal (i.p.) infusion of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). We found that i.p. MOG infusion blocked effector T cell recruitment to the CNS and protected mice from EAE and lymphoid organ atrophy. Innate immune CD11b(+) cells preferentially recruited MOG-specific effector T cells, particularly when activated to become competent antigen presenting cells (APCs). During EAE development, mature APCs were enriched in the CNS rather than in the spleen, attracting effector T cells to the CNS. Increased myelin antigen exposure induced CNS-APC maturation, recruiting additional effector T cells to the CNS, causing symptoms of disease. MOG triggered functional maturation of splenic APCs. MOG presenting APCs interacted with MOG-specific T cells in the spleen, aggregating to cluster around CD11b(+) cells, and were trapped in the periphery. This process was MHC II dependent as an MHC II directed antibody blocked CD4(+) T cell cluster formation. These findings highlight the role of myelin peptide-loaded APCs in myelin peptide-induced EAE and immune tolerance. PMID:27327113

  9. Mild oxidative stress induced by a low dose of cisplatin contributes to the escape of TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in the ovarian cancer SKOV3 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jinzhi; Zhang, Lei; Xie, Fang; Zhu, Liya; Li, Xiaolan; Ouyang, Jingping; He, Xiaohua; Han, Song; Yi, Cunjian

    2016-06-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis‑inducing ligand (TRAIL) is expressed in ovarian tissue and is widely thought to exhibit strong antitumor activity in a variety of tumor cell types. Therefore, we hypothesized that the cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer is linked to the ability to escape from TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. We demonstrated that cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3/DDP tolerated treatment with TRAIL, in contrast to the cisplatin‑sensitive ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3. SKOV3/DDP cells exhibited a much higher cell viability and a lower apoptosis rate than SKOV3 cells after treatment with TRAIL. To determine whether cisplatin induced the tolerance of TRAIL, we pretreated the SKOV3 cells with cisplatin in the presence of TRAIL. This revealed that a low dose of cisplatin (1 µM) increased the TRAIL tolerance of SKOV3 cells. Furthermore, cisplatin induced oxidative stress in both the SKOV3/DDP and SKOV3 cells, although the oxidative stress level of the SKOV3/DDP cells was generally much higher than that noted in the SKOV3 cells. Similarly, a low dose of hydrogen peroxide increased the TRAIL tolerance in SKOV3 cells. Notably, the TRAIL tolerance in the SKOV3 and SKOV3/DDP cells could be abrogated by the oxidative stress scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine. These results suggest that a low dose of cisplatin induces the tolerance of TRAIL in SKOV3 cells at least partly, depending on the oxidative stress signaling pathway. PMID:27035109

  10. Thymic CCL2 influences induction of T-cell tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cédile, O; Løbner, M; Toft-Hansen, H;

    2014-01-01

    promoting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model for multiple sclerosis. We here show that CCL2 is constitutively expressed by endothelial cells and TEC in the thymus. Transgenic mice overexpressing CCL2 in the thymus showed an increased number of thymic plasmacytoid DC and...

  11. Role of Unusual P Loop Ejection and Autophosphorylation in HipA-Mediated Persistence and Multidrug Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Schumacher

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available HipA is a bacterial serine/threonine protein kinase that phosphorylates targets, bringing about persistence and multidrug tolerance. Autophosphorylation of residue Ser150 is a critical regulatory mechanism of HipA function. Intriguingly, Ser150 is not located on the activation loop, as are other kinases; instead, it is in the protein core, where it forms part of the ATP-binding “P loop motif.” How this buried residue is phosphorylated and regulates kinase activity is unclear. Here, we report multiple structures that reveal the P loop motif's exhibition of a remarkable “in-out” conformational equilibrium, which allows access to Ser150 and its intermolecular autophosphorylation. Phosphorylated Ser150 stabilizes the “out state,” which inactivates the kinase by disrupting the ATP-binding pocket. Thus, our data reveal a mechanism of protein kinase regulation that is vital for multidrug tolerance and persistence, as kinase inactivation provides the critical first step in allowing dormant cells to revert to the growth phenotype and to reinfect the host.

  12. Flooding tolerance and cell wall alterations in maize mesocotyl during hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitorino Patrícia Goulart

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to characterize the tolerance to flooding and alterations in pectic and hemicellulose fractions from mesocotyl of maize tolerant to flooding when submitted to hypoxia. In order to characterize tolerance seeds from maize cultivars Saracura BRS-4154 and BR 107 tolerant and sensitive to low oxygen levels, respectively, were set to germinate. Plantlet survival was evaluated during five days after having been submitted to hypoxia. After fractionation with ammonium oxalate 0.5% (w/v and KOH 2M and 4M, Saracura BRS-4154 cell wall was obtained from mesocotyl segments with different damage intensities caused by oxygen deficiency exposure. The cell wall fractions were analyzed by gel filtration and gas chromatography, and also by Infrared Spectrum with Fourrier Transformation (FTIR. The hypoxia period lasting three days or longer caused cell lysis and in advanced stages plant death. The gelic profile from pectic, hemicellulose 2M and 4M fractions from samples with translucid and constriction zone showed the appearance of low molecular weight compounds, similar to glucose. The main neutral sugars in pectic and hemicellulose fractions were arabinose, xilose and mannose. The FTIR spectrum showed a gradual decrease in pectic substances from mesocotyl with normal to translucid and constriction appearance respectively.

  13. Raji B cells, misidentified as THP-1 cells, stimulate DC-SIGN-mediated HIV transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of studies examining interactions of dendritic cell (DC)-specific ICAM-3 grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) with viral pathogens have relied on monocytic transfectants as models for primary DCs. Here we show that the presumed 'THP-1' monocytic cells used in these studies are instead Raji B cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that true THP-1 cells do not support DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 transmission, whereas human B cell lines efficiently enhance this process. These data indicate that there are features common to B cells and DCs that facilitate transmission of HIV-1 and provide new insights toward the mechanism of DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 transmission

  14. Single cell migration dynamics mediated by geometric confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Hou, Ruixia; Xiao, Peng; Xing, Rubo; Chen, Tao; Han, Yanchun; Ren, Penggang; Fu, Jun

    2016-09-01

    The migration dynamics of cells plays a key role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Previous studies mostly focus on regulating stem cell fate and phenotype by biophysical cues. In contrast, less is known about how the geometric cues mediate the migration dynamics of cells. Here, we fabricate graphene oxide (GO) microstripes on cell non-adhesive PEG substrate by using micromolding in capillary (MIMIC) method. Such micropatterns with alternating cell adhesion and cell resistance enable an effective control of selective adhesion and migration of single cells. The sharp contrast in cell adhesion minimizes the invasion of cells into the PEG patterns, and thereby strongly confines the cells on GO microstripes. As a result, the cells are forced to adapt highly polarized, elongated, and oriented geometry to fit the patterns. A series of pattern widths have been fabricated to modulate the extent of cell deformation and polarization. Under strong confinement, the cytoskeleton contractility, intracellular traction, and actin filament elongation are highly promoted, which result in enhanced cell migration along the patterns. This work provides an important insight into developing combinatorial graphene-based patterns for the control of cell migration dynamics, which is of great significance for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:27137805

  15. Regulatory B cells and tolerance in transplantation: from animal models to human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie eChesneau

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the role of B cells in transplantation was thought to be restricted to producing antibodies that have been clearly shown to be deleterious in the long term, but, in fact, B cells are also able to produce cytokine and to present antigen. Their role as regulatory cells in various pathological situations has also been highlighted, and their role in transplantation is beginning to emerge in animal, and also in human, models. This review summarizes the different studies in animals and humans that suggest a B-cell regulatory role in the transplant tolerance mechanisms.

  16. The transcriptional activator LdtR from 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' mediates osmotic stress tolerance.

    OpenAIRE

    Pagliai, Fernando A.; Gardner, Christopher L.; Lora Bojilova; Amanda Sarnegrim; Cheila Tamayo; Potts, Anastasia H.; Max Teplitski; Folimonova, Svetlana Y.; Gonzalez, Claudio F.; Lorca, Graciela L.

    2014-01-01

    The causal agent of Huanglongbing disease, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', is a non-culturable, gram negative, phloem-limited α-proteobacterium. Current methods to control the spread of this disease are still limited to the removal and destruction of infected trees. In this study, we identified and characterized a regulon from 'Ca. L. asiaticus' involved in cell wall remodeling, that contains a member of the MarR family of transcriptional regulators (ldtR), and a predicted L,D-transpepti...

  17. The impact of TH17 cells on transplant rejection and the induction of tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidt, Sebastiaan; Segundo, David San; Wood, Kathryn J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review This review aims to provide an overview of the latest evidence for the involvement of Th17 cells in the rejection of solid organ allografts. It will also consider the implications of the relationship between the differentiation pathways of Th17 and regulatory T cells (Tregs), as well as their plasticity in the context of transplantation tolerance. Recent findings In the absence of the Th1 lineage in vivo, Th17 cells are capable of rejecting cardiac allografts, showing the capacity of Th17 cells to cause allograft rejection, at least in experimental models. Th17 cells are relatively unsusceptible to suppression by Tregs, although this may be context dependent. Furthermore, addition of inflammatory signals to a Treg inducing environment leads to Th17 development and established Tregs can be converted to Th17 cells under inflammatory conditions. Summary The capacity of Th17 cells to cause allograft rejection is becoming increasingly clear. However, the role and contribution of Th17 cells in allograft rejection in the presence of the full orchestra of T helper cells remains elusive. The apparent resistance of Th17 to be suppressed by Tregs may pose a hurdle for effective immunosuppression and tolerance inducing protocols. Furthermore, the close developmental pathways of Th17 and Tregs and the ability of Tregs to convert into Th17 cells in the presence of inflammatory signals may impede the establishment of specific unresponsiveness to donor alloantigens in vivo. PMID:20616728

  18. Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of bacteriophage lambda-mediated gene transfer in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sapinoro, Ramil; Volcy, Ketna; Shanaka, W.W.; Rodrigo, I.; Schlesinger, Jacob J.; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Lambda phage vectors mediate gene transfer in cultured mammalian cells and in live mice, and in vivo phage-mediated gene expression is increased when mice are pre-immunized with bacteriophage lambda. We now show that, like eukaryotic viruses, bacteriophage vectors are subject to Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of infection in mammalian cells. Antibody-dependent enhancement of phage gene transfer required FcγRI, but not its associated γ chain, and was not supported by othe...

  19. The Transcriptional Activator LdtR from ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ Mediates Osmotic Stress Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Pagliai, Fernando A.; Gardner, Christopher L.; Bojilova, Lora; Sarnegrim, Amanda; Tamayo, Cheila; Potts, Anastasia H.; Teplitski, Max; Folimonova, Svetlana Y.; Gonzalez, Claudio F.; Lorca, Graciela L.

    2014-01-01

    The causal agent of Huanglongbing disease, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’, is a non-culturable, gram negative, phloem-limited α-proteobacterium. Current methods to control the spread of this disease are still limited to the removal and destruction of infected trees. In this study, we identified and characterized a regulon from ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ involved in cell wall remodeling, that contains a member of the MarR family of transcriptional regulators (ldtR), and a predicted L,D-transpepti...

  20. Disappearance of T Cell-Mediated Rejection Despite Continued Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Late Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, Philip F; Chang, Jessica; Famulski, Konrad; Hidalgo, Luis G; Salazar, Israel D R; Merino Lopez, Maribel; Matas, Arthur; Picton, Michael; de Freitas, Declan; Bromberg, Jonathan; Serón, Daniel; Sellarés, Joana; Einecke, Gunilla; Reeve, Jeff

    2015-07-01

    The prevalent renal transplant population presents an opportunity to observe the adaptive changes in the alloimmune response over time, but such studies have been limited by uncertainties in the conventional biopsy diagnosis of T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) and antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). To circumvent these limitations, we used microarrays and conventional methods to investigate rejection in 703 unselected biopsies taken 3 days to 35 years post-transplant from North American and European centers. Using conventional methods, we diagnosed rejection in 205 biopsy specimens (28%): 67 pure TCMR, 110 pure ABMR, and 28 mixed (89 designated borderline). Using microarrays, we diagnosed rejection in 228 biopsy specimens (32%): 76 pure TCMR, 124 pure ABMR, and 28 mixed (no borderline). Molecular assessment confirmed most conventional diagnoses (agreement was 90% for TCMR and 83% for ABMR) but revealed some errors, particularly in mixed rejection, and improved prediction of failure. ABMR was strongly associated with increased graft loss, but TCMR was not. ABMR became common in biopsy specimens obtained >1 year post-transplant and continued to appear in all subsequent intervals. TCMR was common early but progressively disappeared over time. In 108 biopsy specimens obtained 10.2-35 years post-transplant, TCMR defined by molecular and conventional features was never observed. We conclude that the main cause of kidney transplant failure is ABMR, which can present even decades after transplantation. In contrast, TCMR disappears by 10 years post-transplant, implying that a state of partial adaptive tolerance emerges over time in the kidney transplant population. PMID:25377077

  1. Dendritic Cells and Multiple Sclerosis: Disease, Tolerance and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad G. Mohammad

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a devastating neurological disease that predominantly affects young adults resulting in severe personal and economic impact. The majority of therapies for this disease were developed in, or are beneficial in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the animal model of MS. While known to target adaptive anti-CNS immune responses, they also target, the innate immune arm. This mini-review focuses on the role of dendritic cells (DCs, the professional antigen presenting cells of the innate immune system. The evidence for a role for DCs in the appropriate regulation of anti-CNS autoimmune responses and their role in MS disease susceptibility and possible therapeutic utility are discussed. Additionally, the current controversy regarding the evidence for the presence of functional DCs in the normal CNS is reviewed. Furthermore, the role of CNS DCs and potential routes of their intercourse between the CNS and cervical lymph nodes are considered. Finally, the future role that this nexus between the CNS and the cervical lymph nodes might play in site directed molecular and cellular therapy for MS is outlined.

  2. HIGH EFFICIENCY RETROVIRUS-MEDIATED GENE TRANSFER TO LEUKEMIA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jian-xin; CHEN Zi-xing; CEN Jian-nong; WANG Wei; RUAN Chang-geng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To establish an efficient and safe gene transfer system mediated by retrovirus for gene marking and gene therapy of human leukemia. Method: The retroviral vector LXSN, containing the neomycin resistance (NeoR) gene, was transferred into amphotropic packaging cells GP+envAm12 by liposome transfection or by ecotropic retrovirus transduction. Amphotropic retrovirus in supernatants with higher titer was used to infect human leukemic cell lines NB4, U937, and THP-1.The efficiency of gene transfer was assayed on colonies formed by transduced K562 cells. Results: The titer of DOSPER directly transfected GP+envAm12 cells determined on NIH3T3 cells was 8.0×105 CFU/ml, while that of producer infected with retrovirus was 1.6×107CFU/ml. Integration of NeoR gene into all leukemia cells was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Absence of replication-competent virus was proved by both nested PCR for env gene and marker gene rescue assay. Gene transfer with the efficiency as high as 93.3 to 100% in K562 cells was verified by seminested PCR for integrated NeoR gene on colonies after 7 days' culture.Conclusion: The efficiency and safety of retrovirus mediated gene transfer system might provide an optimal system in gene therapy for leukemia or genetic diseases.

  3. A review of electrocatalysts with enhanced CO tolerance and stability for polymer electrolyte membarane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive review of the investigations performed in search for development of electrocatalysts with enhanced reformate tolerance for low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are presented. Remarkable efforts have been made to attain improved catalytic activities and robustness by adding second element to Pt/C or third element to Pt–Ru/C, commercial catalysts for PEM fuel cell applications. The enhanced CO tolerance of the developed catalysts is strongly dependent on the type, composition and atomic ratios of the added elements/groups, and type and structure of the support materials. The synthesis method of the catalysts also plays a remarkable role in the catalytic activity and stability since it determines the structure, morphology and size distribution of the catalyst nanoparticles, which are directly effective on the stability and activity. Choosing a proper synthesis method, inclusion of appropriate content of suitable promoters to Pt-based catalysts, and using a proper support material are the major requirements of an effective catalyst. The CO tolerance enhancement has been attributed to the bi-functional mechanism and electronic effects. Understanding the underlying mechanisms and the activity–structure correlations will shed a light in designing novel electrocatalysts via innovative routes for excellent robust CO tolerant electrocatalysts

  4. Tracking antigen-specific T-cells during clinical tolerance induction in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamir Aslam

    Full Text Available Allergen immunotherapy presents an opportunity to define mechanisms of induction of clinical tolerance in humans. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of changes in T cell responses during immunotherapy, but existing work has largely been based on functional T cell assays. HLA-peptide-tetrameric complexes allow the tracking of antigen-specific T-cell populations based on the presence of specific T-cell receptors and when combined with functional assays allow a closer assessment of the potential roles of T-cell anergy and clonotype evolution. We sought to develop tools to facilitate tracking of antigen-specific T-cell populations during wasp-venom immunotherapy in people with wasp-venom allergy. We first defined dominant immunogenic regions within Ves v 5, a constituent of wasp venom that is known to represent a target antigen for T-cells. We next identified HLA-DRB1*1501 restricted epitopes and used HLA class II tetrameric complexes alongside cytokine responses to Ves v 5 to track T-cell responses during immunotherapy. In contrast to previous reports, we show that there was a significant initial induction of IL-4 producing antigen-specific T-cells within the first 3-5 weeks of immunotherapy which was followed by reduction of circulating effector antigen-specific T-cells despite escalation of wasp-venom dosage. However, there was sustained induction of IL-10-producing and FOXP3 positive antigen-specific T cells. We observed that these IL-10 producing cells could share a common precursor with IL-4-producing T cells specific for the same epitope. Clinical tolerance induction in humans is associated with dynamic changes in frequencies of antigen-specific T-cells, with a marked loss of IL-4-producing T-cells and the acquisition of IL-10-producing and FOXP3-positive antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells that can derive from a common shared precursor to pre-treatment effector T-cells. The development of new approaches to track antigen

  5. Regulatory T cell reprogramming towards a Th2 cell-like lineage impairs oral tolerance and promotes food allergy

    OpenAIRE

    Rivas, Magali Noval; Burton, Oliver T.; Wise, Petra; Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Georgiev, Peter; Oettgen, Hans C.; Rachid, Rima; Chatila, Talal

    2015-01-01

    Oral immunotherapy has had limited success in establishing tolerance in food allergy, reflecting failure to elicit an effective regulatory T (Treg) cell response. We show that disease-susceptible mice (Il4raF709) with enhanced IL-4 receptor (IL-4R) signaling exhibited STAT6-dependent impaired generation and function of mucosal allergen-specific Treg cells. This failure was associated with the acquisition by Treg cells of T helper 2 (Th2) cell-like phenotype, also found in peripheral blood all...

  6. Multifaceted effects of synthetic TLR2 ligand and Legionella pneumophilia on Treg-mediated suppression of T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutmuller Roger PM

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory T cells (Treg play a crucial role in maintaining immune homeostasis and self-tolerance. The immune suppressive effects of Tregs should however be limited in case effective immunity is required against pathogens or cancer cells. We previously found that the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 agonist, Pam3CysSK4, directly stimulated Tregs to expand and temporarily abrogate their suppressive capabilities. In this study, we evaluate the effect of Pam3CysSK4 and Legionella pneumophila, a natural TLR2 containing infectious agent, on effector T (Teff cells and dendritic cells (DCs individually and in co-cultures with Tregs. Results TLR2 agonists can directly provide a co-stimulatory signal inducing enhanced proliferation and cytokine production of naive CD4+ Teff cells. With respect to cytokine production, DCs appear to be most sensitive to low amounts of TLR agonists. Using wild type and TLR2-deficient cells in Treg suppression assays, we accordingly show that all cells (e.g. Treg, Teff cells and DCs contributed to overcome Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cell proliferation. Furthermore, while TLR2-stimulated Tregs readily lost their ability to suppress Teff cell proliferation, cytokine production by Teff cells was still suppressed. Similar results were obtained upon stimulation with TLR2 ligand containing bacteria, Legionella pneumophila. Conclusions These findings indicate that both synthetic and natural TLR2 agonists affect DCs, Teff cells and Treg directly, resulting in multi-modal modulation of Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cells. Moreover, Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cell proliferation is functionally distinct from suppression of cytokine secretion.

  7. Nanodrug-Mediated Thermotherapy of Cancer Stem-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Wei; Wang, Hai; Zhong, Allison; Yu, Jianhua; Lu, Xiongbin; He, Xiaoming

    2016-03-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are rare subpopulations of cancer cells that are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy and contribute to cancer metastases and tumor recurrence. Therefore, it is of significance to develop an effective therapy to eliminate the CSCs. Cancer thermotherapy realized by depositing heat into tumor in a minimally invasive way is a promising alternative to the conventional therapies for cancer treatment. However, this method is limited by its inability to target CSCs, potentially allowing the CSCs to survive and re-initiate tumor growth. More recently, nanodrug-mediated thermotherapy has been explored to selectively eliminate CSCs and specifically deposit heat in tumor to spare healthy tissue. Here, we provide a brief overview of the targeting moieties and nanoplatforms used in developing nanodrug-mediated thermotherapy of cancer with particular emphasis on the CSCs, as well as the challenges and potential directions for future research in this emerging field. PMID:27455612

  8. Regulatory T cells in immune-mediated renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Joanna R; Wang, Yuan Min; Holdsworth, Stephen R; Kitching, A Richard

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are CD4+ T cells that can suppress immune responses by effector T cells, B cells and innate immune cells. This review discusses the role that Tregs play in murine models of immune-mediated renal diseases and acute kidney injury and in human autoimmune kidney disease (such as systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis). Current research suggests that Tregs may be reduced in number and/or have impaired regulatory function in these diseases. Tregs possess several mechanisms by which they can limit renal and systemic inflammatory immune responses. Potential therapeutic applications involving Tregs include in vivo induction of Tregs or inducing Tregs from naïve CD4+ T cells or expanding natural Tregs ex vivo, to use as a cellular therapy. At present, the optimal method of generating a phenotypically stable pool of Tregs with long-lasting suppressive effects is not established, but human studies in renal transplantation are underway exploring the therapeutic potential of Tregs as a cellular therapy, and if successful may have a role as a novel therapy in immune-mediated renal diseases. PMID:26206106

  9. Single-cell force spectroscopy of pili-mediated adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Beaussart, Audrey; Tripathi, Prachi; Derclaye, Sylvie; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Li, James K.; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Although bacterial pili are known to mediate cell adhesion to a variety of substrates, the molecular interactions behind this process are poorly understood. We report the direct measurement of the forces guiding pili-mediated adhesion, focusing on the medically important probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). Using non-invasive single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), we quantify the adhesion forces between individual bacteria and biotic (mucin, intestinal cells) or abiotic (hydrophobic monolayers) surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, bacterial pili strengthen adhesion through remarkable nanospring properties, which - presumably - enable the bacteria to resist high shear forces under physiological conditions. On mucin, nanosprings are more frequent and adhesion forces larger, reflecting the influence of specific pili-mucin bonds. Interestingly, these mechanical responses are no longer observed on human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Rather, force curves exhibit constant force plateaus with extended ruptures reflecting the extraction of membrane nanotethers. These single-cell analyses provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which piliated bacteria colonize surfaces (nanosprings, nanotethers), and offer exciting avenues in nanomedicine for understanding and controlling the adhesion of microbial cells (probiotics, pathogens).

  10. Factors influencing ER subtype-mediated cell proliferation and apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Evers, N.M.

    2014-01-01

      The aim of the current thesis is to elucidate the role of estrogen receptor (ER)αand ERβin cell proliferation and apoptosis induced by estrogenic compounds. Special attention is paid to the importance of the receptor preference of the estrogenic compounds, the cellular ERα/ERβratio, the role of coregulators, and ER-mediated induction of protein expression. In chapter 1 estrogenic compounds and their interaction with estrogen receptors are described and the two dif...

  11. Molecular Signaling Pathways Mediating Osteoclastogenesis Induced by Prostate Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced prostate cancer commonly metastasizes to bone leading to osteoblastic and osteolytic lesions. Although an osteolytic component governed by activation of bone resorbing osteoclasts is prominent in prostate cancer metastasis, the molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis are not well-understood. We studied the effect of soluble mediators released from human prostate carcinoma cells on osteoclast formation from mouse bone marrow and RAW 264.7 monocytes. Soluble factors released from human prostate carcinoma cells significantly increased viability of naïve bone marrow monocytes, as well as osteoclastogenesis from precursors primed with receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL). The prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis was not mediated by RANKL as it was not inhibited by osteoprotegerin (OPG). However inhibition of TGFβ receptor I (TβRI), or macrophage-colony stimulating factor (MCSF) resulted in attenuation of prostate cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis. We characterized the signaling pathways induced in osteoclast precursors by soluble mediators released from human prostate carcinoma cells. Prostate cancer factors increased basal calcium levels and calcium fluctuations, induced nuclear localization of nuclear factor of activated t-cells (NFAT)c1, and activated prolonged phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in RANKL-primed osteoclast precursors. Inhibition of calcium signaling, NFATc1 activation, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation significantly reduced the ability of prostate cancer mediators to stimulate osteoclastogenesis. This study reveals the molecular mechanisms underlying the direct osteoclastogenic effect of prostate cancer derived factors, which may be beneficial in developing novel osteoclast-targeting therapeutic approaches

  12. Efficacy and Tolerability of Anthracycline-Based Therapy in Elderly Patients With Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Christine C.; Cohen, Jonathon B.; Shah, Katherine S.; Hutcherson, Don A.; Surati, Minal J.; Valla, Kelly; Panjic, Elyse H.; Handler, Caitlin E.; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Flowers, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    We examined treatment with or without anthracyclines in 72 eldery diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients (age ≥ 65 years) in a retrospective cohort analysis. Factors leading to treatment without an anthracycline included age and ejection fraction, whereas markers of tolerability were similar between groups. This study highlights the details of anthracycline tolerability in elderly lymphoma patients.

  13. Role of T-cell-mediated inflammation in psoriasis: pathogenesis and targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flatz L

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lukas Flatz, Curdin ConradDepartment of Dermatology, University Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV, Lausanne, SwitzerlandAbstract: Psoriasis is one of the most common chronic, inflammatory, T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Over the past decade, increased knowledge of disease pathogenesis has fundamentally changed psoriasis treatment, with the introduction of biologics, and this has led to a multitude of improved selective targets providing potential therapeutic options. Indeed, numerous pathogenesis-based treatments are currently in development, as psoriasis has also become increasingly relevant for proof-of-concept studies. The purpose of this review was to summarize current knowledge of psoriasis immunopathogenesis, focusing on the T-cell-mediated immune response and its initiation. The authors describe recent advances in psoriasis treatment and discuss pathogenesis-based therapies that are currently in development or which could be envisioned for the future. Although current biologics are well tolerated, several issues such as long-term efficacy, long-term safety, and high costs keep driving the search for new and better therapies. With further advances in understanding disease pathogenesis, more genomic data from psoriasis patients becoming available, and potentially the identification of autoantigens in psoriasis, current research should lead to the development of a growing arsenal of improved targeted treatments and to further breakthrough immunotherapies.Keywords: autoimmunity, autoimmune disease, immune response, immunopathogenesis

  14. Effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, A. D.; Balish, E.

    1977-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune response to Listeria monocytogenes was studied in rats subjected to 20 days of flight aboard the Soviet biosatellite Kosmos 7820. Groups of rats were immunized with 1,000,000 formalin-killed Listeria suspended in Freunds Complete Adjuvant, 5 days prior to flight. Immunized rats subjected to the same environmental factors as the flight rats, except flight itself, and immunized and nonimmunized rats held in a normal animal colony served as controls. Following recovery, lymphocyte cultures were harvested from spleens of all rats, cultured in vitro in the presence of L. monocytogenes antigens, Phytohemagglutinin, Conconavlin A, or purified protein derivative (PPD), and measured for their uptake of H-3-thymidine. Although individual rats varied considerably, all flight and immunized control rats gave a blastogenic response to the Listeria antigens and PPD. With several mitogens, the lymphocytes of flight rats showed a significantly increased blastogenic response over the controls. The results of this study do not support a hypothesis of a detrimental effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity. The data suggest a possible suppressive effect of stress and gravity on an in vitro correlate of cell-mediated immunity.

  15. Nitroglycerin induces DNA damage and vascular cell death in the setting of nitrate tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhed, Yuliya; Fahrer, Jörg; Oelze, Matthias; Kröller-Schön, Swenja; Steven, Sebastian; Welschof, Philipp; Zinßius, Elena; Stamm, Paul; Kashani, Fatemeh; Roohani, Siyer; Kress, Joana Melanie; Ullmann, Elisabeth; Tran, Lan P; Schulz, Eberhard; Epe, Bernd; Kaina, Bernd; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Nitroglycerin (GTN) and other organic nitrates are widely used vasodilators. Their side effects are development of nitrate tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. Given the potential of GTN to induce nitro-oxidative stress, we investigated the interaction between nitro-oxidative DNA damage and vascular dysfunction in experimental nitrate tolerance. Cultured endothelial hybridoma cells (EA.hy 926) and Wistar rats were treated with GTN (ex vivo: 10-1000 µM; in vivo: 10, 20 and 50 mg/kg/day for 3 days, s.c.). The level of DNA strand breaks, 8-oxoguanine and O (6)-methylguanine DNA adducts was determined by Comet assay, dot blot and immunohistochemistry. Vascular function was determined by isometric tension recording. DNA adducts and strand breaks were induced by GTN in cells in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. GTN in vivo administration leads to endothelial dysfunction, nitrate tolerance, aortic and cardiac oxidative stress, formation of DNA adducts, stabilization of p53 and apoptotic death of vascular cells in a dose-dependent fashion. Mice lacking O (6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase displayed more vascular O (6)-methylguanine adducts and oxidative stress under GTN therapy than wild-type mice. Although we were not able to prove a causal role of DNA damage in the etiology of nitrate tolerance, the finding of GTN-induced DNA damage such as the mutagenic and toxic adduct O (6)-methylguanine, and cell death supports the notion that GTN based therapy may provoke adverse side effects, including endothelial function. Further studies are warranted to clarify whether GTN pro-apoptotic effects are related to an impaired recovery of patients upon myocardial infarction. PMID:27357950

  16. Cell wall and phospholipid composition and their contribution to the salt tolerance of Halomonas elongata.

    OpenAIRE

    Vreeland, R H; Anderson, R; Murray, R G

    1984-01-01

    The salt-tolerant bacterium Halomonas elongata makes a variety of physiological adaptations in response to increases in the salt concentration of its growth medium. The cell walls become more compact and internally coherent. The overall lipid pattern shows an increased amount of negatively charged lipids. In addition, the peptidoglycan composition of H. elongata, although not changing in response to increased NaCl, contains the hydrophobic amino acid leucine which is unique among bacterial sp...

  17. Direct Measurement of Water States in Cryopreserved Cells Reveals Tolerance toward Ice Crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebinger, Jan; Han, Hong-Mei; Hofnagel, Oliver; Vetter, Ingrid R; Bastiaens, Philippe I H; Grabenbauer, Markus

    2016-02-23

    Complex living systems such as mammalian cells can be arrested in a solid phase by ultrarapid cooling. This allows for precise observation of cellular structures as well as cryopreservation of cells. The state of water, the main constituent of biological samples, is crucial for the success of cryogenic applications. Water exhibits many different solid states. If it is cooled extremely rapidly, liquid water turns into amorphous ice, also called vitreous water, a glassy and amorphous solid. For cryo-preservation, the vitrification of cells is believed to be mandatory for cell survival after freezing. Intracellular ice crystallization is assumed to be lethal, but experimental data on the state of water during cryopreservation are lacking. To better understand the water conditions in cells subjected to freezing protocols, we chose to directly analyze their subcellular water states by cryo-electron microscopy and tomography, cryoelectron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction both in the cryofixed state and after warming to different temperatures. By correlating the survival rates of cells with their respective water states during cryopreservation, we found that survival is less dependent on ice-crystal formation than expected. Using high-resolution cryo-imaging, we were able to directly show that cells tolerate crystallization of extra- and intracellular water. However, if warming is too slow, many small ice crystals will recrystallize into fewer but bigger crystals, which is lethal. The applied cryoprotective agents determine which crystal size is tolerable. This suggests that cryoprotectants can act by inhibiting crystallization or recrystallization, but they also increase the tolerance toward ice-crystal growth. PMID:26541066

  18. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Claire; Lafosse, Jean-Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK. PMID:19932089

  19. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  20. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Claire [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Lafosse, Jean-Michel [CHU Toulouse, Hopital Rangueil, Service d' orthopedie et Traumatologie, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Malavaud, Bernard [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France); CHU Toulouse, Hopital Rangueil, Service d' Urologie et de Transplantation Renale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Cuvillier, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.cuvillier@ipbs.fr [CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse F-31000 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse F-31000 (France)

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  1. Local cell-mediated immune reactions in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of 178 cases of stage I-II breast cancer showed morphological features of local cell-mediated immune reactions to be of limited prognostic value. A comparative evaluation of some characteristics of cell surface receptors, such as ability to spontaneous rosette formation with sheep erythrocytes and sensitivty to theophylline, was carried out in lymphocyte samples obtained from tumor tissue and peripheral blood of 76 cancer patients subjected to preoperative radiotherapy. The said parameters were studied in breast cancer patients of rosette-forming cell reaction to theophylline were identified, the incidence of some of them being determined by the presence or absence of regional metastases. The level and functional activity of surface receptors of tumor mononuclear cells proved to influence prognosis

  2. DNA-mediated gene transfer into ataxia-telangiectasia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complete description of the genetic lesion(s) underlying the AT mutation might, therefore, highlight not only a DNA-repair pathwa, but also an important aspect of the physiology of lymphocytes. DNA-mediated gene transfer into eukaryotic cells has proved a powerful tool for the molecular cloning of certain mammalian genes. The possibility to clone a given gene using this technology depends, basically, on the availability of a selectable marker associated with the expression of the transfected gene in the recipient cell. Recently, a human DNA repair gene has been cloned in CHO mutant cells by taking advantage of the increased resistance to ultraviolet radiation of the transformants. As a preliminary step toward the molecular cloning of the AT gene(s), the authors have attempted to confer radioresistance to AT cells by transfection with normal human DNA

  3. Delay of Morphine Tolerance by Palmitoylethanolamide

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the potency and efficacy of morphine, its clinical application for chronic persistent pain is limited by the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying morphine tolerance are complex and still unclear. Recently, the activation of glial cells and the release of glia-derived proinflammatory mediators have been suggested to play a role in the phenomenon. N-Palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) is an endogenous compound with antinoci...

  4. Inferring RBP-Mediated Regulation in Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafzi, Atefeh; Kazan, Hilal

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play key roles in post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs. Dysregulations in RBP-mediated mechanisms have been found to be associated with many steps of cancer initiation and progression. Despite this, previous studies of gene expression in cancer have ignored the effect of RBPs. To this end, we developed a lasso regression model that predicts gene expression in cancer by incorporating RBP-mediated regulation as well as the effects of other well-studied factors such as copy-number variation, DNA methylation, TFs and miRNAs. As a case study, we applied our model to Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC) data as we found that there are several RBPs differentially expressed in LUSC. Including RBP-mediated regulatory effects in addition to the other features significantly increased the Spearman rank correlation between predicted and measured expression of held-out genes. Using a feature selection procedure that accounts for the adaptive search employed by lasso regularization, we identified the candidate regulators in LUSC. Remarkably, several of these candidate regulators are RBPs. Furthermore, majority of the candidate regulators have been previously found to be associated with lung cancer. To investigate the mechanisms that are controlled by these regulators, we predicted their target gene sets based on our model. We validated the target gene sets by comparing against experimentally verified targets. Our results suggest that the future studies of gene expression in cancer must consider the effect of RBP-mediated regulation. PMID:27186987

  5. Current perspectives on natural killer cell education and tolerance: emerging roles for inhibitory receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas LM

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available L Michael Thomas Laboratory of Immunogenetics, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD, USA Abstract: Natural killer (NK cells are regulated through the coordinated functions of activating and inhibitory receptors. These receptors can act during the initial engagement of an NK cell with a target cell, or in subsequent NK cell engagements to maintain tolerance. Notably, each individual possesses a sizable minority-population of NK cells that are devoid of inhibitory receptors that recognize the surrounding MHC class I (ie, self-MHC. Since these NK cells cannot perform conventional inhibition, they are rendered less responsive through the process of NK cell education (also known as licensing in order to reduce the likelihood of auto-reactivity. This review will delineate current views on NK cell education, clarify various misconceptions about NK cell education, and, lastly, discuss the relevance of NK cell education in anti-cancer therapies. Keywords: natural killer cell education, natural killer cell inhibitory receptors, immunotherapy, cancer

  6. Anergy and exhaustion are independent mechanisms of peripheral T cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, B; Grandien, A; Freitas, A A

    1995-03-01

    We studied the interactions of male-specific T cell receptor (TCR)-alpha/beta-transgenic (TG) cells with different concentrations of male antigen in vivo. We constructed mouse chimeras expressing different amounts of male antigen by injecting thymectomized, lethally irradiated mice with various ratios of male (immunoglobulin [Ig] Ha) and female (IgHb) bone marrow. These chimeras were injected with male-specific TCR-alpha/beta-trangenic cells. These experiments allowed us to monitor antigen persistence and characterize antigen-specific T cells in terms of their frequency, reactivity, and effector functions (as tested by elimination of male B cells in vivo). In the absence of antigen, virgin TG cells persisted but did not expand. Transient exposure to antigen resulted in cell expansion, followed by the persistence of increased numbers of antigen-reactive T cells. In contrast, antigen persistence was followed by two independent mechanisms of tolerance induction: anergy (at high antigen concentrations), where T cells did not differentiate into effector functions but persisted in vivo as unresponsive T cells, and exhaustion (at lower antigen concentrations), where differentiation into effector functions (B cell elimination) occurred but was followed by the disappearance of antigen-specific T cells. PMID:7869056

  7. Cell contact-mediated regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase synthesis in cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    The specific activity of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells can be controlled by changing cell density. Chromaffin cells initially plated at low density (2-3 X 10(4) cells/cm2), and subsequently replated at a 10-fold higher density showed a sixfold increase in specific TH activity within 48 h, resulting from enhanced synthesis (increased number of TH molecules as demonstrated by immunotitration and blockade by cycloheximide) rather than activation. The density-mediat...

  8. Alcohol inhibits cell-cell adhesion mediated by human L1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, R; Wilkemeyer, M F; Mittal, B; Perides, G; Charness, M E

    1996-04-01

    Mental retardation, hydrocephalus, and agenesis of the corpus callosum are observed both in fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and in children with mutations in the gene for the cell adhesion molecule L1. We studied the effects of ethanol on cell-cell adhesion in mouse fibroblasts transfected with human L1. L1-transfected fibroblasts exhibited increased cell-cell adhesion compared with wild-type or vector-transfected controls. Ethanol potently and completely inhibited L1-mediated adhesion both in transfected L cells and NIH/3T3 cells. Half-maximal inhibition was observed at 7 mM ethanol, a concentration achieved in blood and brain after ingesting one alcoholic beverage. In contrast, ethanol did not inhibit the adhesion of fibroblasts transfected with vector alone or with N-CAM-140. L1-mediated cell-cell adhesion was inhibited with increasing potency by n-propanol and n-butanol, but was not inhibited at all by n-alcohols of 5 to 8 carbons, acetaldehyde, or acetate, suggesting that ethanol interacts directly with a small hydrophobic pocket within L1. Phenylalanine, teratogenic anticonvulsants, and high concentrations of glucose did not inhibit L1-mediated cell-cell adhesion. Ethanol also inhibited potently the heterotypic adhesion of rat cerebellar granule cells to a monolayer of L1-transfected NIH/3T3 cells, but had no effect on their adhesion to N-CAM-140 or vector-transfected NIH/3T3 cells. Because L1 plays a role in both neural development and learning, ethanol inhibition of L1-mediated cell-cell interactions could contribute to FAS and ethanol-associated memory disorders. PMID:8609170

  9. Autoradiographic investigations on cell shape-mediated growth regulation of lens epithelial cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An autoradiographic method is described which is well suited for the determination of the labelling index in flattened as well as rounded cells. Using this method DNA synthesis of lens epithelial cells in culture was found to be dependent on cell attachment, cell flattening and intact microfilaments. Thus previous results on cell shape-mediated growth regulation could be confirmed. Moreover, considering the labelling index it was possible to conclude that cell rounding or a disintegration of microfilaments did not impair ongoing DNA synthesis but did prevent cells from entering the S-phase of the cycle. (author)

  10. Interaction of hyperthermia and radiation in tolerant and nontolerant HeLa S3 cells: role of DNA polymerase inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of DNA polymerase α and β were measured in tolerant and nontolerant HeLa S3 suspension cells. The heat-inactivation of the enzymes and their recovery when cells were incubated at 370C after the heat challenge was compared to the synergistic action of heat and x-radiation and its disappearance at the level of cell survival. Thermotolerant cells were radiosensitized by heat similarly to nontolerant cells, but the sensitization decreased more rapidly in the tolerant cells when time at 370C was allowed between the two treatments. For polymerase activities the extent of inactivation, as well as the kinetics of recovery, were similar in tolerant and nontolerant cells. (author)

  11. The microRNA miR-148a functions as a critical regulator of B cell tolerance and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Martin, Alicia; Adams, Brian D; Lai, Maoyi; Shepherd, Jovan; Salvador-Bernaldez, Maria; Salvador, Jesus M; Lu, Jun; Nemazee, David; Xiao, Changchun

    2016-04-01

    Autoreactive B cells have critical roles in a large diversity of autoimmune diseases, but the molecular pathways that control these cells remain poorly understood. We performed an in vivo functional screen of a lymphocyte-expressed microRNA library and identified miR-148a as a potent regulator of B cell tolerance. Elevated miR-148a expression impaired B cell tolerance by promoting the survival of immature B cells after engagement of the B cell antigen receptor by suppressing the expression of the autoimmune suppressor Gadd45α, the tumor suppressor PTEN and the pro-apoptotic protein Bim. Furthermore, increased expression of miR-148a, which occurs frequently in patients with lupus and lupus-prone mice, facilitated the development of lethal autoimmune disease in a mouse model of lupus. Our studies demonstrate a function for miR-148a as a regulator of B cell tolerance and autoimmunity. PMID:26901150

  12. FOXP3 and CTLA-4 : how isoforms regulate immunological tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Sang

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of immunological tolerance is vital for preventing the immune system to damage normal tissues and physiological function of the body. CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells can suppress immune responses in a dominant manner and are essential for immunological tolerance. Although many pathways and molecules have been attributed to the suppressive function of Treg cells, the exact nature of the Treg cell-mediated suppression program is still elusive. In this ...

  13. PPARα Agonist Fenofibrate Reduced the Secreting Load of β-Cells in Hypertriglyceridemia Patients with Normal Glucose Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Jia Liu; Rui Lu; Ying Wang; Yanjin Hu; Yumei Jia; Ning Yang; Jing Fu; Guang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is an important risk factor associated with insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction. This study investigated the effects of hypertriglyceridemia and fenofibrate treatment on insulin sensitivity and β-cell function in subjects with normal glucose tolerance. A total of 1974 subjects with normal glucose tolerance were divided into the normal TG group (NTG group, n = 1302) and hypertriglyceridemia group (HTG group, n = 672). Next, 92 patients selected randomly from 672 pati...

  14. Regulatory T cell reprogramming toward a Th2-cell-like lineage impairs oral tolerance and promotes food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noval Rivas, Magali; Burton, Oliver T; Wise, Petra; Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Georgiev, Peter; Oettgen, Hans C; Rachid, Rima; Chatila, Talal A

    2015-03-17

    Oral immunotherapy has had limited success in establishing tolerance in food allergy, reflecting failure to elicit an effective regulatory T (Treg) cell response. We show that disease-susceptible (Il4ra(F709)) mice with enhanced interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R) signaling exhibited STAT6-dependent impaired generation and function of mucosal allergen-specific Treg cells. This failure was associated with the acquisition by Treg cells of a T helper 2 (Th2)-cell-like phenotype, also found in peripheral-blood allergen-specific Treg cells of food-allergic children. Selective augmentation of IL-4R signaling in Treg cells induced their reprogramming into Th2-like cells and disease susceptibility, whereas Treg-cell-lineage-specific deletion of Il4 and Il13 was protective. IL-4R signaling impaired the capacity of Treg cells to suppress mast cell activation and expansion, which in turn drove Th2 cell reprogramming of Treg cells. Interruption of Th2 cell reprogramming of Treg cells might thus provide candidate therapeutic strategies in food allergy. PMID:25769611

  15. The Role of Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity in Insulin Sensitivity, Beta Cell Function, and Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lou Rose Malamug

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection, for example, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, has been thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Our aim was to determine the role of H. pylori infection in glucose metabolism in an American cohort. We examined data from 4,136 non-Hispanic white (NHW, non-Hispanic black (NHB, and Mexican Americans (MA aged 18 and over from the NHANES 1999-2000 cohort. We calculated the odds ratios for states of glucose tolerance based on the H. pylori status. We calculated and compared homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and beta cell function (HOMA-B in subjects without diabetes based on the H. pylori status. The results were adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI, poverty index, education, alcohol consumption, tobacco use, and physical activity. The H. pylori status was not a risk factor for abnormal glucose tolerance. After adjustment for age and BMI and also adjustment for all covariates, no difference was found in either HOMA-IR or HOMA-B in all ethnic and gender groups except for a marginally significant difference in HOMA-IR in NHB females. H. pylori infection was not a risk factor for abnormal glucose tolerance, nor plays a major role in insulin resistance or beta cell dysfunction.

  16. Cecum lymph node dendritic cells harbor slow-growing bacteria phenotypically tolerant to antibiotic treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Kaiser

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In vivo, antibiotics are often much less efficient than ex vivo and relapses can occur. The reasons for poor in vivo activity are still not completely understood. We have studied the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin in an animal model for complicated Salmonellosis. High-dose ciprofloxacin treatment efficiently reduced pathogen loads in feces and most organs. However, the cecum draining lymph node (cLN, the gut tissue, and the spleen retained surviving bacteria. In cLN, approximately 10%-20% of the bacteria remained viable. These phenotypically tolerant bacteria lodged mostly within CD103⁺CX₃CR1⁻CD11c⁺ dendritic cells, remained genetically susceptible to ciprofloxacin, were sufficient to reinitiate infection after the end of the therapy, and displayed an extremely slow growth rate, as shown by mathematical analysis of infections with mixed inocula and segregative plasmid experiments. The slow growth was sufficient to explain recalcitrance to antibiotics treatment. Therefore, slow-growing antibiotic-tolerant bacteria lodged within dendritic cells can explain poor in vivo antibiotic activity and relapse. Administration of LPS or CpG, known elicitors of innate immune defense, reduced the loads of tolerant bacteria. Thus, manipulating innate immunity may augment the in vivo activity of antibiotics.

  17. Initiation of immune tolerance-controlled HIV gp41 neutralizing B cell lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruijun; Verkoczy, Laurent; Wiehe, Kevin; Munir Alam, S; Nicely, Nathan I; Santra, Sampa; Bradley, Todd; Pemble, Charles W; Zhang, Jinsong; Gao, Feng; Montefiori, David C; Bouton-Verville, Hilary; Kelsoe, Garnett; Larimore, Kevin; Greenberg, Phillip D; Parks, Robert; Foulger, Andrew; Peel, Jessica N; Luo, Kan; Lu, Xiaozhi; Trama, Ashley M; Vandergrift, Nathan; Tomaras, Georgia D; Kepler, Thomas B; Moody, M Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F

    2016-04-27

    Development of an HIV vaccine is a global priority. A major roadblock to a vaccine is an inability to induce protective broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs). HIV gp41 bnAbs have characteristics that predispose them to be controlled by tolerance. We used gp41 2F5 bnAb germline knock-in mice and macaques vaccinated with immunogens reactive with germline precursors to activate neutralizing antibodies. In germline knock-in mice, bnAb precursors were deleted, with remaining anergic B cells capable of being activated by germline-binding immunogens to make gp41-reactive immunoglobulin M (IgM). Immunized macaques made B cell clonal lineages targeted to the 2F5 bnAb epitope, but 2F5-like antibodies were either deleted or did not attain sufficient affinity for gp41-lipid complexes to achieve the neutralization potency of 2F5. Structural analysis of members of a vaccine-induced antibody lineage revealed that heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 (HCDR3) hydrophobicity was important for neutralization. Thus, gp41 bnAbs are controlled by immune tolerance, requiring vaccination strategies to transiently circumvent tolerance controls. PMID:27122615

  18. Determining pancreatic β-cell compensation for changing insulin sensitivity using an oral glucose tolerance test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas; Malin, Steven K; Karstoft, Kristian;

    2014-01-01

    Plasma glucose, insulin, and C-peptide responses during an OGTT are informative for both research and clinical practice in type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to use such information to determine insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion so as to calculate an oral glucose disposition index...... (DIOGTT) that is a measure of pancreatic β-cell insulin secretory compensation for changing insulin sensitivity. We conducted an observational study of n = 187 subjects, representing the entire glucose tolerance continuum from normal glucose tolerance to type 2 diabetes. OGTT-derived insulin sensitivity...... (SI OGTT) was calculated using a novel multiple-regression model derived from insulin sensitivity measured by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp as the independent variable. We also validated the novel SI OGTT in n = 40 subjects from an independent data set. Plasma C-peptide responses during OGTT were...

  19. Overexpression of kinesins mediates docetaxel resistance in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Sarmishtha; Cipriano, Rocky; Jackson, Mark W; Stark, George R

    2009-10-15

    Resistance to chemotherapy remains a major barrier to the successful treatment of cancer. To understand mechanisms underlying docetaxel resistance in breast cancer, we used an insertional mutagenesis strategy to identify proteins whose overexpression confers resistance. A strong promoter was inserted approximately randomly into the genomes of tumor-derived breast cancer cells, using a novel lentiviral vector. We isolated a docetaxel-resistant clone in which the level of the kinesin KIFC3 was elevated. When KIFC3 or the additional kinesins KIFC1, KIF1A, or KIF5A were overexpressed in the breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB231 and MDA-MB 468, the cells became more resistant to docetaxel. The binding of kinesins to microtubules opposes the stabilizing effect of docetaxel that prevents cytokinesis and leads to apoptosis. Our finding that kinesins can mediate docetaxel resistance might lead to novel therapeutic approaches in which kinesin inhibitors are paired with taxanes. PMID:19789344

  20. Role of Arabidopsis RAP2.4 in Regulating Light-and Ethylene-Mediated Developmental Processes and Drought Stress Tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-Cheng Lin; Hee-Jin Park; Hai-Yang Wang

    2008-01-01

    Light and the plant hormone ethylene regulate many aspects of plant growth and development in an overlapping and interdependent fashion. Little is known regarding how their signal transduction pathways cross-talk to regulate plant development in a coordinated manner. Here, we report functional characterization of an AP2/DREB-type transcription factor, Arabidopsis RAP2.4, in mediating light and ethylene signaling. Expression of the RAP2.4 gene is down-regulated by light but up-regulated by salt and drought stresses. RAP2.4 protein is constitutively targeted to the nucleus and it can bind to both the ethylene-responsive GCC-box and the dehydration-responsive element (DRE).We show that RAP2.4 protein possesses an intrinsic transcriptional activation activity in yeast cells and that it can activate a reporter gene driven by the DRE cis-element in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Overexpression of RAP2.4 or mutation in RAP2.4 cause altered expression of representative light-, ethylene-, and drought-responsive genes. Although no salient phenotype was observed with a rap2.4 loss-of-function mutant, constitutive overexpression of RAP2.4 results in defects in multiple developmental processes regulated by light and ethylene, including hypocotyl elongation and gravitropism, apical hook formation and cotyledon expansion, flowering time, root elongation, root hair formation, and drought tolerance.Based on these observations, we propose that RAP2.4 acts at or downstream of a converging point of light and ethylene signaling pathways to coordinately regulate multiple developmental processes and stress responses.

  1. Glycosylation-mediated phenylpropanoid partitioning in Populus tremuloides cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babst Benjamin A

    2009-12-01

    identified candidate genes for glycosyltransferases that may mediate the glycosylation, and for transporters that mediate the subcellular compartmentalization of sugars and phenolic glycosides. The suspension cells appear to represent a facile system for dissecting the regulation of phenolic carbon partitioning, and in turn, its effects on growth in Populus.

  2. Establishment of Stable, Cell-Mediated Immunity that Makes "Susceptible" Mice Resistant to Leishmania major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretscher, Peter A.; Wei, Guojian; Menon, Juthika N.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    1992-07-01

    Cell-mediated, but not antibody-mediated, immune responses protect humans against certain pathogens that produce chronic diseases such as leishmaniasis. Effective vaccination against such pathogens must therefore produce an immunological "imprint" so that stable, cell-mediated immunity is induced in all individuals after natural infection. BALB/c mice "innately susceptible" to Leishmania major produce antibodies after substantial infection. In the present study, "susceptible" mice injected with a small number of parasites mounted a cell-mediated response and acquired resistance to a larger, normally pathogenic, challenge. This vaccination strategy may be applicable in diseases in which protection is dependent on cell-mediated immunity.

  3. CD1-mediated γ/δ T Cell Maturation of Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Leslie, David S; Vincent, Michael S.; Spada, Franca M.; Das, Hiranmoy; Sugita, Masahiko; Morita, Craig T.; Brenner, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    Immature myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) express only low levels of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II but express high levels of CD1 a, b, and c antigen-presenting molecules at the cell surface. As Vδ1+ γ/δ T cells are the main tissue subset of γ/δ T cells and they are known to recognize CD1c in the absence of specific foreign antigen recognition, we examined the possible interaction of these T cells with immature DCs. We show that CD1-restricted γ/δ T cells can mediate the matura...

  4. Integrin Receptors on Tumor Cells Facilitate NK cell-mediated Antibody-dependent Cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Anikeeva, Nadia; Steblyanko, Maria; Fayngerts, Svetlana; Kopylova, Natalya; Marshall, Deborah J.; Powers, Gordon D.; Sato, Takami; Campbell, Kerry S.; Sykulev, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    NK cells that mediate ADCC play an important role in tumor-specific immunity. We have examined factors limiting specific lysis of tumor cells by CD16.NK-92 cells induced by CNTO 95LF antibodies recognizing αV integrins that are overexpressed on many tumor cells. Although all tested tumor cells were killed by CD16.NK-92 effectors in the presence of the antibodies, the killing of target cells with a low level of ICAM-1 expression revealed a dramatic decrease in their specific lysis at high anti...

  5. Selectins mediate small cell lung cancer systemic metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Heidemann

    Full Text Available Metastasis formation is the major reason for the extremely poor prognosis in small cell lung cancer (SCLC patients. The molecular interaction partners regulating metastasis formation in SCLC are largely unidentified, however, from other tumor entities it is known that tumor cells use the adhesion molecules of the leukocyte adhesion cascade to attach to the endothelium at the site of the future metastasis. Using the human OH-1 SCLC line as a model, we found that these cells expressed E- and P-selectin binding sites, which could be in part attributed to the selectin binding carbohydrate motif sialyl Lewis A. In addition, protein backbones known to carry these glycotopes in other cell lines including PSGL-1, CD44 and CEA could be detected in in vitro and in vivo grown OH1 SCLC cells. By intravital microscopy of murine mesenterial vasculature we could capture SCLC cells while rolling along vessel walls demonstrating that SCLC cells mimic leukocyte rolling behavior in terms of selectin and selectin ligand interaction in vivo indicating that this mechanism might indeed be important for SCLC cells to seed distant metastases. Accordingly, formation of spontaneous distant metastases was reduced by 50% when OH-1 cells were xenografted into E-/P-selectin-deficient mice compared with wild type mice (p = 0.0181. However, as metastasis formation was not completely abrogated in selectin deficient mice, we concluded that this adhesion cascade is redundant and that other molecules of this cascade mediate metastasis formation as well. Using several of these adhesion molecules as interaction partners presumably make SCLC cells so highly metastatic.

  6. T Cell-Mediated Modulation of Mast Cell Function: Heterotypic Adhesion-Induced Stimulatory or Inhibitory Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Mekori, Yoseph A.; Hershko, Alon Y.

    2012-01-01

    Close physical proximity between mast cells and T cells has been demonstrated in several T cell mediated inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis and sarcoidosis. However, the way by which mast cells are activated in these T cell-mediated immune responses has not been fully elucidated. We have identified and characterized a novel mast cell activation pathway initiated by physical contact with activated T cells, and showed that this pathway is associated with degranulation and cytok...

  7. Foxp3-modified bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes liver allograft tolerance through the generation of regulatory T cells in rats

    OpenAIRE

    QI, HAIZHI; Chen, Guangshun; Huang, Yaxun; Si, Zhongzhou; Li, Jiequn

    2015-01-01

    Background The transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) is a master regulatory gene necessary for the development and function of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have recently emerged as promising candidates for cell-based immunosuppression/tolerance induction protocols. Thus, we hypothesized that MSC-based Foxp3 gene therapy would improve immunosuppressive capacity of MSC and induce donor-specific allograft tolerance in rat’s liver allograft model. Meth...

  8. Tolerance induction to a thymus-dependent antigen in vitro: treatment of nonadherent cells with tolerogen biologically filtered in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly tolerogenic bovine gamma globulin (BGG), a thymus-dependent antigen, was prepared by biologic filtration in vitro. It readily induced tolerance in vivo in BALB/c mice and also rendered their nonadherent lymph node cells tolerant after in vitro incubation. Biologic filtration in vitro was carried out by incubating 2.5 x 107 lymph node cells with 10 mg of nontolerogenic BGG in 10 ml of Eagle's medium containing 2 percent normal mouse serum at 370C for 6 hr. The BGG-containing medium was clarified by centrifugation and was used without further dilution. For tolerance induction in vitro, lymph node cells were separated into adherent and nonadherent populations on Falcon plastic. These cells were incubated for 0 to 18 hr at 370C with biologically filtered BGG (bBGG). After incubation, the cells were washed three times and (2 to 2.5) x 107 nonadherent or 4 x 106 adherent cells were injected iv with their untreated counterpart into lethally irradiated mice which had received 106 bone marrow cells. The recipients were then challenged with 300 μg of aggregated BGG, and tolerance was assayed by the elimination of labeled BGG, rosette formation, and passive hemagglutination. Spleen cells were similarly treated for comparison. Our findings show that tolerance was not induced in vitro in adherent lymph node cells. However, in the nonadherent populations, those from the lymph node but not the spleen were rendered tolerant. The acquisition of tolerance in vitro was gradual. It was dependent upon the length of exposure to bBGG and required at least 6 hr

  9. Clostridial Glucosylating Toxins Enter Cells via Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Zamboglou, Constantinos; Genisyuerek, Selda; Guttenberg, Gregor; Aktories, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), C. sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL) and C. novyi α-toxin (TcnA) are important pathogenicity factors, which represent the family of the clostridial glucosylating toxins (CGTs). Toxin A and B are associated with antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembraneous colitis. Lethal toxin is involved in toxic shock syndrome after abortion and α-toxin in gas gangrene development. CGTs enter cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and require an ...

  10. The fatty acid profile of rainbow trout liver cells modulates their tolerance to methylmercury and cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferain, Aline; Bonnineau, Chloé; Neefs, Ineke; Rees, Jean François; Larondelle, Yvan; Schamphelaere, Karel A C De; Debier, Cathy

    2016-08-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition of fish tissues, which generally reflects that of the diet, affects various cellular properties such as membrane structure and fluidity, energy metabolism and susceptibility to oxidative stress. Since these cellular parameters can play an important role in the cellular response to organic and inorganic pollutants, a variation of the PUFA supply might modify the toxicity induced by such xenobiotics. In this work, we investigated whether the cellular fatty acid profile has an impact on the in vitro cell sensitivity to two environmental pollutants: methylmercury and cadmium. Firstly, the fatty acid composition of the rainbow trout liver cell line RTL-W1 was modified by enriching the growth medium with either alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6), arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) or docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5n-6). These modified cells and their control (no PUFA enrichment) were then challenged for 24h with increasing concentrations of methylmercury or cadmium. We observed that (i) the phospholipid composition of the RTL-W1 cells was profoundly modulated by changing the PUFA content of the growth medium: major modifications were a high incorporation of the supplemented PUFA in the cellular phospholipids, the appearance of direct elongation and desaturation metabolites in the cellular phospholipids as well as a change in the gross phospholipid composition (PUFA and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) levels and n-3/n-6 ratio); (ii) ALA, EPA and DPA enrichment significantly protected the RTL-W1 cells against both methylmercury and cadmium; (iv) DHA enrichment significantly protected the cells against cadmium but not methylmercury; (v) AA and LA enrichment had no impact on the cell tolerance to both methylmercury and cadmium; (vi) the abundance of 20:3n-6, a metabolite of the n-6 biotransformation pathway, in

  11. Epigenetically Mediated Pathogenic Effects of Phenanthrene on Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenanthrene (Phe, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH, is a major constituent of urban air pollution. There have been conflicting results regarding the role of other AhR ligands 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD and 6-formylindolo [3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ in modifying regulatory T cell populations (Treg or T helper (Th17 differentiation, and the effects of Phe have been understudied. We hypothesized that different chemical entities of PAH induce Treg to become either Th2 or Th17 effector T cells through epigenetic modification of FOXP3. To determine specific effects on T cell populations by phenanthrene, primary human Treg were treated with Phe, TCDD, or FICZ and assessed for function, gene expression, and phenotype. Methylation of CpG sites within the FOXP3 locus reduced FOXP3 expression, leading to impaired Treg function and conversion of Treg into a CD4+CD25lo Th2 phenotype in Phe-treated cells. Conversely, TCDD treatment led to epigenetic modification of IL-17A and conversion of Treg to Th17 T cells. These findings present a mechanism by which exposure to AhR-ligands mediates human T cell responses and begins to elucidate the relationship between environmental exposures, immune modulation, and initiation of human disease.

  12. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khondoker M. Akram

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  13. β-Cell Regeneration Mediated by Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Milanesi; Jang-Won Lee; Zhenhua Li; Stefano Da Sacco; Valentina Villani; Vanessa Cervantes; Laura Perin; Yu, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been shown to ameliorate diabetes in animal models. The mechanism, however, remains largely unknown. An unanswered question is whether BMSCs are able to differentiate into β-cells in vivo, or whether BMSCs are able to mediate recovery and/or regeneration of endogenous β-cells. Here we examined these questions by testing the ability of hBMSCs genetically modified to transiently express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or pancreatic-duode...

  14. Site of clomazone action in tolerant-soybean and susceptible-cotton photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were conducted to determine the herbicidal site of clomazone action in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Corsoy) (SB-M) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum [L.] cv Stoneville 825) (COT-M) photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures. Although a 10 micromolar clomazone treatment did not significantly reduce the terpene or mixed terpenoid content (microgram per gram fresh weight) of the SB-M cell line, there was over a 70% reduction in the chlorophyll (Chl), carotenoid (CAR), and plastoquinone (PQ) content of the COT-M cell line. The tocopherol (TOC) content was reduced only 35.6%. Reductions in the levels of Chl, CAR, TOC, and PQ indicate that the site of clomazone action in COT-M cells is prior to geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). The clomazone treatment did not significantly reduce the flow of [14C]mevalonate ([14C]MEV) (nanocuries per gram fresh weight) into CAR and the three mixed terpenoid compounds of SB-M cells. Conversely, [14C]MEV incorporation into CAR and the terpene moieties of Chl, PQ, and TOC in COT-M cells was reduced at least 73%, indicating that the site of clomazone action must be after MEV. Sequestration of clomazone away from the chloroplast cannot account for soybean tolerance to clomazone since chloroplasts isolated from both cell lines incubated with [14C]clomazone contained a similar amount of radioactivity (disintegrations per minute per microgram of Chl). The possible site(s) of clomazone inhibition include mevalonate kinase, phosphomevalonate kinase, pyrophosphomevalonate decarboxylase, isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase, and/or a prenyl transferase

  15. Nuclear Factor κB1/RelA Mediates Inflammation in Human Lung Epithelial Cells at Atmospheric Oxygen Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Lakshmanan; Jose, Cynthia C; Arita, Adriana; Kluz, Thomas; Sun, Hong; Zhang, Xiaoru; Yao, Yixin; Kartashov, Andrey V; Barski, Artem; Costa, Max; Cuddapah, Suresh

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen levels range from 2% to 9% in vivo. Atmospheric O2 levels (21%) are known to induce cell proliferation defects and cellular senescence in primary cell cultures. However, the mechanistic basis of the deleterious effects of higher O2 levels is not fully understood. On the other hand, immortalized cells including cancer cell lines, which evade cellular senescence are normally cultured at 21% O2 and the effects of higher O2 on these cells are understudied. Here, we addressed this problem by culturing immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells at ambient atmospheric, 21% O2 and lower, 10% O2. Our results show increased inflammatory response at 21% O2 but not at 10% O2. We found higher RelA binding at the NF-κB1/RelA target gene promoters as well as upregulation of several pro-inflammatory cytokines in cells cultured at 21% O2. RelA knockdown prevented the upregulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines at 21% O2, suggesting NF-κB1/RelA as a major mediator of inflammatory response in cells cultured at 21% O2. Interestingly, unlike the 21% O2 cultured cells, exposure of 10% O2 cultured cells to H2O2 did not elicit inflammatory response, suggesting increased ability to tolerate oxidative stress in cells cultured at lower O2 levels. PMID:26588041

  16. Changes in cell-mediated immunity in patients undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cell-mediated immune status of 147 patients who received radiotherapy was evaluated using in vitro tests (PHA, E-rosette, and spontaneous blastogenesis) both before and 6 weeks after the end of radiation. All patients have verified malignancies, involving the bronchus in 29 cases, breast in 28, female genital system in 26, head and neck in 20 and bladder in 15. Patients suffering from bronchogenic carcinomas or malignancies of the head and neck showed a relative high degree of immune suppression. Our findings indicate a trend towards some improvement in PHA reactivity, as well as in the percentage of E-rosette-forming cells after treatment, which is more noticeable in patients with pelvic or breast tumors. A relationship seems to exist between the tumor load and the immune status, which reverts to a normal pattern when the former is extinguished. Moreover, patients with poor clinical response display a profoundly depressed level of immune status without any improvement after treatment

  17. Control of peripheral tolerance by regulatory T cell-intrinsic Notch signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Wang, Sen; Georgiev, Peter; Sefik, Esen; Chatila, Talal A

    2015-11-01

    Receptors of the Notch family direct the differentiation of helper T cell subsets, but their influence on regulatory T cell (T(reg) cell) responses is obscure. We found here that lineage-specific deletion of components of the Notch pathway enhanced T(reg) cell-mediated suppression of type 1 helper T cell (T(H)1 cell) responses and protected against their T(H)1 skewing and apoptosis. In contrast, expression in T(reg) cells of a gain-of-function transgene encoding the Notch1 intracellular domain resulted in lymphoproliferation, exacerbated T(H)1 responses and autoimmunity. Cell-intrinsic canonical Notch signaling impaired T(reg) cell fitness and promoted the acquisition by T(reg) cells of a T(H)1 cell-like phenotype, whereas non-canonical Notch signaling dependent on the adaptor Rictor activated the kinase AKT-transcription factor Foxo1 axis and impaired the epigenetic stability of Foxp3. Our findings establish a critical role for Notch signaling in controlling peripheral T(reg) cell function. PMID:26437242

  18. Chitosan nanoparticles affect acid tolerance response in adhered cells of strpetococcus mutans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neilands, Julia; Sutherland, Duncan S; Resin, Anton;

    2011-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of chitosan nanoparticles on the acid tolerance response (ATR) of adhered Streptococcus mutans. An ATR was induced by exposing S. mutans to pH 5.5 for 2 h and confirmed by exposing the acid-adapted cells to pH 3.5 for 30 min, with the majority of cells...... appearing viable according to the LIVE/DEAD (R) technique. However, when chitosan nanoparticles were present during the exposure to pH 5.5, no ATR occurred as most cells appeared dead after the pH 3.5 shock. We conclude that the chitosan nanoparticles tested had the ability to hinder ATR induction in...

  19. The flavoprotein Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Akira; Kawahara, Nobuhiro [Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Takagi, Hiroshi, E-mail: hiro@bs.naist.jp [Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NO is produced from L-arginine in response to elevated temperature in yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tah18 was first identified as the yeast protein involved in NO synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers tolerance to high-temperature on yeast cells. -- Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule involved in the regulation of a large number of cellular functions. In the unicellular eukaryote yeast, NO may be involved in stress response pathways, but its role is poorly understood due to the lack of mammalian NO synthase (NOS) orthologues. Previously, we have proposed the oxidative stress-induced L-arginine synthesis and its physiological role under stress conditions in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, our experimental results indicated that increased conversion of L-proline into L-arginine led to NO production in response to elevated temperature. We also showed that the flavoprotein Tah18, which was previously reported to transfer electrons to the Fe-S cluster protein Dre2, was involved in NO synthesis in yeast. Gene knockdown analysis demonstrated that Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells. As it appears that such a unique cell protection mechanism is specific to yeasts and fungi, it represents a promising target for antifungal activity.

  20. The flavoprotein Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► NO is produced from L-arginine in response to elevated temperature in yeast. ► Tah18 was first identified as the yeast protein involved in NO synthesis. ► Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers tolerance to high-temperature on yeast cells. -- Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule involved in the regulation of a large number of cellular functions. In the unicellular eukaryote yeast, NO may be involved in stress response pathways, but its role is poorly understood due to the lack of mammalian NO synthase (NOS) orthologues. Previously, we have proposed the oxidative stress-induced L-arginine synthesis and its physiological role under stress conditions in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, our experimental results indicated that increased conversion of L-proline into L-arginine led to NO production in response to elevated temperature. We also showed that the flavoprotein Tah18, which was previously reported to transfer electrons to the Fe–S cluster protein Dre2, was involved in NO synthesis in yeast. Gene knockdown analysis demonstrated that Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells. As it appears that such a unique cell protection mechanism is specific to yeasts and fungi, it represents a promising target for antifungal activity.

  1. NKG2D ligands mediate immunosurveillance of senescent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagiv, Adi; Burton, Dominick G A; Moshayev, Zhana; Vadai, Ezra; Wensveen, Felix; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Golani, Ofra; Polic, Bojan; Krizhanovsky, Valery

    2016-02-01

    Cellular senescence is a stress response mechanism that limits tumorigenesis and tissue damage. Induction of cellular senescence commonly coincides with an immunogenic phenotype that promotes self-elimination by components of the immune system, thereby facilitating tumor suppression and limiting excess fibrosis during wound repair. The mechanisms by which senescent cells regulate their immune surveillance are not completely understood. Here we show that ligands of an activating Natural Killer (NK) cell receptor (NKG2D), MICA and ULBP2 are consistently up-regulated following induction of replicative senescence, oncogene-induced senescence and DNA damage - induced senescence. MICA and ULBP2 proteins are necessary for efficient NK-mediated cytotoxicity towards senescent fibroblasts. The mechanisms regulating the initial expression of NKG2D ligands in senescent cells are dependent on a DNA damage response, whilst continuous expression of these ligands is regulated by the ERK signaling pathway. In liver fibrosis, the accumulation of senescent activated stellate cells is increased in mice lacking NKG2D receptor leading to increased fibrosis. Overall, our results provide new insights into the mechanisms regulating the expression of immune ligands in senescent cells and reveal the importance of NKG2D receptor-ligand interaction in protecting against liver fibrosis. PMID:26878797

  2. Interstitial cells of Cajal mediate mechanosensitive responses in the stomach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Kyung-Jong; Sanders, Kenton M.; Ward, Sean M.

    2005-10-01

    Changes in motor activity are a basic response to filling of smooth muscle organs. Responses to gastric filling, for example, are thought to be regulated by neural reflexes. Here, we demonstrate a previously uncharacterized aspect of stretch-dependent responses in visceral smooth muscles that is mediated by mechanosensitive interstitial cells of Cajal. Length ramps were applied to the murine antral muscles while recording intracellular electrical activity and isometric force. Stretching muscles by an average of 27 ± 1% of resting length resulted in 5 mN of force. Increasing length caused membrane depolarization and increased slow-wave frequency. The responses were dependent on the rate of stretch. Stretch-dependent responses were not inhibited by neuronal antagonists or nifedipine. Increases in slow-wave frequency, but not membrane depolarization, were inhibited by reducing external Ca2+ (100 μM) and by Ni2+ (250 μM). Responses to stretch were inhibited by indomethacin (1 μM) and were absent in cyclooxygenase II-deficient mice, suggesting that cyclooxygenase II-derived eicosanoids may mediate these responses. Dual microelectrode impalements of muscle cells within the corpus and antrum showed that stretch-induced changes in slow-wave frequency uncoupled proximal-to-distal propagation of slow waves. This uncoupling could interfere with gastric peristalsis and impede gastric emptying. Stretch of antral muscles of W/WV mice, which lack intramuscular interstitial cells of Cajal, did not affect membrane depolarization or slow-wave frequency. These data demonstrate a previously uncharacterized nonneural stretch reflex in gastric muscles and provide physiological evidence demonstrating a mechanosensitive role for interstitial cells of Cajal in smooth muscle tissues. gastric compliance | pacemaker | stretch | slow waves | propagation

  3. A Neutralizing Antibody Assay Based on a Reporter of Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuling; Li, Jia J; Kim, Hyun Jun; Liu, Xu; Liu, Weiyi; Akhgar, Ahmad; Bowen, Michael A; Spitz, Susan; Jiang, Xu-Rong; Roskos, Lorin K; White, Wendy I

    2015-11-01

    Benralizumab is a humanized anti-IL5 receptor α (IL5Rα) monoclonal antibody (mAb) with enhanced (afucosylation) antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) function. An ADCC reporter cell-based neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay was developed and characterized to detect NAb against benralizumab in human serum to support the clinical development of benralizumab. The optimal ratio of target cells to effector cells was 3:1. Neither parental benralizumab (fucosylated) nor benralizumab Fab resulted in ADCC activity, confirming the requirement for ADCC activity in the NAb assay. The serum tolerance of the cells was determined to be 2.5%. The cut point derived from normal and asthma serum samples was comparable. The effective range of benralizumab was determined, and 35 ng/mL [80% maximal effective concentration (EC80)] was chosen as the standard concentration to run in the assessment of NAb. An affinity purified goat anti-benralizumab polyclonal idiotype antibody preparation was shown to have NAb since it inhibited ADCC activity in a dose-dependent fashion. The low endogenous concentrations of IL5 and soluble IL5 receptor (sIL5R) did not demonstrate to interfere with the assay. The estimated assay sensitivities at the cut point were 1.02 and 1.10 μg/mL as determined by the surrogate neutralizing goat polyclonal and mouse monoclonal anti-drug antibody (ADA) controls, respectively. The assay can detect NAb (at 2.5 μg/mL) in the presence of 0.78 μg/mL benralizumab. The assay was not susceptible to non-specific matrix effects. This study provides an approach and feasibility of developing an ADCC cell-based NAb assay to support biopharmaceuticals with an ADCC function. PMID:26205082

  4. Genomic and physiological analysis of oxygen sensitivity and hypoxia tolerance in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seta, Karen; Kim, Hie-Won; Ferguson, Tsuneo; Kim, Richard; Pathrose, Peterson; Yuan, Yong; Lu, Gang; Spicer, Zachary; Millhorn, David E

    2002-10-01

    The mechanisms by which cells adapt and respond to changes in oxygen tension remain largely unknown. Our laboratory has used the PC12 cell line to study both biophysical and molecular responses to hypoxia. This chapter summarizes our findings. We found that membrane depolarization that occurred when PC12 cells were exposed to reduced O(2) was mediated by a specific potassium channel, the Kv1.2 channel. The membrane depolarization leads to increased Ca(2+) conductance through a voltage-sensitive channel, which in turn mediates the release of the neurotransmitters dopamine, adenosine, glutamate, and GABA. In addition, increased intracellular Ca(2+) and other signaling systems regulate hypoxia-induced gene expression, which contributes to the adaptive response to reduced O(2+). We identified several critical signaling pathways that regulate a complex gene expression profile in PC12 cells during hypoxia. These include the cAMP-protein kinase A, Ca(2+)-calmodulin, p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK; p38 kinase), and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT as regulators of gene expression. Several of these pathways regulate hypoxia-specific transcription factors that are members of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) family. Recently, we have successfully used subtractive cDNA libraries and microarray analysis to identify the genomic profile that mediates the cellular response to hypoxia. PMID:12438156

  5. Reversal of tolerance induced by transplantation of skin expressing the immunodominant T cell epitope of rat type II collagen entitles development of collagen-induced arthritis but not graft rejection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäcklund, Johan; Treschow, Alexandra; Firan, Mihail; Malmström, Vivianne; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Ward, E Sally; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2002-01-01

    collagen (CI), e.g. in skin, are tolerized against rat CII and resistant to CIA. In this study we transplanted skin from TSC transgenic mice onto non-transgenic CIA-susceptible littermates to investigate whether introduction of this epitope to a naïve immune system would lead to T cell priming and graft...... rejection or instead to tolerance and arthritis protection. Interestingly, TSC grafts were accepted and not even immunization of recipient mice with CII in adjuvant induced graft rejection. Instead, TSC skin recipients displayed a reduced T and B cell response to CII and were also protected from arthritis....... However, additional priming could break arthritis protection and was accompanied by an increased T cell response to the grafted epitope. Strikingly, despite the regained T cell response, development of arthritis was not accompanied by graft rejection, showing that these immune-mediated inflammatory...

  6. The gut microbiome as a target for regulatory T cell-based immunotherapy: induction of regulatory lymphocytes by oral administration of anti-LPS enriched colostrum alleviates immune mediated colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Yaʼacov, Ami Ben; Lichtenstein, Yoav; Zolotarov, Lidya; Ilan, Yaron

    2015-01-01

    Background Gut-derived bacterial endotoxin is an important cofactor in the pathogenesis of IBD. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for maintenance of peripheral tolerance and can prevent and alleviate IBD. To determine the immune modulatory effect of anti-LPS enriched hyperimmune colostrum, its ability to induce Tregs and alleviate immune mediated colitis. Methods Immune-mediated colitis was induced in mice by intra-colonic instillation of Trinitrobenzene Sulfonate (TNBS). Four groups o...

  7. Hepatic non-parenchymal cells and extracellular matrix participate in oval cell-mediated liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Xiao-Ping Chen; Wan-Guang Zhang; Feng Zhang; Shuai Xiang; Han-Hua Dong; Lei Zhang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the interaction between nonparenchymal cells, extracellular matrix and oval cells during the restituting process of liver injury induced by partial hepatectomy (PH). METHODS: We examined the localization of oval cells, non-parenchymal cells, and the extracellular matrix components using immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescent analysis during the proliferation and differentiation of oval cells in N-2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF)/PH rat model. RESULTS: By day 2 after PH, small oval cells began to proliferate around the portal area. Most of stellate cells and laminin were present along the hepatic sinusoids in the periportal area. Kupffer cells and fibronectin markedly increased in the whole hepatic lobule. From day 4 to 9, oval cells spread further into hepatic parenchyma, closely associated with stellate cells, fibronectin and laminin. Kupffer cells admixed with oval cells by day 6 and then decreased in the periportal zone. From day 12 to 15, most of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), laminin and fibronectin located around the small hepatocyte nodus, and minority of them appeared in the nodus. Kupffer cells were mainly limited in the pericentral sinusoids. After day 18, the normal liver lobule structures began to recover.CONCLUSION: Local hepatic microenvironment may participate in the oval cell-mediated liver regeneration through the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions.

  8. β-Cell Regeneration Mediated by Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesi, Anna; Lee, Jang-Won; Li, Zhenhua; Da Sacco, Stefano; Villani, Valentina; Cervantes, Vanessa; Perin, Laura; Yu, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been shown to ameliorate diabetes in animal models. The mechanism, however, remains largely unknown. An unanswered question is whether BMSCs are able to differentiate into β-cells in vivo, or whether BMSCs are able to mediate recovery and/or regeneration of endogenous β-cells. Here we examined these questions by testing the ability of hBMSCs genetically modified to transiently express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or pancreatic-duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1) to reverse diabetes and whether these cells were differentiated into β-cells or mediated recovery through alternative mechanisms. Human BMSCs expressing VEGF and PDX1 reversed hyperglycemia in more than half of the diabetic mice and induced overall improved survival and weight maintenance in all mice. Recovery was sustained only in the mice treated with hBMSCs-VEGF. However, de novo β-cell differentiation from human cells was observed in mice in both cases, treated with either hBMSCs-VEGF or hBMSCs- PDX1, confirmed by detectable level of serum human insulin. Sustained reversion of diabetes mediated by hBMSCs-VEGF was secondary to endogenous β-cell regeneration and correlated with activation of the insulin/IGF receptor signaling pathway involved in maintaining β-cell mass and function. Our study demonstrated the possible benefit of hBMSCs for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes and gives new insight into the mechanism of β-cell recovery after injury mediated by hBMSC therapy. PMID:22879915

  9. β-Cell regeneration mediated by human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Milanesi

    Full Text Available Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs have been shown to ameliorate diabetes in animal models. The mechanism, however, remains largely unknown. An unanswered question is whether BMSCs are able to differentiate into β-cells in vivo, or whether BMSCs are able to mediate recovery and/or regeneration of endogenous β-cells. Here we examined these questions by testing the ability of hBMSCs genetically modified to transiently express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF or pancreatic-duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1 to reverse diabetes and whether these cells were differentiated into β-cells or mediated recovery through alternative mechanisms. Human BMSCs expressing VEGF and PDX1 reversed hyperglycemia in more than half of the diabetic mice and induced overall improved survival and weight maintenance in all mice. Recovery was sustained only in the mice treated with hBMSCs-VEGF. However, de novo β-cell differentiation from human cells was observed in mice in both cases, treated with either hBMSCs-VEGF or hBMSCs- PDX1, confirmed by detectable level of serum human insulin. Sustained reversion of diabetes mediated by hBMSCs-VEGF was secondary to endogenous β-cell regeneration and correlated with activation of the insulin/IGF receptor signaling pathway involved in maintaining β-cell mass and function. Our study demonstrated the possible benefit of hBMSCs for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes and gives new insight into the mechanism of β-cell recovery after injury mediated by hBMSC therapy.

  10. Interferon-γ facilitates hepatic antiviral T cell retention for the maintenance of liver-induced systemic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhutian; Li, Lu; Chen, Yongyan; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-05-30

    Persistent exposure to liver pathogens leads to systemic antigen-specific tolerance, a major cause of chronicity during hepatotropic infection. The mechanism regarding how this systemic tolerance is maintained remains poorly elucidated. In a well established mouse model of hepatitis B virus (HBV) persistence-induced systemic tolerance, we observed that interferon-γ (IFN-γ) deficiency led to complete loss of tolerance, resulting in robust anti-HBV responses upon peripheral vaccination. The recovery of vaccine-induced anti-HBV responses was mainly caused by the retained antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells rather than decreased functional inhibitory cells in the periphery. Mechanistically, HBV persistence induced sustained hepatic CD4(+) T cell-derived IFN-γ production. IFN-γ was found to promote CXCL9 secretion from liver-resident macrophages. This T cell chemokine facilitated the retention of antiviral CD4(+) T cells in the liver in a CXCR3-dependent manner. Hepatic sequestrated antiviral CD4(+) T cells subsequently underwent local apoptotic elimination partially via cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 ligation. These findings reveal an unexpected tolerogenic role for IFN-γ during viral persistence in the liver, providing new mechanistic insights regarding the maintenance of systemic antigen-specific tolerance during HBV persistence. PMID:27139489

  11. Can Airway Tolerance be Promoted Immunopharmacologically with Aspirin in Aspirin-insensitive Allergic Bonchial Asthmatics by T Regulatory Cells (Tregs-directed Immunoregulatory Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzammal Hussain

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The pathobiology of allergic bronchial asthma is mediated by over-expressed T helper type 2 (Th2-biased immune responses to harmless environmental antigens, leading to airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness. These Th2 responses are normally suppressed by functional T regulatory cells (Tregs, which maintain the airway tolerance. However, the Tregs activity is conceived to be compromised in allergic asthmatics. The curative therapy to counteract this immune dysregulation is not available so far, and to devise such a remedy is the current research impetus in allergic asthma therapeutics. One of the novel insights is to consider a Tregs-directed immunoregulatory therapy that could harness endogenous Tregs to redress the Th2/Tregs imbalance, thus enhancing the airway tolerance. Aspirin or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA is a prototype non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that possesses intriguing immunopharmacological attributes. For example, it can enhance the number or the frequency of functional Tregs, especially natural CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Tregs, either directly or by inducing tolerogenic activity in dendritic cells (DCs. It is also considered to be beneficial for the induction of immunological tolerance in autoimmunity and graft rejection. This raises the question whether ASA, if exploited optimally, may be used to induce and harness endogenous Tregs activity for redressing Th2/Tregs imbalance in allergic asthma. In this paper, we hypothesise that ASA may help to counteract the underlying immune dysregulation in allergic asthma by promoting airway tolerance. Nevertheless, the future research in this regard will selectively need to be targeted to allergic asthma models, which are ASA insensitive, as ASA has some adverse background and is contraindicated in asthmatics who are sensitive to it.

  12. Tissue Tolerable Plasma (TTP) induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of microscopic incomplete resections of gastrointestinal cancers including pancreatic cancer has not changed considerably over the past years. Future intra-operative applications of tissue tolerable plasmas (TTP) could help to address this problem. Plasma is generated by feeding energy, like electrical discharges, to gases. The development of non-thermal atmospheric plasmas displaying spectra of temperature within or just above physiological ranges allows biological or medical applications of plasmas. We have investigated the effects of tissue tolerable plasmas (TTP) on the human pancreatic cancer cell line Colo-357 and PaTu8988T and the murine cell line 6606PDA in vitro (Annexin-V-FITC/DAPI-Assay and propidium iodide DNA staining assay) as well as in the in vivo tumour chorio-allantoic membrane (TUM-CAM) assay using Colo-357. TTP of 20 seconds (s) induced a mild elevation of an experimental surface temperature of 23.7 degree Celsius up to 26.63+/−0.40 degree Celsius. In vitro TTP significantly (p=0.0003) decreased cell viability showing the strongest effects after 20s TTP. Also, TTP effects increased over time levelling off after 72 hours (30.1+/−4.4% of dead cells (untreated control) versus 78.0+/−9.6% (20s TTP)). However, analyzing these cells for apoptosis 10s TTP revealed the largest proportion of apoptotic cells (34.8+/−7.2%, p=0.0009 versus 12.3+/−6.6%, 20s TTP) suggesting non-apoptotic cell death in the majority of cells after 20s TTP. Using solid Colo-357 tumours in the TUM-CAM model TUNEL-staining showed TTP-induced apoptosis up to a depth of tissue penetration (DETiP) of 48.8+/−12.3μm (20s TTP, p<0.0001). This was mirrored by a significant (p<0.0001) reduction of Ki-67+ proliferating cells (80.9+/−13.2% versus 37.7+/−14.6%, p<0.0001) in the top cell layers as well as typical changes on HE specimens. The bottom cell layers were not affected by TTP. Our data suggest possible future intra-operative applications of TTP to reduce

  13. Alpha-adrenergic blocker mediated osteoblastic stem cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yoon Jung [Craniomaxillofacial Reconstructive Sciences Major, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jue Yeon [Craniomaxillofacial Reconstructive Sciences Major, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Jin [Department of Industrial Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chong-Pyoung [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yoon Jeong, E-mail: parkyj@snu.ac.kr [Craniomaxillofacial Reconstructive Sciences Major, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin directly up-regulated bone metabolism at a low dose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin induced osteoblastic stem cell differentiation without affecting cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This osteogenic stem cell differentiation is mediated by ERK-signal dependent pathway. -- Abstract: Recent researches have indicated a role for antihypertensive drugs including alpha- or beta-blockers in the prevention of bone loss. Some epidemiological studies reported the protective effects of those agents on fracture risk. However, there is limited information on the association with those agents especially at the mechanism of action. In the present study, we investigated the effects of doxazosin, an alpha-blocker that is clinically used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) along with antihypertensive medication, on the osteogenic stem cell differentiation. We found that doxazosin increased osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells, detected by Alizarin red S staining and calcein. Doxazosin not only induced expression of alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, osteopontin, and osteocalcin, it also resulted in increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), a MAP kinase involved in osteoblastic differentiation. Treatment with U0126, a MAP kinase inhibitor, significantly blocked doxazosin-induced osteoblastic differentiation. Unrelated to activation of osteogenic differentiation by doxazosin, we found that there were no significant changes in adipogenic differentiation or in the expression of adipose-specific genes, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}, aP2, or LPL. In this report, we suggest that doxazosin has the ability to increase osteogenic cell differentiation via ERK1/2 activation in osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells, which supports the protective effects of antihypertensive drug on fracture risk and

  14. Effects of exogenous salicylic acid on cell wall polysaccharides and aluminum tolerance of trichosanthes kirilowii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hydroponic experiment was conducted to study the effects of exogenous salicylic acid (SA) on root length, relative aluminum content in the apical cell wall, acid phosphatase (APA) and pectin methyl esterase (PME) activity, root pectin, hemicellulose 1(HC1), and hemicellulose 2 (HC2) contents of Anguo Trichosanthes kirilowii (Al-tolerant genotype) and Pujiang T. kirilowii (Al-sensitive genotype) under 800 micro mol/L of aluminum stress. The results showed that the growth of Al-tolerant Anguo T. kirilowii and Al-sensitive Pujiang T. kirilowii was inhibited when exposed to 800 micro mol/L of aluminum solution. APA and PME activities were also enhanced for both genotypes. The contents of relative aluminum, pectin, HC1, and HC2, as well as Al accumulation in the root tips were increased under aluminum toxicity. Pujiang T. kirilowii showed higher enzyme activity and cell wall polysaccharide contents than Anguo T. kirilowii. In addition, the root cell wall pectin, HC1, and HC2 contents of Pujiang T. kirilowii were increased by a large margin, showing its greater sensitivity to aluminum toxicity. Root length is an important indicator of aluminum toxicity, and has an important relationship with cell wall polysaccharide content. Aluminum toxicity led to the accumulation of pectin and high PME activity, and also increased the number of free carboxyl groups, which have more aluminum binding sites. Membrane skim increased extensively with the increase in APA activity, damaging membrane structure and function. Different SA concentrations can decrease enzyme activity and cell wall polysaccharide content to some extent. With the addition of different SA concentrations, the root relative aluminum content, cell wall polysaccharide content, APA and PME activities decreased. Aluminum toxicity to both genotypes of T. kirilowii was relieved in different degrees as exogenous SA concentration increased. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) marker was used to examine the genetic distance

  15. Glycan elongation beyond the mucin associated Tn antigen protects tumor cells from immune-mediated killing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Lavrsen, Kirstine; Steentoft, Catharina; Vester-Christensen, Malene B; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2013-01-01

    recognized as cancer associated truncated glycans, and are expressed in many adenocarcinomas, e.g. breast- and pancreatic cancer cells. To investigate the role of the cancer associated glycan truncations in immune-mediated killing we created glyco-engineered breast- and pancreatic cancer cells expressing...... and pancreatic cancer cell lines T47D and Capan-1 increases sensitivity to both NK cell mediated antibody-dependent cellular-cytotoxicity (ADCC) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing. In addition, we investigated the association between total cell surface expression of MUC1/MUC16 and NK or...... CTL mediated killing, and observed an inverse correlation between MUC16/MUC1 expression and the sensitivity to ADCC and CTL-mediated killing. Together, these data suggest that up-regulation of membrane bound mucins protects cells from immune mediated killing, and that particular glycosylation steps...

  16. Intraspecific variability of cadmium tolerance and accumulation, and cadmium-induced cell wall modifications in the metal hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Claire-Lise; Juraniec, Michal; Huguet, Stéphanie; Chaves-Rodriguez, Elena; Salis, Pietro; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Certain molecular mechanisms of Cd tolerance and accumulation have been identified in the model species Arabidopsis halleri, while intraspecific variability of these traits and the mechanisms of shoot detoxification were little addressed. The Cd tolerance and accumulation of metallicolous and non-metallicolous A. halleri populations from different genetic units were tested in controlled conditions. In addition, changes in shoot cell wall composition were investigated using Fourier transform i...

  17. p-Cresol mediates autophagic cell death in renal proximal tubular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Hung; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Lin, Tze-Yi; Lin, Ching-Yuang

    2015-04-01

    Higher serum level of p-cresol (PC) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients has been linked with CKD progression. The toxic effect of PC on diverse cells has been reported by prior studies, except for renal tubular cells. Both autophagy and apoptosis contribute to renal tubular cell death, yet evidence of its response to PC is limited and their crosstalk is still unclear. Autophagy is an important cellular process involved in toxin-induced cell death. Renal tubular cell death in tubular injury is thought to be one of the key events causing the progression of CKD. Thus, we treated rat (NRK-52E) and human (HRPTEC) renal proximal tubular cells (RPTC) with PC and found the cell proliferation was significantly decreased. Cell apoptosis was significantly increased and accompanied with the activation of autophagy as evidenced by increases in LC3-II, beclin 1 and Atg 4. We also found an increase of p62 by c-Jun activation. p62 accumulation could mediate the activation of caspase 8-dependent cell apoptosis. Conversely, knockdown of p62 by siRNA of p62 had the opposite effect by arresting LC3-II accumulation and promoting increasing cell viability. We conclude that PC triggered autophagic RPTC death via JNK-mediated p62 accumulation and then activated caspase 8-dependent cell death pathway. PC can be considered as one of the key events causing progression of CKD, which might affect drug disposition in CKD cases. PMID:25668154

  18. Freezing tolerance of sea urchin embryonic cells: Differentiation commitment and cytoskeletal disturbances in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odintsova, Nelly A; Ageenko, Natalya V; Kipryushina, Yulia O; Maiorova, Mariia A; Boroda, Andrey V

    2015-08-01

    This study focuses on the freezing tolerance of sea urchin embryonic cells. To significantly reduce the loss of physiological activity of these cells that occurs after cryopreservation and to study the effects of ultra-low temperatures on sea urchin embryonic cells, we tested the ability of the cells to differentiate into spiculogenic or pigment directions in culture, including an evaluation of the expression of some genes involved in pigment differentiation. A morphological analysis of cytoskeletal disturbances after freezing in a combination of penetrating (dimethyl sulfoxide and ethylene glycol) and non-penetrating (trehalose and polyvinylpyrrolidone) cryoprotectants revealed that the distribution pattern of filamentous actin and tubulin was similar to that in the control cultures. In contrast, very rare spreading cells and a small number of cells with filamentous actin and tubulin were detected after freezing in the presence of only non-penetrating cryoprotectants. The largest number of pigment cells was found in cultures frozen with trehalose or trehalose and dimethyl sulfoxide. The ability to induce the spicule formation was lost in the cells frozen only with non-penetrating cryoprotectants, while it was maximal in cultures frozen in a cryoprotective mixture containing both non-penetrating and penetrating cryoprotectants (particularly, when ethylene glycol was present). Using different markers for cell state assessment, an effective cryopreservation protocol for sea urchin cells was developed: three-step freezing with a low cooling rate (1-2°C/min) and a combination of non-penetrating and penetrating cryoprotectants made it possible to obtain a high level of cell viability (up to 65-80%). PMID:26049089

  19. Intraspecific variability of cadmium tolerance and accumulation, and cadmium-induced cell wall modifications in the metal hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Claire-Lise; Juraniec, Michal; Huguet, Stéphanie; Chaves-Rodriguez, Elena; Salis, Pietro; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    2015-06-01

    Certain molecular mechanisms of Cd tolerance and accumulation have been identified in the model species Arabidopsis halleri, while intraspecific variability of these traits and the mechanisms of shoot detoxification were little addressed. The Cd tolerance and accumulation of metallicolous and non-metallicolous A. halleri populations from different genetic units were tested in controlled conditions. In addition, changes in shoot cell wall composition were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Indeed, recent works on A. halleri suggest Cd sequestration both inside cells and in the cell wall/apoplast. All A. halleri populations tested were hypertolerant to Cd, and the metallicolous populations were on average the most tolerant. Accumulation was highly variable between and within populations, and populations that were non-accumulators of Cd were identified. The effect of Cd on the cell wall composition was quite similar in the sensitive species A. lyrata and in A. halleri individuals; the pectin/polysaccharide content of cell walls seems to increase after Cd treatment. Nevertheless, the changes induced by Cd were more pronounced in the less tolerant individuals, leading to a correlation between the level of tolerance and the extent of modifications. This work demonstrated that Cd tolerance and accumulation are highly variable traits in A. halleri, suggesting adaptation at the local scale and involvement of various molecular mechanisms. While in non-metallicolous populations drastic modifications of the cell wall occur due to higher Cd toxicity and/or Cd immobilization in this compartment, the increased tolerance of metallicolous populations probably involves other mechanisms such as vacuolar sequestration. PMID:25873677

  20. BNNT-mediated irreversible electroporatio: its potential on cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittoria Raffa, Cristina Riggio, Michael W. Smith, Kevin C. Jordan, Wei Cao, Alfred Cuschieri

    2012-10-01

    Tissue ablation, i.e., the destruction of undesirable tissues, has become an important minimally invasive technique alternative to resection surgery for the treatment of tumours. Several methods for tissue ablation are based on thermal techniques using cold, e.g. cryosurgery [1] or heat, e.g. radiofrequency [2] or high-intensity focused ultrasound [3] or nanoparticle-mediated irradiation [4]. Alternatively, irreversible electroporation (IRE) has been proposed as non thermal technique for minimally invasive tissue ablation based on the use of electrical pulses. When the electric field is applied to a cell, a change in transmembrane potential is induced, which can cause biochemical and physiological changes of the cell. When the threshold value of the transmembrane potential is exceeded, the cell membrane becomes permeable, thus allowing entrance of molecules that otherwise cannot cross the membrane [5]. A further increase in the electric field intensity may cause irreversible membrane permeabilization and cell death. These pulses create irreversible defects (pores) in the cell membrane lipid bilayer, causing cell death through loss of cell homeostasis [6]. This is desirable in tumour ablation in order to produce large cell death, without the use of cytostatic drugs. A study of Davalos, Mir and Rubinsky showed that IRE can ablate substantial volumes of tissue without inducing a thermal effect and therefore serve as an independent and new tissue ablation modality; this opened the way to the use of IRE in surgery [7]. Their finding was subsequently confirmed in studies on cells [8], small animal models [9] and in large animal models in the liver [10] and the heart [11]. The most important finding in these papers is that irreversible electroporation produces precisely delineated ablation zones with cell scale resolution between ablated and non-ablated areas, without zones in which the extent of damage changes gradually as during thermal ablation. Furthermore, it is

  1. Mast cell mediator tryptase levels after inhalation or intravenous administration of high doses pharmaceutically prepared heroin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Rook; A.P. van Zanten; W. van den Brink; J.M. van Ree; J.H. Beijnen

    2006-01-01

    Background: Opioids like morphine and heroin induce mast cell degranulation in vitro. The release of mast cell mediators like histamine and tryptase may lead to allergic symptoms. In this study it was investigated whether mast cell mediator release also occurs in vivo in addicted patients who partic

  2. DNA From Dead Cancer Cells Induces TLR9-Mediated Invasion and Inflammation In Living Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomela, Johanna; Sandholm, Jouko; Kaakinen, Mika; Patel, Ankita; Kauppila, Joonas H.; Ilvesaro, Joanna; Chen, Dongquan; Harris, Kevin W.; Graves, David; Selander, Katri S.

    2014-01-01

    TLR9 is a cellular DNA-receptor, which is widely expressed in breast and other cancers. Although synthetic TLR9-ligands induce cancer cell invasion in vitro, the role of TLR9 in cancer pathophysiology has remained unclear. We show here that living cancer cells uptake DNA from chemotherapy-killed cancer cells. We discovered that such DNA induces TLR9- and cathepsin-mediated invasion in living cancer cells. To study whether this phenomenon contributes to treatment responses, triple negative, human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells stably expressing control or TLR9 siRNA were inoculated orthotopically into nude mice. The mice were treated with vehicle or doxorubicin. The tumor groups exhibited equal decreases in size in response to doxorubicin. However, while the weights of vehicle-treated mice were similar, mice bearing control siRNA tumors became significantly more cachectic in response to doxorubicin, as compared with similarly treated mice bearing TLR9 siRNA tumors, suggesting a TLR9-mediated inflammation at the site of the tumor. In conclusion, our findings propose that DNA released from chemotherapy-killed cancer cells has significant influence on TLR9-mediated biological effects in living cancer cells. Through these mechanisms, tumor TLR9 expression may affect treatment responses to chemotherapy. PMID:24212717

  3. Antigen-specific tolerance induced by IL-10 gene modified immature dendritic cells in experimental autoimmune myocarditis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei-min; LI Yue; LIU Wei; GAO Cheng; ZHOU Bao-guo; YANG Shu-sen; WANG Zheng; ZHANG Rui-hong; GAN Run-tao; KONG Yi-hui

    2006-01-01

    Background Experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) in rats is a T-cell-mediated disorder. The initiation and maintenance of autoimmune responses in EAM depend on the maturation state of dendritic cells. IL-10 is a pleiotrophic immunomodulatory cytokine that functions at different levels of the immune response, so it has emerged as a promising therapeutic factor for the treatment of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that IL-10 gene modified bone marrow-derived immature dendritic cells (iDCs) ameliorate EAM and to explore the underlying mechanisms.Methods EAM was induced using the methods of cardiac myosin immunization on day 0 and day 7. Immature and mature bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) were generated without or with the stimulation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the phenotype was analyzed by flow cytometry. Some of the iDCs were transfected by pcDNA3-IL-10 plasmid. 2 × 106/per rat mature DC (mDC), immature DC (iDC), pcDNA3 transfected iDC,pcDNA3-IL-10 transfected iDC or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were injected intravenously for treatment 5 days after the first immunization. On day 21, HE staining was performed to detect the myocardial inflammation and T lymphocyte proliferation assay was used to determine the effects of IL-10 gene transfected iDC on autoreactive T cell proliferation. Expression of IκB, the inhibitor of NF-κB pathway, was determined by Western blot. Results BMDCs generated in a medium supplemented with granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were relatively immature, as determined by flow cytometry. However, stimulation with LPS induced these cells to become mature (m)DCs with higher levels of surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-Ⅱ and costimulatory molecules. Intravenous administration of iDCs, especially pcDNA3-IL-10 transfected iDC,ameliorated the histopathological severity of the myosin induced-EAM, and the effect was lost after the DCs

  4. Interleukin-2, Interleukin-7, T cell mediated autoimmunity and N-glycosylation

    OpenAIRE

    Grigorian, Ani; Mkhikian, Haik; Demetriou, Michael

    2012-01-01

    T cell activation and self-tolerance are tightly regulated to provide effective host defense against foreign pathogens while deflecting inappropriate autoimmune responses. Golgi Asn (N)-linked protein glycosylation co-regulates homeostatic set points for T cell growth, differentiation and self-tolerance to influence risk of autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Human autoimmunity is a complex trait that develops from intricate and poorly understood interactions between an indi...

  5. Bystander apoptosis in human cells mediated by irradiated blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr, E-mail: vlad.vinnikov@mail.ru [Grigoriev Institute for Medical Radiology of the National Academy of Medical Science of Ukraine (Ukraine); Lloyd, David; Finnon, Paul [Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards of the Health Protection Agency of the United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-01

    Following exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, due to an accident or during radiotherapy, bystander signalling poses a potential hazard to unirradiated cells and tissues. This process can be mediated by factors circulating in blood plasma. Thus, we assessed the ability of plasma taken from in vitro irradiated human blood to produce a direct cytotoxic effect, by inducing apoptosis in primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM), which mainly comprised G{sub 0}-stage lymphocytes. Plasma was collected from healthy donors' blood irradiated in vitro to 0-40 Gy acute {gamma}-rays. Reporter PBM were separated from unirradiated blood with Histopaque and held in medium with the test plasma for 24 h at 37 Degree-Sign C. Additionally, plasma from in vitro irradiated and unirradiated blood was tested against PBM collected from blood given 4 Gy. Apoptosis in reporter PBM was measured by the Annexin V test using flow cytometry. Plasma collected from unirradiated and irradiated blood did not produce any apoptotic response above the control level in unirradiated reporter PBM. Surprisingly, plasma from irradiated blood caused a dose-dependent reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter PBM. The yields of radiation-induced cell death in irradiated reporter PBM (after subtracting the respective values in unirradiated reporter PBM) were 22.2 {+-} 1.8% in plasma-free cultures, 21.6 {+-} 1.1% in cultures treated with plasma from unirradiated blood, 20.2 {+-} 1.4% in cultures with plasma from blood given 2-4 Gy and 16.7 {+-} 3.2% in cultures with plasma from blood given 6-10 Gy. These results suggested that irradiated blood plasma did not cause a radiation-induced bystander cell-killing effect. Instead, a reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter cells cultured with irradiated blood plasma has implications concerning oncogenic risk from mutated cells surviving after high dose in vivo irradiation (e.g. radiotherapy) and requires further study.

  6. Biological features of intrahepatic CD4+CD25+ T cells in the naturally tolerance of rat liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Ling; ZHANG Feng; PU Liyong; YAO Aihua; YU Yue; SUN Beicheng; LI Guoqiang

    2007-01-01

    The biological features of intrahepatic CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells in the naturally tolerance of rat liver transplantation were explored.Orthotopic liver transplantation was performed in two allogeneic rat strain combinations,one with fatal immunosuppression despite a complete major histocompatibility complex mismatch.The subjects were divided into three groups according to different donors and recipients [Tolerance group:LEW-to-DA;Rejection group:DA-to-LEW;Syngegnic group(control group):DAto-DA].The proportion of intrahepatic CD4+CD25+ T cells from three groups was determined by flow cytometry(FCM)in different time.The intrahepaitc CD4+CD25+ T cells were isolated by magnetic activated cell sorting(MACS)method and identified by FCM.The Foxp3 mRNA was detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR).And their suppression on the proliferation of CD4+CD25- T effector cells was analyzed by cell proliferation assay in vitro.Beginning immediately after transplantation,the proportion of Treg cells increased over time in both allogeneic groups but was significantly greater in the Rejection group.The proportion of Treg cells declined after day 5,and such reduction was more dramatic in the Rejection group than in the Tolerance group.Animals in the Tolerance group showed a second increase in the proportion after day 14.Intrahepatic CD4+CD25+T cells isolated from spontaneous tolerance models inhibited the proliferation of mixed lymphocyte reaction.The purity of CD4+CD25+ T cells sorted by MACS was 86%-93%.The CD4+CD25+ T cells could specifically express the Foxp3 gene compared with CD4+CD25- T cells.In vitro,the spleen cells from LEW rats can irritate the proliferation of CD4+CD25+ T cells more obviously than the syngegnic spleen cells.CD4+CD25+ Tr cells could suppress the proliferation of CD4+CD25- T cells,but the inhibition was reversed by exogenous IL-2(200 U/mL).The CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells specifically express the Foxp3 gene,which may play an

  7. E3 ubiquitin ligase GRAIL controls primary T cell activation and oral tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Kriegel, Martin A.; Rathinam, Chozhavendan; Richard A Flavell

    2009-01-01

    T cell unresponsiveness or anergy is one of the mechanisms that maintain inactivity of self-reactive lymphocytes. E3 ubiquitin ligases are important mediators of the anergic state. The RING finger E3 ligase GRAIL is thought to selectively function in anergic T cells but its mechanism of action and its role in vivo are largely unknown. We show here that genetic deletion of Grail in mice leads not only to loss of an anergic phenotype in various models but also to hyperactivation of primary CD4+...

  8. Rare earth metal oxides as BH4-tolerance cathode electrocatalysts for direct borohydride fuel cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Xuemin; WANG Yadong; GUO Feng; YAO Pei; PAN Mu

    2012-01-01

    Rare earth metal oxides (REMO) as cathode electrocatalysts in direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) were investigated.The REMO electrocatalysts tested showed favorable activity to the oxygen electro-reduction reaction and strong tolerance to the attack of BH4- in alkaline electrolytes.The simple membraneless DBFCs using REMO as cathode electrocatalyst and using hydrogen storage alloy as anodic electrocatalyst exhibited an open circuit of about 1 V and peak power of above 60 mW/cm2.The DBFC using Sm2O3 as cathode electrocatalyst showed a relatively better performance.The maximal power density of 76.2 mW/cm2 was obtained at the cell voltage of 0.52 V.

  9. Mn tolerance in rice is mediated by MTP8.1, a member of the cation diffusion facilitator family

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zonghui; Fujii, Yumi; Yamaji, Naoki; Masuda, Sakine; Takemoto, Yuma; Kamiya, Takehiro; Yusuyin, Yusufujiang; Iwasaki, Kozo; Kato, Shin-ichiro; Maeshima, Masayoshi; Ma, Jian Feng; Ueno, Daisei

    2013-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential micronutrient for plants, but is toxic when present in excess. The rice plant (Oryza sativa L.) accumulates high concentrations of Mn in the aerial parts; however, the molecular basis for Mn tolerance is poorly understood. In the present study, genes encoding Mn tolerance were screened for by expressing cDNAs of genes from rice shoots in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A gene encoding a cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) family member, OsMTP8.1, was isolated, and its ...

  10. Defects in Protein Folding Machinery Affect Cell Wall Integrity and Reduce Ethanol Tolerance in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Aswathy; Pullepu, Dileep; Reddy, Praveen Kumar; Uddin, Wasim; Kabir, M Anaul

    2016-07-01

    The chaperonin complex CCT/TRiC (chaperonin containing TCP-1/TCP-1 ring complex) participates in the folding of many crucial proteins including actin and tubulin in eukaryotes. Mutations in genes encoding its subunits can affect protein folding and in turn, the physiology of the organism. Stress response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important in fermentation reactions and operates through overexpression and underexpression of genes, thus altering the protein profile. Defective protein folding machinery can disturb this process. In this study, the response of cct mutants to stress conditions in general and ethanol in specific was investigated. CCT1 mutants showed decreased resistance to different conditions tested including osmotic stress, metal ions, surfactants, reducing and oxidising agents. Cct1-3 mutant with the mutation in the conserved ATP-binding region showed irreversible defects than other mutants. These mutants were found to have inherent cell wall defects and showed decreased ethanol tolerance. This study reveals that cell wall defects and ethanol sensitivity are linked. Genetic and proteomic analyses showed that the yeast genes RPS6A (ribosomal protein), SCL1 (proteasomal subunit) and TDH3 (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) on overexpression, improved the growth of cct1-3 mutant on ethanol. We propose the breakdown of common stress response pathways caused by mutations in CCT complex and the resulting scarcity of functional stress-responsive proteins, affecting the cell's defence against different stress agents in cct mutants. Defective cytoskeleton and perturbed cell wall integrity reduce the ethanol tolerance in the mutants which are rescued by the extragenic suppressors. PMID:26992923

  11. Induced Foxp3+ T Cells Colonizing Tolerated Allografts Exhibit the Hypomethylation Pattern Typical of Mature Regulatory T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbrands, Robert; Chen, Ye; Kendal, Adrian R.; Adams, Elizabeth; Cobbold, Stephen P.; Waldmann, Herman; Howie, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells expressing the transcription factor Foxp3 require acquisition of a specific hypomethylation pattern to ensure optimal functional commitment, limited lineage plasticity, and long-term maintenance of tolerance. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the generation of these epigenetic changes in vivo will contribute to the clinical exploitation of Foxp3+ Treg. Here, we show that both in vitro and in vivo generated antigen-specific Foxp3+ Treg can acquire Treg-specific epigenetic characteristics and prevent skin graft rejection in an animal model. PMID:27148253

  12. Induced Foxp3(+) T Cells Colonizing Tolerated Allografts Exhibit the Hypomethylation Pattern Typical of Mature Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbrands, Robert; Chen, Ye; Kendal, Adrian R; Adams, Elizabeth; Cobbold, Stephen P; Waldmann, Herman; Howie, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells expressing the transcription factor Foxp3 require acquisition of a specific hypomethylation pattern to ensure optimal functional commitment, limited lineage plasticity, and long-term maintenance of tolerance. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the generation of these epigenetic changes in vivo will contribute to the clinical exploitation of Foxp3(+) Treg. Here, we show that both in vitro and in vivo generated antigen-specific Foxp3(+) Treg can acquire Treg-specific epigenetic characteristics and prevent skin graft rejection in an animal model. PMID:27148253

  13. Ethanol regulation of adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels in a clonal neural cell line: an in vitro model of cellular tolerance to ethanol.

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, A S; Collier, K; Diamond, I.

    1986-01-01

    The acute and chronic neurologic effects of ethanol appear to be due to its interaction with neural cell membranes. Chronic exposure to ethanol induces changes in the membrane that lead to tolerance to the effects of ethanol. However, the actual membrane changes that account for tolerance to ethanol are not understood. We have developed a model cell culture system, using NG108-15 neuroblastoma-glioma hybrid cells, to study cellular tolerance to ethanol. We have found that adenosine receptor-s...

  14. Cell mediated immune response in human antirabies revaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Regina Veiga

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of secondary cell mediated immune response (CMI in human antirabies immunization was studied. The Puenzalida & Palácios vaccine was used because it is routinely used in Brazil. CMI was evaluated by lymphoblastic transformation indices obtained in whole blood culture in the presence of rabies and control (nervous tissue antigens. Eleven volunteers submitted to revaccination constituted the group under study, while three other volunteers submitted primo vaccination were utilized as control group. A clear secondary CMI to rabies antigen was detected in all the revaccinated volunteers who showed earlier and more intense response than the control group. Response to the control antigen, however, present in all the components of the first group was not detectable in two out of the three primovaccinated and very low in the third one.

  15. The application of the haploid cell culture system to obtain the variants with tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The different genotypes of rape haploid cells /tissue tolerated to the oxalic acid were correlated with the tolerance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in the plant level through the researches. And this phenomenon also occurred in the tolerance to NaCl between the different genotypes of rape haploid cells and the diploid cells, but the diploid cells were generally more tolerant to the haploid ones. In addition, there were similar situations in barely on NaCl tolerance, aluminum tolerance and resistance to scab. So the above results indicated that the haploid cells/tissue tolerant to the stresses could reflect the situations in the plant level in the certain degree. The technology of inducing and screening the variants of the tolerance to rape Sclerotinia sclerotiorum by in vitro culture of haploid tissue was established. This technical system includes the in vitro microspore culture, the regeneration from the haploid cells to plants and the expanding propagation of the haploids populations. A set of oxalic acid tolerance variants was screened through the treatments of pingyangmycin and oxalic acid in stem apexes culture of haploid plants. After the field identification, 3 individuals with the improved tolerance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum was obtained. The technology of inducing and screening the variants with heat tolerance by in vitro culture of haploid tissue was established in broccoli. A set of variants with the improved heat tolerance was obtained through the treatment of pingyangmycin and the 45 deg C heat treatment and 9 variants with higher stability of cell membrane to heat stress than the original varieties was selected. In addition, the technical systems for inducing and screening barley variants tolerant to aluminum and scab stresses according to the above rules were established. And the relevant resistance variants were obtained. Then 1 aluminum tolerance material and 3 scab resistance materials under the field experiments in the plant level were selected

  16. Integrin receptors on tumor cells facilitate NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikeeva, Nadia; Steblyanko, Maria; Fayngerts, Svetlana; Kopylova, Natalya; Marshall, Deborah J; Powers, Gordon D; Sato, Takami; Campbell, Kerry S; Sykulev, Yuri

    2014-08-01

    NK cells that mediate ADCC play an important role in tumor-specific immunity. We have examined factors limiting specific lysis of tumor cells by CD16.NK-92 cells induced by CNTO 95LF antibodies recognizing αV integrins that are overexpressed on many tumor cells. Although all tested tumor cells were killed by CD16.NK-92 effectors in the presence of the antibodies, the killing of target cells with a low level of ICAM-1 expression revealed a dramatic decrease in their specific lysis at high antibody concentration, revealing a dose limiting effect. A similar effect was also observed with primary human NK cells. The effect was erased after IFN-γ treatment of tumor cells resulting in upregulation of ICAM-1. Furthermore, killing of the same tumor cells induced by Herceptin antibody was significantly impaired in the presence of CNTO 95Ala-Ala antibody variant that blocks αV integrins but is incapable of binding to CD16. These data suggest that αV integrins on tumor cells could compensate for the loss of ICAM-1 molecules, thereby facilitating ADCC by NK cells. Thus, NK cells could exercise cytolytic activity against ICAM-1 deficient tumor cells in the absence of proinflammatory cytokines, emphasizing the importance of NK cells in tumor-specific immunity at early stages of cancer. PMID:24810893

  17. Mesenchymal stem cells induce T-cell tolerance and protect the preterm brain after global hypoxia-ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reint K Jellema

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE in preterm infants is a severe disease for which no curative treatment is available. Cerebral inflammation and invasion of activated peripheral immune cells have been shown to play a pivotal role in the etiology of white matter injury, which is the clinical hallmark of HIE in preterm infants. The objective of this study was to assess the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of intravenously delivered mesenchymal stem cells (MSC in an ovine model of HIE. In this translational animal model, global hypoxia-ischemia (HI was induced in instrumented preterm sheep by transient umbilical cord occlusion, which closely mimics the clinical insult. Intravenous administration of 2 x 10(6 MSC/kg reduced microglial proliferation, diminished loss of oligodendrocytes and reduced demyelination, as determined by histology and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI, in the preterm brain after global HI. These anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects of MSC were paralleled by reduced electrographic seizure activity in the ischemic preterm brain. Furthermore, we showed that MSC induced persistent peripheral T-cell tolerance in vivo and reduced invasion of T-cells into the preterm brain following global HI. These findings show in a preclinical animal model that intravenously administered MSC reduced cerebral inflammation, protected against white matter injury and established functional improvement in the preterm brain following global HI. Moreover, we provide evidence that induction of T-cell tolerance by MSC might play an important role in the neuroprotective effects of MSC in HIE. This is the first study to describe a marked neuroprotective effect of MSC in a translational animal model of HIE.

  18. Ezrin dephosphorylation/downregulation contributes to ursolic acid-mediated cell death in human leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezrin links the actin filaments with the cell membrane and has a functional role in the apoptotic process. It appears clear that ezrin is directly associated with Fas, leading to activation of caspase cascade and cell death. However, the exact role of ezrin in ursolic acid (UA)-induced apoptosis remains unclear. In this study, we show for the first time that UA induces apoptosis in both transformed and primary leukemia cells through dephosphorylation/downregulation of ezrin, association and polarized colocalization of Fas and ezrin, as well as formation of death-inducing signaling complex. These events are dependent on Rho-ROCK1 signaling pathway. Knockdown of ezrin enhanced cell death mediated by UA, whereas overexpression of ezrin attenuated UA-induced apoptosis. Our in vivo study also showed that UA-mediated inhibition of tumor growth of mouse leukemia xenograft model is in association with the dephosphorylation/downregulation of ezrin. Such findings suggest that the cytoskeletal protein ezrin may represent an attractive target for UA-mediated lethality in human leukemia cells

  19. Retrovirus-mediated conditional immortalization and analysis of established cell lines of osteoclast precursor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteoclast precursor cells (OPCs) have previously been established from bone marrow cells of SV40 temperature-sensitive T antigen-expressing transgenic mice. Here, we use retrovirus-mediated gene transfer to conditionally immortalize OPCs by expressing temperature-sensitive large T antigen (tsLT) from wild type bone marrow cells. The immortalized OPCs proliferated at the permissive temperature of 33.5 deg. C, but stopped growing at the non-permissive temperature of 39 deg. C. In the presence of receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL), the OPCs differentiated into tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells and formed multinucleate osteoclasts at 33.5 deg. C. From these OPCs, we cloned two types of cell lines. Both differentiated into TRAP-positive cells, but one formed multinucleate osteoclasts while the other remained unfused in the presence of RANKL. These results indicate that the established cell lines are useful for analyzing mechanisms of differentiation, particularly multinucleate osteoclast formation. Retrovirus-mediated conditional immortalization should be a useful method to immortalize OPCs from primary bone marrow cells

  20. Visfatin Mediates SCLC Cells Migration across Brain Endothelial Cells through Upregulation of CCL2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC is characterized as an aggressive tumor with brain metastasis. Although preventing SCLC metastasis to the brain is immensely important for survival, the molecular mechanisms of SCLC cells penetrating the blood–brain barrier (BBB are largely unknown. Recently, visfatin has been considered as a novel pro-inflammatory adipocytokine involved in various cancers. Herein, we present evidence that elevated levels of visfatin in the serum of SCLC patients were associated with brain metastasis, and visfain was increased in NCI-H446 cells, a SCLC cell line, during interacting with human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC. Using in vitro BBB model, we found that visfatin could promote NCI-H446 cells migration across HBMEC monolayer, while the effect was inhibited by knockdown of visfatin. Furthermore, our findings indicated that CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2 was involved in visfatin-mediated NCI-H446 cells transendothelial migtation. Results also showed that the upregulation of CCL2 in the co-culture system was reversed by blockade of visfatin. In particular, visfatin-induced CCL2 was attenuated by specific inhibitor of PI3K/Akt signaling in NCI-H446 cells. Taken together, we demonstrated that visfatin was a prospective target for SCLC metastasis to brain, and understanding the molecular mediators would lead to effective strategies for inhibition of SCLC brain metastasis.

  1. Promiscuous gene expression in the thymic medulla – on regulation at the epigenetic and single cell level

    OpenAIRE

    Sinemus, Anna

    2009-01-01

    The immune system is delicately balanced by self-antigen driven tolerance and pathogen-driven immunity. Self-tolerance of the T cell repertoire, which is an essential aspect of this balance, is mediated by multiple mechanisms operating both in the thymus (central tolerance) and in peripheral lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs (peripheral tolerance). Central tolerance, thus self-tolerance of the maturing T-cell repertoire in the thymus, is controlled by negative selection and the induction of re...

  2. Role of the H-2 complex in the induction of T cell tolerance to self minor histocompatibility antigens

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    The present study has utilized cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses specific for minor histocompatibility (minor H) antigens as an experimental approach to determining whether recognition of self MHC determinants is involved in the induction of T cell tolerance to self antigens. It was observed that C3H.SW splenic T cells from C3H.SW leads to B10 X B10.BR radiation bone marrow chimeras contained CTL precursors (pCTL) reactive against self C3H minor H antigens + H-2k but were tolerant to sel...

  3. The effect of adenovirus-mediated gene expression of FHIT in small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandi, Roza; Xu, Kai; Poulsen, Hans S;

    2011-01-01

    The candidate tumor suppressor fragile histidine traid (FHIT) is frequently inactivated in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Mutations in the p53 gene also occur in the majority of SCLC leading to the accumulation of the mutant protein. Here we evaluated the effect of FHIT gene therapy alone or in...... combination with the mutant p53-reactivating molecule, PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246, in SCLC. Overexpression of FHIT by recombinant adenoviral vector (Ad-FHIT)-mediated gene transfer in SCLC cells inhibited their growth by inducing apoptosis and when combined with PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246, a synergistic cell growth...

  4. MURINE MOBILIZED PERIPHERAL BLOOD STEM CELLS HAVE A LOWER CAPACITY THAN BONE MARROW TO INDUCE MIXED CHIMERISM AND TOLERANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Koporc, Zvonimir; Pilat, Nina; Nierlich, Patrick; Blaha, Peter; Bigenzahn, Sinda; Pree, Ines; Selzer, Edgar; Sykes, Megan; Muehlbacher, Ferdinand; Wekerle, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) under costimulation blockade allows induction of mixed chimerism and tolerance without global T cell depletion. The mildest such protocols without recipient cytoreduction, however, require clinically impracticable bone marrow (BM) doses. The successful use of mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) instead of BM in such regimens would provide a substantial advance, allowing transplantation of higher doses of hematopoietic donor cells. We thus ...

  5. Comparison of induced versus natural regulatory T cells of the same TCR specificity for induction of tolerance to an environmental antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Ma, Yanna; Dawicki, Wojciech; Zhang, Xiaobei; Gordon, John R

    2013-08-01

    Recent evidence shows that natural CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (nTreg) and induced CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (iTreg) both contribute to tolerance in mouse models of colitis and asthma, but there is little evidence regarding their relative contributions to this tolerance. We compared the abilities of nTreg and iTreg, both from OVA-TCR-transgenic OTII mice, to mediate tolerance in OVA-asthmatic C57BL/6 mice. The iTreg were differentiated from Th2 effector T cells by exposure to IL-10-differentiated dendritic cells (DC10) in vitro or in vivo, whereas we purified nTreg from allergen-naive mice and exposed them to DC10 before use. Each Treg population was subsequently repurified and tested for its therapeutic efficacy in vitro and in vivo. DC10 engaged the nTreg in a cognate fashion in Forster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer assays, and these nTreg reduced in vitro OVA-asthmatic Th2 effector T cell responses by 41-56%, whereas the comparator iTreg reduced these responses by 72-86%. Neutralization of IL-10, but not TGF-β, eliminated the suppressive activities of iTreg but not nTreg. Delivery of 5 × 10(5) purified nTreg reduced allergen challenge-induced airway IL-4 (p ≤ 0.03) and IL-5 (p ≤ 0.001) responses of asthmatic recipients by ≤ 23% but did not affect airway hyperresponsiveness or IgE levels, whereas equal numbers of iTreg of identical TCR specificity reduced all airway responses to allergen challenge by 82-96% (p ≤ 0.001) and fully normalized airway hyperresponsiveness. These data confirm that allergen-specific iTreg and nTreg have active roles in asthma tolerance and that iTreg are substantially more tolerogenic in this setting. PMID:23817420

  6. Mechanisms of immunological tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Herman

    2016-03-01

    There is increasing interest in establishing diagnostic markers of immunological tolerance applicable to efforts to minimize drug immunosuppression in transplantation and chronic immunological diseases. It is hoped that an understanding of the diverse mechanisms that can contribute to tolerance will guide efforts to establish diagnostic tolerance biomarkers. Not only would these be valuable for management of autoimmune diseases, transplants and allergies, but they might also guide efforts to override tolerance processes in cancer and vaccine development. Where tolerance is generated by deletion or inactivation of antigen reactive lymphocytes, it is unlikely that any long-term-valid blood biomarkers might be found. Where tolerance is mediated by active regulatory mechanisms, indicators that can be usefully measured may emerge, but these would likely show significant heterogeneity reflecting the diversity of active tolerance processes operating in different individuals. Given this, the most useful "kits" might be those "smart" enough to detect this diversity of tolerance players. PMID:26036868

  7. Measurement of cell mediated cytotoxicity by post-labeling surviving target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 51Cr release assay (CRA) is the commonly accepted technique for measurement of cell mediated cytotoxicity. This assay shows some disadvantages when mononucleated cells of human peripheral blood (MNC) are used as effector and target cells. The uptake of 51Cr by PHA stimulated lymphocytes is low compared to the spontaneous release. In an attempt to develop a cytotoxicity assay suitable for human lymphocytes we used 14C-TdR to label target cells surviving after contact with effector cells. Cytotoxic lymphocytes were generated by incubation of MNC with irradiated allogeneic MNC for 6 days. On day 6 the effector cells are irradiated and cocultured with PHA stimulated target cells. Twenty-four hours later 14C-TdR is added. After an additional 24 h the cultures are harvested and 14C-TdR taken up by target cells is measured. It is shown that the effector cells are still cytotoxic after irradiation. These cells do not take up 14C-TdR. Cell-free supernatants do not influence the uptake of 14C-TdR by target cells. The results obtained with this assay correlate very well those obtained by the CRA, if the spontaneous release does not exceed 30%. (author)

  8. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha in T-cell-mediated immunity to viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas N; Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan P; Thomsen, Allan R

    2003-01-01

    The immune response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) was evaluated. Generation of virus-specific effector T cells is unimpaired in MIP-1alpha-deficient mice. Furthermore, MIP-1alpha is not required for T-cell-mediated virus...... control or virus-induced T-cell-dependent inflammation. Thus, MIP-1alpha is not mandatory for T-cell-mediated antiviral immunity....

  9. Neutrophil mediated smooth muscle cell loss precedes allograft vasculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Timothy DG

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (AV is a pathological process of vascular remodeling leading to late graft loss following cardiac transplantation. While there is consensus that AV is alloimmune mediated, and evidence that the most important alloimmune target is medial smooth muscle cells (SMC, the role of the innate immune response in the initiation of this disease is still being elucidated. As ischemia reperfusion (IR injury plays a pivotal role in the initiation of AV, we hypothesize that IR enhances the early innate response to cardiac allografts. Methods Aortic transplants were performed between fully disparate mouse strains (C3H/HeJ and C57BL/6, in the presence of therapeutic levels of Cyclosporine A, as a model for cardiac AV. Neutrophils were depleted from some recipients using anti-PMN serum. Grafts were harvested at 1,2,3,5d and 1,2wk post-transplant. Ultrastructural integrity was examined by transmission electron microscopy. SMC and neutrophils were quantified from histological sections in a blinded manner. Results Grafts exposed to cold ischemia, but not transplanted, showed no medial SMC loss and normal ultrastructural integrity. In comparison, allografts harvested 1d post-transplant exhibited > 90% loss of SMC (p Conclusions These novel data show that there is extensive damage to medial SMC at 1d post-transplant. By depleting neutrophils from recipients it was demonstrated that a portion of the SMC loss was mediated by neutrophils. These results provide evidence that IR activation of early innate events contributes to the etiology of AV.

  10. Toll-Like Receptor 2- and 6-Mediated Stimulation by Macrophage-Activating Lipopeptide 2 Induces Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Cross Tolerance in Mice, Which Results in Protection from Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha but in Only Partial Protection from Lethal LPS Doses

    OpenAIRE

    Deiters, Ursula; Gumenscheimer, Marina; Galanos, Chris; Mühlradt, Peter F.

    2003-01-01

    Patients or experimental animals previously exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) become tolerant to further LPS challenge. We investigated the potential of the macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 (MALP-2) to induce in vivo cross tolerance to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and LPS. MALP-2-induced tolerance could be of practical interest, as MALP-2 proved much less pyrogenic in rabbits than LPS. Whereas LPS signals via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), MALP-2 uses TLR2 and TLR6. LPS-mediated cyt...

  11. Manganese oxidation state mediates toxicity in PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of the manganese (Mn) oxidation state on cellular Mn uptake and toxicity is not well understood. Therefore, undifferentiated PC12 cells were exposed to 0-200 μM Mn(II)-chloride or Mn(III)-pyrophosphate for 24 h, after which cellular manganese levels were measured along with measures of cell viability, function, and cytotoxicity (trypan blue exclusion, medium lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), 8-isoprostanes, cellular ATP, dopamine, serotonin, H-ferritin, transferrin receptor (TfR), Mn-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), and copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) protein levels). Exposures to Mn(III) >10 μM produced 2- to 5-fold higher cellular manganese levels than equimolar exposures to Mn(II). Cell viability and ATP levels both decreased at the highest Mn(II) and Mn(III) exposures (150-200 μM), while Mn(III) exposures produced increases in LDH activity at lower exposures (≥50 μM) than did Mn(II) (200 μM only). Mn(II) reduced cellular dopamine levels more than Mn(III), especially at the highest exposures (50% reduced at 200 μM Mn(II)). In contrast, Mn(III) produced a >70% reduction in cellular serotonin at all exposures compared to Mn(II). Different cellular responses to Mn(II) exposures compared to Mn(III) were also observed for H-ferritin, TfR, and MnSOD protein levels. Notably, these differential effects of Mn(II) versus Mn(III) exposures on cellular toxicity could not simply be accounted for by the different cellular levels of manganese. These results suggest that the oxidation state of manganese exposures plays an important role in mediating manganese cytotoxicity

  12. Immunoregulatory functions for murine intraepithelial lymphocytes: gamma/delta T cell receptor-positive (TCR+) T cells abrogate oral tolerance, while alpha/beta TCR+ T cells provide B cell help

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Past work has shown that a subset of effector T cells with unique characteristics could abrogate hapten- or antigen-induced tolerance, and the reconstitution of this immune response has been termed contrasuppression. We have studied contrasuppression in a model of oral tolerance (OT) in which adoptively transferred antigen-specific T contrasuppressor (Tcs) cells reverse OT and result in antibody responses to the eliciting antigen. In the present study, we show that murine intraepithelial lymp...

  13. Incorporation of [14C]-palmitate into lipids of Brassica cells during the induction of freezing tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in plasma membrane lipid composition have been causally related to increased freezing tolerance. Studies of lipid metabolism during ABA induction of freezing tolerance in Brassica napus suspension cultures were undertaken. Cells were labeled with [14C]-palmitate four days after transfer to fresh medium (control) or medium containing ABA (which increases freezing tolerance). At times between one and 20 hrs after labeling, ABA-treated cells incorporated almost twice the amount of label as controls cells. Approximately 80% of the radioactivity was associated with neutral lipids in ABA-treated cells and controls. Incorporation of label into total cellular polar lipids was 4.9 x 105 dpm/mg protein for control cells and 1 x 106 dpm/mg protein for cells transferred to medium containing ABA. Analysis of lipids following alkaline hydrolysis indicated that incorporation of [14C]-palmitate into glucosylceramide of ABA-treated cells was less than 60% of control values when expressed relative to that of the total polar lipids. Incorporation into ceramides was also depressed in ABA-treated cells

  14. Identification of a ferritin-like protein of Listeria monocytogenes as a mediator of β-lactam tolerance and innate resistance to cephalosporins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krawczyk-Balska Agata

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of listeriosis. The β-lactam antibiotics penicillin G and ampicillin are the current drugs of choice for the treatment of listerial infections. While isolates of L. monocytogenes are susceptible to these antibiotics, their action is only bacteriostatic and consequently, this bacterium is regarded as tolerant to β-lactams. In addition, L. monocytogenes has a high level of innate resistance to the cephalosporin family of β-lactams frequently used to treat sepsis of unknown etiology. Given the high mortality rate of listeriosis despite rational antibiotic therapy, it is important to identify genes that play a role in the susceptibility and tolerance of L. monocytogenes to β-lactams. Results The hly-based promoter trap system was applied to identify penicillin G-inducible genes of L. monocytogenes. The results of reporter system studies, verified by transcriptional analysis, identified ten penicillin G-inducible genes. The contribution of three of these genes, encoding a ferritin-like protein (fri, a two-component phosphate-response regulator (phoP and an AraC/XylS family transcriptional regulator (axyR, to the susceptibility and tolerance of L. monocytogenes to β-lactams was examined by analysis of nonpolar deletion mutants. The absence of PhoP or AxyR resulted in more rapid growth of the strains in the presence of sublethal concentration of β-lactams, but had no effect on the MIC values or the ability to survive a lethal dose of these antibiotics. However, the Δfri strain showed impaired growth in the presence of sublethal concentrations of penicillin G and ampicillin and a significantly reduced ability to survive lethal concentrations of these β-lactams. A lack of Fri also caused a 2-fold increase in the sensitivity of L. monocytogenes to cefalotin and cephradine. Conclusions The present study has identified Fri as an important mediator of

  15. Integration of principles of systems biology and radiation biology: toward development of in silico models to optimize IUdR-mediated radiosensitization of DNA mismatch repair-deficient (damage tolerant human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TimothyJamesKinsella

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 7 years, we have focused our experimental and computational research efforts on improving our understanding of the biochemical, molecular, and cellular processing of iododeoxyuridine (IUdR and ionizing radiation (IR induced DNA base damage by DNA mismatch repair (MMR. These coordinated research efforts, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP, brought together system scientists with expertise in engineering, mathematics, and complex systems theory and translational cancer researchers with expertise in radiation biology. Our overall goal was to begin to develop computational models of IUdR- and/or IR- induced base damage processing by MMR that may provide new clinical strategies to optimize IUdR-mediated radiosensitiztion in MMR deficient (MMR- “damage tolerant” human cancers. Using multiple scales of experimental testing, ranging from purified protein systems to in vitro (cellular and to in vivo (human tumor xenografts in athymic mice models, we have begun to integrate and interpolate these experimental data with hybrid stochastic biochemical models of MMR damage processing and probabilistic cell cycle regulation models through a systems biology approach. In this article, we highlight the results and current status of our integration of radiation biology approaches and computational modeling to enhance IUdR-mediated radiosensitization in MMR- damage tolerant cancers.

  16. The nature of tolerance in adult recipient mice made tolerant of alloantigens with supralethal irradiation followed by syngeneic bone marrow cell transplantation plus injection of F1 spleen cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The length of time after syngeneic bone marrow reconstitution when tolerance to alloantigens can be induced in adult mice during T cell differentiation from bone marrow cells was studied by exposing those T cells to (recipient x donor)F1 spleen cells. Supralethally irradiated C3H/He Slc(C3H; H-2k) mice were reconstituted with 1 x 10(7) syngeneic T cell-depleted bone marrow cells and then injected intravenously with 5 x 10(7) (C3H x C57BL/6[B6])F1 (B6C3F1; H-2bxk) or (C3H x AKR/J[AKR])F1 (AKC3F1; H-2kxk) spleen cells at various intervals. In the fully allogeneic combination of B6C3F1----C3H, EL-4 tumor originating from B6 was accepted, and survival of grafted B6 skin was significantly prolonged in the tolerant C3H mice treated with irradiation on day -1 followed by injection of syngeneic bone marrow cells on day 0 plus B6C3F1 spleen cells on days 0, 5, or 10, in a tolerogen-specific manner. In the multiminor histocompatibility antigen-disparate combination of AKC3F1----C3H, AKR skin grafts were permanently accepted in the tolerant C3H mice treated with AKC3F1 spleen cells on days 0, 5, 10, or 15. Immunological parameters, including cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity and delayed foot-pad reaction (DFR), were almost completely suppressed in C3H mice made tolerant of B6 or AKR antigens. A chimeric assay using a direct immunofluorescence method revealed that the tolerant C3H mice given B6C3F1 spleen cells on day 0 were mixed-chimeric for at least 8 weeks after syngeneic bone marrow reconstitution, but not definitely chimeric thereafter. The C3H mice given AKC3F1 spleen cells on day 0 were chimeric even 43 weeks after syngeneic bone marrow reconstitution, but the C3H mice given AKC3F1 spleen cells on day 15 showed temporal chimerism that disappeared within 43 weeks. The untolerant mice were never detectably chimeric

  17. Ctla-4 modulates the differentiation of inducible Foxp3+ Treg cells but IL-10 mediates their function in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Verhagen

    Full Text Available In vitro induced Foxp3+ T regulatory (iTreg cells form a novel and promising target for therapeutic tolerance induction. However, the potential of these cells as a target for the treatment of various immune diseases, as well as the factors involved in their development and function, remain debated. Here, we demonstrate in a myelin basic protein (MBP-specific murine model of CNS autoimmune disease that adoptive transfer of antigen-specific iTreg cells ameliorates disease progression. Moreover, we show that the co-stimulatory molecule CTLA-4 mediates in vitro differentiation of iTreg cells. Finally, we demonstrate that the secreted, immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 controls the ability of antigen-specific iTreg cells to suppress autoimmune disease. Overall, we conclude that antigen-specific iTreg cells, which depend on various immune regulatory molecules for their differentiation and function, represent a major target for effective immunotherapy of autoimmune disease.

  18. Mechanisms of tolerance in murine radiation bone marrow chimeras. II. Absence of nonspecific suppression in mature chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spleen cells from a series of allogeneic bone marrow chimeras were sensitized in vitro with stimulator cells from major histocompatibility complex recombinant strains of mice. The combinations were chosen such that both tolerated (host or donor) and nontolerated (third-party) antigens were present on the same stimulator cells in order to determine whether the tolerated host antigens might elicit nonspecific suppressor mechanisms affecting the cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) response to the nontolerated antigens. No evidence for such nonspecific suppression was obtained in several types of assays. Therefore, if suppressor mechanisms exist that mediate such tolerance in mature allogeneic chimeras then these mechanisms must be highly antigen-specific

  19. Cell surface molecules and fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion: effect of proteolytic digestion of membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    Proteases have been used as a tool to investigate the role of surface molecules in fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion. Proteolytic digestion of membrane-proteins by pronase (1 mg/ml for 20 min at 37 degrees C) completely inhibited adhesion of baby hamster kidney (BHK) fibroblasts on fibronectin-coated plastic dishes. Various degrees of inhibition were also obtained after treatment with proteinase K, chymotrypsin, papain, subtilopeptidase A, and thermolysin. Protein synthesis was required to r...

  20. Performance Factors and Sulfur Tolerance of Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells with Nanostructured Ni:GDC Infiltrated Anodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Hagen, Anke; Persson, Åsa Helen

    2016-01-01

    Two metal supported solid oxide fuel cells (active area 16 cm2) with nanostructured Ni:GDC infiltrated anodes, possessing different anode and support microstructures were studied in respect to sulfur tolerance at an operating temperature of 650°C. The studied MS-SOFCs are based on ferretic stainl...

  1. Performance Factors and Sulfur Tolerance of Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells with Nanostructured Ni:GDC Infiltrated Anodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Hagen, Anke; Persson, Åsa Helen

    2015-01-01

    Two metal supported solid oxide fuel cells (active area 16 cm2) with nanostructured Ni:GDC infiltrated anodes, but different anode and support microstructures were studied in respect to sulfur tolerance at the aimed operating temperature of 650ºC. The studied MS-SOFCs are based on ferretic stainl...

  2. Beta-cell function, incretin effect, and incretin hormones in obese youth along the span of glucose tolerance from normal to prediabetes to Type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using the hyperglycemic and euglycemic clamp, we demonstrated impaired Beta-cell function in obese youth with increasing dysglycemia. Herein we describe oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-modeled Beta-cell function and incretin effect in obese adolescents spanning the range of glucose tolerance. Bet...

  3. Silencing the SpMPK1, SpMPK2, and SpMPK3 Genes in Tomato Reduces Abscisic Acid—Mediated Drought Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Drought is a major threat to agriculture production worldwide. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs play a pivotal role in sensing and converting stress signals into appropriate responses so that plants can adapt and survive. To examine the function of MAPKs in the drought tolerance of tomato plants, we silenced the SpMPK1, SpMPK2, and SpMPK3 genes in wild-type plants using the virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS method. The results indicate that silencing the individual genes or co-silencing SpMPK1, SpMPK2, and SpMPK3 reduced the drought tolerance of tomato plants by varying degrees. Co-silencing SpMPK1 and SpMPK2 impaired abscisic acid (ABA-induced and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced stomatal closure and enhanced ABA-induced H2O2 production. Similar results were observed when silencing SpMPK3 alone, but not when SpMPK1 and SpMPK2 were individually silenced. These data suggest that the functions of SpMPK1 and SpMPK2 are redundant, and they overlap with that of SpMPK3 in drought stress signaling pathways. In addition, we found that SpMPK3 may regulate H2O2 levels by mediating the expression of CAT1. Hence, SpMPK1, SpMPK2, and SpMPK3 may play crucial roles in enhancing tomato plants’ drought tolerance by influencing stomatal activity and H2O2 production via the ABA-H2O2 pathway.

  4. Lymphoid tissue inducer cells: pivotal cells in the evolution of CD4 immunity and tolerance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter John Lane

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Phylogeny suggests that the evolution of placentation in mammals was accompanied by substantial changes in the mammalian immune system: in particular lymph nodes and CD4 high affinity memory antibody responses co-evolved during the same period. Lymphoid tissue inducer cells (LTi are members of an emerging family of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs that are crucial for lymph node development, but our studies have indicated that they also play a pivotal role in the long-term maintenance of memory CD4 T cells in adult mammals through their expression of the tumor necrosis family members, OX40- and CD30-ligands. Additionally, our studies have shown that these two molecules are also key operators in CD4 effector function, as their absence obviates the need for the FoxP3-dependent regulatory T cells (Tregs that prevent CD4 driven autoimmune responses. In this perspective article, we summarize findings from our group over the last 10 years, and focus specifically on the role of LTi in thymus. We suggest that like memory CD4 T cells, LTi also play a role in the selection and maintenance of the Tregs that under normal circumstances are absolutely required to regulate CD4 effector cells.

  5. Cell mediated therapeutics for cancer treatment: Tumor homing cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balivada, Sivasai

    Many cell types were known to have migratory properties towards tumors and different research groups have shown reliable results regarding cells as delivery vehicles of therapeutics for targeted cancer treatment. Present report discusses proof of concept for 1. Cell mediated delivery of Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and targeted Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) as a cancer treatment by using in vivo mouse cancer models, 2. Cells surface engineering with chimeric proteins for targeted cancer treatment by using in vitro models. 1. Tumor homing cells can carry MNPs specifically to the tumor site and tumor burden will decrease after alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure. To test this hypothesis, first we loaded Fe/Fe3O4 bi-magnetic NPs into neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which were previously shown to migrate towards melanoma tumors. We observed that NPCs loaded with MNPs travel to subcutaneous melanoma tumors. After alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure, the targeted delivery of MNPs by the NPCs resulted in a mild decrease in tumor size (Chapter-2). Monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) are known to infiltrate tumor sites, and also have phagocytic activity which can increase their uptake of MNPs. To test Mo/Ma-mediated MHT we transplanted Mo/Ma loaded with MNPs into a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis. We observed that MNP-loaded Mo/Ma infiltrated pancreatic tumors and, after AMF treatment, significantly prolonged the lives of mice bearing disseminated intraperitoneal pancreatic tumors (Chapter-3). 2. Targeted cancer treatment could be achieved by engineering tumor homing cell surfaces with tumor proteases cleavable, cancer cell specific recombinant therapeutic proteins. To test this, Urokinase and Calpain (tumor specific proteases) cleavable; prostate cancer cell (CaP) specific (CaP1 targeting peptide); apoptosis inducible (Caspase3 V266ED3)- rCasp3V266ED3 chimeric protein was designed in silico. Hypothesized membrane anchored chimeric protein (rCasp3V

  6. Dynamic Regulation of Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule–mediated Homotypic Cell Adhesion through the Actin CytoskeletonV⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Nelissen, Judith M. D. T.; Peters, Inge M.; de Grooth, Bart G.; Van Kooyk, Yvette; Figdor, Carl G.

    2000-01-01

    Restricted expression of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) by hematopoietic cells suggests an important role in the immune system and hematopoiesis. To get insight into the mechanisms that control ALCAM-mediated adhesion we have investigated homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions. Here, we demonstrate that the cytoskeleton regulates ALCAM-mediated cell adhesion because inhibition of actin polymerization by cytochalasin D (CytD) strongly induces homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions....

  7. Lentivirus-Mediated Knockdown of Myosin VI Inhibits Cell Proliferation of Breast Cancer Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Biyun; Zhu, Wei; Yang, Ziang

    2015-10-01

    Myosin VI (MYO6) is a unique member of the myosin superfamily, and almost no experimental studies link MYO6 to tumorigenesis of breast cancer. However, previous microarray data demonstrated that MYO6 was frequently overexpressed in breast cancer tissues. In this study, to further develop its role in breast cancer, endogenous expression of MYO6 was significantly inhibited in breast cancer ZR-75-30 and MDA-MB-231 cells using lentivirus-mediated RNA interference. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot were applied to detect the expression level of MYO6. Cell viability of both cell lines was measured by methylthiazol tetrazolium and colony formation assays. Besides, cell cycle assay was utilized to acquire the distribution information of cell phase. The results demonstrated that knockdown of MYO6 markedly reduced cell viability and colony formation, as well as suppressed cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. The results suggested that MYO6 played a vital role in breast cancer cells and might provide useful information for diagnosis and therapy of human breast cancer in future. PMID:26407123

  8. Systemic LPS Translocation Activates Cross-Presenting Dendritic Cells but Is Dispensable for the Breakdown of CD8+ T Cell Peripheral Tolerance in Irradiated Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Espinosa-Carrasco

    Full Text Available Lymphodepletion is currently used to enhance the efficacy of cytotoxic T lymphocyte adoptive transfer immunotherapy against cancer. This beneficial effect of conditioning regimens is due, at least in part, to promoting the breakdown of peripheral CD8+ T cell tolerance. Lymphodepletion by total body irradiation induces systemic translocation of commensal bacteria LPS from the gastrointestinal tract. Since LPS is a potent activator of the innate immune system, including antigen presenting dendritic cells, we hypothesized that LPS translocation could be required for the breakdown of peripheral tolerance observed in irradiated mice. To address this issue, we have treated irradiated mice with antibiotics in order to prevent LPS translocation and utilized them in T cell adoptive transfer experiments. Surprisingly, we found that despite of completely blocking LPS translocation into the bloodstream, antibiotic treatment did not prevent the breakdown of peripheral tolerance. Although irradiation induced the activation of cross-presenting CD8+ dendritic cells in the lymphoid tissue, LPS could not solely account for this effect. Activation of dendritic cells by mechanisms other than LPS translocation is sufficient to promote the differentiation of potentially autoreactive CD8+ T cells into effectors in irradiated mice. Our data indicate that LPS translocation is dispensable for the breakdown of CD8+ T cell tolerance in irradiated mice.

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Immune-Mediated Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Maria-Christina Kastrinaki; Konstantia Pavlaki; Batsali, Aristea K.; Elisavet Kouvidi; Irene Mavroudi; Charalampos Pontikoglou; Papadaki, Helen A

    2013-01-01

    Immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFS) are characterized by ineffective marrow haemopoiesis and subsequent peripheral cytopenias. Ineffective haemopoiesis is the result of a complex marrow deregulation including genetic, epigenetic, and immune-mediated alterations in haemopoietic stem/progenitor cells, as well as abnormal haemopoietic-to-stromal cell interactions, with abnormal release of haemopoietic growth factors, chemokines, and inhibitors. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MS...

  10. Improved salinity tolerance of rice through cell type-specific expression of AtHKT1;1

    OpenAIRE

    Darren Plett; Gehan Safwat; Matthew Gilliham; Inge Skrumsager Møller; Stuart Roy; Neil Shirley; Andrew Jacobs; Alexander Johnson; Mark Tester

    2010-01-01

    Previously, cell type-specific expression of AtHKT1;1, a sodium transporter, improved sodium (Na(+)) exclusion and salinity tolerance in Arabidopsis. In the current work, AtHKT1;1, was expressed specifically in the root cortical and epidermal cells of an Arabidopsis GAL4-GFP enhancer trap line. These transgenic plants were found to have significantly improved Na(+) exclusion under conditions of salinity stress. The feasibility of a similar biotechnological approach in crop plants was explored...

  11. Recovery from bleaching is mediated by threshold densities of background thermo-tolerant symbiont types in a reef-building coral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Line K.; Doyle, Jason; Logan, Murray; Berkelmans, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive molecular analyses show that most corals host a complement of Symbiodinium genotypes that includes thermo-tolerant types in low abundance. While tolerant symbiont types are hypothesized to facilitate tolerance to temperature and recovery from bleaching, empirical data on their distribution and relative abundance in corals under ambient and stress conditions are still rare. We quantified visual bleaching and mortality of coral hosts, along with relative abundance of C- and D-type Symbiodinium cells in 82 Acropora millepora colonies from three locations on the Great Barrier Reef transplanted to a central inshore site over a 13 month period. Our analyses reveal dynamic change in symbiont associations within colonies and among populations over time. Coral bleaching and declines in C- but not D-type symbionts were observed in transplanted corals. Survival and recovery of 25% of corals from one population was associated with either initial D-dominance or an increase in D-type symbionts that could be predicted by a minimum pre-stress D : C ratio of 0.003. One-third of corals from this population became D dominated at the bleached stage despite no initial detection of this symbiont type, but failed to recover and died in mid to late summer. These results provide a predictive threshold minimum density of background D-type symbionts in A. millepora, above which survival following extreme thermal stress is increased. PMID:27429786

  12. Recovery from bleaching is mediated by threshold densities of background thermo-tolerant symbiont types in a reef-building coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Line K; Doyle, Jason; Logan, Murray; Berkelmans, Ray

    2016-06-01

    Sensitive molecular analyses show that most corals host a complement of Symbiodinium genotypes that includes thermo-tolerant types in low abundance. While tolerant symbiont types are hypothesized to facilitate tolerance to temperature and recovery from bleaching, empirical data on their distribution and relative abundance in corals under ambient and stress conditions are still rare. We quantified visual bleaching and mortality of coral hosts, along with relative abundance of C- and D-type Symbiodinium cells in 82 Acropora millepora colonies from three locations on the Great Barrier Reef transplanted to a central inshore site over a 13 month period. Our analyses reveal dynamic change in symbiont associations within colonies and among populations over time. Coral bleaching and declines in C- but not D-type symbionts were observed in transplanted corals. Survival and recovery of 25% of corals from one population was associated with either initial D-dominance or an increase in D-type symbionts that could be predicted by a minimum pre-stress D : C ratio of 0.003. One-third of corals from this population became D dominated at the bleached stage despite no initial detection of this symbiont type, but failed to recover and died in mid to late summer. These results provide a predictive threshold minimum density of background D-type symbionts in A. millepora, above which survival following extreme thermal stress is increased. PMID:27429786

  13. Clonal deletion of self-reactive T cells in irradiation bone marrow chimeras and neonatally tolerant mice. Evidence for intercellular transfer of Mlsa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolerance to Mlsa has been shown to be associated with clonal deletion of cells carrying TCR beta chain variable regions V beta 6 or V beta 8.1 in mice possessing I-E antigens. To evaluate the rules of tolerance induction to Mlsa we prepared irradiation bone marrow chimeras expressing Mlsa or Mlsb and I-E by different cell types. Deletion of V beta 6+, Mlsa-reactive T cells required the presence of Mlsa and I-E products either on bone marrow-derived cells or on irradiated recipient cells. Tolerance was induced when Mlsa and I-E were expressed by distinct cells of the chimera. Also neonatally tolerized mice exhibited depletion of V beta 6+ cells after injection of I-E- Mlsa spleen cells (DBA/1) into newborn I-E+ Mlsb mice (BALB/c x B10.G)F1. These results suggest that the product of the Mlsa locus is soluble and/or may be transferred from cell to cell and bound to I-E antigens. The chimera experiments also showed that tolerance to Mlsa is H-2 allele independent, i.e., is apparently unrestricted. Differentiation of chimeric (H-2d/Mlsa x H-2q/Mlsb)F1 stem cells in either an H-2d or an H-2q thymus revealed that tolerance assessed by absence of V beta 6+ T cells is not dependent on the thymically determined restriction specificity of T cells

  14. Sox17-Mediated XEN Cell Conversion Identifies Dynamic Networks Controlling Cell-Fate Decisions in Embryo-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela C.H. McDonald

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the gene regulatory networks (GRNs distinguishing extraembryonic endoderm (ExEn stem (XEN cells from those that maintain the extensively characterized embryonic stem cell (ESC. An intriguing network candidate is Sox17, an essential transcription factor for XEN derivation and self-renewal. Here, we show that forced Sox17 expression drives ESCs toward ExEn, generating XEN cells that contribute to ExEn when placed back into early mouse embryos. Transient Sox17 expression is sufficient to drive this fate change during which time cells transit through distinct intermediate states prior to the generation of functional XEN-like cells. To orchestrate this conversion process, Sox17 acts in autoregulatory and feedforward network motifs, regulating dynamic GRNs directing cell fate. Sox17-mediated XEN conversion helps to explain the regulation of cell-fate changes and reveals GRNs regulating lineage decisions in the mouse embryo.

  15. Lipophilic Contaminants Influence Cold Tolerance of Invertebrates through Changes in Cell Membrane Fluidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Martin; Bouvrais, Hélène; Westh, Peter;

    2014-01-01

    Contaminants taken up by living organisms in the environment as a result of anthropogenic contamination can reduce the tolerance of natural stressors, e.g., low temperatures, but the physiological mechanisms behind these interactions of effects are poorly understood. The tolerance to low temperat...... present. Contaminants of varying chemical structures can alter the membrane fluidity in either direction and correspondingly modulate the cold tolerance of intact animals....

  16. TRAIL-mediated killing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia by plasmacytoid dendritic cell-activated natural killer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lelaidier, Martin; Dìaz-Rodriguez, Yildian; Cordeau, Martine; Cordeiro, Paulo; Haddad, Elie; Herblot, Sabine; Duval, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) still frequently recurs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), underscoring the need to improve the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect. Natural killer (NK) cells reconstitute in the first months following HSCT when leukemia burden is at its lowest, but ALL cells have been shown to be resistant to NK cell-mediated killing. We show here that this resistance is overcome by NK cell stimulation with TLR-9-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC...

  17. Regulatory T cells and immune tolerance after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Bruinsma (Marieke)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe story of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) begins after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. It was observed that fallout radiation caused dose-dependent depression of hematopoiesis 1. Research first focused on how to protect the hematopo

  18. APECED: Is this a model for failure of T-cell and B-cell tolerance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eKluger

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available APECED and IPEX syndromes show similarities in the clinical presentations and immunological alterations, mainly regarding regulatory T-cells function. T-cell defect may lead to tissue destruction chiefly in endocrine organs. Besides, APECED is characterized by high-titer antibodies against a wide variety of cytokines, that could partly be responsible for the clinical symptoms during APECED, mainly chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, and linked to antibodies against Th17 cells effector molecules, IL-17 and IL-22. On the other hand, the same antibodies, together with antibodies against type I interferons may be prevent from other immunological diseases, such as psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematous. The same effector Th17 cells, present in the lymphocytic infiltrate of target organs of APECED, could be responsible for the tissue destruction. Here again, the antibodies against the corresponding effector molecules, anti-IL-17 and anti-IL-22 could be protective. The occurrence of several effector mechanisms (CD4+ Th17 cell and CD8+ CTL and the effector cytokines IL-17 and IL-22, and simultaneous existence of regulatory mechanisms (CD4+ and CD8+ Treg and antibodies neutralizing the effect of the effector cytokines may explain the polymorphism of APECED. Almost all the patients develop the characteristic manifestations of the complex, but temporal course and symptoms severity vary considerably, even among siblings. The autoantibody profile does not correlate with the clinical picture. One could speculate that a secondary homeostatic balance between the harmful effector mechanisms, and the favorable regulatory mechanisms, finally define both the extent and severity of the clinical condition in the AIRE defective individuals. The proposed hypothesis that in APECED, in addition to strong tissue destructive mechanisms, a controlling regulatory mechanism does exist, allow us to conclude that APECED could be treated, and even cured, with immunological

  19. Macrophages play an essential role in antigen-specific immune suppression mediated by T CD8⁺ cell-derived exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Ptak, Wlodzimierz; Nowak, Bernadeta; Ptak, Maria; Askenase, Philip W; Bryniarski, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Murine contact sensitivity (CS) reaction could be antigen-specifically regulated by T CD8(+) suppressor (Ts) lymphocytes releasing microRNA-150 in antibody light-chain-coated exosomes that were formerly suggested to suppress CS through action on macrophages (Mφ). The present studies investigated the role of Mφ in Ts cell-exosome-mediated antigen-specific suppression as well as modulation of Mφ antigen-presenting function in humoral and cellular immunity by suppressive exosomes. Mice depleted of Mφ by clodronate liposomes could not be tolerized and did not produce suppressive exosomes. Moreover, isolated T effector lymphocytes transferring CS were suppressed by exosomes only in the presence of Mφ, demonstrating the substantial role of Mφ in the generation and action of Ts cell regulatory exosomes. Further, significant decrease of number of splenic B cells producing trinitrophenyl (TNP) -specific antibodies with the alteration of the ratio of serum titres of IgM to IgG was observed in recipients of exosome-treated, antigen-pulsed Mφ and the significant suppression of CS was demonstrated in recipients of exosome-treated, TNP-conjugated Mφ. Additionally, exosome-pulsed, TNP-conjugated Mφ mediated suppression of CS in mice pre-treated with a low-dose of cyclophosphamide, suggesting de novo induction of T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes. Treg cell involvement in the effector phase of the studied suppression mechanism was proved by unsuccessful tolerization of DEREG mice depleted of Treg lymphocytes. Furthermore, the inhibition of proliferation of CS effector cells cultured with exosome-treated Mφ in a transmembrane manner was observed. Our results demonstrated the essential role of Mφ in antigen-specific immune suppression mediated by Ts cell-derived exosomes and realized by induction of Treg lymphocytes and inhibition of T effector cell proliferation. PMID:25808106

  20. In vivo tumor cell adhesion in the pulmonary microvasculature is exclusively mediated by tumor cell - endothelial cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mees Soeren T

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastasis formation is the leading cause of death among colon cancer patients. We established a new in-situ model of in vivo microscopy of the lung to analyse initiating events of metastatic tumor cell adhesion within this typical metastatic target of colon cancer. Methods Anaesthetized CD rats were mechanically ventilated and 106 human HT-29LMM and T84 colon cancer cells were injected intracardially as single cell suspensions. Quantitative in vivo microscopy of the lung was performed in 10 minute intervals for a total of 40 minutes beginning with the time of injection. Results After vehicle treatment of HT-29LMM controls 15.2 ± 5.3; 14.2 ± 7.5; 11.4 ± 5.5; and 15.4 ± 6.5 cells/20 microscopic fields were found adherent within the pulmonary microvasculature in each 10 minute interval. Similar numbers were found after injection of the lung metastasis derived T84 cell line and after treatment of HT-29LMM with unspecific mouse control-IgG. Subsequently, HT-29LMM cells were treated with function blocking antibodies against β1-, β4-, and αv-integrins wich also did not impair tumor cell adhesion in the lung. In contrast, after hydrolization of sialylated glycoproteins on the cells' surface by neuraminidase, we observed impairment of tumor cell adhesion by more than 50% (p Conclusions These results demonstrate that the initial colon cancer cell adhesion in the capillaries of the lung is predominantly mediated by tumor cell - endothelial cell interactions, possibly supported by platelets. In contrast to reports of earlier studies that metastatic tumor cell adhesion occurs through integrin mediated binding of extracellular matrix proteins in liver, in the lung, the continuously lined endothelium appears to be specifically targeted by circulating tumor cells.

  1. Allopurinol-mediated lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitor tolerance by Clostridium beijerinckii during acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujor, Victor; Agu, Chidozie Victor; Gopalan, Venkat; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2015-04-01

    In addition to glucans, xylans, and arabinans, lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates contain significant levels of nonsugar components that are toxic to the microbes that are typically used to convert biomass to biofuels and chemicals. To enhance the tolerance of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE)-generating Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 to these lignocellulose-derived microbial inhibitory compounds (LDMICs; e.g., furfural), we have been examining different metabolic perturbation strategies to increase the cellular reductant pools and thereby facilitate detoxification of LDMICs. As part of these efforts, we evaluated the effect of allopurinol, an inhibitor of NAD(P)H-generating xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH), on C. beijerinckii grown in furfural-supplemented medium and found that it unexpectedly increased the rate of detoxification of furfural by 1.4-fold and promoted growth, butanol, and ABE production by 1.2-, 2.5-, and 2-fold, respectively. Since NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) levels in C. beijerinckii were largely unchanged upon allopurinol treatment, we postulated and validated a possible basis in DNA repair to account for the solventogenic gains with allopurinol. Following the observation that supplementation of allopurinol in the C. beijerinckii growth media mitigates the toxic effects of nalidixic acid, a DNA-damaging antibiotic, we found that allopurinol elicited 2.4- and 6.7-fold increase in the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of xanthine and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases, key purine-salvage enzymes. Consistent with this finding, addition of inosine (a precursor of hypoxanthine) and xanthine led to 1.4- and 1.7-fold increase in butanol production in furfural-challenged cultures of C. beijerinckii. Taken together, our results provide a purine salvage-based rationale for the unanticipated effect of allopurinol in improving furfural tolerance of the ABE-fermenting C. beijerinckii. PMID:25690312

  2. Type 1 pilus-mediated bacterial invasion of bladder epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Juan J.; Mulvey, Matthew A.; Schilling, Joel D.; Pinkner, Jerome S.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2000-01-01

    Most strains of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) encode filamentous adhesive organelles called type 1 pili. We have determined that the type 1 pilus adhesin, FimH, mediates not only bacterial adherence, but also invasion of human bladder epithelial cells. In contrast, adherence mediated by another pilus adhesin, PapG, did not initiate bacterial internalization. FimH-mediated invasion required localized host actin reorganization, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) activation and host...

  3. A20 is critical for the induction of Pam3CSK4-tolerance in monocytic THP-1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyue Hu

    Full Text Available A20 functions to terminate Toll-like receptor (TLR-induced immune response, and play important roles in the induction of lipopolysacchride (LPS-tolerance. However, the molecular mechanism for Pam3CSK4-tolerance is uncertain. Here we report that TLR1/2 ligand Pam3CSK4 induced tolerance in monocytic THP-1 cells. The pre-treatment of THP-1 cells with Pam3CSK4 down-regulated the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by Pam3CSK4 re-stimulation. Pam3CSK4 pre-treatment also down-regulated the signaling transduction of JNK, p38 and NF-κB induced by Pam3CSK4 re-stimulation. The activation of TLR1/2 induced a rapid and robust up-regulation of A20, suggesting that A20 may contribute to the induction of Pam3CSK4-tolerance. This hypothesis was proved by the observation that the over-expression of A20 by gene transfer down-regulated Pam3CSK4-induced inflammatory responses, and the down-regulation of A20 by RNA interference inhibited the induction of tolerance. Moreover, LPS induced a significant up-regulation of A20, which contributed to the induction of cross-tolerance between LPS and Pam3CSK4. A20 was also induced by the treatment of THP-1 cells with TNF-α and IL-1β. The pre-treatment with TNF-α and IL-1β partly down-regulated Pam3CSK4-induced activation of MAPKs. Furthermore, pharmacologic inhibition of GSK3 signaling down-regulated Pam3CSK4-induced A20 expression, up-regulated Pam3CSK4-induced inflammatory responses, and partly reversed Pam3CSK4 pre-treatment-induced tolerance, suggesting that GSK3 is involved in TLR1/2-induced tolerance by up-regulation of A20 expression. Taken together, these results indicated that A20 is a critical regulator for TLR1/2-induced pro-inflammatory responses.

  4. HDAC6-mediated EGFR stabilization and activation restrict cell response to sorafenib in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihao; Hu, Pengchao; Tang, Fang; Xie, Conghua

    2016-05-01

    Sorafenib is a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor and has been the subject of extensive clinical research in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, sorafenib fails to improve overall survival of patients with advanced NSCLC. The molecular mechanisms that account for this phenomenon are unclear. Here we show that sorafenib treatment stabilizes epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and activates EGFR pathway. Moreover, this is partly mediated by stabilization of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), which has been shown to regulate EGFR endocytic trafficking and degradation. Overexpression of HDAC6 confers resistance to sorafenib in NSCLC cells. Inhibition of HDAC6 with selective inhibitors synergizes with sorafenib to kill NSCLC cells via inhibition of sorafenib-mediated EGFR pathway activation. Taken together, our findings might partly explain the failure of Phase III trial of sorafenib in improving overall survival of advanced NSCLC patients and bear possible implications for the improvement on the efficacy of sorafenib in treatment of NSCLC. PMID:27090797

  5. Efficient Oxygen Evolution Reaction Catalysts for Cell Reversal and Start/Stop Tolerance in Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atanasoski, Radoslav [3M Industrial Mineral Products; Atanasoska, Liliana [3M Industrial Mineral Products; Cullen, David A [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Minute amounts of ruthenium and iridium on platinum nanostructured thin films have been evaluated in an effort to reduce carbon corrosion and Pt dissolution during transient conditions in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Electrochemical tests showed the catalysts had a remarkable oxygen evolution reaction (OER) activity, even greater than that of bulk, metallic thin films. Stability tests within a fuel cell environment showed that rapid Ru dissolution could be managed with the addition of Ir. Membrane electrode assemblies containing a Ru to Ir atomic ratio of 1:9 were evaluated under startup/shutdown and cell reversal conditions for OER catalyst loadings ranging from 1 to 10 g/cm2. These tests affirmed that electrode potentials can be controlled through the addition of OER catalysts without impacting the oxygen reduction reaction on the cathode or the hydrogen oxidation reaction on the anode. The morphology and chemical structure of the thin OER layers were characterized by scanning transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in an effort to establish a correlation between interfacial properties and electrochemical behavior.

  6. IL-4 attenuates pulmonary epithelial cell-mediated suppression of T cell priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Melanie; Arnhold, Markus; Lingner, Sandra; Mahapatra, Subhashree; Bruder, Dunja; Hansen, Gesine; Dittrich, Anna-Maria

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that Th2-polarized airway inflammation facilitates sensitization towards new, protein antigens. In this context, we could demonstrate that IL-4 needs to act on cells of the hematopoetic and the structural compartment in order to facilitate sensitization towards new antigens. We thus aimed to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of IL-4 on structural cells choosing to analyze pulmonary epithelial cells as an important part of the lung's structural system. We used a co-culture system of DC- or APC-dependent in vitro priming of T cells, co-cultivated on a layer of cells of a murine pulmonary epithelial cell line (LA-4) pretreated with or without IL-4. Effects on T cell priming were analyzed via CFSE-dilution and flow cytometric assessment of activation status. Pulmonary epithelial cells suppressed T cell proliferation in vitro but this effect was attenuated by pre-treatment of the epithelial cells with IL-4. Transwell experiments suggest that epithelial-mediated suppression of T cell activation is mostly cell-contact dependent and leads to attenuation in an early naive T cell phenotype. Secretion of soluble factors like TARC, TSLP, GM-CSF and CCL20 by epithelial cells did not change after IL-4 treatment. However, analysis of co-stimulatory expression on pulmonary epithelial cells revealed that pre-treatment of epithelial cells with IL-4 changed expression GITR-L, suggesting a possible mechanism for the effects observed. Our studies provide new insight into the role of IL-4 during the early phases of pulmonary sensitization: The inhibitory activity of pulmonary epithelial cells in homeostasis is reversed in the presence of IL-4, which is secreted in the context of Th2-dominated allergic airway inflammation. This mechanism might serve to explain facilitated sensitization in the clinical context of polysensitization where due to a pre-existing sensitization increased levels of IL-4 in the airways might facilitate T cell priming towards new

  7. Remarkable heterogeneity displayed by oval cells in rat and mouse models of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Peter; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Rasmussen, Morten;

    2007-01-01

    The experimental protocols used in the investigation of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration in rodents are characterized by activation of the hepatic stem cell compartment in the canals of Hering followed by transit amplification of oval cells and their subsequent differentiation along hepatic...... the molecular phenotypes of oval cells in several of the most commonly used protocols of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration-namely, treatment with 2-acetylaminofluorene and partial (70%) hepatectomy (AAF/PHx); a choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet; a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1...... results delineate remarkable phenotypic discrepancies exhibited by oval cells in stem cell-mediated liver regeneration between rats and mice and underline the importance of careful extrapolation between individual species....

  8. A mechanism for expansion of regulatory T-cell repertoire and its role in self-tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yongqiang; van der Veeken, Joris; Shugay, Mikhail; Putintseva, Ekaterina V; Osmanbeyoglu, Hatice U; Dikiy, Stanislav; Hoyos, Beatrice E; Moltedo, Bruno; Hemmers, Saskia; Treuting, Piper; Leslie, Christina S; Chudakov, Dmitriy M; Rudensky, Alexander Y

    2015-12-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling has a key role in determining T-cell fate. Precursor cells expressing TCRs within a certain low-affinity range for complexes of self-peptide and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) undergo positive selection and differentiate into naive T cells expressing a highly diverse self-MHC-restricted TCR repertoire. In contrast, precursors displaying TCRs with a high affinity for 'self' are either eliminated through TCR-agonist-induced apoptosis (negative selection) or restrained by regulatory T (Treg) cells, whose differentiation and function are controlled by the X-chromosome-encoded transcription factor Foxp3 (reviewed in ref. 2). Foxp3 is expressed in a fraction of self-reactive T cells that escape negative selection in response to agonist-driven TCR signals combined with interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor signalling. In addition to Treg cells, TCR-agonist-driven selection results in the generation of several other specialized T-cell lineages such as natural killer T cells and innate mucosal-associated invariant T cells. Although the latter exhibit a restricted TCR repertoire, Treg cells display a highly diverse collection of TCRs. Here we explore in mice whether a specialized mechanism enables agonist-driven selection of Treg cells with a diverse TCR repertoire, and the importance this holds for self-tolerance. We show that the intronic Foxp3 enhancer conserved noncoding sequence 3 (CNS3) acts as an epigenetic switch that confers a poised state to the Foxp3 promoter in precursor cells to make Treg cell lineage commitment responsive to a broad range of TCR stimuli, particularly to suboptimal ones. CNS3-dependent expansion of the TCR repertoire enables Treg cells to control self-reactive T cells effectively, especially when thymic negative selection is genetically impaired. Our findings highlight the complementary roles of these two main mechanisms of self-tolerance. PMID:26605529

  9. Polyol-mediated Synthesis of Chalcogenide Nanoparticles for Thin-film Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Hailong

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was polyol-mediated syntheses of chalcogenide nanoparticles for printable thin-film solar cells. In this thesis, chalcogenide nanoparticles, such as Cu2Se, In2Se3, CZTS, Se@CuSe and Te@Bi2Te3, have been successfully synthesized via a polyol-mediated method.

  10. IL-12 and IL-4 activate a CD39-dependent intrinsic peripheral tolerance mechanism in CD8(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Alistair; Mehta, Hema; Lovell, Andrew; Papaioannou, Eleftheria; Fairbanks, Lynette

    2016-06-01

    Immune responses to protein antigens involve CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, which follow distinct programs of differentiation. Naïve CD8 T cells rapidly develop cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) activity after T-cell receptor stimulation, and we have previously shown that this is accompanied by suppressive activity in the presence of specific cytokines, i.e. IL-12 and IL-4. Cytokine-induced CD8(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are one of several Treg-cell phenotypes and are Foxp3(-) IL-10(+) with contact-dependent suppressive capacity. Here, we show they also express high level CD39, an ecto-nucleotidase that degrades extracellular ATP, and this contributes to their suppressive activity. CD39 expression was found to be upregulated on CD8(+) T cells during peripheral tolerance induction in vivo, accompanied by release of IL-12 and IL-10. CD39 was also upregulated during respiratory tolerance induction to inhaled allergen and on tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells. Production of IL-10 and expression of CD39 by CD8(+) T cells was independently regulated, being respectively blocked by extracellular ATP and enhanced by an A2A adenosine receptor agonist. Our results suggest that any CTL can develop suppressive activity when exposed to specific cytokines in the absence of alarmins. Thus negative feedback controls CTL expansion under regulation from both nucleotide and cytokine environment within tissues. PMID:26990545

  11. Tolerating Zero Tolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian N.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of zero tolerance dates back to the mid-1990s when New Jersey was creating laws to address nuisance crimes in communities. The main goal of these neighborhood crime policies was to have zero tolerance for petty crime such as graffiti or littering so as to keep more serious crimes from occurring. Next came the war on drugs. In federal…

  12. Various tolerances to arsenic trioxide between human cortical neurons and leukemic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jin; MENG Ran; SUI Xinhua; LI Wenbin; YANG Baofeng

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is very effective for treatment of acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) but little can pass through the blood-brain-barrier (BBB),which limits its use in the prevention and treatment of central nervous system leukaemia (CNSL). Before creating a non-invasive method to help As2O3 's access, the safe and effective therapeutic concentration of As2O3 in the CNS ought to be known. The changes of apoptosis biomarkers, [Ca2+]i and PKC activity of both leukaemia cells and human cortical neurons, were monitored before and after being treated with As2O3 in vitro with laser confocal microscopy and Western blot. NSE concentration, the neuron invasive biomarker, was monitored by enzyme immunoassay (NSE-EIA). This study revealed that cortical neuron was more tolerable to As2O3 compared to NB4. 1.0 μmol / L As2O3 showed little influence on cortical neuron but effectively promoted apoptosis and induced differentiation of NB4.

  13. The essential role of the Deinococcus radiodurans ssb gene in cell survival and radiation tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Scott Lockhart

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has implicated single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB expression level as an important factor in microbial radiation resistance. The genome of the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans contains genes for two SSB homologs: the homodimeric, canonical Ssb, encoded by the gene ssb, and a novel pentameric protein encoded by the gene ddrB. ddrB is highly induced upon exposure to radiation, and deletions result in decreased radiation-resistance, suggesting an integral role of the protein in the extreme resistance exhibited by this organism. Although expression of ssb is also induced after irradiation, Ssb is thought to be involved primarily in replication. In this study, we demonstrate that Ssb in D. radiodurans is essential for cell survival. The lethality of an ssb deletion cannot be complemented by providing ddrB in trans. In addition, the radiation-sensitive phenotype conferred by a ddrB deletion is not alleviated by providing ssb in trans. By altering expression of the ssb gene, we also show that lower levels of transcription are required for optimal growth than are necessary for high radiation resistance. When expression is reduced to that of E. coli, ionizing radiation resistance is similarly reduced. UV resistance is also decreased under low ssb transcript levels where growth is unimpaired. These results indicate that the expression of ssb is a key component of both normal cellular metabolism as well as pathways responsible for the high radiation tolerance of D. radiodurans.

  14. Efficacy and tolerability of different brands of intravenous immunoglobulin in the maintenance treatment of chronic immune-mediated neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallia, Francesca; Balducci, Claudia; Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is effective in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). Not all brands of IVIg are however licensed for these neuropathies. We reviewed six patients with CIDP and seven with MMN treated with maintenance therapy with IVIg from 2009 to 2013. In all patients, we measured the Medical Research Council (MRC) and Overall Neuropathy Limitation Scale (ONLS) scores before each infusion, registered the monthly dose and brand of IVIg, and recorded adverse events. Patients were treated for 25-60 months (mean 49 months) alternating different brands of IVIg including IgVena, Gammagard, Kiovig, and Flebogamma. Minor and transient side effects were equally observed with each brand. No difference in the MRC or ONLS scores was observed in relation to the brand of IVIg used. Chronic maintenance treatment with IVIg in patients with MMN and CIDP was not associated with a different tolerability or efficacy despite the use of different brands of IVIg. PMID:26817673

  15. The Growing Complexity of Cancer Cell Response to DNA-Damaging Agents: Caspase 3 Mediates Cell Death or Survival?

    OpenAIRE

    Razmik Mirzayans; Bonnie Andrais; Piyush Kumar; David Murray

    2016-01-01

    It is widely stated that wild-type p53 either mediates the activation of cell cycle checkpoints to facilitate DNA repair and promote cell survival, or orchestrates apoptotic cell death following exposure to cancer therapeutic agents. This reigning paradigm has been challenged by numerous discoveries with different human cell types, including solid tumor-derived cell lines. Thus, activation of the p53 signaling pathway by ionizing radiation and other DNA-damaging agents hinders apoptosis and t...

  16. In vitro cell-mediated immunity assay using 125I-iododeoxyuridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated an in vitro cell-mediated immunity assay using incorporation of 125I-iododeoxyuridine as an indicator of lymphocyte responsiveness to mitogen stimulation. The system permits the use of whole-blood cultures in rats and dogs

  17. Inflammatory mediators and cell adhesion molecules as indicators of severity of atherosclerosis: the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.M. de Maat (Moniek); M.L. Bots (Michiel); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); J. Meijer (John); A.J. Kiliaan (Amanda); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Hofman (Albert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractInflammatory mediators and soluble cell adhesion molecules predict cardiovascular events. It is not clear whether they reflect the severity of underlying atherosclerotic disease. Within the Rotterdam Study, we investigated the associations of C-reactive protein (CRP), i

  18. Binding of Candida albicans yeast cells to mouse popliteal lymph node tissue is mediated by macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Y.; Van Rooijen, N.; Cutler, J E

    1993-01-01

    We previously reported that Candida albicans yeast cells adhere to the macrophage-rich medullary and subcapsular sinus areas of mouse lymph node tissue. To determine whether the yeast cell-lymph node interaction is mediated by macrophages, the effect of specific elimination of macrophages on yeast cell binding was studied, and yeast cell adherence was correlated with the ingestion of India ink by lymph node cells. Macrophage elimination was done by use of liposome-containing dichloromethylene...

  19. NK cell survival mediated through the regulatory synapse with human DCs requires IL-15Rα

    OpenAIRE

    Brilot, Fabienne; Strowig, Till; Roberts, Susanne M.; Arrey, Frida; Münz, Christian

    2007-01-01

    DCs activate NK cells during innate immune responses to viral infections. However, the composition and kinetics of the immunological synapse mediating this interaction are largely unknown. Here, we report the rapid formation of an immunological synapse between human resting NK cells and mature DCs. Although inhibitory NK cell receptors were polarized to this synapse, where they are known to protect mature DCs from NK cell lysis, the NK cell also received activation signals that induced mobili...

  20. Lis1 mediates planar polarity of auditory hair cells through regulation of microtubule organization

    OpenAIRE

    Sipe, Conor W.; Liu, Lixia; Lee, Jianyi; Grimsley-Myers, Cynthia; Lu, Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    The V-shaped hair bundles atop auditory hair cells and their uniform orientation are manifestations of epithelial planar cell polarity (PCP) required for proper perception of sound. PCP is regulated at the tissue level by a conserved core Wnt/PCP pathway. However, the hair cell-intrinsic polarity machinery is poorly understood. Recent findings implicate hair cell microtubules in planar polarization of hair cells. To elucidate the microtubule-mediated polarity pathway, we analyzed Lis1 functio...

  1. Enhanced Methanol Tolerance of Highly Pd rich Pd-Pt Cathode Electrocatalysts in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methanol crossover critically restricts the practical application of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). To resolve this crucial difficulty from the standpoint of electrocatalysis, an electrode material having high activity for the oxygen reduction reaction and low activity for the methanol oxidation reaction compared to widely used Pt-based electrodes is needed for DMFC cathodes. In this research carbon-supported Pd-rich Pd–Pt bimetallic nanoparticle electrocatalysts with 60 wt.% metal content were prepared for this purpose by sodium borohydride reduction of metal chlorides. The physical features of the prepared nanoparticles were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy. Methanol tolerance was tested by means of rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry using oxygen-saturated methanol-containing electrolyte solutions as the anode fuel for DMFC unit cell performance tests. In the RDE measurements, Pd-rich electrocatalysts (carbon-supported Pd19Pt1 nanoparticles) showed excellent methanol tolerance compared with Pd-free Pt electrocatalyst. When Pd19Pt1 nanoparticles were used as a DMFC cathode catalyst, unit cell performance tests showed that the i-V curves of the Pd19Pt1 electrocatalyst decreased slightly with increasing methanol concentration, while that of the Pt electrocatalyst decreased rapidly. The results in a liquid-feed DMFC unit cell test were in good agreement with the methanol tolerant characteristics identified in the RDE measurements

  2. Performance, methanol tolerance and stability of Fe-aminobenzimidazole derived catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián, David; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Aricò, Antonino S.; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2016-07-01

    Highly active and durable non-platinum group metals (non-PGM) catalyst based on iron-nitrogen-carbon (Fe-N-C) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) derived from pyrolyzed Fe-aminobenzimidazole (Fe-ABZIM) was synthesized by sacrificial support method (SSM), and characterized by several physical-chemical techniques: scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In half-cell electrochemical configuration, the Fe-ABZIM catalyst presented a significant improvement of ORR activity with respect to a recently reported non-PGM formulation based on Fe-aminoantipyrine, with an enhancement of half-wave potential of about 85 mV in O2-saturated sulfuric acid solution. To the moment, the gap with respect to a benchmark Pt/C catalyst was about 90 mV. The Fe-ABZIM catalyst showed a remarkably high tolerance to methanol, resulting in superior ORR performance compared to Pt/C at methanol concentrations higher than 0.02 M. In direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) good performances were also obtained. A durability test (100 h) at 90 °C, feeding 5 M methanol, was carried out. A certain decrease of performance was recorded, amounting to -0.20 mW cm-2 h-1 at the very beginning of test and -0.05 mW cm-2 h-1 at the end. However, the Fe-ABZIM is more adequate than previously reported formulations in terms of both ORR activity and stability.

  3. A repeatedly refuelable mediated biofuel cell based on a hierarchical porous carbon electrode

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Shuji; Yamanoi, Shun; Murata, Kenichi; Mita, Hiroki; Samukawa, Tsunetoshi; Nakagawa, Takaaki; Sakai, Hideki; Tokita, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Biofuel cells that generate electricity from renewable fuels, such as carbohydrates, must be reusable through repeated refuelling, should these devices be used in consumer electronics. We demonstrate the stable generation of electricity from a glucose-powered mediated biofuel cell through multiple refuelling cycles. This refuelability is achieved by immobilizing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), an electron-transfer mediator, and redox enzymes in high concentrations on porous carbon pa...

  4. Childhood adversity and cell-mediated immunity in young adulthood: Does type and timing matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Slopen, Natalie; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Erin C Dunn; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood adversity can have powerful effects on health over the life course. Persistent changes in cell-mediated immune function may be one pathway linking adverse childhood experiences with later disease risk. However, limited research has examined childhood adversity in relation to cell-mediated immune function, and in particular, immune response to latent viruses in adulthood. The present study investigated the association of two types of childhood adversity, socioeconomic disadvantage du...

  5. Virus-Induced Demyelination in Nude Mice Is Mediated by γδ T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dandekar, Ajai A.; Perlman, Stanley

    2002-01-01

    Infection of mice with mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), strain JHM, results in acute and chronic demyelination with many similarities to the human disease multiple sclerosis. This pathological process is primarily T cell-mediated and MHV infection of mice lacking B and T cells does not result in demyelination. In apparent contradiction to these results, robust demyelination is detected in MHV-infected young nude (athymic) mice. Herein, we show that demyelination in nude mice was mediated by γδ T ...

  6. Adenovirus-mediated transfection with glucose transporter 3 suppresses PC12 cell apoptosis following ischemic injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junliang Li; Xinke Xu; Shanyi Zhang; Meiguang Zheng; Zhonghua Wu; Yinlun Weng; Leping Ouyang; Jian Yu; Fangcheng Li

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of adenovirus-mediated transfection of PC12 cells with glucose transporter 3 after ischemic injury. The results of flow cytometry and TUNEL showed that exogenous glucose transporter 3 significantly suppressed PC12 cell apoptosis induced by ischemic injury. The results of isotopic scintiscan and western blot assays showed that, the glucose uptake rate was significantly increased and nuclear factor kappaB expression was significantly decreased after adenovirus-mediated transfection of ischemic PC12 cells with glucose transporter 3. These results suggest that adenovirus-mediated transfection of cells with glucose transporter 3 elevates the energy metabolism of PC12 cells with ischemic injury, and inhibits cell apoptosis.

  7. Thymoquinone inhibits autophagy and induces cathepsin-mediated, caspase-independent cell death in glioblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira O Racoma

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most aggressive and common type of malignant brain tumor in humans, with a median survival of 15 months. There is a great need for more therapies for the treatment of glioblastoma. Naturally occurring phytochemicals have received much scientific attention because many exhibit potent tumor killing action. Thymoquinone (TQ is the bioactive compound of the Nigella sativa seed oil. TQ has anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic actions with selective cytotoxicity for human cancer cells compared to normal cells. Here, we show that TQ selectively inhibits the clonogenicity of glioblastoma cells as compared to normal human astrocytes. Also, glioblastoma cell proliferation could be impaired by chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, suggesting that glioblastoma cells may be dependent on the autophagic pathway for survival. Exposure to TQ caused an increase in the recruitment and accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II (LC3-II. TQ also caused an accumulation of the LC3-associated protein p62, confirming the inhibition of autophagy. Furthermore, the levels of Beclin-1 protein expression were unchanged, indicating that TQ interferes with a later stage of autophagy. Finally, treatment with TQ induces lysosome membrane permeabilization, as determined by a specific loss of red acridine orange staining. Lysosome membrane permeabilization resulted in a leakage of cathepsin B into the cytosol, which mediates caspase-independent cell death that can be prevented by pre-treatment with a cathepsin B inhibitor. TQ induced apoptosis, as determined by an increase in PI and Annexin V positive cells. However, apoptosis appears to be caspase-independent due to failure of the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-FMK to prevent cell death and absence of the typical apoptosis related signature DNA fragmentation. Inhibition of autophagy is an exciting and emerging strategy in cancer therapy. In this vein, our results describe a

  8. Autophagic Cell Death and Apoptosis Jointly Mediate Cisatracurium Besylate-Induced Cell Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixia Zhuang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cisatracurium besylate is an ideal non-depolarizing muscle relaxant which is widely used in clinical application. However, some studies have suggested that cisatracurium besylate can affect cell proliferation. Moreover, its specific mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we found that the number of GFP-LC3 (green fluoresent protein-light chain 3 positive autophagosomes and the rate of mitochondria fracture both increased significantly in drug-treated GFP-LC3 and MitoDsRed stable HeLa cells. Moreover, cisatracurium promoted the co-localization of LC3 and mitochondria and induced formation of autolysosomes. Levels of mitochondrial proteins decreased, which were reversed by the lysosome inhibitor Bafinomycin A1. Similar results with evidence of dose-dependent effects were found in both HeLa and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs. Cisatracurium lowered HUVEC viability to 0.16 (OD490 at 100 µM and to 0.05 (OD490 after 48 h in vitro; it increased the cell death rate to 56% at 100 µM and to 60% after 24 h in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (p < 0.01. Cell proliferation decreased significantly by four fold in Atg5 WT (wildtype MEF (mouse embryonic fibroblast (p < 0.01 but was unaffected in Atg5 KO (Knockout MEF, even upon treatment with a high dose of cisatracurium. Cisatracurium induced significant increase in cell death of wild-type MEFs even in the presence of the apoptosis inhibitor zVAD. Thus, we conclude that activation of both the autophagic cell death and cell apoptosis pathways contributes to cisatracurium-mediated cell injury.

  9. Analysis of APC types involved in CD4 tolerance and regulatory T cell generation using reaggregated thymic organ cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerri, Lucia; Peguillet, Isabelle; Geraldo, Yvette; Nabti, Sabrina; Premel, Virginie; Lantz, Olivier

    2013-03-01

    Tolerance to self-Ags is generated in the thymus. Both epithelial and hematopoietic thymic stromal cells play an active and essential role in this process. However, the role of each of the various stromal cell types remains unresolved. To our knowledge, we describe the first comparative analysis of several types of thymic hematopoietic stromal cells (THSCs) for their ability to induce CD4 tolerance to self, in parallel with the thymic epithelium. The THSCs--two types of conventional dendritic cells (cDCs), plasmacytoid dendritic cells, macrophages (MΦs), B lymphocytes, and eosinophils--were first characterized and quantified in adult mouse thymus. They were then examined in reaggregated thymic organ cultures containing mixtures of monoclonal and polyclonal thymocytes. This thymocyte mixture allows for the analysis of Ag-specific events while avoiding the extreme skewing frequently seen in purely monoclonal systems. Our data indicate that thymic epithelium alone is capable of promoting self-tolerance by eliminating autoreactive CD4 single-positive thymocytes and by supporting regulatory T cell (Treg) development. We also show that both non-Treg CD4 single-positive thymocytes and Tregs are efficiently deleted by the two populations of cDCs present in the thymus, as well as to a lesser extent by MΦs. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells, B lymphocytes, and eosinophils were not able to do so. Finally, cDCs were also the most efficient THSCs at supporting Treg development in the thymus, suggesting that although they may share some characteristics required for negative selection with MΦs, they do not share those required for the support of Treg development, making cDCs a unique cell subset in the thymus. PMID:23365074

  10. Antigen-specific regulatory T-cell subsets in transplantation tolerance regulatory T-cell subset quality reduces the need for quantity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenen, H.J.P.M.; Joosten, I.

    2006-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are critical controllers of the immune response. Disturbed Treg function results in autoimmunity, whereas in transplantation Treg are crucial in graft survival and transplant tolerance. Hence therapeutic modalities that influence Treg numbers or function hold great clinical

  11. Numerical Modeling of Microbial Fuel Cell Based on Redox Electron Mediator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nanqi Ren

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the behavior of redox electron mediator and its impact to power generation of microbial fuel cell ( MFC ) , this study carries out the numerical modeling of a typical two⁃chamber MFC based on assumption of interfacial electron transfer via redox electron mediator and acetate as sole electron donor. The model simulates the development of cell voltage, current, substrate concentration, redox electron mediator concentration, polarization and power density output under defined conditions. The results demonstrate that the developed models can fit the experimental results well on a qualitative basis, and concentration of electron reduced mediator plays a dominant role in electron transfer process, and the mass transfer may constitute the limiting step when its concentration is at a relatively low level. This study not only provides a better understanding of electron redox mediator behavior during power generation, but also suggests a strategy to improve electron transfer in the anode of MFC.

  12. Separation of effector cells mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADC) to erythrocyte targets from those mediating ADC to tumor targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, S B; Nelson, K; Grausz, J D

    1976-04-01

    Murine spleen cells mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADC) both to erythrocyte targets in a 51Cr release assay and to syngeneic tumor targets in a microcytotoxicity assay. The effector cells active in the two ADC assays can be separated by passage of the spleen cells through columns of Sephadex G-10 at 37 degrees C. Cells mediating ADC to sarcoma cells did not adhere to the G-10 and were recovered in the column effluent. These nonadherent cells were not cytotoxic to antibody-coated chicken red blood cells. Spleen cells which mediated ADC in a 51Cr release assay to the red cell targets adhered to G-10. Adherent effector cells could subsequently be recovered from the columns by elution with 5 X 10(-4) M EDTA. PMID:815438

  13. Chronically Elevated Levels of Short-Chain Fatty Acids Induce T Cell-Mediated Ureteritis and Hydronephrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeongho; Goergen, Craig J; HogenEsch, Harm; Kim, Chang H

    2016-03-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are major products of gut microbial fermentation and profoundly affect host health and disease. SCFAs generate IL-10(+) regulatory T cells, which may promote immune tolerance. However, SCFAs can also induce Th1 and Th17 cells upon immunological challenges and, therefore, also have the potential to induce inflammatory responses. Because of the seemingly paradoxical SCFA activities in regulating T cells, we investigated, in depth, the impact of elevated SCFA levels on T cells and tissue inflammation in mice. Orally administered SCFAs induced effector (Th1 and Th17) and regulatory T cells in ureter and kidney tissues, and they induced T cell-mediated ureteritis, leading to kidney hydronephrosis (hereafter called acetate-induced renal disease, or C2RD). Kidney hydronephrosis in C2RD was caused by ureteral obstruction, which was, in turn, induced by SCFA-induced inflammation in the ureteropelvic junction and proximal ureter. Oral administration of all major SCFAs, such as acetate, propionate, and butyrate, induced the disease. We found that C2RD development is dependent on mammalian target of rapamycin activation, T cell-derived inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ and IL-17, and gut microbiota. Young or male animals were more susceptible than old or female animals, respectively. However, SCFA receptor (GPR41 or GPR43) deficiency did not affect C2RD development. Thus, SCFAs, when systemically administered at levels higher than physiological levels, cause dysregulated T cell responses and tissue inflammation in the renal system. The results provide insights into the immunological and pathological effects of chronically elevated SCFAs. PMID:26819206

  14. T Cell-Mediated Modulation of Mast Cell Function: Heterotypic Adhesion-Induced Stimulatory or Inhibitory Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoseph A. Mekori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Close physical proximity between mast cells and T cells has been demonstrated in several T cell mediated inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis and sarcoidosis. However, the way by which mast cells are activated in these T cell-mediated immune responses has not been fully elucidated. We have identified and characterized a novel mast cell activation pathway initiated by physical contact with activated T cells, and showed that this pathway is associated with degranulation and cytokine release. The signaling events associated with this pathway of mast cell activation have also been elucidated confirming the activation of the Ras MAPK systems. More recently, we hypothesized and demonstrated that mast cells may also be activated by microparticles released from activated T cells that are considered as miniature version of a cell. By extension, microparticles might affect the activity of mast cells, which are usually not in direct contact with T cells at the inflammatory site. Recent works have also focused on the effects of regulatory T cells on mast cells. These reports highlighted the importance of the cytokines IL-2 and IL-9, produced by mast cells and T cells, respectively, in obtaining optimal immune suppression. Finally, physical contact, associated by OX40-OX40L engagement has been found to underlie the down-regulatory effects exerted by regulatory T cells on mast cell function.

  15. Integrin {beta}1-dependent invasive migration of irradiation-tolerant human lung adenocarcinoma cells in 3D collagen matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Seiichiro [Transdisciplinary Life Science Course, Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, N10-W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Haga, Hisashi, E-mail: haga@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Transdisciplinary Life Science Course, Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, N10-W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Yasuda, Motoaki [Department of Oral Pathobiological Science, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, N13-W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Mizutani, Takeomi; Kawabata, Kazushige [Transdisciplinary Life Science Course, Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, N10-W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15-W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Nishioka, Takeshi [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Engineering, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, N12-W5, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan)

    2010-06-04

    Radiotherapy is one of the effective therapies used for treating various malignant tumors. However, the emergence of tolerant cells after irradiation remains problematic due to their high metastatic ability, sometimes indicative of poor prognosis. In this study, we showed that subcloned human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549P-3) that are irradiation-tolerant indicate high invasive activity in vitro, and exhibit an integrin {beta}1 activity-dependent migratory pattern. In collagen gel overlay assay, majority of the A549P-3 cells displayed round morphology and low migration activity, whereas a considerable number of A549P-3IR cells surviving irradiation displayed a spindle morphology and high migration rate. Blocking integrin {beta}1 activity reduced the migration rate of A549P-3IR cells and altered the cell morphology allowing them to assume a round shape. These results suggest that the A549P-3 cells surviving irradiation acquire a highly invasive integrin {beta}1-dependent phenotype, and integrin {beta}1 might be a potentially effective therapeutic target in combination with radiotherapy.

  16. Induction of immune tolerance to FIX by intramuscular AAV gene transfer is independent of the activation status of dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bharadwaj, Arpita S; Kelly, Meagan; Kim, Dongsoo; Chao, Hengjun

    2010-01-01

    The nature of viral vectors is suggested to be a significant contributor to undesirable immune responses subsequent to gene transfer. Such viral vectors, recognized as danger signals by the host immune system, activate dendritic cells (DCs), causing unwanted antivector and/or transgene product immunity. We recently reported efficient induction of immune tolerance to coagulation factor IX (FIX) by direct intramuscular injection of adeno-associated virus (AAV)–FIX. AAV vectors are nonpathogenic...

  17. Tolerance Induction in Liver

    OpenAIRE

    M.H Karimi; Geramizadeh, B; Malek-Hosseini, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Liver is an exclusive anatomical and immunological organ that displays a considerable tolerance effect. Liver allograft acceptance is shown to occur spontaneously within different species. Although in human transplant patients tolerance is rarely seen, the severity level and cellular mechanisms of transplant rejection vary. Non-paranchymal liver cells, including Kupffer cells, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, hepatic stellate cells, and resident dendritic cells may participate in liver tol...

  18. Triptolide induces lysosomal-mediated programmed cell death in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owa C

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Chie Owa, Michael E Messina Jr, Reginald HalabyDepartment of Biology, Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ, USABackground: Breast cancer is a major cause of death; in fact, it is the most common type, in order of the number of global deaths, of cancer in women worldwide. This research seeks to investigate how triptolide, an extract from the Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, induces apoptosis in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Accumulating evidence suggests a role for lysosomal proteases in the activation of apoptosis. However, there is also some controversy regarding the direct participation of lysosomal proteases in activation of key apoptosis-related caspases and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c. In the present study, we demonstrate that triptolide induces an atypical, lysosomal-mediated apoptotic cell death in MCF-7 cells because they lack caspase-3.Methods: MCF-7 cell death was characterized via cellular morphology, chromatin condensation, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric cell growth inhibition assay and the expression levels of proapoptotic proteins. Acridine orange and LysoTracker® staining were performed to visualize lysosomes. Lysosomal enzymatic activity was monitored using an acid phosphatase assay and western blotting of cathepsin B protein levels in the cytosolic fraction, which showed increased enzymatic activity in drug-treated cells.Results: These experiments suggest that triptolide-treated MCF-7 cells undergo atypical apoptosis and that, during the early stages, lysosomal enzymes leak into the cytosol, indicating lysosomal membrane permeability.Conclusion: Our results suggest that further studies are warranted to investigate triptolide's potential as an anticancer therapeutic agent.Keywords: triptolide, MCF-7 breast cancer cells, apoptosis, lysosomes, lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP

  19. The B-cell receptor orchestrates environment-mediated lymphoma survival and drug resistance in B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shain, K H; Tao, J

    2014-08-01

    Specific niches within the lymphoma tumor microenvironment (TME) provide sanctuary for subpopulations of tumor cells through stromal cell-tumor cell interactions. These interactions notably dictate growth, response to therapy and resistance of residual malignant B cells to therapeutic agents. This minimal residual disease (MRD) remains a major challenge in the treatment of B-cell malignancies and contributes to subsequent disease relapse. B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling has emerged as essential mediator of B-cell homing, survival and environment-mediated drug resistance (EMDR). Central to EMDR are chemokine- and integrin-mediated interactions between lymphoma and the TME. Further, stromal cell-B cell adhesion confers a sustained BCR signaling leading to chemokine and integrin activation. Recently, the inhibitors of BCR signaling have garnered a substantial clinical interest because of their effectiveness in B-cell disorders. The efficacy of these agents is, at least in part, attributed to attenuation of BCR-dependent lymphoma-TME interactions. In this review, we discuss the pivotal role of BCR signaling in the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of TME-mediated lymphoma survival and drug resistance. PMID:24037527

  20. Assessing humoral and cell-mediated immune response in Hawaiian green turtles, Chelonia mydas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.; Rameyer, R.A.; Chang, S.P.; Berestecky, J.

    2000-01-01

    Seven immature green turtles, Chelonia mydas, captured from Kaneohe Bay on the island of Oahu were used to evaluate methods for assessing their immune response. Two turtles each were immunized intramuscularly with egg white lysozyme (EWL) in Freunda??s complete adjuvant, Gerbu, or ISA-70; a seventh turtle was immunized with saline only and served as a control. Humoral immune response was measured with an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cell-mediated immune response was measured using in vitro cell proliferation assays (CPA) using whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) cultured with concanavalin A (ConA), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), or soluble egg EWL antigen. All turtles, except for one immunized with Gerbu and the control, produced a detectable humoral immune response by 6 weeks which persisted for at least 14 weeks after a single immunization. All turtles produced an anamnestic humoral immune response after secondary immunization. Antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in PBM was seen in all turtles either after primary or secondary immunization, but it was not as consistent as humoral immune response; antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in whole blood was rarely seen. Mononuclear cells had significantly higher stimulation indices than whole blood regardless of adjuvant, however, results with whole blood had lower variability. Both Gerbu and ISA-70 appeared to potentiate the cell-mediated immune response when PBM or whole blood were cultured with PHA. This is the first time cell proliferation assays have been compared between whole blood and PBM for reptiles. This is also the first demonstration of antigen specific cell-mediated response in reptiles. Cell proliferation assays allowed us to evaluate the cell-mediated immune response of green turtles. However, CPA may be less reliable than ELISA for detecting antigen specific immune response. Either of the three adjuvants appears suitable to safely elicit a

  1. T cell-mediated modulation of mast cell function: heterotypic adhesion-induced stimulatory or inhibitory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekori, Yoseph A; Hershko, Alon Y

    2012-01-01

    Close physical proximity between mast cells and T cells has been demonstrated in several T cell mediated inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis and sarcoidosis. However, the way by which mast cells are activated in these T cell-mediated immune responses has not been fully elucidated. We have identified and characterized a novel mast cell activation pathway initiated by physical contact with activated T cells, and showed that this pathway is associated with degranulation and cytokine release. The signaling events associated with this pathway of mast cell activation have also been elucidated confirming the activation of the Ras mitogen-activated protein kinase systems. More recently, we hypothesized and demonstrated that mast cells may also be activated by microparticles released from activated T cells that are considered as miniature version of a cell. By extension, microparticles might affect the activity of mast cells, which are usually not in direct contact with T cells at the inflammatory site. Recent works have also focused on the effects of regulatory T cells (Treg) on mast cells. These reports highlighted the importance of the cytokines IL-2 and IL-9, produced by mast cells and T cells, respectively, in obtaining optimal immune suppression. Finally, physical contact, associated by OX40-OX40L engagement has been found to underlie the down-regulatory effects exerted by Treg on mast cell function. PMID:22566892

  2. Antagonism of airway tolerance by endotoxin/lipopolysaccharide through promoting OX40L and suppressing antigen-specific Foxp3+ T regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wei; So, Takanori; Croft, Michael

    2008-12-15

    Respiratory exposure to allergens can lead to airway tolerance. Factors that antagonize tolerance mechanisms in the lung might result in susceptibility to diseases such as asthma. We show that inhalation of endotoxin/LPS with Ag prevented airway tolerance and abolished protection from T cell-driven asthmatic lung inflammation. Under conditions leading to tolerance, adaptive Ag-specific CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells (Treg) were generated following exposure to intranasal Ag and outnumbered IL-4- and IFN-gamma-producing CD4 T cells by 100:1 or greater. Inhaled LPS altered the ratio of Treg to IL-4(+) or IFN-gamma(+) T cells by concomitantly suppressing Treg generation and promoting effector T cell generation. LPS induced OX40L expression on dendritic cells and B cells that resulted in a synergistic activity between TLR4 and OX40 signals, leading to production of IL-4, IFN-gamma, and IL-6, which blocked Treg development. Furthermore, inhibiting OX40/OX40L interactions prevented LPS from suppressing tolerance, and resulted in the generation of greater numbers of adaptive Treg. Thus, cooperation between TLR4 and OX40 controls susceptibility to developing airway disease via modulating the balance between adaptive Treg and IL-4(+) or IFN-gamma(+) T cells. Targeting OX40L then has the potential to improve the efficacy of Ag immunotherapy to promote tolerance. PMID:19050285

  3. Phenotype and function of regulatory T cells in Th1- and Th2-mediated inflammatory diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Nowakowska, Dominika Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are critical to the maintenance of immune tolerance, partly by controlling the unwanted activation of effector T cells (Teff) and thereby enhancing the resolution of autoimmune and allergic inflammation. Recent data suggest that Treg can specialize to better control different types of inflammation by using transcriptional machinery which controls differentiation and function of Teff. This thesis addresses questions related to the efficacious use of Tre...

  4. ZFAT plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its T cell receptor-mediated response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We generated Cd4-Cre-mediated T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice. ► Zfat-deficiency leads to reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. ► Impaired T cell receptor-mediated response in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. ► Decreased expression of IL-7Rα, IL-2Rα and IL-2 in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. ► Zfat plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis. -- Abstract: ZFAT, originally identified as a candidate susceptibility gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, has been reported to be involved in apoptosis, development and primitive hematopoiesis. Zfat is highly expressed in T- and B-cells in the lymphoid tissues, however, its physiological function in the immune system remains totally unknown. Here, we generated the T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice and demonstrated that Zfat-deficiency leads to a remarkable reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Intriguingly, a reduced expression of IL-7Rα and the impaired responsiveness to IL-7 for the survival were observed in the Zfat-deficient T cells. Furthermore, a severe defect in proliferation and increased apoptosis in the Zfat-deficient T cells following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation was observed with a reduced IL-2Rα expression as well as a reduced IL-2 production. Thus, our findings reveal that Zfat is a critical regulator in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its TCR-mediated response.

  5. Oral tolerance originates in the intestinal immune system and relies on antigen carriage by dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Worbs, Tim; Bode, Ulrike; Yan, Sheng; Hoffmann, Matthias W.; Hintzen, Gabriele; Bernhardt, Günter; Förster, Reinhold; Pabst, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Oral tolerance induction is a key feature of intestinal immunity, generating systemic nonresponsiveness to ingested antigens. In this study, we report that orally applied soluble antigens are exclusively recognized in the intestinal immune system, particularly in the mesenteric lymph nodes. Consequently, the initiation of oral tolerance is impeded by mesenteric lymphadenectomy. Small bowel transplantation reveals that mesenteric lymph nodes require afferent lymph to accomplish the recognition...

  6. The GARP/Latent TGF-β1 complex on Treg cells modulates the induction of peripherally derived Treg cells during oral tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Justin P; Hand, Timothy W; Morais da Fonseca, Denise; Glass, Deborah D; Belkaid, Yasmine; Shevach, Ethan M

    2016-06-01

    Treg cells can secrete latent TGF-β1 (LTGF-β1), but can also utilize an alternative pathway for transport and expression of LTGF-β1 on the cell surface in which LTGF-β1 is coupled to a distinct LTGF-β binding protein termed glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP)/LRRC32. The function of the GARP/LTGF-β1 complex has remained elusive. Here, we examine in vivo the roles of GARP and TGF-β1 in the induction of oral tolerance. When Foxp3(-) OT-II T cells were transferred to wild-type recipient mice followed by OVA feeding, the conversion of Foxp3(-) to Foxp3(+) OT-II cells was dependent on recipient Treg cells. Neutralization of IL-2 in the recipient mice also abrogated this conversion. The GARP/LTGF-β1 complex on recipient Treg cells, but not dendritic cell-derived TGF-β1, was required for efficient induction of Foxp3(+) T cells and for the suppression of delayed hypersensitivity. Expression of the integrin αvβ8 by Treg cells (or T cells) in the recipients was dispensable for induction of Foxp3 expression. Transient depletion of the bacterial flora enhanced the development of oral tolerance by expanding Treg cells with enhanced expression of the GARP/LTGF-β1 complex. PMID:27062243

  7. Identification and functional expression of the pepper RING type E3 ligase, CaDTR1, involved in drought stress tolerance via ABA-mediated signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Hyunhee; Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Sung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Drought negatively affects plant growth and development, thereby leading to loss of crop productivity. Several plant E3 ubiquitin ligases act as positive or negative regulators of abscisic acid (ABA) and thus play important roles in the drought stress response. Here, we show that the C3HC4-type RING finger E3 ligase, CaDTR1, regulates the drought stress response via ABA-mediated signalling. CaDTR1 contains an amino-terminal RING finger motif and two carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic regions; the RING finger motif functions during attachment of ubiquitins to the target proteins, and the carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic regions function during subcellular localisation. The expression of CaDTR1 was induced by ABA, drought, and NaCl treatments. CaDTR1 localised in the nucleus and displayed in vitro E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. CaDTR1-silenced pepper plants exhibited a drought-sensitive phenotype characterised by high levels of transpirational water loss. On the other hand, CaDTR1-overexpressing (OX) Arabidopsis plants exhibited an ABA-hypersensitive phenotype during the germinative and post-germinative growth stages. Moreover, in contrast to CaDTR1-silenced pepper plants, CaDTR1-OX plants exhibited a drought-tolerant phenotype characterised by low levels of transpirational water loss via increased stomatal closure and high leaf temperatures. Our data indicate that CaDTR1 functions as a positive regulator of the drought stress response via ABA-mediated signalling. PMID:27439598

  8. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 Mediates Human Embryonic Germ Cell Derivation

    OpenAIRE

    Hiller, Marc; Liu, Cyndi; Blumenthal, Paul D; John D Gearhart; Kerr, Candace L.

    2010-01-01

    Human primordial germ cells (PGCs) have proven to be a source of pluripotent stem cells called embryonic germ cells (EGCs). Unlike embryonic stem cells, virtually little is known regarding the factors that regulate EGC survival and maintenance. In mice, the growth factor bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) has been shown to be required for maintaining mouse embryonic stem cells, and disruptions in this gene lead to defects in mouse PGC specification. Here, we sought to determine whether recom...

  9. Methylanthraquinone from Hedyotis diffusa WILLD induces Ca(2+)-mediated apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Liu, Ming; Liu, Miao; Li, Jianchun

    2010-02-01

    Methylanthraquinone from Hedyotis diffusa WILLD exhibited potent anticancer activity in many kinds of cancer cells. However, the exact mechanism and signaling pathway involved in methylanthraquinone-induced apoptosis have not been fully elucidated. Therefore, we explored the mechanisms of methylanthraquinone-mediated apoptosis in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. When MCF-7 cells were co-incubated with methylanthraquinone, the percentage of apoptotic cell and S phase of cell cycle was markedly increased. In addition, a rise in intracellular calcium levels, phosphorylation of JNK and activation of calpain were found in MCF-7 cells after exposure to methylanthraquinone. With the methylanthraquinone-mediated reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c was released from mitochondria to cytosol. Moreover, methylanthraquinone strongly induced cleavage of caspase-4, caspase-9 and caspase-7 in MCF-7 cells. These results suggested that methylanthraquinone from Hedyotis diffusa WILLD induced MCF-7 cells apoptosis via Ca(2+)/calpain/caspase-4 pathway. PMID:19686834

  10. Listeria monocytogenes alters mast cell phenotype, mediator and osteopontin secretion in a listeriolysin-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Jobbings

    Full Text Available Whilst mast cells participate in the immune defence against the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, there is conflicting evidence regarding the ability of L. monocytogenes to infect mast cells. It is known that the pore-forming toxin listeriolysin (LLO is important for mast cell activation, degranulation and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mast cells, however, are a potential source of a wide range of cytokines, chemokines and other mediators including osteopontin, which contributes to the clearing of L. monocytogenes infections in vivo, although its source is unknown. We therefore aimed to resolve the controversy of mast cell infection by L. monocytogenes and investigated the extent of mediator release in response to the bacterium. In this paper we show that the infection of bone marrow-derived mast cells by L. monocytogenes is inefficient and LLO-independent. LLO, however, is required for calcium-independent mast cell degranulation as well as for the transient and selective downregulation of cell surface CD117 (c-kit on mast cells. We demonstrate that in addition to the key pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6, mast cells release a wide range of other mediators in response to L. monocytogenes. Osteopontin, IL-2, IL-4, IL-13 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, and chemokines including CCL2, CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5 are released in a MyD88-dependent manner. The wide range of mediators released by mast cells in response to L. monocytogenes may play an important role in the recruitment and activation of a variety of immune cells in vivo. The cocktail of mediators, however, is unlikely to skew the immune response to a particular effector response. We propose that mast cells provide a hitherto unreported source of osteopontin, and may provide an important role in co-ordinating the immune response during Listeria infection.

  11. The dinoflagellate Prorocentrum cordatum at the edge of the salinity tolerance: The growth is slower but cells are larger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenina, Irina; Vaičiukynas, Evaldas; Šulčius, Sigitas; Paškauskas, Ričardas; Verikas, Antanas; Gelžinis, Adas; Bačauskienė, Marija; Bertašiūtė, Vilma; Olenin, Sergej

    2016-01-01

    In this study we examine how the projected climate change driven decrease in the Baltic Sea salinity can impact the growth, cell size and shape of the recently invaded dinoflagellate Prorocentrum cordatum. In laboratory treatments we mimicked salinity conditions at the edge of the mesohaline south-eastern Baltic and oligohaline-to-limnic Curonian Lagoon. We used an innovative computer-based method allowing detection of P. cordatum cells and quantitative characterization of cell contours in phytoplankton images. This method also made available robust indicators of the morphometric changes, which are not accessible for an expert studying cells under light microscope. We found that the salinity tolerance limit of P. cordatum ranges between 1.8 and 3.6, and that the mean cell size of its population is inversely proportional to both salinity and nutrient content. Under ambient south-eastern Baltic salinity (7.2) the nutrients were stimulating the growth of P. cordatum; while at the edge of its salinity tolerance the nutrient availability did not have such effect. We suggest that in the future Baltic the decline in salinity and increase in nutrient loads may result in larger cells of P. cordatum and extended duration of their presence in plankton, causing longer periods of algal blooms.

  12. Phorbol ester modulation of integrin-mediated cell adhesion: a postreceptor event

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) suspension culture cells adhere readily to substrata coated with extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin, vitronectin, or laminin. In the case of fibronectin, it is known that adhesion is mediated by an integrin-type, cell surface fibronectin receptor (FnR). We demonstrate here that treatment of CHO cells with submicromolar concentrations of phorbol ester produces a remarkable increase in the ability of these cells to adhere to fibronectin. Both the rate ...

  13. CD13 is a novel mediator of monocytic/endothelial cell adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Mina-Osorio, Paola; Winnicka, Beata; O'Conor, Catherine; Grant, Christina L.; Vogel, Lotte K.; Rodriguez-Pinto, Daniel; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Ortega, Enrique; Shapiro, Linda H.

    2008-01-01

    During inflammation, cell surface adhesion molecules guide the adhesion and migration of circulating leukocytes across the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels to access the site of injury. The transmembrane molecule CD13 is expressed on monocytes and endothelial cells and has been shown to mediate homotypic cell adhesion, which may imply a role for CD13 in inflammatory monocyte trafficking. Here, we show that ligation and clustering of CD13 by mAb or viral ligands potently induce myelo...

  14. A role for plasma cell targeting agents in immune tolerance induction in autoimmune disease and antibody responses to therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, A S; Pariser, A R; Diamond, B; Yao, L; Turka, L A; Lacana, E; Kishnani, P S

    2016-04-01

    Antibody responses to life saving therapeutic protein products, such as enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) in the setting of lysosomal storage diseases, have nullified product efficacy and caused clinical deterioration and death despite treatment with immune-suppressive therapies. Moreover, in some autoimmune diseases, pathology is mediated by a robust antibody response to endogenous proteins such as is the case in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, mediated by antibodies to Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF). In this work, we make the case that in such settings, when the antibody response is high titered, sustained, and refractory to immune suppressive treatments, the antibody response is mediated by long-lived plasma cells which are relatively unperturbed by immune suppressants including rituximab. However, long-lived plasma cells can be targeted by proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib. Recent reports of successful reversal of antibody responses with bortezomib in the settings of ERT and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) argue that the safety and efficacy of such plasma cell targeting agents should be evaluated in larger scale clinical trials to delineate the risks and benefits of such therapies in the settings of antibody-mediated adverse effects to therapeutic proteins and autoantibody mediated pathology. PMID:26928739

  15. The impact of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibition on incretin effect, glucose tolerance, and gastrointestinal-mediated glucose disposal in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhee, Nicolai Alexander; Østoft, Signe Harring; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2014-01-01

    effect, glucose tolerance, gastrointestinal-mediated glucose disposal (GIGD) and gastric emptying in healthy subjects. Design Randomised, controlled, open-label. Methods Ten healthy subjects (6 women) (age: 40±5 years (mean±SEM); BMI: 24±3 kg/m2, fasting plasma glucose: 5.1±0.2 mmol/l; HbA1c: 34±1 mmol......Objective Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4), is thought to intensify the physiological effects of the incretin hormones. We investigated the effects of DPP-4 inhibition on plasma levels of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), the incretin....../mol [5.3±0.1%]) were randomised to two paired study days comprising a 4h 50 g-OGTT with paracetamol (A) and an isoglycaemic i.v. glucose infusion (IIGI) (B), with (A1+B1) and without (A2+B2) preceding administration of the DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin. Results Isoglycaemia was obtained in all subjects on...

  16. Rice potassium transporter OsHAK1 is essential for maintaining potassium-mediated growth and functions in salt tolerance over low and high potassium concentration ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang; Hu, Qingdi; Luo, Le; Yang, Tianyuan; Zhang, Song; Hu, Yibing; Yu, Ling; Xu, Guohua

    2015-12-01

    Potassium (K) absorption and translocation in plants rely upon multiple K transporters for adapting varied K supply and saline conditions. Here, we report the expression patterns and physiological roles of OsHAK1, a member belonging to the KT/KUP/HAK gene family in rice (Oryza sativa L.). The expression of OsHAK1 is up-regulated by K deficiency or salt stress in various tissues, particularly in the root and shoot apical meristem, the epidermises and steles of root, and vascular bundles of shoot. Both oshak1 knockout mutants in comparison to their respective Dongjin or Manan wild types showed a dramatic reduction in K concentration and stunted root and shoot growth. Knockout of OsHAK1 reduced the K absorption rate of unit root surface area by ∼50-55 and ∼30%, and total K uptake by ∼80 and ∼65% at 0.05-0.1 and 1 mm K supply level, respectively. The root net high-affinity K uptake of oshak1 mutants was sensitive to salt stress but not to ammonium supply. Overexpression of OsHAK1 in rice increased K uptake and K/Na ratio. The positive relationship between K concentration and shoot biomass in the mutants suggests that OsHAK1 plays an essential role in K-mediated rice growth and salt tolerance over low and high K concentration ranges. PMID:26046301

  17. Specific Btk inhibition suppresses B cell- and myeloid cell-mediated arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Paolo, Julie A.; Huang, Tao; Balazs, Mercedesz; Barbosa, James; Barck, Kai H.; Bravo, Brandon J.; Carano, Richard A.D.; Darrow, James; Davies, Douglas R.; DeForge, Laura E.; Diehl, Lauri; Ferrando, Ronald; Gallion, Steven L.; Giannetti, Anthony M.; Gribling, Peter; Hurez, Vincent; Hymowitz, Sarah G.; Jones, Randall; Kropf, Jeffrey E.; Lee, Wyne P.; Maciejewski, Patricia M.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Rong, Hong; Staker, Bart L.; Whitney, J. Andrew; Yeh, Sherry; Young, Wendy B.; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Juan; Reif, Karin; Currie, Kevin S. (CGI); (Emerald); (Genentech)

    2011-09-20

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Btk mediates inflammation are poorly understood. Here we describe the discovery of CGI1746, a small-molecule Btk inhibitor chemotype with a new binding mode that stabilizes an inactive nonphosphorylated enzyme conformation. CGI1746 has exquisite selectivity for Btk and inhibits both auto- and transphosphorylation steps necessary for enzyme activation. Using CGI1746, we demonstrate that Btk regulates inflammatory arthritis by two distinct mechanisms. CGI1746 blocks B cell receptor-dependent B cell proliferation and in prophylactic regimens reduces autoantibody levels in collagen-induced arthritis. In macrophages, Btk inhibition abolishes Fc{gamma}RIII-induced TNF{alpha}, IL-1{beta} and IL-6 production. Accordingly, in myeloid- and Fc{gamma}R-dependent autoantibody-induced arthritis, CGI1746 decreases cytokine levels within joints and ameliorates disease. These results provide new understanding of the function of Btk in both B cell- or myeloid cell-driven disease processes and provide a compelling rationale for targeting Btk in rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. Atherosclerosis: a chronic inflammatory disease mediated by mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Pio; Shaik-Dasthagirisaeb, Yazdami

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a process that plays an important role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and immune disease, involving multiple cell types, including macrophages, T-lymphocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mast cells. The fundamental damage of atherosclerosis is the atheromatous or fibro-fatty plaque which is a lesion that causes several diseases. In atherosclerosis the innate immune response, which involves macrophages, is initiated by the arterial endothelial cells which respond to modified lipoproteins and lead to Th1 cell subset activation and generation of inflammatory cytokines and chemoattractant chemokines. Other immune cells, such as CD4+ T inflammatory cells, which play a critical role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, and regulatory T cells [Treg], which have a protective effect on the development of atherosclerosis are involved. Considerable evidence indicates that mast cells and their products play a key role in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Activated mast cells can have detrimental effects, provoking matrix degradation, apoptosis, and enhancement as well as recruitment of inflammatory cells, which actively contributes to atherosclerosis and plaque formation. Here we discuss the relationship between atherosclerosis, inflammation and mast cells. PMID:26648785

  19. Gene Therapy Induces Antigen-Specific Tolerance in Experimental Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirholt, Pernilla; Turesson, Olof; Wing, Kajsa; Holmdahl, Rikard; Kihlberg, Jan; Stern, Anna; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill; Henningsson, Louise; Gustafsson, Kenth; Gjertsson, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate induction of immunological tolerance by lentiviral based gene therapy in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, collagen II-induced arthritis (CIA). Targeting the expression of the collagen type II (CII) to antigen presenting cells (APCs) induced antigen-specific tolerance, where only 5% of the mice developed arthritis as compared with 95% of the control mice. In the CII-tolerized mice, the proportion of Tregs as well as mRNA expression of SOCS1 (suppressors of cytokine signaling 1) increased at day 3 after CII immunization. Transfer of B cells or non-B cell APC, as well as T cells, from tolerized to naïve mice all mediated a certain degree of tolerance. Thus, sustainable tolerance is established very early during the course of arthritis and is mediated by both B and non-B cells as APCs. This novel approach for inducing tolerance to disease specific antigens can be used for studying tolerance mechanisms, not only in CIA but also in other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27159398

  20. Neuronal inhibition of astroglial cell proliferation is membrane mediated

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Previously we have used a microwell tissue culture assay to show that early postnatal mouse cerebellar astroglia have a flattened morphology and proliferate rapidly when they are cultured in the absence of neurons, but develop specific cell-cell contacts and undergo morphological differentiation when they are co-cultured with purified granule neurons (Hatten, M. E., 1985, J. Cell Biol., 100:384-396). In these studies of cell binding between neurons and astroglia, measurement with light and fl...

  1. Atherosclerosis: a chronic inflammatory disease mediated by mast cells

    OpenAIRE

    Conti, Pio; Shaik-Dasthagirisaeb, Yazdami

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a process that plays an important role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and immune disease, involving multiple cell types, including macrophages, T-lymphocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mast cells. The fundamental damage of atherosclerosis is the atheromatous or fibro-fatty plaque which is a lesion that causes several diseases. In atherosclerosis the innate immune response, which involves macrophages, is initiated by the arterial endotheli...

  2. HaloTag protein-mediated specific labeling of living cells with quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum dots emerge as an attractive alternative to small molecule fluorophores as fluorescent tags for in vivo cell labeling and imaging. This communication presents a method for specific labeling of live cells using quantum dots. The labeling is mediated by HaloTag protein expressed at the cell surface which forms a stable covalent adduct with its ligand (HaloTag ligand). The labeling can be performed in one single step with quantum dot conjugates that are functionalized with HaloTag ligand, or in two steps with biotinylated HaloTag ligand first and followed by streptavidin coated quantum dots. Live cell fluorescence imaging indicates that the labeling is specific and takes place at the cell surface. This HaloTag protein-mediated cell labeling method should facilitate the application of quantum dots for live cell imaging

  3. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis: the gateway into plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu; Irani, Niloufer G; Friml, Jiří

    2011-12-01

    Endocytosis in plants has an essential role not only for basic cellular functions but also for growth and development, hormonal signaling and communication with the environment including nutrient delivery, toxin avoidance, and pathogen defense. The major endocytic mechanism in plants depends on the coat protein clathrin. It starts by clathrin-coated vesicle formation at the plasma membrane, where specific cargoes are recognized and packaged for internalization. Recently, genetic, biochemical and advanced microscopy studies provided initial insights into mechanisms and roles of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in plants. Here we summarize the present state of knowledge and compare mechanisms of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in plants with animal and yeast paradigms as well as review plant-specific regulations and roles of this process. PMID:21945181

  4. Novel mitochondria-targeted heat-soluble proteins identified in the anhydrobiotic Tardigrade improve osmotic tolerance of human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Sae; Tanaka, Junko; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Horikawa, Daiki D; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2015-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration through transition to a metabolically inactive state, called "anhydrobiosis". Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins involved in the desiccation tolerance of many anhydrobiotic organisms. Tardigrades, Ramazzottius varieornatus, however, express predominantly tardigrade-unique heat-soluble proteins: CAHS (Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble) and SAHS (Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble) proteins, which are secreted or localized in most intracellular compartments, except the mitochondria. Although mitochondrial integrity is crucial to ensure cellular survival, protective molecules for mitochondria have remained elusive. Here, we identified two novel mitochondrial heat-soluble proteins, RvLEAM and MAHS (Mitochondrial Abundant Heat Soluble), as potent mitochondrial protectants from Ramazzottius varieornatus. RvLEAM is a group3 LEA protein and immunohistochemistry confirmed its mitochondrial localization in tardigrade cells. MAHS-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized in human mitochondria and was heat-soluble in vitro, though no sequence similarity with other known proteins was found, and one region was conserved among tardigrades. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RvLEAM protein as well as MAHS protein improved the hyperosmotic tolerance of human cells. The findings of the present study revealed that tardigrade mitochondria contain at least two types of heat-soluble proteins that might have protective roles in water-deficient environments. PMID:25675104

  5. Novel mitochondria-targeted heat-soluble proteins identified in the anhydrobiotic Tardigrade improve osmotic tolerance of human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae Tanaka

    Full Text Available Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration through transition to a metabolically inactive state, called "anhydrobiosis". Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA proteins are heat-soluble proteins involved in the desiccation tolerance of many anhydrobiotic organisms. Tardigrades, Ramazzottius varieornatus, however, express predominantly tardigrade-unique heat-soluble proteins: CAHS (Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble and SAHS (Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble proteins, which are secreted or localized in most intracellular compartments, except the mitochondria. Although mitochondrial integrity is crucial to ensure cellular survival, protective molecules for mitochondria have remained elusive. Here, we identified two novel mitochondrial heat-soluble proteins, RvLEAM and MAHS (Mitochondrial Abundant Heat Soluble, as potent mitochondrial protectants from Ramazzottius varieornatus. RvLEAM is a group3 LEA protein and immunohistochemistry confirmed its mitochondrial localization in tardigrade cells. MAHS-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized in human mitochondria and was heat-soluble in vitro, though no sequence similarity with other known proteins was found, and one region was conserved among tardigrades. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RvLEAM protein as well as MAHS protein improved the hyperosmotic tolerance of human cells. The findings of the present study revealed that tardigrade mitochondria contain at least two types of heat-soluble proteins that might have protective roles in water-deficient environments.

  6. Carbon-tolerant solid oxide fuel cells using NiTiO3 as an anode internal reforming layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiquan; Wang, Zhenbin; Yang, Wenqiang; Peng, Ranran; Lu, Yalin

    2014-06-01

    In this work, adding a NiTiO3 (NTO) reforming layer is firstly adopted as a low cost method to improve the carbon tolerance in solid oxide fuel cells. XRD patterns suggest that NTO has a good chemical compatibility with the YSZ electrolyte, and NTO can be totally reduced to Ni and TiO2 when exposing to the H2 atmosphere. Maximum power densities for the cells with the NTO layers at 700 °C are 270 mWcm-2 with wet H2 fuel, and 236 mWcm-2 with wet methane fuel, respectively. Improved discharging stability for the cells with NTO layers has also been observed. The current density remains unchanged for the cells with NTO layers during a 26 h test, while it drops to zero within 1 h for the cells without NTO. Above electro-performance and long term stability tests suggest that fabricating a NTO reforming layer on the anode surface is an efficient and inexpensive method to realize highly carbon tolerant SOFCs.

  7. Role of the retinoblastoma protein in cell cycle arrest mediated by a novel cell surface proliferation inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enebo, D. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Moos, P. J.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A novel cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS-18), purified from the cell surface of bovine cerebral cortex cells has been shown to be a potent and reversible inhibitor of proliferation of a wide array of fibroblasts as well as epithelial-like cells and nontransformed and transformed cells. To investigate the possible mechanisms by which CeReS-18 exerts its inhibitory action, the effect of the inhibitor on the posttranslational regulation of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product (RB), a tumor suppressor gene, has been examined. It is shown that CeReS-18 mediated cell cycle arrest of both human diploid fibroblasts (HSBP) and mouse fibroblasts (Swiss 3T3) results in the maintenance of the RB protein in the hypophosphorylated state, consistent with a late G1 arrest site. Although their normal nontransformed counterparts are sensitive to cell cycle arrest mediated by CeReS-18, cell lines lacking a functional RB protein, through either genetic mutation or DNA tumor virus oncoprotein interaction, are less sensitive. The refractory nature of these cells is shown to be independent of specific surface receptors for the inhibitor, and another tumor suppressor gene (p53) does not appear to be involved in the CeReS-18 inhibition of cell proliferation. The requirement for a functional RB protein product, in order for CeReS-18 to mediate cell cycle arrest, is discussed in light of regulatory events associated with density-dependent growth inhibition.

  8. TRAIL-mediated killing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia by plasmacytoid dendritic cell-activated natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelaidier, Martin; Dìaz-Rodriguez, Yildian; Cordeau, Martine; Cordeiro, Paulo; Haddad, Elie; Herblot, Sabine; Duval, Michel

    2015-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) still frequently recurs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), underscoring the need to improve the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect. Natural killer (NK) cells reconstitute in the first months following HSCT when leukemia burden is at its lowest, but ALL cells have been shown to be resistant to NK cell-mediated killing. We show here that this resistance is overcome by NK cell stimulation with TLR-9-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). NK cell priming with activated pDCs resulted in TRAIL and CD69 up-regulation on NK cells and IFN-γ production. NK cell activation was dependent on IFN-α produced by pDCs, but was not reproduced by IFN-α alone. ALL killing was further enhanced by inhibition of KIR engagement. We showed that ALL lysis was mainly mediated by TRAIL engagement, while the release of cytolytic granules was involved when ALL expressed NK cell activating receptor ligands. Finally, adoptive transfers of activated-pDCs in ALL-bearing humanized mice delayed the leukemia onset and cure 30% of mice. Our data therefore demonstrate that TLR-9 activated pDCs are a powerful tool to overcome ALL resistance to NK cell-mediated killing and to reinforce the GvL effect of HSCT. These results open new therapeutic avenues to prevent relapse in children with ALL. PMID:26320191

  9. Interleukin-33-dependent Innate Lymphoid Cells Mediate Hepatic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mchedlidze, Tamar; Waldner, Maximilian; Zopf, Steffen; Walker, Jennifer; Rankin, Andrew L.; Schuchmann, Marcus; Voehringer, David; McKenzie, Andrew N.J.; Neurath, Markus F.; Pflanz, Stefan; Wirtz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a consequence of chronic liver diseases and thus a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Clinical evidence and animal studies suggest that local tissue homeostasis is disturbed due to immunological responses to chronic hepatocellular stress. Poorly defined stress-associated inflammatory networks are thought to mediate gradual accumulation of extracellular-matrix-components, ultimately leading to fibrosis and liver-failure. Here we have reported that hepatic expression of i...

  10. Estrogen-mediated down-regulation of E-cadherin in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    E-cadherin is an important mediator of cell-cell interactions, and has been shown to play a crucial role in breast tumor suppression. Its inactivation occurs through instability at its chromosomal locus and mutations, but also through epigenetic mechanisms such as promoter hypermethylation and trans...

  11. Targeting CD47-SIRPα interactions for potentiating therapeutic antibody-mediated tumor cell destruction by phagocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, X.W.

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the role of CD47-SIRPα interactions in therapeutic antibody-dependent tumor cell destruction by human phagocytes and also explore the killing mechanism(s) by which human phagocytes, and in particular human neutrophils, mediate therapeutic antibody-dependent cytotoxicity towards cancer cells.

  12. Antibody-mediated red blood cell agglutination resulting in spontaneous echocardiographic contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M R; Thompson, W R; Casella, J F; Spevak, P J

    1999-01-01

    Spontaneous echocardiographic contrast is well reported in states of low flow and low shear stress, and the primary blood component involved has been reported as red blood cells via rouleaux formation. This report describes the occurrence of spontaneous echocardiographic contrast from a unique mechanism of IgM-mediated red blood cell agglutination and describes the clinical sequelae. PMID:10368455

  13. Aptamer-mediated indirect quantum dot labeling and fluorescent imaging of target proteins in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein labeling for dynamic living cell imaging plays a significant role in basic biological research, as well as in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. We have developed a novel strategy in which the dynamic visualization of proteins within living cells is achieved by using aptamers as mediators for indirect protein labeling of quantum dots (QDs). With this strategy, the target protein angiogenin was successfully labeled with fluorescent QDs in a minor intactness model, which was mediated by the aptamer AL6-B. Subsequent living cell imaging analyses indicated that the QDs nanoprobes were selectively bound to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, gradually internalized into the cytoplasm, and mostly localized in the lysosome organelle, indicating that the labeled protein retained high activity. Compared with traditional direct protein labeling methods, the proposed aptamer-mediated strategy is simple, inexpensive, and provides a highly selective, stable, and intact labeling platform that has shown great promise for future biomedical labeling and intracellular protein dynamic analyses. (paper)

  14. Anti-Apoptotic Effects of Lentiviral Vector Transduction Promote Increased Rituximab Tolerance in Cancerous B-Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjbar, Benyamin; Krogh, Louise Bechmann; Laursen, Maria Bach; Primo, Maria Nascimento; Marques, Sara Correia; Dybkær, Karen; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2016-01-01

    achieved through effects of lentiviral transduction on cell death mediated by complement. Rather, reduced levels of PARP1 and persistent high levels of CD43 in Rituximab-treated GCBs demonstrate anti-apoptotic effects of lentiviral transduction that may interfere with the outcome and interpretation of...

  15. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Jones, David R; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2016-08-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1-mediated (PD-1-mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB-based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies. PMID:27454297

  16. TOLERIZATION OF A TYPE I ALLERGIC IMMUNE RESPONSE THROUGH TRANSPLANTATION OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS1

    OpenAIRE

    Baranyi, Ulrike; Linhart, Birgit; Pilat, Nina; Bagley, Jessamyn; Muehlbacher, Ferdinand; Iacomini, John; Valenta, Rudolf; Wekerle, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Allergy represents a hypersensitivity disease which affects more than 25% of the population in industrialized countries. The underlying type I allergic immune reaction occurs in predisposed atopic individuals in response to otherwise harmless antigens (i.e. allergens) and is characterized by the production of allergen-specific IgE, an allergen-specific T cell response and the release of biologically active mediators such as histamine from mast cells and basophils. Regimens permanently toleriz...

  17. Polycystin-1 promotes PKCα-mediated NF-κB activation in kidney cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycystin-1 (PC1), the PKD1 gene product, is a membrane receptor which regulates many cell functions, including cell proliferation and apoptosis, both typically increased in cyst lining cells in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Here we show that PC1 upregulates the NF-κB signalling pathway in kidney cells to prevent cell death. Human embryonic kidney cell lines (HEK293CTT), stably expressing a PC1 cytoplasmic terminal tail (CTT), presented increased NF-κB nuclear levels and NF-κB-mediated luciferase promoter activity. This, consistently, was reduced in HEK293 cells in which the endogenous PC1 was depleted by RNA interference. CTT-dependent NF-κB promoter activation was mediated by PKCα because it was blocked by its specific inhibitor Ro-320432. Furthermore, it was observed that apoptosis, which was increased in PC1-depleted cells, was reduced in HEK293CTT cells and in porcine kidney LtTA cells expressing a doxycycline-regulated CTT. Staurosporine, a PKC inhibitor, and parthenolide, a NF-κB inhibitor, significantly reduced the CTT-dependent antiapoptotic effect. These data reveal, therefore, a novel pathway by which polycystin-1 activates a PKCα-mediated NF-κB signalling and cell survival

  18. The 3 major types of innate and adaptive cell-mediated effector immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziato, Francesco; Romagnani, Chiara; Romagnani, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    The immune system has tailored its effector functions to optimally respond to distinct species of microbes. Based on emerging knowledge on the different effector T-cell and innate lymphoid cell (ILC) lineages, it is clear that the innate and adaptive immune systems converge into 3 major kinds of cell-mediated effector immunity, which we propose to categorize as type 1, type 2, and type 3. Type 1 immunity consists of T-bet(+) IFN-γ-producing group 1 ILCs (ILC1 and natural killer cells), CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells (TC1), and CD4(+) TH1 cells, which protect against intracellular microbes through activation of mononuclear phagocytes. Type 2 immunity consists of GATA-3(+) ILC2s, TC2 cells, and TH2 cells producing IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, which induce mast cell, basophil, and eosinophil activation, as well as IgE antibody production, thus protecting against helminthes and venoms. Type 3 immunity is mediated by retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt(+) ILC3s, TC17 cells, and TH17 cells producing IL-17, IL-22, or both, which activate mononuclear phagocytes but also recruit neutrophils and induce epithelial antimicrobial responses, thus protecting against extracellular bacteria and fungi. On the other hand, type 1 and 3 immunity mediate autoimmune diseases, whereas type 2 responses can cause allergic diseases. PMID:25528359

  19. Bacterial-mediated DNA delivery to tumour associated phagocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, W L; Murphy, C T; Cronin, M; Wirth, T; Tangney, M

    2014-12-28

    Phagocytic cells including macrophages, dendritic cells and neutrophils are now recognised as playing a negative role in many disease settings including cancer. In particular, macrophages are known to play a pathophysiological role in multiple diseases and present a valid and ubiquitous therapeutic target. The technology to target these phagocytic cells in situ, both selectively and efficiently, is required in order to translate novel therapeutic modalities into clinical reality. We present a novel delivery strategy using non-pathogenic bacteria to effect gene delivery specifically to tumour-associated phagocytic cells. Non-invasive bacteria lack the ability to actively enter host cells, except for phagocytic cells. We exploit this natural property to effect 'passive transfection' of tumour-associated phagocytic cells following direct administration of transgene-loaded bacteria to tumour regions. Using an in vitro-differentiated human monocyte cell line and two in vivo mouse models (an ovarian cancer ascites and a solid colon tumour model) proof of delivery is demonstrated with bacteria carrying reporter constructs. The results confirm that the delivery strategy is specific for phagocytic cells and that the bacterial vector itself recruits more phagocytic cells to the tumour. While proof of delivery to phagocytic cells is demonstrated in vivo for solid and ascites tumour models, this strategy may be applied to other settings, including non-cancer related disease. PMID:25466954

  20. Immune tolerance induced by adoptive transfer of dendritic cells in an insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus routine model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-liang ZHANG; Xiao-lei ZOU; Jia-bei PENG; Ming XIANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect and underlying mechanisms of inunune-tolerance induced by the adoptive transfer of bone marrow (BM)-derived dendritic cells (DC) in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) mice. Methods: The IDDM model was established by a low dose of streptozotocin (STZ) in Balb/c mice. Two DC subpopulations were generated from the BM cells with granulocyte-macroph-age colony-stimulating factor with or without interleukin-4. The purity and the T cell stimulatory capability of DC were identified. These cells were used to modu-late autoimmune response in pre-diabetic mice. Blood glucose was examined weekly; pancreas tissues were taken for histopathological analysis, and CD4+ T cells were isolated to detect lymphocyte proliferation by MTT assay and the ratio of CD4+CD25+ T cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The cytokine secretion was determined by ELISA analysis. Results: Two DC subsets were generated from BM, which have phenotypes of mature DC (mDC) and immature DC (iDC), respectively. The level of blood glucose decreased significantly by transferring iDC (P<0.01) rather than mDC. Less lymphocyte infiltration was ob-served in the islets, and pancreatic structure was intact. In vitro, proliferation of lymphocytes decreased and the proportion of CD4+CD25+ T cells increased remarkably, compared with the mDC-treated groups (P<0.05), which were associ-ated with increased level of the Th2 cytokine and reduced level of the Th1 cytokine after iDC transfer. Conclusion: Our data showed that iDC transfer was able to confer protection to mice from STZ-induced IDDM. The immune-tolerance to IDDM may be associated with promoting the production of CD4+CD25+ T cells and inducing regulatory Th2 responses in vivo.

  1. RAD18 mediates resistance to ionizing radiation in human glioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Chen; Wang, Hongwei; Cheng, Hongbin; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Zhi, E-mail: drzwang@gmail.com; Yue, Wu, E-mail: drwuyue@gmail.com

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in glioma cell lines. • RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis. • The elevated expression of RAD18 is associated with recurrent GBM who underwent IR therapy. - Abstract: Radioresistance remains a major challenge in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). RAD18 a central regulator of translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), has been shown to play an important role in regulating genomic stability and DNA damage response. In the present study, we investigate the relationship between RAD18 and resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and examined the expression levels of RAD18 in primary and recurrent GBM specimens. Our results showed that RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in GBM. The expression level of RAD18 in glioma cells correlates with their resistance to IR. Ectopic expression of RAD18 in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells confers significant resistance to IR treatment. Conversely, depletion of endogenous RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells sensitized these cells to IR treatment. Moreover, RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells, whereas cells deficient in RAD18 exhibit increased apoptosis induced by IR. Furthermore, knockdown of RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells disrupts HR-mediated repair, resulting in increased accumulation of DSB. In addition, clinical data indicated that RAD18 was significantly higher in recurrent GBM samples that were exposed to IR compared with the corresponding primary GBM samples. Collectively, our findings reveal that RAD18 may serve as a key mediator of the IR response and may function as a potential target for circumventing IR resistance in human GBM.

  2. Mechanisms of KGF mediated signaling in pancreatic duct cell proliferation and differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Uzan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF; palifermin is a growth factor with a high degree of specificity for epithelial cells. KGF is an important effector of epithelial growth and tissue homeostasis in various organs including the pancreas. Here we investigated the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the mediation of pancreatic ductal cell proliferation and differentiation induced by exogenous KGF during beta-cell regeneration in diabetic rat. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: In vitro and in vivo duct cell proliferation was measured by BrdU incorporation assay. The implication of MAPK-ERK1/2 in the mediation of KGF-induced cell proliferation was determined by inactivation of this pathway, using the pharmacological inhibitor or antisense morpholino-oligonucleotides against MEK1. In vivo KGF-induced duct cell differentiation was assessed by the immunolocalization of PDX1 and Glut2 in ductal cells and the implication of PI3K/AKT in this process was investigated. We showed that KGF exerted a potent mitogenic effect on ductal cells. Both in vitro and in vivo, its effect on cell proliferation was mediated through the activation of ERK1/2 as evidenced by the abolition of duct cell proliferation in the context of MEK/ERK inactivation. In vivo, KGF treatment triggered ductal cell differentiation as revealed by the expression of PDX1 and Glut2 in a subpopulation of ductal cells via a PI3K-dependent mechanism. CONCLUSION: Here we show that KGF promotes beta-cell regeneration by stimulating duct cell proliferation in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated for the first time that KGF directly induces the expression of PDX1 in some ductal cells thus inducing beta-cell neogenesis. We further explored the molecular mechanisms involved in these processes and showed that the effects of KGF on duct cell proliferation are mediated by the MEK-ERK1/2 pathway, while the KGF-induced cell differentiation is mediated by the PI3K/AKT pathway. These findings might have

  3. Mercury induces inflammatory mediator release from human mast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Erika

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mercury is known to be neurotoxic, but its effects on the immune system are less well known. Mast cells are involved in allergic reactions, but also in innate and acquired immunity, as well as in inflammation. Many patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD have "allergic" symptoms; moreover, the prevalence of ASD in patients with mastocytosis, characterized by numerous hyperactive mast cells in most tissues, is 10-fold higher than the general population suggesting mast cell involvement. We, therefore, investigated the effect of mercuric chloride (HgCl2 on human mast cell activation. Methods Human leukemic cultured LAD2 mast cells and normal human umbilical cord blood-derived cultured mast cells (hCBMCs were stimulated by HgCl2 (0.1-10 μM for either 10 min for beta-hexosaminidase release or 24 hr for measuring vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and IL-6 release by ELISA. Results HgCl2 induced a 2-fold increase in β-hexosaminidase release, and also significant VEGF release at 0.1 and 1 μM (311 ± 32 pg/106 cells and 443 ± 143 pg/106 cells, respectively from LAD2 mast cells compared to control cells (227 ± 17 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p 2 (0.1 μM to the proinflammatory neuropeptide substance P (SP, 0.1 μM had synergestic action in inducing VEGF from LAD2 mast cells. HgCl2 also stimulated significant VEGF release (360 ± 100 pg/106 cells at 1 μM, n = 5, p 6 cells, and IL-6 release (466 ± 57 pg/106 cells at 0.1 μM compared to untreated cells (13 ± 25 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p 2 (0.1 μM to SP (5 μM further increased IL-6 release. Conclusions HgCl2 stimulates VEGF and IL-6 release from human mast cells. This phenomenon could disrupt the blood-brain-barrier and permit brain inflammation. As a result, the findings of the present study provide a biological mechanism for how low levels of mercury may contribute to ASD pathogenesis.

  4. Potassium channels mediate killing by human natural killer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood spontaneously recognize and kill a wide variety of target cells. It has been suggested that ion channels are involved in the killing process because there is a Ca-dependent stage and because killing by presensitized cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which in many respects resembles NK killing, is associated with changes in K and Na transport in the target cell. Using the whole-cell variation of the patch-clamp technique, the authors found a voltage-dependent potassium (K+) current in NK cells. The K+ current was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the K-channel blockers 4-aminopyridine and quinidine and by the traditional Ca-channel blockers verapamil and Cd2+. They tested the effects of ion-channel blockers on killing of two commonly used target cell lines: K562, which is derived from a human myeloid leukemia, and U937, which is derived from a human histiocytic leukemia. Killing of K562 target cells, determined in a standard 51Cr-release assay, was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by verapamil, quinidine, Cd2+, and 4-aminopyridine at concentrations comparable to those that blocked the K+ current in NK cells. In K562 target cells only a voltage-dependent Na= current was found and it was blocked by concentrations of tetrodotoxin that had no effect on killing. Killing of U937 target cells was also inhibited by the two ion-channel blockers tested, quinidine and verapamil. In this cell line only a small K+ current was found that was similar to the one in NK cells. The findings show that there are K channels in NK cells and that these channels play a necessary role in the killing process

  5. Silencing of VAMP3 inhibits cell migration and integrin-mediated adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors for cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. In cell migration, integrins are endocytosed from the plasma membrane or the cell surface, transported in vesicles and exocytosed actively at the cell front. In the present study, we examined the roles of VAMP3, a SNARE protein that mediates exocytosis, in cell migration and integrin trafficking. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced silencing of VAMP3 inhibited chemotactic cell migration by more than 60% without affecting cell proliferation. VAMP3 silencing reduced the levels of β1 integrin at the cell surface but had no effect on total cellular β1 integrin, indicating that VAMP3 is required for trafficking of β1 integrin to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, VAMP3 silencing diminished cell adhesion to laminin but not to fibronectin or collagen. Taken together, these data suggest that VAMP3-dependent integrin trafficking is crucial in cell migration and cell adhesion to laminin.

  6. Cell-cell contact and anatomical compatibility in stromal cell-mediated HSC support during development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Harvey (Kirsten); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractHematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are able to generate the wide variety of blood cells found in the adult and are maintained in the bone marrow (BM) stromal microenvironment. In the aorta-gonads-mesonephros (AGM), which autonomously generates the first HSCs, the stromal m

  7. Tolerance of Listeria monocytogenes to Quaternary Ammonium Sanitizers Is Mediated by a Novel Efflux Pump Encoded by emrE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, Jovana; Ziegler, Jennifer; Wałecka-Zacharska, Ewa; Reimer, Aleisha; Kitts, David D; Gilmour, Matthew W

    2016-02-01

    A novel genomic island (LGI1) was discovered in Listeria monocytogenes isolates responsible for the deadliest listeriosis outbreak in Canada, in 2008. To investigate the functional role of LGI1, the outbreak strain 08-5578 was exposed to food chain-relevant stresses, and the expression of 16 LGI1 genes was measured. LGI1 genes with putative efflux (L. monocytogenes emrE [emrELm]), regulatory (lmo1851), and adhesion (sel1) functions were deleted, and the mutants were exposed to acid (HCl), cold (4°C), salt (10 to 20% NaCl), and quaternary ammonium-based sanitizers (QACs). Deletion of lmo1851 had no effect on the L. monocytogenes stress response, and deletion of sel1 did not influence Caco-2 and HeLa cell adherence/invasion, whereas deletion of emrE resulted in increased susceptibility to QACs (P monocytogenes to QACs via emrELm. Since QACs are commonly used in the food industry, there is a concern that L. monocytogenes strains possessing emrE will have an increased ability to survive this stress and thus to persist in food processing environments. PMID:26590290

  8. Drosophila homologs of transcriptional mediator complex subunits are required for adult cell and segment identity specification

    OpenAIRE

    Boube, Muriel; Faucher, Christian; Joulia, Laurent; Cribbs, David L.; Bourbon, Henri-Marc

    2000-01-01

    The origins of specificity in gene expression are a central concern in understanding developmental control. Mediator protein complexes regulate transcriptional initiation, acting as modular adaptors linking specific transcription factors to core RNA polymerase II. Here, we identified the Drosophila homologs of 23 human mediator genes and mutations of two, dTRAP240 and of dTRAP80 (the putative fly homolog of yeast SRB4). Clonal analysis indicates a general role for dTRAP80 necessary for cell v...

  9. Targeted microbubbles for ultrasound mediated gene transfection and apoptosis induction in ovarian cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Shufang; Guo, Juan; Sun, Jiangchuan; Zhu, Shenyin; Yan, Yu; Zhu, Yi; Li, Min; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Ronald X

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) technique can be potentially used for non-viral delivery of gene therapy. Targeting wild-type p53 (wtp53) tumor suppressor gene may provide a clinically promising treatment for patients with ovarian cancer. However, UTMD mediated gene therapy typically uses non-targeted microbubbles with suboptimal gene transfection efficiency. We synthesized a targeted microbubble agent for UTMD mediated wtp53 gene therapy in ovarian cancer cells. Lipid micr...

  10. Disruption of E-cadherin-mediated adhesion induces a functionally distinct pathway of dendritic cell maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Aimin; Bloom, Ona; Ono, Satoru; Cui, Weiguo; Unternaehrer, Juli; Jiang, Shan; Whitney, J. Andrew; Connolly, John; Banchereau, Jacques; Mellman, Ira

    2007-01-01

    The maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) following exposure to microbial products or inflammatory mediators plays a critical role in initiating the immune response. We now find that maturation can also occur under steady state conditions, triggered by alterations in E-cadherin-mediated DC-DC adhesion. Selective disruption of these interactions induces the typical features of DC maturation including the upregulation of costimulatory molecules, MHC class II, and chemokine receptors. These events...

  11. Identifying Intracellular Sites of Eicosanoid Lipid Mediator Synthesis with EicosaCell Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Bandeira-Melo, Christianne; Weller, Peter Fahey; Bozza, Patricia T.

    2011-01-01

    Eicosanoids, arachidonic acid-derived signaling lipid mediators, are newly formed and nonstorable molecules that have important roles in physiological and pathological processes. EicosaCell is a microscopic assay that enables the intracellular detection and localization of eicosanoid lipid mediator-synthesizing compartments by means of a strategy to covalently cross-link and immobilize eicosanoids at their sites of synthesis followed by immunofluorescent-based localization of the targeted eic...

  12. Triggering cell death by nanographene oxide mediated hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been proposed as an hyperthermia agent for anticancer therapies due to its near-infrared (NIR) optical absorption ability which, with its small two-dimensional size, could have a unique performance when compared to that of any other nanoparticle. Nevertheless, attention should be given to the hyperthermia route and the kind of GO–cell interactions induced in the process. The hyperthermia laser irradiation parameters, such as exposure time and laser power, were investigated to control the temperature rise and consequent damage in the GOs containing cell culture medium. The type of cell damage produced was evaluated as a function of these parameters. The results showed that cell culture temperature (after irradiating cells with internalized GO) increases preferentially with laser power rather than with exposure time. Moreover, when laser power is increased, necrosis is the preferential cell death leading to an increase of cytokine release to the medium. (paper)

  13. Ebola virus mediated infectivity is restricted in canine and feline cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ziying; Bart, Stephen M; Ruthel, Gordon; Vande Burgt, Nathan H; Haines, Kathleen M; Volk, Susan W; Vite, Charles H; Freedman, Bruce D; Bates, Paul; Harty, Ronald N

    2016-01-15

    Ebolaviruses and marburgviruses belong to the Filoviridae family and often cause severe, fatal hemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates. The magnitude of the 2014 outbreak in West Africa and the unprecedented emergence of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in the United States underscore the urgency to better understand the dynamics of Ebola virus infection, transmission and spread. To date, the susceptibility and possible role of domestic animals and pets in the transmission cycle and spread of EVD remains unclear. We utilized infectious VSV recombinants and lentivirus pseudotypes expressing the EBOV surface glycoprotein (GP) to assess the permissiveness of canine and feline cells to EBOV GP-mediated entry. We observed a general restriction in EBOV-mediated infection of primary canine and feline cells. To address the entry mechanism, we used cells deficient in NPC1, a host protein implicated in EBOV entry, and a pharmacological blockade of cholesterol transport, to show that an NPC1-dependent mechanism of EBOV entry is conserved in canine and feline cells. These data demonstrate that cells of canine and feline origin are susceptible to EBOV GP mediated infection; however, infectivity of these cells is reduced significantly compared to controls. Moreover, these data provide new insights into the mechanism of EBOV GP mediated entry into cells of canine and feline origin. PMID:26711035

  14. Function of Helper T Cells in the Memory CTL-mediated Anti-tumor Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高丰光; GermainJ.P.Fernendo; 刘文军

    2004-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the role of CD4+ helper T (Th) cells in the memory CTL-mediated anti-tumor immunity, the RAG-1 gene knock out mice were adoptively transferred with OT-1 cells to generate the memory CTL, the C57B1/6 mice immunized with the epitope peptide of OVA specific Th cells and with different adjuvants were adopfively transferred with these memory-CTLs, and then the animals were challenged with tumor cells EGT. It was found that although the simple immunization of mice with the epitope peptide of the OVA specific Th cells could generate more effect CTL, but this effect was not so strong enough to resist completely the challenges with tumor cells. Nevertheless, the memory CTL-mediated anti-tumor immune effect required the helps of Th1 and Th2 cells. The cross-regulation between Thl and Th2 cells seemed to be beneficial for the host to generate more effector CTL for mounting an efficient anti-tumor response. It concluded that the interaction between Thl and Th2 cells might be more important than the single subset of Th cells in the memory CTL-mediated anti-tumor immune response. More attention should be paid in this regard for the future studies.

  15. Telomerase reverse transcriptase expression protects transformed human cells against DNA-damaging agents, and increases tolerance to chromosomal instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisig, H B; Hukezalie, K R; Thompson, C A H; Au-Yeung, T T T; Ludlow, A T; Zhao, C R; Wong, J M Y

    2016-01-14

    Reactivation of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) expression is found in more than 85% of human cancers. The remaining cancers rely on the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), a recombination-based mechanism for telomere-length maintenance. Prevalence of TERT reactivation over the ALT mechanism was linked to secondary TERT function unrelated to telomere length maintenance. To characterize this non-canonical function, we created a panel of ALT cells with recombinant expression of TERT and TERT variants: TERT-positive ALT cells showed higher tolerance to genotoxic insults compared with their TERT-negative counterparts. We identified telomere synthesis-defective TERT variants that bestowed similar genotoxic stress tolerance, indicating that telomere synthesis activity is dispensable for this survival phenotype. TERT expression improved the kinetics of double-strand chromosome break repair and reduced DNA damage-related nuclear division abnormalities, a phenotype associated with ALT tumors. Despite this reduction in cytological abnormalities, surviving TERT-positive ALT cells were found to have gross chromosomal instabilities. We sorted TERT-positive cells with cytogenetic changes and followed their growth. We found that the chromosome-number changes persisted, and TERT-positive ALT cells surviving genotoxic events propagated through subsequent generations with new chromosome numbers. Our data confirm that telomerase expression protects against double-strand DNA (dsDNA)-damaging events, and show that this protective function is uncoupled from its role in telomere synthesis. TERT expression promotes oncogene-transformed cell growth by reducing the inhibitory effects of cell-intrinsic (telomere attrition) and cell-extrinsic (chemical- or metabolism-induced genotoxic stress) challenges. These data provide the impetus to develop new therapeutic interventions for telomerase-positive cancers through simultaneous targeting of multiple telomerase activities. PMID

  16. Immunological tolerance of human hepatocyte xenograft induced by adenovirus vector-mediated CTLA4Ig gene transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao-Kai Chen; Xiao-Cong Liu; Jun-Gang Li; Guo-Dong Liu; Yan Guo; Ling Cheng; Yu-Ming Wang

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Systemic administration of CTLA4Ig has been applied  in  inducing  immunological  tolerance  of  hepatocyte implants,  but  has  potential  for  systemic  immune  inhibition. This study was designed to induce hepatocyte immunological tolerance  by  locally  expressing  CTLA4Ig  in  an  attempt  to improve the effectiveness of cell transplantation. METHODS: A  normal  human  liver  cell  line  (L02)  was transfected with adenovirus vector containing the CTLA4Ig gene (Ad-CTLA4Ig-EGFP)  in vitro,  and  the  expression  of  CTLA4Ig by  transfected  cells  was  assessed  by  fluorescent  imaging  and immunocytochemical  staining.  Transfected  cells  then  were injected  into  the  spleen  of  Sprague-Dawley  rats,  the  survival of  cells  was  determined  by  immunohistochemistry,  and  the immune status was examined through CD4+ and CD69+ T cell-counts and ELISA detection of IL-2 in peripheral blood. RESULTS: L02 cells expressed CTLA4Ig in the cytoplasm for >4 weeks. Surviving L02 cells were observed in the experimental group at 3 and 4 weeks post-transplantation, while none was detected  in  the  control  group.  Furthermore,  the  percentages of  CD4+  and  CD4+CD69+  T  cells  in  the  CTLA4-transfected group  were  24.5%  and  45.1%,  markedly  lower  than  those  in the  control  group  at  4  weeks  post-transplantation  (P CONCLUSION: Adenovirus-mediated CTLA4Ig gene transfer into  human  hepatocytes  has  the  potential  to  become  an effective  method  of  inducing  immunological  tolerance  in hepatocyte transplantation.

  17. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation induces immunologic tolerance in renal transplant patients via modulation of inflammatory and repair processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Duojiao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inducing donor-specific tolerance in renal transplant patients could potentially prevent allograft rejection and calcineurin inhibitor nephrotoxicity. Combined kidney and hematopoietic stem cell transplant from an HLA-matched donor is an exploratory and promising therapy to induce immune tolerance. Investigtion of molecular mechanisms involved in the disease is needed to understand the potential process of cell therapy and develop strategies to prevent this immunologic rejection. Methods We enrolled nine patients in a clinical study in which cryopreserved donor hematopoietic stem cells were infused on days 2, 4, and 6 after kidney transplantation. One month post-transplant, 4 plasma samples were collected from combined transplants (C + Tx, and 8 plasma samples from patients with kidney transplantation alone (Tx. High abundance proteins in plasma were depleted and the two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with iTRAQ labeling was utilized to identify the protein profiling between the two groups. Clusters of up- and down-regulated protein profiles were submitted to MetaCore for the construction of transcriptional factors and regulation networks. Results and Discussion Among the 179 identified proteins, 65 proteins were found in C + Tx with at least a 2-fold change as compared with Tx. A subset of proteins related to the complement and coagulation cascade, including complement C3a,complement C5a, precrusors to fibrinogen alpha and beta chains,was significantly downregulated in C + Tx. Meanwhile, Apolipoprotein-A1(ApoA1, ApoC1, ApoA2, ApoE, and ApoB were significantly lower in Tx compared to C + Tx. Gene ontology analysis showed that the dominant processes of differentially expressed proteins were associated with the inflammatory response and positive regulation of plasma lipoprotein particle remodeling. Conclusions Thus, our study provides new insight into the molecular events in

  18. CDK8-Mediated STAT1-S727 Phosphorylation Restrains NK Cell Cytotoxicity and Tumor Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, Eva Maria; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Hoermann, Gregor; Csiszar, Agnes; Wirth, Silvia; Berger, Angelika; Straka, Elisabeth; Rigler, Doris; Wallner, Barbara; Jamieson, Amanda M.; Pickl, Winfried F.; Zebedin-Brandl, Eva Maria; Müller, Mathias; Decker, Thomas; Sexl, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor STAT1 is important in natural killer (NK) cells, which provide immediate defense against tumor and virally infected cells. We show that mutation of a single phosphorylation site (Stat1-S727A) enhances NK cell cytotoxicity against a range of tumor cells, accompanied by increased expression of perforin and granzyme B. Stat1-S727A mice display significantly delayed disease onset in NK cell-surveilled tumor models including melanoma, leukemia, and metastasizing breast cancer. Constitutive phosphorylation of S727 depends on cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8). Inhibition of CDK8-mediated STAT1-S727 phosphorylation may thus represent a therapeutic strategy for stimulating NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance. PMID:23933255

  19. CDK8-Mediated STAT1-S727 Phosphorylation Restrains NK Cell Cytotoxicity and Tumor Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Putz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor STAT1 is important in natural killer (NK cells, which provide immediate defense against tumor and virally infected cells. We show that mutation of a single phosphorylation site (Stat1-S727A enhances NK cell cytotoxicity against a range of tumor cells, accompanied by increased expression of perforin and granzyme B. Stat1-S727A mice display significantly delayed disease onset in NK cell-surveilled tumor models including melanoma, leukemia, and metastasizing breast cancer. Constitutive phosphorylation of S727 depends on cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8. Inhibition of CDK8-mediated STAT1-S727 phosphorylation may thus represent a therapeutic strategy for stimulating NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance.

  20. Immunological approaches for tolerance induction in allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Melanie L; Renz, Harald; Blaser, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Allergy is the consequence of an inappropriate inflammatory immune response generated against harmless environmental antigens. In allergic disorders such as asthma and rhinitis, the Th2 mediated phenotype is a result of loss of peripheral tolerance mechanisms. In cases such as these, approaches such as immunotherapy attempt to treat the underlying cause of allergic disease by restoring tolerance. Immunotherapy initiates many complex mechanisms within the immune system that result in initiation of innate immunity, activation of both cellular and humoral B cell immunity, as well as triggering T regulatory subsets which are major players in the establishment of peripheral tolerance. Though studies clearly demonstrate immunotherapy to be efficacious, research to improve this treatment is ongoing. Investigation of allergenicity versus immunogenicity, native versus modified allergens, and the use of adjuvant and modality of dosing are all current strategies for immunotherapy advancement that will be reviewed in this article. PMID:21598104

  1. Transient systemic inflammation does not alter the induction of tolerance to gastric autoantigens by migratory dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourges, Dorothée; Ross, Ellen M; Allen, Stacey; Read, Simon; Houghton, Fiona J; Bedoui, Sammy; Boon, Louis; Gleeson, Paul A; van Driel, Ian R

    2014-06-01

    It has been proposed that activation of dendritic cells (DCs) presenting self-antigens during inflammation may lead to activation of autoreactive T cells and the development of autoimmunity. To test this hypothesis, we examined the presentation of the autoantigen recognized in autoimmune gastritis, gastric H(+)/K(+) ATPase, which is naturally expressed in the stomach and is constitutively presented in the stomach-draining lymph nodes. Systemic administration to mice of the TLR9 agonist CpG DNA, agonist anti-CD40 Ab, or TLR4 agonist LPS all failed to abrogate the process of peripheral clonal deletion of H(+)/K(+) ATPase-specific CD4 T cells or promote the development of autoimmune gastritis. We demonstrated that migratory DCs from the stomach-draining lymph nodes are the only DC subset capable of constitutively presenting the endogenous gastric H(+)/K(+) ATPase autoantigen in its normal physiological context. Analysis of costimulatory molecules indicated that, relative to resident DCs, migratory DCs displayed a partially activated phenotype in the steady state. Furthermore, migratory DCs were refractory to stimulation by transient exposure to TLR agonists, as they failed to upregulate costimulatory molecules, secrete significant amounts of inflammatory cytokines, or induce differentiation of effector T cells. Together, these data show that transient systemic inflammation failed to break tolerance to the gastric autoantigen, as migratory DCs presenting the gastric autoantigen remain tolerogenic under such conditions, demonstrating the robust nature of peripheral tolerance. PMID:24760154

  2. ß-amylase1 mutant Arabidopsis plants show improved drought tolerance due to reduced starch breakdown in guard cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasch, Christian Maximilian; Ott, Kirsten Verena; Bauer, Hubert; Ache, Peter; Hedrich, Rainer; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    In plants, drought stress is a major growth limiting factor causing cell water loss through open stomata. In this study, guard cell-specific transcripts from drought-stressed Arabidopsis plants were analysed and a down-regulation of β-amylase 1 (BAM1) was found. In previous studies, BAM1 was shown to be involved in stomatal starch degradation under ambient conditions. Impaired starch breakdown of bam1 mutant plants was accompanied by decreased stomatal opening. Here, it is shown that drought tolerance of bam1 mutant plants is improved as compared with wild-type controls. Microarray analysis of stomata-specific transcripts from bam1 mutant plants revealed a significant down-regulation of genes encoding aquaporins, auxin- and ethylene-responsive factors, and cell-wall modifying enzymes. This expression pattern suggests that reduced water uptake and limited cell wall extension are associated with the closed state of stomata of bam1 mutant plants. Together these data suggest that regulation of stomata-specific starch turnover is important for adapting stomata opening to environmental needs and its breeding manipulation may result in drought tolerant crop plants. PMID:26139825

  3. Suppression by Apoptotic Cells Defines Tumor Necrosis Factor-Mediated Induction of Glomerular Mesangial Cell Apoptosis by Activated Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Duffield, Jeremy S.; Ware, Carl F.; Ryffel, Bernhardt; Savill, John

    2001-01-01

    Activated macrophages (Mφ) isolated from inflamed glomeruli or generated by interferon-γ and lipopolysaccharide treatment in vitro induce glomerular mesangial cell apoptosis by hitherto incompletely understood mechanisms. In this report we demonstrate that nitric oxide-independent killing of co-cultured mesangial cells by interferon-γ/lipopolysaccharide-activated Mφ is suppressed by binding/ingestion of apoptotic cells and is mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Thus, soluble TNF receptor...

  4. Lysosome fusion to the cell membrane is mediated by the dysferlin C2A domain in coronary arterial endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Wei-Qing; Xia, Min; Xu, Ming; Krishna M Boini; Ritter, Joseph K.; Li, Ning-Jun; Li, Pin-Lan

    2012-01-01

    Dysferlin has recently been reported to participate in cell membrane repair in muscle and other cells through lysosome fusion. Given that lysosome fusion is a crucial mechanism that leads to membrane raft clustering, the present study attempted to determine whether dysferlin is involved in this process and its related signalling, and explores the mechanism underlying dysferlin-mediated lysosome fusion in bovine coronary arterial endothelial cells (CAECs). We found that dysferlin is clustered ...

  5. Retrovirus-Mediated Gene Transfer in Immortalization of Progenitor Hair Cell Lines in Newborn Rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yuan; ZHAI Suo-qiang; SONG Wei; GUO Wei; ZHENG Gui-liang; HU Yin-yan

    2008-01-01

    Objective To present an experimental method that allows isolation of greater epithelial ridge (GER) and lesser epithelial ridge(LER) cells from postnatal rat cochleae using a combinatorial approach of enzymatic digestion and mechanical separation and to investigate a retrovirus-mediated gene transfer technique for its possibl utility in immortalization of the GER and LER cell lines, in an effort to establish an in vitro model system of hair cell differentiation. Methods GER and LER cells were dissected from postnatal rat cochleae and immortalized by transferring the SV40 large T antigen using a retrovirus. The established cell lines were confirmed through morphology observation, immunnocytochemical staining and RT-PCR analysis. The Hathl gene was transferred into the cell lines using adenovirus-mediated techniques to explore their potential to differentiate into hair cells. Results The established cell lines were stably maintained for more than 20 passages and displayed many features similar to primary GER and LER cells. They grew in patches and assumed a polygonal morphology. Immunostaining showed labeling by SV40 large T antigen and Islet1 (a specific marker for GER and LER). All passages of the cell lines expressed SV40 large T antigen on RT-PCR analysis. The cells also showed the capability to differenti-ate into hair cell-like cells when forced to express Hathl. Conclusion Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer can be used in establishing immortalized progenitor hair cell lines in newborn rat, which may provide an invaluable system for studying hair cell differentiation and regeneration for new treatment of sensory hearing loss caused by hair cell loss.

  6. Bone marrow stromal cell : mediated neuroprotection for spinal cord repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, Gaby Jane

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no treatment available that restores anatomy and function after spinal cord injury. This thesis explores transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bone marrow stromal cells; BMSCs) as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. BMSCs secrete neurotrophic f

  7. Harpin Mediates Cell Aggregation in Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937

    OpenAIRE

    Yap, Mee-Ngan; Rojas, Clemencia M.; Yang, Ching-Hong; Charkowski, Amy O.

    2006-01-01

    The hypersensitive response elicitor harpin (HrpN) of soft rot pathogen Erwinia chrysanthemi strains 3937 and EC16 is secreted via the type III secretion system and remains cell surface bound. Strain 3937 HrpN is essential for cell aggregation, but the C-terminal one-third of the protein is not required for aggregative activity.

  8. Mannose 6-, fructose 1-, and fructose 6-phosphates inhibit human natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Forbes, J T; Bretthauer, R. K.; Oeltmann, T N

    1981-01-01

    In vitro human natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity (NCMC) to K-562, Molt-4, and F-265 cells is inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by mannose 6-phosphate, fructose 1-phosphate and fructose 6-phosphate. This inhibition is not observed with mannose, glucose, fucose, glucose 6-phosphate, mannose 1-phosphate, galactose 1-phosphate, or galactose 6-phosphate. Preincubation of the effector cells, obtained from fresh whole blood, with mannose-6-phosphate, fructose-1-phosphate, or fructose-6-phosphate...

  9. Pokemon Silencing Leads to Bim-Mediated Anoikis of Human Hepatoma Cell QGY7703

    OpenAIRE

    Kun Liu; Feng Liu; Nannan Zhang; Shiying Liu; Yuyang Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Pokemon is an important proto-oncogene that plays a critical role in cellular oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis. Anoikis, which is regulated by Bim-mediated apoptosis, is critical to cancer cell invasion and metastasis. We investigated the role of Pokemon in anoikis, and our results show that Pokemon renders liver cells resistant to anoikis via suppression of Bim transcription. We knocked-down Pokemon in human hepatoma cells QGY7703 with small interfering RNAs (siRNA). Knockdown of P...

  10. Nitrosoureas Inhibit the Stathmin Mediated Migration and Invasion of Malignant Glioma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Xing-Jie; Choi, Yong; Sackett, Dan L.; Park, John K.

    2008-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary intrinsic brain tumors and are highly lethal. The widespread migration and invasion of neoplastic cells from the initial site of tumor formation into the surrounding brain render these lesions refractory to definitive surgical treatment. Stathmin, a microtubule destabilizing protein that mediates cell cycle progression, can also regulate directed cell movement. Nitrosoureas, traditionally viewed as DNA alkylating agents, can also covalently modify...

  11. Proteasome Inhibitors Enhance Bacteriophage Lambda (λ) Mediated Gene Transfer in Mammalian Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Volcy, Ketna; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophage lambda vectors can transfer their genomes into mammalian cells, resulting in expression of phage-encoded genes. However, this process is inefficient. Experiments were therefore conducted to delineate the rate limiting step(s) involved, using a phage vector that contains a mammalian luciferase reporter gene cassette. The efficiency of phage-mediated gene transfer in mammalian cells was quantitated, in the presence or absence of pharmacologic inhibitors of cell uptake and degradat...

  12. Lentivirus-mediated LIGHT overexpression inhibits human colorectal carcinoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Haibo; Yu, Zhuang; LIU, SHIHAI; Liu, Xiangping; Sui, Aihua; YAO, RUYONG; Luo, Zheng; LI, CHUANZHI

    2013-01-01

    Human LIGHT (lymphotoxin-related inducible ligand that competes for glycoprotein D binding to herpesvirus entry mediator on T cells) is the 14th member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily and is therefore also known as TNFSF14. LIGHT has been proven to be a multifunctional molecule affecting cell proliferation, differentiation and a number of other biological processes, in particular, cell growth inhibition. However, the expression and molecular mechanisms of the LIGHT gene in huma...

  13. Reg3g overexpression promotes β cell regeneration and induces immune tolerance in nonobese-diabetic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fei; Cao, Hui; Du, Jiao; Liu, Xiulan; Liu, Yang; Xiang, Ming

    2016-06-01

    The regenerating islet-derived gene was first isolated in regenerated pancreas tissues, greatly contributing to β cell regeneration. It is an anti-inflammatory in response to cellular stress. This encouraged us to investigate the exact role of a novel member of Reg family, regenerating islet-derived gene γ, in type 1 diabetes of nonobese-diabetic mice. For this, Reg3g gene was overexpressed in pancreatic islets, and conferred beneficial effects on β cell regeneration through activating the Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3/nuclear factor κB signaling pathway. Lentiviral vector-encoding regenerating islet-derived gene γ treatment also decreased lymphocyte infiltrates of the intra-islet and peri-islet by inducing both differentiation of regulatory T cell and immature dendritic cells of tolerogenic properties, which attenuated autoimmunity. This treatment further contributed to rebalanced levels of type 1/2 helper T cell cytokines and elevated α1-antitrypsin levels in the serum. These results were not observed in phosphate-buffered saline-treated mice or in lentivirus-control mice. We have shown, for the first time, to our knowledge, that regenerating islet-derived gene γ promotes β cell regeneration and preserves β cells from autoimmunity damage by increasing regulatory T cell differentiation and inducing tolerated dendritic cells. This regenerating islet-derived gene γ infusion could probably be developed into an optimal gene therapy for the prevention and reversal of type 1 diabetes. PMID:26667474

  14. Methyltransferases mediate cell memory of a genotoxic insult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugo, R E; Mutamba, J T; Mohan, K N; Yee, T; Chaillet, J R; Greenberger, J S; Engelward, B P

    2011-02-10

    Characterization of the direct effects of DNA-damaging agents shows how DNA lesions lead to specific mutations. Yet, serum from Hiroshima survivors, Chernobyl liquidators and radiotherapy patients can induce a clastogenic effect on naive cells, showing indirect induction of genomic instability that persists years after exposure. Such indirect effects are not restricted to ionizing radiation, as chemical genotoxins also induce heritable and transmissible genomic instability phenotypes. Although such indirect induction of genomic instability is well described, the underlying mechanism has remained enigmatic. Here, we show that mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to γ-radiation bear the effects of the insult for weeks. Specifically, conditioned media from the progeny of exposed cells can induce DNA damage and homologous recombination in naive cells. Notably, cells exposed to conditioned media also elicit a genome-destabilizing effect on their neighbouring cells, thus demonstrating transmission of genomic instability. Moreover, we show that the underlying basis for the memory of an insult is completely dependent on two of the major DNA cytosine methyltransferases, Dnmt1 and Dnmt3a. Targeted disruption of these genes in exposed cells completely eliminates transmission of genomic instability. Furthermore, transient inactivation of Dnmt1, using a tet-suppressible allele, clears the memory of the insult, thus protecting neighbouring cells from indirect induction of genomic instability. We have thus demonstrated that a single exposure can lead to long-term, genome-destabilizing effects that spread from cell to cell, and we provide a specific molecular mechanism for these persistent bystander effects. Collectively, our results impact the current understanding of risks from toxin exposures and suggest modes of intervention for suppressing genomic instability in people exposed to carcinogenic genotoxins. PMID:21057543

  15. Zygosaccharomyces rouxii Trk1 is an efficient potassium transporter providing yeast cells with high lithium tolerance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zimmermannová, Olga; Salazar, A.; Sychrová, Hana; Ramos, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2015), fov029. ISSN 1567-1356 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/10/0307 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Zygosaccharomyces rouxii * potassium transport * lithium tolerance * membrane potential * intracellular pH * pHluorin integration Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.818, year: 2014

  16. Phthalocyanine-mediated photodynamic therapy induces cell death and a G /G1 cell cycle arrest in cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a series of novel photosensitizers which have potential for anticancer photodynamic therapy (PDT). Photosensitizers include zinc phthalocyanine tetra-sulphonic acid and a family of derivatives with amino acid substituents of varying alkyl chain length and degree of branching. Subcellular localization of these photosensitizers at the phototoxic IC5 concentration in human cervical carcinoma cells (SiHa Cells) was similar to that of the lysosomal dye Lucifer Yellow. Subsequent nuclear relocalization was observed following irradiation with 665 nm laser light. The PDT response was characterized using the Sulforhodamine B cytotoxicity assay. Flow cytometry was used for both DNA cell cycle and dual Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide analysis. Phototoxicity of the derivatives was of the same order of magnitude as for tetrasulphonated phthalocyanine but with an overall trend of increased phototoxicity with increasing amino acid chain length. Our results demonstrate cell death, inhibition of cell growth, and G /G1 cell cycle arrest during the phthalocyanine PDT-mediated response

  17. Effect of disodium cromoglycate on mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hye-Young; Kim, Jung-Sook; An, Nyeon-Hyoung; Park, Rae-Kil; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-04-23

    We investigated the effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on mast cell-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity. DSCG inhibited systemic allergic reaction induced by compound 48/80 dose-dependently. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis was inhibited by 71.6% by oral administration of DSCG (1 g/kg). When DSCG was pretreated at concentration rang from 0.01-1000 g/kg, the serum histamine levels were reduced in a dose dependent manner. DSCG also significantly inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cell (RPMC) by compound 48/80. We confirmed that DSCG inhibited compound 48/80-induced degranulation of RPMC by alcian blue/nuclear fast red staining. In addition, DSCG showed a significant inhibitory effect on anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-mediated tumor necrosis factor-alpha production. These results indicate that DSCG inhibits mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reaction. PMID:15050425

  18. High glucose-mediated oxidative stress impairs cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo L Lamers

    Full Text Available Deficient wound healing in diabetic patients is very frequent, but the cellular and molecular causes are poorly defined. In this study, we evaluate the hypothesis that high glucose concentrations inhibit cell migration. Using CHO.K1 cells, NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, mouse embryonic fibroblasts and primary skin fibroblasts from control and diabetic rats cultured in 5 mM D-glucose (low glucose, LG, 25 mM D-glucose (high glucose, HG or 25 mM L-glucose medium (osmotic control--OC, we analyzed the migration speed, protrusion stability, cell polarity, adhesion maturation and the activity of the small Rho GTPase Rac1. We also analyzed the effects of reactive oxygen species by incubating cells with the antioxidant N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC. We observed that HG conditions inhibited cell migration when compared to LG or OC. This inhibition resulted from impaired cell polarity, protrusion destabilization and inhibition of adhesion maturation. Conversely, Rac1 activity, which promotes protrusion and blocks adhesion maturation, was increased in HG conditions, thus providing a mechanistic basis for the HG phenotype. Most of the HG effects were partially or completely rescued by treatment with NAC. These findings demonstrate that HG impairs cell migration due to an increase in oxidative stress that causes polarity loss, deficient adhesion and protrusion. These alterations arise, in large part, from increased Rac1 activity and may contribute to the poor wound healing observed in diabetic patients.

  19. Bax translocation mediated mitochondrial apoptosis and caspase dependent photosensitizing effect of Ficus religiosa on cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneef, Jazir; Parvathy, Muraleedharan; M, Parvathy; Thankayyan R, Santhosh Kumar; Sithul, Hima; Sreeharshan, Sreeja

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of the present work was to investigate the potential effect of acetone extract of Ficus religosa leaf (FAE) in multiple apoptosis signalling in human breast cancer cells. FAE treatment significantly induced dose and time dependent, irreversible inhibition of breast cancer cell growth with moderate toxicity to normal breast epithelial cells. This observation was validated using Sulforhodamine B assay. Cell cycle analysis by Flow cytometry showed cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and induction of sub-G0 peak. FAE induced chromatin condensation and displayed an increase in apoptotic population in Annexin V-FITC/PI (Fluorescein isothiocyanate/Propidium iodide) double staining. FAE stimulated the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in multiple breast cancer cell lines when compared to normal diploid cells. To understand the role of Bax in FAE induced apoptosis, we employed a sensitive cell based platform of MCF-7 cells expressing Bax-EGFP. Bax translocation to mitochondria was accompanied by the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and marked elevation in LEHDase activity (Caspase 9). Consistent with this data, FAE induced Caspase activation as evidenced by ratio change in FRET Caspase sensor expressing MCF-7 cell line and cleavage of prominent Caspases and PARP. Interestingly, FAE accelerated cell death in a mitochondrial dependent manner in continuous live cell imaging mode indicating its possible photosensitizing effect. Intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by FAE played a critical role in mediating apoptotic cell death and photosensitizing activity. FAE induced dose and time dependent inhibition of cancer cell growth which was associated with Bax translocation and mitochondria mediated apoptosis with the activation of Caspase 9 dependent Caspase cascade. FAE also possessed strong photosensitizing effect on cancer cell line that was mediated through rapid mitochondrial transmembrane potential loss and partial Caspase

  20. Bax translocation mediated mitochondrial apoptosis and caspase dependent photosensitizing effect of Ficus religiosa on cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jazir Haneef

    Full Text Available The main aim of the present work was to investigate the potential effect of acetone extract of Ficus religosa leaf (FAE in multiple apoptosis signalling in human breast cancer cells. FAE treatment significantly induced dose and time dependent, irreversible inhibition of breast cancer cell growth with moderate toxicity to normal breast epithelial cells. This observation was validated using Sulforhodamine B assay. Cell cycle analysis by Flow cytometry showed cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and induction of sub-G0 peak. FAE induced chromatin condensation and displayed an increase in apoptotic population in Annexin V-FITC/PI (Fluorescein isothiocyanate/Propidium iodide double staining. FAE stimulated the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in multiple breast cancer cell lines when compared to normal diploid cells. To understand the role of Bax in FAE induced apoptosis, we employed a sensitive cell based platform of MCF-7 cells expressing Bax-EGFP. Bax translocation to mitochondria was accompanied by the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and marked elevation in LEHDase activity (Caspase 9. Consistent with this data, FAE induced Caspase activation as evidenced by ratio change in FRET Caspase sensor expressing MCF-7 cell line and cleavage of prominent Caspases and PARP. Interestingly, FAE accelerated cell death in a mitochondrial dependent manner in continuous live cell imaging mode indicating its possible photosensitizing effect. Intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS by FAE played a critical role in mediating apoptotic cell death and photosensitizing activity. FAE induced dose and time dependent inhibition of cancer cell growth which was associated with Bax translocation and mitochondria mediated apoptosis with the activation of Caspase 9 dependent Caspase cascade. FAE also possessed strong photosensitizing effect on cancer cell line that was mediated through rapid mitochondrial transmembrane potential loss and

  1. Cutting edge: membrane lymphotoxin regulates CD8(+) T cell-mediated intestinal allograft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Z; Wang, J; Meng, L; Wu, Q; Kim, O; Hart, J; He, G; Zhou, P; Thistlethwaite, J R; Alegre, M L; Fu, Y X; Newell, K A

    2001-11-01

    Blocking the CD28/B7 and/or CD154/CD40 costimulatory pathways promotes long-term allograft survival in many transplant models where CD4(+) T cells are necessary for rejection. When CD8(+) T cells are sufficient to mediate rejection, these approaches fail, resulting in costimulation blockade-resistant rejection. To address this problem we examined the role of lymphotoxin-related molecules in CD8(+) T cell-mediated rejection of murine intestinal allografts. Targeting membrane lymphotoxin by means of a fusion protein, mAb, or genetic mutation inhibited rejection of intestinal allografts by CD8(+) T cells. This effect was associated with decreased monokine induced by IFN-gamma (Mig) and secondary lymphoid chemokine (SLC) gene expression within allografts and spleens respectively. Blocking membrane lymphotoxin did not inhibit rejection mediated by CD4(+) T cells. Combining disruption of membrane lymphotoxin and treatment with CTLA4-Ig inhibited rejection in wild-type mice. These data demonstrate that membrane lymphotoxin is an important regulatory molecule for CD8(+) T cells mediating rejection and suggest a strategy to avoid costimulation blockade-resistant rejection. PMID:11673481

  2. HLA-G inhibits xenogenetic cytotoxicity mediated by human NK cells and T lymphocytes against PECs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate whether the non-classi-cal HLA-G classⅠmolecule protects the porcine endothelial cells (PECs) from the lysis mediated by human immune cells in pig to human discordant xenotransplantation, we have cloned HLA-G cDNA from a human placenta by RT-PCR. Mammalian expression vector, pEFG-neo, was constructed by insertion of HLA-G cDNA in pEF-neo. We obtained efficiently expressed PECs by stable transfection. Cytotoxicity assay showed that overexpression of HLA-G on PECs was sufficient to inhibit human NK-92 cell lysis. The level of lysis was equal to or less than that of the lysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells mediated by human NK-92 cells. It also indicated that HLA-G inhibited the lysis of PECs mediated by xeno-antigen specific T lymphocytes. The reduction of lysis ranged between 59.1% and 88.9%. These findings suggest that the transgenic approach to overexpress HLA-G is believed to be a new immunotherapy in overcoming the immune rejections in xenotransplantion, including delayed xenograft rejection and cell-mediated rejection.

  3. CO-Tolerant Pt–BeO as a Novel Anode Electrocatalyst in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyungjung Kwon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs requires less expensive catalysts and higher operating voltage. Substantial anodic overvoltage with the usage of reformed hydrogen fuel can be minimized by using CO-tolerant anode catalysts. Carbon-supported Pt–BeO is manufactured so that Pt particles with an average diameter of 4 nm are distributed on a carbon support. XPS analysis shows that a peak value of the binding energy of Be matches that of BeO, and oxygen is bound with Be or carbon. The hydrogen oxidation current of the Pt–BeO catalyst is slightly higher than that of a Pt catalyst. CO stripping voltammetry shows that CO oxidation current peaks at ~0.85 V at Pt, whereas CO is oxidized around 0.75 V at Pt–BeO, which confirms that the desorption of CO is easier in the presence of BeO. Although the state-of-the-art PtRu anode catalyst is dominant as a CO-tolerant hydrogen oxidation catalyst, this study of Be-based CO-tolerant material can widen the choice of PEMFC anode catalyst.

  4. Safety and Tolerability Study of PCI-32765 in B Cell Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-26

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Well-differentiated Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma,; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Diffuse Lymphoma

  5. Role of Nitric oxide in regulation of H2O2 mediating tolerance of plants to abiotic stress: A synergistic signaling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taqi Ahmed Khan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between abiotic stress, nitric oxide (NO and Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is a challenging one. It is now clear that H2O2 and NO function as signaling molecules in plants. A wide range of abiotic stresses results in H2O2 generation, from a variety of sources and it has many essential roles in plant metabolism but at the same time, accumulation related to virtually any environmental stress is potentially damaging. NO is gaining increasing attention as a regulator of diverse pathophysiological processes in plant science, mainly due to its properties (free radicals, small size, no charge, short-lived, and highly diffusible across biological membranes and multifunctional roles in plant growth, development and regulation of remarkably broad myriad of plant cellular mechanisms. Various abiotic stresses can induce NO synthesis, but its origin and mode of action in plants have not yet been completely resolved. Recent studies on NO production have tended to high light the questions that still remain unanswered rather than telling us more about NO metabolism. But regarding NO-H2O2 signaling and functions, new findings have given an impression of the intricacy of NO-H2O2 related signaling networks against abiotic stresses. Cellular responses to NO-H2O2 are complex, with considerable cross-talk between responses to several abiotic stresses. In last few years, the role of NO in H2O2 mediating tolerance in plants to abiotic stress has established much consideration.

  6. Heat-preconditioning confers protection from Ca2+-mediated cell toxicity in renal tubular epithelial cells (BSC-1)

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhlmann, Martin K.; Betz, Regina; Hanselmann, Rainer; Köhler, Hans

    1997-01-01

    A rise in intracellular calcium may mediate ischemic damage by phospholipid hydrolysis and proteolysis Heat shock proteins have been shown to provide protection from various forms of cell stress, but not from models of Ca2+-mediated injury. The effect of heat preconditioning in a model of ionomycin-induced injury in cultured renal tubular epitheliaal cells (BSC-1) was examined. Hsp70-mRNA expression was induced by hyperthermia (HT) (42°C, 60 min). Hsp70 protein accumulation was maximal after ...

  7. CHOP Contributes to, But Is Not the Only Mediator of, IAPP Induced β-Cell Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurlo, T; Rivera, J F; Butler, A E; Cory, M; Hoang, J; Costes, S; Butler, Peter C

    2016-04-01

    The islet in type 2 diabetes is characterized by β-cell loss, increased β-cell apoptosis, and islet amyloid derived from islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). When protein misfolding protective mechanisms are overcome, human IAPP (h-IAPP) forms membrane permeant toxic oligomers that induce β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis. In humans with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and mice transgenic for h-IAPP, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been inferred from nuclear translocation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), an established mediator of ER stress. To establish whether h-IAPP toxicity is mediated by ER stress, we evaluated diabetes onset and β-cell mass in h-IAPP transgenic (h-TG) mice with and without deletion of CHOP in comparison with wild-type controls. Diabetes was delayed in h-TG CHOP(-/-) mice, with relatively preserved β-cell mass and decreased β-cell apoptosis. Deletion of CHOP attenuates dysfunction of the autophagy/lysosomal pathway in β-cells of h-TG mice, uncovering a role for CHOP in mediating h-IAPP-induced dysfunction of autophagy. As deletion of CHOP delayed but did not prevent h-IAPP-induced β-cell loss and diabetes, we examined CHOP-independent stress pathways. JNK, a target of the IRE-1pTRAF2 complex, and the Bcl-2 family proapoptotic mediator BIM, a target of ATF4, were comparably activated by h-IAPP expression in the presence and absence of CHOP. Therefore, although these studies affirm that CHOP is a mediator of h-IAPP-induced ER stress, it is not the only one. Therefore, suppression of CHOP alone is unlikely to be a durable therapeutic strategy to protect against h-IAPP toxicity because multiple stress pathways are activated. PMID:26900721

  8. Specific Btk inhibition suppresses B cell- and myeloid cell-mediated arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Paolo, Julie A; Huang, Tao; Balazs, Mercedesz; Barbosa, James; Barck, Kai H; Bravo, Brandon J; Carano, Richard A.D.; Darrow, James; Davies, Douglas R; DeForge, Laura E; Diehl, Lauri; Ferrando, Ronald; Gallion, Steven L; Giannetti, Anthony M; Gribling, Peter; Hurez, Vincent; Hymowitz, Sarah G; Jones, Randall; Kropf, Jeffrey E; Lee, Wyne P; Maciejewski, Patricia M; Mitchell, Scott A; Rong, Hong; Staker, Bart L; Whitney, J Andrew; Yeh, Sherry; Young, Wendy B; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Juan; Reif, Karin; Currie, Kevin S [CGI; (Emerald); (Genentech)

    2011-08-29

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Btk mediates inflammation are poorly understood. Here we describe the discovery of CGI1746, a small-molecule Btk inhibitor chemotype with a new binding mode that stabilizes an inactive nonphosphorylated enzyme conformation. CGI1746 has exquisite selectivity for Btk and inhibits both auto- and transphosphorylation steps necessary for enzyme activation. Using CGI1746, we demonstrate that Btk regulates inflammatory arthritis by two distinct mechanisms. CGI1746 blocks B cell receptor–dependent B cell proliferation and in prophylactic regimens reduces autoantibody levels in collagen-induced arthritis. In macrophages, Btk inhibition abolishes FcγRIII-induced TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6 production. Accordingly, in myeloid- and FcγR-dependent autoantibody-induced arthritis, CGI1746 decreases cytokine levels within joints and ameliorates disease. These results provide new understanding of the function of Btk in both B cell– or myeloid cell–driven disease processes and provide a compelling rationale for targeting Btk in rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a cytokine/chemokine-mediated disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabedian, Lara; Struyf, Sofie; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Sozzani, Silvano; Van Damme, Jo; Laureys, Geneviève

    2011-09-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disorder characterized by an abnormal accumulation and/or proliferation of cells with a Langerhans cell phenotype. Although no clear cause of LCH has been identified, it has been postulated that LCH might be the consequence of an immune dysregulation, causing Langerhans cells to migrate to and accumulate at various sites. Production of cytokines and chemokines is a central feature of immune regulation. Cytokines are abundantly present within LCH lesions. We review here the potential role of cytokines and chemokines in the pathogenesis of LCH. The type, distribution, and number of different cytokines released within lesions can provide clues to the possible aetiology of LCH and, ultimately, might offer therapeutic possibilities using recombinant cytokines or antagonists for this disorder. PMID:22001902

  10. Towards Future T Cell-Mediated Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi H. O. Nguyen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAVs infections impact significantly on global health, being particularly problematic in children, the elderly, pregnant women, indigenous populations and people with co-morbidities. Antibody-based vaccines require annual administration to combat rapidly acquired mutations modifying the surface haemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA glycoproteins. Conversely, influenza-specific CD8+ T cell responses directed at peptides derived from the more conserved internal virus proteins are known to be protective, suggesting that T cell-based vaccines may provide long-lasting cross-protection. This review outlines the importance of CD8+ T cell immunity to seasonal influenza and pandemic IAVs and summarises current vaccination strategies for inducing durable CD8+ T cell memory. Aspects of future IAV vaccine design and the use of live virus challenge in humans to establish proof of principle are also discussed.

  11. The Role of TG2 in Regulating S100A4-Mediated Mammary Tumour Cell Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuo Wang; Martin Griffin

    2013-01-01

    The importance of S100A4, a Ca(2+)-binding protein, in mediating tumour cell migration, both intracellularly and extracellularly, is well documented. Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) a Ca(2+)-dependent protein crosslinking enzyme, has also been shown to enhance cell migration. Here by using the well characterised non-metastatic rat mammary R37 cells (transfected with empty vector) and highly metastatic KP1 cells (R37 cells transfected with S100A4), we demonstrate that inhibition of TG2 either by...

  12. Electron Transfer Mediators for Photoelectrochemical Cells Based on Cu(I Metal Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Brugnati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and the photoelectrochemical characterization of a series of bipyridine and pyridyl-quinoline Cu(I complexes, used as electron transfer mediators in regenerative photoelectrochemical cells, are reported. The best performing mediators produced maximum IPCEs of the order of 35–40%. The J-V curves recorded under monochromatic light showed that the selected Cu(I/(II couples generated higher Vocs and fill factors compared to an equivalent I-/I3- cell, due to a decreased dark current.

  13. P-Selectin-Mediated Platelet Adhesion Promotes the Metastasis of Murine Melanoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cui-Ling Qi; Bo Wei; Jie Ye; Yang Yang; Bin Li; Qian-Qian Zhang; Jiang-Chao Li; Xiao-Dong He; Tian Lan; Li-Jing Wang

    2014-01-01

    Studies have indicated that the aggregation of activated platelets with cancer cells facilitates tumor metastasis; the adhesion molecule P-selectin may be an important mediator of this process, but the detailed mechanism is unclear. In the current study, we established a B16F10 (B16) cell metastatic model in P-selectin knockout (P-sel-/-) mice to determine the effect of P-selectin-mediated platelet adhesion on metastasis. Compared with C57 mice, P-sel-/- mice developed fewer metastatic foci, ...

  14. Enhanced PKCδ and ERK signaling mediate cell migration of retinal pigment epithelial cells synergistically induced by HGF and EGF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jung Chen

    Full Text Available Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR are characterized by the development of epi-retinal membranes which may exert a tractional force on retina. A lot of inflammatory growth factors may disturb the local ocular cells such as retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells, causing them to migrate and proliferate in the vitreous cavity and ultimately forming the PVR membrane. In this study, the signal pathways mediating cell migration of RPE induced by growth factors were investigated. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, epidermal growth factor (EGF or heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF induced a greater extent of migration of RPE50 and ARPE19 cells, compared with other growth factors. According to inhibitor studies, migration of RPE cells induced by each growth factor was mediated by protein kinase C (PKC and ERK (MAPK. Moreover, HGF coupled with EGF or HB-EGF had synergistic effects on cell migration and enhanced activation of PKC and ERK, which were attributed to cross activation of growth factor receptors by heterogeneous ligands. Furthermore, using the shRNA technique, PKCδ was found to be the most important PKC isozyme involved. Finally, vitreous fluids from PVR and PDR patients with high concentration of HGF may induce RPE cell migration in PKCδ- and ERK- dependent manner. In conclusion, migration of RPE cells can be synergistically induced by HGF coupled with HB-EGF or EGF, which were mediated by enhanced PKCδ activation and ERK phosphorylation.

  15. Immunotherapy: Shifting the Balance of Cell-Mediated Immunity and Suppression in Human Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Active immunotherapy is dependent on the ability of the immune system to recognize and respond to tumors. Despite overwhelming evidence to support a cell-mediated immune response to prostate cancer, it is insufficient to eradicate the disease. This is likely due to a high level of suppression at the tumor site from a variety of sources, including immunosuppressive cells. Immune cells entering the tumor microenvironment may be inhibited directly by the tumor, stromal cells or other immune cells that have been induced to adopt a suppressive phenotype. The resurgence of interest in immunotherapy following the approval of sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab by the Food and Drug Administration has brought about new strategies for overcoming tumor-mediated suppression and bolstering anti-tumor responses. Improved understanding of the immune response to prostate cancer can lead to new combination therapies, such as the use of vaccine with small molecule and checkpoint inhibitors or other immunotherapies

  16. Conversion of embryonic stem cells into extraembryonic lineages by CRISPR-mediated activators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shu; Zou, Qingjian; Lai, Sisi; Zhang, Quanjun; Li, Li; Yan, Quanmei; Zhou, Xiaoqing; Zhong, Huilin; Lai, Liangxue

    2016-01-01

    The recently emerged CRISPR/Cas9 technique has opened a new perspective on readily editing specific genes. When combined with transcription activators, it can precisely manipulate endogenous gene expression. Here, we enhanced the expression of endogenous Cdx2 and Gata6 genes by CRISPR-mediated activators, thus mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were directly converted into two extraembryonic lineages, i.e., typical trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) and extraembryonic endoderm cells (XENCs), which exhibited characters of TSC or XENC derived from the blastocyst extraembryonic lineages such as cell morphology, specific gene expression, and differentiation ability in vitro and in vivo. This study demonstrates that the cell fate can be effectively manipulated by directly activating of specific endogenous gene expression with CRISPR-mediated activator. PMID:26782778

  17. Immunotherapy: Shifting the Balance of Cell-Mediated Immunity and Suppression in Human Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Jo A.; Jochems, Caroline [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Gulley, James L. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Medical Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Schlom, Jeffrey, E-mail: js141c@nih.gov; Tsang, Kwong Y. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2012-12-11

    Active immunotherapy is dependent on the ability of the immune system to recognize and respond to tumors. Despite overwhelming evidence to support a cell-mediated immune response to prostate cancer, it is insufficient to eradicate the disease. This is likely due to a high level of suppression at the tumor site from a variety of sources, including immunosuppressive cells. Immune cells entering the tumor microenvironment may be inhibited directly by the tumor, stromal cells or other immune cells that have been induced to adopt a suppressive phenotype. The resurgence of interest in immunotherapy following the approval of sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab by the Food and Drug Administration has brought about new strategies for overcoming tumor-mediated suppression and bolstering anti-tumor responses. Improved understanding of the immune response to prostate cancer can lead to new combination therapies, such as the use of vaccine with small molecule and checkpoint inhibitors or other immunotherapies.

  18. Role of very late antigen-1 in T-cell-mediated immunity to systemic viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Kauffmann, Susanne; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2006-01-01

    The T-cell response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was studied in mice lacking very late antigen-1 (VLA-1). The generation of virus-specific effector T cells was unimpaired in VLA-1(-/-) mice. In the memory phase, VLA-1 deficiency did not influence the number of memory CD8(+) T cells or th...... current findings indicate that the expression of VLA-1 is not pivotal for T-cell-mediated antiviral immunity to a systemic infection....... their distribution between lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs. Regarding a functional role of VLA-1, we found that intracerebral infection of both VLA-1(-/-) and wild-type (wt) mice resulted in lethal T-cell-mediated meningitis, and quantitative and qualitative analyses of the cellular exudate did not...

  19. Zinc up-regulated the expression of the rice metallonthionein gene family and enhanced the zinc tolerance of yeast cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Northern blot and functional complementation assay were employed to analyze the effects of zinc on expression of ten rice metallothionein genes (OsMT-Is) in rice seedlings and the growth of yeast cells transformed with OsMT-Is. Northern blot revealed that in shoots of the rice seedlings treated with different Zn2+ concentrations, expression of most members of OsMT-I family was increased, except the type 4 OsMT-Is (OsMT-I-4a, 4b and 4c). In roots, Zn2+ significantly increased the transcription of OsMT-I-1b and OsMT-I-2c, but reduced the trascription of OsMT-I-1a and OsMT-I-3a. When these ten cDNAs were heterologously expressed in zinc sensitive yeast mutant, all transgenic yeasts showed increased tolerance to Zn2+, and zinc accumulation in these yeast cells also increased.These indicated that OsMT-I family members might respond to extra Zn2+, and they could enhance Zn2+ tolerance of cells by direct binding Zn2+.

  20. The role of TG2 in regulating S100A4-mediated mammary tumour cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Wang

    Full Text Available The importance of S100A4, a Ca(2+-binding protein, in mediating tumour cell migration, both intracellularly and extracellularly, is well documented. Tissue transglutaminase (TG2 a Ca(2+-dependent protein crosslinking enzyme, has also been shown to enhance cell migration. Here by using the well characterised non-metastatic rat mammary R37 cells (transfected with empty vector and highly metastatic KP1 cells (R37 cells transfected with S100A4, we demonstrate that inhibition of TG2 either by TG2 inhibitors or transfection of cells with TG2 shRNA block S100A4-accelerated cell migration in the KP1cells and in R37 cells treated with exogenous S100A4. Cell migration was also blocked by the treatment with the non-cell permeabilizing TG2 inhibitor R294, in the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 (Clone 16, which has a high level of TG2 expression. Inhibition was paralleled by a decrease in S100A4 polymer formation. In vitro co-immunoprecipitation and Far Western blotting assays and cross-linking assays showed not only the direct interaction between TG2 and S100A4, but also confirmed S100A4 as a substrate for TG2. Using specific functional blocking antibodies, a targeting peptide and a recombinant protein as a competitive treatment, we revealed the involvement of syndecan-4 and α5β1 integrin co-signalling pathways linked by activation of PKCα in this TG2 and S100A4-mediated cell migration. We propose a mechanism for TG2-regulated S100A4-related mediated cell migration, which is dependent on TG2 crosslinking.

  1. Comparison of lentiviral and sleeping beauty mediated αβ T cell receptor gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Christine Field

    Full Text Available Transfer of tumour antigen-specific receptors to T cells requires efficient delivery and integration of transgenes, and currently most clinical studies are using gamma retroviral or lentiviral systems. Whilst important proof-of-principle data has been generated for both chimeric antigen receptors and αβ T cell receptors, the current platforms are costly, time-consuming and relatively inflexible. Alternative, more cost-effective, Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmid systems could offer a pathway to accelerated clinical testing of a more diverse repertoire of recombinant high affinity T cell receptors. Nucleofection of hyperactive SB100X transposase-mediated stable transposition of an optimised murine-human chimeric T cell receptor specific for Wilm's tumour antigen from a Sleeping Beauty transposon plasmid. Whilst transfer efficiency was lower than that mediated by lentiviral transduction, cells could be readily enriched and expanded, and mediated effective target cells lysis in vitro and in vivo. Integration sites of transposed TCR genes in primary T cells were almost randomly distributed, contrasting the predilection of lentiviral vectors for transcriptionally active sites. The results support exploitation of the Sleeping Beauty plasmid based system as a flexible and adaptable platform for accelerated, early-phase assessment of T cell receptor gene therapies.

  2. Oxaliplatin enhances gap junction-mediated coupling in cell cultures of mouse trigeminal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Jeppe Nørgaard; Warwick, Rebekah; Duroux, Meg; Hanani, Menachem; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-08-01

    Communications between satellite glial cells and neighboring neurons within sensory ganglia may contribute to neuropathic and inflammatory pain. To elucidate the role of satellite glial cells in chemotherapy-induced pain, we examined the effects of oxaliplatin on the gap junction-mediated coupling between these cells. We also examined whether the gap junction blocker, carbenoxolone, can reverse the coupling. Primary cultures of mice trigeminal ganglia, 24-48h after cell isolation, were used. Satellite glial cells were injected with Lucifer yellow in the presence or absence of oxaliplatin (60 μM). In addition, the effect of carbenoxolone (100 μM) on coupling, and the expression of connexin 43 proteins were evaluated. Dye coupling between adjacent satellite glial cells was significantly increased (2.3-fold, P<0.05) following a 2h incubation with oxaliplatin. Adding carbenoxolone to the oxaliplatin-treated cultures reversed oxaliplatin-evoked coupling to baseline (P<0.05). Immunostaining showed no difference between expression of connexin 43 in control and oxaliplatin-treated cultures. Our findings indicated that oxaliplatin-increased gap junction-mediated coupling between satellite glial cells in primary cultures of mouse trigeminal ganglia, and carbenoxolone reversed this effect. Hence, it is proposed that increased gap junction-mediated coupling was seen between satellite glial cells in TG. This observation together with our previous data obtained from a behavioral study suggests that this phenomenon might contribute to chemotherapy-induced nociception following oxaliplatin treatment. PMID:25999145

  3. NK cell-mediated killing of AML blasts. Role of histamine, monocytes and reactive oxygen metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasts recovered from patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) were lysed by heterologeous natural killer (NK) cells treated with NK cell-activating cytokine-induced killing of AML blasts was inhibited by monocytes, recovered from peripheral blood by counterflow centrifugal elutriation. Histamine, at concentrations exceeding 0.1 μM, abrogated the monocyte-induced inhibition of NK cells; thereby, histamine and IL-2 or histamine and IFN-α synergistically induced NK cell-mediated destruction of AML blasts. The effect of histamine was completely blocked by the histamine H2-receptor (H2R) antagonist ranitidine but not by its chemical control AH20399AA. Catalase, a scavenger of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM), reversed the monocyte-induced inhibition of NK cell-mediated killing of blast cells, indicating that the inhibitory signal was mediated by products of the respiratory burst of monocytes. It is concluded that (i) monocytes inhibit anti-leukemic properties of NK cells, (ii) the inhibition is conveyed by monocyte-derived ROM, and (iii) histamine reverses the inhibitory signal and, thereby, synergizes with NK cell-activating cytokines to induce killing of AML blasts. (au) 19 refs

  4. NK cell-mediated killing of AML blasts. Role of histamine, monocytes and reactive oxygen metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, M.; Mellqvist, U.H. [Sahlgren`s Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Medicine, Haematology Section, Goeteborg (Sweden); Hansson, M.; Hermodsson, S.; Hellstrand, K. [Sahlgren`s Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Virology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Blasts recovered from patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) were lysed by heterologeous natural killer (NK) cells treated with NK cell-activating cytokine-induced killing of AML blasts was inhibited by monocytes, recovered from peripheral blood by counterflow centrifugal elutriation. Histamine, at concentrations exceeding 0.1 {mu}M, abrogated the monocyte-induced inhibition of NK cells; thereby, histamine and IL-2 or histamine and IFN-{alpha} synergistically induced NK cell-mediated destruction of AML blasts. The effect of histamine was completely blocked by the histamine H2-receptor (H2R) antagonist ranitidine but not by its chemical control AH20399AA. Catalase, a scavenger of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM), reversed the monocyte-induced inhibition of NK cell-mediated killing of blast cells, indicating that the inhibitory signal was mediated by products of the respiratory burst of monocytes. It is concluded that (i) monocytes inhibit anti-leukemic properties of NK cells, (ii) the inhibition is conveyed by monocyte-derived ROM, and (iii) histamine reverses the inhibitory signal and, thereby, synergizes with NK cell-activating cytokines to induce killing of AML blasts. (au) 19 refs.

  5. 4-1BB signaling breaks the tolerance of maternal CD8+ T cells that are reactive with alloantigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang H Kim

    Full Text Available 4-1BB (CD137, TNFRSF9, a member of the activation-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor family, is a powerful T-cell costimulatory molecule. It generally enhances CD8(+ T responses and even breaks the tolerance of CD8(+ T cells in an antigen-specific manner. In the present study we found that it was expressed in the placentas of pregnant mice and that its expression coincided with that of the immunesuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO. Therefore, we investigated whether 4-1BB signaling is involved in fetal rejection using agonistic anti-4-1BB mAb and 4-1BB-deficient mice. Treatment with agonistic anti-4-1BB mAb markedly increased the rate of rejection of allogeneic but not syngeneic fetuses, and this was primarily dependent on CD8(+ T cells. Complement component 3 (C3 seemed to be the effector molecule because 4-1BB triggering resulting in accumulation of C3 in the placenta, and this accumulation was also reversed by anti-CD8 mAb treatment. These findings demonstrate that 4-1BB triggering breaks the tolerance of CD8(+ T cells to alloantigens in the placenta. Moreover, triggering 4-1BB protected the pregnant mice from Listeria monocytogenes (LM infection, but led to rejection of semi-allogeneic fetuses. Therefore, given the cross-recognition of alloantigen by pathogen-reactive CD8(+ T cells, the true function of 4-1BB may be to reverse the hypo-responsiveness of pathogen-reactive CD8(+ T cells in the placenta in cases of infection, even if that risks losing the fetus.

  6. ROS accumulation by PEITC selectively kills ovarian cancer cells via UPR-mediated apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-hee eHong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Unfolded protein response (UPR is crucial for both survival and death of mammalian cells, which is regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS and nutrient depletion. In this study, we demonstrated the effect of ROS-accumulation, induced by β-phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC, on UPR mediated apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. We used ovarian cancer cell lines, PA-1 and SKOV-3, with different p53 status (wild- and null- type, respectively. PEITC caused increased ROS-accumulation and inhibited proliferation selectively in ovarian cancer cells, and glutathione (GSH depletion in SKOV-3. However, PEITC did not cause any effect in normal ovarian epithelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. After 48 h of PEITC treatment (5 µM, apoptotic cell death was shown to increase significantly in the ovarian cancer cells and not in the normal cells. The key regulator of UPR-mediated apoptosis, CHOP/GADD153 and ER resident chaperone BiP/GRP78 were parallely up-regulated with activation of two major sensors of the UPR (PERK and ATF-6 in PA-1; PERK, and IRE1α in SKOV-3 in response to ROS accumulation induced by PEITC (5 µM. ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, attenuated the effect of PEITC on UPR signatures (P-PERK, IRE1α, CHOP/GADD153, and BiP/GRP78, suggesting the involvement of ROS in UPR-mediated apoptosis. Altogether, PEITC induces UPR-mediated apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells via accumulation of ROS in a cancer-specific manner.

  7. Alcohol inhibits cell-cell adhesion mediated by human L1 [published erratum appears in J Cell Biol 1996 Jun;133(5):1139-40

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Mental retardation, hydrocephalus, and agenesis of the corpus callosum are observed both in fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and in children with mutations in the gene for the cell adhesion molecule L1. We studied the effects of ethanol on cell-cell adhesion in mouse fibroblasts transfected with human L1. L1-transfected fibroblasts exhibited increased cell-cell adhesion compared with wild-type or vector- transfected controls. Ethanol potently and completely inhibited L1- mediated adhesion both in...

  8. NF-KB downregulation may be involved the depression of tumor cell proliferation mediated by human mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling QIAO; Tie-jun ZHAO; Feng-ze WANG; Chang-liang SHAN; Li-hong YE; Xiao-dong ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    Aim:It has been reported that stem cells are able to home to tumorigenesis and inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells.The purpose of our study was to demon-strate the molecular mechanism of the inhibitory proliferation of hepatoma cells and breast cancer cells mediated by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs).Methods:The proliferation of H7402 human hepatoma cells and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was measured by the 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorpora-tion assay and flow cytometry assay after the treatment with conditioned media from hMSCs culture,such as Z3 cells or BMMS-03 cells.The role of NF-kB or the phosphorylation of inhibitor kBoα (p-IkBα) in the depression of hepatoma or breast cancer cells treated with conditioned media from Z3 cells or BMMS-03 cells was examined by reporter gene assay,quantitative real-time PCR,and Western blot analysis,respectively.Results:The proliferation of H7402 cells and MCF-7 cells was decreased significantly by the BrdU incorporation assay and flow cytometry assay after treatment.The transcriptional activity and mRNA level of NF-kB were downregulated in the treated cells by reporter gene assay and quantitative real-time PCR in a dose-dependent manner.At the protein level,NF-kB and p-IkBα decreased in the treated cells by Western blot analysis.Conclusion:Conditioned media from hMSCs are able to inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells.NF-kB downregulation is one of reasons for the depression of tumor cell proliferation mediated by hMSCs.

  9. Transforming Growth Factor Beta-Induced Is Essential for Endotoxin Tolerance Induced by a Low Dose of Lipopolysaccharide in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Our prior study found  that transforming growth factor  beta-induced (TGFBI is  an important negative regulator in TLR-induced inflammation. However, whether TGFBI may affect inflammation during lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced endotoxin tolerance (ET is still unclear.This study aimed to investigate whether TGFBI was involved in the mechanisms of ET in human through dampening nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB mediated pathway. ET models of isolated healthy volunteers peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were established by pretreating with a low dose of LPS to observe the changes of TGFBI expression during ET induction, compared with ten healthy controls. Moreover, a vector-based short hairpin RNA expression system was used to specifically inhibit TGFBI expression to further explore its role in ET induction. The expression was analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and Western blotting. The responses to LPS were determined by the activation of NF-κB, the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and Nitric Oxide (NO, which were analysed by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA.The results showed that TGFBI expression in the ET group obviously increased; ET also led to a hyporesponse of PBMCs to LPS with less activation of NF-κB, less production of TNF-α and NO, as well as more expression of TGFBI than those of non-ET group. Moreover, the inhibitory effect was partly refracted in plasmid TGFBI short hairpin RNA (pTGFBI-shRNA transfected PBMCs. Meanwhile, the absence of TGFBI caused abnormal enhancement of inflammatory cytokine production and it was involved in ET induction through dampening NF-κB mediated pathway.Therefore, TGFBI may be a new target for the clinical treatment of inflammatory disorders.

  10. ZFAT plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its T cell receptor-mediated response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Keiko [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute of Life Sciences for the Next Generation of Women Scientists, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Fujimoto, Takahiro [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Okamura, Tadashi [Division of Animal Models, Department of Infectious Diseases, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Masahiro [Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Tanaka, Yoko [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Mototani, Yasumasa; Goto, Motohito [Division of Animal Models, Department of Infectious Diseases, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ota, Takeharu; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Kuroki, Masahide [Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Tsunoda, Toshiyuki [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Sasazuki, Takehiko [Institute for Advanced Study, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shirasawa, Senji, E-mail: sshirasa@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated Cd4-Cre-mediated T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat-deficiency leads to reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaired T cell receptor-mediated response in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased expression of IL-7R{alpha}, IL-2R{alpha} and IL-2 in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis. -- Abstract: ZFAT, originally identified as a candidate susceptibility gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, has been reported to be involved in apoptosis, development and primitive hematopoiesis. Zfat is highly expressed in T- and B-cells in the lymphoid tissues, however, its physiological function in the immune system remains totally unknown. Here, we generated the T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice and demonstrated that Zfat-deficiency leads to a remarkable reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Intriguingly, a reduced expression of IL-7R{alpha} and the impaired responsiveness to IL-7 for the survival were observed in the Zfat-deficient T cells. Furthermore, a severe defect in proliferation and increased apoptosis in the Zfat-deficient T cells following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation was observed with a reduced IL-2R{alpha} expression as well as a reduced IL-2 production. Thus, our findings reveal that Zfat is a critical regulator in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its TCR-mediated response.

  11. Bone morphogenetic protein 4 mediates human embryonic germ cell derivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Marc; Liu, Cyndi; Blumenthal, Paul D; Gearhart, John D; Kerr, Candace L

    2011-02-01

    Human primordial germ cells (PGCs) have proven to be a source of pluripotent stem cells called embryonic germ cells (EGCs). Unlike embryonic stem cells, virtually little is known regarding the factors that regulate EGC survival and maintenance. In mice, the growth factor bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) has been shown to be required for maintaining mouse embryonic stem cells, and disruptions in this gene lead to defects in mouse PGC specification. Here, we sought to determine whether recombinant human BMP4 could influence EGC derivation and/or human PGC survival. We found that the addition of recombinant BMP4 increased the number of human PGCs after 1 week of culture in a dose-responsive manner. The efficiency of EGC derivation and maintenance in culture was also enhanced by the presence of recombinant BMP4 based on alkaline phosphatase and OCT4 staining. In addition, an antagonist of the BMP4 pathway, Noggin, decreased PGC proliferation and led to an increase in cystic embryoid body formation. Quantitative real-time (qRT)-polymerase chain reaction analyses and immunostaining confirmed that the constituents of the BMP4 pathway were upregulated in EGCs versus PGCs. Downstream activators of the BMP4 pathway such as ID1 and phosphorylated SMADs 1 and 5 were also expressed, suggesting a role of this growth factor in EGC pluripotency. PMID:20486775

  12. Building Cell Selectivity into CPP-Mediated Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Martín

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a pressing need for more effective and selective therapies for cancer and other diseases. Consequently, much effort is being devoted to the development of alternative experimental approaches based on selective systems, which are designed to be specifically directed against target cells. In addition, a large number of highly potent therapeutic molecules are being discovered. However, they do not reach clinical trials because of their low delivery, poor specificity or their incapacity to bypass the plasma membrane. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs are an open door for cell-impermeable compounds to reach intracellular targets. Putting all these together, research is sailing in the direction of the design of systems with the capacity to transport new drugs into a target cell. Some CPPs show cell type specificity while others require modifications or form part of more sophisticated drug delivery systems. In this review article we summarize several strategies for directed drug delivery involving CPPs that have been reported in the literature.

  13. Melatonin-mediated cytoprotection against hyperglycemic injury in Muller cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Jiang

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a contributing factor to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of blindness in people at working age worldwide. Recent studies showed that Müller cells play key roles in diabetic retinopathy and produce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF that regulates retinal vascular leakage and proliferation. Melatonin is a potent antioxidant capable of protecting variety of retinal cells from oxidative damage. In addition to the pineal gland, the retina produces melatonin. In the current study, we investigated whether melatonin protects against hyperglycemia-induced oxidative injury to Müller cells and explored the potential underlying mechanisms. Our results show that both melatonin membrane receptors, MT1 and MT2, are expressed in cultured primary Müller cells and are upregulated by elevated glucose levels. Both basal and high glucose-induced VEGF production was attenuated by melatonin treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that melatonin is a potent activator of Akt in Müller cells. Our findings suggest that in addition to functioning as a direct free radical scavenger, melatonin can elicit cellular signaling pathways that are protective against retinal injury during diabetic retinopathy.

  14. Cdon, a cell surface protein, mediates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Chun; Almazan, Guillermina

    2016-06-01

    During central nervous system development, oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs) establish multiple branched processes and axonal contacts to initiate myelination. A complete understanding of the molecular signals implicated in cell surface interaction to initiate myelination/remyelination is currently lacking. The objective of our study was to assess whether Cdon, a cell surface protein that was shown to participate in muscle and neuron cell development, is involved in oligodendrocyte (OLG) differentiation and myelination. Here, we demonstrate that endogenous Cdon protein is expressed in OLPs, increasing in the early differentiation stages and decreasing in mature OLGs. Immunocytochemistry of endogenous Cdon showed localization on both OLG cell membranes and cellular processes exhibiting puncta- or varicosity-like structures. Cdon knockdown with siRNA decreased protein levels by 62% as well as two myelin-specific proteins, MBP and MAG. Conversely, overexpression of full-length rat Cdon increased myelin proteins in OLGs. The complexity of OLGs branching and contact point numbers with axons were also increased in Cdon overexpressing cells growing alone or in coculture with dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs). Furthermore, myelination of DRGNs was decreased when OLPs were transfected with Cdon siRNA. Altogether, our results suggest that Cdon participates in OLG differentiation and myelination, most likely in the initial stages of development. GLIA 2016;64:1021-1033. PMID:26988125

  15. Involvement of Hydrogen Peroxide in Safingol-Induced Endonuclease G-Mediated Apoptosis of Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakazu Hamada

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Safingol, a L-threo-dihydrosphingosine, induced the nuclear translocation of a mitochondrial apoptogenic mediator—endonuclease G (endo G—and apoptosis of human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC cells. Upstream mediators remain largely unknown. The levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in cultured oral SCC cells were measured. Treatment with safingol increased intracellular H2O2 levels but not extracellular H2O2 levels, indicating the production of H2O2. The cell killing effect of safingol and H2O2 was diminished in the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC. Dual staining of cells with annexin V and propidium iodide (PI revealed that apoptotic cell death occurred by treatment with H2O2 and safingol. The number of apoptotic cells was reduced in the presence of NAC. In untreated cells, endo G distributed in the cytoplasm and an association of endo G with mitochondria was observed. After treatment with H2O2 and safingol, endo G was distributed to the nucleus and cytoplasm, indicating the nuclear translocation of the mitochondrial factor. NAC prevented the increase of apoptotic cells and the translocation of endo G. Knock down of endo G diminished the cell killing effect of H2O2 and safingol. These results suggest that H2O2 is involved in the endo G-mediated apoptosis of oral SCC cells by safingol.

  16. Surface deformation and shear flow in ligand mediated cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, Sarthok; Roberts, Anthony; Sarthok Sircar / Anthony Roberts Collaboration

    We present a unified, multiscale model to study the attachment/detachment dynamics of two deforming, near spherical cells, coated with binding ligands and subject to a slow, homogeneous shear flow in a viscous fluid medium. The binding ligands on the surface of the cells experience attractive and repulsive forces in an ionic medium and exhibit finite resistance to rotation via bond tilting. The microscale drag forces and couples describing the fluid flow inside the small separation gap between the cells, are calculated using a combination of methods in lubrication theory and previously published numerical results. For a select range of material and fluid parameters, a hysteretic transition of the sticking probability curves (i.e., the function g*) between the adhesion phase (when g*>0.5) and the fragmentation phase (when g*University startup funds and AR is supported by the Australian Research Council Discovery Grant DP150102385.

  17. Rescue of marker phenotypes mediated by somatic cell hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of irradiation prior to virus-induced cell fusion on the frequency of hybrid production has been measured as a function of radiation dose. The Chinese hamster line wg3h (HGPRT-) was crossed with the TK- mutants; Chinese hamster A23 or mouse 3T34E, and hybrids were selected in HAT medium. Irradiation of one (marker rescue) or both (mutual rescue) partners before fusion yielded qualitatively different results. After X-irradiation, marker rescue curves were of single-hit type, with D0 values about five-fold greater than the irradiated parent cell. Mutual rescue curves were of the multi-hit type, with zero-dose extrapolation value (n) greater than that of the more resistant partner, but no significant alteration in D0. Qualitatively similar results were obtained after U.V.- irradiation, but the probability of rescue per surviving parent cell was

  18. Stem cell mediation of functional recovery after stroke in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Ramos-Cabrer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regenerative strategies of stem cell grafting have been demonstrated to be effective in animal models of stroke. In those studies, the effectiveness of stem cells promoting functional recovery was assessed by behavioral testing. These behavioral studies do, however, not provide access to the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the observed functional outcome improvement. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to address the underlying mechanisms of stem cell mediated functional improvement, this functional improvement after stroke in the rat was investigated for six months after stroke by use of fMRI, somatosensory evoked potentials by electrophysiology, and sensorimotor behavior testing. Stem cells were grafted ipsilateral to the ischemic lesion. Rigorous exclusion of spontaneous recovery as confounding factor permitted to observe graft-related functional improvement beginning after 7 weeks and continuously increasing during the 6-month observation period. The major findings were i functional improvement causally related to the stem cells grafting; ii tissue replacement can be excluded as dominant factor for stem cell mediated functional improvement; iii functional improvement occurs by exclusive restitution of the function in the original representation field, without clear contributions from reorganization processes, and iv stem cells were not detectable any longer after six months. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A delayed functional improvement due to stem cell implantation has been documented by electrophysiology, fMRI and behavioral testing. This functional improvement occurred without cells acting as a tissue replacement for the necrotic tissue after the ischemic event. Combination of disappearance of grafted cells after six months on histological sections with persistent functional recovery was interpreted as paracrine effects by the grafted stem cells being the dominant mechanism of cell activity underlying the observed

  19. Temporal and Tight Hepatitis C Virus Gene Activation in Cultured Human Hepatoma Cells Mediated by a Cell-Permeable Cre Recombinase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong XIAO; Kang XU; Ying YUE; Zhong-Min GUO; Bing HUANG; Xin-Yan DENG; Huan TANG; Xi-Gu CHEN

    2004-01-01

    Conditional gene expression has greatly facilitated the examination of the functions of particular gene products. Using the Cre/lox P switching expression system, we plan to develop efficient conditional transgene activation of hepatitis C virus core protein (HCV-C) cDNA (nucleotide 342-914) in the transgenic mice to overcome "immune tolerance" formed during the embryonic period and "immune escape" against hepatitis virus antigen in our project. To use this system in vivo, the dormant transgenic construct, i.e.,pApoE-SCS-EGFP-HCV-C, was generated using techniques of standard molecular biology. The liverspecific human apoE promoter was here used to target expression of genes of interest (EGFP and HCV-C) to murine liver. Prior to generating the transgenic mice, the availability of Cre/lox P system and construct functionality were successfully verified by a cell-free recombination system and via checking the expression of EGFP and HCV-C in the human hepatoma cells at the mRNA and protein levels. These results suggest that the Cre/lox P system could tightly control expression of EGFP and HCV-C in vitro, which laid a solid foundation to conditionally activate expression of target gene(s) in transgenic mice by Cre-mediated site-specific recombination.

  20. Identifying genes that mediate anthracyline toxicity in immune cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber eFrick

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of the immune system in response to chemotherapeutic agents remains elusive. The interpatient variability observed in immune and chemotherapeutic cytotoxic responses is likely, at least in part, due to complex genetic differences. Through the use of a panel of genetically diverse mouse inbred strains, we developed a drug screening platform aimed at identifying genes underlying these chemotherapeutic cytotoxic effects on immune cells. Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS, we identified four genome-wide significant quantitative trait loci (QTL that contributed to the sensitivity of doxorubicin and idarubicin in immune cells. Of particular interest, a locus on chromosome 16 was significantly associated with cell viability following idarubicin administration (p = 5.01x10-8. Within this QTL lies App, which encodes amyloid beta precursor protein. Comparison of dose-response curves verified that T-cells in App knockout mice were more sensitive to idarubicin than those of C57BL/6J control mice (p < 0.05.In conclusion, the cellular screening approach coupled with GWAS led to the identification and subsequent validation of a gene involved in T-cell viability after idarubicin treatment. Previous studies have suggested a role for App in in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity to anticancer agents; the overexpression of App enhances resistance, while the knockdown of this gene is deleterious to cell viability. Thus, further investigations should include performing mechanistic studies, validating additional genes from the GWAS, including Ppfia1 and Ppfibp1, and ultimately translating the findings to in vivo and human studies.

  1. Effect of Biophytum sensitivum on cell-mediated immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruvayoorappan, C; Kuttan, G

    2007-01-01

    Effect of Biophytum sensitivum on cell-mediated immune response was studied in normal as well as Ehrlich ascites tumor bearing BALB/c mice. Administration of Biophytum sensitivum significantly enhanced the proliferation of splenocytes, thymocytes and bone marrow cells by stimulating the mitogenic potential of various mitogens such as Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), Concanavalin A (Con A), Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and Poke Weed Mitogen (PWM). Natural killer (NK) cell activity was enhanced significantly by Biophytum sensitivum in both the normal (43.6% cell lysis on day 5) and the tumor bearing group (48.2% cell lysis on day 5), and it was found to be earlier than tumor bearing control animals (maximum of 13.4% cell lysis on day 9). Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) was also enhanced significantly in both Biophytum treated normal (35% cell lysis on day 7) as well as tumor bearing animals (40.2% cell lysis on day 7) compared to untreated control tumor bearing animals (maximum of 12.3% cell lysis on day 11). An early antibody dependent complement mediated cytotoxicity (ACC) was also observed in the Biophytum treated normal (22.6% cell lysis, on day 15) and tumor bearing animals (26.4% cell lysis, on day 15). Results of our present study suggest the immunomodulatory property of Biophytum sensitivum. PMID:18075848

  2. Coordinated Regulation of miR-155 and miR-146a Genes during Induction of Endotoxin Tolerance in Macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doxaki, Christina; Kampranis, Sotirios C; Eliopoulos, Aristides G;

    2015-01-01

    Endotoxin tolerance occurs to protect the organism from hyperactivation of innate immune responses, primarily mediated by macrophages. Regulation of endotoxin tolerance occurs at multiple levels of cell responses and requires significant changes in gene expression. In the process of macrophage ac...

  3. IL1β-mediated Stromal COX-2 signaling mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COX-2 is a major inflammatory mediator implicated in colorectal inflammation and cancer. However, the exact origin and role of COX-2 on colorectal inflammation and carcinogenesis are still not well defined. Recently, we reported that COX-2 and iNOS signalings interact in colonic CCD18Co fibroblasts. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by IL1β in primary colonic fibroblasts obtained from normal and cancer patients play a critical role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that COX-2 level was significantly higher in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts with or without stimulation of IL-1β, a powerful stimulator of COX-2. Using in vitro assays for estimating proliferative and invasive potential, we discovered that the proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts than with normal fibroblasts, with or without stimulation of IL1β. Further analysis indicated that the major COX-2 product, prostaglandin E2, directly enhanced proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells in the absence of fibroblasts. Moreover, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398, blocked the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts on the epithelial cancer cells, with or without stimulation of IL-1β. Those results indicate that activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts plays a major role in promoting proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells. In this process, PKC is involved in the activation of COX-2 signaling induced by IL-1β in the fibroblasts.

  4. Alloreactive regulatory T cells allow the generation of mixed chimerism and transplant tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina eRuiz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The induction of donor-specific transplant tolerance is one of the main goals of modern immunology. Establishment of a mixed chimerism state in the transplant recipient has proven to be a suitable strategy for the induction of long-term allograft tolerance; however, current experimental recipient preconditioning protocols have many side effects, and are not feasible for use in future therapies. In order to improve the current mixed chimerism induction protocols, we developed a non-myeloablative bone-marrow transplant protocol using retinoic acid induced alloantigen-specific Tregs, clinically available immunosuppressive drugs and lower doses of irradiation. We demonstrate that retinoic acid induced alloantigen-specific Tregs in addition to a non-myeloablative bone-marrow transplant protocol generates stable mixed chimerism and induce tolerance to allogeneic secondary skin allografts in mice. Therefore, the establishment of mixed chimerism through the use of donor-specific Tregs rather than non-specific immunosuppression could have a potential use in organ transplantation.

  5. A novel toll-like receptor-9 agonist, MGN1703, enhances HIV-1 transcription and NK cell-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infected autologous CD4+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offersen, Rasmus; Nissen, Sara Konstantin; Rasmussen, Thomas Aagaard; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen; Denton, Paul W; Søgaard, Ole Schmeltz; Tolstrup, Martin

    2016-01-01

    currently undergoing phase 3 clinical testing for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer) induces potent antiviral responses in immune effector cells from HIV-1-infected on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. The significant improved safety and tolerability profile of MGN1703 versus TLR9 agonists of......Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists are potent enhancers of innate antiviral immunity and may also reverse HIV-1 latency. Therefore, TLR agonists have a potential role in the context of a 'shock and kill' approach to eradicate HIV-1. Our extensive preclinical evaluation suggests that a novel TLR9...... induced strong antiviral innate immune responses, enhanced HIV-1 transcription and boosted NK cell-mediated suppression of HIV-1 infection in autologous CD4+ T cells. These findings support clinical testing of MGN1703 in HIV-1 eradication trials. IMPORTANCE: We demonstrate, that MGN1703 (a TLR9 agonist...

  6. Dysfunctional miRNA-Mediated Regulation in Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaohan; Zhang, Junying

    2016-01-01

    Past research on pathogenesis of a complex disease suggests that differentially expressed message RNAs (mRNAs) can be noted as biomarkers of a disease. However, significant miRNA-mediated regulation change might also be more deep underlying cause of a disease. In this study, a miRNA-mediated regulation module is defined based on GO terms (Gene Ontology terms) from which dysfunctional modules are identified as the suspected cause of a disease. A miRNA-mediated regulation module contains mRNAs annotated to a GO term and MicroRNAs (miRNAs) which regulate the mRNAs. Based on the miRNA-mediated regulation coefficients estimated from the expression profiles of the mRNA and the miRNAs, a SW (single regulation-weight) value is then designed to evaluate the miRNA-mediated regulation change of an mRNA, and the modules with significantly differential SW values are thus identified as dysfunctional modules. The approach is applied to Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and it identifies 70 dysfunctional miRNA-mediated regulation modules from initial 4381 modules. The identified dysfunctional modules are detected to be comprehensive reflection of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. The proposed approach suggests that accumulated alteration in miRNA-mediated regulation might cause functional alterations, which further cause a disease. Moreover, this approach can also be used to identify diffentially miRNA-mediated regulated mRNAs showing more comprehensive underlying association with a disease than differentially expressed mRNAs. PMID:27258182

  7. Riluzole mediates anti-tumor properties in breast cancer cells independent of metabotropic glutamate receptor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speyer, Cecilia L; Nassar, Mahdy A; Hachem, Ali H; Bukhsh, Miriam A; Jafry, Waris S; Khansa, Rafa M; Gorski, David H

    2016-06-01

    Riluzole, the only drug approved by the FDA for treating amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, inhibits melanoma proliferation through its inhibitory effect on glutamatergic signaling. We demonstrated that riluzole also inhibits the growth of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and described a role for metabotropic glutamate receptor-1 (GRM1) in regulating TNBC cell growth and progression. However, the role of GRM1 in mediating riluzole's effects in breast cancer has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we seek to determine how much of riluzole's action in breast cancer is mediated through GRM1. We investigated anti-tumor properties of riluzole in TNBC and ER+ cells using cell growth, invasion, and soft-agar assays and compared riluzole activity with GRM1 levels. Using Lentiviral vectors expressing GRM1 or shGRM1, these studies were repeated in cells expressing high or low GRM1 levels where the gene was either silenced or overexpressed. Riluzole inhibited proliferation, invasion, and colony formation in both TNBC and ER+ cells. There was a trend between GRM1 expression in TNBC cells and their response to riluzole in both cell proliferation and invasion assays. However, silencing and overexpression studies had no effect on cell sensitivity to riluzole. Our results clearly suggest a GRM1-independent mechanism through which riluzole mediates its effects on breast cancer cells. Understanding the mechanism by which riluzole mediates breast cancer progression will be useful in identifying new therapeutic targets for treating TNBC and in facilitating stratification of patients in clinical trials using riluzole in conjunction with conventional therapy. PMID:27146584

  8. Tetraspanin CD151 Is a Negative Regulator of FcεRI-Mediated Mast Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; Bryce, Paul J; Schleimer, Robert P; Wechsler, Joshua B; Loffredo, Lucas F; Cook-Mills, Joan M; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Berdnikovs, Sergejs

    2015-08-15

    Mast cells are critical in the pathogenesis of allergic disease due to the release of preformed and newly synthesized mediators, yet the mechanisms controlling mast cell activation are not well understood. Members of the tetraspanin family are recently emerging as modulators of FcεRI-mediated mast cell activation; however, mechanistic understanding of their function is currently lacking. The tetraspanin CD151 is a poorly understood member of this family and is specifically induced on mouse and human mast cells upon FcεRI aggregation but its functional effects are unknown. In this study, we show that CD151 deficiency significantly exacerbates the IgE-mediated late phase inflammation in a murine model of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Ex vivo, FcεRI stimulation of bone marrow-derived mast cells from CD151(-/-) mice resulted in significantly enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-13, and TNF-α compared with wild-type controls. However, FcεRI-induced mast cell degranulation was unaffected. At the molecular signaling level, CD151 selectively regulated IgE-induced activation of ERK1/2 and PI3K, associated with cytokine production, but had no effect on the phospholipase Cγ1 signaling, associated with degranulation. Collectively, our data indicate that CD151 exerts negative regulation over IgE-induced late phase responses and cytokine production in mast cells. PMID:26136426

  9. beta1-integrin-mediated signaling essentially contributes to cell survival after radiation-induced genotoxic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordes, N; Seidler, J; Durzok, R; Geinitz, H; Brakebusch, C

    2006-01-01

    Integrin-mediated adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins confers resistance to radiation- or drug-induced genotoxic injury. To analyse the underlying mechanisms specific for beta1-integrins, wild-type beta1A-integrin-expressing GD25beta1A cells were compared to GD25beta1B cells, which express...... findings in tumor cells, human A-172 glioma cells were examined under the same conditions after siRNA-mediated silencing of beta1-integrins. We found that beta1A-integrin-mediated adhesion to fibronectin, collagen-III or beta1-IgG was essential for cell survival after radiation-induced genotoxic injury...... central role of beta1-integrins in Akt- and p130Cas/paxillin-mediated prosurvival signaling. These findings suggest beta1-integrins as critical regulators of cell survival after radiation-induced genotoxic injury. Elucidation of the molecular circuitry of prosurvival beta1-integrin-mediated signaling in...

  10. Effector CD4+ T cell expression signatures and immune-mediated disease associated genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS in immune-mediated diseases have identified over 150 associated genomic loci. Many of these loci play a role in T cell responses, and regulation of T cell differentiation plays a critical role in immune-mediated diseases; however, the relationship between implicated disease loci and T cell differentiation is incompletely understood. To further address this relationship, we examined differential gene expression in naïve human CD4+ T cells, as well as in in vitro differentiated Th1, memory Th17-negative and Th17-enriched CD4+ T cells subsets using microarray and RNASeq. We observed a marked enrichment for increased expression in memory CD4+ compared to naïve CD4+ T cells of genes contained among immune-mediated disease loci. Within memory T cells, expression of disease-associated genes was typically increased in Th17-enriched compared to Th17-negative cells. Utilizing RNASeq and promoter methylation studies, we identified a differential regulation pattern for genes solely expressed in Th17 cells (IL17A and CCL20 compared to genes expressed in both Th17 and Th1 cells (IL23R and IL12RB2, where high levels of promoter methylation are correlated to near zero RNASeq levels for IL17A and CCL20. These findings have implications for human Th17 celI plasticity and for the regulation of Th17-Th1 expression signatures. Importantly, utilizing RNASeq we found an abundant isoform of IL23R terminating before the transmembrane domain that was enriched in Th17 cells. In addition to molecular resolution, we find that RNASeq provides significantly improved power to define differential gene expression and identify alternative gene variants relative to microarray analysis. The comprehensive integration of differential gene expression between cell subsets with disease-association signals, and functional pathways provides insight into disease pathogenesis.

  11. Prostate cancer cell-stromal cell crosstalk via FGFR1 mediates antitumor activity of dovitinib in bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xinhai; Corn, Paul G; Yang, Jun; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Starbuck, Michael W; Efstathiou, Eleni; Li Ning Tapia, Elsa M; Tapia, Elsa M Li-Ning; Zurita, Amado J; Aparicio, Ana; Ravoori, Murali K; Vazquez, Elba S; Robinson, Dan R; Wu, Yi-Mi; Cao, Xuhong; Iyer, Matthew K; McKeehan, Wallace; Kundra, Vikas; Wang, Fen; Troncoso, Patricia; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Logothetis, Christopher J; Navone, Nora M

    2014-09-01

    Bone is the most common site of prostate cancer (PCa) progression to a therapy-resistant, lethal phenotype. We found that blockade of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) with the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor dovitinib has clinical activity in a subset of men with castration-resistant PCa and bone metastases. Our integrated analyses suggest that FGF signaling mediates a positive feedback loop between PCa cells and bone cells and that blockade of FGFR1 in osteoblasts partially mediates the antitumor activity of dovitinib by improving bone quality and by blocking PCa cell-bone cell interaction. These findings account for clinical observations such as reductions in lesion size and intensity on bone scans, lymph node size, and tumor-specific symptoms without proportional declines in serum prostate-specific antigen concentration. Our findings suggest that targeting FGFR has therapeutic activity in advanced PCa and provide direction for the development of therapies with FGFR inhibitors. PMID:25186177

  12. Dynamic Modeling of Anode Function in Enzyme-Based Biofuel Cells Using High Mediator Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-Sheng Chan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The working principle of enzyme-based biofuel cells (EBFCs is the same as that of conventional fuel cells. In an EBFC system, the electricity-production process is very intricate. Analysis requires a mathematical model that can adequately describe the EBFC and predict its performance. This paper develops a dynamic model simulating the discharge performance of the anode for which supported glucose oxidase and mediator immobilize in the EBFC. The dynamic transport behavior of substrate, redox state (ROS of enzyme, enzyme-substrate complex, and the mediator creates different potential changes inside the anode. The potential-step method illustrates the dynamic phenomena of substrate diffusion, ROS of enzyme, production of enzyme-substrate complex, and reduction of the mediator with different potential changes.

  13. An evidence for adhesion-mediated acquisition of acute myeloid leukemic stem cell-like immaturities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funayama, Keiji; Shimane, Miyuki; Nomura, Hitoshi [Department of Integrative Bioscience and Biomedical Engineering, Waseda University, 4-3-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Asano, Shigetaka, E-mail: asgtkmd@waseda.jp [Department of Integrative Bioscience and Biomedical Engineering, Waseda University, 4-3-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2010-02-12

    For long-term survival in vitro and in vivo of acute myeloid leukemia cells, their adhesion to bone marrow stromal cells is indispensable. However, it is still unknown if these events are uniquely induced by the leukemic stem cells. Here we show that TF-1 human leukemia cells, once they have formed a cobblestone area by adhering to mouse bone marrow-derived MS-5 cells, can acquire some leukemic stem cell like properties in association with a change in the CD44 isoform-expression pattern and with an increase in a set of related microRNAs. These findings strongly suggest that at least some leukemia cells can acquire leukemic stem cell like properties in an adhesion-mediated stochastic fashion.

  14. Tolerance to a new free amino acid-based formula in children with IgE or non-IgE-mediated cow’s milk allergy: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berni Canani Roberto

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amino acid-based formulas (Aaf are increasingly used in children with cow’s milk allergy (CMA. To be labeled hypoallergenic these formulas must demonstrate in clinical studies that they don’t provoke reactions in 90% of subjects with confirmed CMA with 95% confidence when given in prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled challenge (DBPCFC trials. The majority of available safety data on Aaf derived from patients with IgE-mediated CMA. Considering substantial differences in the immunologic mechanism and clinical presentation of non-IgE-mediated CMA it’s important to investigate the hypoallergenicity of these formulas also in these patients. We prospectively assessed the tolerance to a new commercially available Aaf in children affected by IgE- or non-IgE-mediated CMA. Methods Consecutive patients affected by IgE- or non-IgE-mediated CMA, aged ≤ 4 years, were enrolled. DBPCFC was carried out with increasing doses of the new Aaf (Sineall, Humana, Milan, Italy, using validated Aaf as placebo. Faecal concentrations of calprotectin (FC and eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP were monitored. Results Sixty patients (44 male, 73.3%, median age 37, 95%CI 34.5–39.6 months, IgE-mediated CMA 29, 48.3% were enrolled. At the diagnosis clinical symptoms were gastrointestinal (46.6%, cutaneous (36.6%, respiratory (23.3%, and systemic (10.0%. After DBPCFC with the new Aaf, no patient presented early or delayed clinical reactions. Faecal concentration of calprotectin and of ECP remained stable after the exposure to the new Aaf. Conclusions The new Aaf is well tolerated in children with IgE- or non-IgE-mediated CMA, and it could be used as a safe dietotherapy regimen for children with this condition. Trial registration The trial was registered in the ClinicalTrials.gov Protocol Registration System (ID number: NCT01622426.

  15. Tolerance to a new free amino acid-based formula in children with IgE or non-IgE-mediated cow’s milk allergy: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Amino acid-based formulas (Aaf) are increasingly used in children with cow’s milk allergy (CMA). To be labeled hypoallergenic these formulas must demonstrate in clinical studies that they don’t provoke reactions in 90% of subjects with confirmed CMA with 95% confidence when given in prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled challenge (DBPCFC) trials. The majority of available safety data on Aaf derived from patients with IgE-mediated CMA. Considering substantial differences in the immunologic mechanism and clinical presentation of non-IgE-mediated CMA it’s important to investigate the hypoallergenicity of these formulas also in these patients. We prospectively assessed the tolerance to a new commercially available Aaf in children affected by IgE- or non-IgE-mediated CMA. Methods Consecutive patients affected by IgE- or non-IgE-mediated CMA, aged ≤ 4 years, were enrolled. DBPCFC was carried out with increasing doses of the new Aaf (Sineall, Humana, Milan, Italy), using validated Aaf as placebo. Faecal concentrations of calprotectin (FC) and eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP) were monitored. Results Sixty patients (44 male, 73.3%, median age 37, 95%CI 34.5–39.6 months, IgE-mediated CMA 29, 48.3%) were enrolled. At the diagnosis clinical symptoms were gastrointestinal (46.6%), cutaneous (36.6%), respiratory (23.3%), and systemic (10.0%). After DBPCFC with the new Aaf, no patient presented early or delayed clinical reactions. Faecal concentration of calprotectin and of ECP remained stable after the exposure to the new Aaf. Conclusions The new Aaf is well tolerated in children with IgE- or non-IgE-mediated CMA, and it could be used as a safe dietotherapy regimen for children with this condition. Trial registration The trial was registered in the ClinicalTrials.gov Protocol Registration System (ID number: NCT01622426). PMID:23418822

  16. RNA interference-mediated silencing of speckle-type POZ protein promotes apoptosis of renal cell cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Sun, Guiling; Sun, Xiuju

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of silencing the speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) gene on renal cell cancer (RCC) cells and to explore its possible mechanism. The A498 and ACHN RCC cells were transfected with small interference RNA (siRNA)-SPOP by lipofection methods. The silencing efficiency was monitored by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. The effects of SPOP silencing on cell apoptosis, cell viability, colony formation ability, cell migration ability, and chemosensitivity to Sorafenib were assessed by flow cytometry, an MTT assay, a colony formation assay, a trans-well migration assay, and a CCK-8 assay, respectively. Its effects on the expression of several cytokines were determined by a protein microarray. Relevant signaling pathways were also analyzed. Compared with the control group, the cell apoptosis rate was significantly higher; the cell viability, the colony formation, and migration ability were significantly decreased in the siRNA-SPOP group. The protein microarray screening showed that the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, matrix metallopeptidase-9, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and stromal cell-derived factor-1 in the siRNA group was significantly decreased and that the expression of granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor and E-cadherin was significantly increased (P<0.05). The relevant signaling pathways were the integrin-mediated cell surface interactions pathway and extracellular matrix organization signal pathway. SPOP gene silencing induced cell apoptosis, decreased cell viability, colony formation, and migration ability, and elevated the drug sensitivity in the RCC cells. A possible mechanism is that silencing SPOP induces the differential expression of E-cadherin, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, matrix metallopeptidase-9, and vascular cell adhesion molecule, which are related to the integrin-mediated cell surface interactions and extracellular

  17. Murine CD83-positive T cells mediate suppressor functions in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiser, Simon; Eckhardt, Jenny; Kuhnt, Christine; Stein, Marcello; Krzyzak, Lena; Seitz, Christine; Tucher, Christine; Knippertz, Ilka; Becker, Christoph; Günther, Claudia; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Lechmann, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    The CD83 molecule (CD83) is a well-known surface marker present on mature dendritic cells (mDC). In this study, we show that CD83 is also expressed on a subset of T cells which mediate regulatory T cell (Treg)-like suppressor functions in vitro and in vivo. Treg-associated molecules including CD25, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), glucocorticoid-induced TNFR family-related gene (GITR), Helios and neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) as well as forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3) were specifically expressed by these CD83(+) T cells. In contrast, CD83(-) T cells showed a naive T cell phenotype with effector T cell properties upon activation. Noteworthy, CD83(-) T cells were not able to upregulate CD83 despite activation. Furthermore, CD83(+) T cells suppressed the proliferation and inflammatory cytokine release of CD83(-) T cells in vitro. Strikingly, stimulated CD83(+) T cells released soluble CD83 (sCD83), which has been reported to possess immunosuppressive properties. In vivo, using the murine transfer colitis model we could show that CD83(+) T cells were able to suppress colitis symptoms while CD83(-) T cells possessed effector functions. In addition, this CD83 expression is also conserved on expanded human Treg. Thus, from these studies we conclude that CD83(+) T cells share important features with regulatory T cells, identifying CD83 as a novel lineage marker to discriminate between different T cell populations. PMID:25151500

  18. Explanatory style and cell-mediated immunity in elderly men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamen-Siegel, L; Rodin, J; Seligman, M E; Dwyer, J

    1991-01-01

    Correlated pessimistic explanatory style--the belief that negative events are caused by internal, stable, and global factors--with lowered immunocompetence in a sample of 26 older adults. Two measures of cell-mediated immunity--T-helper cell/T-suppressor cell ratio and T-lymphocyte response to mitogen challenge--were lower in individuals with a pessimistic style, controlling for the influence of current health, depression, medication, recent weight change, sleep, and alcohol use. A relative increase in the percentage of T-suppressor cells seemed to underlie this immunosuppression. Although the mechanism by which explanatory style might influence immune function remains unknown, we speculate that a pessimistic style might be an important psychological risk factor--at least among older people--in the early course of certain immune-mediated diseases. PMID:1915208

  19. Wnt3a is critical for endothelial progenitor cell-mediated neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yibin; Zhang, Shuo; Yu, Tao; Du, Gongwen; Zhang, Hui; Yin, Zongsheng

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine whether co-culture with bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) affects the proliferation and differentiation of spinal cord-derived neural stem cells (NSCs), and to investigate the underlying mechanism. The proliferation and differentiation of the NSCs were evaluated by an MTT cell proliferation and cytotoxicity assay, and immunofluorescence, respectively. The number of neurospheres and the number of β-tubulin III-positive cells were detected by microscopy. The wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 3a (Wnt3a)/β-catenin signaling pathway was analyzed by western blot analysis and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction to elucidate the possible mechanisms of EPC-mediated NSC proliferation and differentiation. The results revealed that co-culture with EPCs significantly induced NSC proliferation and differentiation. In addition, co-culture with EPCs markedly induced the expression levels of Wnt3a and β-catenin and inhibited the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β). By contrast, Wnt3a knockdown using a short hairpin RNA plasmid in the EPCs reduced EPC-mediated NSC proliferation and differentiation, accompanied by inhibition of the EPC-mediated expression of β-catenin, and its phosphorylation and activation of GSK-3β. Taken together, the findings of the present study demonstrated that Wnt3a was critical for EPC-mediated NSC proliferation and differentiation. PMID:27484039

  20. Measles Virus Spread by Cell-Cell Contacts: Uncoupling of Contact-Mediated Receptor (CD46) Downregulation from Virus Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    firsching, Ruth; Christian J Buchholz; Schneider, Urs; Cattaneo, Roberto; ter Meulen, Volker; Schneider-Schaulies, Jürgen

    1999-01-01

    CD46, which serves as a receptor for measles virus (MV; strain Edmonston), is rapidly downregulated from the cell surface after contact with viral particles or infected cells. We show here that the same two CD46 complement control protein (CCP) domains responsible for primary MV attachment mediate its downregulation. Optimal downregulation efficiency was obtained with CD46 recombinants containing CCP domains 1 and 2, whereas CCP 1, alone and duplicated, induced a slight downregulation. Using ...