WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell mediated tolerance

  1. Layers of dendritic cell-mediated T cell tolerance, their regulation and the prevention of autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Thomas Mayer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The last decades of Nobel prize-honored research have unequivocally proven a key role of dendritic cells (DCs at controlling both T cell immunity and tolerance. A tight balance between these opposing DC functions ensures immune homeostasis and host integrity. Its perturbation could explain pathological conditions such as the attack of self tissues, chronic infections and tumor immune evasion. While recent insights into the complex DC network help to understand the contribution of individual DC subsets to immunity, the tolerogenic functions of DCs only begin to emerge. As these consist of many different layers, the definition of a ‘tolerogenic DC’ is subjected to variation. Moreover, the implication of DCs and DC subsets in the suppression of autoimmunity are incompletely resolved. In this review, we point out conceptual controversies and dissect the various layers of DC-mediated T cell tolerance. These layers include central tolerance, Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, anergy/deletion and negative feedback regulation. The mode and kinetics of antigen presentation is highlighted as an additional factor shaping tolerance. Special emphasis is given to the interaction between layers of tolerance as well as their differential regulation during inflammation. Furthermore, potential technical caveats of DC depletion models are considered. Finally, we summarize our current understanding of DC-mediated tolerance and its role for the suppression of autoimmunity. Understanding the mechanisms of DC-mediated tolerance and their complex interplay is fundamental for the development of selective therapeutic strategies, e.g. for the modulation of autoimmune responses or for the immunotherapy of cancer.

  2. Revisiting the phenotypic and genetic profiling of anergic T cells mediating long-term transplant tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Sylvaine; Chatenoud, Lucienne

    2018-02-01

    Herein our focus will be to revisit peripheral tolerance mechanisms and in particular 'active' or 'dominant' tolerance as originally defined and mediated by regulatory CD4FoxP3 T lymphocytes (Treg) and also T-cell anergy that appears as a major mainstay to support long-term allograft survival. It is at the same time interesting and rewarding that the tool that recently guided our efforts along this path is the in-vivo use of CD3 antibody, the first monoclonal introduced in the clinic (Orthoclone OKT3) about 35 years ago to treat and prevent rejection of renal allografts. Beyond their immunosuppressive activity, whenever administered judiciously, CD3 antibodies promote robust allograft tolerance through selective purging of alloreactive effectors, resetting Treg-mediated active tolerance and promoting a unique subset of anergic CD8 T cells. The new findings discussed open up new perspectives from both a fundamental and a clinical point of view. In basic research, concrete molecular signaling paths are now spotted to finely dissect the conditions that lead to the establishment and maintenance of robust T-lymphocyte anergy mediating allograft tolerance. In the clinic, this may rapidly translate into novel biomarkers to be used in parallel to the ones already available, to better adapt posttransplant immunotherapy and monitor for long-term allograft acceptance.

  3. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells mediate tolerance induction in autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Anja; Verhagen, Johan; Wraith, David C

    2017-05-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS) T cells aberrantly recognize self-peptides of the myelin sheath and attack the central nervous system (CNS). Antigen-specific peptide immunotherapy, which aims to restore tolerance while avoiding the use of non-specific immunosuppressive drugs, is a promising approach to combat autoimmune disease, but the cellular mechanisms behind successful therapy remain poorly understood. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been studied intensively in the field of cancer and to a lesser extent in autoimmunity. Because of their suppressive effect on the immune system in cancer, we hypothesized that the development of MDSCs and their interaction with CD4 + T cells could be beneficial for antigen-specific immunotherapy. Hence, changes in the quantity, phenotype and function of MDSCs during tolerance induction in our model of MS were evaluated. We reveal, for the first time, an involvement of a subset of MDSCs, known as polymorphonuclear (PMN)-MDSCs, in the process of tolerance induction. PMN-MDSCs were shown to adopt a more suppressive phenotype during peptide immunotherapy and inhibit CD4 + T-cell proliferation in a cell-contact-dependent manner, mediated by arginase-1. Moreover, increased numbers of tolerogenic PMN-MDSCs, such as observed over the course of peptide immunotherapy, were demonstrated to provide protection from disease in a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Tolerance to the Intestinal Microbiota Mediated by ROR(γt)(+) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnmacht, Caspar

    2016-07-01

    Harmless microbes colonizing the gut require the establishment of a well-equilibrated symbiosis between this microbiota and its host. However, the immune system is primed to recognize both conserved microbial patterns and foreign antigens, and therefore developed strong tolerance mechanisms to prevent potential fatal immune reactivity to symbiotic microbes. The transcription factor RAR-related orphan-like γt [ROR(γt); encoded by Rorc] plays a key role in the gut for lymphoid tissue organogenesis, development of innate lymphoid cells type 3 (ILC3s) and proinflammatory type 17 T helper (Th17) cells. Surprisingly, recent research has revealed a contribution of ROR(γt)-expressing cells in a variety of tolerance mechanisms in both the innate and adaptive immune system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis reveals the mechanisms of silicon-mediated cadmium tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Sheng, Huachun; Li, Xiuli; Wang, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    Silicon (Si) can alleviate cadmium (Cd) stress in rice (Oryza sativa) plants, however, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms at the single-cell level remains limited. To address these questions, we investigated suspension cells of rice cultured in the dark environment in the absence and presence of Si with either short- (12 h) or long-term (5 d) Cd treatments using a combination of isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ), fluorescent staining, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). We identified 100 proteins differentially regulated by Si under the short- or long-term Cd stress. 70% of these proteins were down-regulated, suggesting that Si may improve protein use efficiency by maintaining cells in the normal physiological status. Furthermore, we showed two different mechanisms for Si-mediated Cd tolerance. Under the short-term Cd stress, the Si-modified cell walls inhibited the uptake of Cd ions into cells and consequently reduced the expressions of glycosidase, cell surface non-specific lipid-transfer proteins (nsLTPs), and several stress-related proteins. Under the long-term Cd stress, the amount of Cd in the cytoplasm in Si-accumulating (+Si) cells was decreased by compartmentation of Cd into vacuoles, thus leading to a lower expression of glutathione S-transferases (GST). These results provide protein-level insights into the Si-mediated Cd detoxification in rice single cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. T Cell-Mediated Chronic Inflammatory Diseases Are Candidates for Therapeutic Tolerance Induction with Heat Shock Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Barbera Betancourt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Failing immunological tolerance for critical self-antigens is the problem underlying most chronic inflammatory diseases of humans. Despite the success of novel immunosuppressive biological drugs, the so-called biologics, in the treatment of diseases such rheumatoid arthritis (RA and type 1 diabetes, none of these approaches does lead to a permanent state of medicine free disease remission. Therefore, there is a need for therapies that restore physiological mechanisms of self-tolerance. Heat shock proteins (HSPs have shown disease suppressive activities in many models of experimental autoimmune diseases through the induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs. Also in first clinical trials with HSP-based peptides in RA and diabetes, the induction of Tregs was noted. Due to their exceptionally high degree of evolutionary conservation, HSP protein sequences (peptides are shared between the microbiota-associated bacterial species and the self-HSP in the tissues. Therefore, Treg mechanisms, such as those induced and maintained by gut mucosal tolerance for the microbiota, can play a role by targeting the more conserved HSP peptide sequences in the inflamed tissues. In addition, the stress upregulated presence of HSP in these tissues may well assist the targeting of the HSP induced Treg specifically to the sites of inflammation.

  7. Dendritic cell-mediated-immunization with xenogenic PrP and adenoviral vectors breaks tolerance and prolongs mice survival against experimental scrapie.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Bruley Rosset

    Full Text Available In prion diseases, PrP(c, a widely expressed protein, is transformed into a pathogenic form called PrP(Sc, which is in itself infectious. Antibodies directed against PrP(c have been shown to inhibit PrP(c to PrP(Sc conversion in vitro and protect in vivo from disease. Other effectors with potential to eliminate PrPSc-producing cells are cytotoxic T cells directed against PrP-derived peptides but their ability to protect or to induce deleterious autoimmune reactions is not known. The natural tolerance to PrP(c makes difficult to raise efficient adaptive responses. To break tolerance, adenovirus (Ad encoding human PrP (hPrP or control Ad were administered to wild-type mice by direct injection or by transfer of Ad-transduced dendritic cells (DCs. Control Ad-transduced DCs from Tg650 mice overexpressing hPrP were also used for immunization. DC-mediated but not direct administration of AdhPrP elicited antibodies that bound to murine native PrP(c. Frequencies of PrP-specific IFNgamma-secreting T cells were low and in vivo lytic activity only targeted cells strongly expressing hPrP. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that CD3(+ T cell infiltration was similar in the brain of vaccinated and unvaccinated 139A-infected mice suggesting the absence of autoimmune reactions. Early splenic PrP(Sc replication was strongly inhibited ten weeks post infection and mean survival time prolonged from 209 days in untreated 139A-infected mice to 246 days in mice vaccinated with DCs expressing the hPrP. The efficacy appeared to be associated with antibody but not with cytotoxic cell-mediated PrP-specific responses.

  8. Deletional self-tolerance to a melanocyte/melanoma antigen derived from tyrosinase is mediated by a radio-resistant cell in peripheral and mesenteric lymph nodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nichols, Lisa A.; Chen, Yiming; Colella, Teresa A.; Bennett, Clare L.; Clausen, Bjoern E.; Engelhard, Victor H.

    2007-01-01

    Self-tolerance to melanocyte differentiation Ags limits the ability to generate therapeutic antimelanoma responses. However, the mechanisms responsible for CD8 T cell tolerance to these Ags are unknown. We have used a newly generated TCR-transgenic mouse to establish the basis of tolerance to one

  9. New insights into HLA-G mediated tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodio, G; Sales de Albuquerque, R; Gregori, S

    2014-09-01

    Human Leukocyte Antigen G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical HLA class I molecule with well-characterized immunomodulatory activities. HLA-G was first described as a regulatory molecule that allows the fetus to elude the maternal immune response. In the last decade it has become evident that HLA-G is involved in modulating both innate and adaptive immune responses, in maintaining tolerance in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and after transplantation, and in promoting immune escape in cancer and infectious diseases. HLA-G exerts its modulatory/regulatory functions directly by interacting with specific inhibitory receptors. The expression of HLA-G is finely tuned by genetic variations in the noncoding region of the locus. The recent discovery of dendritic cells-10 (DC-10) as naturally occurring HLA-G-expressing dendritic cells opens new perspectives in the identification of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying HLA-G-mediated tolerance. An overview on the HLA-G-mediated inhibition of innate and adaptive immune cells, on the genetic influence on HLA-G expression, and on HLA-G-expressing DC-10 is presented. Moreover, we discuss the central and critical role of DC-10 in the HLA-G-mediated tolerance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. IL-2/neuroantigen fusion proteins as antigen-specific tolerogens in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE): correlation of T cell-mediated antigen presentation and tolerance induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannie, Mark D; Clayson, Barbara A; Buskirk, Elizabeth J; DeVine, Jarret L; Hernandez, Jose J; Abbott, Derek J

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether the Ag-targeting activity of cytokine/neuroantigen (NAg) fusion proteins may be associated with mechanisms of tolerance induction. To assess this question, we expressed fusion proteins comprised of a N-terminal cytokine domain and a C-terminal NAg domain. The cytokine domain comprised either rat IL-2 or IL-4, and the NAg domain comprised the dominant encephalitogenic determinant of the guinea pig myelin basic protein. Subcutaneous administration of IL2NAg (IL-2/NAg fusion protein) into Lewis rats either before or after an encephalitogenic challenge resulted in an attenuated course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In contrast, parallel treatment of rats with IL4NAg (IL-4/NAg fusion protein) or NAg lacked tolerogenic activity. In the presence of IL-2R(+) MHC class II(+) T cells, IL2NAg fusion proteins were at least 1,000 times more potent as an Ag than NAg alone. The tolerogenic activity of IL2NAg in vivo and the enhanced potency in vitro were both dependent upon covalent linkage of IL-2 and NAg. IL4NAg also exhibited enhanced antigenic potency. IL4NAg was approximately 100-fold more active than NAg alone in the presence of splenic APC. The enhanced potency of IL4NAg also required covalent linkage of cytokine and NAg and was blocked by soluble IL-4 or by a mAb specific for IL-4. Other control cytokine/NAg fusion proteins did not exhibit a similar enhancement of Ag potency compared with NAg alone. Thus, the IL2NAg and IL4NAg fusion proteins targeted NAg for enhanced presentation by particular subsets of APC. The activities of IL2NAg revealed a potential relationship between NAg targeting to activated T cells, T cell-mediated Ag presentation, and tolerance induction.

  11. B cells in operational tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesneau, M; Danger, R; Soulillou, J-P; Brouard, S

    2018-02-16

    Transplantation is currently the therapy of choice for endstage organ failure even though it requires long-term immunosuppresive therapy, with its numerous side effects, for acceptance of the transplanted organ. In rare cases however, patients develop operational tolerance, that is, graft survival without immunosuppression. Studies conducted on these patients reveal genetic, phenotypic, and functional signatures. They provide a better understanding of the immunological mechanisms involved in operational tolerance and define biomarkers that could be used to adapt immunosuppressive treatment to the individual, safely reduce immunosuppression doses, and ideally and safely guide immunosuppression withdrawal. This review summarizes studies that suggest a role for B cells as biomarkers of operational tolerance and discusses the use of B cells as a predictive tool for immunologic risk. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Possible new roles for tolerable risk mediators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Riordan, T.

    1989-01-01

    In his report on the Sizewell B Inquiry, the Inspector, Sir Frank Layfield, Q.C. introduced the term ''tolerable risk''. He regarded this as a better concept than the much abused and mis-interpreted phrase ''acceptable risk''. The application of tolerable risk implies that, even after regulation and incorporation of appropriate design safety criteria, there will always be a residual risk over which elements of the public will remain uneasy. They may tolerate, but they do not accept. They only tolerate because they have come to trust the process by which safety is assessed and delivered. This interpretation also implies that no safety target, the central theme of this meeting, should ever be regarded as stable or final. Such targets should continually be argued about and subject to regular searching review. Above all, such targets need to be re-justified to a doubting public so that they can be assured that the safety delivery process, namely the principles and management methods to ensure safety levels are actually met, is accountable and open for them to inspect. Thus the ''tolerable zone'' of nuclear plant safety is the product of procedures not simply assessments. These procedures need to be robust and adaptable. They need to be able to incorporate diversity of viewpoints and have a capacity to enable all who are involved to learn from each other's viewpoints and experience. In short the safety determination process needs to be more participatory and creative. (author)

  13. Tolerization with BLP down-regulates HMGB1 a critical mediator of sepsis-related lethality.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coffey, J Calvin

    2012-02-03

    Tolerization with bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) affords a significant survival benefit in sepsis. Given that high mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB1) is a recognized mediator of sepsis-related lethality, we determined if tolerization with BLP leads to alterations in HMGB1. In vitro, BLP tolerization led to a reduction in HMGB1 gene transcription. This was mirrored at the protein level, as HMGB1 protein expression and release were reduced significantly in BLP-tolerized human THP-1 monocytic cells. BLP tolerance in vivo led to a highly significant, long-term survival benefit following challenge with lethal dose BLP in C57BL\\/6 mice. This was associated with an attenuation of HMGB1 release into the circulation, as evidenced by negligible serum HMGB1 levels in BLP-tolerized mice. Moreover, HMGB1 levels in peritoneal macrophages from BLP-tolerized mice were reduced significantly. Hence, tolerization with BLP leads to a down-regulation of HMGB1 protein synthesis and release. The improved survival associated with BLP tolerance could thus be explained by a reduction in HMGB1, were the latter associated with lethality in BLP-related sepsis. In testing this hypothesis, it was noted that neutralization of HMGB1, using anti-HMGB1 antibodies, abrogated BLP-associated lethality almost completely. To conclude, tolerization with BLP leads to a down-regulation of HMGB1, thus offering a novel means of targeting the latter. HMGB1 is also a mediator of lethality in BLP-related sepsis.

  14. B-Cell Activation and Tolerance Mediated by B-Cell Receptor, Toll-Like Receptor, and Survival Signal Crosstalk in SLE Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    726. 131. Frasca D , Riley RL, Blomberg BB. Effect of age on the immunoglobulin class switch. Crit Rev Immunol 2004;24:297–320. 132. Frasca D , Van der...infections. J Exp Med 1987;165:64–69. 157. Markine-Goriaynoff D , Coutelier JP. Increased efficacy of the immunoglobulin G2a subclass in antibody...cells were stained by TO-PRO-3, while CFSE dilution indicates proliferation. (C, D , E) Fo B cells were cultured with STIC9 + anti-CD40 with or

  15. Novel process of intrathymic tumor-immune tolerance through CCR2-mediated recruitment of Sirpα+ dendritic cells: a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohisa Baba

    Full Text Available Immune surveillance system can detect more efficiently secretory tumor-specific antigens, which are superior as a target for cancer immunotherapy. On the contrary, immune tolerance can be induced in the thymus when a tumor antigen is massively secreted into circulation. Thus, the secretion of tumor-specific antigen may have contradictory roles in tumor immunity in a context-dependent manner. However, it remains elusive on the precise cellular mechanism of intrathymic immune tolerance against tumor antigens. We previously demonstrated that a minor thymic conventional dendritic cell (cDC subset, CD8α(-Sirpα(+ cDCs, but not the major subset, CD8α(+Sirpα(- cDCs can selectively capture blood-borne antigens and crucially contribute to the self-tolerance. In the present study, we further demonstrated that Sirpα(+ cDCs can capture a blood-borne antigen leaking inside the interlobular vascular-rich regions (IVRs. Blood-borne antigen selectively captured by Sirpα(+ cDCs can induce antigen-specific Treg generation or negative selection, depending on the immunogenicity of the presented antigen. Furthermore, CCR2 expression by thymic Sirpα(+ cDCs and abundant expression of its ligands, particularly, CCL2 by tumor-bearing mice prompted us to examine the function of thymic Sirpα(+ cDCs in tumor-bearing mice. Interestingly, tumor-bearing mice deposited CCL2 inside IVRs in the thymus. Moreover, tumor formation induced the accumulation of Sirpα(+ cDCs in IVRs under the control of CCR2-CCL2 axis and enhanced their capacity to take up antigens, resulting in the shift from Treg differentiation to negative selection. Finally, intrathymic negative selection similarly ensued in CCR2-competent mice once the tumor-specific antigen was secreted into bloodstream. Thus, we demonstrated that thymic Sirpα(+ cDCs crucially contribute to this novel process of intrathymic tumor immune tolerance.

  16. Bacterial cells with improved tolerance to polyamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Provided are bacterial cells genetically modified to improve their tolerance to certain commodity chemicals, such as polyamines, and methods of preparing and using such bacterial cells for production of polyamines and other compounds....

  17. Bacterial cells with improved tolerance to polyols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial cells genetically modified to improve their tolerance to certain commodity chemicals, such as diols and other polyols, and to methods of preparing and using such bacterial cells for production of polyols and other compounds....

  18. B-Cell Activation and Tolerance Mediated by B-Cell Receptor, Toll-Like Receptor and Survival Signal Crosstalk in SLE Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    C. O., P. H. van der Meide, and H. O. McDevitt. 1987. In vivo treatment of (NZB X NZW)F1 lupus -like nephritis with monoclonal antibody to gamma in...development of murine lupus nephritis . Arthritis Rheum. 58: 1107–1115. 12. Berland, R., L. Fernandez, E. Kari, J. H. Han, I. Lomakin, S. Akira, H. H...of the origin of B cells responsible for producing detrimental antibodies in autoimmune diseases, particularly Lupus and related diseases. What

  19. Bacterial mediated amelioration of drought stress in drought tolerant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacterial mediated amelioration of drought stress in drought tolerant and susceptible cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa L.) YS Gusain, US Singh, AK Sharma. Abstract. In the present study, plant growth promoting rhizobacterial (PGPR) strains Pseudomonas fluorescence strain P2, Pseudomonas jessenii R62, Pseudomonas ...

  20. ES-cell derived hematopoietic cells induce transplantation tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bonde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone marrow cells induce stable mixed chimerism under appropriate conditioning of the host, mediating the induction of transplantation tolerance. However, their strong immunogenicity precludes routine use in clinical transplantation due to the need for harsh preconditioning and the requirement for toxic immunosuppression to prevent rejection and graft-versus-host disease. Alternatively, embryonic stem (ES cells have emerged as a potential source of less immunogenic hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs. Up till now, however, it has been difficult to generate stable hematopoietic cells from ES cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we derived CD45(+ HPCs from HOXB4-transduced ES cells and showed that they poorly express MHC antigens. This property allowed their long-term engraftment in sublethally irradiated recipients across MHC barriers without the need for immunosuppressive agents. Although donor cells declined in peripheral blood over 2 months, low level chimerism was maintained in the bone marrow of these mice over 100 days. More importantly, chimeric animals were protected from rejection of donor-type cardiac allografts. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show, for the first time, the efficacy of ES-derived CD45(+ HPCs to engraft in allogenic recipients without the use of immunosuppressive agents, there by protecting cardiac allografts from rejection.

  1. Immunity and Tolerance Induced by Intestinal Mucosal Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Aliberti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells present in the digestive tract are constantly exposed to environmental antigens, commensal flora, and invading pathogens. Under steady-state conditions, these cells have high tolerogenic potential, triggering differentiation of regulatory T cells to protect the host from unwanted proinflammatory immune responses to innocuous antigens or commensals. On the other hand, these cells must discriminate between commensal flora and invading pathogens and mount powerful immune response against pathogens. A potential result of unbalanced tolerogenic versus proinflammatory responses mediated by dendritic cells is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, food allergies, and celiac disease. Herein, we review the dendritic cell population involved in mediating tolerance and immunity in mucosal surfaces, the progress in unveiling their development in vivo, and factors that can influence their functions.

  2. STAT4-associated natural killer cell tolerance following liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, K M; Hydes, T J; Cheent, K S; Cassidy, S A; Traherne, J A; Jayaraman, J; Trowsdale, J; Alexander, G J; Little, A-M; McFarlane, H; Heneghan, M A; Purbhoo, M A; Khakoo, S I

    2017-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important mediators of liver inflammation in chronic liver disease. The aim of this study was to investigate why liver transplants (LTs) are not rejected by NK cells in the absence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching, and to identify a tolerogenic NK cell phenotype. Phenotypic and functional analyses on NK cells from 54 LT recipients were performed, and comparisons made with healthy controls. Further investigation was performed using gene expression analysis and donor:recipient HLA typing. NK cells from non-HCV LT recipients were hypofunctional, with reduced expression of NKp46 (p<0.05) and NKp30 (p<0.001), reduced cytotoxicity (p<0.001) and interferon (IFN)-γ secretion (p<0.025). There was no segregation of this effect with HLA-C, and these functional changes were not observed in individuals with HCV. Microarray and RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated downregulation of STAT4 in NK cells from LT recipients (p<0.0001). Changes in the expression levels of the transcription factors Helios (p=0.06) and Hobit (p=0.07), which control NKp46 and IFNγ expression, respectively, were also detected. Hypofunctionality of NK cells was associated with impaired STAT4 phosphorylation and downregulation of the STAT4 target microRNA-155. Conversely in HCV-LT NK cell tolerance was reversed, consistent with the more aggressive outcome of LT for HCV. LT is associated with transcriptional and functional changes in NK cells, resulting in reduced activation. NK cell tolerance occurs upstream of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I mediated education, and is associated with deficient STAT4 phosphorylation. STAT4 therefore represents a potential therapeutic target to induce NK cell tolerance in liver disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Assay of mast cell mediators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rådinger, Madeleine; Jensen, Bettina M; Swindle, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Mediator release from activated mast cells is a major initiator of the symptomology associated with allergic disorders such as anaphylaxis and asthma. Thus, methods to monitor the generation and release of such mediators have widespread applicability in studies designed to understand the processes...... regulating mast cell activation and for the identification of therapeutic approaches to block mast cell-driven disease. In this chapter, we discuss approaches used for the determination of mast cell degranulation, lipid-derived inflammatory mediator production, and cytokine/chemokine gene expression as well...

  4. B Cell Tolerance in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Gururajan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available B lymphocyte receptors are generated randomly during the bone marrow developmental phase of B cells. Hence, the B cell repertoire consists of both self and foreign antigen specificities necessitating specific tolerance mechanisms to eliminate self-reactive B cells. This review summarizes the major mechanisms of B cell tolerance, which include clonal deletion, anergy and receptor editing. In the bone marrow presentation of antigen in membrane bound form is more effective than soluble form and the role of dendritic cells in this process is discussed. Toll like receptor derived signals affect activation of B cells by certain ligands such as nucleic acids and have been shown to play crucial roles in the development of autoimmunity in several animal models. In the periphery availability of BAFF, a B cell survival factor plays a critical role in the survival of self-reactive B cells. Antibodies against BAFF have been found to be effective therapeutic agents in lupus like autoimmune diseases. Recent developments are targeting anergy to control the growth of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

  5. CO tolerance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubler, L.; Scherer, G.G.; Wokaun, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Reformed methanol can be used as a fuel for polymer electrolyte fuel cells instead of pure hydrogen. The reformate gas contains mainly H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} in the order of 20% and low levels of CO in the order of 100 ppm. CO causes severe voltage losses due to poisoning of the anode catalyst. The effect of CO on cell performance was investigated at different CO levels up to 100 ppm. Various options to improve the CO tolerance of the fuel cell were assessed thereafter, of which the injection of a few percents of oxygen into the fuel feed stream proved to be most effective. By mixing 1% of oxygen with hydrogen containing 100 ppm CO, complete recovery of the cell performance could be attained. (author) 2 figs., 2 tabs., 3 refs.

  6. IL-34 is a Treg-specific cytokine and mediates transplant tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Bézie, Séverine; Picarda, Elodie; Ossart, Jason; Tesson, Laurent; Usal, Claire; Renaudin, Karine; Anegon, Ignacio; Guillonneau, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines and metabolic pathway–controlling enzymes regulate immune responses and have potential as powerful tools to mediate immune tolerance. Blockade of the interaction between CD40 and CD40L induces long-term cardiac allograft survival in rats through a CD8+CD45RClo Treg potentiation. Here, we have shown that the cytokine IL-34, the immunoregulatory properties of which have not been previously studied in transplantation or T cell biology, is expressed by rodent CD8+CD45RClo Tregs and huma...

  7. Arabidopsis AINTEGUMENTA mediates salt tolerance by trans-repressing SCABP8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lai-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Bo; Yao, Shun-Qiao; Liu, Aizhong

    2015-08-01

    The Arabidopsis AINTEGUMENTA (ANT) gene, which encodes an APETALA2 (AP2)-like transcription factor, controls plant organ cell number and organ size throughout shoot development. ANT is thus a key factor in the development of plant shoots. Here, we have found that ANT plays an essential role in conferring salt tolerance in Arabidopsis. ant-knockout mutants presented a salt-tolerant phenotype, whereas transgenic plants expressing ANT under the 35S promoter (35S:ANT) exhibited more sensitive phenotypes under high salt stress. Further analysis indicated that ANT functions mainly in the shoot response to salt toxicity. Target gene analysis revealed that ANT bound to the promoter of SOS3-LIKE CALCIUM BINDING PROTEIN 8 (SCABP8), which encodes a putative Ca(2+) sensor, thereby inhibiting expression of SCABP8 (also known as CBL10). It has been reported that the salt sensitivity of scabp8 is more prominent in shoot tissues. Genetic experiments indicated that the mutation of SCABP8 suppresses the ant-knockout salt-tolerant phenotype, implying that ANT functions as a negative transcriptional regulator of SCABP8 upon salt stress. Taken together, the above results reveal that ANT is a novel regulator of salt stress and that ANT binds to the SCABP8 promoter, mediating salt tolerance. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Nitrate tolerance impairs nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jørn Bech; Boesgaard, Søren; Poulsen, Henrik E.

    1996-01-01

    Nitrates, Nitrate tolerence, Nitric oxide, acetylcholine, N-acetylcholine, N-acetylcysteine, L-NAME, Rat, Anesthetized......Nitrates, Nitrate tolerence, Nitric oxide, acetylcholine, N-acetylcholine, N-acetylcysteine, L-NAME, Rat, Anesthetized...

  9. 2. Cell-mediatedImmunity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    Cell-mediated Immunity sma hmed', Banishree Saha', nand Patwardhan°,. Shwetha Shivaprasad and Dipankar Nandis. Our immune system, by and large, does a fine job in protect- ing us from opportunistic and infectious microbes, potential carcinogens and allergens. It is therefore crucial to under- stand the organization ...

  10. Selection of D-Alanine-Tolerant Rice Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hisashi, Manabe; Koji, Ohira; Aizu Junior College of Fukushima Prefecture; Department of Agricultural Chemistry, Faculty of Agriculture, Tohoku University

    1984-01-01

    By repeating subculture of rice cells (parent cells) in a D-alanine containing medium, we could select rice cells which grew well in the D-alanine medium. The D-alanine-tolerant cells absorbed a fairly small amount of D-alanine from the medium and did not accumulate much D-alanine in the cells. Aggregation of D-alanine-tolerant cells was greater than that of parent cells. D-Alanine metabolism of D-alanine.-tolerant cells did not increase in comparison with parent cells.

  11. Specific Osmolyte Transporters Mediate Bile Tolerance in Listeria monocytogenes▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Debbie; Sleator, Roy D.; Casey, Pat G.; Hill, Colin; Gahan, Cormac G. M.

    2009-01-01

    The food-borne pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes has the potential to adapt to an array of suboptimal growth environments encountered within the host. The pathogen is relatively bile tolerant and has the capacity to survive and grow within both the small intestine and the gallbladder in murine models of oral infection. We have previously demonstrated a role for the principal carnitine transport system of L. monocytogenes (OpuC) in gastrointestinal survival of the pathogen (R. Sleator, J. Wouters, C. G. M. Gahan, T. Abee, and C. Hill, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 67:2692-2698, 2001). However, the mechanisms by which OpuC, or indeed carnitine, protects the pathogen in this environment are unclear. In the current study, systematic analysis of strains with mutations in osmolyte transporters revealed a role for OpuC in resisting the acute toxicity of bile, with a minor role also played by BetL, a secondary betaine uptake system which also exhibits a low affinity for carnitine. In addition, the toxic effects of bile on wild-type L. monocytogenes cells were ameliorated when carnitine (but not betaine) was added to the medium. lux-promoter fusions to the promoters of the genes encoding the principal osmolyte uptake systems Gbu, BetL, and OpuC and the known bile tolerance system BilE were constructed. Promoter activity for all systems was significantly induced in the presence of bile, with the opuC and bilE promoters exhibiting the highest levels of bile-dependent expression in vitro and the betL and bilE promoters showing the highest expression levels in the intestines of orally inoculated mice. A direct comparison of all osmolyte transporter mutants in a murine oral infection model confirmed a major role for OpuC in intestinal persistence and systemic invasion and a minor role for the BetL transporter in fecal carriage. This study therefore demonstrates a previously unrecognized function for osmolyte uptake systems in bile tolerance in L. monocytogenes. PMID

  12. Parasite dispersal risk tolerance is mediated by its reproductive value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Maxcy P; Delaplane, Keith S

    2017-10-01

    Parasite dispersal theory draws heavily upon epidemiological SIR models in which host status (susceptible (S), infected (I), or recovered (R)) is used to study parasite dispersal evolution. In contrast to these extrinsically host-centric drivers, in this study we focus on an intrinsic driver, the parasite's reproductive value (predicted future offspring) as a regulator of the extent to which the individual will engage in risky dispersal behaviour. As a model system we use the honeybee Apis mellifera and its ectoparasite, the mite Varroa destructor . Mite reproduction happens exclusively inside cells of bee brood, and newly emerged fecund mites may parasitize either a homocolonial brood cell (low risk dispersal) or emigrate to a new bee colony via phoretic attachment to mature forager bees (high risk dispersal). In an empirical bioassay, prepartum mites (high reproductive value) and postpartum mites (low reproductive value) were offered a choice of newly emerged homocolonial worker bees (low risk), homocolonial pollen forager bees (high risk), or heterocolonial pollen foragers (high risk). A preference for newly emerged bees was earlier and more strongly sustained among prepartum mites. This suggests comparatively greater dispersal risk tolerance among postpartum mites with lower reproductive value. A dangerous bid for dispersal may be adaptive if the individual has already successfully reproduced and the rewards for successful dispersal are sufficiently large.

  13. Interleukin 35: A Key Mediator of Suppression and the Propagation of Infectious Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian M Olson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The importance of regulatory T cells in balancing the effector arm of the immune system is well documented, playing a central role in preventing autoimmunity, facilitating graft tolerance following organ transplantation, and having a detrimental impact on the development of anti-tumor immunity. These regulatory responses use a variety of mechanisms to mediate suppression, including soluble factors. While IL-10 and TGF-β are the most commonly studied immunosuppressive cytokines, the recently identified IL-35 has been shown to have potent suppressive function in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, not only does IL-35 have the ability to directly suppress effector T cell responses, it is also able to expand regulatory responses by propagating infectious tolerance and generating a potent population of IL-35-expressing inducible regulatory T cells. In this review, we summarize research characterizing the structure and function of IL-35, examine its role in disease, and discuss how it can contribute to the induction of a distinct population of inducible regulatory T cells.

  14. Activation of glioma cells generates immune tolerant NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bo; Wu, Wei; Wei, Xiaowei; Li, Yang; Ren, Gang; Fan, Wenhai

    2014-12-12

    Therapeutic outcomes of glioma are currently not encouraging. Tumor tolerance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of glioma. It is reported that micro RNAs (miR) are associated with tumor development. This study aims to investigate the role of miR-92a in the development of tolerant natural killer T (NKT) cells. In this study, U87 cells (a human glioma cell line) and primary glioma cells were prepared. The assessment of miR-92a was performed by real time RT-PCR. The expression of interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-6 in NKT cells was evaluated by flow cytometry. Results showed that abundant IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells were detected in glioma tissue. Cultures of glioma cells and NKT cells induced the expression of IL-6 and IL-10 in NKT cells. Glioma cells expressed miR-92a; the latter played a critical role in the induction of IL-6 and IL-10 expression in NKT cells. The expression of the antitumor molecules, including perforin, Fas ligand, and interferon-γ, was significantly attenuated compared with control NKT cells. The IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells showed less capability in the induction of apoptosis in glioma cells, but showed the immune suppressor functions on CD8(+) T cell activities. We conclude that glioma-derived miR-92a induces IL-6(+) IL-10(+) NKT cells; this fraction of NKT cells can suppress cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Possible neuroimmunomodulation therapy in T-cell-mediated oral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Sato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and oral lichen planus are local chronic inflammatory diseases which are implicated in T cell-mediated immunity. According to the systematic review, there is insufficient evidence to support any specific treatment for T-cell mediated oral diseases. The hypothesis: In this paper, we propose a hypothesis that recurrent aphthous stomatitis and oral lichen planus can be treated with selective α7 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 -nAChR agonists. Our hypothesis is supported by the following two facts. First, the pathophysiological conditions, T h 1/T h 17 cell activation and autonomic nervous system dysfunction, are observed in T-cell mediated oral diseases as well as in T-cell mediated systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Second, the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is inhibited in systemic T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory diseases. On the other hand, treatment with α7 -nAChR agonists which activate the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway suppresses neuroinflammation via inhibition of T h 1/T h 17 responses in animal model of systemic T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory diseases. We thus expect that selective α7 -nAChR agonists will be effective for the treatment of T-cell mediated oral diseases. Evaluation of the hypothesis: To test our hypothesis, we need to develop in vivo mouse model of T-cell mediated oral diseases. To evaluate the therapeutic effect of a selective α7 -nAChR agonist, we choose ABT-107 because of its safety and tolerability. We believe that the selective α7 -nAChR agonist, especially ABT-107, may be a therapeutic drug to treat T-cell mediated oral diseases.

  16. Bacterial cells with improved tolerance to isobutyric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial cells genetically modified to improve their tolerance to certain commodity chemicals, such as isobutyric acid and related compounds, and methods of preparing and using such bacterial cells for production of isobutyric acid and related compounds....

  17. Bacterial mediated amelioration of drought stress in drought tolerant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    yogendra

    2015-02-23

    Feb 23, 2015 ... growth and induction of stress related enzymes in Sahbhagi (drought tolerance) and IR-64 (drought sensitive) cultivars of rice .... Leaf rolling in drought stress was determined based on rice standard evaluation system developed by International Rice Research Institute (IRRI). A visual score was taken of the ...

  18. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis-mediated tomato tolerance to drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitarra, Walter; Maserti, Biancaelena; Gambino, Giorgio; Guerrieri, Emilio; Balestrini, Raffaella

    2016-07-02

    A multidisciplinary approach, involving eco-physiological, morphometric, biochemical and molecular analyses, has been used to study the impact of two different AM fungi, i.e. Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus intraradices, on tomato response to water stress. Overall, results show that AM symbiosis positively affects the tolerance to drought in tomato with a different plant response depending on the involved AM fungal species.

  19. Tolerance and Exhaustion: Defining Mechanisms of T cell Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schietinger, Andrea; Greenberg, Philip D.

    2013-01-01

    CD8 T cell activation and differentiation is tightly controlled, and dependent on the context in which naïve T cells encounter antigen, can either result in functional memory or T cell dysfunction, including exhaustion, tolerance, anergy, or senescence. With the identification of phenotypic and functional traits shared in different settings of T cell dysfunction, distinctions between such dysfunctional `states' have become blurred. Here, we discuss distinct states of CD8 T cell dysfunction, with emphasis on (i) T cell tolerance to self-antigens (self-tolerance), (ii) T cell exhaustion during chronic infections, and (iii) tumor-induced T cell dysfunction. We highlight recent findings on cellular and molecular characteristics defining these states, cell-intrinsic regulatory mechanisms that induce and maintain them, and strategies that can lead to their reversal. PMID:24210163

  20. Mechanisms for T cell tolerance induced with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Zhu; Zhang, Jin-Qiao; Sun, Li-Xia

    2016-02-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been widely accepted as a mediator of T cell tolerance. The immune modulatory effect of G-CSF on T cells is believed to be mediated exclusively through other effector cells, such as monocytes, tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC), and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Recent advances confirmed the direct effects of G-CSF in inducing immune tolerance of T cells through the G-CSF-G-CSF receptor pathway and related molecular mechanisms. This review aims to summarize the findings associated with the direct and indirect mechanisms for T cell tolerance induced with G-CSF. The role of G-CSF in preventing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and in treating autoimmune diseases (ADs) is also discussed. It is conceivable that G-CSF and immune cell compositions, such as tolerogenic DC and CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells, modulated by G-CSF could become an integral part of the immunomodulatory therapies against GVHD and ADs in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Membrane-bound Dickkopf-1 in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells suppresses T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Wook-Jin; Park, Jong-Hyun; Henegariu, Octavian; Yilmaz, Saliha; Hao, Liming; Bothwell, Alfred L M

    2017-10-01

    Induction of tolerance is a key mechanism to maintain or to restore immunological homeostasis. Here we show that Foxp3 + regulatory T (Treg) cells use Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) to regulate T-cell-mediated tolerance in the T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis model. Treg cells from DKK-1 hypomorphic doubleridge mice failed to control CD4 + T-cell proliferation, resulting in CD4 T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. Thymus-derived Treg cells showed a robust expression of DKK-1 but not in naive or effector CD4 T cells. DKK-1 expression in Foxp3 + Treg cells was further increased upon T-cell receptor stimulation in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, Foxp3 + Treg cells expressed DKK-1 in the cell membrane and the functional inhibition of DKK-1 using DKK-1 monoclonal antibody abrogated the suppressor function of Foxp3 + Treg cells. DKK-1 expression was dependent on de novo protein synthesis and regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway but not by the canonical Wnt pathway. Taken together, our results highlight membrane-bound DKK-1 as a novel Treg-derived mediator to maintain immunological tolerance in T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. © 2017 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Tolerance associated gene expression following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Pidala

    Full Text Available Biologic markers of immune tolerance may facilitate tailoring of immune suppression duration after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT. In a cross-sectional study, peripheral blood samples were obtained from tolerant (n = 15, median 38.5 months post-HCT and non-tolerant (n = 17, median 39.5 post-HCT HCT recipients and healthy control subjects (n = 10 for analysis of immune cell subsets and differential gene expression. There were no significant differences in immune subsets across groups. We identified 281 probe sets unique to the tolerant (TOL group and 122 for non-tolerant (non-TOL. These were enriched for process networks including NK cell cytotoxicity, antigen presentation, lymphocyte proliferation, and cell cycle and apoptosis. Differential gene expression was enriched for CD56, CD66, and CD14 human lineage-specific gene expression. Differential expression of 20 probe sets between groups was sufficient to develop a classifier with > 90% accuracy, correctly classifying 14/15 TOL cases and 15/17 non-TOL cases. These data suggest that differential gene expression can be utilized to accurately classify tolerant patients following HCT. Prospective investigation of immune tolerance biologic markers is warranted.

  3. Anergy-associated T cell antigen presentation. A mechanism of infectious tolerance in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannie, M D; Rendall, S K; Arnold, P Y; Nardella, J P; White, G A

    1996-08-01

    CD4+ T cells promote immune responses against foreign Ags while actively suppressing responses against self Ags. To address how CD4+ T cells ensure self-tolerance, we focused on two CD4+ T helper cells specific for myelin basic protein (MBP). GP2.E5/R1 T cells recognized rat MBP (RMBP) as a partial agonist and mediated mild experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), whereas R2 T cells recognized RMBP with full efficacy and mediated severe EAE. GP2.E5/R1 T cells were more susceptible to anergy induction than R2 T cells. Anergic GP2.E5/R1 T cells lacked proliferative reactivity, but expressed both I-A glycoproteins and high levels of radioresistant APC activity. During induction of anergy, these T cells acquired the ability to present MBP. In a separate subsequent culture without further addition of Ag, anergic GP2.E5/R1 T cells elicited full proliferative and IL-2 production responses by R2 T cells. Unlike activations induced via irradiated splenocytes, irradiated anergic T cells elicited anergy in R2 T cells in the form of a postactivational phase of nonresponsiveness. Anergic GP2.E5/R1 T cells not only transferred anergy to pathogenic R2 T cells in vitro, but these anergic T cells also transferred resistance to EAE in Lewis rats subsequently challenged with guinea pig MBP in CFA. Antagonistic signaling by autologous RMBP was more tolerogenic than that of guinea pig MBP in both in vitro and in vivo models of infectious anergy. We conclude that in the presence of tolerogenic mAb, antagonistic signaling by a self protein elicited the coordinate expression of anergy and T cell-mediated APC activity as a mechanism for the genesis and spread of infectious tolerance.

  4. Putrescine controls the formation of Escherichia coli persister cells tolerant to aminoglycoside netilmicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Alexander G; Kashevarova, Natalya M; Karavaeva, Elena A; Shumkov, Mikhail S

    2014-12-01

    Persisters are suggested to be the products of a phenotypic variability that are quasi-dormant forms of regular bacterial cells highly tolerant to antibiotics. Our previous investigations revealed that a decrease in antibiotic tolerance of Escherichia coli cells could be reached through the inhibition of key enzymes of polyamine synthesis (putrescine, spermidine). We therefore assumed that polyamines could be involved in persister cell formation. Data obtained in our experiments with the polyamine-deficient E. coli strain demonstrate that the formation of persisters tolerant to netilmicin is highly upregulated by putrescine in a concentration-dependent manner when cells enter the stationary phase. This period is also accompanied by dissociation of initially homogenous subpopulation of persister cells to some fractions differing in their levels of tolerance to netilmicin. With three independent experimental approaches, we demonstrate that putrescine-dependent upregulation of persister cell formation is mediated by stimulation of rpoS expression. Complementary activity of putrescine and RpoS results in ~ 1000-fold positive effect on persister cell formation. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  5. Cell motility and antibiotic tolerance of bacterial swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Wenlong

    Many bacteria species can move across moist surfaces in a coordinated manner known as swarming. It is reported that swarm cells show higher tolerance to a wide variety of antibiotics than planktonic cells. We used the model bacterium E. coli to study how motility affects the antibiotic tolerance of swarm cells. Our results provide new insights for the control of pathogenic invasion via regulating cell motility. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail: zwlong@live.com.

  6. The deacetylase Sirt1 is an essential regulator of Aire-mediated induction of central immunological tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuprin, Anna; Avin, Ayelet; Goldfarb, Yael; Herzig, Yonatan; Levi, Ben; Jacob, Adi; Sela, Asaf; Katz, Shir; Grossman, Moran; Guyon, Clotilde; Rathaus, Moran; Cohen, Haim Y; Sagi, Irit; Giraud, Matthieu; McBurney, Michael W; Husebye, Eystein S; Abramson, Jakub

    2015-07-01

    Aire is a transcriptional regulator that induces the promiscuous expression of thousands of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs), a step critical for the induction of immunological self-tolerance. Studies have offered molecular insights into how Aire operates, but more comprehensive understanding of this process still remains elusive. Here we found abundant expression of the protein deacetylase Sirtuin-1 (Sirt1) in mature Aire(+) mTECs, wherein it was required for the expression of Aire-dependent TRA-encoding genes and the subsequent induction of immunological self-tolerance. Our study elucidates a previously unknown molecular mechanism for Aire-mediated transcriptional regulation and identifies a unique function for Sirt1 in preventing organ-specific autoimmunity.

  7. Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønder, Lars

    Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics is an experiment in re-orientation. The book is based on the wager that tolerance exceeds the more prevalent images of self-restraint and repressive benevolence because neither precludes the possibility of a more “active tolerance” motivated...... by the desire to experiment and to become otherwise. The objective is to discuss what gets lost, conceptually as well as politically, when we neglect the subsistence of active tolerance within other practices of tolerance, and to develop a theory of active tolerance in which tolerance's mobilizing character...... the current models of restraint and benevolence, other ways of understanding the politics of democratic pluralism might be developed, which will enable us to conceive of tolerance's future in terms different than those currently on offer. Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics develops...

  8. Infectious Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Jonuleit, Helmut; Schmitt, Edgar; Kakirman, Hacer; Stassen, Michael; Knop, Jürgen; Enk, Alexander H.

    2002-01-01

    Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg) are mandatory for maintaining immunologic self-tolerance. We demonstrate that the cell-cell contact–mediated suppression of conventional CD4+ T cells by human CD25+ Treg cells is fixation resistant, independent from membrane-bound TGF-β but requires activation and protein synthesis of CD25+ Treg cells. Coactivation of CD25+ Treg cells with Treg cell–depleted CD4+ T cells results in anergized CD4+ T cells that in turn inhibit the activation of conventional, ...

  9. Role of prethymic cells in acquisition of self-tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besedovsky, H O; del Rey, A; Sorkin, E

    1979-12-01

    The sequential character of T-lymphocyte development as it pertains to the stage at which self-tolerance is acquired was investigated. Three phases were studied, defined here as prethymic, intrathymic, and postthymic as determined by the timing of thymus implantation. The model utilized was the temporal pattern of skin graft rejection in thymusless BALB/c nude mice implanted with allogeneic, C57BL/6J, or syngeneic thymuses before or after skin grafting; in some instances, F(1) hybrid spleen cells were also given to newborns or young adults. These experiments in nude mice showed that, (a) self-tolerance could be established despite the absence of the host's own haplotype in the implanted thymus; (b) recently emigrated postthymic cells could already discriminate self from non-self; (c) specific neonatal tolerance could be induced in nudes by inoculation of F(1) hybrid cells; (d) nudes showed a higher capacity for induction of neonatal tolerance than did normal littermates. These findings indicate that the process of self-tolerance in the T cell's lineage begins during the prethymic state early in ontogeny.

  10. Tolerance through Education: How Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells Shape Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias P. Domogalla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are central players in the initiation and control of responses, regulating the balance between tolerance and immunity. Tolerogenic DCs are essential in the maintenance of central and peripheral tolerance by induction of clonal T cell deletion and T cell anergy, inhibition of memory and effector T cell responses, and generation and activation of regulatory T cells. Therefore, tolerogenic DCs are promising candidates for specific cellular therapy of allergic and autoimmune diseases and for treatment of transplant rejection. Studies performed in rodents have demonstrated the efficacy and feasibility of tolerogenic DCs for tolerance induction in various inflammatory diseases. In the last years, numerous protocols for the generation of human monocyte-derived tolerogenic DCs have been established and some first phase I trials have been conducted in patients suffering from autoimmune disorders, demonstrating the safety and efficiency of this cell-based immunotherapy. This review gives an overview about methods and protocols for the generation of human tolerogenic DCs and their mechanisms of tolerance induction with the focus on interleukin-10-modulated DCs. In addition, we will discuss the prerequisites for optimal clinical grade tolerogenic DC subsets and results of clinical trials with tolerogenic DCs in autoimmune diseases.

  11. B-cell-mediated strategies to fight chronic allograft rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali H Dalloul

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Solid organs have been transplanted for decades. Since the improvement in graft selection and in medical and surgical procedures, the likelihood of graft function after one year is now close to 90%. Nonetheless even well-matched recipients continue to need medications for the rest of their lives hence adverse side effects and enhanced morbidity. Understanding Immune rejection mechanisms, is of increasing importance since the greater use of living-unrelated donors and genetically unmatched individuals. Chronic rejection is devoted to T-cells, however the role of B-cells in rejection has been appreciated recently by the observation that B-cell depletion improve graft survival. By contrast however, B-cells can be beneficial to the grafted tissue. This protective effect is secondary to either the secretion of protective antibodies or the induction of B-cells that restrain excessive inflammatory responses, chiefly by local provision of IL-10, or inhibit effector T-cells by direct cellular interactions. As a proof of concept B-cell-mediated infectious transplantation tolerance could be achieved in animal models, and evidence emerged that the presence of such B-cells in transplanted patients correlate with a favorable outcome. Among these populations, regulatory B-cells constitute a recently described population. These cells may develop as a feedback mechanism to prevent uncontrolled reactivity to antigens and inflammatory stimuli. The difficult task for the clinician, is to quantify the respective ratios and functions of tolerant vs effector B-cells within a transplanted organ, at a given time point in order to modulate B-cell-directed therapy. Several receptors at the B-cell membrane as well as signaling molecules, can now be targeted for this purpose. Understanding the temporal expansion of regulatory B-cells in grafted patients and the stimuli that activate them will help in the future to implement specific strategies aimed at fighting chronic

  12. Characterising Castrate Tolerant Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    ASHLEE KATE CLARK

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a prevalent disease in aging males. This thesis explores prostate cancer cells that escape current therapy and give rise to end-stage disease. Using sophisticated experimental approaches, this important cancer cell population was identified and characterised in human prostate cancer tissues.  Our discoveries will eventually lead to improved cancer treatments for men with prostate cancer.

  13. Antinociceptive tolerance to NSAIDs in the rat formalin test is mediated by the opioid mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiklauri, Nana; Nozadze, Ivliane; Gurtskaia, Gulnaz; Tsagareli, Merab G

    2017-02-01

    In the past decade it has been shown that tolerance develops to the antinociceptive effect of repeated systemic administration of commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in acute pain models using rats. This is similar to the tolerance observed with opioid-induced analgesia. In the present study, we investigated the development of tolerance to the analgesic effects of NSAIDs diclofenac, ketorolac and xefocam in a chronic inflammatory pain model, the formalin test. Male Wistar rats receiving intraplantar formalin were tested for antinociception following intraperitoneal injection of NSAIDs in thermal paw withdrawal (Hargreaves) test and mechanical paw withdrawal (von Frey) test. Repeated measures analysis of variance with post-hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison tests were used for statistical evaluations. Treatment with each NSAID significantly elevated the thermal paw withdrawal latency and mechanical paw withdrawal threshold on the first day, followed by a progressive decrease in the analgesic effect over a 4-day period, i.e., tolerance developed. With daily intraplantar injections of formalin, there was a trend toward reduced antinociceptive effects of diclofenac and ketorolac while xefocam exhibited a significant reduction (tolerance). It is noteworthy that the NSAID tolerant groups of rats still exhibited a strong hyperalgesia during phase I formalin following administration of each NSAID, an effect not observed in non-tolerant rats. Pretreatment with naloxone completely prevented the analgesic effects of these three NSAIDs in both behavioral assays. The present findings support the notion that the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effects of NSAIDs in an inflammatory pain model is mediated via an endogenous opioid system possibly involving descending pain modulatory systems. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  14. Pharmacological targeting of IDO-mediated tolerance for treating autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penberthy, W Todd

    2007-04-01

    Cells at the maternal-fetal interface express indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) to consume all local tryptophan for the express purpose of starving adjacent maternal T cells of this most limiting and essential amino acid. This stops local T cell proliferation to ultimately result in the most dramatic example of immune tolerance, acceptance of the fetus. By contrast, inhibition of IDO using 1-methyl-tryptophan causes a sudden catastrophic rejection of the mammalian fetus. Immunomodulatory factors including IFNgamma, TNFalpha, IL-1, and LPS use IDO induction in responsive antigen presenting cells (APCs) also to transmit tolerogenic signals to T cells. Thus it makes sense to consider IDO induction towards tolerance for autoimmune diseases in general. Approaches to cell specific therapeutic IDO induction with NAD precursor supplementation to prevent the collateral non-T cell pathogenesis due to chronic TNFalpha-IDO activated tryptophan depletion in autoimmune diseases are reviewed. Tryptophan is an essential amino acid most immediately because it is the only precursor for the endogenous biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). Both autoimmune disease and the NAD deficiency disease pellagra occur in women at greater than twice the frequency of occurrence in men. The importance of IDO dysregulation manifest as autoimmune pellagric dementia is genetically illustrated for Nasu-Hakola Disease (or PLOSL), which is caused by a mutation in the IDO antagonizing genes TYROBP/DAP12 or TREM2. Loss of function leads to psychotic symptoms rapidly progressing to presenile dementia likely due to unchecked increases in microglial IDO expression, which depletes neurons of tryptophan causing neurodegeneration. Administration of NAD precursors rescued entire mental hospitals of dementia patients literally overnight in the 1930's and NAD precursors should help Nasu-Hakola patients as well. NAD depletion mediated by peroxynitrate PARP1 activation is one of the few

  15. T-cell exhaustion in allograft rejection and tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorp, Edward B; Stehlik, Christian; Ansari, M Javeed

    2015-02-01

    The role of T-cell exhaustion in the failure of clearance of viral infections and tumors is well established. There are several ongoing trials to reverse T-cell exhaustion for treatment of chronic viral infections and tumors. The mechanisms leading to T-cell exhaustion and its role in transplantation, however, are only beginning to be appreciated and are the focus of the present review. Exhausted T cells exhibit a distinct molecular profile reflecting combinatorial mechanisms involving the interaction of multiple transcription factors important in control of cell metabolism, acquisition of effector function and memory capacity. Change of microenvironmental cues and limiting leukocyte recruitment can modulate T-cell exhaustion. Impaired leukocyte recruitment induces T-cell exhaustion and prevents allograft rejection. Preventing or reversing T-cell exhaustion may lead to prevention of transplant tolerance or triggering of rejection; therefore, caution should be exercised in the use of agents blocking inhibitory receptors for the treatment of chronic viral infections or tumors in transplant recipients. Further definition of the role of T-cell exhaustion in clinical transplantation and an understanding of the mechanisms of induction of T-cell exhaustion are needed to develop strategies for preventing allograft rejection and induction of tolerance.

  16. Major Histocompatibility Complex I Mediates Immunological Tolerance of the Trophoblast during Pregnancy and May Mediate Rejection during Parturition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapacz-Leonard, Anna; Dąbrowska, Małgorzata; Janowski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    During pregnancy in larger mammals, the maternal immune system must tolerate the fetus for months while resisting external infection. This tolerance is facilitated by immunological communication between the fetus and the mother, which is mediated by Major Histocompatibility Complex I (MHC I) proteins, by leukocytes, and by the cytokines secreted by the leukocytes. Fetal-maternal immunological communication also supports pregnancy by inducing physiological changes in the mother. If the mother “misunderstands” the signal sent by the fetus during pregnancy, the fetus will be miscarried or delivered preterm. Unlike any other maternal organ, the placenta can express paternal antigens. At parturition, paternal antigens are known to be expressed in cows and may be expressed in horses, possibly so that the maternal immune system will reject the placenta and help to expel it. This review compares fetal-maternal crosstalk that is mediated by the immune system in three species with pregnancies that last for nine months or longer: humans, cattle, and horses. It raises the possibility that immunological communication early in pregnancy may prepare the mother for successful expulsion of fetal membranes at parturition. PMID:24812442

  17. Fuel cell anode configuration for CO tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Francisco A.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.

    2004-11-16

    A polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is designed to operate on a reformate fuel stream containing oxygen and diluted hydrogen fuel with CO impurities. A polymer electrolyte membrane has an electrocatalytic surface formed from an electrocatalyst mixed with the polymer and bonded on an anode side of the membrane. An anode backing is formed of a porous electrically conductive material and has a first surface abutting the electrocatalytic surface and a second surface facing away from the membrane. The second surface has an oxidation catalyst layer effective to catalyze the oxidation of CO by oxygen present in the fuel stream where at least the layer of oxidation catalyst is formed of a non-precious metal oxidation catalyst selected from the group consisting of Cu, Fe, Co, Tb, W, Mo, Sn, and oxides thereof, and other metals having at least two low oxidation states.

  18. Embryonic stem cells and the challenge of transplantation tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Paul J; Cartland, Siân; Nolan, Kathleen F; Waldmann, Herman

    2004-09-01

    Isolated from early blastocysts, embryonic stem (ES) cells capture the brief moment of pluripotency in the developing embryo, as evidenced by their differentiation into many somatic cell types in vitro. Although these properties might help meet the growing demand for 'spare parts' to replace diseased or worn-out tissues, their use in so-called cell replacement therapy (CRT) poses several challenges, not least of which is the prevention of their subsequent rejection. Here we explore the notion that ES cells might spawn cell types necessary for the treatment of disease while acting as a plentiful source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or terminally differentiated dendritic cells (DCs) that might facilitate the induction of transplantation tolerance to the replacement tissues.

  19. Suppressor cells in transplantation tolerance. III. The role of antigen in the maintenance of transplantation tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tutschka, P.J.; Hess, A.D.; Beschorner, W.E.; Santos, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    Suppressor cells, which in an alloantigen-specific manner inhibit proliferation of donor cells to host antigens in a mixed lymphocyte culture and adoptively transfer the suppression of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), undergo a gradual clonal reduction in long-term, allogeneic, histoincompatible rat radiation chimeras until they can no longer be measured in an in vitro suppressor cell assay. When lymphohematopoietic cells from these chimeras are transferred into lethally irradiated secondary recipients of original donor strain, the suppressor cells, now in a target antigen-free environment, undergo a further clonal reduction. After parking for 120 days, the chimeric cells are specifically tolerant to original host antigens, but cannot adoptively transfer suppression of GVHD. When chimeric cells, parked for 120 days in secondary recipients of original donor strain, are stimulated with original host-type antigen repeatedly during or once at the end of the parking period, the suppressor cell clone is expanded, suppressor cells can be identified in vitro, and suppression of GVHD can adoptively be transferred to tertiary recipients

  20. Targeting CD8+ T-cell tolerance for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Stephanie R; Yuan, Jinyun; Teague, Ryan M

    2014-01-01

    In the final issue of Science in 2013, the American Association of Science recognized progress in the field of cancer immunotherapy as the 'Breakthrough of the Year.' The achievements were actually twofold, owing to the early success of genetically engineered chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) and to the mounting clinical triumphs achieved with checkpoint blockade antibodies. While fundamentally very different, the common thread of these independent strategies is the ability to prevent or overcome mechanisms of CD8(+) T-cell tolerance for improved tumor immunity. Here we discuss how circumventing T-cell tolerance has provided experimental insights that have guided the field of clinical cancer immunotherapy to a place where real breakthroughs can finally be claimed.

  1. Antinociceptive tolerance to NSAIDs in the agranular insular cortex is mediated by opioid mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirkulashvili N

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Natia Pirkulashvili,1 Nana Tsiklauri,1 Marina Nebieridze,2 Merab G Tsagareli1 1Laboratory of Pain and Analgesia, 2Laboratory of Brain Metabolism, Beritashvili Center for Experimental Biomedicine, Tbilisi, Georgia Abstract: Several lines of investigations have shown that in some brain areas, in particular, in the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter, rostral ventromedial medulla, central nucleus of amygdala, nucleus raphe magnus, and dorsal hippocampus, microinjections of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs induce antinociception with distinct development of tolerance. The agranular insular cortex (AIC is a small region of the cerebral cortex located on the lateral area of the rat’s cerebral hemisphere that is involved in the perception and response to pain. In the present study, we investigated the development of tolerance to the analgesic effects of NSAIDs diclofenac, ketorolac, and xefocam microinjected into the AIC in rats. Male Wistar rats receiving NSAIDs into the AIC were tested for antinociception by tail-flick and hot plate tests. Treatment with each NSAID significantly enhanced the tail-flick and hot plate latencies on the first day, followed by a progressive decrease in the analgesic effect over a 4-day period, ie, they developed tolerance. Pretreatment with an opioid antagonist naloxone completely prevented, and posttreatment naloxone abolished, the analgesic effects of the three NSAIDs in both behavioral assays. These findings support the notion that the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effects of NSAIDs is mediated via an endogenous opioid system possibly involving descending pain modulatory systems. Keywords: antinociception, endogenous opioids, descending modulation, nociception, non­opioid tolerance

  2. CCR5 mediates HIV-1 Tat-induced neuroinflammation and influences morphine tolerance, dependence, and reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonek, Maciej; McLane, Virginia D; Stevens, David L; Lippold, Kumiko; Akbarali, Hamid I; Knapp, Pamela E; Dewey, William L; Hauser, Kurt F; Paris, Jason J

    2017-11-13

    The HIV-1 regulatory protein, trans-activator of transcription (Tat), interacts with opioids to potentiate neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration within the CNS. These effects may involve the C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5); however, the behavioral contribution of CCR5 on Tat/opioid interactions is not known. Using a transgenic murine model that expresses HIV-1 Tat protein in a GFAP-regulated, doxycycline-inducible manner, we assessed morphine tolerance, dependence, and reward. To assess the influence of CCR5 on these effects, mice were pretreated with oral vehicle or the CCR5 antagonist, maraviroc, prior to morphine administration. We found that HIV-1 Tat expression significantly attenuated the antinociceptive potency of acute morphine (2-64 mg/kg, i.p.) in non-tolerant mice. Consistent with this, Tat attenuated withdrawal symptoms among morphine-tolerant mice. Pretreatment with maraviroc blocked the effects of Tat, reinstating morphine potency in non-tolerant mice and restoring withdrawal symptomology in morphine-tolerant mice. Twenty-four hours following morphine administration, HIV-1 Tat significantly potentiated (∼3.5-fold) morphine-conditioned place preference and maraviroc further potentiated these effects (∼5.7-fold). Maraviroc exerted no measurable behavioral effects on its own. Protein array analyses revealed only minor changes to cytokine profiles when morphine was administered acutely or repeatedly; however, 24 h post morphine administration, the expression of several cytokines was greatly increased, including endogenous CCR5 chemokine ligands (CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5), as well as CCL2. Tat further elevated levels of several cytokines and maraviroc pretreatment attenuated these effects. These data demonstrate that CCR5 mediates key aspects of HIV-1 Tat-induced alterations in the antinociceptive potency and rewarding properties of opioids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hostility and hearing protection behavior: the mediating role of personal beliefs and low frustration tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, S; Melamed, S; Feiner, M; Weisberg, E; Ribak, J

    1996-10-01

    The authors examined whether hostility would negatively be associated with occupational health behavior, namely, the use of hearing protection devices (HPDs). Also examined as possible mediators were the protection motivation theory (PMT) components and low frustration tolerance (LFT). Participants were 226 male industrial workers, all exposed to potentially hearing-damaging noise. Hostility was negatively related to HPD use. It moderately correlated with the PMT components: negatively with perceived susceptibility, severity, effectiveness, and self-efficacy and positively with perceived barriers. Hostility correlated highly with LFT. Regression analyses confirmed the mediating role of perceived barriers, low self-efficacy, and LFT in the negative relationship between hostility and the use of HPDs. Thus, intrapsychic characteristics of hostile people may be significant for hearing protection behavior.

  4. Nod2 suppresses Borrelia burgdorferi mediated murine Lyme arthritis and carditis through the induction of tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Petnicki-Ocwieja

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The internalization of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, by phagocytes is essential for an effective activation of the immune response to this pathogen. The intracellular, cytosolic receptor Nod2 has been shown to play varying roles in either enhancing or attenuating inflammation in response to different infectious agents. We examined the role of Nod2 in responses to B. burgdorferi. In vitro stimulation of Nod2 deficient bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM resulted in decreased induction of multiple cytokines, interferons and interferon regulated genes compared with wild-type cells. However, B. burgdorferi infection of Nod2 deficient mice resulted in increased rather than decreased arthritis and carditis compared to control mice. We explored multiple potential mechanisms for the paradoxical response in in vivo versus in vitro systems and found that prolonged stimulation with a Nod2 ligand, muramyl dipeptide (MDP, resulted in tolerance to stimulation by B. burgdorferi. This tolerance was lost with stimulation of Nod2 deficient cells that cannot respond to MDP. Cytokine patterns in the tolerance model closely paralleled cytokine profiles in infected Nod2 deficient mice. We propose a model where Nod2 has an enhancing role in activating inflammation in early infection, but moderates inflammation after prolonged exposure to the organism through induction of tolerance.

  5. Infectious Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonuleit, Helmut; Schmitt, Edgar; Kakirman, Hacer; Stassen, Michael; Knop, Jürgen; Enk, Alexander H.

    2002-01-01

    Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg) are mandatory for maintaining immunologic self-tolerance. We demonstrate that the cell-cell contact–mediated suppression of conventional CD4+ T cells by human CD25+ Treg cells is fixation resistant, independent from membrane-bound TGF-β but requires activation and protein synthesis of CD25+ Treg cells. Coactivation of CD25+ Treg cells with Treg cell–depleted CD4+ T cells results in anergized CD4+ T cells that in turn inhibit the activation of conventional, freshly isolated CD4+ T helper (Th) cells. This infectious suppressive activity, transferred from CD25+ Treg cells via cell contact, is cell contact–independent and partially mediated by soluble transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. The induction of suppressive properties in conventional CD4+ Th cells represents a mechanism underlying the phenomenon of infectious tolerance. This explains previously published conflicting data on the role of TGF-β in CD25+ Treg cell–induced immunosuppression. PMID:12119350

  6. Impact of incretin hormones on beta-cell function in subjects with normal or impaired glucose tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muscelli, Elza; Mari, Andrea; Natali, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the enteroinsular axis influences beta-cell function have not been investigated in detail. We performed oral and isoglycemic intravenous (IV) glucose administration in subjects with normal (NGT; n = 11) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 10), using C-peptide deconvolu......The mechanisms by which the enteroinsular axis influences beta-cell function have not been investigated in detail. We performed oral and isoglycemic intravenous (IV) glucose administration in subjects with normal (NGT; n = 11) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 10), using C......-peptide deconvolution to calculate insulin secretion rates and mathematical modeling to quantitate beta-cell function. The incretin effect was taken to be the ratio of oral to IV responses. In NGT, incretin-mediated insulin release [oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)/IV ratio = 1.59 +/- 0.18, P = 0.004] amounted to 18......, with a predominance of glucose-induced vs. incretin-mediated stimulation. We conclude that, under physiological circumstances, incretin-mediated stimulation of insulin secretion results from an enhancement of all dynamic aspects of beta-cell function, particularly beta-cell glucose sensitivity. In IGT, beta...

  7. [EFFECT OF Akt1 GENE TRANSFECTION ON HYPOXIA TOLERANCE OF BONE MARROW MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fengxu; Chen, Yongen; Chen, Feng; Xia, Jiyi; Liu, Hongduan; Fu, Yong; Li, Miaoling; Liao, Bin

    2016-04-01

    To investigate whether Akt1 gene transfection mediated by recombinant lentivirus (LVs) in the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) could enhance the ability of hypoxia tolerance so as to provide a theoretical basis for improving the effectiveness of stem cells transplantation. LVs was used as transfection vector, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was used as markers to construct the pLVX-EGFP-3FLAG virus vector carrying the Akt1 gene. The 3rd generation BMSCs from 3-5 weeks old Sprague Dawley rats were transfected with pLVX-EGFP virus solution as group B and with pLVX-EGFP-3PLAG virus solution as group C; and untransfected BMSCs served as control group (group A). At 2-3 days after transfection, the expression of green fluorescent was observed by fluorescence microscope; and at 48 hours after transfection, Western blot method was used to detect the expression of Akt1 protein in groups B and C. BMSCs of groups B and C were given hypoxia intervention with 94% N₂, 1% O₂, and 5% CO₂ for 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 hours (group B1 and group C1). The flow cytometry was used to analyze the cell apoptosis rate and cell death rate, and the MTT method to analyze the cell proliferation, and Western blot to detect the expression of apoptosis related gene Caspase-3. After transfection, obvious green fluorescence was observed in BMSCs under fluorescence microscopy in groups B and C, the transfection efficiency was about 60%. Akt1 expression of group C was significantly higher than that of group B (t = 17.525, P = 0.013). The apoptosis rate and cell death rate of group B1 increased gradually with time, and difference was significant (P transfection mediated by recombinant LVs could significantly improve hypoxia tolerance of BMSCs by inhibiting the apoptosis, which could provide new ideas for improving the effectiveness of stem cells transplantation.

  8. Changes in Reactivity In Vitro of CD4+CD25+ and CD4+CD25− T Cell Subsets in Transplant Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce M. Hall

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Transplant tolerance induced in adult animals is mediated by alloantigen-specific CD4+CD25+ T cells, yet in many models, proliferation of CD4+ T cells from hosts tolerant to specific-alloantigen in vitro is not impaired. To identify changes that may diagnose tolerance, changes in the patterns of proliferation of CD4+, CD4+CD25+, and CD4+CD25− T cells from DA rats tolerant to Piebald Virol Glaxo rat strain (PVG cardiac allografts and from naïve DA rats were examined. Proliferation of CD4+ T cells from both naïve and tolerant hosts was similar to both PVG and Lewis stimulator cells. In mixed lymphocyte culture to PVG, proliferation of naïve CD4+CD25− T cells was greater than naïve CD4+ T cells. In contrast, proliferation of CD4+CD25− T cells from tolerant hosts to specific-donor PVG was not greater than CD4+ T cells, whereas their response to Lewis and self-DA was greater than CD4+ T cells. Paradoxically, CD4+CD25+ T cells from tolerant hosts did not proliferate to PVG, but did to Lewis, whereas naïve CD4+CD25+ T cells proliferate to both PVG and Lewis but not to self-DA. CD4+CD25+ T cells from tolerant, but not naïve hosts, expressed receptors for interferon (IFN-γ and IL-5 and these cytokines promoted their proliferation to specific-alloantigen PVG but not to Lewis or self-DA. We identified several differences in the patterns of proliferation to specific-donor alloantigen between cells from tolerant and naïve hosts. Most relevant is that CD4+CD25+ T cells from tolerant hosts failed to proliferate or suppress to specific donor in the absence of either IFN-γ or IL-5. The proliferation to third-party and self of each cell population from tolerant and naïve hosts was similar and not affected by IFN-γ or IL-5. Our findings suggest CD4+CD25+ T cells that mediate transplant tolerance depend on IFN−γ or IL-5 from alloactivated Th1 and Th2 cells.

  9. Environmental peer pressure: CD4+ T cell help in tolerance and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Dana; Grakoui, Arash

    2018-01-01

    The liver participates in a multitude of metabolic functions that are critical for sustaining human life. Despite constant encounters with antigenic-rich intestinal blood, oxidative stress, and metabolic intermediates, there is no appreciable immune response. Interestingly, patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation benefit from a high rate of graft acceptance in comparison to other solid organ transplant recipients. In fact, cotransplantation of a donor liver in tandem with a rejection-prone graft increases the likelihood of graft acceptance. A variety of players may account for this phenomenon including the interaction of intrahepatic antigen-presenting cells with CD4 + T cells and the preferential induction of forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) expression on CD4 + T cells following injurious stimuli. Ineffective insult management can cause chronic liver disease, which manifests systemically as the following: antibody-mediated disorders, ineffective antiviral and antibacterial immunity, and gastrointestinal disorders. These sequelae sharing the requirement of CD4 + T cell help to coordinate aberrant immune responses. In this review, we will focus on CD4 + T cell help due to the shared requirements in hepatic tolerance and coordination of extrahepatic immune responses. Overall, intrahepatic deviations from steady state can have deleterious systemic immune outcomes and highlight the liver's remarkable capacity to maintain a balance between tolerance and inflammatory response while simultaneously being inundated with a panoply of antigenic stimuli. Liver Transplantation 24 89-97 2018 AASLD. © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  10. Inhibition of HLA-DM mediated MHC class II peptide loading by HLA-DO promotes self tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa K. Denzin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility class II (MHCII molecules are loaded with peptides derived from foreign and self-proteins within the endosomes and lysosomes of antigen presenting cells (APCs. This process is mediated by interaction of MHCII with the conserved, nonpolymorphic MHCII-like molecule HLA-DM (DM. DM activity is directly opposed by HLA-DO (DO, another conserved, non-polymorphic MHCII like molecule. DO is an MHCII substrate mimic. Binding of DO to DM prevents MHCII from binding to DM, thereby inhibiting peptide loading. Inhibition of DM function enables low stability MHC complexes to survive and populate the surface of APCS. As a consequence, DO promotes the display of a broader pool of low abundance self-peptides. Broadening the peptide repertoire theoretically reduces the likelihood of inadvertently acquiring a density of self-ligands that is sufficient to activate self-reactive T cells. One function of DO, therefore, is to promote T cell tolerance by shaping the visible image of self. Recent data also shows that DO influences the adaptive immune response by controlling B cell entry into the germinal center reaction. This review explores the data supporting these concepts.

  11. Relevance of Regulatory T cell Promotion of Donor-specific Tolerance in Solid Organ Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pervinder eSagoo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Current clinical strategies to control the alloimmune response after transplantation do not fully prevent induction of the immunological processes which lead to acute and chronic immune-mediated graft rejection, and as such the survival of a solid organ allograft is limited. Experimental research on naturally occurring CD4+CD25highFoxP3+ Regulatory T cells (Tregs has indicated their potential to establish stable long-term graft acceptance, with the promise of providing a more effective therapy for transplant recipients. Current approaches for clinical use are based on the infusion of freshly isolated or ex vivo polyclonally expanded Tregs into graft recipients with an aim to redress the in vivo balance of T effector cells to Tregs. However mounting evidence suggests that regulation of donor-specific immunity may be central to achieving immunological tolerance. Therefore the next stages in optimising translation of Tregs to organ transplantation will be through the refinement and development of donor alloantigen-specific Treg therapy. The altering kinetics and intensity of alloantigen presentation pathways and alloimmune priming following transplantation may indeed influence the specificity of the Treg required and the timing or frequency at which it needs to be administered. Here we review and discuss the relevance of antigen-specific regulation of alloreactivity by Tregs in experimental and clinical studies of tolerance and explore the concept of delivering an optimal Treg for the induction and maintenance phases of achieving transplantation tolerance.

  12. Harnessing the properties of dendritic cells in the pursuit of immunological tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Horton

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The acquisition of self-perpetuating, immunological tolerance specific for graft alloantigens has long been described as the “holy grail” of clinical transplantation. By removing the need for life-long immunosuppression following engraftment, the adverse consequences of immunosuppressive regimens, including chronic infections and malignancy, may be avoided. Furthermore, autoimmune diseases and allergy are, by definition, driven by aberrant immunological responses to ordinarily innocuous antigens. The re-establishment of permanent tolerance towards instigating antigens may, therefore, provide a cure to these common diseases. Whilst various cell types exhibiting a tolerogenic phenotype have been proposed for such a task, tolerogenic dendritic cells (tol-DCs are exquisitely adapted for antigen presentation and interact with many facets of the immune system: as such, they are attractive candidates for use in strategies for immune intervention. We review here our current understanding of tol-DC mediated induction and maintenance of immunological tolerance. Additionally, we discuss recent in vitro findings from animal models and clinical trials of tol-DC immunotherapy in the setting of transplantation, autoimmunity and allergy which highlight their promising therapeutic potential, and speculate how tol-DC therapy may be developed in the future.

  13. Redox polymer mediation for enzymatic biofuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaway, Joshua

    Mediated biocatalytic cathodes prepared from the oxygen-reducing enzyme laccase and redox-conducting osmium hydrogels were characterized for use as cathodes in enzymatic biofuel cells. A series of osmium-based redox polymers was synthesized with redox potentials spanning the range from 0.11 V to 0.85 V (SHE), and the resulting biocatalytic electrodes were modeled to determine reaction kinetic constants using the current response, measured osmium concentration, and measured apparent electron diffusion. As in solution-phase systems, the bimolecular rate constant for mediation was found to vary greatly with mediator potential---from 250 s-1M-1 when mediator and enzyme were close in potential to 9.4 x 10 4 s-1M-1 when this overpotential was large. Optimum mediator potential for a cell operating with a non-limiting platinum anode and having no mass transport limitation from bulk solution was found to be 0.66 V (SHE). Redox polymers were synthesized under different concentrations, producing osmium variation. An increase from 6.6% to 7.2% osmium increased current response from 1.2 to 2.1 mA/cm2 for a planar film in 40°C oxygen-saturated pH 4 buffer, rotating at 900 rpm. These results translated to high surface area electrodes, nearly doubling current density to 13 mA/cm2, the highest to date for such an electrode. The typical fungal laccase from Trametes versicolor was replaced by a bacterially-expressed small laccase from Streptomyces coelicolor, resulting in biocatalytic films that reduced oxygen at increased pH, with full functionality at pH 7, producing 1.5 mA/cm 2 in planar configuration. Current response was biphasic with pH, matching the activity profile of the free enzyme in solution. The mediated enzyme electrode system was modeled with respect to apparent electron diffusion, mediator concentration, and transport of oxygen from bulk solution, all of which are to some extent controlled by design. Each factor was found to limit performance in certain circumstances

  14. Neuronal SIRT1 (Silent Information Regulator 2 Homologue 1) Regulates Glycolysis and Mediates Resveratrol-Induced Ischemic Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koronowski, Kevin B; Khoury, Nathalie; Saul, Isabel; Loris, Zachary B; Cohan, Charles H; Stradecki-Cohan, Holly M; Dave, Kunjan R; Young, Juan I; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A

    2017-11-01

    Resveratrol, at least in part via SIRT1 (silent information regulator 2 homologue 1) activation, protects against cerebral ischemia when administered 2 days before injury. However, it remains unclear if SIRT1 activation must occur, and in which brain cell types, for the induction of neuroprotection. We hypothesized that neuronal SIRT1 is essential for resveratrol-induced ischemic tolerance and sought to characterize the metabolic pathways regulated by neuronal Sirt1 at the cellular level in the brain. We assessed infarct size and functional outcome after transient 60 minute middle cerebral artery occlusion in control and inducible, neuronal-specific SIRT1 knockout mice. Nontargeted primary metabolomics analysis identified putative SIRT1-regulated pathways in brain. Glycolytic function was evaluated in acute brain slices from adult mice and primary neuronal-enriched cultures under ischemic penumbra-like conditions. Resveratrol-induced neuroprotection from stroke was lost in neuronal Sirt1 knockout mice. Metabolomics analysis revealed alterations in glucose metabolism on deletion of neuronal Sirt1 , accompanied by transcriptional changes in glucose metabolism machinery. Furthermore, glycolytic ATP production was impaired in acute brain slices from neuronal Sirt1 knockout mice. Conversely, resveratrol increased glycolytic rate in a SIRT1-dependent manner and under ischemic penumbra-like conditions in vitro. Our data demonstrate that resveratrol requires neuronal SIRT1 to elicit ischemic tolerance and identify a novel role for SIRT1 in the regulation of glycolytic function in brain. Identification of robust neuroprotective mechanisms that underlie ischemia tolerance and the metabolic adaptations mediated by SIRT1 in brain are crucial for the translation of therapies in cerebral ischemia and other neurological disorders. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism restores peripheral tolerance of noncross-reactive autoreactive T cells in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingfeng; Racine, Jeremy J; Lin, Qing; Liu, Yuqing; Tang, Shanshan; Qin, Qi; Qi, Tong; Riggs, Arthur D; Zeng, Defu

    2018-03-06

    Autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) and other autoimmune diseases are associated with particular MHC haplotypes and expansion of autoreactive T cells. Induction of MHC-mismatched but not -matched mixed chimerism by hematopoietic cell transplantation effectively reverses autoimmunity in diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, even those with established diabetes. As expected, MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism mediates deletion in the thymus of host-type autoreactive T cells that have T-cell receptor (TCR) recognizing (cross-reacting with) donor-type antigen presenting cells (APCs), which have come to reside in the thymus. However, how MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism tolerizes host autoreactive T cells that recognize only self-MHC-peptide complexes remains unknown. Here, using NOD.Rag1 -/- BDC2.5 or NOD.Rag1 -/- BDC12-4.1 mice that have only noncross-reactive transgenic autoreactive T cells, we show that induction of MHC-mismatched but not -matched mixed chimerism restores immune tolerance of peripheral noncross-reactive autoreactive T cells. MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism results in increased percentages of both donor- and host-type Foxp3 + Treg cells and up-regulated expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) by host-type plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Furthermore, adoptive transfer experiments showed that engraftment of donor-type dendritic cells (DCs) and expansion of donor-type Treg cells are required for tolerizing the noncross-reactive autoreactive T cells in the periphery, which are in association with up-regulation of host-type DC expression of PD-L1 and increased percentage of host-type Treg cells. Thus, induction of MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism may establish a peripheral tolerogenic DC and Treg network that actively tolerizes autoreactive T cells, even those with no TCR recognition of the donor APCs. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  16. Engineering tolerance using biomaterials to target and control antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tostanoski, Lisa H; Gosselin, Emily A; Jewell, Christopher M

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur when cells of the adaptive immune system incorrectly recognize and attack "self" tissues. Importantly, the proliferation and differentiation of these cells is triggered and controlled by interactions with antigen presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells. Thus, modulating the signals transduced by APCs (e.g., cytokines, costimulatory surface proteins) has emerged as a promising strategy to promote tolerance for diseases such as multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and lupus. However, many approaches have been hindered by non-specific activity of immunosuppressive or immunoregulatory cues, following systemic administration of soluble factors via traditional injections routes (e.g., subcutaneous, intravenous). Biomaterials offer a unique opportunity to control the delivery of tolerogenic signals in vivo via properties such as controlled particle size, tunable release kinetics, and co-delivery of multiple classes of cargo. In this review, we highlight recent reports that exploit these properties of biomaterials to target APCs and promote tolerance via three strategies, i) passive or active targeting of particulate carriers to APCs, ii) biomaterial-mediated control over antigen localization and processing, and iii) targeted delivery of encapsulated or adsorbed immunomodulatory signals. These reports represent exciting advances toward the goal of more effective therapies for autoimmune diseases, without the broad suppressive effects associated with current clinically-approved therapies.

  17. Avoiding horror autotoxicus: The importance of dendritic cells in peripheral T cell tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Ralph Marvin; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2002-01-01

    The immune system generally avoids horror autotoxicus or autoimmunity, an attack against the body's own constituents. This avoidance requires that self-reactive T cells be actively silenced or tolerized. We propose that dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in establishing tolerance, especially in the periphery, after functioning T cells have been produced in the thymus. In the steady state, meaning in the absence of acute infection and inflammation, DCs are in an immature state and not fully differentiated to carry out their known roles as inducers of immunity. Nevertheless, immature DCs continuously circulate through tissues and into lymphoid organs, capturing self antigens as well as innocuous environmental proteins. Recent experiments have provided direct evidence that antigen-loaded immature DCs silence T cells either by deleting them or by expanding regulatory T cells. This capacity of DCs to induce peripheral tolerance can work in two opposing ways in the context of infection. In acute infection, a beneficial effect should occur. The immune system would overcome the risk of developing autoimmunity and chronic inflammation if, before infection, tolerance were induced to innocuous environmental proteins as well as self antigens captured from dying infected cells. For chronic or persistent pathogens, a second but dire potential could take place. Continuous presentation of a pathogen by immature DCs, HIV-1 for example, may lead to tolerance and active evasion of protective immunity. The function of DCs in defining immunologic self provides a new focus for the study of autoimmunity and chronic immune-based diseases. PMID:11773639

  18. Avoiding horror autotoxicus: the importance of dendritic cells in peripheral T cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Ralph Marvin; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2002-01-08

    The immune system generally avoids horror autotoxicus or autoimmunity, an attack against the body's own constituents. This avoidance requires that self-reactive T cells be actively silenced or tolerized. We propose that dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in establishing tolerance, especially in the periphery, after functioning T cells have been produced in the thymus. In the steady state, meaning in the absence of acute infection and inflammation, DCs are in an immature state and not fully differentiated to carry out their known roles as inducers of immunity. Nevertheless, immature DCs continuously circulate through tissues and into lymphoid organs, capturing self antigens as well as innocuous environmental proteins. Recent experiments have provided direct evidence that antigen-loaded immature DCs silence T cells either by deleting them or by expanding regulatory T cells. This capacity of DCs to induce peripheral tolerance can work in two opposing ways in the context of infection. In acute infection, a beneficial effect should occur. The immune system would overcome the risk of developing autoimmunity and chronic inflammation if, before infection, tolerance were induced to innocuous environmental proteins as well as self antigens captured from dying infected cells. For chronic or persistent pathogens, a second but dire potential could take place. Continuous presentation of a pathogen by immature DCs, HIV-1 for example, may lead to tolerance and active evasion of protective immunity. The function of DCs in defining immunologic self provides a new focus for the study of autoimmunity and chronic immune-based diseases.

  19. Tolerant chalcogenide cathodes of membraneless micro fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago, Aldo Saul; Gochi-Ponce, Yadira; Feng, Yong-Jun; Esquivel, Juan Pablo; Sabaté, Neus; Santander, Joaquin; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2012-08-01

    The most critical issues to overcome in micro direct methanol fuel cells (μDMFCs) are the lack of tolerance of the platinum cathode and fuel crossover through the polymer membrane. Thus, two novel tolerant cathodes of a membraneless microlaminar-flow fuel cell (μLFFC), Pt(x)S(y) and CoSe(2), were developed. The multichannel structure of the system was microfabricated in SU-8 polymer. A commercial platinum cathode served for comparison. When using 5 M CH(3)OH as the fuel, maximum power densities of 6.5, 4, and 0.23 mW cm(-2) were achieved for the μLFFC with Pt, Pt(x)S(y), and CoSe(2) cathodes, respectively. The Pt(x)S(y) cathode outperformed Pt in the same fuel cell when using CH(3)OH at concentrations above 10 M. In a situation where fuel crossover is 100 %, that is, mixing the fuel with the reactant, the maximum power density of the micro fuel cell with Pt decreased by 80 %. However, for Pt(x)S(y) this decrease corresponded to 35 % and for CoSe(2) there was no change in performance. This result is the consequence of the high tolerance of the chalcogenide-based cathodes. When using 10 M HCOOH and a palladium-based anode, the μLFFC with a CoSe(2) cathode achieved a maxiumum power density of 1.04 mW cm(-2). This micro fuel cell does not contain either Nafion membrane or platinum. We report, for the first time, the evaluation of Pt(x)S(y)- and CoSe(2)-based cathodes in membraneless micro fuel cells. The results suggest the development of a novel system that is not size restricted and its operation is mainly based on the selectivity of its electrodes. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Requirement for Interactions of Natural Killer T Cells and Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells for Transplantation Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, David; Tang, Xiaobin; Baker, Jeanette; Engleman, Edgar G.; Strober, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the study was to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which a clinically applicable immune tolerance regimen of combined bone marrow and heart transplants in mice results in mixed chimerism and graft acceptance. The conditioning regimen of lymphoid irradiation and anti-T cell antibodies changed the balance of cells in the lymphoid tissues to create a tolerogenic microenvironment favoring the increase of natural killer T (NKT) cells, CD4+CD25+ Tregs, and Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), over conventional T cells. The depletion of MDSCs abrogated chimerism and tolerance, and add back of these purified cells was restorative. The conditioning regimen activated the MDSCs as judged by the increased expression of arginase-1, IL-4Rα, and PDL1, and the activated cells gained the capacity to suppress the proliferation of conventional T cells to alloantigens in the mixed leukocyte reaction. MDSC activation was dependent on the presence of host invariant NKT cells. The conditioning regimen polarized the host invariant NKT cells toward IL-4 secretion, and MDSC activation was dependent on IL-4. In conclusion, there was a requirement for MDSCs for chimerism and tolerance, and their suppressive function was dependent on their interactions with NKT cells and IL-4. PMID:25311657

  1. Tonoplast-localized Abc2 transporter mediates phytochelatin accumulation in vacuoles and confers cadmium tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Zhai, Zhiyang; Jobe, Timothy O; Akmakjian, Garo Z; Song, Won-Yong; Limbo, Oliver; Russell, Matthew R; Kozlovskyy, Volodymyr I; Martinoia, Enrico; Vatamaniuk, Olena K; Russell, Paul; Schroeder, Julian I

    2010-12-24

    Phytochelatins mediate tolerance to heavy metals in plants and some fungi by sequestering phytochelatin-metal complexes into vacuoles. To date, only Schizosaccharomyces pombe Hmt1 has been described as a phytochelatin transporter and attempts to identify orthologous phytochelatin transporters in plants and other organisms have failed. Furthermore, recent data indicate that the hmt1 mutant accumulates significant phytochelatin levels in vacuoles, suggesting that unidentified phytochelatin transporters exist in fungi. Here, we show that deletion of all vacuolar ABC transporters abolishes phytochelatin accumulation in S. pombe vacuoles and abrogates (35)S-PC(2) uptake into S. pombe microsomal vesicles. Systematic analysis of the entire S. pombe ABC transporter family identified Abc2 as a full-size ABC transporter (ABCC-type) that mediates phytochelatin transport into vacuoles. The S. pombe abc1 abc2 abc3 abc4 hmt1 quintuple and abc2 hmt1 double mutant show no detectable phytochelatins in vacuoles. Abc2 expression restores phytochelatin accumulation into vacuoles and suppresses the cadmium sensitivity of the abc quintuple mutant. A novel, unexpected, function of Hmt1 in GS-conjugate transport is also shown. In contrast to Hmt1, Abc2 orthologs are widely distributed among kingdoms and are proposed as the long-sought vacuolar phytochelatin transporters in plants and other organisms.

  2. Recipient dendritic cells, but not B cells, are required antigen-presenting cells for peripheral alloreactive CD8+ T-cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollov, J L; Lucas, C L; Haspot, F; Gaspar, J Kurtz C; Guzman, A; Sykes, M

    2010-03-01

    Induction of mixed allogeneic chimerism is a promising approach for achieving donor-specific tolerance, thereby obviating the need for life-long immunosuppression for solid organ allograft acceptance. In mice receiving a low dose (3Gy) of total body irradiation, allogeneic bone marrow transplantation combined with anti-CD154 tolerizes peripheral CD4 and CD8 T cells, allowing achievement of mixed chimerism with specific tolerance to donor. With this approach, peripheral CD8 T-cell tolerance requires recipient MHC class II, CD4 T cells, B cells and DCs. Recipient-type B cells from chimeras that were tolerant to donor still promoted CD8 T-cell tolerance, but their role could not be replaced by donor-type B cells. Using recipients whose B cells or DCs specifically lack MHC class I and/or class II or lack CD80 and CD86, we demonstrate that dendritic cells (DCs) must express CD80/86 and either MHC class I or class II to promote CD8 tolerance. In contrast, B cells, though required, did not need to express MHC class I or class II or CD80/86 to promote CD8 tolerance. Moreover, recipient IDO and IL-10 were not required. Thus, antigen presentation by recipient DCs and not by B cells is critical for peripheral alloreactive CD8 T cell tolerance.

  3. Cell-cycle dependent expression of a translocation-mediated fusion oncogene mediates checkpoint adaptation in rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Kikuchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most commonly occurring soft-tissue sarcoma in childhood. Most rhabdomyosarcoma falls into one of two biologically distinct subgroups represented by alveolar or embryonal histology. The alveolar subtype harbors a translocation-mediated PAX3:FOXO1A fusion gene and has an extremely poor prognosis. However, tumor cells have heterogeneous expression for the fusion gene. Using a conditional genetic mouse model as well as human tumor cell lines, we show that that Pax3:Foxo1a expression is enriched in G2 and triggers a transcriptional program conducive to checkpoint adaptation under stress conditions such as irradiation in vitro and in vivo. Pax3:Foxo1a also tolerizes tumor cells to clinically-established chemotherapy agents and emerging molecularly-targeted agents. Thus, the surprisingly dynamic regulation of the Pax3:Foxo1a locus is a paradigm that has important implications for the way in which oncogenes are modeled in cancer cells.

  4. Recent Advances in Type-2-Cell-Mediated Immunity: Insights from Helminth Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Nicola L; Loke, P'ng

    2017-12-19

    Type-2-cell-mediated immune responses play a critical role in mediating both host-resistance and disease-tolerance mechanisms during helminth infections. Recently, type 2 cell responses have emerged as major regulators of tissue repair and metabolic homeostasis even under steady-state conditions. In this review, we consider how studies of helminth infection have contributed toward our expanding cellular and molecular understanding of type-2-cell-mediated immunity, as well as new areas such as the microbiome. By studying how these successful parasites form chronic infections without overt pathology, we are gaining additional insights into allergic and inflammatory diseases, as well as normal physiology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Alveolar epithelial type II cells induce T cell tolerance to specific antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Bernice; Hansen, Søren; Evans, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    The lungs face the immunologic challenge of rapidly eliminating inhaled pathogens while maintaining tolerance to innocuous Ags. A break in this immune homeostasis may result in pulmonary inflammatory diseases, such as allergies or asthma. The observation that alveolar epithelial type II cells (Type...... II) constitutively express the class II MHC led us to hypothesize that Type II cells play a role in the adaptive immune response. Because Type II cells do not express detectable levels of the costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, we propose that Type II cells suppress activation of naive T cells...

  6. Heat Acclimation-Mediated Cross-Tolerance: Origins in within-Life Epigenetics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Horowitz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The primary outcome of heat acclimation is increased thermotolerance, which stems from enhancement of innate cytoprotective pathways. These pathways produce “ON CALL” molecules that can combat stressors to which the body has never been exposed, via cross-tolerance mechanisms (heat acclimation-mediated cross-tolerance—HACT. The foundation of HACT lies in the sharing of generic stress signaling, combined with tissue/organ- specific protective responses. HACT becomes apparent when acclimatory homeostasis is achieved, lasts for several weeks, and has a memory. HACT differs from other forms of temporal protective mechanisms activated by exposure to lower “doses” of the stressor, which induce adaptation to higher “doses” of the same/different stressor; e.g., preconditioning, hormesis. These terms have been adopted by biochemists, toxicologists, and physiologists to describe the rapid cellular strategies ensuring homeostasis. HACT employs two major protective avenues: constitutive injury attenuation and abrupt post-insult release of help signals enhanced by acclimation. To date, the injury-attenuating features seen in all organs studied include fast-responding, enlarged cytoprotective reserves with HSPs, anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic molecules, and HIF-1α nuclear and mitochondrial target gene products. Using cardiac ischemia and brain hypoxia models as a guide to the broader framework of phenotypic plasticity, HACT is enabled by a metabolic shift induced by HIF-1α and there are less injuries caused by Ca+2 overload, via channel or complex-protein remodeling, or decreased channel abundance. Epigenetic markers such as post-translational histone modification and altered levels of chromatin modifiers during acclimation and its decline suggest that dynamic epigenetic mechanisms controlling gene expression induce HACT and acclimation memory, to enable the rapid return of the protected phenotype. In this review the link between in vivo

  7. Ig gene-like molecule CD31 plays a nonredundant role in the regulation of T-cell immunity and tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Liang; Mauro, Claudio; Cornish, Georgina H.; Chai, Jian-Guo; Coe, David; Fu, Hongmei; Patton, Daniel; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Franzoso, Guido; Dyson, Julian; Nourshargh, Sussan; Marelli-Berg, Federica M.

    2010-01-01

    CD31 is an Ig-like molecule expressed by leukocytes and endothelial cells with an established role in the regulation of leukocyte trafficking. Despite genetic deletion of CD31 being associated with exacerbation of T cell-mediated autoimmunity, the contribution of this molecule to T-cell responses is largely unknown. Here we report that tumor and allograft rejection are significantly enhanced in CD31-deficient mice, which are also resistant to tolerance induction. We propose that these effects...

  8. Alveolar epithelial type II cells induce T cell tolerance to specific antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Bernice; Hansen, Søren; Evans, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    The lungs face the immunologic challenge of rapidly eliminating inhaled pathogens while maintaining tolerance to innocuous Ags. A break in this immune homeostasis may result in pulmonary inflammatory diseases, such as allergies or asthma. The observation that alveolar epithelial type II cells (Ty...

  9. Host-mediated shift in the cold tolerance of an invasive insect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy C. Morey; Robert C. Venette; Erica C. Nystrom Santacruz; Laurel A. Mosca; W. D. Hutchison

    2016-01-01

    While many insects cannot survive the formation of ice within their bodies, a few species can. On the evolutionary continuum from freeze-intolerant (i.e., freeze-avoidant) to freeze-tolerant insects, intermediates likely exist that can withstand some ice formation, but not enough to be considered fully freeze tolerant. Theory suggests that freeze tolerance should be...

  10. Cell-mediated immunity during syphilis. A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavia, Charles S.; Folds, James D.; Baseman, Joel B.

    1978-01-01

    Evidence is presented which reinforces the complexity of the host-parasite interaction during the course of syphilis. Infection with Treponema pallidum evokes a complicated antibody response and an assortment of cell-mediated immune reactions in the host. It appears that humoral immunity plays a minor role towards the complete elimination of syphilitic infection while the cellular limb of the immune response may be an important host defence mechanism. Information now available indicates that a state of anergy, or immunosuppression, exists in the early stages of human and experimental rabbit syphilis based upon negative skin reactions to T. pallidum antigen(s), the abnormal histological appearance of lymphoid organs, and impaired in vitro lymphocyte reactivity. It is also evident that in the later stages of the disease cellular immunity becomes activated as delayed type skin reactions can normally be elicited in tertiary syphilitics and lymphocyte behaviour in cell culture appears normal. Several mechanisms have been invoked to explain the delay in an effective immune response against syphilitic infection and the duration of the disease: (1) a capsule-like substance on the outer surface of virulant T. pallidum may act as a barrier against treponemicidal antibody; (2) this material and other biological properties of virulent treponemes could enable spirochaetes to escape being engulfed by macrophages and other phagocytic cells; (3) antigenic competition among different treponemal antigens causing partial tolerance; (4) T. pallidum infection may bring about the elaboration of immunosuppressive substances of host or treponemal origin which inhibit the proper function of lymphocytes, macrophages, and other cell types. PMID:350348

  11. Salt tolerance at single cell level in giant-celled Characeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilby, Mary J

    2015-01-01

    Characean plants provide an excellent experimental system for electrophysiology and physiology due to: (i) very large cell size, (ii) position on phylogenetic tree near the origin of land plants and (iii) continuous spectrum from very salt sensitive to very salt tolerant species. A range of experimental techniques is described, some unique to characean plants. Application of these methods provided electrical characteristics of membrane transporters, which dominate the membrane conductance under different outside conditions. With this considerable background knowledge the electrophysiology of salt sensitive and salt tolerant genera can be compared under salt and/or osmotic stress. Both salt tolerant and salt sensitive Characeae show a rise in membrane conductance and simultaneous increase in Na(+) influx upon exposure to saline medium. Salt tolerant Chara longifolia and Lamprothamnium sp. exhibit proton pump stimulation upon both turgor decrease and salinity increase, allowing the membrane PD to remain negative. The turgor is regulated through the inward K(+) rectifier and 2H(+)/Cl(-) symporter. Lamprothamnium plants can survive in hypersaline media up to twice seawater strength and withstand large sudden changes in salinity. Salt sensitive C. australis succumbs to 50-100 mM NaCl in few days. Cells exhibit no pump stimulation upon turgor decrease and at best transient pump stimulation upon salinity increase. Turgor is not regulated. The membrane PD exhibits characteristic noise upon exposure to salinity. Depolarization of membrane PD to excitation threshold sets off trains of action potentials, leading to further loses of K(+) and Cl(-). In final stages of salt damage the H(+)/OH(-) channels are thought to become the dominant transporter, dissipating the proton gradient and bringing the cell PD close to 0. The differences in transporter electrophysiology and their synergy under osmotic and/or saline stress in salt sensitive and salt tolerant characean cells are

  12. Salt tolerance at single cell level in giant-celled Characeae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jane eBeilby

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Characean plants provide an excellent experimental system for electrophysiology and physiology due to: (i very large cell size, (ii position on phylogenetic tree near the origin of land plants and (iii continuous spectrum from very salt sensitive to very salt tolerant species. A range of experimental techniques is described, some unique to characean plants. Application of these methods provided electrical characteristics of membrane transporters, which dominate the membrane conductance under different outside conditions. With this considerable background knowledge the electrophysiology of salt sensitive and salt tolerant genera can be compared under salt and/or osmotic stress. Both salt tolerant and salt sensitive Characeae show a rise in membrane conductance and simultaneous increase in Na+ influx upon exposure to saline medium. Salt tolerant Chara longifolia and Lamprothamnium sp. exhibit proton pump stimulation upon both turgor decrease and salinity increase, allowing the membrane PD to remain negative. The turgor is regulated through the inward K+ rectifier and 2H+/Cl- symporter. Lamprothamnium plants can survive in hypersaline media up to twice seawater strength and withstand large sudden changes in salinity. Salt-sensitive Chara australis succumbs to 50 - 100 mM NaCl in few days. Cells exhibit no pump stimulation upon turgor decrease and at best transient pump stimulation upon salinity increase. Turgor is not regulated. The membrane PD exhibits characteristic noise upon exposure to salinity. Depolarization of membrane PD to excitation threshold sets off trains of action potentials, leading to further loses of K+ and Cl-. In final stages of salt damage the H+/OH- channels are thought to become the dominant transporter, dissipating the proton gradient and bringing the cell PD close to 0. The differences in transporter electrophysiology and their synergy under osmotic and/or saline stress in salt sensitive and salt tolerant characean cells

  13. Potentiation and tolerance of toll-like receptor priming in human endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    KOCH, STEPHEN R.; LAMB, FRED S.; HELLMAN, JUDITH; SHERWOOD, EDWARD R.; STARK, RYAN J.

    2016-01-01

    Repeated challenge of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alters the response to subsequent LPS exposures via modulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Whether activation of other TLRs can modulate TLR4 responses, and vice versa, remains unclear. Specifically with regards to endothelial cells, a key component of innate immunity, the impact of TLR cross-modulation is unknown. We postulated that TLR2 priming (via Pam3Csk4) would inhibit TLR4-mediated responses while TLR3 priming (via Poly I:C) would enhance subsequent TLR4-inflammatory signaling. We studied human umbilical vein endothelial cells and neonatal dermal microvascular (HMVECs) endothelial cells. Cells were primed with a combination of Poly I:C (10 μg/ml), Pam3Csk4 (10 μg/ml), or LPS (100 ng/ml), then washed and allowed to rest. They were then rechallenged with either Poly I:C, Pam3Csk4 or LPS. Endothelial cells showed significant tolerance to repeated LPS challenge. Priming with Pam3Csk4 also reduced the response to secondary LPS challenge in both cell types, despite a reduced proinflammatory response to Pam3Csk4 in HMVECs compared to human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Poly I:C priming enhanced inflammatory and interferon producing signals upon Poly I:C or LPS rechallenge, respectively. Poly I:C priming also induced interferon regulatory factor 7, leading to enhancement of interferon production. Finally, both Poly I:C and LPS priming induced significant changes in receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 activity. Pharmacological inhibition of receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 or interferon regulatory factor 7 reduced the potentiated phenotype of TLR3 priming on TLR4 rechallenge. These results demonstrate that in human endothelial cells, prior activation of TLRs can have a significant impact on subsequent exposures and may contribute to the severity of the host response. PMID:27567430

  14. Ig gene-like molecule CD31 plays a nonredundant role in the regulation of T-cell immunity and tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liang; Mauro, Claudio; Cornish, Georgina H.; Chai, Jian-Guo; Coe, David; Fu, Hongmei; Patton, Daniel; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Franzoso, Guido; Dyson, Julian; Nourshargh, Sussan; Marelli-Berg, Federica M.

    2010-01-01

    CD31 is an Ig-like molecule expressed by leukocytes and endothelial cells with an established role in the regulation of leukocyte trafficking. Despite genetic deletion of CD31 being associated with exacerbation of T cell-mediated autoimmunity, the contribution of this molecule to T-cell responses is largely unknown. Here we report that tumor and allograft rejection are significantly enhanced in CD31-deficient mice, which are also resistant to tolerance induction. We propose that these effects are dependent on an as yet unrecognized role for CD31-mediated homophilic interactions between T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) during priming. We show that loss of CD31 interactions leads to enhanced primary clonal expansion, increased killing capacity, and diminished regulatory functions by T cells. Immunomodulation by CD31 signals correlates with a partial inhibition of proximal T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling, specifically Zap-70 phosphorylation. However, CD31-deficient mice do not develop autoimmunity due to increased T-cell death following activation, and we show that CD31 triggering induces Erk-mediated prosurvival activity in T cells either in conjunction with TCR signaling or autonomously. We conclude that CD31 functions as a nonredundant comodulator of T-cell responses, which specializes in sizing the ensuing immune response by setting the threshold for T-cell activation and tolerance, while preventing memory T-cell death. PMID:20978210

  15. How do yeast cells become tolerant to high ethanol concentrations?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoek, Tim; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Voordeckers, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The brewer’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae displays a much higher ethanol tolerance compared to most other organisms, and it is therefore commonly used for the industrial production of bioethanol and alcoholic beverages. However, the genetic determinants underlying this yeast’s exceptional ethanol...... and challenges involved in obtaining superior industrial yeasts with improved ethanol tolerance....

  16. Functionally Selective Signaling for Morphine and Fentanyl Antinociception and Tolerance Mediated by the Rat Periaqueductal Gray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Michael M.; Reid, Rachel A.; Saville, Kimber A.

    2014-01-01

    Functionally selective signaling appears to contribute to the variability in mechanisms that underlie tolerance to the antinociceptive effects of opioids. The present study tested this hypothesis by examining the contribution of G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)/Protein kinase C (PKC) and C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation on both the expression and development of tolerance to morphine and fentanyl microinjected into the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray of the rat. Microinjection of morphine or fentanyl into the periaqueductal gray produced a dose-dependent increase in hot plate latency. Microinjection of the non-specific GRK/PKC inhibitor Ro 32-0432 into the periaqueductal gray to block mu-opioid receptor phosphorylation enhanced the antinociceptive effect of morphine but had no effect on fentanyl antinociception. Microinjection of the JNK inhibitor SP600125 had no effect on morphine or fentanyl antinociception, but blocked the expression of tolerance to repeated morphine microinjections. In contrast, a microinjection of Ro 32-0432 blocked the expression of fentanyl, but not morphine tolerance. Repeated microinjections of Ro 32-0432 blocked the development of morphine tolerance and inhibited fentanyl antinociception whether rats were tolerant or not. Repeated microinjections of SP600125 into the periaqueductal gray blocked the development of tolerance to both morphine and fentanyl microinjections. These data demonstrate that the signaling molecules that contribute to tolerance vary depending on the opioid and methodology used to assess tolerance (expression vs. development of tolerance). This signaling difference is especially clear for the expression of tolerance in which JNK contributes to morphine tolerance and GRK/PKC contributes to fentanyl tolerance. PMID:25503060

  17. Methionine restriction activates the retrograde response and confers both stress tolerance and lifespan extension to yeast, mouse and human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay E Johnson

    Full Text Available A methionine-restricted diet robustly improves healthspan in key model organisms. For example, methionine restriction reduces age-related pathologies and extends lifespan up to 45% in rodents. However, the mechanisms underlying these benefits remain largely unknown. We tested whether the yeast chronological aging assay could model the benefits of methionine restriction, and found that this intervention extends lifespan when enforced by either dietary or genetic approaches, and furthermore, that the observed lifespan extension is due primarily to reduced acid accumulation. In addition, methionine restriction-induced lifespan extension requires the activity of the retrograde response, which regulates nuclear gene expression in response to changes in mitochondrial function. Consistent with an involvement of stress-responsive retrograde signaling, we also found that methionine-restricted yeast are more stress tolerant than control cells. Prompted by these findings in yeast, we tested the effects of genetic methionine restriction on the stress tolerance and replicative lifespans of cultured mouse and human fibroblasts. We found that such methionine-restricted mammalian cells are resistant to numerous cytotoxic stresses, and are substantially longer-lived than control cells. In addition, similar to yeast, the extended lifespan of methionine-restricted mammalian cells is associated with NFκB-mediated retrograde signaling. Overall, our data suggest that improved stress tolerance and extension of replicative lifespan may contribute to the improved healthspan observed in methionine-restricted rodents, and also support the possibility that manipulation of the pathways engaged by methionine restriction may improve healthspan in humans.

  18. Nanomedicine-mediated cancer stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Song; Xia, Jin-Xing; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Circumstantial evidence suggests that most tumours are heterogeneous and contain a small population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that exhibit distinctive self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation capabilities, which are believed to play a crucial role in tumour progression, drug resistance, recurrence and metastasis in multiple malignancies. Given that the existence of CSCs is a primary obstacle to cancer therapy, a tremendous amount of effort has been put into the development of anti-CSC strategies, and several potential approaches to kill therapeutically-resistant CSCs have been explored, including inhibiting ATP-binding cassette transporters, blocking essential signalling pathways involved in self-renewal and survival of CSCs, targeting CSCs surface markers and destroying the tumour microenvironment. Meanwhile, an increasing number of therapeutic agents (e.g. small molecule drugs, nucleic acids and antibodies) to selectively target CSCs have been screened or proposed in recent years. Drug delivery technology-based approaches hold great potential for tackling the limitations impeding clinical applications of CSC-specific agents, such as poor water solubility, short circulation time and inconsistent stability. Properly designed nanocarrier-based therapeutic agents (or nanomedicines) offer new possibilities of penetrating CSC niches and significantly increasing therapeutic drug accumulation in CSCs, which are difficult for free drug counterparts. In addition, intelligent nanomedicine holds great promise to overcome pump-mediated multidrug resistance which is driven by ATP and to decrease detrimental effects on normal somatic stem cells. In this review, we summarise the distinctive biological processes related to CSCs to highlight strategies against inherently drug-resistant CSCs. We then focus on some representative examples that give a glimpse into state-of-the-art nanomedicine approaches developed for CSCs elimination. A perspective on innovative therapeutic

  19. CCR2 mediates Helicobacter pylori-induced immune tolerance and contributes to mucosal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xia; Zhang, Min; El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Huffnagle, Gray B; Kao, John Y

    2017-04-01

    We previously demonstrated that H. pylori infection leads to increased induction of regulatory T cells in local and systemic immune compartments. Here, we investigate the role of CCR2 in the tolerogenic programing of dendritic cells in a mouse model of H. pylori infection. CCR2 deficient (CCR2KO) mice and wild-type (Wt) mice infected with H. pylori SS1 strain were analyzed by qPCR and FACS analysis. In vitro, bone marrow-derived DC on day 6 from CCR2KO and Wt mice cocultured with or without H. pylori were examined to determine the impact of CCR2 signaling on dendritic cells function by qPCR, ELISA, and FACS analyses. Acute H. pylori infection was associated with a threefold increase in CCR2 mRNA expression in the gastric mucosa. H. pylori-infected CCR2KO mice exhibited a higher degree of mucosal inflammation, that is, increased gastritis scores and pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA levels, but lower degree of H. pylori gastric colonization compared to infected Wt mice. Peripheral H. pylori-specific immune response measured in the CCR2KO spleen was characterized by a higher Th17 response and a lower Treg response. In vitro, CCR2KO bone marrow-derived DC was less mature and shown a lower Treg/Th17 ratio. Moreover, blockade of CCR2 signaling by MCP-1 neutralizing antibody inhibited H. pylori-stimulated bone marrow-derived DC maturation. Our results indicate that CCR2 plays an essential role in H. pylori-induced immune tolerance and shed light on a novel mechanism of CCR2-dependent DC Treg induction, which appears to be important in maintaining mucosal homeostasis during H. pylori infection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Evolving approaches of hematopoietic stem cell-based therapies to induce tolerance to organ transplants: the long road to tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, J; Miller, J; Abecassis, M; Tollerud, D J; Ildstad, S T

    2013-01-01

    The immunoregulatory properties of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been recognized for more than 60 years, beginning in 1945, when Owen reported that genetically disparate freemartin cattle sharing a common placenta were red blood cell chimeras. In 1953, Billingham, Brent, and Medawar demonstrated that murine neonatal chimeras prepared by infusion of donor-derived hematopoietic cells exhibited donor-specific tolerance to skin allografts. Various approaches using HSCs in organ transplantation have gradually brought closer to reality the dream of inducing donor-specific tolerance in organ transplant recipients. Several hurdles needed to be overcome, especially the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), the toxicity of ablative conditioning, and the need for close donor-recipient matching. For wide acceptance, HSC therapy must be safe and reproducible in mismatched donor-recipient combinations. Discoveries in other disciplines have often unexpectedly and synergistically contributed to progress in this area. This review presents a historic perspective of the quest for tolerance in organ transplantation, highlighting current clinical approaches.

  1. Transient B cell depletion or improved transgene expression by codon optimization promote tolerance to factor VIII in gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon K Sack

    Full Text Available The major complication in the treatment of hemophilia A is the development of neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors against factor VIII (FVIII. The current method for eradicating inhibitors, termed immune tolerance induction (ITI, is costly and protracted. Clinical protocols that prevent rather than treat inhibitors are not yet established. Liver-directed gene therapy hopes to achieve long-term correction of the disease while also inducing immune tolerance. We sought to investigate the use of adeno-associated viral (serotype 8 gene transfer to induce tolerance to human B domain deleted FVIII in hemophilia A mice. We administered an AAV8 vector with either human B domain deleted FVIII or a codon-optimized transgene, both under a liver-specific promoter to two strains of hemophilia A mice. Protein therapy or gene therapy was given either alone or in conjunction with anti-CD20 antibody-mediated B cell depletion. Gene therapy with a low-expressing vector resulted in sustained near-therapeutic expression. However, supplementary protein therapy revealed that gene transfer had sensitized mice to hFVIII in a high-responder strain but not in mice of a low-responding strain. This heightened response was ameliorated when gene therapy was delivered with anti-murine CD20 treatment. Transient B cell depletion prevented inhibitor formation in protein therapy, but failed to achieve a sustained hypo-responsiveness. Importantly, use of a codon-optimized hFVIII transgene resulted in sustained therapeutic expression and tolerance without a need for B cell depletion. Therefore, anti-CD20 may be beneficial in preventing vector-induced immune priming to FVIII, but higher levels of liver-restricted expression are preferred for tolerance.

  2. IL-33 dysregulates regulatory T cells and impairs established immunologic tolerance in the lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chang; Kobayashi, Takao; Iijima, Koji; Hsu, Fan-Chi; Kita, Hirohito

    2017-11-01

    Airway exposure to environmental antigens generally leads to immunologic tolerance. A fundamental question remains: Why is airway tolerance compromised in patients with allergic airway diseases? IL-33 promotes innate and adaptive type 2 immunity and might provide the answer to this question. The goal of this study was to investigate the roles played by IL-33 in altering regulatory T (Treg) cells in the lungs and in affecting previously established airway immunologic tolerance. We analyzed CD4 + forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) + Treg cells that were isolated from the lungs of naive BALB/c mice and those treated with IL-33. Airway tolerance and allergen-induced airway inflammation models in mice were used to investigate how IL-33 affects established immunologic tolerance in vivo. CD4 + Foxp3 + Treg cells in the lungs expressed the IL-33 receptor ST2. When exposed to IL-33, Treg cells upregulated their expression of the canonical T H 2 transcription factor GATA3, as well as ST2, and produced type 2 cytokines. Treg cells lost their ability to suppress effector T cells in the presence of IL-33. Airway administration of IL-33 with an antigen impaired immunologic tolerance in the lungs that had been established by prior exposure to the antigen. Dysregulated Foxp3 + Treg cells with distinct characteristics of T H 2 cells increased in the lungs of mice undergoing IL-33-dependent allergen-driven airway inflammation. IL-33 dysregulated lung Treg cells and impaired immunologic tolerance to inhaled antigens. Established airway tolerance might not be sustained in the presence of an innate immunologic stimulus, such as IL-33. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Eliciting Autoimmunity to Ovarian Tumors in Mice by Genetic Disruption of T Cell Tolerance Mechanisms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Brad H

    2005-01-01

    ... mechanisms will likely be identified in future. We hypothesize that ovarian tumors are recognized in an antigen-specific manner by T cells but induce immunologic tolerance through one or more of these homeostatic mechanisms, which have evolved...

  4. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Sonoyama

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla. Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  5. Differential sensitivity of regulatory and effector T cells to cell death: a prerequisite for transplant tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvaine eYou

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant progress achieved in transplantation, immunosuppressive therapies currently used to prevent graft rejection are still endowed with severe side effects impairing their efficiency over the long term. Thus, the development of graft-specific, non toxic innovative therapeutic strategies has become a major challenge, the goal being to selectively target alloreactive effector T cells while sparing CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs to promote operational tolerance. Various approaches, notably the one based on monoclonal antibodies or fusion proteins directed against the TCR/CD3 complex, TCR coreceptors, or costimulatory molecules, have been proposed to reduce the alloreactive T cell pool which is an essential prerequisite to create a therapeutic window allowing Tregs to induce and maintain allograft tolerance. In this minireview, we focus on the differential sensitivity of Tregs and effector T cells to the depleting and inhibitory effect of these immunotherapies, with a particular emphasis on CD3-specific antibodies that beyond their immunosuppressive effect, also express potent tolerogenic capacities.

  6. The moderating and mediating roles of self-acceptance and tolerance to others in the relationship between mindfulness and subjective well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Oei, Tian Ps; Liu, Xinghua; Wang, Xiaoming; Ding, Chen

    2016-07-01

    This study explored the moderating and mediating influences of self-acceptance and tolerance to others in the relationship between mindfulness and subjective well-being. In total, 301 (130 males) university students completed the Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire, Index of Well-being, Self-acceptance Questionnaire, and Tolerance Scale. The results showed that the positive link between mindfulness and subjective well-being was significantly mediated by self-acceptance only. Tolerance played a moderating role. The implications of the results for relevant research and mindfulness training were discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Low efficacy of atopy patch test in predicting tolerance development in non-IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzaga, T A; Alves, F A; Cheik, M F A; de Barros, C P; Rezende, E R M A; Segundo, G R S

    2017-10-11

    The food atopy patch (APT) test has been used in previous studies to help the diagnosis of non-IgE mediated food allergies (FA). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of different cow's milk APT preparations to predict oral tolerance in children with previous non-IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy (CMA) diagnosis. Thirty-two patients non-IgE-mediated CMA diagnosed by oral food challenge (OFC) were enrolled to perform APT with three different cow's milk preparations (fresh, 2% in saline solution, 2% in petrolatum) and comparing with a new OFC after at least three months of diet exclusion. Only six (18.7%) subjects presented positive OFC to cow's milk. No differences in gender, onset symptoms age, OFC age, Z-score, and exclusion period were found between positive and negative OFC patients. Preparations using fresh milk and powdered milk in petrolatum presented sensitivity equal to zero and specificity 92.3% and 96.1%. The preparation using powdered milk in saline solution showed sensitivity and specificity of 33.3% and 96.1%. Two patients presented typical IgE symptoms after OFC. Cow's milk APT presented a low efficacy to predict tolerance in patients with previous non-IgE-mediated CMA and should not be used in clinical routine. The presence of typical IgE reactions after OFC hallmark the necessity of previous IgE-mediated investigation for this patient group. Copyright © 2017 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Cell-cell interactions mediate cytoskeleton organization and collective endothelial cell chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the role of cell-cell and cell-ligand interactions in cytoskeleton organization of endothelial cells (ECs) and their directional migration within a microfluidic device. The migration of ECs in response to a biochemical factor was studied. Mathematical analysis of the cell migration pathways and cellular cytoskeleton revealed that directional migration, migration persistence length, migration speed, and cytoskeletal stress fiber alignment can be mediated by the level of cell contacts as well as the presence or absence of a biochemical polarizing factor. It was shown that in the presence of a biochemical polarizing factor, higher cell density and more frequent cell contacts has a reinforcing effect on collective cell chemotaxis. In contrast, in the absence of a polarizing factor, high cell density can decrease or suppress the ability of the cells to migrate. Also, the correlation of actin stress fiber organization and alignment with directional migration of ECs was investigated. It was shown that in the presence of a biochemical polarizing factor, stress fibers within the cytoskeleton of ECs can be significantly aligned parallel to the gradient direction when the cells have higher level of contacts. The results also show that the organization and alignment of actin stress fibers is mediated by cell adhesion junctions during collective cell migration and introduce cell-cell interactions as a key factor during collective cell chemotaxis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Dscam-Mediated Cell Recognition Regulates Neural Circuit Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Hattori, Daisuke; Millard, S. Sean; Wojtowicz, Woj M.; Zipursky, S. Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    The Dscam family of immunoglobulin cell surface proteins mediates recognition events between neurons that play an essential role in the establishment of neural circuits. The Drosophila Dscam1 locus encodes tens of thousands of cell surface proteins via alternative splicing. These isoforms exhibit exquisite isoform-specific binding in vitro that mediates homophilic repulsion in vivo. These properties provide the molecular basis for self-avoidance, an essential developmental mechanism that allo...

  10. Tolerance of yeast biofilm cells towards systemic antifungals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Rasmus Kenneth

    of this thesis has been to explore the tolerance mechanisms of yeast biofilms to systemic antifungal agents and to identify the molecular target of a novel peptidomimetic with anti-biofilm activity. The genetic tractable S. cerevisiae was used as biofilm model system for the pathogenic Candida species...

  11. Tolerance to baked and fermented cow's milk in children with IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy in patients under two years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncuoglu, A; Yologlu, N; Simsek, I E; Uyan, Z S; Aydogan, M

    IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy (CMA) has been shown consistent in milder heated-milk tolerant and severe heated-milk reactant groups in patients older than two years. Little is known whether fermentation of milk gives rise to similar clinical phenotypes. We aimed to determine the influence of extensively heated and fermented cow's milk on the IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated CMA in children younger than two years. Subjects followed with the diagnosis of IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated CMA for at least six months underwent unheated milk challenge. IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated groups were categorised as unheated milk-reactive and tolerant, separately. Unheated milk-reactive groups were further challenged sequentially with fermented milk (yoghurt) and baked milk, 15 days apart. Allergy evaluation with skin tests, prick-to-prick tests and atopy patch tests were performed. Fifty-seven children (median age: 14 months; range: 7-24 months) underwent unheated milk challenge. Eleven of 27 children with IgE-mediated CMA and 14 of 30 children with non-IgE-mediated CMA tolerated unheated milk. Among subjects who reacted to unheated milk; 15 of 16 subjects (93%) with IgE-mediated CMA also reacted to yoghurt, whereas 11 of 16 subjects (68%) with non-IgE-mediated CMA tolerated fermented milk. Thirteen subjects (81%) of the unheated milk-reactive IgE-mediated group tolerated to heated milk. None of 16 subjects of unheated milk-reactive non-IgE-mediated group reacted to baked milk. The majority of children under the age of two years with both IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated CMA tolerated baked-milk products. Yoghurt was tolerated in two thirds of unheated milk reactive patients suffering from non-IgE-mediated CMA. Copyright © 2017 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Preserving the B-Cell Compartment Favors Operational Tolerance in Human Renal Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Hernandez M; Takenaka, Maisa C S; Moraes-Vieira, Pedro M M; Monteiro, Sandra M; Hernandez, Maristela O; Chaara, Wahiba; Six, Adrien; Agena, Fabiana; Sesterheim, Patrícia; Barbé-Tuana, Florencia Maria; Saitovitch, David; Lemos, Francine; Kalil, Jorge; Coelho, Verônica

    2012-01-01

    Transplanted individuals in operational tolerance (OT) maintain long-term stable graft function after completely stopping immunosuppression. Understanding the mechanisms involved in OT can provide valuable information about pathways to human transplantation tolerance. Here we report that operationally tolerant individuals display quantitative and functional preservation of the B-cell compartment in renal transplantation. OT exhibited normal numbers of circulating total B cells, naive, memory and regulatory B cells (Bregs) as well as preserved B-cell receptor repertoire, similar to healthy individuals. In addition, OT also displayed conserved capacity to activate the cluster of differentiation 40 (CD40)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway in Bregs, in contrast, with chronic rejection. Rather than expansion or higher activation, we show that the preservation of the B-cell compartment favors OT. PMID:22252714

  13. Mast cell function modulating IgE-mediated allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby Pawankar

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic diseases, such as atopic rhinitis, bronchial asthma and urticaria, are prevalent and increasing in frequency. Mast cells are known to play a central role in the immediate phase reaction of allergic diseases through the IgE-mediated release of a variety of chemical mediators, such as histamine, leukotrienes and prostaglandins. In contrast, T lymphocytes, basophils and eosinophils are thought to be responsible for inducing the late phase response. However, whether the mast cell can be simplistically assigned a role in the immediate phase allergic response and whether mast cells are necessary for the ongoing allergic response, including the development of hyperresponsiveness, remains to be completely studied. In the present article, the author will discuss the integrated roles of mast cells in IgE-mediated allergic inflammation, with specific emphasis on the roles of mast cell-derived cytokines in the late phase allergic response and chronic allergic inflammation.

  14. Earlier low-dose TBI or DST overcomes CD8+ T-cell-mediated alloresistance to allogeneic marrow in recipients of anti-CD40L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yasuo; Ito, Hiroshi; Kurtz, Josef; Wekerle, Thomas; Ho, Leon; Sykes, Megan

    2004-01-01

    Treatment with a single injection of anti-CD40L (CD154) monoclonal antibody (mAb) and fully mismatched allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) allows rapid tolerization of CD4+ T cells to the donor. The addition of in vivo CD8 T-cell depletion leads to permanent mixed hematopoietic chimerism and tolerance. We now describe two approaches that obviate the requirement for CD8 T-cell depletion by rapidly tolerizing recipient CD8 T cells in addition to CD4 cells. Administration of donor-specific transfusion (DST) to mice receiving 3 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), BMT and anti-CD40L mAb on day 0 uniformly led to permanent mixed chimerism and tolerance, compared with only 40% of mice receiving similar treatment without DST. In the absence of DST, moving the timing of 3 Gy TBI to day -1 or day -2 instead of day 0 led to rapid (by 2 weeks) induction of CD8+ cell tolerance, and also permitted uniform achievement of permanent mixed chimerism and donor-specific tolerance in recipients of anti-CD40L and BMT on day 0. These nontoxic regimens overcome CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell-mediated alloresistance without requiring host T-cell depletion, permitting the induction of permanent mixed chimerism and tolerance.

  15. Overexpression of the Mg-chelatase H subunit in guard cells confers drought tolerance via promotion of stomatal closure in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomo eTsuzuki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Mg-chelatase H subunit (CHLH has been shown to mediate chlorophyll biosynthesis, as well as plastid-to-nucleus and abscisic acid (ABA-mediated signaling. A recent study using a novel CHLH mutant, rtl1, indicated that CHLH specifically affects ABA-induced stomatal closure, but also that CHLH did not serve as an ABA receptor in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the molecular mechanism by which CHLH engages in ABA-mediated signaling in guard cells remains largely unknown. In the present study, we examined CHLH function in guard cells and explored whether CHLH expression might influence stomatal aperture. Incubation of rtl1 guard cell protoplasts with ABA induced expression of the ABA-responsive genes RAB18 and RD29B, as also observed in wild-type (WT cells, indicating that CHLH did not affect the expression of ABA-responsive genes. Earlier, ABA was reported to inhibit blue light (BL-mediated stomatal opening, at least in part through dephosphorylating/inhibiting guard cell H+-ATPase (which drives opening. Therefore, we immunohistochemically examined the phosphorylation status of guard cell H+-ATPase. Notably, ABA inhibition of BL-induced phosphorylation of H+-ATPase was impaired in rtl1 cells, suggesting that CHLH influences not only ABA-induced stomatal closure but also inhibition of BL-mediated stomatal opening by ABA. Next, we generated CHLH-GFP-overexpressing plants using CER6 promoter, which induces gene expression in the epidermis including guard cells. CHLH-transgenic plants exhibited a closed stomata phenotype even when brightly illuminated. Moreover, plant growth experiments conducted under water-deficient conditions showed that CHLH transgenic plants were more tolerant of drought than WT plants. In summary, we show that CHLH is involved in the regulation of stomatal aperture in response to ABA, but not in ABA-induced gene expression, and that manipulation of stomatal aperture via overexpression of CHLH in guard cells improves plant

  16. mediated RNA interference in bovine fibroblast cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-03

    Aug 3, 2011 ... Melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) is a key element in the mechanisms used to regulate both aspects of keeping the balance between energy uptake and energy expenditure. MC4R was knocked down by lentivirus-mediated shRNA expressing plasmids, which were controlled by the U6 promoter in bovine.

  17. Polycation-mediated integrated cell death processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parhamifar, Ladan; Andersen, Helene; Wu, Linping

    2014-01-01

    standard. PEIs are highly efficient transfectants, but depending on their architecture and size they induce cytotoxicity through different modes of cell death pathways. Here, we briefly review dynamic and integrated cell death processes and pathways, and discuss considerations in cell death assay design...

  18. Cdc42-mediated tubulogenesis controls cell specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesavan, Gokul; Sand, Fredrik Wolfhagen; Greiner, Thomas Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how cells polarize and coordinate tubulogenesis during organ formation is a central question in biology. Tubulogenesis often coincides with cell-lineage specification during organ development. Hence, an elementary question is whether these two processes are independently controlled......, or whether proper cell specification depends on formation of tubes. To address these fundamental questions, we have studied the functional role of Cdc42 in pancreatic tubulogenesis. We present evidence that Cdc42 is essential for tube formation, specifically for initiating microlumen formation and later...... for maintaining apical cell polarity. Finally, we show that Cdc42 controls cell specification non-cell-autonomously by providing the correct microenvironment for proper control of cell-fate choices of multipotent progenitors. For a video summary of this article, see the PaperFlick file with the Supplemental Data...

  19. Multifactorial aspects of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapur, R.

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on diseases of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction via FcγRs on phagocytes, in particular regarding platelets in fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and red blood cells (RBC) in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN).

  20. Athymic nude rat. III natural cell mediated cytotoxicity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H. de Jong; P.A. Steerenberg; P.S. Ursem; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); J.G. Vos (Joseph); E.J. Ruitenberg (Joost)

    1980-01-01

    textabstractHomozygous rnu/rnu and heterozygous +/rnu rats were investigated and compared with each other for the existence of natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Investigated were total, adherent, and nonadherent cell populations from spleen, peritoneal cavity, and mesenteric lymph node. The

  1. Fault tolerant design of a servo manipulator system for hot cell operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Jae Hyun; Park, Byung Suk; Ahn, Sung Ho; Yoon, Ji Sup; Jung, Jae Hoo

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, fault tolerant mechanisms are presented for a servo manipulator system designed to operate in a hot cell. A hot cell is a sealed and shielded room to handle radioactive materials, and it is dangerous for people to work in the hot cell. So, remote operations are necessary to handle the radioactive materials in the hot cell. KAERI has developed a servo manipulator system to perform such remote operations. However, since electric components such as servo motors are weakened with radiation, fault tolerant mechanisms have to be considered. For fault tolerance of the servo manipulator system, hardware and software redundancy has been considered. In the case of hardware, radioactive resistant electric components such as cables and connectors have been adopted and motors driving a transport have been duplicated. In case of software, a reconfiguration algorithm accommodating one motor's failure has been developed. The algorithm uses redundant axes to recover the end effector's motion in spite of one motor's failure

  2. Modulation of immune tolerance: the role of tolerogenic dendritic cells and TNFα

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the role of tolerogenic DC and anti-TNFα agents in tolerance induction. IL-10-generated tDC potently induce Treg, while inhibiting CD4+ T cell proliferation and cytokine production by Th1 and Th2 cell subsets. Anti-TNFα shares this dual function; inducing IL-10 production and

  3. Cell therapy to induce allograft tolerance: Time to switch to plan B?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine eSicard

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Organ transplantation is widely acknowledged as the best option for end stage failure of vital organs. Long-term graft survival is however limited by graft rejection, a destructive process resulting from the response of recipient’s immune system against donor-specific alloantigens. Prevention of rejection currently relies exclusively on immunosuppressive drugs that lack antigen specificity and therefore increase the risk for infections and cancers. Induction of donor-specific tolerance would provide indefinite graft survival without morbidity and therefore represents the Grail of transplant immunologists.Progresses in the comprehension of immunoregulatory mechanisms over the last decades have paved the way for cell therapies to induce allograft tolerance. The first part of the present article reviews the promising results obtained in experimental models with adoptive transfer of ex vivo-expanded regulatory CD4+ T cells (CD4+ Tregs and discuss which source and specificity should be preferred for transferred CD4+ Tregs. Interestingly, B cells have recently emerged as potent regulatory cells, able to establish a privileged crosstalk with CD4+ T cells. The second part of the present article reviews the evidences demonstrating the crucial role of regulatory B cells in transplantation tolerance. We propose the possibility to harness B cell regulatory functions to improve cell-based therapies aiming at inducing allograft tolerance.

  4. Modelling microbial fuel cells with suspended cells and added electron transfer mediator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picoreanu, C.; Katuri, K.P.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Head, I.M.; Scott, K.

    2009-01-01

    Derivation of a mathematical model for microbial fuel cells (MFC) with suspended biomass and added electron-transfer mediator is described. The model is based on mass balances for several dissolved chemical species such as substrate, oxidized mediator and reduced mediator. Biological, chemical and

  5. Mammalian mediator 19 mediates H1299 lung adenocarcinoma cell clone conformation, growth, and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu-Lu; Guo, Shu-Liang; Ma, Su-Ren; Luo, Yong-Ai

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian mediator (MED) is a multi-protein coactivator that has been identified by several research groups. The involvement of the MED complex subunit 19 (MED 19) in the metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cell line (H1299), which expresses the MED 19 subunit, was here investigated. When MED 19 expression was decreased by RNA interference H1299 cells demonstrated reduced clone formation, arrest in the S phase of the cell cycle, and lowered metastatic capacity. Thus, MED 19 appears to play important roles in the biological behavior of non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. These findings may be important for the development of novel lung carcinoma treatments.

  6. Genomic and transcriptome analyses reveal that MAPK- and phosphatidylinositol-signaling pathways mediate tolerance to 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde for industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qian; Liu, Z Lewis; Ning, Kang; Wang, Anhui; Zeng, Xiaowei; Xu, Jian

    2014-10-09

    The industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a traditional ethanologenic agent and a promising biocatalyst for advanced biofuels production using lignocellulose materials. Here we present the genomic background of type strain NRRL Y-12632 and its transcriptomic response to 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (HMF), a commonly encountered toxic compound liberated from lignocellulosic-biomass pretreatment, in dissecting the genomic mechanisms of yeast tolerance. Compared with the genome of laboratory model strain S288C, we identified more than 32,000 SNPs in Y-12632 with 23,000 missense and nonsense SNPs. Enriched sequence mutations occurred for genes involved in MAPK- and phosphatidylinositol (PI)- signaling pathways in strain Y-12632, with 41 and 13 genes containing non-synonymous SNPs, respectively. Many of these mutated genes displayed consistent up-regulated signature expressions in response to challenges of 30 mM HMF. Analogous single-gene deletion mutations of these genes showed significantly sensitive growth response on a synthetic medium containing 20 mM HMF. Our results suggest at least three MAPK-signaling pathways, especially for the cell-wall integrity pathway, and PI-signaling pathways to be involved in mediation of yeast tolerance against HMF in industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Higher levels of sequence variations were also observed for genes involved in purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathways.

  7. Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells and Central Tolerance in Autoimmune Hepatitis Development: Novel Perspective from a New Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina Alexandropoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH is an immune-mediated disorder that affects the liver parenchyma. Diagnosis usually occurs at the later stages of the disease, complicating efforts towards understanding the causes of disease development. While animal models are useful for studying the etiology of autoimmune disorders, most of the existing animal models of AIH do not recapitulate the chronic course of the human condition. In addition, approaches to mimic AIH-associated liver inflammation have instead led to liver tolerance, consistent with the high tolerogenic capacity of the liver. Recently, we described a new mouse model that exhibited spontaneous and chronic liver inflammation that recapitulated the known histopathological and immunological parameters of AIH. The approach involved liver-extrinsic genetic engineering that interfered with the induction of T-cell tolerance in the thymus, the very process thought to inhibit AIH induction by liver-specific expression of exogenous antigens. The mutation led to depletion of specialized thymic epithelial cells that present self-antigens and eliminate autoreactive T-cells before they exit the thymus. Based on our findings, which are summarized below, we believe that this mouse model represents a relevant experimental tool towards elucidating the cellular and molecular aspects of AIH development and developing novel therapeutic strategies for treating this disease.

  8. HLA-G Level on Monocytoid Dendritic Cells Correlates with Regulatory T Cell Foxp3 Expression in Liver Transplant Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellaneta, Antonino; Mazariegos, George V; Nayyar, Navdeep; Zeevi, Adriana; Thomson, Angus W

    2011-01-01

    Background Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G is a non-classical HLA class I molecule expressed as membrane-bound and soluble isoforms. Interaction of HLA-G with its receptor, immunoglobulin (Ig)-like transcript (ILT) 4 on dendritic cells (DC) down-regulates their T cell stimulatory ability. Methods We examined expression of HLA-G, ILT4, other immune regulatory molecules (inducible costimulator ligand and glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor-related receptor ligand), and the activation marker CMRF44 on circulating monocytoid (m) and plasmacytoid (p)DC by monoclonal antibody staining and flow cytometry. Three groups of stable liver transplant recipients,-operationally tolerant (TOL), prospective immunosuppressive drug weaning (PW) and maintenance immunosuppression (MI) were studied, together with healthy controls (HC). Serum HLA-G levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results In TOL patients, mDC but not pDC expressed higher HLA-G than in MI patients or HC. In TOL patients, the incidence of CD4+CD25hiCD127− regulatory T cells (Treg) and the intensity of Treg forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) expression were significantly higher than in the MI group. HLA-G expression on circulating mDC correlated significantly with that of Foxp3 in the TOL group. There was no correlation between immunosuppressive drug (tacrolimus) dose or trough level and HLA-G expression or Treg frequency or Foxp3 expression. The incidence of patients with circulating HLA-G levels >100ng/ml was highest in the TOL group, although statistical significance was not achieved. Conclusions Higher HLA-G expression on circulating mDC in TOL recipients compared with MI or HC, suggests a possible role of HLA-G in immune regulation possibly mediated by enhanced host Treg Foxp3 expression. PMID:21423069

  9. Copper tolerance mediated by polyphosphate degradation and low-affinity inorganic phosphate transport system in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo-Puertas, Mariana; Schurig-Briccio, Lici Ariane; Rodríguez-Montelongo, Luisa; Rintoul, María Regina; Rapisarda, Viviana Andrea

    2014-03-19

    Metal tolerance in bacteria has been related to polyP in a model in which heavy metals stimulate the polymer hydrolysis, forming metal-phosphate complexes that are exported. As previously described in our laboratory, Escherichia coli cells grown in media containing a phosphate concentration >37 mM maintained an unusually high polyphosphate (polyP) level in stationary phase. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the influence of polyP levels as the involvement of low-affinity inorganic phosphate transport (Pit) system in E. coli copper tolerance. PolyP levels were modulated by the media phosphate concentration and/or using mutants in polyP metabolism. Stationary phase wild-type cells grown in high phosphate medium were significantly more tolerant to copper than those grown in sufficient phosphate medium. Copper addition to tolerant cells induced polyP degradation by PPX (an exopolyphosphatase), phosphate efflux and membrane polarization. ppk-ppx- (unable to synthesize/degrade polyP), ppx- (unable to degrade polyP) and Pit system mutants were highly sensitive to metal even in high phosphate media. In exponential phase, CopA and polyP-Pit system would act simultaneously to detoxify the metal or one could be sufficient to safeguard the absence of the other. Our results support a mechanism for copper detoxification in exponential and stationary phases of E. coli, involving Pit system and degradation of polyP. Data reflect the importance of the environmental phosphate concentration in the regulation of the microbial physiological state.

  10. Cellular aspects of tolerance. V. The in vivo cooperative role of acceessory and thymus derived cells in responsiveness and unresponsiveness of SJL mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, M.; Cinader, B.

    1974-01-01

    Adult (8-week-old) SJL mice reach a relatively low degree of tolerance when injected with aggregate free rabbit γ-globulin (RGG). To analyze this phenomenon, we first examined indirect plaque-forming responses (PFC) in terms of participation of accessory and thymus-derived cells. Double transfer experiments were used; accessory cells were removed from donor cells by filtration over glasswool and their capacity reduced in recipients by 3 day preirradiation or by horse erythrocyte-mediated blockage. Using this type of experimental arrangement we found that the antibody response to RGG required the cooperation of accessory and thymus-derived cells. The induction of tolerance was affected by the presence of accessory cells. Preirradiated secondary recipients were reconstituted with spleen cells from accessory cell-deprived donors which had received thymus and bone marrow cells. In some experiments, the thymus and bone marrow cells were passed over glasswool. The primary recipients were left untreated or were given tolerogen. A more profound state of tolerance (reduction in plaque forming response) was the consequence of the incapacitation or removal of accessory cells. The magnitude of the reduction in PFC was directly related to the completeness of accessory cell removal and incapacitation. Responsiveness could be restored by administration of irradiated spleen cells as a source of accessory cells. The need for thymus-derived (T) cells in the antibody response was demonstrated by double transfer experiments in which the primary recipient was restored with thymus cells alone, bone marrow cells alone, or with a mixture of cell types

  11. ER Stress Signaling Promotes the Survival of Cancer "Persister Cells" Tolerant to EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terai, Hideki; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Potter, Danielle S; Matsui, Yusuke; Quiceno, Laura Gutierrez; Chen, Ting; Kim, Tae-Jung; Rusan, Maria; Thai, Tran C; Piccioni, Federica; Donovan, Katherine A; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Hinohara, Kunihiko; Wei, Guo; Gray, Nathanael S; Fischer, Eric S; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Shimamura, Teppei; Letai, Anthony; Hammerman, Peter S; Barbie, David A

    2018-02-15

    An increasingly recognized component of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) involves persistence of a drug-tolerant subpopulation of cancer cells that survive despite effective eradication of the majority of the cell population. Multiple groups have demonstrated that these drug-tolerant persister cells undergo transcriptional adaptation via an epigenetic state change that promotes cell survival. Because this mode of TKI drug tolerance appears to involve transcriptional addiction to specific genes and pathways, we hypothesized that systematic functional screening of EGFR TKI/transcriptional inhibitor combination therapy would yield important mechanistic insights and alternative drug escape pathways. We therefore performed a genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9 enhancer/suppressor screen in EGFR-dependent lung cancer PC9 cells treated with erlotinib + THZ1 (CDK7/12 inhibitor) combination therapy, a combination previously shown to suppress drug-tolerant cells in this setting. As expected, suppression of multiple genes associated with transcriptional complexes (EP300, CREBBP, and MED1) enhanced erlotinib/THZ1 synergy. Unexpectedly, we uncovered nearly every component of the recently described ufmylation pathway in the synergy suppressor group. Loss of ufmylation did not affect canonical downstream EGFR signaling. Instead, absence of this pathway triggered a protective unfolded protein response associated with STING upregulation, promoting protumorigenic inflammatory signaling but also unique dependence on Bcl-xL. These data reveal that dysregulation of ufmylation and ER stress comprise a previously unrecognized TKI drug tolerance pathway that engages survival signaling, with potentially important therapeutic implications. Significance: These findings reveal a novel function of the recently described ufmylation pathway, an ER stress survival signaling in drug-tolerant persister cells, which has important biological and therapeutic implications. Cancer Res; 78(4); 1044

  12. Ion mediated targeting of cells with nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Vivek; Fu, Jinlong

    2010-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, Ca^2+ ions are necessary for intracellular signaling, in activity of mitochondria and a variety of other cellular process that have been linked to cell apoptosis, proteins synthesis and cell-cycle regulation. Here we show that Ca^2+ ions, serving as the bio-compatible interface can be used to target Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SaC, baker's yeast), a model eukaryotic cell, with Au nanoparticles (10 nm). The Ca^2+ ions bind to the carboxylic acid groups in the citrate functionalized Au nanoparticles. This transforms the nanoparticles into micron long 1-D branched chain assemblies due to inter-particle dipole-dipole interaction and inter-particle bonding due to the divalent nature of the Ca^2+ ion. A similar transformation is observed with the use of divalent ions Mg^2+, Cd^2+ and Fe^2+. The 1-D assembly aids the interfacing of ion-nanoparticles on the cell by providing multiple contact points. Further monovalent ions such as Na^+ are also effective for the targeting of the cell with nanoparticles. However Na-Au nanoparticles are limited in their deposition as they exist in solution as single particles. The cells remain alive after the deposition process and their vitality is unaffected by the interfacing with ion-nanoparticles.

  13. The heat is on: Genetic adaptation to urbanization mediated by thermal tolerance and body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brans, Kristien I; Jansen, Mieke; Vanoverbeke, Joost; Tüzün, Nedim; Stoks, Robby; De Meester, Luc

    2017-12-01

    Worldwide, urbanization leads to tremendous anthropogenic environmental alterations, causing strong selection pressures on populations of animals and plants. Although a key feature of urban areas is their higher temperature ("urban heat islands"), adaptive thermal evolution in organisms inhabiting urban areas has rarely been studied. We tested for evolution of a higher heat tolerance (CT MAX ) in urban populations of the water flea Daphnia magna, a keystone grazer in freshwater ecosystems, by carrying out a common garden experiment at two temperatures (20°C and 24°C) with genotypes of 13 natural populations ordered along a well-defined urbanization gradient. We also assessed body size and haemoglobin concentration to identify underlying physiological drivers of responses in CT MAX . We found a higher CT MAX in animals isolated from urban compared to rural habitats and in animals reared at higher temperatures. We also observed substantial genetic variation in thermal tolerance within populations. Overall, smaller animals were more heat tolerant. While urban animals mature at smaller size, the effect of urbanization on thermal tolerance is only in part caused by reductions in body size. Although urban Daphnia contained higher concentrations of haemoglobin, this did not contribute to their higher CT MAX . Our results provide evidence of adaptive thermal evolution to urbanization in the water flea Daphnia. In addition, our results show both evolutionary potential and adaptive plasticity in rural as well as urban Daphnia populations, facilitating responses to warming. Given the important ecological role of Daphnia in ponds and lakes, these adaptive responses likely impact food web dynamics, top-down control of algae, water quality, and the socio-economic value of urban ponds. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Trihelix transcription factor GT-4 mediates salt tolerance via interaction with TEM2 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Hong; Li, Qing-Tian; Chen, Hao-Wei; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Ma, Biao; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2014-12-03

    Trihelix transcription factor family is plant-specific and plays important roles in developmental processes. However, their function in abiotic stress response is largely unclear. We studied one member GT-4 from Arabidopsis in relation to salt stress response. GT-4 expression is induced by salt stress and GT-4 protein is localized in nucleus and cytoplasm. GT-4 acts as a transcriptional activator and its C-terminal end is the activation domain. The protein can bind to the cis-elements GT-3 box, GT-3b box and MRE4. GT-4 confers enhanced salt tolerance in Arabidopsis likely through direct binding to the promoter and activation of Cor15A, in addition to possible regulation of other relevant genes. The gt-4 mutant shows salt sensitivity. TEM2, a member of AP2/ERF family was identified to interact with GT-4 in yeast two-hybrid, BiFC and Co-IP assays. Loss-of-function of TEM2 exerts no significant difference on salt tolerance or Cor15A expression in Arabidopsis. However, double mutant gt-4/tem2 shows greater sensitivity to salt stress and lower transcript level of Cor15A than gt-4 single mutant. GT-4 plus TEM2 can synergistically increase the promoter activity of Cor15A. GT-4 interacts with TEM2 and then co-regulates the salt responsive gene Cor15A to improve salt stress tolerance.

  15. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation of mammalian cells by chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1977-01-01

    We have developed a cell-mediated mutagenesis assay in which cells with the appropriate markers for mutagenesis are co-cultivated with either lethally irradiated rodent embryonic cells that can metabolize carcinogenic hydrocarbons or with primary rat liver cells that can metabolize chemicals carcinogenic to the liver. During co-cultivation, the reactive metabolites of the procarcinogen appear to be transmitted to the mutable cells and induce mutations in them. Assays of this type make it possible to demonstrate a relationship between carcinogenic potency of the chemicals and their ability to induce mutations in mammalian cells. In addition, by simultaneously comparing the frequencies of transformation and mutation induced in normal diploid hamster cells by benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and one of its metabolites, it is possible to estimate the genetic target size for cell transformation in vitro

  16. Diacylglycerol kinases in T cell tolerance and effector function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley S Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs are a family of enzymes that regulate the relative levels of diacylglycerol (DAG and phosphatidic acid (PA in cells by phosphorylating DAG to produce PA. Both DAG and PA are important second messengers cascading T cell receptor (TCR signal by recruiting multiple effector molecules such as RasGRP1, PKC, and mTOR. Studies have revealed important physiological functions of DGKs in the regulation of receptor signaling and the development and activation of immune cells. In this review, we will focus on recent progresses in our understanding of two DGK isoforms,  and , in CD8 T effector and memory cell differentiation, regulatory T cell development and function, and invariant NKT cell development and effector lineage differentiation.

  17. Regulatory T Cells: Serious Contenders in the Promise for Immunological Tolerance in Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safinia, Niloufar; Scotta, Cristiano; Vaikunthanathan, Trishan; Lechler, Robert I; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in immunoregulation and have been shown in animal models to promote transplantation tolerance and curb autoimmunity following their adoptive transfer. The safety and potential therapeutic efficacy of these cells has already been reported in Phase I trials of bone-marrow transplantation and type I diabetes, the success of which has motivated the broadened application of these cells in solid-organ transplantation. Despite major advances in the clinical translation of these cells, there are still key questions to be addressed to ensure that Tregs attest their reputation as ideal candidates for tolerance induction. In this review, we will discuss the unique traits of Tregs that have attracted such fame in the arena of tolerance induction. We will outline the protocols used for their ex vivo expansion and discuss the future directions of Treg cell therapy. In this regard, we will review the concept of Treg heterogeneity, the desire to isolate and expand a functionally superior Treg population and report on the effect of differing culture conditions. The relevance of Treg migratory capacity will also be discussed together with methods of in vivo visualization of the infused cells. Moreover, we will highlight key advances in the identification and expansion of antigen-specific Tregs and discuss their significance for cell therapy application. We will also summarize the clinical parameters that are of importance, alongside cell manufacture, from the choice of immunosuppression regimens to the number of injections in order to direct the success of future efficacy trials of Treg cell therapy. Years of research in the field of tolerance have seen an accumulation of knowledge and expertise in the field of Treg biology. This perpetual progression has been the driving force behind the many successes to date and has put us now within touching distance of our ultimate success, immunological tolerance.

  18. Regulatory T cells: serious contenders in the promise for immunological tolerance in transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloufar eSafinia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs play an important role in immunoregulation and have been shown in animal models to promote transplantation tolerance and curb autoimmunity following their adoptive transfer. The safety and potential therapeutic efficacy of these cells has already been reported in Phase I trials of bone marrow transplantation and type I diabetes, the success of which has motivated the broadened application of these cells in solid organ transplantation. Despite major advances in the clinical translation of these cells, there are still key questions to be addressed to ensure that Tregs attest their reputation as ideal candidates for tolerance induction. In this review, we will discuss the unique traits of Tregs that have attracted such fame in the arena of tolerance induction. We will outline the protocols used for their ex vivo expansion and discuss the future directions of Treg cell therapy. In this regard, we will review the concept of Treg heterogeneity, the desire to isolate and expand a functionally superior Treg population and report on the effect of differing culture conditions. The relevance of Treg migratory capacity will also be discussed together with methods of in vivo visualization of the infused cells. Moreover, we will highlight key advances in the identification and expansion of antigen specific Tregs and discuss their significance for cell therapy application. We will also summarize the clinical parameters that are of importance, alongside cell manufacture, from the choice of immunosuppression regimens to the number of injections in order to direct the success of future efficacy trials of Treg cell therapy.Years of research in the field of tolerance have seen an accumulation of knowledge and expertise in the field of Treg biology. This perpetual progression has been the driving force behind the many successes to date and has put us now within touching distance of our ultimate success, immunological tolerance.

  19. Proglucagon Promoter Cre-Mediated AMPK Deletion in Mice Increases Circulating GLP-1 Levels and Oral Glucose Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie R Sayers

    Full Text Available Enteroendocrine L-cells synthesise and release the gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 in response to food transit. Deletion of the tumour suppressor kinase LKB1 from proglucagon-expressing cells leads to the generation of intestinal polyps but no change in circulating GLP-1 levels. Here, we explore the role of the downstream kinase AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in these cells.Loss of AMPK from proglucagon-expressing cells was achieved using a preproglucagon promoter-driven Cre (iGluCre to catalyse recombination of floxed alleles of AMPKα1 and α2. Oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance were measured using standard protocols. L-cell mass was measured by immunocytochemistry. Hormone and peptide levels were measured by electrochemical-based luminescence detection or radioimmunoassay.Recombination with iGluCre led to efficient deletion of AMPK from intestinal L- and pancreatic alpha-cells. In contrast to mice rendered null for LKB1 using the same strategy, mice deleted for AMPK displayed an increase (WT: 0.05 ± 0.01, KO: 0.09±0.02%, p<0.01 in L-cell mass and elevated plasma fasting (WT: 5.62 ± 0.800 pg/ml, KO: 14.5 ± 1.870, p<0.01 and fed (WT: 15.7 ± 1.48pg/ml, KO: 22.0 ± 6.62, p<0.01 GLP-1 levels. Oral, but not intraperitoneal, glucose tolerance was significantly improved by AMPK deletion, whilst insulin and glucagon levels were unchanged despite an increase in alpha to beta cell ratio (WT: 0.23 ± 0.02, KO: 0.33 ± 0.03, p<0.01.AMPK restricts L-cell growth and GLP-1 secretion to suppress glucose tolerance. Targeted inhibition of AMPK in L-cells may thus provide a new therapeutic strategy in some forms of type 2 diabetes.

  20. Mesenchymal stromal cells and regulatory T cells: the Yin and Yang of peripheral tolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, Stephen P; Dazzi, Francesco; Garden, Oliver A

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) have both garnered significant interest from immunologists worldwide, not least because of the potential application of both cell types in the treatment of many chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Although both MSCs and Tregs can be considered immunosuppressive in their own right, the induction of Tregs by activated MSCs is now a well-publicised phenomenon; however, only recently have the mechanisms involved in this induction started to become clear. Indeed, it is becoming increasingly apparent that there exists a complex interplay between the two lineages leading to this potent inhibition of the host immune response. Cell contact, soluble mediators-including prostaglandin E(2) and transforming growth factor β-and indirect induction via manipulation of other antigen-presenting cells all appear to have vital roles in the interactions between MSCs and Tregs. Much still remains to be discovered before we have a full understanding of this important aspect of the immune response, but there have already been a multitude of clinical trials suggesting that MSC/Treg therapies could offer significant benefits in the treatment of both autoimmune disease and graft versus host disease. Although these therapies are still in their infancy, the synergy between MSCs and Tregs will undoubtedly yield future breakthroughs in the treatment of many debilitating conditions and usher in a new wave of targeted, cell-based therapeutics.

  1. Barium inhibits arsenic-mediated apoptotic cell death in human squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Ichiro; Uemura, Noriyuki; Nizam, Saika; Khalequzzaman, Md; Thang, Nguyen D; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Akhand, Anwarul A; Shekhar, Hossain U; Nakajima, Tamie; Kato, Masashi

    2012-06-01

    Our fieldwork showed more than 1 μM (145.1 μg/L) barium in about 3 μM (210.7 μg/L) arsenic-polluted drinking well water (n = 72) in cancer-prone areas in Bangladesh, while the mean concentrations of nine other elements in the water were less than 3 μg/L. The types of cancer include squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We hypothesized that barium modulates arsenic-mediated biological effects, and we examined the effect of barium (1 μM) on arsenic (3 μM)-mediated apoptotic cell death of human HSC-5 and A431 SCC cells in vitro. Arsenic promoted SCC apoptosis with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and JNK1/2 and caspase-3 activation (apoptotic pathway). In contrast, arsenic also inhibited SCC apoptosis with increased NF-κB activity and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) expression level and decreased JNK activity (antiapoptotic pathway). These results suggest that arsenic bidirectionally promotes apoptotic and antiapoptotic pathways in SCC cells. Interestingly, barium in the presence of arsenic increased NF-κB activity and XIAP expression and decreased JNK activity without affecting ROS production, resulting in the inhibition of the arsenic-mediated apoptotic pathway. Since the anticancer effect of arsenic is mainly dependent on cancer apoptosis, barium-mediated inhibition of arsenic-induced apoptosis may promote progression of SCC in patients in Bangladesh who keep drinking barium and arsenic-polluted water after the development of cancer. Thus, we newly showed that barium in the presence of arsenic might inhibit arsenic-mediated cancer apoptosis with the modulation of the balance between arsenic-mediated promotive and suppressive apoptotic pathways.

  2. Enhanced Boron Tolerance in Plants Mediated by Bidirectional Transport Through Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosa, Kareem A; Kumar, Kundan; Chhikara, Sudesh; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Dhankher, Om Parkash

    2016-02-23

    High boron (B) concentration is toxic to plants that limit plant productivity. Recent studies have shown the involvement of the members of major intrinsic protein (MIP) family in controlling B transport. Here, we have provided experimental evidences showing the bidirectional transport activity of rice OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6. Boron transport ability of OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 were displayed in yeast HD9 mutant strain (∆fps1∆acr3∆ycf1) as a result of increased B sensitivity, influx and accumulation by OsPIP1;3, and rapid efflux activity by OsPIP2;6. RT-PCR analysis showed strong upregulation of OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 transcripts in roots by B toxicity. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines overexpressing OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 exhibited enhanced tolerance to B toxicity. Furthermore, B concentration was significantly increased after 2 and 3 hours of tracer boron ((10)B) treatment. Interestingly, a rapid efflux of (10)B from the roots of the transgenic plants was observed within 1 h of (10)B treatment. Boron tolerance in OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 lines was inhibited by aquaporin inhibitors, silver nitrate and sodium azide. Our data proved that OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 are indeed involved in both influx and efflux of boron transport. Manipulation of these PIPs could be highly useful in improving B tolerance in crops grown in high B containing soils.

  3. High Fat Diet Inhibits Dendritic Cell and T Cell Response to Allergens but Does Not Impair Inhalational Respiratory Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Pizzolla

    Full Text Available The incidence of obesity has risen to epidemic proportions in recent decades, most commonly attributed to an increasingly sedentary lifestyle, and a 'western' diet high in fat and low in fibre. Although non-allergic asthma is a well-established co-morbidity of obesity, the influence of obesity on allergic asthma is still under debate. Allergic asthma is thought to result from impaired tolerance to airborne antigens, so-called respiratory tolerance. We sought to investigate whether a diet high in fats affects the development of respiratory tolerance. Mice fed a high fat diet (HFD for 8 weeks showed weight gain, metabolic disease, and alteration in gut microbiota, metabolites and glucose metabolism compared to age-matched mice fed normal chow diet (ND. Respiratory tolerance was induced by repeated intranasal (i.n. administration of ovalbumin (OVA, prior to induction of allergic airway inflammation (AAI by sensitization with OVA in alum i.p. and subsequent i.n. OVA challenge. Surprisingly, respiratory tolerance was induced equally well in HFD and ND mice, as evidenced by decreased lung eosinophilia and serum OVA-specific IgE production. However, in a pilot study, HFD mice showed a tendency for impaired activation of airway dendritic cells and regulatory T cells compared with ND mice after induction of respiratory tolerance. Moreover, the capacity of lymph node cells to produce IL-5 and IL-13 after AAI was drastically diminished in HFD mice compared to ND mice. These results indicate that HFD does not affect the inflammatory or B cell response to an allergen, but inhibits priming of Th2 cells and possibly dendritic cell and regulatory T cell activation.

  4. Antigen dynamics govern the induction of CD4(+) T cell tolerance during autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challa, Dilip K; Mi, Wentao; Lo, Su-Tang; Ober, Raimund J; Ward, E Sally

    2016-08-01

    Antigen-specific T cell tolerance holds great promise for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, strategies to induce durable tolerance using high doses of soluble antigen have to date been unsuccessful, due to lack of efficacy and the risk of hypersensitivity. In the current study we have overcome these limitations by developing a platform for tolerance induction based on engineering the immunoglobulin Fc region to modulate the dynamic properties of low doses (1 μg/mouse; ∼50 μg/kg) of Fc-antigen fusions. Using this approach, we demonstrate that antigen persistence is a dominant factor governing the elicitation of tolerance in the model of multiple sclerosis (MS), experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), induced by immunizing B10.PL mice with the N-terminal epitope of myelin basic protein. Unexpectedly, our analyses reveal a stringent threshold of antigen persistence for both prophylactic and therapeutic treatments, although distinct mechanisms lead to tolerance in these two settings. Importantly, the delivery of tolerogenic Fc-antigen fusions during ongoing disease results in the downregulation of T-bet and CD40L combined with amplification of Foxp3(+) T cell numbers. The generation of effective, low dose tolerogens using Fc engineering has potential for the regulation of autoreactive T cells. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Intratumoral oxygen gradients mediate sarcoma cell invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Daniel M.; Park, Kyung Min; Tang, Vitor; Xu, Yu; Pak, Koreana; Eisinger-Mathason, T. S. Karin; Simon, M. Celeste; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a critical factor in the progression and metastasis of many cancers, including soft tissue sarcomas. Frequently, oxygen (O2) gradients develop in tumors as they grow beyond their vascular supply, leading to heterogeneous areas of O2 depletion. Here, we report the impact of hypoxic O2 gradients on sarcoma cell invasion and migration. O2 gradient measurements showed that large sarcoma mouse tumors (>300 mm3) contain a severely hypoxic core [≤0.1% partial pressure of O2 (pO2)] whereas smaller tumors possessed hypoxic gradients throughout the tumor mass (0.1–6% pO2). To analyze tumor invasion, we used O2-controllable hydrogels to recreate the physiopathological O2 levels in vitro. Small tumor grafts encapsulated in the hydrogels revealed increased invasion that was both faster and extended over a longer distance in the hypoxic hydrogels compared with nonhypoxic hydrogels. To model the effect of the O2 gradient accurately, we examined individual sarcoma cells embedded in the O2-controllable hydrogel. We observed that hypoxic gradients guide sarcoma cell motility and matrix remodeling through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activation. We further found that in the hypoxic gradient, individual cells migrate more quickly, across longer distances, and in the direction of increasing O2 tension. Treatment with minoxidil, an inhibitor of hypoxia-induced sarcoma metastasis, abrogated cell migration and matrix remodeling in the hypoxic gradient. Overall, we show that O2 acts as a 3D physicotactic agent during sarcoma tumor invasion and propose the O2-controllable hydrogels as a predictive system to study early stages of the metastatic process and therapeutic targets. PMID:27486245

  6. Distinct Requirements for HIV-Cell Fusion and HIV-mediated Cell-Cell Fusion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Naoyuki; Marin, Mariana; Kim, Jeong Hwa; Desai, Tanay M.; Melikyan, Gregory B.

    2015-01-01

    Whether HIV-1 enters cells by fusing with the plasma membrane or with endosomes is a subject of active debate. The ability of HIV-1 to mediate fusion between adjacent cells, a process referred to as “fusion-from-without” (FFWO), shows that this virus can fuse with the plasma membrane. To compare FFWO occurring at the cell surface with HIV-cell fusion through a conventional entry route, we designed an experimental approach that enabled the measurements of both processes in the same sample. The following key differences were observed. First, a very small fraction of viruses fusing with target cells participated in FFWO. Second, whereas HIV-1 fusion with adherent cells was insensitive to actin inhibitors, post-CD4/coreceptor binding steps during FFWO were abrogated. A partial dependence of HIV-cell fusion on actin remodeling was observed in CD4+ T cells, but this effect appeared to be due to the actin dependence of virus uptake. Third, deletion of the cytoplasmic tail of HIV-1 gp41 dramatically enhanced the ability of the virus to promote FFWO, while having a modest effect on virus-cell fusion. Distinct efficiencies and actin dependences of FFWO versus HIV-cell fusion are consistent with the notion that, except for a minor fraction of particles that mediate fusion between the plasma membranes of adjacent cells, HIV-1 enters through an endocytic pathway. We surmise, however, that cell-cell contacts enabling HIV-1 fusion with the plasma membrane could be favored at the sites of high density of target cells, such as lymph nodes. PMID:25589785

  7. Intrinsic radiation tolerance of ultra-thin GaAs solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, L. C.; Yakes, M. K.; Warner, J. H.; Schmieder, K. J.; Walters, R. J.; Jenkins, P. P. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW., Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Bennett, M. F. [Sotera Defense Solutions, Inc., Annapolis Junction, Maryland 20701-1067 (United States)

    2016-07-18

    Radiation tolerance is a critical performance criterion of photovoltaic devices for space power applications. In this paper we demonstrate the intrinsic radiation tolerance of an ultra-thin solar cell geometry. Device characteristics of GaAs solar cells with absorber layer thicknesses 80 nm and 800 nm were compared before and after 3 MeV proton irradiation. Both cells showed a similar degradation in V{sub oc} with increasing fluence; however, the 80 nm cell showed no degradation in I{sub sc} for fluences up to 10{sup 14 }p{sup +} cm{sup −2}. For the same exposure, the I{sub sc} of the 800 nm cell had severely degraded leaving a remaining factor of 0.26.

  8. Mediation by the serotonergic system of U-50,488H-induced antinociception and tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Begonia Yeeman.

    1989-01-01

    The antinociceptive action of U-50,488H, a selective {kappa}-opioid receptor agonist, was attenuated by serotonergic but not by noradrenergic receptor antagonists. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered U-50,488H was antagonized by more than two fold by i.c.v. administered pindolol, methysergide, mianserin, ketanserin, pirenperone or ICS-205,930. A similar degree of antagonism of U-50,488H (i.c.v.) was found after intrathecal (i.t.) treatments with pindolol, methysergide or ICS-205,930 but not with mianserin, ketanserin or pirenperone. When U-50,488H and the antagonists were both given i.t., its antinociceptive action was attenuated by pindolol or methysergide, potentiated by mianserin, ketanserin or pirenperone and not affected by ICS-205,930. The release of serotonin was further studied directly by using a superfusion system. A naloxone reversible, concentration- and Ca{sup 2+}- dependent enhancement of release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin by U-50,488H was observed in spinal and brain tissues. Tolerance to the antinociceptive action of U-50,488H was induced in mice using slow release preparations of U-50,488H. Serotonergic receptor antagonists (pindolol or ketanserin) were co-administered with U-50,488H to test for their effects on the development of tolerance to U-50,488H.

  9. Identifying potential molecular factors involved in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens 5113 mediated abiotic stress tolerance in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Daim, I A; Bejai, S; Fridborg, I; Meijer, J

    2018-03-01

    Abiotic stressors are main limiting factors for agricultural production around the world. Plant growth-promoting bacteria have been successfully used to improve abiotic stress tolerance in several crops including wheat. However, the molecular changes involved in the improvement of stress management are poorly understood. The present investigation addressed some molecular factors involved in bacterially induced plant abiotic stress responses by identifying differentially expressed genes in wheat (Triticum aestivum) seedlings treated with the beneficial bacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum UCMB5113 prior to challenge with abiotic stress conditions such as heat, cold or drought. cDNA-AFLP analysis revealed differential expression of more than 200 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) in wheat leaves. Expression of selected TDFs was confirmed using RT-PCR. DNA sequencing of 31 differentially expressed TDFs revealed significant homology with both known and unknown genes in database searches. Virus-induced gene silencing of two abscisic acid-related TDFs showed different effects upon heat and drought stress. We conclude that treatment with B. amyloliquefaciens 5113 caused molecular modifications in wheat in order to induce tolerance against heat, cold and drought stress. Bacillus treatment provides systemic effects that involve metabolic and regulatory functions supporting both growth and stress management. © 2017 German Society for Plant Sciences and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  10. Novel Transgenic Mice for Inducible Gene Overexpression in Pancreatic Cells Define Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Regulations of Beta Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massouridès, Emmanuelle; Singh-Estivalet, Amrit; Valtat, Bérengère; Dorchene, Delphine; Jaisser, Frédéric; Bréant, Bernadette; Tronche, Francois

    2012-01-01

    Conditional gene deletion in specific cell populations has helped the understanding of pancreas development. Using this approach, we have shown that deleting the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene in pancreatic precursor cells leads to a doubled beta-cell mass. Here, we provide genetic tools that permit a temporally and spatially controlled expression of target genes in pancreatic cells using the Tetracycline inducible system. To efficiently target the Tetracycline transactivator (tTA) in specific cell populations, we generated Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BAC) transgenic mice expressing the improved Tetracycline transactivator (itTA) either in pancreatic progenitor cells expressing the transcription factor Pdx1 (BAC-Pdx1-itTA), or in beta cells expressing the insulin1 gene (BAC-Ins1-itTA). In the two transgenic models, itTA-mediated activation of reporter genes was efficient and subject to regulation by Doxycycline (Dox). The analysis of a tetracycline-regulated LacZ reporter gene shows that in BAC-Pdx1-itTA mice, itTA is expressed from embryonic (E) day 11.5 in all pancreatic precursor cells. In the adult pancreas, itTA is active in mature beta, delta cells and in few acinar cells. In BAC-Ins1-itTA mice tTA is active from E13.5 and is restricted to beta cells in fetal and adult pancreas. In both lines, tTA activity was suppressed by Dox treatment and re-induced after Dox removal. Using these transgenic lines, we overexpressed the GR in selective pancreatic cell populations and found that overexpression in precursor cells altered adult beta-cell fraction but not glucose tolerance. In contrast, GR overexpression in mature beta cells did not alter beta-cell fraction but impaired glucose tolerance with insufficient insulin secretion. In conclusion, these new itTA mouse models will allow fine-tuning of gene expression to investigate gene function in pancreatic biology and help us understand how glucocorticoid signaling affects on the long-term distinct aspects of

  11. Increased lignocellulosic inhibitor tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell populations in early stationary phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Venkatachalam; Schelin, Jenny; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie; van Niel, Ed Wj; Carlquist, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Production of second-generation bioethanol and other bulk chemicals by yeast fermentation requires cells that tolerate inhibitory lignocellulosic compounds at low pH. Saccharomyces cerevisiae displays high plasticity with regard to inhibitor tolerance, and adaptation of cell populations to process conditions is essential for reaching efficient and robust fermentations. In this study, we assessed responses of isogenic yeast cell populations in different physiological states to combinations of acetic acid, vanillin and furfural at low pH. We found that cells in early stationary phase (ESP) exhibited significantly increased tolerance compared to cells in logarithmic phase, and had a similar ability to initiate growth in the presence of inhibitors as pre-adapted cells. The ESP cultures consisted of subpopulations with different buoyant cell densities which were isolated with flotation and analysed separately. These so-called quiescent (Q) and non-quiescent (NQ) cells were found to possess similar abilities to initiate growth in the presence of lignocellulosic inhibitors at pH 3.7, and had similar viabilities under static conditions. Therefore, differentiation into Q-cells was not the cause for increased tolerance of ESP cultures. Flow cytometry analysis of cell viability, intracellular pH and reactive oxygen species levels revealed that tolerant cell populations had a characteristic response upon inhibitor perturbations. Growth in the presence of a combination of inhibitors at low pH correlated with pre-cultures having a high frequency of cells with low pH i and low ROS levels. Furthermore, only a subpopulation of ESP cultures was able to tolerate lignocellulosic inhibitors at low pH, while pre-adapted cell populations displayed an almost uniform high tolerance to the adverse condition. This was in stark contrast to cell populations growing exponentially in non-inhibitory medium that were uniformly sensitive to the inhibitors at low pH. ESP cultures of S. cerevisiae

  12. Interferon-α abrogates tolerance induction by human tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Bacher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Administration of interferon-α (IFN-α represents an approved adjuvant therapy as reported for malignancies like melanoma and several viral infections. In malignant diseases, tolerance processes are critically involved in tumor progression. In this study, the effect of IFN-α on tolerance induction by human tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC was analyzed. We focussed on tolerogenic IL-10-modulated DC (IL-10 DC that are known to induce anergic regulatory T cells (iTregs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: IFN-α promoted an enhanced maturation of IL-10 DC as demonstrated by upregulation of the differentiation marker CD83 as well as costimulatory molecules. IFN-α treatment resulted in an increased capacity of DC to stimulate T cell activation compared to control tolerogenic DC. We observed a strengthened T cell proliferation and increased IFN-γ production of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells stimulated by IFN-α-DC, demonstrating a restoration of the immunogenic capacity of tolerogenic DC in the presence of IFN-α. Notably, restimulation experiments revealed that IFN-α treatment of tolerogenic DC abolished the induction of T cell anergy and suppressor function of iTregs. In contrast, IFN-α neither affected the priming of iTregs nor converted iTregs into effector T cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: IFN-α inhibits the induction of T cell tolerance by reversing the tolerogenic function of human DC.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide suppresses IgE-mast cell-mediated reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N; McKell, M; Dang, A; Yamani, A; Waggoner, L; Vanoni, S; Noah, T; Wu, D; Kordowski, A; Köhl, J; Hoebe, K; Divanovic, S; Hogan, S P

    2017-12-01

    Clinical and experimental analyses have identified a central role for IgE/FcεRI/mast cells in promoting IgE-mediated anaphylaxis. Recent data from human studies suggest that bacterial infections can alter susceptibility to anaphylaxis. We examined the effect of LPS exposure on the induction of IgE-mast cell (MC) mediated reactions in mice. C57BL/6 WT, tlr4 -/- and IL10 -/- mice were exposed to LPS, and serum cytokines (TNF and IL-10) were measured. Mice were subsequently treated with anti-IgE, and the symptoms of passive IgE-mediated anaphylaxis, MC activation, Ca 2+ -mobilization and the expression of FcεRI on peritoneal MCs were quantitated. We show that LPS exposure of C57BL/6 WT mice constraints IgE-MC-mediated reactions. LPS-induced suppression of IgE-MC-mediated responses was TLR-4-dependent and associated with increased systemic IL-10 levels, decreased surface expression of FcεRI on MCs and loss of sensitivity to IgE activation. Notably, LPS-induced desensitization of MCs was short term with MC sensitivity to IgE reconstituted within 48 hours, which was associated with recapitulation of FcεRI expression on the MCs. Mechanistic analyses revealed a requirement for IL-10 in LPS-mediated decrease in MC FcεRI surface expression. Collectively, these studies suggest that LPS-induced IL-10 promotes the down-regulation of MC surface FcεRI expression and leads to desensitization of mice to IgE-mediated reactions. These studies indicate that targeting of the LPS-TLR-4-IL-10 pathway may be used as a therapeutic approach to prevent adverse IgE-mediated reactions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. H(2) enhances arabidopsis salt tolerance by manipulating ZAT10/12-mediated antioxidant defence and controlling sodium exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yanjie; Mao, Yu; Lai, Diwen; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Wenbiao

    2012-01-01

    The metabolism of hydrogen gas (H(2)) in bacteria and algae has been extensively studied for the interesting of developing H(2)-based fuel. Recently, H(2) is recognized as a therapeutic antioxidant and activates several signalling pathways in clinical trials. However, underlying physiological roles and mechanisms of H(2) in plants as well as its signalling cascade remain unknown. In this report, histochemical, molecular, immunological and genetic approaches were applied to characterize the participation of H(2) in enhancing Arabidopsis salt tolerance. An increase of endogenous H(2) release was observed 6 hr after exposure to 150 mM NaCl. Arabidopsis pretreated with 50% H(2)-saturated liquid medium, mimicking the induction of endogenous H(2) release when subsequently exposed to NaCl, effectively decreased salinity-induced growth inhibition. Further results showed that H(2) pretreatment modulated genes/proteins of zinc-finger transcription factor ZAT10/12 and related antioxidant defence enzymes, thus significantly counteracting the NaCl-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction and lipid peroxidation. Additionally, H(2) pretreatment maintained ion homeostasis by regulating the antiporters and H(+) pump responsible for Na(+) exclusion (in particular) and compartmentation. Genetic evidence suggested that SOS1 and cAPX1 might be the target genes of H(2) signalling. Overall, our findings indicate that H(2) acts as a novel and cytoprotective regulator in coupling ZAT10/12-mediated antioxidant defence and maintenance of ion homeostasis in the improvement of Arabidopsis salt tolerance.

  15. Strategies for Carbon and Sulfur Tolerant Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Materials, Incorporating Lessons from Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrin, Paul; Ruiz-Trejo, Enrique; Mermelstein, Joshua; Bermúdez Menéndez, José Miguel; Ramı Rez Reina, Tomás; Brandon, Nigel P

    2016-11-23

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are a rapidly emerging energy technology for a low carbon world, providing high efficiency, potential to use carbonaceous fuels, and compatibility with carbon capture and storage. However, current state-of-the-art materials have low tolerance to sulfur, a common contaminant of many fuels, and are vulnerable to deactivation due to carbon deposition when using carbon-containing compounds. In this review, we first study the theoretical basis behind carbon and sulfur poisoning, before examining the strategies toward carbon and sulfur tolerance used so far in the SOFC literature. We then study the more extensive relevant heterogeneous catalysis literature for strategies and materials which could be incorporated into carbon and sulfur tolerant fuel cells.

  16. Phosphoproteomics Reveals Regulatory T Cell-Mediated DEF6 Dephosphorylation That Affects Cytokine Expression in Human Conventional T Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Joshi, Rubin N.

    2017-09-25

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) control key events of immune tolerance, primarily by suppression of effector T cells. We previously revealed that Tregs rapidly suppress T cell receptor (TCR)-induced calcium store depletion in conventional CD4CD25 T cells (Tcons) independently of IP levels, consequently inhibiting NFAT signaling and effector cytokine expression. Here, we study Treg suppression mechanisms through unbiased phosphoproteomics of primary human Tcons upon TCR stimulation and Treg-mediated suppression, respectively. Tregs induced a state of overall decreased phosphorylation as opposed to TCR stimulation. We discovered novel phosphosites (T595_S597) in the DEF6 (SLAT) protein that were phosphorylated upon TCR stimulation and conversely dephosphorylated upon coculture with Tregs. Mutation of these DEF6 phosphosites abrogated interaction of DEF6 with the IP receptor and affected NFAT activation and cytokine transcription in primary Tcons. This novel mechanism and phosphoproteomics data resource may aid in modifying sensitivity of Tcons to Treg-mediated suppression in autoimmune disease or cancer.

  17. Neural stem cell-derived exosomes mediate viral entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sims B

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Brian Sims,1,2,* Linlin Gu,3,* Alexandre Krendelchtchikov,3 Qiana L Matthews3,4 1Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, 2Department of Cell, Developmental, and Integrative Biology, 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, 4Center for AIDS Research, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Viruses enter host cells through interactions of viral ligands with cellular receptors. Viruses can also enter cells in a receptor-independent fashion. Mechanisms regarding the receptor-independent viral entry into cells have not been fully elucidated. Exosomal trafficking between cells may offer a mechanism by which viruses can enter cells.Methods: To investigate the role of exosomes on cellular viral entry, we employed neural stem cell-derived exosomes and adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 for the proof-of-principle study. Results: Exosomes significantly enhanced Ad5 entry in Coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR-deficient cells, in which Ad5 only had very limited entry. The exosomes were shown to contain T-cell immunoglobulin mucin protein 4 (TIM-4, which binds phosphatidylserine. Treatment with anti-TIM-4 antibody significantly blocked the exosome-mediated Ad5 entry.Conclusion: Neural stem cell-derived exosomes mediated significant cellular entry of Ad5 in a receptor-independent fashion. This mediation may be hampered by an antibody specifically targeting TIM-4 on exosomes. This set of results will benefit further elucidation of virus/exosome pathways, which would contribute to reducing natural viral infection by developing therapeutic agents or vaccines. Keywords: neural stem cell-derived exosomes, adenovirus type 5, TIM-4, viral entry, phospholipids

  18. The Major Players in Adaptive Immunity-Cell-mediated Immunity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 6. The Major Players in Adaptive Immunity - Cell-mediated Immunity. Asma Ahmed Banishree Saha Anand Patwardhan Shwetha Shivaprasad Dipankar Nandi. General Article Volume 14 Issue 6 June 2009 pp 610-621 ...

  19. B lymphocytes confer immune tolerance via cell surface GARP-TGF-β complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Caroline H; Wu, Bill X; Salem, Mohammad; Ansa-Addo, Ephraim A; Metelli, Alessandra; Sun, Shaoli; Gilkeson, Gary; Shlomchik, Mark J; Liu, Bei; Li, Zihai

    2018-04-05

    GARP, a cell surface docking receptor for binding and activating latent TGF-β, is highly expressed by platelets and activated Tregs. While GARP is implicated in immune invasion in cancer, the roles of the GARP-TGF-β axis in systemic autoimmune diseases are unknown. Although B cells do not express GARP at baseline, we found that the GARP-TGF-β complex is induced on activated human and mouse B cells by ligands for multiple TLRs, including TLR4, TLR7, and TLR9. GARP overexpression on B cells inhibited their proliferation, induced IgA class-switching, and dampened T cell-independent antibody production. In contrast, B cell-specific deletion of GARP-encoding gene Lrrc32 in mice led to development of systemic autoimmune diseases spontaneously as well as worsening of pristane-induced lupus-like disease. Canonical TGF-β signaling more readily upregulates GARP in Peyer patch B cells than in splenic B cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that B cells are required for the induction of oral tolerance of T cell-dependent antigens via GARP. Our studies reveal for the first time to our knowledge that cell surface GARP-TGF-β is an important checkpoint for regulating B cell peripheral tolerance, highlighting a mechanism of autoimmune disease pathogenesis.

  20. Mast cell-derived histamine mediates cystitis pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles N Rudick

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells trigger inflammation that is associated with local pain, but the mechanisms mediating pain are unclear. Interstitial cystitis (IC is a bladder disease that causes debilitating pelvic pain of unknown origin and without consistent inflammation, but IC symptoms correlate with elevated bladder lamina propria mast cell counts. We hypothesized that mast cells mediate pelvic pain directly and examined pain behavior using a murine model that recapitulates key aspects of IC.Infection of mice with pseudorabies virus (PRV induces a neurogenic cystitis associated with lamina propria mast cell accumulation dependent upon tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF, TNF-mediated bladder barrier dysfunction, and pelvic pain behavior, but the molecular basis for pelvic pain is unknown. In this study, both PRV-induced pelvic pain and bladder pathophysiology were abrogated in mast cell-deficient mice but were restored by reconstitution with wild type bone marrow. Pelvic pain developed normally in TNF- and TNF receptor-deficient mice, while bladder pathophysiology was abrogated. Conversely, genetic or pharmacologic disruption of histamine receptor H1R or H2R attenuated pelvic pain without altering pathophysiology.These data demonstrate that mast cells promote cystitis pain and bladder pathophysiology through the separable actions of histamine and TNF, respectively. Therefore, pain is independent of pathology and inflammation, and histamine receptors represent direct therapeutic targets for pain in IC and other chronic pain conditions.

  1. Engineering PTEN-L for Cell-Mediated Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavictoire, Sylvie J; Gont, Alexander; Julian, Lisa M; Stanford, William L; Vlasschaert, Caitlyn; Gray, Douglas A; Jomaa, Danny; Lorimer, Ian A J

    2018-06-15

    The tumor suppressor PTEN is frequently inactivated in glioblastoma. PTEN-L is a long form of PTEN produced by translation from an alternate upstream start codon. Unlike PTEN, PTEN-L has a signal sequence and a tract of six arginine residues that allow PTEN-L to be secreted from cells and be taken up by neighboring cells. This suggests that PTEN-L could be used as a therapeutic to restore PTEN activity. However, effective delivery of therapeutic proteins to treat CNS cancers such as glioblastoma is challenging. One method under evaluation is cell-mediated therapy, where cells with tumor-homing abilities such as neural stem cells are genetically modified to express a therapeutic protein. Here, we have developed a version of PTEN-L that is engineered for enhanced cell-mediated delivery. This was accomplished by replacement of the native leader sequence of PTEN-L with a leader sequence from human light-chain immunoglobulin G (IgG). This version of PTEN-L showed increased secretion and an increased ability to transfer to neighboring cells. Neural stem cells derived from human fibroblasts could be modified to express this version of PTEN-L and were able to deliver catalytically active light-chain leader PTEN-L (lclPTEN-L) to neighboring glioblastoma cells.

  2. A novel conditional Aire allele enables cell-specific ablation of the immune tolerance regulator Aire

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dobeš, Jan; Edenhofer, F.; Vobořil, Matouš; Brabec, Tomáš; Dobešová, Martina; Čepková, Adéla; Klein, L.; Rajewsky, K.; Filipp, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 3 (2017), s. 546-548 ISSN 0014-2980 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Aire * Conditional Knockout * Immune tolerance * Medullary thymic epithelial cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.227, year: 2016

  3. Elevated level of polysaccharides in a high level UV-B tolerant cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-04-26

    Apr 26, 2011 ... Key words: Bupleurum scorzonerifolium Willd, polysaccharides, in vitro culture, UV-B tolerance, antioxidant. ..... The number of calli formed from protoplasts of the anti-UV-B cell line after different generation of subculture. Figure 4. ..... Tanaka A, Sakamoto A, Ishigaki Y, Nikaido O, Sun G, Hase Y, Shikazono.

  4. Tolerization of an established αb-crystallin-reactive T-cell response by intravenous antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, R.; Mark, K. van der; Wawrousek, E.F.; Plomp, A.C.; Noort, J.M. van

    2007-01-01

    Tolerance induction to prevent activation of a naïve T-cell repertoire has been well documented in rodents and can be readily achieved by intravenous, oral or intranasal administration of antigen in the absence of adjuvants. In autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) the presence of an

  5. Oxidative stress tolerance of early stage diabetic endothelial progenitor cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Sukmawati

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Primitive BM-EPCs showed vasculogenic dysfunction in early diabetes. However the oxidative stress is not denoted as the major initiating factor of its cause. Our results suggest that primitive BM-KSL cell has the ability to compensate oxidative stress levels in early diabetes by increasing the expression of anti-oxidative enzymes.

  6. Cell Adhesions: Actin-Based Modules that Mediate Cell-Extracellular Matrix and Cell-Cell Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachir, Alexia; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Nelson, W. James; Bianchini, Julie M.

    2018-01-01

    Cell adhesions link cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and to each other, and depend on interactions with the actin cytoskeleton. Both cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesion sites contain discrete, yet overlapping functional modules. These modules establish physical association with the actin cytoskeleton, locally modulate actin organization and dynamics, and trigger intracellular signaling pathways. Interplay between these modules generates distinct actin architectures that underlie different stages, types, and functions of cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesions. Actomyosin contractility is required to generate mature, stable adhesions, as well as sense and translate the mechanical properties of the cellular environment to changes in cell organization and behavior. In this chapter we discuss the organization and function of different adhesion modules and how they interact with the actin cytoskeleton. We highlight the molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction in adhesions, and how adhesion molecules mediate crosstalk between cell-ECM and cell-cell adhesion sites. PMID:28679638

  7. Whole-genome analysis of herbicide-tolerant mutant rice generated by Agrobacterium-mediated gene targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Masaki; Kumagai, Masahiko; Motoyama, Ritsuko; Sasaki-Yamagata, Harumi; Mori-Hosokawa, Satomi; Hamada, Masao; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Katayose, Yuichi; Itoh, Takeshi; Toki, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    Gene targeting (GT) is a technique used to modify endogenous genes in target genomes precisely via homologous recombination (HR). Although GT plants are produced using genetic transformation techniques, if the difference between the endogenous and the modified gene is limited to point mutations, GT crops can be considered equivalent to non-genetically modified mutant crops generated by conventional mutagenesis techniques. However, it is difficult to guarantee the non-incorporation of DNA fragments from Agrobacterium in GT plants created by Agrobacterium-mediated GT despite screening with conventional Southern blot and/or PCR techniques. Here, we report a comprehensive analysis of herbicide-tolerant rice plants generated by inducing point mutations in the rice ALS gene via Agrobacterium-mediated GT. We performed genome comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) array analysis and whole-genome sequencing to evaluate the molecular composition of GT rice plants. Thus far, no integration of Agrobacterium-derived DNA fragments has been detected in GT rice plants. However, >1,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion/deletion (InDels) were found in GT plants. Among these mutations, 20-100 variants might have some effect on expression levels and/or protein function. Information about additive mutations should be useful in clearing out unwanted mutations by backcrossing. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists.

  8. Endothelial Cells in Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Kidney Transplantation: Pathogenesis Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR has been identified as a main obstacle for stable immune tolerance and long survival of kidney allografts. In spite of new insights into the underlying mechanisms of AMR, accurate diagnosis and efficient treatment are still challenges in clinical practice. Endothelium is the first barrier between recipients’ immune systems and grafts in vascularized organ transplants. Considering that endothelial cells express a number of antigens that can be attacked by various allo- and autoantibodies, endothelial cells act as main targets for the recipients’ humoral immune responses. Importantly, emerging evidence has shown that endothelial cells in transplants could also initiate protective mechanisms in response to immune injuries. A better understanding of the role of endothelial cells during the pathogenesis of AMR might provide novel therapeutic targets. In the present review, we summarize the antigens expressed by endothelial cells and also discuss the activation and accommodation of endothelial cells as well as their clinical implications. Collectively, the progress discussed in this review indicates endothelial cells as promising targets to improve current diagnosis and therapeutic regimens for AMR.

  9. The Arabidopsis Nitrate Transporter NRT1.8 Functions in Nitrate Removal from the Xylem Sap and Mediates Cadmium Tolerance[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Yong; Fu, Yan-Lei; Pike, Sharon M.; Bao, Juan; Tian, Wang; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Chun-Zhu; Zhang, Yi; Li, Hong-Mei; Huang, Jing; Li, Le-Gong; Schroeder, Julian I.; Gassmann, Walter; Gong, Ji-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Long-distance transport of nitrate requires xylem loading and unloading, a successive process that determines nitrate distribution and subsequent assimilation efficiency. Here, we report the functional characterization of NRT1.8, a member of the nitrate transporter (NRT1) family in Arabidopsis thaliana. NRT1.8 is upregulated by nitrate. Histochemical analysis using promoter-β-glucuronidase fusions, as well as in situ hybridization, showed that NRT1.8 is expressed predominantly in xylem parenchyma cells within the vasculature. Transient expression of the NRT1.8:enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion in onion epidermal cells and Arabidopsis protoplasts indicated that NRT1.8 is plasma membrane localized. Electrophysiological and nitrate uptake analyses using Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that NRT1.8 mediates low-affinity nitrate uptake. Functional disruption of NRT1.8 significantly increased the nitrate concentration in xylem sap. These data together suggest that NRT1.8 functions to remove nitrate from xylem vessels. Interestingly, NRT1.8 was the only nitrate assimilatory pathway gene that was strongly upregulated by cadmium (Cd2+) stress in roots, and the nrt1.8-1 mutant showed a nitrate-dependent Cd2+-sensitive phenotype. Further analyses showed that Cd2+ stress increases the proportion of nitrate allocated to wild-type roots compared with the nrt1.8-1 mutant. These data suggest that NRT1.8-regulated nitrate distribution plays an important role in Cd2+ tolerance. PMID:20501909

  10. The Submergence Tolerance Regulator Sub1A Mediates Stress-Responsive Expression of AP2/ERF Transcription Factors1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ki-Hong; Seo, Young-Su; Walia, Harkamal; Cao, Peijian; Fukao, Takeshi; Canlas, Patrick E.; Amonpant, Fawn; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2010-01-01

    We previously characterized the rice (Oryza sativa) Submergence1 (Sub1) locus encoding three ethylene-responsive factor (ERF) transcriptional regulators. Genotypes carrying the Sub1A-1 allele are tolerant of prolonged submergence. To elucidate the mechanism of Sub1A-1-mediated tolerance, we performed transcriptome analyses comparing the temporal submergence response of Sub1A-1-containing tolerant M202(Sub1) with the intolerant isoline M202 lacking this gene. We identified 898 genes displaying Sub1A-1-dependent regulation. Integration of the expression data with publicly available metabolic pathway data identified submergence tolerance-associated pathways governing anaerobic respiration, hormone responses, and antioxidant systems. Of particular interest were a set of APETALA2 (AP2)/ERF family transcriptional regulators that are associated with the Sub1A-1-mediated response upon submergence. Visualization of expression patterns of the AP2/ERF superfamily members in a phylogenetic context resolved 12 submergence-regulated AP2/ERFs into three putative functional groups: (1) anaerobic respiration and cytokinin-mediated delay in senescence via ethylene accumulation during submergence (three ERFs); (2) negative regulation of ethylene-dependent gene expression (five ERFs); and (3) negative regulation of gibberellin-mediated shoot elongation (four ERFs). These results confirm that the presence of Sub1A-1 impacts multiple pathways of response to submergence. PMID:20107022

  11. Gz mediates the long-lasting desensitization of brain CB1 receptors and is essential for cross-tolerance with morphine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Muñoz María

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the systemic administration of cannabinoids produces antinociception, their chronic use leads to analgesic tolerance as well as cross-tolerance to morphine. These effects are mediated by cannabinoids binding to peripheral, spinal and supraspinal CB1 and CB2 receptors, making it difficult to determine the relevance of each receptor type to these phenomena. However, in the brain, the CB1 receptors (CB1Rs are expressed at high levels in neurons, whereas the expression of CB2Rs is marginal. Thus, CB1Rs mediate the effects of smoked cannabis and are also implicated in emotional behaviors. We have analyzed the production of supraspinal analgesia and the development of tolerance at CB1Rs by the direct injection of a series of cannabinoids into the brain. The influence of the activation of CB1Rs on supraspinal analgesia evoked by morphine was also evaluated. Results Intracerebroventricular (icv administration of cannabinoid receptor agonists, WIN55,212-2, ACEA or methanandamide, generated a dose-dependent analgesia. Notably, a single administration of these compounds brought about profound analgesic tolerance that lasted for more than 14 days. This decrease in the effect of cannabinoid receptor agonists was not mediated by depletion of CB1Rs or the loss of regulated G proteins, but, nevertheless, it was accompanied by reduced morphine analgesia. On the other hand, acute morphine administration produced tolerance that lasted only 3 days and did not affect the CB1R. We found that both neural mu-opioid receptors (MORs and CB1Rs interact with the HINT1-RGSZ module, thereby regulating pertussis toxin-insensitive Gz proteins. In mice with reduced levels of these Gz proteins, the CB1R agonists produced no such desensitization or morphine cross-tolerance. On the other hand, experimental enhancement of Gz signaling enabled an acute icv administration of morphine to produce a long-lasting tolerance at MORs that persisted for more than

  12. RNA Viruses: ROS-Mediated Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshi, Mohammad Latif; Su, Yi-Che; Hong, Jiann-Ruey

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are well known for being both beneficial and deleterious. The main thrust of this review is to investigate the role of ROS in ribonucleic acid (RNA) virus pathogenesis. Much evidences has accumulated over the past decade, suggesting that patients infected with RNA viruses are under chronic oxidative stress. Changes to the body's antioxidant defense system, in relation to SOD, ascorbic acid, selenium, carotenoids, and glutathione, have been reported in various tissues of RNA-virus infected patients. This review focuses on RNA viruses and retroviruses, giving particular attention to the human influenza virus, Hepatitis c virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and the aquatic Betanodavirus. Oxidative stress via RNA virus infections can contribute to several aspects of viral disease pathogenesis including apoptosis, loss of immune function, viral replication, inflammatory response, and loss of body weight. We focus on how ROS production is correlated with host cell death. Moreover, ROS may play an important role as a signal molecule in the regulation of viral replication and organelle function, potentially providing new insights in the prevention and treatment of RNA viruses and retrovirus infections. PMID:24899897

  13. Specific blockade by CD54 and MHC II of CD40-mediated signaling for B cell proliferation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doyle, I S; Hollmann, C A; Crispe, I N

    2001-01-01

    Regulation of B lymphocyte proliferation is critical to maintenance of self-tolerance, and intercellular interactions are likely to signal such regulation. Here, we show that coligation of either the adhesion molecule ICAM-1/CD54 or MHC II with CD40 inhibited cell cycle progression and promoted...... these effects. Addition of BCR or IL-4 signals did not overcome the effect of ICAM-1 or MHC II on CD40-induced proliferation. FasL expression was not detected in B cell populations. These results show that MHC II and ICAM-1 specifically modulate CD40-mediated signaling, so inhibiting proliferation...

  14. Functional cell mediated lympholysis I. Description of the assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeken, N.E.; Thompson, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    The anamnestic response by human bi-directional (BD) mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC) to restimulation by cells of the original stimulating type is generally strikingly reduced as compared to that of standard one-way cultures. This difference was shown not to be related to a change in kinetics nor was it due to exhaustion of the media or soluble factors since fresh media did not ameliorate the effect nor were supernatants from BD cultures found to be suppressive. The relative inhibition was also not reversed by removal of the allogeneic cells by phenotype specific antiserum. Cytotoxic tests with donor and responder specific antisera revealed that the cells bearing that phenotype were dramatically reduced in BD as compared to one-way cultures. Thus, the diminished secondary response appears to be due to cytotoxic elimination of the responder cells. This allogeneic cytotoxicity is dependent on non-T, phagocytic, adherent cells. The phenomenon is called Functional Cell Mediated Lympholysis (F-CML). (author)

  15. Vulnerability of cultured canine lung tumor cells to NK cell-mediated cytolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haley, P.J.; Kohr, J.M.; Kelly, G.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Guilmette, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Five cell lines, designated as canine lung epithelial cell (CLEP), derived from radiation induced canine lung tumors and canine thyroid adeno-carcinoma (CTAC) cells were compared for their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytolysis using peripheral blood lymphocytes from normal, healthy Beagle dogs as effector cells. Effector cells and chromium 51 radiolabeled target cells were incubated for 16 h at ratios of 12.5:1, 25:1, 50:1, and 100:1. Increasing cytolysis was observed for all cell lines as the effector-to-target-cell ratios increased from 12.5:1 to 100:1. The percent cytotoxicity was significantly less for all lung tumor cell lines as compared to CTAC at the 100:1 ratio. One lung tumor cell line, CLEP-9, had 85% of the lytic vulnerability of the CTAC cell line and significantly greater susceptibility to NK cell-mediated lysis than all of the other lung tumor cell lines. Susceptibility to NK cell cytolysis did not correlate with in vivo malignant behavior of the original tumor. These data suggest that cultured canine lung tumor cells are susceptible to NK cell cytolytic activity in vitro and that at least one of these cell lines (CLEP-9) is a candidate for substitution of the standard canine NK cell target, CTAC, in NK cell assays. The use of lung tumor cells in NK cell assays may provide greater insight into the control of lung tumors by immune mechanisms. (author)

  16. Studies on ADCC (antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity) using sheep red blood cells as target cells, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Yukinobu; Takaya, Masatoshi; Arimori, Shigeru

    1979-01-01

    A non-specific cytotoxic mediator from effector cells (human peripheral blood leukocytes) was investigated in the ADCC (antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity) system using antibody-coated sheep red blood cells (SRBC) as target cells. 51 Cr-labelled homologous (sheep) or heterologous (human) red blood cells were used as adjacent cells. Either crude lymphocyte fraction, phagocyte depleted fraction or granulocyte rich fraction separated from human peripheral leukocytes showed moderate cytotoxic effect on homologous adjacent cells, however no cytotoxic activity on heterologous adjacent cells was demonstrated in any leukocyte fraction. This suggests that the cytotoxic effects on homologous adjacent cells were resulted from the translocation of antibody molecules to adjacent cells from antibody-coated target cells. We concluded that the cytotoxic mechanism in this ADCC system was not mediated by non-specific soluble factors released from either human peripheral lymphocytes, monocytes or granulocytes. (author)

  17. SGLT1-Mediated Transport in Caco-2 Cells Is Highly Dependent on Cell Bank Origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, Bente; Pedersen, Maria D L; Laghmoch, Abdel M

    2017-01-01

    The human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cell line is a well-established in vitro model for studying transport phenomena for prediction of intestinal nutrient and drug absorption. However, substances depending on transporters such predictions are complicated due to variable transporter expression...... and limited knowledge about transporter function during multiple cell passaging and cell thawings. In the case of sodium glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), a key transporter of oral absorption of d-glucose, one reason for compromised prediction could be inadequate expression of SGLT1 in Caco-2 cells and thereby...... limited sensitivity in the determination of SGLT1-mediated permeability (PSGLT1). Here, the objective is to characterize and compare SGLT1-mediated uptake in Caco-2 cells obtained from different cell banks. SGLT1-mediated uptake of the standard SGLT1 substrate, methyl-α-d-glucopyranoside, in Caco-2 cells...

  18. Loss of CDKC;2 increases both cell division and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lina; Li, Yaqiong; Xie, Qi; Wu, Yaorong

    2017-09-01

    Drought stress is one of the abiotic stresses that limit plant growth and agricultural productivity. To further understand the mechanism of drought tolerance and identify the genes involved in this process, a genetic screen for altered drought response was conducted in Arabidopsis. One mutant with enhanced drought tolerance was isolated and named Arabidopsis drought tolerance mutant 1 (atdtm1), which has larger lateral organs, prolonged growth duration, increased relative water content and a reduced leaf stomatal density compared with the wild type. The loss of AtDTM1 increases cell division during leaf development. The phenotype is caused by the loss of a T-DNA tagged gene encoding CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE C;2 (CDKC;2), which functions in the regulation of transcription by influencing the phosphorylation status of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Here, we show that CDKC;2 affects the transcription of downstream genes such as cell cycle genes and genes involved in stomatal development, resulting in altered plant organ size as well as drought tolerance of the plant. These results reveal the crucial role of CDKC;2 in modulating both cell division and the drought response in Arabidopsis. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers increase tolerance of cells to copper and cisplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Spincemaille

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The human pathology Wilson disease (WD is characterized by toxic copper (Cu accumulation in brain and liver, resulting in, among other indications, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis of hepatocytes. In an effort to identify novel compounds that can alleviate Cu-induced toxicity, we screened the Pharmakon 1600 repositioning library using a Cu-toxicity yeast screen. We identified 2 members of the drug class of Angiotensin II Type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs that could increase yeast tolerance to Cu, namely Candesartan and Losartan. Subsequently, we show that specific ARBs can increase yeast tolerance to Cu and/or the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin (Cp. The latter also induces mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in mammalian cells. We further demonstrate that specific ARBs can prevent the prevalence of Cu-induced apoptotic markers in yeast, with Candesartan Cilexetil being the ARB which demonstrated most pronounced reduction of apoptosis-related markers. Next, we tested the sensitivity of a selection of yeast knockout mutants affected in detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS and Cu for Candesartan Cilexetil rescue in presence of Cu. These data indicate that Candesartan Cilexetil increases yeast tolerance to Cu irrespectively of major ROS-detoxifying proteins. Finally, we show that specific ARBs can increase mammalian cell tolerance to Cu, as well as decrease the prevalence of Cu-induced apoptotic markers. All the above point to the potential of ARBs in preventing Cu-induced toxicity in yeast and mammalian cells.

  20. Flooding tolerance and cell wall alterations in maize mesocotyl during hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitorino Patrícia Goulart

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to characterize the tolerance to flooding and alterations in pectic and hemicellulose fractions from mesocotyl of maize tolerant to flooding when submitted to hypoxia. In order to characterize tolerance seeds from maize cultivars Saracura BRS-4154 and BR 107 tolerant and sensitive to low oxygen levels, respectively, were set to germinate. Plantlet survival was evaluated during five days after having been submitted to hypoxia. After fractionation with ammonium oxalate 0.5% (w/v and KOH 2M and 4M, Saracura BRS-4154 cell wall was obtained from mesocotyl segments with different damage intensities caused by oxygen deficiency exposure. The cell wall fractions were analyzed by gel filtration and gas chromatography, and also by Infrared Spectrum with Fourrier Transformation (FTIR. The hypoxia period lasting three days or longer caused cell lysis and in advanced stages plant death. The gelic profile from pectic, hemicellulose 2M and 4M fractions from samples with translucid and constriction zone showed the appearance of low molecular weight compounds, similar to glucose. The main neutral sugars in pectic and hemicellulose fractions were arabinose, xilose and mannose. The FTIR spectrum showed a gradual decrease in pectic substances from mesocotyl with normal to translucid and constriction appearance respectively.

  1. Threshold temperatures mediate the impact of reduced snow cover on overwintering freeze-tolerant caterpillars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Katie E.; Sinclair, Brent J.

    2012-01-01

    Decreases in snow cover due to climate change could alter the energetics and physiology of ectothermic animals that overwinter beneath snow, yet how snow cover interacts with physiological thresholds is unknown. We applied numerical simulation of overwintering metabolic rates coupled with field validation to determine the importance of snow cover and freezing to the overwintering lipid consumption of the freeze-tolerant Arctiid caterpillar Pyrrharctia isabella. Caterpillars that overwintered above the snow experienced mean temperatures 1.3°C lower than those below snow and consumed 18.36 mg less lipid of a total 68.97-mg reserve. Simulations showed that linear temperature effects on metabolic rate accounted for only 30% of the difference in lipid consumption. When metabolic suppression by freezing was included, 93% of the difference between animals that overwintered above and below snow was explained. Our results were robust to differences in temperature sensitivity of metabolic rate, changes in freezing point, and the magnitude of metabolic suppression by freezing. The majority of the energy savings was caused by the non-continuous reduction in metabolic rate due to freezing, the first example of the importance of temperature thresholds in the lipid use of overwintering insects.

  2. Dendritic Cells and Multiple Sclerosis: Disease, Tolerance and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad G. Mohammad

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a devastating neurological disease that predominantly affects young adults resulting in severe personal and economic impact. The majority of therapies for this disease were developed in, or are beneficial in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the animal model of MS. While known to target adaptive anti-CNS immune responses, they also target, the innate immune arm. This mini-review focuses on the role of dendritic cells (DCs, the professional antigen presenting cells of the innate immune system. The evidence for a role for DCs in the appropriate regulation of anti-CNS autoimmune responses and their role in MS disease susceptibility and possible therapeutic utility are discussed. Additionally, the current controversy regarding the evidence for the presence of functional DCs in the normal CNS is reviewed. Furthermore, the role of CNS DCs and potential routes of their intercourse between the CNS and cervical lymph nodes are considered. Finally, the future role that this nexus between the CNS and the cervical lymph nodes might play in site directed molecular and cellular therapy for MS is outlined.

  3. Gut feelings of safety: tolerance to the microbiota mediated by innate immune receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatczak, Bartlomiej; Cohen, Irun R

    2015-10-01

    To enable microbial colonization of the gut mucosa, the intestinal immune system must not only react to danger signals but also recognize cues that indicate safety. Recognition of safety, paradoxically, is mediated by the same environmental sensors that are involved in signaling danger. Indeed, in addition to their well-established role in inducing inflammation in response to stress signals, pattern recognition receptors and a variety of metabolic sensors also promote gut-microbiota symbiosis by responding to "microbial symbiosis factors", "resolution-associated molecular patterns", markers of energy extraction and other signals indicating the absence of pathogenic infection and tissue damage. Here we focus on how the paradoxical roles of immune receptors and other environmental sensors define the microbiota signature of an individual. © 2015 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Lysophosphatidic acid mediates pleiotropic responses in skeletal muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean-Baptiste, Gael; Yang Zhao; Khoury, Chamel; Greenwood, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a potent modulator of growth, cell survival, and apoptosis. Although all four LPA receptors are expressed in skeletal muscle, very little is known regarding the role they play in this tissue. We used RT-PCR to demonstrate that cultured skeletal muscle C2C12 cells endogenously express multiple LPA receptor subtypes. The demonstration that LPA mediates the activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase and Akt/PKB in C2C12 cells is consistent with the widely observed mitogenic properties of LPA. In spite of these observations, LPA did not induce proliferation in C2C12 cells. Paradoxically, we found that prolonged treatment of C2C12 cells with LPA led to caspase 3 and PARP cleavage as well as the activation of stress-associated MAP kinases JNK and p38. In spite of these typically pro-apoptotic responses, LPA did not induce cell death. Blocking ERK1/2 and Akt/PKB activation with specific pharmacological inhibitors, nevertheless, stimulated LPA-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that both mitogenic and apoptotic responses serve to counterbalance the effects of LPA in cultured C2C12 cells

  5. The Glycine soja NAC transcription factor GsNAC019 mediates the regulation of plant alkaline tolerance and ABA sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Yu, Yang; Ding, Xiaodong; Zhu, Dan; Yang, Fan; Liu, Beidong; Sun, Xiaoli; Duan, Xiangbo; Yin, Kuide; Zhu, Yanming

    2017-10-01

    Overexpression of Gshdz4 or GsNAC019 enhanced alkaline tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis. We proved that Gshdz4 up-regulated both GsNAC019 and GsRD29B but GsNAC019 may repress the GsRD29B expression under alkaline stress. Wild soybean (Glycine soja) has a high tolerance to environmental challenges. It is a model species for dissecting the molecular mechanisms of salt-alkaline stresses. Although many NAC transcription factors play important roles in response to multiple abiotic stresses, such as salt, osmotic and cold, their mode of action in alkaline stress resistance is largely unknown. In our study, we identified a G. soja NAC gene, GsNAC019, which is a homolog of the Arabidopsis AtNAC019 gene. GsNAC019 was highly up-regulated by 50 mM NaHCO 3 treatment in the roots of wild soybean. Further investigation showed that a well-characterized transcription factor, Gshdz4 protein, bound the cis-acting element sequences (CAATA/TA), which are located in the promoter of the AtNAC019/GsNAC019 genes. Overexpression of Gshdz4 positively regulated AtNAC019 expression in transgenic Arabidopsis, implying that AtNAC019/GsNAC019 may be the target genes of Gshdz4. GsNAC019 was demonstrated to be a nuclear-localized protein in onion epidermal cells and possessed transactivation activity in yeast cells. Moreover, overexpression of GsNAC019 in Arabidopsis resulted in enhanced tolerance to alkaline stress at the seedling and mature stages, but reduced ABA sensitivity. The closest Arabidopsis homolog mutant plants of Gshdz4, GsNAC019 and GsRD29B containing athb40, atnac019 and atrd29b were sensitive to alkaline stress. Overexpression or the closest Arabidopsis homolog mutant plants of the GsNAC019 gene in Arabidopsis positively or negatively regulated the expression of stress-related genes, such as AHA2, RD29A/B and KIN1. Moreover, this mutation could phenotypically promoted or compromised plant growth under alkaline stress, implying that GsNAC019 may contribute to alkaline stress

  6. Network topologies and dynamics leading to endotoxin tolerance and priming in innate immune cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Fu

    Full Text Available The innate immune system, acting as the first line of host defense, senses and adapts to foreign challenges through complex intracellular and intercellular signaling networks. Endotoxin tolerance and priming elicited by macrophages are classic examples of the complex adaptation of innate immune cells. Upon repetitive exposures to different doses of bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide or other stimulants, macrophages show either suppressed or augmented inflammatory responses compared to a single exposure to the stimulant. Endotoxin tolerance and priming are critically involved in both immune homeostasis and the pathogenesis of diverse inflammatory diseases. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. By means of a computational search through the parameter space of a coarse-grained three-node network with a two-stage Metropolis sampling approach, we enumerated all the network topologies that can generate priming or tolerance. We discovered three major mechanisms for priming (pathway synergy, suppressor deactivation, activator induction and one for tolerance (inhibitor persistence. These results not only explain existing experimental observations, but also reveal intriguing test scenarios for future experimental studies to clarify mechanisms of endotoxin priming and tolerance.

  7. Network Topologies and Dynamics Leading to Endotoxin Tolerance and Priming in Innate Immune Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yan; Glaros, Trevor; Zhu, Meng; Wang, Ping; Wu, Zhanghan; Tyson, John; Li, Liwu; Xing, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system, acting as the first line of host defense, senses and adapts to foreign challenges through complex intracellular and intercellular signaling networks. Endotoxin tolerance and priming elicited by macrophages are classic examples of the complex adaptation of innate immune cells. Upon repetitive exposures to different doses of bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) or other stimulants, macrophages show either suppressed or augmented inflammatory responses compared to a single exposure to the stimulant. Endotoxin tolerance and priming are critically involved in both immune homeostasis and the pathogenesis of diverse inflammatory diseases. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. By means of a computational search through the parameter space of a coarse-grained three-node network with a two-stage Metropolis sampling approach, we enumerated all the network topologies that can generate priming or tolerance. We discovered three major mechanisms for priming (pathway synergy, suppressor deactivation, activator induction) and one for tolerance (inhibitor persistence). These results not only explain existing experimental observations, but also reveal intriguing test scenarios for future experimental studies to clarify mechanisms of endotoxin priming and tolerance.

  8. Exogenous Glutathione Enhances Mercury Tolerance by Inhibiting Mercury Entry into Plant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon-Ok Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing understanding of the crucial roles of glutathione (GSH in cellular defense against heavy metal stress as well as oxidative stress, little is known about the functional role of exogenous GSH in mercury (Hg tolerance in plants. Here, we provide compelling evidence that GSH contributes to Hg tolerance in diverse plants. Exogenous GSH did not mitigate the toxicity of cadmium (Cd, copper (Cu, or zinc (Zn, whereas application of exogenous GSH significantly promoted Hg tolerance during seed germination and seedling growth of Arabidopsis thaliana, tobacco, and pepper. By contrast, addition of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of GSH biosynthesis, severely retarded seed germination and seedling growth of the plants in the presence of Hg. The effect of exogenous GSH on Hg specific tolerance was also evident in the presence of other heavy metals, such as Cd, Cu, and Zn, together with Hg. GSH treatment significantly decreased H2O2 and O2- levels and lipid peroxidation, but increased chlorophyll content in the presence of Hg. Importantly, GSH treatment resulted in significantly less accumulation of Hg in Arabidopsis plants, and thin layer chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis revealed that GSH had much stronger binding affinity to Hg than to Cd, Cu, or Zn, suggesting that tight binding of GSH to Hg impedes Hg uptake, leading to low Hg accumulation in plant cells. Collectively, the present findings reveal that GSH is a potent molecule capable of conferring Hg tolerance by inhibiting Hg accumulation in plants.

  9. H(2 enhances arabidopsis salt tolerance by manipulating ZAT10/12-mediated antioxidant defence and controlling sodium exclusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjie Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The metabolism of hydrogen gas (H(2 in bacteria and algae has been extensively studied for the interesting of developing H(2-based fuel. Recently, H(2 is recognized as a therapeutic antioxidant and activates several signalling pathways in clinical trials. However, underlying physiological roles and mechanisms of H(2 in plants as well as its signalling cascade remain unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this report, histochemical, molecular, immunological and genetic approaches were applied to characterize the participation of H(2 in enhancing Arabidopsis salt tolerance. An increase of endogenous H(2 release was observed 6 hr after exposure to 150 mM NaCl. Arabidopsis pretreated with 50% H(2-saturated liquid medium, mimicking the induction of endogenous H(2 release when subsequently exposed to NaCl, effectively decreased salinity-induced growth inhibition. Further results showed that H(2 pretreatment modulated genes/proteins of zinc-finger transcription factor ZAT10/12 and related antioxidant defence enzymes, thus significantly counteracting the NaCl-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS overproduction and lipid peroxidation. Additionally, H(2 pretreatment maintained ion homeostasis by regulating the antiporters and H(+ pump responsible for Na(+ exclusion (in particular and compartmentation. Genetic evidence suggested that SOS1 and cAPX1 might be the target genes of H(2 signalling. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, our findings indicate that H(2 acts as a novel and cytoprotective regulator in coupling ZAT10/12-mediated antioxidant defence and maintenance of ion homeostasis in the improvement of Arabidopsis salt tolerance.

  10. Light mediated regulation of cell division, endoreduplication and cell expansion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okello, R.C.; Visser, de P.H.B.; Heuvelink, E.; Marcelis, L.F.M.; Struik, P.C.

    2016-01-01

    Cell division, endoreduplication and cell expansion are key processes for plant growth and development. Light is the main source of energy for plants and as such has a strong effect on plant growth and development. Insight into the role of light in cellular processes is important for our

  11. Brassinosteroid Mediated Cell Wall Remodeling in Grasses under Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolan Rao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Unlike animals, plants, being sessile, cannot escape from exposure to severe abiotic stresses such as extreme temperature and water deficit. The dynamic structure of plant cell wall enables them to undergo compensatory changes, as well as maintain physical strength, with changing environments. Plant hormones known as brassinosteroids (BRs play a key role in determining cell wall expansion during stress responses. Cell wall deposition differs between grasses (Poaceae and dicots. Grass species include many important food, fiber, and biofuel crops. In this article, we focus on recent advances in BR-regulated cell wall biosynthesis and remodeling in response to stresses, comparing our understanding of the mechanisms in grass species with those in the more studied dicots. A more comprehensive understanding of BR-mediated changes in cell wall integrity in grass species will benefit the development of genetic tools to improve crop productivity, fiber quality and plant biomass recalcitrance.

  12. Melanoma Exosomes Enable Tumor Tolerance in Lymph Nodes

    OpenAIRE

    Hood, Joshua L.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma preferentially spreads via lymph nodes. Melanoma exosomes can induce angiogenesis and immune suppression. However, a role for melanoma exosomes in facilitating tumor tolerance in lymph nodes has not been considered. Herein, the hypothesis that melanoma exosome mediated induction of vascular endothelial cell (VEC) derived TNF-α results in lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) mediated tumor tolerance is explored. To support this hypothesis, experiments involving ex vivo lymph node associat...

  13. Single-cell force spectroscopy of pili-mediated adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Beaussart, Audrey; Tripathi, Prachi; Derclaye, Sylvie; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Li, James K.; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Although bacterial pili are known to mediate cell adhesion to a variety of substrates, the molecular interactions behind this process are poorly understood. We report the direct measurement of the forces guiding pili-mediated adhesion, focusing on the medically important probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). Using non-invasive single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), we quantify the adhesion forces between individual bacteria and biotic (mucin, intestinal cells) or abiotic (hydrophobic monolayers) surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, bacterial pili strengthen adhesion through remarkable nanospring properties, which - presumably - enable the bacteria to resist high shear forces under physiological conditions. On mucin, nanosprings are more frequent and adhesion forces larger, reflecting the influence of specific pili-mucin bonds. Interestingly, these mechanical responses are no longer observed on human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Rather, force curves exhibit constant force plateaus with extended ruptures reflecting the extraction of membrane nanotethers. These single-cell analyses provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which piliated bacteria colonize surfaces (nanosprings, nanotethers), and offer exciting avenues in nanomedicine for understanding and controlling the adhesion of microbial cells (probiotics, pathogens).

  14. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells contribute to CD8 T cell tolerance toward circulating carcinoembryonic antigen in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höchst, Bastian; Schildberg, Frank A; Böttcher, Jan; Metzger, Christina; Huss, Sebastian; Türler, Andreas; Overhaus, Markus; Knoblich, Andreas; Schneider, Berthold; Pantelis, Dimitrios; Kurts, Christian; Kalff, Jörg C; Knolle, Percy; Diehl, Linda

    2012-11-01

    Immunity against cancer is impeded by local mechanisms promoting development of tumor-specific T cell tolerance, such as regulatory T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, or immunosuppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment. The release of soluble antigens, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) from colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cells, has been investigated for diagnostic purposes, but not for its immunological consequences. Here, we address the question of whether soluble CEA influences tumor-specific immunity. Mice were injected with soluble CEA protein, and CEA-specific CD8 T cells were analyzed for their phenotype and functionality by means of restimulation ex vivo or antitumor efficacy in vivo. We furthermore characterized the CD8 T cell population in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMCs) from healthy donors and colorectal carcinoma patients. In mice, circulating CEA was preferentially taken up in a mannose receptor-dependent manner and cross-presented by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, but not dendritic cells, to CD8 T cells. Such systemically circulating CEA promoted tolerization of CEA-specific CD8 T cells in the endogenous T cell repertoire through the coinhibitory molecule B7H1. These CD8 T cells were not deleted but were rendered nonresponsive to antigen-specific stimulation and failed to control growth of CEA-expressing tumor cells. These nonresponsive CD8 T cells were phenotypically similar to central memory T cells being CD44(high) CD62L(high) CD25(neg) . We found T cells with a similar phenotype in PBMCs of healthy donors and at increased frequency also in patients with colorectal carcinoma. Our results provide evidence for the existence of an unrecognized tumor immune escape involving cross-presentation of systemically circulating tumor antigens that may influence immunotherapy of cancer. Copyright © 2012 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  15. Cytotoxic T cells mediate pathology and metastasis in cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda O Novais

    Full Text Available Disease progression in response to infection can be strongly influenced by both pathogen burden and infection-induced immunopathology. While current therapeutics focus on augmenting protective immune responses, identifying therapeutics that reduce infection-induced immunopathology are clearly warranted. Despite the apparent protective role for murine CD8⁺ T cells following infection with the intracellular parasite Leishmania, CD8⁺ T cells have been paradoxically linked to immunopathological responses in human cutaneous leishmaniasis. Transcriptome analysis of lesions from Leishmania braziliensis patients revealed that genes associated with the cytolytic pathway are highly expressed and CD8⁺ T cells from lesions exhibited a cytolytic phenotype. To determine if CD8⁺ T cells play a causal role in disease, we turned to a murine model. These studies revealed that disease progression and metastasis in L. braziliensis infected mice was independent of parasite burden and was instead directly associated with the presence of CD8⁺ T cells. In mice with severe pathology, we visualized CD8⁺ T cell degranulation and lysis of L. braziliensis infected cells. Finally, in contrast to wild-type CD8⁺ T cells, perforin-deficient cells failed to induce disease. Thus, we show for the first time that cytolytic CD8⁺ T cells mediate immunopathology and drive the development of metastatic lesions in cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  16. Multifaceted effects of synthetic TLR2 ligand and Legionella pneumophilia on Treg-mediated suppression of T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutmuller Roger PM

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory T cells (Treg play a crucial role in maintaining immune homeostasis and self-tolerance. The immune suppressive effects of Tregs should however be limited in case effective immunity is required against pathogens or cancer cells. We previously found that the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 agonist, Pam3CysSK4, directly stimulated Tregs to expand and temporarily abrogate their suppressive capabilities. In this study, we evaluate the effect of Pam3CysSK4 and Legionella pneumophila, a natural TLR2 containing infectious agent, on effector T (Teff cells and dendritic cells (DCs individually and in co-cultures with Tregs. Results TLR2 agonists can directly provide a co-stimulatory signal inducing enhanced proliferation and cytokine production of naive CD4+ Teff cells. With respect to cytokine production, DCs appear to be most sensitive to low amounts of TLR agonists. Using wild type and TLR2-deficient cells in Treg suppression assays, we accordingly show that all cells (e.g. Treg, Teff cells and DCs contributed to overcome Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cell proliferation. Furthermore, while TLR2-stimulated Tregs readily lost their ability to suppress Teff cell proliferation, cytokine production by Teff cells was still suppressed. Similar results were obtained upon stimulation with TLR2 ligand containing bacteria, Legionella pneumophila. Conclusions These findings indicate that both synthetic and natural TLR2 agonists affect DCs, Teff cells and Treg directly, resulting in multi-modal modulation of Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cells. Moreover, Treg-mediated suppression of Teff cell proliferation is functionally distinct from suppression of cytokine secretion.

  17. Trans-translation mediates tolerance to multiple antibiotics and stresses in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinghua; Ji, Lei; Shi, Wanliang; Xie, Jianping; Zhang, Ying

    2013-11-01

    Trans-translation mediated by SsrA (tmRNA) and its associated protein SmpB plays an important role in rescuing stalled ribosomes and detoxifying toxic protein products under stress conditions. However, the role of SsrA and SmpB in bacterial persister survival has not been studied. The recent finding that pyrazinamide as a unique persister drug inhibits trans-translation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis prompted us to examine the role of trans-translation in persister survival. Using Escherichia coli as a model, we constructed SsrA and SmpB mutants and assessed the susceptibility of the mutants to various antibiotics and stress conditions in MIC/MBC and persister assays. We found that mutations in SsrA and SmpB caused a defect in persister survival as shown by their increased susceptibility to a variety of antibiotics, including gentamicin, streptomycin, amikacin, norfloxacin, trimethoprim and tetracycline, and also stresses, such as acid, weak acid salicylate, heat and peroxide. Additionally, the SsrA and SmpB mutants were 2-8-fold more susceptible than the parent strain to various antibiotics in MIC and MBC tests. The SmpB mutant was more susceptible to antibiotics and stresses than the SsrA mutant. A particularly interesting finding is the hypersusceptibility of the SmpB mutant and the SsrA mutant to trimethoprim. The defect of various SsrA and SmpB mutant phenotypes could be complemented by functional ssrA and smpB, respectively. We conclude that SsrA and SmpB are important for persister survival and may serve as a good target for developing new antibiotics that kill persister bacteria for improved treatment of persistent bacterial infections.

  18. LXR-mediated inhibition of CD4+ T helper cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A Solt

    Full Text Available T(H17 cells, which require the expression of both retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors α and γt (RORαand RORγt for full differentiation and function, have been implicated as major effectors in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. We recently demonstrated that the Liver X Receptor (LXR agonist, T0901317 (T09, also displays high-affinity RORα and RORγ inverse activity, potentially explaining its effectiveness in various T(H17-mediated autoimmune disease models. However, recent studies suggest that in conjunction with the RORs, LXR mediates a negative regulatory effect on T(H17 cell differentiation. Since T09 acts on both LXRs and RORs, it presents as a valuable tool to understand how compounds with mixed pharmacology affect potential pathological cell types. Therefore, using T09, we investigated the mechanism by which the LXRs and RORs affect T(H17 cell differentiation and function. Here we demonstrate that T09 activity at RORα and γ, not LXR, is facilitating the inhibition of T(H17 cell differentiation and function. We also demonstrate that LXR activity inhibits the differentiation and function of T(H1, T(H2 and iT(reg cells. Finally, T09 inhibited T cell proliferation and induced cell death. These data help explain much of the efficacy of T09 in inflammatory models and suggest that the generation of synthetic ligands with graded, combined LXR and ROR activity may hold utility in the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases where targeting both T(H17 and T(H1 cells is required.

  19. Local cell-mediated immune reactions in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilynskij, B.T.; Vasil'ev, N.V.; Volod'ko, N.A.; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Tomsk. Onkologicheskij Nauchnyj Tsentr)

    1988-01-01

    The analysis of 178 cases of stage I-II breast cancer showed morphological features of local cell-mediated immune reactions to be of limited prognostic value. A comparative evaluation of some characteristics of cell surface receptors, such as ability to spontaneous rosette formation with sheep erythrocytes and sensitivty to theophylline, was carried out in lymphocyte samples obtained from tumor tissue and peripheral blood of 76 cancer patients subjected to preoperative radiotherapy. The said parameters were studied in breast cancer patients of rosette-forming cell reaction to theophylline were identified, the incidence of some of them being determined by the presence or absence of regional metastases. The level and functional activity of surface receptors of tumor mononuclear cells proved to influence prognosis

  20. Suppression of autophagy exacerbates Mefloquine-mediated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ji Hyun; Park, So Jung; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Eun Sung; Kang, Hee; Park, Ji-Ho; Lee, Eunjoo H; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2012-05-02

    Mefloquine is an effective treatment drug for malaria. However, it can cause several adverse side effects, and the precise mechanism associated with the adverse neurological effects of Mefloquine is not clearly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Mefloquine on autophagy in neuroblastoma cells. Mefloquine treatment highly induced the formation of autophagosomes and the conversion of LC3I into LC3II. Moreover, Mefloquine-induced autophagy was efficiently suppressed by an autophagy inhibitor and by down regulation of ATG6. The autophagy was also completely blocked in ATG5 deficient mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Moreover, suppression of autophagy significantly intensified Mefloquine-mediated cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Our findings suggest that suppression of autophagy may exacerbate Mefloquine toxicity in neuroblastoma cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Disturbances of cell-mediated immunity in ornithosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, L; Koba, S; Partyka, M; Maślanka, K; Kryczka, W; Szerszén, B; Bartosz, B

    1984-01-01

    27 cases of ornithosis were observed during an epidemia in 1980 in Kielce and subsequently followed with respect to immunological characteristics of peripheral blood lymphocytes. Blastic transformation of these cells was tested after stimulation in vitro with three different mitogens. Identification of peripheral blood T and B lymphocytes was done using rosette tests (E,EA,EAC) and the occurrence of surface immunoglobulins was determined by the immunofluorescent method with polyvalent anti-immunoglobulin serum. The counts of T and B lymphocytes in the peripheral blood were normal throughout the whole period of the observation, but from the 3rd week on a significant impairment of 3H-thymidine incorporation into the cells stimulated with Con A was observed, and from the 10th week on, this impairment appeared also in cells stimulated with PHA and PWM. These observations revealed considerable disturbances in cell-mediated reactivity in patients with ornithosis and seem to be connected with chronic infection with Chlamydia psittaci.

  2. Differentiation and distribution of colistin- and sodium dodecyl sulfate-tolerant cells in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Klausen, M; Ernst, RK

    2007-01-01

    -targeting antibacterial agents. All biofilm-associated cells were sensitive to the antibacterial agents when tested in standard plate assays. A mutation eliminating the production of type IV pili, and hence surface-associated motility, prevented the formation of regular mushroom-shaped structures in the flow cell......-shaped multicellular structures. The cap-forming subpopulation was found to develop tolerance to membrane-targeting antimicrobial agents, such as the cyclic cationic peptide colistin and the detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate. The stalk-forming subpopulation, on the other hand, was sensitive to the membrane...... that only the cap-forming subpopulation in biofilms treated with colistin expresses the pmr operon. These results suggest that increased antibiotic tolerance in biofilms may be a consequence of differentiation into distinct subpopulations with different phenotypic properties....

  3. Molecular characterization of acquired tolerance of tumor cells to picropodophyllin (PPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Jamileh; Worrall, Claire; Vasilcanu, Daiana; Fryknäs, Mårten; Sulaiman, Luqman; Karimi, Mohsen; Weng, Wen-Hui; Lui, Weng-Onn; Rudduck, Christina; Axelson, Magnus; Jernberg-Wiklund, Helena; Girnita, Leonard; Larsson, Olle; Larsson, Catharina

    2011-03-14

    Picropodophyllin (PPP) is a promising novel anti-neoplastic agent that efficiently kills tumor cells in vitro and causes tumor regression and increased survival in vivo. We have previously reported that PPP treatment induced moderate tolerance in two out of 10 cell lines only, and here report the acquired genomic and expression alterations associated with PPP selection over 1.5 years of treatment. Copy number alterations monitored using metaphase and array-based comparative genomic hybridization analyses revealed largely overlapping alterations in parental and maximally tolerant cells. Gain/amplification of the MYC and PVT1 loci in 8q24.21 were verified on the chromosome level. Abnormalities observed in connection to PPP treatment included regular gains and losses, as well as homozygous losses in 10q24.1-q24.2 and 12p12.3-p13.2 in one of the lines and amplification at 5q11.2 in the other. Abnormalities observed in both tolerant derivatives include amplification/gain of 5q11.2, gain of 11q12.1-q14.3 and gain of 13q33.3-qter. Using Nexus software analysis we combined the array-CGH data with data from gene expression profilings and identified genes that were altered in both inputs. A subset of genes identified as downregulated (ALDH1A3, ANXA1, TLR4 and RAB5A) or upregulated (COX6A1, NFIX, ME1, MAPK and TAP2) were validated by siRNA in the tolerant or parental cells to alter sensitivity to PPP and confirmed to alter sensitivity to PPP in further cell lines. Long-term PPP selection lead to altered gene expression in PPP tolerant cells with increase as well as decrease of genes involved in cell death such as PTEN and BCL2. In addition, acquired genomic copy number alterations were observed that were often reflected by altered mRNA expression levels for genes in the same regions.

  4. Mechanisms of early peripheral CD4 T-cell tolerance induction by anti-CD154 monoclonal antibody and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation: evidence for anergy and deletion but not regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Josef; Shaffer, Juanita; Lie, Ariadne; Anosova, Natalie; Benichou, Gilles; Sykes, Megan

    2004-06-01

    Anti-CD154 (CD40L) monoclonal antibody (mAb) plus bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in mice receiving CD8 cell-depleting mAb leads to long-term mixed hematopoietic chimerism and systemic donor-specific tolerance through peripheral and central deletional mechanisms. However, CD4(+) T-cell tolerance is demonstrable in vitro and in vivo rapidly following BMT, before deletion of donor-reactive CD4 cells is complete, suggesting the involvement of other mechanisms. We examined these mechanisms in more detail. Spot enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISPOT) analysis revealed specific tolerization (within 4 to 15 days) of both T helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokine responses to the donor, with no evidence for cytokine deviation. Tolerant lymphocytes did not significantly down-regulate rejection by naive donor-reactive T cells in adoptive transfer experiments. No evidence for linked suppression was obtained when skin expressing donor alloantigens in association with third-party alloantigens was grafted. T-cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mixing studies revealed that specific peripheral deletion of alloreactive CD4 T cells occurs over the first 4 weeks following BMT with anti-CD154. In contrast to models involving anti-CD154 without BMT, BMT with anti-CD154 leads to the rapid induction of anergy, followed by deletion of pre-existing donor-reactive peripheral CD4(+) T cells; the rapid deletion of these cells obviates the need for a regulatory cell population to suppress CD4 cell-mediated alloreactivity.

  5. Macrophages are essential for CTGF-mediated adult β-cell proliferation after injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly G. Riley

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: Our data show that macrophages are critical for CTGF-mediated adult β-cell proliferation in the setting of partial β-cell ablation. This is the first study to link a specific β-cell proliferative factor with immune-mediated β-cell proliferation in a β-cell injury model.

  6. Strategies for carbon and sulfur tolerant solid oxide fuel cell materials, incorporating lessons from heterogeneous catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Boldrin, P; Ruiz Trejo, E; Mermelstein, J; Bermudez Menendez, J; Ramirez Reina, T; Brandon, N

    2016-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are a rapidly emerging energy technology for a low carbon world, providing high efficiency, potential to use carbonaceous fuels and compatibility with carbon capture and storage. However, current state-of-the-art materials have low tolerance to sulfur, a common contaminant of many fuels, and are vulnerable to deactivation due to carbon deposition when using carbon-containing compounds. In this review we first study the theoretical basis behind carbon and sulfur ...

  7. Role of T-cell-mediated inflammation in psoriasis: pathogenesis and targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flatz L

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lukas Flatz, Curdin ConradDepartment of Dermatology, University Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV, Lausanne, SwitzerlandAbstract: Psoriasis is one of the most common chronic, inflammatory, T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Over the past decade, increased knowledge of disease pathogenesis has fundamentally changed psoriasis treatment, with the introduction of biologics, and this has led to a multitude of improved selective targets providing potential therapeutic options. Indeed, numerous pathogenesis-based treatments are currently in development, as psoriasis has also become increasingly relevant for proof-of-concept studies. The purpose of this review was to summarize current knowledge of psoriasis immunopathogenesis, focusing on the T-cell-mediated immune response and its initiation. The authors describe recent advances in psoriasis treatment and discuss pathogenesis-based therapies that are currently in development or which could be envisioned for the future. Although current biologics are well tolerated, several issues such as long-term efficacy, long-term safety, and high costs keep driving the search for new and better therapies. With further advances in understanding disease pathogenesis, more genomic data from psoriasis patients becoming available, and potentially the identification of autoantigens in psoriasis, current research should lead to the development of a growing arsenal of improved targeted treatments and to further breakthrough immunotherapies.Keywords: autoimmunity, autoimmune disease, immune response, immunopathogenesis

  8. Renal Operational Tolerance Is Associated With a Defect of Blood Tfh Cells That Exhibit Impaired B Cell Help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenouard, A; Chesneau, M; Bui Nguyen, L; Le Bot, S; Cadoux, M; Dugast, E; Paul, C; Malard-Castagnet, S; Ville, S; Guérif, P; Soulillou, J-P; Degauque, N; Danger, R; Giral, M; Brouard, S

    2017-06-01

    Renal operationally tolerant patients (TOL) display a defect in B cell differentiation, with a deficiency in plasma cells. Recently described, T follicular helper (Tfh) cells play a critical role in B cell differentiation. We analyzed blood Tfh subsets in TOL and transplanted patients with stable graft function under immunosuppression (STA). We observed a reduced proportion of blood activated and highly functional Tfh subsets in TOL, without affecting Tfh absolute numbers. Functionally, Tfh cells from TOL displayed a modified gene expression profile, failed to produce interleukin-21, and were unable to induce IgG production by naive B cells. This Tfh defect is linked to a low incidence of postgraft de novo donor-specific antibody (dnDSA) immunization, suggesting that the lack of Tfh cells in TOL may induce a protolerogenic environment with reduced risk of developing dnDSA. Finally, we showed that elevated Tfh in STA precedes the occurrence of dnDSA during an alloresponse. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms of antibody response in operational tolerance. Disrupted homeostasis and impaired Tfh function in TOL could lead to a reduced risk of developing dnDSA and suggest a predictive role of blood Tfh cells on the occurrence of dnDSA in transplant recipients. © 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  9. Functional and regulatory conservation of the soybean ER stress-induced DCD/NRP-mediated cell death signaling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Pedro A B; Carpinetti, Paola A; Freitas, Paula P J; Santos, Eulálio G D; Camargos, Luiz F; Oliveira, Igor H T; Silva, José Cleydson F; Carvalho, Humberto H; Dal-Bianco, Maximiller; Soares-Ramos, Juliana R L; Fontes, Elizabeth P B

    2016-07-12

    tolerance to water stress in Arabidopsis, most likely due to modulation of the drought-induced NRP-mediated cell death response. Our results indicated that the NRP-mediated cell death signaling operates in the plant kingdom with conserved regulatory mechanisms and hence may be target for engineering stress tolerance and adaptation in crops.

  10. SGLT1-Mediated Transport in Caco-2 Cells Is Highly Dependent on Cell Bank Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffansen, Bente; Pedersen, Maria D L; Laghmoch, Abdel M; Nielsen, Carsten U

    2017-09-01

    The human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cell line is a well-established in vitro model for studying transport phenomena for prediction of intestinal nutrient and drug absorption. However, substances depending on transporters such predictions are complicated due to variable transporter expression and limited knowledge about transporter function during multiple cell passaging and cell thawings. In the case of sodium glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), a key transporter of oral absorption of d-glucose, one reason for compromised prediction could be inadequate expression of SGLT1 in Caco-2 cells and thereby limited sensitivity in the determination of SGLT1-mediated permeability (P SGLT1 ). Here, the objective is to characterize and compare SGLT1-mediated uptake in Caco-2 cells obtained from different cell banks. SGLT1-mediated uptake of the standard SGLT1 substrate, methyl-α-d-glucopyranoside, in Caco-2 cells was shown to be highly dependent on cell bank origin. The most robust and reliable SGLT1 functionality was identified in Caco-2 cells from Deutsche Sammlung für Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen (DSMZ), whereas cells from the American Type Culture Collection and European Collection of Authenticated Cell Cultures have lower SGLT1 transport activity. Transepithelial P SGLT1 across Caco-2 cells from DSMZ showed that P SGLT1 likely accounts for approximately 97% of absorptive methyl-α-d-glucopyranoside P app(a-b) . In conclusion, Caco-2 cells from DSMZ provide a robust in vitro model for studying SGLT1-mediated uptake and transport-over multiple cell passages and independent cell stock thawings. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. CD4+ regulatory T cells require CTLA-4 for the maintenance of systemic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedline, Randall H; Brown, David S; Nguyen, Hai; Kornfeld, Hardy; Lee, Jinhee; Zhang, Yi; Appleby, Mark; Der, Sandy D; Kang, Joonsoo; Chambers, Cynthia A

    2009-02-16

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) plays a critical role in negatively regulating T cell responses and has also been implicated in the development and function of natural FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells. CTLA-4-deficient mice develop fatal, early onset lymphoproliferative disease. However, chimeric mice containing both CTLA-4-deficient and -sufficient bone marrow (BM)-derived cells do not develop disease, indicating that CTLA-4 can act in trans to maintain T cell self-tolerance. Using genetically mixed blastocyst and BM chimaeras as well as in vivo T cell transfer systems, we demonstrate that in vivo regulation of Ctla4(-/-) T cells in trans by CTLA-4-sufficient T cells is a reversible process that requires the persistent presence of FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells with a diverse TCR repertoire. Based on gene expression studies, the regulatory T cells do not appear to act directly on T cells, suggesting they may instead modulate the stimulatory activities of antigen-presenting cells. These results demonstrate that CTLA-4 is absolutely required for FOXP3(+) regulatory T cell function in vivo.

  12. Current perspectives on natural killer cell education and tolerance: emerging roles for inhibitory receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas LM

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available L Michael Thomas Laboratory of Immunogenetics, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD, USA Abstract: Natural killer (NK cells are regulated through the coordinated functions of activating and inhibitory receptors. These receptors can act during the initial engagement of an NK cell with a target cell, or in subsequent NK cell engagements to maintain tolerance. Notably, each individual possesses a sizable minority-population of NK cells that are devoid of inhibitory receptors that recognize the surrounding MHC class I (ie, self-MHC. Since these NK cells cannot perform conventional inhibition, they are rendered less responsive through the process of NK cell education (also known as licensing in order to reduce the likelihood of auto-reactivity. This review will delineate current views on NK cell education, clarify various misconceptions about NK cell education, and, lastly, discuss the relevance of NK cell education in anti-cancer therapies. Keywords: natural killer cell education, natural killer cell inhibitory receptors, immunotherapy, cancer

  13. The fatty acid profile of rainbow trout liver cells modulates their tolerance to methylmercury and cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferain, Aline, E-mail: aline.ferain@uclouvain.be [Institute of Life Sciences, Université catholique de Louvain, Place Croix du Sud 2/L7.05.08, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Bonnineau, Chloé [Institute of Life Sciences, Université catholique de Louvain, Place Croix du Sud 2/L7.05.08, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Irstea, UR MALY, Centre de Lyon-Villeurbanne, rue de la Doua 5/32108, F-69616 Villeurbanne (France); Neefs, Ineke; Rees, Jean François; Larondelle, Yvan [Institute of Life Sciences, Université catholique de Louvain, Place Croix du Sud 2/L7.05.08, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Schamphelaere, Karel A.C.De [Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology and Aquatic Ecology, Environmental Toxicology Unit, Ghent University, J. Plateaustraat 22, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Debier, Cathy [Institute of Life Sciences, Université catholique de Louvain, Place Croix du Sud 2/L7.05.08, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2016-08-15

    protected the RTL-W1 cells against both methylmercury and cadmium; (iv) DHA enrichment significantly protected the cells against cadmium but not methylmercury; (v) AA and LA enrichment had no impact on the cell tolerance to both methylmercury and cadmium; (vi) the abundance of 20:3n-6, a metabolite of the n-6 biotransformation pathway, in phospholipids was negatively correlated to the cell tolerance to both methylmercury and cadmium. Overall, our results highlighted the importance of the fatty acid supply on the tolerance of fish liver cells to methylmercury and cadmium.

  14. Fatty Acids, Lipid Mediators, and T-Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Anja J.; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Toes, René E. M.; Ioan-Facsinay, Andreea

    2014-01-01

    Research toward the mechanisms underlying obesity-linked complications has intensified during the last years. As a consequence, it has become clear that metabolism and immunity are intimately linked. Free fatty acids and other lipids acquired in excess by current feeding patterns have been proposed to mediate this link due to their immune modulatory capacity. The functional differences between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, in combination with their dietary intake are believed to modulate the outcome of immune responses. Moreover, unsaturated fatty acids can be oxidized in a tightly regulated and specific manner to generate either potent pro-inflammatory or pro-resolving lipid mediators. These oxidative derivatives of fatty acids have received detailed attention during the last years, as they have proven to have strong immune modulatory capacity, even in pM ranges. Both fatty acids and oxidized fatty acids have been studied especially in relation to macrophage and T-cells functions. In this review, we propose to focus on the effect of fatty acids and their oxidative derivatives on T-cells, as it is an active area of research during the past 5 years. The effect of fatty acids and their derivatives on activation and proliferation of T-cells, as well as the delicate balance between stimulation and lipotoxicity will be discussed. Moreover, the receptors involved in the interaction between free fatty acids and their derivatives with T-cells will be summarized. Finally, the mechanisms involved in modulation of T-cells by fatty acids will be addressed, including cellular signaling and metabolism of T-cells. The in vitro results will be placed in context of in vivo studies both in humans and mice. In this review, we summarize the latest findings on the immune modulatory function of lipids on T-cells and will point out novel directions for future research. PMID:25352844

  15. Protein Kinase G facilitates EGFR-mediated cell death in MDA-MB-468 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Nicole M.; Ceresa, Brian P., E-mail: brian.ceresa@louisville.edu

    2016-08-15

    The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase with critical implications in cell proliferation, migration, wound healing and the regulation of apoptosis. However, the EGFR has been shown to be hyper-expressed in a number of human malignancies. The MDA-MB-468 metastatic breast cell line is one example of this. This particular cell line hyper-expresses the EGFR and undergoes EGFR-mediated apoptosis in response to EGF ligand. The goal of this study was to identify the kinases that could be potential intermediates for the EGFR-mediated induction of apoptosis intracellularly. After identifying Cyclic GMP-dependent Protein Kinase G (PKG) as a plausible intermediate, we wanted to determine the temporal relationship of these two proteins in the induction of apoptosis. We observed a dose-dependent decrease in MDA-MB-468 cell viability, which was co-incident with increased PKG activity as measured by VASPSer239 phosphorylation. In addition, we observed a dose dependent decrease in cell viability, as well as an increase in apoptosis, in response to two different PKG agonists, 8-Bromo-cGMP and 8-pCPT-cGMP. MDA-MB-468 cells with reduced PKG activity had attenuated EGFR-mediated apoptosis. These findings indicate that PKG does not induce cell death via transphosphorylation of the EGFR. Instead, PKG activity occurs following EGFR activation. Together, these data indicate PKG as an intermediary in EGFR-mediated cell death, likely via apoptotic pathway.

  16. Protein Kinase G facilitates EGFR-mediated cell death in MDA-MB-468 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Nicole M.; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase with critical implications in cell proliferation, migration, wound healing and the regulation of apoptosis. However, the EGFR has been shown to be hyper-expressed in a number of human malignancies. The MDA-MB-468 metastatic breast cell line is one example of this. This particular cell line hyper-expresses the EGFR and undergoes EGFR-mediated apoptosis in response to EGF ligand. The goal of this study was to identify the kinases that could be potential intermediates for the EGFR-mediated induction of apoptosis intracellularly. After identifying Cyclic GMP-dependent Protein Kinase G (PKG) as a plausible intermediate, we wanted to determine the temporal relationship of these two proteins in the induction of apoptosis. We observed a dose-dependent decrease in MDA-MB-468 cell viability, which was co-incident with increased PKG activity as measured by VASPSer239 phosphorylation. In addition, we observed a dose dependent decrease in cell viability, as well as an increase in apoptosis, in response to two different PKG agonists, 8-Bromo-cGMP and 8-pCPT-cGMP. MDA-MB-468 cells with reduced PKG activity had attenuated EGFR-mediated apoptosis. These findings indicate that PKG does not induce cell death via transphosphorylation of the EGFR. Instead, PKG activity occurs following EGFR activation. Together, these data indicate PKG as an intermediary in EGFR-mediated cell death, likely via apoptotic pathway.

  17. Induction of Microglial Activation by Mediators Released from Mast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Microglia are the resident immune cells in the brain and play a pivotal role in immune surveillance in the central nervous system (CNS. Brain mast cells are activated in CNS disorders and induce the release of several mediators. Thus, brain mast cells, rather than microglia, are the “first responders” due to injury. However, the functional aspects of mast cell-microglia interactions remain uninvestigated. Methods: Conditioned medium from activated HMC-1 cells induces microglial activation similar to co-culture of microglia with HMC-1 cells. Primary cultured microglia were examined by flow cytometry analysis and confocal microscopy. TNF- alpha and IL-6 were measured with commercial ELISA kits. Cell signalling was analysed by Western blotting. Results: In the present study, we found that the conditioned medium from activated HMC-1 cells stimulated microglial activation and the subsequent production of the pro-inflammatory factors TNF-α and IL-6. Co-culture of microglia and HMC-1 cells with corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH for 24, 48 and 72 hours increased TNF-α and IL-6 production. Antagonists of histamine receptor 1 (H1R, H4R, proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2 or Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 reduced HMC-1-induced pro-inflammatory factor production and MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathway activation. Conclusions: These results imply that activated mast cells trigger microglial activation. Interactions between mast cells and microglia could constitute a new and unique therapeutic target for CNS inflammation-related diseases.

  18. Development of stress tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains by metabolic engineering: New aspects from cell flocculation and zinc supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Mingming; Xue, Chuang; Bai, Fengwu; Zhao, Xinqing

    2017-02-01

    Budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely studied for the production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. However, economic production is currently challenged by the repression of cell growth and compromised fermentation performance of S. cerevisiae strains in the presence of various environmental stresses, including toxic level of final products, inhibitory compounds released from the pretreatment of cellulosic feedstocks, high temperature, and so on. Therefore, it is important to improve stress tolerance of S. cerevisiae to these stressful conditions to achieve efficient and economic production. In this review, the latest advances on development of stress tolerant S. cerevisiae strains are summarized, with the emphasis on the impact of cell flocculation and zinc addition. It was found that cell flocculation affected ethanol tolerance and acetic acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae, and addition of zinc to a suitable level improved stress tolerance of yeast cells to ethanol, high temperature and acetic acid. Further studies on the underlying mechanisms by which cell flocculation and zinc status affect stress tolerance will not only enrich our knowledge on stress response and tolerance mechanisms of S. cerevisiae, but also provide novel metabolic engineering strategies to develop robust yeast strains for biofuels production. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Potential for thermal tolerance to mediate climate change effects on three members of a cool temperate lizard genus, Niveoscincus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Amanda J; While, Geoffrey M; Beeton, Nicholas J; Wapstra, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Climatic changes are predicted to be greater in higher latitude and mountainous regions but species specific impacts are difficult to predict. This is partly due to inter-specific variance in the physiological traits which mediate environmental temperature effects at the organismal level. We examined variation in the critical thermal minimum (CTmin), critical thermal maximum (CTmax) and evaporative water loss rates (EWL) of a widespread lowland (Niveoscincus ocellatus) and two range restricted highland (N. microlepidotus and N. greeni) members of a cool temperate Tasmanian lizard genus. The widespread lowland species had significantly higher CTmin and CTmax and significantly lower EWL than both highland species. Implications of inter-specific variation in thermal tolerance for activity were examined under contemporary and future climate change scenarios. Instances of air temperatures below CTmin were predicted to decline in frequency for the widespread lowland and both highland species. Air temperatures of high altitude sites were not predicted to exceed the CTmax of either highland species throughout the 21st century. In contrast, the widespread lowland species is predicted to experience air temperatures in excess of CTmax on 1 or 2 days by three of six global circulation models from 2068-2096. To estimate climate change effects on activity we reran the thermal tolerance models using minimum and maximum temperatures selected for activity. A net gain in available activity time was predicted under climate change for all three species; while air temperatures were predicted to exceed maximum temperatures selected for activity with increasing frequency, the change was not as great as the predicted decline in air temperatures below minimum temperatures selected for activity. We hypothesise that the major effect of rising air temperatures under climate change is an increase in available activity period for both the widespread lowland and highland species. The

  20. Glycosylation-mediated phenylpropanoid partitioning in Populus tremuloides cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babst Benjamin A

    2009-12-01

    identified candidate genes for glycosyltransferases that may mediate the glycosylation, and for transporters that mediate the subcellular compartmentalization of sugars and phenolic glycosides. The suspension cells appear to represent a facile system for dissecting the regulation of phenolic carbon partitioning, and in turn, its effects on growth in Populus.

  1. Hypothermia Protects and Prolongs the Tolerance Time of Retinal Ganglion Cells against Ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Schultheiss

    Full Text Available Hypothermia has been shown to be neuroprotective in the therapy of ischemic stroke in the brain. To date no studies exist on the level of the inner retina and it is unclear if hypothermia would prolong the ischemic tolerance time of retinal ganglion cells, which are decisive in many ischemic retinopathies.Bovine eyes were enucleated and stored either at 21°C or 37°C for 100 or 340 minutes, respectively. Afterwards the globes were dissected, the retina was prepared and either the spontaneous ganglion cell responses were measured or the retina was incubated as an organotypic culture for additional 24 hours. After incubation the retina was either processed for histology (H&E and DAPI staining or real-time PCR (Thy-1 expression was performed.Hypothermia prolonged ganglion cell survival up to 340 minutes under ischemic conditions. In contrast to eyes kept at 37°C the eyes stored at 21°C still showed spontaneous ganglion cell spiking (56.8% versus 0%, a 5.8 fold higher Thy-1 mRNA expression (not significant, but a trend and a preserved retinal structure after 340 minutes of ischemia.Hypothermia protects retinal ganglion cells against ischemia and prolongs their ischemic tolerance time.

  2. Zip4 mediated zinc influx stimulates insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre B Hardy

    Full Text Available Zinc has an important role in normal pancreatic beta cell physiology as it regulates gene transcription, insulin crystallization and secretion, and cell survival. Nevertheless, little is known about how zinc is transported through the plasma membrane of beta cells and which of the class of zinc influx transporters (Zip is involved. Zip4 was previously shown to be expressed in human and mouse beta cells; however, its function there is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to define the zinc transport role of Zip4 in beta cells. To investigate this, Zip4 was over-expressed in MIN6 beta cells using a pCMV6-Zip4GFP plasmid. Organelle staining combined with confocal microscopy showed that Zip4 exhibits a widespread localization in MIN6 cells. Time-lapse zinc imaging experiments showed that Zip4 increases cytoplasmic zinc levels. This resulted in increased granular zinc content and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Interestingly, it is unlikely that the increased glucose stimulated insulin secretion was triggered by a modulation of mitochondrial function, as mitochondrial membrane potential remained unchanged. To define the role of Zip4 in-vivo, we generated a beta cell-specific knockout mouse model (Zip4BKO. Deletion of the Zip4 gene was confirmed in Zip4BKO islets by PCR, RT-PCR, and immuno-histochemistry. Zip4BKO mice showed slightly improved glucose homeostasis but no change in insulin secretion during an oral glucose tolerance test. While Zip4 was not found to be essential for proper glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion in vivo in mice, this study also found that Zip4 mediates increases in cytoplasmic and granular zinc pools and stimulates glucose dependant insulin secretion in-vitro.

  3. Osteoprotegerin-Mediated Homeostasis of Rank+ Thymic Epithelial Cells Does Not Limit Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cell Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Nicholas I; Cowan, Jennifer E; Nakamura, Kyoko; Bacon, Andrea; Baik, Song; White, Andrea J; Parnell, Sonia M; Jenkinson, Eric J; Jenkinson, William E; Anderson, Graham

    2015-09-15

    In the thymus, medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTEC) regulate T cell tolerance via negative selection and Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell (Treg) development, and alterations in the mTEC compartment can lead to tolerance breakdown and autoimmunity. Both the receptor activator for NF-κB (RANK)/RANK ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin (OPG) axis and expression of the transcriptional regulator Aire are involved in the regulation of thymus medullary microenvironments. However, their impact on the mechanisms controlling mTEC homeostasis is poorly understood, as are the processes that enable the thymus medulla to support the balanced production of mTEC-dependent Foxp3(+) Treg. In this study, we have investigated the control of mTEC homeostasis and examined how this process impacts the efficacy of Foxp3(+) Treg development. Using newly generated RANK Venus reporter mice, we identify distinct RANK(+) subsets that reside within both the mTEC(hi) and mTEC(lo) compartments and that represent direct targets of OPG-mediated control. Moreover, by mapping OPG expression to a subset of Aire(+) mTEC, our data show how cis- and trans-acting mechanisms are able to control the thymus medulla by operating on multiple mTEC targets. Finally, we show that whereas the increase in mTEC availability in OPG-deficient (Tnfrsf11b(-/-)) mice impacts the intrathymic Foxp3(+) Treg pool by enhancing peripheral Treg recirculation back to the thymus, it does not alter the number of de novo Rag2pGFP(+)Foxp3(+) Treg that are generated. Collectively, our study defines patterns of RANK expression within the thymus medulla, and it shows that mTEC homeostasis is not a rate-limiting step in intrathymic Foxp3(+) Treg production. Copyright © 2015 The Authors.

  4. Bcl-2 Allows Effector and Memory CD8+ T Cells To Tolerate Higher Expression of Bim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtulus, Sema; Tripathi, Pulak; Moreno-Fernandez, Maria E.; Sholl, Allyson; Katz, Jonathan D.; Grimes, H. Leighton; Hildeman, David A.

    2014-01-01

    As acute infections resolve, most effector CD8+ T cells die, whereas some persist and become memory T cells. Recent work showed that subsets of effector CD8+ T cells, identified by reciprocal expression of killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1) and CD127, have different lifespans. Similar to previous reports, we found that effector CD8+ T cells reported to have a longer lifespan (i.e., KLRG1lowCD127high) have increased levels of Bcl-2 compared with their shorter-lived KLRG1highCD127low counterparts. Surprisingly, we found that these effector KLRG1lowCD127high CD8+ T cells also had increased levels of Bim compared with KLRG1highCD127low cells. Similar effects were observed in memory cells, in which CD8+ central memory T cells expressed higher levels of Bim and Bcl-2 than did CD8+ effector memory T cells. Using both pharmacologic and genetic approaches, we found that survival of both subsets of effector and memory CD8+ T cells required Bcl-2 to combat the proapoptotic activity of Bim. Interestingly, inhibition or absence of Bcl-2 led to significantly decreased expression of Bim in surviving effector and memory T cells. In addition, manipulation of Bcl-2 levels by IL-7 or IL-15 also affected expression of Bim in effector CD8+ T cells. Finally, we found that Bim levels were significantly increased in effector CD8+ T cells lacking Bax and Bak. Together, these data indicate that cells having the highest levels of Bim are selected against during contraction of the response and that Bcl-2 determines the level of Bim that effector and memory T cells can tolerate. PMID:21451108

  5. VaCPK20, a calcium-dependent protein kinase gene of wild grapevine Vitis amurensis Rupr., mediates cold and drought stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovina, Alexandra S; Kiselev, Konstantin V; Khristenko, Valeriya S; Aleynova, Olga A

    2015-08-01

    Abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity, cold and heat, are major environmental factors that limit crop productivity. Vitis amurensis Rupr. is a wild grapevine species displaying a high level of abiotic and biotic stress resistance. Protein kinases, including Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), are known to mediate plant acclimation to various environmental changes. However, the functions of most grape CDPKs have not been clarified. A recent CDPK gene expression analysis revealed that 10 CDPK genes of V. amurensis were up-regulated under different abiotic stress treatments. The expression of the VaCPK20 gene was significantly up-regulated under low and high temperature stress in V. amurensis. In the current study, the effects of overexpressing the VaCPK20 gene in callus cell lines of V. amurensis and transgenic plants of A. thaliana on their responses to abiotic stresses were investigated. Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing the VaCPK20 gene showed higher tolerance to freezing and drought stresses, and transgenic grape cell cultures overexpressing the VaCPK20 gene showed higher resistance to cold stress in comparison with the controls transformed by the "empty" vector. Heat and salt stress resistance of the transgenic V. amurensis calli and A. thaliana was comparable to that of the wild type and vector controls. Overexpression of the VaCPK20 gene increased the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as COR47, NHX1, KIN1, or ABF3, in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants under non-stress conditions, after freezing, and under drought stress. The results imply that VaCPK20 may act as a regulatory factor involved in cold and drought stress response pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Selectins mediate small cell lung cancer systemic metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Heidemann

    Full Text Available Metastasis formation is the major reason for the extremely poor prognosis in small cell lung cancer (SCLC patients. The molecular interaction partners regulating metastasis formation in SCLC are largely unidentified, however, from other tumor entities it is known that tumor cells use the adhesion molecules of the leukocyte adhesion cascade to attach to the endothelium at the site of the future metastasis. Using the human OH-1 SCLC line as a model, we found that these cells expressed E- and P-selectin binding sites, which could be in part attributed to the selectin binding carbohydrate motif sialyl Lewis A. In addition, protein backbones known to carry these glycotopes in other cell lines including PSGL-1, CD44 and CEA could be detected in in vitro and in vivo grown OH1 SCLC cells. By intravital microscopy of murine mesenterial vasculature we could capture SCLC cells while rolling along vessel walls demonstrating that SCLC cells mimic leukocyte rolling behavior in terms of selectin and selectin ligand interaction in vivo indicating that this mechanism might indeed be important for SCLC cells to seed distant metastases. Accordingly, formation of spontaneous distant metastases was reduced by 50% when OH-1 cells were xenografted into E-/P-selectin-deficient mice compared with wild type mice (p = 0.0181. However, as metastasis formation was not completely abrogated in selectin deficient mice, we concluded that this adhesion cascade is redundant and that other molecules of this cascade mediate metastasis formation as well. Using several of these adhesion molecules as interaction partners presumably make SCLC cells so highly metastatic.

  7. The Role of Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity in Insulin Sensitivity, Beta Cell Function, and Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lou Rose Malamug

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection, for example, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, has been thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Our aim was to determine the role of H. pylori infection in glucose metabolism in an American cohort. We examined data from 4,136 non-Hispanic white (NHW, non-Hispanic black (NHB, and Mexican Americans (MA aged 18 and over from the NHANES 1999-2000 cohort. We calculated the odds ratios for states of glucose tolerance based on the H. pylori status. We calculated and compared homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and beta cell function (HOMA-B in subjects without diabetes based on the H. pylori status. The results were adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI, poverty index, education, alcohol consumption, tobacco use, and physical activity. The H. pylori status was not a risk factor for abnormal glucose tolerance. After adjustment for age and BMI and also adjustment for all covariates, no difference was found in either HOMA-IR or HOMA-B in all ethnic and gender groups except for a marginally significant difference in HOMA-IR in NHB females. H. pylori infection was not a risk factor for abnormal glucose tolerance, nor plays a major role in insulin resistance or beta cell dysfunction.

  8. Cecum lymph node dendritic cells harbor slow-growing bacteria phenotypically tolerant to antibiotic treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Kaiser

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In vivo, antibiotics are often much less efficient than ex vivo and relapses can occur. The reasons for poor in vivo activity are still not completely understood. We have studied the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin in an animal model for complicated Salmonellosis. High-dose ciprofloxacin treatment efficiently reduced pathogen loads in feces and most organs. However, the cecum draining lymph node (cLN, the gut tissue, and the spleen retained surviving bacteria. In cLN, approximately 10%-20% of the bacteria remained viable. These phenotypically tolerant bacteria lodged mostly within CD103⁺CX₃CR1⁻CD11c⁺ dendritic cells, remained genetically susceptible to ciprofloxacin, were sufficient to reinitiate infection after the end of the therapy, and displayed an extremely slow growth rate, as shown by mathematical analysis of infections with mixed inocula and segregative plasmid experiments. The slow growth was sufficient to explain recalcitrance to antibiotics treatment. Therefore, slow-growing antibiotic-tolerant bacteria lodged within dendritic cells can explain poor in vivo antibiotic activity and relapse. Administration of LPS or CpG, known elicitors of innate immune defense, reduced the loads of tolerant bacteria. Thus, manipulating innate immunity may augment the in vivo activity of antibiotics.

  9. Cecum Lymph Node Dendritic Cells Harbor Slow-Growing Bacteria Phenotypically Tolerant to Antibiotic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolowschiak, Tamas; Wotzka, Sandra Y.; Lengefeld, Jette; Slack, Emma; Grant, Andrew J.; Ackermann, Martin; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    In vivo, antibiotics are often much less efficient than ex vivo and relapses can occur. The reasons for poor in vivo activity are still not completely understood. We have studied the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin in an animal model for complicated Salmonellosis. High-dose ciprofloxacin treatment efficiently reduced pathogen loads in feces and most organs. However, the cecum draining lymph node (cLN), the gut tissue, and the spleen retained surviving bacteria. In cLN, approximately 10%–20% of the bacteria remained viable. These phenotypically tolerant bacteria lodged mostly within CD103+CX3CR1−CD11c+ dendritic cells, remained genetically susceptible to ciprofloxacin, were sufficient to reinitiate infection after the end of the therapy, and displayed an extremely slow growth rate, as shown by mathematical analysis of infections with mixed inocula and segregative plasmid experiments. The slow growth was sufficient to explain recalcitrance to antibiotics treatment. Therefore, slow-growing antibiotic-tolerant bacteria lodged within dendritic cells can explain poor in vivo antibiotic activity and relapse. Administration of LPS or CpG, known elicitors of innate immune defense, reduced the loads of tolerant bacteria. Thus, manipulating innate immunity may augment the in vivo activity of antibiotics. PMID:24558351

  10. Performance of a Yeast-mediated Biological Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip To

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae present in common Baker’s yeast was used in a microbial fuel cell in which glucose was the carbon source. Methylene blue was used as the electronophore in the anode compartment, while potassium ferricyanide and methylene blue were tested as electron acceptors in the cathode compartment. Microbes in a mediator-free environment were used as the control. The experiment was performed in both open and closed circuit configurations under different loads ranging from 100 kΩ to 400Ω. The eukaryotic S. cerevisiae-based fuel cell showed improved performance when methylene blue and ferricyanide were used as electron mediators, rendering a maximum power generation of 146.71±7.7 mW/m3. The fuel cell generated a maximum open circuit voltage of 383.6±1.5 mV and recorded a maximum efficiency of 28±1.8 % under 100 kΩ of external load.

  11. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Khondoker M; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2016-01-19

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  12. ERK2 Mediates Metabolic Stress Response to Regulate Cell Fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sejeong; Buel, Gwen R; Wolgamott, Laura; Plas, David R; Asara, John M; Blenis, John; Yoon, Sang-Oh

    2015-08-06

    Insufficient nutrients disrupt physiological homeostasis, resulting in diseases and even death. Considering the physiological and pathological consequences of this metabolic stress, the adaptive responses that cells utilize under this condition are of great interest. We show that under low-glucose conditions, cells initiate adaptation followed by apoptosis responses using PERK/Akt and MEK1/ERK2 signaling, respectively. For adaptation, cells engage the ER stress-induced unfolded protein response, which results in PERK/Akt activation and cell survival. Sustained and extreme energetic stress promotes a switch to isoform-specific MEK1/ERK2 signaling, induction of GCN2/eIF2α phosphorylation, and ATF4 expression, which overrides PERK/Akt-mediated adaptation and induces apoptosis through ATF4-dependent expression of pro-apoptotic factors including Bid and Trb3. ERK2 activation during metabolic stress contributes to changes in TCA cycle and amino acid metabolism, and cell death, which is suppressed by glutamate and α-ketoglutarate supplementation. Taken together, our results reveal promising targets to protect cells or tissues from metabolic stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel protein in tardigrade, Ramazzottius varieornatus, improves radio-tolerance of human cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Takuma; Kunieda, Takekazu; Horikawa, Daiki

    2017-01-01

    Genomic DNA is constantly exposed to various genotoxic stresses of both intrinsic and extrinsic origin. Especially, radiation exposure causes severe DNA lesions including double-strand breaks, and leads to genome instability and less viability. However, some organisms possess extraordinary tolerance against radiation. These organisms should possess efficient mechanisms to protect DNA from radiation and/or efficiently repair radiation-induced DNA damages. The molecular mechanisms enabling the exceptional radio-resistance in animals, however, remain largely unknown. In this review, we provide a brief summary of the current knowledge on extremely radio-tolerant animals, and also present our recent finding that Dsup, a tardigrade-unique DNA-associating protein, suppresses X-ray-induced DNA damage in human cultured cells. (author)

  14. 20(S-Protopanaxatriol inhibits release of inflammatory mediators in immunoglobulin E-mediated mast cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Yong Kim

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: PPT reduces the release of inflammatory mediators via inhibiting multiple cellular signaling pathways comprising the Ca2+ influx, protein kinase C, and PLA2, which are propagated by Syk activation upon allergic stimulation of mast cells.

  15. Heparan sulfate mediates trastuzumab effect in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Eloah Rabello; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Del Giglio, Auro; Tersariol, Ivarne Luis dos Santos; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida Silva

    2013-10-01

    . Trastuzumab action is dependent on the availability of heparan sulfate on the surface of breast cancer cells. Furthermore, our data suggest that high levels of heparan sulfate shed to the medium are able to capture trastuzumab, blocking the antibody action mediated by HER2. In addition to HER2 levels, heparan sulfate synthesis and shedding determine breast cancer cell susceptibility to trastuzumab.

  16. Role of the endothelin axis in astrocyte- and endothelial cell-mediated chemoprotection of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Wook; Choi, Hyun Jin; Lee, Ho-Jeong; He, Junqin; Wu, Qiuyu; Langley, Robert R.; Fidler, Isaiah J.; Kim, Sun-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that astrocytes protect cancer cells from chemotherapy by stimulating upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes in those cells. We investigated the possibility that activation of the endothelin axis orchestrates survival gene expression and chemoprotection in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and H226 lung cancer cells. Methods Cancer cells, murine astrocytes, and murine fibroblasts were grown in isolation, and expression of endothelin (ET) peptides and ET receptors (ETAR and ETBR) compared with expression on cancer cells and astrocytes (or cancer cells and fibroblasts) that were co-incubated for 48 hours. Type-specific endothelin receptor antagonists were used to evaluate the contribution of ETAR and ETBR to astrocyte-induced activation of the protein kinase B (AKT)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction pathways, anti-apoptotic gene expression, and chemoprotection of cancer cells. We also investigated the chemoprotective potential of brain endothelial cells and microglial cells. Results Gap junction signaling between MDA-MB-231 cancer cells and astrocytes stimulates upregulation of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-8 expression in cancer cells, which increases ET-1 production from astrocytes and ET receptor expression on cancer cells. ET-1 signals for activation of AKT/MAPK and upregulation of survival proteins that protect cancer cells from taxol. Brain endothelial cell-mediated chemoprotection of cancer cells also involves endothelin signaling. Dual antagonism of ETAR and ETBR is required to abolish astrocyte- and endothelial cell-mediated chemoprotection. Conclusions Bidirectional signaling between astrocytes and cancer cells involves upregulation and activation of the endothelin axis, which protects cancer cells from cytotoxicity induced by chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:25008093

  17. Rho GTPase activity modulates paramyxovirus fusion protein-mediated cell-cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schowalter, Rachel M.; Wurth, Mark A.; Aguilar, Hector C.; Lee, Benhur; Moncman, Carole L.; McCann, Richard O.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2006-01-01

    The paramyxovirus fusion protein (F) promotes fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane of target cells as well as cell-cell fusion. The plasma membrane is closely associated with the actin cytoskeleton, but the role of actin dynamics in paramyxovirus F-mediated membrane fusion is unclear. We examined cell-cell fusion promoted by two different paramyxovirus F proteins in three cell types in the presence of constitutively active Rho family GTPases, major cellular coordinators of actin dynamics. Reporter gene and syncytia assays demonstrated that expression of either Rac1 V12 or Cdc42 V12 could increase cell-cell fusion promoted by the Hendra or SV5 glycoproteins, though the effect was dependent on the cell type expressing the viral glycoproteins. In contrast, RhoA L63 decreased cell-cell fusion promoted by Hendra glycoproteins but had little affect on SV5 F-mediated fusion. Also, data suggested that GTPase activation in the viral glycoprotein-containing cell was primarily responsible for changes in fusion. Additionally, we found that activated Cdc42 promoted nuclear rearrangement in syncytia

  18. Intrinsic tolerance in autologous collagen-induced arthritis is generated by CD152-dependent CD4+ suppressor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treschow, Alexandra P; Bäcklund, Johan; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2005-01-01

    . We found that expression of heterologous rat CII sequence in the cartilage of mice positively selects autoreactive CD4(+) T cells with suppressive capacity. Although CD4(+)CD25(+) cells did not play a prominent role in this suppression, CD152-expressing T cells played a crucial role in this tolerance....... MMC CD4(+) T cells were able to suppress proliferation of wild-type cells in vitro where this suppression required cell-to-cell contact. The suppressive capability of MMC cells was also demonstrated in vivo, as transfer of such cells into wild-type arthritis susceptible mice delayed arthritis onset....... This study also determined that both tolerance and disease resistance were CD152-dependent as demonstrated by Ab treatment experiments. These findings could have relevance for RA because the transgenic mice used express the same CII epitope in cartilage as humans and because autoreactive T cells, specific...

  19. Singlet oxygen-mediated formation of protein peroxides within cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.; Policarpio, V.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Singlet oxygen is generated by a number of cellular, enzymatic and chemical reactions as well as by exposure to UV, or visible light in the presence of a sensitizer; as a consequence this oxidant has been proposed as a damaging agent in a number of pathologies including photo-aging and skin cancer. Proteins are major targets for singlet oxygen as a result of their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. In this study it is shown that illumination of viable, sensitizer-loaded, THP-1 (human monocyte-like) cells with visible light gives rise to intra-cellular protein-derived peroxides. The peroxide yield increases with illumination time, requires the presence of the sensitizer, is enhanced in D 2 O, and decreased by azide; these data are consistent with the mediation of singlet oxygen. The concentration of peroxides detected, which is not affected by glucose or ascorbate loading of the cells, corresponds to ca. 1.5 nmoles peroxide per 10 6 cells using rose bengal as sensitizer, or 10 nmoles per mg cell protein and account for up to ca. 15% of the O 2 consumed by the cells. Similar peroxides have been detected on isolated cellular proteins exposed to light in the presence of rose bengal and oxygen. After cessation of illumination, the cellular protein peroxide levels decreases with t 1/2 ca. 4 hrs at 37 deg C, and this is associated with increased cell lysis. Decomposition of protein peroxides formed within cells, or on isolated cellular proteins, by metal ions, gives rise to radicals as detected by EPR spin trapping. These protein peroxides, and radicals derived from them, can inactivate key cellular enzymes (including caspases, GAPDH and glutathione reductase) and induce DNA base oxidation, strand breaks and DNA-protein cross-links. These studies demonstrate that exposure of intact cells to visible light in the presence of a sensitizer gives rise to novel long-lived, but reactive, intra-cellular protein peroxides via singlet oxygen-mediated

  20. Interstitial cells of Cajal mediate mechanosensitive responses in the stomach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Kyung-Jong; Sanders, Kenton M.; Ward, Sean M.

    2005-10-01

    Changes in motor activity are a basic response to filling of smooth muscle organs. Responses to gastric filling, for example, are thought to be regulated by neural reflexes. Here, we demonstrate a previously uncharacterized aspect of stretch-dependent responses in visceral smooth muscles that is mediated by mechanosensitive interstitial cells of Cajal. Length ramps were applied to the murine antral muscles while recording intracellular electrical activity and isometric force. Stretching muscles by an average of 27 ± 1% of resting length resulted in 5 mN of force. Increasing length caused membrane depolarization and increased slow-wave frequency. The responses were dependent on the rate of stretch. Stretch-dependent responses were not inhibited by neuronal antagonists or nifedipine. Increases in slow-wave frequency, but not membrane depolarization, were inhibited by reducing external Ca2+ (100 μM) and by Ni2+ (250 μM). Responses to stretch were inhibited by indomethacin (1 μM) and were absent in cyclooxygenase II-deficient mice, suggesting that cyclooxygenase II-derived eicosanoids may mediate these responses. Dual microelectrode impalements of muscle cells within the corpus and antrum showed that stretch-induced changes in slow-wave frequency uncoupled proximal-to-distal propagation of slow waves. This uncoupling could interfere with gastric peristalsis and impede gastric emptying. Stretch of antral muscles of W/WV mice, which lack intramuscular interstitial cells of Cajal, did not affect membrane depolarization or slow-wave frequency. These data demonstrate a previously uncharacterized nonneural stretch reflex in gastric muscles and provide physiological evidence demonstrating a mechanosensitive role for interstitial cells of Cajal in smooth muscle tissues. gastric compliance | pacemaker | stretch | slow waves | propagation

  1. Chitosan nanoparticles affect acid tolerance response in adhered cells of strpetococcus mutans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neilands, Julia; Sutherland, Duncan S; Resin, Anton

    2011-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of chitosan nanoparticles on the acid tolerance response (ATR) of adhered Streptococcus mutans. An ATR was induced by exposing S. mutans to pH 5.5 for 2 h and confirmed by exposing the acid-adapted cells to pH 3.5 for 30 min, with the majority of cells...... appearing viable according to the LIVE/DEAD (R) technique. However, when chitosan nanoparticles were present during the exposure to pH 5.5, no ATR occurred as most cells appeared dead after the pH 3.5 shock. We conclude that the chitosan nanoparticles tested had the ability to hinder ATR induction...

  2. Reduced Drought Tolerance by CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated SlMAPK3 Mutagenesis in Tomato Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liu; Chen, Lin; Li, Rui; Zhao, Ruirui; Yang, Meijing; Sheng, Jiping; Shen, Lin

    2017-10-04

    Drought stress is one of the most destructive environmental factors that affect tomato plants adversely. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are important signaling molecules that respond to drought stress. In this study, SlMAPK3 was induced by drought stress, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system was utilized to generate slmapk3 mutants. Two independent T1 transgenic lines and wild-type (WT) tomato plants were used for analysis of drought tolerance. Compared with WT plants, slmapk3 mutants exhibited more severe wilting symptom, higher hydrogen peroxide content, lower antioxidant enzymes activities, and suffered more membrane damage under drought stress. Furthermore, knockout of SlMAPK3 led to up- or down-regulated expressions of drought stress-responsive genes including SlLOX, SlGST, and SlDREB. The results suggest that SlMAPK3 is involved in drought response in tomato plants by protecting cell membranes from oxidative damage and modulating transcription of stress-related genes.

  3. Hydralazine rescues PC12 cells from acrolein-mediated death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu-Snyder, Peishan; Borgens, Richard Ben; Shi, Riyi

    2006-07-01

    Acrolein, a major lipid peroxidation product, has been associated with both CNS trauma and neurodegenerative diseases. Because of its long half-life, acrolein is a potent endogenous toxin capable of killing healthy cells during the secondary injury process. Traditionally, attempts to intervene in the process of progressive cell death after the primary injury have included scavenging reactive oxygen species (so-called free radicals). The animal data supporting such an approach have generally been positive, but all human clinical trials attempting a similar outcome in human CNS injury have failed. New drugs that might reduce toxicity by scavenging the products of lipid peroxidation present a promising, and little investigated, therapeutic approach. Hydralazine, a well-known treatment for hypertension, has been reported to react with acrolein, forming hydrazone in cell-free systems. In the companion paper, we have established an acrolein-mediated cell injury model using PC12 cells in vitro. Here we test the hypothesis that the formation of hydrazone adducts with acrolein is able to reduce acrolein toxicity and spare a significant percentage of the population of PC12 cells from death. Concentrations of approximately 1 mM of this aldehyde scavenger can rescue over 80% of the population of PC12 cells. This study provides a basis for a new pharmacological treatment to reduce the effects of secondary injury in the damaged and/or diseased nervous system. In particular, we describe the need for new drugs that possess aldehyde scavenging properties but do not interfere with the regulation of blood pressure. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Cell-mediated non-allergic rhinitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli Del Giudice, Alessandro; Barbara, Michele; Russo, Giuseppe Maria; Fiocca Matthews, Emily; Cassano, Michele

    2012-12-01

    Non-allergic rhinitis is a heterogeneous disease whose etiology is largely unknown. Nasal cytology only allows us to recognize different non-allergic rhinitis forms on the basis of the prevalent inflammatory cell infiltrate: non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophils, with neutrophils, with mast-cells and with both eosinophils and mast-cells. The aim of this study is to define the incidence, clinical features and comorbidity of the different types of cell-mediated non-allergic rhinitis in a pediatric age group. One hundred and fourteen non-allergic children with chronic nasal obstruction and associated symptoms (rhinorrhea, sneezing and nasal itchiness) were retrospectively selected. All patients had been submitted to a clinical history, pediatric evaluation, anterior rhinoscopy and fiberendoscopy, rhinomanometry and nasal cytology. Non-allergic rhinitis with neutrophils was present in 46 (40.4%) children, non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophils in 53 (46.5%), non-allergic rhinitis with mast-cells in 12 (10.5%) and non-allergic rhinitis with both eosinophils and mast-cells in 3 (2.6%). Nasal obstruction was prevalent in non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophils and in non-allergic rhinitis with mast-cells patients (Pallergic rhinitis with eosinophils group showed a higher probability of asthma (Ppediatric age group the most frequent forms of non-allergic rhinitis are those with eosinophils or with neutrophils. A diagnosis of non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophils in children presumes more severe symptoms and a higher incidence of pulmonary disease and roncopathy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Alpha-adrenergic blocker mediated osteoblastic stem cell differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yoon Jung; Lee, Jue Yeon; Lee, Seung Jin; Chung, Chong-Pyoung; Park, Yoon Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Doxazocin directly up-regulated bone metabolism at a low dose. ► Doxazocin induced osteoblastic stem cell differentiation without affecting cell proliferation. ► This osteogenic stem cell differentiation is mediated by ERK-signal dependent pathway. -- Abstract: Recent researches have indicated a role for antihypertensive drugs including alpha- or beta-blockers in the prevention of bone loss. Some epidemiological studies reported the protective effects of those agents on fracture risk. However, there is limited information on the association with those agents especially at the mechanism of action. In the present study, we investigated the effects of doxazosin, an alpha-blocker that is clinically used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) along with antihypertensive medication, on the osteogenic stem cell differentiation. We found that doxazosin increased osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells, detected by Alizarin red S staining and calcein. Doxazosin not only induced expression of alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, osteopontin, and osteocalcin, it also resulted in increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), a MAP kinase involved in osteoblastic differentiation. Treatment with U0126, a MAP kinase inhibitor, significantly blocked doxazosin-induced osteoblastic differentiation. Unrelated to activation of osteogenic differentiation by doxazosin, we found that there were no significant changes in adipogenic differentiation or in the expression of adipose-specific genes, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, aP2, or LPL. In this report, we suggest that doxazosin has the ability to increase osteogenic cell differentiation via ERK1/2 activation in osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells, which supports the protective effects of antihypertensive drug on fracture risk and according to our data doxazosin might be useful for application in the field of bone

  6. Alpha-adrenergic blocker mediated osteoblastic stem cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yoon Jung [Craniomaxillofacial Reconstructive Sciences Major, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jue Yeon [Craniomaxillofacial Reconstructive Sciences Major, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Jin [Department of Industrial Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chong-Pyoung [Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yoon Jeong, E-mail: parkyj@snu.ac.kr [Craniomaxillofacial Reconstructive Sciences Major, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin directly up-regulated bone metabolism at a low dose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin induced osteoblastic stem cell differentiation without affecting cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This osteogenic stem cell differentiation is mediated by ERK-signal dependent pathway. -- Abstract: Recent researches have indicated a role for antihypertensive drugs including alpha- or beta-blockers in the prevention of bone loss. Some epidemiological studies reported the protective effects of those agents on fracture risk. However, there is limited information on the association with those agents especially at the mechanism of action. In the present study, we investigated the effects of doxazosin, an alpha-blocker that is clinically used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) along with antihypertensive medication, on the osteogenic stem cell differentiation. We found that doxazosin increased osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells, detected by Alizarin red S staining and calcein. Doxazosin not only induced expression of alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, osteopontin, and osteocalcin, it also resulted in increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), a MAP kinase involved in osteoblastic differentiation. Treatment with U0126, a MAP kinase inhibitor, significantly blocked doxazosin-induced osteoblastic differentiation. Unrelated to activation of osteogenic differentiation by doxazosin, we found that there were no significant changes in adipogenic differentiation or in the expression of adipose-specific genes, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}, aP2, or LPL. In this report, we suggest that doxazosin has the ability to increase osteogenic cell differentiation via ERK1/2 activation in osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells, which supports the protective effects of antihypertensive drug on fracture risk and

  7. The flavoprotein Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Akira; Kawahara, Nobuhiro [Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Takagi, Hiroshi, E-mail: hiro@bs.naist.jp [Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NO is produced from L-arginine in response to elevated temperature in yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tah18 was first identified as the yeast protein involved in NO synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers tolerance to high-temperature on yeast cells. -- Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule involved in the regulation of a large number of cellular functions. In the unicellular eukaryote yeast, NO may be involved in stress response pathways, but its role is poorly understood due to the lack of mammalian NO synthase (NOS) orthologues. Previously, we have proposed the oxidative stress-induced L-arginine synthesis and its physiological role under stress conditions in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, our experimental results indicated that increased conversion of L-proline into L-arginine led to NO production in response to elevated temperature. We also showed that the flavoprotein Tah18, which was previously reported to transfer electrons to the Fe-S cluster protein Dre2, was involved in NO synthesis in yeast. Gene knockdown analysis demonstrated that Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells. As it appears that such a unique cell protection mechanism is specific to yeasts and fungi, it represents a promising target for antifungal activity.

  8. Colony Lysate Arrays for Proteomic Profiling of Drug-Tolerant Persisters of Cancer Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Kohei; Nishizuka, Satoshi S

    2017-09-05

    Functional heterogeneity of cancer cells is one of the key properties to understanding relapse after drug treatment. Hence, clarification is needed with regard to which types of subgroups of cancer cells dominantly contribute to the initiation of relapse. Recently, we established the colony lysate array (CoLA), which is a method that allows comparison of individual colonies at the protein level to assess the initiation of anticancer drug-tolerant persisters (DTPs) based on the reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) system. DTPs grow in various drug concentrations and types showing 2-dimensional growth (∼1 mm) on a flat surface. The size of DTPs are larger than spheroids (∼0.3 mm) in agarose gel, which makes them easy to handle for a number of assays. DTPs provide functional information during the process of their formation, initiating from the origin of a drug-tolerant single cell. Using >2000 DTPs generated from various drugs and doses profiled on the basis of 44 proteins, we demonstrate that the DTPs are clustered on the basis of their proteomic profiles changing in response to drugs and doses. Of interest, nine transcription factors in the DTPs, such as STAT3 and OCT4A, were identified as having decreased or increased levels of proteins in response to gefitinib. Importantly, these results can be obtained only by individual proteomic colony profiling, which may identify alternative therapeutic targets and biomarkers for DTPs that may harbor critical mechanisms for cancer relapse.

  9. Molecular basis of sidekick-mediated cell-cell adhesion and specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Kerry M.; Yamagata, Masahito; Jin, Xiangshu; Mannepalli, Seetha; Katsamba, Phinikoula S.; Ahlsén, Göran; Sergeeva, Alina P.; Honig, Barry; Sanes, Joshua R.; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2016-09-19

    Sidekick (Sdk) 1 and 2 are related immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion proteins required for appropriate synaptic connections between specific subtypes of retinal neurons. Sdks mediate cell-cell adhesion with homophilic specificity that underlies their neuronal targeting function. Here we report crystal structures of Sdk1 and Sdk2 ectodomain regions, revealing similar homodimers mediated by the four N-terminal immunoglobulin domains (Ig1–4), arranged in a horseshoe conformation. These Ig1–4 horseshoes interact in a novel back-to-back orientation in both homodimers through Ig1:Ig2, Ig1:Ig1 and Ig3:Ig4 interactions. Structure-guided mutagenesis results show that this canonical dimer is required for both Sdk-mediated cell aggregation (viatransinteractions) and Sdk clustering in isolated cells (viacisinteractions). Sdk1/Sdk2 recognition specificity is encoded across Ig1–4, with Ig1–2 conferring the majority of binding affinity and differential specificity. We suggest that competition betweencisandtransinteractions provides a novel mechanism to sharpen the specificity of cell-cell interactions.

  10. Integration of principles of systems biology and radiation biology: toward development of in silico models to optimize IUdR-mediated radiosensitization of DNA mismatch repair-deficient (damage tolerant human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy James Kinsella

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 7 years, we have focused our experimental and computational research efforts on improving our understanding of the biochemical, molecular, and cellular processing of iododeoxyuridine (IUdR and ionizing radiation (IR induced DNA base damage by DNA mismatch repair (MMR. These coordinated research efforts, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP, brought together system scientists with expertise in engineering, mathematics, and complex systems theory and translational cancer researchers with expertise in radiation biology. Our overall goal was to begin to develop computational models of IUdR- and/or IR- induced base damage processing by MMR that may provide new clinical strategies to optimize IUdR-mediated radiosensitiztion in MMR deficient (MMR- damage tolerant human cancers. Using multiple scales of experimental testing, ranging from purified protein systems to in vitro (cellular and to in vivo (human tumor xenografts in athymic mice models, we have begun to integrate and interpolate these experimental data with hybrid stochastic biochemical models of MMR damage processing and probabilistic cell cycle regulation models through a systems biology approach. In this article, we highlight the results and current status of our integration of radiation biology approaches and computational modeling to enhance IUdR-mediated radiosensitization in MMR- damage tolerant cancers.

  11. Prophages and growth dynamics confound experimental results with antibiotic-tolerant persister cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Alexander; Fino, Cinzia; Sørensen, Michael Askvad

    2017-01-01

    -tolerant persisters via induction of cryptic prophages. Similarly, the inadvertent infection of mutant strains with bacteriophage φ80, a notorious laboratory contaminant, apparently caused several of the phenotypes that we reported in our previous studies. We therefore reconstructed all infected mutants and probed...... to capture the biology of persisters and instead give widely differing results based on poorly controlled experimental parameters and artifacts caused by cryptic as well as contaminant prophages. We therefore established a new, robust assay that enabled us to follow the dynamics of persister cells through...

  12. BNNT-mediated irreversible electroporatio: its potential on cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittoria Raffa, Cristina Riggio, Michael W. Smith, Kevin C. Jordan, Wei Cao, Alfred Cuschieri

    2012-10-01

    Tissue ablation, i.e., the destruction of undesirable tissues, has become an important minimally invasive technique alternative to resection surgery for the treatment of tumours. Several methods for tissue ablation are based on thermal techniques using cold, e.g. cryosurgery [1] or heat, e.g. radiofrequency [2] or high-intensity focused ultrasound [3] or nanoparticle-mediated irradiation [4]. Alternatively, irreversible electroporation (IRE) has been proposed as non thermal technique for minimally invasive tissue ablation based on the use of electrical pulses. When the electric field is applied to a cell, a change in transmembrane potential is induced, which can cause biochemical and physiological changes of the cell. When the threshold value of the transmembrane potential is exceeded, the cell membrane becomes permeable, thus allowing entrance of molecules that otherwise cannot cross the membrane [5]. A further increase in the electric field intensity may cause irreversible membrane permeabilization and cell death. These pulses create irreversible defects (pores) in the cell membrane lipid bilayer, causing cell death through loss of cell homeostasis [6]. This is desirable in tumour ablation in order to produce large cell death, without the use of cytostatic drugs. A study of Davalos, Mir and Rubinsky showed that IRE can ablate substantial volumes of tissue without inducing a thermal effect and therefore serve as an independent and new tissue ablation modality; this opened the way to the use of IRE in surgery [7]. Their finding was subsequently confirmed in studies on cells [8], small animal models [9] and in large animal models in the liver [10] and the heart [11]. The most important finding in these papers is that irreversible electroporation produces precisely delineated ablation zones with cell scale resolution between ablated and non-ablated areas, without zones in which the extent of damage changes gradually as during thermal ablation. Furthermore, it is

  13. GILT: Shaping the MHC Class II-Restricted Peptidome and CD4(+) T Cell-Mediated Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Karen Taraszka

    2013-12-04

    The MHC class II-restricted antigen processing pathway generates peptide:MHC complexes in the endocytic pathway for the activation of CD4(+) T cells. Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) reduces protein disulfide bonds in the endocytic compartment, thereby exposing buried epitopes for MHC class II binding and presentation. T cell hybridoma responses and elution of MHC class II bound peptides have identified GILT-dependent epitopes, GILT-independent epitopes, and epitopes that are more efficiently presented in the absence of GILT termed GILT-prevented epitopes. GILT-mediated alteration in the MHC class II-restricted peptidome modulates T cell development in the thymus and peripheral tolerance and influences the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. Recent studies suggest an emerging role for GILT in the response to pathogens and cancer survival.

  14. Protein-crystal interface mediates cell adhesion and proangiogenic secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei; Chen, Weisi; Gillis, Brian; Fischbach, Claudia; Estroff, Lara A; Gourdon, Delphine

    2017-02-01

    The nanoscale materials properties of bone apatite crystals have been implicated in breast cancer bone metastasis and their interactions with extracellular matrix proteins are likely involved. In this study, we used geologic hydroxyapatite (HAP, Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 ), closely related to bone apatite, to investigate how HAP surface chemistry and nano/microscale topography individually influence the crystal-protein interface, and how the altered protein deposition impacts subsequent breast cancer cell activities. We first utilized Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to assess the molecular conformation of fibronectin (Fn), a major extracellular matrix protein upregulated in cancer, when it adsorbed onto HAP facets. Our analysis reveals that both low surface charge density and nanoscale roughness of HAP facets individually contributed to molecular unfolding of Fn. We next quantified cell adhesion and secretion on Fn-coated HAP facets using MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Our data show elevated proangiogenic and proinflammatory secretions associated with more unfolded Fn adsorbed onto nano-rough HAP facets with low surface charge density. These findings not only deconvolute the roles of crystal surface chemistry and topography in interfacial protein deposition but also enhance our knowledge of protein-mediated breast cancer cell interactions with apatite, which may be implicated in tumor growth and bone metastasis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Mediators of Mast Cells in Bullous Pemphigoid and Dermatitis Herpetiformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Zebrowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bullous pemphigoid (BP and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH are skin diseases associated with inflammation. However, few findings exist concerning the role of mast cells in autoimmune blistering disease. Skin biopsies were taken from 27 BP and 14 DH patients, as well as 20 healthy individuals. Immunohistochemistry was used to identify the localization and mast cell expression of TNFα and MMP9 in skin lesions and perilesional skin. The serum concentrations of TNFα, MMP9, chymase, tryptase, PAF, and IL-4 were measured by immunoassay. TNFα and MMP9 expression in the epidermis and in inflammatory influxed cells in the dermis was detected in skin biopsies from patients. Although these mediators were found to be expressed in the perilesional skin of all patients, the level was much lower than that in lesional skin. Increased serum PAF levels were observed in BP patients. Mast cells may play an essential role in activating inflammation, which ultimately contributes to the tissue damage observed in BP and DH. Our findings suggest that differences in the pattern of cytokine expression directly contribute to variations in cellular infiltration in DH and BP.

  16. Improving the catalytic potential and substrate tolerance of Gibberella intermedia nitrilase by whole-cell immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng; Yang, Tao; Gong, Jin-Song; Xiong, Lei; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Li, Hui; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Comparative studies of immobilized and free cells of Gibberella intermedia CA3-1 in bioconversion of 3-cyanopyridine to nicotinic acid were performed. Entrapping method was chosen based on the advantages in enzymatic activity recovery, mechanical strength and preparation procedure. Four entrapment matrices were investigated and sodium alginate was screened to be the most suitable material. Maximal nitrilase activity of alginate immobilized cells was obtained under conditions of 2 % alginate, 0.6 % CaCl2, 0.4 g cell/g alginate, 1.8 mm bead size. The immobilized cells showed excellent substrate tolerance even when the 3-cyanopyridine concentration was 700 mM. The half-lives of immobilized cells at 30, 40 and 50 °C were 315, 117.5 and 10.9 h, respectively, correspondingly 1.4, 1.6 and 1.7-fold compared with that of the free cells. Efficient reusability of immobilized cells up to 28 batches was achieved and 205.7 g/(g dcw) nicotinic acid was obtained with 80.55 % enzyme activity preserved.

  17. Plant Cell Division Analyzed by Transient Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The continuing analysis of plant cell division will require additional protein localization studies. This is greatly aided by GFP-technology, but plant transformation and the maintenance of transgenic lines can present a significant technical bottleneck. In this chapter I describe a method for the Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of tobacco BY-2 cells. The method allows for the microscopic analysis of fluorescence-tagged proteins in dividing cells in within 2 days after starting a coculture. This transient transformation procedure requires only standard laboratory equipment. It is hoped that this rapid method would aid researchers conducting live-cell localization studies in plant mitosis and cytokinesis.

  18. Deficiency of autoimmune regulator impairs the immune tolerance effect of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Feifei; Li, Dongbei; Zhao, Bo; Luo, Yadong; Zhao, Bingjie; Zou, Xueyang; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2018-02-01

    As a transcription factor, autoimmune regulator (Aire) participates in thymic negative selection and maintains immune tolerance mainly by regulating the ectopic expression of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). Aire is also expressed in dendritic cells (DCs). DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that affect the differentiation of T cells toward distinct subpopulations and participate in the immune response and tolerance, thereby playing an important role in maintaining homeostasis. To determine the role of Aire in maintaining immune tolerance by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs), in the present study we utilized Aire-knockout mice to examine the changes of maturation status and TRAs expression on BMDCs, additionally investigate the differentiation of CD4 + T cells. The results showed that expression of costimulatory molecule and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecule was increased and expression of various TRAs was decreased in BMDCs from Aire-knockout mice. Aire deficiency reduced the differentiation of naïve CD4 + T cells into type 2T helper (Th2) cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs) but enhanced the differentiation of naïve CD4 + T cells into Th1 cells, Th17 cells, and follicular helper T (Tfh) cells. The results demonstrate that Aire expressed by BMDCs plays an important role in the maintenance of homeostasis by regulating TRA expression and the differentiation of T cell subsets.

  19. Freezing tolerance of sea urchin embryonic cells: Differentiation commitment and cytoskeletal disturbances in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odintsova, Nelly A; Ageenko, Natalya V; Kipryushina, Yulia O; Maiorova, Mariia A; Boroda, Andrey V

    2015-08-01

    This study focuses on the freezing tolerance of sea urchin embryonic cells. To significantly reduce the loss of physiological activity of these cells that occurs after cryopreservation and to study the effects of ultra-low temperatures on sea urchin embryonic cells, we tested the ability of the cells to differentiate into spiculogenic or pigment directions in culture, including an evaluation of the expression of some genes involved in pigment differentiation. A morphological analysis of cytoskeletal disturbances after freezing in a combination of penetrating (dimethyl sulfoxide and ethylene glycol) and non-penetrating (trehalose and polyvinylpyrrolidone) cryoprotectants revealed that the distribution pattern of filamentous actin and tubulin was similar to that in the control cultures. In contrast, very rare spreading cells and a small number of cells with filamentous actin and tubulin were detected after freezing in the presence of only non-penetrating cryoprotectants. The largest number of pigment cells was found in cultures frozen with trehalose or trehalose and dimethyl sulfoxide. The ability to induce the spicule formation was lost in the cells frozen only with non-penetrating cryoprotectants, while it was maximal in cultures frozen in a cryoprotective mixture containing both non-penetrating and penetrating cryoprotectants (particularly, when ethylene glycol was present). Using different markers for cell state assessment, an effective cryopreservation protocol for sea urchin cells was developed: three-step freezing with a low cooling rate (1-2°C/min) and a combination of non-penetrating and penetrating cryoprotectants made it possible to obtain a high level of cell viability (up to 65-80%). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mast cell mediator tryptase levels after inhalation or intravenous administration of high doses pharmaceutically prepared heroin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rook, E. J.; van Zanten, A. P.; van den Brink, W.; van Ree, J. M.; Beijnen, J. H.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids like morphine and heroin induce mast cell degranulation in vitro. The release of mast cell mediators like histamine and tryptase may lead to allergic symptoms. In this study it was investigated whether mast cell mediator release also occurs in vivo in addicted patients who

  1. Glycan elongation beyond the mucin associated Tn antigen protects tumor cells from immune-mediated killing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Lavrsen, Kirstine; Steentoft, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    and pancreatic cancer cell lines T47D and Capan-1 increases sensitivity to both NK cell mediated antibody-dependent cellular-cytotoxicity (ADCC) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing. In addition, we investigated the association between total cell surface expression of MUC1/MUC16 and NK or CTL...

  2. Bystander apoptosis in human cells mediated by irradiated blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr, E-mail: vlad.vinnikov@mail.ru [Grigoriev Institute for Medical Radiology of the National Academy of Medical Science of Ukraine (Ukraine); Lloyd, David; Finnon, Paul [Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards of the Health Protection Agency of the United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-01

    Following exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, due to an accident or during radiotherapy, bystander signalling poses a potential hazard to unirradiated cells and tissues. This process can be mediated by factors circulating in blood plasma. Thus, we assessed the ability of plasma taken from in vitro irradiated human blood to produce a direct cytotoxic effect, by inducing apoptosis in primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM), which mainly comprised G{sub 0}-stage lymphocytes. Plasma was collected from healthy donors' blood irradiated in vitro to 0-40 Gy acute {gamma}-rays. Reporter PBM were separated from unirradiated blood with Histopaque and held in medium with the test plasma for 24 h at 37 Degree-Sign C. Additionally, plasma from in vitro irradiated and unirradiated blood was tested against PBM collected from blood given 4 Gy. Apoptosis in reporter PBM was measured by the Annexin V test using flow cytometry. Plasma collected from unirradiated and irradiated blood did not produce any apoptotic response above the control level in unirradiated reporter PBM. Surprisingly, plasma from irradiated blood caused a dose-dependent reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter PBM. The yields of radiation-induced cell death in irradiated reporter PBM (after subtracting the respective values in unirradiated reporter PBM) were 22.2 {+-} 1.8% in plasma-free cultures, 21.6 {+-} 1.1% in cultures treated with plasma from unirradiated blood, 20.2 {+-} 1.4% in cultures with plasma from blood given 2-4 Gy and 16.7 {+-} 3.2% in cultures with plasma from blood given 6-10 Gy. These results suggested that irradiated blood plasma did not cause a radiation-induced bystander cell-killing effect. Instead, a reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter cells cultured with irradiated blood plasma has implications concerning oncogenic risk from mutated cells surviving after high dose in vivo irradiation (e.g. radiotherapy) and requires further study.

  3. Bystander apoptosis in human cells mediated by irradiated blood plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr; Lloyd, David; Finnon, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Following exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, due to an accident or during radiotherapy, bystander signalling poses a potential hazard to unirradiated cells and tissues. This process can be mediated by factors circulating in blood plasma. Thus, we assessed the ability of plasma taken from in vitro irradiated human blood to produce a direct cytotoxic effect, by inducing apoptosis in primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM), which mainly comprised G 0 -stage lymphocytes. Plasma was collected from healthy donors’ blood irradiated in vitro to 0–40 Gy acute γ-rays. Reporter PBM were separated from unirradiated blood with Histopaque and held in medium with the test plasma for 24 h at 37 °C. Additionally, plasma from in vitro irradiated and unirradiated blood was tested against PBM collected from blood given 4 Gy. Apoptosis in reporter PBM was measured by the Annexin V test using flow cytometry. Plasma collected from unirradiated and irradiated blood did not produce any apoptotic response above the control level in unirradiated reporter PBM. Surprisingly, plasma from irradiated blood caused a dose-dependent reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter PBM. The yields of radiation-induced cell death in irradiated reporter PBM (after subtracting the respective values in unirradiated reporter PBM) were 22.2 ± 1.8% in plasma-free cultures, 21.6 ± 1.1% in cultures treated with plasma from unirradiated blood, 20.2 ± 1.4% in cultures with plasma from blood given 2–4 Gy and 16.7 ± 3.2% in cultures with plasma from blood given 6–10 Gy. These results suggested that irradiated blood plasma did not cause a radiation-induced bystander cell-killing effect. Instead, a reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter cells cultured with irradiated blood plasma has implications concerning oncogenic risk from mutated cells surviving after high dose in vivo irradiation (e.g. radiotherapy) and requires further study.

  4. Targeted delivery of antigen to intestinal dendritic cells induces oral tolerance and prevents autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulin; Wu, Jie; Wang, Jiajia; Zhang, Wenjing; Xu, Bohui; Xu, Xiaojun; Zong, Li

    2018-03-15

    The intestinal immune system is an ideal target to induce immune tolerance physiologically. However, the efficiency of oral protein antigen delivery is limited by degradation of the antigen in the gastrointestinal tract and poor uptake by antigen-presenting cells. Gut dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that are prone to inducing antigen-specific immune tolerance. In this study, we delivered the antigen heat shock protein 65-6×P277 (H6P) directly to the gut DCs of NOD mice through oral vaccination with H6P-loaded targeting nanoparticles (NPs), and investigated the ability of this antigen to induce immune tolerance to prevent autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. A targeting NP delivery system was developed to encapsulate H6P, and the ability of this system to protect and facilitate H6P delivery to gut DCs was assessed. NOD mice were immunised with H6P-loaded targeting NPs orally once a week for 7 weeks and the onset of diabetes was assessed by monitoring blood glucose levels. H6P-loaded targeting NPs protected the encapsulated H6P from degradation in the gastrointestinal tract environment and significantly increased the uptake of H6P by DCs in the gut Peyer's patches (4.1 times higher uptake compared with the control H6P solution group). Oral vaccination with H6P-loaded targeting NPs induced antigen-specific T cell tolerance and prevented diabetes in 100% of NOD mice. Immune deviation (T helper [Th]1 to Th2) and CD4 + CD25 + FOXP3 + regulatory T cells were found to participate in the induction of immune tolerance. In this study, we successfully induced antigen-specific T cell tolerance and prevented the onset of diabetes in NOD mice. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt at delivering antigen to gut DCs using targeting NPs to induce T cell tolerance.

  5. Effects of exogenous salicylic acid on cell wall polysaccharides and aluminum tolerance of trichosanthes kirilowii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, G.; Liu, D.; Xio, Y.; Liu, P.; Gao, P. P.; Cao, L.; Wu, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A hydroponic experiment was conducted to study the effects of exogenous salicylic acid (SA) on root length, relative aluminum content in the apical cell wall, acid phosphatase (APA) and pectin methyl esterase (PME) activity, root pectin, hemicellulose 1(HC1), and hemicellulose 2 (HC2) contents of Anguo Trichosanthes kirilowii (Al-tolerant genotype) and Pujiang T. kirilowii (Al-sensitive genotype) under 800 micro mol/L of aluminum stress. The results showed that the growth of Al-tolerant Anguo T. kirilowii and Al-sensitive Pujiang T. kirilowii was inhibited when exposed to 800 micro mol/L of aluminum solution. APA and PME activities were also enhanced for both genotypes. The contents of relative aluminum, pectin, HC1, and HC2, as well as Al accumulation in the root tips were increased under aluminum toxicity. Pujiang T. kirilowii showed higher enzyme activity and cell wall polysaccharide contents than Anguo T. kirilowii. In addition, the root cell wall pectin, HC1, and HC2 contents of Pujiang T. kirilowii were increased by a large margin, showing its greater sensitivity to aluminum toxicity. Root length is an important indicator of aluminum toxicity, and has an important relationship with cell wall polysaccharide content. Aluminum toxicity led to the accumulation of pectin and high PME activity, and also increased the number of free carboxyl groups, which have more aluminum binding sites. Membrane skim increased extensively with the increase in APA activity, damaging membrane structure and function. Different SA concentrations can decrease enzyme activity and cell wall polysaccharide content to some extent. With the addition of different SA concentrations, the root relative aluminum content, cell wall polysaccharide content, APA and PME activities decreased. Aluminum toxicity to both genotypes of T. kirilowii was relieved in different degrees as exogenous SA concentration increased. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) marker was used to examine the genetic distance

  6. Electronic modification of Pt via Ti and Se as tolerant cathodes in air-breathing methanol microfluidic fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiwei; Habrioux, Aurélien; Morais, Cláudia; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2014-07-21

    We reported herein on the use of tolerant cathode catalysts such as carbon supported Pt(x)Ti(y) and/or Pt(x)Se(y) nanomaterials in an air-breathing methanol microfluidic fuel cell. In order to show the improvement of mixed-reactant fuel cell (MRFC) performances obtained with the developed tolerant catalysts, a classical Pt/C nanomaterial was used for comparison. Using 5 M methanol concentration in a situation where the fuel crossover is 100% (MRFC-mixed reactant fuel cell application), the maximum power density of the fuel cell with a Pt/C cathodic catalyst decreased by 80% in comparison with what is observed in the laminar flow fuel cell (LFFC) configuration. With Pt(x)Ti(y)/C and Pt(x)Se(y)/C cathode nanomaterials, the performance loss was only 55% and 20%, respectively. The evaluation of the tolerant cathode catalysts in an air-breathing microfluidic fuel cell suggests the development of a novel nanometric system that will not be size restricted. These interesting results are the consequence of the high methanol tolerance of these advanced electrocatalysts via surface electronic modification of Pt. Herein we used X-ray photoelectron and in situ FTIR spectroscopies to investigate the origin of the high methanol tolerance on modified Pt catalysts.

  7. Origin of Enriched Regulatory T Cells in Patients Receiving Combined Kidney-Bone Marrow Transplantation to Induce Transplantation Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprangers, B; DeWolf, S; Savage, T M; Morokata, T; Obradovic, A; LoCascio, S A; Shonts, B; Zuber, J; Lau, S P; Shah, R; Morris, H; Steshenko, V; Zorn, E; Preffer, F I; Olek, S; Dombkowski, D M; Turka, L A; Colvin, R; Winchester, R; Kawai, T; Sykes, M

    2017-08-01

    We examined tolerance mechanisms in patients receiving HLA-mismatched combined kidney-bone marrow transplantation (CKBMT) that led to transient chimerism under a previously published nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen (Immune Tolerance Network study 036). Polychromatic flow cytometry and high-throughput sequencing of T cell receptor-β hypervariable regions of DNA from peripheral blood regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD4 non-Tregs revealed marked early enrichment of Tregs (CD3 + CD4 + CD25 high CD127 low Foxp3 + ) in blood that resulted from peripheral proliferation (Ki67 + ), possibly new thymic emigration (CD31 + ), and, in one tolerant subject, conversion from non-Tregs. Among recovering conventional T cells, central memory CD4 + and CD8 + cells predominated. A large proportion of the T cell clones detected in posttransplantation biopsy specimens by T cell receptor sequencing were detected in the peripheral blood and were not donor-reactive. Our results suggest that enrichment of Tregs by new thymic emigration and lymphopenia-driven peripheral proliferation in the early posttransplantation period may contribute to tolerance after CKBMT. Further, most conventional T cell clones detected in immunologically quiescent posttransplantation biopsy specimens appear to be circulating cells in the microvasculature rather than infiltrating T cells. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  8. Sepiapterin Reductase Mediates Chemical Redox Cycling in Lung Epithelial Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaojun; Jan, Yi-Hua; Gray, Joshua P.; Mishin, Vladimir; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    In the lung, chemical redox cycling generates highly toxic reactive oxygen species that can cause alveolar inflammation and damage to the epithelium, as well as fibrosis. In this study, we identified a cytosolic NADPH-dependent redox cycling activity in mouse lung epithelial cells as sepiapterin reductase (SPR), an enzyme important for the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin. Human SPR was cloned and characterized. In addition to reducing sepiapterin, SPR mediated chemical redox cycling of bipyridinium herbicides and various quinones; this activity was greatest for 1,2-naphthoquinone followed by 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, 1,4-naphthoquinone, menadione, and 2,3-dimethyl-1,4-naphthoquinone. Whereas redox cycling chemicals inhibited sepiapterin reduction, sepiapterin had no effect on redox cycling. Additionally, inhibitors such as dicoumarol, N-acetylserotonin, and indomethacin blocked sepiapterin reduction, with no effect on redox cycling. Non-redox cycling quinones, including benzoquinone and phenylquinone, were competitive inhibitors of sepiapterin reduction but noncompetitive redox cycling inhibitors. Site-directed mutagenesis of the SPR C-terminal substrate-binding site (D257H) completely inhibited sepiapterin reduction but had minimal effects on redox cycling. These data indicate that SPR-mediated reduction of sepiapterin and redox cycling occur by distinct mechanisms. The identification of SPR as a key enzyme mediating chemical redox cycling suggests that it may be important in generating cytotoxic reactive oxygen species in the lung. This activity, together with inhibition of sepiapterin reduction by redox-active chemicals and consequent deficiencies in tetrahydrobiopterin, may contribute to tissue injury. PMID:23640889

  9. Salinity tolerance of Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S; Polle, A

    2010-03-01

    The genus Populus has a wide distribution in different climatic zones. Besides its economic and ecological relevance, Populus also serves as a model for elucidating physiological and molecular mechanisms of stress tolerance in tree species. In this review, adaptation strategies of poplars to excess soil salinity are addressed at different scales, from the cellular to the whole-plant level. Striking differences in salt tolerance exist among different poplar species and ecotypes, with Populus euphratica being outstanding in this respect. Key mechanisms identified in this species to mediate salt tolerance are compartmentalisation of Cl(-) in the vacuoles of the root cortex cells, diminished xylem loading of NaCl, activation of Na(+) extrusion into the soil solution under stress, together with simultaneously avoiding excessive K(+) loss by regulation of depolarisation-activated cation channels. This leads to improved maintenance of the K(+)/Na(+) balance, a crucial precondition for survival under salt stress. Leaf cells of this species are able to compartmentalise Na(+) preferentially in the apoplast, whereas in susceptible poplar species, as well as in crop plants, vacuolar Na(+) deposition precedes apoplastic transport. ABA, Ca(2+)and ROS are involved in stress sensing, with higher or faster activation of defences in tolerant than in susceptible poplar species. P. euphratica develops leaf succulence after prolonged salt exposure as a plastic morphological adaptation that leads to salt dilution. Transgenic approaches to improve salt tolerance by transformation of candidate genes have had limited success, since salt tolerance is a multigenic trait. In future attempts towards increased salt resistance, barriers between different poplar sections must be overcome and application of novel biotechnological tools, such as gene stacking, are recommended.

  10. Aberrantly glycosylated MUC1 is expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells and a target for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrsen, Kirstine; Madsen, Caroline B; Rasch, Morten G

    2013-01-01

    not covered by immunological tolerance in MUC1 humanized mice and man. The objective of this study was to determine if mouse antibodies to this Tn-MUC1 epitope induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) pivotal for their potential use in cancer immunotherapy. Binding affinity of mAb 5E5 directed...... to Tn-MUC1 was investigated using BiaCore. The availability of Tn-MUC1 on the surface of breast cancer cells was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry, followed by in vitro assessment of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by mAb 5E5. Biacore analysis...... is expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells and a target for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity suggesting that antibodies targeting glycopeptide epitopes on mucins are strong candidates for cancer-specific immunotherapies....

  11. p53-Mediated Molecular Control of Autophagy in Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mrakovcic

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an indispensable mechanism of the eukaryotic cell, facilitating the removal and renewal of cellular components and thereby balancing the cell’s energy consumption and homeostasis. Deregulation of autophagy is now regarded as one of the characteristic key features contributing to the development of tumors. In recent years, the suppression of autophagy in combination with chemotherapeutic treatment has been approached as a novel therapy in cancer treatment. However, depending on the type of cancer and context, interference with the autophagic machinery can either promote or disrupt tumorigenesis. Therefore, disclosure of the major signaling pathways that regulate autophagy and control tumorigenesis is crucial. To date, several tumor suppressor proteins and oncogenes have emerged as eminent regulators of autophagy whose depletion or mutation favor tumor formation. The mammalian cell “janitor” p53 belongs to one of these tumor suppressors that are most commonly mutated in human tumors. Experimental evidence over the last decade convincingly reports that p53 can act as either an activator or an inhibitor of autophagy depending on its subcellular localization and its mode of action. This finding gains particular significance as p53 deficiency or mutant variants of p53 that accumulate in the cytoplasm of tumor cells enable activation of autophagy. Accordingly, we recently identified p53 as a molecular hub that regulates autophagy and apoptosis in histone deacetylase inhibitor-treated uterine sarcoma cells. In light of this novel experimental evidence, in this review, we focus on p53 signaling as a mediator of the autophagic pathway in tumor cells.

  12. Regulatory T cells, maternal-foetal immune tolerance and recurrent miscarriage: new therapeutic challenging opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alijotas-Reig, Jaume; Melnychuk, Taisiia; Gris, Josep Maria

    2015-03-15

    Because maternal alloreactive lymphocytes are not depleted during pregnancy, local and/or systemic mechanisms have to play a key role in altering the maternal immune response. Peripheral T regulatory cells (pTregs) at the maternal-foetal interface are necessary in situ to prevent early abortion, but only those pTregs that have been previously exposed to paternal alloantigens. It has been showed that pregnancy selectively stimulates the accumulation of maternal Foxp3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) (Foxp3Tregs) cells with foetal specificity. Interestingly, after delivery, foetal-specific pTregs persist at elevated levels, maintain tolerance to pre-existing foetal antigen, and rapidly re-accumulate during subsequent pregnancy. pTreg up-regulation could be hypothesized as a possible future therapeutic strategy in humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Dendritic cells and anergic type I NKT cells play a crucial role in sulfatide-mediated immune regulation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricic, Igor; Halder, Ramesh; Bischof, Felix; Kumar, Vipin

    2014-08-01

    CD1d-restricted NKT cells can be divided into two groups: type I NKT cells use a semi-invariant TCR, whereas type II express a relatively diverse set of TCRs. A major subset of type II NKT cells recognizes myelin-derived sulfatides and is selectively enriched in the CNS tissue during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have shown that activation of sulfatide-reactive type II NKT cells by sulfatide prevents induction of EAE. In this article, we have addressed the mechanism of regulation, as well as whether a single immunodominant form of synthetic sulfatide can treat ongoing chronic and relapsing EAE in SJL/J mice. We have shown that the activation of sulfatide-reactive type II NKT cells leads to a significant reduction in the frequency and effector function of myelin proteolipid proteins 139-151/I-A(s)-tetramer(+) cells in lymphoid and CNS tissues. In addition, type I NKT cells and dendritic cells (DCs) in the periphery, as well as CNS-resident microglia, are inactivated after sulfatide administration, and mice deficient in type I NKT cells are not protected from disease. Moreover, tolerized DCs from sulfatide-treated animals can adoptively transfer protection into naive mice. Treatment of SJL/J mice with a synthetic cis-tetracosenoyl sulfatide, but not α-galactosylceramide, reverses ongoing chronic and relapsing EAE. Our data highlight a novel immune-regulatory pathway involving NKT subset interactions leading to inactivation of type I NKT cells, DCs, and microglial cells in suppression of autoimmunity. Because CD1 molecules are nonpolymorphic, the sulfatide-mediated immune-regulatory pathway can be targeted for development of non-HLA-dependent therapeutic approaches to T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. Cell mediated immune response in human antirabies revaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Regina Veiga

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of secondary cell mediated immune response (CMI in human antirabies immunization was studied. The Puenzalida & Palácios vaccine was used because it is routinely used in Brazil. CMI was evaluated by lymphoblastic transformation indices obtained in whole blood culture in the presence of rabies and control (nervous tissue antigens. Eleven volunteers submitted to revaccination constituted the group under study, while three other volunteers submitted primo vaccination were utilized as control group. A clear secondary CMI to rabies antigen was detected in all the revaccinated volunteers who showed earlier and more intense response than the control group. Response to the control antigen, however, present in all the components of the first group was not detectable in two out of the three primovaccinated and very low in the third one.

  15. Xenin-25 amplifies GIP-mediated insulin secretion in humans with normal and impaired glucose tolerance but not type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wice, Burton M; Reeds, Dominic N; Tran, Hung D; Crimmins, Dan L; Patterson, Bruce W; Dunai, Judit; Wallendorf, Michael J; Ladenson, Jack H; Villareal, Dennis T; Polonsky, Kenneth S

    2012-07-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). This response is blunted in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Xenin-25 is a 25-amino acid neurotensin-related peptide that amplifies GIP-mediated GSIS in hyperglycemic mice. This study determines if xenin-25 amplifies GIP-mediated GSIS in humans with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), or T2DM. Each fasting subject received graded glucose infusions to progressively raise plasma glucose concentrations, along with vehicle alone, GIP, xenin-25, or GIP plus xenin-25. Plasma glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and glucagon levels and insulin secretion rates (ISRs) were determined. GIP amplified GSIS in all groups. Initially, this response was rapid, profound, transient, and essentially glucose independent. Thereafter, ISRs increased as a function of plasma glucose. Although magnitudes of insulin secretory responses to GIP were similar in all groups, ISRs were not restored to normal in subjects with IGT and T2DM. Xenin-25 alone had no effect on ISRs or plasma glucagon levels, but the combination of GIP plus xenin-25 transiently increased ISR and plasma glucagon levels in subjects with NGT and IGT but not T2DM. Since xenin-25 signaling to islets is mediated by a cholinergic relay, impaired islet responses in T2DM may reflect defective neuronal, rather than GIP, signaling.

  16. cells targeting a neuronal paraneoplastic antigen mediate tumor rejection and trigger CNS autoimmunity with humoral activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blachère, Nathalie E; Orange, Dana E; Santomasso, Bianca D; Doerner, Jessica; Foo, Patricia K; Herre, Margaret; Fak, John; Monette, Sébastien; Gantman, Emily C; Frank, Mayu O; Darnell, Robert B

    2014-11-01

    Paraneoplastic neurologic diseases (PND) involving immune responses directed toward intracellular antigens are poorly understood. Here, we examine immunity to the PND antigen Nova2, which is expressed exclusively in central nervous system (CNS) neurons. We hypothesized that ectopic expression of neuronal antigen in the periphery could incite PND. In our C57BL/6 mouse model, CNS antigen expression limits antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell expansion. Chimera experiments demonstrate that this tolerance is mediated by antigen expression in nonhematopoietic cells. CNS antigen expression does not limit tumor rejection by adoptively transferred transgenic T cells but does limit the generation of a memory population that can be expanded upon secondary challenge in vivo. Despite mediating cancer rejection, adoptively transferred transgenic T cells do not lead to paraneoplastic neuronal targeting. Preliminary experiments suggest an additional requirement for humoral activation to induce CNS autoimmunity. This work provides evidence that the requirements for cancer immunity and neuronal autoimmunity are uncoupled. Since humoral immunity was not required for tumor rejection, B-cell targeting therapy, such as rituximab, may be a rational treatment option for PND that does not hamper tumor immunity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Allelic imbalance modulates surface expression of the tolerance-inducing HLA-G molecule on primary trophoblast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djurisic, S; Teiblum, S; Tolstrup, C K

    2015-01-01

    The HLA-G molecule is expressed on trophoblast cells at the feto-maternal interface, where it interacts with local immune cells, and upholds tolerance against the semi-allogeneic fetus. Aberrant HLA-G expression in the placenta and reduced soluble HLA-G levels are observed in pregnancy complicati...

  18. The impact of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibition on incretin effect, glucose tolerance, and gastrointestinal-mediated glucose disposal in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhee, Nicolai Alexander; Østoft, Signe Harring; Holst, Jens Juul

    2014-01-01

    effect, glucose tolerance, gastrointestinal-mediated glucose disposal (GIGD) and gastric emptying in healthy subjects. Design Randomised, controlled, open-label. Methods Ten healthy subjects (6 women) (age: 40±5 years (mean±SEM); BMI: 24±3 kg/m2, fasting plasma glucose: 5.1±0.2 mmol/l; HbA1c: 34±1 mmol...... on the paired study days. Significant increases in fasting levels and OGTT-induced responses of active GLP-1 and GIP were seen after DPP-4 inhibition. No significant impact of DPP-4 inhibition on fasting plasma glucose (5.1±0.1 vs 4.9±0.1 mmol/l, p=0.3), glucose tolerance (AUC for plasma glucose: 151±35 vs 137...

  19. Ezrin dephosphorylation/downregulation contributes to ursolic acid-mediated cell death in human leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, G; Zhou, T; Liu, L; Chen, J; Zhao, Z; Peng, Y; Li, P; Gao, N

    2013-01-01

    Ezrin links the actin filaments with the cell membrane and has a functional role in the apoptotic process. It appears clear that ezrin is directly associated with Fas, leading to activation of caspase cascade and cell death. However, the exact role of ezrin in ursolic acid (UA)-induced apoptosis remains unclear. In this study, we show for the first time that UA induces apoptosis in both transformed and primary leukemia cells through dephosphorylation/downregulation of ezrin, association and polarized colocalization of Fas and ezrin, as well as formation of death-inducing signaling complex. These events are dependent on Rho-ROCK1 signaling pathway. Knockdown of ezrin enhanced cell death mediated by UA, whereas overexpression of ezrin attenuated UA-induced apoptosis. Our in vivo study also showed that UA-mediated inhibition of tumor growth of mouse leukemia xenograft model is in association with the dephosphorylation/downregulation of ezrin. Such findings suggest that the cytoskeletal protein ezrin may represent an attractive target for UA-mediated lethality in human leukemia cells

  20. Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells Resist T Cell Mediated Killing in an HLA-Recognition Independent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proff, Julia; Walterskirchen, Christian; Brey, Charlotte; Geyeregger, Rene; Full, Florian; Ensser, Armin; Lehner, Manfred; Holter, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the potential of HLA-independent T cell therapy for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed against the HCMV encoded glycoprotein B (gB), which is expressed at high levels on the surface of infected cells. T cells engineered with this anti-gB CAR recognized HCMV-infected cells and released cytokines and cytotoxic granules. Unexpectedly, and in contrast to analogous approaches for HIV, Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C virus, we found that HCMV-infected cells were resistant to killing by the CAR-modified T cells. In order to elucidate whether this phenomenon was restricted to the use of CARs, we extended our experiments to T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated recognition of infected cells. To this end we infected fibroblasts with HCMV-strains deficient in viral inhibitors of antigenic peptide presentation and targeted these HLA-class I expressing peptide-loaded infected cells with peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Despite strong degranulation and cytokine production by the T cells, we again found significant inhibition of lysis of HCMV-infected cells. Impairment of cell lysis became detectable 1 day after HCMV infection and gradually increased during the following 3 days. We thus postulate that viral anti-apoptotic factors, known to inhibit suicide of infected host cells, have evolved additional functions to directly abrogate T cell cytotoxicity. In line with this hypothesis, CAR-T cell cytotoxicity was strongly inhibited in non-infected fibroblasts by expression of the HCMV-protein UL37x1, and even more so by additional expression of UL36. Our data extend the current knowledge on Betaherpesviral evasion from T cell immunity and show for the first time that, beyond impaired antigen presentation, infected cells are efficiently protected by direct blockade of cytotoxic effector functions through viral proteins.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells induce T-cell tolerance and protect the preterm brain after global hypoxia-ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reint K Jellema

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE in preterm infants is a severe disease for which no curative treatment is available. Cerebral inflammation and invasion of activated peripheral immune cells have been shown to play a pivotal role in the etiology of white matter injury, which is the clinical hallmark of HIE in preterm infants. The objective of this study was to assess the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of intravenously delivered mesenchymal stem cells (MSC in an ovine model of HIE. In this translational animal model, global hypoxia-ischemia (HI was induced in instrumented preterm sheep by transient umbilical cord occlusion, which closely mimics the clinical insult. Intravenous administration of 2 x 10(6 MSC/kg reduced microglial proliferation, diminished loss of oligodendrocytes and reduced demyelination, as determined by histology and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI, in the preterm brain after global HI. These anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects of MSC were paralleled by reduced electrographic seizure activity in the ischemic preterm brain. Furthermore, we showed that MSC induced persistent peripheral T-cell tolerance in vivo and reduced invasion of T-cells into the preterm brain following global HI. These findings show in a preclinical animal model that intravenously administered MSC reduced cerebral inflammation, protected against white matter injury and established functional improvement in the preterm brain following global HI. Moreover, we provide evidence that induction of T-cell tolerance by MSC might play an important role in the neuroprotective effects of MSC in HIE. This is the first study to describe a marked neuroprotective effect of MSC in a translational animal model of HIE.

  2. Surface receptor Toso controls B cell-mediated regulation of T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinbo; Duong, Vu Huy Hoang; Westphal, Katrin; Westphal, Andreas; Suwandi, Abdulhadi; Grassl, Guntram A; Brand, Korbinian; Chan, Andrew C; Föger, Niko; Lee, Kyeong-Hee

    2018-04-03

    The immune system is tightly controlled by regulatory processes that allow for the elimination of invading pathogens, while limiting immunopathological damage to the host. In the present study, we found that conditional deletion of the cell surface receptor Toso on B cells unexpectedly resulted in impaired proinflammatory T cell responses, which led to impaired immune protection in an acute viral infection model and was associated with reduced immunopathological tissue damage in a chronic inflammatory context. Toso exhibited its B cell-inherent immunoregulatory function by negatively controlling the pool of IL-10-competent B1 and B2 B cells, which were characterized by a high degree of self-reactivity and were shown to mediate immunosuppressive activity on inflammatory T cell responses in vivo. Our results indicate that Toso is involved in the differentiation/maintenance of regulatory B cells by fine-tuning B cell receptor activation thresholds. Furthermore, we showed that during influenza A-induced pulmonary inflammation, the application of Toso-specific antibodies selectively induced IL-10-competent B cells at the site of inflammation and resulted in decreased proinflammatory cytokine production by lung T cells. These findings suggest that Toso may serve as a novel therapeutic target to dampen pathogenic T cell responses via the modulation of IL-10-competent regulatory B cells.

  3. Targeting the allergen to oral dendritic cells with mucoadhesive chitosan particles enhances tolerance induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Lu, N; Tourdot, S; Razafindratsita, A; Mascarell, L; Berjont, N; Chabre, H; Louise, A; Van Overtvelt, L; Moingeon, P

    2009-07-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) efficacy could be improved by formulations facilitating allergen contact with the oral mucosa and uptake by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Two types of chitosan microparticles, differing in size and surface charge, were tested in vitro for their capacity to improve antigen uptake and presentation by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) or purified oral APCs. T-cell priming in cervical lymph nodes (LNs) was assessed by intravenous transfer of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester-labelled ovalbumin (OVA)-specific CD4+ T cells and flow cytometry analysis. Ovalbumin-sensitized BALB/c mice were treated sublingually with soluble or chitosan-formulated OVA twice a week for 2 months. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), lung inflammation and T-cell responses in cervical and mediastinal LNs were assessed by whole-body plethysmography, lung histology and Cytometric Bead Array technology, respectively. Only a mucoadhesive (i.e. highly positively charged) and microparticulate form of chitosan enhances OVA uptake, processing and presentation by murine BMDCs and oral APCs. Targeting OVA to dendritic cells with this formulation increases specific T-cell proliferation and IFN-gamma/IL-10 secretion in vitro, as well as T-cell priming in cervical LNs in vivo. Sublingual administration of such chitosan-formulated OVA particles enhances tolerance induction in mice with established asthma, with a dramatic reduction of both AHR, lung inflammation, eosinophil numbers in bronchoalveolar lavages, as well as antigen-specific Th2 responses in mediastinal LNs. Mucoadhesive chitosan microparticles represent a valid formulation for sublingual allergy vaccines.

  4. Pro-oxidant induced DNA damage in human lymphoblastoid cells: homeostatic mechanisms of genotoxic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, Anna L; Shah, Ume-Kulsoom; Mikhail, Jane M; Nelson, Bryant C; Marquis, Bryce J; Doak, Shareen H; Johnson, George E; Griffiths, Sioned M; Carmichael, Paul L; Scott, Sharon J; Scott, Andrew D; Jenkins, Gareth J S

    2012-08-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to many disease etiologies including ageing, neurodegeneration, and cancer, partly through DNA damage induction (genotoxicity). Understanding the i nteractions of free radicals with DNA is fundamental to discern mutation risks. In genetic toxicology, regulatory authorities consider that most genotoxins exhibit a linear relationship between dose and mutagenic response. Yet, homeostatic mechanisms, including DNA repair, that allow cells to tolerate low levels of genotoxic exposure exist. Acceptance of thresholds for genotoxicity has widespread consequences in terms of understanding cancer risk and regulating human exposure to chemicals/drugs. Three pro-oxidant chemicals, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), potassium bromate (KBrO(3)), and menadione, were examined for low dose-response curves in human lymphoblastoid cells. DNA repair and antioxidant capacity were assessed as possible threshold mechanisms. H(2)O(2) and KBrO(3), but not menadione, exhibited thresholded responses, containing a range of nongenotoxic low doses. Levels of the DNA glycosylase 8-oxoguanine glycosylase were unchanged in response to pro- oxidant stress. DNA repair-focused gene expression arrays reported changes in ATM and BRCA1, involved in double-strand break repair, in response to low-dose pro-oxidant exposure; however, these alterations were not substantiated at the protein level. Determination of oxidatively induced DNA damage in H(2)O(2)-treated AHH-1 cells reported accumulation of thymine glycol above the genotoxic threshold. Further, the H(2)O(2) dose-response curve was shifted by modulating the antioxidant glutathione. Hence, observed pro- oxidant thresholds were due to protective capacities of base excision repair enzymes and antioxidants against DNA damage, highlighting the importance of homeostatic mechanisms in "genotoxic tolerance."

  5. The thymic orchestration involving Aire, miRNAs and cell-cell interactions during the induction of central tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo eAleixo Passos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Developing thymocytes interact sequentially with two distinct structures within the thymus: the cortex and medulla. Surviving single-positive and double-positive thymocytes from the cortex migrate into the medulla, where they interact with medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs. These cells ectopically express a vast set of peripheral tissue antigens (PTAs, a property termed promiscuous gene expression that is associated with the presentation of PTAs by mTECs to thymocytes. Thymocyte clones that have a high affinity for PTAs are eliminated by apoptosis in a process termed negative selection, which is essential for tolerance induction. The Aire gene is an important factor that controls the expression of a large set of PTAs. In addition to PTAs, Aire also controls the expression of miRNAs in mTECs. These miRNAs are important in the organization of the thymic architecture and act as posttranscriptional controllers of PTAs. Herein, we discuss recent discoveries and highlight open questions regarding the migration and interaction of developing thymocytes with thymic stroma, the ectopic expression of PTAs by mTECs, the association between Aire and miRNAs and its effects on central tolerance.

  6. MicroRNA-Mediated Reprogramming of Somatic Cells into Neural Stem Cells or Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao; Zhang, Lingling; An, Jing; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Cuicui; He, Baorong; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2017-03-01

    Cellular reprogramming is a promising strategy to generate neural stem cells (NSCs) or desired subtype-specific neurons for cell-based therapeutic intervention. By far, the intricate cell event like reprogramming of non-neural cells to desired cell types can be achieved by forced expression of lineage-related transcription factors (TFs), nuclear transfer, a defined set of factors, and via non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs), as well as other precisely defined conditions. In addition, scientists have been trying to develop better approaches for reprogramming, either by using distinct combinations of a set of small molecules and certain TFs or delivery of appropriate small molecules and miRNAs. The miRNA-mediated approach is fascinating because of its potential to rapidly generate a variety of therapeutically desired cell types from other cell lineages. Recent studies have made great progress in miRNA-mediated neural reprogramming of somatic cells to various specific neuronal subtypes with more efficiency even though the exact mechanisms remain to be further explored. Based on key roles of miRNAs in neural reprogramming across differentiated cell lineages, it is of vital interest to summarize the recent knowledge regarding the instructive role of miRNAs in direct conversion of somatic cells into neural lineages. This precise review mainly focuses on recent discoveries of miRNAs functions in initiating cell reprogramming and fate specification of the neuronal subtype. Moreover, we discuss most recent findings about some miRNAs' activity in regulating various developmental stages of neurons, which is helpful for understanding the event network between miRNAs and their targets.

  7. Micronutrient supplementation and T-cell mediated immune responses in patients with tuberculosis in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limited studies exist regarding whether incorporating micronutrient supplements during tuberculosis (TB) treatment may improve cell-mediated immune response. We examine the effect of micronutrient supplementation on lymphocyte proliferation response to mycobacteria or T cell mitogens in a randomize...

  8. Increased degradation of ATP is driven by memory regulatory T cells in kidney transplantation tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Maxim; Dubois, Florian; Dejou, Cécile; Durand, Eugénie; Danger, Richard; Chesneau, Mélanie; Brosseau, Carole; Guerif, Pierrick; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Degauque, Nicolas; Eliaou, Jean-François; Giral, Magali; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Brouard, Sophie

    2018-05-01

    Regulatory T cells were recently proposed as the central actor in operational tolerance after renal transplantation. Tolerant patients harbor increased FoxP3hi memory Treg frequency and increased demethylation in the Foxp3 Treg-specific demethylated region when compared to stable kidney recipients and exhibit greater memory Treg suppressive capacities and higher expression of the ectonucleotidase CD39. However, in this particular and unique situation the mechanisms of action of Tregs were not identified. Thus, we analyzed the ability of memory Tregs to degrade extracellular ATP in tolerant patients, healthy volunteers, and patients with stable graft function under immunosuppression and determined the role of immunosuppressive drugs on this process. The conserved proportion of memory Tregs leads to the establishment of a pro-tolerogenic balance in operationally tolerant patients. Memory Tregs in tolerant patients display normal capacity to degrade extracellular ATP/ADP. In contrast, memory Tregs from patients with stable graft function do not have this ability. Finally, in vitro, immunosuppressive drugs may favor the lower proportion of memory Tregs in stable patients, but they have no effect on CD39-dependent ATP degradation and do not explain memory Treg lack of extracellular ATP/ADP degradation ability. Thus, intrinsic active regulatory mechanisms may act long after immunosuppressive drug arrest in operationally tolerant patients and may contribute to kidney allograft tolerance via the maintenance of CD39 Treg function. Copyright © 2018 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cloning a T-DNA-Linked Phosphate Gene that mediates Salt Tolerance on Mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njoroge, N.C; Tremblay, L.; Lefebvre, D.D.

    2006-01-01

    T-DNA insertionally mutagenized seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana were used to unravel genetic mechanisms underlying salt tolerance in plants. Over a period of two weeks, kanamycin homozygous (KK) seeds of the mutant NN143 attain germination levels of 65% and 77% on 175mM Nacl and 300mM mannitol respectively. Under these conditions of osmotic stress, the wild type seeds were incapable of germination. The mutant was also capable of germination on a medium containing 2μM abscisic acid (ABA). After two weeks on 2μM ABA, it attained 100% germination and the wild type did not germinate. The ABA level in the mutant was 40% higher than the wild type. Segregation analysis indicated that salt tolerance in the mutant is T-DNA linked. Genetic analysis of the F1 and F2 generations indicated that the salt tolerance trait in the mutant is dominant. The putative salt tolerance gene of mutant NN143 was cloned by plasmid rescue and sequence data indicated involvement of a protein phosphatase. The possible mechanism underlying salt tolerance in the mutant is discussed.(author)

  10. Weight Cycling Increases T-Cell Accumulation in Adipose Tissue and Impairs Systemic Glucose Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Emily K.; Gutierrez, Dario A.; Kennedy, Arion; Hasty, Alyssa H.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is one of the leading causes of morbidity in the U.S. Accumulation of proinflammatory immune cells in adipose tissue (AT) contributes to the development of obesity-associated disorders. Weight loss is the ideal method to counteract the negative consequences of obesity; however, losses are rarely maintained, leading to bouts of weight cycling. Fluctuations in weight have been associated with worsened metabolic and cardiovascular outcomes; yet, the mechanisms explaining this potential correlation are not known. For determination of whether weight cycling modulates AT immune cell populations, inflammation, and insulin resistance, mice were subjected to a diet-switch protocol designed to induce weight cycling. Weight-cycled mice displayed decreased systemic glucose tolerance and impaired AT insulin sensitivity when compared with mice that gained weight but did not cycle. AT macrophage number and polarization were not modulated by weight cycling. However, weight cycling did increase the number of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in AT. Expression of multiple T helper 1–associated cytokines was also elevated subsequent to weight cycling. Additionally, CD8+ effector memory T cells were present in AT of both obese and weight-cycled mice. These studies indicate that an exaggerated adaptive immune response in AT may contribute to metabolic dysfunction during weight cycling. PMID:23733197

  11. An SEU tolerant memory cell derived from fundamental studies of SEU mechanisms in SRAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, H.T.; Axness, C.L.; McBrayer, J.D.; Browning, J.S.; Fu, J.S.; Ochoa, A. Jr.; Koga, R.

    1987-01-01

    A new single event upset (SEU) hardening concept, an LRAM cell, is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. Decoupling resistors in the LRAM are used only to protect against the short n-channel transient; longer persisting pulses are reduced in magnitude by a voltage divider, a basically new concept for SEU protection. In such a design, smaller resistors provide SEU tolerance, allowing higher performance, hardened memories. As basis for the LRAM idea, techniques were developed to measure time constants for ion induced voltage transients in conventional static random access memories, SRAM. Time constants of 0.8 and 6.3 nsec were measured for transients following strikes at the n- and p-channel drains, respectively - primary areas of SEU sensitivity. These data are the first transient time measurements on full memory chips and the large difference is fundamental to the LRAM concept. Test structures of the new design exhibit equivalent SEU tolerance with resistors 5-to-10 times smaller than currently used in SRAM. Our advanced transport-plus-circuit numerical simulations of the SEU process predicted this result and account for the LRAM experiments, as well as a variety of experiments on conventional SRAM

  12. Optimal fault-tolerant control strategy of a solid oxide fuel cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaojuan; Gao, Danhui

    2017-10-01

    For solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) development, load tracking, heat management, air excess ratio constraint, high efficiency, low cost and fault diagnosis are six key issues. However, no literature studies the control techniques combining optimization and fault diagnosis for the SOFC system. An optimal fault-tolerant control strategy is presented in this paper, which involves four parts: a fault diagnosis module, a switching module, two backup optimizers and a controller loop. The fault diagnosis part is presented to identify the SOFC current fault type, and the switching module is used to select the appropriate backup optimizer based on the diagnosis result. NSGA-II and TOPSIS are employed to design the two backup optimizers under normal and air compressor fault states. PID algorithm is proposed to design the control loop, which includes a power tracking controller, an anode inlet temperature controller, a cathode inlet temperature controller and an air excess ratio controller. The simulation results show the proposed optimal fault-tolerant control method can track the power, temperature and air excess ratio at the desired values, simultaneously achieving the maximum efficiency and the minimum unit cost in the case of SOFC normal and even in the air compressor fault.

  13. Effects of Reactive Nitrogen Scavengers on NK-Cell-Mediated Killing of K562 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yili Zeng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the effects of reactive nitrogen metabolites (RNMS on natural-killer- (NK- cell-mediated killing of K562 cells and the influence of RNM scavengers, such as tiopronin (TIP, glutamylcysteinylglycine (GSH, and histamine dihydrochloride (DHT, on reversing the suppressing effect of RNM. We administered exogenous and endogenous RNM in the NK + K562 culture system and then added RNM scavengers. The concentrations of RNM, TNF-β and IFN-γ, and NK-cell cytotoxicity (NCC and the percentage of living NK cells were then examined. We found that both exogenous and endogenous RNM caused the KIR to decrease (<0.01; however, RNM scavengers such as TIP and GSH rescued this phenomenon dose dependently. In conclusion, our data suggests that RNM scavengers such as TIP and GSH enhance the antineoplasmic activity of NK cells.

  14. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha in T-cell-mediated immunity to viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas N; Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan P

    2003-01-01

    The immune response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) was evaluated. Generation of virus-specific effector T cells is unimpaired in MIP-1alpha-deficient mice. Furthermore, MIP-1alpha is not required for T-cell-mediated virus...... control or virus-induced T-cell-dependent inflammation. Thus, MIP-1alpha is not mandatory for T-cell-mediated antiviral immunity....

  15. Restoring E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion increases PTEN protein level and stability in human breast carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zengxia; Wang Liying; Zhang Wen; Fu Yi; Zhao Hongbo; Hu Yali; Prins, Bram Peter; Zha Xiliang

    2007-01-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a well-characterized tumor suppressor that negatively regulates cell growth and survival. Despite the critical role of PTEN in cell signaling, the mechanisms of its regulation are still under investigation. We reported here that PTEN expression could be controlled by overexpression or knock-down of E-cadherin in several mammary carcinoma cell lines. Furthermore, we showed that the accumulation of PTEN protein in E-cadherin overexpressing cells was due to increased PTEN protein stability rather than the regulation of its transcription. The proteasome-dependent PTEN degradation pathway was impaired after restoring E-cadherin expression. Moreover, maintenance of E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion was necessary for its regulating PTEN. Altogether, our results suggested that E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion was essential for preventing the proteasome degradation of PTEN, which might explain how breast carcinoma cells which lost cell-cell contact proliferate rapidly and are prone to metastasis

  16. Manganese oxidation state mediates toxicity in PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaney, S.H.; Smith, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    The role of the manganese (Mn) oxidation state on cellular Mn uptake and toxicity is not well understood. Therefore, undifferentiated PC12 cells were exposed to 0-200 μM Mn(II)-chloride or Mn(III)-pyrophosphate for 24 h, after which cellular manganese levels were measured along with measures of cell viability, function, and cytotoxicity (trypan blue exclusion, medium lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), 8-isoprostanes, cellular ATP, dopamine, serotonin, H-ferritin, transferrin receptor (TfR), Mn-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), and copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) protein levels). Exposures to Mn(III) >10 μM produced 2- to 5-fold higher cellular manganese levels than equimolar exposures to Mn(II). Cell viability and ATP levels both decreased at the highest Mn(II) and Mn(III) exposures (150-200 μM), while Mn(III) exposures produced increases in LDH activity at lower exposures (≥50 μM) than did Mn(II) (200 μM only). Mn(II) reduced cellular dopamine levels more than Mn(III), especially at the highest exposures (50% reduced at 200 μM Mn(II)). In contrast, Mn(III) produced a >70% reduction in cellular serotonin at all exposures compared to Mn(II). Different cellular responses to Mn(II) exposures compared to Mn(III) were also observed for H-ferritin, TfR, and MnSOD protein levels. Notably, these differential effects of Mn(II) versus Mn(III) exposures on cellular toxicity could not simply be accounted for by the different cellular levels of manganese. These results suggest that the oxidation state of manganese exposures plays an important role in mediating manganese cytotoxicity

  17. Tolerância à salinidade em feijão (Phaseolus vulgaris L Salt tolerance in bean (Paseolus vulgaris cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Broetto

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Uma das aplicações das técnicas da cultura de tecidos no melhoramento é a identificação de linhas de células que apresentam tolerância à salinidade. Vários autores obtiveram linhas de células tolerantes ao estresse salino; e estudo de mecanismos bioquímicos da tolerância a sais em plantas tem demonstrado altas correlações entre estes e o acúmulo de macromoléculas em tecido de plantas superiores. Para verificar essas correlações em feijão (Phaseolus vulgaris cv IAC carioca, calos oriundos de eixos embrionários foram cultivados em meio sólido, suplementado com NaCl nas concentrações de 0 a 60 mM. Após 13 dias de incubação, os calos foram coletados e analisados quanto ao crescimento relativo, teor de proteínas, teor de prolina e atividade da peroxidase. Os parâmetros analisados mostraram decréscimo no crescimento relativo e no de proteínas em resposta ao NaCl. Paralelamente, observou-se aumento significativo no conteúdo de prolina e atividade da enzima peroxidase.One of the applications of the tissue culture technique in plant improvement is the identification of cell lines which show salinity tolerance. Several authors were able to obtain saline stress-tolerant cell lines and show that mechanisms of tolerance to salts have a strong correlation between this phenomenon and a high macromolecule concentration in plant tissues. Callus obtained from embrionic axis of Phaseolus vulgarís cv. IAC carioca in solid medium, supplemented with 0 to 60 mM NaCl, as the salt treatment, were used. Callus harvesting was done on the 13th day, when they were processed for relative growth, protein, proline content and peroxidase acivity. The results show both, a decrease of the relative growth and of protein content in response to the NaCl treatment, as compared to controls. However, there was a significant increase on the proline content and on the peroxidase activity.

  18. OsHKT2;2/1-mediated Na(+) influx over K(+) uptake in roots potentially increases toxic Na(+) accumulation in a salt-tolerant landrace of rice Nona Bokra upon salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kei; Costa, Alex; Nakayama, Hideki; Katsuhara, Maki; Shinmyo, Atsuhiko; Horie, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    HKT transporters are Na(+)-permeable membrane proteins, which mediate Na(+) and K(+) homeostasis in K(+)-depleted and saline environments in plants. Class II HKT transporters, a distinct subgroup found predominantly in monocots, are known to mediate Na(+)-K(+) co-transport in principle. Here we report features of ion transport functions of No-OsHKT2;2/1, a class II transporter identified in a salt tolerant landrace of indica rice, Nona Bokra. We profiled No-OsHKT2;2/1 expression in organs of Nona Bokra plants with or without salinity stress. Dominant accumulation of the No-OsHKT2;2/1 transcript in K(+)-starved roots of Nona Bokra plants largely disappeared in response to 50 mM NaCl. We found that No-OsHKT2;2/1 expressed in the high-affinity K(+) uptake deficient mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Xenopus laevis oocytes shows robust K(+) selectivity even in the presence of a large amount of NaCl as reported previously. However, No-OsHKT2;2/1-expressing yeast cells exhibited Na(+) hypersensitive growth under various concentrations of K(+) and Na(+) as the cells expressing Po-OsHKT2;2, a similar class II transporter from another salt tolerant indica rice Pokkali, when compared with the growth of cells harboring empty vector or cells expressing OsHKT2;4. The OsHKT2;4 protein expressed in Xenopus oocytes showed strong K(+) selectivity in the presence of 50 mM NaCl in comparison with No-OsHKT2;2/1 and Po-OsHKT2;2. Together with apparent plasma membrane-localization of No-OsHKT2;2/1, these results point to possibilities that No-OsHKT2;2/1 could mediate destructive Na(+) influx over K(+) uptake in Nona Bokra plants upon salinity stress, and that a predominant physiological function of No-OsHKT2;2/1 might be the acquisition of Na(+) and K(+) in K(+)-limited environments.

  19. Control of the B cell-intrinsic tolerance programs by ubiquitin ligases Cbl and Cbl-b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Jang, Ihn Kyung; Wang, Yan; Han, Yoon-Chi; Inazu, Tetsuya; Cadera, Emily J; Schlissel, Mark; Hardy, Richard R; Gu, Hua

    2007-05-01

    B cell receptor (BCR) signaling plays a critical role in B cell tolerance and activation. Here, we show that mice with B cell-specific ablation of both Cbl and Cbl-b (Cbl-/-Cblb-/-) manifested systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like autoimmune disease. The Cbl double deficiency resulted in a substantial increase in marginal zone (MZ) and B1 B cells. The mutant B cells were not hyperresponsive in terms of proliferation and antibody production upon BCR stimulation; however, B cell anergy to protein antigen appeared to be impaired. Concomitantly, BCR-proximal signaling, including tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk tyrosine kinase, Phospholipase C-gamma2 (PLC-gamma2), and Rho-family GTP-GDP exchange factor Vav, and Ca2+ mobilization were enhanced, whereas tyrosine phosphorylation of adaptor protein BLNK was substantially attenuated in the mutant B cells. These results suggested that the loss of coordination between these pathways was responsible for the impaired B cell tolerance induction. Thus, Cbl proteins control B cell-intrinsic checkpoint of immune tolerance, possibly through coordinating multiple BCR-proximal signaling pathways during anergy induction.

  20. Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Harness Purinergenic Signaling to Tolerize Human Th1 Cells In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarnath, Shoba; Foley, Jason E.; Farthing, Don E.; Gress, Ronald E.; Laurence, Arian; Eckhaus, Michael A.; Métais, Jean-Yves; Rose, Jeremy J.; Hakim, Frances T.; Felizardo, Tania C.; Cheng, Austin V.; Robey, Pamela G.; Stroncek, David E.; Sabatino, Marianna; Battiwalla, Minoo; Ito, Sawa; Fowler, Daniel H.; Barrett, Austin J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC) in the treatment of alloimmune and autoimmune conditions has generated much interest, yet an understanding of the therapeutic mechanism remains elusive. We therefore explored immune modulation by a clinical-grade BMSC product in a model of human-into-mouse xenogeneic GVHD (x-GVHD) mediated by human CD4+ Th1 cells. BMSC reversed established, lethal x-GVHD through marked inhibition of Th1 cell effector function. Gene marking studies indicated BMSC engraftment was limited to the lung; further, there was no increase in regulatory T cells, thereby suggesting a paracrine mechanism of BMSC action. BMSC recipients had increased serum CD73 expressing exosomes that promoted adenosine accumulation ex vivo. Importantly, immune modulation mediated by BMSC was fully abrogated by pharmacologic therapy with an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist. To investigate the potential clinical relevance of these mechanistic findings, patient serum samples collected pre- and post-BMSC treatment were studied for exosome content: CD73 expressing exosomes promoting adenosine accumulation were detected in post-BMSC samples. In conclusion, BMSC effectively modulate experimental GVHD through a paracrine mechanism that promotes adenosine-based immune suppression. PMID:25532725

  1. Breakdown of Immune Tolerance in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus by Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reihl, Alec M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play an important role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease with multiple tissue manifestations. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of conventional DC and plasmacytoid DC in the development of both murine lupus and human SLE. In the past decade, studies using selective DC depletions have demonstrated critical roles of DC in lupus progression. Comprehensive in vitro and in vivo studies suggest activation of DC by self-antigens in lupus pathogenesis, followed by breakdown of immune tolerance to self. Potential treatment strategies targeting DC have been developed. However, many questions remain regarding the mechanisms by which DC modulate lupus pathogenesis that require further investigations. PMID:27034965

  2. ROS-mediated abiotic stress-induced programmed cell death in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselin ePetrov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available During the course of their ontogenesis, plants are continuously exposed to a large variety of abiotic stress factors which can damage tissues and jeopardize the survival of the organism unless properly countered. While animals can simply escape and thus evade stressors, plants as sessile organisms have developed complex strategies to withstand them. When the intensity of a detrimental factor is high, one of the defense programs employed by plants is the induction of programmed cell death (PCD. This is an active, genetically controlled process which is initiated to isolate and remove damaged tissues thereby ensuring the survival of the organism. The mechanism of PCD induction usually includes an increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS which are utilized as mediators of the stress signal. Abiotic stress-induced PCD is not only a process of fundamental biological importance, but also of considerable interest to agricultural practice as it has the potential to significantly influence crop yield. Therefore, numerous scientific enterprises have focused on elucidating the mechanisms leading to and controlling PCD in response to adverse conditions in plants. This knowledge may help to develop novel strategies to obtain more resilient crop varieties with improved tolerance and enhanced productivity. The aim of the present review is to summarize the recent advances in research on ROS-induced PCD related to abiotic stress and the role of the organelles in the process.

  3. GsSKP21, a Glycine soja S-phase kinase-associated protein, mediates the regulation of plant alkaline tolerance and ABA sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ailin; Yu, Yang; Duan, Xiangbo; Sun, Xiaoli; Duanmu, Huizi; Zhu, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    Plant SKP1-like family proteins, components of the SCF complex E3 ligases, are involved in the regulation of plant development and stress responses. Little is known about the precise function of SKP genes in plant responses to environmental stresses. GsSKP21 was initially identified as a potential stress-responsive gene based on the transcriptome sequencing of Glycine soja. In this study, we found that GsSKP21 protein contains highly conserved SKP domains in its N terminus and an extra unidentified domain in its C terminus. The transcript abundance of GsSKP21, detected by quantitative real-time PCR, was induced under the treatment of alkali and salt stresses. Overexpression of GsSKP21 in Arabidopsis dramatically increased plant tolerance to alkali stress. Furthermore, we found that overexpression of GsSKP21 resulted in decreased ABA sensitivity during both the seed germination and early seedling growth stages. GsSKP21 mediated ABA signaling by altering the expression levels of the ABA signaling-related and ABA-induced genes. We also investigated the tissue expression specificity and subcellular localization of GsSKP21. These results suggest that GsSKP21 is important for plant tolerance to alkali stress and plays a critical regulatory role in the ABA-mediated stress response.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide mediates abscisic acid-induced HSP70 accumulation and heat tolerance in grafted cucumber plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Liu, Shan-Shan; Yi, Chang-Yu; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Jie; Xia, Xiao-Jian; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2014-12-01

    Root-shoot communications play important roles in plant stress responses. Here, we examined the roles of root-sourced signals in the shoot response to heat in cucumber plants. Cucumber plants grafted onto their own roots and luffa roots were exposed to aerial and root-zone heat to examine their tolerance by assessing the levels of oxidative stress, PSII photoinhibition, accumulation of abscisic acid (ABA), H2 O2 and heat shock protein (HSP) 70 using immunoblotting, chlorophyll fluorescence, immunoassay, CeCl3 staining and Western blotting, respectively. Grafting onto the luffa rootstock enhanced the shoot tolerance to the heat. This enhanced tolerance was associated with increased accumulation of ABA and apoplastic H2 O2 , RBOH transcripts and HSP70 expression and a decrease in oxidative stress in the shoots. The increases in the ABA and H2 O2 concentrations in the shoots were attributed to an increase in ABA transport from roots and an increase in ABA biosynthesis in the shoots when the root-zone and shoots were heat stressed, respectively. Inhibition of H2 O2 accumulation compromised luffa rootstock-induced HSP70 expression and heat tolerance. These results suggest that, under heat stress, ABA triggers the expression of HSP70 in an apoplastic H2 O2 -dependent manner, implicating the role of an ABA-dependent H2 O2 -driven mechanism in a systemic response involving root-shoot communication. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. AS3MT-mediated tolerance to arsenic evolved by multiple independent horizontal gene transfers from bacteria to eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmgren, Michael Broberg; Engström, Karin; Hallström, Björn M

    2017-01-01

    the evolutionary origin of AS3MT and assessed the ability of different genotypes to produce methylated arsenic metabolites. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that multiple, independent horizontal gene transfers between different bacteria, and from bacteria to eukaryotes, increased tolerance to environmental arsenic...

  6. Cell mediated therapeutics for cancer treatment: Tumor homing cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balivada, Sivasai

    Many cell types were known to have migratory properties towards tumors and different research groups have shown reliable results regarding cells as delivery vehicles of therapeutics for targeted cancer treatment. Present report discusses proof of concept for 1. Cell mediated delivery of Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and targeted Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) as a cancer treatment by using in vivo mouse cancer models, 2. Cells surface engineering with chimeric proteins for targeted cancer treatment by using in vitro models. 1. Tumor homing cells can carry MNPs specifically to the tumor site and tumor burden will decrease after alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure. To test this hypothesis, first we loaded Fe/Fe3O4 bi-magnetic NPs into neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which were previously shown to migrate towards melanoma tumors. We observed that NPCs loaded with MNPs travel to subcutaneous melanoma tumors. After alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure, the targeted delivery of MNPs by the NPCs resulted in a mild decrease in tumor size (Chapter-2). Monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) are known to infiltrate tumor sites, and also have phagocytic activity which can increase their uptake of MNPs. To test Mo/Ma-mediated MHT we transplanted Mo/Ma loaded with MNPs into a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis. We observed that MNP-loaded Mo/Ma infiltrated pancreatic tumors and, after AMF treatment, significantly prolonged the lives of mice bearing disseminated intraperitoneal pancreatic tumors (Chapter-3). 2. Targeted cancer treatment could be achieved by engineering tumor homing cell surfaces with tumor proteases cleavable, cancer cell specific recombinant therapeutic proteins. To test this, Urokinase and Calpain (tumor specific proteases) cleavable; prostate cancer cell (CaP) specific (CaP1 targeting peptide); apoptosis inducible (Caspase3 V266ED3)- rCasp3V266ED3 chimeric protein was designed in silico. Hypothesized membrane anchored chimeric protein (rCasp3V

  7. Cross tolerance of osmotically and ionically adapted cell lines of rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    saad

    2012-01-10

    Jan 10, 2012 ... tolerance to extreme conditions and to other stresses. The tolerance of plants to adapt/acclimate to a range of different stresses after exposure to one specific stress is referred to as cross tolerance (Pastori and Foyer, 2000;. Alexieva et al., 2003). This is evident from existence of considerable overlap among ...

  8. B Cell Receptor-Mediated Internalization of Salmonella: A Novel Pathway for Autonomous B Cell Activation and Antibody Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souwer, Yuri; Griekspoor, Alexander; Jorritsma, Tineke; de Wit, Jelle; Janssen, Hans; Neefjes, Jacques; van Ham, S. Marieke

    2009-01-01

    The present paradigm is that primary B cells are nonphagocytosing cells. In this study, we demonstrate that human primary B cells are able to internalize bacteria when the bacteria are recognized by the BCR. BCR-mediated internalization of Salmonella typhimurium results in B cell differentiation and

  9. Notch1 modulates mesenchymal stem cells mediated regulatory T-cell induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Papa, Beatrice; Sportoletti, Paolo; Cecchini, Debora; Rosati, Emanuela; Balucani, Chiara; Baldoni, Stefano; Fettucciari, Katia; Marconi, Pierfrancesco; Martelli, Massimo F; Falzetti, Franca; Di Ianni, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Notch1 signaling is involved in regulatory T (Treg)-cell differentiation. We previously demonstrated that, when cocultured with CD3(+) cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) induced a T-cell population with a regulatory phenotype. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying MSC induction of human Treg cells. We show that the Notch1 pathway is activated in CD4(+) T cells cocultured with MSCs. Inhibition of Notch1 signaling through GSI-I or the Notch1 neutralizing antibody reduced expression of HES1 (the Notch1 downstream target) and the percentage of MSC-induced CD4(+) CD25(high) FOXP3(+) cells in vitro. Moreover, we demonstrate that FOXP3 is a downstream target of Notch signaling in human cells. No crosstalk between Notch1 and TGF-β signaling pathways was observed in our experimental system. Together, these findings indicate that activation of the Notch1 pathway is a novel mechanism in the human Treg-cell induction mediated by MSCs. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. CD28 Blockade Ex Vivo Induces Alloantigen-Specific Immune Tolerance but Preserves T-Cell Pathogen Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Dillinger

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Donor T-cells contribute to reconstitution of protective immunity after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT but must acquire specific tolerance against recipient alloantigens to avoid life-threatening graft-versus-host disease (GvHD. Systemic immunosuppressive drugs may abrogate severe GvHD, but this also impedes memory responses to invading pathogens. Here, we tested whether ex vivo blockade of CD28 co-stimulation can enable selective T-cell tolerization to alloantigens by facilitating CD80/86-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4 signaling. Treatment of human allogeneic dendritic cell/T-cell co-cultures with a human CD28 blocking antibody fragment (α-huCD28 significantly abrogated subsequent allospecific immune responses, seen by decreased T-cell proliferation and of type 1 cytokine (IFN-γ and IL-2 expression. Allo-tolerization persisted after discontinuation of CD28 blockade and secondary alloantigen stimulation, as confirmed by enhanced CTLA-4 and PD-1 immune checkpoint signaling. However, T-cells retained reactivity to pathogens, supported by clonotyping of neo-primed and cross-reactive T-cells specific for Candida albicans or third-party antigens using deep sequencing analysis. In an MHC-mismatched murine model, we tolerized C57BL/6 T-cells by ex vivo exposure to a murine single chain Fv specific for CD28 (α-muCD28. Infusion of these cells, after α-muCD28 washout, into bone marrow-transplanted BALB/c mice caused allo-tolerance and did not induce GvHD-associated hepatic pathology. We conclude that selective CD28 blockade ex vivo can allow the generation of stably allo-tolerized T-cells that in turn do not induce graft-versus-host reactions while maintaining pathogen reactivity. Hence, CD28 co-stimulation blockade of donor T-cells may be a useful therapeutic approach to support the immune system after HSCT.

  11. Control of the B Cell-Intrinsic Tolerance Program by c-Cbl and Cbl-b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Jang, Ihn-Kyung; Wang, Yan; Han, Yoon-Chi; Inazu, Tetsuya; Cadera, Emily J.; Schlissel, Mark; Hardy, Richard R.; Gu, Hua

    2007-01-01

    BCR signaling plays a critical role in B-cell tolerance and activation. Here, we show that mice with B cell-specific ablation of both c-Cbl and Cbl-b (Cbl-dko) manifest systemic lupus erythymatosis (SLE)-like autoimmune disease. The Cbl-dko mutation results in a significant increase in marginal zone (MZ) and B1 B cells. The mutant B cells are not hyperresponsive in terms of proliferation and antibody production upon BCR stimulation; however, B-cell anergy to protein antigen appears to be impaired. Concomitantly, BCR-proximal signaling, including tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk, PLCγ-2, and Vav and Ca2+ mobilization, are enhanced, whereas tyrosine phosphorylation of BLNK is significantly attenuated in the mutant B cells, suggesting that the loss of coordination between these pathways is responsible for the impaired B-cell tolerance induction. Thus, Cbl proteins control B cell-intrinsic checkpoint of immune tolerance, possibly through coordinating multiple BCR-proximal signaling pathways during anergy induction. PMID:17493844

  12. Perfluorooctanesulfonate Mediates Renal Tubular Cell Apoptosis through PPARgamma Inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Li Wen

    Full Text Available Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs are ubiquitously distributed in the environments including stainless pan-coating, raincoat, fire extinguisher, and semiconductor products. The PPAR family has been shown to contribute to the toxic effects of PFCs in thymus, immune and excretory systems. Herein, we demonstrated that perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS caused cell apoptosis through increasing ratio of Bcl-xS/xL, cytosolic cytochrome C, and caspase 3 activation in renal tubular cells (RTCs. In addition, PFOS increased transcription of inflammatory cytokines (i.e., TNFα, ICAM1, and MCP1 by NFκB activation. Conversely, PFOS reduced the mRNA levels of antioxidative enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase, as a result of reduced PPARγ transactivational activity by using reporter and chromatin immuoprecipitation (ChIP assays. PFOS reduced the protein interaction between PPARγ and PPARγ coactivator-1 alpha (PGC1α by PPARγ deacetylation through Sirt1 upregulation, of which the binding of PPARγ and PGC1α to a peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE in the promoter regions of these antioxidative enzymes was alleviated in the ChIP assay. Furthermore, Sirt1 also deacetylated p53 and then increased the binding of p53 to Bax, resulting in increased cytosolic cytochrome C. The effect of PPARγ inactivation by PFOS was validated using the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, whereas the adverse effects of PFOS were prevented by PPARγ overexpression and activators, rosiglitozone and L-carnitine, in RTCs. The in vitro finding of protective effect of L-carnitine was substantiated in vivo using Balb/c mice model subjected to PFOS challenge. Altogether, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for the protective mechanism of L-carnitine in eliminating PFOS-mediated renal injury, at least partially, through PPARγ activation.

  13. Intensive meditation training, immune cell telomerase activity, and psychological mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Tonya L; Epel, Elissa S; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth H; Wolkowitz, Owen M; Bridwell, David A; Zanesco, Anthony P; Aichele, Stephen R; Sahdra, Baljinder K; MacLean, Katherine A; King, Brandon G; Shaver, Phillip R; Rosenberg, Erika L; Ferrer, Emilio; Wallace, B Alan; Saron, Clifford D

    2011-06-01

    Telomerase activity is a predictor of long-term cellular viability, which decreases with chronic psychological distress (Epel et al., 2004). Buddhist traditions claim that meditation decreases psychological distress and promotes well-being (e.g., Dalai Lama and Cutler, 2009). Therefore, we investigated the effects of a 3-month meditation retreat on telomerase activity and two major contributors to the experience of stress: Perceived Control (associated with decreased stress) and Neuroticism (associated with increased subjective distress). We used mediation models to test whether changes in Perceived Control and Neuroticism explained meditation retreat effects on telomerase activity. In addition, we investigated whether two qualities developed by meditative practice, increased Mindfulness and Purpose in Life, accounted for retreat-related changes in the two stress-related variables and in telomerase activity. Retreat participants (n=30) meditated for ∼6 h daily for 3 months and were compared with a wait-list control group (n=30) matched for age, sex, body mass index, and prior meditation experience. Retreat participants received instruction in concentrative meditation techniques and complementary practices used to cultivate benevolent states of mind (Wallace, 2006). Psychological measures were assessed pre- and post-retreat. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples were collected post-retreat for telomerase activity. Because there were clear, a priori hypotheses, 1-tailed significance criteria were used throughout. Telomerase activity was significantly greater in retreat participants than in controls at the end of the retreat (pmeditation and positive psychological change with telomerase activity. Although we did not measure baseline telomerase activity, the data suggest that increases in perceived control and decreases in negative affectivity contributed to an increase in telomerase activity, with implications for telomere length and immune cell longevity

  14. Sox17-Mediated XEN Cell Conversion Identifies Dynamic Networks Controlling Cell-Fate Decisions in Embryo-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela C.H. McDonald

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the gene regulatory networks (GRNs distinguishing extraembryonic endoderm (ExEn stem (XEN cells from those that maintain the extensively characterized embryonic stem cell (ESC. An intriguing network candidate is Sox17, an essential transcription factor for XEN derivation and self-renewal. Here, we show that forced Sox17 expression drives ESCs toward ExEn, generating XEN cells that contribute to ExEn when placed back into early mouse embryos. Transient Sox17 expression is sufficient to drive this fate change during which time cells transit through distinct intermediate states prior to the generation of functional XEN-like cells. To orchestrate this conversion process, Sox17 acts in autoregulatory and feedforward network motifs, regulating dynamic GRNs directing cell fate. Sox17-mediated XEN conversion helps to explain the regulation of cell-fate changes and reveals GRNs regulating lineage decisions in the mouse embryo.

  15. Suppression of Th1-mediated autoimmunity by embryonic stem cell-derived dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokunori Ikeda

    Full Text Available We herein demonstrate the immune-regulatory effect of embryonic stem cell-derived dendritic cells (ES-DCs using two models of autoimmune disease, namely non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Treatment of pre-diabetic NOD mice with ES-DCs exerted almost complete suppression of diabetes development during the observation period for more than 40 weeks. The prevention of diabetes by ES-DCs was accompanied with significant reduction of insulitis and decreased number of Th1 and Th17 cells in the spleen. Development of EAE was also inhibited by the treatment with ES-DCs, and the therapeutic effect was obtained even if ES-DCs were administrated after the onset of clinical symptoms. Treatment of EAE-induced mice with ES-DCs reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the spinal cord and suppressed the T cell response to the myelin antigen. Importantly, the ES-DC treatment did not affect T cell response to an exogenous antigen. As the mechanisms underlying the reduction of the number of infiltrating Th1 cells, we observed the inhibition of differentiation and proliferation of Th1 cells by ES-DCs. Furthermore, the expression of VLA-4α on Th1 cells was significantly inhibited by ES-DCs. Considering the recent advances in human induced pluripotent stem cell-related technologies, these results suggest a clinical application for pluripotent stem cell-derived dendritic cells as a therapy for T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases.

  16. Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Mediatization research shares media effects studies' ambition of answering the difficult questions with regard to whether and how media matter and influence contemporary culture and society. The two approaches nevertheless differ fundamentally in that mediatization research seeks answers...... research is concerned with long-term structural changes involving media, culture, and society, i.e. the influences of the media are understood in relation to how media are implicated in social and cultural changes and how these processes come to create new conditions for human communication and interaction....... From the perspective of mediatization research, the most important effect of the media stems from their embeddedness in culture and society....

  17. Integrin αvβ8-Mediated TGF-β Activation by Effector Regulatory T Cells Is Essential for Suppression of T-Cell-Mediated Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, John J.; Kelly, Aoife; Smedley, Catherine; Bauché, David; Campbell, Simon; Marie, Julien C.; Travis, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Regulatory T (Treg) cells play a pivotal role in suppressing self-harmful T cell responses, but how Treg cells mediate suppression to maintain immune homeostasis and limit responses during inflammation is unclear. Here we show that effector Treg cells express high amounts of the integrin αvβ8, which enables them to activate latent transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Treg-cell-specific deletion of integrin αvβ8 did not result in a spontaneous inflammatory phenotype, suggesting that this pathway is not important in Treg-cell-mediated maintenance of immune homeostasis. However, Treg cells lacking expression of integrin αvβ8 were unable to suppress pathogenic T cell responses during active inflammation. Thus, our results identify a mechanism by which Treg cells suppress exuberant immune responses, highlighting a key role for effector Treg-cell-mediated activation of latent TGF-β in suppression of self-harmful T cell responses during active inflammation. PMID:25979421

  18. Ctla-4 modulates the differentiation of inducible Foxp3+ Treg cells but IL-10 mediates their function in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Verhagen

    Full Text Available In vitro induced Foxp3+ T regulatory (iTreg cells form a novel and promising target for therapeutic tolerance induction. However, the potential of these cells as a target for the treatment of various immune diseases, as well as the factors involved in their development and function, remain debated. Here, we demonstrate in a myelin basic protein (MBP-specific murine model of CNS autoimmune disease that adoptive transfer of antigen-specific iTreg cells ameliorates disease progression. Moreover, we show that the co-stimulatory molecule CTLA-4 mediates in vitro differentiation of iTreg cells. Finally, we demonstrate that the secreted, immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 controls the ability of antigen-specific iTreg cells to suppress autoimmune disease. Overall, we conclude that antigen-specific iTreg cells, which depend on various immune regulatory molecules for their differentiation and function, represent a major target for effective immunotherapy of autoimmune disease.

  19. Ctla-4 modulates the differentiation of inducible Foxp3+ Treg cells but IL-10 mediates their function in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Johan; Gabryšová, Leona; Shepard, Ella R; Wraith, David C

    2014-01-01

    In vitro induced Foxp3+ T regulatory (iTreg) cells form a novel and promising target for therapeutic tolerance induction. However, the potential of these cells as a target for the treatment of various immune diseases, as well as the factors involved in their development and function, remain debated. Here, we demonstrate in a myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific murine model of CNS autoimmune disease that adoptive transfer of antigen-specific iTreg cells ameliorates disease progression. Moreover, we show that the co-stimulatory molecule CTLA-4 mediates in vitro differentiation of iTreg cells. Finally, we demonstrate that the secreted, immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 controls the ability of antigen-specific iTreg cells to suppress autoimmune disease. Overall, we conclude that antigen-specific iTreg cells, which depend on various immune regulatory molecules for their differentiation and function, represent a major target for effective immunotherapy of autoimmune disease.

  20. pH-evoked dural afferent signaling is mediated by ASIC3 and is sensitized by mast cell mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jin; Wei, Xiaomei; Bischoff, Christina; Edelmayer, Rebecca M; Dussor, Gregory

    2013-09-01

    Prior studies have shown that decreased meningeal pH activates dural afferents via opening of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), suggesting one pathophysiological mechanism for the generation of headaches. The studies described here further examined the ASIC subtype mediating pH-induced dural-afferent activation and examined whether sensitization influences pH responses. Given the potential importance of meningeal mast cells to headache, the goal of this study was to evaluate dural afferent responses to pH following sensitization with mast cell mediators. Cutaneous allodynia was measured in rats following stimulation of the dura with decreased pH alone or in combination with mast cell mediators. Trigeminal ganglion neurons retrogradely labeled from the dura were stained with an ASIC3 antibody using immunohistochemistry. Current and action potentials evoked by changes in pH alone or in combination with mast cell mediators were measured in retrogradely labeled dural afferents using patch-clamp electrophysiology. pH-sensitive dural afferents generated currents in response to the ASIC3 activator 2-guanidine-4-methylquinazoline (GMQ), approximately 80% of these neurons express ASIC3 protein, and pH-evoked behavioral responses were inhibited by the ASIC3 blocker APETx2. Following exposure to mast cell mediators, dural afferents exhibited increased pH-evoked excitability, and cutaneous allodynia was observed at higher pH than with pH stimuli alone. These data indicate that the predominant ASIC subtype responding to decreased meningeal pH is ASIC3. Additionally, they demonstrate that in the presence of inflammation, dural afferents respond to even smaller decreases in pH providing further support for the ability of small pH changes within the meninges to initiate afferent input leading to headache. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  1. Multivalent Soluble Antigen Arrays Exhibit High Avidity Binding and Modulation of B Cell Receptor-Mediated Signaling to Drive Efficacy against Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, Brittany L; Pickens, Chad J; Leon, Martin; Berkland, Cory

    2017-06-12

    A pressing need exists for antigen-specific immunotherapies (ASIT) that induce selective tolerance in autoimmune disease while avoiding deleterious global immunosuppression. Multivalent soluble antigen arrays (SAgA PLP:LABL ), consisting of a hyaluronic acid (HA) linear polymer backbone cografted with multiple copies of autoantigen (PLP) and cell adhesion inhibitor (LABL) peptides, are designed to induce tolerance to a specific multiple sclerosis (MS) autoantigen. Previous studies established that hydrolyzable SAgA PLP:LABL , employing a degradable linker to codeliver PLP and LABL, was therapeutic in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in vivo and exhibited antigen-specific binding with B cells, targeted the B cell receptor (BCR), and dampened BCR-mediated signaling in vitro. Our results pointed to sustained BCR engagement as the SAgA PLP:LABL therapeutic mechanism, so we developed a new version of the SAgA molecule using nonhydrolyzable conjugation chemistry, hypothesizing it would enhance and maintain the molecule's action at the cell surface to improve efficacy. "Click SAgA" (cSAgA PLP:LABL ) uses hydrolytically stable covalent conjugation chemistry (Copper-catalyzed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition (CuAAC)) rather than a hydrolyzable oxime bond to attach PLP and LABL to HA. We explored cSAgA PLP:LABL B cell engagement and modulation of BCR-mediated signaling in vitro through flow cytometry binding and calcium flux signaling assays. Indeed, cSAgA PLP:LABL exhibited higher avidity B cell binding and greater dampening of BCR-mediated signaling than hydrolyzable SAgA PLP:LABL . Furthermore, cSAgA PLP:LABL exhibited significantly enhanced in vivo efficacy compared to hydrolyzable SAgA PLP:LABL , achieving equivalent efficacy at one-quarter of the dose. These results indicate that nonhydrolyzable conjugation increased the avidity of cSAgA PLP:LABL to drive in vivo efficacy through modulated BCR-mediated signaling.

  2. Nrf2 mediates redox adaptation in NOX4-overexpressed non-small cell lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qipeng; Yao, Bei; Li, Ning; Ma, Lei; Deng, Yanchao; Yang, Yang; Zeng, Cheng; Yang, Zhicheng [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Liu, Bing, E-mail: liubing520@gdpu.edu.cn [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guangdong Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Bioactive Substances, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2017-03-15

    The redox adaptation mechanisms in cancer cells are very complex and remain largely unclear. Our previous studies have confirmed that NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) is abundantly expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and confers apoptosis resistance on NSCLC cells. However, the comprehensive mechanisms for NOX4-mediated oxidative resistance of cancer cells remain still undentified. The present study found that NOX4-derived H{sub 2}O{sub 2} enhanced the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) stability via disruption of redox-dependent proteasomal degradation and stimulated its activity through activation of PI3K signaling. Specifically, the results showed that ectopic NOX4 expression did not induce apoptosis of A549 cells; however, inhibition of Nrf2 resulted in obvious apoptotic death of NOX4-overexpressed A549 cells, accompanied by a significant increase in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} level and decrease in GSH content. Besides, inhibition of Nrf2 could suppress cell growth and efficiently reverse the enhancement effect of NOX4 on cell growth. The in vivo data confirmed that inhibition of Nrf2 could interfere apoptosis resistance in NOX4-overexpressed A549 tumors and led to cell growth inhibition. In conclusion, these results reveal that Nrf2 is critically involved in redox adaptation regulation in NOX4-overexpressed NSCLC cells. Therefore, NOX4 and Nrf2 may be promising combination targets against malignant progression of NSCLC. - Highlights: • NOX4-derived H{sub 2}O{sub 2} upregulates Nrf2 expression and activity in NSCLC. • Nrf2 confers apoptosis resistance in NOX4-overexpressed NSCLC cells. • Inhibition of Nrf2 reverses the enhancement effect of NOX4 on cell growth.

  3. Nrf2 mediates redox adaptation in NOX4-overexpressed non-small cell lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Qipeng; Yao, Bei; Li, Ning; Ma, Lei; Deng, Yanchao; Yang, Yang; Zeng, Cheng; Yang, Zhicheng; Liu, Bing

    2017-01-01

    The redox adaptation mechanisms in cancer cells are very complex and remain largely unclear. Our previous studies have confirmed that NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) is abundantly expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and confers apoptosis resistance on NSCLC cells. However, the comprehensive mechanisms for NOX4-mediated oxidative resistance of cancer cells remain still undentified. The present study found that NOX4-derived H 2 O 2 enhanced the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) stability via disruption of redox-dependent proteasomal degradation and stimulated its activity through activation of PI3K signaling. Specifically, the results showed that ectopic NOX4 expression did not induce apoptosis of A549 cells; however, inhibition of Nrf2 resulted in obvious apoptotic death of NOX4-overexpressed A549 cells, accompanied by a significant increase in H 2 O 2 level and decrease in GSH content. Besides, inhibition of Nrf2 could suppress cell growth and efficiently reverse the enhancement effect of NOX4 on cell growth. The in vivo data confirmed that inhibition of Nrf2 could interfere apoptosis resistance in NOX4-overexpressed A549 tumors and led to cell growth inhibition. In conclusion, these results reveal that Nrf2 is critically involved in redox adaptation regulation in NOX4-overexpressed NSCLC cells. Therefore, NOX4 and Nrf2 may be promising combination targets against malignant progression of NSCLC. - Highlights: • NOX4-derived H 2 O 2 upregulates Nrf2 expression and activity in NSCLC. • Nrf2 confers apoptosis resistance in NOX4-overexpressed NSCLC cells. • Inhibition of Nrf2 reverses the enhancement effect of NOX4 on cell growth.

  4. Boron Supply Enhances Aluminum Tolerance in Root Border Cells of Pea (Pisum sativum by Interacting with Cell Wall Pectins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Wen Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al toxicity is the primary factor limiting crop growth in acidic soils. Boron (B alleviates Al toxicity in plants, which is mainly considered to be due to the formation of Rhamnogalacturonan II-B (RGII-B complexes, which helps to stabilize the cytoskeleton. It is unclear yet whether this is due to the increasing of net negative charges and/or further mechanisms. Kinetics of Al accumulation and adsorption were investigated using entire cells, cell wall and pectin of root border cells (RBCs of pea (Pisum sativum, to reveal the mechanism of B in interacting with alkali-soluble and chelator-soluble pectin for an increased Al tolerance in RBCs. The results show that B could rescue RBCs from Al-induced cell death by accumulating more Al in the cell wall, predominately in alkali-soluble pectin. Boron also promotes Al3+ adsorption and inhibits Al3+ desorption from alkali-soluble pectin. Thus, more Al3+ is immobilized within the alkali-soluble pectin fraction and less in the chelator-soluble pectin, rendering Al3+ less mobile. Boron induces an increase of RG-II (KDO,2-keto-3-deoxyoctonic acid content for forming more borate-RGII complexes, and the decrease of pectin methyl-esterification, thus creates more negative charges to immobilize Al3+ in cell wall pectin. The study provides evidence that abundant B supply enhances the immobilization of Al in alkali-soluble pectin, thus most likely reducing the entry of Al3+ into the symplast from the surroundings.

  5. APECED: Is this a model for failure of T-cell and B-cell tolerance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eKluger

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available APECED and IPEX syndromes show similarities in the clinical presentations and immunological alterations, mainly regarding regulatory T-cells function. T-cell defect may lead to tissue destruction chiefly in endocrine organs. Besides, APECED is characterized by high-titer antibodies against a wide variety of cytokines, that could partly be responsible for the clinical symptoms during APECED, mainly chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, and linked to antibodies against Th17 cells effector molecules, IL-17 and IL-22. On the other hand, the same antibodies, together with antibodies against type I interferons may be prevent from other immunological diseases, such as psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematous. The same effector Th17 cells, present in the lymphocytic infiltrate of target organs of APECED, could be responsible for the tissue destruction. Here again, the antibodies against the corresponding effector molecules, anti-IL-17 and anti-IL-22 could be protective. The occurrence of several effector mechanisms (CD4+ Th17 cell and CD8+ CTL and the effector cytokines IL-17 and IL-22, and simultaneous existence of regulatory mechanisms (CD4+ and CD8+ Treg and antibodies neutralizing the effect of the effector cytokines may explain the polymorphism of APECED. Almost all the patients develop the characteristic manifestations of the complex, but temporal course and symptoms severity vary considerably, even among siblings. The autoantibody profile does not correlate with the clinical picture. One could speculate that a secondary homeostatic balance between the harmful effector mechanisms, and the favorable regulatory mechanisms, finally define both the extent and severity of the clinical condition in the AIRE defective individuals. The proposed hypothesis that in APECED, in addition to strong tissue destructive mechanisms, a controlling regulatory mechanism does exist, allow us to conclude that APECED could be treated, and even cured, with immunological

  6. Performance Factors and Sulfur Tolerance of Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells with Nanostructured Ni:GDC Infiltrated Anodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Hagen, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Two metal supported solid oxide fuel cells (active area 16 cm2) with nanostructured Ni:GDC infiltrated anodes, possessing different anode and support microstructures were studied in respect to sulfur tolerance at an operating temperature of 650°C. The studied MS-SOFCs are based on ferretic...

  7. Performance Factors and Sulfur Tolerance of Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells with Nanostructured Ni:GDC Infiltrated Anodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Hagen, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Two metal supported solid oxide fuel cells (active area 16 cm2) with nanostructured Ni:GDC infiltrated anodes, but different anode and support microstructures were studied in respect to sulfur tolerance at the aimed operating temperature of 650ºC. The studied MS-SOFCs are based on ferretic...

  8. Metabolism-mediated induction of zinc tolerance in Brassica rapa by Burkholderia cepacia CS2-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang-Mo; Shahzad, Raheem; Bilal, Saqib; Khan, Abdul Latif; You, Young-Hyun; Lee, Won-Hee; Ryu, Hee-La; Lee, Ko-Eun; Lee, In-Jung

    2017-12-01

    Brassica rapa (Chinese cabbage) is an essential component of traditional Korean food. However, the crop is often subject to zinc (Zn + ) toxicity from contaminated irrigation water, which, as a result, compromises plant growth and production, as well as the health of human consumers. The present study investigated the bioaccumulation of Zn + by Burkholderia cepacia CS2-1 and its effect on the heavy metal tolerance of Chinese cabbage. Strain CS2-1 was identified and characterized on the basis of 16S rRNA sequences and phylogenetic analysis. The strain actively produced indole-3-acetic acid (3.08 ± 0.21 μg/ml) and was also able to produce siderophore, solubilize minerals, and tolerate various concentrations of Zn + . The heavy metal tolerance of B. rapa plants was enhanced by CS2-1 inoculation, as indicated by growth attributes, Zn + uptake, amino acid synthesis, antioxidant levels, and endogenous hormone (ABA and SA) synthesis. Without inoculation, the application of Zn + negatively affected the growth and physiology of B. rapa plants. However, CS2-1 inoculation improved plant growth, lowered Zn + uptake, altered both amino acid regulation and levels of flavonoids and phenolics, and significantly decreased levels of superoxide dismutase, endogenous abscisic acid, and salicylic acid. These findings indicate that B. cepacia CS2-1 is suitable for bioremediation against Zn + -induced oxidative stress.

  9. Melanoma exosomes enable tumor tolerance in lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Joshua L

    2016-05-01

    Melanoma preferentially spreads via lymph nodes. Melanoma exosomes can induce angiogenesis and immune suppression. However, a role for melanoma exosomes in facilitating tumor tolerance in lymph nodes has not been considered. Herein, the hypothesis that melanoma exosome mediated induction of vascular endothelial cell (VEC) derived tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) results in lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) mediated tumor tolerance is explored. To support this hypothesis, experiments involving ex vivo lymph node associated VECs, LECs, dendritic cells and T lymphocytes are proposed based upon a previously established fluorescent exosome lymph node trafficking model. The implication of the hypothesis in the context of melanoma exosome mediated induction of tumor tolerance in lymph nodes is then discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Oncolytic Group B Adenovirus Enadenotucirev Mediates Non-apoptotic Cell Death with Membrane Disruption and Release of Inflammatory Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Dyer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Enadenotucirev (EnAd is a chimeric group B adenovirus isolated by bioselection from a library of adenovirus serotypes. It replicates selectively in and kills a diverse range of carcinoma cells, shows effective anticancer activity in preclinical systems, and is currently undergoing phase I/II clinical trials. EnAd kills cells more quickly than type 5 adenovirus, and speed of cytotoxicity is dose dependent. The EnAd death pathway does not involve p53, is predominantly caspase independent, and appears to involve a rapid fall in cellular ATP. Infected cells show early loss of membrane integrity; increased exposure of calreticulin; extracellular release of ATP, HSP70, and HMGB1; and influx of calcium. The virus also causes an obvious single membrane blister reminiscent of ischemic cell death by oncosis. In human tumor biopsies maintained in ex vivo culture, EnAd mediated release of pro-inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α, IL-6, and HMGB1. In accordance with this, EnAd-infected tumor cells showed potent stimulation of dendritic cells and CD4+ T cells in a mixed tumor-leukocyte reaction in vitro. Whereas many viruses have evolved for efficient propagation with minimal inflammation, bioselection of EnAd for rapid killing has yielded a virus with a short life cycle that combines potent cytotoxicity with a proinflammatory mechanism of cell death.

  11. Beta-cell function, incretin effect, and incretin hormones in obese youth along the span of glucose tolerance from normal to prediabetes to Type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using the hyperglycemic and euglycemic clamp, we demonstrated impaired Beta-cell function in obese youth with increasing dysglycemia. Herein we describe oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-modeled Beta-cell function and incretin effect in obese adolescents spanning the range of glucose tolerance. Bet...

  12. Enhancement of co-tolerance in polymer electrolyte fuel cells by increased cell temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajbolouri, F.; Andreaus, B.; Scherer, G.; Wokaun A

    2003-03-01

    AC-impedance spectroscopy has been employed to investigate the temperature dependence of CO-poisoning in a 30 cm{sup 2} fuel cell for commercial Pt E-tek electrodes. An inductive behavior was shown to be characteristic for the CO-poisoning on Pt at higher current densities, above 200 mA/cm{sup 2}, and for CO-contents higher than 50 ppm. At lower current densities where the CO-oxidation is slight or negligible no inductive behavior was observed. The increase of cell temperature from 90 {sup o}C to 100 {sup o}C decreased the charge transfer resistivity by a factor of 4. A simple model was established for a quantitative analysis of CO-poisoning. (author)

  13. APECED: is this a model for failure of T cell and B cell tolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Nicolas; Ranki, Annamari; Krohn, Kai

    2012-01-01

    In APECED, the key abnormality is in the T cell defect that may lead to tissue destruction chiefly in endocrine organs. Besides, APECED is characterized by high-titer antibodies against a wide variety of cytokines that could partly be responsible for the clinical symptoms during APECED, mainly chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, and linked to antibodies against Th17 cells effector molecules, IL-17 and IL-22. On the other hand, the same antibodies, together with antibodies against type I interferons may prevent the patients from other immunological diseases, such as psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematous. The same effector Th17 cells, present in the lymphocytic infiltrate of target organs of APECED, could be responsible for the tissue destruction. Here again, the antibodies against the corresponding effector molecules, anti-IL-17 and anti-IL-22 could be protective. The occurrence of several effector mechanisms (CD4+ Th17 cell and CD8+ CTL and the effector cytokines IL-17 and IL-22), and simultaneous existence of regulatory mechanisms (CD4+ Treg and antibodies neutralizing the effect of the effector cytokines) may explain the polymorphism of APECED. Almost all the patients develop the characteristic manifestations of the complex, but temporal course and severity of the symptoms vary considerably, even among siblings. The autoantibody profile does not correlate with the clinical picture. One could speculate that a secondary homeostatic balance between the harmful effector mechanisms, and the favorable regulatory mechanisms, finally define both the extent and severity of the clinical condition in the AIRE defective individuals. The proposed hypothesis that in APECED, in addition to strong tissue destructive mechanisms, a controlling regulatory mechanism does exist, allow us to conclude that APECED could be treated, and even cured, with immunological manipulation. PMID:22876245

  14. A review of fault tolerant control strategies applied to proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijoux, Etienne; Steiner, Nadia Yousfi; Benne, Michel; Péra, Marie-Cécile; Pérez, Brigitte Grondin

    2017-08-01

    Fuel cells are powerful systems for power generation. They have a good efficiency and do not generate greenhouse gases. This technology involves a lot of scientific fields, which leads to the appearance of strongly inter-dependent parameters. This makes the system particularly hard to control and increases fault's occurrence frequency. These two issues call for the necessity to maintain the system performance at the expected level, even in faulty operating conditions. It is called "fault tolerant control" (FTC). The present paper aims to give the state of the art of FTC applied to the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The FTC approach is composed of two parts. First, a diagnosis part allows the identification and the isolation of a fault; it requires a good a priori knowledge of all the possible faults. Then, a control part allows an optimal control strategy to find the best operating point to recover/mitigate the fault; it requires the knowledge of the degradation phenomena and their mitigation strategies.

  15. T Cell-Mediated Beta Cell Destruction: Autoimmunity and Alloimmunity in the Context of Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L. Burrack

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D results from destruction of pancreatic beta cells by T cells of the immune system. Despite improvements in insulin analogs and continuous blood glucose level monitoring, there is no cure for T1D, and some individuals develop life-threatening complications. Pancreas and islet transplantation have been attractive therapeutic approaches; however, transplants containing insulin-producing cells are vulnerable to both recurrent autoimmunity and conventional allograft rejection. Current immune suppression treatments subdue the immune system, but not without complications. Ideally a successful approach would target only the destructive immune cells and leave the remaining immune system intact to fight foreign pathogens. This review discusses the autoimmune diabetes disease process, diabetic complications that warrant a transplant, and alloimmunity. First, we describe the current understanding of autoimmune destruction of beta cells including the roles of CD4 and CD8 T cells and several possibilities for antigen-specific tolerance induction. Second, we outline diabetic complications necessitating beta cell replacement. Third, we discuss transplant recognition, potential sources for beta cell replacement, and tolerance-promoting therapies under development. We hypothesize that a better understanding of autoreactive T cell targets during disease pathogenesis and alloimmunity following transplant destruction could enhance attempts to re-establish tolerance to beta cells.

  16. The Cytosolic pH of Individual Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells Is a Key Factor in Acetic Acid Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Niño, Miguel; Marquina, Maribel; Swinnen, Steve; Rodríguez-Porrata, Boris

    2015-01-01

    It was shown recently that individual cells of an isogenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae population show variability in acetic acid tolerance, and this variability affects the quantitative manifestation of the trait at the population level. In the current study, we investigated whether cell-to-cell variability in acetic acid tolerance could be explained by the observed differences in the cytosolic pHs of individual cells immediately before exposure to the acid. Results obtained with cells of the strain CEN.PK113-7D in synthetic medium containing 96 mM acetic acid (pH 4.5) showed a direct correlation between the initial cytosolic pH and the cytosolic pH drop after exposure to the acid. Moreover, only cells with a low initial cytosolic pH, which experienced a less severe drop in cytosolic pH, were able to proliferate. A similar correlation between initial cytosolic pH and cytosolic pH drop was also observed in the more acid-tolerant strain MUCL 11987-9. Interestingly, a fraction of cells in the MUCL 11987-9 population showed initial cytosolic pH values below the minimal cytosolic pH detected in cells of the strain CEN.PK113-7D; consequently, these cells experienced less severe drops in cytosolic pH. Although this might explain in part the difference between the two strains with regard to the number of cells that resumed proliferation, it was observed that all cells from strain MUCL 11987-9 were able to proliferate, independently of their initial cytosolic pH. Therefore, other factors must also be involved in the greater ability of MUCL 11987-9 cells to endure strong drops in cytosolic pH. PMID:26341199

  17. Taraxerol Induces Cell Apoptosis through A Mitochondria-Mediated Pathway in HeLa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, Xiangyang; Lu, Binyu; Lü, Chaotian; Bai, Qin; Yan, Dazhong; Xu, Hui

    2017-10-01

    Taraxerol acetate has potent anti-cancer effects via the induction of apoptosis, autophagy, cell cycle arrest, and inhibition of cell migration. However, whether taraxerol induced apoptosis and its underlying mechanisms of action is not clear. In the present study, we assess the effects of taraxerol on the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and determine the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol and activation of caspases. In this experimental study, we mainly investigated the effect of taraxerol on HeLa cells. We tested cell viability by the MTT assay and morphologic changes, analyzed apoptosis by DAPI staining and flow cytometry. We also determined reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) using a Microplate Reader. In addition, the apoptotic proteins were tested by Western blot. Taraxerol enhanced ROS levels and attenuated the MMP (Δψm) in HeLa cells. Taraxerol induced apoptosis mainly via the mitochondrial pathway including the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol and activation of caspases 9 and 3, and anti-poly (ADPribose) polymerase (PARP). Taraxerol could induce the down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and up-regulation of pro-apoptotic protein Bax. It suppressed the PI3K/ Akt signaling pathway. These results demonstrated that taraxerol induced cell apoptosis through a mitochondria-mediated pathway in HeLa cells. Thus, taraxerol might be a potential anticervical cancer candidate.

  18. [Zileuton, a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, attenuates mouse microglial cell-mediated rotenone toxicity in PC12 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-yan; Chen, Lu; Xu, Dong-min; Wang, Xiao-rong; Wang, Yan-fang; Li, Cheng-tan; Wei, Er-qing; Zhang, Li-hui

    2014-05-01

    To examine the effect of a selective inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) zileuton on microglia-mediated rotenone neurotoxicity. The supernatant from different concentrations of rotenone-stimulated mouse microglia BV2 cells was used as the conditioned media (CM) for PC12 cells. The viability of PC12 cells was determined by MTT assay and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Cell death was observed by LDH release and double fluorescence staining with Hoechst/propidiumiodide (PI). The effect of zileuton on microglia-mediated rotenone toxicity was evaluated by the above methods. Rotenone at 1-10 nmol/L was nontoxic to PC12 cells directly. However, the CM from BV2 cells that were treated with rotenone (1-10 nmol/L) resulted in toxicity of PC12 cells. The BV2 CM which stimulated with rotenone (1-10 nmol/L) induced morphological changes, reduced cell viability, and increased LDH release and cell necrosis in PC12 cells. Pretreatment of BV2 cells with the 5-LOX inhibitor zileuton (0.01-1 μmol/L) protected PC12 cells from the microglia-mediated rotenone toxicity. The 5-LOX inhibitor zileuton effectively attenuates microglia-mediated rotenone toxicity in PC12 cells. These results suggest that 5-LOX pathway may be involved in neuronal death induced by microglial inflammation.

  19. Enhanced cell adhesion on bioinert ceramics mediated by the osteogenic cell membrane enzyme alkaline phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminian, Alieh; Shirzadi, Bahareh; Azizi, Zahra; Maedler, Kathrin; Volkmann, Eike; Hildebrand, Nils; Maas, Michael; Treccani, Laura; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2016-12-01

    Functional bone and dental implant materials are required to guide cell response, offering cues that provide specific instructions to cells at the implant/tissue interface while maintaining full biocompatibility as well as the desired structural requirements and functions. In this work we investigate the influence of covalently immobilized alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an enzyme involved in bone mineralization, on the first contact and initial cell adhesion. To this end, ALP is covalently immobilized by carbodiimide-mediated chemoligation on two highly bioinert ceramics, alpha-alumina (Al2O3) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) that are well-established for load-bearing applications. The physicochemical surface properties are evaluated by profilometry, zeta potential and water contact angle measurements. The initial cell adhesion of human osteoblasts (HOBs), human osteoblast-like cells (MG-63) and mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) was investigated. Cell adhesion was assessed at serum free condition via quantification of percentage of adherent cells, adhesion area and staining of the focal adhesion protein vinculin. Our findings show that after ALP immobilization, the Al2O3 and Y-TZP surfaces gained a negative charge and their hydrophilicity was increased. In the presence of surface-immobilized ALP, a higher cell adhesion, more pronounced cell spreading and a higher number of focal contact points were found. Thereby, this work gives evidence that surface functionalization with ALP can be utilized to modify inert materials for biological conversion and faster bone regeneration on inert and potentially load-bearing implant materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Uptake and metabolism of clomazone in tolerant-soybean and susceptible-cotton photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, M.A.; Liebl, R.A.; Widholm, J.M. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the uptake and metabolism of the pigment synthesis inhibiting herbicide clomazone in tolerant-soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv Corsoy) and susceptible-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum (L.) cv Stoneville 825) photomixotrophic cell suspensions. Soybean and cotton on a whole plant level are tolerant and susceptible to clomazone, respectively. Preliminary studies indicated that I{sub 50} values for growth, chlorophyll (Chl), {beta}-carotene, and lutein were, respectively, >22, 14, 19, and 23 times greater for the soybean cell line (SB-M) 8 days after treatment (DAT) compared to the cotton cell line (COT-M) 16 DAT. Differences in ({sup 14}C)clomazone uptake cannot account for selectivity since there were significantly greater levels of domazone absorbed by the SB-M cells compared to the COT-M cells for each treatment. The percentage of absorbed clomazone converted to more polar metabolite(s) was significantly greater by the SB-M cells relative to COT-M cells at 6 and 24 hours after treatment, however, only small differences existed between the cell lines by 48 hours after treatment. Nearly identical levels of parental clomazone was recovered from both cell lines for all treatments. A pooled metabolite fraction isolated from SB-M cells had no effect on the leaf pigment content of susceptible velvetleaf or soybean seedlings. Conversely, a pooled metabolite fraction from COT-M cells reduced the leaf Chl content of velvetleaf. Soybean tolerance to clomazone appears to be due to differential metabolism (bioactivation) and/or differences at the site of action.

  1. C-Reactive Protein Impairs Dendritic Cell Development, Maturation, and Function: Implications for Peripheral Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel V. Jimenez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP is the prototypical acute phase reactant, increasing in blood concentration rapidly and several-fold in response to inflammation. Recent evidence indicates that CRP has an important physiological role even at low, baseline levels, or in the absence of overt inflammation. For example, we have shown that human CRP inhibits the progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in CRP transgenic mice by shifting CD4+ T cells away from the TH1 and toward the TH2 subset. Notably, this action required the inhibitory Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB, but did not require high levels of human CRP. Herein, we sought to determine if CRP’s influence in EAE might be explained by CRP acting on dendritic cells (DC; antigen presenting cells known to express FcγRIIB. We found that CRP (50 µg/ml reduced the yield of CD11c+ bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs and CRP (≥5 μg/ml prevented their full expression of major histocompatibility complex class II and the co-stimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40. CRP also decreased the ability of BMDCs to stimulate antigen-driven proliferation of T cells in vitro. Importantly, if the BMDCs were genetically deficient in mouse FcγRIIB then (i the ability of CRP to alter BMDC surface phenotype and impair T cell proliferation was ablated and (ii CD11c-driven expression of a human FCGR2B transgene rescued the CRP effect. Lastly, the protective influence of CRP in EAE was fully restored in mice with CD11c-driven human FcγRIIB expression. These findings add to the growing evidence that CRP has important biological effects even in the absence of an acute phase response, i.e., CRP acts as a tonic suppressor of the adaptive immune system. The ability of CRP to suppress development, maturation, and function of DCs implicates CRP in the maintenance of peripheral T cell tolerance.

  2. Physiological and proteomic changes suggest an important role of cell walls in the high tolerance to metals of Elodea nuttallii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larras, Floriane; Regier, Nicole; Planchon, Sébastien; Poté, John; Renaut, Jenny; Cosio, Claudia

    2013-12-15

    Macrophytes bioaccumulate metals, the suggestion being made that they be considered for phytoremediation. However, a thorough understanding of the mechanisms of metal tolerance in these plants is necessary to allow full optimization of this approach. The present study was undertaken to gain insight into Hg and Cd accumulation and their effects in a representative macrophyte, Elodea nuttallii. Exposure to methyl-Hg (23 ng dm(-3)) had no significant effect while inorganic Hg (70 ng dm(-3)) and Cd (281 μg dm(-3)) affected root growth but did not affect shoots growth, photosynthesis, or antioxidant enzymes. Phytochelatins were confirmed as having a role in Cd tolerance in this plant while Hg tolerance seems to rely on different mechanisms. Histology and subcellular distribution revealed a localized increase in lignification, and an increased proportion of metal accumulation in cell wall over time. Proteomics further suggested that E. nuttallii was able to efficiently adapt its energy sources and the structure of its cells during Hg and Cd exposure. Storage in cell walls to protect cellular machinery is certainly predominant at environmental concentrations of metals in this plant resulting in a high tolerance highlighted by the absence of toxicity symptoms in shoots despite the significant accumulation of metals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cell-Based Phenotyping Reveals QTL for Membrane Potential Maintenance Associated with Hypoxia and Salinity Stress Tolerance in Barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad B. Gill

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Waterlogging and salinity are two major abiotic stresses that hamper crop production world-wide resulting in multibillion losses. Plant abiotic stress tolerance is conferred by many interrelated mechanisms. Amongst these, the cell’s ability to maintain membrane potential (MP is considered to be amongst the most crucial traits, a positive relationship between the ability of plants to maintain highly negative MP and its tolerance to both salinity and waterlogging stress. However, no attempts have been made to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL conferring this trait. In this study, the microelectrode MIFE technique was used to measure the plasma membrane potential of epidermal root cells of 150 double haploid (DH lines of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. from a cross between a Chinese landrace TX9425 and Japanese malting cultivar Naso Nijo under hypoxic conditions. A major QTL for the MP in the epidermal root cells in hypoxia-exposed plants was identified. This QTL was located on 2H, at a similar position to the QTL for waterlogging and salinity tolerance reported in previous studies. Further analysis confirmed that MP showed a significant contribution to both waterlogging and salinity tolerance. The fact that the QTL for MP was controlled by a single major QTL illustrates the power of the single-cell phenotyping approach and opens prospects for fine mapping this QTL and thus being more effective in marker assisted selection.

  4. Alterations in cellular metabolism modulate CD1d-mediated NKT-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Tonya J; Carey, Gregory B; East, James E; Sun, Wenji; Bollino, Dominique R; Kimball, Amy S; Brutkiewicz, Randy R

    2016-08-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells play a critical role in the host's innate immune response. CD1d-mediated presentation of glycolipid antigens to NKT cells has been established; however, the mechanisms by which NKT cells recognize infected or cancerous cells remain unclear. 5(')-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master regulator of lipogenic pathways. We hypothesized that activation of AMPK during infection and malignancy could alter the repertoire of antigens presented by CD1d and serve as a danger signal to NKT cells. In this study, we examined the effect of alterations in metabolism on CD1d-mediated antigen presentation to NKT cells and found that an infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus rapidly increased CD1d-mediated antigen presentation. Hypoxia inducible factors (HIF) enhance T-cell effector functions during infection, therefore antigen presenting cells pretreated with pharmacological agents that inhibit glycolysis, induce HIF and activate AMPK were assessed for their ability to induce NKT-cell responses. Pretreatment with 2-deoxyglucose, cobalt chloride, AICAR and metformin significantly enhanced CD1d-mediated NKT-cell activation. In addition, NKT cells preferentially respond to malignant B cells and B-cell lymphomas express HIF-1α. These data suggest that targeting cellular metabolism may serve as a novel means of inducing innate immune responses. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Integration of Principles of Systems Biology and Radiation Biology: Toward Development of in silico Models to Optimize IUdR-Mediated Radiosensitization of DNA Mismatch Repair Deficient (Damage Tolerant) Human Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Timothy J.; Gurkan-Cavusoglu, Evren; Du, Weinan; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 7 years, we have focused our experimental and computational research efforts on improving our understanding of the biochemical, molecular, and cellular processing of iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) and ionizing radiation (IR) induced DNA base damage by DNA mismatch repair (MMR). These coordinated research efforts, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP), brought together system scientists with expertise in engineering, mathematics, and complex systems theory and translational cancer researchers with expertise in radiation biology. Our overall goal was to begin to develop computational models of IUdR- and/or IR-induced base damage processing by MMR that may provide new clinical strategies to optimize IUdR-mediated radiosensitization in MMR deficient (MMR−) “damage tolerant” human cancers. Using multiple scales of experimental testing, ranging from purified protein systems to in vitro (cellular) and to in vivo (human tumor xenografts in athymic mice) models, we have begun to integrate and interpolate these experimental data with hybrid stochastic biochemical models of MMR damage processing and probabilistic cell cycle regulation models through a systems biology approach. In this article, we highlight the results and current status of our integration of radiation biology approaches and computational modeling to enhance IUdR-mediated radiosensitization in MMR− damage tolerant cancers. PMID:22649757

  6. Integration of Principles of Systems Biology and Radiation Biology: Toward Development of in silico Models to Optimize IUdR-Mediated Radiosensitization of DNA Mismatch Repair Deficient (Damage Tolerant) Human Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, Timothy J.; Gurkan-Cavusoglu, Evren; Du, Weinan; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 7 years, we have focused our experimental and computational research efforts on improving our understanding of the biochemical, molecular, and cellular processing of iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) and ionizing radiation (IR) induced DNA base damage by DNA mismatch repair (MMR). These coordinated research efforts, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP), brought together system scientists with expertise in engineering, mathematics, and complex systems theory and translational cancer researchers with expertise in radiation biology. Our overall goal was to begin to develop computational models of IUdR- and/or IR-induced base damage processing by MMR that may provide new clinical strategies to optimize IUdR-mediated radiosensitization in MMR deficient (MMR − ) “damage tolerant” human cancers. Using multiple scales of experimental testing, ranging from purified protein systems to in vitro (cellular) and to in vivo (human tumor xenografts in athymic mice) models, we have begun to integrate and interpolate these experimental data with hybrid stochastic biochemical models of MMR damage processing and probabilistic cell cycle regulation models through a systems biology approach. In this article, we highlight the results and current status of our integration of radiation biology approaches and computational modeling to enhance IUdR-mediated radiosensitization in MMR − damage tolerant cancers.

  7. Eliciting Autoimmunity to Ovarian Tumors in Mice by Genetic Disruption of T Cell Tolerance Mechanisms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Brad H

    2005-01-01

    Research in the fields of basic immunology and autoimmunity has identified several distinct mechanisms through which immune tolerance is established and maintained in the normal host, and additional...

  8. Clinical Cancer Therapy by NK Cells via Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kory L. Alderson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are powerful effector cells that can be directed to eliminate tumor cells through tumor-targeted monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. Some tumor-targeted mAbs have been successfully applied in the clinic and are included in the standard of care for certain malignancies. Strategies to augment the antitumor response by NK cells have led to an increased understanding of how to improve their effector responses. Next-generation reagents, such as molecularly modified mAbs and mAb-cytokine fusion proteins (immunocytokines, ICs designed to augment NK-mediated killing, are showing promise in preclinical and some clinical settings. Continued research into the antitumor effects induced by NK cells and tumor-targeted mAbs suggests that additional intrinsic and extrinsic factors may influence the antitumor response. Therefore more research is needed that focuses on evaluating which NK cell and tumor criteria are best predictive of a clinical response and which combination immunotherapy regimens to pursue for distinct clinical settings.

  9. Hemeoxygenase-1 Mediates an Adaptive Response to Spermidine-Induced Cell Death in Human Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spermidine (SPD is a ubiquitous polycation that is commonly distributed in living organisms. Intracellular levels of SPD are tightly regulated, and SPD controls cell proliferation and death. However, SPD undergoes oxidation in the presence of serum, producing aldehydes, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonia, which exert cytotoxic effect on cells. Hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1 is thought to have a protective effect against oxidative stress. Upregulation of HO-1 in endothelial cells is considered to be beneficial in the cardiovascular disease. In the present study, we demonstrate that the ubiquitous polyamine, SPD, induces HO-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. SPD-induced HO-1 expression was examined by Western blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Involvement of reactive oxygen species, serum amine oxidase, PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, and transcription factor Nrf2 in the induction of HO-1 by SPD was also investigated. Furthermore, small interfering RNA knockdown of Nrf2 or HO-1 and treatment with the specific HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP exhibited a noteworthy increase of death of SPD-stimulated HUVECs. In conclusion, these results suggest that SPD induces PI3K/Akt-Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression in human endothelial cells, which may have a role in cytoprotection of the cells against oxidative stress-induced death.

  10. Integrin-mediated cell surface recruitment of autotaxin promotes persistent directional cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Kooi, Craig Vander; Shah, Pritom; Charnigo, Richard; Huang, Cai; Smyth, Susan S.; Morris, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) that binds to integrin adhesion receptors. We dissected the roles of integrin binding and lysoPLD activity in stimulation of human breast cancer and mouse aortic vascular smooth muscle cell migration by ATX. We compared effects of wild-type human ATX, catalytically inactive ATX, an integrin binding-defective ATX variant with wild-type lysoPLD activity, the isolated ATX integrin binding N-terminal domain, and a potent ATX selective lysoPLD inhibitor on cell migration using transwell and single-cell tracking assays. Stimulation of transwell migration was reduced (18 or 27% of control, respectively) but not ablated by inactivation of integrin binding or inhibition of lysoPLD activity. The N-terminal domain increased transwell migration (30% of control). ATX lysoPLD activity and integrin binding were necessary for a 3.8-fold increase in the fraction of migrating breast cancer cell step velocities >0.7 μm/min. ATX increased the persistent directionality of single-cell migration 2-fold. This effect was lysoPLD activity independent and recapitulated by the integrin binding N-terminal domain. Integrin binding enables uptake and intracellular sequestration of ATX, which redistributes to the front of migrating cells. ATX binding to integrins and lysoPLD activity therefore cooperate to promote rapid persistent directional cell migration.—Wu, T., Kooi, C. V., Shah, P., Charnigo, R., Huang, C., Smyth, S. S., Morris, A. J. Integrin-mediated cell surface recruitment of autotaxin promotes persistent directional cell migration. PMID:24277575

  11. Polyol-mediated Synthesis of Chalcogenide Nanoparticles for Thin-film Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Hailong

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was polyol-mediated syntheses of chalcogenide nanoparticles for printable thin-film solar cells. In this thesis, chalcogenide nanoparticles, such as Cu2Se, In2Se3, CZTS, Se@CuSe and Te@Bi2Te3, have been successfully synthesized via a polyol-mediated method.

  12. Decreased drug accumulation and increased tolerance to DNA damage in tumor cells with a low level of cisplatin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzi, C; Perego, P; Supino, R; Romanelli, S; Pensa, T; Carenini, N; Viano, I; Colangelo, D; Leone, R; Apostoli, P; Cassinelli, G; Gambetta, R A; Zunino, F

    1998-04-15

    In an attempt to examine the cellular changes associated with cisplatin resistance, we selected a cisplatin-resistant (A43 1/Pt) human cervix squamous cell carcinoma cell line following continuous in vitro drug exposure. The resistant subline was characterized by a 2.5-fold degree of resistance. In particular, we investigated the expression of cellular defence systems and other cellular factors probably involved in dealing with cisplatin-induced DNA damage. Resistant cells exhibited decreased platinum accumulation and reduced levels of DNA-bound platinum and interstrand cross-link frequency after short-term drug exposure. Analysis of the effect of cisplatin on cell cycle progression revealed a cisplatin-induced G2M arrest in sensitive and resistant cells. Interestingly, a slowdown in S-phase transit was found in A431/Pt cells. A comparison of the ability of sensitive and resistant cells to repair drug-induced DNA damage suggested that resistant cells were able to tolerate higher levels of cisplatin-induced DNA damage than their parental counterparts. Analysis of the expression of proteins involved in DNA mismatch repair showed a decreased level of MSH2 in resistant cells. Since MSH2 seems to be involved in recognition of drug-induced DNA damage, this change may account for the increased tolerance to DNA damage observed in the resistant subline. In conclusion, the involvement of accumulation defects and the increased tolerance to cisplatin-induced DNA damage in these cisplatin-resistant cells support the notion that multiple changes contribute to confer a low level of cisplatin resistance.

  13. Heterotypic contact reveals a COX-2-mediated suppression of osteoblast differentiation by endothelial cells: A negative modulatory role for prostanoids in VEGF-mediated cell: cell communication?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarkin, Claire E.; Garonna, Elena; Pitsillides, Andrew A.; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline P.D.

    2008-01-01

    In bone, angiogenesis must be initiated appropriately, but limited once remodelling or repair is complete. Our recent findings have supported a role for prostaglandins (PG), known modulators of osteoblast (OB) and endothelial cell (EC) behaviour, in facilitating VEGF-mediated paracrine communication from OBs to 'remotely located' ECs, but the mechanism(s) regulating OB:EC crosstalk when these cells are closely opposed are undefined. In this study we have examined: (i) the effects of exogenous PGE 2 on VEGF-driven events in ECs, and (ii) the role of endogenous COX-2-derived prostanoids in mediating communication between intimately opposed OBs and ECs in direct contact. Exposure of ECs to PGE 2 increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation, COX-2 induction, 6-keto-PGF 1α release and EC proliferation. In contrast, PGE 2 attenuated VEGF 165 -induced VEGFR2/Flk1 phosphorylation, ERK1/2 activation and proliferation of ECs, suggesting that exogenous PGE 2 restricts the actions of VEGF. However, the COX-2-selective inhibitor, NS398, also attenuated VEGF-induced proliferation, implying a distinct role for endogenous COX-2 activity in regulating EC behaviour. To examine the effect of OB:EC proximity and the role of COX-2 products further, we used a confrontational co-culture model. These studies showed that COX-2 blockade with NS398 enhanced EC-dependent increases in OB differentiation, that this effect was reversed by exogenous PGH 2 (immediate COX-2 product), and that exogenous VEGF did not influence EC-dependent OB differentiation under these conditions. Our findings indicate that locally produced prostanoids may serve distinct roles depending on OB:EC proximity and negatively modulate VEGF-mediated changes in EC behaviour when these cells are closely opposed to control angiogenesis during bone (re)modelling

  14. NUP98-HOXA10hd-expanded hematopoietic stem cells efficiently reconstitute bone marrow of mismatched recipients and induce tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Y; Bennett, J L; Sekulovic, S; So, L; Yi, L; McNagny, K; Humphries, R K; Rossi, F M V

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy as well as methods capable of returning cells to a pluripotent state (iPS) have enabled the correction of genetic deficiencies in syngenic adult progenitors, reducing the need for immunosuppression in cell therapy approaches. However, in diseases involving mutations that lead to the complete lack of a protein, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the main immunogens leading to rejection of transplanted cells are the therapeutic proteins themselves. In these cases even iPS cells would not circumvent the need for immunosuppression, and alternative strategies must be developed. One such potential strategy seeks to induce immune tolerance using hematopoietic stem cells originated from the same donor or iPS line from which the therapeutic progenitors are derived. However, donor hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are available in limiting numbers and embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived HSCs engraft poorly in adults. While these limitations have been circumvented by ectopic expression of HOXB4, overexpression of this protein is associated with inefficient lymphoid reconstitution. Here we show that adult HSCs expanded with a NUP98- HOXA10hd fusion protein sustain long-term engraftment in immunologically mismatched recipients and generate normal numbers of lymphoid cells. In addition, NUP98-HOXA10hd-expanded cells induce functional immune tolerance to a subsequent transplant of myogenic progenitors immunologically matched with the transplanted HSCs.

  15. A20 is critical for the induction of Pam3CSK4-tolerance in monocytic THP-1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyue Hu

    Full Text Available A20 functions to terminate Toll-like receptor (TLR-induced immune response, and play important roles in the induction of lipopolysacchride (LPS-tolerance. However, the molecular mechanism for Pam3CSK4-tolerance is uncertain. Here we report that TLR1/2 ligand Pam3CSK4 induced tolerance in monocytic THP-1 cells. The pre-treatment of THP-1 cells with Pam3CSK4 down-regulated the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by Pam3CSK4 re-stimulation. Pam3CSK4 pre-treatment also down-regulated the signaling transduction of JNK, p38 and NF-κB induced by Pam3CSK4 re-stimulation. The activation of TLR1/2 induced a rapid and robust up-regulation of A20, suggesting that A20 may contribute to the induction of Pam3CSK4-tolerance. This hypothesis was proved by the observation that the over-expression of A20 by gene transfer down-regulated Pam3CSK4-induced inflammatory responses, and the down-regulation of A20 by RNA interference inhibited the induction of tolerance. Moreover, LPS induced a significant up-regulation of A20, which contributed to the induction of cross-tolerance between LPS and Pam3CSK4. A20 was also induced by the treatment of THP-1 cells with TNF-α and IL-1β. The pre-treatment with TNF-α and IL-1β partly down-regulated Pam3CSK4-induced activation of MAPKs. Furthermore, pharmacologic inhibition of GSK3 signaling down-regulated Pam3CSK4-induced A20 expression, up-regulated Pam3CSK4-induced inflammatory responses, and partly reversed Pam3CSK4 pre-treatment-induced tolerance, suggesting that GSK3 is involved in TLR1/2-induced tolerance by up-regulation of A20 expression. Taken together, these results indicated that A20 is a critical regulator for TLR1/2-induced pro-inflammatory responses.

  16. Siglec-G represses DAMP-mediated effects on T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubai, Tomomi; Rossi, Corinne; Oravecz-Wilson, Katherine; Zajac, Cynthia; Liu, Chen; Braun, Thomas; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Wu, Julia; Sun, Yaping; Brabbs, Stuart; Tamaki, Hiroya; Magenau, John; Zheng, Pang; Liu, Yang; Reddy, Pavan

    2017-07-20

    The role of negative regulators or suppressors of the damage-associated molecular pattern-mediated (DAMP-mediated) stimulation of innate immune responses is being increasingly appreciated. However, the presence and function of suppressors of DAMP-mediated effects on T cells, and whether they can be targeted to mitigate T cell-dependent immunopathology remain unknown. Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin G (Siglec-G) is a negative regulator of DAMP-mediated responses in innate immune cells, but its T cell-autonomous role is unknown. Utilizing loss-of-function-based (genetic knockout) and gain-of-function-based (agonist) approaches, we demonstrate that in the presence of certain DAMPs, Siglec-G suppressed in vitro and in vivo T cell responses. We also demonstrate that its T cell-autonomous role is critical for modulating the severity of the T cell-mediated immunopathology, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Enhancing the Siglec-G signaling in donor T cells with its agonist, a CD24Fc fusion protein, ameliorated GVHD while preserving sufficient graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects in vivo. Collectively, these data demonstrate that Siglec-G is a potentially novel negative regulator of T cell responses, which can be targeted to mitigate GVHD.

  17. RelE-mediated dormancy is enhanced at high cell density in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Yosuke; Kawata, Koji; Taniuchi, Asami; Kakinuma, Kenji; May, Thithiwat; Okabe, Satoshi

    2012-03-01

    Bacteria show remarkable adaptability under several stressful conditions by shifting themselves into a dormant state. Less is known, however, about the mechanism underlying the cell transition to dormancy. Here, we report that the transition to dormant states is mediated by one of the major toxin-antitoxin systems, RelEB, in a cell density-dependent manner in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. We constructed a strain, IKA121, which expresses the toxin RelE in the presence of rhamnose and lacks chromosomal relBE and rhaBAD. With this strain, we demonstrated that RelE-mediated dormancy is enhanced at high cell densities compared to that at low cell densities. The initiation of expression of the antitoxin RelB from a plasmid, pCA24N, reversed RelE-mediated dormancy in bacterial cultures. The activation of RelE increased the appearance of persister cells against β-lactams, quinolones, and aminoglycosides, and more persister cells appeared at high cell densities than at low cell densities. Further analysis indicated that amino acid starvation and an uncharacterized extracellular heat-labile substance promote RelE-mediated dormancy. This is a first report on the induction of RelE-mediated dormancy by high cell density. This work establishes a population-based dormancy mechanism to help explain E. coli survival in stressful environments.

  18. Silencing the SpMPK1, SpMPK2, and SpMPK3 Genes in Tomato Reduces Abscisic Acid—Mediated Drought Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Drought is a major threat to agriculture production worldwide. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs play a pivotal role in sensing and converting stress signals into appropriate responses so that plants can adapt and survive. To examine the function of MAPKs in the drought tolerance of tomato plants, we silenced the SpMPK1, SpMPK2, and SpMPK3 genes in wild-type plants using the virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS method. The results indicate that silencing the individual genes or co-silencing SpMPK1, SpMPK2, and SpMPK3 reduced the drought tolerance of tomato plants by varying degrees. Co-silencing SpMPK1 and SpMPK2 impaired abscisic acid (ABA-induced and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced stomatal closure and enhanced ABA-induced H2O2 production. Similar results were observed when silencing SpMPK3 alone, but not when SpMPK1 and SpMPK2 were individually silenced. These data suggest that the functions of SpMPK1 and SpMPK2 are redundant, and they overlap with that of SpMPK3 in drought stress signaling pathways. In addition, we found that SpMPK3 may regulate H2O2 levels by mediating the expression of CAT1. Hence, SpMPK1, SpMPK2, and SpMPK3 may play crucial roles in enhancing tomato plants’ drought tolerance by influencing stomatal activity and H2O2 production via the ABA-H2O2 pathway.

  19. Melatonin confers plant tolerance against cadmium stress via the decrease of cadmium accumulation and reestablishment of microRNA-mediated redox homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Quan; Chen, Ziping; Yu, Xiuli; Cui, Weiti; Pan, Jincheng; Zhao, Gan; Xu, Sheng; Wang, Ren; Shen, Wenbiao

    2017-08-01

    Although melatonin-alleviated cadmium (Cd) toxicity both in animals and plants have been well studied, little is known about its regulatory mechanisms in plants. Here, we discovered that Cd stress stimulated the production of endogenous melatonin in alfalfa seedling root tissues. The pretreatment with exogenous melatonin not only increased melatonin content, but also alleviated Cd-induced seedling growth inhibition. The melatonin-rich transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing alfalfa SNAT (a melatonin synthetic gene) exhibited more tolerance than wild-type plants under Cd conditions. Cd content was also reduced in root tissues. In comparison with Cd stress alone, ABC transporter and PCR2 transcripts in alfalfa seedlings, PDR8 and HMA4 in Arabidopsis, were up-regulated by melatonin. By contrast, Nramp6 transcripts were down-regulated. Changes in above transporters were correlated with the less accumulation of Cd. Additionally Cd-triggered redox imbalance was improved by melatonin. These could be supported by the changes of the Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase gene regulated by miR398a and miR398b. Histochemical staining, laser scanning confocal microscope, and H 2 O 2 contents analyses showed the similar tendencies. Taking together, we clearly suggested that melatonin enhanced Cd tolerance via decreasing cadmium accumulation and reestablishing the microRNAs-mediated redox homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [Observation of cells tolerant of tobacco mosaic virus in virus-induced local lesions in Datura stramonium L. leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reunov, A V; Lega, S N; Nagorskaia, V P; Lapshina, L A

    2011-01-01

    Ultrastructural examination of tobacco mosaic virus-induced local lesions developing in leaves of Datura stramonium plants demonstrated that, in the central area of the lesions, the cell response to viral invasion was not uniform. Most cells exhibited an acute hypersensitive reaction and underwent rapid and complete necrosis. However, some cells, despite considerable virus accumulation and immediate contact with completely collapsed cells, maintained a certain degree of structural integrity. Analysis performed showed that the proportion of collapsed and uncollapsed cells in the lesion centre 3 to 5 days after infection did not change essentially. These data suggest that the absence of hypersensitive response in some cells in the lesion centre is not due to an early stage of infection but is likely caused by cell tolerance of the virus.

  1. In vitro evaluation of inorganic and methyl mercury mediated cytotoxic effect on neural cells derived from different animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jing; Wang, Youwei; Lu, Yuanan

    2016-03-01

    To extend the current understanding of the mercury-mediated cytotoxic effect, five neural cell lines established from different animal species were comparatively analyzed using three different endpoint bioassays: thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay (MTT), neutral red uptake assay (NRU), and Coomassie blue assay (CB). Following a 24-hr exposure to selected concentrations of mercury chloride (HgCl2) and methylmercury (II) chloride (MeHgCl), the cytotoxic effect on test cells was characterized by comparing their 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) values. Experimental results indicated that both these forms of mercury were toxic to all the neural cells, but at very different degrees. The IC50 values of MeHgCl among these cell lines ranged from 1.15±0.22 to 10.31±0.70μmol/L while the IC50 values for HgCl2 were much higher, ranging from 6.44±0.36 to 160.97±19.63μmol/L, indicating the more toxic nature of MeHgCl. The IC50 ratio between HgCl2 and MeHgCl ranged from 1.75 to 96.0, which confirms that organic mercury is much more toxic to these neural cells than inorganic mercury. Among these cell lines, HGST-BR and TriG44 derived from marine sea turtles showed a significantly high tolerance to HgCl2 as compared to the three mammalian neural cells. Among these neural cells, SK-N-SH represented the most sensitive cells to both chemical forms of mercury. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Maintenance therapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer: evolution, tolerability and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coate, Linda E.; Shepherd, Frances A.

    2011-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer death in the industrialized world. Despite significant progress in early stage disease, survival rates for advanced disease remain low. Maintenance therapy is a treatment strategy that has been investigated extensively in NSCLC and has been the subject of considerable recent debate. Options for maintenance include continuing the initial combination chemotherapy regimen, continuing only single agent chemotherapy (‘continuation maintenance’) or introducing a new agent (‘switch’ maintenance therapy). Therapies that have been studied in this setting in randomized trials to date include chemotherapy, molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapy approaches. Following the development of multiple new agents that show activity in NSCLC, and have a tolerable side-effect profile, there has been increasing interest in utilizing them to maintain response to initial therapy after treatment with platinum-based doublets. Despite considerable controversy, it has become an acceptable treatment paradigm. Here, we briefly outline the evolution of this treatment paradigm and examine which subgroups of patients are most likely to benefit. PMID:21904577

  3. The essential role of the Deinococcus radiodurans ssb gene in cell survival and radiation tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Scott Lockhart

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has implicated single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB expression level as an important factor in microbial radiation resistance. The genome of the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans contains genes for two SSB homologs: the homodimeric, canonical Ssb, encoded by the gene ssb, and a novel pentameric protein encoded by the gene ddrB. ddrB is highly induced upon exposure to radiation, and deletions result in decreased radiation-resistance, suggesting an integral role of the protein in the extreme resistance exhibited by this organism. Although expression of ssb is also induced after irradiation, Ssb is thought to be involved primarily in replication. In this study, we demonstrate that Ssb in D. radiodurans is essential for cell survival. The lethality of an ssb deletion cannot be complemented by providing ddrB in trans. In addition, the radiation-sensitive phenotype conferred by a ddrB deletion is not alleviated by providing ssb in trans. By altering expression of the ssb gene, we also show that lower levels of transcription are required for optimal growth than are necessary for high radiation resistance. When expression is reduced to that of E. coli, ionizing radiation resistance is similarly reduced. UV resistance is also decreased under low ssb transcript levels where growth is unimpaired. These results indicate that the expression of ssb is a key component of both normal cellular metabolism as well as pathways responsible for the high radiation tolerance of D. radiodurans.

  4. Palladium-alloy catalysts as ethanol tolerant cathodes for direct alcohol fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savadogo, O. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire de nouveaux materiaux pour l' energie et l' electrochimie; Varela, F.J.R. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Coahuila (Mexico). Unidad Saltillo

    2008-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that electroactive palladium (Pd) and Pd-alloy catalysts prepared using a sputtering technique possess a similar degree of activity as platinum (Pt) electrodes. This study demonstrated that Pd and Pd-alloys show a high degree of tolerance to ethanol during oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) processes. The onset potential of the ORR process in the presence of 0.5M of ethanol decreased by only 33 mV and 18 mV on Pd and Pd-cobalt (Co) catalysts. Linear sweep voltammetry experiments showed that no peak current density caused by the electro-oxidation of ethanol was observed in the Pd-based catalysts. The selective behaviour of the Pd and Pd-Co catalysts was attributed to a slow rate of adsorption of the ethanol as well as the presence of reaction intermediates on the catalytic surface. Results suggested that the Pd and Pd-Co catalysts are suitable candidates for direct alcohol fuel cell applications. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Lipophilic Contaminants Influence Cold Tolerance of Invertebrates through Changes in Cell Membrane Fluidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, M.; Bouvrais, Hélène; Westh, P.

    2014-01-01

    Contaminants taken up by living organisms in the environment as a result of anthropogenic contamination can reduce the tolerance of natural stressors, e.g., low temperatures, but the physiological mechanisms behind these interactions of effects are poorly understood. The tolerance to low temperat...

  6. Recovery from bleaching is mediated by threshold densities of background thermo-tolerant symbiont types in a reef-building coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Line K; Doyle, Jason; Logan, Murray; Berkelmans, Ray

    2016-06-01

    Sensitive molecular analyses show that most corals host a complement of Symbiodinium genotypes that includes thermo-tolerant types in low abundance. While tolerant symbiont types are hypothesized to facilitate tolerance to temperature and recovery from bleaching, empirical data on their distribution and relative abundance in corals under ambient and stress conditions are still rare. We quantified visual bleaching and mortality of coral hosts, along with relative abundance of C- and D-type Symbiodinium cells in 82 Acropora millepora colonies from three locations on the Great Barrier Reef transplanted to a central inshore site over a 13 month period. Our analyses reveal dynamic change in symbiont associations within colonies and among populations over time. Coral bleaching and declines in C- but not D-type symbionts were observed in transplanted corals. Survival and recovery of 25% of corals from one population was associated with either initial D-dominance or an increase in D-type symbionts that could be predicted by a minimum pre-stress D : C ratio of 0.003. One-third of corals from this population became D dominated at the bleached stage despite no initial detection of this symbiont type, but failed to recover and died in mid to late summer. These results provide a predictive threshold minimum density of background D-type symbionts in A. millepora, above which survival following extreme thermal stress is increased.

  7. The healthy donor profile of immunoregulatory soluble mediators is altered by stem cell mobilization and apheresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melve, Guro Kristin; Ersvaer, Elisabeth; Paulsen Rye, Kristin; Bushra Ahmed, Aymen; Kristoffersen, Einar K; Hervig, Tor; Reikvam, Håkon; Hatfield, Kimberley Joanne; Bruserud, Øystein

    2018-03-22

    Peripheral blood stem cells from healthy donors mobilized by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and thereafter harvested by leukapheresis are commonly used for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Plasma levels of 38 soluble mediators (cytokines, soluble adhesion molecules, proteases, protease inhibitors) were analyzed in samples derived from healthy stem cell donors before G-CSF treatment and after 4 days, both immediately before and after leukapheresis. Donors could be classified into two main subsets based on their plasma mediator profile before G-CSF treatment. Seventeen of 36 detectable mediators were significantly altered by G-CSF; generally an increase in mediator levels was seen, including pro-inflammatory cytokines, soluble adhesion molecules and proteases. Several leukocyte- and platelet-released mediators were increased during apheresis. Both plasma and graft mediator profiles were thus altered and showed correlations to graft concentrations of leukocytes and platelets; these concentrations were influenced by the apheresis device used. Finally, the mediator profile of the allotransplant recipients was altered by graft infusion, and based on their day +1 post-transplantation plasma profile our recipients could be divided into two major subsets that differed in overall survival. G-CSF alters the short-term plasma mediator profile of healthy stem cell donors. These effects together with the leukocyte and platelet levels in the graft determine the mediator profile of the stem cell grafts. Graft infusion also alters the systemic mediator profile of the recipients, but further studies are required to clarify whether such graft-induced alterations have a prognostic impact. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. ZFAT plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its T cell receptor-mediated response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Keiko; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Okamura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoko; Mototani, Yasumasa; Goto, Motohito; Ota, Takeharu; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Masahide; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We generated Cd4-Cre-mediated T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice. ► Zfat-deficiency leads to reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. ► Impaired T cell receptor-mediated response in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. ► Decreased expression of IL-7Rα, IL-2Rα and IL-2 in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. ► Zfat plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis. -- Abstract: ZFAT, originally identified as a candidate susceptibility gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, has been reported to be involved in apoptosis, development and primitive hematopoiesis. Zfat is highly expressed in T- and B-cells in the lymphoid tissues, however, its physiological function in the immune system remains totally unknown. Here, we generated the T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice and demonstrated that Zfat-deficiency leads to a remarkable reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Intriguingly, a reduced expression of IL-7Rα and the impaired responsiveness to IL-7 for the survival were observed in the Zfat-deficient T cells. Furthermore, a severe defect in proliferation and increased apoptosis in the Zfat-deficient T cells following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation was observed with a reduced IL-2Rα expression as well as a reduced IL-2 production. Thus, our findings reveal that Zfat is a critical regulator in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its TCR-mediated response.

  9. Oxidant-mediated epithelial cell injury in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Cantin, A M; North, S L; Fells, G A; Hubbard, R C; Crystal, R G

    1987-01-01

    Lung inflammatory cells of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) were evaluated for their ability to injure 51Cr-labeled AKD alveolar epithelial cells in the presence and absence of IPF alveolar epithelial lining fluid (ELF). The IPF cells were spontaneously releasing exaggerated amounts of superoxide (O.2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) compared with normal (P less than 0.02). Cytotoxicity of the AKD cells was markedly increased when the IPF inflammatory cells were incubated with a...

  10. Insulin resistance according to β-cell function in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and normal glucose tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Kyeong Song

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is associated with insulin resistance (IR and compensatory hyperinsulinemia. IR is recognized as a major risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, few studies have investigated IR in women with PCOS and normal glucose tolerance. The objective of this study was to evaluate IR and β-cell function in women with PCOS and normal glucose tolerance. Additionally, we sought to evaluate the usefulness of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT-derived IR indices in lean women with PCOS.We recruited 100 women with PCOS and normal glucose tolerance and 100 age- and BMI-matched women as controls. IR and insulin secretory indices, including the homeostasis-model assessment (HOMA-IR, HOMA-M120, HOMA-F and the Stumvoll index, were calculated from an OGTT. Increased β-cell function was defined as>75th percentile for the HOMA-F in control women.Women with PCOS had higher values for post-load 2-hour glucose, fasting insulin, post-load 2-hour insulin, HOMA-IR, HOMA-M120, HOMA-F and lower values for the Stumvoll index than the controls (all Ps<0.05. Women with PCOS and increased β-cell function showed lower Stumvoll index values than the matched controls (P<0.05. The HOMA-F was significantly associated with the HOMA-M120 and Stumvoll index when adjusted for age and BMI in a multiple regression analysis (all Ps<0.05. The HOMA-M120 was positively correlated with triglycerides and free testosterone, and the Stumvoll index was negatively correlated with triglycerides and free testosterone in lean women with PCOS (all Ps<0.05.Women with PCOS and normal glucose tolerance showed higher IR than controls matched for age, BMI, and β-cell function. β-cell function was increased in women with PCOS when compared to the matched controls, but not when the lean subjects were compared to the matched controls separately. Therefore, early evaluation of IR in women with PCOS and normal glucose tolerance may be needed.

  11. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) with a rice chitinase gene for improved tolerance to a fungal pathogen Sclerotium rolfsii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoling; Miyasaka, Susan C; Fitch, Maureen M M; Moore, Paul H; Zhu, Yun J

    2008-05-01

    Taro (Colocasia esculenta) is one of the most important crops in the Pacific Islands, however, taro yields have been declining in Hawaii over the past 30 years partly due to diseases caused by oomycete and fungal pathogens. In this study, an efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method for taro is first reported. In total, approximately 200 pieces (8 g) of embryogenic calluses were infected with the super-virulent A. tumefaciens strain EHA105 harboring the plant transformation plasmid pBI121/ricchi11 that contains the rice chitinase gene ricchi11. The presence and expression of the transgene ricchi11 in six independent transgenic lines was confirmed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). Southern blot analysis of the six independent lines indicated that three out of six (50%) had integrated a single copy of the transgene, and the other three lines had two or three copies of the transgene. Compared to the particle bombardment transformation of taro method, which was used in the previous studies, the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method obtained 43-fold higher transformation efficiency. In addition, these six transgenic lines via Agrobacterium may be more effective for transgene expression as a result of single-copy or low-copy insertion of the transgene than the single line with multiple copies of the transgene via particle bombardment. In a laboratory bioassay, all six transgenic lines exhibited increased tolerance to the fungal pathogen Sclerotium rolfsii, ranging from 42 to 63% reduction in lesion expansion.

  12. Combined effect of x irradiation and cell-mediated immune reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, C.W.; Guertin, D.P.

    1978-01-01

    The combined effect of radiation and cell-mediated immune reaction on tumor cells was investigated in vitro. Mastocytoma P815-X2 cells of DBA mice either were irradiated first and subjected to immune lysis by immune splenic lymphocytes of C57Bl mice, or the tumor cells were subjected to immune reaction first and then irradiated. Cell survival was quantitated by colony formation in soft agar medium. It was observed that cellular immune damage to tumor cells did not influence the response of tumor cells to subsequent radiation. Irradiation of tumor cells first, followed by subjection of the cells to cellular immune reaction, slightly enhanced the death of the tumor cells. It appears that this enhanced death might have resulted from a relative increase in the ratio of the number of cytotoxic immune cells to the number of target tumor cells in the incubation mixture as a consequence of the decrease in the number of viable tumor cells by radiation

  13. Suppression of HLA expression by lentivirus-mediated gene transfer of siRNA cassettes and in vivo chemoselection to enhance hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacke, Katrin; Falahati, Rustom; Flebbe-Rehwaldt, Linda; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Gaensler, Karin M L

    2009-01-01

    uniquely combined transplantation during the neonatal period, when tolerance may be more readily achieved, with a positive selection strategy for in vivo amplification of drug-resistant donor HSC. This model system enables the evaluation of mechanisms of tolerance induction to neo-antigens, and allogeneic stem cells during immune ontogeny. HSC are transduced ex vivo by lentivirus-mediated gene transfer of P140K-O(6)-methylguanine-methyltransferase (MGMT(P140K)). The MGMT(P140K) DNA repair enzyme confers resistance to benzylguanine, an inhibitor of endogenous MGMT, and to chloroethylating agents such as BCNU. In vivo chemoselection enables enrichment of donor cells at the stem cell level. Using complementary approaches of in vivo chemoselection and RNAi-induced silencing of HLA expression may enable the generation of histocompatibility-enhanced, and eventually, perhaps "universally" compatible cellular grafts.

  14. Snail-mediated cancer stem cell-like phenotype in human CNE2 nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shan; Wu, Cheng; Sun, Wei; Liu, Dongbo; Luo, Min; Su, Beibei; Zhang, Linli; Mei, Qi; Hu, Guoqing

    2018-03-01

    Cancer stem cell (CSC)-like phenotype, which has been proven to play a critical role in invasion and metastasis of many kinds of cancers, has also been reported to be associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Snail, a potent repressor of E-cadherin expression, was found to have a function to regulate the aforementioned processes. In the current study, expression of putative CSCs biomarkers and the ratio of CSC-like CNE2 (cancer cell line) in total CNE2 were measured, and CSC-like characteristics were analyzed with tumor-sphere self-renewal and colony-forming assays. Migration and invasion properties were determined by using transwell and wound healing assays. Xenograft tumor assays in vivo were done to evaluate the function of Snail and radiation in the tumor forming ability. In human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells, overexpression of Snail mediates a CSC-like phenotype, which enhances the initiation, invasion, and migration ability of cancer cells. Thus, Snail is a potential therapeutic target in NPC. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Benzodiazepinone derivatives protect against endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated cell death in human neuronal cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Haixia; Limpert, Allison S; Zou, Jiwen; Dembo, Anna; Lee, Pooi-San; Grant, Daniel; Ardecky, Robert; Pinkerton, Anthony B; Magnuson, Gavin K; Goldman, Mark E; Rong, Juan; Teriete, Peter; Sheffler, Douglas J; Reed, John C; Cosford, Nicholas D P

    2015-03-18

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress causes neuronal dysfunction followed by cell death and is recognized as a feature of many neurodegenerative diseases. Using a phenotypic screen, we recently identified benzodiazepinone derivatives that reduce ER stress-mediated apoptosis in a rat neuronal progenitor cell line (CSM14.1). Herein we describe how structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies around these screening hits led to compounds that display robust cytoprotective activity against thapsigargin-induced ER stress in SH-SY5Y and H4 human neuronal cell lines. We demonstrate that the most potent of these derivatives, compound 4hh, inhibits the activation of p38 MAP kinase (p38) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), protein kinases that are downstream signal effectors of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Compound 4hh specifically protects against thapsigargin-induced cell death and displays no protection against other insults known to induce cellular stress or activate p38. However, compound 4hh provides moderate inhibition of p38 activity stimulated by compounds that disrupt calcium homeostasis. Our data indicate that probe compound 4hh is a valuable small molecule tool that can be used to investigate the effects of ER stress on human neurons. This approach may provide the basis for the future development of therapeutics for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Circumvention of regulatory CD4(+) T cell activity during cross-priming strongly enhances T cell-mediated immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heit, Antje; Gebhardt, Friedemann; Lahl, Katharina; Neuenhahn, Michael; Schmitz, Frank; Anderl, Florian; Wagner, Hermann; Sparwasser, Tim; Busch, Dirk H; Kastenmüller, Kathrin

    2008-06-01

    Immunization with purified antigens is a safe and practical vaccination strategy but is generally unable to induce sustained CD8(+) T cell-mediated protection against intracellular pathogens. Most efforts to improve the CD8(+) T cell immunogenicity of these vaccines have focused on co-administration of adjuvant to support cross-presentation and dendritic cell maturation. In addition, it has been shown that CD4(+) T cell help during the priming phase contributes to the generation of protective CD8(+) memory T cells. In this report we demonstrate that the depletion of CD4(+) T cells paradoxically enhances long-lasting CD8-mediated protective immunity upon protein vaccination. Functional and genetic in vivo inactivation experiments attribute this enhancement primarily to MHC class II-restricted CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which appear to physiologically suppress the differentiation process towards long-living effector memory T cells. Since, in functional terms, this suppression by Treg largely exceeds the positive effects of conventional CD4(+) T cell help, even the absence of all CD4(+) T cells or lack of MHC class II-mediated interactions on priming dendritic cells result in enhanced CD8(+) T cell immunogenicity. These findings have important implications for the improvement of vaccines against intracellular pathogens or tumors, especially in patients with highly active Treg.

  17. Phosphorylated Akt Protein at Ser473 Enables HeLa Cells to Tolerate Nutrient-Deprived Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathy, Moustafa; Awale, Suresh; Nikaido, Toshio

    2017-12-29

    Background: Despite angiogenesis, many tumours remain hypovascular and starved of nutrients while continuing to grow rapidly. The specific biochemical mechanisms associated with starvation resistance, austerity, may be new biological characters of cancer that are critical for cancer progression. Objective: This study aim was to investigate the effect of nutrient starvation on HeLa cells and the possible mechanism by which the cells are able to tolerate nutrient-deprived conditions. Methods: Nutrient starvation was achieved by culturing HeLa cells in nutrient-deprived medium (NDM) and cell survival was estimated by using cell counting kit-8. The effect of starvation on cell cycle distribution and the quantitative analysis of apoptotic cells were investigated by flow cytometry using propidium iodide staining. Western blotting was used to detect the expression levels of Akt and phosphorylated Akt at Ser473 (Ser473p-Akt) proteins. Results: HeLa cells displayed extremely long survival when cultured in NDM. The percentage of apoptotic HeLa cells was significantly increased by starvation in a time-dependent manner. A significant increase in the expression of Ser473p-Akt protein after starvation was also observed. Furthermore, it was found that Akt inhibitor III molecule inhibited the cells proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Conclusion: Results of the present study provide evidence that Akt activation may be implicated in the tolerance of HeLa cells for nutrient starvation and may help to suggest new therapeutic strategies designed to prevent austerity of cervical cancer cells through inhibition of Akt activation. Creative Commons Attribution License

  18. A multimeric carcinoembryonic antigen signal inhibits the activation of human T cells by a SHP-independent mechanism: a potential mechanism for tumor-mediated suppression of T-cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoo-A; Bae, Eun-Ah; Song, You Chan; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Yoon-Sook; Kim, Tai-Gyu; Kang, Chang-Yuil

    2015-06-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a well-known tumor antigen that is found in the serum of patients with various cancers and is correlated with an increased risk of cancer recurrence and metastasis. To understand the tumor environment and to develop antitumor therapies, CEA has been studied as an antigen to activate/tolerate specific T cells. In this study, we show that CEA can function as a coinhibitory molecule and can inhibit the activation of human peripheral blood mononucleated cell-derived T cells. The addition of CEA-overexpressing tumor cells or immobilized CEA dampened both cell proliferation and the expression of IL-2 and CD69 expression in T cells after TCR stimulation. The phosphorylation of ERK and translocation of NFAT were hampered in these cells, whereas the phosphorylation of proximal TCR signaling molecules such as ZAP70 and phospholipase Cγ was not affected by immobilized CEA. To determine the relevance of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 and Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase (SHP) molecules to CEA-mediated suppression, we tested the effect of the SHP inhibitor, NSC-87877, on CEA-mediated suppression of T cells; however, it did not reverse the effect of CEA. Collectively, these results indicate that CEA can function as a modulator of T-cell responses suggesting a novel mechanism of tumor evasion. © 2014 UICC.

  19. UCP2- and non-UCP2-mediated electric current in eukaryotic cells exhibits different properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruihua; MoYung, K C; Zhang, M H; Poon, Karen

    2015-12-01

    Using live eukaryotic cells, including cancer cells, MCF-7 and HCT-116, normal hepatocytes and red blood cells in anode and potassium ferricyanide in cathode of MFC could generate bio-based electric current. Electrons and protons generated from the metabolic reaction in both cytosol and mitochondria contributing to the leaking would mediate the generation of electric current. Both resveratrol (RVT) and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) used to induce proton leak in mitochondria were found to promote electric current production in all cells except red blood cells without mitochondria. Proton leak might be important for electric current production by bringing the charge balance in cells to enhance the further electron leak. The induced electric current by RVT can be blocked by Genipin, an inhibitor of UCP2-mediated proton leak, while that induced by DNP cannot. RVT could reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in cells better than that of DNP. In addition, RVT increased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), while DNP decreased it. Results highly suggested the existence of at least two types of electric current that showed different properties. They included UCP2-mediated and non-UCP2-mediated electric current. UCP2-mediated electric current exhibited higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction effect per unit electric current production than that of non-UCP2-mediated electric current. Higher UCP2-mediated electric current observed in cancer cells might contribute to the mechanism of drug resistence. Correlation could not be established between electric current production with either ROS and MMP without distinguishing the types of electric current.

  20. Adult Tissue-Derived Stem Cells and Tolerance Induction in Nonhuman Primates for Vascularized Composite Allograft Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Allograft Transplantation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Eric A. Elster, MD RECIPIENT: The Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military...Medicine Bethesda, MD 20817 REPORT DATE: October 2017 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command...2017 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2016 - 29 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Adult Tissue-Derived Stem Cells and Tolerance Induction

  1. Secretory phospholipase A2-mediated neuronal cell death involves glutamate ionotropic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, Miriam; de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    2002-01-01

    To define the significance of glutamate ionotropic receptors in sPLA -mediated neuronal cell death we used the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 and the AMPA receptor antagonist PNQX. In primary neuronal cell cultures both MK-801 and PNQX inhibited sPLA - and glutamate-induced neuronal death. [ H...... neuronal cell death. We conclude that glutamatergic synaptic activity modulates sPLA -induced neuronal cell death....

  2. Modulation of T Cell Tolerance in a Murine Model for Immunotherapy of Prostatic Adenocarcinoma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hurwitz, Arthur

    2002-01-01

    ...) under the transcriptional control of a prostate-specific promoter. In this summary, we report that TRAMP mice express TAg in the thymus which indicates that both central and peripheral tolerance exist...

  3. Glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with or without low-to-medium dose glucocorticoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoes, J.N.; van der Goes, M.C.; van Raalte, D.H.; van der Zijl, N.J.; den Uyl, D.; Lems, W.F.; Lafeber, F.P.G.J.; Jacobs, J.W.G.; Welsing, P.M.J.; Diamant, M.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To compare glucose tolerance and parameters of insulin sensitivity and β-cell function between chronic glucocorticoid (GC)-using and GC-naive patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Frequently sampled 75 g oral glucose tolerance tests were performed in 58 chronic GC-using and

  4. Evaluation of engraftment and immunological tolerance after reduced intensity conditioning in a rhesus hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, N; Weitzel, R P; Evans, M E; Green, R; Bonifacino, A C; Krouse, A E; Metzger, M E; Hsieh, M M; Donahue, R E; Tisdale, J F

    2014-02-01

    Reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) is desirable for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) targeted gene therapy; however, RIC may be insufficient for efficient engraftment and inducing immunological tolerance to transgenes. We previously established long-term gene marking in our rhesus macaque autologous HSC transplantation model following 10 Gy total body irradiation (TBI). In this study, we evaluated RIC transplantation with 4 Gy TBI in two rhesus macaques that received equal parts of CD34(+) cells transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing lentiviral vector and empty vector not expressing transgenes. In both animals, equivalently low gene marking between GFP and empty vectors was observed 6 months post-transplantation, even with efficient transduction of CD34(+) cells in vitro. Autologous lymphocyte infusion with GFP marking resulted in an increase of gene marking in lymphocytes in a control animal with GFP tolerance, but not in the two RIC-transplanted animals. In vitro assays revealed strong cellular and humoral immune responses to GFP protein in the two RIC-transplanted animals, but this was not observed in controls. In summary, 4 Gy TBI is insufficient to permit engraftment of genetically modified HSCs and induce immunological tolerance to transgenes. Our findings should help in the design of conditioning regimens in gene therapy trials.

  5. Intraoral administration of a T-cell epitope peptide induces immunological tolerance in Cry j 2-sensitized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitomi, Tomomi; Nakagami, Yasuhiro; Hirahara, Kazuki; Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Yamashita, Makoto

    2007-08-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy using allergen-derived peptides is feasible as a novel specific immunotherapy, but its efficacy has not yet been demonstrated in either humans or animals. In addition, it remains obscure whether the oral immune system is involved in the mechanism of sublingual immunotherapy. Here, we show that the intraoral administration of the T-cell epitope peptide P2-246-259 derived from Cry j 2, a major Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) pollen allergen, to Cry j 2-sensitized mice induces immunological tolerance, and that ex vivo lymph node cell proliferation to P2-246-259 and Cry j 2 was inhibited. In addition, intraoral administration was shown to be superior to intragastric administration in terms of tolerance induction, suggesting that the oral immune system contributes to the induction of immunological tolerance. Therefore, the significant efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy using a peptide on allergen-specific T-cells was demonstrated in animals, and this may be potentiated by the oral mucosal immune system. Copyright (c) 2007 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Tolerability of Repeat Use of Blue Light Cystoscopy with Hexaminolevulinate for Patients with Urothelial Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Giulia I; Downs, Tracy M; Soubra, Ayman; Rao, Amrita; Hemsley, Lauren; Laylan, Christopher; Shi, Fangfang; Konety, Badrinath

    2017-03-01

    Hexaminolevulinate hydrochloride with blue light cystoscopy is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as an adjunct to white light cystoscopy for the detection of urothelial cell carcinoma. In this study we examined the tolerability of the repeat use of white light cystoscopy with blue light cystoscopy. We retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients who underwent white light cystoscopy with blue light cystoscopy using hexaminolevulinate hydrochloride during a 34-month period at 2 institutions. We compared the incidence of adverse events after initial and subsequent procedures. We grouped, graded and assigned the degree of attribution for all adverse events. A total of 180 patients underwent 269 white light cystoscopy with blue light cystoscopy procedures. Of those 180 patients 118 (65%) underwent white light cystoscopy with blue light cystoscopy only 1 time. The other 62 (35%) patients underwent white light cystoscopy with blue light cystoscopy 2 or more times, including 43 (24%) 2 times and 19 (10%) 3 or more times. We noted 89 adverse events out of 269 procedures (33%), of which 66 (74%) occurred after the first white light cystoscopy with blue light cystoscopy; 14 (16%) after the second time and 9 (10%) after the third time or more. We found no statistically significant difference in adverse events between those patients undergoing 1 vs 2 or more white light cystoscopy with blue light cystoscopy procedures (p=0.134). We observed 1 grade 3 adverse event and no grade 4 or 5 adverse events. None of the adverse events were classified as probably or definitely related to hexaminolevulinate hydrochloride. In this retrospective study we found no statistically significant difference in the frequency or the grade of adverse events between first and repeat use of white light cystoscopy with blue light cystoscopy using hexaminolevulinate hydrochloride. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier

  7. HIV-1 adaptation to NK cell-mediated immune pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elemans, Marjet; Boelen, Lies; Rasmussen, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The observation, by Alter et al., of the enrichment of NK cell “escape” variants in individuals carrying certain Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor (KIR) genes is compelling evidence that natural killer (NK) cells exert selection pressure on HIV-1. Alter et al hypothesise that variant pepti...

  8. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Jones, David R.; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S.

    2016-01-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1–mediated (PD-1–mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB–based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies. PMID:27454297

  9. Role of the retinoblastoma protein in cell cycle arrest mediated by a novel cell surface proliferation inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enebo, D. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Moos, P. J.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A novel cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS-18), purified from the cell surface of bovine cerebral cortex cells has been shown to be a potent and reversible inhibitor of proliferation of a wide array of fibroblasts as well as epithelial-like cells and nontransformed and transformed cells. To investigate the possible mechanisms by which CeReS-18 exerts its inhibitory action, the effect of the inhibitor on the posttranslational regulation of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product (RB), a tumor suppressor gene, has been examined. It is shown that CeReS-18 mediated cell cycle arrest of both human diploid fibroblasts (HSBP) and mouse fibroblasts (Swiss 3T3) results in the maintenance of the RB protein in the hypophosphorylated state, consistent with a late G1 arrest site. Although their normal nontransformed counterparts are sensitive to cell cycle arrest mediated by CeReS-18, cell lines lacking a functional RB protein, through either genetic mutation or DNA tumor virus oncoprotein interaction, are less sensitive. The refractory nature of these cells is shown to be independent of specific surface receptors for the inhibitor, and another tumor suppressor gene (p53) does not appear to be involved in the CeReS-18 inhibition of cell proliferation. The requirement for a functional RB protein product, in order for CeReS-18 to mediate cell cycle arrest, is discussed in light of regulatory events associated with density-dependent growth inhibition.

  10. Remarkable heterogeneity displayed by oval cells in rat and mouse models of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Peter; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Rasmussen, Morten

    2007-01-01

    the molecular phenotypes of oval cells in several of the most commonly used protocols of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration-namely, treatment with 2-acetylaminofluorene and partial (70%) hepatectomy (AAF/PHx); a choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet; a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydro...

  11. Highly Methanol Tolerant Cathode Based on PtAg for Use in Microfluidic Fuel Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrego-Martínez, J C; Arriaga, L G; Cuevas-Muñiz, F M; Mendoza-Huizar, L H; Ledesma-Garcia, J

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, a methanol tolerant cathode catalyst was developed through the electrodeposition of bimetallic nanoparticles PtAg on a glassy carbon electrode using potentiostatic and voltammetric techniques. The resulting particles were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical techniques. According to the SEM study the synthetized nanoparticles have semi-spherical shape and their average diameter is 100 nm. This material shows catalytic activity to the oxygen reduction reaction with high tolerance to methanol. (paper)

  12. Tolerating Zero Tolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian N.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of zero tolerance dates back to the mid-1990s when New Jersey was creating laws to address nuisance crimes in communities. The main goal of these neighborhood crime policies was to have zero tolerance for petty crime such as graffiti or littering so as to keep more serious crimes from occurring. Next came the war on drugs. In federal…

  13. Shikonin kills glioma cells through necroptosis mediated by RIP-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanjiang Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Shikonin was reported to induce necroptosis in leukemia cells, but apoptosis in glioma cell lines. Thus, it is needed to clarify whether shikonin could cause necroptosis in glioma cells and investigate its underlying mechanisms. METHODS: Shikonin and rat C6 glioma cell line and Human U87 glioma cell line were used in this study. The cellular viability was assayed by MTT. Flow cytometry with annexin V-FITC and PI double staining was used to analyze cellular death modes. Morphological alterations in C6 glioma cells treated with shikoinin were evaluated by electronic transmission microscopy and fluorescence microscopy with Hoechst 33342 and PI double staining. The level of reactive oxygen species was assessed by using redox-sensitive dye DCFH-DA. The expressional level of necroptosis associated protein RIP-1 was analyzed by western blotting. RESULTS: Shikonin induced cell death in C6 and U87 glioma cells in a dose and time dependent manner. The cell death in C6 and U87 glioma cells could be inhibited by necroptosis inhibitor necrotatin-1, not by pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Shikonin treated C6 glioma cells presented electron-lucent cytoplasm, loss of plasma membrane integrity and intact nuclear membrane in morphology. The increased ROS level caused by shikonin was attenuated by necrostatin-1 and blocking ROS by anti-oxidant NAC rescued shikonin-induced cell death in both C6 and U87 glioma cells. Moreover, the expressional level of RIP-1 was up-regulated by shikonin in a dose and time dependent manner as well, but NAC suppressed RIP-1 expression. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated that the cell death caused by shikonin in C6 and U87 glioma cells was mainly via necroptosis. Moreover, not only RIP-1 pathway, but also oxidative stress participated in the activation of shikonin induced necroptosis.

  14. Concise Review: Cellular Therapies: The Potential to Regenerate and Restore Tolerance in Immune-Mediated Intestinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Cangemi, Giuseppina Cristina; Kruzliak, Peter; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2016-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory enteropathies, including celiac disease, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis, are lifelong disabling conditions whose cure is still an unmet need, despite the great strides made in understanding their complex pathogenesis. The advent of cellular therapies, mainly based on the use of stem cells, represents a great step forward thanks to their multitarget strategy. Both hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) have been employed in the treatment of refractory cases with promising results. The lack of immunogenicity makes MSC more suitable for therapeutic purposes as their infusion may be performed across histocompatibility locus antigen barriers without risk of rejection. The best outcome has been obtained when treating fistulizing Crohn's disease with local injections of MSC. In addition, both HSC and MSC proved successful in promoting regeneration of intestinal mucosa, and favoring the expansion of a T-cell regulatory subset. By virtue of the ability to favor mucosal homeostasis, this last cell population has been exploited in clinical trials, with inconsistent results. Finally, the recent identification of the epithelial stem cell marker has opened up the possibility of tissue engineering, with an array of potential applications for intestinal diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms of action of these interconnected therapeutic strategies are still poorly understood. It is conceivable that over the next few years their role will become clearer as the biological interactions with injured tissues and the hierarchy by which they deliver their action are unraveled through a continuous moving from bench to bedside and vice versa. Stem Cells 2016;34:1474-1486. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  15. Prevention of Tracheal High-Dose Tolerance Induction by Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor- Dependent Restoration of Antigen-Presenting Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanna Haneda

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The intrusion of airborne allergens into airways elicits eosinophilic inflammation, as represented by bronchial asthma. It has been shown that excessive amounts of allergen in murine trachea lead to an unexpected evasion of deleterious eosinophilic inflammation by inducing T cell tolerance. In the present study, the mechanisms of tracheal high-dose tolerance are examined with regard to accessory cell functions and the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines on tolerance. Antigen-induced tracheal eosinophilia was suppressed on instillation of high doses of antigen into the trachea, while concurrent instillation of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF with the antigen restored the diminished responses. The restoration of eosinophilic infiltration by GM-CSF occurred in parallel with an increase in interleukin (IL-4 production by CD4+ T cells from the mediastinal lymph nodes. This was found to reflect the empowerment of antigen-presenting cells by GM-CSF, because the impaired ability of Ia+ cells from the tolerant mice to stimulate IL-4-producing T cells is restored by GM-CSF administration. The prevention of tolerance by up-regulating accessory cell functions is a feature unique to GM-CSF, because another pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-iβ, failed to empower antigen-presenting cells. Thus, besides the induction of transforming growth factor-β-secreting CD4+ T cells, high-dose tolerance in the trachea includes an impairment of the accessory cell functions that support IL-4 production from T cells, which was reversed by GM-CSF. This report is the first demonstration that GM-CSF breaks the T cell tolerance of IL-4-producing T helper cells.

  16. Gold nanoparticle-mediated laser stimulation induces a complex stress response in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsmeier, Sonja; Heeger, Patrick; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Kalies, Stefan; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo; Heinemann, Dag

    2018-04-25

    Stimulation of neuronal cells generally resorts to electric signals. Recent advances in laser-based stimulation methods could present an alternative with superior spatiotemporal resolution. The avoidance of electronic crosstalk makes these methods attractive for in vivo therapeutic application. In particular, nano-mediators, such as gold nanoparticles, can be used to transfer the energy from a laser pulse to the cell membrane and subsequently activate excitable cells. Although the underlying mechanisms of neuronal activation have been widely unraveled, the overall effect on the targeted cell is not understood. Little is known about the physiological and pathophysiological impact of a laser pulse targeted onto nanoabsorbers on the cell membrane. Here, we analyzed the reaction of the neuronal murine cell line Neuro-2A and murine primary cortical neurons to gold nanoparticle mediated laser stimulation. Our study reveals a severe, complex and cell-type independent stress response after laser irradiation, emphasizing the need for a thorough assessment of this approach's efficacy and safety.

  17. HaloTag protein-mediated specific labeling of living cells with quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, Min-kyung; Yao Hequan; Rao Jianghong

    2008-01-01

    Quantum dots emerge as an attractive alternative to small molecule fluorophores as fluorescent tags for in vivo cell labeling and imaging. This communication presents a method for specific labeling of live cells using quantum dots. The labeling is mediated by HaloTag protein expressed at the cell surface which forms a stable covalent adduct with its ligand (HaloTag ligand). The labeling can be performed in one single step with quantum dot conjugates that are functionalized with HaloTag ligand, or in two steps with biotinylated HaloTag ligand first and followed by streptavidin coated quantum dots. Live cell fluorescence imaging indicates that the labeling is specific and takes place at the cell surface. This HaloTag protein-mediated cell labeling method should facilitate the application of quantum dots for live cell imaging

  18. The 3 major types of innate and adaptive cell-mediated effector immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziato, Francesco; Romagnani, Chiara; Romagnani, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    The immune system has tailored its effector functions to optimally respond to distinct species of microbes. Based on emerging knowledge on the different effector T-cell and innate lymphoid cell (ILC) lineages, it is clear that the innate and adaptive immune systems converge into 3 major kinds of cell-mediated effector immunity, which we propose to categorize as type 1, type 2, and type 3. Type 1 immunity consists of T-bet(+) IFN-γ-producing group 1 ILCs (ILC1 and natural killer cells), CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells (TC1), and CD4(+) TH1 cells, which protect against intracellular microbes through activation of mononuclear phagocytes. Type 2 immunity consists of GATA-3(+) ILC2s, TC2 cells, and TH2 cells producing IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, which induce mast cell, basophil, and eosinophil activation, as well as IgE antibody production, thus protecting against helminthes and venoms. Type 3 immunity is mediated by retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt(+) ILC3s, TC17 cells, and TH17 cells producing IL-17, IL-22, or both, which activate mononuclear phagocytes but also recruit neutrophils and induce epithelial antimicrobial responses, thus protecting against extracellular bacteria and fungi. On the other hand, type 1 and 3 immunity mediate autoimmune diseases, whereas type 2 responses can cause allergic diseases. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Inhibition of natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity by lipids extracted from Mycobacterium bovis BCG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozemond, R. C.; Halperin, M.; Das, P. K.

    1985-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated an augmentation of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity by various adjuvants including BCG. Inhibitory effects of BCG have also been reported, particularly for relatively high doses. Because the cell wall of Mycobacterium bovis BCG contains a high

  20. Mercury induces inflammatory mediator release from human mast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Erika

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mercury is known to be neurotoxic, but its effects on the immune system are less well known. Mast cells are involved in allergic reactions, but also in innate and acquired immunity, as well as in inflammation. Many patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD have "allergic" symptoms; moreover, the prevalence of ASD in patients with mastocytosis, characterized by numerous hyperactive mast cells in most tissues, is 10-fold higher than the general population suggesting mast cell involvement. We, therefore, investigated the effect of mercuric chloride (HgCl2 on human mast cell activation. Methods Human leukemic cultured LAD2 mast cells and normal human umbilical cord blood-derived cultured mast cells (hCBMCs were stimulated by HgCl2 (0.1-10 μM for either 10 min for beta-hexosaminidase release or 24 hr for measuring vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and IL-6 release by ELISA. Results HgCl2 induced a 2-fold increase in β-hexosaminidase release, and also significant VEGF release at 0.1 and 1 μM (311 ± 32 pg/106 cells and 443 ± 143 pg/106 cells, respectively from LAD2 mast cells compared to control cells (227 ± 17 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p 2 (0.1 μM to the proinflammatory neuropeptide substance P (SP, 0.1 μM had synergestic action in inducing VEGF from LAD2 mast cells. HgCl2 also stimulated significant VEGF release (360 ± 100 pg/106 cells at 1 μM, n = 5, p 6 cells, and IL-6 release (466 ± 57 pg/106 cells at 0.1 μM compared to untreated cells (13 ± 25 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p 2 (0.1 μM to SP (5 μM further increased IL-6 release. Conclusions HgCl2 stimulates VEGF and IL-6 release from human mast cells. This phenomenon could disrupt the blood-brain-barrier and permit brain inflammation. As a result, the findings of the present study provide a biological mechanism for how low levels of mercury may contribute to ASD pathogenesis.

  1. Adaptive and innate immune reactions regulating mast cell activation: from receptor-mediated signaling to responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tkaczyk, Christine; Jensen, Bettina M; Iwaki, Shoko

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we have described studies that have demonstrated that mast cells can be activated as a consequence of adaptive and innate immune reactions and that these responses can be modified by ligands for other receptors expressed on the surface of mast cells. These various stimuli...... differentially activate multiple signaling pathways within the mast cells required for the generation and/or release of inflammatory mediators. Thus, the composition of the suite of mediators released and the physiologic ramifications of these responses are dependent on the stimuli and the microenvironment...

  2. Vault nanocapsules as adjuvants favor cell-mediated over antibody-mediated immune responses following immunization of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upendra K Kar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modifications of adjuvants that induce cell-mediated over antibody-mediated immunity is desired for development of vaccines. Nanocapsules have been found to be viable adjuvants and are amenable to engineering for desired immune responses. We previously showed that natural nanocapsules called vaults can be genetically engineered to elicit Th1 immunity and protection from a mucosal bacterial infection. The purpose of our study was to characterize immunity produced in response to OVA within vault nanoparticles and compare it to another nanocarrier. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterized immunity resulting from immunization with the model antigen, ovalbumin (OVA encased in vault nanocapsules and liposomes. We measured OVA responsive CD8(+ and CD4(+ memory T cell responses, cytokine production and antibody titers in vitro and in vivo. We found that immunization with OVA contain in vaults induced a greater number of anti-OVA CD8(+ memory T cells and production of IFNγ plus CD4(+ memory T cells. Also, modification of the vault body could change the immune response compared to OVA encased in liposomes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These experiments show that vault nanocapsules induced strong anti-OVA CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cell memory responses and modest antibody production, which markedly differed from the immune response induced by liposomes. We also found that the vault nanocapsule could be modified to change antibody isotypes in vivo. Thus it is possible to create a vault nanocapsule vaccine that can result in the unique combination of immunogen-responsive CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cell immunity coupled with an IgG1 response for future development of vault nanocapsule-based vaccines against antigens for human pathogens and cancer.

  3. Mediation of autophagic cell death by type 3 ryanodine receptor (RyR3 in adult hippocampal neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Min eChung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic Ca2+ actively engages in diverse intracellular processes from protein synthesis, folding and trafficking to cell survival and death. Dysregulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels is observed in various neuropathological states including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs and IP3 receptors (IP3Rs, the main Ca2+ release channels located in endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes, are known to direct various cellular events such as autophagy and apoptosis. Here we investigated the intracellular Ca2+-mediated regulation of survival and death of adult hippocampal neural stem (HCN cells utilizing an insulin withdrawal model of autophagic cell death. Despite comparable expression levels of RyR and IP3R transcripts in HCN cells at normal state, the expression levels of RyRs — especially RyR3 — were markedly upregulated upon insulin withdrawal. While treatment with the RyR agonist caffeine significantly promoted the autophagic death of insulin-deficient HCN cells, treatment with its inhibitor dantrolene prevented the induction of autophagy following insulin withdrawal. Furthermore, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of the RyR3 gene abolished autophagic cell death of HCN cells. This study delineates a distinct, RyR3-mediated ER Ca2+ regulation of autophagy and programmed cell death in neural stem cells. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical, yet understudied mechanisms underlying the regulatory function of ER Ca2+ in neural stem cell biology.

  4. Double overexpression of DREB and PIF transcription factors improves drought stress tolerance and cell elongation in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Madoka; Kidokoro, Satoshi; Yoshida, Takuya; Mizoi, Junya; Todaka, Daisuke; Fernie, Alisdair R; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2017-04-01

    Although a variety of transgenic plants that are tolerant to drought stress have been generated, many of these plants show growth retardation. To improve drought tolerance and plant growth, we applied a gene-stacking approach using two transcription factor genes: DEHYDRATION-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT-BINDING 1A (DREB1A) and rice PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR-LIKE 1 (OsPIL1). The overexpression of DREB1A has been reported to improve drought stress tolerance in various crops, although it also causes a severe dwarf phenotype. OsPIL1 is a rice homologue of Arabidopsis PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4), and it enhances cell elongation by activating cell wall-related gene expression. We found that the OsPIL1 protein was more stable than PIF4 under light conditions in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Transactivation analyses revealed that DREB1A and OsPIL1 did not negatively affect each other's transcriptional activities. The transgenic plants overexpressing both OsPIL1 and DREB1A showed the improved drought stress tolerance similar to that of DREB1A overexpressors. Furthermore, double overexpressors showed the enhanced hypocotyl elongation and floral induction compared with the DREB1A overexpressors. Metabolome analyses indicated that compatible solutes, such as sugars and amino acids, accumulated in the double overexpressors, which was similar to the observations of the DREB1A overexpressors. Transcriptome analyses showed an increased expression of abiotic stress-inducible DREB1A downstream genes and cell elongation-related OsPIL1 downstream genes in the double overexpressors, which suggests that these two transcription factors function independently in the transgenic plants despite the trade-offs required to balance plant growth and stress tolerance. Our study provides a basis for plant genetic engineering designed to overcome growth retardation in drought-tolerant transgenic plants. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology

  5. IL-10 polymorphism and cell-mediated immune response to Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, H.; Tiitinen, A; Halttunen, M.

    2006-01-01

    background. To study a relationship between interleukin-10 (IL-10) promoter -1082 polymorphism and cell-mediated immune response during C trachomatis infection in vitro, lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine (IL-10, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5) secretion were analysed in subjects with different...... IL-10 genotypes. Enhanced IL-10 secretion and reduced antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferative and IFN-gamma responses were found in subjects with IL-10 -1082 GG genotype when compared to those with -1082 AA genotype. CD14+ monocytes were main source of IL-10 indicating that these cells...... are important regulators of the antigen-specific cell-mediated responses during active C trachomatis infection. We conclude that impaired cell-mediated response to C trachomatis is associated with IL-10 genotype in subjects with high IL-10 producing capacity. A comparison of immune markers between subjects...

  6. Aptamer-mediated indirect quantum dot labeling and fluorescent imaging of target proteins in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jianbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Guo, Qiuping; Huang, Jin; Li, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Protein labeling for dynamic living cell imaging plays a significant role in basic biological research, as well as in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. We have developed a novel strategy in which the dynamic visualization of proteins within living cells is achieved by using aptamers as mediators for indirect protein labeling of quantum dots (QDs). With this strategy, the target protein angiogenin was successfully labeled with fluorescent QDs in a minor intactness model, which was mediated by the aptamer AL6-B. Subsequent living cell imaging analyses indicated that the QDs nanoprobes were selectively bound to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, gradually internalized into the cytoplasm, and mostly localized in the lysosome organelle, indicating that the labeled protein retained high activity. Compared with traditional direct protein labeling methods, the proposed aptamer-mediated strategy is simple, inexpensive, and provides a highly selective, stable, and intact labeling platform that has shown great promise for future biomedical labeling and intracellular protein dynamic analyses. (paper)

  7. Cell-mediated immunity to herpes simplex in humans: lymphocyte cytotoxicity measured by 51Cr release from infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, A.S.; Percy, J.S.; Kovithavongs, T.

    1975-01-01

    We assessed cell-mediated immunity to herpes simplex virus type 1 antigen in patients suffering from recurrent cold sores and in a series of healthy controls. Paradoxically, all those subject to recurrent herpetic infections had, without exception, evidence of cell-mediated immunity to herpes antigens. This was demonstrated by lymphocyte transformation and specific 51 Cr release from infected human amnion cells after incubation with peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Where performed, skin tests with herpes antigen were also positive. In addition, serum from these patients specifically sensitized herpes virus-infected cells to killing by nonimmune, control mononuclear cells. These tests were negative in the control patients except in a few cases, and it is suggested that these latter may be the asymptomatic herpes virus carriers previously recognized or that they may have experienced a genital infection. (U.S.)

  8. [T cell-mediated immune responses and the recognition of tuberculosis antigens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Kunio; Koide, Yukio

    2010-06-01

    T cell-mediated immune responses profoundly contribute to the protection against the re-activation of latently infected Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Th1 cells produce IFN-gamma to activate infected macrophages and promote the formation of granulomas around infected macrophages. CD8+, gamma delta and CD1-restricted T cells also produce IFN-gamma and participate the protective responses against bacterial growth. Th17 cells produce IL-17 to promote the mobilization of immunocompetent cells and contribute to the granuloma formation. On the contrary, Th2 cells and Tregs interfere these protective immune responses.

  9. Cells that mediate NK like cytotoxicity are present in the human delayed type hypersensitivity response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartof, D; Yung, C W; Curran, J J; Livingston, C; Thalji, Z

    1984-11-01

    By inducing delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses under previously formed skin blisters we determined that cells which mediate natural killer (NK) like cytotoxicity are present in the DTH response in man. Similar levels of killing were not present in cells obtained from skin blisters not associated with positive DTH responses. The DTH response associated killer cell was found to be a mononuclear cell that had presumably undergone stimulation since it not only killed NK sensitive K-562 cells, but also NK resistant Daudi target cells.

  10. Visfatin Reduces Gap Junction Mediated Cell-to-Cell Communication in Proximal Tubule-Derived Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E. Hills

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In the current study we examined if the adipocytokine, visfatin, alters connexin-mediated intercellular communication in proximal tubule-derived epithelial cells. Methods: The effects of visfatin (10-200ng/mL on cell viability and cytotoxicity in HK2-cells were assessed by MTT, crystal violet and lactate dehydrogenase assays. Western blot analysis was used to confirm expression of Cx26, Cx40 and Cx43. The effect of visfatin (10-200ng/mL on TGF-β1 secretion was confirmed by ELISA, and the effects of both TGF-β1 (2-10ng/mL and visfatin (10-200ng/mL on connexin expression were assessed by western blot. Functional intercellular communication was determined using transfer of Lucifer Yellow and paired-whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology. Results: In low glucose (5mM, visfatin (10-200ng/mL did not affect membrane integrity, cytotoxicity or cell viability at 48hrs, but did evoke a concentration-dependent reduction in Cx26 and Cx43 expression. The expression of Cx40 was unaffected. At 48hrs, visfatin (10-200ng/mL increased the secretion of TGF-β1 and the visfatin-evoked changes in connexin expression were mimicked by exogenous application of the pro-fibrotic cytokine (2-10ng/ml. Visfatin reduced dye transfer between coupled cells and decreased functional conductance, with levels falling by 63% as compared to control. Although input resistance was increased following visfatin treatment by 166%, the change was not significant as compared to control. The effects of visfatin on Cx-expression and cell-coupling were blocked in the presence of a TGF-β1 specific neutralizing antibody. Conclusions: The adipocytokine visfatin selectively evoked a non-toxic reduction in connexin expression in HK2-cells. The loss in gap-junction associated proteins was mirrored by a loss in functional conductance between coupled cells. Visfatin increased TGF-β secretion and the pattern of change for connexins expression was mimicked by exogenous

  11. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Eucalyptus globulus using explants with shoot apex with introduction of bacterial choline oxidase gene to enhance salt tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Etsuko; Nanto, Kazuya; Oishi, Masatoshi; Ebinuma, Hiroyasu; Morishita, Yoshihiko; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shibata, Daisuke; Shimada, Teruhisa

    2012-01-01

    Eucalyptus globulus is one of the most economically important plantation hardwoods for paper making. However, its low transformation frequency has prevented genetic engineering of this species with useful genes. We found the hypocotyl section with a shoot apex has the highest regeneration ability among another hypocotyl sections, and have developed an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method using these materials. We then introduced a salt tolerance gene, namely a bacterial choline oxidase gene (codA) with a GUS reporter gene, into E. globulus. The highest frequency of transgenic shoot regeneration from hypocotyls with shoot apex was 7.4% and the average frequency in four experiments was 4.0%, 12-fold higher than that from hypocotyls without shoot apex. Using about 10,000 explants, over 250 regenerated buds were confirmed as transformants by GUS analysis. Southern blot analysis of 100 elongated shoots confirmed successful generation of stable transformants. Accumulation of glycinebetaine was investigated in 44 selected transgenic lines, which showed 1- to 12-fold higher glycinebetaine levels than non-transgenic controls. Rooting of 16 transgenic lines was successful using a photoautotrophic method under enrichment with 1,000 ppm CO(2). The transgenic whole plantlets were transplanted into potting soil and grown normally in a growth room. They showed salt tolerance to 300 mM NaCl. The points of our system are using explants with shoot apex as materials, inhibiting the elongation of the apex on the selection medium, and regenerating transgenic buds from the side opposite to the apex. This approach may also solve transformation problems in other important plants.

  12. Silicon Dioxide Thin Film Mediated Single Cell Nucleic Acid Isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Evgeny; Dominova, Irina; Shusharina, Natalia; Botman, Stepan; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Patrushev, Maksim

    2013-01-01

    A limited amount of DNA extracted from single cells, and the development of single cell diagnostics make it necessary to create a new highly effective method for the single cells nucleic acids isolation. In this paper, we propose the DNA isolation method from biomaterials with limited DNA quantity in sample, and from samples with degradable DNA based on the use of solid-phase adsorbent silicon dioxide nanofilm deposited on the inner surface of PCR tube. PMID:23874571

  13. Enhanced tolerance against early and late apoptotic oxidative stress in mammalian neurons through nicotinamidase and sirtuin mediated pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Zhao Zhong; Maiese, Kenneth

    2008-08-01

    Focus upon therapeutic strategies that intersect between pathways that govern cellular metabolism and cellular survival may offer the greatest impact for the treatment of a number of neurodegenerative and metabolic disorders, such as diabetes mellitus. In this regard, we investigated the role of a Drosophila nicotinamidase (DN) in mammalian SH-SY5Y neuronal cells during oxidative stress. We demonstrate that during free radical exposure to nitric oxide generators DN neuronal expression significantly increased cell survival and blocked cellular membrane injury. Furthermore, DN neuronal expression prevented both apoptotic late DNA degradation and early phosphatidylserine exposure that may serve to modulate inflammatory cell activation in vivo. Nicotinamidase activity that limited nicotinamide cellular concentrations appeared to be necessary for DN neuroprotection, since application of progressive nicotinamide concentrations could abrogate the benefits of DN expression during oxidative stress. Pathways that involved sirtuin activation and SIRT1 were suggested to be vital, at least in part, for DN to confer protection through a series of studies. First, application of resveratrol increased cell survival during oxidative stress either alone or in conjunction with the expression of DN to a similar degree, suggesting that DN may rely upon SIRT1 activation to foster neuronal protection. Second, the overexpression of either SIRT1 or DN in neurons prevented apoptotic injury specifically in neurons expressing these proteins during oxidative stress, advancing the premise that DN and SIRT1 may employ similar pathways for neuronal protection. Third, inhibition of sirtuin activity with sirtinol was detrimental to neuronal survival during oxidative stress and prevented neuronal protection during overexpression of DN or SIRT1, further supporting that SIRT1 activity may be necessary for DN neuroprotection during oxidative stress. Implementation of further work to elucidate the

  14. RAD18 mediates resistance to ionizing radiation in human glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Chen; Wang, Hongwei; Cheng, Hongbin; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Zhi; Yue, Wu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in glioma cell lines. • RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis. • The elevated expression of RAD18 is associated with recurrent GBM who underwent IR therapy. - Abstract: Radioresistance remains a major challenge in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). RAD18 a central regulator of translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), has been shown to play an important role in regulating genomic stability and DNA damage response. In the present study, we investigate the relationship between RAD18 and resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and examined the expression levels of RAD18 in primary and recurrent GBM specimens. Our results showed that RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in GBM. The expression level of RAD18 in glioma cells correlates with their resistance to IR. Ectopic expression of RAD18 in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells confers significant resistance to IR treatment. Conversely, depletion of endogenous RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells sensitized these cells to IR treatment. Moreover, RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells, whereas cells deficient in RAD18 exhibit increased apoptosis induced by IR. Furthermore, knockdown of RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells disrupts HR-mediated repair, resulting in increased accumulation of DSB. In addition, clinical data indicated that RAD18 was significantly higher in recurrent GBM samples that were exposed to IR compared with the corresponding primary GBM samples. Collectively, our findings reveal that RAD18 may serve as a key mediator of the IR response and may function as a potential target for circumventing IR resistance in human GBM

  15. Regulatory dendritic cells for promotion of liver transplant operational tolerance: Rationale for a clinical trial and accompanying mechanistic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Angus W; Humar, Abhinav; Lakkis, Fadi G; Metes, Diana M

    2017-10-31

    Dendritic cells (DC) are rare, bone marrow (BM)-derived innate immune cells that critically maintain self-tolerance in the healthy steady-state. Regulatory DC (DCreg) with capacity to suppress allograft rejection and promote transplant tolerance in pre-clinical models can readily be generated from BM precursors or circulating blood monocytes. These DCreg enhance allograft survival via various mechanisms, including promotion of regulatory T cells. In non-human primates receiving minimal immunosuppressive drug therapy (IS), infusion of DCreg of donor origin, one week before transplant, safely prolongs renal allograft survival and selectively attenuates anti-donor CD8 + memory T cell responses in the early post-transplant period. Based on these observations, and in view of the critical need to reduce patient dependence on non-specific IS agents that predispose to cardiometabolic side effects and renal insufficiency, we will conduct a first-in-human safety and preliminary efficacy study of donor-derived DCreg infusion to achieve early (18 months post-transplant) complete IS withdrawal in low-risk, living donor liver transplant recipients receiving standard-of-care IS (mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus and steroids). We will test the hypothesis that, although donor-derived DCreg are short-lived, they will induce robust donor-specific T cell hyporesponsiveness. We will examine immunological mechanisms by sequential analysis of blood and tissue samples, incorporating cutting-edge technologies. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of cell tolerability of a series of lipoamino acids using biological membranes and a biomembrane model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatello, R; Noce, C; Campisi, A; Acquaviva, R; Bucolo, C; Puglisi, G; Toth, I

    2007-04-01

    The interaction of a series of amphiphilic 2-alkyl aminoacids (lipoamino acids, LAAs) with different cell cultures and biomembrane models was investigated. LAAs can be useful promoieties to modify the physico-chemical properties of many drugs, and in particular their lipophilicity. Tests were performed in vitro on mammalian cells (murine astrocytes) and human red blood cells (haemolysis), and in vivo on rabbit eye as alternative models to assess the tolerability or the potential damaging effects of these compounds on different biological systems. The mode of interaction of LAAs with pure phospholipid multilamellar liposomes, taken as a biomembrane model, was also analysed by differential scanning calorimetry experiments. Different tolerability/toxicity patterns were obtained in the various models; in particular, the most lipophilic terms of the series, methyl 2-aminohexadecanoate (LAA16), displayed haemolytic activity and toxicity for mouse astrocyte cultures. A specific assay confirmed that LAA16 acted at level of cell membranes, while neither any damaging effects on nucleus or apoptotic induction were observed. The shorter-chain LAAs and the tetradecyl homologue (LAA14) showed the best compatibility with the various cell models.

  17. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors as modulators of trastuzumab-mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Denis M; Gately, Kathy; Hughes, Clare; Edwards, Connla; Davies, Anthony; Madden, Stephen F; O'Byrne, Kenneth J; O'Donovan, Norma; Crown, John

    2017-09-01

    Trastuzumab is an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy capable of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and used in the treatment of HER2+ breast cancer. Through interactions with FcƴR+ immune cell subsets, trastuzumab functions as a passive immunotherapy. The EGFR/HER2-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) lapatinib and the next generation TKIs afatinib and neratinib, can alter HER2 levels, potentially modulating the ADCC response to trastuzumab. Using LDH-release assays, we investigated the impact of antigen modulation, assay duration and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) activity on trastuzumab-mediated ADCC in breast cancer models of maximal (SKBR3) and minimal (MCF-7) target antigen expression to determine if modulating the ADCC response to trastuzumab using TKIs may be a viable approach for enhancing tumor immune reactivity. HER2 levels were determined in lapatinib, afatinib and neratinib-treated SKBR3 and MCF-7 using high content analysis (HCA). Trastuzumab-mediated ADCC was assessed following treatment with TKIs utilising a colorimetric LDH release-based protocol at 4 and 12h timepoints. PBMC activity was assessed against non-MHC-restricted K562 cells. A flow cytometry-based method (CFSE/7-AAD) was also used to measure trastuzumab-mediated ADCC in medium-treated SKBR3 and MCF-7. HER2 antigen levels were significantly altered by the three TKIs in both cell line models. The TKIs significantly reduced LDH levels directly in SKBR3 cells but not MCF-7. Lapatinib and neratinib augment trastuzumab-related ADCC in SKBR3 but the effect was not consistent with antigen expression levels and was dependent on volunteer PBMC activity (vs. K562). A 12h assay timepoint produced more consistent results. Trastuzumab-mediated ADCC (PBMC:target cell ratio of 10:1) was measured at 7.6±4.7% (T12) by LDH assay and 19±3.2 % (T12) using the flow cytometry-based method in the antigen-low model MCF-7. In the presence of effector cells with high

  18. Oral macrophage-like cells play a key role in tolerance induction following sublingual immunotherapy of asthmatic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarell, L; Saint-Lu, N; Moussu, H; Zimmer, A; Louise, A; Lone, Y; Ladant, D; Leclerc, C; Tourdot, S; Van Overtvelt, L; Moingeon, P

    2011-11-01

    Sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy (SLIT) is a safe and efficacious treatment for type 1 respiratory allergies. Herein, we investigated the key subset(s) of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) involved in antigen/allergen capture and tolerance induction during SLIT. Following sublingual administration, fluorochrome-labeled ovalbumin (OVA) is predominantly captured by oral CD11b⁺CD11c⁻ cells that migrate to cervical lymph nodes (CLNs) and present the antigen to naive CD4⁺ T cells. Conditional depletion with diphtheria toxin of CD11b⁺, but not CD11c⁺ cells, in oral tissues impairs CD4⁺ T-cell priming in CLNs. In mice with established asthma to OVA, specific targeting of the antigen to oral CD11b⁺ cells using the adenylate cyclase vector system reduces airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), eosinophil recruitment in bronchoalveolar lavages (BALs), and specific Th2 responses in CLNs and lungs. Oral CD11b⁺CD11c⁻ cells resemble tolerogenic macrophages found in the lamina propria (LP) of the small intestine in that they express the mannose receptor CD206, as well as class-2 retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (RALDH2), and they support the differentiation of interferon-γ/interleukin-10 (IFNγ/IL-10)-producing Foxp3⁺ CD4⁺ regulatory T cells. Thus, among the various APC subsets present in oral tissues of mice, macrophage-like cells play a key role in tolerance induction following SLIT.

  19. Royal jelly promotes DAF-16-mediated proteostasis to tolerate β-amyloid toxicity in C. elegans model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Cao, Min; Dong, Yuqing

    2016-08-23

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that dietary intervention may promote health and help prevent Alzheimer's disease (AD). We recently reported that bee products of royal jelly (RJ) and enzyme-treated royal jelly (eRJ) were potent to promote healthy aging in C. elegans. Here, we examined whether RJ/eRJ consumption may benefit to mitigate the AD symptom in the disease model of C. elegans. Our results showed that RJ/eRJ supplementation significantly delayed the body paralysis in AD worms, suggesting the β-amyloid (Aβ) toxicity attenuation effects of RJ/eRJ. Genetic analyses suggested that RJ/eRJ-mediated alleviation of Aβ toxicity in AD worms required DAF-16, rather than HSF-1 and SKN-1, in an insulin/IGF signaling dependent manner. Moreover, RJ/eRJ modulated the transactivity of DAF-16 and dramatically improved the protein solubility in aged worms. Given protein solubility is a hallmark of healthy proteostasis, our findings demonstrated that RJ/eRJ supplementation improved proteostasis, and this promotion depended on the transactivity of DAF-16. Collectively, the present study not only elucidated the possible anti-AD mechanism of RJ/eRJ, but also provided evidence from a practical point of view to shed light on the extensive correlation of proteostasis and the prevention of neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. Homeostatic NF-κB Signaling in Steady-State Migratory Dendritic Cells Regulates Immune Homeostasis and Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratin, Myriam; Foray, Chloe; Demaria, Olivier; Habbeddine, Mohamed; Pollet, Emeline; Maurizio, Julien; Verthuy, Christophe; Davanture, Suzel; Azukizawa, Hiroaki; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Dalod, Marc; Lawrence, Toby

    2015-04-21

    Migratory non-lymphoid tissue dendritic cells (NLT-DCs) transport antigens to lymph nodes (LNs) and are required for protective immune responses in the context of inflammation and to promote tolerance to self-antigens in steady-state. However, the molecular mechanisms that elicit steady-state NLT-DC maturation and migration are unknown. By comparing the transcriptome of NLT-DCs in the skin with their migratory counterparts in draining LNs, we have identified a novel NF-κB-regulated gene network specific to migratory DCs. We show that targeted deletion of IKKβ in DCs, a major activator of NF-κB, prevents NLT-DC accumulation in LNs and compromises regulatory T cell conversion in vivo. This was associated with impaired tolerance and autoimmunity. NF-κB is generally considered the prototypical pro-inflammatory transcription factor, but this study describes a role for NF-κB signaling in DCs for immune homeostasis and tolerance that could have implications in autoimmune diseases and immunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel mitochondria-targeted heat-soluble proteins identified in the anhydrobiotic Tardigrade improve osmotic tolerance of human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae Tanaka

    Full Text Available Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration through transition to a metabolically inactive state, called "anhydrobiosis". Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA proteins are heat-soluble proteins involved in the desiccation tolerance of many anhydrobiotic organisms. Tardigrades, Ramazzottius varieornatus, however, express predominantly tardigrade-unique heat-soluble proteins: CAHS (Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble and SAHS (Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble proteins, which are secreted or localized in most intracellular compartments, except the mitochondria. Although mitochondrial integrity is crucial to ensure cellular survival, protective molecules for mitochondria have remained elusive. Here, we identified two novel mitochondrial heat-soluble proteins, RvLEAM and MAHS (Mitochondrial Abundant Heat Soluble, as potent mitochondrial protectants from Ramazzottius varieornatus. RvLEAM is a group3 LEA protein and immunohistochemistry confirmed its mitochondrial localization in tardigrade cells. MAHS-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized in human mitochondria and was heat-soluble in vitro, though no sequence similarity with other known proteins was found, and one region was conserved among tardigrades. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RvLEAM protein as well as MAHS protein improved the hyperosmotic tolerance of human cells. The findings of the present study revealed that tardigrade mitochondria contain at least two types of heat-soluble proteins that might have protective roles in water-deficient environments.

  2. TLR ligands, but not modulators of histone modifiers, can induce the complex immune response pattern of endotoxin tolerance in mammary epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Juliane; Petzl, Wolfram; Zerbe, Holm; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Excessive stimulation of the TLR4 axis through LPS reduces the expression of some cytokine genes in immune cells, while stimulating the expression of immune defense genes during a subsequent bacterial infection. This endotoxin tolerance (ET) is mediated via epigenetic mechanisms. Priming the udder of cows with LPS was shown to induce ET in mammary epithelial cells (MEC), thereby protecting the udder against reinfection for some time. Seeking alternatives to LPS priming we tried to elicit ET by priming MEC with either lipopeptide (Pam2CSK4) via the TLR2/6 axis or inhibitors of histone-modifying enzymes. Pre-incubation of MEC with Pam2CSK4 enhanced baseline and induced expression of bactericidal (β-defensin; SLPI) and membrane protecting factors (SAA3, TGM3), while reducing the expression of cytokine- and chemokine-encoding genes (TNF, IL1β) after a subsequent pathogen challenge, the latter, however, not as efficiently as after LPS priming. Pre-treating MEC with various inhibitors of histone H3 modifiers (for demethylation, acetylation or deacetylation) all failed to induce any of the protective factors and only resulted in some dampening of cytokine gene expression after the re-challenge. Hence, triggering immune functions via the TLR axis, but not through those histone modifiers, induced the beneficial phenomenon of ET in MEC. PMID:27913794

  3. T-cell mediated immunity in Wegener's granulomatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdulahad, Wayel Habib

    2008-01-01

    Although the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in Wegener’s granulomatosis (WG) are not completely understood, considerable evidence support the concepts that activated T-cells play an important role in disease expression. It is, however, not clear which subsets of T-cells are involved in the

  4. Actin-mediated cytoplasmic organization of plant cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, van der H.S.

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, I present results that give insight in the role of the actin cytoskeleton in the production of an organized cytoplasm in plant cells, which is, for instance, required for proper cell morphogenesis.

    Chapter 1 is a review in which we discuss the possible role of actin-based

  5. Bone marrow stromal cell : mediated neuroprotection for spinal cord repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, Gaby Jane

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no treatment available that restores anatomy and function after spinal cord injury. This thesis explores transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bone marrow stromal cells; BMSCs) as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. BMSCs secrete neurotrophic

  6. Divergent Roles of Interferon-γ and Innate Lymphoid Cells in Innate and Adaptive Immune Cell-Mediated Intestinal Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseit, Jennifer; Kwong Chung, Cheong K. C.; Noti, Mario; Zysset, Daniel; Hoheisel-Dickgreber, Nina; Genitsch, Vera; Corazza, Nadia; Mueller, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    Aberrant interferon gamma (IFNγ) expression is associated with the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune- and inflammatory disorders, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, the requirement of IFNγ for the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation remains controversial. The aim of this study was thus to investigate the role of IFNγ in experimental mouse models of innate and adaptive immune cell-mediated intestinal inflammation using genetically and microbiota-stabilized hosts. While we find that IFNγ drives acute intestinal inflammation in the anti-CD40 colitis model in an innate lymphoid cell (ILC)-dependent manner, IFNγ secreted by both transferred CD4 T cells and/or cells of the lymphopenic Rag1−/− recipient mice was dispensable for CD4 T cell-mediated colitis. In the absence of IFNγ, intestinal inflammation in CD4 T cell recipient mice was associated with enhanced IL17 responses; consequently, targeting IL17 signaling in IFNγ-deficient mice reduced T cell-mediated colitis. Intriguingly, in contrast to the anti-CD40 model of colitis, depletion of ILC in the Rag1−/− recipients of colitogenic CD4 T cells did not prevent induction of colonic inflammation. Together, our findings demonstrate that IFNγ represents an essential, or a redundant, pro-inflammatory cytokine for the induction of intestinal inflammation, depending on the experimental mouse model used and on the nature of the critical disease inducing immune cell populations involved. PMID:29416538

  7. Dynamics of Receptor-Mediated Nanoparticle Internalization into Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Barakat, Abdul I.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles offer a promising medical tool for targeted drug delivery, for example to treat inflamed endothelial cells during the development of atherosclerosis. To inform the design of such therapeutic strategies, we develop a computational model of nanoparticle internalization into endothelial cells, where internalization is driven by receptor-ligand binding and limited by the deformation of the cell membrane and cytoplasm. We specifically consider the case of nanoparticles targeted against ICAM-1 receptors, of relevance for treating atherosclerosis. The model computes the kinetics of the internalization process, the dynamics of binding, and the distribution of stresses exerted between the nanoparticle and the cell membrane. The model predicts the existence of an optimal nanoparticle size for fastest internalization, consistent with experimental observations, as well as the role of bond characteristics, local cell mechanical properties, and external forces in the nanoparticle internalization process. PMID:25901833

  8. Spontaneous T cell mediated keratoconjunctivitis in Aire-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, S; de Paiva, C S; Hwang, C S; Trinca, K; Lingappan, A; Rafati, J K; Farley, W J; Li, D-Q; Pflugfelder, S C

    2013-01-01

    Background/aims Patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) develop severe keratoconjunctivitis, corneal scarring and visual loss, but the precise pathogenesis is unknown. This study evaluated the ocular surface immune cell environment, conjunctival goblet cell density and response to desiccating environmental stress of the autoimmune regulatory (Aire) gene knockout murine model of APECED. Methods Aire-deficient and wild type (WT) mice were subjected to desiccating stress from a drafty, low-humidity environment and pharmacological inhibition of tear secretion for 5 days. Immune cell populations (CD4+, CD8+, CD11b+, CD45+) and goblet cell density were measured in ocular surface tissues and meibomian glands, and compared with baseline values. Results Greater CD4+ T cell populations were observed in the conjunctival epithelium of Aire-deficient mice (pAPECED. PMID:19429577

  9. Pokemon Silencing Leads to Bim-Mediated Anoikis of Human Hepatoma Cell QGY7703

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Kun; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Nannan; Liu, Shiying; Jiang, Yuyang

    2012-01-01

    Pokemon is an important proto-oncogene that plays a critical role in cellular oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis. Anoikis, which is regulated by Bim-mediated apoptosis, is critical to cancer cell invasion and metastasis. We investigated the role of Pokemon in anoikis, and our results show that Pokemon renders liver cells resistant to anoikis via suppression of Bim transcription. We knocked-down Pokemon in human hepatoma cells QGY7703 with small interfering RNAs (siRNA). Knockdown of P...

  10. Mode of Action Temu Kunci (Kaempferia pandurata Essential Oil on E. coli K1.1 Cell Determined by Leakage of Material Cell and Salt Tolerance Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIKSUSANTI

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil of Kaempferia pandurata consist of terpen and oxygenated terpen that exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. It's mode of action against the gram-negative bacterium E. coli K1.1 has been investigated using a range of treatments. The mode action of the essential oil were analyzed by it's ability to leakage E. coli K1.1 cell, to change permeability of the cell, and to alter salt tolerance of the cell. Ion leakage from the cell were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Salt tolerance assays was conducted by investigating the ability of E. coli K1.1 treated with temu kunci essential oil to grow on NA supplemented with NaCl. Protein and acid nucleic leakage were analyzed by UV spectrophotometer. There were inorganic compound leakage (potassium, calcium ion and organic compound leakage (nucleic acid, protein from cytoplasmic membrane, after exposing this organism to essential oil of Kaempferia pandurata. The more concentration of oil added, the more leakage was observed due to the loss of absorbing material such as nucleic acid (260 nm and protein (280 nm, the loss of potassium and calcium ion, and loss of the salt tolerance of E. coli K1.1.

  11. High glucose-mediated oxidative stress impairs cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo L Lamers

    Full Text Available Deficient wound healing in diabetic patients is very frequent, but the cellular and molecular causes are poorly defined. In this study, we evaluate the hypothesis that high glucose concentrations inhibit cell migration. Using CHO.K1 cells, NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, mouse embryonic fibroblasts and primary skin fibroblasts from control and diabetic rats cultured in 5 mM D-glucose (low glucose, LG, 25 mM D-glucose (high glucose, HG or 25 mM L-glucose medium (osmotic control--OC, we analyzed the migration speed, protrusion stability, cell polarity, adhesion maturation and the activity of the small Rho GTPase Rac1. We also analyzed the effects of reactive oxygen species by incubating cells with the antioxidant N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC. We observed that HG conditions inhibited cell migration when compared to LG or OC. This inhibition resulted from impaired cell polarity, protrusion destabilization and inhibition of adhesion maturation. Conversely, Rac1 activity, which promotes protrusion and blocks adhesion maturation, was increased in HG conditions, thus providing a mechanistic basis for the HG phenotype. Most of the HG effects were partially or completely rescued by treatment with NAC. These findings demonstrate that HG impairs cell migration due to an increase in oxidative stress that causes polarity loss, deficient adhesion and protrusion. These alterations arise, in large part, from increased Rac1 activity and may contribute to the poor wound healing observed in diabetic patients.

  12. Arf6 mediates Schwann cell differentiation and myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Tomohiro; Miyamoto, Yuki; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Tsumura, Hideki; Kawahara, Kazuko; Tanoue, Akito; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Junji

    2015-09-25

    During development of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), Schwann cells wrap neuronal axons, becoming the myelin sheaths that help axonal functions. While the intercellular signals controlling the myelination process between Schwann cells and peripheral neurons are well studied, the transduction of these signals in Schwann cells still remains elusive. Here, we show that Arf6, an Arf protein of the small GTPase family, is involved in promoting the myelination process. Knockdown of Arf6 with the small-interfering (si)RNA in primary Schwann cells markedly decreases dibutyl-cyclic AMP-induced myelin marker protein expression, indicating that Arf6 plays a role in differentiation-like phenotypic changes. To obtain in vivo evidence, we generated small-hairpin (sh)RNA transgenic mice targeting Arf6 for Schwann cells. Transgenic mice exhibited reduced myelin thickness compared to littermate controls, consistent with the defective myelin formation observed in the transgenic mouse-derived Schwann cell and neuronal culture system. Transgenic mice also exhibited decreased phosphorylation of myelination-related signaling molecules such as Akt kinase cascade proteins as well as downregulation of myelin marker proteins. These results suggest that signaling through Arf6 is required for Schwann cell myelination, adding Arf6 to the list of intracellular signaling molecules involved in the myelination process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Snail recruits Ring1B to mediate transcriptional repression and cell migration in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiangzhi; Xu, Hong; Zou, Xiuqun; Wang, Jiamin; Zhu, Yi; Chen, Hao; Shen, Baiyong; Deng, Xiaxing; Zhou, Aiwu; Chin, Y Eugene; Rauscher, Frank J; Peng, Chenghong; Hou, Zhaoyuan

    2014-08-15

    Transcriptional repressor Snail is a master regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), yet the epigenetic mechanism governing Snail to induce EMT is not well understood. Here, we report that in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), elevated levels of the ubiquitin E3 ligase Ring1B and Snail, along with elevated monoubiquitination of H2A at K119 (H2AK119Ub1), are highly correlated with poor survival. Mechanistic investigations identified Ring1B as a Snail-interacting protein and showed that the carboxyl zinc fingers of Snail recruit Ring1B and its paralog Ring1A to repress its target promoters. Simultaneous depletion of Ring1A and Ring1B in pancreatic cancer cells decreased Snail binding to the target chromatin, abolished H2AK119Ub1 modification, and thereby compromised Snail-mediated transcriptional repression and cell migration. We found that Ring1B and the SNAG-associated chromatin modifier EZH2 formed distinct protein complexes with Snail and that EZH2 was required for Snail-Ring1A/B recruitment to the target promoter. Collectively, our results unravel an epigenetic mechanism underlying transcriptional repression by Snail, suggest Ring1A/B as a candidate therapeutic target, and identify H2AK119Ub1 as a potential biomarker for PDAC diagnosis and prognosis. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Low cost industrial production of coagulation factor IX bioencapsulated in lettuce cells for oral tolerance induction in hemophilia B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jin; Zhu, Liqing; Sherman, Alexandra; Wang, Xiaomei; Lin, Shina; Kamesh, Aditya; Norikane, Joey H; Streatfield, Stephen J; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2015-11-01

    Antibodies (inhibitors) developed by hemophilia B patients against coagulation factor IX (FIX) are challenging to eliminate because of anaphylaxis or nephrotic syndrome after continued infusion. To address this urgent unmet medical need, FIX fused with a transmucosal carrier (CTB) was produced in a commercial lettuce (Simpson Elite) cultivar using species specific chloroplast vectors regulated by endogenous psbA sequences. CTB-FIX (∼1 mg/g) in lyophilized cells was stable with proper folding, disulfide bonds and pentamer assembly when stored ∼2 years at ambient temperature. Feeding lettuce cells to hemophilia B mice delivered CTB-FIX efficiently to the gut immune system, induced LAP(+) regulatory T cells and suppressed inhibitor/IgE formation and anaphylaxis against FIX. Lyophilized cells enabled 10-fold dose escalation studies and successful induction of oral tolerance was observed in all tested doses. Induction of tolerance in such a broad dose range should enable oral delivery to patients of different age groups and diverse genetic background. Using Fraunhofer cGMP hydroponic system, ∼870 kg fresh or 43.5 kg dry weight can be harvested per 1000 ft(2) per annum yielding 24,000-36,000 doses for 20-kg pediatric patients, enabling first commercial development of an oral drug, addressing prohibitively expensive purification, cold storage/transportation and short shelf life of current protein drugs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. IL-2-Mediated In Vivo Expansion of Regulatory T Cells Combined with CD154–CD40 Co-Stimulation Blockade but Not CTLA-4 Ig Prolongs Allograft Survival in Naive and Sensitized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dela Golshayan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, regulatory T cells (Treg-based immunotherapy has emerged as a promising strategy to promote operational tolerance after solid organ transplantation (SOT. However, a main hurdle for the therapeutic use of Treg in transplantation is their low frequency, particularly in non-lymphopenic hosts. We aimed to expand Treg directly in vivo and determine their efficacy in promoting donor-specific tolerance, using a stringent experimental model. Administration of the IL-2/JES6-1 immune complex at the time of transplantation resulted in significant expansion of donor-specific Treg, which suppressed alloreactive T cells. IL-2-mediated Treg expansion in combination with short-term CD154–CD40 co-stimulation blockade, but not CTLA-4 Ig or rapamycin, led to tolerance to MHC-mismatched skin grafts in non-lymphopenic mice, mainly by hindering alloreactive CD8+ effector T cells and the production of alloantibodies. Importantly, this treatment also allowed prolonged survival of allografts in the presence of either donor-specific or cross-reactive memory cells. However, late rejection occurred in sensitized hosts, partly mediated by activated B cells. Overall, these data illustrate the potential but also some important limitations of Treg-based therapy in clinical SOT as well as the importance of concomitant immunomodulatory strategies in particular in sensitized hosts.

  16. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation induces immunologic tolerance in renal transplant patients via modulation of inflammatory and repair processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Duojiao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inducing donor-specific tolerance in renal transplant patients could potentially prevent allograft rejection and calcineurin inhibitor nephrotoxicity. Combined kidney and hematopoietic stem cell transplant from an HLA-matched donor is an exploratory and promising therapy to induce immune tolerance. Investigtion of molecular mechanisms involved in the disease is needed to understand the potential process of cell therapy and develop strategies to prevent this immunologic rejection. Methods We enrolled nine patients in a clinical study in which cryopreserved donor hematopoietic stem cells were infused on days 2, 4, and 6 after kidney transplantation. One month post-transplant, 4 plasma samples were collected from combined transplants (C + Tx, and 8 plasma samples from patients with kidney transplantation alone (Tx. High abundance proteins in plasma were depleted and the two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with iTRAQ labeling was utilized to identify the protein profiling between the two groups. Clusters of up- and down-regulated protein profiles were submitted to MetaCore for the construction of transcriptional factors and regulation networks. Results and Discussion Among the 179 identified proteins, 65 proteins were found in C + Tx with at least a 2-fold change as compared with Tx. A subset of proteins related to the complement and coagulation cascade, including complement C3a,complement C5a, precrusors to fibrinogen alpha and beta chains,was significantly downregulated in C + Tx. Meanwhile, Apolipoprotein-A1(ApoA1, ApoC1, ApoA2, ApoE, and ApoB were significantly lower in Tx compared to C + Tx. Gene ontology analysis showed that the dominant processes of differentially expressed proteins were associated with the inflammatory response and positive regulation of plasma lipoprotein particle remodeling. Conclusions Thus, our study provides new insight into the molecular events in

  17. Towards Future T Cell-Mediated Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi H. O. Nguyen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAVs infections impact significantly on global health, being particularly problematic in children, the elderly, pregnant women, indigenous populations and people with co-morbidities. Antibody-based vaccines require annual administration to combat rapidly acquired mutations modifying the surface haemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA glycoproteins. Conversely, influenza-specific CD8+ T cell responses directed at peptides derived from the more conserved internal virus proteins are known to be protective, suggesting that T cell-based vaccines may provide long-lasting cross-protection. This review outlines the importance of CD8+ T cell immunity to seasonal influenza and pandemic IAVs and summarises current vaccination strategies for inducing durable CD8+ T cell memory. Aspects of future IAV vaccine design and the use of live virus challenge in humans to establish proof of principle are also discussed.

  18. Pannexin1 as mediator of inflammation and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Willebrords, Joost; Johnstone, Scott R; Maes, Michaël; Decrock, Elke; De Bock, Marijke; Leybaert, Luc; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    Pannexins form channels at the plasma membrane surface that establish a pathway for communication between the cytosol of individual cells and their extracellular environment. By doing so, pannexin signaling dictates several physiological functions, but equally underlies a number of pathological processes. Indeed, pannexin channels drive inflammation by assisting in the activation of inflammasomes, the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and the activation and migration of leukocytes. Furthermore, these cellular pores facilitate cell death, including apoptosis, pyroptosis and autophagy. The present paper reviews the roles of pannexin channels in inflammation and cell death. In a first part, a state-of-the-art overview of pannexin channel structure, regulation and function is provided. In a second part, the mechanisms behind their involvement in inflammation and cell death are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Increased 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity enhances Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene delivery into plant cells

    OpenAIRE

    Someya, Tatsuhiko; Nonaka, Satoko; Nakamura, Kouji; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is a useful tool for the genetic modification in plants, although its efficiency is low for several plant species. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation has three major steps in laboratory-controlled experiments: the delivery of T-DNA into plant cells, the selection of transformed plant cells, and the regeneration of whole plants from the selected cells. Each of these steps must be optimized to improve the efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated plant transf...

  20. Plant-based oral tolerance to hemophilia therapy employs a complex immune regulatory response including LAP+CD4+ T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaomei; Su, Jin; Sherman, Alexandra; Rogers, Geoffrey L.; Liao, Gongxian; Hoffman, Brad E.; Leong, Kam W.; Terhorst, Cox; Daniell, Henry; Herzog, Roland W.

    2015-01-01

    Coadministering FIX orally and systemically induces tolerance via complex immune regulation, involving tolerogenic dendritic and T-cell subsets.Induced CD4+CD25−LAP+ regulatory T cells with increased IL-10 and TGF-β expression and CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells suppress antibody formation against FIX.

  1. Enhanced B-Raf-mediated NRF2 gene transcription and HATs-mediated NRF2 protein acetylation contributes to ABCC1-mediated chemoresistance and glutathione-mediated survival in acquired topoisomerase II poison-resistant cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huang-Hui; Chang, Hsin-Huei; Chang, Jang-Yang; Tang, Ya-Chu; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Lin, Li-Mei; Cheng, Shu-Ying; Huang, Chih-Hsiang; Sun, Man-Wu; Chen, Chiung-Tong; Kuo, Ching-Chuan

    2017-12-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (NRF2) mainly regulates transcriptional activation through antioxidant-responsive elements (AREs) present in the promoters of NRF2 target genes. Recently, we found that NRF2 was overexpressed in a KB-derived drug-resistant cancer cell panel. In this panel, KB-7D cells, which show acquired resistance to topoisomerase II (Top II) poisons, exhibited the highest NRF2 activation. To investigate whether NRF2 directly contributed to acquired resistance against Top II poisons, we manipulated NRF2 by genetic and pharmacological approaches. The result demonstrated that silencing of NRF2 by RNA interference increased the sensitivity and treatment with NRF2 activator decreased the sensitivity of KB and KB-7D cells toward Top II poisons. Further, increased B-Raf-mediated NRF2 gene transcription and HATs-mediated NRF2 protein acetylation activated NRF2 signaling in KB-7D cells. Moreover, increased binding of NRF2 to an ARE in the promoter of ATP-binding cassette subfamily C member 1 (ABCC1) directly contributed to Top II poison resistance. In addition, activation of NRF2 increased glutathione level and antioxidant capacity in KB-7D cells compared with that in KB cells; moreover, high glutathione level provided survival advantage to KB-7D cells. Our study is the first to show that aberrant NRF2 activation is via increased B-Raf-mediated NRF2 gene transcription and HATs-mediated NRF2 protein acetylation, which increases the acquired resistance and promote the survival of Top II poison-resistant cancer cells. Importantly, NRF2 downstream effectors ABCC1 and glutathione directly contribute to acquired resistance and survival, respectively. These results suggest that blockade of NRF2 signaling may enhance therapeutic efficacy and reduce the survival of Top II poison-refractory tumors in clinical. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity is increased by a type II arabinogalactan from Anoectochilus formosanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Chan; Lai, Ching-Yi; Lin, Wen-Chuan

    2017-01-02

    This study investigated the effects of a type II arabinogalactan from Anoectochilus formosanus (AGAF) on natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity and the possible underlying mechanisms. This study reported that sustained exposure to AGAF increased NK-92MI cell-mediated cytotoxicity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, as characterized according to the cellular lactic dehydrogenase leakage from K562 leukemia cells. Additionally, antibody neutralization studies have reported that interferon (IFN)-γ, but not perforin or tumor necrosis factor-α, released by NK-92MI NK cells is crucial in enhancing cytotoxicity through an autocrine loop. In this study, AGAF was further demonstrated to induce IFN-γ expression, increasing the susceptibility to NK-92MI cell-mediated cytotoxicity through the toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, TLR4, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear factor-κB pathways. A pharmacological study revealed that Janus kinase 2/signal transducers and activators of the signal transducers and of transcription 3 signaling are involved in IFN-γ-induced NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. ZFAT plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its T cell receptor-mediated response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Keiko [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute of Life Sciences for the Next Generation of Women Scientists, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Fujimoto, Takahiro [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Okamura, Tadashi [Division of Animal Models, Department of Infectious Diseases, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Masahiro [Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Tanaka, Yoko [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Mototani, Yasumasa; Goto, Motohito [Division of Animal Models, Department of Infectious Diseases, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ota, Takeharu; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Kuroki, Masahide [Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Tsunoda, Toshiyuki [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Sasazuki, Takehiko [Institute for Advanced Study, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shirasawa, Senji, E-mail: sshirasa@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan); Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated Cd4-Cre-mediated T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat-deficiency leads to reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaired T cell receptor-mediated response in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased expression of IL-7R{alpha}, IL-2R{alpha} and IL-2 in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis. -- Abstract: ZFAT, originally identified as a candidate susceptibility gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, has been reported to be involved in apoptosis, development and primitive hematopoiesis. Zfat is highly expressed in T- and B-cells in the lymphoid tissues, however, its physiological function in the immune system remains totally unknown. Here, we generated the T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice and demonstrated that Zfat-deficiency leads to a remarkable reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Intriguingly, a reduced expression of IL-7R{alpha} and the impaired responsiveness to IL-7 for the survival were observed in the Zfat-deficient T cells. Furthermore, a severe defect in proliferation and increased apoptosis in the Zfat-deficient T cells following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation was observed with a reduced IL-2R{alpha} expression as well as a reduced IL-2 production. Thus, our findings reveal that Zfat is a critical regulator in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its TCR-mediated response.

  4. Zygosaccharomyces rouxii Trk1 is an efficient potassium transporter providing yeast cells with high lithium tolerance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zimmermannová, Olga; Salazar, A.; Sychrová, Hana; Ramos, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2015), fov029 ISSN 1567-1356 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/10/0307 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Zygosaccharomyces rouxii * potassium transport * lithium tolerance * membrane potential * intracellular pH * pHluorin integration Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.479, year: 2015

  5. VEGF masks BNIP3-mediated apoptosis of hypoxic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurasz, Paul; Yurkova, Natasha; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie; Stewart, Duncan J

    2011-05-01

    Hypoxia results in the apoptotic death of myocytes, neurons, and epithelial cells, through the actions of Bcl-2 and Nineteen kilodalton Interacting Protein-3 (BNIP3). On the contrary, endothelial cells are especially adept at surviving conditions of oxygen deprivation via up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) the most potent endothelial survival factor. Both VEGF and BNIP3 expression are transcriptionally regulated by hypoxia inducible factor and may antagonize each other's affects in endothelial cells (ECs). Since factors that promote and inhibit apoptosis may be expressed at the same time in endothelial cells under hypoxic conditions, we decided to investigate whether VEGF and BNIP3 have opposing actions in endothelial cells. Human microvascular endothelial cells were exposed to hypoxic conditions in a Billups-Rothenburg chamber. Under hypoxic conditions BNIP3 expression by endothelial cells increased as measured by real-time PCR and immunoblot. After 48 h of hypoxia, EC apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry and was lower than in corresponding normoxia serum starved controls. The increase in EC survival under hypoxic conditions corresponded with an increase in the expression of VEGF. Under normoxic conditions adenoviral BNIP3 over-expression promoted apoptosis of ECs; however, recombinant VEGF (100 pg/ml) antagonized the BNIP3 apoptosis promoting affects. SiRNA knockdown of VEGF expression by hypoxic ECs resulted in increased apoptosis with a concomitant increase in BNIP3 expression. SiRNA knockdown of BNIP3 expression by hypoxic ECs reduced the increase in EC apoptosis as a result of VEGF knockdown. We conclude that under hypoxic conditions VEGF counteracts and masks the apoptosis promoting affects of BNIP3.

  6. Plastid-expressed betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase gene in carrot cultured cells, roots, and leaves confers enhanced salt tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shashi; Dhingra, Amit; Daniell, Henry

    2004-09-01

    Salinity is one of the major factors that limits geographical distribution of plants and adversely affects crop productivity and quality. We report here high-level expression of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) in cultured cells, roots, and leaves of carrot (Daucus carota) via plastid genetic engineering. Homoplasmic transgenic plants exhibiting high levels of salt tolerance were regenerated from bombarded cell cultures via somatic embryogenesis. Transformation efficiency of carrot somatic embryos was very high, with one transgenic event per approximately seven bombarded plates under optimal conditions. In vitro transgenic carrot cells transformed with the badh transgene were visually green in color when compared to untransformed carrot cells, and this offered a visual selection for transgenic lines. BADH enzyme activity was enhanced 8-fold in transgenic carrot cell cultures, grew 7-fold more, and accumulated 50- to 54-fold more betaine (93-101 micromol g(-1) dry weight of beta-Ala betaine and Gly betaine) than untransformed cells grown in liquid medium containing 100 mm NaCl. Transgenic carrot plants expressing BADH grew in the presence of high concentrations of NaCl (up to 400 mm), the highest level of salt tolerance reported so far among genetically modified crop plants. BADH expression was 74.8% in non-green edible parts (carrots) containing chromoplasts, and 53% in proplastids of cultured cells when compared to chloroplasts (100%) in leaves. Demonstration of plastid transformation via somatic embryogenesis utilizing non-green tissues as recipients of foreign DNA for the first time overcomes two of the major obstacles in extending this technology to important crop plants.

  7. Immunotherapy: Shifting the Balance of Cell-Mediated Immunity and Suppression in Human Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Jo A.; Jochems, Caroline [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Gulley, James L. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Medical Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Schlom, Jeffrey, E-mail: js141c@nih.gov; Tsang, Kwong Y. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2012-12-11

    Active immunotherapy is dependent on the ability of the immune system to recognize and respond to tumors. Despite overwhelming evidence to support a cell-mediated immune response to prostate cancer, it is insufficient to eradicate the disease. This is likely due to a high level of suppression at the tumor site from a variety of sources, including immunosuppressive cells. Immune cells entering the tumor microenvironment may be inhibited directly by the tumor, stromal cells or other immune cells that have been induced to adopt a suppressive phenotype. The resurgence of interest in immunotherapy following the approval of sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab by the Food and Drug Administration has brought about new strategies for overcoming tumor-mediated suppression and bolstering anti-tumor responses. Improved understanding of the immune response to prostate cancer can lead to new combination therapies, such as the use of vaccine with small molecule and checkpoint inhibitors or other immunotherapies.

  8. PUMA mediates the anti-cancer effect of osimertinib in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lingchuan; Huang, Shan; Wang, Xinwei

    2017-01-01

    Osimertinib, an irreversible EGFR/HER2 inhibitor, has been found to be effective in the cancer cell with EGFR gene mutations in preclinical lung cancer models. However, the effect of osimertinib in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells is unclear. In the present study, we investigated how osimertinib suppresses CRC cells growth and potentiates effects of other chemotherapeutic drugs. We found that p73-mediated osimertinib-induced p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) expression irrespective of p53 status following PI3K/AKT pathway inhibition in CRC cells. Furthermore, PUMA is required for osimertinib-induced apoptosis. In addition, osimertinib also synergized with 5-FU to induce significant apoptosis via PUMA in CRC cells. These results demonstrated a critical role of PUMA in mediating the anticancer effects of osimertinib and suggest that PUMA induction can be used as an indicator of osimertinib sensitivity.

  9. Challenges and opportunities for T cell-mediated strategies to eliminate HIV reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Alan Brockman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available HIV’s ability to establish latent reservoirs of reactivation-competent virus is the major barrier to cure. Shock and kill methods consisting of latency reversing agents (LRAs followed by elimination of reactivating cells through cytopathic effects are under active development. However, the clinical efficacy of LRAs remains to be established. Moreover, recent studies indicate that reservoirs may not be reduced efficiently by either viral cytopathic or CD8+ T-cell-mediated mechanisms. In this perspective, we highlight challenges to T-cell-mediated elimination of HIV reservoirs, including characteristics of responding T-cells, aspects of the cellular reservoirs and properties of the latent virus itself. We also discuss potential strategies to overcome these challenges by targeting the antiviral activity of T-cells towards appropriate viral antigens following latency.

  10. Immunotherapy: Shifting the Balance of Cell-Mediated Immunity and Suppression in Human Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, Jo A.; Jochems, Caroline; Gulley, James L.; Schlom, Jeffrey; Tsang, Kwong Y.

    2012-01-01

    Active immunotherapy is dependent on the ability of the immune system to recognize and respond to tumors. Despite overwhelming evidence to support a cell-mediated immune response to prostate cancer, it is insufficient to eradicate the disease. This is likely due to a high level of suppression at the tumor site from a variety of sources, including immunosuppressive cells. Immune cells entering the tumor microenvironment may be inhibited directly by the tumor, stromal cells or other immune cells that have been induced to adopt a suppressive phenotype. The resurgence of interest in immunotherapy following the approval of sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab by the Food and Drug Administration has brought about new strategies for overcoming tumor-mediated suppression and bolstering anti-tumor responses. Improved understanding of the immune response to prostate cancer can lead to new combination therapies, such as the use of vaccine with small molecule and checkpoint inhibitors or other immunotherapies

  11. Role of very late antigen-1 in T-cell-mediated immunity to systemic viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Kauffmann, Susanne; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2006-01-01

    The T-cell response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was studied in mice lacking very late antigen-1 (VLA-1). The generation of virus-specific effector T cells was unimpaired in VLA-1(-/-) mice. In the memory phase, VLA-1 deficiency did not influence the number of memory CD8(+) T cells or th......, the current findings indicate that the expression of VLA-1 is not pivotal for T-cell-mediated antiviral immunity to a systemic infection....... or their distribution between lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs. Regarding a functional role of VLA-1, we found that intracerebral infection of both VLA-1(-/-) and wild-type (wt) mice resulted in lethal T-cell-mediated meningitis, and quantitative and qualitative analyses of the cellular exudate did not reveal any...

  12. β-catenin mediates tumor-induced immunosuppression by inhibiting cross-priming of CD8⁺ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xinjun; Fu, Chunmei; Cui, Weiguo; Ober-Blöbaum, Julia L; Zahner, Sonja P; Shrikant, Protul A; Clausen, Björn E; Flavell, Richard A; Mellman, Ira; Jiang, Aimin

    2014-01-01

    Whereas CD8⁺ T cells are essential for anti-tumor immunity, tumors often evade CD8⁺ T cell surveillance by immunosuppression. As the initiators of antigen-specific immune responses, DCs are likely to play a central role in regulating the balance between immunity and tolerance to tumor antigens and are specialized in their ability to cross-present exogenous tumor antigens on MHC class I molecules to initiate CD8⁺ T cell immunity. However, it remains unclear whether and how tumors modulate DC functions to suppress CD8⁺ T cell responses. We have shown previously that β-catenin signaling in DCs promotes DC-mediated CD8⁺ T cell tolerance. Here, we tested the hypothesis that β-catenin in DCs mediates tumor-induced suppression of CD8⁺ T cell immunity by inhibiting the ability of DCs in cross-priming. β-Catenin was activated in DCs by multiple tumors in vivo and in vitro. B16 melanoma-bearing mice, when vaccinated with DC-targeting anti-DEC-205 mAb fused with tumor antigens, exhibited dampened CD8⁺ immunity, similar to DC-β-catenin(active) mice. DCs from DC-β-catenin(active) and tumor-bearing mice were deficient in cross-priming, and antigen-specific CD8⁺ T cells primed in these mice resulted in dampened CD8⁺ memory responses. Importantly, DC-β-catenin⁻/⁻ mice completely abrogate tumor-mediated inhibition of cross-priming, suggesting that tumor-induced inhibition of cross-priming is dependent on β-catenin. Finally, enhancing cross-priming at the priming or recall phase rescued β-catenin-suppressed CD8⁺ immunity in DC-β-catenin(active) and tumor-bearing mice. Thus, β-catenin-mediated inhibition of cross-priming represents a new and potentially general mechanism that tumors employ to achieve immunosuppression.

  13. Cdon, a cell surface protein, mediates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Chun; Almazan, Guillermina

    2016-06-01

    During central nervous system development, oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs) establish multiple branched processes and axonal contacts to initiate myelination. A complete understanding of the molecular signals implicated in cell surface interaction to initiate myelination/remyelination is currently lacking. The objective of our study was to assess whether Cdon, a cell surface protein that was shown to participate in muscle and neuron cell development, is involved in oligodendrocyte (OLG) differentiation and myelination. Here, we demonstrate that endogenous Cdon protein is expressed in OLPs, increasing in the early differentiation stages and decreasing in mature OLGs. Immunocytochemistry of endogenous Cdon showed localization on both OLG cell membranes and cellular processes exhibiting puncta- or varicosity-like structures. Cdon knockdown with siRNA decreased protein levels by 62% as well as two myelin-specific proteins, MBP and MAG. Conversely, overexpression of full-length rat Cdon increased myelin proteins in OLGs. The complexity of OLGs branching and contact point numbers with axons were also increased in Cdon overexpressing cells growing alone or in coculture with dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs). Furthermore, myelination of DRGNs was decreased when OLPs were transfected with Cdon siRNA. Altogether, our results suggest that Cdon participates in OLG differentiation and myelination, most likely in the initial stages of development. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Building Cell Selectivity into CPP-Mediated Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Martín

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a pressing need for more effective and selective therapies for cancer and other diseases. Consequently, much effort is being devoted to the development of alternative experimental approaches based on selective systems, which are designed to be specifically directed against target cells. In addition, a large number of highly potent therapeutic molecules are being discovered. However, they do not reach clinical trials because of their low delivery, poor specificity or their incapacity to bypass the plasma membrane. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs are an open door for cell-impermeable compounds to reach intracellular targets. Putting all these together, research is sailing in the direction of the design of systems with the capacity to transport new drugs into a target cell. Some CPPs show cell type specificity while others require modifications or form part of more sophisticated drug delivery systems. In this review article we summarize several strategies for directed drug delivery involving CPPs that have been reported in the literature.

  15. Electron Transfer Mediators for Photoelectrochemical Cells Based on Cu(I Metal Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Brugnati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and the photoelectrochemical characterization of a series of bipyridine and pyridyl-quinoline Cu(I complexes, used as electron transfer mediators in regenerative photoelectrochemical cells, are reported. The best performing mediators produced maximum IPCEs of the order of 35–40%. The J-V curves recorded under monochromatic light showed that the selected Cu(I/(II couples generated higher Vocs and fill factors compared to an equivalent I-/I3- cell, due to a decreased dark current.

  16. Analysis of Exocyst-Positive Organelle (EXPO)-Mediated Unconventional Protein Secretion (UPS) in Plant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yu; Wang, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Unconventional protein secretion (UPS) together with conventional protein secretion (CPS) is responsible for protein secretion in plants. We have previously identified a novel UPS pathway in plants, which is mediated by exocyst-positive organelle-EXPO. Here, we describe detailed protocols to study UPS in plants by using Arabidopsis protoplasts or transgenic suspension cells, expressing the EXPO marker Exo70E2-XFP, as materials. Via drug and osmotic treatment plus secretion assay, we illustrate several major methods to analyze EXPO-mediated UPS in plant cells, which also supplys mining tools for similar study.

  17. Analysis of cell-mediated immune responses in support of dengue vaccine development efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Alan L; Currier, Jeffrey R; Friberg, Heather L; Mathew, Anuja

    2015-12-10

    Dengue vaccine development has made significant strides, but a better understanding of how vaccine-induced immune responses correlate with vaccine efficacy can greatly accelerate development, testing, and deployment as well as ameliorate potential risks and safety concerns. Advances in basic immunology knowledge and techniques have already improved our understanding of cell-mediated immunity of natural dengue virus infection and vaccination. We conclude that the evidence base is adequate to argue for inclusion of assessments of cell-mediated immunity as part of clinical trials of dengue vaccines, although further research to identify useful correlates of protective immunity is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Delivery of proteins to mammalian cells via gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinemann, D; Kalies, S; Schomaker, M; Ertmer, W; Meyer, H; Ripken, T; Murua Escobar, H

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle laser interactions are in widespread use in cell manipulation. In particular, molecular medicine needs techniques for the directed delivery of molecules into mammalian cells. Proteins are the final mediator of most cellular cascades. However, despite several methodical approaches, the efficient delivery of proteins to cells remains challenging. This paper presents a new protein transfection technique via laser scanning of cells previously incubated with gold nanoparticles. The laser-induced plasmonic effects on the gold nanoparticles cause a transient permeabilization of the cellular membrane, allowing proteins to enter the cell. Applying this technique, it was possible to deliver green fluorescent protein into mammalian cells with an efficiency of 43%, maintaining a high level of cell viability. Furthermore, a functional delivery of Caspase 3, an apoptosis mediating protein, was demonstrated and evaluated in several cellular assays. Compared to conventional protein transfection techniques such as microinjection, the methodical approach presented here enables high-throughput transfection of about 10 000 cells per second. Moreover, a well-defined point in time of delivery is guaranteed by gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection, allowing the detailed temporal analysis of cellular pathways and protein trafficking. (papers)

  19. DNA methyltransferase I is a mediator of doxorubicin-induced genotoxicity in human cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Hwee Hong; Porter, Alan George

    2009-01-01

    Doxorubicin can induce the formation of extra-nuclear bodies during mitosis termed micronuclei but the underlying causes remain unknown. Here, we show that sub-lethal exposure to doxorubicin-induced micronuclei formation in human cancer cells but not in non-tumorigenic cells. Occurrence of micronuclei coincided with stability of DNMT1 upon doxorubicin assault, and DNMT1 was localized to the micronuclei structures. Furthermore, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-mediated DNMT1 depletion or siDNMT1 knock-down attenuated the frequency of doxorubicin-induced micronucleated cells. Human DNMT1 -/- cells displayed significantly fewer micronuclei compared to DNMT1 +/+ cells when challenged with doxorubicin, providing additional evidence for the involvement of DNMT1 in mediating such chromosomal aberrations. Collectively, our results demonstrate a role for DNMT1 in promoting DNA damage-induced genotoxicity in human cancer cells. DNMT1, recently identified as a candidate for doxorubicin-mediated cytotoxicity, is over-expressed in various cancer cell types. We propose that DNMT1 levels in tumor cells may determine the effectiveness of doxorubicin in chemotherapy.

  20. DNA methyltransferase I is a mediator of doxorubicin-induced genotoxicity in human cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Hwee Hong, E-mail: tanhh@imcb.a-star.edu.sg [Cell Death and Human Disease Group, Division of Cancer and Developmental Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, A-STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 61 Biopolis Drive, Singapore 138673 (Singapore); Porter, Alan George [Cell Death and Human Disease Group, Division of Cancer and Developmental Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, A-STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 61 Biopolis Drive, Singapore 138673 (Singapore)

    2009-05-01

    Doxorubicin can induce the formation of extra-nuclear bodies during mitosis termed micronuclei but the underlying causes remain unknown. Here, we show that sub-lethal exposure to doxorubicin-induced micronuclei formation in human cancer cells but not in non-tumorigenic cells. Occurrence of micronuclei coincided with stability of DNMT1 upon doxorubicin assault, and DNMT1 was localized to the micronuclei structures. Furthermore, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-mediated DNMT1 depletion or siDNMT1 knock-down attenuated the frequency of doxorubicin-induced micronucleated cells. Human DNMT1{sup -/-} cells displayed significantly fewer micronuclei compared to DNMT1{sup +/+} cells when challenged with doxorubicin, providing additional evidence for the involvement of DNMT1 in mediating such chromosomal aberrations. Collectively, our results demonstrate a role for DNMT1 in promoting DNA damage-induced genotoxicity in human cancer cells. DNMT1, recently identified as a candidate for doxorubicin-mediated cytotoxicity, is over-expressed in various cancer cell types. We propose that DNMT1 levels in tumor cells may determine the effectiveness of doxorubicin in chemotherapy.

  1. NK cell-mediated killing of AML blasts. Role of histamine, monocytes and reactive oxygen metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, M.; Mellqvist, U.H. [Sahlgren`s Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Medicine, Haematology Section, Goeteborg (Sweden); Hansson, M.; Hermodsson, S.; Hellstrand, K. [Sahlgren`s Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Virology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Blasts recovered from patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) were lysed by heterologeous natural killer (NK) cells treated with NK cell-activating cytokine-induced killing of AML blasts was inhibited by monocytes, recovered from peripheral blood by counterflow centrifugal elutriation. Histamine, at concentrations exceeding 0.1 {mu}M, abrogated the monocyte-induced inhibition of NK cells; thereby, histamine and IL-2 or histamine and IFN-{alpha} synergistically induced NK cell-mediated destruction of AML blasts. The effect of histamine was completely blocked by the histamine H2-receptor (H2R) antagonist ranitidine but not by its chemical control AH20399AA. Catalase, a scavenger of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM), reversed the monocyte-induced inhibition of NK cell-mediated killing of blast cells, indicating that the