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Sample records for cell matrix strengthening

  1. The matrix polysaccharide (1;3,1;4)-β-D-glucan is involved in silicon-dependent strengthening of rice cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Natsumi; Yokoyama, Ryusuke; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Jun; Iwai, Hiroaki; Satoh, Shinobu; Nishitani, Kazuhiko

    2015-02-01

    Poales [represented by rice (Oryza sativa L.)] in angiosperms and Equisetum (horsetails) in Pteridophytes are two major groups of heavy silicon (Si) accumulators. In rice, Si is polymerized preferentially in the epidermal cell wall, forming Si-cuticle double layers and Si-cellulose double layers beneath the cuticle. This Si layer is thought to exert various beneficial effects on the growth and development of land plants. Although the recent discovery of the influx and efflux transporters of silicic acid has shed some light on the molecular mechanisms of Si uptake and transport in rice, the mechanism underlying the final incorporation of polymerized Si into the cell wall remains elusive. Despite their phylogenetic distance, the cell walls of the two Si accumulators, Poales and Equisetum, share another common component, i.e. (1;3,1;4)-β-D-glucan, also known as mixed-linkage glucan (MLG), a matrix polysaccharide not found in other plants. Based on this coincidence, a possible correlation between the functions of Si and MLG in the cell wall has been suggested, but no experimental evidence has been obtained in support of this functional correlation. Here, we present an analysis of the correlative action of Si and MLG on the mechanical properties of leaf blades using a transgenic rice line in which the MLG level was reduced by overexpressing EGL1, which encodes (1;3,1;4)-β-D-glucanase. The reduction in MLG did not affect total Si accumulation, but it significantly altered the Si distribution profile and reduced the Si-dependent mechanical properties of the leaf blades, strongly suggesting a functional correlation between Si and MLG. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Cell-matrix adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrier, Allison L; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2007-12-01

    The complex interactions of cells with extracellular matrix (ECM) play crucial roles in mediating and regulating many processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and signaling during morphogenesis, tissue homeostasis, wound healing, and tumorigenesis. Many of these interactions involve transmembrane integrin receptors. Integrins cluster in specific cell-matrix adhesions to provide dynamic links between extracellular and intracellular environments by bi-directional signaling and by organizing the ECM and intracellular cytoskeletal and signaling molecules. This mini review discusses these interconnections, including the roles of matrix properties such as composition, three-dimensionality, and porosity, the bi-directional functions of cellular contractility and matrix rigidity, and cell signaling. The review concludes by speculating on the application of this knowledge of cell-matrix interactions in the formation of cell adhesions, assembly of matrix, migration, and tumorigenesis to potential future therapeutic approaches. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Prediction of Flexural Capacity of RC Beams Strengthened in Flexure with FRP Fabric and Cementitious Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyusan Jung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents both experimental and analytical research results for predicting the flexural capacity of reinforced concrete (RC beams strengthened in flexure with fabric reinforced cementitious matrix (FRCM. In order to assess the efficiency of the FRCM-strengthening method, six beams were strengthened in flexure with FRCM composite having different amounts and layers of FRP fabric and were tested under four-point loading. From test results, it was confirmed that the slippage between the FRP fabric and matrix occurs at a high strain level, and all of the FRCM-strengthened beams failed by the debonding of the FRCM. Additionally, a new bond strength model for FRCM considering the slippage between fabric and matrix was proposed, using a test database to predict the strengthening performance of the FRCM composite. The prediction of the proposed bond strength model agreed well with the debonding loads of the test database.

  4. The role of the alloy matrix in the creep behavior of particle-strengthened alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajaja, O.; Howson, T. E.; Purushothaman, S.; Tien, J. K.

    1980-01-01

    The strengthening microstructural features in heat-resistant super-alloys are oxide dispersoids and/or gamma-prime precipitates. The role of the strength of the alloy matrix in the creep resistance of these alloys is considered. An evaluation was made of experimental data on oxide-dispersion- and/or precipitation-strengthened nickel-based alloys with various levels of matrix solid solution strengthening; a generalized expression for creep rates which separates the matrix contributions from the particle contributions to the resisting stress and creep strength of these alloys was derived. It is concluded that the major role of the alloy matrix in the creep behavior of these alloys is in determining the apparent stress dependence of the creep rates.

  5. Microstructural evolution and strengthening behavior in in-situ magnesium matrix composites fabricated by solidification processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelliah, Nagaraj M., E-mail: cmnraj.7@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar 140001, Punjab (India); Singh, Harpreet, E-mail: harpreetsingh@iitrpr.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar 140001, Punjab (India); Surappa, M.K., E-mail: mirle@materials.iisc.ac.in [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560012, Karnataka (India)

    2017-06-15

    In-situ magnesium matrix composites with three different matrix materials (including Mg, AZ91 and AE44 Mg-alloys) were fabricated by injecting cross-linked polymer directly into the molten Mg/Mg-alloys, and having it convert to the 2.5 vol% SiCNO ceramic phase using liquid stir-casting method. In-situ chemical reaction took place within the molten slurry tending to produce 42 and 18 vol% Mg{sub 2}Si crystals in Mg and AE44 matrix composites, respectively but not in AZ91 matrix composite. Microstructural evolution of Mg{sub 2}Si crystals was discussed on the basis of availability of heterogeneous nucleation sites and amount of Al-atoms in the molten slurry. The observed micro-hardness and yield strengths are enhanced by factor of four to three as compared to their unreinforced counterparts, and Taylor strengthening was found to be the predominant strengthening mechanism in magnesium and AE44 matrix composites. Summation model predicted the yield strengths of the fabricated composites more preciously when compared to Zhang and Chen, and modified Clyne models. - Highlights: • In-situ magnesium composites were fabricated using liquid stir-casting method. • In-situ pyrolysis of cross-linked polymer has been utilized to obtain ceramic phases. • Mg{sub 2}Si crystals were formed in magnesium and AE44 matrix composites but not in AZ91 matrix composites. • The variation in size and morphology of Mg{sub 2}Si crystals with matrix materials are discussed. • Strengthening mechanisms in in-situ composites are analyzed and discussed.

  6. Development of a Precipitation-Strengthened Matrix for Non-quenchable Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Nhon Q.; Sorensen, Jim; Klier, Eric M.; Sanaty-Zadeh, Amirreza; Bayansan, Davaadorj; Seidman, David N.; Dunand, David C.

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in metal matrix composite-encapsulated ceramic armor show promise in lightweight armor technology. The system contains ceramic tiles, such as alumina, sandwiched between unreinforced aluminum or aluminum metal matrix composite (Al-MMC), which has a better toughness compared to the ceramic tiles. The sandwich structures should not be quenched during the fabrication, as the large mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion between the ceramic tiles and the unreinforced aluminum or Al-MMC creates internal stresses high enough to fracture the ceramic tiles. However, slow cooling of most commercial alloys creates large precipitates making solute unavailable for the formation of fine precipitates during aging. Here, we develop a non-quenched, high-strength metal matrix utilizing dilute Al-Sc-Zr alloys. We demonstrate that the dilute Al-0.09 Sc-0.045 Zr at.% alloy and the same alloy containing 0-4 vol.% alumina short fibers do not result in precipitation upon slow cooling from a high temperature, and can thereafter be aged to increase their strength. They exhibit a moderate strength, but improved ductility and toughness as compared to common armor aluminum alloys, such as AA5083-H131, making them attractive as armor materials and hybrid armor systems.

  7. RC beams shear-strengthened with fabric-reinforced-cementitious-matrix (FRCM) composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreto, Giovanni; Babaeidarabad, Saman; Leardini, Lorenzo; Nanni, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    The interest in retrofit/rehabilitation of existing concrete structures has increased due to degradation and/or introduction of more stringent design requirements. Among the externally-bonded strengthening systems fiber-reinforced polymers is the most widely known technology. Despite its effectiveness as a material system, the presence of an organic binder has some drawbacks that could be addressed by using in its place a cementitious binder as in fabric-reinforced cementitious matrix (FRCM) systems. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened in shear with U-wraps made of FRCM. An extensive experimental program was undertaken in order to understand and characterize this composite when used as a strengthening system. The laboratory results demonstrate the technical viability of FRCM for shear strengthening of RC beams. Based on the experimental and analytical results, FRCM increases shear strength but not proportionally to the number of fabric plies installed. On the other hand, FRCM failure modes are related with a high consistency to the amount of external reinforcement applied. Design considerations based on the algorithms proposed by ACI guidelines are also provided.

  8. Oxide nanoparticles in an Al-alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened steel: crystallographic structure and interface with ferrite matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Pantleon, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Oxide nanoparticles are quintessential for ensuring the extraordinary properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels. In this study, the crystallographic structure of oxide nanoparticles, and their interface with the ferritic steel matrix in an Al-alloyed ODS steel, i.e. PM2000, were...

  9. Interplay of Matrix Stiffness and Cell-Cell Contact in Regulating Differentiation of Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Kai; Cao, Luping; Li, Shiyu; Yu, Lin; Ding, Jiandong

    2016-08-31

    Stem cells are capable of sensing and responding to the mechanical properties of extracellular matrixes (ECMs). It is well-known that, while osteogenesis is promoted on the stiff matrixes, adipogenesis is enhanced on the soft ones. Herein, we report an "abnormal" tendency of matrix-stiffness-directed stem cell differentiation. Well-defined nanoarrays of cell-adhesive arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) peptides were modified onto the surfaces of persistently nonfouling poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels to achieve controlled specific cell adhesion and simultaneously eliminate nonspecific protein adsorption. Mesenchymal stem cells were cultivated on the RGD-nanopatterned PEG hydrogels with the same RGD nanospacing but different hydrogel stiffnesses and incubated in the induction medium to examine the effect of matrix stiffness on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation extents. When stem cells were kept at a low density during the induction period, the differentiation tendency was consistent with the previous reports in the literature; however, both lineage commitments were favored on the stiff matrices at a high cell density. We interpreted such a complicated stiffness effect at a high cell density in two-dimensional culture as the interplay of matrix stiffness and cell-cell contact. As a result, this study strengthens the essence of the stiffness effect and highlights the combinatory effects of ECM cues and cell cues on stem cell differentiation.

  10. Microstructure and properties of bulk copper matrix composites strengthened with various kinds of graphene nanoplatelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutkiewicz, Jan, E-mail: j.dutkiewicz@imim.pl; Ozga, Piotr; Maziarz, Wojciech; Pstruś, Janusz; Kania, Bogusz; Bobrowski, Piotr; Stolarska, Justyna

    2015-03-25

    Copper matrix composites strengthened with graphene were prepared by vacuum uniaxial hot pressing of ball milled mixtures of powders. Two grades of graphene platelets were used; one with thickness of 10–20 nm and with lateral size of less than 14 μm and another with much lower thickness of platelets of 2–4 nm and in (002) plane crystallite size below 100 nm. Hot pressing in vacuum allowed obtaining composites containing 1 and 2 wt% of graphene. The addition of fine graphene led to about 50% higher hardness and about 30% lower electrical resistivity than composite with coarse graphene platelets. SEM studies of samples with fine graphene additions showed much more homogeneous microstructure than those containing coarse graphene. Based on TEM studies, copper particle size was estimated between 100 and 300 nm, and smaller in the areas of copper particle boundaries, where plastic deformation of copper particles brought about mixing nanocrystalline copper and graphene phases. Graphene conglomerates were identified using electron diffraction and often consisted of elongated platelets of thickness up to 20 nm in both graphene composites studied. Raman spectra confirmed nonhomogeneity of graphene in bulk composites and showed increase of defect density within graphene platelets, as was assessed from low intensity ratio I(2D)/I(G), in places of high graphene concentration in both kinds of samples. The weak signal in more homogeneously distributed graphene in samples with fine graphene additions confirmed similar structural features, however the lateral size of finer graphene remain unchanged in composites, contrary to that with coarser graphene additions.

  11. Matrix control of stem cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even-Ram, Sharona; Artym, Vira; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2006-08-25

    A key challenge in stem cell research is to learn how to direct the differentiation of stem cells toward specific fates. In this issue of Cell, Engler et al. (2006) identify a new factor regulating stem cell fate: the elasticity of the matrix microenvironment. By changing the stiffness of the substrate, human mesenchymal stem cells could be directed along neuronal, muscle, or bone lineages.

  12. A mechanically strengthened polyacrylamide gel matrix fully compatible with electrophoresis of proteins and nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushparajan, Charlotte; Goswami, Shailesh K; McAdam, Christopher J; Hanton, Lyall R; Dearden, Peter K; Moratti, Stephen C; Cridge, Andrew G

    2017-11-10

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is a universal tool in a biochemist's toolkit for protein and nucleic acid separation and subsequent visualisation and analysis. The standard formulation of polyacrylamide gels consists of acrylamide (ACM) monomer crosslinked with bisacrylamide (MBA) which creates a gel with excellent sieving properties but which is mechanically fragile and prone to tearing during post-electrophoresis manipulations involved in visualisation and analysis. By adding a poly(ethylene oxide) macro-crosslinker to the standard gel formulation, we have created a tough gel matrix that can be used to fractionate proteins and nucleic acids by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The protein and nucleic acid resolving capabilities and performance during staining and electroblotting of the tough gel matrix rivals that of conventional acrylamide/bisacrylamide gels. The tough gel matrix is resistant to tear and remarkably elastic, capable of stretching to over four times its original length before breaking, and represents a significant improvement over standard polyacrylamide gel formulations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. DNA builds and strengthens the extracellular matrix in Myxococcus xanthus biofilms by interacting with exopolysaccharides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    Full Text Available One intriguing discovery in modern microbiology is the extensive presence of extracellular DNA (eDNA within biofilms of various bacterial species. Although several biological functions have been suggested for eDNA, including involvement in biofilm formation, the detailed mechanism of eDNA integration into biofilm architecture is still poorly understood. In the biofilms formed by Myxococcus xanthus, a Gram-negative soil bacterium with complex morphogenesis and social behaviors, DNA was found within both extracted and native extracellular matrices (ECM. Further examination revealed that these eDNA molecules formed well organized structures that were similar in appearance to the organization of exopolysaccharides (EPS in ECM. Biochemical and image analyses confirmed that eDNA bound to and colocalized with EPS within the ECM of starvation biofilms and fruiting bodies. In addition, ECM containing eDNA exhibited greater physical strength and biological stress resistance compared to DNase I treated ECM. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that DNA interacts with EPS and strengthens biofilm structures in M. xanthus.

  14. Graphene-and-Copper Artificial Nacre Fabricated by a Preform Impregnation Process: Bioinspired Strategy for Strengthening-Toughening of Metal Matrix Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ding-Bang; Cao, Mu; Guo, Qiang; Tan, Zhanqiu; Fan, Genlian; Li, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Di

    2015-07-28

    Metals can be strengthened by adding hard reinforcements, but such strategy usually compromises ductility and toughness. Natural nacre consists of hard and soft phases organized in a regular "brick-and-mortar" structure and exhibits a superior combination of mechanical strength and toughness, which is an attractive model for strengthening and toughening artificial composites, but such bioinspired metal matrix composite has yet to be made. Here we prepared nacre-like reduced graphene oxide (RGrO) reinforced Cu matrix composite based on a preform impregnation process, by which two-dimensional RGrO was used as "brick" and inserted into "□-and-mortar" ordered porous Cu preform (the symbol "□" means the absence of "brick"), followed by compacting. This process realized uniform dispersion and alignment of RGrO in Cu matrix simultaneously. The RGrO-and-Cu artificial nacres exhibited simultaneous enhancement on yield strength and ductility as well as increased modulus, attributed to RGrO strengthening, effective crack deflection and a possible combined failure mode of RGrO. The artificial nacres also showed significantly higher strengthening efficiency than other conventional Cu matrix composites, which might be related to the alignment of RGrO.

  15. Matrix metalloproteinases in stem cell mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Gerd; Schmal, Olga; Aicher, Wilhelm K

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have the capability to migrate back and forth between their preferred microenvironment in bone marrow niches and the peripheral blood, but under steady-state conditions only a marginal number of stem cells can be found in the circulation. Different mobilizing agents, however, which create a highly proteolytic milieu in the bone marrow, can drastically increase the number of circulating HSCs. Among other proteases secreted and membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are known to be involved in the induced mobilization process and can digest niche-specific extracellular matrix components and cytokines responsible for stem cell retention to the niches. Iatrogenic stem cell mobilization and stem cell homing to their niches are clinically employed on a routine basis, although the exact mechanisms of both processes are still not fully understood. In this review we provide an overview on the various roles of MMPs in the induced release of HSCs from the bone marrow. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Matrix metalloproteinases as reagents for cell isolation

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    Knapinska, Anna M.; Amar, Sabrina; He, Zhong; Matosevic, Sandro; Zylberberg, Claudia; Fields, Gregg B.

    2016-01-01

    Cell isolation methods for therapeutic purposes have seen little advancement over the years. The original methods of stem cell and islet isolation using bacterial collagenases were developed in the early 1980s and are still used today. Bacterial collagenases are subject to autodegradation, and isolates obtained with these enzymes may be contaminated with endotoxins, reducing cell viability and contributing to toxicity in downstream applications. Here we describe a novel method for isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue (ADSC) utilizing recombinantly produced matrix metalloproteases (MMPs). The ADSCs isolated by MMPs displayed essentially identical morphological and phenotypical characteristics to cells isolated by bacterially-derived collagenase I and Liberase™. Samples isolated with MMPs and Liberase™ had comparable levels of CD73, CD90, and CD105. The adipogenic and osteogenic potential of the ADSCs isolated by MMPs was retained as compared to cells isolated with Liberase™. However, ADSCs isolated by Liberase™ displayed 6% contamination with other cells as per negative markers revealed by PE staining, as opposed to <1% for all MMP-treated samples. MMP-based cell isolation may contribute to optimization of transplantation technology. PMID:27702483

  17. Metal Matrix Composite Solar Cell Metallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilt David M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced solar cells are moving to ever thinner formats in order to save mass and in some cases improve performance. As cells are thinned, the possibility that they may fracture or cleave due to mechanical stresses is increased. Fractures of the cell can degrade the overall device performance if the fracture propagates through the contact metallization, which frequently occurs. To address this problem, a novel semiconductor metallization system based on multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT reinforcement, termed metal matrix composite (MMC metallization is under investigation. Electro-mechanical characterization of MMC films demonstrate their ability to provide electrical conductivity over >40 micron wide cracks in the underlying semiconductor, with the carbon nanotubes bridging the gap. In addition, these materials show a “self-healing” behaviour, electrically reconnecting at ~30 microns when strained past failure. Triple junction (TJ space cells with MMC metallization demonstrated no loss in Jsc after intentional fracture, whereas TJ cells with conventional metallization suffer up to 50% Jsc loss.

  18. Subwavelength coupling strengthened optical amplification in nematic liquid crystal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua; Xue, Tingyu; Su, Hang; Wang, Yingce; Zhang, Jingwen

    2017-09-01

    We observed strikingly different first reflection dynamics of two counter-propagating laser beams passing through a wedge-shaped C60-doped liquid crystal cell sandwiched between two ZnSe-coated ITO glass plates without applied electric field, suggesting a strong subwavelength energy coupling between light beams. Exponential gain coefficient as high as 10 574 cm-1 was obtained from the 1.1 μm-thick portion of the cell under applied voltage U0 = 3.0 V, consisting with the subwavelength coupling picture. Surface plasmon polariton (SPP) supporting layer is identified by considering dipolar properties of liquid crystal molecules that are well aligned. The specific features in energy coupling dynamics and 2D diffraction patterns perceived suggest that SPP mediated coupling is responsible for all the findings.

  19. Modulation of Cell-Cell Junctional Complexes by Matrix Metalloproteinases

    OpenAIRE

    Bartlett, J. D.; Smith, C. E.

    2013-01-01

    The ameloblast cell layer of the enamel organ is in contact with the forming enamel as it develops into the hardest substance in the body. Ameloblasts move in groups that slide by one another as the enamel layer thickens. Each ameloblast is responsible for the formation of one enamel rod, and the rods are the mineralized trail that moving ameloblasts leave behind. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) facilitate cell movement in various tissues during development, and in this review we suggest tha...

  20. Quantitative image analysis for investigating cell-matrix interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkel, Brian; Notbohm, Jacob

    2017-07-01

    The extracellular matrix provides both chemical and physical cues that control cellular processes such as migration, division, differentiation, and cancer progression. Cells can mechanically alter the matrix by applying forces that result in matrix displacements, which in turn may localize to form dense bands along which cells may migrate. To quantify the displacements, we use confocal microscopy and fluorescent labeling to acquire high-contrast images of the fibrous material. Using a technique for quantitative image analysis called digital volume correlation, we then compute the matrix displacements. Our experimental technology offers a means to quantify matrix mechanics and cell-matrix interactions. We are now using these experimental tools to modulate mechanical properties of the matrix to study cell contraction and migration.

  1. Experimental analysis of compressive notch strengthening in closed-cell aluminum alloy foam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniou, A; Onck, PR; Bastawros, Ashraf F.

    2004-01-01

    The notch strengthening effect is studied experimentally in closed cell aluminum foams. The limit loads, net section strength were found for a set of double-edge-notched (DEN) and single-edge-notched (SEN) specimens loaded in compression. In addition, the evolution of the deformation is monitored

  2. In PC3 prostate cancer cells ephrin receptors crosstalk to β1-integrins to strengthen adhesion to collagen type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Miao; Wang, Jinghe; Muller, Daniel J.; Helenius, Jonne

    2015-01-01

    Eph receptor (Eph) and ephrin signaling can play central roles in prostate cancer and other cancer types. Exposed to ephrin-A1 PC3 prostate cancer cells alter adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. However, whether PC3 cells increase or reduce adhesion, and by which mechanisms they change adhesion to the ECM remains to be characterized. Here, we assay how ephrin-A1 stimulates PC3 cells to adhere to ECM proteins using single-cell force spectroscopy. We find that PC3 cells binding to immobilized ephrin-A1 but not to solubilized ephrin-A1 specifically strengthen adhesion to collagen I. This Eph-ephrin-A1 signaling, which we suppose is based on mechanotransduction, stimulates β1-subunit containing integrin adhesion via the protein kinase Akt and the guanine nucleotide-exchange factor cytohesin. Inhibiting the small GTPases, Rap1 or Rac1, generally lowered adhesion of PC3 prostate cancer cells. Our finding suggests a mechanism by which PC3 prostate cancer cells exposed to ephrins crosstalk to β1-integrins and preferably metastasize in bone, a collagen I rich tissue. PMID:25644492

  3. Hydrophilic polyurethane matrix promotes chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalluri, Sandeep M; Krishnan, G Rajesh; Cheah, Calvin; Arzumand, Ayesha; Yuan, Yuan; Richardson, Caley A; Yang, Shuying; Sarkar, Debanjan

    2015-09-01

    Segmental polyurethanes exhibit biphasic morphology and can control cell fate by providing distinct matrix guided signals to increase the chondrogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Polyethylene glycol (PEG) based hydrophilic polyurethanes can deliver differential signals to MSCs through their matrix phases where hard segments are cell-interactive domains and PEG based soft segments are minimally interactive with cells. These coordinated communications can modulate cell-matrix interactions to control cell shape and size for chondrogenesis. Biphasic character and hydrophilicity of polyurethanes with gel like architecture provide a synthetic matrix conducive for chondrogenesis of MSCs, as evidenced by deposition of cartilage-associated extracellular matrix. Compared to monophasic hydrogels, presence of cell interactive domains in hydrophilic polyurethanes gels can balance cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. These results demonstrate the correlation between lineage commitment and the changes in cell shape, cell-matrix interaction, and cell-cell adhesion during chondrogenic differentiation which is regulated by polyurethane phase morphology, and thus, represent hydrophilic polyurethanes as promising synthetic matrices for cartilage regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Modulation of Cell-Cell Junctional Complexes by Matrix Metalloproteinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, J.D.; Smith, C.E.

    2013-01-01

    The ameloblast cell layer of the enamel organ is in contact with the forming enamel as it develops into the hardest substance in the body. Ameloblasts move in groups that slide by one another as the enamel layer thickens. Each ameloblast is responsible for the formation of one enamel rod, and the rods are the mineralized trail that moving ameloblasts leave behind. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) facilitate cell movement in various tissues during development, and in this review we suggest that the tooth-specific MMP, enamelysin (MMP20), facilitates ameloblast movements during enamel development. Mmp20 null mice have thin brittle enamel with disrupted rod patterns that easily abrades from the underlying dentin. Strikingly, the Mmp20 null mouse enamel organ morphology is noticeably dysplastic during late-stage development, when MMP20 is no longer expressed. We suggest that in addition to its role of cleaving enamel matrix proteins, MMP20 also cleaves junctional complexes present on ameloblasts to foster the cell movement necessary for formation of the decussating enamel rod pattern. Therefore, inactivation of MMP20 would result in tight ameloblast cell-cell attachments that may cause maturation-stage enamel organ dysplasia. The tight ameloblast attachments would also preclude the ameloblast movement necessary to form decussating enamel rod patterns. PMID:23053846

  5. Intestinal Stem Cell Niche: The Extracellular Matrix and Cellular Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laween Meran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium comprises a monolayer of polarised columnar cells organised along the crypt-villus axis. Intestinal stem cells reside at the base of crypts and are constantly nourished by their surrounding niche for maintenance, self-renewal, and differentiation. The cellular microenvironment including the adjacent Paneth cells, stromal cells, smooth muscle cells, and neural cells as well as the extracellular matrix together constitute the intestinal stem cell niche. A dynamic regulatory network exists among the epithelium, stromal cells, and the matrix via complex signal transduction to maintain tissue homeostasis. Dysregulation of these biological or mechanical signals could potentially lead to intestinal injury and disease. In this review, we discuss the role of different intestinal stem cell niche components and dissect the interaction between dynamic matrix factors and regulatory signalling during intestinal stem cell homeostasis.

  6. Modeling the formation of cell-matrix adhesions on a single 3D matrix fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano, J; Sánchez, M T; García-Aznar, J M

    2015-11-07

    Cell-matrix adhesions are crucial in different biological processes like tissue morphogenesis, cell motility, and extracellular matrix remodeling. These interactions that link cell cytoskeleton and matrix fibers are built through protein clutches, generally known as adhesion complexes. The adhesion formation process has been deeply studied in two-dimensional (2D) cases; however, the knowledge is limited for three-dimensional (3D) cases. In this work, we simulate different local extracellular matrix properties in order to unravel the fundamental mechanisms that regulate the formation of cell-matrix adhesions in 3D. We aim to study the mechanical interaction of these biological structures through a three dimensional discrete approach, reproducing the transmission pattern force between the cytoskeleton and a single extracellular matrix fiber. This numerical model provides a discrete analysis of the proteins involved including spatial distribution, interaction between them, and study of the different phenomena, such as protein clutches unbinding or protein unfolding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Method of making molten carbonate fuel cell ceramic matrix tape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricle, Donald L.; Putnam, Gary C.; Stewart, Jr., Robert C.

    1984-10-23

    A method of making a thin, flexible, pliable matrix material for a molten carbonate fuel cell is described. The method comprises admixing particles inert in the molten carbonate environment with an organic polymer binder and ceramic particle. The composition is applied to a mold surface and dried, and the formed compliant matrix material removed.

  8. Clara cell adhesion and migration to extracellular matrix

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    deMello Daphne

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clara cells are the epithelial progenitor cell of the small airways, a location known to be important in many lung disorders. Although migration of alveolar type II and bronchiolar ciliated epithelial cells has been examined, the migratory response of Clara cells has received little attention. Methods Using a modification of existing procedures for Clara cell isolation, we examined mouse Clara cells and a mouse Clara-like cell line (C22 for adhesion to and migration toward matrix substrate gradients, to establish the nature and integrin dependence of migration in Clara cells. Results We observed that Clara cells adhere preferentially to fibronectin (Fn and type I collagen (Col I similar to previous reports. Migration of Clara cells can be directed by a fixed gradient of matrix substrates (haptotaxis. Migration of the C22 cell line was similar to the Clara cells so integrin dependence of migration was evaluated with this cell line. As determined by competition with an RGD containing-peptide, migration of C22 cells toward Fn and laminin (Lm 511 (formerly laminin 10 was significantly RGD integrin dependent, but migration toward Col I was RGD integrin independent, suggesting that Clara cells utilize different receptors for these different matrices. Conclusion Thus, Clara cells resemble alveolar type II and bronchiolar ciliated epithelial cells by showing integrin mediated pro-migratory changes to extracellular matrix components that are present in tissues after injury.

  9. Extracellular matrix type modulates cell migration on mechanical gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Christopher D; Isenberg, Brett C; Chua, Samantha G; Wong, Joyce Y

    2017-10-15

    Extracellular matrix composition and stiffness are known to be critical determinants of cell behavior, modulating processes including differentiation, traction generation, and migration. Recent studies have demonstrated that the ECM composition can modulate how cells migrate in response to gradients in environmental stiffness, altering a cell's ability to undergo durotaxis. These observations were limited to single varieties of extracellular matrix, but typically cells are exposed to environments containing complex mixtures of extracellular matrix proteins. Here, we investigate migration of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts on mechanical gradients coated with one or more type of extracellular matrix protein. Our results show that NIH 3T3 fibroblasts exhibit durotaxis on fibronectin-coated mechanical gradients but not on those coated with laminin, demonstrating that extracellular matrix type can act as a regulator of cell response to mechanical gradients. Interestingly, NIH 3T3 fibroblasts were also observed to migrate randomly on gradients coated with a mixture of both fibronectin and laminin, suggesting that there may be a complex interplay in the cellular response to mechanical gradients in the presence of multiple extracellular matrix signals. These findings indicate that specific composition of available adhesion ligands is a critical determinant of a cell's migratory response to mechanical gradients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fibronectin matrix assembly is essential for cell condensation during chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Purva; Schwarzbauer, Jean E

    2014-10-15

    Mesenchymal cell condensation is the initiating event in endochondral bone formation. Cell condensation is followed by differentiation into chondrocytes, which is accompanied by induction of chondrogenic gene expression. Gene mutations involved in chondrogenesis cause chondrodysplasias and other skeletal defects. Using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in an in vitro chondrogenesis assay, we found that knockdown of the diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) sulfate transporter (DTDST, also known as SLC26A2), which is required for normal cartilage development, blocked cell condensation and caused a significant reduction in fibronectin matrix. Knockdown of fibronectin with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) also blocked condensation. Fibrillar fibronectin matrix was detected prior to cell condensation, and its levels increased during and after condensation. Inhibition of fibronectin matrix assembly by use of the functional upstream domain (FUD) of adhesin F1 from Streptococcus pyogenes prevented cell condensation by MSCs and also by the chondrogenic cell line ATDC5. Our data show that cell condensation and induction of chondrogenesis depend on fibronectin matrix assembly and DTDST, and indicate that this transporter is required earlier in chondrogenesis than previously appreciated. They also raise the possibility that certain of the skeletal defects in DTD patients might derive from the link between DTDST, fibronectin matrix and condensation. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Engineered cell-adhesive nanoparticles nucleate extracellular matrix assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Marian; Sharma, Ram I; Penkala, Rebecca; Gentzel, Thomas A; Schwarzbauer, Jean E; Moghe, Prabhas V

    2007-03-01

    Tissue engineering aims to regenerate new biological tissue for replacing diseased or injured tissues. We propose a new approach to accelerate the deposition of cell-secreted matrix proteins into extracellular matrix fibrils. We examined whether dynamic substrates with nanoscale ligand features allowing for alpha5beta1 integrin recruiting, cellular tension generation, and alpha5beta1 integrin mobility would enhance fibronectin matrix assembly in a ligand model system that is routinely not sufficient for its induction. To this end, we developed biodynamic substrates consisting of cell adhesive fragment from the 9th and 10th type repeats of fibronectin (FNf ) functionalized to 100 nm prefabricated albumin nanoparticles (ANPs). FNf-ANPs modulated cellular spreading processes, promoting the development of stellate or dendritic morphologies. Concomitant with the spreading, FNf-ANPs rapidly recruited beta1 integrins to focal contacts and promoted the migration of beta1 integrins centripetally from the cell periphery toward the center. FNf-ANPs stimulated the deposition of secreted fibronectin into matrix fibrils; FNf, the key ligand alone, was not sufficient for fibronectin fibrillogenesis. When FNf-ANPs were displayed from "immobilized" substrates, abolishing any mobility of ligated beta1 integrins, fibronectin matrix assembly was abrogated, implicating the role of dynamic matrix display on matrix assembly. Receptor ligation of FNf-ANPs via noncontractile adhesions was not sufficient to stimulate fibrillogenesis, and Rho-kinase inhibitors abolished fibronectin matrix deposition. Our approach highlights the possibility of engineering integrin-based extracellular matrix assembly using nanotechnology, which may have implications for improved biomaterials for wound repair and basic understanding of matrix remodeling within pathogenesis and biomedicine.

  12. Senescent intervertebral disc cells exhibit perturbed matrix homeostasis phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Kevin; Patil, Prashanti; McGowan, Sara J; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Robbins, Paul D; Kang, James; Sowa, Gwendolyn; Vo, Nam

    2017-09-01

    Aging greatly increases the risk for intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) as a result of proteoglycan loss due to reduced synthesis and enhanced degradation of the disc matrix proteoglycan (PG). How disc matrix PG homeostasis becomes perturbed with age is not known. The goal of this study is to determine whether cellular senescence is a source of this perturbation. We demonstrated that disc cellular senescence is dramatically increased in the DNA repair-deficient Ercc1(-/Δ) mouse model of human progeria. In these accelerated aging mice, increased disc cellular senescence is closely associated with the rapid loss of disc PG. We also directly examine PG homeostasis in oxidative damage-induced senescent human cells using an in vitro cell culture model system. Senescence of human disc cells treated with hydrogen peroxide was confirmed by growth arrest, senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, γH2AX foci, and acquisition of senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Senescent human disc cells also exhibited perturbed matrix PG homeostasis as evidenced by their decreased capacity to synthesize new matrix PG and enhanced degradation of aggrecan, a major matrix PG. of the disc. Our in vivo and in vitro findings altogether suggest that disc cellular senescence is an important driver of PG matrix homeostatic perturbation and PG loss. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Human hematopoietic stem cell adherence to cytokines and matrix molecules.

    OpenAIRE

    Long, M. W.; Briddell, R.; Walter, A W; Bruno, E; Hoffman, R.

    1992-01-01

    The hematopoietic microenvironment is a complex structure in which stem cells, progenitor cells, stromal cells, growth factors, and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules each interact to direct the coordinate regulation of blood cell development. While much is known concerning the individual components of this microenvironment, little is understood of the interactions among these various components or, in particular, the nature of those interactions responsible for the regional localization of...

  14. Role of cysteine cathepsins in matrix degradation and cell signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermajer, Natasa; Jevnikar, Zala; Doljak, Bojan; Kos, Janko

    2008-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsins participate in extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation and remodelling and thus influence important cellular processes such as cell transformation and differentiation, motility, adhesion, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Also, cathepsins are involved in cell signalling and are capable of activating specific cell receptors and growth factors or liberating them from the ECM. In this review we emphasize recent studies on cathepsins in regard to ECM degradation and cell signalling.

  15. Strong work-hardening behavior induced by the solid solution strengthening of dendrites in TiZr-based bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, D.Q. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Jiao, W.T. [College of Education, Hebei Normal University of Science and Technology, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Zhang, Y.F. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Hebei Vocational and Technical College of Building Materials, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Wang, B.A.; Li, J.; Zhang, X.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Ma, M.Z., E-mail: mz550509@ysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Liu, R.P. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2015-03-05

    Highlights: • Hardness of dendrite of TiZr-based BMGMCs increases. • Strong work-hardening behavior is obtained after solid solution strengthening. • Lattice distortions of dendrite suffering from rapid cooling are detected. - Abstract: A series of TiZr-based bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs) with distinguished mechanical properties are successfully fabricated by adding different volume fractions of Ta (Ti{sub 38.8}Zr{sub 28.8}Cu{sub 6.2}Be{sub 16.2}Nb{sub 10} as the basic composition, denoted as Ta{sub 0.0}–Ta{sub 8.0}). Along with the growth of precipitated phase, typical dendritic morphology is fully developed in the TiZr-based BMGMCs of Ta{sub 8.0}. Energy-dispersive spectrometry analysis of the dendrites and glass matrix indicates that the metallic elements of Nb and Ta should preferentially form solid solution into dendrites. The chaotic structure of high-temperature precipitate phase is trapped down by the rapid cooling of the copper-mould. The detected lattice distortions in the dendrites are attributed to the strong solid solution strengthening of the metallic elements of Ti, Zr, Nb, and Ta. These lattice distortions increase the resistance of the dislocation motion and pin the dislocations, thus the strength and hardness of dendrite increase. Dendrites create a strong barrier for the shear band propagation and generate multiple shear bands after solid solution strengthening, thereby providing the TiZr-based BMGMCs with greatly improved capacity to sustain plastic deformation and resistance to brittle fracture. Thus, the TiZr-based BMGMCs possess distinguished work-hardening capability. Among these TiZr-based BMGMCs, the sample Ta{sub 0.5} possesses the largest plastic strain (ε{sub p}) at 20.3% and ultimate strength (σ{sub max}) of 2613 MPa during compressive loading. In addition, the sample of Ta{sub 0.5} exhibits work-hardening up to an ultrahigh tensile strength of 1680 MPa during the tensile process, and then progressively

  16. Random matrix analysis for gene interaction networks in cancer cells

    CERN Document Server

    Kikkawa, Ayumi

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The investigation of topological modifications of the gene interaction networks in cancer cells is essential for understanding the desease. We study gene interaction networks in various human cancer cells with the random matrix theory. This study is based on the Cancer Network Galaxy (TCNG) database which is the repository of huge gene interactions inferred by Bayesian network algorithms from 256 microarray experimental data downloaded from NCBI GEO. The original GEO data are provided by the high-throughput microarray expression experiments on various human cancer cells. We apply the random matrix theory to the computationally inferred gene interaction networks in TCNG in order to detect the universality in the topology of the gene interaction networks in cancer cells. Results: We found the universal behavior in almost one half of the 256 gene interaction networks in TCNG. The distribution of nearest neighbor level spacing of the gene interaction matrix becomes the Wigner distribution when the net...

  17. Nickel hydrogen battery cell storage matrix test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, James R.; Dodson, Gary W.

    1993-01-01

    Test were conducted to evaluate post storage performance of nickel hydrogen cells with various design variables, the most significant being nickel precharge versus hydrogen precharge. Test procedures and results are presented in outline and graphic form.

  18. Mechanism of regulation of stem cell differentiation by matrix stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongwei; Li, Lisha; Sun, Meiyu; Zhang, Yin; Chen, Li; Rong, Yue; Li, Yulin

    2015-05-27

    Stem cell behaviors are regulated by multiple microenvironmental cues. As an external signal, mechanical stiffness of the extracellular matrix is capable of governing stem cell fate determination, but how this biophysical cue is translated into intracellular signaling remains elusive. Here, we elucidate mechanisms by which stem cells respond to microenvironmental stiffness through the dynamics of the cytoskeletal network, leading to changes in gene expression via biophysical transduction signaling pathways in two-dimensional culture. Furthermore, a putative rapid shift from original mechanosensing to de novo cell-derived matrix sensing in more physiologically relevant three-dimensional culture is pointed out. A comprehensive understanding of stem cell responses to this stimulus is essential for designing biomaterials that mimic the physiological environment and advancing stem cell-based clinical applications for tissue engineering.

  19. Imaging Cells in Three-Dimensional Collagen Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Artym, Vira V.; Matsumoto, Kazue

    2010-01-01

    The use of in vitro three-dimensional (3D) collagen matrices to mimic an in vivo cellular environment has become increasingly popular and is broadening our understanding of cellular processes and cell - ECM interactions. To study cells in in vitro 3D collagen matrices, both cellular proteins and the collagen matrix must be visualized. In this unit, the authors describe the protocol and provide troubleshooting for immuno-labeling of cells in 3D collagen gels to localize and visualize cellular ...

  20. Human hematopoietic stem cell adherence to cytokines and matrix molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, M W; Briddell, R; Walter, A W; Bruno, E; Hoffman, R

    1992-07-01

    The hematopoietic microenvironment is a complex structure in which stem cells, progenitor cells, stromal cells, growth factors, and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules each interact to direct the coordinate regulation of blood cell development. While much is known concerning the individual components of this microenvironment, little is understood of the interactions among these various components or, in particular, the nature of those interactions responsible for the regional localization of specific developmental signals. We hypothesized that cytokines act together with ECM molecules to anchor stem cells within the microenvironment, thus modulating their function. In order to analyze matrix-cytokine-stem cell interactions, we developed an ECM model system in which purified stem cell populations and plastic-immobilized individual proteins are used to assess the role of various matrix molecules and/or cytokines in human hematopoietic cell development. Analysis of these interactions revealed that a single ECM protein, thrombospondin, in conjunction with a single cytokine (e.g., c-kit ligand), constitutes a developmental signal that synergistically modulates hematopoietic stem cell function.

  1. Influence of Porcine Intervertebral Disc Matrix on Stem Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Lothar Fuchsbauer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available For back disorders, cell therapy is one approach for a real regeneration of a degenerated nucleus pulposus. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC could be differentiated into nucleus pulposus (NP-like cells and used for cell therapy. Therefore it is necessary to find a suitable biocompatible matrix, which supports differentiation. It could be shown that a differentiation of hMSC in a microbial transglutaminase cross-linked gelatin matrix is possible, but resulted in a more chondrocyte-like cell type. The addition of porcine NP extract to the gelatin matrix caused a differentiation closer to the desired NP cell phenotype. This concludes that a hydrogel containing NP extract without any other supplements could be suitable for differentiation of hMSCs into NP cells. The NP extract itself can be cross-linked by transglutaminase to build a hydrogel free of NP atypical substrates. As shown by side-specific biotinylation, the NP extract contains molecules with free glutamine and lysine residues available for the transglutaminase.

  2. Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-14 in osteosarcoma cells by clodronate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heikkilä, P.; Teronen, O.; Hirn, M.Y.; Sorsa, T.; Tervahartiala, T.; Salo, T.; Konttinen, Y.T.; Halttunen, T.; Moilanen, M.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Laitinen, M.

    2003-01-01

    Background. Bisphosphonates reduce the bone metastasis formation and angiogenesis but the exact molecular mechanisms involved are unclear. Progelatinase A (proMMP-2; 78 KDa) is activated up during the tumor spread and metastasis by a cell surface-associated matrix metalloproteinase (membrane-type

  3. Soft matrix supports osteogenic differentiation of human dental follicle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viale-Bouroncle, Sandra; Voellner, Florian [Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, University Hospital Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany); Moehl, Christoph; Kuepper, Kevin [Institute of Complex Systems, ICS7: Biomechanics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Brockhoff, Gero [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Regensburg (Germany); Reichert, Torsten E. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany); Schmalz, Gottfried [Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, University Hospital Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany); Morsczeck, Christian, E-mail: christian.morsczeck@klinik.uni-regensburg.de [Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, University Hospital Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Rigid stiffness supports osteogenic differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). {yields} Our study examined stiffness and differentiation of dental follicle cells (DFCs). {yields} Soft ECMs have a superior capacity to support the osteogenic differentiation of DFCs. {yields} DFCs and MSCs react contrarily to soft and rigid surface stiffness. -- Abstract: The differentiation of stem cells can be directed by the grade of stiffness of the developed tissue cells. For example a rigid extracellular matrix supports the osteogenic differentiation in bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, less is known about the relation of extracellular matrix stiffness and cell differentiation of ectomesenchymal dental precursor cells. Our study examined for the first time the influence of the surface stiffness on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human dental follicle cells (DFCs). Cell proliferation of DFCs was only slightly decreased on cell culture surfaces with a bone-like stiffness. The osteogenic differentiation in DFCs could only be initiated with a dexamethasone based differentiation medium after using varying stiffness. Here, the softest surface improved the induction of osteogenic differentiation in comparison to that with the highest stiffness. In conclusion, different to bone marrow derived MSCs, soft ECMs have a superior capacity to support the osteogenic differentiation of DFCs.

  4. Self-Assembled Matrix by Umbilical Cord Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biagio Saitta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Corneal integrity is critical for vision. Corneal wounds frequently heal with scarring that impairs vision. Recently, human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (cord stem cells have been investigated for tissue engineering and therapy due to their availability and differentiation potential. In this study, we used cord stem cells in a 3-dimensional (3D stroma-like model to observe extracellular matrix organization, with human corneal fibroblasts acting as a control. For 4 weeks, the cells were stimulated with a stable Vitamin C (VitC derivative ±TGF-b1. After 4 weeks, the mean thickness of the constructs was ~30 mm; however, cord stem cell constructs had 50% less cells per unit volume, indicating the formation of a dense matrix. We found minimal change in decorin and lumican mRNA, and a significant increase in perlecan mRNA in the presence of TGF-b1. Keratocan on the other hand decreased with TGF-b1 in both cell lineages. With both cell types, the constructs possessed aligned collagen fibrils and associated glycosaminoglycans. Fibril diameters did not change with TGF-b1 stimulation or cell lineage; however, highly sulfated glycosaminoglycans associated with the collagen fibrils significantly increased with TGF-b1. Overall, we have shown that cord stem cells can secrete their own extracellular matrix and promote the deposition and sulfation of various proteoglycans. Furthermore, these cells are at least comparable to commonly used corneal fibroblasts and present an alternative for the 3D in vitro tissue engineered model.

  5. Proteoglycans, ion channels and cell-matrix adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitsou, Ioli; Multhaupt, Hinke A.B.; Couchman, John R.

    2017-01-01

    .Recent data now suggest that syndecans can regulate stretchactivated ion channels.The structure and function of the syndecans and the ion channels are reviewed here, along with an analysis of ion channel functions in cell-matrix adhesion.This area sheds new light on the syndecans, not least since evidence......, growth factors and morphogens to enzymes and extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins and collagens.Extracellular interactions with other receptors, such as some integrins, are mediated by the core protein.This places syndecans at the nexus of many cellular responses to extracellular cues in development...

  6. Extracellular Matrix and Integrins in Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Luo, Xie; Leighton, Jake

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are pluripotent cells with great therapeutic potentials. The in vitro differentiation of ESC was designed by recapitulating embryogenesis. Significant progress has been made to improve the in vitro differentiation protocols by toning soluble maintenance factors. However, more robust methods for lineage-specific differentiation and maturation are still under development. Considering the complexity of in vivo embryogenesis environment, extracellular matrix (ECM) cues should be considered besides growth factor cues. ECM proteins bind to cells and act as ligands of integrin receptors on cell surfaces. Here, we summarize the role of the ECM and integrins in the formation of three germ layer progenies. Various ECM-integrin interactions were found, facilitating differentiation toward definitive endoderm, hepatocyte-like cells, pancreatic beta cells, early mesodermal progenitors, cardiomyocytes, neuroectoderm lineages, and epidermal cells, such as keratinocytes and melanocytes. In the future, ECM combinations for the optimal ESC differentiation environment will require substantial study.

  7. Osteogenic Matrix Cell Sheets Facilitate Osteogenesis in Irradiated Rat Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Uchihara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of large bone defects after resection of malignant musculoskeletal tumors is a significant challenge in orthopedic surgery. Extracorporeal autogenous irradiated bone grafting is a treatment option for bone reconstruction. However, nonunion often occurs because the osteogenic capacity is lost by irradiation. In the present study, we established an autogenous irradiated bone graft model in the rat femur to assess whether osteogenic matrix cell sheets improve osteogenesis of the irradiated bone. Osteogenic matrix cell sheets were prepared from bone marrow-derived stromal cells and co-transplanted with irradiated bone. X-ray images at 4 weeks after transplantation showed bridging callus formation around the irradiated bone. Micro-computed tomography images at 12 weeks postoperatively showed abundant callus formation in the whole circumference of the irradiated bone. Histology showed bone union between the irradiated bone and host femur. Mechanical testing showed that the failure force at the irradiated bone site was significantly higher than in the control group. Our study indicates that osteogenic matrix cell sheet transplantation might be a powerful method to facilitate osteogenesis in irradiated bones, which may become a treatment option for reconstruction of bone defects after resection of malignant musculoskeletal tumors.

  8. Complex matrix remodeling and durotaxis can emerge from simple rules for cell-matrix interaction in agent-based models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, James W; Krakauer, Daniel A; Gooch, Keith J

    2013-07-01

    Using a top-down approach, an agent-based model was developed within NetLogo where cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) fibers were composed of multiple agents to create deformable structures capable of exerting, reacting to, and transmitting mechanical force. At the beginning of the simulation, long fibers were randomly distributed and cross linked. Throughout the simulation, imposed rules allowed cells to exert traction forces by extending pseudopodia, binding to fibers and pulling them towards the cell. Simulated cells remodeled the fibrous matrix to change both the density and alignment of fibers and migrated within the matrix in ways that are consistent with previous experimental work. For example, cells compacted the matrix in their pericellular regions much more than the average compaction experienced for the entire matrix (696% versus 21%). Between pairs of cells, the matrix density increased (by 92%) and the fibers became more aligned (anisotropy index increased from 0.45 to 0.68) in the direction parallel to a line connecting the two cells, consistent with the "lines of tension" observed in experiments by others. Cells migrated towards one another at an average rate of ∼0.5 cell diameters per 10,000 arbitrary units (AU); faster migration occurred in simulations where the fiber density in the intercellular area was greater. To explore the potential contribution of matrix stiffness gradients in the observed migration (i.e., durotaxis), the model was altered to contain a regular lattice of fibers possessing a stiffness gradient and just a single cell. In these simulations cells migrated preferentially in the direction of increasing stiffness at a rate of ∼2 cell diameter per 10,000 AU. This work demonstrates that matrix remodeling and durotaxis, both complex phenomena, might be emergent behaviors based on just a few rules that control how a cell can interact with a fibrous ECM.

  9. CARTILAGE OLIGOMERIC MATRIX PROTEIN ENHANCES MATRIX ASSEMBLY DURING CHONDROGENESIS OF HUMAN MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem-Smith, Hana; Calderon, Raul; Song, Yingjie; Tuan, Rocky S.; Chen, Faye H.

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein/thrombospondin-5 (COMP/TSP5) is an abundant cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that interacts with major cartilage ECM components, including aggrecan and collagens. To test our hypothesis that COMP/TSP5 functions in the assembly of the ECM during cartilage morphogenesis, we have employed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis in vitro as a model to examine the effects of COMP over-expression on neo-cartilage formation. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transfected with either full-length COMP cDNA or control plasmid, followed by chondrogenic induction in three-dimensional pellet or alginate-hydrogel culture. MSC chondrogenesis and ECM production was estimated based on quantitation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) accumulation, immunohistochemistry of the presence and distribution of cartilage ECM proteins, and real-time RT-PCR analyis of mRNA expression of cartilage markers. Our results showed that COMP over-expression resulted in increased total sGAG content during the early phase of MSC chondrogenesis, and increased immuno-detectable levels of aggrecan and collagen type II in the ECM of COMP-transfected pellet and alginate cultures, indicating more abundant cartilaginous matrix. COMP transfection did not significantly increase the transcript levels of the early chondrogenic marker, Sox9, or aggrecan, suggesting that enhancement of MSC cartilage ECM was effected at post-transcriptional levels. These findings strongly suggest that COMP functions in mesenchymal chondrogenesis by enhancing cartilage ECM organization and assembly. The action of COMP is most likely mediated not via direct changes in cartilage matrix gene expression but via interactions of COMP with other cartilage ECM proteins, such as aggrecan and collagens, that result in enhanced assembly and retention. PMID:22095699

  10. Collagen matrix as a tool in studying fibroblastic cell behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanta, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is a fibrillar protein, a member of a large family of collagen proteins. It is present in most body tissues, usually in combination with other collagens and other components of extracellular matrix. Its synthesis is increased in various pathological situations, in healing wounds, in fibrotic tissues and in many tumors. After extraction from collagen-rich tissues it is widely used in studies of cell behavior, especially those of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Cells cultured in a classical way, on planar plastic dishes, lack the third dimension that is characteristic of body tissues. Collagen I forms gel at neutral pH and may become a basis of a 3D matrix that better mimics conditions in tissue than plastic dishes. PMID:25734486

  11. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) modulates Leydig cell extracellular matrix components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catizone, A; Ricci, G; Tufano, M A; Perfetto, B; Canipari, R; Galdieri, M

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a pleiotropic factor that plays multiple roles during mammalian development. We previously demonstrated that in the postnatal testes, the HGF receptor, c-met, is expressed by Leydig cells and HGF increases the steroidogenetic activity of the cells. In the present article, we report that HGF modifies the composition of the extracellular matrix of cultured Leydig cells. We show that HGF increases the metabolic activity of isolated Leydig cells; in particular, the factor increases urokinase plasminogen activator and matrix metalloproteinase 2 secretion. We have also shown that the levels of active transforming growth factor beta are increased by HGF. On the contrary, using the Western blotting technique, a strong reduction in the amount of fibronectin present in the culture medium of cells cultured in the presence of HGF has been detected. The presented data demonstrate that HGF modulates several functional activities of Leydig cells, further supporting the hypothesis that this factor has a relevant role in the regulation of mammalian spermatogenesis.

  12. Cell stiffness, contractile stress and the role of extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Steven S., E-mail: san@jhsph.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Kim, Jina [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Ahn, Kwangmi [Division of Biostatistics, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Trepat, Xavier [CIBER, Enfermedades Respiratorias, 07110 Bunyola (Spain); Drake, Kenneth J. [Division of Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kumar, Sarvesh; Ling, Guoyu; Purington, Carolyn; Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Kensler, Thomas W.; Mitzner, Wayne [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Fredberg, Jeffrey J. [Division of Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Biswal, Shyam [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Room E-7616, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    Here we have assessed the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and rigidity on mechanical properties of the human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. Cell stiffness and contractile stress showed appreciable changes from the most relaxed state to the most contracted state: we refer to the maximal range of these changes as the cell contractile scope. The contractile scope was least when the cell was adherent upon collagen V, followed by collagen IV, laminin, and collagen I, and greatest for fibronectin. Regardless of ECM composition, upon adherence to increasingly rigid substrates, the ASM cell positively regulated expression of antioxidant genes in the glutathione pathway and heme oxygenase, and disruption of a redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor (Nrf2), culminated in greater contractile scope. These findings provide biophysical evidence that ECM differentially modulates muscle contractility and, for the first time, demonstrate a link between muscle contractility and Nrf2-directed responses.

  13. Endothelial cell contraction increases Candida adherence to exposed extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, S A; Maca, R D

    1988-01-01

    Bovine vascular endothelial cells treated with EDTA, urea, or thrombin underwent a marked, reversible contraction resulting in exposure of the subendothelial extracellular matrix (ECM). Candida yeasts adhered more to contracted monolayers than to confluent monolayers (P less than 0.01) by preferentially adhering to the ECM. Two strains of Candida albicans and one strain of Candida tropicalis bound avidly to exposed ECM, but Pseudomonas aeruginosa did not. However, treatment of endothelium with forskolin, which induces cell shape changes without exposure of the ECM, did not cause an increase in adherence. Images PMID:3137171

  14. Dense and Sparse Matrix Operations on the Cell Processor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Samuel W.; Shalf, John; Oliker, Leonid; Husbands,Parry; Yelick, Katherine

    2005-05-01

    The slowing pace of commodity microprocessor performance improvements combined with ever-increasing chip power demands has become of utmost concern to computational scientists. Therefore, the high performance computing community is examining alternative architectures that address the limitations of modern superscalar designs. In this work, we examine STI's forthcoming Cell processor: a novel, low-power architecture that combines a PowerPC core with eight independent SIMD processing units coupled with a software-controlled memory to offer high FLOP/s/Watt. Since neither Cell hardware nor cycle-accurate simulators are currently publicly available, we develop an analytic framework to predict Cell performance on dense and sparse matrix operations, using a variety of algorithmic approaches. Results demonstrate Cell's potential to deliver more than an order of magnitude better GFLOP/s per watt performance, when compared with the Intel Itanium2 and Cray X1 processors.

  15. Matrix metalloproteinase expression in keratocystic odontogenic tumors and primary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amm, Hope M; Casimir, Monee D; Clark, Dakota B; Sohn, Phillip; MacDougall, Mary

    2014-08-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) are locally invasive, rapidly proliferating cystic lesions of the jaw. The bone-invasive nature of these tumors has been previously associated with the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which degrade the extracellular matrix. The purpose of this study was to assess the expression and activity of MMPs in primary KCOT cells and tumor tissue. Four independently established KCOT primary cell populations were grown in Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium supplemented with 10% FBS and antibiotics. Primary cells were analyzed by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC), and for secretion of active MMPs. Primary tumor sections were analyzed by IHC. Of the 18 human MMPs examined, 9 were consistently expressed in primary KCOT cells. MMP-2 and MMP-14 were highly expressed in all KCOT populations, while MMP-1, 3, 11, 12, 16, 17, and 19 were moderately expressed. MMP-3, 11, 12, 16, 17 and 19 were shown to be expressed in KCOTs for the first time. No significant differences in MMPS profiles were found between syndromic (KCOT-3) and non-syndromic cell populations (KCOT-1/2/4). Protein expression of MMP-1, 11, 12, 14 and 16 was confirmed in each KCOT cell populations by IHC. KCOT-3 cells secreted active MMP-2 as determined by a gel zymography assay. Expression of MMP-1, 2, 3, 11, 12, 14, and 16 was confirmed in matching primary KCOT tumor sections representing syndromic and non-syndromic KCOTs. KCOT primary cell populations and tumors express a wide range of MMPs, which likely play a role in the bone-invasive nature of these tumors.

  16. An immunofluorescence assay for extracellular matrix components highlights the role of epithelial cells in producing a stable, fibrillar extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar S. Qureshi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Activated fibroblasts are considered major drivers of fibrotic disease progression through the production of excessive extracellular matrix (ECM in response to signals from damaged epithelial and inflammatory cells. Nevertheless, epithelial cells are capable of expressing components of the ECM, cross-linking enzymes that increase its stability and are sensitive to factors involved in the early stages of fibrosis. We therefore wanted to test the hypothesis that epithelial cells can deposit ECM in response to stimulation in a comparable manner to fibroblasts. We performed immunofluorescence analysis of components of stable, mature extracellular matrix produced by primary human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells and renal fibroblasts in response to cytokine stimulation. Whilst fibroblasts produced a higher basal level of extracellular matrix components, epithelial cells were able to deposit significant levels of fibronectin, collagen I, III and IV in response to cytokine stimulation. In response to hypoxia, epithelial cells showed an increase in collagen IV deposition but not in response to the acute stress stimuli aristolochic acid or hydrogen peroxide. When epithelial cells were in co-culture with fibroblasts we observed significant increases in the level of matrix deposition which could be reduced by transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β blockade. Our results highlight the role of epithelial cells acting as efficient producers of stable extracellular matrix which could contribute to renal tubule thickening in fibrosis.

  17. An immunofluorescence assay for extracellular matrix components highlights the role of epithelial cells in producing a stable, fibrillar extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Omar S; Bon, Hélène; Twomey, Breda; Holdsworth, Gill; Ford, Kirsty; Bergin, Marianne; Huang, Linghong; Muzylak, Mariusz; Healy, Louise J; Hurdowar, Vanessa; Johnson, Timothy S

    2017-10-15

    Activated fibroblasts are considered major drivers of fibrotic disease progression through the production of excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) in response to signals from damaged epithelial and inflammatory cells. Nevertheless, epithelial cells are capable of expressing components of the ECM, cross-linking enzymes that increase its stability and are sensitive to factors involved in the early stages of fibrosis. We therefore wanted to test the hypothesis that epithelial cells can deposit ECM in response to stimulation in a comparable manner to fibroblasts. We performed immunofluorescence analysis of components of stable, mature extracellular matrix produced by primary human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells and renal fibroblasts in response to cytokine stimulation. Whilst fibroblasts produced a higher basal level of extracellular matrix components, epithelial cells were able to deposit significant levels of fibronectin, collagen I, III and IV in response to cytokine stimulation. In response to hypoxia, epithelial cells showed an increase in collagen IV deposition but not in response to the acute stress stimuli aristolochic acid or hydrogen peroxide. When epithelial cells were in co-culture with fibroblasts we observed significant increases in the level of matrix deposition which could be reduced by transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) blockade. Our results highlight the role of epithelial cells acting as efficient producers of stable extracellular matrix which could contribute to renal tubule thickening in fibrosis. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Patterned cell and matrix dynamics in branching morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaohe; Sekiguchi, Rei; Daley, William P; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2017-03-06

    Many embryonic organs undergo branching morphogenesis to maximize their functional epithelial surface area. Branching morphogenesis requires the coordinated interplay of multiple types of cells with the extracellular matrix (ECM). During branching morphogenesis, new branches form by "budding" or "clefting." Cell migration, proliferation, rearrangement, deformation, and ECM dynamics have varied roles in driving budding versus clefting in different organs. Elongation of the newly formed branch and final maturation of the tip involve cellular mechanisms that include cell elongation, intercalation, convergent extension, proliferation, and differentiation. New methodologies such as high-resolution live imaging, tension sensors, and force-mapping techniques are providing exciting new opportunities for future research into branching morphogenesis. This is a work of the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. Foreign copyrights may apply.

  19. Engineering nanoscale stem cell niche: direct stem cell behavior at cell-matrix interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Gordon, Andrew; Qian, Weiyi; Chen, Weiqiang

    2015-09-16

    Biophysical cues on the extracellular matrix (ECM) have proven to be significant regulators of stem cell behavior and evolution. Understanding the interplay of these cells and their extracellular microenvironment is critical to future tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, both of which require a means of controlled differentiation. Research suggests that nanotopography, which mimics the local, nanoscale, topographic cues within the stem cell niche, could be a way to achieve large-scale proliferation and control of stem cells in vitro. This Progress Report reviews the history and contemporary advancements of this technology, and pays special attention to nanotopographic fabrication methods and the effect of different nanoscale patterns on stem cell response. Finally, it outlines potential intracellular mechanisms behind this response. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Molecular Control of Vascular Tube Morphogenesis and Stabilization: Regulation by Extracellular Matrix, Matrix Metalloproteinases, and Endothelial Cell-Pericyte Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, George E.; Stratman, Amber N.; Sacharidou, Anastasia

    Recent studies have revealed a critical role for both extracellular matrices and matrix metalloproteinases in the molecular control of vascular morphogenesis and stabilization in three-dimensional (3D) tissue environments. Key interactions involve endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes, which coassemble to affect vessel formation, remodeling, and stabilization events during development and postnatal life. EC-pericyte interactions control extracellular matrix remodeling events including vascular basement membrane matrix assembly, a necessary step for endothelial tube maturation and stabilization. ECs form tube networks in 3D extracellular matrices in a manner dependent on integrins, membrane-type metalloproteinases, and the Rho GTPases, Cdc42 and Rac1. Recent work has defined an EC lumen signaling complex of proteins composed of these proteins that controls 3D matrix-specific signaling events required for these processes. The EC tube formation process results in the creation of a network of proteolytically generated vascular guidance tunnels. These tunnels are physical matrix spaces that regulate vascular tube remodeling and represent matrix conduits into which pericytes are recruited to allow dynamic cell-cell interactions with ECs. These dynamic EC-pericyte interactions induce vascular basement membrane matrix deposition, leading to vessel maturation and stabilization.

  1. Cells involved in extracellular matrix remodeling after acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Larissa Ferraz [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Mataveli, Fábio D’Aguiar [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mader, Ana Maria Amaral Antônio; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Justo, Giselle Zenker; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Evaluate the effects of VEGF{sub 165} gene transfer in the process of remodeling of the extracellular matrix after an acute myocardial infarct. Wistar rats were submitted to myocardial infarction, after the ligation of the left descending artery, and the left ventricle ejection fraction was used to classify the infarcts into large and small. The animals were divided into groups of ten, according to the size of infarcted area (large or small), and received or not VEGF{sub 165} treatment. Evaluation of different markers was performed using immunohistochemistry and digital quantification. The primary antibodies used in the analysis were anti-fibronectin, anti-vimentin, anti-CD44, anti-E-cadherin, anti-CD24, anti-alpha-1-actin, and anti-PCNA. The results were expressed as mean and standard error, and analyzed by ANOVA, considering statistically significant if p≤0.05. There was a significant increase in the expression of undifferentiated cell markers, such as fibronectin (protein present in the extracellular matrix) and CD44 (glycoprotein present in the endothelial cells). However, there was decreased expression of vimentin and PCNA, indicating a possible decrease in the process of cell proliferation after treatment with VEGF{sub 165}. Markers of differentiated cells, E-cadherin (adhesion protein between myocardial cells), CD24 (protein present in the blood vessels), and alpha-1-actin (specific myocyte marker), showed higher expression in the groups submitted to gene therapy, compared to non-treated group. The value obtained by the relation between alpha-1-actin and vimentin was approximately three times higher in the groups treated with VEGF{sub 165}, suggesting greater tissue differentiation. The results demonstrated the important role of myocytes in the process of tissue remodeling, confirming that VEGF{sub 165} seems to provide a protective effect in the treatment of acute myocardial infarct.

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 contribution to sarcoma cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garamszegi, Nandor; Garamszegi, Susanna P; Scully, Sean P

    2012-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) activity has been linked to numerous disease processes from arthritis to ulcer. Its proteolytic activity has been implicated inconsistently in different steps of tumourigenesis and metastasis. The discrepancies may be attributable to our limited understanding of MMP-1 production, cellular trafficking, secretion and local activation. Specifically, regulation of MMP-1 directional delivery versus its general extracellular matrix secretion is largely unknown. Inhibition of prenylation by farnesyl transferase inhibitor (FTI-276) decreased extracellular MMP-1 and subsequently reduced invasiveness by 30%. Parallel, stable cell line RNAi knockdown of MMP-1 confirmed its role in cellular invasiveness. The prenylation agonist farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) partially normalized FTI-276 inhibited extracellular MMP-1 levels and invasion capacity while transiently delayed its cellular podia distribution. MMP-1 directional delivery to these structures were confirmed by combination of a MMP-1-specific fluorogenic substrate, a MMP1-Ds-Red fusion protein construct expression and DQ-collagen degradation, which demonstrated coupling of directional delivery and activation. MetaMorph analysis of cellular lamellipodia structures indicated that FTI-276 inhibited formation and delivery to these structures. Farnesyl pyrophosphate partially restored lamellipodia area but not MMP-1 delivery under the time frame investigated. These results indicate that MMP-1 directional delivery to podia structures is involved in the invasive activity of sarcoma cells, and this process is prenylation sensitive. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2011 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Imaging cells in three-dimensional collagen matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artym, Vira V; Matsumoto, Kazue

    2010-09-01

    The use of in vitro three-dimensional (3-D) collagen matrices to mimic an in vivo cellular environment has become increasingly popular and is broadening our understanding of cellular processes and cell-ECM interactions. To study cells in in vitro 3-D collagen matrices, both cellular proteins and the collagen matrix must be visualized. In this unit, the authors describe the protocol and provide troubleshooting for immunolabeling of cells in 3-D collagen gels to localize and visualize cellular proteins with high-resolution fluorescence confocal microscopy. The authors then describe confocal reflection microscopy as a technique for direct imaging of 3-D fibrillar collagen matrices by discussing the advantages and disadvantages of the technique. They also provide instrument settings required for simultaneous imaging of cellular proteins with fluorescence confocal imaging and 3-D collagen fibrils with confocal reflection microscopy. Additionally, the authors provide protocols for a "cell sandwiching" technique to prepare cell cultures in 3-D collagen matrices required for high-resolution confocal imaging. © 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Debonding damage analysis in composite-masonry strengthening systems with polymer- and mortar-based matrix by means of the acoustic emission technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstrynge, E.; Wevers, M.; Ghiassi, B.; Lourenço, P. B.

    2016-01-01

    Different types of strengthening systems, based on fiber reinforced materials, are under investigation for external strengthening of historic masonry structures. A full characterization of the bond behavior and of the short- and long-term failure mechanisms is crucial to ensure effective design, compatibility with the historic substrate and durability of the strengthening solution. Therein, non-destructive techniques are essential for bond characterization, durability assessment and on-site condition monitoring. In this paper, the acoustic emission (AE) technique is evaluated for debonding characterization and localization on fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) and steel reinforced grout-strengthened clay bricks. Both types of strengthening systems are subjected to accelerated ageing tests under thermal cycles and to single-lap shear bond tests. During the reported experimental campaign, AE data from the accelerated ageing tests demonstrated the thermal incompatibility between brick and epoxy-bonded FRP composites, and debonding damage was successfully detected, characterized and located. In addition, a qualitative comparison is made with digital image correlation and infrared thermography, in view of efficient on-site debonding detection.

  5. Observation of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells retained inside the non-woven fiber matrix of the CellTank bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Chotteau, Véronique

    2015-12-01

    This data article shows how the recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells are located in the interstices of the matrix fibers of a CellTank bioreactor after completion of a perfusion culture, supporting the article entitled "Very high cell density perfusion of CHO cells anchored in a non-woven matrix-based bioreactor" by Zhang et al. [1]. It provides a visualization of the cell distribution in the non-woven fiber matrix in a deeper view.

  6. Punching strengthen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazem M.F. Elbakry

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental and analytical study on the punching strengthening of reinforced concrete two-way slabs using external steel plates is presented. Five reinforced concrete square slabs of 100 mm thickness were tested over simply supported four sides of 1000 mm span under central square patch load of 100 mm size up to failure. One control slab was tested without strengthening; however, four tested slabs were strengthened using four configurations of square steel plates provided with steel anchor shear studs. Such configurations considered two different plate thickness, two plate side dimensions and different arrangement and diameter of shear studs. The strengthened four slabs showed improved stiffness and punching shear capacity. The magnitude of improvement depended on the plate dimensions and the studs diameter and arrangement. An analytical approach was proposed for predicting the punching shear strength increase due to using the strengthening steel plate. The proposed approach was applied to the tested specimens with the use of the punching shear strength equations adopted by several codes of practice and proved to be in good agreement with the test results. Generally, this research presented a practical strengthening concept that can be used to increase the punching shear capacity of two-way slabs.

  7. VANGL2 interacts with integrin αv to regulate matrix metalloproteinase activity and cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Tammy N; Jessen, Jason R

    2017-12-15

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins are implicated in a variety of morphogenetic processes including embryonic cell migration and potentially cancer progression. During zebrafish gastrulation, the transmembrane protein Vang-like 2 (VANGL2) is required for PCP and directed cell migration. These cell behaviors occur in the context of a fibrillar extracellular matrix (ECM). While it is thought that interactions with the ECM regulate cell migration, it is unclear how PCP proteins such as VANGL2 influence these events. Using an in vitro cell culture model system, we previously showed that human VANGL2 negatively regulates membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MMP14) and activation of secreted matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2). Here, we investigated the functional relationship between VANGL2, integrin αvβ3, and MMP2 activation. We provide evidence that VANGL2 regulates cell surface integrin αvβ3 expression and adhesion to fibronectin, laminin, and vitronectin. Inhibition of MMP14/MMP2 activity suppressed the cell adhesion defect in VANGL2 knockdown cells. Furthermore, our data show that MMP14 and integrin αv are required for increased proteolysis by VANGL2 knockdown cells. Lastly, we have identified integrin αvβ3 as a novel VANGL2 binding partner. Together, these findings begin to dissect the molecular underpinnings of how VANGL2 regulates MMP activity and cell adhesion to the ECM. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Regulation of pituitary hormones and cell proliferation by components of the extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Paez-Pereda

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix is a three-dimensional network of proteins, glycosaminoglycans and other macromolecules. It has a structural support function as well as a role in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The extracellular matrix conveys signals through membrane receptors called integrins and plays an important role in pituitary physiology and tumorigenesis. There is a differential expression of extracellular matrix components and integrins during the pituitary development in the embryo and during tumorigenesis in the adult. Different extracellular matrix components regulate adrenocorticotropin at the level of the proopiomelanocortin gene transcription. The extracellular matrix also controls the proliferation of adrenocorticotropin-secreting tumor cells. On the other hand, laminin regulates the production of prolactin. Laminin has a dynamic pattern of expression during prolactinoma development with lower levels in the early pituitary hyperplasia and a strong reduction in fully grown prolactinomas. Therefore, the expression of extracellular matrix components plays a role in pituitary tumorigenesis. On the other hand, the remodeling of the extracellular matrix affects pituitary cell proliferation. Matrix metalloproteinase activity is very high in all types of human pituitary adenomas. Matrix metalloproteinase secreted by pituitary cells can release growth factors from the extracellular matrix that, in turn, control pituitary cell proliferation and hormone secretion. In summary, the differential expression of extracellular matrix components, integrins and matrix metalloproteinase contributes to the control of pituitary hormone production and cell proliferation during tumorigenesis.

  9. Mechanical cell-matrix feedback explains pairwise and collective endothelial cell behavior in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René F M van Oers

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In vitro cultures of endothelial cells are a widely used model system of the collective behavior of endothelial cells during vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. When seeded in an extracellular matrix, endothelial cells can form blood vessel-like structures, including vascular networks and sprouts. Endothelial morphogenesis depends on a large number of chemical and mechanical factors, including the compliancy of the extracellular matrix, the available growth factors, the adhesion of cells to the extracellular matrix, cell-cell signaling, etc. Although various computational models have been proposed to explain the role of each of these biochemical and biomechanical effects, the understanding of the mechanisms underlying in vitro angiogenesis is still incomplete. Most explanations focus on predicting the whole vascular network or sprout from the underlying cell behavior, and do not check if the same model also correctly captures the intermediate scale: the pairwise cell-cell interactions or single cell responses to ECM mechanics. Here we show, using a hybrid cellular Potts and finite element computational model, that a single set of biologically plausible rules describing (a the contractile forces that endothelial cells exert on the ECM, (b the resulting strains in the extracellular matrix, and (c the cellular response to the strains, suffices for reproducing the behavior of individual endothelial cells and the interactions of endothelial cell pairs in compliant matrices. With the same set of rules, the model also reproduces network formation from scattered cells, and sprouting from endothelial spheroids. Combining the present mechanical model with aspects of previously proposed mechanical and chemical models may lead to a more complete understanding of in vitro angiogenesis.

  10. Past matrix stiffness primes epithelial cells and regulates their future collective migration through a mechanical memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrollahi, Samila; Walter, Christopher; Loza, Andrew J; Schimizzi, Gregory V; Longmore, Gregory D; Pathak, Amit

    2017-11-01

    During morphogenesis and cancer metastasis, grouped cells migrate through tissues of dissimilar stiffness. Although the influence of matrix stiffness on cellular mechanosensitivity and motility are well-recognized, it remains unknown whether these matrix-dependent cellular features persist after cells move to a new microenvironment. Here, we interrogate whether priming of epithelial cells by a given matrix stiffness influences their future collective migration on a different matrix - a property we refer to as the 'mechanical memory' of migratory cells. To prime cells on a defined matrix and track their collective migration onto an adjoining secondary matrix of dissimilar stiffness, we develop a modular polyacrylamide substrate through step-by-step polymerization of different PA compositions. We report that epithelial cells primed on a stiff matrix migrate faster, display higher actomyosin expression, form larger focal adhesions, and retain nuclear YAP even after arriving onto a soft secondary matrix, as compared to their control behavior on a homogeneously soft matrix. Priming on a soft ECM causes a reverse effect. The depletion of YAP dramatically reduces this memory-dependent migration. Our results present a previously unidentified regulation of mechanosensitive collective cell migration by past matrix stiffness, in which mechanical memory depends on YAP activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. High fidelity visualization of cell-to-cell variation and temporal dynamics in nascent extracellular matrix formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Claire M.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix dynamics are key to tissue morphogenesis, homeostasis, injury, and repair. The spatiotemporal organization of this matrix has profound biological implications, but is challenging to monitor using standard techniques. Here, we address these challenges by using noncanonical amino acid tagging to fluorescently label extracellular matrix synthesized in the presence of bio-orthogonal methionine analogs. This strategy labels matrix proteins with high resolution, without compromising their distribution or mechanical function. We demonstrate that the organization and temporal dynamics of the proteinaceous matrix depend on the biophysical features of the microenvironment, including the biomaterial scaffold and the niche constructed by cells themselves. Pulse labeling experiments reveal that, in immature constructs, nascent matrix is highly fibrous and interdigitates with pre-existing matrix, while in more developed constructs, nascent matrix lacks fibrous organization and is retained in the immediate pericellular space. Inhibition of collagen crosslinking increases matrix synthesis, but compromises matrix organization. Finally, these data demonstrate marked cell-to-cell heterogeneity amongst both chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells undergoing chondrogenesis. Collectively, these results introduce fluorescent noncanonical amino acid tagging as a strategy to investigate spatiotemporal matrix organization, and demonstrate its ability to identify differences in phenotype, microenvironment, and matrix assembly at the single cell level. PMID:27941914

  12. RGD peptide-immobilized electrospun matrix of polyurethane for enhanced endothelial cell affinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Won Sup; Bae, Jin Woo; Joung, Yoon Ki; Park, Ki Dong [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, 5 Wonchon, Yeongtong, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hye Ryeon; Park, Jong-Chul [Department of Medical Engineering, 2 Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Il Keun [Department of Oral Biology and Institute of Oral Biology at Graduate School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kdp@ajou.ac.kr

    2008-12-15

    An Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide-immobilized electrospun matrix of polyurethane (PU) was developed for the enhanced affinity of endothelial cells (EC). The novel PU matrix was fabricated as a vascular shape using the electrospinning technique. Then, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was immobilized on the porous PU matrix as a spacer, followed by conjugating RGD peptide to the amino end group of the PEG chain. In the proliferation test of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) on the modified PU matrix, the RGD-immobilized porous matrix showed enhanced viability of HUVEC as compared with an unmodified surface, demonstrating that the presence of RGD peptide promoted HUVEC proliferation. In addition, the RGD-immobilized PU porous matrix revealed higher cell viability than the RGD-immobilized PU film because of the porous structure with higher surface area, indicating an advantageous property of the porous matrix for HUVEC proliferation.

  13. Mechanosensing of matrix by stem cells: From matrix heterogeneity, contractility, and the nucleus in pore-migration to cardiogenesis and muscle stem cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lucas; Cho, Sangkyun; Discher, Dennis E

    2017-11-01

    Stem cells are particularly 'plastic' cell types that are induced by various cues to become specialized, tissue-functional lineages by switching on the expression of specific gene programs. Matrix stiffness is among the cues that multiple stem cell types can sense and respond to. This seminar-style review focuses on mechanosensing of matrix elasticity in the differentiation or early maturation of a few illustrative stem cell types, with an intended audience of biologists and physical scientists. Contractile forces applied by a cell's acto-myosin cytoskeleton are often resisted by the extracellular matrix and transduced through adhesions and the cytoskeleton ultimately into the nucleus to modulate gene expression. Complexity is added by matrix heterogeneity, and careful scrutiny of the evident stiffness heterogeneity in some model systems resolves some controversies concerning matrix mechanosensing. Importantly, local stiffness tends to dominate, and 'durotaxis' of stem cells toward stiff matrix reveals a dependence of persistent migration on myosin-II force generation and also rigid microtubules that confer directionality. Stem and progenitor cell migration in 3D can be further affected by matrix porosity as well as stiffness, with nuclear size and rigidity influencing niche retention and fate choices. Cell squeezing through rigid pores can even cause DNA damage and genomic changes that contribute to de-differentiation toward stem cell-like states. Contraction of acto-myosin is the essential function of striated muscle, which also exhibit mechanosensitive differentiation and maturation as illustrated in vivo by beating heart cells and by the regenerative mobilization of skeletal muscle stem cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An Evaluation of Matrix-Containing and Humanised Matrix-Free 3-Dimensional Cell Culture Systems for Studying Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Grace C; Morris, Paul G; Moss, Marcus A; Maltby, Sarah L; Palmer, Chelsea A; Nash, Claire E; Smart, Emily; Holliday, Deborah L; Speirs, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    3D cell cultures are emerging as more physiologically meaningful alternatives to monolayer cultures for many biological applications. They are attractive because they more closely mimic in vivo morphology, especially when co-cultured with stromal fibroblasts. We compared the efficacy of 3 different 3D cell culture systems; collagen I, low attachment culture vessels and a modification of Fibrolife®, a specialised humanised cell culture medium devoid of animal-derived components, using breast cancer cell lines representative of the different molecular subtypes of breast cancer, cultured alone or with human mammary fibroblasts with a view to developing matrix-free humanised systems. 3D collagen I culture supported the growth of a range of breast cancer cell lines. By modifying the composition of Fibrolife® to epiFL, matrix-free cell culture was possible. During sequential transfer to epiFL breast cancer cells gradually detached from the flask, growing progressively as spheroids. Phenotype was stable and reversible with cells remaining actively proliferating and easily accessible throughout culture. They could also be revived from frozen stocks. To achieve co-culture with fibroblasts in epiFL required use of low attachment culture vessels instead of standard plastic as fibroblasts remained adherent in epiFL. Here, cancer cell spheroids were allowed to form before adding fibroblasts. Immunohistochemical examination showed fibroblasts scattered throughout the epithelial spheroid, not dissimilar to the relationship of tumour stroma in human breast cancer. Because of its ease of handling, matrix-free 3D cell culture may be a useful model to study the influence of fibroblasts on breast cancer epithelial cells with use of epiFL culture medium taking this a step further towards a fully humanised 3D model. This methodology could be applied to other types of cancer cell lines, making this a versatile technique for cancer researchers wishing to use in vitro systems that better

  15. An Evaluation of Matrix-Containing and Humanised Matrix-Free 3-Dimensional Cell Culture Systems for Studying Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace C Roberts

    Full Text Available 3D cell cultures are emerging as more physiologically meaningful alternatives to monolayer cultures for many biological applications. They are attractive because they more closely mimic in vivo morphology, especially when co-cultured with stromal fibroblasts.We compared the efficacy of 3 different 3D cell culture systems; collagen I, low attachment culture vessels and a modification of Fibrolife®, a specialised humanised cell culture medium devoid of animal-derived components, using breast cancer cell lines representative of the different molecular subtypes of breast cancer, cultured alone or with human mammary fibroblasts with a view to developing matrix-free humanised systems. 3D collagen I culture supported the growth of a range of breast cancer cell lines. By modifying the composition of Fibrolife® to epiFL, matrix-free cell culture was possible. During sequential transfer to epiFL breast cancer cells gradually detached from the flask, growing progressively as spheroids. Phenotype was stable and reversible with cells remaining actively proliferating and easily accessible throughout culture. They could also be revived from frozen stocks. To achieve co-culture with fibroblasts in epiFL required use of low attachment culture vessels instead of standard plastic as fibroblasts remained adherent in epiFL. Here, cancer cell spheroids were allowed to form before adding fibroblasts. Immunohistochemical examination showed fibroblasts scattered throughout the epithelial spheroid, not dissimilar to the relationship of tumour stroma in human breast cancer.Because of its ease of handling, matrix-free 3D cell culture may be a useful model to study the influence of fibroblasts on breast cancer epithelial cells with use of epiFL culture medium taking this a step further towards a fully humanised 3D model. This methodology could be applied to other types of cancer cell lines, making this a versatile technique for cancer researchers wishing to use in vitro

  16. Three-Dimensional-Engineered Matrix to Study Cancer Stem Cells and Tumorsphere Formation: Effect of Matrix Modulus

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xiaoming; Samaneh K Sarvestani; Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; He, Xuezhong; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is regulated by the tumor microenvironment. Synthetic hydrogels provide the flexibility to design three-dimensional (3D) matrices to isolate and study individual factors in the tumor microenvironment. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of matrix modulus on tumorsphere formation by breast cancer cells and maintenance of CSCs in an inert microenvironment without the interference of other factors. In that regard, 4T1 mouse breast canc...

  17. Dynamic protrusive cell behaviour generates force and drives early matrix contraction by fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlmann-Noor, Annegret H.; Martin-Martin, Belen; Eastwood, Mark; Khaw, Peng T.; Bailly, Maryse

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying force generation and matrix contraction, using human corneal, Tenon's and scleral fibroblasts in a standard collagen matrix. We used timelapse light and confocal reflection microscopy to analyse concomitantly cell behaviour and matrix remodeling during contraction and devised a novel index to quantify dynamic cell behaviour in 3D. Based on the previously described culture force monitor, a novel simultaneous imaging and micro-culture force mon...

  18. Matrix mechanics and fluid shear stress control stem cells fate in three dimensional microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guobao; Lv, Yonggang; Guo, Pan; Lin, Chongwen; Zhang, Xiaomei; Yang, Li; Xu, Zhiling

    2013-07-01

    Stem cells have the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into multiple mature cell types during early life and growth. Stem cells adhesion, proliferation, migration and differentiation are affected by biochemical, mechanical and physical surface properties of the surrounding matrix in which stem cells reside and stem cells can sensitively feel and respond to the microenvironment of this matrix. More and more researches have proven that three dimensional (3D) culture can reduce the gap between cell culture and physiological environment where cells always live in vivo. This review summarized recent findings on the studies of matrix mechanics that control stem cells (primarily mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)) fate in 3D environment, including matrix stiffness and extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness. Considering the exchange of oxygen and nutrients in 3D culture, the effect of fluid shear stress (FSS) on fate decision of stem cells was also discussed in detail. Further, the difference of MSCs response to matrix stiffness between two dimensional (2D) and 3D conditions was compared. Finally, the mechanism of mechanotransduction of stem cells activated by matrix mechanics and FSS in 3D culture was briefly pointed out.

  19. Targeting Extracellular Matrix Glycoproteins in Metastases for Tumor-Initiating Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0041 TITLE: Targeting Extracellular Matrix Glycoproteins in Metastases for Tumor- Initiating Cell Therapy PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting Extracellular Matrix Glycoproteins in Metastases for Tumor-Initiating Cell Therapy 5b. GRANT

  20. Distinct migratory behaviors of striosome and matrix cells underlying the mosaic formation in the developing striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagimoto, Kazuya; Takami, Saki; Murakami, Fujio; Tanabe, Yasuto

    2017-03-01

    The striatum, the largest nucleus of the basal ganglia controlling motor and cognitive functions, can be characterized by a labyrinthine mosaic organization of striosome/matrix compartments. It is unclear how striosome/matrix mosaic formation is spatially and temporally controlled at the cellular level during striatal development. Here, by combining in vivo electroporation and brain slice cultures, we set up a prospective experimental system in which we differentially labeled striosome and matrix cells from the time of birth and followed their distributions and migratory behaviors. Our results showed that, at an initial stage of striosome/matrix mosaic formation, striosome cells were mostly stationary, whereas matrix cells actively migrated in multiple directions regardless of the presence of striosome cells. The mostly stationary striosome cells were still able to associate to form patchy clusters via attractive interactions. Our results suggest that the restricted migratory capability of striosome cells may allow them to cluster together only when they happen to be located in close proximity to each other and are not separated by actively migrating matrix cells. The way in which the mutidirectionally migrating matrix cells intermingle with the mostly stationary striosome cells may therefore determine the topographic features of striosomes. At later stages, the actively migrating matrix cells began to repulse the patchy clusters of striosomes, presumably enhancing the striosome cluster formation and the segregation and eventual formation of dichotomous homogeneous striosome/matrix compartments. Overall, our study reveals temporally distinct migratory behaviors of striosome/matrix cells, which may underlie the sequential steps of mosaic formation in the developing striatum. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:794-817, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. MG63 osteoblast-like cells exhibit different behavior when grown on electrospun collagen matrix versus electrospun gelatin matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiao-Wen Tsai

    Full Text Available Electrospinning is a simple and efficient method of fabricating a non-woven polymeric nanofiber matrix. However, using fluorinated alcohols as a solvent for the electrospinning of proteins often results in protein denaturation. TEM and circular dichroism analysis indicated a massive loss of triple-helical collagen from an electrospun collagen (EC matrix, and the random coils were similar to those found in gelatin. Nevertheless, from mechanical testing we found the Young's modulus and ultimate tensile stresses of EC matrices were significantly higher than electrospun gelatin (EG matrices because matrix stiffness can affect many cell behaviors such as cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. We hypothesize that the difference of matrix stiffness between EC and EG will affect intracellular signaling through the mechano-transducers Rho kinase (ROCK and focal adhesion kinase (FAK and subsequently regulates the osteogenic phenotype of MG63 osteoblast-like cells. From the results, we found there was no significant difference between the EC and EG matrices with respect to either cell attachment or proliferation rate. However, the gene expression levels of OPN, type I collagen, ALP, and OCN were significantly higher in MG63 osteoblast-like cells grown on the EC than in those grown on the EG. In addition, the phosphorylation levels of Y397-FAK, ERK1/2, BSP, and OPN proteins, as well as ALP activity, were also higher on the EC than on the EG. We further inhibited ROCK activation with Y27632 during differentiation to investigate its effects on matrix-mediated osteogenic differentiation. Results showed the extent of mineralization was decreased with inhibition after induction. Moreover, there is no significant difference between EC and EG. From the results of the protein levels of phosphorylated Y397-FAK, ERK1/2, BSP and OPN, ALP activity and mineral deposition, we speculate that the mechanism that influences the osteogenic differentiation of MG63

  2. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubham Dayal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1 to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene.

  3. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-01-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene. PMID:28257035

  4. Molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction in integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenhai; Lee, Hyunjung; Zhu, Cheng

    2016-11-15

    Cell-matrix adhesion complexes are multi-protein structures linking the extracellular matrix (ECM) to the cytoskeleton. They are essential to both cell motility and function by bidirectionally sensing and transmitting mechanical and biochemical stimulations. Several types of cell-matrix adhesions have been identified and they share many key molecular components, such as integrins and actin-integrin linkers. Mechanochemical coupling between ECM molecules and the actin cytoskeleton has been observed from the single cell to the single molecule level and from immune cells to neuronal cells. However, the mechanisms underlying force regulation of integrin-mediated mechanotransduction still need to be elucidated. In this review article, we focus on integrin-mediated adhesions and discuss force regulation of cell-matrix adhesions and key adaptor molecules, three different force-dependent behaviors, and molecular mechanisms for mechanochemical coupling in force regulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Observation of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells retained inside the non-woven fiber matrix of the CellTank bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This data article shows how the recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cells are located in the interstices of the matrix fibers of a CellTank bioreactor after completion of a perfusion culture, supporting the article entitled “Very high cell density perfusion of CHO cells anchored in a non-woven matrix-based bioreactor” by Zhang et al. [1]. It provides a visualization of the cell distribution in the non-woven fiber matrix in a deeper view.

  6. Integrative systems and synthetic biology of cell-matrix adhesion sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamir, Eli

    2016-09-02

    The complexity of cell-matrix adhesion convolves its roles in the development and functioning of multicellular organisms and their evolutionary tinkering. Cell-matrix adhesion is mediated by sites along the plasma membrane that anchor the actin cytoskeleton to the matrix via a large number of proteins, collectively called the integrin adhesome. Fundamental challenges for understanding how cell-matrix adhesion sites assemble and function arise from their multi-functionality, rapid dynamics, large number of components and molecular diversity. Systems biology faces these challenges in its strive to understand how the integrin adhesome gives rise to functional adhesion sites. Synthetic biology enables engineering intracellular modules and circuits with properties of interest. In this review I discuss some of the fundamental questions in systems biology of cell-matrix adhesion and how synthetic biology can help addressing them.

  7. CELL-DENSITY MODULATES GROWTH, EXTRACELLULAR-MATRIX, AND PROTEIN-SYNTHESIS OF CULTURED RAT MESANGIAL CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLTHUIS, A; BOES, A

    1993-01-01

    Mesangial cell (MC) hyperplasia and accumulation of extracellular matrix are hallmarks of chronic glomerular disease. The present in vitro study examined the effects of cell density on growth, extracellular matrix formation, and protein synthesis of cultured rat MCs. A negative linear relationship

  8. Expression of cytokine and extracellular matrix mRNAs in fetal hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Keai Sinn; Kulkeaw, Kasem; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Sugiyama, Daisuke

    2017-09-01

    In mouse fetal liver, hepatoblasts, sinusoidal endothelial cells and macrophages (or erythroblastic islands) promote differentiation and proliferation of hematopoietic cells through cell-cell interactions and secretion of cytokines and extracellular matrix factors. Until now, we have had little knowledge of the hematopoietic cytokines or extracellular matrix mRNAs expressed in hepatic stellate cells. Using p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) to mark this cell population, we sorted 12.5, 14.5 and 16.5 dpc hepatic stellate cells and analyzed expression of cytokines and extracellular matrix mRNAs. Among cytokines, insulin-like growth factor 2 (Igf2) was highly expressed at all three stages analyzed. The extracellular matrix molecule fibronectin (Fn1) was highly expressed in 12.5 dpc cells, whereas vitronectin (Vtn) was highly expressed in 14.5 and 16.5 dpc hepatic stellate cells. Among liver cells, Igf2 was predominantly expressed in hepatoblast-like cells at all three stages examined, suggesting that hepatoblast-like cells are an essential part of the niche that maintains homeostasis of hematopoietic cells in embryonic mouse liver. Defining these expression patterns could facilitate our understanding of cross talk between cytokine and extracellular matrix molecules in hepatic stellate cells and benefit research in developmental hematopoiesis as well as the study of liver biology. © 2017 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Three-dimensional-engineered matrix to study cancer stem cells and tumorsphere formation: effect of matrix modulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoming; Sarvestani, Samaneh K; Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; He, Xuezhong; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2013-03-01

    Maintenance of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is regulated by the tumor microenvironment. Synthetic hydrogels provide the flexibility to design three-dimensional (3D) matrices to isolate and study individual factors in the tumor microenvironment. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of matrix modulus on tumorsphere formation by breast cancer cells and maintenance of CSCs in an inert microenvironment without the interference of other factors. In that regard, 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells were encapsulated in inert polyethylene glycol diacrylate hydrogels and the effect of matrix modulus on tumorsphere formation and expression of CSC markers was investigated. The gel modulus had a strong effect on tumorsphere formation and the effect was bimodal. Tumorsphere formation and expression of CSC markers peaked after 8 days of culture. At day 8, as the matrix modulus was increased from 2.5 kPa to 5.3, 26.1, and 47.1 kPa, the average tumorsphere size changed from 37±6 μm to 57±6, 20±4, and 12±2 μm, respectively; cell number density in the gel changed from 0.8±0.1×10⁵ cells/mL to 1.7±0.2×10⁵, 0.4±0.1×10⁵, and 0.2±0.1×10⁵ cells/mL after initial encapsulation of 0.14×10⁵ cells/mL; and the expression of CD44 breast CSC marker changed from 17±4-fold to 38±9-, 3±1-, and 2±1-fold increase compared with the initial level. Similar results were obtained with MCF7 human breast carcinoma cells. Mouse 4T1 and human MCF7 cells encapsulated in the gel with 5.3 kPa modulus formed the largest tumorspheres and highest density of tumorspheres, and had highest expression of breast CSC markers CD44 and ABCG2. The inert polyethylene glycol hydrogel can be used as a model-engineered 3D matrix to study the role of individual factors in the tumor microenvironment on tumorigenesis and maintenance of CSCs without the interference of other factors.

  10. Enhanced assembly of basement membrane matrix by endodermal cells in response to fibronectin substrata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austria, M R; Couchman, J R

    1991-01-01

    cells, in comparison to cells adherent to type I collagen-coated, vitronectin-coated or uncoated substrata. Direct effects of fibronectin or laminin on the degree of cell spreading or rate of proliferation were not responsible for enhanced matrix deposition. The effect did not result from a redirection....... Experiments with fibronectin fragments showed that a 105 x 10(3) Mr 'cell'-binding domain (containing the cell attachment sequence Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser) was an important contributor to enhanced matrix deposition, while the N-terminal 29 x 10(3) Mr heparin-binding domain also contributed to the effect, particularly...... the role of extracellular matrix molecules in the control of basement membrane matrix assembly by cultured endodermal (PFHR-9) cells. In the presence of fibronectin-depleted serum, substrata of fibronectin or laminin induced an increase in deposition of laminin, type IV collagen and proteoglycans by PFHR-9...

  11. The ECM-Cell Interaction of Cartilage Extracellular Matrix on Chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuyun; Huang, Jingxiang; Guo, Weimin; Chen, Jifeng; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Bin; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Aiyuan; Wang, Yu; Xu, Wenjing; Lu, Shibi; Yuan, Mei; Guo, Quanyi

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) is composed primarily of the network type II collagen (COLII) and an interlocking mesh of fibrous proteins and proteoglycans (PGs), hyaluronic acid (HA), and chondroitin sulfate (CS). Articular cartilage ECM plays a crucial role in regulating chondrocyte metabolism and functions, such as organized cytoskeleton through integrin-mediated signaling via cell-matrix interaction. Cell signaling through integrins regulates several chondrocyte functions, including differentiation, metabolism, matrix remodeling, responses to mechanical stimulation, and cell survival. The major signaling pathways that regulate chondrogenesis have been identified as wnt signal, nitric oxide (NO) signal, protein kinase C (PKC), and retinoic acid (RA) signal. Integrins are a large family of molecules that are central regulators in multicellular biology. They orchestrate cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesive interactions from embryonic development to mature tissue function. In this review, we emphasize the signaling molecule effect and the biomechanics effect of cartilage ECM on chondrogenesis. PMID:24959581

  12. The ECM-Cell Interaction of Cartilage Extracellular Matrix on Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM is composed primarily of the network type II collagen (COLII and an interlocking mesh of fibrous proteins and proteoglycans (PGs, hyaluronic acid (HA, and chondroitin sulfate (CS. Articular cartilage ECM plays a crucial role in regulating chondrocyte metabolism and functions, such as organized cytoskeleton through integrin-mediated signaling via cell-matrix interaction. Cell signaling through integrins regulates several chondrocyte functions, including differentiation, metabolism, matrix remodeling, responses to mechanical stimulation, and cell survival. The major signaling pathways that regulate chondrogenesis have been identified as wnt signal, nitric oxide (NO signal, protein kinase C (PKC, and retinoic acid (RA signal. Integrins are a large family of molecules that are central regulators in multicellular biology. They orchestrate cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesive interactions from embryonic development to mature tissue function. In this review, we emphasize the signaling molecule effect and the biomechanics effect of cartilage ECM on chondrogenesis.

  13. Union is strength: matrix elasticity and microenvironmental factors codetermine stem cell differentiation fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongwei; Li, Lisha; Zhang, Yin; Chen, Zhishen; Sun, Meiyu; Xu, Tiankai; Tian, Licheng; Lu, Man; Ren, Min; Liu, Yuanyuan; Li, Yulin

    2015-09-01

    Stem cells are an attractive cellular source for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications due to their multipotency. Although the elasticity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) has been shown to have crucial impacts in directing stem cell differentiation, it is not the only contributing factor. Many researchers have recently attempted to design microenvironments that mimic the stem cell niche with combinations of ECM elasticity and other cues, such as ECM physical properties, soluble biochemical factors and cell-cell interactions, thereby driving cells towards their preferred lineages. Here, we briefly discuss the effect of matrix elasticity on stem cell lineage specification and then summarize recent advances in the study of the combined effects of ECM elasticity and other cues on the differentiation of stem cells, focusing on two aspects: biophysical and biochemical factors. In the future, biomedical scientists will continue investigating the union strength of matrix elasticity and microenvironmental cues for manipulating stem cell fates.

  14. Endocytosis of collagen by hepatic stellate cells regulates extracellular matrix dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yan; Mukhopadhyay, Dhriti; Drinane, Mary; Ji, Baoan; Li, Xing; Cao, Sheng; Shah, Vijay H

    2014-10-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) generate matrix, which in turn may also regulate HSCs function during liver fibrosis. We hypothesized that HSCs may endocytose matrix proteins to sense and respond to changes in microenvironment. Primary human HSCs, LX2, or mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) [wild-type; c-abl(-/-); or Yes, Src, and Fyn knockout mice (YSF(-/-))] were incubated with fluorescent-labeled collagen or gelatin. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and confocal microscopy were used for measuring cellular internalization of matrix proteins. Targeted PCR array and quantitative real-time PCR were used to evaluate gene expression changes. HSCs and LX2 cells endocytose collagens in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Endocytosed collagen colocalized with Dextran 10K, a marker of macropinocytosis, and 5-ethylisopropyl amiloride, an inhibitor of macropinocytosis, reduced collagen internalization by 46%. Cytochalasin D and ML7 blocked collagen internalization by 47% and 45%, respectively, indicating that actin and myosin are critical for collagen endocytosis. Wortmannin and AKT inhibitor blocked collagen internalization by 70% and 89%, respectively, indicating that matrix macropinocytosis requires phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling. Overexpression of dominant-negative dynamin-2 K44A blocked matrix internalization by 77%, indicating a role for dynamin-2 in matrix macropinocytosis. Whereas c-abl(-/-) MEF showed impaired matrix endocytosis, YSF(-/-) MEF surprisingly showed increased matrix endocytosis. It was also associated with complex gene regulations that related with matrix dynamics, including increased matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) mRNA levels and zymographic activity. HSCs endocytose matrix proteins through macropinocytosis that requires a signaling network composed of PI3K/AKT, dynamin-2, and c-abl. Interaction with extracellular matrix regulates matrix dynamics through modulating multiple gene expressions including MMP-9

  15. Matrix Metalloproteinase-3 in Odontoblastic Cells Derived from Ips Cells: Unique Proliferation Response as Odontoblastic Cells Derived from ES Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyama, Taiki; Ozeki, Nobuaki; Mogi, Makio; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Kawai, Rie; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Kondo, Ayami; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 accelerates wound healing following dental pulp injury. In addition, we reported that a proinflammatory cytokine mixture (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and interferon-γ) induced MMP-3 activity in odontoblast-like cells derived from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, suggesting that MMP-3 plays a potential unique physiological role in wound healing and regeneration of dental pulp in odontoblast-like cells. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that upregulation of MMP-3 activity by IL-1β promotes proliferation and apoptosis of purified odontoblast-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) and ES cells. Each odontoblast-like cell was isolated and incubated with different concentrations of IL-1β. MMP-3 mRNA and protein expression were assessed using RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. MMP-3 activity was measured using immunoprecipitation and a fluorescence substrate. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined using ELISA for BrdU and DNA fragmentation, respectively. siRNA was used to reduce MMP-3 transcripts in these cells. Treatment with IL-1β increased MMP-3 mRNA and protein levels, and MMP-3 activity in odontoblast-like cells. Cell proliferation was found to markedly increase with no changes in apoptosis. Endogenous tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2 were constitutively expressed during all experiments. The exocytosis inhibitor, Exo1, potently suppressed the appearance of MMP-3 in the conditioned medium. Treatment with siRNA against MMP-3 suppressed an IL-1β-induced increase in MMP-3 expression and activity, and also suppressed cell proliferation, but unexpectedly increased apoptosis in these cells (PiPS cells and ES cells. This siRNA-mediated increase in apoptosis could be reversed with exogenous MMP-3 stimulation (PiPS and ES cells. PMID:24358294

  16. Novel image analysis methods for quantification of in situ 3-D tendon cell and matrix strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Ashley K; Paredes, J J; Andarawis-Puri, Nelly

    2018-01-23

    Macroscopic tendon loads modulate the cellular microenvironment leading to biological outcomes such as degeneration or repair. Previous studies have shown that damage accumulation and the phases of tendon healing are marked by significant changes in the extracellular matrix, but it remains unknown how mechanical forces of the extracellular matrix are translated to mechanotransduction pathways that ultimately drive the biological response. Our overarching hypothesis is that the unique relationship between extracellular matrix strain and cell deformation will dictate biological outcomes, prompting the need for quantitative methods to characterize the local strain environment. While 2-D methods have successfully calculated matrix strain and cell deformation, 3-D methods are necessary to capture the increased complexity that can arise due to high levels of anisotropy and out-of-plane motion, particularly in the disorganized, highly cellular, injured state. In this study, we validated the use of digital volume correlation methods to quantify 3-D matrix strain using images of naïve tendon cells, the collagen fiber matrix, and injured tendon cells. Additionally, naïve tendon cell images were used to develop novel methods for 3-D cell deformation and 3-D cell-matrix strain, which is defined as a quantitative measure of the relationship between matrix strain and cell deformation. The results support that these methods can be used to detect strains with high accuracy and can be further extended to an in vivo setting for observing temporal changes in cell and matrix mechanics during degeneration and healing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Effect of matrix metalloproteinase-mediated matrix degradation on glioblastoma cell behavior in 3D PEG-based hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Christine; Tong, Xinming; Jiang, Xinyi; Yang, Fan

    2017-03-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumor with median survival of 12 months. To improve clinical outcomes, it is critical to develop in vitro models that support GBM proliferation and invasion for deciphering tumor progression and screening drug candidates. A key hallmark of GBM cells is their extreme invasiveness, a process mediated by matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-mediated degradation of the extracellular matrix. We recently reported the development of a MMP-degradable, poly(ethylene-glycol)-based hydrogel platform for culturing GBM cells. In the present study, we modulated the percentage of MMP-degradable crosslinks in 3D hydrogels to analyze the effects of MMP-degradability on GBM fates. Using an immortalized GBM cell line (U87) as a model cell type, our results showed that MMP-degradability was not required for supporting GBM proliferation. All hydrogel formulations supported robust GBM proliferation, up to 10 fold after 14 days. However, MMP-degradability was essential for facilitating tumor spreading, and 50% MMP-degradable hydrogels were sufficient to enable both robust tumor cell proliferation and spreading in 3D. The findings of this study highlight the importance of modulating MMP-degradability in engineering 3D in vitro brain cancer models and may be applied for engineering in vitro models for other cancer types. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 770-778, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Blueberry consumption prevents loss of collagen in bone matrix and inhibits senescence pathways in osteoblastic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovariectomy (OVX)-induced bone loss has been linked to increased bone turnover and higher bone matrix collagen degradation as the result of osteoclast activation. However, the role of degraded collagen matrix in the fate of resident bone-forming cells is unclear. In this report, we show that OVX-i...

  19. Α2 integrin, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, and matrix metalloproteinase-3 act sequentially to induce differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into odontoblast-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, Nobuaki; Kawai, Rie; Hase, Naoko; Hiyama, Taiki; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Kondo, Ayami; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Mogi, Makio

    2015-02-01

    We previously reported that interleukin 1β acts via matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 to regulate cell proliferation and suppress apoptosis in α2 integrin-positive odontoblast-like cells differentiated from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here we characterize the signal cascade underpinning odontoblastic differentiation in mouse ES cells. The expression of α2 integrin, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (Emmprin), and MMP-3 mRNA and protein were all potently increased during odontoblastic differentiation. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) disruption of the expression of these effectors potently suppressed the expression of the odontoblastic biomarkers dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein-1 and alkaline phosphatase, and blocked odontoblast calcification. Our siRNA, western blot and blocking antibody analyses revealed a unique sequential cascade involving α2 integrin, Emmprin and MMP-3 that drives ES cell differentiation into odontoblasts. This cascade requires the interaction between α2 integrin and Emmprin and is potentiated by exogenous MMP-3. Finally, although odontoblast-like cells potently express α2, α6, αV, β1, and β3, integrins, we confirmed that β1 integrin acts as the trigger for ES cell differentiation, apparently in complex with α2 integrin. These results demonstrate a unique and unanticipated role for an α2 integrin-, Emmprin-, and MMP-3-mediated signaling cascade in driving mouse ES cell differentiation into odontoblast-like cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Plasma matrix metalloprotease 9 correlates with blood lymphocytosis, leukemic cell invasiveness, and prognosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusella, Milena; Bolzonella, Caterina; Paolini, Rossella; Rodella, Elisabetta; Bertolaso, Laura; Scipioni, Cinzia; Bellini, Silvia; Cuneo, Antonio; Pasini, Felice; Ramazzina, Emilio

    2017-02-01

    The complex biology underlying chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell migration and tissue invasiveness is not yet completely understood and might provide novel predictive markers and therapeutic targets. A total of 36 patients out of treatment from at least 3 months were enrolled and followed up for a median period of 44.2 months (range: 4.4-99.2). Matrix metalloprotease 9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases 1 plasma levels and production/release from lymphoid cells were measured by zymography and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. Malignant and normal lymphocyte mobility and matrix-degradation capability were studied using a Boyden chamber system, with and without autologous plasma. Free matrix metalloprotease 9 plasma levels were related with blood lymphocytosis, especially in more advanced stages (p = 0.003), and higher concentrations were associated with an increased disease progression risk (hazard ratio = 9.0, 95% confidence interval = 1.5-13.8). Leukemic cells expressed and secreted very little matrix metalloprotease 9. On the contrary, normal lymphocytes derived from the same leukemic patients showed matrix metalloprotease 9 intracellular levels that were lower in subjects with higher blood lymphocytosis (p = 0.024) and more advanced stages (p = 0.03); the released quantities were inversely associated with matrix metalloprotease 9 plasma concentrations (p = 0.035). Leukemic cells had a reduced spontaneous mobility and matrix-degradation capability that were stimulated by autologous plasma (p = 0.001) and normal lymphocytes (p = 0.005), respectively. Matrix metalloprotease 9 affected cell invasiveness depending on concentration and disease stage. In conclusion, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells have a reduced mobility, matrix-degradation capability, and matrix metalloprotease 9 production compared to their own autologous normal lymphocytes. They are exposed to matrix metalloprotease 9 of prevalently systemic origin whose higher levels are

  1. Matrix metalloproteinase-3 in odontoblastic cells derived from ips cells: unique proliferation response as odontoblastic cells derived from ES cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiki Hiyama

    Full Text Available We previously reported that matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-3 accelerates wound healing following dental pulp injury. In addition, we reported that a proinflammatory cytokine mixture (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL-1β and interferon-γ induced MMP-3 activity in odontoblast-like cells derived from mouse embryonic stem (ES cells, suggesting that MMP-3 plays a potential unique physiological role in wound healing and regeneration of dental pulp in odontoblast-like cells. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that upregulation of MMP-3 activity by IL-1β promotes proliferation and apoptosis of purified odontoblast-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem (iPS and ES cells. Each odontoblast-like cell was isolated and incubated with different concentrations of IL-1β. MMP-3 mRNA and protein expression were assessed using RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. MMP-3 activity was measured using immunoprecipitation and a fluorescence substrate. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined using ELISA for BrdU and DNA fragmentation, respectively. siRNA was used to reduce MMP-3 transcripts in these cells. Treatment with IL-1β increased MMP-3 mRNA and protein levels, and MMP-3 activity in odontoblast-like cells. Cell proliferation was found to markedly increase with no changes in apoptosis. Endogenous tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were constitutively expressed during all experiments. The exocytosis inhibitor, Exo1, potently suppressed the appearance of MMP-3 in the conditioned medium. Treatment with siRNA against MMP-3 suppressed an IL-1β-induced increase in MMP-3 expression and activity, and also suppressed cell proliferation, but unexpectedly increased apoptosis in these cells (P<0.05. Exogenous MMP-3 was found to induce cell proliferation in odontoblast-like cells derived from iPS cells and ES cells. This siRNA-mediated increase in apoptosis could be reversed with exogenous MMP-3 stimulation (P<0

  2. The role of nuclear matrix proteins binding to matrix attachment regions (Mars) in prostate cancer cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboro, Paola; Repaci, Erica; D'Arrigo, Cristina; Balbi, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    In tumor progression definite alterations in nuclear matrix (NM) protein composition as well as in chromatin structure occur. The NM interacts with chromatin via specialized DNA sequences called matrix attachment regions (MARs). In the present study, using a proteomic approach along with a two-dimensional Southwestern assay and confocal laser microscopy, we show that the differentiation of stabilized human prostate carcinoma cells is marked out by modifications both NM protein composition and bond between NM proteins and MARs. Well-differentiated androgen-responsive and slowly growing LNCaP cells are characterized by a less complex pattern and by a major number of proteins binding MAR sequences in comparison to 22Rv1 cells expressing androgen receptor but androgen-independent. Finally, in the poorly differentiated and strongly aggressive androgen-independent PC3 cells the complexity of NM pattern further increases and a minor number of proteins bind the MARs. Furthermore, in this cell line with respect to LNCaP cells, these changes are synchronous with modifications in both the nuclear distribution of the MAR sequences and in the average loop dimensions that significantly increase. Although the expression of many NM proteins changes during dedifferentiation, only a very limited group of MAR-binding proteins seem to play a key role in this process. Variations in the expression of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and special AT-rich sequence-binding protein-1 (SATB1) along with an increase in the phosphorylation of lamin B represent changes that might trigger passage towards a more aggressive phenotype. These results suggest that elucidating the MAR-binding proteins that are involved in the differentiation of prostate cancer cells could be an important tool to improve our understanding of this carcinogenesis process, and they could also be novel targets for prostate cancer therapy.

  3. The role of nuclear matrix proteins binding to matrix attachment regions (Mars in prostate cancer cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Barboro

    Full Text Available In tumor progression definite alterations in nuclear matrix (NM protein composition as well as in chromatin structure occur. The NM interacts with chromatin via specialized DNA sequences called matrix attachment regions (MARs. In the present study, using a proteomic approach along with a two-dimensional Southwestern assay and confocal laser microscopy, we show that the differentiation of stabilized human prostate carcinoma cells is marked out by modifications both NM protein composition and bond between NM proteins and MARs. Well-differentiated androgen-responsive and slowly growing LNCaP cells are characterized by a less complex pattern and by a major number of proteins binding MAR sequences in comparison to 22Rv1 cells expressing androgen receptor but androgen-independent. Finally, in the poorly differentiated and strongly aggressive androgen-independent PC3 cells the complexity of NM pattern further increases and a minor number of proteins bind the MARs. Furthermore, in this cell line with respect to LNCaP cells, these changes are synchronous with modifications in both the nuclear distribution of the MAR sequences and in the average loop dimensions that significantly increase. Although the expression of many NM proteins changes during dedifferentiation, only a very limited group of MAR-binding proteins seem to play a key role in this process. Variations in the expression of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP and special AT-rich sequence-binding protein-1 (SATB1 along with an increase in the phosphorylation of lamin B represent changes that might trigger passage towards a more aggressive phenotype. These results suggest that elucidating the MAR-binding proteins that are involved in the differentiation of prostate cancer cells could be an important tool to improve our understanding of this carcinogenesis process, and they could also be novel targets for prostate cancer therapy.

  4. From single cells to tissues: interactions between the matrix and human breast cells in real time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifford Barnes

    Full Text Available Mammary gland morphogenesis involves ductal elongation, branching, and budding. All of these processes are mediated by stroma--epithelium interactions. Biomechanical factors, such as matrix stiffness, have been established as important factors in these interactions. For example, epithelial cells fail to form normal acinar structures in vitro in 3D gels that exceed the stiffness of a normal mammary gland. Additionally, heterogeneity in the spatial distribution of acini and ducts within individual collagen gels suggests that local organization of the matrix may guide morphogenesis. Here, we quantified the effects of both bulk material stiffness and local collagen fiber arrangement on epithelial morphogenesis.The formation of ducts and acini from single cells and the reorganization of the collagen fiber network were quantified using time-lapse confocal microscopy. MCF10A cells organized the surrounding collagen fibers during the first twelve hours after seeding. Collagen fiber density and alignment relative to the epithelial surface significantly increased within the first twelve hours and were a major influence in the shaping of the mammary epithelium. The addition of Matrigel to the collagen fiber network impaired cell-mediated reorganization of the matrix and increased the probability of spheroidal acini rather than branching ducts. The mechanical anisotropy created by regions of highly aligned collagen fibers facilitated elongation and branching, which was significantly correlated with fiber organization. In contrast, changes in bulk stiffness were not a strong predictor of this epithelial morphology.Localized regions of collagen fiber alignment are required for ductal elongation and branching suggesting the importance of local mechanical anisotropy in mammary epithelial morphogenesis. Similar principles may govern the morphology of branching and budding in other tissues and organs.

  5. Properties of near- and sub-micrometre Al matrix composites strengthened with nano-scale in-situ Al2O3 aimed for low temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kováč, P.; Balog, M.; Hušek, I.; Kopera, L.; Križik, P.; Rosová, A.; Kováč, J.; Kulich, M.; Čaplovičová, M.

    2017-10-01

    Mechanical and electrical properties of in-situ Al-Al2O3 metal matrix composites (MMCs) fabricated by powder metallurgy approach using different aluminium powders of particle size 0.8-21 μm and purity 99.8-99.996% were examined. Hot working powder consolidation by vacuum hot pressing at 270 °C and direct extrusion at 425 °C and reduction ratio of 7:1 were applied. Subsequently, extruded composite rods with the diameter of 7.5 mm were cold worked by groove rolling and rotary swaging to the wires with the diameter of 1.1 mm. Detailed microstructural characterization of composite materials was carried out. Stress-strain characteristics of composite wires were measured at 77 and 300 K. In addition, resistivity of all wires were measured by four-probe method between 25 and 300 K and eddy current losses at frequency 72 Hz and temperatures between 18 and 77 K. Obtained results clearly showed that properly designed Al-Al2O3 MMC materials can be utilized at low temperatures e.g., for the thermal stabilization of superconducting wires.

  6. Nuclear matrix and structural and functional compartmentalization of the eucaryotic cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razin, S V; Borunova, V V; Iarovaia, O V; Vassetzky, Y S

    2014-07-01

    Becoming popular at the end of the 20th century, the concept of the nuclear matrix implies the existence of a nuclear skeleton that organizes functional elements in the cell nucleus. This review presents a critical analysis of the results obtained in the study of nuclear matrix in the light of current views on the organization of the cell nucleus. Numerous studies of nuclear matrix have failed to provide evidence of the existence of such a structure. Moreover, the existence of a filamentous structure that supports the nuclear compartmentalization appears to be unnecessary, since this function is performed by the folded genome itself.

  7. Matrix production of smooth muscle cells from rat aorta in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiemer, B; Springmeier, G; el-Jarad, L; Schröter-Kermani, C

    1993-01-01

    Immunofluorescence microscopic methods served to demonstrate the production of the following matrix components in cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells from rat aorta: fibronectin; nidogen; heparan sulphate-proteoglycan (HS-PG); laminin; and collagen types I, III, IV, V, and VI. A time-dependence of synthesis and secretion could be shown for a number of components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), such as laminin. The results revealed the following estimated quantitative differences of the collagen types: type I > type III > types V and VI. A filamentous/fibrillar matrix and also occasionally a typical basal lamina could be demonstrated electron microscopically around the smooth muscle cells.

  8. ATRA mechanically reprograms pancreatic stellate cells to suppress matrix remodelling and inhibit cancer cell invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronopoulos, Antonios; Robinson, Benjamin; Sarper, Muge; Cortes, Ernesto; Auernheimer, Vera; Lachowski, Dariusz; Attwood, Simon; García, Rebeca; Ghassemi, Saba; Fabry, Ben; del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive malignancy with a dismal survival rate. Persistent activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) can perturb the biomechanical homoeostasis of the tumour microenvironment to favour cancer cell invasion. Here we report that ATRA, an active metabolite of vitamin A, restores mechanical quiescence in PSCs via a mechanism involving a retinoic acid receptor beta (RAR-β)-dependent downregulation of actomyosin (MLC-2) contractility. We show that ATRA reduces the ability of PSCs to generate high traction forces and adapt to extracellular mechanical cues (mechanosensing), as well as suppresses force-mediated extracellular matrix remodelling to inhibit local cancer cell invasion in 3D organotypic models. Our findings implicate a RAR-β/MLC-2 pathway in peritumoural stromal remodelling and mechanosensory-driven activation of PSCs, and further suggest that mechanical reprogramming of PSCs with retinoic acid derivatives might be a viable alternative to stromal ablation strategies for the treatment of PDAC. PMID:27600527

  9. The importance of extracellular matrix for cell function and in vivo likeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, N U B; Genovese, F; Leeming, D J; Karsdal, M A

    2015-04-01

    Fibrotic diseases may be described as a disease of the extracellular matrix, where the balance between matrix formation and degradation has been shifted leading to an accumulation of matrix. Currently a fit for purpose model and readily available approach are adapted when doing cell cultures, which may not reflect physiology and pathophysiology optimally. The aim of this review is to draw special attention to the similarities and differences of current state of the art in vitro and ex vivo models, with special focus on the proteins, cell-cell interactions, and correct matrix composition, which may be a better representative of in vivo conditions in a disease where the extracellular matrix is the central player. We reviewed current literature with emphasis on the role of the extracellular matrix in health and disease, different fibrotic disease models, and highlighting the importance of this when looking at translational science. To further our fibrotic research one paramount problem is to fundamentally understand the core of the disease, the production and degradation of the extracellular matrix. For a surprisingly long time the ECM has been underestimated until recently, with the discovery that the ECM may control cell phenotype through cell-matrix interactions. This highlights the need of a native ECM when investigating pathways and response to potential therapy. Clearly, both in vitro and in vivo models provide fit to purpose benefits, but in particular for the fibrosis field we may ask, do single cell cultures in monolayers recapitulate the complicated ECM environment controlling cell fate? Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Topological Control of Extracellular Matrix Growth: A Native-Like Model for Cell Morphodynamics Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, David; Samitier, Josep

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of cells with their natural environment influences a large variety of cellular phenomena, including cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration. The complex extracellular matrix network has challenged the attempts to replicate in vitro the heterogeneity of the cell environment and has threatened, in general, the relevance of in vitro studies. In this work, we describe a new and extremely versatile approach to generate native-like extracellular matrices with controlled morphologies for the in vitro study of cellular processes. This general approach combines the confluent culture of fibroblasts with microfabricated guiding templates to direct the three-dimensional growth of well-defined extracellular networks which recapitulate the structural and biomolecular complexity of features typically found in vivo. To evaluate its performance, we studied fundamental cellular processes, including cell cytoskeleton organization, cell-matrix adhesion, proliferation, and protrusions morphodynamics. In all cases, we found striking differences depending on matrix architecture and, in particular, when compared to standard two-dimensional environments. We also assessed whether the engineered matrix networks influenced cell migration dynamics and locomotion strategy, finding enhanced migration efficiency for cells seeded on aligned matrices. Altogether, our methodology paves the way to the development of high-performance models of the extracellular matrix for potential applications in tissue engineering, diagnosis, or stem-cell biology.

  11. Cytoskeletal filament assembly and the control of cell spreading and function by extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, D. J.; Langer, R.; Ingber, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to analyze how cell binding to extracellular matrix produces changes in cell shape. We focused on the initial process of cell spreading that follows cell attachment to matrix and, thus, cell 'shape' changes are defined here in terms of alterations in projected cell areas, as determined by computerized image analysis. Cell spreading kinetics and changes in microtubule and actin microfilament mass were simultaneously quantitated in hepatocytes plated on different extracellular matrix substrata. The initial rate of cell spreading was highly dependent on the matrix coating density and decreased from 740 microns 2/h to 50 microns 2/h as the coating density was lowered from 1000 to 1 ng/cm2. At approximately 4 to 6 hours after plating, this initial rapid spreading rate slowed and became independent of the matrix density regardless of whether laminin, fibronectin, type I collagen or type IV collagen was used for cell attachment. Analysis of F-actin mass revealed that cell adhesion to extracellular matrix resulted in a 20-fold increase in polymerized actin within 30 minutes after plating, before any significant change in cell shape was observed. This was followed by a phase of actin microfilament disassembly which correlated with the most rapid phase of cell extension and ended at about 6 hours; F-actin mass remained relatively constant during the slow matrix-independent spreading phase. Microtubule mass increased more slowly in spreading cells, peaking at 4 hours, the time at which the transition between rapid and slow spreading rates was observed. However, inhibition of this early rise in microtubule mass using either nocodazole or cycloheximide did not prevent this transition. Use of cytochalasin D revealed that microfilament integrity was absolutely required for hepatocyte spreading whereas interference with microtubule assembly (using nocodazole or taxol) or protein synthesis (using cycloheximide) only partially suppressed cell extension. In

  12. Interplay of matrix stiffness and protein tethering in stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jessica H; Vincent, Ludovic G; Fuhrmann, Alexander; Choi, Yu Suk; Hribar, Kolin C; Taylor-Weiner, Hermes; Chen, Shaochen; Engler, Adam J

    2014-10-01

    Stem cells regulate their fate by binding to, and contracting against, the extracellular matrix. Recently, it has been proposed that in addition to matrix stiffness and ligand type, the degree of coupling of fibrous protein to the surface of the underlying substrate, that is, tethering and matrix porosity, also regulates stem cell differentiation. By modulating substrate porosity without altering stiffness in polyacrylamide gels, we show that varying substrate porosity did not significantly change protein tethering, substrate deformations, or the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stromal cells and marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells. Varying protein-substrate linker density up to 50-fold changed tethering, but did not affect osteogenesis, adipogenesis, surface-protein unfolding or underlying substrate deformations. Differentiation was also unaffected by the absence of protein tethering. Our findings imply that the stiffness of planar matrices regulates stem cell differentiation independently of protein tethering and porosity.

  13. In vitro culture characteristics of corneal epithelial, endothelial, and keratocyte cells in a native collagen matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orwin, E J; Hubel, A

    2000-08-01

    The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the effectiveness of a tissue-engineered collagen sponge as a substrate for the culture of human corneal cells. To that end, human kerotocyte, epithelial, and endothelial cells were cultured separately on collagen sponges composed of native fibrillar collagen with a pore size of approximately 0.1 mm. Co-culture experiments were also performed (epithelial/endothelial and epithelial/keratocyte cultures). Proliferation of keratocytes and matrix production was assessed. The morphology of the epithelial and endothelial cell cultures was characterized by histology and scanning electron microscopy. Keratocytes cultured on collagen sponges exhibited increased matrix synthesis over time as well as proliferation and repopulation of the matrix. Epithelial and endothelial cells showed the ability to migrate over the collagen sponge. The thickness of the epithelial layer was influenced by soluble factors produced by endothelial cells. The morphology of the bottom layer of epithelial cells was influenced by the presence of keratocytes in the culture. These studies indicate that human corneal cells exhibit normal cell phenotype when cultured individually on an engineered collagen sponge matrix and co-culture of different cell types in the cornea can influence cell behavior.

  14. Alignment and cell-matrix interactions of human corneal endothelial cells on nanostructured collagen type I matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruschwitz, Rita; Friedrichs, Jens; Valtink, Monika; Franz, Clemens M; Müller, Daniel J; Funk, Richard H W; Engelmann, Katrin

    2010-12-01

    To use nanoscopically defined, two-dimensional matrices assembled from aligned collagen type I fibrils as a sheet substratum for in vitro cultivation of human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs). To assess the effect of matrix architecture on HCEC morphology and to characterize integrin-mediated HCEC-matrix interaction. Cell alignment and cell-matrix interactions of primary HCECs and three different immortalized HCEC populations on native and UV-cross-linked collagen type I matrices were examined by time-lapse microscopy. Specific integrin α(2)β(1) binding to the collagen matrix was demonstrated using a function-blocking α(2) antibody. Integrin α(2) subunit expression levels of the four HCEC populations were analyzed by Western blot analysis. All HCEC populations aligned along the oriented collagen fibrils. Primary HCECs and, to a lesser extent, the other tested HCEC populations exerted high traction forces, leading to progressive matrix destruction. Cross-linking of the collagen matrices considerably increased matrix stability. Integrin subunit α(2) expression levels of the four cell types correlated with the degree of cell alignment and exertion of traction forces. In turn, blocking integrin subunit α(2) reduced cell alignment and prevented matrix destruction. HCECs align directionally along parallel arrays of collagen type I fibrils. The interactions of HCECs with collagen type I are primarily mediated by integrin α(2)β(1). Integrin subunit α(2) levels correlate with matrix contraction and subsequent destruction. Sustained cultivation of HCECs on ultrathin collagen matrices thus requires matrix cross-linking and moderate integrin α(2)β(1) expression levels.

  15. Investigating the role of the extracellular matrix on differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells and MC3T3 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, H.A.M.; Dechering, Koen; Someren, Eugene; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are a promising cell source for bone tissue engineering, but due to their limited number and donor variation, other cell types are used to answer relevant questions in bone tissue engineering. Since the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex entity with

  16. Decellularized Matrix from Tumorigenic Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promotes Neovascularization with Galectin-1 Dependent Endothelial Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jorge S.; Kristiansen, Malthe; Kristensen, Lars P.; Larsen, Kenneth H.; Nielsen, Maria O.; Christiansen, Helle; Nehlin, Jan; Andersen, Jens S.; Kassem, Moustapha

    2011-01-01

    Background Acquisition of a blood supply is fundamental for extensive tumor growth. We recently described vascular heterogeneity in tumours derived from cell clones of a human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) strain (hMSC-TERT20) immortalized by retroviral vector mediated human telomerase (hTERT) gene expression. Histological analysis showed that cells of the most vascularized tumorigenic clone, -BD11 had a pericyte-like alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA+) and CD146+ positive phenotype. Upon serum withdrawal in culture, -BD11 cells formed cord-like structures mimicking capillary morphogenesis. In contrast, cells of the poorly tumorigenic clone, -BC8 did not stain for ASMA, tumours were less vascularized and serum withdrawal in culture led to cell death. By exploring the heterogeneity in hMSC-TERT20 clones we aimed to understand molecular mechanisms by which mesenchymal stem cells may promote neovascularization. Methodology/Principal Findings Quantitative qRT-PCR analysis revealed similar mRNA levels for genes encoding the angiogenic cytokines VEGF and Angiopoietin-1 in both clones. However, clone-BD11 produced a denser extracellular matrix that supported stable ex vivo capillary morphogenesis of human endothelial cells and promoted in vivo neovascularization. Proteomic characterization of the -BD11 decellularized matrix identified 50 extracellular angiogenic proteins, including galectin-1. siRNA knock down of galectin-1 expression abrogated the ex vivo interaction between decellularized -BD11 matrix and endothelial cells. More stable shRNA knock down of galectin-1 expression did not prevent -BD11 tumorigenesis, but greatly reduced endothelial migration into -BD11 cell xenografts. Conclusions Decellularized hMSC matrix had significant angiogenic potential with at least 50 angiogenic cell surface and extracellular proteins, implicated in attracting endothelial cells, their adhesion and activation to form tubular structures. hMSC -BD11 surface galectin-1 expression was

  17. Cinematographic analysis of vascular smooth muscle cell interactions with extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absher, M; Baldor, L

    1991-01-01

    The interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells with growth modulators and extracellular matrix molecules may play a role in the proliferation and migration of these cells after vascular injury and during the development of atherosclerosis. Time-lapse cinematographic techniques have been used to study cell division and migration of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells in response to matrix molecules consisting of solubilized basement membrane (Matrigel) and type I collagen. When cells were grown adjacent to Matrigel, both migration and cell proliferation were increased and interdivision time was shortened. Cells grown in Matrigel or in type I collagen had markedly reduced migration rates but interdivision time was not altered. Further, diffusible components of the Matrigel were found to stimulate proliferation of the smooth muscle cells.

  18. Composition of extracellular matrix and distribution of cell adhesion molecules in renal cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droz, D; Patey, N; Paraf, F; Chrétien, Y; Gogusev, J

    1994-11-01

    Cell to cell and cell to matrix interactions play a major role in tumor growth and invasion. Therefore, we studied the composition of extracellular matrices and the distribution of cell adhesion molecules in 50 renal cell tumors of various types and various grades of malignancy as compared with nontumoral kidney. In the present study, we used immunolabeling with specific antibodies directed against the alpha 1, alpha 2, and alpha 3 chains of collagen type IV; laminin; heparan sulfate proteoglycan; fibronectin; collagen I; collagen III; the alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 3, alpha 5, alpha 6, alpha v, beta 1, and beta 3 subunits of integrins; and ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and ELAM-1 molecules. In clear cell type carcinomas (24 cases) the basal laminae surrounding the tumor islets contained the alpha 1 and alpha 2 chains of collagen type IV and heparan sulfate proteoglycan in all cases, and laminin in 96% of the cases. The alpha 3 chain of collagen IV was present in only one case, whereas fibronectin, collagen I, and collagen III were detected in nearly 50% of the cases. The tumor cells expressed alpha 3, alpha 6, and beta 1 integrin subunits in all cases, alpha 5 in 25%, alpha v beta 3 in 54%, and alpha 2 in none. ICAM-1 was detected in all cases, and VCAM-1 in 58%. The expression of the alpha 6 subunit was weak in 2 tumors of high grade, whereas the alpha v subunit was expressed in 7 of 14 low grade and in 7 of 10 intermediate and high grade tumors. In tubulopapillary carcinomas with chromophilic cells (12 cases), the most prominent findings were the presence of the alpha 3 chain of collagen IV in tumor basal laminae in 66% and the expression of the alpha 2 integrin subunit by the tumor cells in 58% of the cases, both features characterizing distal renal tubules. In chromophobic carcinomas (4 cases), the tumor basement membranes were tenuous and contained no fibronectin or interstitial collagens. The tumor cells expressed the alpha 6, alpha 2, alpha 3, beta 1, and alpha nu beta 3

  19. Effect of matrix rigidity on organ-specific capture of tumor cells by flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, P; Shen, X; Tan, P; Yang, L; Liu, W

    2017-04-29

    Accumulating evidences have suggested that tumor metastasis exists prominent organ discrepancy. In this progression, the capture of intravascular tumor cells (TCs) to endothelium in distant tissues and organs plays a decisive role in the organ-specific metastasis formation. However, the mechanism of tumor cells preferentially arrest and adhere to endothelial cells (ECs) of target organ still remains elusive. By using the parallel plate flow chamber and the polyacrylamide gels with different matrix stiffness, we here explored the combined effects of matrix rigidity, shear stress, and chemokine SDF-1 on the capture of circulating tumor cells to ECs in the bloodstream. In addition, the expression and the role of integrin β1 on the tumor cells surface were also detected by SDF-1 treatment. The results show that breast tumor cells MDA-MB-231 display an increasing number of adherent cells on the preferred substrate, which is similar to the matrix rigidity of breast cancer tissue (about 5kPa), under a certain shear stress. Moreover, ECs exacerbates the preferred capture of tumor cells compared with the FN-coated substrate alone. Besides, SDF-1 upregulates the number of adherent tumor cells by responding to matrix stiffness via promoting the expression of integrin β1, which is abolished by blocking of integrin β1. These results may provide a novel point of view for the mechanism of "organ specificity" phenomenon in tumor metastasis, which in turn contribute to a rational development of new drugs for cancer.

  20. The effect of tomatine on metastasis related matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activities in breast cancer cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelken, Besra Özmen; Balcı, Tuğçe; Süslüer, Sunde Yılmaz; Kayabaşı, Çağla; Avcı, Çığır Biray; Kırmızıbayrak, Petek Ballar; Gündüz, Cumhur

    2017-09-05

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women and metastasis is the cause of morbidity and mortality in patients. In the development of metastasis, the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family has a very important role in tumor development. MMP-2 and MMP-9 work together for extracellular matrix (ECM) cleavage to increase migration. Tomatine is a secondary metabolite that has a natural defense role against plants, fungi, viruses and bacteria that are synthesized from tomato. In additıon, tomatine is also known that it breaks down the cell membrane and is a strong inhibitor in human cancer cells. In this study, it was aimed to evaluate the effect of tomatine on cytotoxicity, apoptosis and matrix metalloproteinase inhibition in MCF-7 cell lines. Human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) was used as a cell line. In MCF-7 cells, the IC50 dose of tomatine was determined to be 7.07μM. According to the control cells, apoptosis increased 3.4 fold in 48thh. Activation of MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-9\\NGAL has been shown to decrease significantly in cells treated with tomatine by gelatin zymography compared to the control. As a result, matrix metalloproteinase activity and cell proliferation were suppressed by tomatine and this may provide support in treatment methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. α2 Integrin, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, and matrix metalloproteinase-3 act sequentially to induce differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into odontoblast-like cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozeki, Nobuaki; Kawai, Rie; Hase, Naoko; Hiyama, Taiki; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki [Department of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, Aichi Gakuin University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8651 (Japan); Kondo, Ayami [Department of Medicinal Biochemistry, School of Pharmacy, Aichi Gakuin University, Nagoya 464-8650 (Japan); Nakata, Kazuhiko [Department of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, Aichi Gakuin University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8651 (Japan); Mogi, Makio, E-mail: makio@dpc.agu.ac.jp [Department of Medicinal Biochemistry, School of Pharmacy, Aichi Gakuin University, Nagoya 464-8650 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    We previously reported that interleukin 1β acts via matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 to regulate cell proliferation and suppress apoptosis in α2 integrin-positive odontoblast-like cells differentiated from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here we characterize the signal cascade underpinning odontoblastic differentiation in mouse ES cells. The expression of α2 integrin, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (Emmprin), and MMP-3 mRNA and protein were all potently increased during odontoblastic differentiation. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) disruption of the expression of these effectors potently suppressed the expression of the odontoblastic biomarkers dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein-1 and alkaline phosphatase, and blocked odontoblast calcification. Our siRNA, western blot and blocking antibody analyses revealed a unique sequential cascade involving α2 integrin, Emmprin and MMP-3 that drives ES cell differentiation into odontoblasts. This cascade requires the interaction between α2 integrin and Emmprin and is potentiated by exogenous MMP-3. Finally, although odontoblast-like cells potently express α2, α6, αV, β1, and β3, integrins, we confirmed that β1 integrin acts as the trigger for ES cell differentiation, apparently in complex with α2 integrin. These results demonstrate a unique and unanticipated role for an α2 integrin-, Emmprin-, and MMP-3-mediated signaling cascade in driving mouse ES cell differentiation into odontoblast-like cells. - Highlights: • Odontoblast differentiation requires activation of α2 integrin, Emmprin and MMP-3. • α2 integrin, Emmprin and MMP-3 form a sequential signaling cascade. • β1 integrin acts a specific trigger for odontoblast differentiation. • The role of these effectors is highly novel and unanticipated.

  2. Nanofiber density determines endothelial cell behavior on hydrogel matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berti, Fernanda V., E-mail: fernanda@intelab.ufsc.br [Department of Chemical and Food Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Rambo, Carlos R. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Dias, Paulo F. [Department of Cell Biology, Embryology and Genetics, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Porto, Luismar M. [Department of Chemical and Food Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2013-12-01

    When cultured under static conditions, bacterial cellulose pellicles, by the nature of the polymer synthesis that involves molecular oxygen, are characterized by two distinct surface sides. The upper surface is denser in fibers (entangled) than the lower surface that shows greater surface porosity. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to exploit how the microarchitecture (i.e., surface porosity, fiber network structure, surface topology, and fiber density) of bacterial cellulose pellicle surfaces influence cell–biomaterial interaction and therefore cell behavior. Adhesion, cell ingrowth, proliferation, viability and cell death mechanisms were evaluated on the two pellicle surface sides. Cell behavior, including secondary necrosis, is influenced only by the microarchitecture of the surface, since the biomaterial is extremely pure (constituted of cellulose and water only). Cell–cellulose fiber interaction is the determinant signal in the cell–biomaterial responses, isolated from other frequently present interferences such as protein and other chemical traces usually present in cell culture matrices. Our results suggest that microarchitecture of hydrogel materials might determine the performance of biomedical products, such as bacterial cellulose tissue engineering constructs (BCTECs). - Highlights: • Topography of BC pellicle is relevant to determine endothelial cells' fate. • Cell–biomaterial response is affected by the topography of BC-pellicle surface. • Endothelial cells exhibit different behavior depending on the BC topography. • Apoptosis and necrosis of endothelial cells were affected by the BC topography.

  3. Extracellular Matrix Properties Regulate the Migratory Response of Glioblastoma Stem Cells in Three-Dimensional Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Perez, Marisol; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse infiltration across brain tissue is a hallmark of glioblastoma and the main cause of unsuccessful total resection that leads to tumor reappearance. A subpopulation termed glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) has been directly related to aggressive invasion; nonetheless, their migratory characteristics and regulation by the microenvironment are still unknown. In this study, we developed a composite matrix of hyaluronan (HA) structurally supported by a collagen-oligomer fibril network to simulate the brain tumor extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. Matrigel-coated microfibers were embedded within the matrix to create a tunable dual niche microenvironment that resembles the vascular network of the brain. This model was compared with the most commonly used in vitro three-dimensional (3D) culture formats, Matrigel and collagen type-I monomer matrices, to study how the mechanical and compositional properties of the ECM alter the migration characteristics of GSC neurospheres. The migration mode, distance, velocity, and morphology of the GSCs were monitored over a 72-h period. The cells altered their migration mode depending on the matrix composition, showing migration by expansive growth in Matrigel matrices, multicellular extension along rigid interfaces (as Matrigel glass and coated microfibers), and mesenchymal single-cell migration in collagen matrices. Velocity and distance of migration within each composition varied according to matrix mechanical properties. In the dual niche system, the presence of HA reduced velocity and number of migratory cells; however, cells that came in contact with the pseudovessels exhibited collective migration by an extensive strand and reached higher velocities than cells migrating individually across the 3D matrix. Our results show that GSCs adopt varied migration mechanisms to invade multiple ECM microenvironments, and the migration characteristics exhibited are highly influenced by the matrix physical properties. Moreover, GSC

  4. Conversion Matrix Analysis of GaAs HEMT Active Gilbert Cell Mixers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Chenhui; Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Krozer, Viktor

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the nonlinear model of the GaAs HEMT active Gilbert cell mixer is investigated. Based on the model, the conversion gain expression of active Gilbert cell mixers is derived theoretically by using conversion matrix analysis method. The expression is verified by harmonic balance...

  5. Influence of acellular natural lung matrix on murine embryonic stem cell differentiation and tissue formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortiella, Joaquin; Niles, Jean; Cantu, Andrea; Brettler, Andrea; Pham, Anthony; Vargas, Gracie; Winston, Sean; Wang, Jennifer; Walls, Shannon; Nichols, Joan E

    2010-08-01

    We report here the first attempt to produce and use whole acellular (AC) lung as a matrix to support development of engineered lung tissue from murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs). We compared the influence of AC lung, Gelfoam, Matrigel, and a collagen I hydrogel matrix on the mESC attachment, differentiation, and subsequent formation of complex tissue. We found that AC lung allowed for better retention of cells with more differentiation of mESCs into epithelial and endothelial lineages. In constructs produced on whole AC lung, we saw indications of organization of differentiating ESC into three-dimensional structures reminiscent of complex tissues. We also saw expression of thyroid transcription factor-1, an immature lung epithelial cell marker; pro-surfactant protein C, a type II pneumocyte marker; PECAM-1/CD31, an endothelial cell marker; cytokeratin 18; alpha-actin, a smooth muscle marker; CD140a or platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha; and Clara cell protein 10. There was also evidence of site-specific differentiation in the trachea with the formation of sheets of cytokeratin-positive cells and Clara cell protein 10-expressing Clara cells. Our findings support the utility of AC lung as a matrix for engineering lung tissue and highlight the critical role played by matrix or scaffold-associated cues in guiding ESC differentiation toward lung-specific lineages.

  6. Conversion Matrix Analysis of GaAs HEMT Active Gilbert Cell Mixers

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Chenhui; Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Krozer, Viktor

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the nonlinear model of the GaAs HEMT active Gilbert cell mixer is investigated. Based on the model, the conversion gain expression of active Gilbert cell mixers is derived theoretically by using conversion matrix analysis method. The expression is verified by harmonic balance simulation with Angelov HEMT model in Agilent Advanced Design System (ADS) and by chip measurement results.

  7. Matrix Stiffness Modulates Proliferation, Chemotherapeutic Response and Dormancy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Schrader, Joerg; Gordon-Walker, Timothy T; Aucott, Rebecca L; van Deemter, Marielle; Quaas, Alexander; Walsh, Shaun; Benten, Daniel; Stuart J. Forbes; Wells, Rebecca G.; John P. Iredale

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the physical environment is a critical mediator of tumor behavior. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) develops within an altered biomechanical environment, and increasing matrix stiffness is a strong predictor of HCC development. The aim of this study was to establish whether changes in matrix stiffness, which are characteristic of inflammation and fibrosis, regulate HCC cell proliferation and chemotherapeutic response. Using an in vitro system of "mechanically t...

  8. Collective adhesion and displacement of retinal progenitor cells upon extracellular matrix substrates of transplantable biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Ankush; Mishra, Shawn; Pena, Juan; Zhou, Jing; Redenti, Stephen; Majeska, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Strategies to replace retinal photoreceptors lost to damage or disease rely upon the migration of replacement cells transplanted into sub-retinal spaces. A significant obstacle to the advancement of cell transplantation for retinal repair is the limited migration of transplanted cells into host retina. In this work, we examine the adhesion and displacement responses of retinal progenitor cells on extracellular matrix substrates found in retina as well as widely used in the design and preparation of transplantable scaffolds. The data illustrate that retinal progenitor cells exhibit unique adhesive and displacement dynamics in response to poly-l-lysine, fibronectin, laminin, hyaluronic acid, and Matrigel. These findings suggest that transplantable biomaterials can be designed to improve cell integration by incorporating extracellular matrix substrates that affect the migratory behaviors of replacement cells. PMID:29344334

  9. [Extracellular matrix regulates expressions of germ cell differentiation associated genes in mouse embryonic stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xin; Qi, Zheng-Yu; Qin, Jie; Cui, Guang-Hui; Gui, Yao-Ting; Cai, Zhi-Ming

    2009-11-01

    Interactions of cells with the extracellular matrix (ECM) are essential for cell differentiation. The authors sought to determine the roles of different ECMs in the expressions of germ cell differentiation associated genes after mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) differentiated into embryoid bodies (EBs). EBs derived from mESCs were maintained in suspension for 3 days and then cultured on the plates coated with various ECMs, including fibronectin (F), laminin (L), matrigel (M), collagen (C) and nonadhensive agarose (A), respectively, for 1, 2, 3 or 4 days, followed by evaluation of the expressions of the genes associated with germ cell differentiation by RT-PCR. The EBs of the F and L groups exhibited facilitated adherent differentiation. The expressions of the Blimp-1, Stella, Mvh and Stra8 genes were increased gradually in the F and L but not obviously in the M and C groups. The overall gene expressions were low in the A group, but high and then gradually decreased in the blank control group. Endogenous fibronectin, laminin and integrin beta1 were obviously expressed in the L and control groups. Laminin /integrin beta1 signaling may play a role in regulating the differentiation of mESCs into primordial germ cells (PGCs). Exogenous laminin can facilitate the differentiation of mESC-derived EBs into PGCs by acting on the integrin beta1 subunit, while exogenous fibronectin may be involved in the regulation of the differentiation through other integrin subunit. Endogenous laminin and fibronectin secreted by EBs may also facilitate cell differentiation in the absence of exogenous ECMs.

  10. Imaging viscosity of intragranular mucin matrix in cystic fibrosis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, Sebastian; Ponomarchuk, Olga; Castillo, Marlius; Rebik, Jonathan; Brochiero, Emmanuelle; Borejdo, Julian; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Dzyuba, Sergei V; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Grygorczyk, Ryszard; Fudala, Rafal

    2017-12-01

    Abnormalities of mucus viscosity play a critical role in the pathogenesis of several respiratory diseases, including cystic fibrosis. Currently, there are no approaches to assess the rheological properties of mucin granule matrices in live cells. This is the first example of the use of a molecular rotor, a BODIPY dye, to quantitatively visualize the viscosity of intragranular mucin matrices in a large population of individual granules in differentiated primary bronchial epithelial cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

  11. Moderate-Grade Germinal Matrix Haemorrhage Activates Cell Division in the Neonatal Mouse Subventricular Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, William J; Zhang, Xinyu; Fancy, Stephen P J; Rowitch, David; Marino, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Precise temporal and spatial control of the neural stem/progenitor cells within the subventricular zone (SVZ) germinal matrix of the brain is important for normal development in the third trimester and the early postnatal period. The high metabolic demands of proliferating germinal matrix precursors, coupled with the flimsy structure of the germinal matrix cerebral vasculature, are thought to account for the high rates of haemorrhage in extremely- and very-low-birth-weight preterm infants. Germinal matrix haemorrhage can commonly extend to intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH). Because neural stem/progenitor cells are sensitive to microenvironmental cues from the ventricular, intermediate, and basal domains within the germinal matrix, haemorrhage has been postulated to impact neurological outcomes through aberration of normal neural stem/progenitor cell behaviour. We developed an animal model of neonatal germinal matrix haemorrhage using stereotactic injection of autologous blood into the mouse neonatal germinal matrix. Pathological analysis at 4 days postinjury showed high rates of intraventricular extension and ventricular dilatation but low rates of parenchymal disruption outside the germinal zone, recapitulating key features of human "Papile grade III" IVH. At 4 days postinjury we observed proliferation in the wall of the lateral ventricle with significantly increased numbers of transient amplifying cells within the SVZ and the corpus callosum. Analysis at 21 days postinjury revealed that cortical development was also affected, with increased neuronal and concomitant reduced oligodendroglial differentiation. At the molecular level, we showed downregulation of the expression of the transmembrane receptor Notch2 in CD133+ve cells of the SVZ, raising the possibility that the burst of precocious proliferation seen in our experimental mouse model and the skewed differentiation could be mediated by downregulation of the Notch pathway within the proximal

  12. Sensitivity of bladder cancer cells to curcumin and its derivatives depends on the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Paul J; Han, Zhiyong; Sindhwani, Puneet; Hurst, Robert E

    2007-01-01

    Because the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents depends upon the supporting extracellular matrix (ECM), the response in vivo may not be reproduced in 2-dimensional cell culture. The dose-response to curcumin and two derivatives by bladder cancer cells grown on both normal (SISgel) and cancer-derived ECM (Matrigel) and on plastic were contrasted. Cells grown on Matrigel were resistant to curcumins, but cells growing on SISgel, which mimic cancer cells suppressed by normal ECM, were nearly as sensitive as cells grown on plastic. SV40-immortalized urothelial cells, which are models for premalignant cells, were the most sensitive, but even aggressive cell lines were nearly as sensitive when grown on SISgel as on plastic. Curcumin response depends highly on the supporting ECM, and cells grown on plastic poorly models cells growing on natural ECM. Curcumin could prove an effective chemopreventive for bladder cancer recurrence when administered intravesically post-therapy.

  13. Elasticity Modulation of Fibroblast-Derived Matrix for Endothelial Cell Vascular Morphogenesis and Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ping; Suhaeri, Muhammad; Subbiah, Ramesh; Van, Se Young; Park, Jimin; Kim, Sang Heon; Park, Kwideok; Lee, Kangwon

    2016-03-01

    Biophysical properties of the microenvironment, including matrix elasticity and topography, are known to affect various cell behaviors; however, the specific role of each factor is unclear. In this study, fibroblast-derived matrix (FDM) was used as cell culture substrate and physically modified to investigate the influence of its biophysical property changes on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) behavior in vitro. These FDMs were physically modified by simply storing them at different temperatures: the one stored at 4°C, maintained its original properties, was considered natural FDM, whereas the ones stored at -20°C or -80°C, exhibited a distinct surface morphology, were considered physically modified FDM. Physical modification induced matrix fiber rearrangement in FDM, forming different microstructures on the surface as characterized by focused ion beam (FIB)-cryoSEM. A significant increase of matrix elasticity was found with physically modified FDMs as determined by atomic force microscopy. HUVEC and hMSC behaviors on these natural and physically modified FDMs were observed and compared with each other and with gelatin-coated coverslips. HUVECs showed a similar adhesion level on these substrates at 3 h, but exhibited different proliferation rates and morphologies at 24 h; HUVECs on natural FDM proliferated relatively slower and assembled to capillary-like structures (CLSs). It is observed that HUVECs assembled to CLSs on natural FDMs are independent on the exogenous growth factors and yet dependent on nonmuscle myosin II activity. This result indicates the important role of matrix mechanical properties in regulating HUVECs vascular morphogenesis. As for hMSCs multilineage differentiation, adipogenesis is improved on natural FDM that with lower matrix elasticity, while osteogenesis is accelerated on physically modified FDMs that with higher matrix elasticity, these results further confirm the crucial

  14. Chemical and enzymatic fractionation of cell walls from Fucales: insights into the structure of the extracellular matrix of brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniaud-Bouët, Estelle; Kervarec, Nelly; Michel, Gurvan; Tonon, Thierry; Kloareg, Bernard; Hervé, Cécile

    2014-10-01

    Brown algae are photosynthetic multicellular marine organisms evolutionarily distant from land plants, with a distinctive cell wall. They feature carbohydrates shared with plants (cellulose), animals (fucose-containing sulfated polysaccharides, FCSPs) or bacteria (alginates). How these components are organized into a three-dimensional extracellular matrix (ECM) still remains unclear. Recent molecular analysis of the corresponding biosynthetic routes points toward a complex evolutionary history that shaped the ECM structure in brown algae. Exhaustive sequential extractions and composition analyses of cell wall material from various brown algae of the order Fucales were performed. Dedicated enzymatic degradations were used to release and identify cell wall partners. This approach was complemented by systematic chromatographic analysis to study polymer interlinks further. An additional structural assessment of the sulfated fucan extracted from Himanthalia elongata was made. The data indicate that FCSPs are tightly associated with proteins and cellulose within the walls. Alginates are associated with most phenolic compounds. The sulfated fucans from H. elongata were shown to have a regular α-(1→3) backbone structure, while an alternating α-(1→3), (1→4) structure has been described in some brown algae from the order Fucales. The data provide a global snapshot of the cell wall architecture in brown algae, and contribute to the understanding of the structure-function relationships of the main cell wall components. Enzymatic cross-linking of alginates by phenols may regulate the strengthening of the wall, and sulfated polysaccharides may play a key role in the adaptation to osmotic stress. The emergence and evolution of ECM components is further discussed in relation to the evolution of multicellularity in brown algae. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please

  15. Two-way regulation between cells and aligned collagen fibrils: local 3D matrix formation and accelerated neural differentiation of human decidua parietalis placental stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Zhu, Bofan; Strakova, Zuzana; Wang, Rong

    2014-08-08

    It has been well established that an aligned matrix provides structural and signaling cues to guide cell polarization and cell fate decision. However, the modulation role of cells in matrix remodeling and the feedforward effect on stem cell differentiation have not been studied extensively. In this study, we report on the concerted changes of human decidua parietalis placental stem cells (hdpPSCs) and the highly ordered collagen fibril matrix in response to cell-matrix interaction. With high-resolution imaging, we found the hdpPSCs interacted with the matrix by deforming the cell shape, harvesting the nearby collagen fibrils, and reorganizing the fibrils around the cell body to transform a 2D matrix to a localized 3D matrix. Such a unique 3D matrix prompted high expression of β-1 integrin around the cell body that mediates and facilitates the stem cell differentiation toward neural cells. The study offers insights into the coordinated, dynamic changes at the cell-matrix interface and elucidates cell modulation of its matrix to establish structural and biochemical cues for effective cell growth and differentiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bupivacaine decreases cell viability and matrix protein synthesis in an intervertebral disc organ model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Vo, Nam V; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Hartman, Robert A; Ngo, Kevin; Choe, So Ra; Witt, William T; Dong, Qing; Lee, Joon Y; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Kang, James D

    2011-02-01

    Bupivacaine is a local anesthetic commonly used for back pain management in interventional procedures. Cytotoxic effects of bupivacaine have been reported in articular cartilage and, recently, in intervertebral disc cell culture. However, the relevance of these effects to discs in vivo remains unclear. This study examines the effect of bupivacaine on disc cell metabolism using an organotypic culture model system that mimics the in vivo environment. To assess the effect of bupivacaine on disc cell viability and matrix protein synthesis using an organotypic model system and to determine whether this anesthetic has toxic effects. Mouse intervertebral discs were isolated and maintained ex vivo in an organotypic culture then exposed to clinically relevant concentrations of bupivacaine, and the impact on disc cell viability and matrix proteoglycan (PG) and collagen syntheses were measured in the presence and absence of the drug. Mouse functional spine units (FSUs) were isolated from the lumbar spines of 10-week-old mice. Cell viability was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Total PG and collagen syntheses were determined by measuring the incorporation of radioactive (35)S-sulfate and (3)H-l-proline into PG and collagen, respectively. Organotypic cultures of mouse FSUs were exposed to different concentrations (0%-0.5%) of bupivacaine for variable amounts of time (0-2 hours). Cell viability within disc tissue was quantified by MTT staining and histologic assay. Matrix protein synthesis was measured by incorporation of radioactive (35)S-sulfate (for PG synthesis) and (3)H-l-proline (for collagen synthesis). Untreated mouse disc organs were maintained in culture for up to 1 month with minimal changes in tissue histology, cell viability, and matrix protein synthesis. Exposure to bupivacaine decreased cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Exposure to bupivacaine at concentrations less than or equal to 0.25% did

  17. Mimicking cell/extracellular matrix adhesion with lipid membranes and solid substrates: requirements, pitfalls and proposals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvelier, Damien; Vezy, Cyrille; Viallat, Annie; Bassereau, Patricia; Nassoy, Pierre

    2004-07-01

    The interest in physical approaches to the study of cell adhesion has generated numerous recent works on the development of substrates mimicking the extracellular matrix and the use of giant synthetic liposomes, commonly considered as basic models of living cells. The use of well-characterized bioactive substrates and artificial cells should allow us to gain new insight into the cell-extracellular matrix interactions, provided that their biomimetic relevance has been really proved. The aim of this paper is to define some minimal requirements for effective biomimetic features and to propose simple adhesion assays. We show, for instance, that immobilization of specific ligands is sometimes not sufficient to ensure specific adhesion of cells expressing the corresponding receptors. By investigating comparatively the adhesive behaviour of decorated erythrocytes and vesicles, we also discuss the potentialities and limitations of synthetic vesicles as test cells.

  18. The effect of fibrillar matrix architecture on tumor cell invasion of physically challenging environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Asja; Ziperstein, Michelle J; Kaufman, Laura J

    2014-08-01

    Local invasion by and dissemination of cancer cells from a primary tumor are key initial steps of metastasis, the most lethal aspect of cancer. To study these processes in vitro, the invasion of cells from multicellular breast cancer aggregates embedded in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix culture systems was studied. This work showed that in 3D fibrillar environments composed of collagen I, pore size--not the viscoelastic properties of the matrix--was the biophysical characteristic controlling breast cancer cell invasion efficiency. Furthermore, it was shown that fibrillar matrix architecture is a crucial factor that allows for efficient 3D invasion. In a 3D non-fibrillar environment composed of basement membrane extract (BME), invasion efficiency was greatly diminished, the mesenchymal individual mode of 3D invasion was abolished, and establishment of cell polarity and protrusions was compromised. These effects were seen even though the BME matrix has invasion permissive viscoelasticity and suitable adhesion ligands. The altered and limited invasive behavior observed in BME was rescued through introduction of fibrillar collagen into the non-fibrillar matrix. The biophysical cues of fibrillar collagen facilitated efficient invasion of sterically disadvantageous environments through assisting cell polarization and formation of stable cell protrusions. Finally, we suggest the composite matrices employed in this study consisting of fibrillar collagen I and BME in either a liquid-like or gelled state are suitable for a wide range of 3D cell studies, as these matrices combine fibrillar features that require cells to deploy integrin-dependent mechanotransduction machinery and a tunable non-fibrillar component that may require cells to adopt alternative migratory modes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells modulate release of matrix proteins from tendon surfaces in vitro: a potential beneficial therapeutic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvican, Elaine R; Dudhia, Jayesh; Alves, Ana-Liz; Clements, Lucy E; Plessis, Francois Du; Smith, Roger K W

    2014-05-01

    Injury of tendons contained within a synovial environment, such as joint, bursa or tendon sheath, frequently fails to heal and releases matrix proteins into the synovial fluid, driving inflammation. This study investigated the effectiveness of cells to seal tendon surfaces and provoke matrix synthesis as a possible effective injectable therapy. Equine flexor tendon explants were cultured overnight in suspensions of bone marrow and synovium-derived mesenchymal stems cells and, as controls, two sources of fibroblasts, derived from tendon and skin, which adhered to the explants. Release of the most abundant tendon extracellular matrix proteins into the media was assayed, along with specific matrix proteins synthesis by real-time PCR. Release of extracellular matrix proteins was influenced by the coating cell type. Fibroblasts from skin and tendon appeared less capable of preventing the release of matrix proteins than mesenchymal stems cells. The source of cell is an important consideration for cell therapy.

  20. Cancer cell metabolism regulates extracellular matrix degradation by invadopodia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horssen, R. van; Buccione, R.; Willemse, M.P.; Cingir, S.; Wieringa, B.; Attanasio, F.

    2013-01-01

    Transformed cancer cells have an altered metabolism, characterized by a shift towards aerobic glycolysis, referred to as 'the Warburg phenotype'. A change in flux through mitochondrial OXPHOS and cytosolic pathways for ATP production and a gain of capacity for biomass production in order to sustain

  1. Cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell adhesion are linked by syndecan-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakideeri Karat, Sandeep Gopal; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Pocock, Roger

    2017-01-01

    calcium. While it is known that cell-ECM and cell-cell junctions may be linked, possible roles for syndecans in this process are not understood. Here we show that wild type primary fibroblasts and those lacking syndecan-4 utilize different cadherins in their adherens junctions and that tension is a major...

  2. THE DIFFERENTIAL REGULATION OF CELL MOTILE ACTIVITY THROUGH MATRIX STIFFNESS AND POROSITY IN THREE DIMENSIONAL COLLAGEN MATRICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron-Mendoza, Miguel; Seemann, Joachim; Grinnell, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    In three dimensional collagen matrices, cell motile activity results in collagen translocation, cell spreading and cell migration. Cells can penetrate into the matrix as well as spread and migrate along its surface. In the current studies, we quantitatively characterize collagen translocation, cell spreading and cell migration in relationship to collagen matrix stiffness and porosity. Collagen matrices prepared with 1 to 4 mg/ml collagen exhibited matrix stiffness (storage modulus measured by oscillating rheometry) increasing from 4 to 60 Pa and matrix porosity (measured by scanning electron microscopy) decreasing from 4 to 1 μm2. Over this collagen concentration range, the consequences of cell motile activity changed markedly. As collagen concentration increased, cells no longer were able to cause translocation of collagen fibrils. Cell migration increased and cell spreading changed from dendritic to more flattened and polarized morphology depending on location of cells within or on the surface of the matrix. Collagen translocation appeared to depend primarily on matrix stiffness, whereas cell spreading and migration were less dependent on matrix stiffness and more dependent on collagen matrix porosity. PMID:20537378

  3. Dynamic 3D cell rearrangements guided by a fibronectin matrix underlie somitogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel G Martins

    Full Text Available Somites are transient segments formed in a rostro-caudal progression during vertebrate development. In chick embryos, segmentation of a new pair of somites occurs every 90 minutes and involves a mesenchyme-to-epithelium transition of cells from the presomitic mesoderm. Little is known about the cellular rearrangements involved, and, although it is known that the fibronectin extracellular matrix is required, its actual role remains elusive. Using 3D and 4D imaging of somite formation we discovered that somitogenesis consists of a complex choreography of individual cell movements. Epithelialization starts medially with the formation of a transient epithelium of cuboidal cells, followed by cell elongation and reorganization into a pseudostratified epithelium of spindle-shaped epitheloid cells. Mesenchymal cells are then recruited to this medial epithelium through accretion, a phenomenon that spreads to all sides, except the lateral side of the forming somite, which epithelializes by cell elongation and intercalation. Surprisingly, an important contribution to the somite epithelium also comes from the continuous egression of mesenchymal cells from the core into the epithelium via its apical side. Inhibition of fibronectin matrix assembly first slows down the rate, and then halts somite formation, without affecting pseudopodial activity or cell body movements. Rather, cell elongation, centripetal alignment, N-cadherin polarization and egression are impaired, showing that the fibronectin matrix plays a role in polarizing and guiding the exploratory behavior of somitic cells. To our knowledge, this is the first 4D in vivo recording of a full mesenchyme-to-epithelium transition. This approach brought new insights into this event and highlighted the importance of the extracellular matrix as a guiding cue during morphogenesis.

  4. Origin of Matrix-Producing Cells That Contribute to Aortic Fibrosis in Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Montaniel, Kim Ramil C; Saleh, Mohamed A; Xiao, Liang; Chen, Wei; Owens, Gary K; Humphrey, Jay D; Majesky, Mark W; Paik, David T; Hatzopoulos, Antonis K; Madhur, Meena S; Harrison, David G

    2016-02-01

    Various hypertensive stimuli lead to exuberant adventitial collagen deposition in large arteries, exacerbating blood pressure elevation and end-organ damage. Collagen production is generally attributed to resident fibroblasts; however, other cells, including resident and bone marrow-derived stem cell antigen positive (Sca-1(+)) cells and endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, can produce collagen and contribute to vascular stiffening. Using flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, we found that adventitial Sca-1(+) progenitor cells begin to produce collagen and acquire a fibroblast-like phenotype in hypertension. We also found that bone marrow-derived cells represent more than half of the matrix-producing cells in hypertension, and that one-third of these are Sca-1(+). Cell sorting and lineage-tracing studies showed that cells of endothelial origin contribute to no more than one fourth of adventitial collagen I(+) cells, whereas those of vascular smooth muscle lineage do not contribute. Our findings indicate that Sca-1(+) progenitor cells and bone marrow-derived infiltrating fibrocytes are major sources of arterial fibrosis in hypertension. Endothelial to mesenchymal transition likely also contributes, albeit to a lesser extent and pre-existing resident fibroblasts represent a minority of aortic collagen-producing cells in hypertension. This study shows that vascular stiffening represents a complex process involving recruitment and transformation of multiple cells types that ultimately elaborate adventitial extracellular matrix. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. The Origin of Matrix-Producing Cells that Contribute to Aortic Fibrosis in Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Montaniel, Kim Ramil C.; Saleh, Mohamed A.; Xiao, Liang; Chen, Wei; Owens, Gary K.; Humphrey, Jay D.; Majesky, Mark W.; Paik, David T.; Hatzopoulos, Antonis K.; Madhur, Meena S.; Harrison, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Various hypertensive stimuli lead to exuberant adventitial collagen deposition in large arteries, exacerbating blood pressure elevation and end-organ damage. Collagen production is generally attributed to resident fibroblasts, however other cells, including resident and bone marrow derived Stem Cell Antigen positive (Sca1+) cells, endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, can produce collagen and contribute to vascular stiffening. Using flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, we found that adventitial Sca-1+ progenitor cells begin to produce collagen and acquire a fibroblast-like phenotype in hypertension. We also found that bone marrow derived cells represent more than half of the matrix producing cells in hypertension, and that one-third of these are Sca-1+. Cell sorting and lineage tracing studies showed that cells of endothelial origin contribute to no more than one-fourth of adventitial collagen I+ cells while those of vascular smooth muscle lineage do not contribute. Our findings indicate that Sca-1+ progenitor cells and bone marrow-derived infiltrating fibrocytes are major sources of arterial fibrosis in hypertension. Endothelial to mesenchymal transition likely also contributes, albeit to a lesser extent and pre-existing resident fibroblasts represent a minority of aortic collagen-producing cells in hypertension. This study shows that vascular stiffening represents a complex process involving recruitment and transformation of multiple cells types that ultimately elaborate adventitial extracellular matrix. PMID:26693821

  6. Intracellular localization of the extracellular matrix enzyme lysyl oxidase in polarized epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Matthias K.; Csiszar, Katalin

    2007-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports novel functions for lysyl oxidase (LOX) beyond its traditional role in initiating crosslinkages in collagen and elastin within the extracellular matrix. These novel roles are particularly relevant during the transition of malignant epithelial cells towards a migratory and invasive phenotype. However, knowledge on cellular and matrix functions of LOX has been generated almost exclusively in mesenchymal cell types. But it is becoming increasingly evident that these cell types are not adequate to address these novel and highly significant roles for LOX in epithelial tissues. In this initial report, we demonstrate that active LOX is expressed by polarized MDCK II kidney and MCF-10A breast epithelial cells. Furthermore, we show evidence for the presence of mature LOX in the cytoplasm and establish these cell lines as models for epithelial LOX studies. PMID:17074474

  7. Wavy-walled bioreactor supports increased cell proliferation and matrix deposition in engineered cartilage constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Ericka M; Bilgen, Bahar; Barabino, Gilda A

    2005-01-01

    Hydrodynamic forces in bioreactors can decisively influence extracellular matrix deposition in engineered cartilage constructs. In the present study, the reduced fluid shear, high-axial mixing environment provided by a wavy-walled bioreactor was exploited in the cultivation of cartilage constructs using polyglycolic acid scaffolds seeded with bovine articular chondrocytes. Increased growth as defined by weight, cell proliferation and extracellular matrix deposition was observed in cartilage constructs from wavy-walled bioreactors in comparison with those from spinner flasks cultured under the same conditions. The wet weight composition of 4-week constructs from the wavy-walled bioreactor was similar to that of spinner flask constructs, but the former were 60% heavier due to equally higher incorporation of extracellular matrix and 30% higher cell population. It is most likely that increased construct matrix incorporation was a result of increased mitotic activity of chondrocytes cultured in the environment of the wavy-walled bioreactor. A layer of elongated cells embedded in type I collagen formed at the periphery of wavy-walled bioreactor and spinner flask constructs, possibly as a response to local shear forces. On the basis of the robustness and reproducibility of the extracellular matrix composition of cartilage constructs, the wavy-walled bioreactor demonstrated promise as an experimental cartilage tissue-engineering vessel. Increased construct growth in the wavy-walled bioreactor may lead to enhanced mechanical properties and expedited in vitro cultivation.

  8. Cell-matrix interactions in Schistosomal portal fibrosis: a dynamic event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Alexis Grimaud

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, one of the most significant progress in the understanding of liver diseases was the demonstration that liver fibrosis is a dynamic process resulting from a balance between synthesis and degradation of several matrix components, collagen in particular. Thus, fibrosis has been found to be a very early event during liver diseases, be it of toxic, viral or parasitic origin, and to be spontaneously reversible, either partially or totally. In liver fibrosis cell matrix interactions are dependent on the existence of the many factors (sometimes acting in combination which produce the same events at the cellular and molecular levels. These events are: (i the recruitment of fiber-producing cells, (ii their proliferation, (iii the secretion of matrix constituents of the extracellular matrix, and (iv the remodeling and degradation of the newly formed matrix. All these events represent, at least in principle, a target for a therapeutic intervention aimed at influencing the experimentally induced hepatic fibrosis. In this context, hepatosplenic schistosomiasis is of particular interest, being an immune cell-mediated granulomatous disease and a model of liver fibrosis allowing extensive studies in human and animals as well as providing original in vitro models.

  9. The Complex Interaction of Matrix Metalloproteinases in the Migration of Cancer Cells through Breast Tissue Stroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry J. Davies

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer mortality is directly linked to metastatic spread. The metastatic cell must exhibit a complex phenotype that includes the capacity to escape from the primary tumour mass, invade the surrounding normal tissue, and penetrate into the circulation before proliferating in the parenchyma of distant organs to produce a metastasis. In the normal breast, cellular structures change cyclically in response to ovarian hormones leading to regulated cell proliferation and apoptosis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are a family of zinc dependent endopeptidases. Their primary function is degradation of proteins in the extracellular matrix to allow ductal progression through the basement membrane. A complex balance between matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors regulate these changes. These proteinases interact with cytokines, growth factors, and tumour necrosis factors to stimulate branching morphologies in normal breast tissues. In breast cancer this process is disrupted facilitating tumour progression and metastasis and inhibiting apoptosis increasing the life of the metastatic cells. This paper highlights the role of matrix metalloproteinases in cell progression through the breast stroma and reviews the complex relationships between the different proteinases and their inhibitors in relation to breast cancer cells as they metastasise.

  10. Mechanoresponsive, omni-directional and local matrix-degrading actin protrusions in human mesenchymal stem cells microencapsulated in a 3D collagen matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Fu Chak; Zhang, Wei; Li, Yuk Yin; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2015-01-01

    Cells are known to respond to multiple niche signals including extracellular matrix and mechanical loading. In others and our own studies, mechanical loading has been shown to induce the formation of cell alignment in 3D collagen matrix with random meshwork, challenging our traditional understanding on the necessity of having aligned substrates as the prerequisite of alignment formation. This motivates our adventure in deciphering the mechanism of loading-induced cell alignment and hence the discovery of the novel protrusive functional structure at the cell-matrix interface. Here we report the formation of mechanoresponsive, omni-directional and local matrix-degrading actin protrusions in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) microencapsulated in collagen following a shifted actin assembly/disassembly balance. These actin protrusive structures exhibit morphological and compositional similarity to filopodia and invadopodia but differ from them in stability, abundance, signaling and function. Without ruling out the possibility that these structures may comprise special subsets of filopodia and invadopodia, we propose to name them as mechanopodia so as to reveal their mechano-inductive mechanism. We also suggest that more intensive investigations are needed to delineate the functional significance and physiological relevance of these structures. This work identifies a brand new target for cell-matrix interaction and mechanoregulation studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Toll-like receptor 2 activation and serum amyloid A regulate smooth muscle cell extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Stephanie E; Pessolano, Lawrence G; Bishop, Christopher A; Best, Michael; Rich, Celeste B; Stone, Phillip J; Schreiber, Barbara M

    2017-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells contribute to extracellular matrix remodeling during atherogenesis. De-differentiated, synthetic smooth muscle cells are involved in processes of migration, proliferation and changes in expression of extracellular matrix components, all of which contribute to loss of homeostasis accompanying atherogenesis. Elevated levels of acute phase proteins, including serum amyloid A (SAA), are associated with an increased risk for atherosclerosis. Although infection with periodontal and respiratory pathogens via activation of inflammatory cell Toll-like receptor (TLR)2 has been linked to vascular disease, little is known about smooth muscle cell TLR2 in atherosclerosis. This study addresses the role of SAA and TLR2 activation on smooth muscle cell matrix gene expression and insoluble elastin accumulation. Cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells were treated with SAA or TLR2 agonists and the effect on expression of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) and tropoelastin studied. SAA up-regulated MMP9 expression. Tropoelastin is an MMP9 substrate and decreased tropoelastin levels in SAA-treated cells supported the concept of extracellular matrix remodeling. Interestingly, SAA-induced down-regulation of tropoelastin was not only evident at the protein level but at the level of gene transcription as well. Contributions of proteasomes, nuclear factor κ B and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β on regulation of MMP9 vs. tropoleastin expression were revealed. Effects on Mmp9 and Eln mRNA expression persisted with long-term SAA treatment, resulting in decreased insoluble elastin accumulation. Interestingly, the SAA effects were TLR2-dependent and TLR2 activation by bacterial ligands also induced MMP9 expression and decreased tropoelastin expression. These data reveal a novel mechanism whereby SAA and/or infection induce changes in vascular elastin consistent with atherosclerosis.

  12. Mueller matrix imaging and analysis of cancerous cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, A.; Fernández-Luna, J. L.; Moreno, F.; Saiz, J. M.

    2017-08-01

    Imaging polarimetry is a focus of increasing interest in diagnostic medicine because of its non-invasive nature and its potential for recognizing abnormal tissues. However, handling polarimetric images is not an easy task, and different intermediate steps have been proposed to introduce physical parameters that may be helpful to interpret results. In this work, transmission Mueller matrices (MM) corresponding to cancer cell samples have been experimentally obtained, and three different transformations have been applied: MM-Polar Decomposition, MM-Transformation and MM-Differential Decomposition. Special attention has been paid to diattenuation as a sensitive parameter to identify apoptosis processes induced by cisplatin and etoposide.

  13. A thin layer angiogenesis assay: a modified basement matrix assay for assessment of endothelial cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Ashton; Purcell, Robert; Hibbert, Andrew; Latham, Sally; Thomson, Scott; Hall, Wendy L; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2014-12-05

    Basement matrices such as Matrigel™ and Geltrex™ are used in a variety of cell culture assays of anchorage-dependent differentiation including endothelial cell tube formation assays. The volumes of matrix recommended for these assays (approximately 150 μl/cm(2)) are costly, limit working distances for microscopy, and require cell detachment for subsequent molecular analysis. Here we describe the development and validation of a thin-layer angiogenesis (TLA) assay for assessing the angiogenic potential of endothelial cells that overcomes these limitations. Geltrex™ basement matrix at 5 μl/cm(2) in 24-well (10 μl) or 96-well (2 μl) plates supports endothelial cell differentiation into tube-like structures in a comparable manner to the standard larger volumes of matrix. Since working distances are reduced, high-resolution single cell microscopy, including DIC and confocal imaging, can be used readily. Using MitoTracker dye we now demonstrate, for the first time, live mitochondrial dynamics and visualise the 3-dimensional network of mitochondria present in differentiated endothelial cells. Using a standard commercial total RNA extraction kit (Qiagen) we also show direct RNA extraction and RT-qPCR from differentiated endothelial cells without the need to initially detach cells from their supporting matrix. We present here a new thin-layer assay (TLA) for measuring the anchorage-dependent differentiation of endothelial cells into tube-like structures which retains all the characteristics of the traditional approach but with the added benefit of a greatly lowered cost and better compatibility with other techniques, including RT-qPCR and high-resolution microscopy.

  14. Osteoactivin regulates head and neck squamous cell carcinoma invasion by modulating matrix metalloproteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosarena, Oneida A; Barr, Eric W; Thorpe, Ryan; Yankey, Hilary; Tarr, Joseph T; Safadi, Fayez F

    2018-01-01

    Nearly 60% of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) die of metastases or locoregional recurrence. Metastasis is mediated by cancer cell migration and invasion, which are in part dependent on extracellular matrix degradation by matrix metalloproteinases. Osteoactivin (OA) overexpression plays a role in metastases in several malignancies, and has been shown to upregulate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity. To determine how OA modulates MMP expression and activity in HNSCC, and to investigate OA effects on cell invasion, we assessed effects of OA treatment on MMP mRNA and protein expression, as well as gelatinase and caseinolytic activity in HNSCC cell lines. We assessed the effects of OA gene silencing on MMP expression, gelatinase and caseinolytic activity, and cell invasion. OA treatment had differential effects on MMP mRNA expression. OA treatment upregulated MMP-10 expression in UMSCC14a (p = 0.0431) and SCC15 (p < 0.0001) cells, but decreased MMP-9 expression in UMSCC14a cells (p = 0.0002). OA gene silencing decreased MMP-10 expression in UMSCC12 cells (p = 0.0001), and MMP-3 (p = 0.0005) and -9 (p = 0.0036) expression in SCC25 cells. In SCC15 and SCC25 cells, OA treatment increased MMP-2 (p = 0.0408) and MMP-9 gelatinase activity (p < 0.0001), respectively. OA depletion decreased MMP-2 (p = 0.0023) and -9 (p < 0.0001) activity in SCC25 cells. OA treatment increased 70 kDa caseinolytic activity in UMSCC12 cells consistent with tissue type plasminogen activator (p = 0.0078). OA depletion decreased invasive capacity of UMSCC12 cells (p < 0.0001). OA's effects on MMP expression in HNSCC are variable, and may promote cancer cell invasion. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Ionic control of the size of the vesicle matrix of beige mouse mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, M J; Brodwick, M S

    1991-10-01

    Isolated matrices of the giant secretory vesicles of mast cells of the beige mouse were reliably produced by the osmotic lysis of isolated vesicles. These matrices maintained their form, and their sizes were easily measured using Nomarski optics. The size of the matrix depended on the ionic composition of the bathing solution. The physiologically relevant ions, histamine and serotonin, contracted the matrix. Multivalent cations condensed the matrix relative to univalents. Ag+, acid pH (below 5), and basic pH (above 9) expanded the matrix. In the presence of 10 mM histamine, lowering the pH from 9 to 5 contracted the matrix more than can be attributed to the pH-dependent matrix contraction in zero histamine. The nontitratable organic cation, dimethonium, contracts the matrix with little effect of pH in the range of 5-9. These results suggest that histamine acts as a matrix contractor in the divalent form. The dose-response (contraction) relation for histamine was gradual from micromolar to 316 mM (millimolar) histamine. Experiments with mixtures of histamine and sodium show antagonistic effects on the matrix but are inconsistent with either a model where ions compete for identical sites or a parallel model where ions interact with separate independent sites. In vigorous histamine washoff experiments, the half time for vesicle expansion in 10(-4) M pH buffer was approximately 4 s; in isotonic NaCl solution, it was 0.5 s. When 1 M histamine was presented to closely apposed matrices, fusion resulted. The matrix material returned to its initial shape after being mechanically deformed with a glass probe. These results suggest that the matrix size is controlled by its ion exchange properties. The matrix expansion can quantitatively account for the vesicular size increase observed upon exocytosis (as a postfusional event) and the osmotic nonideality of intact vesicles. The mechanical expansion is probably significant in the widening of the exocytotic pore and the dispersal

  16. Discovering cell types in flow cytometry data with random matrix theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yang; Nussenblatt, Robert; Losert, Wolfgang

    Flow cytometry is a widely used experimental technique in immunology research. During the experiments, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from a single patient, labeled with multiple fluorescent stains that bind to different proteins, are illuminated by a laser. The intensity of each stain on a single cell is recorded and reflects the amount of protein expressed by that cell. The data analysis focuses on identifying specific cell types related to a disease. Different cell types can be identified by the type and amount of protein they express. To date, this has most often been done manually by labelling a protein as expressed or not while ignoring the amount of expression. Using a cross correlation matrix of stain intensities, which contains both information on the proteins expressed and their amount, has been largely ignored by researchers as it suffers from measurement noise. Here we present an algorithm to identify cell types in flow cytometry data which uses random matrix theory (RMT) to reduce noise in a cross correlation matrix. We demonstrate our method using a published flow cytometry data set. Compared with previous analysis techniques, we were able to rediscover relevant cell types in an automatic way. Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742.

  17. The Optimization of Matrix Preparation Process and Performance Testing for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A key component in the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC is electrolyte matrix, which provides both ionic conduction and gas sealing. The aim of this work is to investigate the effects of selected operating conditions on the performance of the matrix preparation. Slurries were prepared to produce matrices by the technique of tape casting. The characteristics of the slurries and matrices were examined by laser particle size analyzer, scanning electron microscopy, and BET surface area analyzer. The testing results revealed that a slurry composition with 40 wt.% lithium aluminate was the optimal formulation to produce a good matrix with a pore size distribution of 0.1–0.4 μm and porosity of 50 vol.%. Coarse and fine LiAlO2 particles were added in the matrix slurry to enhance the mechanical strength. Several green sheets were heated and pressed to enhance the bulk density to get a dense matrix of MCFC. Finally, a single MCFC was assembled and tested. The testing results showed the matrix with 40% solid loading gave the maximum discharge current of 20 A at 0.56 V.

  18. Balancing Cell Migration with Matrix Degradation Enhances Gene Delivery to Cells Cultured Three-Dimensionally Within Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Huang, Alyssa; Shikanova, Ariella; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2010-01-01

    In regenerative medicine, hydrogels are employed to fill defects and support the infiltration of cells that can ultimately regenerate tissue. Gene delivery within hydrogels targeting infiltrating cells has the potential to promote tissue formation, but the delivery efficiency of nonviral vectors within hydrogels is low hindering their applicability in tissue regeneration. To improve their functionality, we have conducted a mechanistic study to investigate the contribution of cell migration and matrix degradation on gene delivery. In this report, lipoplexes were entrapped within hydrogels based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) crosslinked with peptides containing matrix metalloproteinase degradable sequences. The mesh size of these hydrogels is substantially less than the size of the entrapped lipoplexes, which can function to retain vectors. Cell migration and transfection were simultaneously measured within hydrogels with varying density of cell adhesion sites (Arg-Gly-Asp peptides) and solids content. Increasing RGD density increased expression levels up to 100-fold, while greater solids content sustained expression levels for 16 days. Increasing RGD density and decreasing solids content increased cell migration, which indicates expression levels increase with increased cell migration. Initially exposing cells to vector resulted in transient expression that declined after 2 days, verifying the requirement of migration to sustain expression. Transfected cells were predominantly located within the population of migrating cells for hydrogels that supported cell migration. Although the small mesh size retained at least 70% of the lipoplexes in the absence of cells after 32 days, the presence of cells decreased retention to 10% after 16 days. These results indicate that vectors retained within hydrogels contact migrating cells, and that persistent cell migration can maintain elevated expression levels. Thus matrix degradation and cell migration are fundamental design

  19. HEPARINS MODULATE EXTRACELLULAR-MATRIX AND PROTEIN-SYNTHESIS OF CULTURED RAT MESANGIAL CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLTHUIS, A; BOES, A; BERDEN, JHM

    Heparins blunt the development of glomerulosclerosis in several disease models in the rat and this protective effect may be related to suppression of glomerular cell proliferation. In this study the direct effect of heparins on another key event in glomerulosclerosis, extracellular matrix (ECM)

  20. Chemically modified tetracyclines stimulate matrix metalloproteinase-s production by periodontal ligament cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bildt, M.M.; Snoek-van Beurden, A.M.P.; Groot, J. de; El, B. van; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Hoff, J.W. van den

    2006-01-01

    Background and Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of chemically modified tetracyclines (CMTs) on the production of gelatinases [matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9] by human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells, and on the activity of recombinant gelatinases.

  1. Decellularized matrix from tumorigenic human mesenchymal stem cells promotes neovascularization with galectin-1 dependent endothelial interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge S Burns

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acquisition of a blood supply is fundamental for extensive tumor growth. We recently described vascular heterogeneity in tumours derived from cell clones of a human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC strain (hMSC-TERT20 immortalized by retroviral vector mediated human telomerase (hTERT gene expression. Histological analysis showed that cells of the most vascularized tumorigenic clone, -BD11 had a pericyte-like alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA+ and CD146+ positive phenotype. Upon serum withdrawal in culture, -BD11 cells formed cord-like structures mimicking capillary morphogenesis. In contrast, cells of the poorly tumorigenic clone, -BC8 did not stain for ASMA, tumours were less vascularized and serum withdrawal in culture led to cell death. By exploring the heterogeneity in hMSC-TERT20 clones we aimed to understand molecular mechanisms by which mesenchymal stem cells may promote neovascularization. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Quantitative qRT-PCR analysis revealed similar mRNA levels for genes encoding the angiogenic cytokines VEGF and Angiopoietin-1 in both clones. However, clone-BD11 produced a denser extracellular matrix that supported stable ex vivo capillary morphogenesis of human endothelial cells and promoted in vivo neovascularization. Proteomic characterization of the -BD11 decellularized matrix identified 50 extracellular angiogenic proteins, including galectin-1. siRNA knock down of galectin-1 expression abrogated the ex vivo interaction between decellularized -BD11 matrix and endothelial cells. More stable shRNA knock down of galectin-1 expression did not prevent -BD11 tumorigenesis, but greatly reduced endothelial migration into -BD11 cell xenografts. CONCLUSIONS: Decellularized hMSC matrix had significant angiogenic potential with at least 50 angiogenic cell surface and extracellular proteins, implicated in attracting endothelial cells, their adhesion and activation to form tubular structures. hMSC -BD11 surface galectin-1

  2. Interactions of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiovascular progenitor cells with immobilized extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jizhen; Kaestle, Katrin; Huang, Jijun; Liu, Qiao; Zhang, Peng; Gao, Ling; Gardiner, James; Thissen, Helmut; Yang, Huang-Tian

    2017-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiovascular progenitor cells (hESC-CVPCs) hold great promise for cell-based therapies of heart diseases. However, little is known about their niche microenvironment and in particular the required extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Here we screened combinations of surface-immobilized ECM proteins to identify substrates that support the attachment and survival of hESC-CVPCs. Covalent immobilization of ECM proteins laminin (Lm), fibronectin (Fn), collagen I (CI), collagen III (CIII), and collagen IV (CIV) in multiple combinations and concentrations was achieved by reductive amination on transparent acetaldehyde plasma polymer (AAPP) interlayer coatings. We identified that CI, CIII, CIV, and Fn and their combinations were important for hESC-CVPC attachment and survival, while Lm was dispensable. Moreover, for coatings displaying single ECM proteins, CI and CIII performed better than CIV and Fn, while coatings displaying the combined ECM proteins CIII + CIV and Fn + CIII + CIV at 100 µg/mL were comparable to Matrigel in regard to supporting hESC-CVPC attachment and viability. Our results identify ECM proteins required for hESC-CVPCs and demonstrate that coatings displaying multiple immobilized ECM proteins offer a suitable microenvironment for the attachment and survival of hESC-CVPCs. This knowledge contributes to the development of approaches for maintaining hESC-CVPCs and therefore to advances in cardiovascular regeneration. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1094-1104, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Diet-induced obesity regulates adipose-resident stromal cell quantity and extracellular matrix gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Pincu, Yair; Huntsman, Heather D.; Zou, Kai; De Lisio, Michael; Ziad S. Mahmassani; Michael R. Munroe; Garg, Koyal; Jensen, Tor; Boppart, Marni D.

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue expansion during periods of excess nutrient intake requires significant turnover of the extracellular matrix (ECM) to allow for maximal lipid filling. Recent data suggest that stromal cells may be a primary contributor to ECM modifications in visceral adipose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the capacity for high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity to alter adipose-derived stromal cell (ADSC) relative quantity and ECM gene expression, and determine the extent to which e...

  4. Mechanical phenotyping of cells and extracellular matrix as grade and stage markers of lung tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzetta, Valeria; Musella, Ida; Rapa, Ida; Volante, Marco; Netti, Paolo A; Fusco, Sabato

    2017-07-15

    The mechanical cross-talk between cells and the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) regulates the properties, functions and healthiness of the tissues. When this is disturbed it changes the mechanical state of the tissue components, singularly or together, and cancer, along with other diseases, may start and progress. However, the bi-univocal mechanical interplay between cells and the ECM is still not properly understood. In this study we show how a microrheology technique gives us the opportunity to evaluate the mechanics of cells and the ECM at the same time. The mechanical phenotyping was performed on the surgically removed tissues of 10 patients affected by adenocarcinoma of the lung. A correlation between the mechanics and the grade and stage of the tumor was reported and compared to the mechanical characteristics of the healthy tissue. Our findings suggest a sort of asymmetric modification of the mechanical properties of the cells and the extra-cellular matrix in the tumor, being the more compliant cell even though it resides in a stiffer matrix. Overall, the simultaneous mechanical characterization of the tissues constituents (cells and ECM) provided new support for diagnosis and offered alternative points of analysis for cancer mechanobiology. When the integrity of the mechanical cross-talk between cells and the extra-cellular matrix is disturbed cancer, along with other diseases, may initiate and progress. Here, we show how a new technique gives the opportunity to evaluate the mechanics of cells and the ECM at the same time. It was applied on surgically removed tissues of 10 patients affected by adenocarcinoma of the lung and a correlation between the mechanics and the grade and stage of the tumor was reported and compared to the mechanical characteristics of the healthy tissue. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Matrix stiffness regulates endothelial cell proliferation through septin 9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ting Yeh

    Full Text Available Endothelial proliferation, which is an important process in vascular homeostasis, can be regulated by the extracellular microenvironment. In this study we demonstrated that proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs was enhanced on hydrogels with high stiffness (HSG, 21.5 kPa in comparison to those with low stiffness (LSG, 1.72 kPa. ECs on HSG showed markedly prominent stress fibers and a higher RhoA activity than ECs on LSG. Blockade of RhoA attenuated stress fiber formation and proliferation of ECs on HSG, but had little effect on ECs on LSG; enhancement of RhoA had opposite effects. The phosphorylations of Src and Vav2, which are positive RhoA upstream effectors, were higher in ECs on HSG. The inhibition of Src/Vav2 attenuated the HSG-mediated RhoA activation and EC proliferation but exhibited nominal effects on ECs on LSG. Septin 9 (SEPT9, the negative upstream effector for RhoA, was significantly higher in ECs on LSG. The inhibition of SEPT9 increased RhoA activation, Src/Vav2 phosphorylations, and EC proliferation on LSG, but showed minor effects on ECs on HSG. We further demonstrated that the inactivation of integrin α(vβ(3 caused an increase of SEPT9 expression in ECs on HSG to attenuate Src/Vav2 phosphorylations and inhibit RhoA-dependent EC proliferation. These results demonstrate that the SEPT9/Src/Vav2/RhoA pathway constitutes an important molecular mechanism for the mechanical regulation of EC proliferation.

  6. In vitro enhancement of extracellular matrix formation as natural bioscaffold for stem cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naroeni, Aroem; Shalihah, Qonitha; Meilany, Sofy

    2017-02-01

    Growing cells in plastic with liquid media for in vitro study is very common but far from physiological. The use of scaffold materials is more biocompatible. Extracellular matrix provides tissue integrity which acts as a native scaffold for cell attachment and interaction, as well as it serves as a reservoir for growth factors. For this reason, we have developed natural scaffold from mice fibroblast to form a natural scaffold for stem cell culture. Fibroblasts were cultured under crowded condition and lysed to form natural scaffold. The natural scaffold formation was observed using immunofluorescence which then will be used and tested for stem cell propagation and differentiation.

  7. RGD-Dependent Epithelial Cell-Matrix Interactions in the Human Intestinal Crypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick D. Benoit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between the extracellular matrix (ECM and integrin receptors trigger structural and functional bonds between the cell microenvironment and the cytoskeleton. Such connections are essential for adhesion structure integrity and are key players in regulating transduction of specific intracellular signals, which in turn regulate the organization of the cell microenvironment and, consequently, cell function. The RGD peptide-dependent integrins represent a key subgroup of ECM receptors involved in the maintenance of epithelial homeostasis. Here we review recent findings on RGD-dependent ECM-integrin interactions and their roles in human intestinal epithelial crypt cells.

  8. Matrix composition regulates three-dimensional network formation by endothelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells in collagen/fibrin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rameshwar R; Peterson, Alexis W; Ceccarelli, Jacob; Putnam, Andrew J; Stegemann, Jan P

    2012-06-01

    Co-cultures of endothelial cells (EC) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in three-dimensional (3D) protein hydrogels can be used to recapitulate aspects of vasculogenesis in vitro. MSC provide paracrine signals that stimulate EC to form vessel-like structures, which mature as the MSC transition to the role of mural cells. In this study, vessel-like network formation was studied using 3D collagen/fibrin (COL/FIB) matrices seeded with embedded EC and MSC and cultured for 7 days. The EC:MSC ratio was varied from 5:1, 3:2, 1:1, 2:3 and 1:5. The matrix composition was varied at COL/FIB compositions of 100/0 (pure COL), 60/40, 50/50, 40/60 and 0/100 (pure FIB). Vasculogenesis was markedly decreased in the highest EC:MSC ratio, relative to the other cell ratios. Network formation increased with increasing fibrin content in composite materials, although the 40/60 COL/FIB and pure fibrin materials exhibited the same degree of vasculogenesis. EC and MSC were co-localized in vessel-like structures after 7 days and total cell number increased by approximately 70%. Mechanical property measurements showed an inverse correlation between matrix stiffness and network formation. The effect of matrix stiffness was further investigated using gels made with varying total protein content and by crosslinking the matrix using the dialdehyde glyoxal. This systematic series of studies demonstrates that matrix composition regulates vasculogenesis in 3D protein hydrogels, and further suggests that this effect may be caused by matrix mechanical properties. These findings have relevance to the study of neovessel formation and the development of strategies to promote vascularization in transplanted tissues.

  9. Study on the Preparation Process and Influential Factors of Large Area Environment-friendly Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiyun; Xu, Shisen; Cheng, Jian; Wang, Hongjian; Ren, Yongqiang

    2017-07-01

    Low-cost and high-performance matrix materials used in mass production of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) were prepared by automatic casting machine with α-LiAlO2 powder material synthesized by gel-solid method, and distilled water as solvent. The single cell was assembled for generating test, and the good performance of the matrix was verified. The paper analyzed the factors affecting aqueous tape casting matrix preparation, such as solvent content, dispersant content, milling time, blade height and casting machine running speed, providing a solid basis for the mass production of large area environment-friendly matrix used in molten carbonate fuel cell.

  10. A 3D printed nano bone matrix for characterization of breast cancer cell and osteoblast interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Castro, Nathan J.; Cui, Haitao; Zhou, Xuan; Boualam, Benchaa; McGrane, Robert; Glazer, Robert I.; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-08-01

    Bone metastasis is one of the most prevalent complications of late-stage breast cancer, in which the native bone matrix components, including osteoblasts, are intimately involved in tumor progression. The development of a successful in vitro model would greatly facilitate understanding the underlying mechanism of breast cancer bone invasion as well as provide a tool for effective discovery of novel therapeutic strategies. In the current study, we fabricated a series of in vitro bone matrices composed of a polyethylene glycol hydrogel and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite of varying concentrations to mimic the native bone microenvironment for the investigation of breast cancer bone metastasis. A stereolithography-based three-dimensional (3D) printer was used to fabricate the bone matrices with precisely controlled architecture. The interaction between breast cancer cells and osteoblasts was investigated in the optimized bone matrix. Using a Transwell® system to separate the two cell lines, breast cancer cells inhibited osteoblast proliferation, while osteoblasts stimulated breast cancer cell growth, whereas, both cell lines increased IL-8 secretion. Breast cancer cells co-cultured with osteoblasts within the 3D bone matrix formed multi-cellular spheroids in comparison to two-dimensional monolayers. These findings validate the use of our 3D printed bone matrices as an in vitro metastasis model, and highlights their potential for investigating breast cancer bone metastasis.

  11. In vitro characterization of cancer cell morphology, chemokinesis, and matrix invasion using a novel microfabricated system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, Laura

    A diagnosis of metastatic cancer reduces a patient's 5-year survival rate by nearly 80% compared to a primary tumor diagnosed at an early stage. While gene expression arrays have revealed unique gene signatures for metastatic cancer cells, we are lacking an understanding of the tangible physical changes that distinguish metastatic tumor cells from each other and from their related primary tumors. At the fundamental level, this translates into first characterizing the phenotype of metastatic cancer cells in vitro both in 2D - looking at morphology and migration - and in 3D - focusing on matrix invasion. While 2D in vitro studies have provided insight into the effects of specific environmental conditions on specific cancer cell lines, the unique details included in each experimental design make it challenging to compare cell phenotype across different in vitro platforms as well as between laboratories and disciplines that share the goal of understanding cancer. While 3D phenotype studies have employed more standardized and ubiquitous assays, most available tools lack the imaging capability and geometry to effectively characterize all factors driving 3D matrix invasion. In this work, we present protocols and platforms aimed at addressing the problems identified in the tools currently available for studying metastatic cancer in vitro. First, we present a 2D study of morphology and migration using widely accepted protocols. The study is applied to characterizing phenotypes of three breast cancer cell lines with different metastatic organ tropisms. The results show that general populations of cells from each of the 3 lines are unique in shape and motility despite being derived from the same tumor line and that the observed phenotype differences may be related to differences in focal adhesion assembly. More broadly, these studies suggest that standardizing phenotype studies using commonly available techniques may provide a platform by which to compare phenotypic studies

  12. Mathematical model of water transport in Bacon and alkaline matrix-type hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopius, P. R.; Easter, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Based on general mass continuity and diffusive transport equations, a mathematical model was developed that simulates the transport of water in Bacon and alkaline-matrix fuel cells. The derived model was validated by using it to analytically reproduce various Bacon and matrix-cell experimental water transport transients.

  13. Injectable in situ crosslinkable RGD-modified alginate matrix for endothelial cells delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidarra, Sílvia J; Barrias, Cristina C; Fonseca, Keila B; Barbosa, Mário A; Soares, Raquel A; Granja, Pedro L

    2011-11-01

    Cell-based therapies offer an attractive approach for revascularization and regeneration of tissues. However, and despite the pressing clinical needs for effective revascularization strategies, the successful immobilization of viable vascular cells within 3D matrices has been difficult to achieve. In this paper the in vitro potential of a natural, injectable RGD-alginate hydrogel as an in situ forming matrix to deliver endothelial cells was evaluated. Several techniques were employed to investigate how these microenvironments could influence the behavior of vascular cells, namely their ability to promote the outward migration of viable, proliferative cells, retaining the ability to form a 3D arrangement. Cells within RGD-grafted alginate hydrogel were able to proliferate and maintained 80% of viability for at least 48 h post-immobilization. Additionally, entrapped cells created a 3D organization into cellular networks and, when put in contact with matrigel, cells migrated out of the RGD-matrix. Overall, the obtained results support the idea that the RGD peptides conjugated to alginate provide a 3D environment for endothelial cells adhesion, survival, migration and organization. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The contribution of the extracellular matrix to gravisensing in characean cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, R.; Staves, M. P.; Leopold, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    The cell-extracellular matrix junction, which includes the cell wall and the outer surface of the plasma membrane, may be an essential region for the perception of gravity by the internodal cells of Chara corallina. Typically, when an internodal cell is oriented vertically, the downwardly directed cytoplasmic stream travels at a velocity that is 10% faster than that of the upwardly directed stream. However when the cells are treated with impermeant hydrolytic enzymes that partially digest cellulose or hemicellulose, the cells lose their ability to respond to gravity even though streaming continues. By contrast, enzymes that digest pectins have no effect on the gravity-induced polarity of cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, gravisensing is sensitive to protease treatment; Proteinase K, thermolysin and collagenase but not trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin or carboxypeptidase B, inhibit gravisensing. These findings indicate that proteins in the cell-extracellular matrix junction may be required for gravisensing. Moreover, the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) inhibits gravisensing in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating that the gravireceptor may be an integrin-like protein. The macromolecules necessary for gravisensing have been localized to the cell ends. As a consequence of the exoplasmic site of action of the enzymes and the tetrapeptides, we interpret the results to mean that they are acting on the gravireceptor, although we cannot eliminate the possibility that they are acting on the signal transduction chain. On the whole, our observations indicate that the cell-extracellular matrix junction is a sine qua non for graviperception in statolith-free Chara internodal cells and we suggest that the gravireceptor is located in this region.

  15. Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into neuronal cells on fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix as a tissue engineered nerve scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuping; Wang, Jiao; Ling, Shixin; Li, Zhuo; Li, Mingsheng; Li, Qiongyi; Ma, Zongren; Yu, Sijiu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix as a scaffold for supporting the differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into neural cells following induction with neural differentiation medium. We performed long-term, continuous observation of cell morphology, growth, differentiation, and neuronal development using several microscopy techniques in conjunction with immunohistochemistry. We examined specific neuronal proteins and Nissl bodies involved in the differentiation process in order to determine the neuronal differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The results show that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells that differentiate on fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix display neuronal morphology with unipolar and bi/multipolar neurite elongations that express neuronal-specific proteins, including βIII tubulin. The bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells grown on fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix and induced for long periods of time with neural differentiation medium differentiated into a multilayered neural network-like structure with long nerve fibers that was composed of several parallel microfibers and neuronal cells, forming a complete neural circuit with dendrite-dendrite to axon-dendrite to dendrite-axon synapses. In addition, growth cones with filopodia were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Paraffin sectioning showed differentiated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with the typical features of neuronal phenotype, such as a large, round nucleus and a cytoplasm full of Nissl bodies. The data suggest that the biological scaffold fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix is capable of supporting human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into functional neurons and the subsequent formation of tissue engineered nerve. PMID:25598779

  16. Adaptive rheology and ordering of cell cytoskeleton govern matrix rigidity sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mukund; Sarangi, Bibhu Ranjan; Deschamps, Joran; Nematbakhsh, Yasaman; Callan-Jones, Andrew; Margadant, Felix; Mège, René-Marc; Lim, Chwee Teck; Voituriez, Raphaël; Ladoux, Benoît

    2015-06-25

    Matrix rigidity sensing regulates a large variety of cellular processes and has important implications for tissue development and disease. However, how cells probe matrix rigidity, and hence respond to it, remains unclear. Here, we show that rigidity sensing and adaptation emerge naturally from actin cytoskeleton remodelling. Our in vitro experiments and theoretical modelling demonstrate a biphasic rheology of the actin cytoskeleton, which transitions from fluid on soft substrates to solid on stiffer ones. Furthermore, we find that increasing substrate stiffness correlates with the emergence of an orientational order in actin stress fibres, which exhibit an isotropic to nematic transition that we characterize quantitatively in the framework of active matter theory. These findings imply mechanisms mediated by a large-scale reinforcement of actin structures under stress, which could be the mechanical drivers of substrate stiffness-dependent cell shape changes and cell polarity.

  17. Effect of matrix stiffness on the proliferation and differentiation of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells.

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    Xu, Juanjuan; Sun, Meiyu; Tan, Ye; Wang, Haowei; Wang, Heping; Li, Pengdong; Xu, Ziran; Xia, Yuhan; Li, Lisha; Li, Yulin

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a compatible cellular alternative for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering because of their powerful multipotency. Matrix stiffness plays a profound role on stem cell behavior. Nevertheless, the effect of matrix stiffness on umbilical cordmesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) remains unexplored. To conduct an in-depth exploration, we cultured UC-MSCs on different stiffness (Young's modulus: 13-16, 35-38, 48-53, and 62-68 kPa) polyacrylamide gels coated with fibronectin. We found that the proliferation and adhesion of UC-MSCs varied when cultured on the different matrices, and the spreading capacity was stronger as the stiffness increased (*Pmatrix promoted adipogenic differentiation, with higher expression levels of adipocytic markers like PPARγ and C/EBPα (*Pmatrix, which was validated by increased expression of myogenic makers like desminand MOYG (*Pmatrix. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Matrix elasticity, replicative senescence and DNA methylation patterns of mesenchymal stem cells.

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    Schellenberg, Anne; Joussen, Sylvia; Moser, Kristin; Hampe, Nico; Hersch, Nils; Hemeda, Hatim; Schnitker, Jan; Denecke, Bernd; Lin, Qiong; Pallua, Norbert; Zenke, Martin; Merkel, Rudolf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2014-08-01

    Matrix elasticity guides differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) but it is unclear if these effects are only transient - while the cells reside on the substrate - or if they reflect persistent lineage commitment. In this study, MSCs were continuously culture-expanded in parallel either on tissue culture plastic (TCP) or on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) gels of different elasticity to compare impact on replicative senescence, in vitro differentiation, gene expression, and DNA methylation (DNAm) profiles. The maximal number of cumulative population doublings was not affected by matrix elasticity. Differentiation towards adipogenic and osteogenic lineage was increased on soft and rigid biomaterials, respectively - but this propensity was no more evident if cells were transferred to TCP. Global gene expression profiles and DNAm profiles revealed relatively few differences in MSCs cultured on soft or rigid matrices. Furthermore, only moderate DNAm changes were observed upon culture on very soft hydrogels of human platelet lysate. Our results support the notion that matrix elasticity influences cellular behavior while the cells reside on the substrate, but it does not have major impact on cell-intrinsic lineage determination, replicative senescence or DNAm patterns. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Alterations in Cell-Extracellular Matrix Interactions during Progression of Cancers

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    Rajeswari Jinka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer progression is a multistep process during which normal cells exhibit molecular changes that culminate into the highly malignant and metastatic phenotype, observed in cancerous tissues. The initiation of cell transformation is generally associated with genetic alterations in normal cells that lead to the loss of intercellular- and/or extracellular-matrix- (ECM- mediated cell adhesion. Transformed cells undergo rapid multiplication and generate more modifications in adhesion and motility-related molecules which allow them to escape from the original site and acquire invasive characteristics. Integrins, which are multifunctional adhesion receptors, and are present, on normal as well as transformed cells, assist the cells undergoing tumor progression in creating the appropriate environment for their survival, growth, and invasion. In this paper, we have briefly discussed the role of ECM proteins and integrins during cancer progression and described some unique conditions where adhesion-related changes could induce genetic mutations in anchorage-independent tumor model systems.

  20. Cell-mediated fibre recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

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    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices, we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibres, and bulk contraction of the material. Increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation; however, increasing fibre stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation for certain network architectures. Lower fibre stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibres, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signalling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fibre recruitment as a previously undescribed mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices.

  1. Promotion of Hepatic Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Decellularized Cell-Deposited Extracellular Matrix

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    Hongliang He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between stem cells and extracellular matrix (ECM are requisite for inducing lineage-specific differentiation and maintaining biological functions of mesenchymal stem cells by providing a composite set of chemical and structural signals. Here we investigated if cell-deposited ECM mimicked in vivo liver's stem cell microenvironment and facilitated hepatogenic maturation. Decellularization process preserved the fibrillar microstructure and a mix of matrix proteins in cell-deposited ECM, such as type I collagen, type III collagen, fibronectin, and laminin that were identical to those found in native liver. Compared with the cells on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs cultured on cell-deposited ECM showed a spindle-like shape, a robust proliferative capacity, and a suppressed level of intracellular reactive oxygen species, accompanied with upregulation of two superoxide dismutases. Hepatocyte-like cells differentiated from BM-MSCs on ECM were determined with a more intensive staining of glycogen storage, an elevated level of urea biosynthesis, and higher expressions of hepatocyte-specific genes in contrast to those on TCPS. These results demonstrate that cell-deposited ECM can be an effective method to facilitate hepatic maturation of BM-MSCs and promote stem-cell-based liver regenerative medicine.

  2. Matrix production and organization by endothelial colony forming cells in mechanically strained engineered tissue constructs.

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    Nicky de Jonge

    Full Text Available AIMS: Tissue engineering is an innovative method to restore cardiovascular tissue function by implanting either an in vitro cultured tissue or a degradable, mechanically functional scaffold that gradually transforms into a living neo-tissue by recruiting tissue forming cells at the site of implantation. Circulating endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs are capable of differentiating into endothelial cells as well as a mesenchymal ECM-producing phenotype, undergoing Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal-transition (EndoMT. We investigated the potential of ECFCs to produce and organize ECM under the influence of static and cyclic mechanical strain, as well as stimulation with transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1. METHODS AND RESULTS: A fibrin-based 3D tissue model was used to simulate neo-tissue formation. Extracellular matrix organization was monitored using confocal laser-scanning microscopy. ECFCs produced collagen and also elastin, but did not form an organized matrix, except when cultured with TGFβ1 under static strain. Here, collagen was aligned more parallel to the strain direction, similar to Human Vena Saphena Cell-seeded controls. Priming ECFC with TGFβ1 before exposing them to strain led to more homogenous matrix production. CONCLUSIONS: Biochemical and mechanical cues can induce extracellular matrix formation by ECFCs in tissue models that mimic early tissue formation. Our findings suggest that priming with bioactives may be required to optimize neo-tissue development with ECFCs and has important consequences for the timing of stimuli applied to scaffold designs for both in vitro and in situ cardiovascular tissue engineering. The results obtained with ECFCs differ from those obtained with other cell sources, such as vena saphena-derived myofibroblasts, underlining the need for experimental models like ours to test novel cell sources for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

  3. Very high cell density perfusion of CHO cells anchored in a non-woven matrix-based bioreactor.

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    Zhang, Ye; Stobbe, Per; Silvander, Christian Orrego; Chotteau, Véronique

    2015-11-10

    Recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells producing IgG monoclonal antibody were cultivated in a novel perfusion culture system CellTank, integrating the bioreactor and the cell retention function. In this system, the cells were harbored in a non-woven polyester matrix perfused by the culture medium and immersed in a reservoir. Although adapted to suspension, the CHO cells stayed entrapped in the matrix. The cell-free medium was efficiently circulated from the reservoir into- and through the matrix by a centrifugal pump placed at the bottom of the bioreactor resulting in highly homogenous concentrations of the nutrients and metabolites in the whole system as confirmed by measurements from different sampling locations. A real-time biomass sensor using the dielectric properties of living cells was used to measure the cell density. The performances of the CellTank were studied in three perfusion runs. A very high cell density measured as 200 pF/cm (where 1 pF/cm is equivalent to 1 × 10(6)viable cells/mL) was achieved at a perfusion rate of 10 reactor volumes per day (RV/day) in the first run. In the second run, the effect of cell growth arrest by hypothermia at temperatures lowered gradually from 37 °C to 29 °C was studied during 13 days at cell densities above 100 pF/cm. Finally a production run was performed at high cell densities, where a temperature shift to 31 °C was applied at cell density 100 pF/cm during a production period of 14 days in minimized feeding conditions. The IgG concentrations were comparable in the matrix and in the harvest line in all the runs, indicating no retention of the product of interest. The cell specific productivity was comparable or higher than in Erlenmeyer flask batch culture. During the production run, the final harvested IgG production was 35 times higher in the CellTank compared to a repeated batch culture in the same vessel volume during the same time period. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  4. The Role of Titanium Surface Microtopography on Adhesion, Proliferation, Transformation, and Matrix Deposition of Corneal Cells.

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    Zhou, Chengxin; Lei, Fengyang; Chodosh, James; Paschalis, Eleftherios I

    2016-04-01

    Titanium (Ti) is an excellent implantable biomaterial that can be further enhanced by surface topography optimization. Despite numerous data from orthopedics and dentistry, the effect of Ti surface topography on ocular cells is still poorly understood. In light of the recent adaptation of Ti in the Boston Keratoprosthesis artificial cornea, we attempted to perform an extended evaluation of the effect of Ti surface topography on corneal cell adhesion, proliferation, cytotoxicity, transformation, and matrix deposition. Different surface topographies were generated on medical grade Ti-6Al-4V-ELI (extra-low interstitial), with linearly increased roughness (polished to grit blasted). Biological response was evaluated in vitro using human corneal limbal epithelial (HCLE) cells, stromal fibroblasts (HCF), and endothelial cells (HCEnC). None of the Ti surface topographies caused cytotoxicity to any of the three corneal cell types. However, rough Ti surface inhibited HCLE and HCF cell adhesion and proliferation, while HCEnC proliferation was unaffected. Long-term experiments with HCF revealed that rough Ti surface with R(a) (the arithmetic average of the profile height from the mean line) ≥ 1.15 μm suppressed HCF focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation, changed fibroblast morphology, and caused less aligned and reduced deposition of collagen matrix as compared to smooth Ti (R(a) ≤ 0.08 μm). In the presence of transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) stimulation, rough Ti inhibited alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression and collagen deposition, leading to decreased myofibroblast transformation and disorganization of the collagen fibrils as compared to smooth Ti. This study suggests that Ti surface topography regulates corneal cell behavior in a tissue-dependent manner that varies across the corneal strata. Contrary to the accepted paradigm, smooth surface topography can enhance cell adhesion and proliferation and increase matrix deposition by corneal cells.

  5. Directing the osteoblastic and chondrocytic differentiations of mesenchymal stem cells: matrix vs. induction media

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    He, Jing; Guo, Jianglong; Jiang, Bo; Yao, Ruijuan; Wu, Yao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract While both induction culture media and matrix have been reported to regulate the stem cell fate, little is known about which factor plays a more decisive role in directing the MSC differentiation lineage as well as the underlying mechanisms. To this aim, we seeded MSCs on HA-collagen and HA-synthetic hydrogel matrixes, which had demonstrated highly different potentials toward osteoblastic and chondrocytic differentiation lineages, respectively, and cultured them with osteogenic, chondrogenic and normal culture media, respectively. A systematic comparison has been carried out on the effects of induction media and matrix on MSC adhesion, cytoskeleton organization, proliferation, and in particular differentiation into the osteoblastic and chondrocytic lineages. The results demonstrated that the matrix selection had a much more profound effect on directing the differentiation lineage than the induction media did. The strong modulation effect on the transcription activities might be the critical factor contributing to the above observations in our study, where canonical Wnt-β-Catenin signal pathway was directly involved in the matrix-driven osteoblastic differentiation. Such findings not only provide a critical insight on natural cellular events leading to the osteoblastic and chondrocytic differentiations, but also have important implications in biomaterial design for tissue engineering applications. PMID:29026640

  6. Rigid matrix supports osteogenic differentiation of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED).

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    Viale-Bouroncle, Sandra; Gosau, Martin; Küpper, Kevin; Möhl, Christoph; Brockhoff, Gero; Reichert, Torsten E; Schmalz, Gottfried; Ettl, Tobias; Morsczeck, Christian

    2012-12-01

    Stem cell fate can be induced by the grade of stiffness of the extracellular matrix, depending on the developed tissue or complex tissues. For example, a rigid extracellular matrix induces the osteogenic differentiation in bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), while a softer surface induces the osteogenic differentiation in dental follicle cells (DFCs). To determine whether differentiation of ectomesenchymal dental precursor cells is supported by similar grades of extracellular matrices (ECMs) stiffness, we examined the influence of the surface stiffness on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED). Cell proliferation of SHED was significantly decreased on cell culture surfaces with a muscle-like stiffness. A dexamethasone-based differentiation medium induced the osteogenic differentiation of SHED on substrates of varying mechanical stiffness. Here, the hardest surface improved the induction of osteogenic differentiation in comparison to that with the softest stiffness. In conclusion, our study showed that the osteogenic differentiation of ectomesenchymal dental precursor cells SHED and DFCs are not supported by similar grades of ECM stiffness. Copyright © 2012 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain) enhances human tongue carcinoma cells gelatinase production, migration and metastasis formation.

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    Laaksonen, Matti; Suojanen, Juho; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Läärä, Esa; Sorsa, Timo; Salo, Tuula

    2008-08-01

    Enamel matrix derivative Emdogain (EMD) is widely used in periodontal treatment to regenerate lost connective tissue and to improve the attachment of the teeth. Gelatinases (MMP-2 and -9) have an essential role in the promotion and progression of oral cancer growth and metastasis formation. We studied the effects of EMD on human tongue squamous cell carcinoma (HSC-3) cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, EMD (100 microg/ml and 200 microg/ml) remarkably induced the MMP-2 and -9 production from HSC-3 cells analysed by zymography and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. EMD also slightly induced the MMP-2 and -9 production from benign human mucosal keratinocytes (HMK). Furthermore, EMD clearly induced the transmigration of HSC-3 cells but had no effect on the HMK migration in transwell assays. The in vitro wound closure of HSC-3 cells was notably accelerated by EMD, whereas it had only minor effect on the wound closure of HMKs. The migration of both cell lines was inhibited by a selective cyclic anti-gelatinolytic peptide CTT-2. EMD had no effect on HSC-3 cell proliferation or apoptosis and only a limited effect on cell attachment to various extracellular matrix components. The in vivo mice experiment revealed that EMD substantially induced HSC-3 xenograft metastasis formation. Our results suggest that the use of EMD for patients with oral mucosal carcinomas or premalignant lesions should be carefully considered, possibly avoided.

  8. c-Myb regulates matrix metalloproteinases 1/9, and cathepsin D: implications for matrix-dependent breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis

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    Knopfová Lucia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The c-Myb transcription factor is essential for the maintenance of stem-progenitor cells in bone marrow, colon epithelia, and neurogenic niches. c-Myb malfunction contributes to several types of malignancies including breast cancer. However, the function of c-Myb in the metastatic spread of breast tumors remains unexplored. In this study, we report a novel role of c-Myb in the control of specific proteases that regulate the matrix-dependent invasion of breast cancer cells. Results Ectopically expressed c-Myb enhanced migration and ability of human MDA-MB-231 and mouse 4T1 mammary cancer cells to invade Matrigel but not the collagen I matrix in vitro. c-Myb strongly increased the expression/activity of cathepsin D and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP 9 and significantly downregulated MMP1. The gene coding for cathepsin D was suggested as the c-Myb-responsive gene and downstream effector of the migration-promoting function of c-Myb. Finally, we demonstrated that c-Myb delayed the growth of mammary tumors in BALB/c mice and affected the metastatic potential of breast cancer cells in an organ-specific manner. Conclusions This study identified c-Myb as a matrix-dependent regulator of invasive behavior of breast cancer cells.

  9. c-Myb regulates matrix metalloproteinases 1/9, and cathepsin D: implications for matrix-dependent breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The c-Myb transcription factor is essential for the maintenance of stem-progenitor cells in bone marrow, colon epithelia, and neurogenic niches. c-Myb malfunction contributes to several types of malignancies including breast cancer. However, the function of c-Myb in the metastatic spread of breast tumors remains unexplored. In this study, we report a novel role of c-Myb in the control of specific proteases that regulate the matrix-dependent invasion of breast cancer cells. Results Ectopically expressed c-Myb enhanced migration and ability of human MDA-MB-231 and mouse 4T1 mammary cancer cells to invade Matrigel but not the collagen I matrix in vitro. c-Myb strongly increased the expression/activity of cathepsin D and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 and significantly downregulated MMP1. The gene coding for cathepsin D was suggested as the c-Myb-responsive gene and downstream effector of the migration-promoting function of c-Myb. Finally, we demonstrated that c-Myb delayed the growth of mammary tumors in BALB/c mice and affected the metastatic potential of breast cancer cells in an organ-specific manner. Conclusions This study identified c-Myb as a matrix-dependent regulator of invasive behavior of breast cancer cells. PMID:22439866

  10. Reproductive stem cell differentiation: extracellular matrix, tissue microenvironment, and growth factors direct the mesenchymal stem cell lineage commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidane, Atanásio S; Zomer, Helena D; Oliveira, Bruna M M; Guimarães, Carina F; Fernandes, Cláudia B; Perecin, Felipe; Silva, Luciano A; Miglino, Maria A; Meirelles, Flávio V; Ambrósio, Carlos E

    2013-10-01

    The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have awakened interest in regenerative medicine due to its high capability to proliferate and differentiate in multiple specialized lineages under defined conditions. The reproductive system is considered a valuable source of MSCs, which needs further investigations. Many factors have been reported as critical for these cell lineage specification and determination. In this review, we discuss the main effects of extracellular matrix or tissue environment and growth factors in the cell lineage commitment, including the reproductive stem cells. The MSCs responses to culture medium stimuli or to soluble factors probably occur through several intracellular activation pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms in which the cells respond to these mechanical or chemical perturbations remain elusive. Recent findings suggest a synergic effect of microenvironment and soluble cell culture factors affecting cell differentiation. For future applications in cell therapy, protocols of reproductive MSCs differentiation must be established.

  11. Crosslinking of extracellular matrix scaffolds derived from pluripotent stem cell aggregates modulates neural differentiation.

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    Sart, Sébastien; Yan, Yuanwei; Li, Yan; Lochner, Eric; Zeng, Changchun; Ma, Teng; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    At various developmental stages, pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) and their progeny secrete a large amount of extracellular matrices (ECMs) which could interact with regulatory growth factors to modulate stem cell lineage commitment. ECMs derived from PSC can be used as unique scaffolds that provide broad signaling capacities to mediate cellular differentiation. However, the rapid degradation of ECMs can impact their applications as the scaffolds for in vitro cell expansion and in vivo transplantation. To address this issue, this study investigated the effects of crosslinking on the ECMs derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and the regulatory capacity of the crosslinked ECMs on the proliferation and differentiation of reseeded ESC-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs). To create different biological cues, undifferentiated aggregates, spontaneous embryoid bodies, and ESC-derived NPC aggregates were decellularized. The derived ECMs were crosslinked using genipin or glutaraldehyde to enhance the scaffold stability. ESC-derived NPC aggregates were reseeded on different ECM scaffolds and differential cellular compositions of neural progenitors, neurons, and glial cells were observed. The results indicate that ESC-derived ECM scaffolds affect neural differentiation through intrinsic biological cues and biophysical properties. These scaffolds have potential for in vitro cell culture and in vivo tissue regeneration study. Dynamic interactions of acellular extracellular matrices and stem cells are critical for lineage-specific commitment and tissue regeneration. Understanding the synergistic effects of biochemical, biological, and biophysical properties of acellular matrices would facilitate scaffold design and the functional regulation of stem cells. The present study assessed the influence of crosslinked embryonic stem cell-derived extracellular matrix on neural differentiation and revealed the synergistic interactions of various matrix properties. While embryonic stem

  12. Cell-matrix interactions: focus on proteoglycan-proteinase interplay and pharmacological targeting in cancer.

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    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Gialeli, Chrisostomi; Bouris, Panagiotis; Giannopoulou, Efstathia; Skandalis, Spyros S; Aletras, Alexios J; Iozzo, Renato V; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2014-11-01

    Proteoglycans are major constituents of extracellular matrices, as well as cell surfaces and basement membranes. They play key roles in supporting the dynamic extracellular matrix by generating complex structural networks with other macromolecules and by regulating cellular phenotypes and signaling. It is becoming evident, however, that proteolytic enzymes are required partners for matrix remodeling and for modulating cell signaling via matrix constituents. Proteinases contribute to all stages of diseases, particularly cancer development and progression, and contextually participate in either the removal of damaged products or in the processing of matrix molecules and signaling receptors. The dynamic interplay between proteoglycans and proteolytic enzymes is a crucial biological step that contributes to the pathophysiology of cancer and inflammation. Moreover, proteoglycans are implicated in the expression and secretion of proteolytic enzymes and often modulate their activities. In this review, we describe the emerging biological roles of proteoglycans and proteinases, with a special emphasis on their complex interplay. We critically evaluate this important proteoglycan-proteinase interactome and discuss future challenges with respect to targeting this axis in the treatment of cancer. © 2014 FEBS.

  13. [Effect of polydimethylsiloxane matrix elasticity on osteogenic differentiation of rat marrow stromal cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Y; Zhao, J Z; Yang, C; Zu, Y; Li, Q

    2017-08-09

    Objective: To investigate the effect of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix elasticity on osteogenic differentiation of rat marrow stromal cells (rBMSC). Methods: A series of PDMS composite substrates with different elastic modulus were constructed by adjusting the relative concentrations of cross-linking agent. The Young's modulus was used to describe the elasticity of PDMS after measurement by atomic force microscope (AFM). After surface modification, rBMSC was seeded on PDMS matrix, and 7 days after rBMSC was cultured on the five different Young's moduli matrix, the differences of osteogenic differentiation of rBMSC were observed by the method of real-time PCR, Western blotting, and alkaline phosphatase assay. Results: The PDMS was suitable for cell culture after surface modification, and by altering the concentration of cross-linking agent, PDMS could mimic the majority of the tissues' elasticity in vivo. The related osteogenic differentiation markers expression showed significant difference between the five matrixes (Pmatrix which could be used in the investigation of inducing rBMSCs into osteoblastic lineages. PDMS substrate stiffness has an obvious influence on rBMSC osteogenic differentiation.

  14. Tissue engineering of rat bladder using marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and bladder acellular matrix.

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    Daniel L Coutu

    Full Text Available Bladder replacement or augmentation is required in congenital malformations or following trauma or cancer. The current surgical solution involves enterocystoplasty but is associated with high complication rates. Strategies for bladder tissue engineering are thus actively sought to address this unmet clinical need. Because of the poor efficacy of synthetic polymers, the use of bladder acellular matrix (BAM has been proposed. Indeed when cellular components are removed from xenogenic or allogeneic bladders, the extracellular matrix scaffold thus obtained can be used alone or in combination with stem cells. In this study, we propose the use of BAM seeded with marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs for bladder tissue engineering. We optimized a protocol for decellularization of bladder tissue from different species including rat, rabbit and swine. We demonstrate the use of non-ionic detergents followed by nuclease digestion results in efficient decellularization while preserving the extracellular matrix. When MSCs were seeded on acellular matrix scaffold, they remained viable and proliferative while adopting a cellular phenotype consistent with their microenvironment. Upon transplantation in rats after partial cystectomy, MSC-seeded BAM proved superior to unseeded BAM with animals recovering nearly 100% normal bladder capacity for up to six months. Histological analyses also demonstrated increased muscle regeneration.

  15. Naturally Occurring Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds for Dermal Regeneration: Do They Really Need Cells?

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    A. M. Eweida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pronounced effect of extracellular matrix (ECM scaffolds in supporting tissue regeneration is related mainly to their maintained 3D structure and their bioactive components. These decellularized matrix scaffolds could be revitalized before grafting via adding stem cells, fibroblasts, or keratinocytes to promote wound healing. We reviewed the online published literature in the last five years for the studies that performed ECM revitalization and discussed the results of these studies and the related literature. Eighteen articles met the search criteria. Twelve studies included adding cells to acellular dermal matrix (ADM, 3 studies were on small intestinal mucosa (SIS, one study was on urinary bladder matrix (UBM, one study was on amniotic membrane, and one study included both SIS and ADM loaded constructs. We believe that, in chronic and difficult-to-heal wounds, revitalizing the ECM scaffolds would be beneficial to overcome the defective host tissue interaction. This belief still has to be verified by high quality randomised clinical trials, which are still lacking in literature.

  16. Implementing a Parallel Matrix Factorization Library on the Cell Broadband Engine

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    B.C. Vishwas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrix factorization (or often called decomposition is a frequently used kernel in a large number of applications ranging from linear solvers to data clustering and machine learning. The central contribution of this paper is a thorough performance study of four popular matrix factorization techniques, namely, LU, Cholesky, QR and SVD on the STI Cell broadband engine. The paper explores algorithmic as well as implementation challenges related to the Cell chip-multiprocessor and explains how we achieve near-linear speedup on most of the factorization techniques for a range of matrix sizes. For each of the factorization routines, we identify the bottleneck kernels and explain how we have attempted to resolve the bottleneck and to what extent we have been successful. Our implementations, for the largest data sets that we use, running on a two-node 3.2 GHz Cell BladeCenter (exercising a total of sixteen SPEs, on average, deliver 203.9, 284.6, 81.5, 243.9 and 54.0 GFLOPS for dense LU, dense Cholesky, sparse Cholesky, QR and SVD, respectively. The implementations achieve speedup of 11.2, 12.8, 10.6, 13.0 and 6.2, respectively for dense LU, dense Cholesky, sparse Cholesky, QR and SVD, when running on sixteen SPEs. We discuss the interesting interactions that result from parallelization of the factorization routines on a two-node non-uniform memory access (NUMA Cell Blade cluster.

  17. Maintenance of neural progenitor cell stemness in 3D hydrogels requires matrix remodelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madl, Christopher M.; Lesavage, Bauer L.; Dewi, Ruby E.; Dinh, Cong B.; Stowers, Ryan S.; Khariton, Margarita; Lampe, Kyle J.; Nguyen, Duong; Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Enejder, Annika; Heilshorn, Sarah C.

    2017-12-01

    Neural progenitor cell (NPC) culture within three-dimensional (3D) hydrogels is an attractive strategy for expanding a therapeutically relevant number of stem cells. However, relatively little is known about how 3D material properties such as stiffness and degradability affect the maintenance of NPC stemness in the absence of differentiation factors. Over a physiologically relevant range of stiffness from ~0.5 to 50 kPa, stemness maintenance did not correlate with initial hydrogel stiffness. In contrast, hydrogel degradation was both correlated with, and necessary for, maintenance of NPC stemness. This requirement for degradation was independent of cytoskeletal tension generation and presentation of engineered adhesive ligands, instead relying on matrix remodelling to facilitate cadherin-mediated cell-cell contact and promote β-catenin signalling. In two additional hydrogel systems, permitting NPC-mediated matrix remodelling proved to be a generalizable strategy for stemness maintenance in 3D. Our findings have identified matrix remodelling, in the absence of cytoskeletal tension generation, as a previously unknown strategy to maintain stemness in 3D.

  18. Extracellular matrix and cell shape: potential control points for inhibition of angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, D.

    1991-01-01

    Capillary endothelial (CE) cells require two extracellular signals in order to switch from quiescence to growth and back to differentiation during angiogenesis: soluble angiogenic factors and insoluble extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. Soluble endothelial mitogens, such as basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), act over large distances to trigger capillary growth, whereas ECM molecules act locally to modulate cell responsiveness to these soluble cues. Recent studies reveal that ECM molecules regulate CE cell growth and differentiation by modulating cell shape and by activating intracellular chemical signaling pathways inside the cell. Recognition of the importance of ECM and cell shape during capillary morphogenesis has led to the identification of a series of new angiogenesis inhibitors. Elucidation of the molecular mechanism of capillary regulation may result in development of even more potent angiogenesis modulators in the future.

  19. Multi-lineage differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells on the biophysical microenvironment of cell-derived matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dong Hoon; Suhaeri, Muhammad; Hwang, Mintai P; Kim, Ik Hwan; Han, Dong Keun; Park, Kwideok

    2014-09-01

    We obtained fibroblast- (FDM) and preosteoblast- (PDM) derived matrices in vitro from their respective cells. Our hypothesis was that these naturally occurring cell-derived matrices (CDMs) would provide a better microenvironment for the multi-lineage differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) than those based on traditional single-protein-based platforms. Cells cultured for 5-6 days were decellularized with detergents and enzymes. The resulting matrices showed a fibrillar surface texture. Under osteogenic conditions, human bone-marrow-derived stromal cells (HS-5) exhibited higher amounts of both mineralized nodule formation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression than those cultured on plastic or gelatin. Osteogenic markers (Col I, osteopontin, and cbfa1) and ALP activity from cells cultured on PDM were notably upregulated at 4 weeks. The use of FDM significantly improved the cellular expression of chondrogenic markers (Sox 9 and Col II), while downregulating that of Col I at 4 weeks. Both CDMs were more effective in inducing cellular synthesis of glycosaminoglycan content than control substrates. We also investigated the effect of matrix surface texture on hMSC (PT-2501) differentiation; soluble matrix (S-matrix)-coated substrates exhibited a localized fibronectin (FN) alignment, whereas natural matrix (N-matrix)-coated substrates preserved the naturally formed FN fibrillar alignment. hMSCs cultured for 4 weeks on N-matrices under osteogenic or chondrogenic conditions deposited a greater amount of calcium and proteoglycan than those cultured on S-matrices as assessed by von Kossa and Safranin O staining. In contrast to the expression levels of lineage-specific markers for cells cultured on gelatin, FN, or S-matrices, those cultured on N-matrices yielded highly upregulated levels. This study demonstrates not only the capacity of CDM for being an effective inductive template for the multi-lineage differentiation of hMSCs, but also the critical

  20. A role for topographic cues in the organization of collagenous matrix by corneal fibroblasts and stem cells.

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    Dimitrios Karamichos

    Full Text Available Human corneal fibroblasts (HCF and corneal stromal stem cells (CSSC each secrete and organize a thick stroma-like extracellular matrix in response to different substrata, but neither cell type organizes matrix on tissue-culture polystyrene. This study compared cell differentiation and extracellular matrix secreted by these two cell types when they were cultured on identical substrata, polycarbonate Transwell filters. After 4 weeks in culture, both cell types upregulated expression of genes marking differentiated keratocytes (KERA, CHST6, AQP1, B3GNT7. Absolute expression levels of these genes and secretion of keratan sulfate proteoglycans were significantly greater in CSSC than HCF. Both cultures produced extensive extracellular matrix of aligned collagen fibrils types I and V, exhibiting cornea-like lamellar structure. Unlike HCF, CSSC produced little matrix in the presence of serum. Construct thickness and collagen organization was enhanced by TGF-ß3. Scanning electron microscopic examination of the polycarbonate membrane revealed shallow parallel grooves with spacing of 200-300 nm, similar to the topography of aligned nanofiber substratum which we previously showed to induce matrix organization by CSSC. These results demonstrate that both corneal fibroblasts and stromal stem cells respond to a specific pattern of topographical cues by secreting highly organized extracellular matrix typical of corneal stroma. The data also suggest that the potential for matrix secretion and organization may not be directly related to the expression of molecular markers used to identify differentiated keratocytes.

  1. A role for topographic cues in the organization of collagenous matrix by corneal fibroblasts and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamichos, Dimitrios; Funderburgh, Martha L; Hutcheon, Audrey E K; Zieske, James D; Du, Yiqin; Wu, Jian; Funderburgh, James L

    2014-01-01

    Human corneal fibroblasts (HCF) and corneal stromal stem cells (CSSC) each secrete and organize a thick stroma-like extracellular matrix in response to different substrata, but neither cell type organizes matrix on tissue-culture polystyrene. This study compared cell differentiation and extracellular matrix secreted by these two cell types when they were cultured on identical substrata, polycarbonate Transwell filters. After 4 weeks in culture, both cell types upregulated expression of genes marking differentiated keratocytes (KERA, CHST6, AQP1, B3GNT7). Absolute expression levels of these genes and secretion of keratan sulfate proteoglycans were significantly greater in CSSC than HCF. Both cultures produced extensive extracellular matrix of aligned collagen fibrils types I and V, exhibiting cornea-like lamellar structure. Unlike HCF, CSSC produced little matrix in the presence of serum. Construct thickness and collagen organization was enhanced by TGF-ß3. Scanning electron microscopic examination of the polycarbonate membrane revealed shallow parallel grooves with spacing of 200-300 nm, similar to the topography of aligned nanofiber substratum which we previously showed to induce matrix organization by CSSC. These results demonstrate that both corneal fibroblasts and stromal stem cells respond to a specific pattern of topographical cues by secreting highly organized extracellular matrix typical of corneal stroma. The data also suggest that the potential for matrix secretion and organization may not be directly related to the expression of molecular markers used to identify differentiated keratocytes.

  2. Enamel matrix derivative promote primary human pulp cell differentiation and mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riksen, Elisabeth Aurstad; Landin, Maria A; Reppe, Sjur; Nakamura, Yukio; Lyngstadaas, Ståle Petter; Reseland, Janne E

    2014-05-05

    Enamel matrix derivative (EMD) has been found to induce reactive dentin formation; however the molecular mechanisms involved are unclear. The effect of EMD (5-50 μg/mL) on primary human pulp cells were compared to untreated cells and cells incubated with 10⁻⁸ M dexamethasone (DEX) for 1, 2, 3, 7, and 14 days in culture. Expression analysis using Affymetrix microchips demonstrated that 10 μg/mL EMD regulated several hundred genes and stimulated the gene expression of proteins involved in mesenchymal proliferation and differentiation. Both EMD and DEX enhanced the expression of amelogenin (amel), and the dentinogenic markers dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSSP) and dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein 1 (DMP1), as well as the osteogenic markers osteocalcin (OC, BGLAP) and collagen type 1 (COL1A1). Whereas, only EMD had effect on alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA expression, the stimulatory effect were verified by enhanced secretion of OC and COL1A from EMD treated cells, and increased ALP activity in cell culture medium after EMD treatment. Increased levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and monocyte chemoattractant proteins (MCP-1) in the cell culture medium were also found. Consequently, the suggested effect of EMD is to promote differentiation of pulp cells and increases the potential for pulpal mineralization to favor reactive dentine formation.

  3. Collagen Matrix Density Drives the Metabolic Shift in Breast Cancer Cells

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    Brett A. Morris

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased breast density attributed to collagen I deposition is associated with a 4–6 fold increased risk of developing breast cancer. Here, we assessed cellular metabolic reprogramming of mammary carcinoma cells in response to increased collagen matrix density using an in vitro 3D model. Our initial observations demonstrated changes in functional metabolism in both normal mammary epithelial cells and mammary carcinoma cells in response to changes in matrix density. Further, mammary carcinoma cells grown in high density collagen matrices displayed decreased oxygen consumption and glucose metabolism via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle compared to cells cultured in low density matrices. Despite decreased glucose entry into the TCA cycle, levels of glucose uptake, cell viability, and ROS were not different between high and low density matrices. Interestingly, under high density conditions the contribution of glutamine as a fuel source to drive the TCA cycle was significantly enhanced. These alterations in functional metabolism mirrored significant changes in the expression of metabolic genes involved in glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and the serine synthesis pathway. This study highlights the broad importance of the collagen microenvironment to cellular expression profiles, and shows that changes in density of the collagen microenvironment can modulate metabolic shifts of cancer cells.

  4. A Novel Silicon-based Wideband RF Nano Switch Matrix Cell and the Fabrication of RF Nano Switch Structures

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    Yi Xiu YANG

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the concept of RF nano switch matrix cell and the fabrication of RF nano switch. The nano switch matrix cell can be implemented into complex switch matrix for signal routing. RF nano switch is the decision unit for the matrix cell; in this research, it is fabricated on a tri-layer high-resistivity-silicon substrate using surface micromachining approach. Electron beam lithography is introduced to define the pattern and IC compatible deposition process is used to construct the metal layers. Silicon-based nano switch fabricated by IC compatible process can lead to a high potential of system integration to perform a cost effective system-on-a-chip solution. In this paper, simulation results of the designed matrix cell are presented; followed by the details of the nano structure fabrication and fabrication challenges optimizations; finally, measurements of the fabricated nano structure along with analytical discussions are also discussed.

  5. Influence of Enamel Matrix Derivative on Cells at Different Maturation Stages of Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Richard J.; Caluseru, Oana M.; Guillemette, Vincent; Zhang, Yufeng; Gemperli, Anja C.; Chandad, Fatiha; Sculean, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Enamel matrix derivative (EMD), a porcine extract harvested from developing porcine teeth, has been shown to promote formation of new cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. Despite its widespread use, an incredibly large variability among in vitro studies has been observed. The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of EMD on cells at different maturation stages of osteoblast differentiation by testing 6 cell types to determine if cell phenotype plays a role in cell behaviour following treatment with EMD. Six cell types including MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts, rat calvarial osteoblasts, human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells, ROS cells, MG63 cells and human alveolar osteoblasts were cultured in the presence or absence of EMD and proliferation rates were quantified by an MTS assay. Gene expression of collagen1(COL1), alkaline phosphate(ALP) and osteocalcin(OC) were investigated by real-time PCR. While EMD significantly increased cell proliferation of all cell types, its effect on osteoblast differentiation was more variable. EMD significantly up-regulated gene expression of COL1, ALP and OC in cells early in their differentiation process when compared to osteoblasts at later stages of maturation. Furthermore, the effect of cell passaging of primary human PDL cells (passage 2 to 15) was tested in response to treatment with EMD. EMD significantly increased cell proliferation and differentiation of cells at passages 2–5 however had completely lost their ability to respond to EMD by passages 10+. The results from the present study suggest that cell stimulation with EMD has a more pronounced effect on cells earlier in their differentiation process and may partially explain why treatment with EMD primarily favors regeneration of periodontal defects (where the periodontal ligament contains a higher number of undifferentiated progenitor cells) over regeneration of pure alveolar bone defects containing no periodontal ligament and a more limited

  6. Influence of enamel matrix derivative on cells at different maturation stages of differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Miron

    Full Text Available Enamel matrix derivative (EMD, a porcine extract harvested from developing porcine teeth, has been shown to promote formation of new cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. Despite its widespread use, an incredibly large variability among in vitro studies has been observed. The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of EMD on cells at different maturation stages of osteoblast differentiation by testing 6 cell types to determine if cell phenotype plays a role in cell behaviour following treatment with EMD. Six cell types including MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts, rat calvarial osteoblasts, human periodontal ligament (PDL cells, ROS cells, MG63 cells and human alveolar osteoblasts were cultured in the presence or absence of EMD and proliferation rates were quantified by an MTS assay. Gene expression of collagen1(COL1, alkaline phosphate(ALP and osteocalcin(OC were investigated by real-time PCR. While EMD significantly increased cell proliferation of all cell types, its effect on osteoblast differentiation was more variable. EMD significantly up-regulated gene expression of COL1, ALP and OC in cells early in their differentiation process when compared to osteoblasts at later stages of maturation. Furthermore, the effect of cell passaging of primary human PDL cells (passage 2 to 15 was tested in response to treatment with EMD. EMD significantly increased cell proliferation and differentiation of cells at passages 2-5 however had completely lost their ability to respond to EMD by passages 10+. The results from the present study suggest that cell stimulation with EMD has a more pronounced effect on cells earlier in their differentiation process and may partially explain why treatment with EMD primarily favors regeneration of periodontal defects (where the periodontal ligament contains a higher number of undifferentiated progenitor cells over regeneration of pure alveolar bone defects containing no periodontal ligament and a more

  7. Development of an in vitro cell system from zebrafish suitable to study bone cell differentiation and extracellular matrix mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Parameswaran; Laizé, Vincent; Cardeira, João; Trindade, Marlene; Cancela, M Leonor

    2013-12-01

    Mechanisms of bone formation and skeletal development have been successfully investigated in zebrafish using a variety of in vivo approaches, but in vitro studies have been hindered due to a lack of homologous cell lines capable of producing an extracellular matrix (ECM) suitable for mineral deposition. Here we describe the development and characterization of a new cell line termed ZFB1, derived from zebrafish calcified tissues. ZFB1 cells have an epithelium-like phenotype, grow at 28°C in a regular L-15 medium supplemented with 15% of fetal bovine serum, and are maintained and manipulated using standard methods (e.g., trypsinization, cryopreservation, and transfection). They can therefore be propagated and maintained easily in most cell culture facilities. ZFB1 cells show aneuploidy with 2n=78 chromosomes, indicative of cell transformation. Furthermore, because DNA can be efficiently delivered into their intracellular space by nucleofection, ZFB1 cells are suitable for gene targeting approaches and for assessing gene promoter activity. ZFB1 cells can also differentiate toward osteoblast or chondroblast lineages, as demonstrated by expression of osteoblast- and chondrocyte-specific markers, they exhibit an alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker of bone formation in vivo, and they can mineralize their ECM. Therefore, they represent a valuable zebrafish-derived in vitro system for investigating bone cell differentiation and extracellular matrix mineralization.

  8. Osthole suppresses migration and invasion of A549 human lung cancer cells through inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metallopeptidase-9 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Man; Zhang, Yi; Qu, Dan; Feng, Xue-Wei; Chen, Yu; Zhao, Li

    2012-11-01

    Osthole, a natural compound, may be extracted from Cnidium monnieri and other medicinal plants. Previous studies have shown that osthole has anticancer effects in various human cancer cell lines. There is, however, no available information concerning the effects of osthole on the migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells. In the current study, we used Transwell assays to demonstrate that osthole inhibited the migration and invasion of A549 human lung cancer cells. Western blot analysis revealed that osthole reduced the levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metallopeptidase-9 (MMP-9) in the A549 human lung cancer cells. Our findings indicate that osthole may have a novel function as an inhibitor of the metastasis of human lung cancer.

  9. Doxycycline inhibits leukemic cell migration via inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, CHUNHUAI; XIANG, RU; ZHANG, XIANGZHONG; CHEN, YUNXIAN

    2015-01-01

    Doxycycline, a tetracycline-based antibiotic, has been reported to attenuate melanoma cell migration through inhibiting the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway. However, it remains to be elucidated whether doxycycline exerts this effect on leukemia cell migration. The present study aimed to examine the role of doxycycline in leukemia cell migration. The invasion capacities of the human leukemia cell lines KG1a (acute myelogenous leukemia) and K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia) were evaluated using Matrigel® matrix-coated Transwell® chamber assays; leukemic cell lines treated with doxycycline (1 µg/ml) or anti-β1-integrin antibodies were added to the upper chamber, while untreated cells were included as controls. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed in order to further understand the influence of doxycycline treatment on the expression of FAK and gelatinases in the KG1a and K562 leukemic cell lines. In addition, FAK protein expression and phosphorylation were determined using western blot analysis in order to investigate the mechanism by which doxycycline inhibited leukemic cell migration. The results revealed that doxycycline treatment significantly attenuated the migration of KG1a and K562 cells, which was demonstrated to be associated with inhibition of the expression and phosphorylation of FAK. In addition, doxycycline treatment inhibited matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression. Furthermore, incubation with blocking anti-β1-integrin antibodies had an analogous inhibitory effect on leukemic cell migration to that of doxycycline. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that doxycycline attenuated leukemic cell migration through inhibiting the FAK signaling pathway. Therefore, doxycycline may have potential for use as a novel strategy for the treatment of leukemia. PMID:26004127

  10. Three-dimensional extracellular matrix-mediated neural stem cell differentiation in a microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sewoon; Yang, Kisuk; Shin, Yoojin; Lee, Jung Seung; Kamm, Roger D; Chung, Seok; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2012-07-07

    Here, we report a unique method to quantify the effects of in vivo-like extracellular matrix (ECM) for guiding differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) in three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). We successfully monitored and quantified differentiation of NSCs in small volume ECMs and found that differentiation of NSCs, especially those differentiating towards neuronal and oligodendrocytic lineages, is significantly enhanced by 3D microenvironments reconstituted in the microfluidic channels.

  11. THE COMPLEX ORGANIZATION OF EUKARYOTIC CELL NUCLEUS (III: THE NUCLEAR MATRIX AND THE NUCLEAR LAMINA

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    Cristian S. Cimpeanu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A large variety of nuclear fibrous proteins (such as actin, myosin, lamin B, transcription factors, topoisomerases, etc represent constitutive elements of complex structures present in the eukaryotic nuclei: the nuclear matrix and the nuclear lamina, repectively. These nuclear compartments, with fibrous network-like structure, play crucialroles in structural organization of nuclei, chromatin remodeling, DNA transcription, signals transduction, cell cycle regulation, embryonic development and other nuclear basic processes.

  12. THE COMPLEX ORGANIZATION OF EUKARYOTIC CELL NUCLEUS (III): THE NUCLEAR MATRIX AND THE NUCLEAR LAMINA

    OpenAIRE

    Cristian S. Cimpeanu; Mirela Campeanu

    2015-01-01

    A large variety of nuclear fibrous proteins (such as actin, myosin, lamin B, transcription factors, topoisomerases, etc) represent constitutive elements of complex structures present in the eukaryotic nuclei: the nuclear matrix and the nuclear lamina, repectively. These nuclear compartments, with fibrous network-like structure, play crucialroles in structural organization of nuclei, chromatin remodeling, DNA transcription, signals transduction, cell cycle regulation, embryonic development and...

  13. Polyphosphate induces matrix metalloproteinase-3-mediated proliferation of odontoblast-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozeki, Nobuaki; Hase, Naoko; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Hiyama, Taiki; Kawai, Rie [Department of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, Aichi Gakuin University, 2-11 Suemori-dori, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8651 (Japan); Kondo, Ayami [Department of Medicinal Biochemistry, School of Pharmacy, Aichi Gakuin University, 1-100 Kusumoto, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8650 (Japan); Nakata, Kazuhiko [Department of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, Aichi Gakuin University, 2-11 Suemori-dori, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8651 (Japan); Mogi, Makio, E-mail: makio@dpc.agu.ac.jp [Department of Medicinal Biochemistry, School of Pharmacy, Aichi Gakuin University, 1-100 Kusumoto, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8650 (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate [Poly(P)] may represent a physiological source of phosphate and has the ability to induce bone differentiation in osteoblasts. We previously reported that cytokine-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 accelerates the proliferation of purified odontoblast-like cells. In this study, MMP-3 small interfering RNA (siRNA) was transfected into odontoblast-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells to investigate whether MMP-3 activity is induced by Poly(P) and/or is associated with cell proliferation and differentiation into odontoblast-like cells. Treatment with Poly(P) led to an increase in both cell proliferation and additional odontoblastic differentiation. Poly(P)-treated cells showed a small but significant increase in dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1) mRNA expression, which are markers of mature odontoblasts. The cells also acquired additional odontoblast-specific properties including adoption of an odontoblastic phenotype typified by high alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and a calcification capacity. In addition, Poly(P) induced expression of MMP-3 mRNA and protein, and increased MMP-3 activity. MMP-3 siRNA-mediated disruption of the expression of these effectors potently suppressed the expression of odontoblastic biomarkers ALP, DSPP, and DMP-1, and blocked calcification. Interestingly, upon siRNA-mediated silencing of MMP-3, we noted a potent and significant decrease in cell proliferation. Using specific siRNAs, we revealed that a unique signaling cascade, Poly(P)→MMP-3→DSPP and/or DMP-1, was intimately involved in the proliferation of odontoblast-like cells. - Highlights: • Polyphosphate increases proliferation of iPS cell-derived odontoblast-like cells. • Polyphosphate-induced MMP-3 results in an increase of cell proliferation. • Induced cell proliferation involves MMP-3, DSPP, and/or DMP-1 sequentially. • Induced MMP-3 also results in an increase of odontoblastic

  14. 3D Cell Culture in Interpenetrating Networks of Alginate and rBM Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisdom, Katrina; Chaudhuri, Ovijit

    2017-01-01

    Altered tissue mechanical properties have been implicated in many key physiological and pathological processes. Hydrogel-based materials systems, made with native extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, nonnative biopolymers, or synthetic polymers are often used to study these processes in vitro in 3D cell culture experiments. However, each of these materials systems present major limitations when used in mechanobiological studies. While native ECM-based hydrogels may enable good recapitulation of physiological behavior, the mechanics of these hydrogels are often manipulated by increasing or decreasing the protein concentration. This manipulation changes cell adhesion ligand density, thereby altering cell signaling. Alternatively, synthetic polymer-based hydrogels and nonnative biopolymer-based hydrogels can be mechanically tuned and engineered to present cell adhesion peptide motifs, but still may not fully promote physiologically relevant behavior. Here, we combine the advantages of native ECM proteins and nonnative biopolymers in interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels consisting of rBM matrix, which contains ligands native to epithelial basement membrane, and alginate, an inert biopolymer derived from seaweed. The following protocol details the generation of IPNs for mechanical testing or for 3D cell culture. This biomaterial system offers the ability to tune the stiffness of the 3D microenvironment without altering cell adhesion ligand concentration or pore size.

  15. Extracellular matrix of dental pulp stem cells: Applications in pulp tissue engineering using somatic MSCs

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    Sriram eRavindran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental Caries affects approximately 90% of the world’s population. At present, the clinical treatment for dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality. Tissue engineering can potentially solve this problem by enabling regeneration of a functional pulp tissue. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs have been shown to be an excellent source for pulp regeneration. However, limited availability of these cells hinders its potential for clinical translation. We have investigated the possibility of using somatic mesenchymal stem cells from other sources for dental pulp tissue regeneration using a biomimetic dental pulp extracellular matrix (ECM incorporated scaffold. Human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs and human bone marrow stromal cells (HMSCs were investigated for their ability to differentiate towards an odontogenic lineage. In vitro real-time PCR results coupled with histological and immunohistochemical examination of the explanted tissues confirmed the ability of PDLSCs and HMSCs to form a vascularized pulp-like tissue. These findings indicate that the dental pulp stem derived ECM scaffold stimulated odontogenic differentiation of PDLSCs and HMSCs without the need for exogenous addition of growth and differentiation factors. This study represents a translational perspective toward possible therapeutic application of using a combination of somatic stem cells and extracellular matrix for pulp regeneration.

  16. Adipose progenitor cells increase fibronectin matrix strain and unfolding in breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, E. M.; Saunders, M. P.; Yoon, C. J.; Gourdon, D.; Fischbach, C.

    2011-02-01

    Increased stiffness represents a hallmark of breast cancer that has been attributed to the altered physicochemical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, the role of fibronectin (Fn) in modulating the composition and mechanical properties of the tumor-associated ECM remains unclear. We have utilized a combination of biochemical and physical science tools to evaluate whether paracrine signaling between breast cancer cells and adipose progenitor cells regulates Fn matrix assembly and stiffness enhancement in the tumor stroma. In particular, we utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging to map the molecular conformation and stiffness of Fn that has been assembled by 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in response to conditioned media from MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells. Our results reveal that soluble factors secreted by tumor cells promote Fn expression, unfolding, and stiffening by adipose progenitor cells and that transforming growth factor-β serves as a soluble cue underlying these changes. In vivo experiments using orthotopic co-transplantation of primary human adipose-derived stem cells and MDA-MB231 into SCID mice support the pathological relevance of our results. Insights gained by these studies advance our understanding of the role of Fn in mammary tumorigenesis and may ultimately lead to improved anti-cancer therapies.

  17. Endothelial cell-derived matrix promotes the metabolic functional maturation of hepatocyte via integrin-Src signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xinyue; Li, Weihong; Ma, Minghui; Lu, Xin; Zhang, Haiyan

    2017-11-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment is involved in the regulation of hepatocyte phenotype and function. Recently, the cell-derived extracellular matrix has been proposed to represent the bioactive and biocompatible materials of the native ECM. Here, we show that the endothelial cell-derived matrix (EC matrix) promotes the metabolic maturation of human adipose stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (hASC-HLCs) through the activation of the transcription factor forkhead box protein A2 (FOXA2) and the nuclear receptors hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) and pregnane X receptor (PXR). Reducing the fibronectin content in the EC matrix or silencing the expression of α5 integrin in the hASC-HLCs inhibited the effect of the EC matrix on Src phosphorylation and hepatocyte maturation. The inhibition of Src phosphorylation using the inhibitor PP2 or silencing the expression of Src in hASC-HLCs also attenuated the up-regulation of the metabolic function of hASC-HLCs in a nuclear receptor-dependent manner. These data elucidate integrin-Src signalling linking the extrinsic EC matrix signals and metabolic functional maturation of hepatocyte. This study provides a model for studying the interaction between hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cell-derived matrix. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  18. Physical, Spatial, and Molecular Aspects of Extracellular Matrix of In Vivo Niches and Artificial Scaffolds Relevant to Stem Cells Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmanova, Maria; Osidak, Egor; Domogatsky, Sergey; Rodin, Sergey; Domogatskaya, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix can influence stem cell choices, such as self-renewal, quiescence, migration, proliferation, phenotype maintenance, differentiation, or apoptosis. Three aspects of extracellular matrix were extensively studied during the last decade: physical properties, spatial presentation of adhesive epitopes, and molecular complexity. Over 15 different parameters have been shown to influence stem cell choices. Physical aspects include stiffness (or elasticity), viscoelasticity, pore size, porosity, amplitude and frequency of static and dynamic deformations applied to the matrix. Spatial aspects include scaffold dimensionality (2D or 3D) and thickness; cell polarity; area, shape, and microscale topography of cell adhesion surface; epitope concentration, epitope clustering characteristics (number of epitopes per cluster, spacing between epitopes within cluster, spacing between separate clusters, cluster patterns, and level of disorder in epitope arrangement), and nanotopography. Biochemical characteristics of natural extracellular matrix molecules regard diversity and structural complexity of matrix molecules, affinity and specificity of epitope interaction with cell receptors, role of non-affinity domains, complexity of supramolecular organization, and co-signaling by growth factors or matrix epitopes. Synergy between several matrix aspects enables stem cells to retain their function in vivo and may be a key to generation of long-term, robust, and effective in vitro stem cell culture systems. PMID:26351461

  19. Role of YAP/TAZ in cell-matrix adhesion-mediated signalling and mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Sirio

    2016-04-10

    Signalling from the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a fundamental cellular input that sustains proliferation, opposes cell death and regulates differentiation. Through integrins, cells perceive both the chemical composition and physical properties of the ECM. In particular, cell behaviour is profoundly influenced by the mechanical elasticity or stiffness of the ECM, which regulates the ability of cells to develop forces through their contractile actomyosin cytoskeleton and to mature focal adhesions. This mechanosensing ability affects fundamental cellular functions, such that alterations of ECM stiffness is nowadays considered not a simple consequence of pathology, but a causative input driving aberrant cell behaviours. We here discuss recent advances on how mechanical signals intersect nuclear transcription and in particular the activity of YAP/TAZ transcriptional coactivators, known downstream transducers of the Hippo pathway and important effectors of ECM mechanical cues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of YAP/TAZ in cell-matrix adhesion-mediated signalling and mechanotransduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, Sirio, E-mail: sirio.dupont@unipd.it

    2016-04-10

    Signalling from the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a fundamental cellular input that sustains proliferation, opposes cell death and regulates differentiation. Through integrins, cells perceive both the chemical composition and physical properties of the ECM. In particular, cell behaviour is profoundly influenced by the mechanical elasticity or stiffness of the ECM, which regulates the ability of cells to develop forces through their contractile actomyosin cytoskeleton and to mature focal adhesions. This mechanosensing ability affects fundamental cellular functions, such that alterations of ECM stiffness is nowadays considered not a simple consequence of pathology, but a causative input driving aberrant cell behaviours. We here discuss recent advances on how mechanical signals intersect nuclear transcription and in particular the activity of YAP/TAZ transcriptional coactivators, known downstream transducers of the Hippo pathway and important effectors of ECM mechanical cues.

  1. Effect of dentine matrix proteins on human endometrial adult stem-like cells: in vitro regeneration of odontoblasts cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Fahimeh S; Ai, Jafar; Jafarzadeh Kashi, Tahereh S; Khazaei, Mozaffar; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Ghanbari, Zinat

    2013-07-01

    Human endometrium has enormous regenerative capacity due to the presence of endometrial stem cells. The present study sought to assess the possibility of differentiation of these cells into odontoblast-like cells by in vitro induction. Endometrial stem-like cells were obtained using enzymatic digestion of the biopsy samples of the endometrium after hysterectomy and cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) which contained dentine non-collagenous proteins (dNCPs). The results were evaluated using the following assays: analysis of morphology, enzymatic assay for measuring alkaline phosphatase activity, Alizarin Red staining to detect in vitro formation of mineralized nodules, immunofluorescence for detection of dentine sialoprotein (DSP) and dentine-matrix protein (DMP1), and Western blotting for DMP1 expression. Following induction, endometrial stem-like cells demonstrated high alkaline phosphatase activity, and expression of DSP and DMP1 confirmed the odontoblast phenotype. DMP1 level increased in samples treated with dNCPs. Study results indicated that odontoblastic differentiation of endometrial stem cells can be induced by extracellular matrix proteins (e.g. dNCPs). The capacity of endometrial stem-like cells to differentiate into odontoblast-like cells under specific conditions gives new insights into the mechanism of odontogenesis and highlights the potential of such approaches for further research on dental tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Studying of Perovskite Nanoparticles in PMMA Matrix Used As Light Converter for Silicon Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipiński M.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The nanoparticles of CH3NH3PbBr3 hybrid perovskites were synthesized. These perovskite nanoparticles we embedded in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA in order to obtain the composite, which we used as light converter for silicon solar cells. It was shown that the composite emit the light with the intensity maximum at about 527 nm when exited by a short wavelength (300÷450 nm of light. The silicon solar cells were used to examine the effect of down-conversion (DC process by perovskite nanoparticles embedded in PMMA. For experiments, two groups of monocrystalline silicon solar cells were used. The first one included the solar cells without surface texturization and antireflection coating. The second one included the commercial cells with surface texturization and antireflection coating. In every series of the cells one part of the cells were covered by composite (CH3NH3PbBr3 in PMMA layer and second part of cells by pure PMMA for comparison. It was shown that External Quantum Efficiency EQE of the photovoltaic cells covered by composite (CH3NH3PbBr3 in PMMA layer was improved in both group of the cells but unfortunately the Internal Quantum Efficiency was reduced. This reduction was caused by high absorption of the short wavelength light and reabsorption of the luminescence light. Therefore, the CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite nanoparticles embedded in PMMA matrix were unable to increase silicon solar cell efficiency in the tested systems.

  3. Osteogenic potential of mesenchymal cells derived from canine umbilical cord matrix co-cultured with platelet-rich plasma and demineralized bone matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Talita F B; Sakamoto, Silmara S; Ferreira, Gabriel T N M; Gameiro, Roberto; Marinho, Marcia; de Andrade, Alexandre L; Cardoso, Tereza C

    2015-01-01

    Canine mesenchymal cells (MSCs) derived from Wharton's jelly were co-cultured, then supplemented or not supplemented with platelet rich plasma (PRP) and demineralized bone matrix (DBM) to verify osteogenic differentiation. Osteoblastic differentiation followed by mineralized bone matrix production was found to be significantly higher (p < 0.05) when MSCs were associated with PRP/DBM in culture after 14-21-days of induction. Osteopontin and osteocalcin gene expression were significantly superior (p < 0.05) under the same culture conditions after 21 days of observation. In conclusion, addition of PRP to DBM co-cultured with MSCs successfully induced osteogenesis in vitro.

  4. Change in cell shape is required for matrix metalloproteinase-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of mammary epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Khauv, Davitte; Bissell, Mina J.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2008-06-26

    Cell morphology dictates response to a wide variety of stimuli, controlling cell metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and death. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental process in which epithelial cells acquire migratory characteristics, and in the process convert from a 'cuboidal' epithelial structure into an elongated mesenchymal shape. We had shown previously that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) can stimulate EMT of cultured mouse mammary epithelial cells through a process that involves increased expression of Rac1b, a protein that stimulates alterations in cytoskeletal structure. We show here that cells treated with MMP-3 or induced to express Rac1b spread to cover a larger surface, and that this induction of cell spreading is a requirement of MMP-3/Rac1b-induced EMT. We find that limiting cell spreading, either by increasing cell density or by culturing cells on precisely defined micropatterned substrata, blocks expression of characteristic markers of EMT in cells treated with MMP-3. These effects are not caused by general disruptions in cell signaling pathways, as TGF-{beta}-induced EMT is not affected by similar limitations on cell spreading. Our data reveal a previously unanticipated cell shape-dependent mechanism that controls this key phenotypic alteration and provide insight into the distinct mechanisms activated by different EMT-inducing agents.

  5. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in the neoplastic and interstitial inflammatory infiltrate cells in gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Kemona

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs play an important role in the extracellular matrix degradation, that is an essential step in tumor invasion and metastases. The current study objective was to evaluate the expression of MMP-9 in the neoplastic and in the interstitial inflammatory infiltrate cells in gastric cancer (GC. Moreover, the relationship between expression of this enzyme and clinicopathological features of GC, such as TNM stage, the depth of tumor invasion, lymph node and distant metastases were assessed. The study comprised 54 patients with gastric cancer. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the expression of MMP-9 in gastric cancer cells. The semi-quantitative scale was applied to evaluate the expression of metalloproteinase-9. Immunohistochemical testing revealed a positive reaction of MMP-9 in 98% of all cancer tissue specimens and in 93% of inflammatory cells. The expression of MMP-9 in the neoplastic and inflammatory cells increased with more advance tumor stage, depth of tumor invasion and presence of lymph node as well as distant metastases. These findings indicate the significance of interstitial inflammatory infiltrate cells in the MMP-9 synthesis and the role of this enzyme in the invasiveness and metastatic potential of GC.

  6. A novel honeycomb matrix for cell immobilization to enhance lactic acid production by Rhizopus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Wang, Yuanliang; Yang, Shang-Tian; Wang, Runguang; Ren, Huiqing

    2010-07-01

    A new support matrix inspired by honeycomb was developed for cell immobilization to control fungal morphology and enhance mass transfer in bioreactor for lactic acid production by Rhizopus oryzae. The immobilization matrix composed of asterisk-shaped fibrous matrices in a honeycomb configuration provided high surface areas for cell attachment and biofilm growth. More than 90% of inoculated spores were adsorbed onto the matrices within 6-8h and after 10h there was no suspended cell in the fermentation broth, indicating a 100% immobilization efficiency. Compared to free-cell fermentation, lactic acid production increased approximately 70% (49.5 g/L vs. 29.3g/L) and fermentation time reduced 33% (48 h vs. 72 h) in shake-flasks with 80 g/L initial glucose. The immobilized-cell fermentation was evaluated for its long-term performance in a bubble-column bioreactor operated in a repeated batch mode for nine cycles in 36 days. The highest lactic acid production was 68.8 g/L, corresponding to a volumetric productivity of 0.72 g/Lh and 93.4% (w/w) lactic acid yield from consumed glucose. The overall yield and productivity were 77.6% and 0.57 g/Lh, respectively. The fermentation can be improved by increasing aeration and mixing in the bubble-column bioreactor. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Extracellular matrix elasticity and topography: material-based cues that affect cell function via conserved mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, Isaac A; Putnam, Andrew J

    2015-03-01

    Chemical, mechanical, and topographic extracellular matrix (ECM) cues have been extensively studied for their influence on cell behavior. These ECM cues alter cell adhesion, cell shape, and cell migration and activate signal transduction pathways to influence gene expression, proliferation, and differentiation. ECM elasticity and topography, in particular, have emerged as material properties of intense focus based on strong evidence these physical cues can partially dictate stem cell differentiation. Cells generate forces to pull on their adhesive contacts, and these tractional forces appear to be a common element of cells' responses to both elasticity and topography. This review focuses on recently published work that links ECM topography and mechanics and their influence on differentiation and other cell behaviors. We also highlight signaling pathways typically implicated in mechanotransduction that are (or may be) shared by cells subjected to topographic cues. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of the potential implications of these commonalities for cell based therapies and biomaterial design. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jraufman@medicine.umaryland.edu [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  9. Early local differentiation of the cell wall matrix defines the contact sites in lobed mesophyll cells of Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoutsou, E; Sotiriou, P; Apostolakos, P; Galatis, B

    2013-10-01

    The morphogenesis of lobed mesophyll cells (MCs) is highly controlled and coupled with intercellular space formation. Cortical microtubule rings define the number and the position of MC isthmi. This work investigated early events of MC morphogenesis, especially the mechanism defining the position of contacts between MCs. The distributions of plasmodesmata, the hemicelluloses callose and (1 → 3,1 → 4)-β-d-glucans (MLGs) and the pectin epitopes recognized by the 2F4, JIM5, JIM7 and LM6 antibodies were studied in the cell walls of Zea mays MCs. Matrix cell wall polysaccharides were immunolocalized in hand-made sections and in sections of material embedded in LR White resin. Callose was also localized using aniline blue in hand-made sections. Plasmodesmata distribution was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Before reorganization of the dispersed cortical microtubules into microtubule rings, particular bands of the longitudinal MC walls, where the MC contacts will form, locally differentiate by selective (1) deposition of callose and the pectin epitopes recognized by the 2F4, LM6, JIM5 and JIM7 antibodies, (2) degradation of MLGs and (3) formation of secondary plasmodesmata clusterings. This cell wall matrix differentiation persists in cell contacts of mature MCs. Simultaneously, the wall bands between those of future cell contacts differentiate with (1) deposition of local cell wall thickenings including cellulose microfibrils, (2) preferential presence of MLGs, (3) absence of callose and (4) transient presence of the pectins identified by the JIM5 and JIM7 antibodies. The wall areas between cell contacts expand determinately to form the cell isthmi and the cell lobes. The morphogenesis of lobed MCs is characterized by the early patterned differentiation of two distinct cell wall subdomains, defining the sites of the future MC contacts and of the future MC isthmi respectively. This patterned cell wall differentiation precedes cortical microtubule

  10. Differentiation of BMMSCs into odontoblast-like cells induced by natural dentine matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Gang; Yu, Yan; Jiang, Yujiao; Wang, Sainan; Yan, Ming; Smith, Anthony J; Smith, Gay; Cooper, Paul R; Tang, Chunbo; Zhang, Guangdong; Yu, Jinhua

    2013-07-01

    To assess the odontogenic potential of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) to differentiate into odontoblast-like cells under the morphogenetic influence of dentine matrix as a possible basis for new stem cell-mediated therapeutic approaches to pulp diseases. BMMSCs were harvested from the whole bone marrow and cells at passages 3-5 were used for subsequent experiments. For in vitro studies, 1×10(4) cells were seeded on the surface of dentine slabs and co-cultured for 2 weeks in 24-well plates, then fixed, decalcified, embedded in paraffin and serial sections were processed for analyses. Haematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining was used for the morphological analysis of BMMSCs on the dentine slabs. The protein expression of dentine sialoprotein (DSP) in co-cultured BMMSCs was detected by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. For in vivo studies, 5×10(6) cells were collected as cell pellets, seeded onto dentine slices and transplanted into renal capsules for 6 weeks. Histological analyses of harvested tissues were performed as described for the in vitro studies. Total RNA and protein were extracted from harvested tissues and Dspp/DSP expression was investigated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot, respectively. After 2 weeks of co-culture with dentine slabs, BMMSCs demonstrated good viability in terms of morphological appearance and some showed polarization and extension of their cytoplasmic processes into dentine tubules with DSP expression. In vivo study demonstrated similar morphological changes and DSP expression in cells adjacent to dentine. RT-PCR and Western blot also demonstrated that the expression of Dspp/DSP in the co-cultured BMMSCs groups was higher than in the control groups. Dentine matrix can signal morphogenic induction of differentiation of BMMSCs into odontoblast-like cells in vivo and in vitro. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cardiac differentiation of cardiosphere-derived cells in scaffolds mimicking morphology of the cardiac extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanyi; Patnaik, Sourav; Guo, Xiaolei; Li, Zhenqing; Lo, Wilson; Butler, Ryan; Claude, Andrew; Liu, Zhenguo; Zhang, Ge; Liao, Jun; Anderson, Peter M; Guan, Jianjun

    2014-08-01

    Stem cell therapy has the potential to regenerate heart tissue after myocardial infarction (MI). The regeneration is dependent upon cardiac differentiation of the delivered stem cells. We hypothesized that timing of the stem cell delivery determines the extent of cardiac differentiation as cell differentiation is dependent on matrix properties such as biomechanics, structure and morphology, and these properties in cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) continuously vary with time after MI. In order to elucidate the relationship between ECM properties and cardiac differentiation, we created an in vitro model based on ECM-mimicking fibers and a type of cardiac progenitor cell, cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs). A simultaneous fiber electrospinning and cell electrospraying technique was utilized to fabricate constructs. By blending a highly soft hydrogel with a relatively stiff polyurethane and modulating fabrication parameters, tissue constructs with similar cell adhesion property but different global modulus, single fiber modulus, fiber density and fiber alignment were achieved. The CDCs remained alive within the constructs during a 1week culture period. CDC cardiac differentiation was dependent on the scaffold modulus, fiber volume fraction and fiber alignment. Two constructs with relatively low scaffold modulus, ∼50-60kPa, most significantly directed the CDC differentiation into mature cardiomyocytes as evidenced by gene expressions of cardiac troponin T (cTnT), calcium channel (CACNA1c) and cardiac myosin heavy chain (MYH6), and protein expressions of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and connexin 43 (CX43). Of these two low-modulus constructs, the extent of differentiation was greater for lower fiber alignment and higher fiber volume fraction. These results suggest that cardiac ECM properties may have an effect on cardiac differentiation of delivered stem cells. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Downregulation of Connective Tissue Growth Factor by Three-Dimensional Matrix Enhances Ovarian Carcinoma Cell Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbolina, Maria V.; Adley, Brian P.; Kelly, David L.; Shepard, Jaclyn; Fought, Angela J.; Scholtens, Denise; Penzes, Peter; Shea, Lonnie D.; Sharon Stack, M

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) is a leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy, due mainly to the prevalence of undetected metastatic disease. The process of cell invasion during intra-peritoneal anchoring of metastatic lesions requires concerted regulation of many processes, including modulation of adhesion to the extracellular matrix and localized invasion. Exploratory cDNA microarray analysis of early response genes (altered after 4 hours of 3-dimensional collagen culture) coupled with confirmatory real-time RT-PCR, multiple three-dimensional cell culture matrices, Western blot, immunostaining, adhesion, migration, and invasion assays were used to identify modulators of adhesion pertinent to EOC progression and metastasis. cDNA microarray analysis indicated a dramatic downregulation of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in EOC cells placed in invasion-mimicking conditions (3-dimensional type I collagen). Examination of human EOC specimens revealed that CTGF expression was absent in 46% of the tested samples (n=41), but was present in 100% of normal ovarian epithelium samples (n=7). Reduced CTGF expression occurs in many types of cells and may be a general phenomenon displayed by cells encountering a 3D environment. CTGF levels were inversely correlated with invasion such that downregulation of CTGF increased, while its upregulation reduced, collagen invasion. Cells adhered preferentially to a surface comprised of both collagen I and CTGF relative to either component alone using α6β1 and α3β1 integrins. Together these data suggest that downregulation of CTGF in EOC cells may be important for cell invasion through modulation of cell-matrix adhesion. PMID:19382180

  13. Visualization of polarized membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase activity in live cells by fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouyang, Mingxing; Lu, Shaoying; Li, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Jing; Seong, Jihye; Giepmans, Ben N. G.; Shyy, John Y. -J.; Weiss, Stephen J.; Wang, Yingxiao

    2008-01-01

    Membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) plays a critical role in cancer cell biology by proteolytically remodeling the extracellular matrix. Utilizing fluorescence resonance energy transfer ( FRET) imaging, we have developed a novel biosensor, with its sensing element anchoring at the

  14. Feeder-free and xeno-free culture of human pluripotent stem cells using UCBS matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yan; Yang, Hua; Yu, Li; Xu, Chang Long; Zeng, Yi; Qiu, Ying; Li, Dong Sheng

    2015-10-01

    The ideal medium for human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) culture should be feeder-free, xeno-free, and completely defined. The present study aims to establish a new feeder-free and xeno-free system for culturing hPSCs. The system consists of the matrix, which was prepared from human umbilical cord blood serum (UCBS) and used to coat the culture plates, and the xeno-free medium, which was conventional serum-free hES medium supplemented with high concentrations of bFGF and Fibronectin. Compared with matrigel and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), the UCBS matrix was proved to be equally suitable for the growth of hPSCs. After a series of experiments with different media and cytokins, the UCBS matrix was found worked the best with the basic medium (BM) supplemented with 20 ng/mL bFGF, 10 ug/mL fibronectin and Y-27632 for culture of hES cells. The hPSCs maintained normal karyotype, high proliferation rate and self-renewal ability after continuous culture more than 10 passages in this feeder-free and xeno-free system. Furthermore, a new human embryonic stem (hES) cell line was derived from discarded day 3 embryos in this newly developed culture system. In conclusion, this feeder-free and xeno-free system could not only be used to the culture hPSCs, but could also be used to derive new hES cell lines. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  15. Artificial Polymeric Scaffolds as Extracellular Matrix Substitutes for Autologous Conjunctival Goblet Cell Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min; Storr-Paulsen, Thomas; Wang, Annie L; Ghezzi, Chiara E; Wang, Siran; Fullana, Matthew; Karamichos, Dimitrios; Utheim, Tor P; Islam, Rakibul; Griffith, May; Islam, M Mirazul; Hodges, Robin R; Wnek, Gary E; Kaplan, David L; Dartt, Darlene A

    2016-11-01

    We fabricated and investigated polymeric scaffolds that can substitute for the conjunctival extracellular matrix to provide a substrate for autologous expansion of human conjunctival goblet cells in culture. We fabricated two hydrogels and two silk films: (1) recombinant human collagen (RHC) hydrogel, (2) recombinant human collagen 2-methacryloylxyethyl phosphorylcholine (RHC-MPC) hydrogel, (3) arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) modified silk, and (4) poly-D-lysine (PDL) coated silk, and four electrospun scaffolds: (1) collagen, (2) poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), (3) poly(caprolactone) (PCL), and (4) poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). Coverslips and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were used for comparison. Human conjunctival explants were cultured on scaffolds for 9 to 15 days. Cell viability, outgrowth area, and the percentage of cells expressing markers for stratified squamous epithelial cells (cytokeratin 4) and goblet cells (cytokeratin 7) were determined. Most of cells grown on all scaffolds were viable except for PCL in which only 3.6 ± 2.2% of the cells were viable. No cells attached to PVA scaffold. The outgrowth was greatest on PDL-silk and PET. Outgrowth was smallest on PCL. All cells were CK7-positive on RHC-MPC while 84.7 ± 6.9% of cells expressed CK7 on PDL-silk. For PCL, 87.10 ± 3.17% of cells were CK7-positive compared to PET where 67.10 ± 12.08% of cells were CK7-positive cells. Biopolymer substrates in the form of hydrogels and silk films provided for better adherence, proliferation, and differentiation than the electrospun scaffolds and could be used for conjunctival goblet cell expansion for eventual transplantation once undifferentiated and stratified squamous cells are included. Useful polymer scaffold design characteristics have emerged from this study.

  16. Collagen-binding VEGF mimetic peptide: Structure, matrix interaction, and endothelial cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tania R.

    Long term survival of artificial tissue constructs depends greatly on proper vascularization. In nature, differentiation of endothelial cells and formation of vasculature are directed by dynamic spatio-temporal cues in the extracellular matrix that are difficult to reproduce in vitro. In this dissertation, we present a novel bifunctional peptide that mimics matrix-bound vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which can be used to encode spatially controlled angiogenic signals in collagen-based scaffolds. The peptide, QKCMP, contains a collagen mimetic domain (CMP) that binds to type I collagen by a unique triple helix hybridization mechanism and a VEGF mimetic domain (QK) with pro-angiogenic activity. We demonstrate QKCMP's ability to hybridize with native and heat denatured collagens through a series of binding studies on collagen and gelatin substrates. Circular dichroism experiments show that the peptide retains the triple helical structure vital for collagen binding, and surface plasmon resonance study confirms the molecular interaction between the peptide and collagen strands. Cell culture studies demonstrate QKCMP's ability to induce endothelial cell morphogenesis and network formation as a matrix-bound factor in 2D and 3D collagen scaffolds. We also show that the peptide can be used to spatially modify collagen-based substrates to promote localized endothelial cell activation and network formation. To probe the biological events that govern these angiogenic cellular responses, we investigated the cell signaling pathways activated by collagen-bound QKCMP and determined short and long-term endothelial cell response profiles for p38, ERK1/2, and Akt signal transduction cascades. Finally, we present our efforts to translate the peptide's in vitro bioactivity to an in vivo burn injury animal model. When implanted at the wound site, QKCMP functionalized biodegradable hydrogels induce enhanced neovascularization in the granulation tissue. The results show QKCMP

  17. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 and membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase co-regulate axonal outgrowth of mouse retinal ganglion cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaublomme, Djoere; Buyens, Tom; De Groef, Lies

    2014-01-01

    regenerative therapies, an improved understanding of axonal outgrowth and the various molecules influencing it, is highly needed. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a family of zinc-dependent proteases that were sporadically reported to influence axon outgrowth. Using an ex vivo retinal explant model...

  18. Ulex europaeus I lectin induces activation of matrix-metalloproteinase-2 in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, D E; Yoshiji, H; Kim, J C; Thorgeirsson, U P

    1995-11-02

    In this report, we show that the lectin Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA I), which binds to alpha-linked fucose residues on the surface of endothelial cells, mediates activation of the 72-kDa matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). A dose-dependent increase in the active 62-kDa form of MMP-2 was observed in conditioned medium from monkey aortic endothelial cells (MAEC) following incubation with concentrations of UEA I ranging from 2 to 100 micrograms/ml. The increase in the 62-kDa MMP-2 gelatinolytic activity was not reflected by a rise in MMP-2 gene expression. The UEA I-mediated activation of MMP-2 was blocked by L-fucose, which competes with UEA I for binding to alpha-fucose. These findings may suggest that a similar in vivo mechanism exists, whereby adhesive interactions between tumor cell lectins and endothelial cells can mediate MMP-2 activation.

  19. [Bioanode for a microbial fuel cell based on Gluconobacter oxydans inummobilized into a polymer matrix].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alferov, S V; Minaĭcheva, P R; Arliapov, V A; Asulian, L D; Alferov, V A; Ponomareva, O N; Reshetilov, A N

    2014-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria Gluconobacter oxydans subsp. industrius RKM V-1280 were immobilized into a synthetic matrix based on polyvinyl alcohol modified with N-vinylpyrrolidone and used as biocatalysts for the development ofbioanodes for microbial fuel cells. The immobilization method did not significantly affect bacterial substrate specificity. Bioanodes based on immobilized bacteria functioned stably for 7 days. The maximum voltage (fuel cell signal) was reached when 100-130 µM of an electron transport mediator, 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol, was added into the anode compartment. The fuel cell signals reached a maximum at a glucose concentration higher than 6 mM. The power output of the laboratory model of a fuel cell based on the developed bioanode reached 7 mW/m2 with the use of fermentation industry wastes as fuel.

  20. Morphological and ultrastructural characteristics of extracellular matrix changes in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Usha; Rai, Himanshu; Jain, Arun K

    2011-01-01

    The biology of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), including its progression from dysplasia to carcinoma, "field effects", genetic changes in tumor associated mucosa (TAM) and effect of matrix metalloproteinases in breaking down of matrix proteins to facilitate invasion, has been well documented. However, what remains to be done is to extrapolate this knowledge to improve patient care. The aim of this study was to observe the extracellular matrix (ECM) changes with the routine histochemical stains available to most histopathologists. The study includes 72 cases of OSCC in which the tumor and adjacent normal appearing areas were sampled to study the ECM changes with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) and Verhoeff's-Van Gieson elastic stain (VVG). Basophilic fragmentation of collagen (H and E) and clumped short elastic fibers (VVG) were seen in 12 (16.7%) cases. Of the remaining cases, 18 (25%) had a dense lymphocytic infiltrate and had no demonstrable elastic fibers. Those cases with H and E changes were further studied and compared with normal mucosa for ultrastructural changes. The ultrastructural study demonstrated an increase in oxytalan, elaunin and elastic fibers and decrease in collagen fibers with some transformation changes associated with OSCCs and lymph node metastasis. Changes in transformation of collagen to elastic fibers and also the loss of both the fibers in areas of lymphocytic infiltration possibly indicate degradation of ECM fibers by factors released from the lymphocytes or tumor cells and the limiting effect on the tumor by ECM remodeling.

  1. Dynamin Participates in Focal Extracellular Matrix Degradation by Invasive CellsV⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassarre, Massimiliano; Pompeo, Arsenio; Beznoussenko, Galina; Castaldi, Claudia; Cortellino, Salvatore; McNiven, Mark A.; Luini, Alberto; Buccione, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    The degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) by matrix metalloproteases is crucial in physiological and pathological cell invasion alike. Degradation occurs at specific sites where invasive cells make contact with the ECM via specialized plasma membrane protrusions termed invadopodia. Herein, we show that the dynamin 2 (Dyn2), a GTPase implicated in the control of actin-driven cytoskeletal remodeling events and membrane transport, is necessary for focalized matrix degradation at invadopodia. Dynamin was inhibited by using two approaches: 1) expression of dominant negative GTPase-impaired or proline-rich domain-deleted Dyn2 mutants; and 2) inhibition of the dynamin regulator calcineurin by cyclosporin A. In both cases, the number and extension of ECM degradation foci were drastically reduced. To understand the site and mechanism of dynamin action, the cellular structures devoted to ECM degradation were analyzed by correlative confocal light-electron microscopy. Invadopodia were found to be organized into a previously undescribed ECM-degradation structure consisting of a large invagination of the ventral plasma membrane surface in close spatial relationship with the Golgi complex. Dyn2 seemed to be concentrated at invadopodia. PMID:12631724

  2. Myogenic Progenitor Cells Control Extracellular Matrix Production by Fibroblasts during Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Christopher S; Kirby, Tyler J; Kosmac, Kate; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2017-01-05

    Satellite cells, the predominant stem cell population in adult skeletal muscle, are activated in response to hypertrophic stimuli and give rise to myogenic progenitor cells (MPCs) within the extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds myofibers. This ECM is composed largely of collagens secreted by interstitial fibrogenic cells, which influence satellite cell activity and muscle repair during hypertrophy and aging. Here we show that MPCs interact with interstitial fibrogenic cells to ensure proper ECM deposition and optimal muscle remodeling in response to hypertrophic stimuli. MPC-dependent ECM remodeling during the first week of a growth stimulus is sufficient to ensure long-term myofiber hypertrophy. MPCs secrete exosomes containing miR-206, which represses Rrbp1, a master regulator of collagen biosynthesis, in fibrogenic cells to prevent excessive ECM deposition. These findings provide insights into how skeletal stem and progenitor cells interact with other cell types to actively regulate their extracellular environments for tissue maintenance and adaptation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Strengthening of Shear Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg

    The theory for concrete structures strengthened with fiber reinforced polymer materials has been developing for approximately two decades, and there are at the present time numerous guidelines covering strengthening of many commonly encountered structural building elements. Strengthening of in......-plane loaded walls and disks is however not included in any guidelines, and only a small fraction of scientists have initiated research within this topic. Furthermore, studies of the principal behavior and response of a strengthened disk has not yet been investigated satisfactorily, and this is the principal...... that describes a unit width strip of a strengthened disk. The unit width strip is named a strengthened concrete tension member and contains a single tensile crack and four debonding cracks. Analysis of the member results in closed form expressions for the load-crack opening relationship. Further analysis...

  4. Fluctuating Roles of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi-Tuuli Vilen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One hallmark of cancer is the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM, which is caused by proteinases. In oral cancers, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, especially MMP-9, are associated with this degradation. MMPs break down the ECM allowing cancer to spread; they also release various factors from their cryptic sites, including cytokines. These factors modulate cell behavior and enhance cancer progression by regulating angiogenesis, migration, proliferation, and invasion. The development of early metastases is typical for oral cancer, and increased MMP-9 expression is associated with a poor disease prognosis. However, many studies fail to relate MMP-9 expression with metastasis formation. Contrary to earlier models, recent studies show that MMP-9 plays a protective role in oral cancers. Therefore, the role of MMP-9 is complicated and may fluctuate throughout the different types and stages of oral cancers.

  5. Decellularized bone extracellular matrix and human dental pulp stem cells as a construct for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduano, Francesco; Marrelli, Massimo; Alom, Noura; Amer, Mahetab; White, Lisa J; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Tatullo, Marco

    2017-06-01

    Dental pulp tissue represents a source of mesenchymal stem cells that have a strong differentiation potential towards the osteogenic lineage. The objective of the current study was to examine in vitro osteogenic induction of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) cultured on hydrogel scaffolds derived from decellularized bone extracellular matrix (bECM) compared to collagen type I (Col-I), the major component of bone matrix. DPSCs in combination with bECM hydrogels were cultured under three different conditions: basal medium, osteogenic medium and medium supplemented with growth factors (GFs) and cell growth, mineral deposition, gene and protein expression were investigated. The DPSCs/bECM hydrogel constructs cultured in basal medium showed that cells were viable after three weeks and that the expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX-2) and bone sialoprotein (BSP) were significantly upregulated in the absence of extra osteogenic inducers compared to Col-I hydrogel scaffolds. In addition, the protein expression levels of BSP and osteocalcin were higher on bECM with respect to Col-I hydrogel scaffolds. Furthermore, DPSCs/bECM hydrogels cultured with osteogenic or GFs supplemented medium displayed a higher upregulation of the osteo-specific markers compared to Col-I hydrogels in identical media. Collectively, our results demonstrate that bECM hydrogels might be considered as suitable scaffolds to support osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs.

  6. Differential integrin expression regulates cell sensing of the matrix nanoscale geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cio, Stefania; Bøggild, Thea M L; Connelly, John; Sutherland, Duncan S; Gautrot, Julien E

    2017-03-01

    The nanoscale geometry and topography of the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) is an important parameter controlling cell adhesion and phenotype. Similarly, integrin expression and the geometrical maturation of adhesions they regulate have been correlated with important changes in cell spreading and phenotype. However, how integrin expression controls the nanoscale sensing of the ECM geometry is not clearly understood. Here we develop a new nanopatterning technique, electrospun nanofiber lithography (ENL), which allows the production of a quasi-2D fibrous nanopattern with controlled dimensions (250-1000nm) and densities. ENL relies on electrospun fibres to act as a mask for the controlled growth of protein-resistant polymer brushes. SEM, AFM and immunofluorescence imaging were used to characterise the resulting patterns and the adsorption of the extra-cellular matrix protein fibronectin to the patterned fibres. The control of adhesion formation was studied, as well as the remodelling and deposition of novel matrix. Cell spreading was found to be regulated by the size of fibres, similarly to previous observations made on circular nanopatterns. However, cell shape and polarity were more significantly affected. These changes correlated with important cytoskeleton reorganisation, with a gradual decrease in stress fibre formation as the pattern dimensions decrease. Finally, the differential expression of αvβ3 and α5β1 integrins in engineered cell lines was found to be an important mediator of cell sensing of the nanoscale geometry of the ECM. The novel nanofiber patterns developed in this study, via ENL, mimic the geometry and continuity of natural matrices found in the stroma of tissues, whilst preserving a quasi-2D character (to facilitate imaging and for comparison with other 2D systems such as micropatterned monolayers and circular nanopatches generated by colloidal lithography). These results demonstrate that the nanoscale geometry of the ECM plays an important role

  7. Cardiogel: a nano-matrix scaffold with potential application in cardiac regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajalakshmi Santhakumar

    Full Text Available 3-Dimensional conditions for the culture of Bone Marrow-derived Stromal/Stem Cells (BMSCs can be generated with scaffolds of biological origin. Cardiogel, a cardiac fibroblast-derived Extracellular Matrix (ECM has been previously shown to promote cardiomyogenic differentiation of BMSCs and provide protection against oxidative stress. To determine the matrix composition and identify significant proteins in cardiogel, we investigated the differences in the composition of this nanomatrix and a BMSC-derived ECM scaffold, termed as 'mesogel'. An optimized protocol was developed that resulted in efficient decellularization while providing the maximum yield of ECM. The proteins were sequentially solubilized using acetic acid, Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS and Dithiothreitol (DTT. These proteins were then analyzed using surfactant-assisted in-solution digestion followed by nano-liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS. The results of these analyses revealed significant differences in their respective compositions and 17 significant ECM/matricellular proteins were differentially identified between cardiogel and mesogel. We observed that cardiogel also promoted cell proliferation, adhesion and migration while enhancing cardiomyogenic differentiation and angiogenesis. In conclusion, we developed a reproducible method for efficient extraction and solubilization of in vitro cultured cell-derived extracellular matrix. We report several important proteins differentially identified between cardiogel and mesogel, which can explain the biological properties of cardiogel. We also demonstrated the cardiomyogenic differentiation and angiogenic potential of cardiogel even in the absence of any external growth factors. The transplantation of Bone Marrow derived Stromal/Stem Cells (BMSCs cultured on such a nanomatrix has potential applications in regenerative therapy for Myocardial Infarction (MI.

  8. Influence of the extracellular matrix on endogenous and transplanted stem cells after brain damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, Lars; Faissner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The limited regeneration capacity of the adult central nervous system (CNS) requires strategies to improve recovery of patients. In this context, the interaction of endogenous as well as transplanted stem cells with their environment is crucial. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms could help to improve regeneration by targeted manipulation. In the course of reactive gliosis, astrocytes upregulate Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and start, in many cases, to proliferate. Beside GFAP, subpopulations of these astroglial cells coexpress neural progenitor markers like Nestin. Although cells express these markers, the proportion of cells that eventually give rise to neurons is limited in many cases in vivo compared to the situation in vitro. In the first section, we present the characteristics of endogenous progenitor-like cells and discuss the differences in their neurogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. As the environment plays an important role for survival, proliferation, migration, and other processes, the second section of the review describes changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM), a complex network that contains numerous signaling molecules. It appears that signals in the damaged CNS lead to an activation and de-differentiation of astrocytes, but do not effectively promote neuronal differentiation of these cells. Factors that influence stem cells during development are upregulated in the damaged brain as part of an environment resembling a stem cell niche. We give a general description of the ECM composition, with focus on stem cell-associated factors like the glycoprotein Tenascin-C (TN-C). Stem cell transplantation is considered as potential treatment strategy. Interaction of transplanted stem cells with the host environment is critical for the outcome of stem cell-based therapies. Possible mechanisms involving the ECM by which transplanted stem cells might improve recovery are discussed in the last section. PMID:25191223

  9. Three distinct cell populations express extracellular matrix proteins and increase in number during skeletal muscle fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Mark A; Mukund, Kavitha; Subramaniam, Shankar; Brenner, David; Lieber, Richard L

    2017-02-01

    Tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structural support and creates unique environments for resident cells (Bateman JF, Boot-Handford RP, Lamandé SR. Nat Rev Genet 10: 173-183, 2009; Kjaer M. Physiol Rev 84: 649-98, 2004). However, the identities of cells responsible for creating specific ECM components have not been determined. In striated muscle, the identity of these cells becomes important in disease when ECM changes result in fibrosis and subsequent increased tissue stiffness and dysfunction. Here we describe a novel approach to isolate and identify cells that maintain the ECM in both healthy and fibrotic muscle. Using a collagen I reporter mouse, we show that there are three distinct cell populations that express collagen I in both healthy and fibrotic skeletal muscle. Interestingly, the number of collagen I-expressing cells in all three cell populations increases proportionally in fibrotic muscle, indicating that all cell types participate in the fibrosis process. Furthermore, while some profibrotic ECM and ECM-associated genes are significantly upregulated in fibrotic muscle, the fibrillar collagen gene expression profile is not qualitatively altered. This suggests that muscle fibrosis in this model results from an increased number of collagen I-expressing cells and not the initiation of a specific fibrotic collagen gene expression program. Finally, in fibrotic muscle, we show that these collagen I-expressing cell populations differentially express distinct ECM proteins-fibroblasts express the fibrillar components of ECM, fibro/adipogenic progenitors cells differentially express basal laminar proteins, and skeletal muscle progenitor cells differentially express genes important for the satellite cell. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Activity of Matrix Metalloproteinase in Airway Epithelial Cells of COPD Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To examine the mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and the gelatinase activity of its inhibitor, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) in the primary epithelial cells of patients with COPD, airway epithelial cells were taken from 15 COPD patients and cultured in vitro. The patients were divided into three groups, COPD group, normal smoking control group and non-smoking control group, with 5 subjects in each group, on basis of the smoking history and lung function. The semi-qualitative RT-PCR was employed to determine the mRNA levels of MMP 9 and TIMP-1 and SDS PAGE was used for the determination of the gelatinase activity of MMP-9 and TIMP-1. Our result showed that the mRNA of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in epithelial cells of the non-smoking subjects was at a low level The mRNA of MMP 9 and TIMP-1 in COPD patients and smokers was significantly higher than that in non-smokers (P<0.05). No significant difference was found in the levels of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in epithelial cells between the COPD patients and smokers. The MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratios in COPD patients and smokers were significantly lower than that of non-smokers (P<0.05). The gelatinase activity in the epithelial cells of both COPD patients and normal smokers was increased (P<0.05), but no difference existed in the gelatinase activity in the epithelial cells between COPD patients and normal smokers. It is concluded that the transcription of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 and the gelatinase activity of MMP-9 and MMP-2 in the epithelial cells in COPD patients were increased, which resulted in an imbalance of MMP-9/TIMP-1, thereby causing pulmonary fibrosis. These factors play important roles in the pathogenesis of COPD.

  11. Uridine 5'-triphosphate promotes in vitro Schwannoma cell migration through matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloa Lamarca

    Full Text Available In response to peripheral nerve injury, Schwann cells adopt a migratory phenotype and modify the extracellular matrix to make it permissive for cell migration and axonal re-growth. Uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP and other nucleotides are released during nerve injury and activate purinergic receptors expressed on the Schwann cell surface, but little is known about the involvement of purine signalling in wound healing. We studied the effect of UTP on Schwannoma cell migration and wound closure and the intracellular signaling pathways involved. We found that UTP treatment induced Schwannoma cell migration through activation of P2Y2 receptors and through the increase of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 activation and expression. Knockdown P2Y2 receptor or MMP-2 expression greatly reduced wound closure and MMP-2 activation induced by UTP. MMP-2 activation evoked by injury or UTP was also mediated by phosphorylation of all 3 major mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs: JNK, ERK1/2, and p38. Inhibition of these MAPK pathways decreased both MMP-2 activation and cell migration. Interestingly, MAPK phosphorylation evoked by UTP exhibited a biphasic pattern, with an early transient phosphorylation 5 min after treatment, and a late and sustained phosphorylation that appeared at 6 h and lasted up to 24 h. Inhibition of MMP-2 activity selectively blocked the late, but not the transient, phase of MAPK activation. These results suggest that MMP-2 activation and late MAPK phosphorylation are part of a positive feedback mechanism to maintain the migratory phenotype for wound healing. In conclusion, our findings show that treatment with UTP stimulates in vitro Schwannoma cell migration and wound repair through a MMP-2-dependent mechanism via P2Y2 receptors and MAPK pathway activation.

  12. Tooth root regeneration using dental follicle cell sheets in combination with a dentin matrix - based scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Chen, Gang; Li, Jie; Zou, Qing; Xie, Dan; Chen, Yali; Wang, Hang; Zheng, Xiaohui; Long, Jie; Tang, Wei; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2012-03-01

    Stem cell mediated tissue engineering has been acknowledged as a prospective strategy for repairing and replacing damaged and lost tissues. However, the low survival rate of implanted stem cells proves to be a major challenge in the management of transplantation failures. While previous studies have indicated the effectiveness of tissue engineered cell sheets in improving the survival rate of implanted cells, we have recently demonstrated the use of treated dentin matrix (TDM) as a biological scaffold and dental follicle cells (DFCs) as the seeding cells for dentinogenesis and tooth root construction. This study proposes a strategy utilizing TDM with human dental follicle cell sheets (DFCSs) for root regeneration. The biological characteristics and changes of human DFCSs under the effect of TDM were studied with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, immunofluorescence microscopy, immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR. DFCSs combined with TDM were implanted subcutaneously into the dorsum of mice. Histological examination of the harvested grafts revealed a whirlpool-like alignment of the DFCs in multiple layers that were positive for COLI, integrinβ1, fibronectin and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), suggestive of the formation of a rich extracellular matrix. DFCSs, under the effect of TDM, highly expressed DMP-1 and bone sialoprotein (BSP), indicating their potential for odontogenesis and osteogenesis. Importantly, in vivo, TDM could induce and support DFCSs to develop new dentin-pulp like tissues and cementum-periodontal complexes that were positive for markers such as DSP, nestin and VIII factors, COLI and cementum attachment protein (CAP), implying successful root regeneration. Therefore, DFCSs combined with TDM may prove to be a better strategy for the construction of tooth root, and is a prospective approach that could be utilized for the treatment of root or tooth defect or loss in future. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All

  13. Ultrasensitive detection of drug resistant cancer cells in biological matrixes using an amperometric nanobiosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Pranjal; Noh, Hui-Bog; Pallela, Ramjee; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2015-08-15

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a key issue in the failure of cancer chemotherapy and its detection will be helpful to develop suitable therapeutic strategies for cancer patients and overcome the death rates. In this direction, we designed a new amperometric sensor (a medical device prototype) to detect drug resistant cancer cells by sensing "Permeability glycoprotein (P-gp)". The sensor probe is fabricated by immobilizing monoclonal P-gp antibody on the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conducting polymer composite. The detection relies on a sandwich-type approach using a bioconjugate, where the aminophenyl boronic acid (APBA) served as a recognition molecule which binds with the cell surface glycans and hydrazine (Hyd) served as an electrocatalyst for the reduction of H2O2 which are attached on multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) (APBA-MWCNT-Hyd). A linear range for the cancer cell detection is obtained between 50 and 100,000 cells/mL with the detection limit of 23±2 cells/mL. The proposed immunosensor is successfully applied to detect MDR cancer cells (MDRCC) in serum and mixed cell samples. Interferences by drug sensitive (SKBr-3 and HeLa), noncancerous cells (HEK-293 and OSE), and other chemical molecules present in the real sample matrix are examined. The sensitivity of the proposed immunosensor is excellent compared with the conventional reporter antibody based assay. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Growth and differentiation of human lens epithelial cells in vitro on matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E. A.; Bjornstad, K. A.; Chang, P. Y.; McNamara, M. P.; Chang, E.; Aragon, G.; Lin, S. P.; Lui, G.; Polansky, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To characterize the growth and maturation of nonimmortalized human lens epithelial (HLE) cells grown in vitro. METHODS: HLE cells, established from 18-week prenatal lenses, were maintained on bovine corneal endothelial (BCE) extracellular matrix (ECM) in medium supplemented with basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2). The identity, growth, and differentiation of the cultures were characterized by karyotyping, cell morphology, and growth kinetics studies, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunofluorescence, and Western blot analysis. RESULTS: HLE cells had a male, human diploid (2N = 46) karyotype. The population-doubling time of exponentially growing cells was 24 hours. After 15 days in culture, cell morphology changed, and lentoid formation was evident. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) indicated expression of alphaA- and betaB2-crystallin, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1), and major intrinsic protein (MIP26) in exponential growth. Western analyses of protein extracts show positive expression of three immunologically distinct classes of crystallin proteins (alphaA-, alphaB-, and betaB2-crystallin) with time in culture. By Western blot analysis, expression of p57(KIP2), a known marker of terminally differentiated fiber cells, was detectable in exponential cultures, and levels increased after confluence. MIP26 and gamma-crystallin protein expression was detected in confluent cultures, by using immunofluorescence, but not in exponentially growing cells. CONCLUSIONS: HLE cells can be maintained for up to 4 months on ECM derived from BCE cells in medium containing FGF-2. With time in culture, the cells demonstrate morphologic characteristics of, and express protein markers for, lens fiber cell differentiation. This in vitro model will be useful for investigations of radiation-induced cataractogenesis and other studies of lens toxicity.

  15. Scleraxis is required for cell lineage differentiation and extracellular matrix remodeling during murine heart valve formation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levay, Agata K; Peacock, Jacqueline D; Lu, Yinhui; Koch, Manuel; Hinton, Robert B; Kadler, Karl E; Lincoln, Joy

    2008-10-24

    Heart valve structures, derived from mesenchyme precursor cells, are composed of differentiated cell types and extracellular matrix arranged to facilitate valve function. Scleraxis (scx) is a transcription factor required for tendon cell differentiation and matrix organization. This study identified high levels of scx expression in remodeling heart valve structures at embryonic day 15.5 through postnatal stages using scx-GFP reporter mice and determined the in vivo function using mice null for scx. Scx(-/-) mice display significantly thickened heart valve structures from embryonic day 17.5, and valves from mutant mice show alterations in valve precursor cell differentiation and matrix organization. This is indicated by decreased expression of the tendon-related collagen type XIV, increased expression of cartilage-associated genes including sox9, as well as persistent expression of mesenchyme cell markers including msx1 and snai1. In addition, ultrastructure analysis reveals disarray of extracellular matrix and collagen fiber organization within the valve leaflet. Thickened valve structures and increased expression of matrix remodeling genes characteristic of human heart valve disease are observed in juvenile scx(-/-) mice. In addition, excessive collagen deposition in annular structures within the atrioventricular junction is observed. Collectively, our studies have identified an in vivo requirement for scx during valvulogenesis and demonstrate its role in cell lineage differentiation and matrix distribution in remodeling valve structures.

  16. Implementation and Evaluation of Fock Matrix Calculation Program on the Cell Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Tetsuo; Inadomi, Yuichi; Inoue, Koji; Murakami, Kazuaki J.

    2007-12-01

    Various processor architectures have been proposed until today, and the performance has improved remarkably. Recently, the Chip Multi-processors (CMPs), which has many processor cores onto a chip, are proposed for further performance improvement. The Cell processor is one of such CMP and shows high computational performance. Although this processor is designed for the multimedia, that high performance character can be utilized to molecular orbital calculation. In this study we implemented Fock matrix construction program on the Cell processor, and evaluated computational performance. As a result, there were two kinds of main stalls by the branch prediction and the data alignment, which are controlled by software mechanism for the simplification of the Cell processor hardware. It is possible to improve the performance about 30%, if the branch prediction hit ratio could be improved to 99%. For data alignment stall, a part of stalls, which is originated by data shuffle pipeline, could be decreased by preparing hardware data alignment mechanism.

  17. Diversity of matrix protein in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and measles virus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, T; Yoshikawa, Y; Yamanouchi, K

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the viral matrix (M) proteins in Vero cells infected with 18 strains of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) virus and measles virus was examined by immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis using an anti-M monospecific serum and two sera against the M protein specific synthetic peptides. By immunocytochemistry using the anti-M monospecific serum, M protein was detected in all of the virus-infected cells regardless of cell-free virus production. M proteins of the seven non-productive strains were found to vary significantly in their epitope, in their reactivity to different assay systems, and in their molecular weight, whereas M proteins of the other 11 productive strains were detected consistently. These results suggest diversification of M protein of the non-productive strains.

  18. Scattering matrix analysis for evaluating the photocurrent in hydrogenated-amorphous-silicon-based thin film solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Myunghun; Lee, Seong Hyun; Lim, Jung Wook; Yun, Sun Jin

    2014-11-01

    A scattering matrix (S-matrix) analysis method was developed for evaluating hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H)-based thin film solar cells. In this approach, light wave vectors A and B represent the incoming and outgoing behaviors of the incident solar light, respectively, in terms of coherent wave and incoherent intensity components. The S-matrix determines the relation between A and B according to optical effects such as reflection and transmission, as described by the Fresnel equations, scattering at the boundary surfaces, or scattering within the propagation medium, as described by the Beer-Lambert law and the change in the phase of the propagating light wave. This matrix can be used to evaluate the behavior of angle-incident coherent and incoherent light simultaneously, and takes into account not only the light scattering process at material boundaries (haze effects) but also nonlinear optical processes within the material. The optical parameters in the S-matrix were determined by modeling both a 2%-gallium-doped zinc oxide transparent conducting oxide and germanium-compounded a-Si:H (a-SiGe:H). Using the S-matrix equations, the photocurrent for an a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H tandem cell and the optical loss in semitransparent a-Si:H solar cells for use in building-integrated photovoltaic applications were analyzed. The developed S-matrix method can also be used as a general analysis tool for various thin film solar cells.

  19. Phospholipases of Mineralization Competent Cells and Matrix Vesicles: Roles in Physiological and Pathological Mineralizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Buchet

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The present review aims to systematically and critically analyze the current knowledge on phospholipases and their role in physiological and pathological mineralization undertaken by mineralization competent cells. Cellular lipid metabolism plays an important role in biological mineralization. The physiological mechanisms of mineralization are likely to take place in tissues other than in bones and teeth under specific pathological conditions. For instance, vascular calcification in arteries of patients with renal failure, diabetes mellitus or atherosclerosis recapitulates the mechanisms of bone formation. Osteoporosis—a bone resorbing disease—and rheumatoid arthritis originating from the inflammation in the synovium are also affected by cellular lipid metabolism. The focus is on the lipid metabolism due to the effects of dietary lipids on bone health. These and other phenomena indicate that phospholipases may participate in bone remodelling as evidenced by their expression in smooth muscle cells, in bone forming osteoblasts, chondrocytes and in bone resorbing osteoclasts. Among various enzymes involved, phospholipases A1 or A2, phospholipase C, phospholipase D, autotaxin and sphingomyelinase are engaged in membrane lipid remodelling during early stages of mineralization and cell maturation in mineralization-competent cells. Numerous experimental evidences suggested that phospholipases exert their action at various stages of mineralization by affecting intracellular signaling and cell differentiation. The lipid metabolites—such as arachidonic acid, lysophospholipids, and sphingosine-1-phosphate are involved in cell signaling and inflammation reactions. Phospholipases are also important members of the cellular machinery engaged in matrix vesicle (MV biogenesis and exocytosis. They may favour mineral formation inside MVs, may catalyse MV membrane breakdown necessary for the release of mineral deposits into extracellular matrix (ECM, or

  20. Thermomechanical analysis of freezing-induced cell-fluid-matrix interactions in engineered tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bumsoo; Teo, Ka Yaw; Ghosh, Soham; Dutton, J. Craig; Grinnell, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Successful cryopreservation of functional engineered tissues (ETs) is significant to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, but it is extremely challenging to develop a successful protocol because the effects of cryopreservation parameters on the post-thaw functionality of ETs are not well understood. Particularly, the effects on the microstructure of their extracellular matrix (ECM) have not been well studied, which determines many functional properties of the ETs. In this study, we investigated the effects of two key cryopreservation parameters – i) freezing temperature and corresponding cooling rate; and ii) the concentration of cryoprotective agent (CPA) on the ECM microstructure as well as the cellular viability. Using dermal equivalent as a model ET and DMSO as a model CPA, freezing-induced spatiotemporal deformation and post-thaw ECM microstructure of ETs was characterized while varying the freezing temperature and DMSO concentrations. The spatial distribution of cellular viability and the cellular actin cytoskeleton was also examined. The results showed that the tissue dilatation increased significantly with reduced freezing temperature (i.e., rapid freezing). A maximum limit of tissue deformation was observed for preservation of ECM microstructure, cell viability and cell-matrix adhesion. The dilatation decreased with the use of DMSO, and a freezing temperature dependent threshold concentration of DMSO was observed. The threshold DMSO concentration increased with lowering freezing temperature. In addition, an analysis was performed to delineate thermodynamic and mechanical components of freezing-induced tissue deformation. The results are discussed to establish a mechanistic understanding of freezing-induced cell-fluid-matrix interaction and phase change behavior within ETs in order to improve cryopreservation of ETs. PMID:23246556

  1. Three-dimensional aspects of matrix assembly by cells in the developing cornea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert D.; Knupp, Carlo; Pinali, Christian; Png, Kenneth M.Y.; Ralphs, James R.; Bushby, Andrew J.; Starborg, Tobias; Kadler, Karl E.; Quantock, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Cell-directed deposition of aligned collagen fibrils during corneal embryogenesis is poorly understood, despite the fact that it is the basis for the formation of a corneal stroma that must be transparent to visible light and biomechanically stable. Previous studies of the structural development of the specialized matrix in the cornea have been restricted to examinations of tissue sections by conventional light or electron microscopy. Here, we use volume scanning electron microscopy, with sequential removal of ultrathin surface tissue sections achieved either by ablation with a focused ion beam or by serial block face diamond knife microtomy, to examine the microanatomy of the cornea in three dimensions and in large tissue volumes. The results show that corneal keratocytes occupy a significantly greater tissue volume than was previously thought, and there is a clear orthogonality in cell and matrix organization, quantifiable by Fourier analysis. Three-dimensional reconstructions reveal actin-associated tubular cell protrusions, reminiscent of filopodia, but extending more than 30 µm into the extracellular space. The highly extended network of these membrane-bound structures mirrors the alignment of collagen bundles and emergent lamellae and, we propose, plays a fundamental role in dictating the orientation of collagen in the developing cornea. PMID:24385584

  2. Three-dimensional aspects of matrix assembly by cells in the developing cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert D; Knupp, Carlo; Pinali, Christian; Png, Kenneth M Y; Ralphs, James R; Bushby, Andrew J; Starborg, Tobias; Kadler, Karl E; Quantock, Andrew J

    2014-01-14

    Cell-directed deposition of aligned collagen fibrils during corneal embryogenesis is poorly understood, despite the fact that it is the basis for the formation of a corneal stroma that must be transparent to visible light and biomechanically stable. Previous studies of the structural development of the specialized matrix in the cornea have been restricted to examinations of tissue sections by conventional light or electron microscopy. Here, we use volume scanning electron microscopy, with sequential removal of ultrathin surface tissue sections achieved either by ablation with a focused ion beam or by serial block face diamond knife microtomy, to examine the microanatomy of the cornea in three dimensions and in large tissue volumes. The results show that corneal keratocytes occupy a significantly greater tissue volume than was previously thought, and there is a clear orthogonality in cell and matrix organization, quantifiable by Fourier analysis. Three-dimensional reconstructions reveal actin-associated tubular cell protrusions, reminiscent of filopodia, but extending more than 30 µm into the extracellular space. The highly extended network of these membrane-bound structures mirrors the alignment of collagen bundles and emergent lamellae and, we propose, plays a fundamental role in dictating the orientation of collagen in the developing cornea.

  3. Human dental pulp stem cells produce mineralized matrix in 2D and 3D cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Riccio

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the in vitro osteogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs in 2D cultures and 3D biomaterials. DPSCs, separated from dental pulp by enzymatic digestion, and isolated by magnetic cell sorting were differentiated toward osteogenic lineage on 2D surface by using an osteogenic medium. During the differentiation process, DPSCs express specific bone proteins like Runx-2, Osx, OPN and OCN with a sequential expression, analogous to those occurring during osteoblast differentiation, and produce extracellular calcium deposits. In order to differentiate cells in a 3D space that mimes the physiological environment, DPSCs were cultured in two distinct bioscaffolds, MatrigelTM and Collagen sponge. With the addition of a third dimension, osteogenic differentiation and mineralized extracellular matrix production significantly improved. In particular, in MatrigelTM DPSCs differentiated with osteoblast/osteocyte characteristics and connected by gap junction, and therefore formed calcified nodules with a 3D intercellular network. Furthermore, DPSCs differentiated in collagen sponge actively secrete human type I collagen micro-fibrils and form calcified matrix containing trabecular-like structures. These neo-formed DPSCs-scaffold devices may be used in regenerative surgical applications in order to resolve pathologies and traumas characterized by critical size bone defects.

  4. Performance of FRCM strengthened beams subject to fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-31

    Fabric Reinforced Cementitious Matrix (FRCM) systems have been developed to strengthen or rehabilitate existing concrete and masonry structures subject to damage, steel reinforcement corrosion or requiring resistance capacity improvements due to incr...

  5. Mineralized polycaprolactone nanofibrous matrix for odontogenesis of human dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Jin; Bae, Won-Jung; Kim, Joung-Mok; Kim, Jung-Ju; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to fabricate mineralized polycaprolactone nanofibrous scaffold and investigate its ability to elicit odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells, compared to the pure polycaprolactone scaffold. Polycaprolactone nanofibrous scaffold was produced by electrospinning, and the surface was mineralized with apatite. Cellular behaviors on the mineralized polycaprolactone scaffold were assessed in terms of cell adhesion, growth, and odontoblastic differentiation. To evaluate the signal transduction of human dental pulp cells, mRNA expression was analyzed and Western blotting was performed. Mineralized polycaprolactone showed improved cell proliferation, mineralized nodule formation, and expression of odontoblastic marker genes including alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, osteocalcin, dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), and dentin matrix protein-1, as compared with pure polycaprolactone. Although the cell adhesion on the mineralized polycaprolactone was similar to that of the polycaprolactone, the expression level of proteins including collagen type I and the key adhesion receptor (integrin components α1, α2, and β1) was upregulated in mineralized polycaprolactone compared to polycaprolactone. Especially, cells seeded onto mineralized polycaprolactone scaffolds showed significantly increased levels of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase, a marker of integrin activation, and downstream pathways, such as phosphor (p)-Akt, p-extracellular signal regulated kinase, p-c Jun N-terminal kinase, nuclear factor-kappa B, c-fos, and c-jun, compared with pure polycaprolactone. The mineralized polycaprolactone scaffold is attractive for dentin tissue engineering by promoting growth and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells through the integrin-mediated signaling pathway.

  6. Semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase and extracellular matrix deposition by smooth-muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Shannon D.; Trent, Margaret B.; Boor, Paul J.

    2002-01-01

    We have recently reported in vivo disruption of collagen and elastin architecture within blood vessel walls resulting from the selective inhibition of the enzyme semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO). This study further investigates the effects of SSAO inhibition on extracellular matrix deposition by smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) cultured from neonatal rat hearts. SMCs were characterized, SSAO activity was measured, and soluble and insoluble collagen and elastin in the extracellular matrix (ECM) were quantified. Cultured neonatal rat heart SMC exhibited a monotypic synthetic phenotype that likely represents a myofibroblast. Detectable levels of SSAO activity present throughout 30-d culture peaked at 7-14 d, coinciding with the production of ECM. The addition of enzyme inhibitors and alternate SSAO substrates (benzylamine) produced varied and, in some cases, marked changes in SSAO activity as well as in the composition of mature and soluble matrix components. Similar to our previous in vivo findings, in vitro SSAO inhibition produced aberrations in collagen and elastin deposition by heart SMC. Because changes in SSAO activity are associated with cardiovascular pathologic states, this enzyme may play a protective or modulating role by regulating ECM production during pathologic insult.

  7. Cell wall matrix polysaccharide distribution and cortical microtubule organization: two factors controlling mesophyll cell morphogenesis in land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiriou, P; Giannoutsou, E; Panteris, E; Apostolakos, P; Galatis, B

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the involvement of local differentiation of cell wall matrix polysaccharides and the role of microtubules in the morphogenesis of mesophyll cells (MCs) of three types (lobed, branched and palisade) in the dicotyledon Vigna sinensis and the fern Asplenium nidus. Homogalacturonan (HGA) epitopes recognized by the 2F4, JIM5 and JIM7 antibodies and callose were immunolocalized in hand-made leaf sections. Callose was also stained with aniline blue. We studied microtubule organization by tubulin immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. In both plants, the matrix cell wall polysaccharide distribution underwent definite changes during MC differentiation. Callose constantly defined the sites of MC contacts. The 2F4 HGA epitope in V. sinensis first appeared in MC contacts but gradually moved towards the cell wall regions facing the intercellular spaces, while in A. nidus it was initially localized at the cell walls delimiting the intercellular spaces, but finally shifted to MC contacts. In V. sinensis, the JIM5 and JIM7 HGA epitopes initially marked the cell walls delimiting the intercellular spaces and gradually shifted in MC contacts, while in A. nidus they constantly enriched MC contacts. In all MC types examined, the cortical microtubules played a crucial role in their morphogenesis. In particular, in palisade MCs, cortical microtubule helices, by controlling cellulose microfibril orientation, forced these MCs to acquire a truncated cone-like shape. Unexpectedly in V. sinensis, the differentiation of colchicine-affected MCs deviated completely, since they developed a cell wall ingrowth labyrinth, becoming transfer-like cells. The results of this work and previous studies on Zea mays (Giannoutsou et al., Annals of Botany 2013; 112: : 1067-1081) revealed highly controlled local cell wall matrix differentiation in MCs of species belonging to different plant groups. This, in coordination with microtubule-dependent cellulose microfibril

  8. Native extracellular matrix-derived semipermeable, optically transparent, and inexpensive membrane inserts for microfluidic cell culture.

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    Mondrinos, Mark J; Yi, Yoon-Suk; Wu, Nan-Kun; Ding, Xueting; Huh, Dongeun

    2017-09-12

    Semipermeable cell culture membranes are commonly used in multilayered microfluidic devices to mimic the basement membrane in vivo and to create compartmentalized microenvironments for physiological cell growth and differentiation. However, existing membranes are predominantly made up of synthetic polymers, providing limited capacity to replicate cellular interactions with native extracellular matrices that play a crucial role in the induction of physiological phenotypes. Here we describe a new type of cell culture membranes engineered from native extracellular matrix (ECM) materials that are thin, semipermeable, optically transparent, and amenable to integration into microfluidic cell culture devices. Facile and cost-effective fabrication of these membranes was achieved by controlled sequential steps of vitrification that transformed three-dimensional (3D) ECM hydrogels into structurally stable thin films. By modulating the composition of the ECM, our technique provided a means to tune key membrane properties such as optical transparency, stiffness, and porosity. For microfluidic cell culture, we constructed a multilayered microdevice consisting of two parallel chambers separated by a thin membrane insert derived from different types of ECM. This study showed that our ECM membranes supported attachment and growth of various types of cells (epithelial, endothelial, and mesenchymal cells) under perfusion culture conditions. Our data also revealed the promotive effects of the membranes on adhesion-associated intracellular signaling that mediates cell-ECM interactions. Moreover, we demonstrated the use of these membranes for constructing compartmentalized microfluidic cell culture systems to induce physiological tissue differentiation or to replicate interfaces between different tissue types. Our approach provides a robust platform to produce and engineer biologically active cell culture substrates that serve as promising alternatives to conventional synthetic

  9. Matrigel basement membrane matrix influences expression of microRNAs in cancer cell lines.

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    Price, Karina J; Tsykin, Anna; Giles, Keith M; Sladic, Rosemary T; Epis, Michael R; Ganss, Ruth; Goodall, Gregory J; Leedman, Peter J

    2012-10-19

    Matrigel is a medium rich in extracellular matrix (ECM) components used for three-dimensional cell culture and is known to alter cellular phenotypes and gene expression. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression and have roles in cancer. While miRNA profiles of numerous cell lines cultured on plastic have been reported, the influence of Matrigel-based culture on cancer cell miRNA expression is largely unknown. This study investigated the influence of Matrigel on the expression of miRNAs that might facilitate ECM-associated cancer cell growth. We performed miRNA profiling by microarray using two colon cancer cell lines (SW480 and SW620), identifying significant differential expression of miRNAs between cells cultured in Matrigel and on plastic. Many of these miRNAs have previously been implicated in cancer-related processes. A common Matrigel-induced miRNA signature comprised of up-regulated miR-1290 and miR-210 and down-regulated miR-29b and miR-32 was identified using RT-qPCR across five epithelial cancer cell lines (SW480, SW620, HT-29, A549 and MDA-MB-231). Experimental modulation of these miRNAs altered expression of their known target mRNAs involved in cell adhesion, proliferation and invasion, in colon cancer cell lines. Furthermore, ITGA5 was identified as a novel putative target of miR-32 that may facilitate cancer cell interactions with the ECM. We propose that culture of cancer cell lines in Matrigel more accurately recapitulates miRNA expression and function in cancer than culture on plastic and thus is a valuable approach to the in vitro study of miRNAs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Preparation and evaluation of human choroid extracellular matrix scaffolds for the study of cell replacement strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirco, Kathleen R; Worthington, Kristan S; Flamme-Wiese, Miles J; Riker, Megan J; Andrade, Joshua D; Ueberheide, Beatrix M; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A; Mullins, Robert F

    2017-07-15

    Endothelial cells (ECs) of the choriocapillaris are one of the first cell types lost during age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and cell replacement therapy is currently a very promising option for patients with advanced AMD. We sought to develop a reliable method for the production of human choroidal extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds, which will allow for the study of choroidal EC (CEC) replacement strategies in an environment that closely resembles the native tissue. Human RPE/choroid tissue was treated sequentially with Triton X-100, SDS, and DNase to remove all native cells. While all cells were successfully removed from the tissue, collagen IV, elastin, and laminin remained, with preserved architecture of the acellular vascular tubes. The ECM scaffolds were then co-cultured with exogenous ECs to determine if the tissue can support cell growth and allow EC reintegration into the decellularized choroidal vasculature. Both monkey and human ECs took up residence in the choriocapillary tubes of the decellularized tissue. Together, these data suggest that our decellularization methods are sufficient to remove all cellular material yet gentle enough to preserve tissue structure and allow for the optimization of cell replacement strategies. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a devastating disease affecting more than 600 million people worldwide. Endothelial cells of the choriocapillaris (CECs) are among the first cell types lost in early AMD, and cell replacement therapy is currently the most promising option for restoring vision in patients with advanced AMD. In order to study CEC replacement strategies we have generated a 3D choroid scaffold using a novel decellularization method in human RPE/choroid tissue. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing decellularization of human RPE/choroid, as well as recellularization of a choroid scaffold with CECs. This work will aid in our development and optimization of cell replacement strategies using

  11. Effect of culture media on expansion properties of human umbilical cord matrix-derived mesenchymal cells.

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    Salehinejad, Parvin; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Nematollahi-Mahani, Seyed Noureddin; Ali, Abdul Manaf; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Janzamin, Ehsan; Hajghani, Masoomeh

    2012-09-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been isolated from a number of different tissues, including umbilical cord. Because of the lack of a uniform approach to human umbilical cord matrix-derived mesenchymal (hUCM) cell expansion, we attempted to identify the optimum conditions for the production of a high quantity of hUCM cells by comparing two media. We compared the ability of Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium/F12 (DMEM/F12) and Alpha Minimum Essential Medium (α-MEM) with Glutamax (GL) (α-MEM/GL) to expand hUCM cells. For this purpose, hUCM cells were cultured in plates containing different culture media supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Culture dishes were left undisturbed for 10-14 days to allow propagation of the newly formed hUCM cells. The expansion properties, CD marker expression, differentiation potential, population doubling time (PDT) and cell activity were compared between the two groups. The hUCM cells harvested from each group were positive for MSC markers, including CD44, CD90 and CD105, while they were negative for the hematopoietic cell surface marker CD34. Differentiation into adipogenic and osteogenic lineages was confirmed for both treatments. Cell activity was higher in the α-MEM/GL group than the DMEM/F12 group. PDT was calculated to be 60 h for the DMEM/F12 group, while for the α-MEM/GL group it was 47 h. Our data reveal that α-MEM/GL with 10% FBS supports hUCM cell growth more strongly than DMEM/F12 with 10% FBS.

  12. A photoactivatable nanopatterned substrate for analyzing collective cell migration with precisely tuned cell-extracellular matrix ligand interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Shimizu

    Full Text Available Collective cell migration is involved in many biological and pathological processes. Various factors have been shown to regulate the decision to migrate collectively or individually, but the impact of cell-extracellular matrix (ECM interactions is still debated. Here, we developed a method for analyzing collective cell migration by precisely tuning the interactions between cells and ECM ligands. Gold nanoparticles are arrayed on a glass substrate with a defined nanometer spacing by block copolymer micellar nanolithography (BCML, and photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol (Mw  =  12 kDa, PEG12K and a cyclic RGD peptide, as an ECM ligand, are immobilized on this substrate. The remaining glass regions are passivated with PEG2K-silane to make cells interact with the surface via the nanoperiodically presented cyclic RGD ligands upon the photocleavage of PEG12K. On this nanostructured substrate, HeLa cells are first patterned in photo-illuminated regions, and cell migration is induced by a second photocleavage of the surrounding PEG12K. The HeLa cells gradually lose their cell-cell contacts and become disconnected on the nanopatterned substrate with 10-nm particles and 57-nm spacing, in contrast to their behavior on the homogenous substrate. Interestingly, the relationship between the observed migration collectivity and the cell-ECM ligand interactions is the opposite of that expected based on conventional soft matter models. It is likely that the reduced phosphorylation at tyrosine-861 of focal adhesion kinase (FAK on the nanopatterned surface is responsible for this unique migration behavior. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the presented method in understanding the process of determining collective and non-collective migration features in defined micro- and nano-environments and resolving the crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesions.

  13. Phospholipids reduce gastric cancer cell adhesion to extracellular matrix in vitro

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    Jansen Petra

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nidation of floating tumour cells initiates peritoneal carcinosis and limits prognosis of gastro-intestinal tumours. Adhesion of tumour cells to extracellular matrix components is a pivotal step in developing peritoneal dissemination of intraabdominal malignancies. Since phospholipids efficaciously prevented peritoneal adhesion formation in numerous animal studies we investigated their capacity to reduce adhesions of gastric cancer cells to extracellular matrix components (ECM. Methods Human gastric cancer cells (NUGC-4, Japanese Cancer Research Resources Bank, Tokyo, Japan were used in this study. Microtiter plates were coated with collagen IV (coll, laminin (ln and fibronectin (fn. Non-specific protein binding of the coated wells was blocked by adding 1% (w/v BSA (4°C, 12 h and rinsing the wells with Hepes buffer. 50.000 tumour cells in 100 μl medium were seeded into each well. Beside the controls, phospholipids were added in concentrations of 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0/100 μl medium. After an incubation interval of 30 min, attached cells were fixed and stained with 0.1% (w/v crystal violet. The dye was resuspended with 50 μl of 0.2% (v/v Triton X-100 per well and colour yields were then measured by an ELISA reader at 590 nm. Optical density (OD showed a linear relationship to the amount of cells and was corrected for dying of BSA/polystyrene without cells. Results The attachment of gastric cancer cells to collagen IV, laminin, and fibronectin could be significantly reduced up to 53% by phospholipid concentrations of 0.5 mg/100 μl and higher. Conclusion These results, within the scope of additional experimental studies on mice and rats which showed a significant reduction of peritoneal carcinosis, demonstrated the capacity of phospholipids in controlling abdominal nidation of tumour cells to ECM components. Lipid emulsions may be a beneficial adjunct in surgery of gastrointestinal malignancies.

  14. Dexamethasone-Mediated Activation of Fibronectin Matrix Assembly Reduces Dispersal of Primary Human Glioblastoma Cells.

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    Stephen Shannon

    Full Text Available Despite resection and adjuvant therapy, the 5-year survival for patients with Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is less than 10%. This poor outcome is largely attributed to rapid tumor growth and early dispersal of cells, factors that contribute to a high recurrence rate and poor prognosis. An understanding of the cellular and molecular machinery that drive growth and dispersal is essential if we are to impact long-term survival. Our previous studies utilizing a series of immortalized GBM cell lines established a functional causation between activation of fibronectin matrix assembly (FNMA, increased tumor cohesion, and decreased dispersal. Activation of FNMA was accomplished by treatment with Dexamethasone (Dex, a drug routinely used to treat brain tumor related edema. Here, we utilize a broad range of qualitative and quantitative assays and the use of a human GBM tissue microarray and freshly-isolated primary human GBM cells grown both as conventional 2D cultures and as 3D spheroids to explore the role of Dex and FNMA in modulating various parameters that can significantly influence tumor cell dispersal. We show that the expression and processing of fibronectin in a human GBM tissue-microarray is variable, with 90% of tumors displaying some abnormality or lack in capacity to secrete fibronectin or assemble it into a matrix. We also show that low-passage primary GBM cells vary in their capacity for FNMA and that Dex treatment reactivates this process. Activation of FNMA effectively "glues" cells together and prevents cells from detaching from the primary mass. Dex treatment also significantly increases the strength of cell-ECM adhesion and decreases motility. The combination of increased cohesion and decreased motility discourages in vitro and ex vivo dispersal. By increasing cell-cell cohesion, Dex also decreases growth rate of 3D spheroids. These effects could all be reversed by an inhibitor of FNMA and by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, RU

  15. Combination of platelet-rich plasma within periodontal ligament stem cell sheets enhances cell differentiation and matrix production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiu; Li, Bei; Yuan, Lin; Dong, Zhiwei; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Han; Sun, Jin; Ge, Song; Jin, Yan

    2017-03-01

    The longstanding goal of periodontal therapy is to regenerate periodontal tissues. Although platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been gaining increasing popularity for use in the orofacial region, whether PRP is useful for periodontal regeneration is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a mixture of periodontal ligament stem cell (PDLSC) sheets and PRP promoted bone regeneration, one of the most important measurement indices of periodontal tissue regenerative capability in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the effects of different doses of PRP on the differentiation of human PDLSCs. Then cell sheet formation, extracellular matrix deposition and osteogenic gene expression in response to different doses of PRP treatment during sheet grafting was investigated. Furthermore, we implanted PDLSC sheets treated with 1% PRP subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice to evaluate their bone-regenerative capability. The results revealed that 1% PRP significantly enhanced the osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs. Based on the production of extracellular matrix proteins, the results of scanning electron microscopy and the expression of the osteogenic genes ALP, Runx2, Col-1 and OCN, the provision of 1% PRP for PDLSC sheets was the most effective PRP administration mode for cell sheet formation. The results of in vivo transplantation showed that 1% PRP-mediated PDLSC sheets exhibited better periodontal tissue regenerative capability than those obtained without PRP intervention. These data suggest that a suitable concentration of PRP stimulation may enhance extracellular matrix production and positively affect cell behaviour in PDLSC sheets. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Gene expression signatures of extracellular matrix and growth factors during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Rekha; Ngangan, Alyssa V; Kemp, Melissa L; McDevitt, Todd C

    2012-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are uniquely capable of differentiating into somatic cell derivatives of all three germ lineages, therefore holding tremendous promise for developmental biology studies and regenerative medicine therapies. Although temporal patterns of phenotypic gene expression have been relatively well characterized during the course of differentiation, coincident patterns of endogenous extracellular matrix (ECM) and growth factor expression that accompany pluripotent stem cell differentiation remain much less well-defined. Thus, the objective of this study was to examine the global dynamic profiles of ECM and growth factor genes associated with early stages of pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation. Gene expression analysis of ECM and growth factors by ESCs differentiating as embryoid bodies for up to 14 days was assessed using PCR arrays (172 unique genes total), and the results were examined using a variety of data mining methods. As expected, decreases in the expression of genes regulating pluripotent stem cell fate preceded subsequent increases in morphogen expression associated with differentiation. Pathway analysis generated solely from ECM and growth factor gene expression highlighted morphogenic cell processes within the embryoid bodies, such as cell growth, migration, and intercellular signaling, that are required for primitive tissue and organ developmental events. In addition, systems analysis of ECM and growth factor gene expression alone identified intracellular molecules and signaling pathways involved in the progression of pluripotent stem cell differentiation that were not contained within the array data set. Overall, these studies represent a novel framework to dissect the complex, dynamic nature of the extracellular biochemical milieu of stem cell microenvironments that regulate pluripotent cell fate decisions and morphogenesis.

  17. Matrix stiffness and oxigen tension modulate epigenetic conversion of mouse dermal fibroblasts into insulin producing cells.

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    Alessandro Zenobi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In vivo, cells are surrounded by a three-dimensional (3-D organization of supporting matrix, neighboring cells and a gradient of chemical and mechanical signals (Antoni, et al., 2015. However, the present understanding of many biological processes is mainly based on two-dimensional (2-D systems that typically provides a static environment. In the present study, we tested two different 3-D culture systems and apply them to the epigenetic conversion of mouse dermal fibroblasts into insulin producing-cells (Pennarossa, et al., 2013; Brevini, et al., 2015, combining also the use of two oxygen tensions. In particular, cells were differentiated using the Polytetrafluoroethylene micro-bioreactor (PTFE and the Polyacrylamide (PAA gels with different stiffness (1 kPa; 4 kPa, maintained either in the standard 20% or in the more physiological 5% oxygen tensions. Standard differentiation performed on plastic substrates was assessed as a control. Cell morphology (Fig.1A, insulin expression and release were analyzed to evaluate the role of both stiffness and oxygen tension in the process. The results obtained showed that 1 kPa PAA gel and PTFE system induced a significantly higher insulin expression and release than plastic and 4 kPa PAA gel, especially in low oxygen condition (Fig.1B. Furthermore, comparing the efficiency of the two systems tested, 1 kPa PAA gel ensured a higher insulin transcription than PTFE (Fig.1C. Recent studies show the direct influence of substrates on lineage commitment and cell differentiation (Engler, et al., 2006; Evans, et al., 2009. The evidence here presented confirm that the use of an appropriate stiffness (similar to the pancreatic tissue, combined with a physiological oxygen tension, promote β-cell differentiation, with beneficial effects on cell functional activity and insulin release. The present results highlight the importance of 3-D cell rearrangement and oxigen tension to promote in vitro epigenetic conversion of

  18. A new synthetic matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor reduces human mesenchymal stem cell adipogenesis.

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    Dale B Bosco

    Full Text Available Development of adipose tissue requires the differentiation of less specialized cells, such as human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs, into adipocytes. Since matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs play critical roles in the cell differentiation process, we conducted investigations to determine if a novel mercaptosulfonamide-based MMP inhibitor (MMPI, YHJ-7-52, could affect hMSC adipogenic differentiation and lipid accumulation. Enzyme inhibition assays, adipogenic differentiation experiments, and quantitative PCR methods were employed to characterize this inhibitor and determine its effect upon adipogenesis. YHJ-7-52 reduced lipid accumulation in differentiated cells by comparable amounts as a potent hydroxamate MMPI, GM6001. However, YHJ-7-82, a non-inhibitory structural analog of YHJ-7-52, in which the zinc-binding thiol group is replaced by a hydroxyl group, had no effect on adipogenesis. The two MMPIs (YHJ-7-52 and GM6001 were also as effective in reducing lipid accumulation in differentiated cells as T0070907, an antagonist of peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPAR-gamma, at a similar concentration. PPAR-gamma is a typical adipogenic marker and a key regulatory protein for the transition of preadiopocyte to adipocyte. Moreover, MMP inhibition was able to suppress lipid accumulation in cells co-treated with Troglitazone, a PPAR-gamma agonist. Our results indicate that MMP inhibitors may be used as molecular tools for adipogenesis and obesity treatment research.

  19. Nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 regulates T-cell differentiation and allergic airway disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemmannur, S V; Badhwar, A J; Mirlekar, B; Malonia, S K; Gupta, M; Wadhwa, N; Bopanna, R; Mabalirajan, U; Majumdar, S; Ghosh, B; Chattopadhyay, S

    2015-11-01

    Asthma is a complex airway allergic disease involving the interplay of various cell types, cytokines, and transcriptional factors. Though many factors contribute to disease etiology, the molecular control of disease phenotype and responsiveness is not well understood. Here we report an essential role of the matrix attachment region (MAR)-binding protein SMAR1 in regulating immune response during allergic airway disease. Conditional knockout of SMAR1 in T cells rendered the mice resistant to eosinophilic airway inflammation against ovalbumin (OVA) allergen with low immunoglobulin E (IgE) and interleukin-5 (IL-5) levels. Moreover, a lower IgE/IgG2a ratio and higher interferon-γ (IFN-γ) response suggested aberrant skewing of T-cell differentiation toward type 1 helper T cell (Th1) response. We show that SMAR1 functions as a negative regulator of Th1 and Th17 differentiation by interacting with two potential and similar MAR regions present on the promoters of T-bet and IL-17. Thus, we present SMAR1 as a regulator of T-cell differentiation that favors the establishment of Th2 cells by modulating Th1 and Th17 responses.

  20. N-cadherin adhesive interactions modulate matrix mechanosensing and fate commitment of mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Brian D.; Mui, Keeley L.; Driscoll, Tristan P.; Caliari, Steven R.; Mehta, Kush D.; Assoian, Richard K.; Burdick, Jason A.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2016-12-01

    During mesenchymal development, the microenvironment gradually transitions from one that is rich in cell-cell interactions to one that is dominated by cell-ECM (extracellular matrix) interactions. Because these cues cannot readily be decoupled in vitro or in vivo, how they converge to regulate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) mechanosensing is not fully understood. Here, we show that a hyaluronic acid hydrogel system enables, across a physiological range of ECM stiffness, the independent co-presentation of the HAVDI adhesive motif from the EC1 domain of N-cadherin and the RGD adhesive motif from fibronectin. Decoupled presentation of these cues revealed that HAVDI ligation (at constant RGD ligation) reduced the contractile state and thereby nuclear YAP/TAZ localization in MSCs, resulting in altered interpretation of ECM stiffness and subsequent changes in downstream cell proliferation and differentiation. Our findings reveal that, in an evolving developmental context, HAVDI/N-cadherin interactions can alter stem cell perception of the stiffening extracellular microenvironment.

  1. Extracellular Alix regulates integrin-mediated cell adhesions and extracellular matrix assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shujuan; Wang, Ruoning; Zhou, Xi; Corvera, Joe; Kloc, Malgorzata; Sifers, Richard; Gallick, Gary E; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Kuang, Jian

    2008-08-06

    Alix (ALG-2-interacting protein X), a cytoplasmic adaptor protein involved in endosomal sorting and actin cytoskeleton assembly, is required for the maintenance of fibroblast morphology. As Alix has sequence similarity to adhesin in Entamoeba histolytica, and we observed that Alix is secreted, we determined whether extracellular Alix affects fibroblast morphology. Here, we demonstrate that secreted Alix is deposited on the substratum of non-immortalized WI38 fibroblasts. Antibody binding to extracellular Alix retards WI38 cell adhesion and spreading on fibronectin and vitronectin. Alix knockdown in WI38 cells reduces spreading and fibronectin assembly, and the effect is partially complemented by coating recombinant Alix on the cell substratum. Immortalized NIH/3T3 fibroblasts deposit less Alix on the substratum and have defects in alpha5beta1-integrin functions. Coating recombinant Alix on the culture substratum for NIH/3T3 cells promotes alpha5beta1-integrin-mediated cell adhesions and fibronectin assembly, and these effects require the aa 605-709 region of Alix. These findings demonstrate that a sub-population of Alix localizes extracellularly and regulates integrin-mediated cell adhesions and fibronectin matrix assembly.

  2. Regulation of hematopoietic stem cell behavior by the nanostructured presentation of extracellular matrix components.

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    Christine Anna Muth

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are maintained in stem cell niches, which regulate stem cell fate. Extracellular matrix (ECM molecules, which are an essential part of these niches, can actively modulate cell functions. However, only little is known on the impact of ECM ligands on HSCs in a biomimetic environment defined on the nanometer-scale level. Here, we show that human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC adhesion depends on the type of ligand, i.e., the type of ECM molecule, and the lateral, nanometer-scaled distance between the ligands (while the ligand type influenced the dependency on the latter. For small fibronectin (FN-derived peptide ligands such as RGD and LDV the critical adhesive interligand distance for HSPCs was below 45 nm. FN-derived (FN type III 7-10 and osteopontin-derived protein domains also supported cell adhesion at greater distances. We found that the expression of the ECM protein thrombospondin-2 (THBS2 in HSPCs depends on the presence of the ligand type and its nanostructured presentation. Functionally, THBS2 proved to mediate adhesion of HSPCs. In conclusion, the present study shows that HSPCs are sensitive to the nanostructure of their microenvironment and that they are able to actively modulate their environment by secreting ECM factors.

  3. Gold nanorods contained polyvinyl alcohol/chitosan nanofiber matrix for cell imaging and drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Eryun, E-mail: yaney359@126.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Qiqihar University, Qiqihar 161006 (China); Cao, Minglu [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Qiqihar University, Qiqihar 161006 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qiqihar University, Qiqihar 161006 (China); Wang, Yuwei; Hao, Xiaoyuan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Qiqihar University, Qiqihar 161006 (China); Pei, Shichun; Gao, Jianwei; Wang, Yan [College of Food and Biological Engineering, Qiqihar University, Qiqihar 161006 (China); Zhang, Zhuanfang [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qiqihar University, Qiqihar 161006 (China); Zhang, Deqing, E-mail: zhdqing@163.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Qiqihar University, Qiqihar 161006 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanorods (AuNRs) that contained polyvinyl alcohol/chitosan (PVA/CS) hybrid nanofibers with dual functions are successfully fabricated by a simple electrospinning method. The results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy indicate that AuNRs are indeed encapsulated into the PVA/CS hybrid nanofibers. FTIR spectra results demonstrate that the chemical structures of PVA and CS are not affected when the AuNRs are introduced into the fibers. In vitro cytotoxicity test reveals that the hybrid fibers involving AuNRs are completely biocompatible. The as-prepared fibers can be used as a carrier for anticancer agent doxorubicin (DOX), and the drug is delivered into the cell nucleus. The AuNRs and DOX incorporated fibers are effective for inhibiting the growth and proliferation of ovary cancer cells and they can also be used as the cell imaging agent due to the unique optical properties of AuNRs. The nanofiber matrix combining two functions of cell imaging and drug delivery may be of great application potential in biomedical-related areas. - Highlights: • The AuNRs contained PVA/CS nanofibers are fabricated by electrospinning. • The hybrid fibers involving AuNRs are completely biocompatible. • The DOX loaded fibers are effective for inhibiting the proliferation of cancer cells. • The nanofibers combined two functions of cell imaging and drug delivery.

  4. Bio-artificial tongue with tongue extracellular matrix and primary taste cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Seung; Cho, Ann-Na; Jin, Yoonhee; Kim, Jin; Kim, Suran; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2018-01-01

    Artificial taste devices for tastant sensing and taste information standardization are attracting increasing attention with the exponential growth of the food and beverage industries. Despite recent developments in artificial taste sensors incorporating polymers, lipid membranes, and synthetic vesicles, current devices have limited functionality and sensitivity, and are complex to manufacture. Moreover, such synthetic systems cannot simulate the taste signal transmissions that are critical for complicated taste perception. The current document describes a primary taste cell-based artificial tongue that can mimic taste sensing. To maintain viable and functional taste cells required for in vitro tastant sensing, a tongue extracellular matrix (TEM) prepared by decellularization of tongue tissue was applied to two- and three-dimensional taste cell cultures. The TEM-based system recreates the tongue's microenvironment and significantly improves the functionality of taste cells for sensing tastant molecules by enhancing cellular adhesion and gustatory gene expression compared with conventional collagen-based systems. The TEM-based platform simulates signal transmission from tastant-treated taste cells to adjacent neuronal cells, which was impossible with previous artificial taste sensors. The artificial tongue device may provide highly efficient, functional sensors for tastant detection and in vitro organ models that mimic the tongue allowing elucidation of the mechanisms of taste. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Extracellular matrix from human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a scaffold for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bo; Rao, Feng; Guo, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Xun; Wang, Yi-Guo; Liu, Shu-Yun; Wang, Ai-Yuan; Guo, Quan-Yi; Meng, Hao-Ye; Zhao, Qing; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Yu; Lu, Shi-Bi

    2016-07-01

    The extracellular matrix, which includes collagens, laminin, or fibronectin, plays an important role in peripheral nerve regeneration. Recently, a Schwann cell-derived extracellular matrix with classical biomaterial was used to mimic the neural niche. However, extensive clinical use of Schwann cells remains limited because of the limited origin, loss of an autologous nerve, and extended in vitro culture times. In the present study, human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs), which are easily accessible and more proliferative than Schwann cells, were used to prepare an extracellular matrix. We identified the morphology and function of hUCMSCs and investigated their effect on peripheral nerve regeneration. Compared with a non-coated dish tissue culture, the hUCMSC-derived extracellular matrix enhanced Schwann cell proliferation, upregulated gene and protein expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor in Schwann cells, and enhanced neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglion neurons. These findings suggest that the hUCMSC-derived extracellular matrix promotes peripheral nerve repair and can be used as a basis for the rational design of engineered neural niches.

  6. A Gene Expression-Based Comparison of Cell Adhesion to Extracellular Matrix and RGD-Terminated Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobers, Courtney J.; Wood, Sarah E.; Mrksich, Milan

    2015-01-01

    This work uses global gene expression analysis to compare the extent to which model substrates presenting peptide adhesion motifs mimic the use of conventional extracellular matrix protein coated substrates for cell culture. We compared the transcriptional activities of genes in cells that were cultured on matrix-coated substrates with those cultured on self-assembled monolayers presenting either a linear or cyclic RGD peptide. Cells adherent to cyclic RGD were most similar to those cultured on native ECM, while cells cultured on monolayers presenting the linear RGD peptide had transcriptional activities that were more similar to cells cultured on the uncoated substrates. This study suggests that biomaterials presenting the cyclic RGD peptide are substantially better mimics of extracellular matrix than are uncoated materials or materials presenting the common linear RGD peptide. PMID:25818445

  7. Interleukin-1beta regulates cell proliferation and activity of extracellular matrix remodelling enzymes in cultured primary pig heart cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitta, Karina; Brandt, Berenice; Wuensch, Annegret; Meybohm, Patrick; Bein, Berthold; Steinfath, Markus; Scholz, Jens; Albrecht, Martin

    2010-09-03

    After myocardial infarction, elevated levels of interleukins (ILs) are found within the myocardial tissue and IL-1beta is considered to play a major role in tissue remodelling events throughout the body. In the study presented, we have established a cell culture model of primary pig heart cells to evaluate the effects of different concentrations of IL-1beta on cell proliferation as well as expression and activity of enzymes typically involved in tissue remodelling. Primary pig heart cell cultures were derived from three different animals and stimulated with recombinant pig IL-1beta. RNA expression was detected by RT-PCR, protein levels were evaluated by Western blotting, activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was quantified by gelatine zymography and cell proliferation was measured using colorimetric MTS assays. Pig heart cells express receptors for IL-1 and application of IL-1beta resulted in a dose-dependent increase of cell proliferation (Ppig heart cells by Western blotting. MMP-2 gene expression as well as enzymatic activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were increased by IL-1beta (Pheart. Combined with our recently published in vivo data (Meybohm et al., PLoS One, 2009), the results presented here strongly suggest IL-1beta as a key molecule guiding tissue remodelling events after myocardial infarction. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of work hardening characteristics of matrix alloys in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The strengthening of particulate reinforced metal–matrix composites is associated with a high dislocation density in the matrix due to the difference in coefficient of thermal expansion between the reinforcement and the matrix. While this is valid, the role of work hardening characteristics of the matrix alloys in strengthening of ...

  9. Morphological and ultrastructural characteristics of extracellular matrix changes in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Agrawal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The biology of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, including its progression from dysplasia to carcinoma, "field effects", genetic changes in tumor associated mucosa (TAM and effect of matrix metalloproteinases in breaking down of matrix proteins to facilitate invasion, has been well documented. However, what remains to be done is to extrapolate this knowledge to improve patient care. Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the extracellular matrix (ECM changes with the routine histochemical stains available to most histopathologists. Materials and Methods: The study includes 72 cases of OSCC in which the tumor and adjacent normal appearing areas were sampled to study the ECM changes with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E and Verhoeff′s-Van Gieson elastic stain (VVG. Results: Basophilic fragmentation of collagen (H and E and clumped short elastic fibers (VVG were seen in 12 (16.7% cases. Of the remaining cases, 18 (25% had a dense lymphocytic infiltrate and had no demonstrable elastic fibers. Those cases with H and E changes were further studied and compared with normal mucosa for ultrastructural changes. The ultrastructural study demonstrated an increase in oxytalan, elaunin and elastic fibers and decrease in collagen fibers with some transformation changes associated with OSCCs and lymph node metastasis. Conclusion: Changes in transformation of collagen to elastic fibers and also the loss of both the fibers in areas of lymphocytic infiltration possibly indicate degradation of ECM fibers by factors released from the lymphocytes or tumor cells and the limiting effect on the tumor by ECM remodeling.

  10. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Li, Zheng-Wei; Luo, Min; Li, Ya-Jun; Zhang, Ke-Qiang

    2015-06-01

    The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some respects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, or a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel. After 24 weeks, mechanical testing was performed to determine the stress relaxation and creep parameters. Following sciatic nerve injury, the magnitudes of the stress decrease and strain increase at 7,200 seconds were largest in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group, followed by the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and then the autologous nerve group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that compared with the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group and the autologous nerve group, a more complete sciatic nerve regeneration was found, including good myelination, regularly arranged nerve fibers, and a completely degraded and resorbed conduit, in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group. These results indicate that bridging 10-mm sciatic nerve defects with a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel construct increases the stress relaxation under a constant strain, reducing anastomotic tension. Large elongations under a constant physiological load can limit the anastomotic opening and shift, which is beneficial for the regeneration and functional reconstruction of sciatic nerve. Better regeneration was

  11. Relationship between the Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase and Clinicopathologic Features in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Jafarian

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity is one of the most important and common types of head and neck malignancy, with an estimated rate of 4% among all human malignancies. The aim of this study was to determine the association between expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9 and the clinicopathological features of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC.   Materials and Methods: One hundred existing samples of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded specimens of OSCC were evaluated by immunohistochemistry staining for matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9 antibodies. Samples were divided into four groups: negative, 50%. Patient records were assessed for demographic characteristics such as age and gender, smoking and family history of OSCC as well as tumor features including location, differentiation, stage and lymph node involvement.   Results: In this study, 58 patients (58% were male and 42 (42% female. The mean age of patients was 60.38±14.07 years. The average number of lymph nodes involved was 8.9±3.8. Tumoral grade, tumoral stage, lymphatic metastasis and history of smoking were significantly related to MMP2 and MMP9 expression.   Conclusion:  Our study demonstrated that MMP2 and MMP9 expression are important in the development of OSCC.

  12. Cell migration in schizophrenia: Patient-derived cells do not regulate motility in response to extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Jing Yang; Sutharsan, Ratneswary; Fan, Yongjun; Mackay-Sim, Alan

    2017-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable psychiatric disorder linked to a large number of risk genes. The function of these genes in disease etiology is not fully understood but pathway analyses of genomic data suggest developmental dysregulation of cellular processes such as neuronal migration and axon guidance. Previous studies of patient-derived olfactory cells show them to be more motile than control-derived cells when grown on a fibronectin substrate, motility that is dependent on focal adhesion kinase signaling. The aim of this study was to investigate whether schizophrenia patient-derived cells are responsive to other extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins that bind integrin receptors. Olfactory neurosphere-derived cells from nine patients and nine matched controls were grown on ECM protein substrates at increasing concentrations and their movement was tracked for 24h using automated high-throughput imaging. Control-derived cells increased their motility as the ECM substrate concentration increased, whereas patient-derived cell motility was little affected by ECM proteins. Patient and control cells had appropriate integrin receptors for these ECM substrates and detected them as shown by increases in focal adhesion number and size in response to ECM proteins, which also induced changes in cell morphology and cytoskeleton. These observations indicate that patient cells failed to translate the detection of ECM proteins into appropriate changes in cell motility. In a sense, patient cells act like a moving car whose accelerator is jammed, moving at the same speed without regard to the external environment. This focuses attention on cell motility regulation rather than speed as key to impairment of neuronal migration in the developing brain in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. CADM1 Controls Actin Cytoskeleton Assembly and Regulates Extracellular Matrix Adhesion in Human Mast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseeva, Elena P.; Straatman, Kees R.; Leyland, Mark L.; Bradding, Peter

    2014-01-01

    CADM1 is a major receptor for the adhesion of mast cells (MCs) to fibroblasts, human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) and neurons. It also regulates E-cadherin and alpha6beta4 integrin in other cell types. Here we investigated a role for CADM1 in MC adhesion to both cells and extracellular matrix (ECM). Downregulation of CADM1 in the human MC line HMC-1 resulted not only in reduced adhesion to HASMCs, but also reduced adhesion to their ECM. Time-course studies in the presence of EDTA to inhibit integrins demonstrated that CADM1 provided fast initial adhesion to HASMCs and assisted with slower adhesion to ECM. CADM1 downregulation, but not antibody-dependent CADM1 inhibition, reduced MC adhesion to ECM, suggesting indirect regulation of ECM adhesion. To investigate potential mechanisms, phosphotyrosine signalling and polymerisation of actin filaments, essential for integrin-mediated adhesion, were examined. Modulation of CADM1 expression positively correlated with surface KIT levels and polymerisation of cortical F-actin in HMC-1 cells. It also influenced phosphotyrosine signalling and KIT tyrosine autophosphorylation. CADM1 accounted for 46% of surface KIT levels and 31% of F-actin in HMC-1 cells. CADM1 downregulation resulted in elongation of cortical actin filaments in both HMC-1 cells and human lung MCs and increased cell rigidity of HMC-1 cells. Collectively these data suggest that CADM1 is a key adhesion receptor, which regulates MC net adhesion, both directly through CADM1-dependent adhesion, and indirectly through the regulation of other adhesion receptors. The latter is likely to occur via docking of KIT and polymerisation of cortical F-actin. Here we propose a stepwise model of adhesion with CADM1 as a driving force for net MC adhesion. PMID:24465823

  14. CADM1 controls actin cytoskeleton assembly and regulates extracellular matrix adhesion in human mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P Moiseeva

    Full Text Available CADM1 is a major receptor for the adhesion of mast cells (MCs to fibroblasts, human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs and neurons. It also regulates E-cadherin and alpha6beta4 integrin in other cell types. Here we investigated a role for CADM1 in MC adhesion to both cells and extracellular matrix (ECM. Downregulation of CADM1 in the human MC line HMC-1 resulted not only in reduced adhesion to HASMCs, but also reduced adhesion to their ECM. Time-course studies in the presence of EDTA to inhibit integrins demonstrated that CADM1 provided fast initial adhesion to HASMCs and assisted with slower adhesion to ECM. CADM1 downregulation, but not antibody-dependent CADM1 inhibition, reduced MC adhesion to ECM, suggesting indirect regulation of ECM adhesion. To investigate potential mechanisms, phosphotyrosine signalling and polymerisation of actin filaments, essential for integrin-mediated adhesion, were examined. Modulation of CADM1 expression positively correlated with surface KIT levels and polymerisation of cortical F-actin in HMC-1 cells. It also influenced phosphotyrosine signalling and KIT tyrosine autophosphorylation. CADM1 accounted for 46% of surface KIT levels and 31% of F-actin in HMC-1 cells. CADM1 downregulation resulted in elongation of cortical actin filaments in both HMC-1 cells and human lung MCs and increased cell rigidity of HMC-1 cells. Collectively these data suggest that CADM1 is a key adhesion receptor, which regulates MC net adhesion, both directly through CADM1-dependent adhesion, and indirectly through the regulation of other adhesion receptors. The latter is likely to occur via docking of KIT and polymerisation of cortical F-actin. Here we propose a stepwise model of adhesion with CADM1 as a driving force for net MC adhesion.

  15. Dentin matrix components extracted with phosphoric acid enhance cell proliferation and mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Satin; Cooper, Paul; Smith, Anthony; Ferracane, Jack

    2016-03-01

    Acids, such as those used in adhesive dentistry, have been shown to solubilize bioactive molecules from dentin. These dentin matrix components (DMC) may promote cell proliferation and differentiation, and ultimately contribute to dentin regeneration. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential for varying concentrations of DMC extracted from human dentin by phosphoric acid of a range of pHs to stimulate proliferation and mineralization of two different cultured pulp cell populations. DMC were solubilized from powdered human dentin (7 days - 4°C) by phosphoric acid of pH 1, 3, and 5 and also, EDTA. Extracts were dialyzed for 7 days against distilled water and lyophilized. Undifferentiated mouse dental pulp cells (OD-21) and cells of the odontoblast-like cell line (MDPC-23) were seeded in six-well plates (1×10(5)) and cultured for 24h in DMEM (Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium) containing 10% (v/v) FBS (fetal bovine serum). The cells were washed with serum-free medium and then treated with different concentrations of DMC (0.01, 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0μg/ml) daily in serum free medium for 7 days. After 3, 5 (MDPC-23 only), and 7 days of treatment, cell proliferation was measured using 10vol% Alamar blue solution, which was added to each well for 1h. Cell numbers were first measured by cell counting (Trypan blue; n=5) and Alamar blue fluorescence to validate the assay, which was then used for the subsequent assessments of proliferation. Mineralization was assessed by Alizarin Red S assay after 12 days exposure to DMC (n=5). Controls were media-only (DMEM) and dexamethasone (DEX; positive control). Results were analysed by ANOVA/Tukey's (p≤0.05). There was a linear correlation between cell counts and Alamar blue fluorescence (R(2)>0.96 for both cell types) , verifying the validity of the Alamar blue assay for these cell types. In general, there was a dose-dependent trend for enhanced cell proliferation with higher concentration of DMC for both cell lines

  16. Transplantation of neurons derived from human iPS cells cultured on collagen matrix into guinea-pig cochleae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Masaaki; Ohnishi, Hiroe; Skerleva, Desislava; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Yamamoto, Norio; Hotta, Akitsu; Ito, Juichi; Nakagawa, Takayuki

    2017-06-01

    The present study examined the efficacy of a neural induction method for human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells to eliminate undifferentiated cells and to determine the feasibility of transplanting neurally induced cells into guinea-pig cochleae for replacement of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). A stepwise method for differentiation of human iPS cells into neurons was used. First, a neural induction method was established on Matrigel-coated plates; characteristics of cell populations at each differentiation step were assessed. Second, neural stem cells were differentiated into neurons on a three-dimensional (3D) collagen matrix, using the same protocol of culture on Matrigel-coated plates; neuron subtypes in differentiated cells on a 3D collagen matrix were examined. Then, human iPS cell-derived neurons cultured on a 3D collagen matrix were transplanted into intact guinea-pig cochleae, followed by histological analysis. In vitro analyses revealed successful induction of neural stem cells from human iPS cells, with no retention of undifferentiated cells expressing OCT3/4. After the neural differentiation of neural stem cells, approximately 70% of cells expressed a neuronal marker, 90% of which were positive for vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1). The expression pattern of neuron subtypes in differentiated cells on a 3D collagen matrix was identical to that of the differentiated cells on Matrigel-coated plates. In addition, the survival of transplant-derived neurons was achieved when inflammatory responses were appropriately controlled. Our preparation method for human iPS cell-derived neurons efficiently eliminated undifferentiated cells and contributed to the settlement of transplant-derived neurons expressing VGLUT1 in guinea-pig cochleae. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Matrix metalloproteinase-14 mediates formation of bile ducts and hepatic maturation of fetal hepatic progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otani, Satoshi [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Kakinuma, Sei, E-mail: skakinuma.gast@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department for Liver Disease Control, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Kamiya, Akihide [Institute of Innovative Science and Technology, Tokai University, Isehara (Japan); Goto, Fumio; Kaneko, Shun; Miyoshi, Masato; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Asano, Yu; Kawai-Kitahata, Fukiko; Nitta, Sayuri; Nakata, Toru; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Itsui, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Mina; Azuma, Seishin [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Asahina, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Department for Liver Disease Control, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki [Division of Stem Cell Therapy, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Koshikawa, Naohiko [Division of Cancer Cell Research, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Seiki, Motoharu [Medical School, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Nakauchi, Hiromitsu [Division of Stem Cell Therapy, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); and others

    2016-01-22

    Fetal hepatic stem/progenitor cells, called hepatoblasts, play central roles in liver development; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating the phenotype of these cells have not been completely elucidated. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-14 is a type I transmembrane proteinase regulating pericellular proteolysis of the extracellular matrix and is essential for the activation of several MMPs and cytokines. However, the physiological functions of MMP-14 in liver development are unknown. Here we describe a functional role for MMP-14 in hepatic and biliary differentiation of mouse hepatoblasts. MMP-14 was upregulated in cells around the portal vein in perinatal stage liver. Formation of bile duct-like structures in MMP-14–deficient livers was significantly delayed compared with wild-type livers in vivo. In vitro biliary differentiation assays showed that formation of cholangiocytic cysts derived from MMP-14–deficient hepatoblasts was completely impaired, and that overexpression of MMP-14 in hepatoblasts promoted the formation of bile duct-like cysts. In contrast, the expression of molecules associated with metabolic functions in hepatocytes, including hepatic nuclear factor 4α and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, were significantly increased in MMP-14–deficient livers. Expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly upregulated in MMP-14–deficient livers. We demonstrate that MMP-14–mediated signaling in fetal hepatic progenitor cells promotes biliary luminal formation around the portal vein and negatively controls the maturation of hepatocytes. - Highlights: • Loss of MMP-14 delayed formation of bile duct-like structures in perinatal liver. • Overexpression of MMP-14 in hepatobalsts promoted the biliary formation in vitro. • Loss of MMP-14 promoted hepatocyte maturation of hepatoblasts in vivo. • MMP-14–mediated signaling regulates terminal differentiation of

  18. Cell aggregation on agar as an indicator for cell-matrix adhesion: effects of opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debruyne, Delphine; Mareel, Marc; Vanhoecke, Barbara; Bracke, Marc

    2009-09-01

    The slow aggregation assay is generally used to study the functionality of cell-cell adhesion complexes. Single cells are seeded on a semisolid agar substrate in a 96-well plate and the cells spontaneously aggregate. We used HEK FLAG-MOP cells that stably overexpress the mu opioid receptor and the mu-opioid-receptor-selective agonists DAMGO and morphine to study whether other factors than functionality of cell-cell adhesions complexes can contribute to changes in the pattern of slow aggregation on agar. HEK FLAG-MOP cells formed small compact aggregates. In the presence of DAMGO and morphine, larger and fewer aggregates were formed in comparison to the vehicle control. These aggregates were localized in the center of the agar surface, whereas in the vehicle control they were dispersed over the substrate. However, in suspension culture on a Gyrotory shaker, no stimulation of aggregation was observed by DAMGO and morphine, showing that opioids do not affect affinity. A dissociation experiment revealed that HEK FLAG-MOP aggregates formed in the absence or presence of opioids are resistant to de-adhesion. We demonstrated that the larger aggregates are neither the result of cell growth stimulation by DAMGO and morphine. Since manipulations of the substrate such as increasing the agar concentration or mixing agar with agarose induced the same changes in the pattern of slow aggregation as treatment with opioids, we suggest that cell-substrate adhesion may be involved in opioid-stimulated aggregation.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus hemolysin A disrupts cell-matrix adhesions in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Ina; Räth, Susann; Ziesemer, Sabine; Volksdorf, Thomas; Dress, Regine J; Gutjahr, Melanie; Müller, Christian; Beule, Achim G; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of primary or immortalized human airway epithelial cells (16HBE14o-, S9) or alveolar cancer cells (A549) with recombinant hemolysin A (rHla), a major virulence-associated factor of Staphylococcus aureus, induces alterations in cell shape and formation of paracellular gaps in the cell layer. Semiquantitative Western blotting using extracts of freshly isolated airway tissue (nasal epithelium) or 16HBE14o- model cells revealed that phosphorylation levels of focal adhesion kinase (Fak) and paxillin were altered upon treatment of tissue or cells with rHla. Immune fluorescence analyses showed that rHla treatment of 16HBE14o- cells results in losses of vinculin and paxillin from focal contacts and a net reduction in the number of focal contacts. The actin cytoskeleton was strongly remodeled. We concluded that treatment of cells with rHla activates Fak signaling, which accelerates focal contact turnover and prevents newly formed focal contacts (focal complexes) from maturation to focal adhesions. The inability of rHla-treated cells to form stable focal adhesions may be one factor that contributes to gap formation in the cell layer. In vivo, such changes may disturb the defensive barrier function of the airway epithelium and may facilitate lung infections by S. aureus.

  20. Characterization and fuel cell performance analysis of polyvinylalcohol-mordenite mixed-matrix membranes for direct methanol fuel cell use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uctug, Fehmi Goerkem, E-mail: gorkem.uctug@bahcesehir.edu.t [University of Manchester, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Holmes, Stuart M. [University of Manchester, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-01

    Highlights: > We investigated the availability of PVA-mordenite membranes for DMFC use. > We measured the methanol permeability of PVA-mordenite membranes via pervaporation. > We did the fuel cell testing of these membranes, which had not been done before. > We showed that PVA-mordenite membranes have poorer DMFC performance than Nafion. > Membrane performance can be improved by increasing the proton conductivity of PVA. - Abstract: Polyvinylalcohol-mordenite (PVA-MOR) mixed matrix membranes were synthesized for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) use. For the structural and the morphological characterization, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis methods were used. Zeolite distribution within the polymer matrix was found to be homogeneous. An impedance spectroscope was used to measure the proton conductivity. In order to obtain information about methanol permeation characteristics, swelling tests and a series of pervaporation experiments were carried out. 60-40 wt% PVA-MOR membranes were found to give the optimum transport properties. Proton conductivity of these membranes was found to be slightly lower than that of Nafion117{sup TM} whereas their methanol permeability was at least two orders of magnitude lower than Nafion117{sup TM}. DMFC performance of the PVA-MOR membranes was also measured. The inferior DMFC performance of PVA-MOR membranes was linked to drying in the fuel cell medium and the consequent proton conductivity loss. Their performance was improved by adding a dilute solution of sulfuric acid into the feed methanol solution. Future studies on the improvement of the proton conductivity of PVA-MOR membranes, especially via sulfonation of the polymer matrix, can overcome the low-performance problem associated with insufficient proton conductivity.

  1. [Effect of enamel matrix protein on periodontal cells in an in vitro wound healing model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yuan-zheng; Shen, Chi-jing; Song, Zhong-chen; Zhang, Xiu-li

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of enamel matrix protein (EMP) on wound filling of periodontal ligament cells (PDLC) and gingival fibroblasts (GF), using an in vitro model of wound healing. In vitro wound models were mechanically created in subconfluent cultures of human GF and PDLC, by removing a 7mm wide band of the cell layer respectively. Wounded cultures were then incubated for a time periods up to 2,6,9 days in a media containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), stimulated with EMP (100microg/ml) simultaneously, negative controls were those cultured only with media containing 10% FBS. Slides were fixed, stained with crystal violet and cell filling area within the wound boundaries was quantified by computer assisted histomorphometry. Statistical analysis was performed by SAS6.12 software package to determine the differences between the time points and groups. in the control group, there was difference between GF and PDLC in filling wound in vitro over 9 days of healing period. The difference was significant (P0.05) between the filling rate of two types of periodontal cells at the 6th, 9th day after wound creating. GF has a significantly greater ability to fill a wound than PDLC. However, EMP appears to exert an influence on cells that is compatible with improved wound healing, especially in that of PDLC.

  2. By activating matrix metalloproteinase-7, shear stress promotes chondrosarcoma cell motility, invasion and lung colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Pei-Pei; Yu, Xin; Guo, Jian-Jun; Wang, Yue; Wang, Tao; Li, Jia-Yi; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Wang, Zhan-You; Wang, Pu

    2015-04-20

    Interstitial fluid flow and associated shear stress are relevant mechanical signals in cartilage and bone (patho)physiology. However, their effects on chondrosarcoma cell motility, invasion and metastasis have yet to be delineated. Using human SW1353, HS.819.T and CH2879 chondrosarcoma cell lines as model systems, we found that fluid shear stress induces the accumulation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which in turn markedly enhance chondrosarcoma cell motility and invasion via the induction of matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7). Specifically, shear-induced cAMP and IL-1β activate PI3-K, ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways, which lead to the synthesis of MMP-7 via transactivating NF-κB and c-Jun in human chondrosarcoma cells. Importantly, MMP-7 upregulation in response to shear stress exposure has the ability to promote lung colonization of chondrosarcomas in vivo. These findings offer a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying MMP-7 activation in shear-stimulated chondrosarcoma cells, and provide insights on designing new therapeutic strategies to interfere with chondrosarcoma invasion and metastasis.

  3. Transchromosomic cell model of Down syndrome shows aberrant migration, adhesion and proteome response to extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotter Finbarr E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome (DS, caused by trisomy of human chromosome 21 (HSA21, is the most common genetic birth defect. Congenital heart defects (CHD are seen in 40% of DS children, and >50% of all atrioventricular canal defects in infancy are caused by trisomy 21, but the causative genes remain unknown. Results Here we show that aberrant adhesion and proliferation of DS cells can be reproduced using a transchromosomic model of DS (mouse fibroblasts bearing supernumerary HSA21. We also demonstrate a deacrease of cell migration in transchromosomic cells independently of their adhesion properties. We show that cell-autonomous proteome response to the presence of Collagen VI in extracellular matrix is strongly affected by trisomy 21. Conclusion This set of experiments establishes a new model system for genetic dissection of the specific HSA21 gene-overdose contributions to aberrant cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and specific proteome response to collagen VI, cellular phenotypes linked to the pathogenesis of CHD.

  4. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN/CD147) as a novel regulator of myogenic cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Mohamed; Mohamed, Attia; Huet, Eric; Eric, Huet; Delbé, Jean; Jean, Delbé; Ledoux, Dominique; Dominique, Ledoux; Menashi, Suzanne; Suzanne, Menashi; Martelly, Isabelle; Isabelle, Martelly

    2011-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are thought to play an important role in skeletal muscle cell growth and differentiation. In view of the MMP inducing function of EMMPRIN/CD147, its role in myogenic cell differentiation was investigated. EMMPRIN level increased during differentiation of both rat primary myoblasts derived from satellite cells and mouse C2.7 myogenic cells and was associated with an alteration in its molecular forms. In parallel, expression of pro-MMP-9 gradually decreased and that of pro-MMP-2 and active MMP-2 increased. While small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibition of EMMPRIN expression accelerated cell differentiation, exogenously added recombinant EMMPRIN inhibited differentiation by an MMP-mediated mechanism, as the MMP inhibitor marimastat abrogated EMMPRIN's effect. Our results further suggest that EMMPRIN regulates differentiation through an MMP activation of transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ), a known inhibitor of myoblast's differentiation, as the increased activation and signaling of TGFβ by EMMPRIN was attenuated in the presence of marimastat. EMMPRIN inhibition may thus represent a novel strategy in the treatment of muscular degenerative disorders.

  5. Unique proliferation response in odontoblastic cells derived from human skeletal muscle stem cells by cytokine-induced matrix metalloproteinase-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozeki, Nobuaki; Hase, Naoko; Kawai, Rie; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Hiyama, Taiki [Department of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, Aichi Gakuin University, 2-11 Suemori-dori, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8651, Aichi (Japan); Kondo, Ayami [Department of Medicinal Biochemistry, School of Pharmacy, Aichi Gakuin University, 1-100 Kusumoto, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8650 (Japan); Nakata, Kazuhiko [Department of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, Aichi Gakuin University, 2-11 Suemori-dori, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8651, Aichi (Japan); Mogi, Makio, E-mail: makio@dpc.agu.ac.jp [Department of Medicinal Biochemistry, School of Pharmacy, Aichi Gakuin University, 1-100 Kusumoto, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8650 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    A pro-inflammatory cytokine mixture (CM: interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ) and IL-1β-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 activity have been shown to increase the proliferation of rat dental pulp cells and murine stem cell-derived odontoblast-like cells. This suggests that MMP-3 may regulate wound healing and regeneration in the odontoblast-rich dental pulp. Here, we determined whether these results can be extrapolated to human dental pulp by investigating the effects of CM-induced MMP-3 up-regulation on the proliferation and apoptosis of purified odontoblast-like cells derived from human skeletal muscle stem cells. We used siRNA to specifically reduce MMP-3 expression. We found that CM treatment increased MMP-3 mRNA and protein levels as well as MMP-3 activity. Cell proliferation was also markedly increased, with no changes in apoptosis, upon treatment with CM and following the application of exogenous MMP-3. Endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases were constitutively expressed during all experiments and unaffected by MMP-3. Although treatment with MMP-3 siRNA suppressed cell proliferation, it also unexpectedly increased apoptosis. This siRNA-mediated increase in apoptosis could be reversed by exogenous MMP-3. These results demonstrate that cytokine-induced MMP-3 activity regulates cell proliferation and suppresses apoptosis in human odontoblast-like cells. - Highlights: • Pro-inflammatory cytokines induce MMP-3 activity in human odontoblast-like cells. • Increased MMP-3 activity can promote cell proliferation in odontoblasts. • Specific loss of MMP-3 increases apoptosis in odontoblasts. • MMP-3 has potential as a promising new target for pupal repair and regeneration.

  6. Myoferlin depletion elevates focal adhesion kinase and paxillin phosphorylation and enhances cell-matrix adhesion in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, B N; Li, R; Ackerman, W E; Ghadiali, S N; Powell, H M; Kniss, D A

    2015-04-15

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of malignant death among women. A crucial feature of metastatic cancers is their propensity to lose adhesion to the underlying basement membrane as they transition to a motile phenotype and invade surrounding tissue. Attachment to the extracellular matrix is mediated by a complex of adhesion proteins, including integrins, signaling molecules, actin and actin-binding proteins, and scaffolding proteins. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is pivotal for the organization of focal contacts and maturation into focal adhesions, and disruption of this process is a hallmark of early cancer invasive potential. Our recent work has revealed that myoferlin (MYOF) mediates breast tumor cell motility and invasive phenotype. In this study we demonstrate that noninvasive breast cancer cell lines exhibit increased cell-substrate adhesion and that silencing of MYOF using RNAi in the highly invasive human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 also enhances cell-substrate adhesion. In addition, we detected elevated tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK (FAK(Y397)) and paxillin (PAX(Y118)), markers of focal adhesion protein activation. Morphometric analysis of PAX expression revealed that RNAi-mediated depletion of MYOF resulted in larger, more elongated focal adhesions, in contrast to cells transduced with a control virus (MDA-231(LVC) cells), which exhibited smaller focal contacts. Finally, MYOF silencing in MDA-MB-231 cells exhibited a more elaborate ventral cytoskeletal structure near focal adhesions, typified by pronounced actin stress fibers. These data support the hypothesis that MYOF regulates cell adhesions and cell-substrate adhesion strength and may account for the high degree of motility in invasive breast cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Up-regulated expression of extracellular matrix remodeling genes in phagocytically challenged trabecular meshwork cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine M Porter

    Full Text Available Cells in the trabecular meshwork (TM, the tissue responsible for draining aqueous humor out of the eye, are known to be highly phagocytic. Phagocytic function in TM cells is thought to play an important role in the normal functioning of the outflow pathway. Dysfunction of phagocytosis could lead to abnormalities of outflow resistance and increased intraocular pressure (IOP. However, the molecular mechanisms triggered by phagocytosis in TM cells are completely unknown.Gene expression profile analysis of human TM cells phagocytically challenged to E. coli or pigment under physiological and oxidative stress environment were performed using Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0 array and analyzed with Genespring GX. Despite the differential biological response elicited by E. coli and pigment particles, a number of genes, including MMP1, MMP3, TNFSF11, DIO2, KYNU, and KCCN2 showed differential expression with both phagocytic ligands in all conditions. Data was confirmed by qPCR in both human and porcine TM cells. Metacore pathway analysis and the usage of recombinant adenovirus encoding the dominant negative mutant of IkB identified NF-κB as a transcription factor mediating the up-regulation of at least MMP1 and MMP3 in TM cells with phagocytosis. In-gel zymography demonstrated increased collagenolytic and caseinolytic activities in the culture media of TM cells challenge to E. coli. In addition, collagenolytic I activity was further confirmed using the self-quenched fluorescent substrate DQ-Collagen I.Here we report for the first time the differential gene expression profile of TM cells phagocytically challenged with either E. coli or pigment. Our data indicate a potential role of phagocytosis in outflow pathway tissue homeostasis through the up-regulation and/or proteolytic activation of extracellular matrix remodeling genes.

  8. Video-rate bioluminescence imaging of matrix metalloproteinase-2 secreted from a migrating cell.

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    Takahiro Suzuki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 plays an important role in cancer progression and metastasis. MMP-2 is secreted as a pro-enzyme, which is activated by the membrane-bound proteins, and the polarized distribution of secretory and the membrane-associated MMP-2 has been investigated. However, the real-time visualizations of both MMP-2 secretion from the front edge of a migration cell and its distribution on the cell surface have not been reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The method of video-rate bioluminescence imaging was applied to visualize exocytosis of MMP-2 from a living cell using Gaussia luciferase (GLase as a reporter. The luminescence signals of GLase were detected by a high speed electron-multiplying charge-coupled device camera (EM-CCD camera with a time resolution within 500 ms per image. The fusion protein of MMP-2 to GLase was expressed in a HeLa cell and exocytosis of MMP-2 was detected in a few seconds along the leading edge of a migrating HeLa cell. The membrane-associated MMP-2 was observed at the specific sites on the bottom side of the cells, suggesting that the sites of MMP-2 secretion are different from that of MMP-2 binding. CONCLUSIONS: We were the first to successfully demonstrate secretory dynamics of MMP-2 and the specific sites for polarized distribution of MMP-2 on the cell surface. The video-rate bioluminescence imaging using GLase is a useful method to investigate distribution and dynamics of secreted proteins on the whole surface of polarized cells in real time.

  9. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 is involved in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell response to fludarabine and arsenic trioxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Amigo-Jiménez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 contributes to chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL pathology by regulating cell migration and preventing spontaneous apoptosis. It is not known if MMP-9 is involved in CLL cell response to chemotherapy and we address this in the present study, using arsenic trioxide (ATO and fludarabine as examples of cytotoxic drugs. METHODS: We used primary cells from the peripheral blood of CLL patients and MEC-1 cells stably transfected with an empty vector or a vector containing MMP-9. The effect of ATO and fludarabine was determined by flow cytometry and by the MTT assay. Expression of mRNA was measured by RT-PCR and qPCR. Secreted and cell-bound MMP-9 was analyzed by gelatin zymography and flow cytometry, respectively. Protein expression was analyzed by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation. Statistical analyses were performed using the two-tailed Student's t-test. RESULTS: In response to ATO or fludarabine, CLL cells transcriptionally upregulated MMP-9, preceding the onset of apoptosis. Upregulated MMP-9 primarily localized to the membrane of early apoptotic cells and blocking apoptosis with Z-VAD prevented MMP-9 upregulation, thus linking MMP-9 to the apoptotic process. Culturing CLL cells on MMP-9 or stromal cells induced drug resistance, which was overcome by anti-MMP-9 antibodies. Accordingly, MMP-9-MEC-1 transfectants showed higher viability upon drug treatment than Mock-MEC-1 cells, and this effect was blocked by silencing MMP-9 with specific siRNAs. Following drug exposure, expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Mcl-1, Bcl-xL, Bcl-2 and the Mcl-1/Bim, Mcl-1/Noxa, Bcl-2/Bax ratios were higher in MMP-9-cells than in Mock-cells. Similar results were obtained upon culturing primary CLL cells on MMP-9. CONCLUSIONS: Our study describes for the first time that MMP-9 induces drug resistance by modulating proteins of the Bcl-2 family and upregulating the corresponding anti-apoptotic/pro-apoptotic ratios. This

  10. beta-Catenin signaling is required for TGF-beta(1)-induced extracellular matrix production by airway smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarsma, Hoeke A.; Menzen, Mark H.; Halayko, Andrew J.; Meurs, Herman; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Gosens, Reinoud

    2011-01-01

    Baarsma HA, Menzen MH, Halayko AJ, Meurs H, Kerstjens HA, Gosens R. beta-Catenin signaling is required for TGF-beta(1)-induced extracellular matrix production by airway smooth muscle cells. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 301: L956-L965, 2011. First published September 9, 2011; doi:

  11. Proliferation and extracellular matrix synthesis of smooth muscle cells cultured from human coronary atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. MacLeod (Donald); B.H. Strauss (Bradley); J. Escaned (Javier); V.A.W.M. Umans (Victor); R-J. van Suylen (Robert-Jan); A. Verkerk (Anton); P.J. de Feyter (Pim); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); M. de Jong (Marcel)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to examine the proliferative capacity and extracellular matrix synthesis of human coronary plaque cells in vitro. BACKGROUND. Common to both primary atherosclerosis and restenosis are vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and production of

  12. Defining the role of mesenchymal stromal cells on the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases in skeletal muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassoli, Chiara; Nosi, Daniele; Tani, Alessia; Chellini, Flaminia [Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine—Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, 50134, Florence (Italy); Mazzanti, Benedetta [Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine—Section of Haematology, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, 50134, Florence (Italy); Quercioli, Franco [CNR-National Institute of Optics (INO), Largo Enrico Fermi 6, 50125 Arcetri-Florence (Italy); Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra [Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine—Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, 50134, Florence (Italy); Formigli, Lucia, E-mail: formigli@unifi.it [Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine—Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, 50134, Florence (Italy)

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies indicate that mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) transplantation improves healing of injured and diseased skeletal muscle, although the mechanisms of benefit are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated whether MSCs and/or their trophic factors were able to regulate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity in different cells of the muscle tissue. MSCs in co-culture with C2C12 cells or their conditioned medium (MSC-CM) up-regulated MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and function in the myoblastic cells; these effects were concomitant with the down-regulation of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 and -2 and with increased cell motility. In the single muscle fiber experiments, MSC-CM administration increased MMP-2/9 expression in Pax-7{sup +} satellite cells and stimulated their mobilization, differentiation and fusion. The anti-fibrotic properties of MSC-CM involved also the regulation of MMPs by skeletal fibroblasts and the inhibition of their differentiation into myofibroblasts. The treatment with SB-3CT, a potent MMP inhibitor, prevented in these cells, the decrease of α-smooth actin and type-I collagen expression induced by MSC-CM, suggesting that MSC-CM could attenuate the fibrogenic response through mechanisms mediated by MMPs. Our results indicate that growth factors and cytokines released by these cells may modulate the fibrotic response and improve the endogenous mechanisms of muscle repair/regeneration. - Highlights: • MSC-CM contains paracrine factors that up-regulate MMP expression and function in different skeletal muscle cells. • MSC-CM promotes myoblast and satellite cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. • MSC-CM negatively interferes with fibroblast-myoblast transition in primary skeletal fibroblasts. • Paracrine factors from MSCs modulate the fibrotic response and improve the endogenous mechanisms of muscle regeneration.

  13. Staurosporine and extracellular matrix proteins mediate the conversion of small cell lung carcinoma cells into a neuron-like phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Murmann

    Full Text Available Small cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs represent highly aggressive tumors with an overall five-year survival rate in the range of 5 to 10%. Here, we show that four out of five SCLC cell lines reversibly develop a neuron-like phenotype on extracellular matrix constituents such as fibronectin, laminin or thrombospondin upon staurosporine treatment in an RGD/integrin-mediated manner. Neurite-like processes extend rapidly with an average speed of 10 µm per hour. Depending on the cell line, staurosporine treatment affects either cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase or induction of polyploidy. Neuron-like conversion, although not accompanied by alterations in the expression pattern of a panel of neuroendocrine genes, leads to changes in protein expression as determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. It is likely that SCLC cells already harbour the complete molecular repertoire to convert into a neuron-like phenotype. More extensive studies are needed to evaluate whether the conversion potential of SCLC cells is suitable for therapeutic interventions.

  14. Matrigel Basement Membrane Matrix influences expression of microRNAs in cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Karina J. [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia); School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6008 (Australia); Tsykin, Anna [Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia); School of Molecular and Biomedical Science, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Giles, Keith M. [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia); Sladic, Rosemary T. [Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia); Epis, Michael R. [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia); Ganss, Ruth [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine Angiogenesis Unit, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia); Goodall, Gregory J. [Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia); School of Molecular and Biomedical Science, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Department of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Leedman, Peter J., E-mail: peter.leedman@waimr.uwa.edu.au [Laboratory for Cancer Medicine, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and University of Western Australia Centre for Medical Research, Perth, WA 6000 (Australia); School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6008 (Australia)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matrigel alters cancer cell line miRNA expression relative to culture on plastic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Many identified Matrigel-regulated miRNAs are implicated in cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-1290, -210, -32 and -29b represent a Matrigel-induced miRNA signature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-32 down-regulates Integrin alpha 5 (ITGA5) mRNA. -- Abstract: Matrigel is a medium rich in extracellular matrix (ECM) components used for three-dimensional cell culture and is known to alter cellular phenotypes and gene expression. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression and have roles in cancer. While miRNA profiles of numerous cell lines cultured on plastic have been reported, the influence of Matrigel-based culture on cancer cell miRNA expression is largely unknown. This study investigated the influence of Matrigel on the expression of miRNAs that might facilitate ECM-associated cancer cell growth. We performed miRNA profiling by microarray using two colon cancer cell lines (SW480 and SW620), identifying significant differential expression of miRNAs between cells cultured in Matrigel and on plastic. Many of these miRNAs have previously been implicated in cancer-related processes. A common Matrigel-induced miRNA signature comprised of up-regulated miR-1290 and miR-210 and down-regulated miR-29b and miR-32 was identified using RT-qPCR across five epithelial cancer cell lines (SW480, SW620, HT-29, A549 and MDA-MB-231). Experimental modulation of these miRNAs altered expression of their known target mRNAs involved in cell adhesion, proliferation and invasion, in colon cancer cell lines. Furthermore, ITGA5 was identified as a novel putative target of miR-32 that may facilitate cancer cell interactions with the ECM. We propose that culture of cancer cell lines in Matrigel more accurately recapitulates miRNA expression and function in cancer than culture on plastic and thus is a

  15. Novel use for polyvinylpyrrolidone as a macromolecular crowder for enhanced extracellular matrix deposition and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Rafi; Lim, Natalie Sheng Jie; Chee, Stella Min Ling; Png, Si Ning; Wohland, Thorsten; Raghunath, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Macromolecular crowding (MMC) is a biophysical effect that governs biochemical processes inside and outside of cells. Since standard cell culture media lack this effect, the physiological performance of differentiated and progenitor cells, including extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, is impaired in vitro. To bring back physiological crowdedness to in vitro systems, we have previously introduced carbohydrate-based macromolecules to culture media and have achieved marked improvements with mixed MMC in terms of ECM deposition and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We show here that although this system is successful, it is limited, due to viscosity, to only 33% of the fractional volume occupancy (FVO) of full serum, which we calculated to have an FVO of approximately 54% v/v. We show here that full-serum FVO can be achieved using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) 360 kDa. Under these conditions, ECM deposition in human fibroblasts and MSCs is on par, if not stronger than, with original MMC protocols using carbohydrates, but with a viscosity that is not significantly changed. In addition, we have found that the proliferation rate for bone marrow-derived MSCs and fibroblasts increases slightly in the presence of PVP360, similar to that observed with carbohydrate-based crowders. A palette of MMC compounds is now emerging that enables us to tune the crowdedness of culture media seamlessly from interstitial fluid (9% FVO), in which the majority of tissue cells might be based, to serum environments mimicking intravascular conditions. Despite identical FVO's, individual crowder size effects play a role and different cell types appear to have preferences in terms of FVO and the crowder that this is achieved with. However, in the quest of crowders that we have predicted to have a smoother regulatory approval path, PVP is a highly interesting compound, as it has been widely used in the medical and food industries and shows a novel promising use in cell culture and

  16. Expression of tissue levels of matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Zhen-kui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in tumor invasion and metastasis and are inhibited by naturally occurring tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs. {AU Query: Please verify that corrections made to previous sentence did not alter intended meaning}. In this study, we examined the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, membrane-type 1 (MT1-MMP, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 in renal tissue samples of renal cell cancer and examined the correlation between their expression and clinicopathological parameters. Methods Renal tissue samples from 76 patients with renal cell carcinoma were available for this study. To determine the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, MT1-MMP, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2, semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was carried out on tumor and normal tissues. Results Mean MMP-2, MMP-9, MT1-MMP, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 mRNA expression in the renal cell carcinomas was significantly higher than in the normal renal tissue (P Conclusions Mean MMP-2, MMP-9, MT1-MMP, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 mRNA expression in the renal cell carcinomas was significantly higher than in the normal renal tissue.

  17. Cell Invasion Dynamics into a Three Dimensional Extracellular Matrix Fibre Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Cheol Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of filopodia interacting with the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM play a key role in various cell-ECM interactions, but their mechanisms of interaction with the ECM in 3D environment remain poorly understood. Based on first principles, here we construct an individual-based, force-based computational model integrating four modules of 1 filopodia penetration dynamics; 2 intracellular mechanics of cellular and nuclear membranes, contractile actin stress fibers, and focal adhesion dynamics; 3 structural mechanics of ECM fiber networks; and 4 reaction-diffusion mass transfers of seven biochemical concentrations in related with chemotaxis, proteolysis, haptotaxis, and degradation in ECM to predict dynamic behaviors of filopodia that penetrate into a 3D ECM fiber network. The tip of each filopodium crawls along ECM fibers, tugs the surrounding fibers, and contracts or retracts depending on the strength of the binding and the ECM stiffness and pore size. This filopodium-ECM interaction is modeled as a stochastic process based on binding kinetics between integrins along the filopodial shaft and the ligands on the surrounding ECM fibers. This filopodia stochastic model is integrated into migratory dynamics of a whole cell in order to predict the cell invasion into 3D ECM in response to chemotaxis, haptotaxis, and durotaxis cues. Predicted average filopodia speed and that of the cell membrane advance agreed with experiments of 3D HUVEC migration at r(2 > 0.95 for diverse ECMs with different pore sizes and stiffness.

  18. Pterostilbene Inhibits Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 through Modulation of MAPK Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsing-Chun; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Peng, Chiung-Huei; Yang, Shun-Fa; Huang, Chien-Ning

    2015-10-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) migration and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activation are main roles in atherosclerosis. Pterostilbene (trans-3, 5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxystilbene) is known to have various pharmacologic effects such as anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic properties. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-atheroscleroic property of pterostilbene in the rat smooth muscle cell (SMC) A7r9 cell lines and the underlying mechanisms. In this study, pterostilbene treatment significantly inhibited migration/invasion capacities of in A7r9 cell. Pterostilbene was also found to significantly decreased MMP-2 activity and expression by gelatin zymography and western blot assay in SMC. In the MAPK signaling pathway, western blot assay also indicated that pterostilbene up-regulated the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (Erk)1/2. Moreover, inhibition of Erk1/2 by specific inhibitors significantly abolished the pterostilbene-decreased expression of MMP-2 and migration/invasion capacities. These findings suggest that pterostilbene inhibited SMC migration and that MMP-2 activation could be mediated via Erk1/2 phosphorylation. It is further possible that pterostilbene could play a novel role in the treatment of atherosclerosis. Pterostilbene is a plant polyphenol compound that is principally found in blueberries. In this study, we found that pterostilbene could inhibit SMCs migration via down-regulation of MMP-2. Particularly, expression of MMP-2 was found to be strongly associated with the phosphorylation of Erk1/2. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Spatio-temporal diversification of the cell wall matrix materials in the developing stomatal complexes of Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoutsou, E; Apostolakos, P; Galatis, B

    2016-11-01

    The matrix cell wall materials, in developing Zea mays stomatal complexes are asymmetrically distributed, a phenomenon appearing related to the local cell wall expansion and deformation, the establishment of cell polarity, and determination of the cell division plane. In cells of developing Zea mays stomatal complexes, definite cell wall regions expand determinately and become locally deformed. This differential cell wall behavior is obvious in the guard cell mother cells (GMCs) and the subsidiary cell mother cells (SMCs) that locally protrude towards the adjacent GMCs. The latter, emitting a morphogenetic stimulus, induce polarization/asymmetrical division in SMCs. Examination of immunolabeled specimens revealed that homogalacturonans (HGAs) with a high degree of de-esterification (2F4- and JIM5-HGA epitopes) and arabinogalactan proteins are selectively distributed in the extending and deformed cell wall regions, while their margins are enriched with rhamnogalacturonans (RGAs) containing highly branched arabinans (LM6-RGA epitope). In SMCs, the local cell wall matrix differentiation constitutes the first structural event, indicating the establishment of cell polarity. Moreover, in the premitotic GMCs and SMCs, non-esterified HGAs (2F4-HGA epitope) are preferentially localized in the cell wall areas outlining the cytoplasm where the preprophase band is formed. In these areas, the forthcoming cell plate fuses with the parent cell walls. These data suggest that the described heterogeneity in matrix cell wall materials is probably involved in: (a) local cell wall expansion and deformation, (b) the transduction of the inductive GMC stimulus, and (c) the determination of the division plane in GMCs and SMCs.

  20. Adipose Extracellular Matrix/Stromal Vascular Fraction Gel: A Novel Adipose Tissue-Derived Injectable for Stem Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao; Dong, Ziqing; Liao, Yunjun; Zhang, Pan; Ma, Jingjing; Gao, Jianhua; Lu, Feng

    2017-04-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells and other stromal vascular fraction cells were used more often for stem cell therapy, even though limitations such as poor cell retention rate, complicated and expensive isolation processes, and the use of specific laboratory equipment need to be overcome. Here, the authors developed a novel but simple method for generating an injectable mixture of stromal vascular fraction cells and native adipose extracellular matrix. It is a purely mechanical process in which lipoaspirate is processed into an extracellular matrix/stromal vascular fraction gel. The standard processing procedure was established using quantized tests. The therapeutic potential of the product for wound healing was then tested. Extracellular matrix/stromal vascular fraction gel derived from lipoaspirate and processed using a standard Coleman technique, followed by 1 minute of mechanical processing by passage back and forth between two 10-ml syringes at a flow rate of 10 ml/second, showed the highest adipose-derived stem cell and endothelial cell density. The stromal vascular fraction cells within the product also showed potential for multipotent differentiation similar to that of normal fat samples. In addition, the product showed better therapeutic results than stromal vascular fraction cell suspension when used to treat a nude mouse model of wound healing. Extracellular matrix/stromal vascular fraction gel is an autologous injectable derived from native extracellular matrix and is a functional cellular component generated using a simple mechanical process. As such, it may offer a novel mode of tissue repair suitable for clinical application in stem cell therapies.

  1. SU-F-SPS-08: Measuring the Interaction Of DDR Cell Receptors and Extracellular Matrix Collagen in Prostate Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J; Sarkar, A; Hoffmann, P [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Suhail, A; Fridman, R [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Discoidin domain receptors (DDR) have recently been recognized as important players in cancer progression. DDRs are cell receptors that interact with collagen, an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein. However the detailed mechanism of their interaction is unclear. Here we attempted to examine their interaction in terms of structural (surface topography), mechanical (rupture force), and kinetic (binding probability) information on the single molecular scale with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Methods: The Quantitative Nano-mechanical property Mapping (QNM) mode of AFM allowed to assess the cells in liquid growth media at their optimal physiological while being viable. Human benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH-1) cell line was genetically regulated to suppress DDR expression (DDR- cells) and was compared with naturally DDR expressing cells (DDR+). Results: Binding force measurements (n = 1000) were obtained before and after the two groups were treated with fibronectin (FN), an integrin-inhibiting antibody to block the binding of integrin. The quantification indicates that cells containing DDR bind with collagen at a most probable force of 80.3–83.0 ±7.6 pN. The probability of them binding is 0.167 when other interactions (mainly due to integrin-collagen binding) are minimized. Conclusion: Together with further force measurements at different pulling speeds will determine dissociation rate, binding distance and activation barrier. These parameters in benign cells provides some groundwork in understanding DDR’s behavior in various cell microenvironments such as in malignant tumor cells. Funding supported by Richard Barber Interdisciplinary Research Program of Wayne State University.

  2. TRANSGLUTAMINASE-2: A NEW ENDOSTATIN PARTNER IN THE EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX OF ENDOTHELIAL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, Clément; Inforzato, Antonio; Bignon, Marine; Hartmann, Daniel J.; Muller, Laurent; Ballut, Lionel; Olsen, Bjorn R.; Day, Anthony J.; Ricard-Blum, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Endostatin, the C-terminal domain of collagen XVIII, binds to transglutaminase-2 (TG-2) in a cation-dependent manner. Recombinant human endostatin binds to TG-2 with an affinity in the nanomolar range (KD = 6.8 nM). Enzymatic assays indicated that, in contrast to other extracellular matrix proteins, endostatin is not a glutaminyl substrate of TG-2 and is not cross-linked to itself by the enzyme. Two arginine residues of endostatin, R27 and R139, are crucial for its binding to TG-2. They are also involved in the binding to heparin (Sasaki et al., EMBO J 18:6240–6248), and to α5β1 and αvβ3 integrins (Faye et al., J Biol Chem 284:22029–22040), suggesting that endostatin is not able to interact simultaneously with TG-2 and heparan sulfate, or with TG-2 and integrins. Inhibition experiments support the GTP binding site of TG-2 as a potential binding site for endostatin. Endostatin and TG-2 are colocalized in the extracellular matrix secreted by endothelial cells under hypoxia, that stimulates angiogenesis. This interaction occurring in a cellular context might participate in the concerted regulation of angiogenesis, and tumorigenesis by the two proteins. PMID:20156196

  3. Buddleja officinalis inhibits high glucose-induced matrix metalloproteinase activity in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun Jung; Kang, Dae Gill; Kim, Jin Sook; Lee, Ho Sub

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to investigate whether an aqueous extract of Buddleja officinalis (ABO), a traditional Korean herbal medicine, suppresses the endothelial extracellular matrix degradation under high glucose condition. The incubation with high concentration of glucose (25 mM) increased significantly matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/-9 expressions and activities in primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Pretreatment with ABO decreased high glucose-induced increase of MMP-2/-9 activities in a dose-dependent manner. Real time qRT-PCR revealed that high glucose-induced MMP-2/-9 mRNA expression levels were attenuated by pretreatment with ABO. High glucose-induced MCP-1 and IL-8 mRNA expression levels also decreased by ABO. ABO decreased high glucose-induced hydrogen peroxide production, oxidative stress marker. These results provide new insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms for anti-inflammatory properties of ABO in vascular diseases associated with diabetes mellitus. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Matrix-directed differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells to dermal-like fibroblasts that produce extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Unnikrishnan; Jayakumar, K; Krishnan, Lissy K

    2016-10-01

    Commercially available skin substitutes lack essential non-immune cells for adequate tissue regeneration of non-healing wounds. A tissue-engineered, patient-specific, dermal substitute could be an attractive option for regenerating chronic wounds, for which adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) could become an autologous source. However, ADMSCs are multipotent in nature and may differentiate into adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes in vitro, and may develop into undesirable tissues upon transplantation. Therefore, ADMSCs committed to the fibroblast lineage could be a better option for in vitro or in vivo skin tissue engineering. The objective of this study was to standardize in vitro culture conditions for ADMSCs differentiation into dermal-like fibroblasts which can synthesize extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Biomimetic matrix composite, deposited on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), and differentiation medium (DM), supplemented with fibroblast-conditioned medium and growth factors, were used as a fibroblast-specific niche (FSN) for cell culture. For controls, ADMSCs were cultured on bare TCPS with either DM or basal medium (BM). Culture of ADMSCs on FSN upregulated the expression of differentiation markers such as fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1) and a panel of ECM molecules specific to the dermis, such as fibrillin-1, collagen I, collagen IV and elastin. Immunostaining showed the deposition of dermal-specific ECM, which was significantly higher in FSN compared to control. Fibroblasts derived from ADMSCs can synthesize elastin, which is an added advantage for successful skin tissue engineering as compared to fibroblasts from skin biopsy. To obtain rapid differentiation of ADMSCs to dermal-like fibroblasts for regenerative medicine, a matrix-directed differentiation strategy may be employed. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Regeneration of Articular Cartilage Surface: Morphogens, Cells, and Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Ryosuke; Iwakura, Takashi; Reddi, A Hari

    2015-10-01

    The articular cartilage is a well-organized tissue for smooth and friction-free joint movement for locomotion in animals and humans. Adult articular cartilage has a very low self-regeneration capacity due to its avascular nature. The regeneration of articular cartilage surface is critical to prevent the progression to osteoarthritis (OA). Although various joint resurfacing procedures in experimental articular cartilage defects have been developed, no standardized clinical protocol has yet been established. The three critical ingredients for tissue regeneration are morphogens and growth factors, cells, and scaffolds. The concepts based on the regeneration triad have been extensively investigated in animal models. However, these studies in animal models have demonstrated variable results and outcomes. An optimal animal model must precisely mimic and model the sequence of events in articular cartilage regeneration in human. In this article, the progress and remaining challenges in articular cartilage regeneration in animal models are reviewed. The role of individual morphogens and growth factors in cartilage regeneration has been investigated. In normal articular cartilage homeostasis, morphogens and growth factors function sequentially in tissue regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cell-based repair of articular cartilage defects, performed with or without various growth factors and scaffolds, has been widely attempted in animal models. Stem cells, including embryonic and adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, have also been reported as attractive cell sources for articular cartilage surface regeneration. Several studies with regard to scaffolds have been advanced, including recent investigations based on nanomaterials, functional mechanocompatible scaffolds, multilayered scaffolds, and extracellular matrix scaffolds for articular cartilage surface regeneration. Continuous refinement of animal models in chondral and osteochondral defects provide opportunities

  6. Regulation of proximal tubular cell differentiation and proliferation in primary culture by matrix stiffness and ECM components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wan-Chun; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Tang, Ming-Jer

    2014-09-15

    To explore whether matrix stiffness affects cell differentiation, proliferation, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in primary cultures of mouse proximal tubular epithelial cells (mPTECs), we used a soft matrix made from monomeric collagen type I-coated polyacrylamide gel or matrigel (MG). Both kinds of soft matrix benefited primary mPTECs to retain tubular-like morphology with differentiation and growth arrest and to evade TGF-β1-induced EMT. However, the potent effect of MG on mPTEC differentiation was suppressed by glutaraldehyde-induced cross-linking and subsequently stiffening MG or by an increasing ratio of collagen in the soft mixed gel. Culture media supplemented with MG also helped mPTECs to retain tubular-like morphology and a differentiated phenotype on stiff culture dishes as soft MG did. We further found that the protein level and activity of ERK were scaled with the matrix stiffness. U-0126, a MEK inhibitor, abolished the stiff matrix-induced dedifferentiation and proliferation. These data suggest that the ERK signaling pathway plays a vital role in matrix stiffness-regulated cell growth and differentiation. Taken together, both compliant property and specific MG signals from the matrix are required for the regulation of epithelial differentiation and proliferation. This study provides a basic understanding of how physical and chemical cues derived from the extracellular matrix regulate the physiological function of proximal tubules and the pathological development of renal fibrosis. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Calcium Alginate Gels as Stem Cell Matrix – Making Paracrine Stem Cell Activity Available for Enhanced Healing after Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Andreas; Rödel, Philipp; Anamur, Cihad; Seeliger, Claudine; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Herbst, Elmar; Vogt, Stephan; van Griensven, Martijn; Winter, Gerhard; Engert, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration after surgery can be improved by the administration of anabolic growth factors. However, to locally maintain these factors at the site of regeneration is problematic. The aim of this study was to develop a matrix system containing human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) which can be applied to the surgical site and allows the secretion of endogenous healing factors from the cells. Calcium alginate gels were prepared by a combination of internal and external gelation. The gelling behaviour, mechanical stability, surface adhesive properties and injectability of the gels were investigated. The permeability of the gels for growth factors was analysed using bovine serum albumin and lysozyme as model proteins. Human MSCs were isolated, cultivated and seeded into the alginate gels. Cell viability was determined by AlamarBlue assay and fluorescence microscopy. The release of human VEGF and bFGF from the cells was determined using an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Gels with sufficient mechanical properties were prepared which remained injectable through a syringe and solidified in a sufficient time frame after application. Surface adhesion was improved by the addition of polyethylene glycol 300,000 and hyaluronic acid. Humans MSCs remained viable for the duration of 6 weeks within the gels. Human VEGF and bFGF was found in quantifiable concentrations in cell culture supernatants of gels loaded with MSCs and incubated for a period of 6 weeks. This work shows that calcium alginate gels can function as immobilization matrices for human MSCs. PMID:25793885

  8. Calcium alginate gels as stem cell matrix-making paracrine stem cell activity available for enhanced healing after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Andreas; Rödel, Philipp; Anamur, Cihad; Seeliger, Claudine; Imhoff, Andreas B; Herbst, Elmar; Vogt, Stephan; van Griensven, Martijn; Winter, Gerhard; Engert, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration after surgery can be improved by the administration of anabolic growth factors. However, to locally maintain these factors at the site of regeneration is problematic. The aim of this study was to develop a matrix system containing human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) which can be applied to the surgical site and allows the secretion of endogenous healing factors from the cells. Calcium alginate gels were prepared by a combination of internal and external gelation. The gelling behaviour, mechanical stability, surface adhesive properties and injectability of the gels were investigated. The permeability of the gels for growth factors was analysed using bovine serum albumin and lysozyme as model proteins. Human MSCs were isolated, cultivated and seeded into the alginate gels. Cell viability was determined by AlamarBlue assay and fluorescence microscopy. The release of human VEGF and bFGF from the cells was determined using an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Gels with sufficient mechanical properties were prepared which remained injectable through a syringe and solidified in a sufficient time frame after application. Surface adhesion was improved by the addition of polyethylene glycol 300,000 and hyaluronic acid. Humans MSCs remained viable for the duration of 6 weeks within the gels. Human VEGF and bFGF was found in quantifiable concentrations in cell culture supernatants of gels loaded with MSCs and incubated for a period of 6 weeks. This work shows that calcium alginate gels can function as immobilization matrices for human MSCs.

  9. Calcium alginate gels as stem cell matrix-making paracrine stem cell activity available for enhanced healing after surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Schmitt

    Full Text Available Regeneration after surgery can be improved by the administration of anabolic growth factors. However, to locally maintain these factors at the site of regeneration is problematic. The aim of this study was to develop a matrix system containing human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs which can be applied to the surgical site and allows the secretion of endogenous healing factors from the cells. Calcium alginate gels were prepared by a combination of internal and external gelation. The gelling behaviour, mechanical stability, surface adhesive properties and injectability of the gels were investigated. The permeability of the gels for growth factors was analysed using bovine serum albumin and lysozyme as model proteins. Human MSCs were isolated, cultivated and seeded into the alginate gels. Cell viability was determined by AlamarBlue assay and fluorescence microscopy. The release of human VEGF and bFGF from the cells was determined using an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Gels with sufficient mechanical properties were prepared which remained injectable through a syringe and solidified in a sufficient time frame after application. Surface adhesion was improved by the addition of polyethylene glycol 300,000 and hyaluronic acid. Humans MSCs remained viable for the duration of 6 weeks within the gels. Human VEGF and bFGF was found in quantifiable concentrations in cell culture supernatants of gels loaded with MSCs and incubated for a period of 6 weeks. This work shows that calcium alginate gels can function as immobilization matrices for human MSCs.

  10. Initial contact of glioblastoma cells with existing normal brain endothelial cells strengthen the barrier function via fibroblast growth factor 2 secretion: a new in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Keisuke; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Nakagawa, Shinsuke; Thuy, Dinh Ha Duy; Ujifuku, Kenta; Kamada, Kensaku; Hayashi, Kentaro; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Niwa, Masami

    2013-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells invade along the existing normal capillaries in brain. Normal capillary endothelial cells function as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that limits permeability of chemicals into the brain. To investigate whether GBM cells modulate the BBB function of normal endothelial cells, we developed a new in vitro BBB model with primary cultures of rat brain endothelial cells (RBECs), pericytes, and astrocytes. Cells were plated on a membrane with 8 μm pores, either as a monolayer or as a BBB model with triple layer culture. The BBB model consisted of RBEC on the luminal side as a bottom, and pericytes and astrocytes on the abluminal side as a top of the chamber. Human GBM cell line, LN-18 cells, or lung cancer cell line, NCI-H1299 cells, placed on either the RBEC monolayer or the BBB model increased the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) values against the model, which peaked within 72 h after the tumor cell application. The TEER value gradually returned to baseline with LN-18 cells, whereas the value quickly dropped to the baseline in 24 h with NCI-H1299 cells. NCI-H1299 cells invaded into the RBEC layer through the membrane, but LN-18 cells did not. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) strengthens the endothelial cell BBB function by increased occludin and ZO-1 expression. In our model, LN-18 and NCI-H1299 cells secreted FGF-2, and a neutralization antibody to FGF-2 inhibited LN-18 cells enhanced BBB function. These results suggest that FGF-2 would be a novel therapeutic target for GBM in the perivascular invasive front.

  11. Static stretch affects neural stem cell differentiation in an extracellular matrix-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulmoli, Janahan; Pathak, Medha M; McDonnell, Lisa P; Nourse, Jamison L; Tombola, Francesco; Earthman, James C; Flanagan, Lisa A

    2015-02-17

    Neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) fate is strongly influenced by mechanotransduction as modulation of substrate stiffness affects lineage choice. Other types of mechanical stimuli, such as stretch (tensile strain), occur during CNS development and trauma, but their consequences for NSPC differentiation have not been reported. We delivered a 10% static equibiaxial stretch to NSPCs and examined effects on differentiation. We found static stretch specifically impacts NSPC differentiation into oligodendrocytes, but not neurons or astrocytes, and this effect is dependent on particular extracellular matrix (ECM)-integrin linkages. Generation of oligodendrocytes from NSPCs was reduced on laminin, an outcome likely mediated by the α6 laminin-binding integrin, whereas similar effects were not observed for NSPCs on fibronectin. Our data demonstrate a direct role for tensile strain in dictating the lineage choice of NSPCs and indicate the dependence of this phenomenon on specific substrate materials, which should be taken into account for the design of biomaterials for NSPC transplantation.

  12. TSP-1 promotes glomerular mesangial cell proliferation and extracellular matrix secretion in Thy-1 nephritis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wen; Li, Yan; Zhou, Jianbo; Zhao, Chenhui; Zhang, Jing; Shan, Kai; Zhao, Dan; Wang, Yingwei

    2011-11-01

    The proliferation of glomerular mesangial cells (GMC) and secretion of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in rat with Thy-1 nephritis (Thy-1N) resembling human mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis have been explored for many years; however, the molecular mechanisms of GMC proliferation and ECM production remain unclear. Our previous studies have demonstrated that the thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) gene was involved in mediating rat GMC proliferation and ECM synthesis induced by sublytic C5b-9 in vitro. In the present study, the roles of the TSP-1 gene in GMC proliferation, ECM production, and urinary protein secretion in Thy-1N rats were determined by using TSP-1 small hairpin RNA, and the results revealed that silencing of the TSP-1 gene in rat renal tissues could diminish GMC proliferation (P TSP-1 gene expression was required for GMC proliferation and ECM production in Thy-1N rats.

  13. MR imaging features of gadofluorine-labeled matrix-associated stem cell implants in cartilage defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Nejadnik

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to assess the chondrogenic potential and the MR signal effects of GadofluorineM-Cy labeled matrix associated stem cell implants (MASI in pig knee specimen.Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs were labeled with the micelle-based contrast agent GadofluorineM-Cy. Ferucarbotran-labeled hMSCs, non-labeled hMSCs and scaffold only served as controls. Chondrogenic differentiation was induced and gene expression and histologic evaluation were performed. The proportions of spindle-shaped vs. round cells of chondrogenic pellets were compared between experimental groups using the Fisher's exact test. Labeled and unlabeled hMSCs and chondrocytes in scaffolds were implanted into cartilage defects of porcine femoral condyles and underwent MR imaging with T1- and T2-weighted SE and GE sequences. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR between implants and adjacent cartilage were determined and analyzed for significant differences between different experimental groups using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Significance was assigned for p0.017. However, hMSC differentiation into chondrocytes was superior for unlabeled and GadofluorineM-Cy-labeled cells compared with Ferucarbotran-labeled cells, as evidenced by a significantly higher proportion of spindle cells in chondrogenic pellets (p<0.05. GadofluorineM-Cy-labeled hMSCs and chondrocytes showed a positive signal effect on T1-weighted images and a negative signal effect on T2-weighted images while Ferucarbotran-labeled cells provided a negative signal effect on all sequences. CNR data for both GadofluorineM-Cy-labeled and Ferucarbotran-labeled hMSCs were significantly different compared to unlabeled control cells on T1-weighted SE and T2*-weighted MR images (p<0.017.hMSCs can be labeled by simple incubation with GadofluorineM-Cy. The labeled cells provide significant MR signal effects and less impaired chondrogenesis compared to Ferucarbotran-labeled hMSCs. Thus, GadoflurineM-Cy might represent an

  14. Cannabinoids inhibit angiogenic capacities of endothelial cells via release of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 from lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramer, Robert; Fischer, Sascha; Haustein, Maria; Manda, Katrin; Hinz, Burkhard

    2014-09-15

    Cannabinoids inhibit tumor neovascularization as part of their tumorregressive action. However, the underlying mechanism is still under debate. In the present study the impact of cannabinoids on potential tumor-to-endothelial cell communication conferring anti-angiogenesis was studied. Cellular behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) associated with angiogenesis was evaluated by Boyden chamber, two-dimensional tube formation and fibrin bead assay, with the latter assessing three-dimensional sprout formation. Viability was quantified by the WST-1 test. Conditioned media (CM) from A549 lung cancer cells treated with cannabidiol, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, R(+)-methanandamide or the CB2 agonist JWH-133 elicited decreased migration as well as tube and sprout formation of HUVEC as compared to CM of vehicle-treated cancer cells. Inhibition of sprout formation was further confirmed for cannabinoid-treated A549 cells co-cultured with HUVEC. Using antagonists to cannabinoid-activated receptors the antimigratory action was shown to be mediated via cannabinoid receptors or transient receptor potential vanilloid 1. SiRNA approaches revealed a cannabinoid-induced expression of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) as well as its upstream trigger, the intercellular adhesion molecule-1, to be causally linked to the observed decrease of HUVEC migration. Comparable anti-angiogenic effects were not detected following direct exposure of HUVEC to cannabinoids, but occurred after addition of recombinant TIMP-1 to HUVEC. Finally, antimigratory effects were confirmed for CM of two other cannabinoid-treated lung cancer cell lines (H460 and H358). Collectively, our data suggest a pivotal role of the anti-angiogenic factor TIMP-1 in intercellular tumor-endothelial cell communication resulting in anti-angiogenic features of endothelial cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Automated analysis of cell-matrix adhesions in 2D and 3D environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Joshua A; Diggins, Nicole L; Hummel, Stephen; Georgescu, Walter; Quaranta, Vito; Webb, Donna J

    2015-01-29

    Cell-matrix adhesions are of great interest because of their contribution to numerous biological processes, including cell migration, differentiation, proliferation, survival, tissue morphogenesis, wound healing, and tumorigenesis. Adhesions are dynamic structures that are classically defined on two-dimensional (2D) substrates, though the need to analyze adhesions in more physiologic three-dimensional (3D) environments is being increasingly recognized. However, progress has been greatly hampered by the lack of available tools to analyze adhesions in 3D environments. To address this need, we have developed a platform for the automated analysis, segmentation, and tracking of adhesions (PAASTA) based on an open source MATLAB framework, CellAnimation. PAASTA enables the rapid analysis of adhesion dynamics and many other adhesion characteristics, such as lifetime, size, and location, in 3D environments and on traditional 2D substrates. We manually validate PAASTA and utilize it to quantify rate constants for adhesion assembly and disassembly as well as adhesion lifetime and size in 3D matrices. PAASTA will be a valuable tool for characterizing adhesions and for deciphering the molecular mechanisms that regulate adhesion dynamics in 3D environments.

  16. Diet-induced obesity regulates adipose-resident stromal cell quantity and extracellular matrix gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Pincu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue expansion during periods of excess nutrient intake requires significant turnover of the extracellular matrix (ECM to allow for maximal lipid filling. Recent data suggest that stromal cells may be a primary contributor to ECM modifications in visceral adipose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the capacity for high fat diet (HFD-induced obesity to alter adipose-derived stromal cell (ADSC relative quantity and ECM gene expression, and determine the extent to which exercise training can mitigate such changes. Male C57BL/6J mice were placed on control or HFD for 8 weeks prior to and following initiation of a 16 week treadmill exercise program. ADSCs (Sca-1+CD45− were isolated from epididymal adipose tissue and mRNA was evaluated using high throughput qPCR. Stromal cells were also obtained from skeletal muscle (MDSC. HFD decreased the quantity of ADSCs and markedly altered gene expression related to ECM remodeling (Col1α1, MMP2, MMP9, Timp1. Exercise did not reverse these changes. MDSCs were minimally altered by HFD or exercise. Overall, the data from this study suggest that ADSCs decrease in quantity and contribute to adipose ECM remodeling in response to obesity, and exercise training does not significantly impact these outcomes.

  17. Diet-induced obesity regulates adipose-resident stromal cell quantity and extracellular matrix gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincu, Yair; Huntsman, Heather D; Zou, Kai; De Lisio, Michael; Mahmassani, Ziad S; Munroe, Michael R; Garg, Koyal; Jensen, Tor; Boppart, Marni D

    2016-07-01

    Adipose tissue expansion during periods of excess nutrient intake requires significant turnover of the extracellular matrix (ECM) to allow for maximal lipid filling. Recent data suggest that stromal cells may be a primary contributor to ECM modifications in visceral adipose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the capacity for high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity to alter adipose-derived stromal cell (ADSC) relative quantity and ECM gene expression, and determine the extent to which exercise training can mitigate such changes. Male C57BL/6J mice were placed on control or HFD for 8weeks prior to and following initiation of a 16week treadmill exercise program. ADSCs (Sca-1(+)CD45(-)) were isolated from epididymal adipose tissue and mRNA was evaluated using high throughput qPCR. Stromal cells were also obtained from skeletal muscle (MDSC). HFD decreased the quantity of ADSCs and markedly altered gene expression related to ECM remodeling (Col1α1, MMP2, MMP9, Timp1). Exercise did not reverse these changes. MDSCs were minimally altered by HFD or exercise. Overall, the data from this study suggest that ADSCs decrease in quantity and contribute to adipose ECM remodeling in response to obesity, and exercise training does not significantly impact these outcomes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Extracellular Matrix Proteins Expression Profiling in Chemoresistant Variants of the A2780 Ovarian Cancer Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosław Januchowski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among gynaecological malignancies. Extracellular matrix (ECM can affect drug resistance by preventing the penetration of the drug into cancer cells and increased resistance to apoptosis. This study demonstrates alterations in the expression levels of ECM components and related genes in cisplatin-, doxorubicin-, topotecan-, and paclitaxel-resistant variants of the A2780 ovarian cancer cell line. Affymetrix Gene Chip Human Genome Array Strips were used for hybridisations. The genes that had altered expression levels in drug-resistant sublines were selected and filtered by scatter plots. The genes that were up- or downregulated more than fivefold were selected and listed. Among the investigated genes, 28 genes were upregulated, 10 genes were downregulated, and two genes were down- or upregulated depending on the cell line. Between upregulated genes 12 were upregulated very significantly—over 20-fold. These genes included COL1A2, COL12A1, COL21A1, LOX, TGFBI, LAMB1, EFEMP1, GPC3, SDC2, MGP, MMP3, and TIMP3. Four genes were very significantly downregulated: COL11A1, LAMA2, GPC6, and LUM. The expression profiles of investigated genes provide a preliminary insight into the relationship between drug resistance and the expression of ECM components. Identifying correlations between investigated genes and drug resistance will require further analysis.

  19. Process Extension from Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Motor Neurons through Synthetic Extracellular Matrix Mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Daniel Devaud

    This thesis focuses on studying the extension of motor axons through synthetic poly(ethylene glycol) PEG hydrogels that have been modified with biochemical functionalities to render them more biologically relevant. Specifically, the research strategy is to encapsulate embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons (ESMNs) in synthetic PEG hydrogels crosslinked through three different chemistries providing three mechanisms for dynamically tuning material properties. First, a covalently crosslinked, enzymatically degradable hydrogel is developed and exploited to study the biophysical dynamics of axon extension and matrix remodeling. It is demonstrated that dispersed motor neurons require a battery of adhesive peptides and growth factors to maintain viability and extend axons while those in contact with supportive neuroglial cells do not. Additionally, cell-degradable crosslinker peptides and a soft modulus mimicking that of the spinal cord are requirements for axon extension. However, because local degradation of the hydrogel results in a cellular environment significantly different than that of the bulk, enzymatically degradable peptide crosslinkers were replaced with reversible covalent hydrazone bonds to study the effect of hydrogel modulus on axon extension. This material is characterized in detail and used to measure forces involved in axon extension. Finally, a hydrogel with photocleavable linkers incorporated into the network structure is exploited to explore motor axon response to physical channels. This system is used to direct the growth of motor axons towards co-cultured myotubes, resulting in the formation of an in vitro neural circuit.

  20. Pattern secretion of matrix Metalloproteinases and their biological tissue inhibitors by human glomerular mesangial cells in culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Hosseini R

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available The glomerular mesangial cells (GMC play a central role in the synthesis and turnover of the glomerular mesangial matrix. The breakdown of the matrix likely depends on the balance between of a variety of proteinases including matrix metalloproteinases and their biological inhibitors secreted by the GMC, and any disturbance in the balance may result in appearance of various pathological states such as glomerulosclerosis. We therefore studied pattern secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9 and their biological tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 by cultured human GMC. We also measured MMP-1/TIMP-1 complex level in the cell culture supernatants. For this purpose, the GMC were incubated under serum-free conditions with medium (RPMI-1640 alone or in combination with TNF-α (30 ng/ml or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA (50 ng/ml for exactly 24, 48 and 72 hours. The above parameters were assayed by established ELISA techniques. Our results showed that the lowest and largest secretions were related to MMP-9 and MMP-2, respectively. The results indicated that the MMPs and TIMPs secretion were increased by TNF-α (MMP-1, MMP-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 and PMA (MMP-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2, significantly (P<0.05. These results suggest that the GMC can synthesis and release various MMPs and their inhibitors (TIMPs that, in part, control turnover of extracellular matrix proteins.

  1. Human cardiac extracellular matrix supports myocardial lineage commitment of pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberwallner, Barbara; Brodarac, Andreja; Anić, Petra; Šarić, Tomo; Wassilew, Katharina; Neef, Klaus; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Stamm, Christof

    2015-03-01

    Cross-talk between organ-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) and stem cells is often assumed but has not been directly demonstrated. We developed a protocol for the preparation of human cardiac ECM (cECM) and studied whether cECM has effects on pluripotent stem cell differentiation that may be useful for future cardiac regeneration strategies in patients with end-stage heart failure. Of note, 0.3 mm-thick cECM slices were prepared from samples of myocardium from patients with end-stage non-ischaemic dilated cardiomyopathy, using a three-step protocol involving hypotonic lysis buffer, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and foetal bovine serum (FBS). Murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were seeded and grown in standard culture, on cECM or on non-specific ECM preparations (Matrigel® or Geltrex®). Cell attachment, apoptosis induction (Caspase 3/7 activity) and metabolic activity (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium conversion) were followed. Transcriptional activation of genes involved in pluripotency; early and late myocardial development; and endothelial, ectodermal or endodermal commitment were monitored by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (rtPCR). Protein expression of selected markers was confirmed by immunohistology. cECM supported the proliferation of ESCs and iPSCs, and Caspase 3/7 activity was significantly lower compared with standard culture. Cardiac lineage commitment was favoured when ESCs or iPSCs were grown on cECM, as evidenced by the significantly increased mRNA expression of cardiac alpha myosin heavy polypeptide 6 (Myh6), cardiac troponin T2 (Tnnt2) and NK2 homeobox 5 (Nkx2.5) as well as positive immunohistology for cardiac troponin T and heavy-chain cardiac myosin protein. In contrast, Matrigel or Geltrex did not induce cardiac-specific markers. MSCs showed no evidence of cardiomyocyte differentiation. Human

  2. Effect of bone graft density on in vitro cell behavior with enamel matrix derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Richard J; Caluseru, Oana M; Guillemette, Vincent; Zhang, Yufeng; Buser, Daniel; Chandad, Fatiha; Sculean, Anton

    2015-09-01

    Bone replacement grafting materials play an important role in regenerative dentistry. Despite a large array of tested bone-grafting materials, little information is available comparing the effects of bone graft density on in vitro cell behavior. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to compare the effects of cells seeded on bone grafts at low and high density in vitro for osteoblast adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. The response of osteoblasts to the presence of a growth factor (enamel matrix derivative, (EMD)) in combination with low (8 mg per well) or high (100 mg per well) bone grafts (BG; natural bone mineral, Bio-Oss®) density, was studied and compared for osteoblast cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation as assessed by real-time PCR. Standard tissue culture plastic was used as a control with and without EMD. The present study demonstrates that in vitro testing of bone-grafting materials is largely influenced by bone graft seeding density. Osteoblast adhesion was up to 50 % lower when cells were seeded on high-density BG when compared to low-density BG and control tissue culture plastic. Furthermore, proliferation was affected in a similar manner whereby cell proliferation on high-density BG (100 mg/well) was significantly increased when compared to that on low-density BG (8 mg/well). In contrast, cell differentiation was significantly increased on high-density BG as assessed by real-time PCR for markers collagen 1 (Col 1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and osteocalcin (OC) as well as alizarin red staining. The effects of EMD on osteoblast adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation further demonstrated that the bone graft seeding density largely controls in vitro results. EMD significantly increased cell attachment only on high-density BG, whereas EMD was able to further stimulate cell proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts on control culture plastic and low-density BG when compared to high-density BG. The results

  3. The extracellular matrix niche microenvironment of neural and cancer stem cells in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Jacqueline; Brösicke, Nicole; Theocharidis, Ursula; Faissner, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    Numerous studies demonstrated that neural stem cells and cancer stem cells (NSCs/CSCs) share several overlapping characteristics such as self-renewal, multipotency and a comparable molecular repertoire. In addition to the intrinsic cellular properties, NSCs/CSCs favor a similar environment to acquire and maintain their characteristics. In the present review, we highlight the shared properties of NSCs and CSCs in regard to their extracellular microenvironment called the NSC/CSC niche. Moreover, we point out that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and their complementary receptors influence the behavior of NSCs/CSCs as well as brain tumor progression. Here, we focus on the expression profile and functional importance of the ECM glycoprotein tenascin-C, the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan DSD-1-PG/phosphacan but also on other important glycoprotein/proteoglycan constituents. Within this review, we specifically concentrate on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). GBM is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults and is associated with poor prognosis despite intense and aggressive surgical and therapeutic treatment. Recent studies indicate that GBM onset is driven by a subpopulation of CSCs that display self-renewal and recapitulate tumor heterogeneity. Based on the CSC hypothesis the cancer arises just from a small subpopulation of self-sustaining cancer cells with the exclusive ability to self-renew and maintain the tumor. Besides the fundamental stem cell properties of self-renewal and multipotency, GBM stem cells share further molecular characteristics with NSCs, which we would like to review in this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Gene expression and cell differentiation in matrix-associated chondrocyte transplantation grafts: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, C; Tichy, B; Nürnberger, S; Hosiner, S; Zak, L; Aldrian, S; Marlovits, S

    2011-10-01

    Although scaffold composition and architecture are considered to be important parameters for tissue engineering, their influence on gene expression and cell differentiation is rarely investigated in scaffolds used for matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT). In this study we have therefore comparatively analyzed the gene expression of important chondrogenic markers in four clinical applied cell-graft systems with very different scaffold characteristics. Residuals (n=165) of four different transplant types (MACI®, Hyalograft®C, CaReS® and Novocart®3D) were collected during surgery and analyzed for Col1, Col2, aggrecan, versican, melanoma inhibitory activity (MIA) and IL-1β by real-time PCR. Scaffold and cell morphology were evaluated by histology and electron microscopy. Despite the cultivation on 3D scaffolds, the cell differentiation on all transplant types didn't reach the levels of native cartilage. Gene expression highly differed between the transplant types. The highest differentiation of cells (Col2/Col1 ratio) was found in CaReS®, followed by Novocart®3D, Hyalograft®C and MACI®. IL-1β expression also exhibited high differences between the scaffolds showing low expression levels in Novocart®3D and CaReS® and higher expression levels in MACI® and Hyalograft®C. Our data indicate that scaffold characteristics as well as culture conditions highly influence gene expression in cartilage transplants and that these parameters may have profound impact on the tissue regeneration after MACT. Copyright © 2011 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Illustration of extensive extracellular matrix at the epithelial-mesenchymal interface within the renal stem/progenitor cell niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minuth Will W

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stem/progenitor cells are promising candidates to treat diseased renal parenchyma. However, implanted stem/progenitor cells are exposed to a harmful atmosphere of degenerating parenchyma. To minimize hampering effects after an implantation investigations are in progress to administer these cells within an artificial polyester interstitum supporting survival. Learning from nature the renal stem/progenitor cell niche appears as a valuable model. At this site epithelial stem/progenitor cells within the collecting duct ampulla face mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells. Both cell types do not have close contact but are separated by a wide interstitium. Methods To analyze extracellular matrix in this particular interstitium, special contrasting for transmission electron microscopy was performed. Kidneys of neonatal rabbits were fixed in solutions containing glutaraldehyde (GA or in combination with cupromeronic blue, ruthenium red and tannic acid. Results GA revealed a basal lamina at the ampulla and a bright but inconspicuously looking interstitial space. In contrast, GA containing cupromeronic blue exhibits numerous proteoglycan braces lining from the ampulla towards the interstitial space. GA containing ruthenium red or tannic acid demonstrates clouds of extracellular matrix protruding from the basal lamina of the ampulla to the surface of mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells. Conclusions The actual data show that the interstitium between epithelial and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells contains much more and up to date unknown extracellular matrix than earlier observed by classical GA fixation.

  6. Finite element implementation and numerical issues of strain gradient plasticity with application to metal matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksson, Per; Gudmundson, Peter; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2009-01-01

    of quadrilateral type are examined and a few numerical issues are addressed related to these elements as well as to strain gradient plasticity theories in general. Numerical results are presented for an idealized cell model of a metal matrix composite under shear loading. It is shown that strengthening due...

  7. Interleukin-1{beta} regulates cell proliferation and activity of extracellular matrix remodelling enzymes in cultured primary pig heart cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zitta, Karina; Brandt, Berenice [Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany); Wuensch, Annegret [Institute of Molecular Animal Breeding and Biotechnology, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Meybohm, Patrick; Bein, Berthold; Steinfath, Markus; Scholz, Jens [Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany); Albrecht, Martin, E-mail: Albrecht@anaesthesie.uni-kiel.de [Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Levels of IL-1{beta} are increased in the pig myocardium after infarction. {yields} Cultured pig heart cells possess IL-1 receptors. {yields} IL-1{beta} increases cell proliferation of pig heart cells in-vitro. {yields} IL-1{beta} increases MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in pig heart cells in-vitro. {yields} IL-1{beta} may be important for tissue remodelling events after myocardial infarction. -- Abstract: After myocardial infarction, elevated levels of interleukins (ILs) are found within the myocardial tissue and IL-1{beta} is considered to play a major role in tissue remodelling events throughout the body. In the study presented, we have established a cell culture model of primary pig heart cells to evaluate the effects of different concentrations of IL-1{beta} on cell proliferation as well as expression and activity of enzymes typically involved in tissue remodelling. Primary pig heart cell cultures were derived from three different animals and stimulated with recombinant pig IL-1{beta}. RNA expression was detected by RT-PCR, protein levels were evaluated by Western blotting, activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was quantified by gelatine zymography and cell proliferation was measured using colorimetric MTS assays. Pig heart cells express receptors for IL-1 and application of IL-1{beta} resulted in a dose-dependent increase of cell proliferation (P < 0.05 vs. control; 100 ng/ml; 24 h). Gene expression of caspase-3 was increased by IL-1{beta} (P < 0.05 vs. control; 100 ng/ml; 3 h), and pro-caspase-3 but not active caspase was detected in lysates of pig heart cells by Western blotting. MMP-2 gene expression as well as enzymatic activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were increased by IL-1{beta} (P < 0.05 vs. control; 100 ng/ml; 3 h for gene expression, 48 and 72 h for enzymatic activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9, respectively). Our in vitro data suggest that IL-1{beta} plays a major role in the events of tissue remodelling in the heart. Combined

  8. Effects of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor doxycycline and CD147 antagonist peptide-9 on gallbladder carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shihang; Liu, Chao; Liu, Xinjiang; He, Yanxin; Shen, Dongfang; Luo, Qiankun; Dong, Yuxi; Dong, Haifeng; Pang, Zhigang

    2017-10-01

    Gallbladder carcinoma is the most common and aggressive malignancy of the biliary tree and highly expresses CD147, which is closely related to disease prognosis in a variety of human cancers. Doxycycline exhibited anti-tumor properties in many cancer cells. CD147 antagonist peptide-9 is a polypeptide and can specifically bind to CD147. The effect of these two drugs on gallbladder cancer cells has not been studied. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of doxycycline and antagonist peptide-9 on gallbladder carcinoma cells and the possible mechanism of inhibition on cancer cell of doxycycline. To investigate the effects of doxycycline and antagonist peptide-9 on gallbladder carcinoma cells (GBC-SD and SGC-996), cell proliferation, CD147 expression, and early-stage apoptosis rate were measured after treated with doxycycline. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 activities were measured after treated with different concentrations of doxycycline, antagonist peptide-9, and their combination. The results demonstrated that doxycycline inhibited cell proliferation, reduced CD147 expression level, and induced an early-stage apoptosis response in GBC-SD and SGC-996 cells. The matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 activities were inhibited by antagonist peptide-9 and doxycycline, and the inhibitory effects were enhanced by combined drugs in gallbladder carcinoma cell lines. Taken together, doxycycline showed inhibitory effects on gallbladder carcinoma cell lines and reduced the expression of CD147, and this may be the mechanism by which doxycycline inhibits cancer cells. This study provides new information and tries to implement the design of adjuvant therapy method for gallbladder carcinoma.

  9. clickECM: Development of a cell-derived extracellular matrix with azide functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, S M; Keller, S; Wieland, D E; Wittmann, V; Tovar, G E M; Bach, M; Kluger, P J

    2017-04-01

    In vitro cultured cells produce a complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that remains intact after decellularization. The biological complexity derived from the variety of distinct ECM molecules makes these matrices ideal candidates for biomaterials. Biomaterials with the ability to guide cell function are a topic of high interest in biomaterial development. However, these matrices lack specific addressable functional groups, which are often required for their use as a biomaterial. Due to the biological complexity of the cell-derived ECM, it is a challenge to incorporate such functional groups without affecting the integrity of the biomolecules within the ECM. The azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click reaction, Huisgen-reaction) is an efficient and specific ligation reaction that is known to be biocompatible when strained alkynes are used to avoid the use of copper (I) as a catalyst. In our work, the ubiquitous modification of a fibroblast cell-derived ECM with azides was achieved through metabolic oligosaccharide engineering by adding the azide-modified monosaccharide Ac4GalNAz (1,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-N-azidoacetylgalactosamine) to the cell culture medium. The resulting azide-modified network remained intact after removing the cells by lysis and the molecular structure of the ECM proteins was unimpaired after a gentle homogenization process. The biological composition was characterized in order to show that the functionalization does not impair the complexity and integrity of the ECM. The azides within this "clickECM" could be accessed by small molecules (such as an alkyne-modified fluorophore) or by surface-bound cyclooctynes to achieve a covalent coating with clickECM. The clickECM was produced by the incorporation of azide-functionalized sugar analogues into the extracellular glycans of fibroblast cell cultures by metabolic oligosaccharide engineering. By introducing these azide groups into the glycan structures, we enabled this cell-derived ECM for bioorthogonal click

  10. The influence of physiological matrix conditions on permanent culture of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heras-Bautista, Carlos O; Katsen-Globa, Alisa; Schloerer, Nils E; Dieluweit, Sabine; Abd El Aziz, Osama M; Peinkofer, Gabriel; Attia, Wael A; Khalil, Markus; Brockmeier, Konrad; Hescheler, Jürgen; Pfannkuche, Kurt

    2014-08-01

    Cardiomyocytes (CMs) from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells mark an important achievement in the development of in vitro pharmacological, toxicological and developmental assays and in the establishment of protocols for cardiac cell replacement therapy. Using CMs generated from murine embryonic stem cells and iPS cells we found increased cell-matrix interaction and more matured embryoid body (EB) structures in iPS cell-derived EBs. However, neither suspension-culture in form of purified cardiac clusters nor adherence-culture on traditional cell culture plastic allowed for extended culture of CMs. CMs grown for five weeks on polystyrene exhibit signs of massive mechanical stress as indicated by α-smooth muscle actin expression and loss of sarcomere integrity. Hydrogels from polyacrylamide allow adapting of the matrix stiffness to that of cardiac tissue. We were able to eliminate the bottleneck of low cell adhesion using 2,5-Dioxopyrrolidin-1-yl-6-acrylamidohexanoate as a crosslinker to immobilize matrix proteins on the gels surface. Finally we present an easy method to generate polyacrylamide gels with a physiological Young's modulus of 55 kPa and defined surface ligand, facilitating the culture of murine and human iPS-CMs, removing excess mechanical stresses and reducing the risk of tissue culture artifacts exerted by stiff substrates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Overexpression of Dentin matrix protein 1 in Nestin+cells causes bone loss in mouse long bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Min; Weng, Yuteng; Sun, Yao

    2017-08-19

    The well-known matrix protein Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is expressed by osteoblasts and osteocytes in bone, and it controls bone mineralization. Recently, it has been found that DMP1 is also expressed in other cell types, such as chondrocytes. Nestin + cells are one important type of progenitor cell in bone marrow and are associated with bone remodeling. In our preliminary experiment, DMP1 could also be detected in Nestin + cells in bone marrow. This study was designed to explore the effect on bone of DMP1 in Nestin + cells. A transgenic mouse model with DMP1 expression driven by the Nestin promoter was generated. In vivo and in vitro experiments revealed that overexpression of DMP1 in Nestin + cells could limit the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of BMMSCs, subsequently leading to decreased bone mass. Lower expression of bone matrix protein and a lower bone deposition rate were also observed. Meanwhile, overexpression of DMP1 in Nestin + cells had no influence on osteoclast activity. These data indicate that DMP1 plays negative roles in differentiation of Nestin + cells and bone formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Non-Muscle Myosin II Isoforms Have Different Functions in Matrix Rearrangement by MDA-MB-231 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget Hindman

    Full Text Available The role of a stiffening extra-cellular matrix (ECM in cancer progression is documented but poorly understood. Here we use a conditioning protocol to test the role of nonmuscle myosin II isoforms in cell mediated ECM arrangement using collagen constructs seeded with breast cancer cells expressing shRNA targeted to either the IIA or IIB heavy chain isoform. While there are several methods available to measure changes in the biophysical characteristics of the ECM, we wanted to use a method which allows for the measurement of global stiffness changes as well as a dynamic response from the sample over time. The conditioning protocol used allows the direct measurement of ECM stiffness. Using various treatments, it is possible to determine the contribution of various construct and cellular components to the overall construct stiffness. Using this assay, we show that both the IIA and IIB isoforms are necessary for efficient matrix remodeling by MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, as loss of either isoform changes the stiffness of the collagen constructs as measured using our conditioning protocol. Constructs containing only collagen had an elastic modulus of 0.40 Pascals (Pa, parental MDA-MB-231 constructs had an elastic modulus of 9.22 Pa, while IIA and IIB KD constructs had moduli of 3.42 and 7.20 Pa, respectively. We also calculated the cell and matrix contributions to the overall sample elastic modulus. Loss of either myosin isoform resulted in decreased cell stiffness, as well as a decrease in the stiffness of the cell-altered collagen matrices. While the total construct modulus for the IIB KD cells was lower than that of the parental cells, the IIB KD cell-altered matrices actually had a higher elastic modulus than the parental cell-altered matrices (4.73 versus 4.38 Pa. These results indicate that the IIA and IIB heavy chains play distinct and non-redundant roles in matrix remodeling.

  13. Non-Muscle Myosin II Isoforms Have Different Functions in Matrix Rearrangement by MDA-MB-231 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindman, Bridget; Goeckeler, Zoe; Sierros, Kostas; Wysolmerski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The role of a stiffening extra-cellular matrix (ECM) in cancer progression is documented but poorly understood. Here we use a conditioning protocol to test the role of nonmuscle myosin II isoforms in cell mediated ECM arrangement using collagen constructs seeded with breast cancer cells expressing shRNA targeted to either the IIA or IIB heavy chain isoform. While there are several methods available to measure changes in the biophysical characteristics of the ECM, we wanted to use a method which allows for the measurement of global stiffness changes as well as a dynamic response from the sample over time. The conditioning protocol used allows the direct measurement of ECM stiffness. Using various treatments, it is possible to determine the contribution of various construct and cellular components to the overall construct stiffness. Using this assay, we show that both the IIA and IIB isoforms are necessary for efficient matrix remodeling by MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, as loss of either isoform changes the stiffness of the collagen constructs as measured using our conditioning protocol. Constructs containing only collagen had an elastic modulus of 0.40 Pascals (Pa), parental MDA-MB-231 constructs had an elastic modulus of 9.22 Pa, while IIA and IIB KD constructs had moduli of 3.42 and 7.20 Pa, respectively. We also calculated the cell and matrix contributions to the overall sample elastic modulus. Loss of either myosin isoform resulted in decreased cell stiffness, as well as a decrease in the stiffness of the cell-altered collagen matrices. While the total construct modulus for the IIB KD cells was lower than that of the parental cells, the IIB KD cell-altered matrices actually had a higher elastic modulus than the parental cell-altered matrices (4.73 versus 4.38 Pa). These results indicate that the IIA and IIB heavy chains play distinct and non-redundant roles in matrix remodeling. PMID:26136073

  14. Evidence for an extracellular matrix bridge guiding proepicardial cell migration to the myocardium of chick embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahirney, Patrick C; Mikawa, Takashi; Fischman, Donald A

    2003-08-01

    During heart development, the proepicardium (PE) gives rise to cells of the epicardial epithelium, connective tissue of the subepicardium and the myocardium, and smooth muscle, endothelium, and connective tissue of the coronary arteries. The PE arises as an outgrowth of the pericardial serosa at embryonic day 2 (Hamburger and Hamilton stage [HH] 14) of chick development. Between stages HH14 and HH17, multicellular villous projections extend from the PE toward the dorsal aspect of the lesser curvature of the myocardium. On reaching the atrioventricular (AV) junction, the cells spread over the myocardium, eventually enveloping the complete heart surface as a simple squamous epithelium. Although the lineage of the PE cells is well established, it remains uncertain how cells of the PE reach the myocardial surface and specifically target the AV junction. By using a combination of serial section reconstructions, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy, we have identified an extracellular matrix bridge (ECMB) spanning the coelomic cavity between the PE and the myocardium. The ECMB is first detectable at HH14 and persists until the PE contacts the bare myocardial surface. This ECMB stains intensely with ruthenium red and Alcian blue, contains heparan sulfate and fibronectin, and exhibits both fibrillar and globular ultrastructure, reminiscent of proteoglycans. After PE attachment to the myocardium (HH16-HH17), the subepicardium exhibited strong staining for heparan sulfate. Heparinase injection into the pericardial coelom at HH15 resulted in aberrant development of the primordial epicardium. On the basis of these studies, we suggest that the ECMB may participate in migration and targeting of the PE to the myocardium. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Ornamenting 3D printed scaffolds with cell-laid extracellular matrix for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Falguni; Song, Tae-Ha; Rijal, Girdhari; Jang, Jinah; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    3D printing technique is the most sophisticated technique to produce scaffolds with tailorable physical properties. But, these scaffolds often suffer from limited biological functionality as they are typically made from synthetic materials. Cell-laid mineralized ECM was shown to be potential for improving the cellular responses and drive osteogenesis of stem cells. Here, we intend to improve the biological functionality of 3D-printed synthetic scaffolds by ornamenting them with cell-laid mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) that mimics a bony microenvironment. We developed bone graft substitutes by using 3D printed scaffolds made from a composite of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and mineralized ECM laid by human nasal inferior turbinate tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hTMSCs). A rotary flask bioreactor was used to culture hTMSCs on the scaffolds to foster formation of mineralized ECM. A freeze/thaw cycle in hypotonic buffer was used to efficiently decellularize (97% DNA reduction) the ECM-ornamented scaffolds while preserving its main organic and inorganic components. The ECM-ornamented 3D printed scaffolds supported osteoblastic differentiation of newly-seeded hTMSCs by upregulating four typical osteoblastic genes (4-fold higher RUNX2; 3-fold higher ALP; 4-fold higher osteocalcin; and 4-fold higher osteopontin) and increasing calcium deposition compared to bare 3D printed scaffolds. In vivo, in ectopic and orthotopic models in rats, ECM-ornamented scaffolds induced greater bone formation than that of bare scaffolds. These results suggest a valuable method to produce ECM-ornamented 3D printed scaffolds as off-the-shelf bone graft substitutes that combine tunable physical properties with physiological presentation of biological signals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Combined effects of extracellular matrix and growth factors on NBT-II rat bladder carcinoma cell dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, G C; Boyer, B; Valles, A M; Thiery, J P

    1991-10-01

    Using the rat bladder carcinoma cell line NBT-II we showed that collagens but not laminin and fibronectin were able to induce cell scattering. Acidic fibroblast growth factor and transforming growth factor alpha also promoted NBT-II cell dispersion on glass or tissue culture plastic. We have now further analysed the scatter response to these two growth factors in the presence of extracellular matrix molecules. In the presence of growth factors, no peripheral single-cell dispersion occurred on fibronectin and laminin, although time-lapse video analyses revealed intense cell mingling and motility inside the monolayer forming around NBT-II aggregates. Patterns of strings or files of cells protruding from the monolayer were often observed. The presence of a scattering activity in the complex acellular extracellular matrix deposited by NBT-II cells themselves strongly suggested that substratum conditioning was responsible for this effect. On the other hand, the two growth factors accelerated collagen-mediated NBT-II individual cell dispersion and locomotion in a reversible way. As a marker of cell dissociation, we studied desmosome distribution in aggregate cultures: desmosomes were present in aggregates formed in suspension even in the presence of growth factors, whereas internalization occurred after cell-to-substratum contact. On laminin or fibronectin and in the presence of growth factors, peripheral cells inside the halo of NBT-II aggregates did not exhibit desmosome linkages. These observations suggest that scatter effects per se are dependent on the composition of the extracellular matrix. In particular, on a substratum nonpermissive for direct cell translocation, individual cell dispersion can be replaced by en bloc patterns of migration following substratum conditioning by the cells.

  17. A cellular Potts model for the MMP-dependent and -independent cancer cell migration in matrix microtracks of different dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scianna, Marco; Preziosi, Luigi

    2014-03-01

    Cell migration is fundamental in a wide variety of physiological and pathological phenomena, among other in cancer invasion and development. In particular, the migratory/invasive capability of single metastatic cells is fundamental in determining the malignancy of a solid tumor. Specific cell migration phenotypes result for instance from the reciprocal interplay between the biophysical and biochemical properties of both the malignant cells themselves and of the surrounding environment. In particular, the extracellular matrices (ECMs) forming connective tissues can provide both loosely organized zones and densely packed barriers, which may impact cell invasion mode and efficiency. The critical processes involved in cell movement within confined spaces are (i) the proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and (ii) the deformation of the entire cell body, and in particular of the nucleus. We here present an extended cellular Potts model (CPM) to simulate a bio-engineered matrix system, which tests the active motile behavior of a single cancer cell into narrow channels of different widths. As distinct features of our approach, the cell is modeled as a compartmentalized discrete element, differentiated in the nucleus and in the cytosolic region, while a directional shape-dependent movement is explicitly driven by the evolution of its polarity vector. As outcomes, we find that, in a large track, the tumor cell is not able to maintain a directional movement. On the contrary, a structure of subcellular width behaves as a contact guidance sustaining cell persistent locomotion. In particular, a MMP-deprived cell is able to repolarize and follow the micropattern geometry, while a full MMP activity leads to a secondary track expansion by degrading the matrix structure. Finally, we confirm that cell movement within a subnuclear structure can be achieved either by pericellular proteolysis or by a significant deformation of cell nucleus.

  18. Matrix attachment region combinations increase transgene expression in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chun-Peng; Guo, Xiao; Chen, Si-Jia; Li, Chang-Zheng; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Jun-He; Chen, Shao-Nan; Jia, Yan-Long; Wang, Tian-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Matrix attachment regions (MARs) are cis-acting DNA elements that can increase transgene expression levels in a CHO cell expression system. To investigate the effects of MAR combinations on transgene expression and the underlying regulatory mechanisms, we generated constructs in which the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene flanked by different combinations of human β-interferon and β-globin MAR (iMAR and gMAR, respectively), which was driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) or simian virus (SV) 40 promoter. These were transfected into CHO-K1 cells, which were screened with geneticin; eGFP expression was detected by flow cytometry. The presence of MAR elements increased transfection efficiency and transient and stably expression of eGFP expression under both promoters; the level was higher when the two MARs differed (i.e., iMAR and gMAR) under the CMV but not the SV40 promoter. For the latter, two gMARs showed the highest activity. We also found that MARs increased the ratio of stably transfected positive colonies. These results indicate that combining the CMV promoter with two different MAR elements or the SV40 promoter with two gMARs is effective for inducing high expression level and stability of transgenes. PMID:28216629

  19. Enamel matrix derivative has no effect on the chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisanne C Groeneveldt

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment of large bone defects due to trauma, tumour resection, or congenital abnormalities is challenging. Bone tissue engineering using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs represents a promising treatment option. However, the quantity and quality of engineered bone tissue are not sufficient to fill large bone defects. The aim of this study was to determine if the addition of enamel matrix derivative (EMD improves in vitro chondrogenic priming of MSCs to ultimately improve in vivo MSC mediated endochondral bone formation.Methods: MSCs were chondrogenically differentiated in 200,0002.0x105 cell pellets in medium supplemented with TGFβ3 in the absence or presence of 1, 10, or 100 µg/mL EMD. Samples were analysed for gene expression of RUNX2, Col II, Col X, and Sox9. Protein, and glycoaminoglycan (GAG production were also investigated via DMB assays, histology and immunohistochemistry. Osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation capacity were also assessed. Results: The addition of EMD did not negatively affect chondrogenic differentiation of adult human MSCs. EMD did not appear to alter GAG production or expression of chondrogenic genes. Osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation were also unaffected though a trend towards decreased adipogenic gene expression was observed.Conclusions: EMD does not affect chondrogenic differentiation of adult human MSCs. As such the use of EMD in combination with chondrogenically primed MSCs for periodontal bone tissue repair is unlikely to have negative effects on MSC differentiation.

  20. Vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation to an osteogenic phenotype involves matrix metalloproteinase-2 modulation by homocysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tingjiao; Lin, Jinghan; Ju, Ting; Chu, Lei; Zhang, Liming

    2015-08-01

    Arterial calcification is common in vascular diseases and involves conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to an osteoblast phenotype. Clinical studies suggest that the development of atherosclerosis can be promoted by homocysteine (HCY), but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we determined whether increases in HCY levels lead to an increase in VSMC calcification and differentiation, and examined the role of an extracellular matrix remodeler, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Rat VSMCs were exposed to calcification medium in the absence or presence of HCY (10, 100 or 200 μmol/L) or an MMP-2 inhibitor (10(-6) or 10(-5) mol/L). MTT assays were performed to determine the cytotoxicity of the MMP-2 inhibitor in calcification medium containing 200 μmol/L HCY. Calcification was assessed by measurements of calcium deposition and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as well as von Kossa staining. Expression of osteocalcin, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, and osteopontin, and MMP-2 was determined by immunoblotting. Calcification medium induced osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs. HCY promoted calcification, increased osteocalcin and BMP-2 expression, and decreased expression of osteopontin. MMP-2 expression was increased by HCY in a dose-dependent manner in VSMCs exposed to both control and calcification medium. The MMP-2 inhibitor decreased the calcium content and ALP activity, and attenuated the osteoblastic phenotype of VSMCs. Vascular calcification and osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs were positively regulated by HCY through increased/restored MMP-2 expression, increased expression of calcification proteins, and decreased anti-calcification protein levels. In summary, MMP-2 inhibition may be a protective strategy against VSMC calcification.

  1. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein prevents vascular aging and vascular smooth muscle cells senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meili; Fu, Yi; Gao, Cheng; Jia, Yiting; Huang, Yaqian; Liu, Limei; Wang, Xian; Wang, Wengong; Kong, Wei

    2016-09-16

    Aging-related vascular dysfunction contributes to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), a vascular extracellular matrix protein, has been described as a negative regulatory factor for the vascular aging-related processes including atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. However, whether COMP is implicated in the process of vascular aging remains unclear. Here, we identified a novel function of COMP in preventing vascular aging and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) senescence. Firstly, vascular COMP expression was decreased in three different senescence-accelerated mouse models and was also declining with age. COMP(-/-) mice displayed elevated senescence-associated markers expression, including p53, p21 and p16, in the aortas compared with their wild type (WT) littermates. In accordance, COMP deficiency induced aging-related vascular dysfunction as evidenced by the significantly reduced phenylephrine-induced contraction and increased vascular stiffness as evaluated by pulse wave velocity. The aortic wall of COMP(-/-) mice was susceptible to senescence by displaying senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-gal) activity induced by periadventitial application of CaCl2 to the abdominal aorta. In vitro, COMP knockdown by small interfering (si) RNA led to the elevation of p53, p21 and p16 as well as SA β-gal activity in VSMCs after H2O2 stimulation. VSMCs isolated from COMP(-/-) mice showed elevated senescence-associated markers expression and supplement of COMP adenovirus to COMP-deficient VSMCs greatly rescued cellular senescence. Taken together, these findings revealed the essential role of COMP in retarding the development of vascular aging and VSMC senescence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cardiotrophin-1 induces matrix metalloproteinase-1 in human aortic endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Tokito

    Full Text Available Rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque is a key event in the development of cardiovascular disorders, in which matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1 plays a crucial role by degradation of extracellular matrix resulting in plaque instability. Cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1, a member of interleukin-6-type proinflammatory cytokines, has potent cardiovascular actions and is highly expressed in vascular endothelium, however its role in atherosclerosis has not been fully elucidated to date. The present study was designed to investigate whether CT-1 induces MMP-1 in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs. Ribonuclease protection assay demonstrated that MMP-1 gene level in HAECs was enhanced by the treatment of CT-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Immunocytochemical staining, Western immunoblot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that CT-1 augmented MMP-1 protein synthesis and secretion. MMP-1 activity assay revealed that MMP-1 present in the supernatant of HAECs was exclusively precursor form. Casein zymography disclosed proteolytic activity in the supernatant of HAECs, which was enhanced by CT-1 treatment. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibitor study indicated the important roles of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT signaling pathways in mediating CT-1-induced MMP-1 gene and protein expression. These data reveal for the first time that CT-1 induces the proteolytic potential in HAECs by upregulating MMP-1 expression through ERK1/2, p38 MAP kinase, JNK and JAK/STAT pathways, and suggest that CT-1 may play an important role in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and plaque instability.

  3. Oxidation modifies the structure and function of the extracellular matrix generated by human coronary artery endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Christine Y; Degendorfer, Georg; Hammer, Astrid; Whitelock, John M; Malle, Ernst; Davies, Michael J

    2014-04-15

    ECM (extracellular matrix) materials, such as laminin, perlecan, type IV collagen and fibronectin, play a key role in determining the structure of the arterial wall and the properties of cells that interact with the ECM. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of peroxynitrous acid, an oxidant generated by activated macrophages, on the structure and function of the ECM laid down by HCAECs (human coronary artery endothelial cells) in vitro and in vivo. We show that exposure of HCAEC-derived native matrix components to peroxynitrous acid (but not decomposed oxidant) at concentrations >1 μM results in a loss of antibody recognition of perlecan, collagen IV, and cell-binding sites on laminin and fibronectin. Loss of recognition was accompanied by decreased HCAEC adhesion. Real-time PCR showed up-regulation of inflammation-associated genes, including MMP7 (matrix metalloproteinase 7) and MMP13, as well as down-regulation of the laminin α2 chain, in HCAECs cultured on peroxynitrous acid-treated matrix compared with native matrix. Immunohistochemical studies provided evidence of co-localization of laminin with 3-nitrotyrosine, a biomarker of peroxynitrous acid damage, in type II-III/IV human atherosclerotic lesions, consistent with matrix damage occurring during disease development in vivo. The results of the present study suggest a mechanism through which peroxynitrous acid modifies endothelial cell-derived native ECM proteins of the arterial basement membrane in atherosclerotic lesions. These changes to ECM and particularly perlecan and laminin may be important in inducing cellular dysfunction and contribute to atherogenesis.

  4. Effect of Cell-to-matrix Ratio in Polyvinyl Alcohol Immobilized Pure and Mixed Cultures on Atrazine Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siripattanakul, Sumana [Chulalongkorn University, National Research Center for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management (Thailand); Wirojanagud, Wanpen [Khon Kaen University, Department of Environmental Engineering and Research Center for Environmental and Hazardous Substance Management (Thailand); McEvoy, John [North Dakota State University, Department of Veterinary and Microbiological Sciences (United States); Khan, Eakalak [North Dakota State University, Department of Civil Engineering (United States)], E-mail: eakalak.khan@ndsu.edu

    2008-08-15

    Atrazine biodegradation by immobilized pure and mixed cultures was examined. A pure atrazine-degrading culture, Agrobacterium radiobacter J14a (J14a), and a mixed culture (MC), isolated from an atrazine-contaminated crop field, were immobilized using phosphorylated-polyvinyl alcohol (PPVA). An existing cell immobilization procedure was modified to enhance PPVA matrix stability. The results showed that the matrices remained mechanically and chemically stable after shaking with glass beads over 15 days under various salt solutions and pH values. The immobilization process had a slight effect on cell viability. With the aid of scanning electron microscopy, a suitable microstructure of PPVA matrices for cell entrapment was observed. There were two porous layers of spherical gel matrices, the outside having an encapsulation property and the inside containing numerous pores for bacteria to occupy. J14a and MC were immobilized at three cell-to-matrix ratios of 3.5, 6.7, and 20 mg dry cells/mL matrix. The atrazine biodegradation tests were conducted in an aerobic batch system, which was inoculated with cells at 2,000 mg/L. The tests were also conducted using free (non-immobilized) J14a and MC for comparative purpose. The cell-to-matrix ratio of 3.5 mg/mL provided the highest atrazine removal efficiency of 40-50% in 120 h for both J14a and MC. The free cell systems, for both cultures, presented much lower atrazine removal efficiencies compared to the immobilized cell systems at the same level of inoculation.

  5. BD PuraMatrix peptide hydrogel as a culture system for human fetal Schwann cells in spinal cord regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Fateme; Bahktiari, Mehrdad; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Nobakht, Maliheh; Soleimani, Masoud; Hasanzadeh, Gholamreza; Fallah, Ali; Zarbakhsh, Sam; Hejazian, Leila Beigom; Shirmohammadi, Maryam; Maleki, Fatemeh

    2012-12-01

    BD PuraMatrix peptide hydrogel, a three-dimensional cell culture model of nanofiber scaffold derived from the self-assembling peptide RADA16, has been applied to regenerative tissue repair in order to develop novel nanomedicine systems. In this study with PuraMatrix, self-assembling nanofiber scaffold (SAPNS) and Schwann cells (SCs) were isolated from human fetal sciatic nerves, cultured within SAPNS, and then transplanted into the spinal cord after injury (SCI) in rats. First, the peptide nanofiber scaffold was evaluated via scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. With phase-contrast microscopy, the appearance of representative human fetal SCs encapsulated in PuraMatrix on days 3, 5, and 7 in 12-well plates was revealed. The Schwann cells in PuraMatrix were cultured for 2 days, and the SCs had active proliferative potential. Spinal cord injury was induced by placing a 35-g weight on the dura of T9-T10 segments for 15 min, followed by in vivo treatment with SAPNS and human fetal SCs (100,000 cells/10 μl/injection) grafted into spinal cord 7 days after SCI. After treatment, the recovery of motor function was assessed periodically using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scoring system. Eight weeks after grafting, animals were perfusion fixed, and the survival of implanted cells was analyzed with antibody recognizing SCs. Immunohistochemical analysis of grafted lumber segments at 8 weeks after grafting revealed reduced asterogliosis and considerably increased infiltration of endogenous S100(+) cells into the injury site, suggesting that PuraMatrix may play an important role in the repair observed after SAPNS and human fetal SC transplantation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Molecular constituents of the extracellular matrix in rat liver mounting a hepatic progenitor cell response for tissue repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestentoft, Peter Siig; Jelnes, Peter; Andersen, Jesper Bøje

    2013-01-01

    Tissue repair in the adult mammalian liver occurs in two distinct processes, referred to as the first and second tiers of defense. We undertook to characterize the changes in molecular constituents of the extracellular matrix when hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) respond in a second tier of defense...

  7. A NEW SAMPLE CELL DESIGN FOR STUDYING SOLID-MATRIX ROOM TEMPERATURE PHOSPHORESCENCE MOISTURE QUENCHING. (R824100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new sample chamber was developed that can be used in the measurement of the effects of moisture on the room-temperature solid-matrix phosphorescence of phosphors adsorbed onto filter paper. The sample chamber consists of a sealed quartz cell that contains a special teflon sampl...

  8. Strengthening Masonry Arches with Lime-Based Mortar Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Alecci

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, many strengthening interventions on masonry elements were performed by using fiber reinforced polymers (FRPs. These advanced materials proved to be effective to increase the load-carrying capacity of masonry elements and to improve their structural behavior, avoiding the most critical failure modes. Despite the advantages of this technique compared to more traditional methods, FRP systems have disadvantages related to their low resistance to high temperatures, impossibility of application on wet surfaces, low permeability, and poor compatibility with masonry supports. Therefore, composite materials made of a fiber textile embedded in an inorganic matrix were recently proposed as alternatives to FRPs for strengthening historic masonry constructions. These composite materials are easier to install, have higher resistance to high temperatures, and permit higher vapor permeability than FRPs. The inorganic matrix is frequently a cement-based mortar, and the composite materials made of a fiber textile embedded in a cement-based mortar are usually identified as FRCM (fabric reinforced cementitious matrix composites. More recently, the use of natural lime mortar as an inorganic matrix has been proposed as an alternative to cement-based mortars when historic compatibility with the substrate is strictly required, as in case of restoration of historic buildings. In this paper, the effectiveness of a fabric made of basalt fibers embedded in lime mortar matrix (Basalt-FRLM for the strengthening of masonry arches is investigated. An experimental investigation was performed on 1:2 scaled brick masonry arches strengthened at the extrados with a layer of Basalt-FRLM and tested under vertical load. The results obtained are compared with previous results obtained by the authors by testing masonry arches strengthened at their extrados with FRCM and FRP composites. This investigation highlights the effectiveness of Basalt-FRLM in increasing load

  9. A protein involved in central nervous system myelination: localization in the extracellular matrix and induction in neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notterpek, L M; Rome, L H

    1994-01-01

    G21.3, a monoclonal antibody previously shown to block central nervous system (CNS) myelination, is now demonstrated to recognize an extracellular matrix (ECM) component. The antigen is present on the surface of neurons but not oligodendrocytes and is highly abundant in the white matter of the adult rat brain; however, it is not found in isolated myelin. Double immunostaining studies indicate a neuronal and ependymal cell source of the G21.3 antigen and a developmental expression pattern distinct from known markers of CNS myelination. The antigen is found at low levels in non-neuronal tissue and is mainly localized to basement membranes. G21.3 immunoreactive proteins are upregulated by retinoic acid-induced differentiation of SK-N-SHF neuroblastoma cells. These results suggest that the G21.3 antigen is an axolemma-associated ECM component with roles in postnatal CNS development and cell-matrix interactions during morphological differentiation of neuroblastoma cells.

  10. Candidate Cell and Matrix Interaction Domains on the Collagen Fibril, the Predominant Protein of Vertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweeney, Shawn M.; Orgel, Joseph P.; Fertala, Andrzej; McAuliffe, Jon D.; Turner, Kevin R.; Di Lullo, Gloria A.; Chen, Steven; Antipova, Olga; Perumal, Shiamalee; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Forlinoi, Antonella; Cabral, Wayne A.; Barnes, Aileen M.; Marini, Joan C.; San Antonio, James D. (IIT); (TJU); (UPENN); (Oulu); (Chicago-Med); (NIST)

    2008-07-18

    Type I collagen, the predominant protein of vertebrates, polymerizes with type III and V collagens and non-collagenous molecules into large cable-like fibrils, yet how the fibril interacts with cells and other binding partners remains poorly understood. To help reveal insights into the collagen structure-function relationship, a data base was assembled including hundreds of type I collagen ligand binding sites and mutations on a two-dimensional model of the fibril. Visual examination of the distribution of functional sites, and statistical analysis of mutation distributions on the fibril suggest it is organized into two domains. The 'cell interaction domain' is proposed to regulate dynamic aspects of collagen biology, including integrin-mediated cell interactions and fibril remodeling. The 'matrix interaction domain' may assume a structural role, mediating collagen cross-linking, proteoglycan interactions, and tissue mineralization. Molecular modeling was used to superimpose the positions of functional sites and mutations from the two-dimensional fibril map onto a three-dimensional x-ray diffraction structure of the collagen microfibril in situ, indicating the existence of domains in the native fibril. Sequence searches revealed that major fibril domain elements are conserved in type I collagens through evolution and in the type II/XI collagen fibril predominant in cartilage. Moreover, the fibril domain model provides potential insights into the genotype-phenotype relationship for several classes of human connective tissue diseases, mechanisms of integrin clustering by fibrils, the polarity of fibril assembly, heterotypic fibril function, and connective tissue pathology in diabetes and aging.

  11. Knockdown of asporin affects transforming growth factor-β1-induced matrix synthesis in human intervertebral annulus cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jiang

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: Our results have verified a functional feedback loop between TGF-β1 and asporin in human intervertebral annulus cells indicating that TGF-β1-induced annulus matrix biosynthesis can be significantly upregulated by knockdown of asporin. Therefore, asporin could be a potential new therapeutic target and inhibition of asporin could be adopted to enhance the anabolic effect of TGF-β1 in human intervertebral annulus cells in degenerative IVD diseases.

  12. Cell-matrix mechanical interaction in electrospun polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering: Implications for scaffold design and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kelsey M; Bhaw-Luximon, Archana; Jhurry, Dhanjay

    2017-03-01

    Engineered scaffolds produced by electrospinning of biodegradable polymers offer a 3D, nanofibrous environment with controllable structural, chemical, and mechanical properties that mimic the extracellular matrix of native tissues and have shown promise for a number of tissue engineering applications. The microscale mechanical interactions between cells and electrospun matrices drive cell behaviors including migration and differentiation that are critical to promote tissue regeneration. Recent developments in understanding these mechanical interactions in electrospun environments are reviewed, with emphasis on how fiber geometry and polymer structure impact on the local mechanical properties of scaffolds, how altering the micromechanics cues cell behaviors, and how, in turn, cellular and extrinsic forces exerted on the matrix mechanically remodel an electrospun scaffold throughout tissue development. Techniques used to measure and visualize these mechanical interactions are described. We provide a critical outlook on technological gaps that must be overcome to advance the ability to design, assess, and manipulate the mechanical environment in electrospun scaffolds toward constructs that may be successfully applied in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Tissue engineering requires design of scaffolds that interact with cells to promote tissue development. Electrospinning is a promising technique for fabricating fibrous, biomimetic scaffolds. Effects of electrospun matrix microstructure and biochemical properties on cell behavior have been extensively reviewed previously; here, we consider cell-matrix interaction from a mechanical perspective. Micromechanical properties as a driver of cell behavior has been well established in planar substrates, but more recently, many studies have provided new insights into mechanical interaction in fibrillar, electrospun environments. This review provides readers with an overview of how electrospun scaffold mechanics and

  13. Phenotypic stability, matrix elaboration and functional maturation of nucleus pulposus cells encapsulated in photocrosslinkable hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hwa; Martin, John T; Elliott, Dawn M; Smith, Lachlan J; Mauck, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    Degradation of the nucleus pulposus (NP) is an early hallmark of intervertebral disc degeneration. The capacity for endogenous regeneration in the NP is limited due to the low cellularity and poor nutrient and vascular supply. Towards restoring the NP, a number of biomaterials have been explored for cell delivery. These materials must support the NP cell phenotype while promoting the elaboration of an NP-like extracellular matrix in the shortest possible time. Our previous work with chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated that hydrogels based on hyaluronic acid (HA) are effective at promoting matrix production and the development of functional material properties. However, this material has not been evaluated in the context of NP cells. Therefore, to test this material for NP regeneration, bovine NP cells were encapsulated in 1%w/vol HA hydrogels at either a low seeding density (20×10(6)cellsml(-1)) or a high seeding density (60×10(6)cellsml(-1)), and constructs were cultured over an 8week period. These NP cell-laden HA hydrogels showed functional matrix accumulation, with increasing matrix content and mechanical properties with time in culture at both seeding densities. Furthermore, encapsulated cells showed NP-specific gene expression profiles that were significantly higher than expanded NP cells prior to encapsulation, suggesting a restoration of phenotype. Interestingly, these levels were higher at the lower seeding density compared to the higher seeding density. These findings support the use of HA-based hydrogels for NP tissue engineering and cellular therapies directed at restoration or replacement of the endogenous NP. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ridge preservation with acellular dermal matrix and anorganic bone matrix cell-binding peptide P-15 after tooth extraction in humans. A histologic and morphometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur B. Novaes Jr

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze by histomorphometric parameters the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM with or without anorganic bovine bone matrix (ABM / synthetic cell-binding peptide P-15 in the formation of bone in human alveoli. Materials and methods: Eighteen patients in need of extraction of maxillary anterior teeth were selected and randomly assigned to the test group (ADM plus ABM/P-15 or the control group (ADM only. Histomorphometric measurements and histological analysis were recorded about 6 months after ridge preservation procedures in ten patients. The amount of newly formed bone, the most recently formed bone, fibrous tissue plus marrow spaces and remaining graft particles were measured and analyzed. Results: At 6 months, the new bone area parameter and the percentage of fibrous tissue plus marrow space areas showed higher values to the control group, and statistically significant differences when compared with the test group (p=0.03. Conclusion: The ADM acted as a membrane. The association of ABM/P-15 with ADM resulted in new bone formation within the alveoli, but the results were not considered relevant when used in this indication.

  15. Dextran sulphate crowding and sodium deoxycholate lysis of primary breast fibroblast cells achieve extracellular matrix deposition and decellularization for breast cancer stem cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aroem Naruni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Lingkungan mikro yaitu sel stromal dam matriks ekstraseluler saat ini dinyatakansebagai kontributor dalam perkembangan tumor. Beberapa penelitian telah mengembangkan matriksekstraseluler yang mendukung perkembangan sel in vitro. Matriks ekstraseluler adalah suatu komplekssusunan supramolekuler dari berbagai macam glycoprotein dan proteoglycan. Matriks ekstraselulermenyediakan integritas jaringan, bertindak sebagai scaffold alami tempat sel melekat dan berinteraksiserta berperan sebagai reservoir pertumbuhan sel. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendapatkan deposisidan deselularisasi yang optimal pada matriks ekstraseluler.Metode: Dalam penelitian ini, kami mengembangkan cells crowder untuk meningkatkan deposit matriksekstraseluler dari kultur sel primer fibroblast payudara yang diperoleh dari spesimen hasil operasimammoplasty. Dextran 500 kDa ditambahkan dalam media kultur DMEM lengkap yang telah ditambahkan0.5% FBS dan 100μM L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate. Setelah tujuh hari, sel dilisis dengan menggunakanSodium Deoxycolate (DOC.Hasil: Deposisi matriks ekstraseluler dan proses deselulerisasi dari sel primer fibroblas payudara dapatterdeteksi dengan menggunakan antibodi Rabbit anti human fibronectin yang selanjutnya ditambahkandengan anti rabbit IgG yang telah dikonjugasi dengan Alexa Fluor 488.Kesimpulan: Penambahan dextran sulfat dan prosesing lysis dengan sodium deoxycolate dapatmeningkatkan deposisi dan menghasilkan deselularisasi matriks ekstraseluler. (Health Science Journalof Indonesia 2015;6:43-7Kata kunci: matriks ekstra selular, kanker mammae, stem cell, sel fibroblast AbstractBackground: The microenvironment including stromal cells and extracellular matrix (ECM is now consideredan active contributor to tumor progression. Certain studies have developed ECM which supports a suitable cellulargrowth in vitro. The ECM is a complex supramolecular assembly of a variety of glycoproteins and proteoglycans

  16. Potential effect of matrix stiffness on the enrichment of tumor initiating cells under three-dimensional culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Liu, Yang; Xu, Xiao-xi; Wu, Hao; Xie, Hong-guo; Chen, Li; Lu, Ting; Yang, Li; Guo, Xin; Sun, Guang-wei; Wang, Wei; Ma, Xiao-jun; He, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cell (CSC) or tumor initiating cell (TIC) plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. Biophysical forces in tumor microenvironment have an important effect on tumor formation and development. In this study, the potential effect of matrix stiffness on the biological characteristics of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) TICs, especially the enrichment of HNSCC TICs, was investigated under three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions by means of alginate gel (ALG) beads with different matrix stiffnesses. ALG beads with soft (21 kPa), moderate (70 kPa) and hard (105 kPa) stiffness were generated by changing alginate concentration. It was found that significant HNSCC TIC enrichment was achieved in the ALG beads with moderate matrix stiffness (70 kPa). The gene expression of stemness markers Oct3/4 and Nanog, TIC markers CD44 and ABCG2 was enhanced in cells under this moderate (70 kPa) stiffness. HNSCC TIC proportion was also highly enriched under moderate matrix stiffness, accompanying with higher tumorigenicity, metastatic ability and drug resistance. And it was also found that the possible molecular mechanism underlying the regulated TIC properties by matrix stiffness under 3D culture conditions was significantly different from 2D culture condition. Therefore, the results achieved in this study indicated that 3D biophysical microenvironment had an important effect on TIC characteristics and alginate-based biomimetic scaffolds could be utilized as a proper platform to investigate the interaction between tumor cells and 3D microenvironment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An Immunohistochemical Study of Inflammatory Cell Changes and Matrix Remodeling With and Without Acute Hydrops in Keratoconus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan Gaskin, Jennifer C; Loh, I-Ping; McGhee, Charles N J; Sherwin, Trevor

    2015-09-01

    To determine the inflammatory cell and matrix changes in advanced keratoconus, including acute hydrops, using immunohistochemical analysis. The corneal tissue from eight subjects with keratoconus undergoing corneal transplantation (three keratoconic buttons, five buttons post acute hydrops—one of them with extensive neovascularization following hydrops) was compared with tissue from two normal corneoscleral rims (n = 10). The corneas were sectioned and analyzed with specific markers for macrophages, lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and scar associated matrix molecules laminin, fibronectin, tenascin-C, and type III collagen. Populations of cells using markers for macrophages, leucocytes and antigen presenting cells were found to be associated with the epithelium and stroma of keratoconic tissue. Populations of these cells appeared decreased in hydrops-associated keratoconus except for a large increase in leucocytes in the stroma and endothelium associated with neovascularization. Extracellular matrix deposition was found to be uniquely demonstrated in localized areas of the stroma, corresponding to the site of hydrops involvement. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a chronic, inflammatory process with recruitment of immunoinflammatory cells and deposition of scar tissue in keratoconus. The inflammatory markers were somewhat attenuated in hydrops-associated keratoconus corneas and thus inflammation was not considered to be a major factor in the development of acute corneal hydrops.

  18. Effects of ionizing radiation on cell-matrix interactions at the single molecule level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauer, Florian

    2015-04-20

    Single molecule microscopy is a technology that allows for accurate assessment of the location and motion of single fluorescent molecules, even in the context of observations on living biological samples. In the present thesis, a flexible analysis tool for single molecule data as obtained in biological experiments was established. The development of a tool to faithfully detect and localize diffraction-limited images of individual fluorescent probes was necessary since data acquired under cell cultivation conditions that account for a three-dimensional microenvironment as experienced physiologically by cells in native tissue poses a challenge not faced ordinarily. After design, implementation, quantitative tests using simulations for comparisons and verification, and evaluation of the different steps of the analysis procedure including local background estimation, local noise estimation, de-noising approaches, detection, localization, and post-processing, analysis capabilities were utilized to evaluate the impact of x-ray irradiation on the plasma membrane architecture of U2OS human osteosarcoma cells as assessed by tracking individual fluorescent lipid-mimetic dye molecules diffusing in the outer membrane leaflet. It was shown that lateral diffusion in the plasma membrane is well described as two-phase anomalous subdiffusion and presence of 3D extracellular matrix leads to lower anomalous exponents of the fast fraction in comparison to monolayer cell culture. Interestingly, even high single-dose (25 Gy) treatments known to induce membrane-mediated apoptosis in tumor microvessel endothelium via membrane viscosity enhancing ceramide generation were not observed to alter membrane architecture in U2OS cells which can be related to amplifying, feedback-driven redox-signaling in the endothelium absent in U2OS. In summary, the sensitive and accurate framework developed in this thesis to assess minute changes of plasma membrane located dynamic processes did not uncover a

  19. Evidence for a role of matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors in primordial germ cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-Torre, A; Díaz-Núñez, M; Eguizábal, C; Silván, U; Aréchaga, J

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that enable migrating cells to reach their targets is of vital importance, as several pathologies, including cardiac defects and some tumours, are consequences of altered cell migration. With a view to evaluating if matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) play a role in the active migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs) from their place of origin in extra-embryonic sites towards their final destination in the developing gonads, we analysed the expression of mRNAs encoding nine MMPs and four TIMPs in migrating (E10.5) and post-migrating (E12.5) PGCs by means of quantitative polymerase chain reaction and the presence of MT1-MMP in the membrane of these cells. Our results show that PGCs express MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-11, MT1-MMP, TIMP-1, TIMP-2 and TIMP-3 at both migrating and non-migrating stages. Comparing expression levels of MMP genes between E10.5 and E12.5 PGCs revealed higher expression in migrating PGCs of MT1- MMP (10.3-fold), MMP-2 (4.8-fold), MMP-11 (3.2-fold) and MMP-9 (2.1-fold). Similarly, the levels of TIMP gene expression were always higher in E12.5 genital ridge somatic cells: TIMP-3 (3.4-fold), TIMP-1 (2.4-fold) and TIMP-2 (1.8-fold). Moreover, the analysis at protein level showed the presence of MT1-MMP in the membrane of migrating PGCs whereas the expression of these metalloproteinase is not detected once the PGCs have reach the urogenital ridges and stop migrating. These results suggest that the change from the motile to non-motile phenotype that occurs during PGC maturation to gonocytes may be mediated in part by enhanced expression of MMPs in migrating PGCs together with higher expression of TIMPs in E12.5 genital ridges. © 2013 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  20. Neisseria meningitidis induces brain microvascular endothelial cell detachment from the matrix and cleavage of occludin: a role for MMP-8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Schubert-Unkmeir

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB is a hallmark event in the pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis. Several inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha, nitric oxide and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, contribute to this disruption. Here we show that infection of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC with Neisseria meningitidis induced an increase of permeability at prolonged time of infection. This was paralleled by an increase in MMP-8 activity in supernatants collected from infected cells. A detailed analysis revealed that MMP-8 was involved in the proteolytic cleavage of the tight junction protein occludin, resulting in its disappearance from the cell periphery and cleavage to a lower-sized 50-kDa protein in infected HBMEC. Abrogation of MMP-8 activity by specific inhibitors as well as transfection with MMP-8 siRNA abolished production of the cleavage fragment and occludin remained attached to the cell periphery. In addition, MMP-8 affected cell adherence to the underlying matrix. A similar temporal relationship was observed for MMP activity and cell detachment. Injury of the HBMEC monolayer suggested the requirement of direct cell contact because no detachment was observed when bacteria were placed above a transwell membrane or when bacterial supernatant was directly added to cells. Inhibition of MMP-8 partially prevented detachment of infected HBMEC and restored BBB permeability. Together, we established that MMP-8 activity plays a crucial role in disassembly of cell junction components and cell adhesion during meningococcal infection.

  1. Anti-Metastatic Effect of Dehydrocorydaline on H1299 Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Cells via Inhibition of Matrix Metalloproteinases and B Cell Lymphoma 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jihyun; Sohn, Eun Jung; Yoon, Sang Wook; Kim, Chang Geun; Lee, Sangil; Kim, Joe Young; Baek, Namin; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2017-03-01

    Though Dehydrocorydaline, an alkaloid isolated from Corydalis turtschaninovii tuber, was known to have anti-coronary artery disease, anti-inflammatory, apoptotic, anti-allergic, anti-acetylcholinesterase, and antitumor effects, the underlying anti-metastatic mechanism of Dehydrocorydalin was never elucidated in lung cancer cells so far. Thus, in the present study, the anti-metastatic effect of Dehydrocorydaline was examined in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells, mainly targeting matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) signaling. Here, Dehydrocorydaline exerted weak cytotoxicity and attenuated the protein expression of Bcl-2 and activated Bax in a concentration-dependent manner in NSCLC cells, such as A549, H460, H1299, and H596 cells. Also, Dehydrocorydaline suppressed the migration of H1299 cells by wound healing assay and transwell migration assay. Consistently, Dehydrocorydaline attenuated mRNA and protein levels of MMP7 and MMP9 as metastasis biomarkers in H1299 cells by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Of note, Bcl-2 overexpression reduced the cytotoxic and anti-metastatic effects of Dehydrocorydaline on pCDNA-Bcl-2 transfected H1299 cells. Overall, our findings provide scientific evidence that Dehydrocorydaline exerts anti-metastatic potential via suppression of MMPs and Bcl-2 signaling in NSCLC cells. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Cell-matrix Interactions of Factor IX (FIX)-engineered human mesenchymal stromal cells encapsulated in RGD-alginate vs. fibrinogen-alginate microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyar, Bahareh; Dodd, Megan; Marquez-Curtis, Leah; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2014-04-01

    The success of cell microencapsulation technology in tissue engineering and protein delivery applications depends on the viability and functionality of the encapsulated cells, which in turn are dependent upon cell/matrix interactions. In this work, we compared the viability of cord blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (CB MSCs), engineered to secrete factor IX (FIX) for hemophilia treatment, and encapsulated in arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD)-alginate versus fibrinogen-alginate microcapsules. We evaluated the effect of the biomimetic matrix on cell attachment, proliferation, and secretion of FIX. Compared with nonsupplemented alginate matrix, RGD-alginate significantly enhanced the viability of the encapsulated MSCs. Further, cells in RGD-alginate displayed distinct attachment morphology, thus suggesting that RGD-alginate can potentially be used for the encapsulation of MSCs in tissue engineering applications that require enhanced cell attachment and viability. However, our data also showed that RGD-alginate microcapsules, in contrast to fibrinogen-alginate microcapsules, did not significantly improve cell proliferation of or FIX secretion by encapsulated MSCs. Our findings suggest that evidence of cell attachment alone may not accurately predict the functionality of cells in biomimetic microcapsules.

  3. Cost-benefit analysis of the mechanisms that enable migrating cells to sustain motility upon changes in matrix environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozluoglu, Melda; Mao, Yanlan; Bates, Paul A; Sahai, Erik

    2015-05-06

    Cells can move through extracellular environments with varying geometries and adhesive properties. Adaptation to these differences is achieved by switching between different modes of motility, including lamellipod-driven and blebbing motility. Further, cells can modulate their level of adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) depending on both the level of force applied to the adhesions and cell intrinsic biochemical properties. We have constructed a computational model of cell motility to investigate how motile cells transition between extracellular environments with varying surface continuity, confinement and adhesion. Changes in migration strategy are an emergent property of cells as the ECM geometry and adhesion changes. The transition into confined environments with discontinuous ECM fibres is sufficient to induce shifts from lamellipod-based to blebbing motility, while changes in confinement alone within a continuous geometry are not. The geometry of the ECM facilitates plasticity, by inducing shifts where the cell has high marginal gain from a mode change, and conserving persistency where the cell can continue movement regardless of the motility mode. This regulation of cell motility is independent of global changes in cytoskeletal properties, but requires locally higher linkage between the actin network and the plasma membrane at the cell rear, and changes in internal cell pressure. In addition to matrix geometry, we consider how cells might transition between ECM of different adhesiveness. We find that this requires positive feedback between the forces cells apply on the adhesion points, and the strength of the cell-ECM adhesions on those sites. This positive feedback leads to the emergence of a small number of highly adhesive cores, similar to focal adhesions. While the range of ECM adhesion levels the cell can invade is expanded with this feedback mechanism; the velocities are lowered for conditions where the positive feedback is not vital. Thus

  4. High-performance amperometric biosensors and biofuel cell based on chitosan-strengthened cast thin films of chemically synthesized catecholamine polymers with glucose oxidase effectively entrapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Wang, Lihua; Tan, Yueming; Qin, Cong; Xie, Fangyun; Fu, Yingchun; Xie, Qingji; Chen, Jinhua; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2011-01-15

    Rapid oxidation of dopamine (DA) or L-noradrenaline (NA) by K(3)Fe(CN)(6) yields poly(DA) (PDA(C)) or poly(NA) (PNA(C)) with glucose oxidase (GOx) effectively entrapped, and such an enzyme-entrapped catecholamine polymer is cast on an Au electrode followed by chitosan (CS) strengthening for biosensing and fabrication of a biofuel cell (BFC). The optimized glucose biosensor of CS/PDA(C)-GOx/Au displays an extremely high sensitivity up to 135 μA mM(-1) cm(-2), a very low limit of detection of 0.07 μM, a response time of biosensor also works well in the second generation biosensing mode with p-benzoquinone (BQ) or ferrocene monocarboxylic acid (Fc) as an artificial mediator, with greatly broadened linear detection ranges (2.0 μM-48.0 mM for BQ and 2.0 μM-16.0 mM for Fc) and up to mA cm(-2)-scale glucose-saturated current density. The good permeability of artificial mediators across the enzyme film enables the quantification of the surface concentration of immobilized GOx on the basis of a reported kinetic model, and UV-Vis spectrophotometry is used to measure the enzymatic activity, revealing high enzymatic activity/load at CS/PDA(C)-GOx/Au. A BFC is also successfully fabricated with a bioanode of CS/PDA(C)-GOx/Au in phosphate buffer solution containing 100 mM glucose and 4.0 mM BQ and a carbon cathode in Nafion-membrane-isolated acidic KMnO(4), and its maximum power density of 1.62 mW cm(-2) is superior to those of most BFC hitherto reported. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Magnetically Responsive Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Smooth Muscle Cells Maintain Their Benefits to Augmenting Elastic Matrix Neoassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Ganesh; Sivaraman, Balakrishnan; Moore, Lee; Zborowski, Maciej; Ramamurthi, Anand

    2016-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) represent abnormal aortal expansions that result from chronic proteolytic breakdown of elastin and collagen fibers by matrix metalloproteases. Poor elastogenesis by adult vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) limits regenerative repair of elastic fibers, critical for AAA growth arrest. Toward overcoming these limitations, we recently demonstrated significant elastogenesis by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived SMCs (BM-SMCs) and their proelastogenesis and antiproteolytic effects on rat aneurysmal SMCs (EaRASMCs). We currently investigate the effects of super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION) labeling of BM-SMCs, necessary to magnetically guide them to the AAA wall, on their functional benefits. Our results indicate that SPION-labeling is noncytotoxic and does not adversely impact the phenotype and elastogenesis by BM-SMCs. In addition, SPION-BM-SMCs showed no changes in the ability of the BM-SMCs to stimulate elastin regeneration and attenuate proteolytic activity by EaRASMCs. Together, our results are promising toward the utility of SPIONs for magnetic targeting of BM-SMCs for in situ AAA regenerative repair.

  6. Optimization of Liver Decellularization Maintains Extracellular Matrix Micro-Architecture and Composition Predisposing to Effective Cell Seeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Georgiades, Fanourios; Smith, Holly; Milan, Anna; Shangaris, Panicos; Urbani, Luca; Loukogeorgakis, Stavros P.; Lombardi, Benedetta; Mazza, Giuseppe; Hagen, Charlotte; Sebire, Neil J.; Turmaine, Mark; Eaton, Simon; Olivo, Alessandro; Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka; Pinzani, Massimo; Gissen, Paul; De Coppi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic tissue engineering using decellularized scaffolds is a potential therapeutic alternative to conventional transplantation. However, scaffolds are usually obtained using decellularization protocols that destroy the extracellular matrix (ECM) and hamper clinical translation. We aim to develop a decellularization technique that reliably maintains hepatic microarchitecture and ECM components. Isolated rat livers were decellularized by detergent-enzymatic technique with (EDTA-DET) or without EDTA (DET). Histology, DNA quantification and proteomics confirmed decellularization with further DNA reduction with the addition of EDTA. Quantification, histology, immunostaining, and proteomics demonstrated preservation of extracellular matrix components in both scaffolds with a higher amount of collagen and glycosaminoglycans in the EDTA-DET scaffold. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray phase contrast imaging showed microarchitecture preservation, with EDTA-DET scaffolds more tightly packed. DET scaffold seeding with a hepatocellular cell line demonstrated complete repopulation in 14 days, with cells proliferating at that time. Decellularization using DET preserves microarchitecture and extracellular matrix components whilst allowing for cell growth for up to 14 days. Addition of EDTA creates a denser, more compact matrix. Transplantation of the scaffolds and scaling up of the methodology are the next steps for successful hepatic tissue engineering. PMID:27159223

  7. Inhibition of extracellular matrix production and remodeling by doxycycline in smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogelio Palomino-Morales

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the extracellular matrix (ECM production and remodeling of smooth muscle cells (SMCs have been implicated in processes related to the differentiation in atherosclerosis. Due to the anti-atherosclerotic properties of the tetracyclines, we aimed to investigate whether cholesterol supplementation changes the effect of doxycycline over the ECM proteins synthesis and whether isoprenylated proteins and Rho A protein activation are affected. SMC primary culture isolated from chicks exposed to atherogenic factors in vivo (a cholesterol-rich diet, SMC-Ch, comparing it with control cultures isolated after a standard diet (SMC-C. After treatment with 20 nM doxycycline, [H3]-proline and [H3]-mevalonate incorporation were used to measure the synthesis of collagen and isoprenylated proteins, respectively. Real-time PCR was assessed to determine col1a2, col2a1, col3a1, fibronectin, and mmp2 gene expression and the pull-down technique was applied to determine the Rho A activation state. A higher synthesis of collagens and isoprenylated proteins in SMC-Ch than in SMC-C was determined showing that doxycycline inhibits ECM production and remodeling in both SMC types of cultures. Moreover, preliminary results about the effect of doxycycline on protein isoprenylation and Rho A protein activation led us to discuss the possibility that membrane G-protein activation pathways could mediate the molecular mechanism.

  8. Inhibition of extracellular matrix production and remodeling by doxycycline in smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomino-Morales, Rogelio; Torres, Carolina; Perales, Sonia; Linares, Ana; Alejandre, Maria Jose

    2016-12-01

    Alterations in the extracellular matrix (ECM) production and remodeling of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) have been implicated in processes related to the differentiation in atherosclerosis. Due to the anti-atherosclerotic properties of the tetracyclines, we aimed to investigate whether cholesterol supplementation changes the effect of doxycycline over the ECM proteins synthesis and whether isoprenylated proteins and Rho A protein activation are affected. SMC primary culture isolated from chicks exposed to atherogenic factors in vivo (a cholesterol-rich diet, SMC-Ch), comparing it with control cultures isolated after a standard diet (SMC-C). After treatment with 20 nM doxycycline, [H3]-proline and [H3]-mevalonate incorporation were used to measure the synthesis of collagen and isoprenylated proteins, respectively. Real-time PCR was assessed to determine col1a2, col2a1, col3a1, fibronectin, and mmp2 gene expression and the pull-down technique was applied to determine the Rho A activation state. A higher synthesis of collagens and isoprenylated proteins in SMC-Ch than in SMC-C was determined showing that doxycycline inhibits ECM production and remodeling in both SMC types of cultures. Moreover, preliminary results about the effect of doxycycline on protein isoprenylation and Rho A protein activation led us to discuss the possibility that membrane G-protein activation pathways could mediate the molecular mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Pharmacological Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Tailored integrin-extracellular matrix interactions to direct human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, Jessica Ellen; Mills, Richard James; Hudson, James Edward; Cooper-White, Justin John

    2012-09-01

    Integrins provide the primary link between mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM), with different integrin pairs having specificity for different ECM molecules or peptide sequences contained within them. It is widely acknowledged that the type of ECM present can influence MSC differentiation; however, it is yet to be determined how specific integrin-ECM interactions may alter this or how they change during differentiation. We determined that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) express a broad range of integrins in their undifferentiated state and show a dramatic, but transient, increase in the level of α5 integrin on day 7 of osteogenesis and an increase in α6 integrin expression throughout adipogenesis. We used a nonfouling polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide)-copolymer (PS-PEO) surface to present short peptides with defined integrin-binding capabilities (RGD, IKVAV, YIGSR, and RETTAWA) to hMSCs and investigate the effects of such specific integrin-ECM contacts on differentiation. hMSCs cultured on these peptides displayed different morphologies and had varying abilities to differentiate along the osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. The peptide sequences most conducive to differentiation (IKVAV for osteogenesis and RETTAWA and IKVAV for adipogenesis) were not necessarily those that were bound by those integrin subunits seen to increase during differentiation. Additionally, we also determined that presentation of RGD, which is bound by multiple integrins, was required to support long-term viability of hMSCs. Overall we confirm that integrin-ECM contacts change throughout hMSC differentiation and show that surfaces presenting defined peptide sequences can be used to target specific integrins and ultimately influence hMSC differentiation. This platform also provides information for the development of biomaterials capable of directing hMSC differentiation for use in tissue engineering therapies.

  10. Up-Regulated Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinases in Endothelial Cells Mediates Platelet Microvesicle-Induced Angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cheng; Feng, Shi-Bin; Cao, Zheng-Wang; Bei, Jun-Jie; Chen, Qiang; Zhao, Wei-Bo; Xu, Xian-Jie; Zhou, Zhou; Yu, Zheng-Ping; Hu, Hou-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Platelet microvesicles (PMVs) contribute to angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, but the mechanisms underlying these contributions have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated whether PMVs regulate the angiogenic properties of endothelial cells (ECs) via mechanisms extending beyond the transport of angiogenic regulators from platelets. In vitro Matrigel tube formation assay and in vivo Matrigel plug assay were used to evaluate the pro-angiogenic activity of PMVs. The effects of PMVs on the migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were detected by transwell assay and wound-healing assay. Real-time PCR and western blot were conducted to examine mRNA and protein expression of pro-angiogenic factors in HUVECs. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity was assayed by gelatin zymography. Moreover, the effects of specific MMP inhibitors were tested. PMVs promoted HUVEC capillary-like network formation in a dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, PMVs dose-dependently facilitated HUVEC migration. Levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and activity were up-regulated in HUVECs stimulated with PMVs. Inhibition of MMPs decreased their pro-angiogenic and pro-migratory effects on HUVECs. Moreover, we confirmed the pro-angiogenic activity of PMVs in vivo in mice with subcutaneous implantation of Matrigel, and demonstrated that blockade of MMPs attenuated PMV-induced angiogenesis. The findings of our study indicate that PMVs promote angiogenesis by up-regulating MMP expression in ECs via mechanism extending beyond the direct delivery of angiogenic factors. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Impact of flavonoids on matrix metalloproteinase secretion and invadopodia formation in highly invasive A431-III cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo-Chuen Lin

    Full Text Available Metastasis is a major cause of mortality in cancer patients. Invadopodia are considered to be crucial structures that allow cancer cells to penetrate across the extracellular matrix (ECM by using matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. Previously, we isolated a highly invasive A431-III subline from parental A431 cells by Boyden chamber assay. The A431-III cells possess higher invasive and migratory abilities, elevated levels of MMP-9 and an enhanced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT phenotype. In this study, we discovered that A431-III cells had an increased potential to form invadopodia and an improved capacity to degrade ECM compared with the original A431 cells. We also observed enhanced phosphorylation levels of cortactin and Src in A431-III cells; these phosphorylated proteins have been reported to be the main regulators of invadopodia formation. Flavonoids, almost ubiquitously distributed in food plants and plant food products, have been documented to exhibit anti-tumor properties. Therefore, it was of much interest to explore the effects of flavonoid antioxidants on the metastatic activity of A431-III cells. Exposure of A431-III cells to two potent dietary flavonoids, namely luteolin (Lu and quercetin (Qu, caused inhibition of invadopodia formation and decrement in ECM degradation. We conclude that Lu and Qu attenuate the phosphorylation of cortactin and Src in A431-III cells. As a consequence, there ensues a disruption of invadopodia generation and the suppression of MMP secretion. These changes, in concert, bring about a reduction in metastasis.

  12. Bone regeneration in critical-size calvarial defects using human dental pulp cells in an extracellular matrix-based scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, Xenos; Diamanti, Evangelia; Trigas, George Ch; Kalyvas, Demos; Kitraki, Efthymia

    2015-05-01

    The rat calvarial defect is an established model to evaluate craniofacial bone regeneration using cell-scaffold biocomplexes. Dental pulp harbors stem cells with significant osteogenic properties. Extracellular matrix (ECM)-like scaffolds simulate the environment that cells observe in vivo. In the present study, we evaluated the osteogenic effect of a biocomplex of human dental pulp cells and a hyaluronic-based hydrogel scaffold in calvarial defects of immunocompetent rats. Dental pulp cells at the 2nd passage were characterized by flow cytometry, osteodifferentiated ex vivo for 4 days and the whole population was encapsulated in the synthetic ECM matrix. Cell vitality was verified 24 h upon encapsulation. 5 mm calvarial defects were created in 30 male rats and filled with the biocomplex, the scaffold alone, or left untreated. Histological evaluation at 8 weeks showed incomplete bone regeneration in all groups. The scaffold was not fully degraded and entrapped cells were detected in it. Histomorphometry showed statistically significant superior new bone formation in the biocomplex-treated group, compared to the two other groups. The present study provides evidence that the whole population of human dental pulp cells can advance bone healing when transplanted in immunocompetent animals and highlights the importance of proper scaffold degradation in cell-driven bioengineering treatments. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. HES1 promotes extracellular matrix protein expression and inhibits proliferation and migration in human trabecular meshwork cells under oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linqi; Zhang, Yan; Guo, Ruru; Shen, Wencui; Qi, Yan; Wang, Qingsong; Guo, Zhenglong; Qi, Chen; Yin, Haifang; Wang, Jiantao

    2017-03-28

    Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness. The most prevalent form of glaucoma is primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Oxidative stress is one of the major pathogenic factors of the POAG, and can elicit molecular and functional changes in trabecular meshwork cells, causing increased aqueous humor outflow resistance and elevated intraocular pressure. However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying oxidative stress-induced cell phenotypic changes remain elusive. Herein, we exposed primary human trabecular meshwork cells to the oxidative stress induced by 300 μM H2O2 for 2 h, and found significantly up-regulated expression of extracellular matrix proteins and a transcription factor, hairy and enhancer of split-1 (HES1). The cell functions, including migration and proliferation, were impaired by the oxidative stress. Furthermore, HES1 shRNA abrogated the extracellular matrix protein up-regulation and rescued the functional defects caused by the oxidative stress; conversely, HES1 overexpression resulted in the molecular and functional changes similar to those induced by H2O2. These results suggest that HES1 promotes extracellular matrix protein expression and inhibits proliferative and migratory functions in the trabecular meshwork cells under oxidative stress, thereby providing a novel pathogenic mechanism underlying and a potential therapeutic target to the POAG.

  14. Cannabinoid inhibits HIV-1 Tat-stimulated adhesion of human monocyte-like cells to extracellular matrix proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raborn, Erinn S.; Jamerson, Melissa; Marciano-Cabral, Francine; Cabral, Guy A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to assess the effect of select cannabinoids on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transactivating (Tat) protein-enhanced monocyte-like cell adhesion to proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Main Methods Collagen IV, laminin, or an ECM gel were used to construct extracellular matrix layers. Human U937 monocyte-like cells were exposed to Tat in the presence of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), CP55,940, and other select cannabinoids. Cell attachment to ECM proteins was assessed using an adhesion assay. Key findings THC and CP55,940 inhibited Tat-enhanced attachment of U937 cells to ECM proteins in a mode that was linked to the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2R). The cannabinoid treatment of Tat-activated U937 cells was associated with altered β1-integrin expression and distribution of polymerized actin, suggesting a modality by which these cannabinoids inhibited adhesion to the ECM. Significance The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a complex structure that is composed of cellular elements and an extracellular matrix (ECM). HIV-1 Tat promotes transmigration of monocytes across this barrier, a process that includes interaction with ECM proteins. The results indicate that cannabinoids that activate the CB2R inhibit the ECM adhesion process. Thus, this receptor has potential to serve as a therapeutic agent for ablating neuroinflammation associated with HIV-elicited influx of monocytes across the BBB. PMID:24742657

  15. Native thymic extracellular matrix improves in vivo thymic organoid T cell output, and drives in vitro thymic epithelial cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hun, Michael; Barsanti, Marco; Wong, Kahlia; Ramshaw, John; Werkmeister, Jerome; Chidgey, Ann P

    2017-02-01

    Although the thymus is a primary lymphoid organ, its function is compromised by an age-induced loss of resident epithelial cells, which results in reduced naïve T cell output. This has important implications for immune recovery in aged and elderly patients following damage from cytoablative therapies. As thymic architecture plays a crucial role in naïve T cell development, a tissue specific scaffold that provides essential supporting matrix may assist in stem cell-based thymus regeneration to recreate complex organoids. Here we investigate thymus decellularization approaches that preserve major extracellular matrix components and support thymic epithelial cells for the generation of a functional thymic microenvironment with improved T cell output. We also established an in vitro, serum-free culture system that both maintains a progenitor thymic epithelial cell pool and drives their differentiation in the presence of decellularized thymic matrix. This approach enables further dissection of key cellular and niche components involved in thymic epithelial stem cell maintenance and T cell production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hsp90 Binds Directly to Fibronectin (FN) and Inhibition Reduces the Extracellular Fibronectin Matrix in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Amy; Dhanani, Karim C. H.; Prinsloo, Earl; Edkins, Adrienne L.

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) has been identified in the extracellular space and has been shown to chaperone a finite number of extracellular proteins involved in cell migration and invasion. We used chemical cross-linking and immunoprecipitation followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to isolate a complex containing Hsp90 and the matrix protein fibronectin (FN) from breast cancer cells. Further analysis showed direct binding of Hsp90 to FN using an in vitro co-immunoprecipitation assay, a solid phase binding assay and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. Confocal microscopy showed regions of co-localisation of Hsp90 and FN in breast cancer cell lines. Exogenous Hsp90β was shown to increase the formation of extracellular FN matrix in the Hs578T cell line, whilst knockdown or inhibition of Hsp90 led to a reduction in the levels of both soluble and insoluble FN and could be partially rescued by addition of exogenous Hsp90β. Treatment of cells with novobiocin led to internalization of FN into vesicles that were positive for the presence of the lysosomal marker, LAMP-1. Taken together, the direct interaction between FN and Hsp90, as well as the decreased levels of both soluble and insoluble FN upon Hsp90 inhibition or knockdown, suggested that FN may be a new client protein for Hsp90 and that Hsp90 was involved in FN matrix assembly and/or stability. The identification of FN as a putative client protein of Hsp90 suggests a role for Hsp90 in FN matrix stability, which is important for a number of fundamental cellular processes including embryogenesis, wound healing, cell migration and metastasis. PMID:24466266

  17. Bioengineered 3D brain tumor model to elucidate the effects of matrix stiffness on glioblastoma cell behavior using PEG-based hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Christine; Tong, Xinming; Yang, Fan

    2014-07-07

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumor with a median survival of 12-15 months, and the mechanisms underlying GBM tumor progression remain largely elusive. Given the importance of tumor niche signaling in driving GBM progression, there is a strong need to develop in vitro models to facilitate analysis of brain tumor cell-niche interactions in a physiologically relevant and controllable manner. Here we report the development of a bioengineered 3D brain tumor model to help elucidate the effects of matrix stiffness on GBM cell fate using poly(ethylene-glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels with brain-mimicking biochemical and mechanical properties. We have chosen PEG given its bioinert nature and tunable physical property, and the resulting hydrogels allow tunable matrix stiffness without changing the biochemical contents. To facilitate cell proliferation and migration, CRGDS and a MMP-cleavable peptide were chemically incorporated. Hyaluronic acid (HA) was also incorporated to mimic the concentration in the brain extracellular matrix. Using U87 cells as a model GBM cell line, we demonstrate that such biomimetic hydrogels support U87 cell growth, spreading, and migration in 3D over the course of 3 weeks in culture. Gene expression analyses showed U87 cells actively deposited extracellular matrix and continued to upregulate matrix remodeling genes. To examine the effects of matrix stiffness on GBM cell fate in 3D, we encapsulated U87 cells in soft (1 kPa) or stiff (26 kPa) hydrogels, which respectively mimics the matrix stiffness of normal brain or GBM tumor tissues. Our results suggest that changes in matrix stiffness induce differential GBM cell proliferation, morphology, and migration modes in 3D. Increasing matrix stiffness led to delayed U87 cell proliferation inside hydrogels, but cells formed denser spheroids with extended cell protrusions. Cells cultured in stiff hydrogels also showed upregulation of HA synthase 1 and matrix

  18. Extracellular matrix rigidity modulates neuroblastoma cell differentiation and N-myc expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wilbur A; Cao, Lizhi; Umesh, Vaibhavi; Keung, Albert J; Sen, Shamik; Kumar, Sanjay

    2010-02-10

    Neuroblastoma is a pediatric malignancy characterized by tremendous clinical heterogeneity, in which some tumors are extremely aggressive while others spontaneously differentiate into benign forms. Because the degree of differentiation correlates with prognosis, and because differentiating agents such as retinoic acid (RA) have proven to decrease mortality, much effort has been devoted to identifying critical regulators of neuroblastoma differentiation in the cellular microenvironment, including cues encoded in the extracellular matrix (ECM). While signaling between tumor cells and the ECM is classically regarded to be based purely on biochemical recognition of ECM ligands by specific cellular receptors, a number of recent studies have made it increasingly clear that the biophysical properties of the ECM may also play an important role in this cross-talk. Given that RA-mediated neuroblastoma differentiation is accompanied by profound changes in cell morphology and neurite extension, both of which presumably rely upon mechanotransductive signaling systems, it occurred to us that mechanical cues from the ECM might also influence RA-mediated differentiation, which in turn might regulate clinically-relevant aspects of neuroblastoma biology. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by subjecting a series of neuroblastoma culture models to ECM microenvironments of varying mechanical stiffness and examined the regulatory role of ECM stiffness in proliferation, differentiation, and expression of tumor markers. We find that increasing ECM stiffness enhances neuritogenesis and suppresses cell proliferation. Remarkably, increasing ECM stiffness also reduces expression of N-Myc, a transcription factor involved in multiple aspects of oncogenic proliferation that is used for evaluating prognosis and clinical grading of neuroblastoma. Furthermore, the addition of RA enhances all of these effects for all ECM stiffnesses tested. Together, our data strongly support the notion that

  19. Strengthening bridges using composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The objective of this research project is to outline methodologies for using Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) composites to strengthen and rehabilitate reinforced concrete bridge elements. : Infrastructure deterioration and bridge strengthening techniq...

  20. Extracellular matrix of adipogenically differentiated mesenchymal stem cells reveals a network of collagen filaments, mostly interwoven by hexagonal structural units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Mujib; Sittinger, Michael; Ringe, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is the non-cellular component of tissues, which not only provides biological shelter but also takes part in the cellular decisions for diverse functions. Every tissue has an ECM with unique composition and topology that governs the process of determination, differentiation, proliferation, migration and regeneration of cells. Little is known about the structural organization of matrix especially of MSC-derived adipogenic ECM. Here, we particularly focus on the composition and architecture of the fat ECM to understand the cellular behavior on functional bases. Thus, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were adipogenically differentiated, then, were transferred to adipogenic propagation medium, whereas they started the release of lipid droplets leaving bare network of ECM. Microarray analysis was performed, to indentify the molecular machinery of matrix. Adipogenesis was verified by Oil Red O staining of lipid droplets and by qPCR of adipogenic marker genes PPARG and FABP4. Antibody staining demonstrated the presence of collagen type I, II and IV filaments, while alkaline phosphatase activity verified the ossified nature of these filaments. In the adipogenic matrix, the hexagonal structures were abundant followed by octagonal structures, whereas they interwoven in a crisscross manner. Regarding molecular machinery of adipogenic ECM, the bioinformatics analysis revealed the upregulated expression of COL4A1, ITGA7, ITGA7, SDC2, ICAM3, ADAMTS9, TIMP4, GPC1, GPC4 and downregulated expression of COL14A1, ADAMTS5, TIMP2, TIMP3, BGN, LAMA3, ITGA2, ITGA4, ITGB1, ITGB8, CLDN11. Moreover, genes associated with integrins, glycoproteins, laminins, fibronectins, cadherins, selectins and linked signaling pathways were found. Knowledge of the interactive-language between cells and matrix could be beneficial for the artificial designing of biomaterials and bioscaffolds. © 2013.

  1. Cell-bound and extracellular matrix-associated alkaline phosphatase activity in rat periodontal ligament. Experimental Oral Biology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneveld, M C; Van den Bos, T; Everts, V; Beertsen, W

    1996-01-01

    In previous studies it was noted that alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in periodontal ligament does not only seem to be related to cells but may also be associated with the extracellular matrix. In an attempt to clarify this we studied the distribution of the enzyme at the electron microscopic level. In addition, ALP-activity was assessed biochemically following extraction of the ligament with (i) agents dissolving the membrane or splitting the phosphatidylinositol anchor (Triton X-100 or phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C, respectively), and (ii) a matrix-degrading enzyme cocktail (collagenase, hyaluronidase and elastase). Histochemical observations revealed (a) a heterogeneous distribution of ALP-activity, with highest activity adjacent to the alveolar bone and (b) two pools of activity; one bound to cells and one associated with the collagenous extracellular matrix. In line with this were the biochemical data indicating that approximately 10% of the enzyme activity was firmly bound to the extracellular matrix and 90% to plasma membranes. Isoelectric focusing did not reveal differences between the two fractions, both samples yielding a single broad band corresponding with an isoelectric point of about 4.4.

  2. Collagenous matrix supported by a 3D-printed scaffold for osteogenic differentiation of dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahimipour, Farahnaz; Dashtimoghadam, Erfan; Rasoulianboroujeni, Morteza; Yazdimamaghani, Mostafa; Khoshroo, Kimia; Tahriri, Mohammadreza; Yadegari, Amir; Gonzalez, Jose A; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Lobner, Douglas C; Jafarzadeh Kashi, Tahereh S; Tayebi, Lobat

    2017-10-17

    A systematic characterization of hybrid scaffolds, fabricated based on combinatorial additive manufacturing technique and freeze-drying method, is presented as a new platform for osteoblastic differentiation of dental pulp cells (DPCs). The scaffolds were consisted of a collagenous matrix embedded in a 3D-printed beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) as the mineral phase. The developed construct design was intended to achieve mechanical robustness owing to 3D-printed β-TCP scaffold, and biologically active 3D cell culture matrix pertaining to the Collagen extracellular matrix. The β-TCP precursor formulations were investigated for their flow-ability at various temperatures, which optimized for fabrication of 3D printed scaffolds with interconnected porosity. The hybrid constructs were characterized by 3D laser scanning microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and compressive strength testing. The in vitro characterization of scaffolds revealed that the hybrid β-TCP/Collagen constructs offer superior DPCs proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity compared to the 3D-printed β-TCP scaffold over three weeks. Moreover, it was found that the incorporation of TCP into the Collagen matrix improves the ALP activity. The presented results converge to suggest the developed 3D-printed β-TCP/Collagen hybrid constructs as a new platform for osteoblastic differentiation of DPCs for craniomaxillofacial bone regeneration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Influence of culture conditions and extracellular matrix alignment on human mesenchymal stem cells invasion into decellularized engineered tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenhamer, Nathan K; Moore, Dusty L; Lobo, Fluvio L; Klair, Nathaniel T; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2015-05-01

    The variables that influence the in vitro recellularization potential of decellularized engineered tissues, such as cell culture conditions and scaffold alignment, have yet to be explored. The goal of this work was to explore the influence of insulin and ascorbic acid and extracellular matrix (ECM) alignment on the recellularization of decellularized engineered tissue by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Aligned and non-aligned tissues were created by specifying the geometry and associated mechanical constraints to fibroblast-mediated fibrin gel contraction and remodelling using circular and C-shaped moulds. Decellularized tissues (matrices) of the same alignment were created by decellularization with detergents. Ascorbic acid promoted the invasion of hMSCs into the matrices due to a stimulated increase in motility and proliferation. Invasion correlated with hyaluronic acid secretion, α-smooth muscle actin expression and decreased matrix thickness. Furthermore, hMSCs invasion into aligned and non-aligned matrices was not different, although there was a difference in cell orientation. Finally, we show that hMSCs on the matrix surface appear to differentiate toward a smooth muscle cell or myofibroblast phenotype with ascorbic acid treatment. These results inform the strategy of recellularizing decellularized engineered tissue with hMSCs. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Flax Fiber Hydrophobic Extract Inhibits Human Skin Cells Inflammation and Causes Remodeling of Extracellular Matrix and Wound Closure Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Styrczewska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is the basis of many diseases, with chronic wounds amongst them, limiting cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. Our previous preclinical study of flax fiber applied as a wound dressing and analysis of its components impact on the fibroblast transcriptome suggested flax fiber hydrophobic extract use as an anti-inflammatory and wound healing preparation. The extract contains cannabidiol (CBD, phytosterols, and unsaturated fatty acids, showing great promise in wound healing. In in vitro proliferation and wound closure tests the extract activated cell migration and proliferation. The activity of matrix metalloproteinases in skin cells was increased, suggesting activation of extracellular components remodeling. The expression of cytokines was diminished by the extract in a cannabidiol-dependent manner, but β-sitosterol can act synergistically with CBD in inflammation inhibition. Extracellular matrix related genes were also analyzed, considering their importance in further stages of wound healing. The extract activated skin cell matrix remodeling, but the changes were only partially cannabidiol- and β-sitosterol-dependent. The possible role of fatty acids also present in the extract is suggested. The study shows the hydrophobic flax fiber components as wound healing activators, with anti-inflammatory cannabidiol acting in synergy with sterols, and migration and proliferation promoting agents, some of which still require experimental identification.

  5. Flax Fiber Hydrophobic Extract Inhibits Human Skin Cells Inflammation and Causes Remodeling of Extracellular Matrix and Wound Closure Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styrczewska, Monika; Kostyn, Anna; Kulma, Anna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Prescha, Anna; Czuj, Tadeusz; Szopa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is the basis of many diseases, with chronic wounds amongst them, limiting cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. Our previous preclinical study of flax fiber applied as a wound dressing and analysis of its components impact on the fibroblast transcriptome suggested flax fiber hydrophobic extract use as an anti-inflammatory and wound healing preparation. The extract contains cannabidiol (CBD), phytosterols, and unsaturated fatty acids, showing great promise in wound healing. In in vitro proliferation and wound closure tests the extract activated cell migration and proliferation. The activity of matrix metalloproteinases in skin cells was increased, suggesting activation of extracellular components remodeling. The expression of cytokines was diminished by the extract in a cannabidiol-dependent manner, but β-sitosterol can act synergistically with CBD in inflammation inhibition. Extracellular matrix related genes were also analyzed, considering their importance in further stages of wound healing. The extract activated skin cell matrix remodeling, but the changes were only partially cannabidiol- and β-sitosterol-dependent. The possible role of fatty acids also present in the extract is suggested. The study shows the hydrophobic flax fiber components as wound healing activators, with anti-inflammatory cannabidiol acting in synergy with sterols, and migration and proliferation promoting agents, some of which still require experimental identification.

  6. Interaction of Munc18c and syntaxin4 facilitates invadopodium formation and extracellular matrix invasion of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasher, Megan I; Martynowicz, David M; Grafinger, Olivia R; Hucik, Andrea; Shanks-Skinner, Emma; Uniacke, James; Coppolino, Marc G

    2017-09-29

    Tumor cell invasion involves targeted localization of proteins required for interactions with the extracellular matrix and for proteolysis. The localization of many proteins during these cell-extracellular matrix interactions relies on membrane trafficking mediated in part by SNAREs. The SNARE protein syntaxin4 (Stx4) is involved in the formation of invasive structures called invadopodia; however, it is unclear how Stx4 function is regulated during tumor cell invasion. Munc18c is known to regulate Stx4 activity, and here we show that Munc18c is required for Stx4-mediated invadopodium formation and cell invasion. Biochemical and microscopic analyses revealed a physical association between Munc18c and Stx4, which was enhanced during invadopodium formation, and that a reduction in Munc18c expression decreases invadopodium formation. We also found that an N-terminal Stx4-derived peptide associates with Munc18c and inhibits endogenous interactions of Stx4 with synaptosome-associated protein 23 (SNAP23) and vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2). Furthermore, expression of the Stx4 N-terminal peptide decreased invadopodium formation and cell invasion in vitro Of note, cells expressing the Stx4 N-terminal peptide exhibited impaired trafficking of membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) and EGF receptor (EGFR) to the cell surface during invadopodium formation. Our findings implicate Munc18c as a regulator of Stx4-mediated trafficking of MT1-MMP and EGFR, advancing our understanding of the role of SNARE function in the localization of proteins that drive tumor cell invasion. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Effect of Nitric Oxide on the Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase and Its Association with Migration of Cultured Trabecular Meshwork Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo

    2016-02-01

    To determine the effect of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) on the migration of trabecular meshwork (TM) cells and its association with expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Primary human TM cells treated with 1 or 10 µM S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP) and examined for changes in adherence. TM cells were seeded onto transwell culture inserts, and changes in their migratory activity were quantified. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to determine the relative changes in mRNA expression of MMPs and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Treatment with SNAP did not significantly suppress TM cell adhesion or migration (p > 0.05). Treatment of TM cells with 10 µM SNAP decreased expression of MMP-2 and increased expression of membrane type MMP-1 and TIMP-2. Treatment with interleukin-1α triggered MMP-3 expression but did not exert significant effects on MMP-3 activation in response to SNAP. These data suggest that NO revealed no significant effect on the migration of TM cells because NO decreased MMP-2 and increased TIMP-2 expression. Although expression of certain MMPs and TIMPs change in response to NO donors, NO may modulate trabecular outflow by changing the cellular production of extracellular matrix without having a significant effect on the migration of TM cells.

  8. Transforming Growth Factor-Beta and Matrix Metalloproteinases: Functional Interactions in Tumor Stroma-Infiltrating Myeloid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santibanez, Juan F.

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic factor with several different roles in health and disease. In tumorigenesis, it may act as a protumorigenic factor and have a profound impact on the regulation of the immune system response. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family that comprises more than 25 members, which have recently been proposed as important regulators acting in tumor stroma by regulating the response of noncellular and cellular microenvironment. Tumor stroma consists of several types of resident cells and infiltrating cells derived from bone marrow, which together play crucial roles in the promotion of tumor growth and metastasis. In cancer cells, TGF-β regulates MMPs expression, while MMPs, produced by either cancer cells or residents' stroma cells, activate latent TGF-β in the extracellular matrix, together facilitating the enhancement of tumor progression. In this review we will focus on the compartment of myeloid stroma cells, such as tumor-associated macrophages, neutrophils, and dendritic and mast cells, which are potently regulated by TGF-β and produce large amounts of MMPs. Their interplay and mutual implications in the generation of pro-tumorigenic cancer microenvironment will be analyzed. PMID:24578639

  9. Influence of the polymer matrix on the efficiency of hybrid solar cells based on silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Dkhil, S., E-mail: sadok.bendekhil@gmail.com [Laboratoire Physique des Materiaux: Structures et Proprietes Groupe Physique des Composants et Dispositifs Nanometriques, 7021 Jarzouna, Bizerte (Tunisia); Ingenierie des Materiaux Polymeres: IMP, UMR CNRS 5223, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 15 boulevard Latarjet, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Bourguiga, R. [Laboratoire Physique des Materiaux: Structures et Proprietes Groupe Physique des Composants et Dispositifs Nanometriques, 7021 Jarzouna, Bizerte (Tunisia); Davenas, J. [Ingenierie des Materiaux Polymeres: IMP, UMR CNRS 5223, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 15 boulevard Latarjet, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Cornu, D. [Institut Europeen des Membranes, UMR CNRS 5635, Ecole Nationale superieure de Chimie, Universite de Montpellier, 1919 route de Mende, 34000 Montpellier (France)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybrid solar cells based on silicon nanowires have been fabricated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relation between the morphology of the composite thin films and the charge transfer between the polymer matrices and SiNWs has been examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have investigated the effect of the polymer matrix on the photovoltaic characteristics. - Abstract: Poly (N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK):SiNWs and poly (2-methoxy, 5-(2-ethyl-hexyloxy)-p-phenyl vinylene) (MEH-PPV):SiNWs bulk-heterojunctions (BHJ) have been elaborated from blends of SiNWs and the polymer in solution from a common solvent. Optical properties of these nanocomposites have been investigated by UV-vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectral measurements. We have studied the charge transfer between SiNWs and the two polymers using the photoluminescence quenching of PVK and MEH-PPV which is a convenient signature of the reduced radiative recombination of the generated charge pairs upon exciton dissociation. We found that PVK and SiNWs constitutes the better donor-acceptor system. In order to understand the difference between PVK:SiNWs or MEH-PPV:SiNWs behaviours, photoluminescence responses were correlated with the topography (SEM) of the thin films. The photovoltaic effect of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/SiNWs:PVK/Al and ITO/PEDOT:PSS/SiNWs:MEH-PPV/Al structures was studied by current-voltage (I-V) measurements in dark and under illumination and interpreted on the basis of the charge transfer differences resulting from the morphologies.

  10. Synthesis of collagen by bovine chondrocytes cultured in alginate; posttranslational modifications and cell-matrix interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, B.; Verzijl, N.; Bank, R.A.; Von Der Mark, K.; TeKoppele, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The extracellular matrix synthesized by articular chondrocytes cultured in alginate beads was investigated. Collagen levels increased sigmoidally with time and remained constant after 2 weeks of culture. The presence of cartilage-specific type II collagen was confirmed immunohistochemically.

  11. The effects of omega-3 Fatty acids on matrix metalloproteinase-9 production and cell migration in human immune cells: implications for multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinto, Lynne; Marracci, Gail; Bumgarner, Lauren; Yadav, Vijayshree

    2011-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), compromised blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity contributes to inflammatory T cell migration into the central nervous system. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is associated with BBB disruption and subsequent T cell migration into the CNS. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the effects of omega-3 fatty acids on MMP-9 levels and T cell migration. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy controls were pretreated with two types of omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Cell supernatants were used to determine MMP-9 protein and activity levels. Jurkat cells were pretreated with EPA and DHA and were added to fibronectin-coated transwells to measure T cell migration. EPA and DHA significantly decreased MMP-9 protein levels, MMP-9 activity, and significantly inhibited human T cell migration. The data suggest that omega-3 fatty acids may benefit patients with multiple sclerosis by modulating immune cell production of MMP-9.

  12. The Nuclear Matrix Protein Megator Regulates Stem Cell Asymmetric Division through the Mitotic Checkpoint Complex in Drosophila Testes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In adult Drosophila testis, asymmetric division of germline stem cells (GSCs is specified by an oriented spindle and cortically localized adenomatous coli tumor suppressor homolog 2 (Apc2. However, the molecular mechanism underlying these events remains unclear. Here we identified Megator (Mtor, a nuclear matrix protein, which regulates GSC maintenance and asymmetric division through the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC complex. Loss of Mtor function results in Apc2 mis-localization, incorrect centrosome orientation, defective mitotic spindle formation, and abnormal chromosome segregation that lead to the eventual GSC loss. Expression of mitotic arrest-deficient-2 (Mad2 and monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1 of the SAC complex effectively rescued the GSC loss phenotype associated with loss of Mtor function. Collectively our results define a new role of the nuclear matrix-SAC axis in regulating stem cell maintenance and asymmetric division.

  13. Scaffold composition affects cytoskeleton organization, cell-matrix interaction and the cellular fate of human mesenchymal stem cells upon chondrogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuk Yin; Choy, Tze Hang; Ho, Fu Chak; Chan, Pui Barbara

    2015-06-01

    The stem cell niche, or microenvironment, consists of soluble, matrix, cell and mechanical factors that together determine the cellular fates and/or differentiation patterns of stem cells. Collagen and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are important scaffolding materials that can mimic the natural matrix niche. Here, we hypothesize that imposing changes in the scaffold composition or, more specifically, incorporating GAGs into the collagen meshwork, will affect the morphology, cytoskeletal organization and integrin expression profiles, and hence the fate of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) upon the induction of differentiation. Using chondrogenesis as an example, we microencapsulated MSCs in three scaffold systems that had varying matrix compositions: collagen alone (C), aminated collagen (AC) and aminated collagen with GAGs (ACG). We then induced the MSCs to differentiate toward a chondrogenic lineage, after which, we characterized the cell viability and morphology, as well as the level of cytoskeletal organization and the integrin expression profile. We also studied the fate of the MSCs by evaluating the major chondrogenic markers at both the gene and protein level. In C, MSC chondrogenesis was successfully induced and MSCs that spread in the scaffolds had a clear actin cytoskeleton; they expressed integrin α2β1, α5 and αv; promoted sox9 nuclear localization transcription activation; and upregulated the expression of chondrogenic matrix markers. In AC, MSC chondrogenesis was completely inhibited but the scaffold still supported cell survival. The MSCs did not spread and they had no actin cytoskeleton; did not express integrin α2 or αv; they failed to differentiate into chondrogenic lineage cells even on chemical induction; and there was little colocalization or functional interaction between integrin α5 and fibronectin. In ACG, although the MSCs did not express integrin α2, they did express integrin αv and there was strong co-localization and hence functional

  14. Beneficial effect of the antioxidant riboflavin on gene expression of extracellular matrix elements, antioxidants and oxidases in keratoconic stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Isabella M Y; McGhee, Charles N J; Sherwin, Trevor

    2014-07-01

    Keratoconus manifests as a conical protrusion of the cornea and is characterised by stromal thinning. This causes debilitating visual impairment which may necessitate corneal transplantation. Therapeutic targets related to disease mechanisms are currently lacking, as the pathobiology remains unclear. Many pathological features may be manifestations of defects in wound healing and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-associated functions. In a wide range of tissue and cell types, antioxidant exposure has beneficial effects on both of these pathways. This study investigated the effect of treatment with the antioxidant riboflavin on wound healing and ROS-associated functions in keratoconus. Stromal cells were isolated from human central keratoconic (n = 3) and normal (n = 3) corneas. Total RNA was extracted and reverse-transcribed into complementary DNA. The gene expression of 22 genes involved in repair (eight normal and four repair-type extracellular matrix constituents) and ROS-associated processes (eight antioxidants and two ROS-synthesising oxidases) was quantified using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. This was also performed on keratoconic stromal cells treated in vitro with riboflavin (n = 3). In stromal cells from untreated keratoconic corneas (compared with untreated normal corneas), there was an up-regulation of 7/12 extracellular matrix elements. Four of eight antioxidants and two of two oxidases were also increased. In treated keratoconic corneas (compared with untreated keratoconic corneas), six out of eight normal extracellular matrix constituents were up-regulated and two of four repair-type molecules were reduced. An increase was also observed in seven out of eight antioxidants and there was a diminution in two out of two oxidases. Riboflavin encourages the synthesis of a normal extracellular matrix and reduces reactive oxygen species levels in keratoconus. This supports the occurrence of wound healing and ROS-associated abnormalities in keratoconus

  15. Compressive elasticity of three-dimensional nanofiber matrix directs mesenchymal stem cell differentiation to vascular cells with endothelial or smooth muscle cell markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingate, K; Bonani, W; Tan, Y; Bryant, S J; Tan, W

    2012-04-01

    The importance of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in vascular regeneration is becoming increasingly recognized. However, few in vitro studies have been performed to identify the effects of environmental elasticity on the differentiation of MSC into vascular cell types. Electrospinning and photopolymerization techniques were used to fabricate a three-dimensional (3-D) polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate nanofiber hydrogel matrix with tunable elasticity for use as a cellular substrate. Compression testing demonstrated that the elastic modulus of the hydrated 3-D matrices ranged from 2 to 15 kPa, similar to the in vivo elasticity of the intima basement membrane and media layer. MSC seeded on rigid matrices (8-15 kPa) showed an increase in cell area compared with those seeded on soft matrices (2-5 kPa). Furthermore, the matrix elasticity guided the cells to express different vascular-specific phenotypes with high differentiation efficiency. Around 95% of MSC seeded on the 3-D matrices with an elasticity of 3 kPa showed Flk-1 endothelial markers within 24h, while only 20% of MSC seeded on the matrices with elasticity >8 kPa demonstrated Flk-1 marker. In contrast, ∼80% of MSC seeded on 3-D matrices with elasticity >8 kPa demonstrated smooth muscle α-actin marker within 24h, while fewer than 10% of MSC seeded on 3-D matrices with elasticity differentiation into either endothelial or smooth muscle-like cells based purely on the local elasticity of the substrate could be a powerful tool for vascular tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A novel method for morphological pleomorphism and heterogeneity quantitative measurement: Named cell feature level co-occurrence matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Akira; Numata, Yasushi; Hamada, Takuya; Horisawa, Tomoyoshi; Cosatto, Eric; Graf, Hans-Peter; Kuroda, Masahiko; Yamamoto, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in molecular pathology and genetic/epigenetic analysis of cancer tissue have resulted in a marked increase in objective and measurable data. In comparison, the traditional morphological analysis approach to pathology diagnosis, which can connect these molecular data and clinical diagnosis, is still mostly subjective. Even though the advent and popularization of digital pathology has provided a boost to computer-aided diagnosis, some important pathological concepts still remain largely non-quantitative and their associated data measurements depend on the pathologist's sense and experience. Such features include pleomorphism and heterogeneity. In this paper, we propose a method for the objective measurement of pleomorphism and heterogeneity, using the cell-level co-occurrence matrix. Our method is based on the widely used Gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), where relations between neighboring pixel intensity levels are captured into a co-occurrence matrix, followed by the application of analysis functions such as Haralick features. In the pathological tissue image, through image processing techniques, each nucleus can be measured and each nucleus has its own measureable features like nucleus size, roundness, contour length, intra-nucleus texture data (GLCM is one of the methods). In GLCM each nucleus in the tissue image corresponds to one pixel. In this approach the most important point is how to define the neighborhood of each nucleus. We define three types of neighborhoods of a nucleus, then create the co-occurrence matrix and apply Haralick feature functions. In each image pleomorphism and heterogeneity are then determined quantitatively. For our method, one pixel corresponds to one nucleus feature, and we therefore named our method Cell Feature Level Co-occurrence Matrix (CFLCM). We tested this method for several nucleus features. CFLCM is showed as a useful quantitative method for pleomorphism and heterogeneity on histopathological image

  17. Matrix rigidity regulates spatiotemporal dynamics of Cdc42 activity and vacuole formation kinetics of endothelial colony forming cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Joon; Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Han, Bumsoo; Yoder, Mervin C; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L; Na, Sungsoo

    2014-01-24

    Recent evidence has shown that endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) may serve as a cell therapy for improving blood vessel formation in subjects with vascular injury, largely due to their robust vasculogenic potential. The Rho family GTPase Cdc42 is known to play a primary role in this vasculogenesis process, but little is known about how extracellular matrix (ECM) rigidity affects Cdc42 activity during the process. In this study, we addressed two questions: Does matrix rigidity affect Cdc42 activity in ECFC undergoing early vacuole formation? How is the spatiotemporal activation of Cdc42 related to ECFC vacuole formation? A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based Cdc42 biosensor was used to examine the effects of the rigidity of three-dimensional (3D) collagen matrices on spatiotemporal activity of Cdc42 in ECFCs. Collagen matrix stiffness was modulated by varying the collagen concentration and therefore fibril density. The results showed that soft (150 Pa) matrices induced an increased level of Cdc42 activity compared to stiff (1 kPa) matrices. Time-course imaging and colocalization analysis of Cdc42 activity and vacuole formation revealed that Cdc42 activity was colocalized to the periphery of cytoplasmic vacuoles. Moreover, soft matrices generated faster and larger vacuoles than stiff matrices. The matrix-driven vacuole formation was enhanced by a constitutively active Cdc42 mutant, but significantly inhibited by a dominant-negative Cdc42 mutant. Collectively, the results suggest that matrix rigidity is a strong regulator of Cdc42 activity and vacuole formation kinetics, and that enhanced activity of Cdc42 is an important step in early vacuole formation in ECFCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A novel method to understand tumor cell invasion: integrating extracellular matrix mimicking layers in microfluidic chips by "selective curing".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami Amirabadi, H; SahebAli, S; Frimat, J P; Luttge, R; den Toonder, J M J

    2017-10-17

    A major challenge in studying tumor cell invasion into its surrounding tissue is to identify the contribution of individual factors in the tumor microenvironment (TME) to the process. One of the important elements of the TME is the fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM) which is known to influence cancer cell invasion, but exactly how remains unclear. Therefore, there is a need for new models to unravel mechanisms behind the tumor-ECM interaction. In this article, we present a new microfabrication method, called selective curing, to integrate ECM-mimicking layers between two microfluidic channels. This method enables us to study the effect of 3D matrices with controlled architecture, beyond the conventionally used hydrogels, on cancer invasion in a controlled environment. As a proof of principle, we have integrated two electrospun Polycaprolactone (PCL) matrices with different fiber diameters in one chip. We then studied the 3D migration of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells into the matrices under the influence of a chemotactic gradient. The results show that neither the invasion distance nor the general cell morphology is affected significantly by the difference in fiber size of these matrices. The cells however do produce longer and more protrusions in the matrix with smaller fiber size. This microfluidic system enables us to study the influence of other factors in the TME on cancer development as well as other biological applications as it provides a controlled compartmentalized environment compatible with cell culturing.

  19. CUB domain-containing protein 1, a prognostic factor for human pancreatic cancers, promotes cell migration and extracellular matrix degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Yuri; Uekita, Takamasa; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Fujii, Satoko; Kosuge, Tomoo; Kanai, Yae; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Sakai, Ryuichi

    2010-06-15

    CUB domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) is a membrane protein that is highly expressed in several solid cancers. We reported previously that CDCP1 regulates anoikis resistance as well as cancer cell migration and invasion, although the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. In this study, we found that expression of CDCP1 in pancreatic cancer tissue was significantly correlated with overall survival and that CDCP1 expression in pancreatic cancer cell lines was relatively high among solid tumor cell lines. Reduction of CDCP1 expression in these cells suppressed extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase-9 secretion. Using the Y734F mutant of CDCP1, which lacks the tyrosine phosphorylation site, we showed that CDCP1 regulates cell migration, invasion, and ECM degradation in a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent manner and that these CDCP1-associated characteristics were inhibited by blocking the association of CDCP1 and protein kinase Cdelta (PKCdelta). CDCP1 modulates the enzymatic activity of PKCdelta through the tyrosine phosphorylation of PKCdelta by recruiting PKCdelta to Src family kinases. Cortactin, which was detected as a CDCP1-dependent binding partner of PKCdelta, played a significant role in migration and invasion but not in ECM degradation of pancreatic cells. These results suggest that CDCP1 expression might play a crucial role in poor outcome of pancreatic cancer through promotion of invasion and metastasis and that molecules blocking the expression, phosphorylation, or the PKCdelta-binding site of CDCP1 are potential therapeutic candidates.

  20. Effect of bradykinin on TGF-β1-induced retinal pigment epithelial cell proliferation and extracellular matrix secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wenting; Wei, Qingquan; Liu, Qingyu; Ren, Chengda; Liu, Junling; Zhang, Ruiling; He, Mengmei; Wang, Qianyi; Du, Yaru; Yu, Jing

    2016-11-10

    To evaluate the effect of bradykinin (BK) on TGF-β1-induced retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell proliferation and extracellular matrix secretion and to elucidate the relationship between BK and the Erk/Akt signaling pathway. The effects of BK on TGF-β1-induced RPE cell proliferation were examined via CCK-8 assay. Cell culture supernatant collagen I concentrations were measured via ELISA. Fibronectin (Fn), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 mRNA and protein expression levels were measured via q-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Changes in Akt/Erk phosphorylation induced by BK and HOE-140 were evaluated via Western blotting. TGF-β1 stimulated ARPE-19 cell proliferation, which was inhibited by BK, whose effects were inhibited by HOE-140. BK inhibited TGF-β1-induced collagen I, Fn and MMP-2 secretion in RPE cells, and these effects were inhibited by HOE-140. BK also inhibited TGF-β1-induced Akt phosphorylation in RPE cells, and these effects were blocked by HOE-140. BK had no significant effect on Erk-mediated signaling. The findings from this study indicate that BK could be novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of PVR.

  1. Investigating the Influence of Extracellular Matrix and Glycolytic Metabolism on Muscle Stem Cell Migration on Their Native Fiber Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Butera

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM of skeletal muscle fibers is a unique environment that supports the regenerative capacity of satellite cells; the resident stem cell population. The impact of environment has great bearing on key properties permitting satellite cells to carry out tissue repair. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the ECM and glycolytic metabolism on satellite cell emergence and migration—two early processes required for muscle repair. Our results show that both influence the rate at which satellite