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Sample records for cell lung cancers

  1. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC ...

  2. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  3. Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon R. Pine

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related lethality because of high incidence and recurrence in spite of significant advances in staging and therapies. Recent data indicates that stem cells situated throughout the airways may initiate cancer formation. These putative stem cells maintain protumorigenic characteristics including high proliferative capacity, multipotent differentiation, drug resistance and long lifespan relative to other cells. Stem cell signaling and differentiation pathways are maintained within distinct cancer types, and destabilization of this machinery may participate in maintenance of cancer stem cells. Characterization of lung cancer stem cells is an area of active research and is critical for developing novel therapies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on stem cell signaling pathways and cell markers used to identify the lung cancer stem cells.

  4. Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pine, Sharon R.; Blair Marshall; Lyuba Varticovski

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related lethality because of high incidence and recurrence in spite of significant advances in staging and therapies. Recent data indicates that stem cells situated throughout the airways may initiate cancer formation. These putative stem cells maintain protumorigenic characteristics including high proliferative capacity, multipotent differentiation, drug resistance and long lifespan relative to other cells. Stem cell signaling and differentiation p...

  5. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Horn L, Eisenberg R, Gius D, et al. Cancer of the lung. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan ...

  6. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  7. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  8. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  9. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk ... day and for how long you have smoked. Being around the smoke ...

  10. FR901228 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Progressive Small Cell Lung Cancer or Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  11. Targeted therapies in small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    LU, HONG-YANG; Wang, Xiao-Jia; Mao, Wei-Min

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounted for 12.95% of all lung cancer histological types in 2002. Despite trends toward modest improvement in survival, the outcome remains extremely poor. Chemotherapy is the cornerstone of treatment in SCLC. More than two-thirds of patients who succumb to lung cancer in the United States are over 65 years old. Elderly patients tolerate chemotherapy poorly and need novel therapeutic agents. Targeted...

  12. Cell of origin of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna, Jennifer M.; Onaitis, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and current therapies are disappointing. Elucidation of the cell(s) of origin of lung cancer may lead to new therapeutics. In addition, the discovery of putative cancer-initiating cells with stem cell properties in solid tumors has emerged as an important area of cancer research that may explain the resistance of these tumors to currently available therapeutics. Progress in our understanding of normal tissue stem cells, tumor cell o...

  13. Advances in Lung Stem Cells and Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijing YIN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are emerging as a hot topic for cancer research. Lung CSCs share many characteristics with normal lung stem cells (SCs, including self-renewal and multi-potency for differentiation. Many molecular markers expressed in various types of CSCs were also found in lung CSCs, such as CD133, CD44, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2. Similarly, proliferation and expansion of lung CSCs are regulated not only by signal transduction pathways functioning in normal lung SCs, such as Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt pathways, but also by those acting in tumor cells, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K pathways. As CSC plays an critical role in tumor recurrence, metastasis and drug-resistance, understanding the difference between lung CSCs and normal lung SCs, identifying and targeting CSC markers or related signaling pathways may increase the efficacy of therapy on lung cancer and improved survival of lung cancer patients.

  14. Cancer Stem Cells in Lung Tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kratz, Johannes R.; Yagui-Beltrán, Adam; Jablons, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Although stem cells were discovered more than 50 years ago, we have only recently begun to understand their potential importance in cancer biology. Recent advances in our ability to describe, isolate, and study lung stem cell populations has led to a growing recognition of the central importance cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis. This article reviews the major studies supporting the existence and importance of cancer stem cells in lung tumorigenesis. Continue...

  15. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  16. Markers of small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma SK; Taneja Tarvinder

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer death; however, no specific serum biomarker is available till date for detection of early lung cancer. Despite good initial response to chemotherapy, small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) has a poor prognosis. Therefore, it is important to identify molecular markers that might influence survival and may serve as potential therapeutic targets. The review aims to summarize the current knowledge of serum biomarkers in SCLC to improve diagnostic effi...

  17. Tracheal metastasis of small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    De, Sajal

    2009-01-01

    Endotracheal metastases of primary lung cancer are rare. Only one case of tracheal metastasis from small cell lung cancer has been reported in literature. Here, we report a rare case of a 45-year-old woman who was admitted for sudden-onset breathlessness with respiratory failure and required ventilatory support. Endotracheal growth was identified during bronchoscopy, and biopsy revealed endotracheal metastasis of small cell lung cancer.

  18. Targeted therapy for squamous cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Rachel G.; Watanabe, Hideo; Meyerson, Matthew; Hammerman, Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) is the second most common subtype of non-small-cell lung cancer and leads to 40,000–50,000 deaths per year in the USA. Management of non-small-cell lung cancer has dramatically changed over the past decade with the introduction of targeted therapeutic agents for genotypically selected individuals with lung adenocarcinoma. These agents lead to improved outcomes, and it has now become the standard of care to perform routine molecular genotyping of lung adenoc...

  19. Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spreads in different ways, and each is treated differently. Non-small cell lung cancer is more common than small cell lung cancer. Small cell lung cancer grows more quickly and is more likely to spread to other organs in the body. Learn more about non-small cell lung cancer. Learn ...

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Non- ...

  1. Stages of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Non- ...

  2. General Information about Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Non- ...

  3. Treatment Options by Stage (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Non- ...

  4. Cell of origin of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Hanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and current therapies are disappointing. Elucidation of the cell(s of origin of lung cancer may lead to new therapeutics. In addition, the discovery of putative cancer-initiating cells with stem cell properties in solid tumors has emerged as an important area of cancer research that may explain the resistance of these tumors to currently available therapeutics. Progress in our understanding of normal tissue stem cells, tumor cell of origin, and cancer stem cells has been hampered by the heterogeneity of the disease, the lack of good in vivo transplantation models to assess stem cell behavior, and an overall incomplete understanding of the epithelial stem cell hierarchy. As such, a systematic computerized literature search of the MEDLINE database was used to identify articles discussing current knowledge about normal lung and lung cancer stem cells or progenitor cells. In this review, we discuss what is currently known about the role of cancer-initiating cells and normal stem cells in the development of lung tumors.

  5. Markers of small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma SK

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer death; however, no specific serum biomarker is available till date for detection of early lung cancer. Despite good initial response to chemotherapy, small-cell lung cancer (SCLC has a poor prognosis. Therefore, it is important to identify molecular markers that might influence survival and may serve as potential therapeutic targets. The review aims to summarize the current knowledge of serum biomarkers in SCLC to improve diagnostic efficiency in the detection of tumor progression in lung cancer. The current knowledge on the known serum cytokines and tumor biomarkers of SCLC is emphasized. Recent findings in the search for novel diagnostic and therapeutic molecular markers using the emerging genomic technology for detecting lung cancer are also described. It is believed that implementing these new research techniques will facilitate and improve early detection, prognostication and better treatment of SCLC.

  6. Limited small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper assesses the prognosis of patients with limited small cell lung cancer (LSCLC) not achieving complete response (CR) to induction combination chemotherapy (ICC) but who achieve CR after thoracic irradiation (TI). Twenty-four patients had CRs to ICC (CR- ICC) of two cycles of cytoxan, Adriamycin, and vincristine alternating with two cycles of cisplatin with VP-16. Another 24 had CR after consolidation with subsequent T1 (CR-T1): 45 Gy in daily fractions of 2.5 Gy or twice-daily fractions of 1.5 Gy. The CR-ICC and CR-TI patients had similar prognostic factors and treatment. Comparing CR-ICC and CR-TI, survival was 40% versus 26% at 2 years and 35% versus 4% at 5 years (P < .05). There were eight (33%) long-term survivors (≥3 years) in the CR-ICC group versus three (13%) in the CR-TI group. Local control for CR-ICC patients was 59% at 5 years versus 21% for the CR-TI patients (not significant). Freedom from DM for the CR-ICC patients was 41% at 5 years versus 8% for the CR-TI patients (P < .05)

  7. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Improving Lung Function in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-17

    Cachexia; Fatigue; Pulmonary Complications; Radiation Toxicity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  8. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Screening, Diagnosis, and Staging

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, J; Magalhães, M; Rocha, E; Marques, F

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Tobacco consumption is the primary cause of lung cancer, accounting for more than 85% 90% of all lung cancer deaths. Non-small cell lung cancer accounts for about 85% of all lung cancers. Several studies have shown that low-dose helical CT of the lung detects more nodules and lung cancers, including early-stage cancers, than does chest radiography. The National Lung Cancer Screening Trial results show that three annual roun...

  9. Surgery for small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Hoyos, Alberto; DeCamp, Malcolm M

    2014-11-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) comprises approximately 14% of all lung cancer cases. Most patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease and are therefore treated nonoperatively with chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or both. A small subset of patients with SCLC present with early-stage disease and will benefit from surgical resection plus chemotherapy. The rationale for radiotherapy in these patients remains controversial. PMID:25441133

  10. Surgery for nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Lang-Lazdunski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Surgery remains the best curative option in patients with early stage lung cancer (stage I and II. Developments in minimally invasive techniques now allow surgeons to perform lung resections on elderly patients, patients with poor pulmonary function or significant cardiopulmonary comorbidities. New techniques, such as stereotactic radiotherapy and ablative procedures, are being evaluated in early-stage lung cancer and may represent an alternative to surgery in patients unfit for lung resection. Perioperative mortality rates have dropped significantly at most institutions in the past two decades and complications are managed more efficiently. Progress in imaging and staging techniques have helped cut futile thoracotomy rates and offer patients the most adequate treatment options. Large randomised trials have helped clarify the role of neoadjuvant, induction and adjuvant chemotherapy, as well as radiotherapy. Surgery remains an essential step in the multimodality therapy of selected patients with advanced-stage lung cancer (stage III and IV. Interventional and endoscopic techniques have reduced the role of surgery in the diagnosis and staging of nonsmall cell lung cancer, but surgery remains an important tool in the palliation of advanced-stage lung cancer. Large national/international surgical databases have been developed and predictive risk-models for surgical mortality/morbidity published by learned surgical societies. Nonetheless, lung cancer overall survival rates remain deceptively low and it is hoped that early detection/screening, better understanding of tumour biology and development of biomarkers, and development of efficient targeted therapies will help improve the prognosis of lung cancer patients in the next decade.

  11. Enrichment and Function Research of Large Cell Lung Cancer Stem Cell-like Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wenke YUE; JIAO, FENG; Liu, Bin; Jiacong YOU; Zhou, Qinghua

    2011-01-01

    Background and objective There are no universal method to recognize and screen for lung cancer stem cell markers and indicators. Commonly used methods are flow Cytometry and learning from other cancer stem cell sorting tags to sort lung cancer stem cells. But this method has low specificity screening, the workload is huge. In this study, Serum-free suspension culture was used to enrich lung cancer stem cells, and explore method for lung cancer stem cell screening. Methods Human large lung can...

  12. Circulating tumor cells in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Rachel; Pailler, Emma; Billiot, Fanny; Drusch, Françoise; Barthelemy, Amélie; Oulhen, Marianne; Besse, Benjamin; Soria, Jean-Charles; Farace, Françoise; Vielh, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as potential biomarkers in several cancers such as colon, prostate, and breast carcinomas, with a correlation between CTC number and patient prognosis being established by independent research groups. The detection and enumeration of CTCs, however, is still a developing field, with no universal method of detection suitable for all types of cancer. CTC detection in lung cancer in particular has proven difficult to perform, as CTCs in this type of cancer often present with nonepithelial characteristics. Moreover, as many detection methods rely on the use of epithelial markers to identify CTCs, the loss of these markers during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in certain metastatic cancers can render these methods ineffective. The development of personalized medicine has led to an increase in the advancement of molecular characterization of CTCs. The application of techniques such as FISH and RT-PCR to detect EGFR, HER2, and KRAS abnormalities in lung, breast, and colon cancer, for example, could be used to characterize CTCs in real time. The use of CTCs as a 'liquid biopsy' is therefore an exciting possibility providing information on patient prognosis and treatment efficacy. This review summarizes the state of CTC detection today, with particular emphasis on lung cancer, and discusses the future applications of CTCs in helping the clinician to develop new strategies in patient treatment. PMID:23207444

  13. Radiation Therapy, Chemotherapy, and Soy Isoflavones in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-08

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  14. Comprehensive genomic characterization of squamous cell lung cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammerman, Peter S.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Voet, Douglas; Jing, Rui; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sivachenko, Andrey; Stojanov, Petar; McKenna, Aaron; Lander, Eric S.; Gabriel, Stacey; Getz, Gad; Sougnez, Carrie; Imielinski, Marcin; Helman, Elena; Hernandez, Bryan; Pho, Nam H.; Meyerson, Matthew; Chu, Andy; Chun, Hye-Jung E.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Pleasance, Erin; Robertson, A. Gordon; Sipahimalani, Payal; Stoll, Dominik; Balasundaram, Miruna; Birol, Inanc; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Chuah, Eric; Coope, Robin J. N.; Corbett, Richard; Dhalla, Noreen; Guin, Ranabir; Hirst, Anhe Carrie; Hirst, Martin; Holt, Robert A.; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Karen; Nip, Ka Ming; Olshen, Adam; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Slobodan, Jared R.; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Varhol, Richard; Zeng, Thomas; Zhao, Yongjun; Jones, Steven J. M.; Marra, Marco A.; Saksena, Gordon; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Schumacher, Stephen E.; Tabak, Barbara; Carter, Scott L.; Pho, Nam H.; Nguyen, Huy; Onofrio, Robert C.; Crenshaw, Andrew; Ardlie, Kristin; Beroukhim, Rameen; Winckler, Wendy; Hammerman, Peter S.; Getz, Gad; Meyerson, Matthew; Protopopov, Alexei; Zhang, Jianhua; Hadjipanayis, Angela; Lee, Semin; Xi, Ruibin; Yang, Lixing; Ren, Xiaojia; Zhang, Hailei; Shukla, Sachet; Chen, Peng-Chieh; Haseley, Psalm; Lee, Eunjung; Chin, Lynda; Park, Peter J.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Socci, Nicholas D.; Liang, Yupu; Schultz, Nikolaus; Borsu, Laetitia; Lash, Alex E.; Viale, Agnes; Sander, Chris; Ladanyi, Marc; Auman, J. Todd; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Shi, Yan; Liquori, Christina; Meng, Shaowu; Li, Ling; Turman, Yidi J.; Topal, Michael D.; Tan, Donghui; Waring, Scot; Buda, Elizabeth; Walsh, Jesse; Jones, Corbin D.; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Singh, Darshan; Wu, Junyuan; Gulabani, Anisha; Dolina, Peter; Bodenheimer, Tom; Hoyle, Alan P.; Simons, Janae V.; Soloway, Matthew G.; Mose, Lisle E.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Balu, Saianand; O'Connor, Brian D.; Prins, Jan F.; Liu, Jinze; Chiang, Derek Y.; Hayes, D. Neil; Perou, Charles M.; Cope, Leslie; Danilova, Ludmila; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Maglinte, Dennis T.; Pan, Fei; Van den Berg, David J.; Triche, Timothy; Herman, James G.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Laird, Peter W.; Getz, Gad; Noble, Michael; Voet, Doug; Saksena, Gordon; Gehlenborg, Nils; DiCara, Daniel; Zhang, Jinhua; Zhang, Hailei; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Liu, Spring Yingchun; Lawrence, Michael S.; Zou, Lihua; Sivachenko, Andrey; Lin, Pei; Stojanov, Petar; Jing, Rui; Cho, Juok; Nazaire, Marc-Danie; Robinson, Jim; Thorvaldsdottir, Helga; Mesirov, Jill; Park, Peter J.; Chin, Lynda; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sinha, Rileen; Ciriello, Giovanni; Cerami, Ethan; Gross, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Anders; Gao, Jianjiong; Aksoy, B. Arman; Weinhold, Nils; Ramirez, Ricardo; Taylor, Barry S.; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Reva, Boris; Shen, Ronglai; Mo, Qianxing; Seshan, Venkatraman; Paik, Paul K.; Ladanyi, Marc; Sander, Chris; Akbani, Rehan; Zhang, Nianxiang; Broom, Bradley M.; Casasent, Tod; Unruh, Anna; Wakefield, Chris; Cason, R. Craig; Baggerly, Keith A.; Weinstein, John N.; Haussler, David; Benz, Christopher C.; Stuart, Joshua M.; Zhu, Jingchun; Szeto, Christopher; Scott, Gary K.; Yau, Christina; Ng, Sam; Goldstein, Ted; Waltman, Peter; Sokolov, Artem; Ellrott, Kyle; Collisson, Eric A.; Zerbino, Daniel; Wilks, Christopher; Ma, Singer; Craft, Brian; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Auman, J. Todd; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Du, Ying; Cabanski, Christopher; Walter, Vonn; Singh, Darshan; Wu, Junyuan; Gulabani, Anisha; Bodenheimer, Tom; Hoyle, Alan P.; Simons, Janae V.; Soloway, Matthew G.; Mose, Lisle E.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Balu, Saianand; Marron, J. S.; Liu, Yufeng; Wang, Kai; Liu, Jinze; Prins, Jan F.; Hayes, D. Neil; Perou, Charles M.; Creighton, Chad J.; Zhang, Yiqun; Travis, William D.; Rekhtman, Natasha; Yi, Joanne; Aubry, Marie C.; Cheney, Richard; Dacic, Sanja; Flieder, Douglas; Funkhouser, William; Illei, Peter; Myers, Jerome; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Penny, Robert; Mallery, David; Shelton, Troy; Hatfield, Martha; Morris, Scott; Yena, Peggy; Shelton, Candace; Sherman, Mark; Paulauskis, Joseph; Meyerson, Matthew; Baylin, Stephen B.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Akbani, Rehan; Azodo, Ijeoma; Beer, David; Bose, Ron; Byers, Lauren A.; Carbone, David; Chang, Li-Wei; Chiang, Derek; Chu, Andy; Chun, Elizabeth; Collisson, Eric; Cope, Leslie; Creighton, Chad J.; Danilova, Ludmila; Ding, Li; Getz, Gad; Hammerman, Peter S.; Hayes, D. Neil; Hernandez, Bryan; Herman, James G.; Heymach, John; Ida, Cristiane; Imielinski, Marcin; Johnson, Bruce; Jurisica, Igor; Kaufman, Jacob; Kosari, Farhad; Kucherlapati, Raju; Kwiatkowski, David; Ladanyi, Marc; Lawrence, Michael S.; Maher, Christopher A.; Mungall, Andy; Ng, Sam; Pao, William; Peifer, Martin; Penny, Robert; Robertson, Gordon; Rusch, Valerie; Sander, Chris; Schultz, Nikolaus; Shen, Ronglai; Siegfried, Jill; Sinha, Rileen; Sivachenko, Andrey; Sougnez, Carrie; Stoll, Dominik; Stuart, Joshua; Thomas, Roman K.; Tomaszek, Sandra; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Travis, William D.; Vaske, Charles; Weinstein, John N.; Weisenberger, Daniel; Wheeler, David; Wigle, Dennis A.; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Wilks, Christopher; Yang, Ping; Zhang, Jianjua John; Jensen, Mark A.; Sfeir, Robert; Kahn, Ari B.; Chu, Anna L.; Kothiyal, Prachi; Wang, Zhining; Snyder, Eric E.; Pontius, Joan; Pihl, Todd D.; Ayala, Brenda; Backus, Mark; Walton, Jessica; Baboud, Julien; Berton, Dominique L.; Nicholls, Matthew C.; Srinivasan, Deepak; Raman, Rohini; Girshik, Stanley; Kigonya, Peter A.; Alonso, Shelley; Sanbhadti, Rashmi N.; Barletta, Sean P.; Greene, John M.; Pot, David A.; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Bandarchi-Chamkhaleh, Bizhan; Boyd, Jeff; Weaver, JoEllen; Wigle, Dennis A.; Azodo, Ijeoma A.; Tomaszek, Sandra C.; Aubry, Marie Christine; Ida, Christiane M.; Yang, Ping; Kosari, Farhad; Brock, Malcolm V.; Rogers, Kristen; Rutledge, Marian; Brown, Travis; Lee, Beverly; Shin, James; Trusty, Dante; Dhir, Rajiv; Siegfried, Jill M.; Potapova, Olga; Fedosenko, Konstantin V.; Nemirovich-Danchenko, Elena; Rusch, Valerie; Zakowski, Maureen; Iacocca, Mary V.; Brown, Jennifer; Rabeno, Brenda; Czerwinski, Christine; Petrelli, Nicholas; Fan, Zhen; Todaro, Nicole; Eckman, John; Myers, Jerome; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Thorne, Leigh B.; Huang, Mei; Boice, Lori; Hill, Ashley; Penny, Robert; Mallery, David; Curley, Erin; Shelton, Candace; Yena, Peggy; Morrison, Carl; Gaudioso, Carmelo; Bartlett, Johnm. S.; Kodeeswaran, Sugy; Zanke, Brent; Sekhon, Harman; David, Kerstin; Juhl, Hartmut; Van Le, Xuan; Kohl, Bernard; Thorp, Richard; Tien, Nguyen Viet; Van Bang, Nguyen; Sussman, Howard; Phu, Bui Duc; Hajek, Richard; PhiHung, Nguyen; Khan, Khurram Z.; Muley, Thomas; Shaw, Kenna R. Mills; Sheth, Margi; Yang, Liming; Buetow, Ken; Davidsen, Tanja; Demchok, John A.; Eley, Greg; Ferguson, Martin; Dillon, Laura A. L.; Schaefer, Carl; Guyer, Mark S.; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Palchik, Jacqueline D.; Peterson, Jane; Sofia, Heidi J.; Thomson, Elizabeth; Meyerson, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma is a common type of lung cancer, causing approximately 400,000 deaths per year worldwide. Genomic alterations in squamous cell lung cancers have not been comprehensively characterized, and no molecularly targeted agents have been specifically developed for its treatment.

  15. Pancreatic involvement in small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Few data are available concerning incidence, clinical picture, and prognosis for pancreatic metastases of small cell lung carcinoma. In this paper we review the related literature available in English language. Although pancreatic metastases are generally asymptomatic, they can rarely produce clinical symptoms or functional abnormalities. The widespread use of multi-detector computerised tomography (CT) in contemporary medical practice has led to an increased detection of pancreatic metastases in oncology patients. Tissue diagnosis is imperative because radiological techniques alone are incapable of differentiating them from primary pancreatic tumours. Pancreatic metastases occur in the relative end stage of small cell lung cancer. The main complications of these lesions, although rare, are acute pancreatitis and obstructive jaundice. Early chemotherapy can provide a survival benefit even in patients with mild acute pancreatitis or extrahepatic biliary obstruction

  16. Immune and Inflammatory Cell Composition of Human Lung Cancer Stroma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G-Andre Banat

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that the abnormal microenvironment of tumors may play a critical role in carcinogenesis, including lung cancer. We comprehensively assessed the number of stromal cells, especially immune/inflammatory cells, in lung cancer and evaluated their infiltration in cancers of different stages, types and metastatic characteristics potential. Immunohistochemical analysis of lung cancer tissue arrays containing normal and lung cancer sections was performed. This analysis was combined with cyto-/histomorphological assessment and quantification of cells to classify/subclassify tumors accurately and to perform a high throughput analysis of stromal cell composition in different types of lung cancer. In human lung cancer sections we observed a significant elevation/infiltration of total-T lymphocytes (CD3+, cytotoxic-T cells (CD8+, T-helper cells (CD4+, B cells (CD20+, macrophages (CD68+, mast cells (CD117+, mononuclear cells (CD11c+, plasma cells, activated-T cells (MUM1+, B cells, myeloid cells (PD1+ and neutrophilic granulocytes (myeloperoxidase+ compared with healthy donor specimens. We observed all of these immune cell markers in different types of lung cancers including squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, adenosquamous cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, papillary adenocarcinoma, metastatic adenocarcinoma, and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. The numbers of all tumor-associated immune cells (except MUM1+ cells in stage III cancer specimens was significantly greater than those in stage I samples. We observed substantial stage-dependent immune cell infiltration in human lung tumors suggesting that the tumor microenvironment plays a critical role during lung carcinogenesis. Strategies for therapeutic interference with lung cancer microenvironment should consider the complexity of its immune cell composition.

  17. CD24 negative lung cancer cells, possessing partial cancer stem cell properties, cannot be considered as cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Haineng; Mu, Jiasheng; Xiao, Jing; Wu, Xiangsong; Li, Maolan; Liu, Tianrun; Liu, Xinyuan

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) play vital role in lung cancer progression, resistance, metastasis and relapse. Identifying lung CSCs makers for lung CSCs targeting researches are critical for lung cancer therapy. In this study, utilizing previous identified lung CSCs as model, we compared the expression of CD24, CD133 and CD44 between CSCs and non-stem cancer cells. Increased ratio of CD24- cells were found in CSCs. CD24- cells were then sorted by flow cytometry and their proliferative ability, che...

  18. MET and Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelsomino, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.gelsomino@istitutotumori.mi.it [Medical Oncology Unit 1, Medical Oncology Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Via G. Venezian 1, 20133 Milano (Italy); Rossi, Giulio [Operative Unit of Pathology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Policlinico, Via del Pozzo 71, 41124 Modena (Italy); Tiseo, Marcello [Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, Viale A. Gramsci 14, 43126 Parma (Italy)

    2014-10-13

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is one of the most aggressive lung tumors. The majority of patients with SCLC are diagnosed at an advanced stage. This tumor type is highly sensitive to chemo-radiation treatment, with very high response rates, but invariably relapses. At this time, treatment options are still limited and the prognosis of these patients is poor. A better knowledge of the molecular biology of SCLC allowed us to identify potential druggable targets. Among these, the MET/HGF axis seems to be one of the most aberrant signaling pathways involved in SCLC invasiveness and progression. In this review, we describe briefly all recent literature on the different molecular profiling in SCLC; in particular, we discuss the specific alterations involving c-MET gene and their implications as a potential target in SCLC.

  19. MET and Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gelsomino

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC is one of the most aggressive lung tumors. The majority of patients with SCLC are diagnosed at an advanced stage. This tumor type is highly sensitive to chemo-radiation treatment, with very high response rates, but invariably relapses. At this time, treatment options are still limited and the prognosis of these patients is poor. A better knowledge of the molecular biology of SCLC allowed us to identify potential druggable targets. Among these, the MET/HGF axis seems to be one of the most aberrant signaling pathways involved in SCLC invasiveness and progression. In this review, we describe briefly all recent literature on the different molecular profiling in SCLC; in particular, we discuss the specific alterations involving c-MET gene and their implications as a potential target in SCLC.

  20. Squamous Cell Lung Cancer Presenting as a Malar Mass

    OpenAIRE

    Ganesh Veerappan; Christopher Lettieri; Brian Cuneo

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Lung cancer metastasizing to the face has rarely been reported and is an even more unusual presentation. Case: This is the case of a 49-year-old man diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the face, scheduled for resection. Preoperative radiographs revealed a left upper lobe mass, found to be squamous cell carcinoma. Diagnosis was changed to Stage IV primary lung cancer. The patient did not undergo resection. Discussion: No previous cases of primary lung cancer presenting as a...

  1. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M;

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference, the...... expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas as follows: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to be addressed through...

  2. Squamous Cell Lung Cancer Presenting as a Malar Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Veerappan

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lung cancer metastasizing to the face has rarely been reported and is an even more unusual presentation. Case: This is the case of a 49-year-old man diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the face, scheduled for resection. Preoperative radiographs revealed a left upper lobe mass, found to be squamous cell carcinoma. Diagnosis was changed to Stage IV primary lung cancer. The patient did not undergo resection. Discussion: No previous cases of primary lung cancer presenting as a malar mass have been reported. Facial lesions can be the presenting feature of primary lung cancer. Discovery of the true primary lesion can alter therapy and prognosis.

  3. Cellular radiosensitivity of small-cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, M; Poulsen, H S; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to determine the radiobiological characteristics of a panel of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines by use of a clonogenic assay. In addition, we tested whether comparable results could be obtained by employing a growth extrapolation method based on the...

  4. Update in non small- cell lung cancer staging

    OpenAIRE

    Salgado, RA; Snoeckx, A.; Spinhoven, M; Beeck, B Op de; Corthouts, B; Parizel, PM

    2013-01-01

    Significant progress has been made with the introduction of the TNM-7 staging system for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Constituting the first major revision in 12 years, the seventh edition of NSCLC TNM (TNM-7) is based on the recommendations from the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) Lung Cancer Staging Project of 2007. This new TNM iteration includes a subset analysis on SCLC and carcinoid tumors.A thorough understanding of its principles by the radiologis...

  5. Cancer Stem Cells, Epithelial to Mesenchymal Markers, and Circulating Tumor Cells in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pore, Milind; Meijer, Coby; de Bock, Geertruida H; Boersma-van Ek, Wytske; Terstappen, Leon W M M; Groen, Harry J M; Timens, Wim; Kruyt, Frank A E; Hiltermann, T Jeroen N

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has a poor prognosis, and even with localized (limited) disease, the 5-year survival has only been around 20%. Elevated levels of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been associated with a worse prognosis, and markers of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and epitheli

  6. Effect of primarily cultured human lung cancer-associated fibroblasts on radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effect of human lung cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) on the radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells when CAF is placed in direct contact co-culture with lung cancer cells. Methods: Human lung CAF was obtained from fresh human lung adenocarcinoma tissue specimens by primary culture and subculture and was then identified by immunofluorescence staining. The CAF was placed in direct contact co-culture with lung cancer A549 and H1299 cells, and the effects of CAF on the radiosensitivity of A549 and H1299 cells were evaluated by colony-forming assay. Results: The human lung CAF obtained by adherent culture could stably grow and proliferate, and it had specific expression of α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin, and fibroblast activation protein,but without expression of cytokeratin-18. The plating efficiency (PE, %) of A549 cells at 0 Gy irradiation was (20.0 ± 3.9)% when cultured alone versus (32.3 ± 5.5)% when co-cultured with CAF (t=3.16, P<0.05), and the PE of H1299 cells at 0 Gy irradiation was (20.6 ± 3.1)% when cultured alone versus (35.2 ± 2.3)% when co-cultured with CAF (t=6.55, P<0.05). The cell survival rate at 2 Gy irradiation (SF2) of A549 cells was 0.727 ±0.061 when cultured alone versus 0.782 ± 0.089 when co-cultured with CAF (t=0.88, P>0.05), and the SF2 of H1299 cells was 0.692 ±0.065 when cultured alone versus 0.782 ± 0.037 when co-cultured with CAF (t=2.08, P>0.05). The protection enhancement ratios of human lung CAF for A549 cells and H1299 cells were 1.29 and 1.25, respectively. Conclusions: Human lung CAF reduces the radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells when placed in direct contact co-culture with them, and the radioprotective effect may be attributed to CAF promoting the proliferation of lung cancer cells. (authors)

  7. Gefitinib in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Costanzo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gefitinib is an oral, reversible, tyrosine kinase inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR that plays a key role in the biology of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Phase I studies indicated that the recommended dose of gefitinib was 250 mg/day. Rash, diarrhea, and nausea were the most common adverse events. The positive results obtained in early phase 2 clinical trials with gefitinib were not confirmed in large phase 3 trials in unselected patients with advanced NSCLC. The subsequent discovery that the presence of somatic mutations in the kinase domain of EGFR strongly correlates with increased responsiveness to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors prompted phase 2 and 3 trials with gefitinib in the first line-treatment of EGFR-mutated NSCLC. The results of these trials have demonstrated the efficacy of gefitinib that can be now considered as the standard first-line treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC harbouring activating EGFR mutations.

  8. Personalized Therapy of Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bryan J; Kalemkerian, Gregory P

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma with distinct clinical, pathological and molecular characteristics. Despite robust responses to initial chemotherapy and radiation, the prognosis of patients with SCLC remains poor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 10 %. Despite the fact that numerous molecularly targeted approaches have thus far failed to demonstrate clinical utility in SCLC, further advances will rely on better definition of the biological pathways that drive survival, proliferation and metastasis. Recent next-generation, molecular profiling studies have identified many new therapeutic targets in SCLC, as well as extreme genomic instability which explains the high degree of resistance. A wide variety of anti-angiogenic agents, growth factor inhibitors, pro-apoptotic agents, and epigenetic modulators have been evaluated in SCLC and many studies of these strategies are on-going. Perhaps the most promising approaches involve agents targeting cancer stem cell pathways and immunomodulatory drugs that interfere with the PD1 and CTLA-4 pathways. SCLC offers many barriers to the development of successful therapy, including limited tumor samples, inadequate preclinical models, high mutational burden, and aggressive tumor growth which impairs functional status and hampers enrollment on clinical trials. PMID:26703804

  9. Targeted therapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shou-Ching Tang

    2004-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Recent progress in molecular biology has enabled us to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying pathogenesis of human malignancy including lung cancer. Sequencing of human genome has identified many oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes,giving us a better understanding of the molecular events leading to the formation, progression, metastasis, and the development of drug resistance in human lung cancer. In addition, many signal transduction pathways have been discovered that play important roles in lung cancer. Novel strategy of anti-cancer drug development now involves the identification and development of targeted therapy that interrupts one or more than one pathways or cross-talk among different signal transduction pathways. In addition, efforts are underway that combine the traditional cytotoxic (non-targeted) agents with the biological (targeted) therapy to increase the response rate and survival in patients with lung cancer, especially advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

  10. Staging of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which therapy (or therapies) should be used. Second, lung cancer staging tells how much your cancer has spread. Knowing ... your body. How good are these tests at staging lung cancer? If your biopsy finds cancer cells, this is ...

  11. TP53 Mutations in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Mogi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor gene TP53 is frequently mutated in human cancers. Abnormality of the TP53 gene is one of the most significant events in lung cancers and plays an important role in the tumorigenesis of lung epithelial cells. Human lung cancers are classified into two major types, small cell lung cancer (SCLC and nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The latter accounts for approximately 80% of all primary lung cancers, and the incidence of NSCLC is increasing yearly. Most clinical studies suggest that NSCLC with TP53 alterations carries a worse prognosis and may be relatively more resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. A deep understanding of the role of TP53 in lung carcinogenesis may lead to a more reasonably targeted clinical approach, which should be exploited to enhance the survival rates of patients with lung cancer. This paper will focus on the role of TP53 in the molecular pathogenesis, epidemiology, and therapeutic strategies of TP53 mutation in NSCLC.

  12. The role of SOX2 in small cell lung cancer, lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the lung

    OpenAIRE

    Karachaliou, Niki; Rosell, Rafael; Viteri, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    SOX2 is a stem cell transcription factor that plays a crucial role in the regulation of embryonic development. It is one of the genes in a set of factors (Oct4, SOX2, Nanog) that are able to reprogram human somatic cells to pluripotent stem cells. Overexpression of SOX2 has been described in all types of lung cancer tissues, including small cell and squamous cell carcinoma but also adenocarcinoma. An in-depth view of the spectrum of genomic alterations in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has ide...

  13. Advances in immunotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckamp, Karen L

    2015-12-01

    In most patients, lung cancer presents as advanced disease with metastases to lymph nodes and/or distant organs, and survival is poor. Lung cancer is also a highly immune-suppressing malignancy with numerous methods to evade antitumor immune responses, including deficiencies in antigen processing and presentation, release of immunomodulatory cytokines, and inhibition of T-cell activation. Advances in understanding the complex interactions of the immune system and cancer have led to novel therapies that promote T-cell activation at the tumor site, resulting in prolonged clinical benefit. Immune checkpoint inhibitors, specifically programmed death receptor 1 pathway antibodies, have demonstrated impressively durable responses and improved survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. This article will review the recent progress made in immunotherapy for lung cancer with data from trials evaluating programmed death receptor 1 and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 monoclonal antibodies in addition to cancer vaccines. The review will focus on studies that have been published and the latest randomized trials exploring immune therapy in lung cancer. These results form the framework for a new direction in the treatment of lung cancer toward immunotherapy. PMID:27058851

  14. Importance of Molecular Features of Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer for Choice of Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Approximately 85% of lung cancer is categorized as non–small cell lung cancer, and traditionally, non–small cell lung cancer has been treated with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Targeted agents that inhibit the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway have been developed and integrated into the treatment regimens in non–small cell lung cancer. Currently, approved epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors ...

  15. Chemoradiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer remains a disease associated with a poor prognosis. Chemoradiotherapy is performed for unresectable stage 3 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and inoperable limited-disease small cell lung cancer. In this lecture, chemoradiotherapy for lung cancer is outlined primary according to the 2014 edition of the Clinical Practice Guidelines for Lung Cancer, and also referring to molecular targeted drugs, radiation pneumonitis, and particle radiotherapy. (author)

  16. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-05

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  17. Lung cancer survival in England: trends in non-small-cell lung cancer survival over the duration of the National Lung Cancer Audit

    OpenAIRE

    Khakwani, A; Rich, A L; Powell, H A; Tata, L J; Stanley, R A; Baldwin, D R; Duffy, J P; Hubbard , R B

    2013-01-01

    Background: In comparison with other European and North American countries, England has poor survival figures for lung cancer. Our aim was to evaluate the changes in survival since the introduction of the National Lung Cancer Audit (NLCA). Methods: We used data from the NLCA to identify people with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and stratified people according to their performance status (PS) and clinical stage. Using Cox regression, we calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for death according t...

  18. Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of ... in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  19. Cavitary Lung Cancer Lined with Normal Bronchial Epithelium and Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, Taichiro; Maeshima, Arafumi; Oyamada, Yoshitaka; Kato, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    Reports of cavitary lung cancer are not uncommon, and the cavity generally contains either dilated bronchi or cancer cells. Recently, we encountered a surgical case of cavitary lung cancer whose cavity tended to enlarge during long-term follow-up, and was found to be lined with normal bronchial epithelium and adenocarcinoma cells.

  20. Sirolimus and Gold Sodium Thiomalate in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  1. Personalized Therapy of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgeel, Shirish M

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the most common cause of cancer related deaths in both men and women in the United States and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for over 85 % of all lung cancers. Survival of these patients has not significantly altered in over 30 years. This chapter initially discusses the clinical presentation of lung cancer patients. Most patients diagnosed with lung cancer due to symptoms have advanced stage cancer. Once diagnosed, lung cancer patients need imaging studies to assess the stage of the disease before decisions regarding therapy are finalized. The most important prognostic factors are stage of the disease and performance status and these factors also determine therapy. The chapter subsequently discusses management of each stage of the disease and the impact of several pathologic, clinical factors in personalizing therapy for each individual patient. Transition from chemotherapy for every patient to a more personalized approach based on histology and molecular markers has occurred in the management of advanced stage NSCLC. It is expected that such a personalized approach will extend to all stages of NSCLC and will likely improve the outcomes of all NSCLC patients. PMID:26703806

  2. Gigantol Suppresses Cancer Stem Cell-Like Phenotypes in Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Narumol Bhummaphan; Pithi Chanvorachote

    2015-01-01

    As cancer stem cells (CSCs) contribute to malignancy, metastasis, and relapse of cancers, potential of compound in inhibition of CSCs has garnered most attention in the cancer research as well as drug development fields recently. Herein, we have demonstrated for the first time that gigantol, a pure compound isolated from Dendrobium draconis, dramatically suppressed stem-like phenotypes of human lung cancer cells. Gigantol at nontoxic concentrations significantly reduced anchorage-independent ...

  3. Advanced Research on Circulating Tumor Cells in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui LI

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the malignant disease with the highest rate in terms of incidence and mortality in China. Early diagnosis and timely monitoring tumor recurrence and metastasis are extremely important for improving 5-year survival rate of lung cancer patients. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs, as a "liquid biopsy specimens” for the primary tumor, provide the possibility to perform real-time, non-invasive histological identification for lung cancer patients. The detection of CTCs contributes to early diagnosis, surveillance of tumor recurrence and metastasis, and prediction of therapeutic efficacy and prognosis. Furthermore, CTCs-dependent detection emerges as a new approach for molecularly pathologic examination, study of molecular mechanisms involved in drug resistance, and resolution for tumor heterogeneity. This study reviewed the recent progress of CTCs in lung cancer research field.

  4. Clinicopathological Characteristics and Prognosis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Associated with a Family History of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shuji Haraguchi, Kiyoshi Koizumi, Iwao Mikami, Okamoto Junichi, Yoshihito Iijima, Takayuki Ibi, Kazuo Shimizu

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with a family history of lung cancer (FHLC) have not been well established.Methods: Clinical records of patients with NSCLC treated at our institute from 1982 to 2010 were reviewed with special reference to family history of lung cancer and clinicopathological factors including patient's outcome. Univariate analyses of the factors between the groups of FHLC and non-FHLC were performe...

  5. Clinicopathological Characteristics and Prognosis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Associated with a Family History of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Haraguchi, Shuji; Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Mikami, Iwao; Junichi, Okamoto; Iijima, Yoshihito; Ibi, Takayuki; Shimizu, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with a family history of lung cancer (FHLC) have not been well established. Methods: Clinical records of patients with NSCLC treated at our institute from 1982 to 2010 were reviewed with special reference to family history of lung cancer and clinicopathological factors including patient's outcome. Univariate analyses of the factors between the groups of FHLC and non-FHLC were perform...

  6. Pancreatic involvement in small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gonlugur, Ugur; Mirici, Arzu; Karaayvaz, Muammer

    2014-01-01

    Background Few data are available concerning incidence, clinical picture, and prognosis for pancreatic metastases of small cell lung carcinoma. In this paper we review the related literature available in English language. Conclusions Although pancreatic metastases are generally asymptomatic, they can rarely produce clinical symptoms or functional abnormalities. The widespread use of multi-detector computerised tomography (CT) in contemporary medical practice has led to an increased detection ...

  7. Integrated molecular portrait of non-small cell lung cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Lazar, Vladimir; Suo, Chen; Orear, Cedric; van den Oord, Joost; Balogh, Zsofia; Guegan, Justine; Job, Bastien; Meurice, Guillaume; Ripoche, Hugues; Calza, Stefano; Hasmats, Johanna; Lundeberg, Joakim; Lacroix, Ludovic; Vielh, Philippe; Dufour, Fabienne

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a leading cause of cancer deaths, represents a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, mostly comprising squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), adenocarcinoma (AC) and large-cell carcinoma (LCC). The objectives of this study were to utilize integrated genomic data including copy-number alteration, mRNA, microRNA expression and candidate-gene full sequencing data to characterize the molecular distinctions between AC and SCC. Methods Comparative genomic hybridiz...

  8. Image-Guided Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  9. Genetically Modified T Cells in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer or Mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-02

    Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; HLA-A*0201 Positive Cells Present; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage III Pleural Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pleural Mesothelioma

  10. Enrichment and Function Research of Large Cell Lung Cancer Stem Cell-like Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenke YUE

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective There are no universal method to recognize and screen for lung cancer stem cell markers and indicators. Commonly used methods are flow Cytometry and learning from other cancer stem cell sorting tags to sort lung cancer stem cells. But this method has low specificity screening, the workload is huge. In this study, Serum-free suspension culture was used to enrich lung cancer stem cells, and explore method for lung cancer stem cell screening. Methods Human large lung cancer cell line-L9981 was cultured in serum-free and growth factors added medium, and spheres were obtained. Then the morphological differences of sphere cells and adherent L9981 cells cultured in serum-containing mediums are observed. Cell proliferation was analyzed by Vi-cell viability analyzer; invasion ability was tested by transwell assay; and in vivo tumorigenicity of the two groups of cells was studied in nude mouse. Results Compared with adherent L9981 cells cultured in serum-containing mediums, cells cultured in serum-free medium display sphere appearance. Doubling time of adherent cells and sphere cells are (56.05±1.95 h and (33.00±1.44 h respectively; Spheroid cells had higher invasion and tumorigenicity ability, 5 times and 20 times respectively, than adherent cells. Conclusion Suspension cultured L9981 in Serum-free medium could form spheroid populations. Cells in spheres had higher ability of invasion and Tumorigenicity than adherent L9981 cells. These results indicated spheroid L9981 cells contained enriched lung cancer stem cells, and Serum-free suspension culture can be a candidate method for enriching lung cancer stem cell.

  11. Enhanced Heme Function and Mitochondrial Respiration Promote the Progression of Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hooda, Jagmohan; Cadinu, Daniela; Alam, Md. Maksudul; Shah, Ajit; Cao, Thai M.; Sullivan, Laura A.; Brekken, Rolf; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality, and about 85% of the cases are non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Importantly, recent advance in cancer research suggests that altering cancer cell bioenergetics can provide an effective way to target such advanced cancer cells that have acquired mutations in multiple cellular regulators. This study aims to identify bioenergetic alterations in lung cancer cells by directly measuring and comparing key metabolic activities in a pair...

  12. Palliative Care Intervention in Improving Symptom Control and Quality of Life in Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Their Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-06

    Caregiver; Psychological Impact of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  13. Primary non-small cell lung cancer in a transplanted lung treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy. A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first case of primary lung cancer in a transplanted lung was described in 2001. Since then, only 5 cases of lung cancer in donated lung have been reported. We present one more patient with non-small cell cancer in the transplanted lung treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy. In most cases of primary lung cancer in transplanted lung, rapid progression of the cancer was reported. Occurrence of the locoregional failure in our case could be explained by factors related to the treatment protocol and also to underlying immunosuppression.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells as vectors for lung cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kolluri, K. K.; Laurent, G. J.; Janes, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent advances in treatment, lung cancer accounts for one third of all cancer-related deaths, underlining the need of development of new therapies. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess the ability to specifically home into tumours and their metastases. This property of MSCs could be exploited for the delivery of various anti-tumour agents directly into tumours. However, MSCs are not simple delivery vehicles but cells with active physiological process. This review outlines various ag...

  15. CD133 is a temporary marker of cancer stem cells in small cell lung cancer, but not in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Fei; Wang, Jian; Chen, Duan; Chen, Yi-Jiang

    2011-03-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Current investigations in the field of cancer research have intensively focused on the 'cancer stem cell' or 'tumor-initiating cell'. While CD133 was initially considered as a stem cell marker only in the hematopoietic system and the nervous system, the membrane antigen also identifies tumorigenic cells in certain solid tumors. In this study, we investigated the human lung cancer cell lines A549, H157, H226, Calu-1, H292 and H446. The results of real-time PCR analysis after chemotherapy drug selection and the fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis showed that CD133 only functioned as a marker in the small cell lung cancer line H446. The sorted CD133+ subset presented stem cell-like features, including self-renewal, differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenic capacity in subsequent assays. Furthermore, a proportion of the CD133+ cells had a tendency to remain stable, which may explain the controversies arising from previous studies. Therefore, the CD133+ subset should provide an enriched source of tumor-initiating cells among H446 cells. Moreover, the antigen could be used as an investigative marker of the tumorigenic process and an effective treatment for small cell lung cancer. PMID:21174061

  16. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Aftab, Blake T. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Rudin, Charles M. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hales, Russell K., E-mail: rhales1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  17. The Utilization and Limitation of CD133 Epitopes in Lung Cancer Stem Cells Research

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yin; Hong ZHONG

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common tumor, which lacks of effective clinical treatment to lead to desirable prognosis. According to cancer stem cell hypothesis, lung cancer stem cells are considered to be responsible for carcinogenesis, development, metastasis, recurrence, invasion, resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy of lung cancer. In recent years, more and more institutes used glycosylated CD133 epitopes to define, isolate, purify lung cancer stem cells. However, along with deepl...

  18. Systemic Chemotherapy for Progression of Brain Metastases in Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nagla Abdel Karim; Ananta Bhatt; Lauren Chiec; Richard Curry

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related mortality in men and women. Approximately 15% of lung cancers are small cell type. Chemotherapy and radiation are the mainstay treatments. Currently, the standard chemotherapy regimen includes platinum/etoposide. For extensive small cell lung cancer, irinotecan and cisplatin have also been used. Patients with relapsed small cell lung cancer have a very poor prognosis, and the morbidity increases with brain metastases. Approximately 10%–14...

  19. Methoxyamine, Pemetrexed Disodium, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-05

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Stage IIIA Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  20. Lung cancer-initiating cells: a novel target for cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, Brian J.; Morris, John C.; Steel, Jason C

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is a major public health problem causing more deaths than any other cancer. A better understanding of the biology of this disease and improvements in treatment are greatly needed. Increasing evidence supports the concept that a rare and specialized population of cancer cells, so-called cancer-initiating cells with stem cell-like characteristics, is responsible for tumor growth, maintenance, and recurrence. Cancer-initiating cells also exhibit characteristics that render them resis...

  1. Overexpression of cyclin Y in non-small cell lung cancer is associated with cancer cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Cyclin Y (CCNY) is a key cell cycle regulator that acts as a growth factor sensor to integrate extracellular signals with the cell cycle machinery. The expression status of CCNY in lung cancer and its clinical significance remain unknown. The data indicates that CCNY may be deregulated in non-small cell lung cancer, where it may act to promote cell proliferation. These studies suggest that CCNY may be a candidate biomarker of NSCLC and a possible therapeutic target for lung cancer treatment.

  2. Establishment and characterization of primary lung cancer cell lines from Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao ZHENG; Yi-hua SUN; Xiao-lei YE; Hai-quan CHEN; Hong-bin JI

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To establish and characterize primary lung cancer cell lines from Chinese population.Methods: Lung cancer specimens or pleural effusions were collected from Chinese lung cancer patients and cultured in vitro with ACL4 medium (for non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC)) or HITES medium (for small cell lung carcinomas (SCLC)) supplemented with 5%FBS. All cell lines were maintained in culture for more than 25 passages. Most of these cell lines were further analyzed for oncogenic mutations, karyotype, cell growth kinetics, and tumorigenicity in nude mice.Results: Eight primary cell lines from Chinese lung cancer patients were established and characterized, including seven NSCLC cell lines and one SCLC cell line. Five NSCLC cell lines were found to harbor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase domain mutations.Conclusion: These well-characterized primary lung cancer cell lines from Chinese population provide a unique platform for future studies of the ethnic differences in lung cancer biology and drug response.

  3. Murine Lung Cancer Induces Generalized T Cell Exhaustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rohit; Chen, Ching-Wen; Lyons, John D; Margoles, Lindsay M; Liang, Zhe; Coopersmith, Craig M; Ford, Mandy L

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer is known to modulate tumor-specific immune responses by establishing a micro-environment that leads to the upregulation of T cell inhibitory receptors, resulting in the progressive loss of function and eventual death of tumor-specific T cells. However, the ability of cancer to impact the functionality of the immune system on a systemic level is much less well characterized. Because cancer is known to predispose patients to infectious complications including sepsis, we hypothesized that the presence of cancer alters pathogen-directed immune responses on a systemic level. Materials and Methods We assessed systemic T cell coinhibitory receptor expression, cytokine production, and apoptosis in mice with established subcutaneous lung cancer tumors and in unmanipulated mice without cancer. Results Results indicated that the frequencies of PD-1+, BTLA+, and 2B4+ cells in both the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell compartments were increased in mice with localized cancer relative to non-cancer controls, and the frequencies of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing multiple different inhibitory receptors was increased in cancer animals relative to non-cancer controls. Additionally, 2B4+CD8+ T cells in cancer mice exhibited reduced IL-2 and IFN-γ, while BTLA+CD8+ T cells in cancer mice exhibited reduced IL-2 and TNF. Conversely, CD4+ T cells in cancer animals demonstrated an increase in the frequency of Annexin V+ apoptotic cells. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that the presence of cancer induces systemic T cell exhaustion and generalized immune suppression. PMID:25748104

  4. Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  5. Differential expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α in non-small cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Eleni Karetsi; Maria G. Ioannou; Theodora Kerenidi; Markos Minas; Paschalis A Molyvdas; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Efrosyni Paraskeva

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and vascular endothelial growth factor in small cell lung cancer and subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer and examine their relationships with clinicopathologic factors, response to treatment and survival. METHODS: We examined samples obtained by bronchial endoscopic biopsy from 55 patients with inoperable lung cancer (16 with adenocarcinoma, 17 with squamous cell carcinoma, and 22 with small cell...

  6. Advances in Research on Circulating Tumor Cells in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjian SONG

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic and recurrent tumors have been identified as the leading attribute to the lung cancer deaths. Cancer research has demonstrated the critical role circulating tumor cells (CTCs play in the metastatic spread of carcinomas and the recurrence of lung cancer. The rapid advancement of technology in targeted therapy resolves the embarrassing situation for those late-stage patients whose tumor tissues cannot be obtained. CTCs, as a substitute for the tumor tissues, represent a decisive tool to the cancer treatment strategy. Thus, CTCs exert a fundamental role in the early detection of micro-metastasis, assisting in diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of the recurrent tumors, and subsequently choosing an individualized approach for the therapeutic treatment. This article will review the advances, which have been made in the research area of CTCs with the aid of its applications in cancer therapy.

  7. Prophylactic cranial irradiation in patients with small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramlov, Anne; Tietze, Anna; Khalil, Azza Ahmed;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prophylactic cerebral irradiation (PCI) is a standard treatment for all small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients with response to chemotherapy. The aims of this study were: to evaluate patients undergoing PCI with regard to cerebral recurrence rate, site of recurrence, and overall...

  8. Anticoagulant drugs increase natural killer cell activity in lung cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bobek, M.; Boubelík, Michael; Fišerová, Anna; Luptovcová, Martina; Vannucci, Luca; Kacprzak, G.; Kolodzej, J.; Majewski, A.M.; Hoffman, R. M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 2 (2005), s. 215-223. ISSN 0169-5002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : anticoagulant drugs * lung cancer * NK cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.172, year: 2005

  9. Application of proteomics in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, William C S

    2016-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a heterogeneous disease with diverse pathological features. Clinical proteomics allows the discovery of molecular markers and new therapeutic targets for this most prevalent type of lung cancer. Some of them may be used to detect early lung cancer, while others may serve as predictive markers of resistance to different therapies. Therapeutic targets and prognostic markers in NSCLC have also been discovered. These proteomics biomarkers may help to pair the individual NSCLC patient with the best treatment option. Despite the fact that implementation of these biomarkers in the clinic appears to be scarce, the recently launched Precision Medicine Initiative may encourage their translation into clinical practice. PMID:26577456

  10. Refining the treatment of advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wozniak, Antoinette

    2010-01-01

    Shin Ogita, Antoinette J WozniakKarmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USAAbstract: Metastatic nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a debilitating and deadly disease with virtually no chance for long-term survival. Chemotherapy has improved both survival and quality of life for patients with advanced disease. Overall survival of patients with metastatic NSCLC has gradually increased from 8 to 12 months over the past three decades with the introduction of new chemother...

  11. Dihydroartemisinin inhibits cell proliferation via AKT/GSK3β/cyclinD1 pathway and induces apoptosis in A549 lung cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Kui; Li, Juan; Wang, Zhiling

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. The main types of lung cancer are small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) and non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC); non small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) includes squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), adenocarcinoma and large cell carcinoma, Non small cell lung carcinoma accounts for about 80% of the total lung cancer cases. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in several cancer cell lines. The...

  12. BM-26CD15 AND E-SELECTIN MEDIATION OF ADHESION OF NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER CELLS TO BRAIN ENDOTHELIUM IN LUNG-BRAIN METASTASIS

    OpenAIRE

    Pilkington, Geoffrey; Jassam, Samah; Maherally, Zaynah; Smith, James; Fillmore, Helen

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lung metastases to the brain are common secondary cancers, representing over 50% of fatal complications of systemic cancer. Metastasis of cancer cells involves multiple steps including intravasation, cancer cell-endothelial rolling and adhesion, extravasation and cerebral colonization. Here, we focused on metastatic Non-Small Cell lung cancer cells adhesion to brain endothelial cells. Specifically, we investigated the role of CD15 in lung cancer and its interaction with E-selectin...

  13. What Is Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may spread ... lung cancer. For more information, visit the National Cancer Institute’s Lung Cancer. Previous Basic Information Basic Information Basic Information ...

  14. EF5 and Motexafin Lutetium in Detecting Tumor Cells in Patients With Abdominal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Localized Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Localized Gallbladder Cancer; Localized Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage 0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Gastric Cancer; Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Colon Cancer; Stage II Gastric Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Rectal Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage

  15. Clinical applications of circulating tumor cells in lung cancer patients by CellSearch system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnaTruini

    2014-09-01

    In the present review the significance of CTC detection in lung cancer is examined through the analysis of the published studies in both non-small cell and small cell lung cancers; additionally the prognostic and the clinical role of CTC enumeration in treatment monitoring will be reported and discussed.

  16. Pulmonary Embolism as the Initial Manifestation of Large Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jin Kook; Lee, Sang Moo; Kim, Hyeon Tae; Uh, Sootaek; Chung, Yeontae; Kim, Yong Hoon; Park, Choonsik; Jin, So Young; Lee, Dong Hwa

    1992-01-01

    Lung cancer is known as a risk factor of pulmonary embolism. We experienced a case of pulmonary embolism combined with pleural effusion and pleuritic chest pain as the initial manifestation of large cell lung cancer, which is a relatively rare cell type of lung cancer in Korea. We report it with a review of the literature.

  17. Lung Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease in ...

  18. Advances in Immunotherapies for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan HE

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Globally, Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death of high morbidity and mortality with poor prognosis, which needs some more effective and less toxic therapies. The immunotherapies offer a novel approach for the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in both the adjuvant and palliative disease settings. A number of promising immunotherapies based on different mechanism have now been evaluated showing an increasing response rate. Moreover, further phase II/III clinical trials will be indicated to explore its value. These include checkpoint inhibitors (anti-CTLA4 antibody, anti-PD-1 antibody, anti-PD-L1 antibody, active vaccination (L-BLP25 liposome vaccine, Belagenpumatucel-L vaccine, MAGE-A3 protein vaccine and adoptive vaccination (CIK cells. The purpose of this paper will draw a summary on the theory, clinical trials, toxicity and problems to be solved of the immunotherapies in NSCLC.

  19. Treatment Advances in Locally Advanced and Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Surmont, Veerle

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States and Europe. Approximately 85% of the patients with lung cancer have non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which can be classified into squamous, adeno, large cell and not otherwise specified (NOS) histologies. The most common histologies are: adenocarcinoma ( 50%), squamous cell ( 20%), and large cell ( 10%). More than two third of the patients have locally advanced or metastatic disease at the time of diagnos...

  20. Comparison of Two Therapeutic Strategies in Patients With Non-squamous Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) With Asymptomatic Brain Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-29

    Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Metastatic; Non Epidermoid; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Adenocarcinoma of Lung Metastatic to Brain; Cerebral Metastases; Cerebral Radiotherapy; Brain Radiotherapy; Bevacizumab

  1. The increasing role of amphiregulin in non-small cell lung cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Busser, Benoît; Coll, Jean-Luc; Hurbin, Amandine

    2009-01-01

    International audience Non-small cell lung cancers present a 5-year survival rate below 12%. Such a poor prognosis may be explained by non small cell lung cancer cells evasion to apoptosis and resistance to treatments. Amphiregulin, an epidermal growth factor-related growth factor is secreted by non-small cell lung cancer cells in an autocrine/paracrine manner to promote autonomous growth of tumor cells and to provide resistance to apoptosis. Furthermore, amphiregulin is involved in non-sm...

  2. How do patient and hospital features influence outcomes in small-cell lung cancer in England?

    OpenAIRE

    Rich, A L; Tata, L J; Free, C M; Stanley, R. A.; Peake, M D; Baldwin, D. R.; Hubbard , R B

    2011-01-01

    Background: Our aim was to systematically determine how features of patients and hospitals influence access to chemotherapy and survival for people with small-cell lung cancer in England. Methods: We linked the National Lung Cancer Audit and Hospital Episode Statistics and used multiple logistic and Cox regression analyses to assess the influence of patient and hospital features on small-cell lung cancer outcomes. Results: There were 7845 patients with histologically proven small-cell lung ca...

  3. Inhibitory effect of Disulfiram/copper complex on non-small cell lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Lincan [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Shen, Hongmei [Cancer Center of Integrative Medicine, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Zhao, Guangqiang [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Yang, Runxiang [Cancer Chemotherapy Center, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Cai, Xinyi [Colorectal Cancer Center, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Zhang, Lijuan [Department of Pathology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Jin, Congguo [Cancer Institute, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China); Huang, Yunchao, E-mail: daliduanlincan@163.com [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming (China)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Disulfiram and copper synergistically inhibit lung cancer cell proliferation. • Lung cancer cell colony formation ability is inhibited by Disulfiram/copper. • Disulfiram/copper increases the sensitivity of cisplatin to lung cancer cells. • Lung cancer stem cells are specifically targeted by Disulfiram/copper complex. - Abstract: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women worldwide. Recently, Disulfiram has been reported to be able to inhibit glioblastoma, prostate, or breast cancer cell proliferation. In this study, the synergistic effect of Disulfiram and copper on NSCLC cell growth was investigated. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation was detected by 1-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT) assay and cell cycle analysis. Liquid colony formation and tumor spheroid formation assays were used to evaluate their effect on cancer cell clonogenicity. Real-time PCR was performed to test the mRNA level of cancer stem cell related genes. We found that Disulfiram or copper alone did not potently inhibit NSCLC cell proliferation in vitro. However, the presence of copper significantly enhanced inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell growth, indicating a synergistic effect between Disulfiram and copper. Cell cycle analysis showed that Disulfiram/copper complex caused NSCLC cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Furthermore, Disulfiram/copper significantly increased the sensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cells tested by MTT assay. Liquid colony formation assay revealed that copper dramatically increased the inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell colony forming ability. Disulfiram combined with copper significantly attenuated NSCLC cell spheroid formation and recuded the mRNA expression of lung cancer stem cell related genes. Our data suggest that Disulfiram/copper complex alone or combined with other chemotherapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients.

  4. Inhibitory effect of Disulfiram/copper complex on non-small cell lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Disulfiram and copper synergistically inhibit lung cancer cell proliferation. • Lung cancer cell colony formation ability is inhibited by Disulfiram/copper. • Disulfiram/copper increases the sensitivity of cisplatin to lung cancer cells. • Lung cancer stem cells are specifically targeted by Disulfiram/copper complex. - Abstract: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women worldwide. Recently, Disulfiram has been reported to be able to inhibit glioblastoma, prostate, or breast cancer cell proliferation. In this study, the synergistic effect of Disulfiram and copper on NSCLC cell growth was investigated. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation was detected by 1-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT) assay and cell cycle analysis. Liquid colony formation and tumor spheroid formation assays were used to evaluate their effect on cancer cell clonogenicity. Real-time PCR was performed to test the mRNA level of cancer stem cell related genes. We found that Disulfiram or copper alone did not potently inhibit NSCLC cell proliferation in vitro. However, the presence of copper significantly enhanced inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell growth, indicating a synergistic effect between Disulfiram and copper. Cell cycle analysis showed that Disulfiram/copper complex caused NSCLC cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Furthermore, Disulfiram/copper significantly increased the sensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cells tested by MTT assay. Liquid colony formation assay revealed that copper dramatically increased the inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell colony forming ability. Disulfiram combined with copper significantly attenuated NSCLC cell spheroid formation and recuded the mRNA expression of lung cancer stem cell related genes. Our data suggest that Disulfiram/copper complex alone or combined with other chemotherapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients

  5. Gigantol Suppresses Cancer Stem Cell-Like Phenotypes in Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narumol Bhummaphan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As cancer stem cells (CSCs contribute to malignancy, metastasis, and relapse of cancers, potential of compound in inhibition of CSCs has garnered most attention in the cancer research as well as drug development fields recently. Herein, we have demonstrated for the first time that gigantol, a pure compound isolated from Dendrobium draconis, dramatically suppressed stem-like phenotypes of human lung cancer cells. Gigantol at nontoxic concentrations significantly reduced anchorage-independent growth and survival of the cancer cells. Importantly, gigantol significantly reduced the ability of the cancer cells to form tumor spheroids, a critical hallmark of CSCs. Concomitantly, the treatment of the compound was shown to reduce well-known lung CSCs markers, including CD133 and ALDH1A1. Moreover, we revealed that gigantol decreased stemness in the cancer cells by suppressing the activation of protein kinase B (Akt signal which in turn decreased the cellular levels of pluripotency and self-renewal factors Oct4 and Nanog. In conclusion, gigantol possesses CSCs suppressing activity which may facilitate the development of this compound for therapeutic approaches by targeting CSCs.

  6. Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease in ...

  7. Sex-differences in lung cancer cell-types? An epidemiologic study in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Clancy, Luke; Kabir, Zubair; Connolly, Gregrory N.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study assesses the epidemiological pattern of lung cancer cell-types in Ireland, with identification of any underlying gender variations. Methods: Lung cancer incidence data, including the major cell-types: squamous-cell-carcinoma (SCC), adenocarcinoma (AC), small-cell-lung-carcinoma (SCLC) and large-cell-carcinoma (LCC) were obtained from the national cancer registry (1994–2000), together with individual characteristics, such as age, gender, smoking status, and the year of di...

  8. Economics of Treatments for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Christos Chouaid; Kukovi Atsou; Gilles Hejblum; Alain Vergnenegre

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the economics of treatments for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We systematically analysed the cost effectiveness of treatments for the different stages of NSCLC, with particular emphasis on more recently approved agents. Numerous economic analyses in NSCLC have been conducted, with a variety of methods and in a number of countries. In patients with localized disease, adjuvant chemotherapy appears to have greater cost effectiveness than observation...

  9. An IMRT/VMAT Technique for Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nan Zhao; Ruijie Yang; Junjie Wang; Xile Zhang; Jinna Li

    2015-01-01

    The study is to investigate a Hybrid IMRT/VMAT technique which combines intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two partial arcs VMAT, 5-field IMRT, and hybrid plans were created for 15 patients with NSCLC. The hybrid plans were combination of 2 partial arcs VMAT and 5-field IMRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) for hybrid technique was compa...

  10. Staging and imaging of small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kalemkerian, Gregory P.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has been primarily classified as limited or extensive, with limited stage confined to the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes. In the future, the TNM staging system should be integrated into the classification of SCLC. The appropriate staging work-up for patients with SCLC has traditionally included contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest and abdomen, bone scan, and magnetic resonance imaging or CT scan of the brain. Recent data ...

  11. Kinome sequencing reveals RET G691S polymorphism in human neuroendocrine lung cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Sosonkina, Nadiya; HONG, SEUNG-KEUN; Starenki, Dmytro; Park, Jong-In

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) lung tumors comprise 20–25% of all invasive lung malignancies. Currently, no effective treatments are available to cure these tumors, and it is necessary to identify a molecular alteration(s) that characterizes NE lung tumor cells. We aimed to identify a kinase mutation(s) associated with NE lung tumor by screening 517 kinase-encoding genes in human lung cancer cell lines. Our next-generation sequencing analysis of six NE lung tumor cell lines (four small cell lung cancer ...

  12. Effects of Src on Proliferation and Invasion of Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    ZHENG, Rui; Qin, Xiaosong; Li, Wenjie; Kang, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Background and objective It has been proven that Src played pivotal roles in carcinogenesis, cancer progression and metastasis. The aim of this study is to explore the roles of Src phosphorylation on lung cancer cells. Methods Western blot and immunoprecipitation was used to detect the expression and phosphorylation of Src in lung cancer cells. MTT and Boyden chamber assay was used to examine the effects of inhibition of Src phosphorylation on proliferation and invasion of lung cancer cells i...

  13. Non-small cell lung cancer staging: proposed revisions to the TNM system

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Bryan J.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) require careful staging at the time of diagnosis to determine prognosis and guide treatment recommendations. The seventh edition of the TNM Classification of Malignant Tumors is scheduled to be published in 2009 and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) created the Lung Cancer Staging Project (LCSP) to guide revisions to the current lung cancer staging system. These recommendations will be submitted to the ...

  14. Lichen Secondary Metabolite, Physciosporin, Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Park, So-Yeon; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Yu, Young Hyun; Nguyen, Tru Van; Sun, Eun Gene; Udeni, Jayalal; Jeong, Min-Hye; Pereira, Iris; Moon, Cheol; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2015-01-01

    Lichens produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. To screen for novel lichen secondary metabolites showing inhibitory activity against lung cancer cell motility, we tested acetone extracts of 13 lichen samples collected in Chile. Physciosporin, isolated from Pseudocyphellaria coriacea (Hook f. & Taylor) D.J. Galloway & P. James, was identified as an effective compound and showed significant inhibitory activity in migration and invasion assays against human lung cancer cells. Physciosporin treatment reduced both protein and mRNA levels of N-cadherin with concomitant decreases in the levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers such as snail and twist. Physciosporin also suppressed KITENIN (KAI1 C-terminal interacting tetraspanin)-mediated AP-1 activity in both the absence and presence of epidermal growth factor stimulation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of the metastasis suppressor gene, KAI1, was increased while that of the metastasis enhancer gene, KITENIN, was dramatically decreased by physciosporin. Particularly, the activity of 3'-untranslated region of KITENIN was decreased by physciosporin. Moreover, Cdc42 and Rac1 activities were decreased by physciosporin. These results demonstrated that the lichen secondary metabolite, physciosporin, inhibits lung cancer cell motility through novel mechanisms of action. PMID:26371759

  15. Lichen Secondary Metabolite, Physciosporin, Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yang

    Full Text Available Lichens produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. To screen for novel lichen secondary metabolites showing inhibitory activity against lung cancer cell motility, we tested acetone extracts of 13 lichen samples collected in Chile. Physciosporin, isolated from Pseudocyphellaria coriacea (Hook f. & Taylor D.J. Galloway & P. James, was identified as an effective compound and showed significant inhibitory activity in migration and invasion assays against human lung cancer cells. Physciosporin treatment reduced both protein and mRNA levels of N-cadherin with concomitant decreases in the levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers such as snail and twist. Physciosporin also suppressed KITENIN (KAI1 C-terminal interacting tetraspanin-mediated AP-1 activity in both the absence and presence of epidermal growth factor stimulation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of the metastasis suppressor gene, KAI1, was increased while that of the metastasis enhancer gene, KITENIN, was dramatically decreased by physciosporin. Particularly, the activity of 3'-untranslated region of KITENIN was decreased by physciosporin. Moreover, Cdc42 and Rac1 activities were decreased by physciosporin. These results demonstrated that the lichen secondary metabolite, physciosporin, inhibits lung cancer cell motility through novel mechanisms of action.

  16. Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy With or Without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-29

    Adenosquamous Lung Carcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  17. Noncoding RNA small nucleolar RNA host gene 1 promote cell proliferation in nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J You

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC is the major cause of cancer death worldwide. Increasing evidence shows that noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs are widely involved in the development and progression of NSCLC. ncRNA small nucleolar RNA host gene 1 (SNHG1 has not been studied in cancer, especially its role in lung cancer remains unknown. Our studies were designed to investigate the expression and biological significance of SNHG1 in lung cancer. SNHG1 may be a novel ncRNA in early diagnosis in lung cancer. Methods: Noncoding RNA SNHG1 expression in 7 lung cancer cell lines was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. RNA interference approaches were used to find the biological functions of SNHG1. The effect of SNHG1 on proliferation was evaluated by cell count and crystal violet stains. Results: Noncoding RNA SNHG1 expression was significantly upregulated in lung cancer cells when compared with normal bronchial epithelial cells. In addition, in vitro assays our results indicated that knockdown of SNHG1 inhibited cell proliferation. Conclusions: Our data indicated that ncRNA SNHG1 is significantly upregulated in NSCLC cell lines and may represent a new biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for NSCLC intervention.

  18. Comprehensive genomic profiles of small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    George, J.; Lim, J; JANG, S.; Cun, Y.; Ozretic, L.; Kong, G.; Leenders, F.; Lu, X.; Fernandez-Cuesta, L.; Bosco, G.; Müller, C.(Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Sternwartstr. 7, 96049 , Bamberg, Germany); Dahmen, I.; Jahchan, N.; K. Park; D. Yang

    2015-01-01

    We have sequenced the genomes of 110 small cell lung cancers (SCLC), one of the deadliest human cancers. In nearly all the tumours analysed we found bi-allelic inactivation of TP53 and RB1, sometimes by complex genomic rearrangements. Two tumours with wild-type RB1 had evidence of chromothripsis leading to overexpression of cyclin D1 (encoded by the CCND1 gene), revealing an alternative mechanism of Rb1 deregulation. Thus, loss of the tumour suppressors TP53 and RB1 is obligatory in SCLC. We ...

  19. Lung Cancer Screening and clinical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. van 't Westeinde (Susan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the most frequently diagnosed major cancer worldwide and the leading cause of death from cancer. Lung cancer is divided into two subgroups: small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), accounting for 10-20% and 75% of lung cancer cases, respectivel

  20. AUTOPHAGY IN LUNG CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    Jaboin, Jerry J.; Hwang, Misun; Lu, Bo

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The relatively poor cure rate in lung cancer patients has been associated with a resistance to chemotherapy and radiation that is at least in part related to defects in cellular apoptotic machinery. Exploitation of another form of cell death, autophagy, has the capacity to improve the therapeutic gain of current therapies. In an effort to develop novel treatment strategies to enhance the therapeutic ratio for lung cancer, we...

  1. Differential expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α in non-small cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Karetsi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and vascular endothelial growth factor in small cell lung cancer and subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer and examine their relationships with clinicopathologic factors, response to treatment and survival. METHODS: We examined samples obtained by bronchial endoscopic biopsy from 55 patients with inoperable lung cancer (16 with adenocarcinoma, 17 with squamous cell carcinoma, and 22 with small cell lung cancer. Hypoxiainducible factor 1α and vascular endothelial growth factor were detected using immunohistochemistry. The diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients were conducted according to the standard practice. RESULTS: A significant difference (p=0.022 in hypoxia-inducible factor 1α expression was observed between nonsmall cell lung cancer (75.8% positive and small cell lung cancer (45.5% positive. The frequency of hypoxiainducible factor 1α nuclear expression was 88.2% in squamous cell carcinoma, 62.5% in adenocarcinoma, and 45.5% in small cell lung cancer. A significant correlation was observed between hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and vascular endothelial growth factor expression (Fisher's exact test, p=0.001 when all types of lung cancer were examined, either collectively or separately. CONCLUSIONS: The expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α differs significantly between subtypes of lung cancer. These findings could help elucidate the biology of the different types of non-operable lung carcinomas and have implications for the design of new therapeutic approaches for lung cancer.

  2. Surgical management of non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamousa Ahmed

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Surgery plays a major role in the management of patients with lung cancer. Surgery is not only the main curative treatment modality in patients with early-stage lung cancer but it also has a significant role in the initial workup for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. This article describes the surgical management of patients with lung cancer. Surgical resection for lung cancer is still regarded as the most effective method for controlling the primary tumor, provided it is resectable for cure and the risks of the procedure are low. The 5-year survival rare following complete resection (R0 of a lung cancer is stage dependent [Table 1]. [1-3] Incomplete resection (R1, R2 rarely, if ever, cures the patient.

  3. Lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There will be over 160,000 cases of lung cancer diagnosed in the US in 1991, and deaths from this disease account for a quarter of all cancer deaths in this country. The incidence of lung cancer has continued to increase, especially among women. With 31% of American men and 25% of American women identified in the 1985 census as cigarette smokers, it is likely that this trend will continue well into the next century. Unfortunately, the majority of patients present with locally advanced tumors or distant metastatic disease. Presently, most patients with lung cancer will receive radiation therapy either in an attempt to control inoperable or locally advanced disease, or for palliation of symptomatic intrathoracic or metastatic disease. Because of the poor prognosis of all patients excepting those with early stage resectable lesions, lung cancer is appropriately the subject of intense clinical investigation and controversy throughout the world

  4. Wnt/β-catenin signaling regulates cancer stem cells in lung cancer A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays an important role not only in cancer, but also in cancer stem cells. In this study, we found that β-catenin and OCT-4 was highly expressed in cisplatin (DDP) selected A549 cells. Stimulating A549 cells with lithium chloride (LiCl) resulted in accumulation of β-catenin and up-regulation of a typical Wnt target gene cyclin D1. This stimulation also significantly enhanced proliferation, clone formation, migration and drug resistance abilities in A549 cells. Moreover, the up-regulation of OCT-4, a stem cell marker, was observed through real-time PCR and Western blotting. In a reverse approach, we inhibited Wnt signaling by knocking down the expression of β-catenin using RNA interference technology. This inhibition resulted in down-regulation of the Wnt target gene cyclin D1 as well as the proliferation, clone formation, migration and drug resistance abilities. Meanwhile, the expression of OCT-4 was reduced after the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Taken together, our study provides strong evidence that canonical Wnt signaling plays an important role in lung cancer stem cell properties, and it also regulates OCT-4, a lung cancer stem cell marker.

  5. Systemic Chemotherapy for Progression of Brain Metastases in Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagla Abdel Karim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related mortality in men and women. Approximately 15% of lung cancers are small cell type. Chemotherapy and radiation are the mainstay treatments. Currently, the standard chemotherapy regimen includes platinum/etoposide. For extensive small cell lung cancer, irinotecan and cisplatin have also been used. Patients with relapsed small cell lung cancer have a very poor prognosis, and the morbidity increases with brain metastases. Approximately 10%–14% of small cell lung cancer patients exhibit brain metastases at the time of diagnosis, which increases to 50%–80% as the disease progresses. Mean survival with brain metastases is reported to be less than six months, thus calling for improved regimens. Here we present a case series of patients treated with irinotecan for progressive brain metastases in small cell lung cancer, which serves as a reminder of the role of systemic chemotherapy in this setting.

  6. The Utilization and Limitation of CD133 Epitopes in Lung Cancer Stem Cells Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin CHEN

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the most common tumor, which lacks of effective clinical treatment to lead to desirable prognosis. According to cancer stem cell hypothesis, lung cancer stem cells are considered to be responsible for carcinogenesis, development, metastasis, recurrence, invasion, resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy of lung cancer. In recent years, more and more institutes used glycosylated CD133 epitopes to define, isolate, purify lung cancer stem cells. However, along with deeply research, the application of CD133 epitopes in lung cancer stem cell research is questioned. The utilization and limitation of CD133 epitopes in lung cancer stem cells research for the past few years is summaried in this review.

  7. Mediastinal Staging in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamliel, Ziv

    2016-07-01

    In the absence of distant metastases, lung cancer treatment is determined by the results of mediastinal lymph node staging. Occult mediastinal lymph node metastases can be missed by radiologic and needle-based staging methods. Aggressive staging of mediastinal lymph nodes improves staging accuracy. Improved accuracy of mediastinal lymph node staging results in more appropriate lung cancer treatment. Improved accuracy of mediastinal lymph node staging can improve stage-specific survival from lung cancer. PMID:27261911

  8. EPS8 inhibition increases cisplatin sensitivity in lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija K Gorsic

    Full Text Available Cisplatin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic, is associated with ototoxicity, renal toxicity and neurotoxicity, thus identifying means to increase the therapeutic index of cisplatin may allow for improved outcomes. A SNP (rs4343077 within EPS8, discovered through a genome wide association study of cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs, provided impetus to further study this gene. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the role of EPS8 in cellular susceptibility to cisplatin in cancerous and non-cancerous cells. We used EPS8 RNA interference to determine the effect of decreased EPS8 expression on LCL and A549 lung cancer cell sensitivity to cisplatin. EPS8 knockdown in LCLs resulted in a 7.9% increase in cisplatin-induced survival (P = 1.98 × 10(-7 and an 8.7% decrease in apoptosis (P = 0.004 compared to control. In contrast, reduced EPS8 expression in lung cancer cells resulted in a 20.6% decrease in cisplatin-induced survival (P = 5.08 × 10(-5. We then investigated an EPS8 inhibitor, mithramycin A, as a potential agent to increase the therapeutic index of cisplatin. Mithramycin A decreased EPS8 expression in LCLs resulting in decreased cellular sensitivity to cisplatin as evidenced by lower caspase 3/7 activation following cisplatin treatment (42.7% ± 6.8% relative to control P = 0.0002. In 5 non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC cell lines, mithramycin A also resulted in decreased EPS8 expression. Adding mithramycin to 4 NSCLC cell lines and a bladder cancer cell line, resulted in increased sensitivity to cisplatin that was significantly more pronounced in tumor cell lines than in LCL lines (p<0.0001. An EGFR mutant NSCLC cell line (H1975 showed no significant change in sensitivity to cisplatin with the addition of mithramycin treatment. Therefore, an inhibitor of EPS8, such as mithramycin A, could improve cisplatin treatment by increasing sensitivity of tumor relative to normal cells.

  9. Safety and Efficacy of Vinorelbine in the Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Faller, Bryan A; Pandit, Trailokya N.

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the most frequently diagnosed cancer in the United States, excluding non-melanoma skin cancer. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) constitutes the majority (more than 80%) of lung cancer diagnoses. Systemic therapy, with either cytotoxic chemotherapy and/or targeted therapies, has been established to provide benefit to patients with NSCLC in both the adjuvant and advanced disease settings. Vinorelbine, a semi-synthetic vinca-alkaloid has been extensively tested alone and in...

  10. Induction of apoptosis in lung cancer cells by isorhamnetin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LingZHU; Li-mingZHOU; Chun-leiYANG; Zun-zhenZHANG; JingXIAO; Zheng-rongWANG

    2005-01-01

    AIM The aim of the present study was to explore cytotoxic activity and the mechanism of tumor cell killing by isorhamnetin and to investigate the effect of isorhamnetin on tumor growth, cell prolification and apoptosis in transplantation tumor of lung cancer of Lewis cell line in C57BL/6 mice. METHODS Human A549 cells were treated with 10-320(g/ml isorhamnetin, C57BL/6 mice were subcutaneously inoculated Lewis cells 0.2ml/each (1×107cells/ml) below the right forelimb armpit and were treated with 50 (g/ml isorhamnetin isorhamnetin.The results were observed and analyzed under light-microscope, electronic microscopy, growth inhibition was analyzed by MTT, clonogenic asssays and growth curve;the apoptosis and the expression-associated genes peaks were detected with flow cytometry (FCM), DNA fragmentation, single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay,

  11. Opioid and nicotine receptors affect growth regulation of human lung cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using specific radioactively-labeled ligands, the authors find that lung cancer cell lines of diverse histologic types express multiple, high-affinity membrane receptors for μ, δ, and κ opioid agonists and for nicotine and α-bungarotoxin. These receptors are biologically active because cAMP levels decreased in lung cancer cells after opioid and nicotine application. Nicotine at concentrations found in the blood of smokers had no effect on in vitro lung cancer cell growth, whereas μ, δ, and κ opioid agonists at low concentrations inhibited lung cancer growth in vitro. They also found that lung cancer cells expressed various combinations of immunoreactive opioid peptides (β-endorphin, enkephalin, or dynorphin), suggesting the participation of opioids in a negative autocrine loop or tumor-suppressing system. Due to the almost universal exposure of patients with lung cancer to nicotine, they tested whether nicotine affected the response of lung cancer cell growth to opioids and found that nicotine at concentrations of 100-200 nM partially or totally reversed opioid-induced growth inhibition in 9/14 lung cancer cell lines. These in vitro results for lung cancer cells suggest that opioids could function as part of a tumor suppressor system and that nicotine can function to circumvent this system in the pathogenesis of lung cancer

  12. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.;

    2009-01-01

    DNA into malignant cells causing them to die. Since SCLC is a highly disseminated malignancy, the gene therapeutic agent must be administered systemically, obligating a high level of targeting of tumor tissue and the use of delivery vehicles designed for systemic circulation of the therapeutic DNA......Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous...

  13. Effects of Src on Proliferation and Invasion of Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui ZHENG

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that Src played pivotal roles in carcinogenesis, cancer progression and metastasis. The aim of this study is to explore the roles of Src phosphorylation on lung cancer cells. Methods Western blot and immunoprecipitation was used to detect the expression and phosphorylation of Src in lung cancer cells. MTT and Boyden chamber assay was used to examine the effects of inhibition of Src phosphorylation on proliferation and invasion of lung cancer cells in vitro, respectively. Results pp60src was expressed in all lung cancer cell lines in this study. All 5 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell lines had increased autophosphorylated tyrosine-418, while nearly no phosphorylated Src in small cell lung cancer SBC5 cell line was detected. The effect of inhibition of Src tyrosine kinase on cell proliferation varied among the lung cancer cell lines. Submicromolar Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor (≤1 μM remarkably suppressed the proliferation of PC-9 and A549 cells in a dose dependent manner (P < 0.05, while the same concentration of Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor had no significant effect on proliferation of H226, PC14PE6 and RERFLCOK cells. Invasiveness of lung cancer cells was significantly suppressed by Src tyrosine kinase in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05. Conclusion Phosphorylation of Src, but not over-expression, plays a pivotal role in proliferation and invasion of NSCLC cell lines in vitro.

  14. Lung cancer-associated tumor antigens and the present status of immunotherapy against non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite recent advances in surgery, irradiation, and chemotherapy, the prognosis of patients with lung cancer is still poor. Therefore, the development and application of new therapeutic strategies are essential for improving the prognosis of this disease. Significant progress in our understanding of tumor immunology and molecular biology has allowed us to identify the tumor-associated antigens recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Immune responses and tumor-associated antigens against not only malignant melanoma but also lung cancer have been elucidated at the molecular level. In a theoretical sense, tumor eradication is considered possible through antigen-based immunotherapy against such diseases. However, many clinical trials of cancer vaccination with defined tumor antigens have resulted in objective clinical responses in only a small number of patients. Tumor escape mechanisms from host immune surveillance remain a major obstacle for cancer immunotherapy. A better understanding of the immune escape mechanisms employed by tumor cells is necessary before we can develop a more effective immunotherapeutic approach to lung cancer. We review recent studies regarding the identification of tumor antigens in lung cancer, tumor immune escape mechanisms, and clinical vaccine trials in lung cancer. (author)

  15. HOXA11 hypermethylation is associated with progression of non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Jung-Ah; Lee, Bo Bin; Kim, Yujin; Park, Seong-Eun; Heo, Kyun; Hong, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Young-Ho; Han, Joungho; Shim, Young Mog; Lee, Yeon-Su; Kim, Duk-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed at understanding the functional significance of HOXA11 hypermethylation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). HOXA11 hypermethylation was characterized in six lung cancer cell lines, and its clinical significance was analyzed using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from 317 NSCLC patients, and Ki-67 expression was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The promoter region of HOXA11 was highly methylated in six lung cancer cell lines, but not in normal bronchial epit...

  16. Surgical Treatment for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients with Synchronous Solitary Brain Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Hao; Han, Baohui

    2013-01-01

    Background and objective Brain metastases are common in non-small cell lung cancer. Usual treatments include radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, these methods result in poor patient prognosis. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of surgical resection in the multimodality management of non-small cell lung cancer patients with synchronous solitary brain metastasis. Methods The clinical data of 46 non-small cell lung cancer patients with synchronous solitary brain metastasis...

  17. Advances of Immunotherapy in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing LIU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Small cell lung cancer (SCLC is complex heterogeneous due to unclear biological characteristics in terms of cell origin, pathogenesis and driver genes etc. Diagnosis and treatment of SCLC has been slowly improved and few breakthroughs have been discovered up to now. Therefore new strategies are urgently needed to improve the efficacy of SCLC treatment. Tumor immunotherapy has potential to restore and trigger the immune system to recognize and eliminate tumor cells, notably it has only minimal adverse impact on normal tissue. Cancer vaccine, adoptive immunotherapy, cytokines and checkpoint inhibitors have now been launched for clinical treatment of SCLC. Ipilimumab is the most promising medicine of immunotherapy. Immunotherapy is expected to bring new vision to the treatment of SCLC. And further researches are needed on such problems affecting efficacy of immunotherapy as the heterogeneity of SCLC, the uncertainty of target for immunotherapy, the immune tolerance, etc.

  18. Recent advances in the treatment of non-small cell and small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent presentations at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting from 30 May to 3 June, 2014, will impact routine clinical care and the development of clinical trials in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and extensive stage small cell lung cancer (ES-SCLC). Patients with activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, defined as exon 19 and exon 21 L858R point mutations, experience a high objective response rate and prolonged progression-free survival with EGFR ...

  19. The role of stem cells in airway repair: implications for the origins of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mulvihill, Michael S.; Kratz, Johannes R.; Patrick Pham; Jablons, David M.; Biao He

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Recently, advancements in our ability to identify and study stem cell populations in the lung have helped researchers to elucidate the central role that cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis. Much of this research has focused on the use of the airway repair model to study response to injury. In this review, we discuss the primary evidence of the role that cancer stem cells play in lung cancer de...

  20. The Research Progress about Wnt Pathway of Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojiang LI

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Being the most critical signaling molecule in the Wnt pathway, the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays an important role in the maintenance of the cell proliferation and clone formation of lung cancer stem cells. Since it is closely related to the WNT pathway, the proliferation of lung cancer stem cells can be restrained by blocking the WNT pathway or influencing its key protein. Such method provides a new method for the treatment of lung cancer. By summarizing the state of-the-art research of lung cancer stem cells and the Wnt pathway from 2005 to 2010, their relationship is investigated.

  1. SAMHD1 is down regulated in lung cancer by methylation and inhibits tumor cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • SAMHD1 expression level is down regulated in lung adenocarcinoma. • The promoter of SAMHD1 is methylated in lung adenocarcinoma. • Over expression of SAMHD1 inhibits the proliferation of lung cancer cells. - Abstract: The function of dNTP hydrolase SAMHD1 as a viral restriction factor to inhibit the replication of several viruses in human immune cells was well established. However, its regulation and function in lung cancer have been elusive. Here, we report that SAMHD1 is down regulated both on protein and mRNA levels in lung adenocarcinoma compared to adjacent normal tissue. We also found that SAMHD1 promoter is highly methylated in lung adenocarcinoma, which may inhibit its gene expression. Furthermore, over expression of the SAMHD1 reduces dNTP level and inhibits the proliferation of lung tumor cells. These results reveal the regulation and function of SAMHD1 in lung cancer, which is important for the proliferation of lung tumor cells

  2. SAMHD1 is down regulated in lung cancer by methylation and inhibits tumor cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jia-lei [Department of Medical Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032 (China); Lu, Fan-zhen [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Shen, Xiao-Yong, E-mail: shengxiaoyong_sh@163.com [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Wu, Yun, E-mail: WuYun_hd@163.com [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Zhao, Li-ting [Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China)

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • SAMHD1 expression level is down regulated in lung adenocarcinoma. • The promoter of SAMHD1 is methylated in lung adenocarcinoma. • Over expression of SAMHD1 inhibits the proliferation of lung cancer cells. - Abstract: The function of dNTP hydrolase SAMHD1 as a viral restriction factor to inhibit the replication of several viruses in human immune cells was well established. However, its regulation and function in lung cancer have been elusive. Here, we report that SAMHD1 is down regulated both on protein and mRNA levels in lung adenocarcinoma compared to adjacent normal tissue. We also found that SAMHD1 promoter is highly methylated in lung adenocarcinoma, which may inhibit its gene expression. Furthermore, over expression of the SAMHD1 reduces dNTP level and inhibits the proliferation of lung tumor cells. These results reveal the regulation and function of SAMHD1 in lung cancer, which is important for the proliferation of lung tumor cells.

  3. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary, Pancreatic, Urothelial, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  4. S100A4 is frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cells and promotes cell growth and cell motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We observed frequent overexpression of S100A4 in lung cancer cell lines. • Knockdown of S100A4 suppressed proliferation in lung cancer cells. • Forced expression of S100A4 accelerated cell motility in lung cancer cells. • PRDM2 was found to be one of the downstream suppressed genes of S100A4. - Abstract: S100A4, a small calcium-binding protein belonging to the S100 protein family, is commonly overexpressed in a variety of tumor types and is widely accepted to associate with metastasis by regulating the motility and invasiveness of cancer cells. However, its biological role in lung carcinogenesis is largely unknown. In this study, we found that S100A4 was frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cells, irrespective of histological subtype. Then we performed knockdown and forced expression of S100A4 in lung cancer cell lines and found that specific knockdown of S100A4 effectively suppressed cell proliferation only in lung cancer cells with S100A4-overexpression; forced expression of S100A4 accelerated cell motility only in S100A4 low-expressing lung cancer cells. PRDM2 and VASH1, identified as novel upregulated genes by microarray after specific knockdown of S100A4 in pancreatic cancer, were also analyzed, and we found that PRDM2 was significantly upregulated after S100A4-knockdown in one of two analyzed S100A4-overexpressing lung cancer cells. Our present results suggest that S100A4 plays an important role in lung carcinogenesis by means of cell proliferation and motility by a pathway similar to that in pancreatic cancer

  5. S100A4 is frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cells and promotes cell growth and cell motility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Na; Sato, Daisuke; Saiki, Yuriko; Sunamura, Makoto; Fukushige, Shinichi; Horii, Akira, E-mail: horii@med.tohoku.ac.jp

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • We observed frequent overexpression of S100A4 in lung cancer cell lines. • Knockdown of S100A4 suppressed proliferation in lung cancer cells. • Forced expression of S100A4 accelerated cell motility in lung cancer cells. • PRDM2 was found to be one of the downstream suppressed genes of S100A4. - Abstract: S100A4, a small calcium-binding protein belonging to the S100 protein family, is commonly overexpressed in a variety of tumor types and is widely accepted to associate with metastasis by regulating the motility and invasiveness of cancer cells. However, its biological role in lung carcinogenesis is largely unknown. In this study, we found that S100A4 was frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cells, irrespective of histological subtype. Then we performed knockdown and forced expression of S100A4 in lung cancer cell lines and found that specific knockdown of S100A4 effectively suppressed cell proliferation only in lung cancer cells with S100A4-overexpression; forced expression of S100A4 accelerated cell motility only in S100A4 low-expressing lung cancer cells. PRDM2 and VASH1, identified as novel upregulated genes by microarray after specific knockdown of S100A4 in pancreatic cancer, were also analyzed, and we found that PRDM2 was significantly upregulated after S100A4-knockdown in one of two analyzed S100A4-overexpressing lung cancer cells. Our present results suggest that S100A4 plays an important role in lung carcinogenesis by means of cell proliferation and motility by a pathway similar to that in pancreatic cancer.

  6. Resected small cell lung cancer-time for more?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Alissa S; Zhang, Chi; Ganti, Apar Kishor

    2016-08-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) often presents with either regional or systemic metastases, but approximately 4% of patients present with a solitary pulmonary nodule. Surgical resection can be an option for these patients and is endorsed by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. There are no prospective randomized clinical trials evaluating the role of adjuvant systemic therapy in these resected SCLC patients. A recent National Cancer Database analysis found that the receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy alone [hazard ratio (HR), 0.78; 95% CI, 0.63-0.95] or with brain radiation (HR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.36-0.75) was associated with significantly improved survival as compared to surgery alone. As it is unlikely that a randomized prospective clinical trial addressing this question will be completed, these data should assist with decision making in these patients. PMID:27620199

  7. Lung cancer stem cells and lung cancer%肺癌干细胞与肺癌的发生

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘哲亮; 肖高明; 陈跃军; 吴冠宇

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Lung cancers are highly heterogeneous and resistant to available therapeutic agents, with a five year survival rate of less than 15%. It has been difficult to determine the basis of lung cancer heterogeneity and drug resistance. Cancer stem cellmodel has attracted a significant amount of attention in recent years as a viable explanation for the heterogeneity, drug resistance, dormancy and recurrence and metastasis of various tumors. OBJECTIVE:To summarize the current understanding of lung cancer stem cells, including their histological types and tumor growth areas, and to discusses the prognosis of lung cancer and its relationship with lung cancer stem cells, in an effort to eradicate these cells to combat lung cancer. METHODS:In order to search relevant articles about the lung cancer stem celland its relationship with lung cancer from PubMed and Sciencedirect databases (from 1990 to 2014), a computer-based search was performed, using the key words of“lung cancer, cancer stem cell, lung cancer stem cell, lung cancer occur, tumor heterogeneity, drug resistance, gene mutation, signal pathways”in English. After eliminating literatures which were irrelevant to research purpose or containing a similar content, 48 articles were chosen for further analysis. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:The cancer stem cellmodel has gained considerable support recently in context of lung cancers and stem-like cells that are associated with aggressive cancer behavior, metastatic progression, resistance to therapy and relapse. Since lung cancer stem cells are thought to consist of a heterogeneous population depending on the histology and site of tumors, and multiple signaling pathways might have to be targeted to effectively eliminate lung cancer stem cells for therapeutic benefit. It can be imagined that the multidisciplinary efforts currently under way to characterize and target stem-like cells in lung cancer wil reap significant therapeutic benefits in the future.%背景:肺

  8. Lung cancer stem cells and lung cancer%肺癌干细胞与肺癌的发生

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘哲亮; 肖高明; 陈跃军; 吴冠宇

    2014-01-01

    背景:肺癌具有高度异质性,能够抵抗化疗药物治疗,5年生存率小于15%,目前难以确定肺癌的异质性和耐药性的发病基础。肿瘤干细胞模型近年来吸引了相当多的关注,通过这种模型可以解释各种肿瘤的异质性、耐药性、休眠、复发和转移的机制。目的:通过综述各类肺癌的组织学类型和肿瘤生长部位的特征,概括肺癌干细胞与各种肺癌发生的关系,从而为消灭肺癌干细胞攻克肺癌提供理论依据。方法:以英文检索词为“lung cancer,cancer stem cel ,lung cancer stem cel ,lung cancer occur,tumor heterogeneity, drug resistance,gene mutation,signal pathways”由第一作者检索1990至2014年Sciencedirect/PubMed 数据库,查阅近年肺癌干细胞对肺癌发生的影响的相关文献,最终保留48篇文献。结果与结论:肿瘤干细胞模型近年来吸引了相当多的关注,通过这种模型可以解释各种肿瘤的异质性、耐药性、休眠、复发和转移。肺癌干细胞被认为是一类异质的细胞群,多种信号通路可以有针对性的有效的消除他们,从而有助于增强治疗效果。目前多学科通力合作,正在进行肺癌干细胞表征和靶定,这将给肺癌治疗领域带来显著的治疗受益。%BACKGROUND:Lung cancers are highly heterogeneous and resistant to available therapeutic agents, with a five year survival rate of less than 15%. It has been difficult to determine the basis of lung cancer heterogeneity and drug resistance. Cancer stem cellmodel has attracted a significant amount of attention in recent years as a viable explanation for the heterogeneity, drug resistance, dormancy and recurrence and metastasis of various tumors. OBJECTIVE:To summarize the current understanding of lung cancer stem cells, including their histological types and tumor growth areas, and to discusses the prognosis of lung cancer and its relationship with lung

  9. Inhibition of thromboxane synthase induces lung cancer cell death via increasing the nuclear p27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Kin Chung; Hsin, Michael K.Y.; Chan, Joey S.Y.; Yip, Johnson H.Y.; Li, Mingyue; Leung, Billy C.S. [Department of Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong); Mok, Tony S.K. [Department of Clinical Oncology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong); Warner, Timothy D. [The William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London (United Kingdom); Underwood, Malcolm J. [Department of Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong); Chen, George G., E-mail: gchen@cuhk.edu.hk [Department of Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong)

    2009-10-15

    The role of thromboxane in lung carcinogenesis is not clearly known, though thromboxane B2 (TXB{sub 2}) level is increased and antagonists of thromboxane receptors or TXA2 can induce apoptosis of lung cancer cells. p27, an atypical tumor suppressor, is normally sequestered in the nucleus. The increased nuclear p27 may result in apoptosis of tumor cells. We hypothesize that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induces the death of lung cancer cells and that such inhibition is associated with the nuclear p27 level. Our experiment showed that the inhibition of TXS significantly induced the death or apoptosis in lung cancer cells. The activity of TXS was increased in lung cancer. The nuclear p27 was remarkably reduced in lung cancer tissues. The inhibition of TXS caused the cell death and apoptosis of lung cancer cells, likely via the elevation of the nuclear p27 since the TXS inhibition promoted the nuclear p27 level and the inhibition of p27 by its siRNA recovered the cell death induced by TXS inhibition. Collectively, lung cancer cells produce high levels of TXB{sub 2} but their nuclear p27 is markedly reduced. The inhibition of TXS results in the p27-related induction of cell death in lung cancer cells.

  10. The Possibility of Traditional Chinese Medicine as Maintenance Therapy for Advanced Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer has become the leading cause of cancer deaths, with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounting for around 80% of lung cancer cases. Chemotherapy is the main conventional therapy for advanced NSCLC. However, the disease control achieved with classical chemotherapy in advanced NSCLC is usually restricted to only a few months. Thus, sustaining the therapeutic effect of first-line chemotherapy is an important problem that requires study. Maintenance therapy is given for patients wit...

  11. Significances of RET Fusion Gene in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jingjing; Minghong BI

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, molecular target therapy has become a hot research direction of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment. RET fusion gene with an identifiable clinical pathological features, is present in some subsets of lung cancer, and its treatment is effective by RET inhibitor, suggesting that RET fusion gene may be a new target for individualized treatment to the subgroup of NSCLC. This article reviews the structural characteristics...

  12. Rational use of cetuximab in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Borghaei, Hossein

    2009-01-01

    Charu Aggarwal, Hossein BorghaeiDepartment of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of mortality in the United States. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 85% of all lung cancers. Most NSCLC patients present with loco-regionally advanced or metastatic disease where response rates are low and median overall survival approximates 8 to 10 months. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for NSCLC pati...

  13. Computational discovery of pathway-level genetic vulnerabilities in non-small-cell lung cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel approaches are needed for discovery of targeted therapies for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that are specific to certain patients. Whole genome RNAi screening of lung cancer cell lines provides an ideal source for determining candidate drug targets. Unsupervised learning algorithms uncovered patterns of differential vulnerability across lung cancer cell lines to loss of functionally related genes. Such genetic vulnerabilities represent candidate targets for therapy and are found to be involved in splicing, translation and protein folding.

  14. Promoter Methylation Primarily Occurs in Tumor Cells of Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Wouter K.; Verpooten, Gonda F.; Kramer, Henk; Louwagie, Joost; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The distribution of promoter methylation throughout the lungs of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unknown. In this explorative study, we assessed the methylation status of the promoter region of 11 genes in brush samples of 3 well-defined endobronchial locations in pat

  15. Radio(chemotherapy in locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Glatzer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Definitive radiochemotherapy is the standard treatment for many patients with locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Treatment outcomes have improved over the last decades. Several treatment regimens have been shown effective and safe. This review summarises the results of significant studies between 1996 and 2015 on concomitant and sequential radiochemotherapy regimens and radiation dose per fraction. Beside therapy regimens, optimised radiotherapy planning is indispensable to improve outcome and minimise radiation-induced toxicity. An insight into the rationale of radiotherapy planning for stage III NSCLC is also provided.

  16. Neoadjuvant Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yifan; Jaklitsch, Michael T; Bueno, Raphael

    2016-07-01

    Locally advanced (stage IIIA) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is confined to the chest, but requires more than surgery to maximize cure. Therapy given preoperatively is termed neoadjuvant, whereas postoperative therapy is termed adjuvant. Trimodality therapy (chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery) has become the standard treatment regimen for resectable, locally advanced NSCLC. During the past 2 decades, several prospective, randomized, and nonrandomized studies have explored various regimens for preoperative treatment of NSCLC. The evaluation of potential candidates with NSCLC for neoadjuvant therapy as well as the currently available therapeutic regimens are reviewed. PMID:27261916

  17. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M;

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference, the...

  18. Impacts of Exercise on Prognostic Biomarkers in Lung Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-18

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Healthy, no Evidence of Disease; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  19. An IMRT/VMAT Technique for Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan; Yang, Ruijie; Wang, Junjie; Zhang, Xile; Li, Jinna

    2015-01-01

    The study is to investigate a Hybrid IMRT/VMAT technique which combines intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two partial arcs VMAT, 5-field IMRT, and hybrid plans were created for 15 patients with NSCLC. The hybrid plans were combination of 2 partial arcs VMAT and 5-field IMRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) for hybrid technique was compared with IMRT and VMAT. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. Hybrid technique significantly improved the target conformity and homogeneity compared with IMRT and VMAT. The mean delivery time of IMRT, VMAT, and hybrid plans was 280 s, 114 s, and 327 s, respectively. The mean MUs needed for IMRT, VMAT, and hybrid plans were 933, 512, and 737, respectively. Hybrid technique reduced V5, V10, V30, and MLD of normal lung compared with VMAT and spared the OARs better with fewer MUs with the cost of a little higher V5, V10, and mean lung dose (MLD) of normal lung compared with IMRT. Hybrid IMRT/VMAT can be a viable radiotherapy technique with better plan quality. PMID:26539515

  20. An IMRT/VMAT Technique for Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study is to investigate a Hybrid IMRT/VMAT technique which combines intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT for the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Two partial arcs VMAT, 5-field IMRT, and hybrid plans were created for 15 patients with NSCLC. The hybrid plans were combination of 2 partial arcs VMAT and 5-field IMRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV and organs at risk (OARs for hybrid technique was compared with IMRT and VMAT. The monitor units (MUs and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. Hybrid technique significantly improved the target conformity and homogeneity compared with IMRT and VMAT. The mean delivery time of IMRT, VMAT, and hybrid plans was 280 s, 114 s, and 327 s, respectively. The mean MUs needed for IMRT, VMAT, and hybrid plans were 933, 512, and 737, respectively. Hybrid technique reduced V5, V10, V30, and MLD of normal lung compared with VMAT and spared the OARs better with fewer MUs with the cost of a little higher V5, V10, and mean lung dose (MLD of normal lung compared with IMRT. Hybrid IMRT/VMAT can be a viable radiotherapy technique with better plan quality.

  1. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Person, Rachel J.; Tokar, Erik J.; Xu, Yuanyuan; Orihuela, Ruben; Ngalame, Ntube N. Olive; Waalkes, Michael P., E-mail: waalkes@niehs.nih.gov

    2013-12-01

    Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 μM cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell's ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. - Highlights: • Chronic cadmium exposure induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells. • This provides an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung cell transformation. • This occurred with general and lung specific changes typical for cancer cells. • These findings add insight to the

  2. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 μM cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell's ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. - Highlights: • Chronic cadmium exposure induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells. • This provides an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung cell transformation. • This occurred with general and lung specific changes typical for cancer cells. • These findings add insight to the relationship

  3. Investigational Study of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Lung Cancer Cell Proliferation and Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei LI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC are adult stem cells derived from mesoderm. Evidence has shown that MSC could migrate towards tumor tissue and differentiate into tumor associated fibroblast in tumor microenvironment, which influences tumor growth and metastasis. However, the reports of MSC in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC are few and controversial. The aim of this study is to explore the chemotaxis of MSC towards NSCLC and to test the effects of MSC on the proliferation and invasion ability of NSCLC. Methods Transwell assay was used to test MSC and NSCLC migration and invasion, and Thymidine incorporation assay was adopted to measure NSCLC cells proliferation. The expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6, insulinlike growth factor (IGF-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and dickkopf-related protein 1 (DKK1 of MSCs were determined by real time PCR. A549 lung cancer xenograft animal tumor model was set up to evaluate the MSC effect in vivo. Results Lung cancer cells could attract MSC tropism. MSC conditioned medium favored lung cancer cell proliferation and lung cancer cells stimulated the expression of IL-6, IGF-1, VEGF and DKK1 on MSCs. In vivo animal study showed that the tumor with MSC injection grew much faster compared to control group. Conclusion MSCs could migrate towards NSCLC cells and favor tumor growth. In turn, NSCLC cells could stimulate the overexpression of cytokines on MSCs which are essential for the tumor growth.

  4. Treatment of initially metastatic small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer (LC) is the most common cause of death associated with neoplasms. The incidence of LC in 2007 was 71.3/100,000 men and 18.6/100,000 women in Slovakia. Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) includes 15 - 18% of all cases. The diagnosis of LC is based on patient's history, physical examination, basic laboratory tests, x-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) imaging and histology. The material required for histology can be obtained by means of endoscopy or surgery. Ultrasonography (USG) and/or CT of abdomen is commonly performed as a part of staging process, along with CT or MRI of brain. Bone scan is performed in case of suspicion of bone involvement. According to TNM classification, seventh edition, the same classification can be used for SCLC and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are available for treatment of initially metastatic SCLC. First-line chemotherapy regimen should be based on combination of cisplatin or carboplatin with etoposide (PE). Alternatively, CAV regimen (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine) can be used. Newer regimens did not provide benefit when compared to standard regimens. If progression occurs later than 3 months after finishing first-line chemotherapy, the same regimen may be used in second-line chemotherapy. If progression occurs earlier than 3 months after finishing first-line chemotherapy, topotecan-based regimen is an option for second-line line chemotherapy. Despite promising outcomes of amrubicin-based second-line chemotherapy in Japan, amrubicin is not available in countries of E U. Standard therapy schedules do not include radiotherapy targeted on primary tumor and affected lymph-nodes. According to American and European guidelines, prophylactic cranial irradiation is recommended for patients with extensive disease-SCLC with good performance status after achieving complete or partial response to first-line chemotherapy. (author)

  5. Development of the Fibulin-3 protein therapeutics of non small cell lung cancer stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focuses on developing an efficient bioprocess for large-scale production of fibulin-3 using Chinese Hamster Ovary cell expression system and evaluating its therapeutic potential for the treatment of cancer. The specific aims are as follows: Isolation and establishment of CSCs using FACS based on cell surface markers and high ALDH1 activity. Identification and characterization of lung cancer stem cells that acquire features of CSC upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Evaluation of the fibulin-3 effects on the stem traits and signaling pathways required for the generation and maintenance of CSCs. In vivo validation of fivulin-3 for tumor prognosis and therapeutic efficacy against lung cancer using animal model

  6. Development of the Fibulin-3 protein therapeutics of non small cell lung cancer stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kugchan; Jung, Il Lae; Kim, Seo Yeon; Choi, Su Im; Lee, Jae Ha

    2013-09-15

    This study focuses on developing an efficient bioprocess for large-scale production of fibulin-3 using Chinese Hamster Ovary cell expression system and evaluating its therapeutic potential for the treatment of cancer. The specific aims are as follows: Isolation and establishment of CSCs using FACS based on cell surface markers and high ALDH1 activity. Identification and characterization of lung cancer stem cells that acquire features of CSC upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Evaluation of the fibulin-3 effects on the stem traits and signaling pathways required for the generation and maintenance of CSCs. In vivo validation of fivulin-3 for tumor prognosis and therapeutic efficacy against lung cancer using animal model.

  7. Polymorphisms in miRNA binding site: new insight into small cell lung cancer susceptibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-yu LIU; Jun CHEN

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause in cancer-related deaths with less than 15% five-year survival worldwide.Small cell lung cancer (SCLC),which accounts for about 15%-18% of lung cancer,carries the worst prognosis within the lung cancer patients.SCLC differs from other lung cancers,so called non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs),in the specifically clinical and biologic characteristics.It exhibits aggressive behavior,with rapid growth,early spread to distant sites.Although exquisite sensitive to chemotherapy and radiation,SCLC recurs rapidly with only 5% of patients surviving five years and frequent association with distinct paraneoplastic syndromes[1].

  8. Estrogen and its signaling pathway in non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruitong Xu; Yongqian Shu

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer in the world. It is a highly lethal disease in women and men, and new treatments are urgently needed. Several studies have implicated a role of estrogens and estrogen receptors in lung cancer progression. This review will investigate the biological significance of estrogens in lung cancer cells, the expression and molecular mechanisms of estrogen receptors(ER α and ER β, elucidate the prognostic significance of estrogens and their receptors in lung carcinomas and provide new options for patients afflicted with lung malignancies.

  9. Presence of urokinase plasminogen activator, its inhibitor and receptor in small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pappot, H.; Pfeiffer, P.; Grøndahl Hansen, J.;

    1997-01-01

    Spreading of cancer cells is dependent on the combined action of several proteolytic enzymes, such as serine proteases, comprising the urokinase pathway of plasminogen activation. Previous studies of lung cancer indicate that expression, localization and prognostic impact of the components of the...... plasminogen activation system differ in the different non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) types, whereas the expression of the components in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has only sparingly been investigated. In the present study we investigate the presence of the components of the plasminogen activation...... the clinical parameters. This is the first report of a study using a quantitative method to compare levels of the components of the plasminogen activation system in tissue extracts from the two major lung cancer groups. The study shows that uPA, PAI-1 and uPAR are present in SCLC-tissue, suggesting...

  10. Autophagy Accompanied with Bisdemethoxycurcumin-induced Apoptosis in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jin Hong; YANG He Ping; ZHOU Xiang Dong; WANG Hai Jing; GONG Liang; TANG Chun Lan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line, A549, and the highly metastatic lung cancer 95D cells. Methods CCK-8 assay was used to assess the effect of BDMC on cytotoxicity. Flow cytometry was used to evaluate apoptosis. Western blot analysis, electron microscopy, and quantification of GFP-LC3 punctuates were used to test the effect of BDMC on autophagy and apoptosis of lung cancer cells. Results BDMC inhibited the viability of NSCLC cells, but had no cytotoxic effects on lung small airway epithelial cells (SAECs). The apoptotic cell death induced by BDMC was accompanied with the induction of autophagy in NSCLC cells. Blockage of autophagy by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) repressed the growth inhibitory effects and induction of apoptosis by BDMC. In addition, BDMC treatment significantly decreased smoothened (SMO) and the transcription factor glioma-associated oncogene 1 (Gli1) expression. Furthermore, depletion of Gli1 by siRNA and cyclopamine (a specific SMO inhibitor) induced autophagy. Conclusion Aberrant activation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling has been implicated in several human cancers, including lung cancers. The present findings provide direct evidence that BDMC-induced autophagy plays a pro-death role in NSCLC, in part, by inhibiting Hedgehog signaling.

  11. Lung Cancer in Pulmonary Fibrosis: Tales of Epithelial Cell Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Königshoff, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    Lung epithelial cells exhibit a high degree of plasticity. Alterations to lung epithelial cell function are critically involved in several chronic lung diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by repetitive injury and subsequent impaired repair of epithelial cells, which leads to aberrant growth factor activation and fibroblast accumulation. Increased proliferation and hyper- and metaplasia of epithelial cells upon injury have also been observed in pulmonary fi...

  12. Evaluation of Irinotecan as a Third- or Fourth-line Treatment for Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Keener, James

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. There are two major types of lung cancer: non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which comprises approximately 85% of all lung cancers, and small cell lung cancer. Currently, the most prevalent third- and fourth- line treatment for non-small cell lung cancer is cisplatin-based therapy. This form of therapy has been long established as the chief treatment for advanced NSCLC; however, cisplatin-based therapy also impai...

  13. Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics and N-terminal Analysis of Human Metastatic Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Min, Hophil; Han, Dohyun; Kim, Yikwon; Cho, Jee Yeon; Jin, Jonghwa; Kim, Youngsoo

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic analysis is helpful in identifying cancer-associated proteins that are differentially expressed and fragmented that can be annotated as dysregulated networks and pathways during metastasis. To examine meta-static process in lung cancer, we performed a proteomics study by label-free quantitative analysis and N-terminal analysis in 2 human non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines with disparate metastatic potentials—NCI-H1703 (primary cell, stage I) and NCI-H1755 (metastatic cell, stage ...

  14. Profile of ceritinib in the treatment of ALK+ metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Mark W Burns, Eric S Kim Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA Abstract: Lung cancer has become one of the leading causes of death in both men and women in the United States, with approximately 230,000 new cases and 160,000 deaths each year. Approximately 80% of lung cancer patients are diagnosed with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a subset of epithelial lung cancers that are generally insensitive to chemotherapy. An estimated 3%–7% of NSCLC patient...

  15. Profile of ceritinib in the treatment of ALK+ metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Burns MW; Kim ES

    2015-01-01

    Mark W Burns, Eric S Kim Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA Abstract: Lung cancer has become one of the leading causes of death in both men and women in the United States, with approximately 230,000 new cases and 160,000 deaths each year. Approximately 80% of lung cancer patients are diagnosed with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a subset of epithelial lung cancers that are generally insensitive to chemotherapy. An estimated 3%–7% of NSCLC patients ha...

  16. Urokinase receptor forms in serum from non-small cell lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almasi, Charlotte Elberling; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla; Danø, Keld; Pappot, Helle; Dienemann, Hendrik; Muley, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    To study the prognostic impact of the different forms of the receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR) in serum from 171 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.......To study the prognostic impact of the different forms of the receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR) in serum from 171 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients....

  17. Unlocking Pandora's box: personalising cancer cell death in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fennell Dean A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Evasion of apoptosis is a hallmark of tumorigenesis and a recognised cause of multidrug resistance. Over the last decade, insights into how apoptosis might be exploited in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and how cancer therapeutics might be used to engage apoptotic signalling in a personalised manner have changed markedly. We are now in the wake of a paradigm shift in stratified therapeutic approaches related to NSCLC. At the heart of this shift in thinking is the emerging knowledge that even the most drug-resistant cancers exhibit a functional death pathway and, critically, that this pathway can be efficiently engaged, leading to clinical benefit. This review will summarise current knowledge of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway dysfunction in NSCLC and how the next generation of targeted therapeutics might be used to exploit deficiencies in apoptotic signalling in a personalised manner to improve clinical outcome and predict therapeutic benefit.

  18. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Abigail T., E-mail: abigail.berman@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); James, Sara St.; Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2015-07-02

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning.

  19. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning

  20. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail T. Berman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT, through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning.

  1. ABCC4 is required for cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao X

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoting Zhao, Yinan Guo, Wentao Yue, Lina Zhang, Meng Gu, Yue Wang Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Beijing TB and Thoracic Tumor Research Institute/Beijing Chest Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China Background: Multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4, also known as ATP-cassette binding protein 4 (ABCC4, is a member of the MRP/ABCC subfamily of ATP-binding cassette transporters, which are capable of pumping a wide variety of drugs out of the cell. However, little is known about the function of ABCC4 in the proliferation of lung cancer cells. Methods: ABCC4 mRNA and protein levels in lung cancer cell lines were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot, respectively. A lentivirus-mediated RNA interference technique was used to inhibit ABCC4 mRNA expression in A549 and 801D cells. The function of ABCC4 in cell growth was investigated by MTS and colony formation assays. The role of ABCC4 in cell cycle progression was evaluated by flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. ABCC4 mRNA levels in 30 pairs of tumors and corresponding matched adjacent normal tissues from non-small cell lung cancer patients were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: ABCC4 was highly expressed in lung cancer cell lines. ABCC4 expression was markedly downregulated in A549 and 801D cells using the RNA interference technique. Suppression of ABCC4 expression inhibited cell growth. The percentage of cells in G1 phase was increased when ABCC4 expression was suppressed. Phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein was weakened, originating in the downregulation of ABCC4. ABCC4 mRNA was highly expressed in lung cancer tissue and lung cancer cell lines. Conclusion: ABCC4 may play an important role in the control of A549 and 801D cell growth. ABCC4 is a potential target for lung cancer therapy. Keywords: ABCC4, cell proliferation, lung cancer, cell cycle

  2. Crizotinib for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A summary of results from an international phase III clinical trial that compared crizotinib versus chemotherapy in previously treated patients with advanced lung cancer whose tumors have an EML4-ALK fusion gene.

  3. The role of stem cells in airway repair: implications for the origins of lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael S.Mulvihill; Johannes R.Kratz; Patrick Pham; David M.Jablons; Biao He

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide.Recently,advancements in our ability to identify and study stem cell populations in the lung have helped researchers to elucidate the central role that cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis.Much of this research has focused on the use of the airway repair model to study response to injury.In this review,we discuss the primary evidence of the role that cancer stem cells play in lung cancer development.The implications of a stem cell origin of lung cancer are reviewed,and the importance of ongoing research to identify novel therapeutic and prognostic targets is reiterated.

  4. The role of stem cells in airway repair: implications for the origins of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Mulvihill

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Recently, advancements in our ability to identify and study stem cell populations in the lung have helped researchers to elucidate the central role that cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis. Much of this research has focused on the use of the airway repair model to study response to injury. In this review, we discuss the primary evidence of the role that cancer stem cells play in lung cancer development. The implications of a stem cell origin of lung cancer are reviewed, and the importance of ongoing research to identify novel therapeutic and prognostic targets is reiterated.

  5. Roles of Mir-144-ZFX Pathway in Growth Regulation of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zha, Wangjian; Cao, Liu; Shen, Ying; Mao HUANG

    2013-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) accounts for most of the lung cancer cases and the prognosis of this disease remains poor despite decades of intensive investigation. Thus new insights into underlying mechanisms by which NSCLC develops are avidly needed as the basis for development of new lines of therapeutic strategies. The past decade has witnessed a growing interest on the regulatory roles of micro RNAs on ...

  6. Xylitol induces cell death in lung cancer A549 cells by autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunjoo; Park, Mi Hee; Na, Hee Sam; Chung, Jin

    2015-05-01

    Xylitol is a widely used anti-caries agent that has anti-inflammatory effects. We have evaluated the potential of xylitol in cancer treatment. It's effects on cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were measured by MTT assay and LDH assay. Cell morphology and autophagy were examined by immunostaining and immunoblotting. Xylitol inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in these cancer cells: A549, Caki, NCI-H23, HCT-15, HL-60, K562, and SK MEL-2. The IC50 of xylitol in human gingival fibroblast cells was higher than in cancer cells, indicating that it is more specific for cancer cells. Moreover, xylitol induced autophagy in A549 cells that was inhibited by 3-methyladenine, an autophagy inhibitor. These results indicate that xylitol has potential in therapy against lung cancer by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing autophagy of A549 cells. PMID:25650339

  7. The presence of old pulmonary tuberculosis is an independent prognostic factor for squamous cell lung cancer survival

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yiming; Cui, Zhenling; Zhou, Xiao; Chen, Chang; Jiang, Sen; Hu, Zhongyi; Jiang, Gening

    2013-01-01

    Background Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. Our study investigated whether the coexistence of an old pulmonary TB lesion is an independent prognostic factor for lung cancer survival in Chinese non-small cell lung cancer patients. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 782 non-small cell lung cancer patients who underwent surgical resection as their primary treatment in 2006 and were followed for 5 years. The associations between lung can...

  8. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... for Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next ...

  9. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next three ...

  10. Cryotherapy in Treating Patients With Lung Cancer That Has Spread to the Other Lung or Parts of the Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    Advanced Malignant Mesothelioma; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  11. Lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is about the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of lung cancer. Before the treatment the histological samples allowing the diagnosis as well as its histological variety. The diagnosis include techniques such as bronchoscopy, ultrasound, tomography, puncture and endoscopic thoracotomy. The chemotherapy and radiotherapy are the main techniques used for the treatment

  12. Lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H H; Rørth, M

    1999-01-01

    The results of the many clinical trials published in 1997 had only modest impact on the treatment results using either cytostatic agents alone or combined with radiotherapy in lung cancer. In SCLC, combination chemotherapy including platin-compounds (cisplatin, carboplatin) and the podophyllotoxins...

  13. Immunotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: current concepts and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Marissa; Yang, Neng; Sterman, Daniel; Jones, David R; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2016-05-01

    Recent successes in immunotherapeutic strategies are being investigated to combat cancers that have less than ideal responses to standard of care treatment, such as non-small-cell lung cancer. In this paper, we summarize concepts and the current status of immunotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer, including salient features of the major categories of immunotherapy-monoclonal antibody therapy, immune checkpoint blockade, immunotoxins, anticancer vaccines, and adoptive cell therapy. PMID:26516195

  14. Inhibition of mTOR enhances radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells and protects normal lung cells against radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hang; Wang, Miao; Wu, Jing; Wang, Zhi-Ming; Nan, Hai-Jun; Sun, He

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy has been used for a long time as a standard therapy for cancer; however, there have been no recent research breakthroughs. Radioresistance and various side-effects lead to the unexpected outcomes of radiation therapy. Specific and accurate targeting as well as reduction of radioresistance have been major challenges for irradiation therapy. Recent studies have shown that rapamycin shows promise for inhibiting tumorigenesis by suppressing mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). We found that the combination of rapamycin with irradiation significantly diminished cell viability and colony formation, and increased cell apoptosis, as compared with irradiation alone in lung cancer cell line A549, suggesting that rapamycin can enhance the effectiveness of radiation therapy by sensitizing cancer cells to irradiation. Importantly, we observed that the adverse effects of irradiation on a healthy lung cell line (WI-38) were also offset. No enhanced protein expression of mTOR signaling was observed in WI-38 cells, which is normally elevated in lung cancer cells. Moreover, DNA damage was significantly less with the combination therapy than with irradiation therapy alone. Our data suggest that the incorporation of rapamycin during radiation therapy could be a potent way to improve the sensitivity and effectiveness of radiation therapy as well as to protect normal cells from being damaged by irradiation. PMID:26999331

  15. ANALYSIS OF IMMUNOREGULATORY BIOMARKERS IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    USÓ MARCO, MARTA

    2015-01-01

    [EN] Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and is the third most common cancer type; it can be classified into two subgroups based on histology: non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). The 5-year survival still remains poor and despite the existence of several distinct tumour phenotypes, therapeutic decisions are mainly based on clinical features such as stage or performance status. This highlights the need for new diagnostic and pro...

  16. Comprehensive genomic profiles of small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Julie; Lim, Jing Shan; Jang, Se Jin; Cun, Yupeng; Ozretić, Luka; Kong, Gu; Leenders, Frauke; Lu, Xin; Fernández-Cuesta, Lynnette; Bosco, Graziella; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Jahchan, Nadine S.; Park, Kwon-Sik; Yang, Dian; Karnezis, Anthony N.; Vaka, Dedeepya; Torres, Angela; Wang, Maia Segura; Korbel, Jan O.; Menon, Roopika; Chun, Sung-Min; Kim, Deokhoon; Wilkerson, Matt; Hayes, Neil; Engelmann, David; Pützer, Brigitte; Bos, Marc; Michels, Sebastian; Vlasic, Ignacija; Seidel, Danila; Pinther, Berit; Schaub, Philipp; Becker, Christian; Altmüller, Janine; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi; Iwakawa, Reika; Tsuta, Koji; Noguchi, Masayuki; Muley, Thomas; Hoffmann, Hans; Schnabel, Philipp A.; Petersen, Iver; Chen, Yuan; Soltermann, Alex; Tischler, Verena; Choi, Chang-min; Kim, Yong-Hee; Massion, Pierre P.; Zou, Yong; Jovanovic, Dragana; Kontic, Milica; Wright, Gavin M.; Russell, Prudence A.; Solomon, Benjamin; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Muscarella, Lucia A.; la Torre, Annamaria; Field, John K.; Jakopovic, Marko; Knezevic, Jelena; Castaños-Vélez, Esmeralda; Roz, Luca; Pastorino, Ugo; Brustugun, Odd-Terje; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Thunnissen, Erik; Köhler, Jens; Schuler, Martin; Botling, Johan; Sandelin, Martin; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Salvesen, Helga B.; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Bogus, Magdalena; Schneider, Peter M.; Zander, Thomas; Ansén, Sascha; Hallek, Michael; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Yatabe, Yasushi; Travis, William D.; Nürnberg, Peter; Reinhardt, Christian; Perner, Sven; Heukamp, Lukas; Büttner, Reinhard; Haas, Stefan A.; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Peifer, Martin; Sage, Julien; Thomas, Roman K.

    2016-01-01

    We have sequenced the genomes of 110 small cell lung cancers (SCLC), one of the deadliest human cancers. In nearly all the tumours analysed we found bi-allelic inactivation of TP53 and RB1, sometimes by complex genomic rearrangements. Two tumours with wild-type RB1 had evidence of chromothripsis leading to overexpression of cyclin D1 (encoded by the CCND1 gene), revealing an alternative mechanism of Rb1 deregulation. Thus, loss of the tumour suppressors TP53 and RB1 is obligatory in SCLC. We discovered somatic genomic rearrangements of TP73 that create an oncogenic version of this gene, TP73Δex2/3. In rare cases, SCLC tumours exhibited kinase gene mutations, providing a possible therapeutic opportunity for individual patients. Finally, we observed inactivating mutations in NOTCH family genes in 25% of human SCLC. Accordingly, activation of Notch signalling in a pre-clinical SCLC mouse model strikingly reduced the number of tumours and extended the survival of the mutant mice. Furthermore, neuroendocrine gene expression was abrogated by Notch activity in SCLC cells. This first comprehensive study of somatic genome alterations in SCLC uncovers several key biological processes and identifies candidate therapeutic targets in this highly lethal form of cancer. PMID:26168399

  17. Comprehensive genomic profiles of small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Julie; Lim, Jing Shan; Jang, Se Jin; Cun, Yupeng; Ozretić, Luka; Kong, Gu; Leenders, Frauke; Lu, Xin; Fernández-Cuesta, Lynnette; Bosco, Graziella; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Jahchan, Nadine S; Park, Kwon-Sik; Yang, Dian; Karnezis, Anthony N; Vaka, Dedeepya; Torres, Angela; Wang, Maia Segura; Korbel, Jan O; Menon, Roopika; Chun, Sung-Min; Kim, Deokhoon; Wilkerson, Matt; Hayes, Neil; Engelmann, David; Pützer, Brigitte; Bos, Marc; Michels, Sebastian; Vlasic, Ignacija; Seidel, Danila; Pinther, Berit; Schaub, Philipp; Becker, Christian; Altmüller, Janine; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi; Iwakawa, Reika; Tsuta, Koji; Noguchi, Masayuki; Muley, Thomas; Hoffmann, Hans; Schnabel, Philipp A; Petersen, Iver; Chen, Yuan; Soltermann, Alex; Tischler, Verena; Choi, Chang-min; Kim, Yong-Hee; Massion, Pierre P; Zou, Yong; Jovanovic, Dragana; Kontic, Milica; Wright, Gavin M; Russell, Prudence A; Solomon, Benjamin; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Muscarella, Lucia A; la Torre, Annamaria; Field, John K; Jakopovic, Marko; Knezevic, Jelena; Castaños-Vélez, Esmeralda; Roz, Luca; Pastorino, Ugo; Brustugun, Odd-Terje; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Thunnissen, Erik; Köhler, Jens; Schuler, Martin; Botling, Johan; Sandelin, Martin; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Salvesen, Helga B; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Bogus, Magdalena; Schneider, Peter M; Zander, Thomas; Ansén, Sascha; Hallek, Michael; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Yatabe, Yasushi; Travis, William D; Nürnberg, Peter; Reinhardt, Christian; Perner, Sven; Heukamp, Lukas; Büttner, Reinhard; Haas, Stefan A; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Peifer, Martin; Sage, Julien; Thomas, Roman K

    2015-08-01

    We have sequenced the genomes of 110 small cell lung cancers (SCLC), one of the deadliest human cancers. In nearly all the tumours analysed we found bi-allelic inactivation of TP53 and RB1, sometimes by complex genomic rearrangements. Two tumours with wild-type RB1 had evidence of chromothripsis leading to overexpression of cyclin D1 (encoded by the CCND1 gene), revealing an alternative mechanism of Rb1 deregulation. Thus, loss of the tumour suppressors TP53 and RB1 is obligatory in SCLC. We discovered somatic genomic rearrangements of TP73 that create an oncogenic version of this gene, TP73Δex2/3. In rare cases, SCLC tumours exhibited kinase gene mutations, providing a possible therapeutic opportunity for individual patients. Finally, we observed inactivating mutations in NOTCH family genes in 25% of human SCLC. Accordingly, activation of Notch signalling in a pre-clinical SCLC mouse model strikingly reduced the number of tumours and extended the survival of the mutant mice. Furthermore, neuroendocrine gene expression was abrogated by Notch activity in SCLC cells. This first comprehensive study of somatic genome alterations in SCLC uncovers several key biological processes and identifies candidate therapeutic targets in this highly lethal form of cancer. PMID:26168399

  18. Teroxirone inhibited growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells by activating p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing-Ping; Lin, Kai-Han; Liu, Chun-Yen; Yu, Ya-Chu; Wu, Pei-Tsun [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Chien-Chih [Department of Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Su, Chun-Li [Department of Human Development and Family Studies, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kwun-Min [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Fang, Kang, E-mail: kangfang@ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we demonstrated that the growth of human non-small-cell-lung-cancer cells H460 and A549 cells can be inhibited by low concentrations of an epoxide derivative, teroxirone, in both in vitro and in vivo models. The cytotoxicity was mediated by apoptotic cell death through DNA damage. The onset of ultimate apoptosis is dependent on the status of p53. Teroxirone caused transient elevation of p53 that activates downstream p21 and procaspase-3 cleavage. The presence of caspase-3 inhibitor reverted apoptotic phenotype. Furthermore, we showed the cytotoxicity of teroxirone in H1299 cells with stable ectopic expression of p53, but not those of mutant p53. A siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 expression attenuated drug sensitivity. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that teroxirone suppressed growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Being a potential therapeutic agent by restraining cell growth through apoptotic death at low concentrations, teroxirone provides a feasible perspective in reversing tumorigenic phenotype of human lung cancer cells. - Highlights: • Teroxirone repressed tumor cell growth in nude mice of human lung cancer cells. • The apoptotic cell death reverted by caspase-3 inhibitor is related to p53 status. • Teroxirone provides a good candidate for lung cancer treatment.

  19. Teroxirone inhibited growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells by activating p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we demonstrated that the growth of human non-small-cell-lung-cancer cells H460 and A549 cells can be inhibited by low concentrations of an epoxide derivative, teroxirone, in both in vitro and in vivo models. The cytotoxicity was mediated by apoptotic cell death through DNA damage. The onset of ultimate apoptosis is dependent on the status of p53. Teroxirone caused transient elevation of p53 that activates downstream p21 and procaspase-3 cleavage. The presence of caspase-3 inhibitor reverted apoptotic phenotype. Furthermore, we showed the cytotoxicity of teroxirone in H1299 cells with stable ectopic expression of p53, but not those of mutant p53. A siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 expression attenuated drug sensitivity. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that teroxirone suppressed growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Being a potential therapeutic agent by restraining cell growth through apoptotic death at low concentrations, teroxirone provides a feasible perspective in reversing tumorigenic phenotype of human lung cancer cells. - Highlights: • Teroxirone repressed tumor cell growth in nude mice of human lung cancer cells. • The apoptotic cell death reverted by caspase-3 inhibitor is related to p53 status. • Teroxirone provides a good candidate for lung cancer treatment

  20. Radical radiotherapy for early nonsmall cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of a departmental treatment policy in a consecutive series of patients with nonsmall cell carcinoma of the lung. A second purpose was to estimate the survival of patients treated with radical intent. A third purpose was to estimate the impact of comorbidity on the selection of patients for treatment and on its outcome. Methods and Materials: The records of 720 consecutive patients referred to a single Department of Radiation Oncology between 1979 and 1985 were reviewed. One hundred fifty patients with early stage (Stage I and II disease) were studied in detail and the results are presented for the outcome of 103 patients treated by radical radiotherapy. All patients were followed for a minimum period of five years or until death. Results: Patients referred for radiation therapy were elderly and usually had squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. Comorbidity was significant as was weight loss which occurred in a third of patients. The overall survival of patients treated with radical intent was 13%. In a small subgroup of patients with T1 tumors without weight loss and aged under 70 survival reached 50% at 5 years with no treatment-related mortality and with insignificant treatment-related morbidity. Conclusion: Highly selected subsets of patients suitable for treatment with radiotherapy can be defined equally as well as highly selected subsets of patients can be selected for surgery. Treatment outcome can be surprisingly good in these subsets indicating that the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer, particularly in older patients without comorbidity should not automatically be by a surgical approach

  1. Nitric oxide induces cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongsanguanchai, Nuttida; Pongrakhananon, Varisa; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Rojanasakul, Yon; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2015-01-15

    Even though tremendous advances have been made in the treatment of cancers during the past decades, the success rate among patients with cancer is still dismal, largely because of problems associated with chemo/radioresistance and relapse. Emerging evidence has indicated that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are behind the resistance and recurrence problems, but our understanding of their regulation is limited. Rapid reversible changes of CSC-like cells within tumors may result from the effect of biological mediators found in the tumor microenvironment. Here we show how nitric oxide (NO), a key cellular modulator whose level is elevated in many tumors, affects CSC-like phenotypes of human non-small cell lung carcinoma H292 and H460 cells. Exposure of NO gradually altered the cell morphology toward mesenchymal stem-like shape. NO exposure promoted CSC-like phenotype, indicated by increased expression of known CSC markers, CD133 and ALDH1A1, in the exposed cells. These effects of NO on stemness were reversible after cessation of the NO treatment for 7 days. Furthermore, such effect was reproducible using another NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine. Importantly, inhibition of NO by the known NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5 tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxy-3-oxide strongly inhibited CSC-like aggressive cellular behavior and marker expression. Last, we unveiled the underlying mechanism of NO action through the activation of caveolin-1 (Cav-1), which is upregulated by NO and is responsible for the aggressive behavior of the cells, including anoikis resistance, anchorage-independent cell growth, and increased cell migration and invasion. These findings indicate a novel role of NO in CSC regulation and its importance in aggressive cancer behaviors through Cav-1 upregulation. PMID:25411331

  2. Small cell lung cancer transformation and T790M mutation: complimentary roles in acquired resistance to kinase inhibitors in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kenichi Suda; Isao Murakami; Kazuko Sakai; Hiroshi Mizuuchi; Shigeki Shimizu; Katsuaki Sato; Kenji Tomizawa; Shuta Tomida; Yasushi Yatabe; Kazuto Nishio; Tetsuya Mitsudomi

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancers often harbour a mutation in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene. Because proliferation and survival of lung cancers with EGFR mutation solely depend on aberrant signalling from the mutated EGFR, these tumours often show dramatic responses to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, acquiring resistance to these drugs is almost inevitable, thus a better understanding of the underlying resistance mechanisms is critical. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) transformat...

  3. Neuromedin B receptors regulate EGF receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in lung cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Moody, Terry W.; Berna, Marc J.; Mantey, Samuel; Sancho, Veronica; Ridnour, Lisa; Wink, David A.; Chan, Daniel; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Jensen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Neuromedin B (NMB), a member of the bombesin family of peptides, is an autocrine growth factor for many lung cancer cells. The present study investigated the ability of NMB to cause transactivation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor in lung cancer cells. By Western blot, addition of NMB or related peptides to NCI-H1299 human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, caused phosphorylation of Tyr1068 of the EGF receptor. The signal was amplified using NCI-H1299 cells stably transect...

  4. PGP9.5 As a Candidate Tumor Marker for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hibi, Kenji; Westra, William H.; Borges, Michael; Goodman, Steve; Sidransky, David; Jen, Jin

    1999-01-01

    PGP9.5 is a neurospecific peptide that functions to remove ubiquitin from ubiquitinated proteins and prevents them from targeted degradation by proteasomes. Using the serial analysis of gene expression method (SAGE), we observed that the PGP9.5 transcript was highly expressed in primary lung cancers and lung cancer cell lines but was not detectable in the normal lung. Here we examined the expression of PGP9.5 protein in normal lung epithelium, lung tumor cell lines, and 98 resected primary no...

  5. Cetuximab in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carillio, Guido; Montanino, Agnese; Costanzo, Raffaele; Sandomenico, Claudia; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; Di Maio, Massimo; Daniele, Gennaro; Giordano, Pasqualina; Bryce, Jane; Normanno, Nicola; Rocco, Gaetano; Perrone, Francesco; Morabito, Alessandro

    2012-02-01

    Cetuximab is a chimeric human-mouse anti-EGF receptor monoclonal antibody. In Phase I studies, no dose-limiting toxicities were observed with cetuximab as a single agent or combined with chemotherapy; pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses supported 250 mg/m(2) weekly administration. Skin toxicity, diarrhea and fatigue were the most common toxicities. The positive results obtained in Phase II trials in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer prompted two randomized Phase III trials evaluating cetuximab in addition to first-line chemotherapy. Both trials showed a small benefit in overall survival for the experimental treatment, which was considered insufficient by the EMA for marketing approval. However, a subgroup analysis of the FLEX Phase III trial recently demonstrated a larger survival benefit from the experimental treatment in patients with high immunohistochemical EGF receptor expression. This finding, if confirmed prospectively, could represent a new opportunity for positioning cetuximab into the standard treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma. PMID:22316364

  6. Current situation of interventional treatment for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary bronchogenic carcinoma, which referred to as lung cancer, is one of the most common malignant tumors in china. The 2010 China Health Statistical Yearbook indicates that in 2005 the mortality of lung cancer was at the first place of all cancers. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for 8.5% of all the lung cancers, most of the patents are diagnosed in their late stages and have lost the chance of operation resection, and the 5-year survival rate is only about 15%. Being of technical simplicity, mild side reaction, satisfactory local effect and reliable reproducibility, interventional therapy has become an important and non-surgical method for advanced NSCLC, and has been widely applied in clinical practice. This paper aims to make a review about the current situation of interventional treatment for non-small cell lung cancer. (authors)

  7. In vitro evaluation of a new nitrosourea, TCNU, against human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, H; Vindeløv, L L; Spang-Thomsen, M; Christensen, I J; Hansen, H H

    1987-01-01

    The cytotoxic activity of a new nitrosourea, TCNU, was compared with that of BCNU in five human small cell lung cancer cell lines in vitro. TCNU was found to be equivalent or inferior to BCNU when compared on a microgram to microgram basis. If the potential of in vitro phase II trials for selection...

  8. [Maintenance therapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruwatari, Koichi; Yoh, Kiyotaka

    2014-08-01

    Maintenance therapy is a new treatment strategy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer(NSCLC), and it consists of switch maintenance and continuation maintenance.Switch maintenance is the introduction of a different drug, not included as part of the induction therapy, immediately after completion of 4 cycles of first-line platinum-based chemotherapy.Continuation maintenance is a continuation of at least one of the drugs used in the induction therapy in the absence of disease progression.Several phase III trials have reported survival benefits with continuation maintenance of pemetrexed and switch maintenance of pemetrexed or erlotinib.Therefore, maintenance therapy has become a part of the standard first-line treatment for advanced NSCLC.However, further research is needed to elucidate the selection criteria of patients who may benefit the most from maintenance therapy. PMID:25132023

  9. Lung cancer in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, G; Roder, D M

    1989-02-20

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death of cancer in Australian men and the third leading cause in Australian women. Efforts are being made to reduce the incidence of this disease by smoking-cessation programmes and improved industrial hygiene, and these measures need to be encouraged strongly by all sectors of the community. On a population basis, insufficient evidence is available to justify screening procedures for the early detection of lung cancer in "at-risk" groups. Cure is possible by surgical resection in early cases. Improvements in therapeutic results with traditional cancer treatments largely have reached a plateau, but a number of newer therapies, and combinations of standard therapies, currently are being evaluated. Of particular interest is concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy in localized non-small-cell lung cancer; laser "debulking" in conjunction with radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer, and biological response-modifying agents in non-small-cell and small-cell lung cancer. It is important that data be collected adequately to define epidemiological changes and to evaluate treatment results (including repeat bronchoscopy, to assess local control of tumour), and that the quality of life is recorded and reported in the evaluation process. Finally, phase-III studies in lung-cancer treatments require adequate numbers of subjects to enable meaningful conclusions to be achieve objectives within a reasonable study period. PMID:2469943

  10. REV3L modulates cisplatin sensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer H1299 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjie; Sheng, Wenjiong; Yu, Chenxiao; Cao, Jianping; Zhou, Jundong; Wu, Jinchang; Zhang, Huojun; Zhang, Shuyu

    2015-09-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 80-85% of all cases of lung cancer. Cisplatin plays a significant role in the management of human lung cancer. Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) is involved in DNA damage repair. DNA polymerase ζ (Pol ζ) is able to mediate the DNA replication bypass of DNA damage, which is suggested to be involved in chemoresistance. REV3L is the catalytic subunit of Pol ζ. Due to its critical role in translesion DNA synthesis, whether REV3L modulates cisplatin response in NSCLC cells remains unknown. In this study, REV3L overexpression and silencing H1299 cell lines were established. The reports showed that cisplatin induced the expression of REV3L by recruiting Sp1 to its promoter. Similar results were obtained when the ability of the cells to express luciferase from a platinated plasmid was measured. Co-transfection of the reporter with the REV3L overexpression vector or REV3L plus REV7L significantly enhanced the reporter activity. Nuclear condensation and fragmentation of shRNA-REV3L H1299 cells were more pronounced than shRNA-NC H1299 cells after cisplatin exposure, indicating that REV3L overexpression abolished cisplatin-induced DNA damage. Moreover, a forced expression of REV3L conferred the resistance of H1299 cells to cisplatin, whereas the knockdown of REV3L sensitized cisplatin efficacy in H1299 cells. Taken together, we demonstrated that inhibition of REV3L sensitized lung cancer H1299 cells to cisplatin treatment. Thus, REV3L may be a novel target for the chemotherapy of NSCLC. PMID:26165320

  11. Next-generation anthracycline for the management of small cell lung cancer: focus on amrubicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiko Yamamoto

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Michiko Yamamoto, Akira Takakura, Noriyuki MasudaDepartment of Respiratory Medicine, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kitasato, JapanAbstract: Amrubicin is a totally synthetic anthracycline anticancer agent that acts as a potent topoisomerase II inhibitor. Amrubicin has been approved in Japan for the treatment of lung cancer, and the results from clinical studies of amrubicin as a single agent or as part of combination regimens for lung cancer, particularly for small cell lung cancer, conducted in Japan and overseas have been promising. Amrubicin should be included among new treatment strategies especially for chemoresistant patients. Here, preclinical, pharmacological, and clinical data on the use of amrubicin for the treatment of small cell lung cancer are reviewed.Keywords: amrubicin, anthracycline, small-cell lung cancer, extensive disease

  12. Combination of Circulating Tumor Cells with Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen Enhances Clinical Prediction of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xi Chen; Xu Wang; Hua He; Ziling Liu; Ji-Fan Hu; Wei Li

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as a potential biomarker in the diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and surveillance of lung cancer. However, CTC detection is not only costly, but its sensitivity is also low, thus limiting its usage and the collection of robust data regarding the significance of CTCs in lung cancer. We aimed to seek clinical variables that enhance the prediction of CTCs in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Clinical samples and pathological data were c...

  13. Postoperative radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate effect of postoperative radiotherapy on survival and local control for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Ninety two NSCLC patients with N1 or N2 involvement who were treated with postoperative radiotherapy following surgery with curative intent from May 1987 to October 1999 were retrospectively analyzed. Age of the patients was ranged from 32 to 78 years. According to TNM Stage, 35 patients had Stage II and 57 had Stage III disease. There were 49 patients with N1 involvement and 43 patients with N2 involvement. Fifty six patients were noted to have T1-2 tumors and 36 patients to have T3-4 tumors. Delivered total dose was ranged from 40 to 60 Gy. Majority of patients received 50 Gy or 50.4 Gy. Follow-up period was ranged from 9 month to 7 years with median follow-up of 26 months. Overall survival rates at 3 and 5 years for entire group of patients were 46% and 38%, respectively. Corresponding disease free survival rates were 44% and 36%. There was significant difference in survival between patients with Stage II and Stage III disease (50% vs 28% at 5-year). Five year survival rates for N1 and N2 patients were 52% and 20%, respectively (p<0.05). These were 40% and 34% for patients with T1-2 tumors and T3-4 tumors. There were documented local relapses in 13% of the patients. For patients with N1 and N2 Stage, local relapse rates were 8% and 18%, respectively. Our study confirms that postoperative radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer improves local control. However, influence of postoperative radiotherapy on long-term survival is less clear. More effective systemic treatment to prevent distant metastasis should be investigated in future study to improve long-term survival

  14. Screening of Highly-expressed-HMGB1-Gene Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi LIU

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Lung cancer is a type of malignant tumor which threats human health and life. Its morbidity might increase dramatically in a long period. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death all over the world. HMGB1 (high mobility group box B 1 is a non-histone chromosome binding protein in the cells. It takes part in many biological processes including genes transcription and DNA repair. HMGB1 overexpression can result in cell apoptosis, differentiation, migration and proliferation. The main purpose of this study was to detect the HMGB1 expression of 4 lung cancer cell lines in order to select the most suitable cell line to do the work next step. Methods Four lung cancer cell lines were cultured by normal method, Western blot and real-time quantitative PCR were used to verify the levels of expression of HMGB1. The cell line which HMGB1 over-expressed was selected. Results HMGB1 expressed in all 4 lung cancer cell lines, the cell line L9981 was the most highly expressed cell line (P < 0.001. Conclusion All 4 lung cancer cell lines expree HMGB1 gene. As the HMGB1 overexpression cell line, L9981 is an ideal material for follow-up research.

  15. Selectins mediate small cell lung cancer systemic metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Heidemann

    Full Text Available Metastasis formation is the major reason for the extremely poor prognosis in small cell lung cancer (SCLC patients. The molecular interaction partners regulating metastasis formation in SCLC are largely unidentified, however, from other tumor entities it is known that tumor cells use the adhesion molecules of the leukocyte adhesion cascade to attach to the endothelium at the site of the future metastasis. Using the human OH-1 SCLC line as a model, we found that these cells expressed E- and P-selectin binding sites, which could be in part attributed to the selectin binding carbohydrate motif sialyl Lewis A. In addition, protein backbones known to carry these glycotopes in other cell lines including PSGL-1, CD44 and CEA could be detected in in vitro and in vivo grown OH1 SCLC cells. By intravital microscopy of murine mesenterial vasculature we could capture SCLC cells while rolling along vessel walls demonstrating that SCLC cells mimic leukocyte rolling behavior in terms of selectin and selectin ligand interaction in vivo indicating that this mechanism might indeed be important for SCLC cells to seed distant metastases. Accordingly, formation of spontaneous distant metastases was reduced by 50% when OH-1 cells were xenografted into E-/P-selectin-deficient mice compared with wild type mice (p = 0.0181. However, as metastasis formation was not completely abrogated in selectin deficient mice, we concluded that this adhesion cascade is redundant and that other molecules of this cascade mediate metastasis formation as well. Using several of these adhesion molecules as interaction partners presumably make SCLC cells so highly metastatic.

  16. IGFBP2/FAK pathway is causally associated with dasatinib resistance in non-small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Haibo; Wang, Li; Gao, Wen; Meng, Jieru; Dai, Bingbing; Wu, Shuhong; Minna, John; Roth, Jack A.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Fang, Bingliang

    2013-01-01

    IGFBP2 expression is increased in various types of cancers, including in a subset of lung cancer patients. Because IGFBP2 is involved in signal transduction of some critical cancer related pathways, we analyzed the association between IGFBP2 and response to pathway-targeted agents in seven human non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. Western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed that four of the seven NSCLC cell lines analyzed expressed high levels of IGFB...

  17. Interleukin-22 Is Frequently Expressed in Small- and Large-Cell Lung Cancer and Promotes Growth in Chemotherapy-Resistant Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kobold, Sebastian; Völk, Stefanie; Clauditz, Till; Küpper, Natascha Jennifer; Minner, Sarah; Tufman, Amanda; Düwell, Peter; Lindner, Michael; Koch, Ina; Heidegger, Simon; Rothenfußer, Simon; Schnurr, Max; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Wilczak, Waldemar; Endres, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In lung cancer, interleukin-22 (IL-22) expression within primary tissue has been demonstrated, but the frequency and the functional consequence of IL-22 signaling have not been addressed. This study aims at analyzing the cellular effects of IL-22 on lung carcinoma cell lines and the prognostic impact of IL-22 tissue expression in lung cancer patients. Methods: Biological effects of IL-22 signaling were investigated in seven lung cancer cell lines by Western blot, flow cytometry,...

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-homeostasis is altered in small and non-small cell lung cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufman Amanda

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of differences in the cellular physiology of malignant and non-malignant cells is a prerequisite for the development of cancer treatments that effectively kill cancer without damaging normal cells. Calcium is a ubiquitous signal molecule that is involved in the control of proliferation and apoptosis. We aimed to investigate if the endoplasmic reticulum (ER Ca2+-homeostasis is different in lung cancer and normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE cells. Methods The intracellular Ca2+-signaling was investigated using fluorescence microscopy and the expression of Ca2+-regulating proteins was assessed using Western Blot analysis. Results In a Small Cell Lung Cancer (H1339 and an Adeno Carcinoma Lung Cancer (HCC cell line but not in a Squamous Cell Lung Cancer (EPLC and a Large Cell Lung Cancer (LCLC cell line the ER Ca2+-content was reduced compared to NHBE. The reduced Ca2+-content correlated with a reduced expression of SERCA 2 pumping calcium into the ER, an increased expression of IP3R releasing calcium from the ER, and a reduced expression of calreticulin buffering calcium within the ER. Lowering the ER Ca2+-content with CPA led to increased proliferation NHBE and lung cancer cells. Conclusion The significant differences in Ca2+-homeostasis between lung cancer and NHBE cells could represent a new target for cancer treatments.

  19. Distribution of Mast Cells in Mediastinal Lymph Nodes from Lung Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu Tetsuya; Edagawa Masao; Matsuzaki Yasunori; Tomita Masaki; Hara Masaki; Onitsuka Toshio

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background Mast cells have been documented to have several key functions with regards to malignant neoplasms. However, the functional significance of their accumulation is largely unknown. An analysis of the mast cell profile in mediastinal lymph nodes from lung cancer patients is reported here. Methods One hundred thirty-four, randomly selected lymph nodes (63 with positive pathological lymph node status) from 39 surgically treated lung cancer patients were examined. All cancer nega...

  20. Lineage tracing of metastasis in a mouse model for Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    OpenAIRE

    Thakur, Chitra

    2012-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the deadliest form of lung cancer and has a poor prognosis due to its high rate of metastasis. Notably, metastasis is one of the leading causes of death among cancer patients. Despite the clinical importance, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern the initiation, establishment and progression of metastasis remain unclear. Moreover, knowledge gained on metastatic process was largely based on cultured or in vitro manipulated cells that were reint...

  1. Interpretation of NCCN Guidelines: General Therapies on Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (Version 6. 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-en HUANG

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in China and ranks the first of cancer-related death. The major etiological agent of lung cancer is an industry-made and promoted addictive product, so lung cancer is considered to be a unique disease in all cancers. Effective policies for public health are required to prevent the smoking initiation so as to reduce the mortality of lung cancer, so Food and Drug Administration (FDA has introduced a series of measures to monitor the tobacco products. As to patients with strong suspicion of lung cancer in stage Ⅰ-Ⅱ, a preoperative biopsy is needed and intra-operative diagnosis is necessary before pneumonectomy, bilobectomy or lobectomy if the preoperative tissue diagnosis is not obtained. However, lung cancer still cannot be easily diagnosed and cured, so the annual improvement and update of new therapeutic protocols and the development of new agents is of great significance. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC accounts for about 80% of all lung cancer, and above 75% NSCLC patients are in middle-advanced stage when diagnosed, so they have lost the optimal therapeutic opportunity and the 5-year survival rate is relatively low. Therefore, this study mainly interpreted the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN guidelines on the general therapies on NSCLC, hoping to provide references for the treatment of NSCLC patients and prolong their long-term survival.

  2. Alpinetin inhibits lung cancer progression and elevates sensitization drug-resistant lung cancer cells to cis-diammined dichloridoplatium

    OpenAIRE

    Wu L; Yang W.; Zhang SN; Lu JB

    2015-01-01

    Lin Wu, Wei Yang, Su-ning Zhang, Ji-bin Lu Department of Thoracic Surgery, Sheng Jing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China Objective: Alpinetin is a novel flavonoid that has demonstrated potent antitumor activity in previous studies. However, the efficacy and mechanism of alpinetin in treating lung cancer have not been determined. Methods: We evaluated the impact of different doses and durations of alpinetin treatment on the cell proliferatio...

  3. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1 Is a Tumor Stem Cell-Associated Marker in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Feng; Qiu, Qi; Khanna, Abha; Todd, Nevins W.; Deepak, Janaki; Xing, Lingxiao; Wang, Huijun; Liu, Zhenqiu; Su, Yun; Stass, Sanford A.; Katz, Ruth L

    2009-01-01

    Tumor contains small population of cancer stem cells (CSC) that are responsible for its maintenance and relapse. Analysis of these CSCs may lead to effective prognostic and therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer patients. We report here the identification of CSCs from human lung cancer cells using Aldefluor assay followed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. Isolated cancer cells with relatively high aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) activity display in vitro features o...

  4. Advances of Driver Gene and Targeted Therapy of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Dan; Huang, Yan; Wang, Hongyang

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the worldwide. The discovery of drive gene makes tumor treatment is no longer "one-size-fits-all". Targeted therapy to change the present situation of cancer drugs become "bullet" with eyes, the effect is visible and bring a revolution in the treatment of lung cancer. The diver gene and targeted therapy have became the new cedule of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has showed 11 kinds of div...

  5. PET/CT in the Staging of the Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fangfang Chao; Hong Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is a common disease and the leading cause of cancer-related death in many countries. Precise staging of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer plays an important role in determining treatment strategy and prognosis. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), combining anatomic information of CT and metabolic information of PET, is emerging as a potential diagnosis and staging test in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this paper is t...

  6. Non small-cell lung cancer with metastasis to thigh muscle and mandible: two case reports

    OpenAIRE

    Giugliano, Francesca Maria; Alberti, Domingo; Guida, Giovanna; Palma, Giampaolo De; Iadanza, Luciano; Mormile, Maria; Cammarota, Fabrizio; Montanino, Agnese; Fulciniti, Franco; Ravo, Vincenzo; Muto, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in Europe and the US. Isolated metastases to skeletal muscle and the mandible are very uncommon. Case presentation This report presents two cases. Case 1 concerns a 45-year-old Caucasian woman affected by muscle metastasis of the right thigh from non-small-cell lung cancer. Case 2 concerns a 61-year-old Caucasian man affected by mandible metastasis from non-small-cell lung cancer. Both metastases were detected by diagnostic...

  7. Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Molecular Signatures Recapitulate Lung Developmental Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Borczuk, Alain C.; Gorenstein, Lyall; Walter, Kristin L.; Assaad, Adel A.; Wang, Liqun; Powell, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    Current paradigms hold that lung carcinomas arise from pleuripotent stem cells capable of differentiation into one or several histological types. These paradigms suggest lung tumor cell ontogeny is determined by consequences of gene expression that recapitulate events important in embryonic lung development. Using oligonucleotide microarrays, we acquired gene profiles from 32 microdissected non-small-cell lung tumors. We determined the 100 top-ranked marker genes for adenocarcinoma, squamous ...

  8. The clinical significance of Psoriasin for non-small cell lung cancer patients and its biological impact on lung cancer cell functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psoriasin (S100A7) is a member of the S100 gene family. Alteration of Psoriasin expression has previously been reported to play an important role in cancer aggressive behaviour. The current study sought to investigate the level of Psoriasin expression at the mRNA level in a cohort of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the association with clinical implication and outcomes, and the molecular and cellular impact of the protein on lung cancer cells. Fresh frozen NSCLC cell carcinoma tissues, along with matched normal tissues were obtained from 83 NSCLC patients who received curative resection from January 2003 to December 2011. The expression of Psoriasin in the NSCLC specimens was assessed using both quantitative real time PCR (QPCR) and immunochemical staining. Knockdown and forced expression of Psoriasin in NSCLC cell lines were carried out using constructed plasmid vectors carrying either ribozyme transgenes targeting human Psoriasin or full-length coding sequence, respectively. The effect of Psoriasin on the functions of NSCLC cells was determined using a variety of in vitro cell function assays. Higher mRNA levels of Psoriasin were observed in tumour tissues when compared to both the paired normal background tissues and none paired normal tissues (p = 0.0251 and 0.0195). The mRNA level of Psoriasin was found to be higher in the squamous carcinoma (P=0.035). Higher Psoriasin expression is associated with poor prognosis. The cell function tests had supportive results to the clinical findings. Over-expression of Posriasin in lung cancer cells (SK-MES-1) resulted in an increase in in vitro growth and invasiveness. In contrast, Psoriasin knockdown suppressed cell growth and invasion (P<0.05), but increased cell adhesion (P<0.05). Psoriasin expression is increased in lung cancer, more specifically in lung squamous carcinoma compared with adenocarcinoma, and is associated with poor prognosis. Psoriasin plays crucial roles in regulating the growth and

  9. Cediranib Maleate and Whole Brain Radiation Therapy in Patients With Brain Metastases From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    Male Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Tumors Metastatic to Brain

  10. Medical treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer: progress in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong SONG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer is the most common pathological type of lung cancer. Along with the rising incidence in recent years, lung cancer has been the leading cause of death due to malignancies both in our country and worldwide. Due to simplistic therapeutic approach for lung cancer decades ago, those patients suffering from advanced lung cancer had short lifetime, and it was difficult to ensure their life quality. In recent years, many molecular targeted drugs, such as Gefitinib, Erlotinib and Crizotinib etc., have been successively applied in clinical use, and they bring about a substantial prolongation of survival life and improvement in life quality of those patients with advanced lung cancer. In 2014, there was a number of important reports concerning the diagnosis and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer in the annual meetings of either American Society of Clinical Oncology or European Society for Medical Oncology. On the basis of the relevant reports delivered in the conferences, it is our attempt to summarize the recent advances in regard to chemotherapy, molecular targeted therapy, measures to treat TKI therapy resistant cases, and immune therapy, followed by a comment regarding recent advances in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer in 2014. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.01.03

  11. Effects of Monoclonal Antibody Cetuximab on Proliferation of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen CHEN

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab has been used widely in non-small cell lung cancer patients. The aim of this study is to explore the effect of lung cancer cells (A549, H460, H1299, SPC-A-1 which were treated by cetuximab in vitro. Methods We studied the effects of increasing concentrations of cetuximab (1 nmol/L-625 nmol/L in four human lung cancer cell lines (A549, SPC-A-1, H460, H1229. CCK8 measured the inhibition of cell proliferation in each group. A549, SPC-A-1 were marked by PI and the statuses of apoptosis were observed. Western blot were used to detect the proliferation-related signaling protein and apoptosis-related protein in A549. Results The treatment with cetuximab resulted in the effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis in a time- and dosedependent manner. The expression of activated key enzymes (p-AKT, p-EGFR, p-MAPK in EGFR signaling transduction pathway were down-regulated more obviously. Conclusion Cetuximab is an effective targeted drug in the treatment of lung cancer cell lines, tissues, most likely to contribute to the inhibition of key enzymes in EGFR signaling transduction pathway.

  12. Presence of urokinase plasminogen activator, its inhibitor and receptor in small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pappot, H.; Pfeiffer, P.; Grøndahl Hansen, J.; Skov, B.G.

    1997-01-01

    Spreading of cancer cells is dependent on the combined action of several proteolytic enzymes, such as serine proteases, comprising the urokinase pathway of plasminogen activation. Previous studies of lung cancer indicate that expression, localization and prognostic impact of the components of the...

  13. Selective Antitumor Activity of Ibrutinib in EGFR-Mutant Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Wen; Wang, Michael; Wang, Li; Lu, Haibo; Wu, Shuhong; Dai, Bingbing; Ou, Zhishuo; Zhang, Liang; Heymach, John V.; Gold, Kathryn A.; Minna, John ,; Roth, Jack A.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Fang, Bingliang

    2014-01-01

    Ibrutinib, which irreversibly inhibits Bruton tyrosine kinase, was evaluated for antitumor activity in a panel of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and found to selectively inhibit growth of NSCLC cells carrying mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, including T790M mutant and erlotinib-resistant H1975 cells. Ibrutinib induced dose-dependent inhibition of phosphor-EGFR at both Y1068 and Y1173 sites, suggesting ibrutinib functions as an EGFR inhibitor. Survi...

  14. Lung Adenocarcinomas and Lung Cancer Cell Lines Show Association of MMP-1 Expression With STAT3 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Schütz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 is constitutively activated in the majority of lung cancer. This study aims at defining connections between STAT3 function and the malignant properties of non–small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC cells. To address possible mechanisms by which STAT3 influences invasiveness, the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1 was analyzed and correlated with the STAT3 activity status. Studies on both surgical biopsies and on lung cancer cell lines revealed a coincidence of STAT3 activation and strong expression of MMP-1. MMP-1 and tyrosine-phosphorylated activated STAT3 were found co-localized in cancer tissues, most pronounced in tumor fronts, and in particular in adenocarcinomas. STAT3 activity was constitutive, although to different degrees, in the lung cancer cell lines investigated. Three cell lines (BEN, KNS62, and A549 were identified in which STAT3 activitation was inducible by Interleukin-6 (IL-6. In A549 cells, STAT3 activity enhanced the level of MMP-1 mRNA and stimulated transcription from the MMP-1 promoter in IL-6–stimulated A549 cells. STAT3 specificity of this effect was confirmed by STAT3 knockdown through RNA interference. Our results link aberrant activity of STAT3 in lung cancer cells to malignant tumor progression through up-regulation of expression of invasiveness-associated MMPs.

  15. Identification of Gene Biomarkers for Distinguishing Small-Cell Lung Cancer from Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using a Network-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Long

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer consists of two main subtypes: small-cell lung cancer (SCLC and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC that are classified according to their physiological phenotypes. In this study, we have developed a network-based approach to identify molecular biomarkers that can distinguish SCLC from NSCLC. By identifying positive and negative coexpression gene pairs in normal lung tissues, SCLC, or NSCLC samples and using functional association information from the STRING network, we first construct a lung cancer-specific gene association network. From the network, we obtain gene modules in which genes are highly functionally associated with each other and are either positively or negatively coexpressed in the three conditions. Then, we identify gene modules that not only are differentially expressed between cancer and normal samples, but also show distinctive expression patterns between SCLC and NSCLC. Finally, we select genes inside those modules with discriminating coexpression patterns between the two lung cancer subtypes and predict them as candidate biomarkers that are of diagnostic use.

  16. The Research Progress about Wnt Pathway of Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaojiang; Jia, Yingjie; Wenzhi ZHANG; Zhang, Ying; Li, Baole; Minna HUANG; Bao, Fangfang; Wu, Jianguo; Lou, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Being the most critical signaling molecule in the Wnt pathway, the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays an important role in the maintenance of the cell proliferation and clone formation of lung cancer stem cells. Since it is closely related to the WNT pathway, the proliferation of lung cancer stem cells can be restrained by blocking the WNT pathway or influencing its key protein. Such method provides a new method for the treatment of lung cancer. By summarizing the state of-the-art research...

  17. CXCR4/CXCL12 in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Metastasis to the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Cavallaro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer represents the leading cause of cancer-related mortality throughout the world. Patients die of local progression, disseminated disease, or both. At least one third of the people with lung cancer develop brain metastases at some point during their disease, even often before the diagnosis of lung cancer is made. The high rate of brain metastasis makes lung cancer the most common type of tumor to spread to the brain. It is critical to understand the biologic basis of brain metastases to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. This review will focus on the emerging data supporting the involvement of the chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 in the brain metastatic evolution of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC and the pharmacological tools that may be used to interfere with this signaling axis.

  18. Celecoxib increases lung cancer cell lysis by lymphokine-activated killer cells via upregulation of ICAM-1

    OpenAIRE

    Schellhorn, Melina; Haustein, Maria; Frank, Marcus; Linnebacher, Michael; Hinz, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    The antitumorigenic mechanism of the selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor celecoxib is still a matter of debate. Using lung cancer cell lines (A549, H460) and metastatic cells derived from a lung cancer patient, the present study investigates the impact of celecoxib on the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and cancer cell lysis by lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells. Celecoxib, but not other structurally related selective COX-2 inhibitors (i.e., etoricoxib, ...

  19. Cell cycle arrest biomarkers in human lung cancer cells after treatment with selenium in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swede, Helen; Dong, Yan; Reid, Mary; Marshall, James; Ip, Clement

    2003-11-01

    In the planning of future intervention trials using chemopreventive agents against lung cancer, it is critical to evaluate the effect on biomarkers implicated specifically in lung carcinogenesis. With the use of the H520 and H522 human lung cancer cell lines, the present study showed that treatment with selenium (in the form of methylseleninic acid) inhibited cell growth, arrested cell cycle progression at G(1), and induced apoptosis as a late event. Because H520 cells were more sensitive to selenium than H522 cells (IC(50) of MSA was 2.5 or 10 micro M for H520 or H522 cells, respectively, at 24 h), a panel of nine cell cycle regulatory proteins known to be involved in G(1)-->S transition was assessed by Western analysis using whole cell lysate from H520 cells. These nine proteins (DP1, cdc25A, cyclin A, cyclin B(1), cyclin D(1), cdk1, cdk5, p21(WAF1), and GADD153) have been reported previously by our laboratory to be modulated by MSA in human breast and prostate cancer cells. Our data showed that only four (DP1, cdc25A, p21(WAF1), and GADD153) of nine biomarkers produced the expected changes after treatment of lung cancer cells with MSA. This finding raises the possibility that the molecular targets sensitive to selenium modulation may be tissue specific. Thus, the selection of selenium biomarkers for evaluation in an intervention trial must be based on empirical data derived from the cancer cell type of interest. PMID:14652289

  20. Targeting DNA Damage Response in the Radio(Chemo)therapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ling Li; Tao Zhu; Yuan-Feng Gao; Wei Zheng; Chen-Jing Wang; Ling Xiao; Ma-Sha Huang; Ji-Ye Yin; Hong-Hao Zhou; Zhao-Qian Liu

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide due to its high incidence and mortality. As the most common lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a terrible threat to human health. Despite improvements in diagnosis and combined treatments including surgical resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the overall survival for NSCLC patients still remains poor. DNA damage is considered to be the primary cause of lung cancer development and is normally recognized and repair...

  1. Non-small cell lung cancer cell survival crucially depends on functional insulin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Carolin Maria; Zimmermann, Katrin; Zilleßen, Pia; Pfeifer, Alexander; Racké, Kurt; Mayer, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Insulin plays an important role as a growth factor and its contribution to tumor proliferation is intensely discussed. It acts via the cognate insulin receptor (IR) but can also activate the IGF1 receptor (IGF1R). Apart from increasing proliferation, insulin might have additional effects in lung cancer. Therefore, we investigated insulin action and effects of IR knockdown (KD) in three (NCI-H292, NCI-H226 and NCI-H460) independent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. All lung cancer lines studied were found to express IR, albeit with marked differences in the ratio of the two variants IR-A and IR-B. Insulin activated the classical signaling pathway with IR autophosphorylation and Akt phosphorylation. Moreover, activation of MAPK was observed in H292 cells, accompanied by enhanced proliferation. Lentiviral shRNA IR KD caused strong decrease in survival of all three lines, indicating that the effects of insulin in lung cancer go beyond enhancing proliferation. Unspecific effects were ruled out by employing further shRNAs and different insulin-responsive cells (human pre-adipocytes) for comparison. Caspase assays demonstrated that IR KD strongly induced apoptosis in these lung cancer cells, providing the physiological basis of the rapid cell loss. In search for the underlying mechanism, we analyzed alterations in the gene expression profile in response to IR KD. A strong induction of certain cytokines (e.g. IL20 and tumour necrosis factor) became obvious and it turned out that these cytokines trigger apoptosis in the NSCLC cells tested. This indicates a novel role of IR in tumor cell survival via suppression of pro-apoptotic cytokines. PMID:26113601

  2. Cancer Stem Cell Radioresistance and Enrichment: Where Frontline Radiation Therapy May Fail in Lung and Esophageal Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many studies have highlighted the role cancer stem cells (CSC) play in the development and progression of various types of cancer including lung and esophageal cancer. More recently, it has been proposed that the presence of CSCs affects treatment efficacy and patient prognosis. In reviewing this new area of cancer biology, we will give an overview of the current literature regarding lung and esophageal CSCs and radioresistance of CSC, and discuss the potential therapeutic applications of these findings

  3. AKAP4 is a circulating biomarker for non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Li, Anping; Chang, David H.; Liu, Qin; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Yan, Jinchun; Korst, Robert J.; Nam, Brian T.; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Lin; Ganepola, Ganepola A.P.; Showe, Louise C.; Huang, Qihong

    2015-01-01

    Cancer testis antigens (CTAs) are widely expressed in tumor tissues, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and in cancer derived exosomes that are frequently engulfed by lymphoid cells. To determine whether tumor derived CTA mRNAs could be detected in RNA from purified peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, we assayed for the expression of 116 CTAs in PBMC RNA in a discovery set and identified AKAP4 as a potential NSCLC biomarker. We validated AKAP4 as a highly accurate biomarker in a cohort of 264 NSCLCs and 135 controls from 2 different sites including a subset of controls with high risk lung nodules. When all (264) lung cancers were compared with all (135) controls the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.9714. When 136 stage I NSCLC lung cancers are compared with all controls the AUC is 0.9795 and when all lung cancer patients were compared to 27 controls with histologically confirmed benign lung nodules, a comparison of significant clinical importance, the AUC was 0.9825. AKAP4 expression increases significantly with tumor stage, but independent of age, gender, smoking history or cancer subtype. Follow-up studies in a small number of resected NSCLC patients revealed a decrease of AKAP4 expression post-surgical resection that remained low in patients in remission and increased with tumor recurrence. AKAP4 is a highly accurate biomarker for the detection of early stage lung cancer. PMID:26160834

  4. The treatment Results of Radiotherapy for nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From Nov. 1983 through Jan. 1986, 43 patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer were treated by radiation therapy at Inje Medical College Paik Hospital. 38 patients were available for the analysis of this study. 33 patients received definite irradiation with curative intent, while 5 patients received postoperative irradiation. Chemotherapy was added in 12 patients before, during and after radio-therapy. 28 patients were squamous cell carcinoma and 10 patients were adenocarcinoma. There were 29 men and 9 women (median age, 58 years; range 34 to 74 years). Stage I was 1 patient, Stage 11, 7 patient, and Stage 111, 30 patients. Among 33 patients who received radiotherapy with curative intent, follow up radiological study revealed complete response in 12 patients (36%), partial response, in 9 patients (27%), and minimal response, in 5 patients (15%), while 7 patients (21%) were nonresponders. Median survival for all patients was 6.9 months; squamous cell carcinoma, 7.3 months, adenocarcinoma, 5.9 months. Responders survived median 7 months, while nonresponders survived median 1.9 months. Improved complete response rate and survival were shown in high radiation dose group. As prognostic factors, age, initial performance status, sex, histology and tumor location were evaluated

  5. Metformin inhibits lung cancer cells proliferation through repressing microRNA-222.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuqi; Dai, Weimin; Chu, Xiangyang; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Ming; Sun, Yu'e

    2013-12-01

    Metformin, which is commonly used as an oral anti-hyperglycemic agent of the biguanide family, may reduce cancer risk and improve prognosis. However, the mechanism by which metformin affects various cancers, including lung cancer, remains unknown. MiR-222 induces cell growth and cell cycle progression via direct targeting of p27, p57 and PTEN in cancer cells. In the present study, we used A549 and NCI-H358 human lung cancer cell lines to study the effects and mechanisms of metformin. Metformin treatment reduced expression of miR-222 in these cells (p metformin. Therefore, these data provide novel evidence for a mechanism that may contribute to the anti-neoplastic effects of metformin suggested by recent population studies and justifying further work to explore potential roles for it in lung cancer treatment. PMID:23974492

  6. Activation of AIFM2 enhances apoptosis of human lung cancer cells undergoing toxicological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Chen, Jian; Xu, Nianjun; Wu, Jun; Kang, Yani; Shen, Tingting; Kong, Hualei; Ma, Chao; Cheng, Ming; Shao, Zhifeng; Xu, Ling; Zhao, Xiaodong

    2016-09-01

    Application of cisplatin (DDP) for treating lung cancer is restricted due to its toxicity and lung cancer's drug resistance. In this study, we examined the effect of Jinfukang (JFK), an effective herbal medicine against lung cancer, on DDP-induced cytotoxicity in lung cancer cells. Morphologically, we observed that JFK increases DDP-induced pro-apoptosis in A549 cells in a synergistic manner. Transcriptome profiling analysis indicated that the combination of JFK and DDP regulates genes involved in apoptosis-related signaling pathways. Moreover, we found that the combination of JFK and DDP produces synergistic pro-apoptosis effect in other lung cancer cell lines, such as NCI-H1975, NCI-H1650, and NCI-H2228. Particularly, we demonstrated that AIFM2 is activated by the combined treatment of JFK and DDP and partially mediates the synergistic pro-apoptosis effect. Collectively, this study not only offered the first evidence that JFK promotes DDP-induced cytotoxicity, and activation of AIFM2 enhances apoptosis of human lung cancer cells undergoing toxicological stress, but also provided a novel insight for improving cytotoxicity by combining JFK with DDP to treat lung cancer cells. PMID:27392435

  7. Mechanism of multidrug resistance of human small cell lung cancer cell line H446/VP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan-ling; YAN Yun-li; ZHOU Na-jing; HAN Shuo; ZHAO Jun-xia; CAO Cui-li; Lü Yu-hong

    2010-01-01

    Background Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is the most aggressive form of lung cancer. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of human small cell lung cancer cell line resistance to etoposide (VP-16), H446/VP.Methods The cell viability was measured by M∏ assay. Immunocytochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting methods were used to detect the multidrug resistance gene (MDR1), bcl-2, bax and the topoisomerase Ⅱ (Topo Ⅱ) expressions in H446 and H446/VP cells after treated with or without VP-16.Results The 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) of VP-16 on H446 cells was 49 mg/L, and 836 mg/L was for H446/VP cells. The expressions of MDR1 and bcl-2 were up-regulated, while the amounts of bax and Topo Ⅱ were reduced in H446/VP cells. After treated with 49 mg/L of VP-16, it showed that the drug could significantly inhibit bcl-2 and Topo Ⅱ expressions, and increase bax expression in H446 cells compared with that of H446/VP cells.Conclusions The H446/VP cell was stably resistant to VP-16. The decreased expression of Topo Ⅱ was correlated with the H446/VP multidrug resistance. The elevated expressions of MDR1, and the altered apoptotic pathways also played an important role in VP-16 induced multidrug resistance of SCLC.

  8. Non-small cell lung cancer stem/progenitor cells are enriched in multiple distinct phenotypic subpopulations and exhibit plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Akunuru, S; James Zhai, Q; Zheng, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a population of cancer cells that possess unique self-renewal and differentiation characteristics required for tumorigenesis and are resistant to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. Lung CSCs can be enriched by several markers including drug-resistant side population (SP), CD133pos and ALDHhigh. Using human non-small cell lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and patient-derived primary tumor cells, we demonstrate that SP cells represent a subpopulation distinct from o...

  9. S100P interacts with integrin α7 and increases cancer cell migration and invasion in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ya-Ling; Hung, Jen-Yu; Liang, Yung-Yu; Lin, Yi-Shiuan; Tsai, Ming-Ju; Chou, Shah-Hwa; Lu, Chi-Yu; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2015-10-01

    S100P, a Ca2+ binding protein, has been shown to be overexpressed in various cancers. However, its functional character in lung cancer remains largely unknown. In this study, we show that S100P increases cancer migration, invasion and metastasis in lung cancer cells. Ectopic expression of S100P increases migration, invasion and EMT in less invasive CL1-0 lung cancer cells. Conversely, knockdown of S100P suppressed migration and invasion, and caused a reversion of EMT in highly invasive lung cancer cells. These effects were transduced by increasing the interaction of S100P with integrin α7, which activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and AKT. Blocking FAK significantly decreased S100P-induced migration by decreasing Src and AKT activation, whereas inhibiting AKT reduced S100P upregulation on ZEB1 expression. Further study has indicated that S100P knockdown prevents the spread of highly metastatic human lung cancer in animal models. This study therefore suggests that S100P represents a critical activator of lung cancer metastasis. Detection and targeted treatment of S100P-expressing cancer is an attractive therapeutic strategy in treating lung cancer. PMID:26320193

  10. Therapeutic vaccines in non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socola, Francisco; Scherfenberg, Naomi; Raez, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) unfortunately carries a very poor prognosis. Patients usually do not become symptomatic, and therefore do not seek treatment, until the cancer is advanced and it is too late to employ curative treatment options. New therapeutic options are urgently needed for NSCLC, because even current targeted therapies cure very few patients. Active immunotherapy is an option that is gaining more attention. A delicate and complex interplay exists between the tumor and the immune system. Solid tumors utilize a variety of mechanisms to evade immune detection. However, if the immune system can be stimulated to recognize the tumor as foreign, tumor cells can be specifically eliminated with little systemic toxicity. A number of vaccines designed to boost immunity against NSCLC are currently undergoing investigation in phase III clinical trials. Belagenpumatucel-L, an allogeneic cell vaccine that decreases transforming growth factor (TGF-β) in the tumor microenvironment, releases the immune suppression caused by the tumor and it has shown efficacy in a wide array of patients with advanced NSCLC. Melanoma-associated antigen A3 (MAGE-A3), an antigen-based vaccine, has shown promising results in MAGE-A3+ NSCLC patients who have undergone complete surgical resection. L-BLP25 and TG4010 are both antigenic vaccines that target the Mucin-1 protein (MUC-1), a proto-oncogene that is commonly mutated in solid tumors. CIMAVax is a recombinant human epidermal growth factor (EGF) vaccine that induces anti-EGF antibody production and prevents EGF from binding to its receptor. These vaccines may significantly improve survival and quality of life for patients with an otherwise dismal NSCLC prognosis. This review is intended to give an overview of the current data and the most promising studies of active immunotherapy for NSCLC.

  11. Effect of BRCA1 on radiosensitivity of different lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effects BRCA1 on sensitivity of lung cancer cells to γ-irradiation. Methods: A mammalian expression pcDNA3 vectors encoding a full-length of BRCA1 cDNA and BRCA1 siRNA were transfected into lung cancer cells. Western blot, MTT and clonogenic assays were used to determine BRCA1 protein expression and cell survival following γ-irradiation respectively. Results: There is a close relationship between BRCA1 level and radiosensitivity in different lung cancer cell lines. Compared with the control cells transfected with the 'empty' pcDNA3 vector and parental cells, the more survival of cells transfected with BRCA1 was observed after irradiation. The BRCA1-caused radioresistance were observed in both A549 and HTB-58 lung cancer lines. However, NIH-H2170 cells transfected with BRCA1 siRNA became more sensitive to γ-irradiation. Conclusion: This study, for the first time, demonstrates that the alteration of BRCA1 expression significantly affects radiosensitivity of lung cancer, indicating that BRCA1 may be an important mediator in radiotherapy of lung cancer cells. (authors)

  12. Iron induces cancer stem cells and aggressive phenotypes in human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanvorachote, Pithi; Luanpitpong, Sudjit

    2016-05-01

    Evidence has accumulated in support of the critical impact of cancer stem cells (CSCs) behind the chemotherapeutic failure, cancer metastasis, and subsequent disease recurrence and relapse, but knowledge of how CSCs are regulated is still limited. Redox status of the cells has been shown to dramatically influence cell signaling and CSC-like aggressive behaviors. Here, we investigated how subtoxic concentrations of iron, which have been found to specifically induce cellular hydroxyl radical, affected CSC-like subpopulations of human non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). We reveal for the first time that subchronic iron exposure and higher levels of hydroxyl radical correlated well with increased CSC-like phenotypes. The iron-exposed NSCLC H460 and H292 cells exhibited a remarkable increase in propensities to form CSC spheroids and to proliferate, migrate, and invade in parallel with an increase in level of a well-known CSC marker, ABCG2. We further observed that such phenotypic changes induced by iron were not related to an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Instead, the sex-determining region Y (SRY)-box 9 protein (SOX9) was substantially linked to iron treatment and hydroxyl radical level. Using gene manipulations, including ectopic SOX9 overexpression and SOX9 short hairpin RNA knockdown, we have verified that SOX9 is responsible for CSC enrichment mediated by iron. These findings indicate a novel role of iron via hydroxyl radical in CSC regulation and its importance in aggressive cancer behaviors and likely metastasis through SOX9 upregulation. PMID:26911281

  13. The effect of adenovirus-mediated gene expression of FHIT in small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandi, Roza; Xu, Kai; Poulsen, Hans S;

    2011-01-01

    The candidate tumor suppressor fragile histidine traid (FHIT) is frequently inactivated in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Mutations in the p53 gene also occur in the majority of SCLC leading to the accumulation of the mutant protein. Here we evaluated the effect of FHIT gene therapy alone or in...

  14. XCR1 promotes cell growth and migration and is correlated with bone metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone metastasis occurs in approximately 30–40% patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but the mechanism underlying this bone metastasis remains poorly understood. The chemokine super family is believed to play an important role in tumor metastasis in lung cancer. The chemokine receptor XCR1 has been identified to promote cell proliferation and migration in oral cancer and ovarian carcinoma, but the role of XCR1 in lung cancer has not been reported. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that XCR1 was overexpressed in lung cancer bone metastasis as compared with that in patients with primary lung cancer. In addition, the XCR1 ligand XCL1 promoted the proliferation and migration of lung cancer cells markedly, and knockdown of XCR1 by siRNA abolished the effect of XCL1 in cell proliferation and migration. Furthermore, we identified JAK2/STAT3 as a novel downstream pathway of XCR1, while XCL1/XCR1 increased the mRNA level of the downstream of JAK2/STAT3 including PIM1, JunB, TTP, MMP2 and MMP9. These results indicate that XCR1 is a new potential therapeutic target for the treatment of lung cancer bone metastasis. - Highlights: • XCR1 is overexpressed in bone metastasis compared with primary NSCLC. • XCR1 activation by XCL1 promotes lung cancer cell proliferation and migration. • JAK2/STAT3 is a novel potential downstream pathway of XCR1

  15. XCR1 promotes cell growth and migration and is correlated with bone metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ting; Han, Shuai; Wu, Zhipeng; Han, Zhitao; Yan, Wangjun; Liu, Tielong; Wei, Haifeng; Song, Dianwen; Zhou, Wang, E-mail: brilliant212@163.com; Yang, Xinghai, E-mail: cnspineyang@163.com; Xiao, Jianru, E-mail: jianruxiao83@163.com

    2015-08-21

    Bone metastasis occurs in approximately 30–40% patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but the mechanism underlying this bone metastasis remains poorly understood. The chemokine super family is believed to play an important role in tumor metastasis in lung cancer. The chemokine receptor XCR1 has been identified to promote cell proliferation and migration in oral cancer and ovarian carcinoma, but the role of XCR1 in lung cancer has not been reported. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that XCR1 was overexpressed in lung cancer bone metastasis as compared with that in patients with primary lung cancer. In addition, the XCR1 ligand XCL1 promoted the proliferation and migration of lung cancer cells markedly, and knockdown of XCR1 by siRNA abolished the effect of XCL1 in cell proliferation and migration. Furthermore, we identified JAK2/STAT3 as a novel downstream pathway of XCR1, while XCL1/XCR1 increased the mRNA level of the downstream of JAK2/STAT3 including PIM1, JunB, TTP, MMP2 and MMP9. These results indicate that XCR1 is a new potential therapeutic target for the treatment of lung cancer bone metastasis. - Highlights: • XCR1 is overexpressed in bone metastasis compared with primary NSCLC. • XCR1 activation by XCL1 promotes lung cancer cell proliferation and migration. • JAK2/STAT3 is a novel potential downstream pathway of XCR1.

  16. A multi-analyte serum test for the detection of non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Farlow, E C; Vercillo, M S; Coon, J. S.; S. Basu; Kim, A.W.; Faber, L P; Warren, W H; Bonomi, P; Liptay, M. J.; Borgia, J A

    2010-01-01

    Background: In this study, we appraised a wide assortment of biomarkers previously shown to have diagnostic or prognostic value for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with the intent of establishing a multi-analyte serum test capable of identifying patients with lung cancer. Methods: Circulating levels of 47 biomarkers were evaluated against patient cohorts consisting of 90 NSCLC and 43 non-cancer controls using commercial immunoassays. Multivariate statistical methods were used on all biomar...

  17. Immune checkpoint inhibitors: the new frontier in non–small cell lung cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    El-Osta, Hazem; Shahid,Kamran; Mills, Glenn; Peddi, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Hazem El-Osta, Kamran Shahid, Glenn M Mills, Prakash Peddi Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA, USA Abstract: Lung cancer is the major cause for cancer-related death in the US. Although advances in chemotherapy and targeted therapy have improved the outcome of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer, its prognosis remains dismal. A deeper understanding of the complex interaction between the immune system an...

  18. B7-H6 expression in non-small cell lung cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiuqin; Zhang, Guangbo; Qin, Yan; Bai, Ruizhen; Huang, Jianan

    2014-01-01

    B7 family has been known to be a negative regulator of immunity response in patients with lung cancer. B7-H6 as a novel identified member of B7 family is found to trigger natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion by binding natural cytotoxicity receptor NKp30. Up until now, no investigations have been made about B7-H6 expression in lung cancer. We present the result of the B7-H6 prognostic value in 65 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues and 65 matched adjacent non-tu...

  19. XAF1 as a prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target in squamous cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yong-bing; SHU Jian; YANG Wen-tao; SHI Li; GUO Xu-feng; WANG Fei-ge; QIAN Yong-yue

    2011-01-01

    Background X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP)-associated factor 1 (XAF1) is a new tumor suppressor.Low expression of XAF1 is associated with poor prognosis of human cancers.However,the effect of XAF1 on lung cancerremains unknown.In this study,we investigated the expression of XAF1 and its role in squamous cell lung cancer.Methods Cancer tissues,cancer adjacent tissues and normal lung tissues were collected from 51 cases of squamous cell lung cancer.The expression of XAF1 mRNA was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).The expression of XAF1 protein was determined by Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining.Ad5/F35-XAF1 virus was generated.Cell proliferation and apoptosis were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method and flow cytometry (FACS),respectively.Results The levels of XAF1 protein and mRNA in cancer tissues were significantly lower than those in cancer adjacent and normal lung tissues (P <0.05).The low expression of XAF1 was associated with tumor grade,disease stage,differentiation status and lymph node metastasis in squamous cell lung cancer patients.The restoration of XAF1 expression mediated by Ad5/F35-XAF1 virus significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner.Conclusion XAF1 is a valuable prognostic marker in squamous cell lung cancer and may be a potential candidate gene for lung cancer therapy.

  20. Acute onset paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration in a patient with small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatia R

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available A patient with small cell lung cancer presented with a rare presentation of an acute onset pancerebellar dysfunction. His clinical condition markedly improved following the surgical removal of the tumor and chemo- and radiotherapy.

  1. Augmented delivery of gemcitabine in lung cancer cells exploring mannose anchored solid lipid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Namrata; Soni, Neetu; Pandey, Himanshu; Maheshwari, Rahul; Kesharwani, Prashant; Tekade, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Gemcitabine (GmcH) is an effective anti-cancer agent used in the chemotherapy of lung cancer. However, the clinical applications of GmcH has been impeded primarily due to its low blood residence time, unfavorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) profile, and poor penetration in the complex environment of lung cancer cells. Thus, the present study aims to formulate GmcH loaded mannosylated solid lipid nanoparticles (GmcH-SLNs) for improving its drug uptake into the lung cancer cells. GmcH-SLNs were prepared by emulsification and solvent evaporation process, and surface modification was done with mannose using ring opening technique. The cellular toxicity and cell uptake studies were performed in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cell line. The developed nanoformulation appears to be proficient in targeted delivery of GmcH with improved therapeutic effectiveness and enhanced safety. PMID:27459173

  2. Expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damstrup, L; Rygaard, K; Spang-Thomsen, M; Poulsen, H S

    1992-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor expression was evaluated in a panel of 21 small cell lung cancer cell lines with radioreceptor assay, affinity labeling, and Northern blotting. We found high-affinity receptors to be expressed in 10 cell lines. Scatchard analysis of the binding data...... lung cancer cell lines express the EGF receptor....... demonstrated that the cells bound between 3 and 52 fmol/mg protein with a KD ranging from 0.5 x 10(-10) to 2.7 x 10(-10) M. EGF binding to the receptor was confirmed by affinity-labeling EGF to the EGF receptor. The cross-linked complex had a M(r) of 170,000-180,000. Northern blotting showed the expression of...

  3. Triclosan Potentiates Epithelial-To-Mesenchymal Transition in Anoikis-Resistant Human Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Winitthana, Thidarat; Lawanprasert, Somsong; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2014-01-01

    Alteration of cancer cell toward mesenchymal phenotype has been shown to potentiate tumor aggressiveness by increasing cancer cell metastasis. Herein, we report the effect of triclosan, a widely used antibacterial agent found in many daily products, in enhancing the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in aggressive anoikis resistant human H460 lung cancer cells. EMT has been long known to increase abilities of the cells to increase migration, invasion, and survival in circulating syste...

  4. Protein signature for non-small cell lung cancer prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Wu, Yong; Wang, Libo; Gao, Ling; Wang, Yingping; Liu, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Kai; Song, Jena; Wang, Hongxia; Bayer, Thomas A; Glaser, Laurel; Sun, Yezhou; Zhang, Weijia; Cutaia, Michael; Zhang, David Y; Ye, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Background: Current histopathological classification and TNM staging have limited accuracy in predicting survival and stratifying patients for appropriate treatment. The goal of the study is to determine whether the expression pattern of functionally important regulatory proteins can add additional values for more accurate classification and prognostication of non-small lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: The expression of 108 proteins and phosphoproteins in 30 paired NSCLC samples were assessed using Protein Pathway Array (PPA). The differentially expressed proteins were further confirmed using a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 94 NSCLC samples and were correlated with clinical data and survival. Results: Twelve of 108 proteins (p-CREB(Ser133), p-ERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204), Cyclin B1, p-PDK1(Ser241), CDK4, CDK2, HSP90, CDC2p34, β-catenin, EGFR, XIAP and PCNA) were selected to build the predictor to classify normal and tumor samples with 97% accuracy. Five proteins (CDC2p34, HSP90, XIAP, CDK4 and CREB) were confirmed to be differentially expressed between NSCLC (n=94) and benign lung tumor (n=19). Over-expression of CDK4 and HSP90 in tumors correlated with a favorable overall survival in all NSCLC patients and the over-expression of p-CREB(Ser133) and CREB in NSCLC correlated with a favorable survival in smokers and those with squamous cell carcinoma, respectively. Finally, the four proteins (CDK4, HSP90, p-CREB and CREB) were used to calculate the risk score of each individual patient with NSCLC to predict survival. Conclusion: In summary, our data demonstrated a broad disturbance of functionally important regulatory proteins in NSCLC and some of these can be selected as clinically useful biomarkers for diagnosis, classification and prognosis. PMID:24959380

  5. Ninjurin1 suppresses metastatic property of lung cancer cells through inhibition of interleukin 6 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yeong-Su; Kang, Ju-Hee; Woo, Jong Kyu; Kim, Hwan Mook; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Lee, Sang-Jin; Lee, Ho-Young; Oh, Seung Hyun

    2016-07-15

    Nerve injury-induced protein 1 (Ninjurin1, Ninj1) is a cell surface molecule that can mediate homophilic adhesion and promote neurite outgrowth from cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Interestingly, Ninj1 overexpressed in human cancer; however, its role in metastasis is not clear. This study showed that inhibition of Ninj1 promotes lung cancer metastasis through interleukin 6 (IL-6)/STAT3 signaling. Ninj1 levels were relatively low in highly motile lung cancer cells. While inhibition of Ninj1 enhanced cell migration in lung cancer cells, overexpression of Ninj1 significantly suppressed it. We found that inhibition of Ninj1 significantly increased expression and secretion of IL-6 in A549 cells. We also found that inhibition of IL-6 decreased intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expression. In addition, inhibition of Ninj1 significantly increased cell motility and invasiveness of lung cancer cells. In an in vivo model, we found that Ninj1 suppression did not affect tumor growth but induced significant increase in incidence of lung metastasis, and sizes and number of tumor nodules. Taken together, our data clearly demonstrate that Ninj1 suppresses migration, invasion and metastasis of lung cancer via inhibition of the IL-6 signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26815582

  6. Identification of uPAR-positive chemoresistant cells in small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Gutova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA and its receptor (uPAR/CD87 are major regulators of extracellular matrix degradation and are involved in cell migration and invasion under physiological and pathological conditions. The uPA/uPAR system has been of great interest in cancer research because it is involved in the development of most invasive cancer phenotypes and is a strong predictor of poor patient survival. However, little is known about the role of uPA/uPAR in small cell lung cancer (SCLC, the most aggressive type of lung cancer. We therefore determined whether uPA and uPAR are involved in generation of drug resistant SCLC cell phenotype. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We screened six human SCLC cell lines for surface markers for putative stem and cancer cells. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS, fluorescence microscopy and clonogenic assays to demonstrate uPAR expression in a subpopulation of cells derived from primary and metastatic SCLC cell lines. Cytotoxic assays were used to determine the sensitivity of uPAR-positive and uPAR-negative cells to chemotherapeutic agents. The uPAR-positive cells in all SCLC lines demonstrated multi-drug resistance, high clonogenic activity and co-expression of CD44 and MDR1, putative cancer stem cell markers. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that uPAR-positive cells may define a functionally important population of cancer cells in SCLC, which are resistant to traditional chemotherapies, and could serve as critical targets for more effective therapeutic interventions in SCLC.

  7. Inhibitory Activity of (+-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yang

    Full Text Available Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action.

  8. Preliminary study of steep pulse irreversible electroporation technology in human large cell lung cancer cell lines L9981

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Zuoqing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to validate the effectiveness of steep pulse irreversible electroporation technology in human large cell lung cancer cells and to screen the optimal treatment of parameters for human large cell lung cancer cells. Three different sets of steep pulse therapy parameters were applied on the lung cancer cell line L9981. The cell line L9981 inhibition rate and proliferation capacity were detected by Vi-Cell vitality analysis and MTT. Steep pulsed irreversible electroporation technology for large cell lung cancer L9981 presents killing effects with various therapy parameters. The optimal treatment parameters are at a voltage amplitude of 2000V/cm, pulse width of 100μs, pulse frequency of 1 Hz, pulse number 10. With this group of parameters, steep pulse could have the best tumor cell-killing effects.

  9. Wnt signaling pathway in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David J

    2014-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin alterations are prominent in human malignancies. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), β-catenin and APC mutations are uncommon, but Wnt signaling is important in NSCLC cell lines, and Wnt inhibition reduces proliferation. Overexpression of Wnt-1, -2, -3, and -5a and of Wnt-pathway components Frizzled-8, Dishevelled, Porcupine, and TCF-4 is common in resected NSCLC and is associated with poor prognosis. Conversely, noncanonical Wnt-7a suppresses NSCLC development and is often downregulated. Although β-catenin is often expressed in NSCLCs, it was paradoxically associated with improved prognosis in some series, possibly because of E-cadherin interactions. Downregulation of Wnt inhibitors (eg, by hypermethylation) is common in NSCLC tumor cell lines and resected samples; may be associated with high stage, dedifferentiation, and poor prognosis; and has been reported for AXIN, sFRPs 1-5, WIF-1, Dkk-1, Dkk-3, HDPR1, RUNX3, APC, CDX2, DACT2, TMEM88, Chibby, NKD1, EMX2, ING4, and miR-487b. AXIN is also destabilized by tankyrases, and GSK3β may be inactivated through phosphorylation by EGFR. Preclinically, restoration of Wnt inhibitor function is associated with reduced Wnt signaling, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis. Wnt signaling may also augment resistance to cisplatin, docetaxel, and radiotherapy, and Wnt inhibitors may restore sensitivity. Overall, available data indicate that Wnt signaling substantially impacts NSCLC tumorigenesis, prognosis, and resistance to therapy, with loss of Wnt signaling inhibitors by promoter hypermethylation or other mechanisms appearing to be particularly important. Wnt pathway antagonists warrant exploration clinically in NSCLC. Agents blocking selected specific β-catenin interactions and approaches to increase expression of downregulated Wnt inhibitors may be of particular interest. PMID:24309006

  10. Treatment Algorithms for Patients with Metastatic Non-Small Cell, Non-Squamous Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Melosky, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    A number of developments have altered the treatment paradigm for metastatic non-small cell, non-squamous lung cancer. These include increasing knowledge of molecular signal pathways, as well as the outcomes of several large-scale trials. As a result, treatments are becoming more efficacious and more personalized, and are changing the management and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer patients. This is resulting in increased survival in select patient groups. In this paper, a simplified al...

  11. Chemotherapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: Role of paclitaxel and gemcitabine

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, WK; Tsang, KWT; Ip, MSM

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To review the role of chemotherapy in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, focusing on cisplatin-based regimens and two new drugs: paclitaxel and gemcitabine. Data sources. Medline search of the relevant English literature. Study selection. Open and randomised comparative (phases II and III) studies, and meta-analyses of cytotoxic drugs/regimens used to treat advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. Data extraction. The following factors were studied and compared: symptomatic response ...

  12. Properties of resistant cells generated from lung cancer cell lines treated with EGFR inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling plays an important role in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and therapeutics targeted against EGFR have been effective in treating a subset of patients bearing somatic EFGR mutations. However, the cancer eventually progresses during treatment with EGFR inhibitors, even in the patients who respond to these drugs initially. Recent studies have identified that the acquisition of resistance in approximately 50% of cases is due to generation of a secondary mutation (T790M) in the EGFR kinase domain. In about 20% of the cases, resistance is associated with the amplification of MET kinase. In the remaining 30-40% of the cases, the mechanism underpinning the therapeutic resistance is unknown. An erlotinib resistant subline (H1650-ER1) was generated upon continuous exposure of NSCLC cell line NCI-H1650 to erlotinib. Cancer stem cell like traits including expression of stem cell markers, enhanced ability to self-renew and differentiate, and increased tumorigenicity in vitro were assessed in erlotinib resistant H1650-ER1 cells. The erlotinib resistant subline contained a population of cells with properties similar to cancer stem cells. These cells were found to be less sensitive towards erlotinib treatment as measured by cell proliferation and generation of tumor spheres in the presence of erlotinib. Our findings suggest that in cases of NSCLC accompanied by mutant EGFR, treatment targeting inhibition of EGFR kinase activity in differentiated cancer cells may generate a population of cancer cells with stem cell properties

  13. Genetic and Prognostic Differences of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer between Elderly Patients and Younger Counterparts

    OpenAIRE

    Suda, Kenichi; Tomizawa, Kenji; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Ito, Simon; Kitahara, Hirokazu; Shimamatsu, Shinichiro; Kohno, Mikihiro; Yoshida, Tsukihisa; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Yatabe, Yasushi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2012-01-01

    Many elderly patients suffer from lung cancers, but it is not clear if their lung cancers differ from those of younger patients. In this study, we compared genetic and prognostic characteristics of lung cancers of patients aged ≥75 years with those of patients aged ≤ 64 years. In the genetic analysis, we explored 292 surgically treated non-squamous cell lung cancers with known mutational status of epidermal growth factor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). In the prognostic analysis,...

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Inhalable Flavonoid Nanoparticle for Lung Cancer Cell Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wing-Hin; Loo, Ching-Yee; Ong, Hui-Xin; Traini, Daniela; Young, Paul M; Rohanizadeh, Ramin

    2016-02-01

    Current cancer treatments are not adequate to cure cancer disease, as most chemotherapeutic drugs do not differentiate between cancerous and non-cancerous cells; which lead to systemic toxicity and adverse effects. We have developed a promising approach to deliver a potential anti-cancer compound (curcumin) for lung cancer treatment through pulmonary delivery. Three different sizes of curcumin micellar nanoparticles (Cur-NPs) were fabricated and their cytotoxicity effects (proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle progression) were evaluated against non-small-cell lung cancer, human lung carcinoma (A549) and human lung adenocarcinoma (Calu-3). The in vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that Cur-NPs were more effective to kill lung cancer cells compared to DMSO-solubilised raw curcumin. The potency of the anti-cancer killing activities was size-dependent. Both raw curcumin and Cur-NPs were not toxic to healthy lung cells (BEAS-2B). Smaller Cur-NPs accumulated within nucleus, membrane and cytoplasm. Cur-NPs also induced apoptosis and caused G2/M arrest in both A549 and Calu-3 cell lines. Compared to raw curcumin, Cur-NPs were more effective in suppressing the expression of the inflammatory marker, Interleukin-8 (IL8). The aerosol performance of Cur-NPs was characterized using the next generation impactor (NGI). All Cur-NPs showed promising aerosolization property with mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and geometric standard deviation (GSD) ranging between 4.8-5.2 and 2.0-2.1, respectively. This study suggests that inhaled curcumin nanoparticles could potentially be used for lung cancer treatment with minimal side effects. PMID:27305771

  15. Expression of TMPRSS4 in non-small cell lung cancer and its modulation by hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    NGUYEN, TRI-HUNG; WEBER, WILLIAM; HAVARI, EVIS; CONNORS, TIMOTHY; BAGLEY, REBECCA G.; McLAREN, RAJASHREE; Nambiar, Prashant R; Madden, Stephen L.; Teicher, Beverly A.; Roberts, Bruce; Kaplan, Johanne; SHANKARA, SRINIVAS

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of TMPRSS4, a cell surface-associated transmembrane serine protease, has been reported in pancreatic, colorectal and thyroid cancers, and has been implicated in tumor cell migration and metastasis. Few reports have investigated both TMPRSS4 gene expression levels and the protein products. In this study, quantitative RT-PCR and protein staining were used to assess TMPRSS4 expression in primary non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tissues and in lung tumor cell lines. At the tra...

  16. Effects of Curcuma longa Extract on Telomerase Activity in Lung and Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosratollah Zarghami

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of Curcuma longa extract on the telomerase gene expression in QU-DB lung cancer and T47D breast cancer cell lines. Materials and Methods: The present study is an experimental research. Using 3 different phases n-hexane, dichloromethane and methanol, total extract of Curcuma longa in a serial dilution was prepared and three phases was analyzed for determining which phase has more curcuminoids. Then the extract cytotoxicity effect was tested on breast cancer cell line (T47D, and lung cancer cell line (QU-DB by 24, 48 and 72 h MTT (Dimethyl thiazolyl diphenyl tetrazolium assay. Then, the cells were treated with serial concentrations of the extract. Finally, total protein was extracted from the control and test groups, its quantity was determined and telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP assay was performed for measurement of possible inhibition of the telomerase activity. Results: Cell viability and MTT-based cytotoxicity assay show that the total extract of Curcuma longa has cytotoxic effect with different IC50s in breast and lung cancer cell lines. Analysis of TRAP assay also shows a significant reduction in telomerase activity on both cancer cells with different levels. Conclusion: Curcuma longa extract has anti-proliferation and telomerase inhibitory effects on QU-DB lung cancer and T47D breast cancer cells with differences in levels of telomerase inhibition.

  17. Expression of transcription factor Klf8 in lung cancer tissue and the biological effect of downregulation of Klf8 expression in lung cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan-Hong Yi; Jing Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the expression of transcription factor Klf8 in lung cancer tissue and the biological effect of downregulation of Klf8 expression in lung cancer cell lines.Methods:Cancer tissue and adjacent normal lung tissue were collected and mRNA contents of Klf8 were detected; lung cancer A549 cell lines were cultured, and after transfection of Klf8 siRNA, cell cycle, cell invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition were detected.Results:mRNA contents of Klf8 in lung cancer tissue were higher than those in adjacent normal lung tissue; after transfection of Klf8 siRNA, Klf8 mRNA inhibition rate was 74.31%; G0/G1 phase ratio of Klf8 siRNA group was higher than that of negative control siRNA group; ratios of S-phase and G2/M phase cells, mRNA contents of Cyclin D1 and number of cells invading to the outer side of the transwell microporous membrane were lower than those of negative control siRNA group; mRNA contents of CDH1 and CK18 as well as Snail and Slug of Klf8 siRNA group were higher than those of negative control siRNA group; mRNA contents of VIM and N-cadherin were lower than those of negative control siRNA group.Conclusion:The expression of Klf8 in lung cancer tissue abnormally elevates; downregulation of Klf8 expression in lung cancer cell lines can inhibit malignant biological effect of cells, manifested as cell cycle arrest as well as the inhibition of cell invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition processes.

  18. Antitumor Effect of Antisense Ornithine Decarboxylase Adenovirus on Human Lung Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui TIAN; Lin LI; Xian-Xi LIU; Yan ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the first enzyme of polyamine biosynthesis, was found to increase in cancer cells, especially lung cancer cells. Some chemotherapeutic agents aimed at decreasing ODC gene expression showed inhibitory effects on cancer cells. In this study, we examined the effects of adenoviral transduced antisense ODC on lung cancer cells. An adenovirus carrying antisense ODC (rAd-ODC/Ex3as) was used to infect lung cancer cell line A-549. The 3-(4,5-me thylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was used to analyze the effect on cell growth. Expression of ODC and concentration of polyamines in cells were determined by Western blot analysis and high performance liquid chromatography. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotin-dUTP nick-end labeling was used to analyze cell apoptosis. The expression of ODC in A-549 cells was reduced to 54%, and that of three polyamines was also decreased through the rAd-ODC/Ex3as treatment. Consequently, cell growth was substantially inhibited and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotin-dUTP nick-end labeling showed that rAd-ODC/Ex3as could lead to cell apoptosis, with apoptosis index of 46%. This study suggests that rAd-ODC/Ex3as has an antitumor effect on the human lung cancer cells.

  19. Mitochondrial Variations in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Survival

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaoxi Wang; Sojung Choi; Jinseon Lee; Yen-Tsung Huang; Feng Chen; Yang Zhao; Xihong Lin; Donna Neuberg; Jhingook Kim; Christiani, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the mtDNA genome have long been suspected to play an important role in cancer. Although most cancer cells harbor mtDNA mutations, the question of whether such mutations are associated with clinical prognosis of lung cancer remains unclear. We resequenced the entire mitochondrial genomes of tumor tissue from a population of 250 Korean patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our analysis revealed that the haplogroup (D/D4) was associated with worse overall survival (OS) o...

  20. Expression of YKL-40 by peritumoral macrophages in human small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Nanna; Johansen, Julia S; Andersen, Claus B; Kristjansen, Paul E G

    2005-01-01

    YKL-40 is a 40 kDa protein with possible involvement in tissue remodeling, cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Elevated serum YKL-40 levels in patients with metastatic cancers (including small cell lung cancer (SCLC)) are associated with poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to identify the...... in the cancer cells, in macrophages infiltrating the solid tumor areas, or in non-malignant tissue. In conclusion, the predominant source of elevated serum YKL-40 in SCLC is peritumoral macrophages....

  1. Integrative genome analyses identify key somatic driver mutations of small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peifer, Martin; Fernandez-Cuesta, Lynnette; Sos, Martin L.; George, Julie; Seidel, Danila; Kasper, Lawryn H.; Plenker, Dennis; Leenders, Frauke; Sun, Ruping; Zander, Thomas; Menon, Roopika; Koker, Mirjam; Dahmen, Ilona; Mueller, Christian; Di Cerbo, Vincenzo; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Altmueller, Janine; Baessmann, Ingelore; Becker, Christian; de Wilde, Bram; Vandesompele, Jo; Boehm, Diana; Ansen, Sascha; Gabler, Franziska; Wilkening, Ines; Heynck, Stefanie; Heuckmann, Johannes M.; Lu, Xin; Carter, Scott L.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Banerji, Shantanu; Getz, Gad; Park, Kwon-Sik; Rauh, Daniel; Gruetter, Christian; Fischer, Matthias; Pasqualucci, Laura; Wright, Gavin; Wainer, Zoe; Russell, Prudence; Petersen, Iver; Chen, Yuan; Stoelben, Erich; Ludwig, Corinna; Schnabel, Philipp; Hoffmann, Hans; Muley, Thomas; Brockmann, Michael; Engel-Riedel, Walburga; Muscarella, Lucia A.; Fazio, Vito M.; Groen, Harry; Timens, Wim; Sietsma, Hannie; Thunnissen, Erik; Smit, Egbert; Heideman, Danielle A. M.; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Cappuzzo, Federico; Ligorio, Claudia; Damiani, Stefania; Field, John; Solberg, Steinar; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Saenger, Joerg; Clement, Joachim H.; Soltermann, Alex; Moch, Holger; Weder, Walter; Solomon, Benjamin; Soria, Jean-Charles; Validire, Pierre; Besse, Benjamin; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Brambilla, Christian; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Lorimier, Philippe; Schneider, Peter M.; Hallek, Michael; Pao, William; Meyerson, Matthew; Sage, Julien; Shendure, Jay; Schneider, Robert; Buettner, Reinhard; Wolf, Juergen; Nuernberg, Peter; Perner, Sven; Heukamp, Lukas C.; Brindle, Paul K.; Haas, Stefan; Thomas, Roman K.

    2012-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive lung tumor subtype with poor prognosis(1-3). We sequenced 29 SCLC exomes, 2 genomes and 15 transcriptomes and found an extremely high mutation rate of 7.4 +/- 1 protein-changing mutations per million base pairs. Therefore, we conducted integrated analys

  2. Highly tumorigenic lung cancer CD133+ cells display stem-like features and are spared by cisplatin treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Bertolini, Giulia; Roz, Luca; Perego, Paola; Tortoreto, Monica; Fontanella, Enrico; Gatti, Laura; Pratesi, Graziella; Fabbri, Alessandra; Andriani, Francesca; Tinelli, Stella; Roz, Elena; Caserini, Roberto; Lo Vullo, Salvatore; Camerini, Tiziana; Mariani, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    The identification of lung tumor-initiating cells and associated markers may be useful for optimization of therapeutic approaches and for predictive and prognostic information in lung cancer patients. CD133, a surface glycoprotein linked to organ-specific stem cells, was described as a marker of cancer-initiating cells in different tumor types. Here, we report that a CD133+, epithelial-specific antigen-positive (CD133+ESA+) population is increased in primary nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) ...

  3. Wif1 Hypermethylation as Unfavorable Prognosis of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers with EGFR Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Su Man; Park, Jae Yong; Kim, Dong Sun

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality across the world and tobacco smoking is the major risk factor. The Wnt signaling pathway is known to be involved in smoke-induced tumorigenesis in the lung. Promoter hypermethylation of Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (Wif1) has become a common event in a number of human tumors. Using a methylation-specific PCR, hypermethylation of the Wif1 gene promoter was evaluated in 139 primary non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) and its correlation wit...

  4. [Advances in Bevacizumab Therapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 
with Brain Metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Liyan; Geng, Rui; Song, Xia

    2016-08-20

    Brain metastases are frequently encountered in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Antiangiogenesis therapy plays a major role in the management of brain metastases in lung cancer. Bevacizumab have become the novel method for the treatment of lung cancer with brain metastases beyond the whole brain radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery and chemotherapy. Recently, more and more studies and trials laid emphasis on the bevacizumab for NSCLC with brain metastases treatment. The key point is the efficacy and safety. In this review, bevacizumab therapy of NSCLC with brain metastases were summarized. PMID:27561800

  5. Staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    OpenAIRE

    Rankin, S. C.

    2006-01-01

    Staging of non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) uses the TNM classification and is undertaken to identify those patients who are surgical candidates, either initially or after chemo-radiotherapy, and to differentiate patients who will be treated radically from those requiring palliation and to plan radiotherapy fields. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used in staging and provide anatomical information but have well known limitations in differentiating reactive from malign...

  6. Maintenance Therapies for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    NormandBlais

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of lung cancer had evolved during the last decade with the introduction of new chemotherapeutic regimens and targeted therapies. However, the maximum benefit reached after first-line therapy is limited by the cumulative toxicity of platinum drugs and the subsequent deterioration in performance status in a high percentage of patients who end up receiving not more than one line of treatment. Maintenance therapy had been introduced and evaluated in many large randomized trials showing ...

  7. Primary tumor genotype is an important determinant in identification of lung cancer propagating cells

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, Stephen J; Sinkevicius, Kerstin W; Li, Danan; Lau, Allison N; Roach, Rebecca R.; Zamponi, Raffaella; Woolfenden, Amber E.; Kirsch, David G.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Kim, Carla F

    2010-01-01

    Successful cancer therapy requires the elimination or incapacitation of all tumor cells capable of regenerating a tumor. Therapeutic advances therefore necessitate the characterization of the cells that are able to propagate a tumor in vivo. We show an important link between tumor genotype and isolation of tumor-propagating cells (TPCs). Three mouse models of the most common form of human lung cancer each had TPCs with a unique cell surface phenotype. The cell surface marker Sca1 did not enri...

  8. Palliation of symptoms in non-small cell lung cancer: a study by the Yorkshire Regional Cancer Organisation Thoracic Group.

    OpenAIRE

    Muers, M. F.; Round, C. E.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Although most treatment for non-small cell lung cancer is palliative, data on the adequacy of symptom control are scanty and there has been little discussion about the appropriate indices. METHODS--Two hundred and eighty nine unselected patients presenting sequentially to six specialists were studied; 242 cases were confirmed histologically and all were managed as non-small cell lung cancer. At presentation and two monthly for one year or until death each of 12 symptoms was graded...

  9. Regulation of Mitochondria-dependent Apoptosis in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Implications for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Checinska, A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The work described in this thesis focuses on the characterization of the mechanism(s) underlying the deregulated activation of the intrinsic or mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Apoptosis suppression might contribute to the chemoresistance often observed in NSCLC patients, and elucidation of the molecular causes of this resistance may provide clues for the development of targeted apoptosis-based therapies. In this introduction, lung cancer an...

  10. GENETIC ALTERRATIONS OF MICROSATELLITE MARKERS AT CHROMOSOME 17 IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; Xue-jun

    2001-01-01

    [1]Froudarakis ME, Bouros D, Spandidos DA, et al. Microsatellite instability and loss of heterozygosity at chromosomes 17 in non-small cell lung cancer [J]. Chest 1998; 113:1091.[2]Fong KM, Zimmerman PV, Smith PJ. Microsatellite instability and other molecular abnormalities in non-small cell lung cancer [J]. Cancer Res 1994; 54:2098.[3]Mountain CF. A new international staging system for lung cancer [J]. Chest 1986; 89(suppl):225.[4]Shridhar V, Siegfried J, Hunt J, et al. Genetic instability of microsatellite sequences in many non-small cell lung carcinomas [J]. Cancer Res 1994; 54:2084.[5]Loeb LA. Microsatellite instability: Marker of a mutator phenotype in cancer [J]. Cancer Res 1994; 54:5059.[6]Sanchez CM, Monzo M, Rosell R, et al. Detection of chromosome 3p alterations in serum DNA of non-small cell lung cancer patients [J]. Ann Oncol 1989; 113.

  11. Advanced Research of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 
in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan PU

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is severely threatening human health. In recent years, the treatment for lung adenocarcinoma has made a great progress, targeted therapy has been widely applied in clinic, and benefits amount of patients. However, in squamous cell lung cancer, the incidence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene mutant and ALK fusion gene are low,and targeted therapy like Tarceva and crizotinib, can hardly work. Since the fibroblast growth factors (fibroblast growth factor, FGF pathway is considered to be related to tumor cell proliferation, metastasis and angiogenesis, more and more researches proved the amplification of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR in squamous cell lung cancer. Experiments in vivo and in vitro found that blocking FGF pathway could reduce the proliferation of tumor cells and inhibit metastasis. The FGF pathway might be a new target for treatment of squamous cell lung cancer. This article reviews the effect of FGFR in tumorigenesis,as well as the prospect as a therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer.

  12. The proteasomal and apoptotic phenotype determine bortezomib sensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chęcińska Agnieszka

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bortezomib is a novel anti-cancer agent which has shown promising activity in non-small lung cancer (NSCLC patients. However, only a subset of patients respond to this treatment. We show that NSCLC cell lines are differentially sensitive to bortezomib, IC50 values ranging from 5 to 83 nM. The apoptosis-inducing potential of bortezomib in NSCLC cells was found to be dependent not only on the apoptotic phenotype but also on the proteasomal phenotype of individual cell lines. Upon effective proteasome inhibition, H460 cells were more susceptible to apoptosis induction by bortezomib than SW1573 cells, indicating a different apoptotic phenotype. However, exposure to a low dose of bortezomib did only result in SW1573 cells, and not in H460 cells, in inhibition of proteasome activity and subsequent apoptosis. This suggests a different proteasomal phenotype as well. Additionally, overexpression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in H460 cells did not affect the proteasomal phenotype of H460 cells but did result in decreased bortezomib-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, successful proteasome-inhibitor based treatment strategies in NSCLC face the challenge of having to overcome apoptosis resistance as well as proteasomal resistance of individual lung cancer cells. Further studies in NSCLC are warranted to elucidate underlying mechanisms.

  13. Functional image-based radiotherapy planning for non-small cell lung cancer: a simulation study

    OpenAIRE

    Bates, E.L.; Bragg, C.M.; Wild, J. M.; Hatton, M.Q.F.; Ireland, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the incorporation of data from single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (He-3-MRI) into intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and methods: Seven scenarios were simulated that represent cases of NSCLC with significant functional lung defects. Two independent IMRT plans were produced for each scenario; one to minimise total lung vo...

  14. Advances on Mechanisms of Coagulation with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhua LI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, researchers have been increasingly finding coagulation disorders are commonly the first sign of malignancy. It has now been established that cancer development leads to an increased risk of thrombosis, and conversely, excessive activation of blood coagulation profoundly influences cancer progression. In patients with lung cancer, a sustained stimulation of blood coagulation takes place. Cancer cells trigger coagulation through expression of tissue factor, and affect coagulation through expression of thrombin, release of microparticles that augment coagulation and so on. Coagulation also facilitates tumour progression through release of platelet granule contents, inhibition of natural killer cells and recruitment of macrophages. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC accounts for about 80%-85% of all lung malignancies. In the present review, we summarized the newly updated data about the physiopathological mechanisms of various components of the clotting system in different stages of carcinogenesis in NSCLC.

  15. Enhanced Anti-Cancer Effect of Snake Venom Activated NK Cells on Lung Cancer Cells by Inactivation of NF-κB

    OpenAIRE

    Kollipara, Pushpa Saranya; Won, Do Hee; Hwang, Chul Ju; Jung, Yu Yeon; Yoon, Heui Seoung; Park, Mi Hee; Song, Min Jong; Song, Ho Sueb; Hong, Jin Tae

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated anti-cancer effect of snake venom activated NK cells (NK-92MI) in lung cancer cell lines. We used snake venom (4 μg/ml) treated NK-92MI cells to co-culture with lung cancer cells. There was a further decrease in cancer cell growth up to 65% and 70% in A549 and NCI-H460 cell lines respectively, whereas 30–40% was decreased in cancer cell growth by snake venom or NK-92MI alone treatment. We further found that the expression of various apoptotic proteins suc...

  16. The regulation of cancer cell migration by lung cancer cell-derived exosomes through TGF-β and IL-10

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yuzhou; Yi, Jun; CHEN, XINGGUI; Zhang, Ying; Xu, Meng; Yang, Zhixiong

    2015-01-01

    Tumorigenesis has been considered to be as a result of abnormal cell-cell communication. It has been proposed that exosomes act as communicators between tumors and their microenvironment and have been demonstrated to be involved in tumorigenesis and subsequent metastasis. However, the mechanisms underlying the role of exosomes in these processes remains elusive. The present study sought to determine the underlying mechanisms. Using two lung cancer cell lines, it was demonstrated that exosomes...

  17. Osteopontin knockdown suppresses non-small cell lung cancer cell invasion and metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Bing-sheng; YOU Jian; LI Yue; ZHANG Zhen-fa; WANG Chang-li

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteopontin (OPN) was identified as one of the leading genes that promote the metastasis of malignant tumor.However,the mechanism by which OPN mediates metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains unknown.The aim of the study is to investigate the biological significance and the related molecular mechanism of OPN expression in lung cancer cell line.Methods Lentiviral-mediated RNA interference was applied to inhibit OPN expression in metastatic human NSCLC cell line (A549).The invasion,proliferation,and metastasis were evaluated OPN-silenced in A549 cells in vitro and in vivo.The related mechanism was further investigated.Results Interestingly,OPN knockdown significantly suppressed the invasiveness of A549 cells,but had only a minor effect on the cellular migration and proliferation.Moreover,we demonstrated that OPN knockdown significantly reduced the levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA),and led to an obviousinhibition of both in vitro invasion and in vivo lung metastasis of A549 cells (P <0.001).Conclusions Our data demonstrate that OPN contributes to A549 cell metastasis by stimulating cell invasion,independent of cellular migration and proliferation.OPN could be a new treatment target of NSCLC.

  18. A gene-alteration profile of human lung cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    R. Blanco; Iwakawa, R.; Tang, M; Kohno, T.; Angulo, B; Pio, R. (Rubén); Montuenga, L M; Minna, J D; Yokota, J; Sanchez-Cespedes, M.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Aberrant proteins encoded from genes altered in tumors drive cancer development and may also be therapeutic targets. Here we derived a comprehensive gene-alteration profile of lung cancer cell lines. We tested 17 genes in a panel of 88 lung cancer cell lines and found the rates of alteration to be higher than previously thought. Nearly all cells feature inactivation at TP53 and CDKN2A or RB1, whereas BRAF, MET, ERBB2, and NRAS alterations were infrequent. A p...

  19. Rap2b promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yi-Gen; Zhang, Zheng-Qun; Chen, Yan-Bin; Huang, Jian-An

    2016-10-01

    Rap2b, a member of the guanosine triphosphate-binding proteins, is widely up-regulated in many types of tumors. However, the functional role of Rap2b in tumorigenesis of lung cancer remains to be fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the effect of Rap2b on the lung cancer malignant phenotype, such as cell proliferation and metastasis. We found that Rap2b could promote the abilities of lung cancer cell wound healing, migration, and invasion via increasing matrix metalloproteinase-2 enzyme activity. Furthermore, Rap2b overexpression could increase the phosphorylation level of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1/2. In conclusion, our results suggested that Rap2b may be a potential therapeutic target for lung cancer. PMID:26671640

  20. First line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer – specific focus on albumin bound paclitaxel

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta N; Hatoum H; Dy GK

    2013-01-01

    Neha Gupta, Hassan Hatoum, Grace K DyDepartment of Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USAAbstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide in both men and women. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer, accounting for more than 80% of cases. Paclitaxel has a broad spectrum of activity against various malignancies, including NSCLC. Paclitaxel is poorly soluble in water and thus, until recently, its commercially availab...

  1. Rapamycin potentiates cytotoxicity by docetaxel possibly through downregulation of Survivin in lung cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hui

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To elucidate whether rapamycin, the inhibitor of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin, can potentiate the cytotoxic effect of docetaxel in lung cancer cells and to probe the mechanism underlying such enhancement. Methods Lung cancer cells were treated with docetaxel and rapamycin. The effect on the proliferation of lung cancer cells was evaluated using the MTT method, and cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry. Protein expression and level of phosphorylation were assayed using Western Blot method. Results Co-treatment of rapamycin and docetaxel was found to favorably enhance the cytotoxic effect of docetaxel in four lung cancer cell lines. This tumoricidal boost is associated with a reduction in the expression and phosphorylation levels of Survivin and ERK1/2, respectively. Conclusion The combined application of mTOR inhibitor and docetaxel led to a greater degree of cancer cell killing than that by either compound used alone. Therefore, this combination warrants further investigation in its suitability of serving as a novel therapeutic scheme for treating advanced and recurrent lung cancer patients.

  2. Metagenes Associated with Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Egon Urgard; Tõnu Vooder; Urmo Võsa; Kristjan Välk; Mingming Liu; Cheng Luo; Fabian Hoti; Retlav Roosipuu; Tarmo Annilo; Jukka Laine; Frenz, Christopher M.; Liqing Zhang; Andres Metspalu

    2011-01-01

    NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer) comprises about 80% of all lung cancer cases worldwide. Surgery is most effective treatment for patients with early-stage disease. However, 30%–55% of these patients develop recurrence within 5 years. Therefore, markers that can be used to accurately classify early-stage NSCLC patients into different prognostic groups may be helpful in selecting patients who should receive specific therapies. A previously published dataset was used to evaluate gene expressio...

  3. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the development of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz, Myrna L.; Lu, Lily; Ramachandran, Indu; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are widely implicated in immune suppression associated with tumor progression and chronic inflammation. However, very little is known about their possible role in tumor development. Here, we evaluated the role of MDSC in two experimental models of lung cancer: inflammation-associated lung cancer caused by chemical carcinogen urethane in combination with exposure to cigarette smoke (CS); and transgenic CC10Tg model not associated with inflammation. Expos...

  4. Clinical evaluation of serum tumour marker CA 242 in non-small cell lung cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Pujol, J L; Cooper, E H; Lehmann, M.; Purves, D. A.; Dan-Aouta, M.; Midander, J.; Godard, P.; Michel, F B

    1993-01-01

    CA 242, a novel tumour carbohydrate antigen present in serum (upper limit of normal values: 20.0 U ml-1), has been measured in a group of 102 pathologically confirmed non-small cell lung cancer patients. The aim of the present prospective study was to identify any relationship between pre-treatment serum CA 242 level and different features of lung cancer including prognosis. Serum CA 242 was measured using the delayed europium lanthanide fluoroimmunometric assay. Sensitivity and specificity w...

  5. Challenges in optimizing chemoradiation in locally advanced non small-cell lung cancers in India

    OpenAIRE

    Sushma Agrawal

    2013-01-01

    Data supporting use of concurrent chemoradiation in locally advanced lung cancers comes from clinical trials from developed countries. Applicability and outcomes of such schedules in developing countries is not widely reported. There are various challenges in delivering chemoradiation in locally advanced non small cell lung cancer in developing countries which is highlighted by an audit of patients treated with chemoradiation in our center. This article deals with the challenges in the contex...

  6. Clinical and surgical-pathological staging in early non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannis Koukis; Ioannis Gkiozos; Ioannis Ntanos; Elias Kainis; Konstantinos N. Syrigos

    2013-01-01

    Staging is of the utmost importance in the evaluation of a patient with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) because it defines the actual extent of the disease. Accurate staging allows multidisciplinary oncology teams to plan the best surgical or medical treatment and to predict patient prognosis. Based on the recommendation of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), a tumor, node, and metastases (TNM) staging system is currently used for NSCLC. Clinical staging (c-...

  7. Prognostic implication of PTPRH hypomethylation in non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Takashi; Soejima, Kenzo; Arai, Eri; HAMAMOTO, JUNKO; Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Arai, Daisuke; Ishioka, Kota; Ohgino, Keiko; Naoki, Katsuhiko; Kohno, Takashi; Tsuta, Koji; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Kanai, Yae; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    PTPRH is a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase thought to be a potential regulator of tumorigenesis. The aim of the present study was to clarify the significance of PTPRH expression and its regulation by DNA methylation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), especially in lung adenocarcinoma (LADC). PTPRH mRNA expression was examined in 89 NSCLC and corresponding non-cancerous tissues. The correlation between DNA methylation and PTPRH gene expression was investigated in another cohort ...

  8. Conjunctival Metastasis as an Initial Sign of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Afsun Sahin; Nilgun Yildirim; Deniz Goren Sahin; Hikmet Basmak; Mustafa Acikalin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. To report a case of a conjunctival metastasis as the initial manifestation of small cell lung cancer. Methods. Observational case report. Results. A 50-year-old man without known systemic disease developed a conjunctival mass in his right eye. He underwent incisional biopsy of the tumor and systemic evaluation. Histopathologically, the conjunctival mass was a metastatic small cell carcinoma. Further evaluation revealed a primary small cell lung carcinoma with metastasis to liver...

  9. Nicotine prevents the apoptosis induced by menadione in human lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately 50% of long-term cigarette smokers die prematurely from the adverse effects of smoking, including on lung cancer and other illnesses. Nicotine is a main component in tobacco and has been implicated as a potential factor in the pathogenesis of human lung cancer. However, the mechanism of nicotine action in the development of lung cancer remains largely unknown. In the present study, we designed a nicotine-apoptosis system, by pre-treatment of nicotine making lung cancer cell A549 to be in a physiological nicotine environment, and observed that nicotine promoted cell proliferation and prevented the menadione-induced apoptosis, and exerts its role of anti-apoptosis by shift of apoptotic stage induced by menadione from late apoptotic stage to early apoptotic stage, in which NF-κB was up-regulated. Interference analysis of NF-κB in A549 cells showed that knock down of NF-κB resulted in apoptosis promotion and counteracted the protective effect of nicotine. The findings suggest that nicotine has potential effect in lung cancer genesis, especially in patients with undetectable early tumor development and development of specific NF-κB inhibitors would represent a potentially exciting new pharmacotherapy for tobacco-related lung cancer

  10. Overexpression of TRPV3 Correlates with Tumor Progression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 (TRPV3 is a member of the TRP channels family of Ca2+-permeant channels. The proteins of some TRP channels are highly expressed in cancer cells. This study aimed to assess the clinical significance and biological functions of TRPV3 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC; (2 Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of TRPV3 in NSCLC tissues and adjacent noncancerous lung tissues. Western blot was used to detect the protein expressions of TRPV3, CaMKII, p-CaMKII, CyclinA, CyclinD, CyclinE1, CDK2, CDK4, and P27. Small interfering RNA was used to deplete TRPV3 expression. A laser scanning confocal microscope was used to measure intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i. Flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle; (3 Results: TRPV3 was overexpressed in 65 of 96 (67.7% human lung cancer cases and correlated with differentiation (p = 0.001 and TNM stage (p = 0.004. Importantly, TRPV3 expression was associated with short overall survival. In addition, blocking or knockdown of TRPV3 could inhibit lung cancer cell proliferation. Moreover, TRPV3 inhibition could decrease [Ca2+]i of lung cancer cells and arrest cell cycle at the G1/S boundary. Further results revealed that TRPV3 inhibition decreased expressions of p-CaMKII, CyclinA, CyclinD1, CyclinE, and increased P27 level; (4 Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that TRPV3 was overexpressed in NSCLC and correlated with lung cancer progression. TRPV3 activation could promote proliferation of lung cancer cells. TRPV3 might serve as a potential companion drug target in NSCLC.

  11. Prophylactic cranial irradiation for patients with small-cell lung cancer: a systematic review of the literature with meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Wenwen; Jiang, Wenjing; Luan, Linlin; Wang, Lili; Zheng, Xiangrong; Wang, Gongchao

    2014-01-01

    Background Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounts for about 13% of all lung cancer cases. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounts for about 13% of all lung cancer cases. The purpose of the present article is to assess the role of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) by performing a systematic review of the randomized trials published in the literature. Methods Randomized controlled trials were identified that compared brain metastases incidence and overall su...

  12. Beclin1-induced autophagy abrogates radioresistance of lung cancer cells by suppressing osteopontin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteopontin (OPN) serves as an indicator of resistance to radiotherapy. However, the role of OPN in the development of acquired radioresistance in human lung cancer cells has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, the potential importance of OPN as a marker of lung cancer with a potential significant role in the development of radioresistance against repeated radiotherapy has prompted us to define the pathways by which OPN regulates lung cancer cell growth. In addition, autophagy has been reported to play a key role in the radiosensitization of cancer cells. Here, we report that increased OPN expression through induction of nuclear p53 following irradiation was inhibited by exogenous beclin-1 (BECN1). Our results clearly show that BECN1 gene expression led to induction of autophagy and inhibition of cancer cell growth and angiogenesis. Our results suggest that the induction of autophagy abrogated the radioresistance of the cancer cells. Interestingly, we showed that knockdown of OPN by lentivirus-mediated shRNA induced the autophagy of human lung cancer cell. Taken together, these results suggest that OPN and BECN1 can be molecular targets for overcoming radioresistance by controlling autophagy. (author)

  13. Facial Nerve Palsy: An Unusual Presenting Feature of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozcan Yildiz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world and is the most common cause of cancer-related death in men and women; it is responsible for 1.3 million deaths annually worldwide. It can metastasize to any organ. The most common site of metastasis in the head and neck region is the brain; however, it can also metastasize to the oral cavity, gingiva, tongue, parotid gland and lymph nodes. This article reports a case of small cell lung cancer presenting with metastasis to the facial nerve.

  14. ANTICANCER ACTIVITY OF OSCILLATORIA TEREBRIFORMIS CYANOBACTERIA IN HUMAN LUNG CANCER CELL LINE A549

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Mukund

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the anti-cancer properties of the cyanobacterial extract of Oscillatoria terebriformis Methods: The extract was tested in Human lung cancer cell lines and examined for its effect on cell viability, nuclear morphology and sub-G1 formation. Cell viability was determined by micro culture tetrazolium technique (MTT, nuclear morphology investigated using 4’-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI staining technique, and apoptosis assay using DNA fragmentation. Results: The results showed decreasing cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. Altered cell morphology after treatment with the extract demonstrated that cells experienced apoptosis. Conclusion: The data demonstrate that Oscillatoria Terebriformis extract induced apoptosis in Human lung cancer A549 cells, and therefore, has a potential as an anti-cancer agent.

  15. Clinical utility of Circulating Tumor Cells in ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent eFaugeroux; Emma ePailler; Nathalie eAuger; Meilissa eTaylor; Françoise eFarace

    2014-01-01

    The advent of rationally targeted therapies such as small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has considerably transformed the therapeutic management of a subset of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring defined molecular abnormalities. When such genetic molecular alterations are detected the use of specific TKI has demonstrated better results (overall response rate (ORR), progression free survival (PFS)) compared to systemic therapy. However the detection of such m...

  16. Clinical Utility of Circulating Tumor Cells in ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Faugeroux, Vincent; Pailler, Emma; Auger, Nathalie; Taylor, Melissa; Farace, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    The advent of rationally targeted therapies such as small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has considerably transformed the therapeutic management of a subset of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring defined molecular abnormalities. When such genetic molecular alterations are detected the use of specific TKI has demonstrated better results (overall response rate, progression free survival) compared to systemic therapy. However, the detection of such molecular ab...

  17. Epigenetics in non-small cell lung cancer: from basics to therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Junaid; El-Osta, Hazem

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the number one cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with 221,200 estimated new cases and 158,040 estimated deaths in 2015. Approximately 80% of cases are non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The diagnosis is usually made at an advanced stage where the prognosis is poor and therapeutic options are limited. The evolution of lung cancer is a multistep process involving genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factor interactions that result in the dysregulation of key oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, culminating in activation of cancer-related signaling pathways. The past decade has witnessed the discovery of multiple molecular aberrations that drive lung cancer growth, among which are epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and translocations involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene. This has translated into therapeutic agent developments that target these molecular alterations. The absence of targetable mutations in 50% of NSCLC cases and targeted therapy resistance development underscores the importance for developing alternative therapeutic strategies for treating lung cancer. Among these strategies, pharmacologic modulation of the epigenome has been used to treat lung cancer. Epigenetics approaches may circumvent the problem of tumor heterogeneity by affecting the expression of multiple tumor suppression genes (TSGs), halting tumor growth and survival. Moreover, it may be effective for tumors that are not driven by currently recognized druggable mutations. This review summarizes the molecular pathology of lung cancer epigenetic aberrations and discusses current efforts to target the epigenome with different pharmacological approaches. Our main focus will be on hypomethylating agents, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, microRNA modulations, and the role of novel epigenetic biomarkers. Last, we will address the challenges that face this old-new strategy in treating lung cancer.

  18. Epigenetics in non-small cell lung cancer: from basics to therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Junaid; Shackelford, Rodney E; El-Osta, Hazem

    2016-04-01

    Lung cancer remains the number one cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with 221,200 estimated new cases and 158,040 estimated deaths in 2015. Approximately 80% of cases are non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The diagnosis is usually made at an advanced stage where the prognosis is poor and therapeutic options are limited. The evolution of lung cancer is a multistep process involving genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factor interactions that result in the dysregulation of key oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, culminating in activation of cancer-related signaling pathways. The past decade has witnessed the discovery of multiple molecular aberrations that drive lung cancer growth, among which are epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and translocations involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene. This has translated into therapeutic agent developments that target these molecular alterations. The absence of targetable mutations in 50% of NSCLC cases and targeted therapy resistance development underscores the importance for developing alternative therapeutic strategies for treating lung cancer. Among these strategies, pharmacologic modulation of the epigenome has been used to treat lung cancer. Epigenetics approaches may circumvent the problem of tumor heterogeneity by affecting the expression of multiple tumor suppression genes (TSGs), halting tumor growth and survival. Moreover, it may be effective for tumors that are not driven by currently recognized druggable mutations. This review summarizes the molecular pathology of lung cancer epigenetic aberrations and discusses current efforts to target the epigenome with different pharmacological approaches. Our main focus will be on hypomethylating agents, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, microRNA modulations, and the role of novel epigenetic biomarkers. Last, we will address the challenges that face this old-new strategy in treating lung cancer. PMID:27186511

  19. Diagnosis, staging and treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer for the surgeon

    OpenAIRE

    Bryant, Ayesha S.; Cerfolio, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    This article covers the risk factors, diagnostic tools, staging methods/modalities and treatment for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Also presented is the new 7th edition American Joint Cancer Committee (AJCC) TNM classification for staging of NSCLC and a recommended treatment algorithm.

  20. Overexpression of Cathepsin L is associated with gefitinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, F; Wang, W; Wu, D; He, X; Wu, J; Wang, M

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer, the most common malignancy, is still the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for 80 % of all lung cancers. Recent studies showed Cathepsin L (CTSL) is overexpressed in various cancerous tissues; however, the association between CTSL expression and EGFR-TKI resistance remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of CTSL in lung cancer specimens and matched normal tissues by quantitative real-time PCR and IHC. The functional role of CTSL in resistant PC-9/GR cell line was investigated by proliferation and apoptosis analysis compared with control PC-9 cells. Our results found that the level of CTSL expression was higher in NSCLC tissues compared with matched normal adjacent tissue samples, and CTSL was more highly expressed in PC-9/GR cells compared to PC-9 cells. Knocking-down of CTSL in PC-9/GR cells could decrease cell proliferation and potentiate apoptosis induced by gefitinib, suggesting CTSL may contribute to gefitinib resistance in NSCLC. CTSL might be explored as a candidate of therapeutic target for modulating EGFR-TKI sensitivity in NSCLC. PMID:26474873

  1. Genomic profiling toward precision medicine in non-small cell lung cancer: getting beyond EGFR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richer AL

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Amanda L Richer,1 Jacqueline M Friel,1 Vashti M Carson,2 Landon J Inge,1 Timothy G Whitsett2 1Norton Thoracic Institute, St Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, 2Cancer and Cell Biology Division, Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA Abstract: Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The application of next-generation genomic technologies has offered a more comprehensive look at the mutational landscape across the different subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. A number of recurrent mutations such as TP53, KRAS, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR have been identified in NSCLC. While targeted therapeutic successes have been demonstrated in the therapeutic targeting of EGFR and ALK, the majority of NSCLC tumors do not harbor these genomic events. This review looks at the current treatment paradigms for lung adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas, examining genomic aberrations that dictate therapy selection, as well as novel therapeutic strategies for tumors harboring mutations in KRAS, TP53, and LKB1 which, to date, have been considered “undruggable”. A more thorough understanding of the molecular alterations that govern NSCLC tumorigenesis, aided by next-generation sequencing, will lead to targeted therapeutic options expected to dramatically reduce the high mortality rate observed in lung cancer. Keywords: non-small cell lung cancer, precision medicine, epidermal growth factor receptor, Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog, serine/threonine kinase 11, tumor protein p53

  2. A Preliminary Analysis of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Biomarkers in Serum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE-YUAN XIAO; YING TANG; XIU-PING WEI; DA-CHENG HE

    2003-01-01

    Objective To identify potential serum biomarkers that could be used to discriminate lungcancers from normal. Methods Proteomic spectra of twenty-eight serum samples from patientswith non-small cell lung cancer and twelve from normal individuals were generated by SELDI(Surfaced Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization) Mass Spectrometry. Anion-exchange columns wereused to fractionate the sera into 6 designated pH groups. Two different types of protein chip arrays,IMAC-Cu and WCX2, were employed. Samples were examined in PBSII Protein Chip Reader(Ciphergen Biosystem Inc) and the discriminatory profiling between cancer and normal samples wasanalyzed with Biomarker Pattern software. Results Five distinct potential lung cancer biomarkerswith higher sensitivity and specificity were found, with four common biomarkers in both IMAC-Cuand WCX2 chip; the remaining biomarker occurred only in WCX2 chip. Two biomarkers wereup-regulated while three biomarkers were down-regulated in the serum samples from patients withnon-small cell lung cancer. The sensitivities provided by the individual biomarkers were 75%-96.43%and specificities were 75%-100%. Conclusions The preliminary results suggest that serum is acapable resource for detecting specific non-small cell lung cancer biomarkers. SELDI massspectrometry is a useful tool for the detection and identification of new potential biomarker ofnon-small cell lung cancer in serum.

  3. Human lung cancer-derived microparticles enhanced angiogenesis and growth of hepatoma cells in rodent lung parenchyma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Sheung-Fat; Hsu, Shu-Yuan; Chen, Chih-Hung; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Zhen, Meng-Shen TongYen-Yi; Chen, Yi-Ling; Huang, Tien-Hung; Chen, Sheng-Yi; Kao, Gour-Shenq; Chen, Hong-Hwa; Chang, Chia-Lo; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that human lung cancer-derived microparticles (LcD-MPs) played an important role in tumor angiogenesis and growth. Fischer 344 rats (F344, n=18) were equally categorized into group 1 [Sham Control (3.0 mL normal saline intravenous injection (IV))], group 2 [hepatoma cell line (2.0 x 106 cells, IV)], and group 3 [hepatoma cell line + LcD-MPs (3.0 x 106, IV)]. Animals were euthanized by day 28 after hepatoma cells transfusion. Our result showed that the gross pathology confirmed growth of hepatoma cell line in lung parenchyma. The size and weight of the lungs were significantly increased in group 2 and further elevated in group 3 than in group 1 (all p<0.001). Histopathological analysis demonstrated that the lung crowded score and number of small vessel exhibited an identical pattern, whereas the number of alveolar sacs showed an opposite pattern compared to that of total lung weight among the three groups (all p<0.0001). The cellular expressions of CD34+, CXCR4+, c-Kit+, CK19+, VEGF+ and vimentin+ cells in lung parenchyma exhibited an identical pattern compared to those of total lung weight among all groups (all p<0.001). The protein expressions of apoptotic (Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and c-PARP), fibrotic (Smad3, TGF-β), and tumor suppression (PTEN) biomarkers showed an identical pattern, whereas that of anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2) and anti-fibrotic (Smad1/5, BMP-2) biomarkers were displayed an opposite pattern compared to that of total lung weight among all groups (all p<0.001). The MPs could enhance angiogenesis and accelerated hepatoma cell growth in rodent lung parenchyma.

  4. MiR-614 Inhibited Lung Cancer Cell Invasion and Proliferation via Targeting PSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang LV

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective MicroRNAs (miRNAs is a group of non-coding small RNA molecules, which play important roles in the development of tumor. The mechanisms of various kinds of miRNAs in lung cancer still need to be further elucidated. This study investigated the function of miR-614 on lung cancer cell invasion and proliferation. Methods Real-time quantitative PCR was used to detect the expression of miR-614 in lung cancer cell PGCL3 and PGLH7. Transwell assay was used to test the role of miR-614 on regulating invasion and migration of cells. CCK8 assay and BrdU incorporation assay was used to assess the role of miR-614 on cell proliferation. Bioinformatics software predicted the potential target genes of miR-614 and dual luciferase reporter gene was used to analyze the binding between miR-614 and 3’UTR of puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase (PSA. Western blot detected the PSA protein levels. Results The expression of miR-614 in PGCL3 cells with high metastasis potential was significantly lower than that in PGLH7 cells with low metastasis potential. Furthermore, altered expression of miR-614 by transfection of pre-miR-614 mimics and inhibitor significantly affected the ability of invasion and proliferation of lung cancer cells. Bioinformatics analysis predicted that PSA was one of the potential target genes of miR-614. Altered expression of miR-614 markedly down-regulated the PSA protein levels of lung cancer cells. In addition, dual luciferase reporter gene assay indicated that miR-614 regulated PSA expression by binding to the 3’UTR of PSA mRNA. Conclusion MiR-614 inhibited cell invasion and proliferationa targeting PSA in lung cancer cells, PGCL3.

  5. Molecular and Cellular Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Human Lung Cancer Cells: Potential Therapeutic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has a very high mortality-to-incidence ratio, representing one of the main causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Therefore, new treatment strategies are urgently needed. Several diseases including lung cancer have been associated with the action of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most studied. Despite the fact that H2O2 may have opposite effects on cell proliferation depending on the concentration and cell type, it triggers several antiproliferative responses. H2O2 produces both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA lesions, increases the expression of cell adhesion molecules, and increases p53 activity and other transcription factors orchestrating cancer cell death. In addition, H2O2 facilitates the endocytosis of oligonucleotides, affects membrane proteins, induces calcium release, and decreases cancer cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, the MAPK pathway and the expression of genes related to inflammation including interleukins, TNF-α, and NF-κB are also affected by H2O2. Herein, we will summarize the main effects of hydrogen peroxide on human lung cancer leading to suggesting it as a potential therapeutic tool to fight this disease. Because of the multimechanistic nature of this molecule, novel therapeutic approaches for lung cancer based on the use of H2O2 may help to decrease the mortality from this malignancy. PMID:27375834

  6. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Person, Rachel J.; Olive Ngalame, Ntube N.; Makia, Ngome L.; Bell, Matthew W.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Tokar, Erik J., E-mail: tokare@niehs.nih.gov

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure transforms a human peripheral lung epithelia cell line. • Cells acquire characteristics in common with human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • These transformed cells provide a

  7. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure transforms a human peripheral lung epithelia cell line. • Cells acquire characteristics in common with human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • These transformed cells provide a

  8. The effect of adenovirus-mediated gene expression of FHIT in small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandi, Roza; Xu, Kai; Poulsen, Hans S;

    2011-01-01

    The candidate tumor suppressor fragile histidine traid (FHIT) is frequently inactivated in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Mutations in the p53 gene also occur in the majority of SCLC leading to the accumulation of the mutant protein. Here we evaluated the effect of FHIT gene therapy alone or in...... combination with the mutant p53-reactivating molecule, PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246, in SCLC. Overexpression of FHIT by recombinant adenoviral vector (Ad-FHIT)-mediated gene transfer in SCLC cells inhibited their growth by inducing apoptosis and when combined with PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246, a synergistic cell growth...

  9. The role of mismatch repair in small-cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L T; Thykjaer, T; Ørntoft, T F; Rasmussen, L J; Keller, P; Spang-Thomsen, M; Edmonston, T Bocker; Schmutte, C; Fishel, R; Petersen, L Nørgård

    2003-01-01

    The role of mismatch repair (MMR) in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is controversial, as the phenotype of a MMR-deficiency, microsatellite instability (MSI), has been reported to range from 0 to 76%. We studied the MMR pathway in a panel of 21 SCLC cell lines and observed a highly heterogeneous...... pattern of MMR gene expression. A significant correlation between the mRNA and protein levels was found. We demonstrate that low hMLH1 gene expression was not linked to promoter CpG methylation. One cell line (86MI) was found to be deficient in MMR and exhibited resistance to the alkylating agent MNNG...

  10. EGFR-dependent Impact of Indol-3-Carbinol on Radiosensitivity 
of Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Xiao(Institute for Strings, Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics (ISCAP) and Physics Department, Columbia University, 538 West 120th Street, New York, NY, 10027 U.S.A.); Meng, Qinghui; Xu, Jiaying; Jiao, Yang; Rosen, Eliot M.; Fan, Saijun

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) is a naturally occurring phytochemical found in cruciferous vegetables. The aim of the present study is to investigate the influence of I3C on radiosensitivity in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-positive and EGFR-negative lung cancer cell lines. Methods Human lung adenocarcinoma NIH-H1975 cells and human lung squamous carcinoma NIH-H226 and NIH-H520 cells were routinely cultured in RPMI-1640. MTT assay and clonogenic assay were used to ...

  11. Si-RNA mediated knockdown of CELF1 gene suppressed the proliferation of human lung cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Li-Na; Xue, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Li-Jian; Ma, Xue-Mei; Chen, Jin-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the world, with metastasis as the main reason for the mortality. CELF1 is an RNA-binding protein controlling the post-transcriptional regulation of genes related to cell survival. As yet, there is little knowledge of CELF1 expression and biological function in lung cancer. This study investigated the expression levels of CELF1 in lung cancer tissues and the biological function of CELF1 in lung cancer cells. Methods CELF1 m...

  12. DNA methylation-based biomarkers for early detection of non-small cell lung cancer: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Laird-Offringa Ite A; Alonzo Todd A; Anglim Paul P

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Lung cancer is the number one cancer killer in the United States. This disease is clinically divided into two sub-types, small cell lung cancer, (10–15% of lung cancer cases), and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC; 85–90% of cases). Early detection of NSCLC, which is the more common and less aggressive of the two sub-types, has the highest potential for saving lives. As yet, no routine screening method that enables early detection exists, and this is a key factor in the high mortalit...

  13. Effect of the Hedgehog Pathway inhibitor GDC-0449 in lung cancer cells and lung cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Fei

    2013-01-01

    The cancer stem cell hypothesis implicates that tumor cell population is heterogeneous with relatively well-differentiated cells and poorly-differentiated cells. Only the small population of tumourigenic poorly-differentiated CSCs can escape the normal limits of self-renewal and has the ability to proliferate and maintain the malignant growth of the tumor. One characteristic of stem cell is that the ability to exclude DNA dyes, such as Hoechst 33342 via the over-expression of ATP-binding c...

  14. Survival and treatment patterns in elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer in Manitoba

    OpenAIRE

    Baunemann Ott, C.L.; Ratna, N.; Prayag, R.; Nugent, Z; Badiani, K.; Navaratnam, S.

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc) is the most common form of lung cancer, with a median age at diagnosis of 70 years. These elderly patients are often underrepresented in the randomized clinical trials upon which chemotherapy plans are based. The objective of the present study was to determine the patterns of treatment and survival in elderly patients with advanced nsclc in Manitoba.

  15. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bahader Yasser; Jazieh Abdul-Rahman

    2013-01-01

    Incidence and mortality attributed to lung cancer has risen steadily since the 1930s. Efforts to improve outcomes have not only led to a greater understanding of the etiology of lung cancer, but also the histologic and molecular characteristics of individual lung tumors. This article describes this evolution by discussing the extent of the current lung cancer epidemic including contemporary incidence and mortality trends, the risk factors for development of lung cancer, and details of promisi...

  16. Tumor-specific cytotoxic t cells are crucial for efficacy of immunomodulatory antibodies in patients with lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G.J.V. Aerts (Joachim); J.P.J.J. Hegmans (Joost)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThere is growing evidence that activation of the immune system may be an effective treatment for patients with either small cell lung cancer or non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Immunomodulatory antibodies directed against cytotoxic T cell-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4/CD152) and progra

  17. Growth arrest and apoptosis via caspase activation of dioscoreanone in human non-small-cell lung cancer A549 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hansakul, Pintusorn; Aree, Kalaya; Tanuchit, Sermkiat; Itharat, Arunporn

    2014-01-01

    Background Dioscoreanone (DN) isolated from Dioscorea membranacea Pierre has been reported to exert potent cytotoxic effects against particular types of cancer. The present study was carried out to investigate the cytotoxicity of DN against a panel of different human lung cancer cell lines. The study further examined the underlying mechanisms of its anticancer activity in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. Methods Antiproliferative effects of DN were determined by SRB and CFSE assa...

  18. Role of Chemokines in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Angiogenesis and Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Rivas-Fuentes, Selma; Salgado-Aguayo, Alfonso; Pertuz Belloso, Silvana; Gorocica Rosete, Patricia; Alvarado-Vásquez, Noé; Aquino-Jarquin, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most common types of aggressive cancer. The tumor tissue, which shows an active angiogenesis, is composed of neoplastic and stromal cells, and an abundant inflammatory infiltrate. Angiogenesis is important to support tumor growth, while infiltrating cells contribute to the tumor microenvironment through the secretion of growth factors, cytokines and chemokines, important molecules in the progression of the disease. Chemokines are important in d...

  19. Effect of Inhibiting NGAL Gene Expression on A549 Lung Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian TANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective To detect the expression of neutrophil gelatinase-assoeiated lipocalin (NGAL in the different differentiations of lung cancer tissues and to study the mechanism of invasion of A549 cells affected by NGAL. Methods The expression of NGAL was detected by immunochemistry in lung cancer tissue and the tissue around edge of the cancer. The effect of NGAL expression on A549 cells was observed by using qRT-PCR and Western blot. The abilities of invasion and metastasis were evaluated by transwell invasion and migration assay, and cell scratch assay in vitro. The protein expression of E-cadherin, Vimentin was measured by immunofluoresence and Western blot. Results The positive expression rate of NGAL was 76.32% (58/76 in the lung cancer, 13.3% (4/30 in adjacent tissue by immunochemistry. NGAL expression levels in the lung cancer tissues were significantly higher than that in adjacent tissues. The rate of migration and invasion in NGAL-siRNA group was 60.4%±6.4% compared to 50.5%±4.4% in the control group, there was a significant difference (P<0.05. Vimentin was suppressed, and E-cadherin was upregulated when NGAL was inhibited. MMP-2 and MMP-9 decreased when NGAL was knocked down. Conclusion The expression level of NGAL is highly expressed in lung cancer. NGAL may be one of important indicators involved in lung cancer infiltrated and transferred. NGAL might be one of potential targets for lung cancer treatment.

  20. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong, E-mail: jungkim@cau.ac.kr; Choi, Kyung-Hee, E-mail: khchoi@cau.ac.kr

    2015-08-07

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. - Highlights: • Identification of new target genes of FOXA2. • Identifications of novel interaction proteins of FOXA2. • Construction of FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulatory network in non-small cell lung cancer.

  1. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. - Highlights: • Identification of new target genes of FOXA2. • Identifications of novel interaction proteins of FOXA2. • Construction of FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulatory network in non-small cell lung cancer

  2. Cost and effectiveness studies in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Yalcin-Balcik

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer disease diagnosis and treatment is costly. As the numbers of inflicted rise so does the economic burden assumed for this cancer type. When the treatment expenditures are considered for all types of cancer, the lung cancer is thought to occupy a 20% share. The disease examined in two basic groups as small-cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is the most frequently encountered type of its kind nationally and in the World. This study considers the cost, effectiveness and cost effectiveness of platinum based chemotherapy medications with active ingredients pemetrexed and gemcitabine used for NSCLC. A review of studies relevant to the advanced stage NSCLC where majority of patients are positioned is foreseen to be useful to the decision makers since policy makers, regulating authorities and physicians require more information due to increased overall finance and costs, as well as treatment cost effectiveness. Furthermore, due to the entry attempt of pemetrexed active ingredient to the list of reimbursed medications for the first stage lung cancer treatment, it is assumed that a review of studies containing pemetrexed and gemcitabine will draw the attention of decision makers at the Social Security Instutition. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(1.000: 55-64

  3. Role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Prakash, Gaurav; Jakhetiya, Ashish; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-03-26

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Non-small cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma are the main histological subtypes and constitutes around 85% and 15% of all lung cancer respectively. Multimodality treatment plays a key role in the successful management of lung cancer depending upon the histological subtype, stage of disease, and performance status. Imaging modalities play an important role in the diagnosis and accurate staging of the disease, in assessing the response to neoadjuvant therapy, and in the follow-up of the patients. Last decade has witnessed voluminous upsurge in the use of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT); role of PET-CT has widened exponentially in the management of lung cancer. The present article reviews the role of 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose PET-CT in the management of non small cell lung cancer with emphasis on staging of the disease and the assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy based on available literature. PMID:27018223

  4. Breast cancer lung metastasis requires expression of chemokine receptor CCR4 and regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkhanud, Purevdorj B; Baatar, Dolgor; Bodogai, Monica; Hakim, Fran; Gress, Ronald; Anderson, Robin L; Deng, Jie; Xu, Mai; Briest, Susanne; Biragyn, Arya

    2009-07-15

    Cancer metastasis is a leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. More needs to be learned about mechanisms that control this process. In particular, the role of chemokine receptors in metastasis remains controversial. Here, using a highly metastatic breast cancer (4T1) model, we show that lung metastasis is a feature of only a proportion of the tumor cells that express CCR4. Moreover, the primary tumor growing in mammary pads activates remotely the expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 in the lungs. These chemokines acting through CCR4 attract both tumor and immune cells. However, CCR4-mediated chemotaxis was not sufficient to produce metastasis, as tumor cells in the lung were efficiently eliminated by natural killer (NK) cells. Lung metastasis required CCR4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which directly killed NK cells using beta-galactoside-binding protein. Thus, strategies that abrogate any part of this process should improve the outcome through activation of effector cells and prevention of tumor cell migration. We confirm this prediction by killing CCR4(+) cells through delivery of TARC-fused toxins or depleting Tregs and preventing lung metastasis. PMID:19567680

  5. Allele specific gain-of-function activity of p53 mutants in lung cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughan, Catherine A.; Frum, Rebecca; Pearsall, Isabella; Singh, Shilpa; Windle, Brad; Yeudall, Andrew; Deb, Swati P.; Deb, Sumitra

    2012-01-01

    p53 mutations are mostly single amino acid changes resulting in expression of a stable mutant protein with “gain of function” (GOF) activity having a dominant oncogenic role rather than simple loss of function of wild-type p53. Knock-down of mutant p53 in human lung cancer cell lines with different endogenous p53 mutants results in loss of GOF activity as shown by lowering of cell growth rate. Two lung cancer cell lines, ABC1 and H1437 carrying endogenous mutants p53–P278S and –R267P, both sh...

  6. Drug resistance, and the role of p53, in lung cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Breen, Laura

    2005-01-01

    This thesis sets out to increase our knowledge of mechanisms by which lung cancer cells develop resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. The involvement of the tumour suppressor p53 in the development of drug resistance in lung cancer cell lines was investigated. p53 is a tumour suppressor gene, which is mutated in more than half of all tumours. Most chemotherapeutic drugs cause DNA damage that is sensed by p53, which either arrests the cell cycle to allow DNA repair or induces apoptosis. Wildt...

  7. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are available to help. HELPFUL WEB SITES ON LUNG CANCER American Lung Association www.lung.org Lungcancer.org www.lungcancer.org Lung Cancer Alliance www.lungcanceralliance.org Lung Cancer Online www. ...

  8. Thymosin beta 10 Prompted the VEGF-C Expression in Lung Cancer Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zixuan LI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Our previous study found that thymosin β10 overexpressed in lung cancer and positively correlated with differentiation, lymph node metastasis and stage of lung cancer. In this reasearch we aim to study the effects and mechanism of exogenous human recombinant Tβ10 on the expression of VEGF-C on non-small cell lung cancer. Methods After SPC, A549 and LK2 cells were treated with 100 ng/mL recombinant human Tβ10, the mRNA level of VEGF-C were detected by RT-PCR. The mean while the protein expression of VEGF-C, P-AKT and AKT were determined by Western blot assay. Results Exogenous recombinant human Tβ10 were significantly promote the expression levels of VEGF-C mRNA and protein while promoting the phosphorylation of AKT. Exogenous Tβ10 can promote the expression of VEGF-C mRNA and protein in lung cancer cell lines A549 and LK2 (P<0.05, and this effect can be inhibited by use AKT inhibitor LY294002 (P<0.05. Conclusion Tβ10 human recombinant proteins can promote the expression of VEGF-C by activating AKT phosphorylation in lung cancer cell lines.

  9. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  10. Lung cancer: assessing resectability

    OpenAIRE

    Quint, Leslie E

    2003-01-01

    Staging classification in patients with non-small cell lung cancer does not always correlate perfectly with surgical resectability. Therefore, it is important to evaluate individual features of a patient’s tumor in order to determine if surgical resection is the optimal method of treatment, regardless of tumor stage. Such features include characteristics of the primary tumor, regional lymph nodes and distant sites.

  11. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yousheng; Yang, Ding; He, Jie; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer has been transformed from a rare disease into a global problem and public health issue. The etiologic factors of lung cancer become more complex along with industrialization, urbanization, and environmental pollution around the world. Currently, the control of lung cancer has attracted worldwide attention. Studies on the epidemiologic characteristics of lung cancer and its relative risk factors have played an important role in the tertiary prevention of lung cancer and in exploring new ways of diagnosis and treatment. This article reviews the current evolution of the epidemiology of lung cancer. PMID:27261907

  12. microRNA Expression Profiling of Side Population Cells in Human Lung Cancer and Preliminary Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotao XU

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Recent studies indicate that the side population (SP which is an enriched source of cancer stem cells (CSCs is the root cause of tumor growth and development. SP appears to be highly resistant to chemo- and radio-therapy which becomes an important factor in tumor recurrence and metastasis. The aim of this study is to determine the difference of microRNA expression profiles between SP cells and non-SP cells so as to lay necessary basis for research on the function of miRNA in lung cancer stem cells. Methods SP and non-SP cells were isolated using flow cytometry and Hoechst 33342 dye efflux assay from human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell. The total RNA was extracted. The microarray detection system was employed to analyze whether there was difference in miRNA expression profile between SP and non-SP cells. Results A total of 85 differentially expressed miRNA were found, including 32 over-expression and 53 low-expression miRNA in SP. Conclusion miRNA may play important roles in tumorigenesis of lung cancer stem cell. The study of miRNA contributes to elucidate the molecular mechanism of lung cancer stem cell.

  13. Comparison of FDG-PET findings of brain metastasis from non-small-cell lung cancer and small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compared the F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) findings of brain metastasis between patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). A whole-body FDG and a brain PET were performed in 48 patients (31 men, 17 women; 57±9 years, 42 NSCLC, 6 SCLC), who had brain metastasis on magnetic resonance (MR). All primary lung lesions were detected by FDG-PET and confirmed pathologically. We analyzed the PET findings, lesion sizes, and the pathological result of primary lung cancer. Of the 48 patients, 31 (64.6%) showed hypermetabolic lesions on FDG-PET of the brain image, and 14 (29.2%) showed hypometabolic lesions. Three patients (6.3%) had both hypermetabolic and hypometabolic lesions. On the lesion-based analysis, 74 lesions (67.3%) showed hypermetabolism on FDG-PET, and 36 lesions (32.7%) showed hypometabolism. All primary lung lesions were hypermetabolic on FDG-PET. When the FDG findings of metastatic brain lesions were analyzed with the pathological types of primary lung cancer, NSCLC was more frequently associated with hypermetabolic metastatic brain lesions than SCLC (80% and 26.7%, respectively, P<0.01). On comparing the sizes of metastatic lesions between SCLC (1.3±1.2 cm) and NSCLC (1.8±1.2 cm), lesions of <1 cm were more frequent in SCLC than in NSCLC (P=0.012). But no significant relationship was found between the size and PET finding of metastatic lesion (P=0.412). Even when the primary lesion of lung cancer showed hypermetabolism in FDG-PET, FDG accumulation in metastatic brain lesions was variable. One-third of brain metastases from lung cancer showed hypometabolism. NSCLC was more frequently associated with hypermetabolic metastatic brain lesions than SCLC. The PET findings of brain lesions were affected not only by the size of lesion but also by its biological characteristics. (author)

  14. S1415CD, Prophylactic Colony Stimulating Factor Management in Patients With Breast, Colorectal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Receiving Chemotherapy and With Risk of Developing Febrile Neutropenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-08

    Febrile Neutropenia; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage 0 Colorectal Cancer; Stage 0 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer

  15. Pyruvate carboxylase is critical for non-small-cell lung cancer proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Katherine; Fox, Matthew P; Bousamra, Michael; Slone, Stephen P; Higashi, Richard M; Miller, Donald M; Wang, Yali; Yan, Jun; Yuneva, Mariia O; Deshpande, Rahul; Lane, Andrew N; Fan, Teresa W-M

    2015-02-01

    Anabolic biosynthesis requires precursors supplied by the Krebs cycle, which in turn requires anaplerosis to replenish precursor intermediates. The major anaplerotic sources are pyruvate and glutamine, which require the activity of pyruvate carboxylase (PC) and glutaminase 1 (GLS1), respectively. Due to their rapid proliferation, cancer cells have increased anabolic and energy demands; however, different cancer cell types exhibit differential requirements for PC- and GLS-mediated pathways for anaplerosis and cell proliferation. Here, we infused patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with uniformly 13C-labeled glucose before tissue resection and determined that the cancerous tissues in these patients had enhanced PC activity. Freshly resected paired lung tissue slices cultured in 13C6-glucose or 13C5,15N2-glutamine tracers confirmed selective activation of PC over GLS in NSCLC. Compared with noncancerous tissues, PC expression was greatly enhanced in cancerous tissues, whereas GLS1 expression showed no trend. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of paired lung tissues showed PC overexpression in cancer cells rather than in stromal cells of tumor tissues. PC knockdown induced multinucleation, decreased cell proliferation and colony formation in human NSCLC cells, and reduced tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. Growth inhibition was accompanied by perturbed Krebs cycle activity, inhibition of lipid and nucleotide biosynthesis, and altered glutathione homeostasis. These findings indicate that PC-mediated anaplerosis in early-stage NSCLC is required for tumor survival and proliferation. PMID:25607840

  16. 1p/19q codeletion and RET rearrangements in small-cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lu H; Xu H; Xie F; Qin J; Han N; Fan Y; Mao W

    2016-01-01

    Hongyang Lu,1,2 Haimiao Xu,3 Fajun Xie,2 Jing Qin,2 Na Han,2 Yun Fan,1,2 Weimin Mao1 1Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Diagnosis & Treatment Technology on Thoracic Oncology (Lung and Esophagus), 2Department of Thoracic Medical Oncology, 3Department of Pathology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The prognosis of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is poor despite reports suggesting modest improvement in survival. To date, c...

  17. [Targeted Therapy and Immunotherapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 
with Brain Metastasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qi; Jiao, Shunchang; Li, Fang

    2016-08-20

    Brain metastasis, a common complication of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with an incidence rate of 30%-50%, significantly affects the patients' quality of life. The prognosis of patients of NSCLC with brain metastasis is extremely poor, the average median survival is only 1 m-2 m without treatment. The targeted therapy based on lung cancer driven gene is a new treatment. Besides, the immunotherapy which can enhance the effect of anti-cancer by simulating the immune system is a new approach. The combination of targeted therapy and immunotherapy can greatly benefit patients in clinical work. PMID:27561803

  18. [Stereotactic radiotherapy is established treatment in localized non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailas, Liisa; Virsunen, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Surgery has been the standard treatment in localized non-small cell lung cancer. Some of the early stage lung cancer patients are not suitable for surgery owing to associated diseases or refusing surgery. Ninety percent of untreated patients die within five years. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy is a technique in which highly focused radiation treatment is given at a couple of high single doses to the tumor region. The treatment results in an average of 90% local control of the cancer, and the adverse effects are minor. Treatment outcome is equivalent to those of surgical therapy and is better than obtained with conventional external radiation therapy. PMID:27132296

  19. Lentivirus-mediated gene silencing of NOB1 suppresses non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weiyi; Zhong, Weiqing; Xu, Jun; Su, Benhua; Huang, Guanghui; Du, Jiajun; Liu, Qi

    2015-09-01

    NIN/RPN12 binding protein 1 (NOB1p) encoded by NOB1 has been found to be an essential factor in 26S proteasome biogenesis which participates in protein degradation. However, the functions of NOB1 in non-small cell lung cancer cells are largely unknown. In the present study, lentivirus-mediated NOB1 shRNA transfection in two non-small cell lung cancer cell lines (A549 and H1299) was accomplished, as determined by fluorescence imaging. Downregulation of NOB1 expression was confirmed by real-time PCR and western blotting. NOB1 silencing resulted in a significant decline in the proliferation and colony formation capability of non-small cell lung cancer cells. Moreover, flow cytometry showed that A549 cells were arrested in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle after NOB1 suppression. Furthermore, depletion of NOB1 resulted in a significant decrease in CDK4 and cyclin D1 expression. These results suggest that NOB1 may act as an important regulator in non-small cell lung cancer growth and could be a therapeutic target of non‑small cell lung cancer. PMID:26178254

  20. Validation of an elastic registration technique to estimate anatomical lung modification in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Tomotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persano Diego

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study of lung parenchyma anatomical modification is useful to estimate dose discrepancies during the radiation treatment of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC patients. We propose and validate a method, based on free-form deformation and mutual information, to elastically register planning kVCT with daily MVCT images, to estimate lung parenchyma modification during Tomotherapy. Methods We analyzed 15 registrations between the planning kVCT and 3 MVCT images for each of the 5 NSCLC patients. Image registration accuracy was evaluated by visual inspection and, quantitatively, by Correlation Coefficients (CC and Target Registration Errors (TRE. Finally, a lung volume correspondence analysis was performed to specifically evaluate registration accuracy in lungs. Results Results showed that elastic registration was always satisfactory, both qualitatively and quantitatively: TRE after elastic registration (average value of 3.6 mm remained comparable and often smaller than voxel resolution. Lung volume variations were well estimated by elastic registration (average volume and centroid errors of 1.78% and 0.87 mm, respectively. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that this method is able to estimate lung deformations in thorax MVCT, with an accuracy within 3.6 mm comparable or smaller than the voxel dimension of the kVCT and MVCT images. It could be used to estimate lung parenchyma dose variations in thoracic Tomotherapy.

  1. Validation of an elastic registration technique to estimate anatomical lung modification in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of lung parenchyma anatomical modification is useful to estimate dose discrepancies during the radiation treatment of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) patients. We propose and validate a method, based on free-form deformation and mutual information, to elastically register planning kVCT with daily MVCT images, to estimate lung parenchyma modification during Tomotherapy. We analyzed 15 registrations between the planning kVCT and 3 MVCT images for each of the 5 NSCLC patients. Image registration accuracy was evaluated by visual inspection and, quantitatively, by Correlation Coefficients (CC) and Target Registration Errors (TRE). Finally, a lung volume correspondence analysis was performed to specifically evaluate registration accuracy in lungs. Results showed that elastic registration was always satisfactory, both qualitatively and quantitatively: TRE after elastic registration (average value of 3.6 mm) remained comparable and often smaller than voxel resolution. Lung volume variations were well estimated by elastic registration (average volume and centroid errors of 1.78% and 0.87 mm, respectively). Our results demonstrate that this method is able to estimate lung deformations in thorax MVCT, with an accuracy within 3.6 mm comparable or smaller than the voxel dimension of the kVCT and MVCT images. It could be used to estimate lung parenchyma dose variations in thoracic Tomotherapy

  2. iASPP is over-expressed in human non-small cell lung cancer and regulates the proliferation of lung cancer cells through a p53 associated pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    iASPP is a key inhibitor of tumour suppressor p53 and is found to be up-regulated in certain malignant conditions. The present study investigated the expression of iASPP in clinical lung cancer, a leading cancer type in the world, and the biological impact of this molecule on lung cancer cells. iASPP protein levels in lung cancer tissues were evaluated using an immunohistochemical method. In vitro, iASPP gene expression was suppressed with a lentvirus-mediated shRNA method and the biological impact after knocking down iASSP on lung cancer cell lines was investigated in connection with the p53 expression status. We showed here that the expression of iASPP was significantly higher in lung cancer tissues compared with the adjacent normal tissues. iASPP shRNA treatment resulted in a down-regulation of iASPP in lung cancer cells. There was a subsequent reduction of cell proliferation of the two lung tumour cell lines A459 and 95D both of which had wild-type p53 expression. In contrast, reduction of iASPP in H1229 cells, a cell with little p53 expression, had no impact on its growth rate. iASPP regulates the proliferation and motility of lung cancer cells. This effect is intimately associated with the p53 pathway. Together with the pattern of the over-expression in clinical lung cancers, it is concluded that iASPP plays an pivotal role in the progression of lung cancer and is a potential target for lung cancer therapy

  3. New serum markers for small-cell lung cancer. I. The ganglioside fucosyl-GM1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsted, A; Drivsholm, L; Andersen, E;

    1994-01-01

    The ganglioside fucosyl-GM1 (FucGM1) has been suggested as a marker for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Immunohistochemical analyses have shown the expression of the ganglioside in tumors in 75 to 90% of patients with SCLC. We have demonstrated that the ganglioside is shedded from SCLC cells both in...

  4. Effect of TRAF6 Downregulation on Malignant Biological Behavior of
Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen LIN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6 was a commonly amplified oncogene in lung cancer. However, the precise role of TRAF6 protein in lung cancer has not been extensively investigated. This study analyzed the effects of TRAF6 on the proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, migration, and invasion capability of lung cancer cell lines, as well as the potential molecular mechanisms involved. Methods To address the expression of TRAF6 in lung cancer cells, four lung cancer cell lines (A549, H1650, SPC-A-1 and Calu-3 were assayed to determine the expression of TRAF6 protein by Western blot and TRAF6 mRNA via qRT-PCR. Moreover, siRNA targeting TRAF6 was introduced into SPC-A-1 and Calu-3 cells. Nuclear factor-қB (NF-қB DNA-binding activity, apoptosis rates, cell proliferation, cell cycle, migration, and invasion were determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, flow cytometry, MTS assay, flow cytometry, scratch test, and transwell chamber assay, respectively. Western blot analysis was also performed to evaluate the expression of the following proteins through K63-ubiquitination: P65, CD24 and CXCR4. Whole-genome sequencing analysis was conducted using a second-generation sequencer in SPC-A-1 cells. Results TRAF6 was highly up-expressed in SPC-A-1 and Calu-3 cell lines than the other two cells, which also showed K63-ubiquitinization in TRAF6. However, constitutive activation of NF-қB was observed only in SPC-A-1 lung cancer cells. Downregulation of TRAF6 suppressed the NF-κB activation, cell migration, and invasion but promoted the cell apoptosis of SPC-A-1 cells. Markedly decreased expression of CD24 and CXCR4 was observed in SPC-A-1 cells transfected by TRAF6 siRNA. Nevertheless, TRAF6 downregulation did not affect the proliferation and cell cycle of SPC-A-1 cells. Additionally, TRAF6 regulation did not affect the proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, migration, and invasion

  5. Nicotine-induced resistance of non-small cell lung cancer to treatment – possible mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Czyżykowski

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking is the leading risk factor of lung cancer. Data from several clinical studies suggest that continuation of smoking during therapy of tobacco-related cancers is associated with lower response rates to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, and even with decreased survival. Although nicotine – an addictive component of tobacco – is not a carcinogen, it may influence cancer development and progression or effectiveness of anti-cancer therapy. Several in vitro and in vivo trials have evaluated the influence of nicotine on lung cancer cells. The best known mechanisms by which nicotine impacts cancer biology involve suppression of apoptosis induced by certain drugs or radiation, promotion of proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and migration of cancer cells. This effect is mainly mediated by membranous nicotinic acetylcholine receptors whose stimulation leads to sustained activation of such intracellular pathways as PI3K/Akt/mTOR, RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK and JAK/STAT, induction of NF-κB activity, enhanced transcription of mitogenic promoters, inhibition of the mitochondrial death pathway or stimulation of pro-angiogenic factors. We herein summarize the mechanisms underlying nicotine’s influence on biology of lung cancer cells and the effectiveness of anti-cancer therapy.

  6. Lung cancer stem cells—characteristics, phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Hardavella, Georgia; George, Rachel; Sethi, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with unfavourable prognosis mainly due to the late stage of disease at presentation. High incidence and disease recurrence rates are a fact despite advances in treatment. Ongoing experimental and clinical observations suggest that the malignant phenotype in lung cancer is sustained by lung cancer stem cells (CSCs) which are putative stem cells situated throughout the airways that have the potential of initiating lung cancer ...

  7. Analysis of non-thermal plasma-induced cell injury in human lung cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Sano, Kaori; Wada, Motoi; Mizuno, Kazue; Ono, Ryo; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Recent progress of biomedical application of atmospheric pressure plasma shows that the biological effects are mainly due to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in liquid produced by the plasma exposure. To elucidate the cellular responses induced by exposure to the plasma, we focused on identification and quantification of reactive chemical species in plasma-exposed cell culture medium, and cell injury in mammalian cells after treatment of the plasma-exposed medium. In this study, we examined human lung cancer cell lines. The contribution of H2O2 to the cellular responses was considered. Here, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) sustained by a pulsed power supply in argon was used. After APPJ exposure to cell culture medium, RONS detection in liquid was conducted. It showed that OH radical, ONOO-, NO2-, NO3-, and H2O2 were produced in the plasma-exposed medium. Cellular responses of human lung cancer cell lines to the plasma-exposed medium in a concentration-dependence manner were also studied. It showed that the plasma-exposed medium and the H2O2 treatment gave similar reduction in viability and induction of apoptosis. This work was partly supported by MEXT KAKENHI Grant Number 24108005 and JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26390096.

  8. Effects of chemically modified nanostructured PLGA on functioning of lung and breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang L

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Lijuan Zhang,1 Thomas J Webster21Department of Chemistry, 2School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI, USABackground: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanotopographies with alginate or chitosan protein preadsorption on the functioning of healthy and cancerous lung and breast cells, including adhesion, proliferation, apoptosis, and release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, which promotes tumor angiogenesis and secretion.Methods: We used a well established cast-mold technique to create nanoscale surface features on PLGA. Some of the nanomodified PLGA films were then exposed to alginate and chitosan. Surface roughness and the presence of protein was confirmed by atomic force microscopy. Surface energy was quantified by contact angle measurement.Results: Nanostructured PLGA surfaces with 23 nm features decreased synthesis of VEGF in both lung and breast cancer cells compared with conventional PLGA. Preadsorbing alginate further decreased cancer cell function, with nanostructured PLGA preadsorbed with alginate achieving the greatest decrease in synthesis of VEGF in both lung and breast cancer cells. In contrast, compared with nonmodified smooth PLGA, healthy cell functions were either not altered (ie, breast or were enhanced (ie, lung by use of nanostructured features and alginate or chitosan protein preadsorption.Conclusion: Using this technique, we developed surface nanometric roughness and modification of surface chemistry that could selectively decrease breast and lung cancer cell functioning without the need for chemotherapeutics. This technique requires further study in a wide range of anticancer and regenerative medicine applications.Keywords: breast, lung, cancer, nanotechnology, alginate, chitosan

  9. Advanced Small Cell Lung Cancer with Cerebellar Metastases – A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Xiong Chong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Small cell lung cancer is an aggressive subtype of lung cancer whereby about one-third of cases are complicated with bra­in metastases. However, cerebellar metastases are uncommon and contribute to less than 10% of brain metastases. Case: We report a 76-year-old Malay male, an active smoker who presented with dyspnea and occasional cough with hemoptysis for one week. He also pre­sented with headache and constitutional symptoms of malignancy. Clinical examination suggested the presence of right upper chest patholo­gy and positive left cerebellar signs. His condition deteriorated two days later and he passed away after failed attempts at resuscitation. Chest radiograph showed right upper lobe collapse, and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed metastatic lesion in the left cerebellum extending to the right cerebellum. Post-mortem findings revealed small cell lung cancer with cerebellar metastases. Conclusion: Small cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases deteriorate very rapidly, and the management is mainly supportive. Primary prevention through education is the best way to reduce the incidence of lung cancer. In addition, secondary prevention and screening should be undertaken at earlier stages of the disease, as some studies have shown that combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy improve prog­nosis of malignancies detected at early stage.

  10. Migration Suppression of Small Cell Lung Cancer by Polysaccharides from Nostoc commune Vaucher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Ding, Guo-Bin; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Lichao; Wu, Haili; Li, Hanqing; Li, Zhuoyu

    2016-08-17

    Nostoc commune Vauch., classified into cyanobacteria, has been always well appreciated as a healthy food and medicine worldwide owing to its rich nutrition and potent bioactivities. Nevertheless, the inhibitory effect of polysaccharides from N. commune Vauch. (NVPS) against cancer cell progression and metastasis is still being unraveled. The results in this study showed that NVPS remarkably suppressed cell migration through blocking the epithelial-mesenchymal transition program in NCI-H446 and NCI-H1688 human small cell lung cancer cells. The inhibitory effects were attributed to the suppression of integrin β1/FAK signaling through regulating cell-matrix adhesion. Furthermore, NVPS treatment could increase E-cadherin expression, but down-regulate N-cadherin, Vimentin, and MMP-9 expression, which resulted in the blockage of STAT3 nuclear translocation and JAK1 signaling. These findings suggest that NVPS may be a good candidate for development as a possible antitumor agent against small cell lung cancer. PMID:27465400

  11. Gastrin releasing peptide GRP(14-27) in human breast cancer cells and in small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsted, A J; Andersen, E V; Nedergaard, L;

    1991-01-01

    Immunoreactivity related to the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) precursor was detected in four different human breast cancer cell lines. The amounts and the characteristics in extracts from different breast carcinoma cells were compared with cell extracts from small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells....... Two different radioimmunoassays were employed, directed against the amino acid sequence 14-27 of GRP (IR-GRP) or the 42-53 amino acid sequence at the C-terminal end of the GRP precursor (GRP precursor fragment). In extracts from T47D cells cultured under serum free conditions, IR-GRP coeluted with GRP......(14-27) or GRP(18-27) in Sephadex G-50 chromatography. No immunoreactivity was detected in the fractions containing high molecular weight components. In a total of 41 human breast carcinoma biopsies from different postmenopausal patients, IR-GRP was detected by immunohistological staining in 39% of...

  12. The influence of the pituitary tumor transforming gene-1 (PTTG-1 on survival of patients with small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geddert Helene

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PTTG-1 (pituitary tumor transforming gene is a novel oncogene that is overexpressed in tumors, such as pituitary adenoma, breast and gastrointestinal cancers as well as in leukemia. In this study, we examined the role of PTTG-1 expression in lung cancer with regard to histological subtype, the correlation of PTTG-1 to clinical parameters and relation on patients' survival. Methods Expression of PTTG-1 was examined immunohistochemically on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 136 patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC and 91 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, retrospectively. The intensity of PTTG-1 expression as well as the proportion of PTTG-1 positive cells within a tumor was used for univariate and multivariate analysis. Results PTTG-1 expression was observed in 64% of SCLC tumors and in 97.8% of NSCLC tumors. In patients with SCLC, negative or low PTTG-1 expression was associated with a shorter mean survival time compared with patients with strong PTTG-1 expression (265 ± 18 days vs. 379 ± 66 days; p = 0.0291. Using the Cox regression model for multivariate analysis, PTTG-1 expression was a significant predictor for survival next to performance status, tumor stage, LDH and hemoglobin. In contrast, in patients with NSCLC an inverse correlation between survival and PTTG-1 expression was seen. Strong PTTG-1 expression was associated with a shorter mean survival of 306 ± 58 days compared with 463 ± 55 days for those patients with no or low PTTG-1 intensities (p = 0.0386. Further, PTTG-1 expression was associated with a more aggressive NSCLC phenotype with an advanced pathological stage, extensive lymph node metastases, distant metastases and increased LDH level. Multivariate analysis using Cox regression confirmed the prognostic relevance of PTTG-1 expression next to performance status and tumor stage in patients with NSCLC. Conclusion Lung cancers belong to the group of tumors expressing

  13. Radiofrequency ablation in primary non-small cell lung cancer: What a radiologist needs to know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivank Bhatia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer continues to be one of the leading causes of death worldwide. In advanced cases of lung cancer, a multimodality approach is often applied, however with poor local control rates. In early non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, surgery is the standard of care. Only 15-30% of patients are eligible for surgical resection. Improvements in imaging and treatment delivery systems have provided new tools to better target these tumors. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT has evolved as the next best option. The role of radiofrequency ablation (RFA is also growing. Currently, it is a third-line option in stage 1 NSCLC, when SBRT cannot be performed. More recent studies have demonstrated usefulness in recurrent tumors and some authors have also suggested combination of RFA with other modalities in larger tumors. Following the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST, screening by low-dose computed tomography (CT has demonstrated high rates of early-stage lung cancer detection in high-risk populations. Hence, even considering the current role of RFA as a third-line option, in view of increasing numbers of occurrences detected, the number of potential RFA candidates may see a steep uptrend. In view of all this, it is imperative that interventional radiologists be familiar with the techniques of lung ablation. The aim of this article is to discuss the procedural technique of RFA in the lung and review the current evidence regarding RFA for NSCLC.

  14. Multidrug resistance and retroviral transduction potential in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, M D; Gram, G J; Jensen, P B;

    1999-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major problem in the successful treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). New treatment strategies are needed, such as gene therapy specifically targeting the MDR cells in the tumor. Retroviral LacZ gene-containing vectors that were either pseudotyped...... for the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV-1) receptor or had specificity for the amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-A) receptor were used for transduction of five SCLC cell lines differing by a range of MDR mechanisms. Transduction efficiencies in these cell lines were compared by calculating the percentage...... of blue colonies after X-Gal staining of the cells grown in soft agar. All examined SCLC cell lines were transducible with either vector. Transduction efficiencies varied from 5.7% to 33.5% independent of the presence of MDR. These results indicate that MDR does not severely impair transduction of SCLC...

  15. Multidrug resistance and retroviral transduction potential in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, M D; Gram, G J; Jensen, P B;

    1999-01-01

    blue colonies after X-Gal staining of the cells grown in soft agar. All examined SCLC cell lines were transducible with either vector. Transduction efficiencies varied from 5.7% to 33.5% independent of the presence of MDR. These results indicate that MDR does not severely impair transduction of SCLC......Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major problem in the successful treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). New treatment strategies are needed, such as gene therapy specifically targeting the MDR cells in the tumor. Retroviral LacZ gene-containing vectors that were either pseudotyped for the...... gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV-1) receptor or had specificity for the amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-A) receptor were used for transduction of five SCLC cell lines differing by a range of MDR mechanisms. Transduction efficiencies in these cell lines were compared by calculating the percentage of...

  16. Left behind? Drug discovery in extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riess, Jonathan W; Lara, Primo N

    2014-03-01

    Systemic therapy and subsequent survival for patients with extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) are poor and have remained unchanged in the past quarter century. To improve outcomes in these patients, a new drug development paradigm must be adopted that moves away from empiricism and instead focuses on tumor biology and heterogeneity as a means to increase target and drug class diversity. By incorporating tools that have led to new diagnostic and treatment options in non-small-cell lung cancer, there could be hope yet for the future of SCLC therapeutics. PMID:24529447

  17. Isolating and Testing Circulating Tumor DNA and Soluble Immune Markers During the Course of Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-11

    Lung Cancer; Lung Neoplasms; Cancer of Lung; Cancer of the Lung; Neoplasms, Lung; Neoplasms, Pulmonary; Pulmonary Cancer; Pulmonary Neoplasms; Carcinoma, Non-small-cell Lung; Adenocarcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  18. Increased expression of the lncRNA PVT1 promotes tumorigenesis in non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yan-Rong; Zang, Shu-Zhi; Zhong, Chun-Lei; Li, Yun-Xia; Zhao, Sha-Sha; Feng, Xian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the major cause of cancer death worldwide. Increasing evidence shows that long non coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are widely involved in the development and progression of NSCLC. lncRNA PVT1 in several cancers has been studied, its role in lung cancer remains unknown. Our studies were designed to investigate the expression, biological role and clinical significance of PVT1 in lung cancer. Methods: lncRNA PVT1 expression in 82 NSCLC tissues and 3 lung...

  19. Lung and Bronchus Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... copy to myself The information used on this page will not be used to send unsolicited emails or shared with a third party. HPF: Did You Know? Video Series Lung Cancer - Did you know that lung cancer is the ...

  20. ZEB-1, a Repressor of the Semaphorin 3F Tumor Suppressor Gene in Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Clarhaut

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available SEMA3F is a secreted semaphorin with potent antitumor activity, which is frequently downregulated in lung cancer. In cancer cell lines, SEMA3F overexpression decreases hypoxia-induced factor 1α protein and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA, and inhibits multiple signaling components. Therefore, understanding how SEMA3F expression is inhibited in cancer cells is important. We previously defined the promoter organization of SEMA3F and found that chromatin remodeling by a histone deacetylase inhibitor was sufficient to activate SEMA3F expression. In lung cancer, we have also shown that ZEB-1, an E-box transcription repressor, is predominantly responsible for loss of E-Cadherin associated with a poor prognosis and resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. In the present study, we demonstrated that ZEB-1 also inhibits SEMA3F in lung cancer cells. Levels of ZEB-1, but not ZEB-2, Snail or Slug, significantly correlate with SEMA3F inhibition, and overexpression or inhibition of ZEB-1 correspondingly affected SEMA3F expression. Four conserved E-box sites were identified in the SEMA3F gene. Direct ZEB-1 binding was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays for two of these, and ZEB-1 binding was reduced when cells were treated with a histone deacetylase inhibitor. These results demonstrate that ZEB-1 directly inhibits SEMA3F expression in lung cancer cells. SEMA3F loss was associated with changes in cell signaling: increased phospho-AKT in normoxia and increase of hypoxia-induced factor 1α protein in hypoxia. Moreover, exogenous addition of SEMA3F could modulate ZEB-1-induced angiogenesis in a chorioallantoic membrane assay. Together, these data provide further support for the importance of SEMA3F and ZEB-1 in lung cancer progression.

  1. The liberated domain I of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor--a new tumour marker in small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almasi, Charlotte E; Drivsholm, Lars; Pappot, Helle;

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) remains poor with a 5-year survival rate of 4-6%. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), high levels of intact and cleaved forms of the receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR) are significantly associated with short overall survival. Our...

  2. Early effects of radiotherapy in small cell lung cancer xenografts monitored by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and biochemical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristjansen, P E; Pedersen, E J; Quistorff, B;

    1990-01-01

    31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) and biochemical analysis of extracts were applied to study the metabolic response to X-irradiation of small cell lung cancer in nude mice. Two small cell lung cancer xenografts, CPH SCCL 54A and 54B, with different radiosensitivity, although derived...

  3. The effect of comorbidity on stage-specific survival in resected non-small cell lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüchtenborg, Margreet; Jakobsen, Erik; Krasnik, Mark; Linklater, Karen M; Mellemgaard, Anders; Møller, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    To quantify the effect of comorbidity on stage-specific survival in resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.......To quantify the effect of comorbidity on stage-specific survival in resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients....

  4. Co-expression network analysis identifies Spleen Tyrosine Kinase (SYK) as a candidate oncogenic driver in a subset of small-cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Udyavar, Akshata R; Hoeksema, Megan D.; Clark, Jonathan E; Zou, Yong; Tang, Zuojian; Li, Zhiguo; Li, Ming; Chen, Heidi; Statnikov, Alexander; Shyr, Yu; Liebler, Daniel C.; Field, John; Eisenberg, Rosana; Estrada, Lourdes; Massion, Pierre P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Oncogenic mechanisms in small-cell lung cancer remain poorly understood leaving this tumor with the worst prognosis among all lung cancers. Unlike other cancer types, sequencing genomic approaches have been of limited success in small-cell lung cancer, i.e., no mutated oncogenes with potential driver characteristics have emerged, as it is the case for activating mutations of epidermal growth factor receptor in non-small-cell lung cancer. Differential gene expression analysis has al...

  5. The histone demethylase PHF8 is an oncogenic protein in human non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • PHF8 overexpresses in human NSCLC and predicts poor survival. • PHF8 regulates lung cancer cell growth and transformation. • PHF8 regulates apoptosis in human lung cancer cells. • PHF8 promotes miR-21 expression in human lung cancer. • MiR-21 is critically essential for PHF8 function in human lung cancer cells. - Abstract: PHF8 is a JmjC domain-containing protein and erases repressive histone marks including H4K20me1 and H3K9me1/2. It binds to H3K4me3, an active histone mark usually located at transcription start sites (TSSs), through its plant homeo-domain, and is thus recruited and enriched in gene promoters. PHF8 is involved in the development of several types of cancer, including leukemia, prostate cancer, and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Herein we report that PHF8 is an oncogenic protein in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). PHF8 is up-regulated in human NSCLC tissues, and high PHF8 expression predicts poor survival. Our in vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrate that PHF8 regulates lung cancer cell proliferation and cellular transformation. We found that PHF8 knockdown induces DNA damage and apoptosis in lung cancer cells. PHF8 promotes miR-21 expression in human lung cancer, and miR-21 knockdown blocks the effects of PHF8 on proliferation and apoptosis of lung cancer cells. In summary, PHF8 promotes lung cancer cell growth and survival by regulating miR-21

  6. Prediction of pulmonary complications after a lobectomy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Uramoto, H; Nakanishi, R.; Fujino, Y; Imoto, H; Takenoyama, M; Yoshimatsu, T.; Oyama, T; Osaki, T.; Yasumoto, K

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Although the preoperative prediction of pulmonary complications after lung major surgery has been reported in various papers, it still remains unclear.
METHODS—Eighty nine patients with stage I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who underwent a complete resection at our institute from 1994-8 were evaluated for the feasibility of making a preoperative prediction of pulmonary complications. All had either a predicted postoperative forced vital capacity (FVC)...

  7. Cancer stem cells and cisplatin-resistant cells isolated from non-small-lung cancer cell lines constitute related cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Ayllon, Blanca D; Moncho-Amor, Veronica; Abarrategi, Ander; de Cáceres, Inmaculada Ibañez; Castro-Carpeño, Javier; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Perona, Rosario; Sastre, Leandro

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the top cause of cancer-related deceases. One of the reasons is the development of resistance to the chemotherapy treatment. In particular, cancer stem cells (CSCs), can escape treatment and regenerate the bulk of the tumor. In this article, we describe a comparison between cancer cells resistant to cisplatin and CSCs, both derived from the non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines H460 and A549. Cisplatin-resistant cells were obtained after a single treatment with the drug. CSCs were isolated by culture in defined media, under nonadherent conditions. The isolated CSCs were clonogenic, could be differentiated into adherent cells and were less sensitive to cisplatin than the original cells. Cisplatin resistant and CSCs were able to generate primary tumors and to metastasize when injected into immunodeficient Nu/Nu mice, although they formed smaller tumors with a larger latency than untreated cells. Notably, under appropriated proportions, CSCs synergized with differentiated cells to form larger tumors. CSCs also showed increased capacity to induce angiogenesis in Nu/Nu mice. Conversely, H460 cisplatin-resistant cells showed increased tendency to develop bone metastasis. Gene expression analysis showed that several genes involved in tumor development and metastasis (EGR1, COX2, MALAT1, AKAP12, ADM) were similarly induced in CSC and cisplatin-resistant H460 cells, in agreement with a close similarity between these two cell populations. Cells with the characteristic growth properties of CSCs were also isolated from surgical samples of 18 out of 44 lung cancer patients. A significant correlation (P = 0.028) was found between the absence of CSCs and cisplatin sensitivity. PMID:24961511

  8. Cancer Stem Cells in Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line H446: Higher Dependency on Oxidative Phosphorylation and Mitochondrial Substrate-Level Phosphorylation than Non-Stem Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Cuicui; Shen, Yao; Jin, Fang; Miao, Yajing; Qiu, Xiaofei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, targeting cancer stem cells (CSCs) metabolism is becoming a promising therapeutic approach to improve cancer treatment outcomes. However, knowledge of the metabolic state of CSCs in small cell lung cancer is still lacking. In this study, we found that CSCs had significantly lower oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate than non-stem cancer cells. Meanwhile, this subpopulation of cells consumed less glucose, produced less lactate and maintained lower ATP levels. ...

  9. Genes suppressed by DNA methylation in non-small cell lung cancer reveal the epigenetics of epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Steven; Wang, Jing; Saintigny, Pierre; Wu, Chia-Chin; Giri, Uma; Jing ZHANG; Menju, Toshi; Diao, Lixia; Byers, Lauren; Weinstein, John ,; Coombes, Kevin; Girard, Luc; Komaki, Ritsuko; Wistuba, Ignacio; Date, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA methylation is associated with aberrant gene expression in cancer, and has been shown to correlate with therapeutic response and disease prognosis in some types of cancer. We sought to investigate the biological significance of DNA methylation in lung cancer. Results We integrated the gene expression profiles and data of gene promoter methylation for a large panel of non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, and identified 578 candidate genes with expression levels that were inver...

  10. Mutational landscape determines sensitivity to PD-1 blockade in non–small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Naiyer A.; Hellmann, Matthew D.; Snyder, Alexandra; Kvistborg, Pia; Makarov, Vladimir; Havel, Jonathan J.; Lee, William; Yuan, Jianda; Wong, Phillip; Ho, Teresa S.; Miller, Martin L.; Rekhtman, Natasha; Moreira, Andre L.; Ibrahim, Fawzia; Bruggeman, Cameron; Gasmi, Billel; Zappasodi, Roberta; Maeda, Yuka; Sander, Chris; Garon, Edward B.; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Schumacher, Ton N.; Chan, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors, which unleash a patient’s own T cells to kill tumors, are revolutionizing cancer treatment. To unravel the genomic determinants of response to this therapy, we used whole-exome sequencing of non–small cell lung cancers treated with pembrolizumab, an antibody targeting programmed cell death-1 (PD-1). In two independent cohorts, higher nonsynonymous mutation burden in tumors was associated with improved objective response, durable clinical benefit, and progression-free survival. Efficacy also correlated with the molecular smoking signature, higher neoantigen burden, and DNA repair pathway mutations; each factor was also associated with mutation burden. In one responder, neoantigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses paralleled tumor regression, suggesting that anti–PD-1 therapy enhances neoantigen-specific T cell reactivity. Our results suggest that the genomic landscape of lung cancers shapes response to anti–PD-1 therapy. PMID:25765070

  11. Transforming growth factor-beta signaling network regulates plasticity and lineage commitment of lung cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ischenko, I; Liu, J.; Petrenko, O; Hayman, M J

    2014-01-01

    Identification of target cells in lung tumorigenesis and characterization of the signals that control their behavior is an important step toward improving early cancer diagnosis and predicting tumor behavior. We identified a population of cells in the adult lung that bear the EpCAM+CD104+CD49f+CD44+CD24loSCA1+ phenotype and can be clonally expanded in culture, consistent with the properties of early progenitor cells. We show that these cells, rather than being restricted to one tumor type, ca...

  12. CHMP4C Disruption Sensitizes the Human Lung Cancer Cells to Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human lung cancer is highly invasive and the most malignant among human tumors. Adenocarcinoma as a specific type of non-small cell lung cancer occurs with high frequency and is also highly resistant to radiation therapy. Thus, how to avoid radiation resistance and improve radiotherapy effectiveness is a crucial question. In the present study, human lung cancer A549 and H1299 cells were irradiated using γ-rays from a Co60 irradiator. Protein expression was detected by Western blotting. Cell cycle and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry. Surviving fraction was determined by colony formation assay. γH2AX and 53BP1 foci formation were examined by fluorescence microscopy. In the results, we show that CHMP4C, a subunit of Endosomal sorting complex-III (ESCRT-III, is involved in radiation-induced cellular response. Radiation-induced Aurora B expression enhances CHMP4C phosphorylation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells, maintaining cell cycle check-point and cellular viability as well as resisting apoptosis. CHMP4C depletion enhances cellular sensitivity to radiation, delays S-phase of cell cycle and reduces ionizing radiation (IR-induced γH2AX foci formation. We found that Aurora B targets CHMP4C and inhibition of Aurora B exhibits similar effects with silencing of CHMP4C in radioresistance. We also confirm that CHMP4C phosphorylation is elevated after IR both in p53-positive and-negative cells, indicating that the close correlation between CHMP4C and Aurora B signaling pathway in mediating radiation resistance is not p53 dependent. Together, our work establishes a new function of CHMP4C in radiation resistance, which will offer a potential strategy for non-small cell lung cancer by disrupting CHMP4C.

  13. CHMP4C Disruption Sensitizes the Human Lung Cancer Cells to Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kang; Liu, Jianxiang; Tian, Mei; Gao, Gang; Qi, Xuesong; Pan, Yan; Ruan, Jianlei; Liu, Chunxu; Su, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Human lung cancer is highly invasive and the most malignant among human tumors. Adenocarcinoma as a specific type of non-small cell lung cancer occurs with high frequency and is also highly resistant to radiation therapy. Thus, how to avoid radiation resistance and improve radiotherapy effectiveness is a crucial question. In the present study, human lung cancer A549 and H1299 cells were irradiated using γ-rays from a Co60 irradiator. Protein expression was detected by Western blotting. Cell cycle and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry. Surviving fraction was determined by colony formation assay. γH2AX and 53BP1 foci formation were examined by fluorescence microscopy. In the results, we show that CHMP4C, a subunit of Endosomal sorting complex-III (ESCRT-III), is involved in radiation-induced cellular response. Radiation-induced Aurora B expression enhances CHMP4C phosphorylation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, maintaining cell cycle check-point and cellular viability as well as resisting apoptosis. CHMP4C depletion enhances cellular sensitivity to radiation, delays S-phase of cell cycle and reduces ionizing radiation (IR)-induced γH2AX foci formation. We found that Aurora B targets CHMP4C and inhibition of Aurora B exhibits similar effects with silencing of CHMP4C in radioresistance. We also confirm that CHMP4C phosphorylation is elevated after IR both in p53-positive and-negative cells, indicating that the close correlation between CHMP4C and Aurora B signaling pathway in mediating radiation resistance is not p53 dependent. Together, our work establishes a new function of CHMP4C in radiation resistance, which will offer a potential strategy for non-small cell lung cancer by disrupting CHMP4C. PMID:26712741

  14. A Novel Muscarinic Antagonist R2HBJJ Inhibits Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Growth and Arrests the Cell Cycle in G0/G1

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, Nan; Wei, Xiaoli; Liu, Xiaoyan; Ma, Xiaoyun; He, Xinhua; Zhuo, Rengong; Zhao, Zhe; Wang, Liyun; Yan, Haitao; Zhong, Bohua; Zheng, Jianquan

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancers express the cholinergic autocrine loop, which facilitates the progression of cancer cells. The antagonists of mAChRs have been demonstrated to depress the growth of small cell lung cancers (SCLCs). In this study we intended to investigate the growth inhibitory effect of R2HBJJ, a novel muscarinic antagonist, on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and the possible mechanisms. The competitive binding assay revealed that R2HBJJ had a high affinity to M3 and M1 AChRs. R2HBJJ pre...

  15. Over-Expression of LSD1 Promotes Proliferation, Migration and Invasion in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lv, Tangfeng; Yuan, Dongmei; Xiaohui MIAO; Lv, Yanling; Zhan, Ping; Shen, Xiaokun; Song, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Background Lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) has been identified and biochemically characterized in epigenetics, but the pathological roles of its dysfunction in lung cancer remain to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of LSD1 expression in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to define its exact role in lung cancer proliferation, migration and invasion. Methods The protein levels of LSD1 in surgically resected samples from NSCL...

  16. Radiotherapy diagnostic biomarkers in radioresistant human H460 lung cancer stem-like cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Hong Shik; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Yim, Ji-Hye; Um, Hong-Duck; Park, Jong Kuk; Song, Jie-Young; Park, In-Chul; KIM, JAE-SUNG; Lee, Su-Jae; Lee, Chang-Woo; Hwang, Sang-Gu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor cell radioresistance is a major contributor to radiotherapy failure, highlighting the importance of identifying predictive biomarkers for radioresistance. In this work, we established a radioresistant H460 (RR-H460) cell line from parental radiosensitive H460 lung cancer cells by exposure to fractionated radiation. The radiation-resistant, anti-apoptotic phenotype of RR-H460 cell lines was confirmed by their enhanced clonogenic survival and increased expression of the radioresi...

  17. Superior vena cava obstruction in small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify prognostic or treatment factors influencing the response of superior vena cava obstruction (SVCO), time to SVCO recurrence, and overall survival of SCLC patients with SVCO at presentation; and to assess the role of retreatment in patients with SVCO at recurrent or persistent disease. Methods and Materials: Between January 1983 and November 1993, 76 consecutive patients who had small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) with SVCO were treated in our institution. Analysis was done according to the disease status at diagnosis of SVCO. The first analysis concerned a group of 50 patients who had SVCO at initial presentation. The second analysis concerned a group who had SVCO as a manifestation of persistent or recurrent disease. Results: In the first analysis, 93% had significant improvement in symptoms of SVCO after chemotherapy and 94% after mediastinal radiation. Response is almost universal despite a wide range of radiation fractionation and total dose used. Seventy percent remained SVCO-free before death. Thirty percent developed recurrence of SVCO symptoms 1-16 months (median 8) after the start of initial treatment. Those who received combined chemotherapy and radiation had a longer time to SVCO recurrence (p = 0.018) compared to those who received chemotherapy alone. This effect is mainly seen in limited-stage patients. The presence of SVCO recurrence tends to have an adverse effect on the overall survival (p = 0.077) irrespective of the time when the recurrences occurred (p = 0.296). The median survival of this whole group of 50 patients in the first analysis was 9.5 months, and the 2-year survival was 10%. Stage was strongly predictive of survival (p < 0.001). Sixteen percent (3 of 19) of the patients with limited-stage diseases were long-term survivors (two patients survived 35 months and one survived 70 months). The early mortality from SVCO was 2%. In the second analysis, 85% had previously been treated with chemotherapy alone. The response rate of

  18. Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Head and Neck Cancer or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Insular Thyroid Cancer; Metastatic Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus

  19. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cancer stem-like cells via down-regulation of Gli1 in lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ke-Jie; Yang, Meng-Hang; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Li, Bing; Nie, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for the tumorigenesis and recurrence, so targeting CSCs is a potential effective method to cure cancers. Activated Hedgehog signaling pathway has been proved to be implicated in the maintenance of self-renewal of CSCs, and arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has been reported to inhibit Gli1, a key transcription factor of Hedgehog pathway. In this study, we evaluated whether As2O3 has inhibitory effects on cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs) in lung cancer and further explored the possible mechanism. CCK8 assay and colony formation assay were performed to demonstrate the ability of As2O3 to inhibit the growth of NCI-H460 and NCI-H446 cells, which represented non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC), respectively. Tumor sphere formation assay was carried out to evaluate the effects of As2O3 on stem cell-like subpopulations. The expression of stem cell biomarkers CD133 and stem cell transcription factors such as Sox2 and Oct4 were detected. Moreover, the effects of As2O3 on expression of Gli1 and its target genes were observed. We found that As2O3 inhibited the cell proliferation and reduced the colony formation ability. Importantly, As2O3 decreased the formation of tumor spheres. The expression of stem cell biomarker CD133 and stem cell transcription factors such as Sox2 and Oct4 were markedly reduced by As2O3 treatment. Furthermore, As2O3 decreased the expression of Gli1, N-myc and GAS1. Our results suggested that As2O3 is a promising agent to inhibit CSLCs in lung cancer. In addition, the mechanism of CSLCs inhibition might involve Gli1 down-regulation.

  20. Ligand independent aryl hydrocarbon receptor inhibits lung cancer cell invasion by degradation of Smad4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chen-Chen; Yang, Wen-Hao; Li, Ching-Hao; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Tsai, Chi-Hao; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2016-07-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent-activated transcriptional factor that regulates the metabolism of xenobiotic and endogenous compounds. Although AhR plays a crucial role in air toxicant-induced carcinogenesis, AhR expression was shown to negatively regulate tumorigenesis. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effect of AhR without ligand treatment on cancer invasion in lung cancer cell lines. Lung cancer cells expressing lower levels of AhR showed higher invasion ability (H1299 cells) compared with cells expressing higher levels of AhR (A549 cells). Overexpression of AhR in H1299 cells inhibited the invasion ability. We found that vimentin expression was inhibited in AhR-overexpressing H1299 cells. Additionally, the expression of EMT-related transcriptional factors Snail and ID-1 decreased. Interestingly, we found that Smad4 degradation was induced in AhR-overexpressing H1299 cells. Our data showed that AhR could interact with Jun-activation domain binding protein (Jab1) and Smad4, which may cause degradation of Smad4 by the proteasome. Our data suggest that AhR affects the transforming growth factor-β signaling pathway by inducing Smad4 degradation by the proteasome and suppressing tumor metastasis via epithelial to mesenchymal transition reduction in lung cancer cells. PMID:27060206

  1. Recent advances in the treatment of non-small cell and small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Recent presentations at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting from 30 May to 3 June, 2014, will impact routine clinical care and the development of clinical trials in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and extensive stage small cell lung cancer (ES-SCLC). Patients with activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, defined as exon 19 and exon 21 L858R point mutations, experience a high objective response rate and prolonged progression-free survival with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. However, inevitably, patients experience disease progression and the most common mechanism of acquired resistance is an EGFR exon 20 T790M mutation. Several agents (AZD9291, CO-1686 and HM61713) have demonstrated impressive activity in patients with T790M resistance mutations. Additional data on the efficacy of first-line therapy with afatinib and the combination of erlotinib and bevacizumab for patients with EGFR mutant NSCLC were presented. The results of a phase III trial of crizotinib compared to platinum-pemetrexed in the first-line setting, and a phase I trial and expansion cohort of ceritinib, provided additional efficacy and toxicity data for patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearranged NSCLC. A phase III trial of cisplatin and gemcitabine, with and without necitumumab, revealed an improvement in overall survival with the addition of necitumumab in patients with squamous NSCLC. In the second-line setting, a phase III trial of docetaxel with ramucirumab or placebo revealed an improvement in overall survival with the addition of ramucirumab. In extensive stage small cell lung cancer phase III trials of consolidative thoracic radiation therapy and prophylactic cranial radiation failed to reveal an improvement in overall survival. PMID:25580271

  2. Fibroblasts weaken the anti-tumor effect of gefitinib on co-cultured non-small cell lung cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Xiao; Wang Peiqin; Jiang Tao; Yu Wenchen; Shang Yan; Han Yiping; Zhang Pingping

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common lung malignancy worldwide.The metastatic potential of NSCLC cells has been shown to be associated with the tumor microenvironment,which consists of tumor cells,stroma,blood vessels,immune infiltrates and the extracellular matrix.Fibroblasts can produce numerous extraceilular matrix molecules and growth factors.Gefitinib has been evaluated as a first-line treatment in selected patients,and it has shown favorable efficacy especially in NSCLC,but it is not effective for everyone.Methods In this study,we examined the antitumor activity of gefitinib on lung fibroblasts co-cultured of lung cancer cells.A series of co-culture experiments that employed cell counting kit-8 (CCK8),transwells,real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting with HFL-1 fibroblasts and A549 human lung carcinoma cells were performed to learn more about tumor cell proliferation,migration and invasion; and to determine any change of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated tumor markers vimentin,matrix metallopro-teinase 2 (MMP2) and chemotaxis cytokines receptor 4 (CXCR4) mRNA levels.Results A549 cell proliferation in the presence of HFL-1 cells was not significantly increased compared with A549 cells alone,but A549 cell spheroid body formation was increased after co-culture,and treatment with gefitinib increased further.Our study also revealed that fibroblasts attenuated the lung cancer cell inhibition ratio of migration and invasion after gefitinib treatment in vitro.To further study this mechanism,RT-PCR analysis showed that vimentin,MMP2 and CXCR4 mRNA levels were more highly expressed in the lung cancer cells after co-culture,but did not obviously decrease compared with the control cells following gefitinib treatment.This suggests the mechanism by which fibroblasts attenuate gefitinib-induced expression of EMT-associated tumor markers.Finally,our results demonstrated that co-culture with A549 lung

  3. Micro RNA-98 interferes with expression interleukin-10 in peripheral B cells of patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Rong, Jian; Qin, Jie; He, Jin-Yuan; Chen, Hui-Guo; Huang, Shao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10-producing B cells (B10 cells) plays an important role in the tumor tolerance. High frequency of peripheral B10 cell was reported in patients with lung cancer recently. Micro RNA (miR) regulates some gene expression. This study test a hypothesis that miR-98 suppresses the expression of IL-10 in B cells of subjects with lung cancer. The results showed that the levels of miR-98 were significantly less in peripheral B cells of patients with lung cancer than that in healthy subjects. IL-10 mRNA levels in peripheral B cells were significantly higher in lung cancer patients as compared with healthy controls. A negative correlation was identified between miR-98 and IL-10 in peripheral B cells. Serum IL-13 was higher in lung cancer patients than that in healthy controls. The levels of IL-13 were also negatively correlated with IL-10 in B cells. Exposure B10 cells to IL-13 in the culture or over expression of miR-98 reduced the expression of IL-10 in B cells. Administration with miR-98-laden liposomes inhibited the lung cancer growth in a mouse model. In conclusion, up regulation of miR-98 inhibits the expression of IL-10 in B cells, which may contribute to inhibit the lung cancer tolerance in the body. PMID:27605397

  4. Lung Cancer in the 1990s

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Nevin

    1990-01-01

    The author reviews the investigation and staging of patients with lung cancer. Surgical, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy roles in management of non-small cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer are discussed. The author concludes with practical guidelines for screening and prevention by family physicians.

  5. EXPRESSION OF P120ctn IN NON-SMALL-CELL LUNG CANCER: A CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL STUDY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志坤; 林东; 王恩华; 关奕

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of p120ctn in non-small-cell lungcancer (NSCLC) and its relationship with clinicopathological factors and prognosis. Methods: p120ctn expression was tested by immunohistochemistry for 80 tumors from patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. Correlations were investigated between p120ctn immunostaining in primary tumors and clinicopathological characteristics and survival. Results: Abnormal expression of p120ctn was found in 68/80(85%) tumors in which 43 cases had cytoplasmic staining. Abnormal staining of p120ctn was related with high TNM stage (P=0.003) and nodal metastasis (P=0.024).However, there was no correlation between altered expression with poor differentiation and histological type. According to Kaplan-Meier survival estimate, the expression of p120ctn was related to the poor survival (P=0.015) of patients. A Cox regression analysis revealed that p120ctn expression was a significant independent factor in the prediction of survival for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (P=0.008). Conclusion: altered expression of p120ctn was found in non-small-cell lung cancers and was correlated with lymph node metastasis and prognosis. From a practical point of view, the expression of p120ctn can be of prognostic value for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer.

  6. Changing paradigm in treatment of lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sundaram Viswanath; Abhishek Pathak; Amul Kapoor; Anvesh Rathore; Bhupendra Nath Kapur

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common and deadliest forms of cancer. It accounts for 13% of all new cancer cases and 19% of cancer-related deaths. In India, lung cancer constitutes 6.9% of all new cancer cases and 9.3% of all cancer cases. There has also been a dramatic rise worldwide in both the absolute and relative frequencies of lung cancer occurrence. In 1953 it became the most common cause of cancer mortality in men. By 1985, it became the leading cause of cancer deaths in women, causing almost twice as many deaths as breast cancer. The demographic proifle of lung cancer has changed greatly over the years; however, methods for diagnosing, screening, and managing lung cancer patients have improved. This is due to our growing understanding of the biology of lung cancer. It is now possible to further deifne lung cancer types beyond small cell lung carcinoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma. Moreover, new histology-based therapeutic modalities have been developed, and more new lung cancer biomarkers have been uncovered. Therefore, more detailed histological characterization of lung cancer samples is warranted in order to determine the best course of treatment for speciifc patients. This review article describes how these new molecular technologies are shaping the way lung cancer can be treated in future.

  7. Axin gene methylation status correlates with radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously reported that Axin1 (Axin) is down-regulated in many cases of lung cancer, and X-ray irradiation increased Axin expression and inhibited lung cancer cells. The mechanisms, however, were not clear. Four lung cancer cell lines were used to detect the methylation status of Axin with or without X-ray treatment. Real-time PCR was used to quantify the expression of Axin, and western blot analysis was applied to measure protein levels of Axin, β-catenin, Cyclin D1, MMP-7, DNMTS, MeCP2 and acetylated histones. Flow cytometric analysis, colony formation assay, transwell assay and xenograft growth experiment were used to study the biological behavior of the cells with hypermethylated or unmethylated Axin gene after X-ray treatment. Hypermethylated Axin gene was detected in 2 of 4 cell lines, and it correlated inversely with Axin expression. X-ray treatment significantly up-regulated Axin expression in H446 and H157 cells, which possess intrinsic hypermethylation of the Axin gene (P<0.01), but did not show up-regulation in LTE and H460 cells, which have unmethylated Axin gene. 2Gy X-ray significantly reduced colony formation (from 71% to 10.5%) in H157 cells, while the reduction was lower in LTE cells (from 71% to 20%). After X-ray irradiation, xenograft growth was significantly decreased in H157 cells (from 1.15 g to 0.28 g) in comparison with LTE cells (from 1.06 g to 0.65 g). Significantly decreased cell invasiveness and increased apoptosis were also observed in H157 cells treated with X-ray irradiation (P<0.01). Down-regulation of DNMTs and MeCP2 and up-regulation of acetylated histones could be detected in lung cancer cells. X-ray-induced inhibition of lung cancer cells may be mediated by enhanced expression of Axin via genomic DNA demethylation and histone acetylation. Lung cancer cells with a different methylation status of the Axin gene showed different radiosensitivity, suggesting that the methylation status of the Axin gene may be one important factor

  8. MG132 enhances the radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Liu, Jing; Nie, Jihua; Sheng, Wenjiong; Cao, Han; Shen, Wenhao; Dong, Aijing; Zhou, Jundong; Jiao, Yang; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping

    2015-10-01

    Radiotherapy is a common treatment modality for lung cancer, however, radioresistance remains a fundamental barrier to attaining the maximal efficacy. Cancer cells take advantage of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) for increased proliferation and decreased apoptotic cell death. MG132 (carbobenzoxyl-leucinyl-leucinyl-leucinal‑H), a specific and selective reversible inhibitor of the 26S proteasome, has shown anticancer effect in multiple types of cancers. Previously, we have reported that MG132 enhances the anti‑growth and anti-metastatic effects of irradiation in lung cancer cells. However, whether MG132 can enhance the radiosensitivity in lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo is still unknown. In this study, we found that MG132 increased apoptosis and dicentric chromosome ratio of A549 and H1299 cells treated by irradiation. Radiation-induced NF-κB expression and IκBα phosphorylation was attenuated in MG132 plus irradiation-treated cells. The in vivo model of H1299 xenografts of nude mice showed that the tumor size of MG132 plus irradiation treated xenografts was smaller than that of irradiation, MG132 or the control group. Moreover, MG132 plus irradiation group showed significant reduced Ki67 expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MG132 enhances the radiosensitivity through multiple mechanisms in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26238156

  9. Loss of aquaporin-4 expression and putative function in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquaporins (AQPs) have been recognized to promote tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis and are therefore recognized as promising targets for novel anti-cancer therapies. Potentially relevant AQPs in distinct cancer entities can be determined by a comprehensive expression analysis of the 13 human AQPs. We analyzed the presence of all AQP transcripts in 576 different normal lung and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples using microarray data and validated our findings by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Variable expression of several AQPs (AQP1, -3, -4, and -5) was found in NSCLC and normal lung tissues. Furthermore, we identified remarkable differences between NSCLC subtypes in regard to AQP1, -3 and -4 expression. Higher transcript and protein levels of AQP4 in well-differentiated lung adenocarcinomas suggested an association with a more favourable prognosis. Beyond water transport, data mining of co-expressed genes indicated an involvement of AQP4 in cell-cell signalling, cellular movement and lipid metabolism, and underlined the association of AQP4 to important physiological functions in benign lung tissue. Our findings accentuate the need to identify functional differences and redundancies of active AQPs in normal and tumor cells in order to assess their value as promising drug targets

  10. Assessment of metal contaminants in non-small cell lung cancer by EDX microanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Scimeca

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Human cardio-respiratory diseases are strongly correlated to concentrations of atmospheric elements. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals is strictly monitored, because of its possible toxic effects. In this work, we utilized the EDX microanalysis in order to identify the potential heavy metal accumulation in the lung tissue.  To this aim, we enrolled 45 human lung biopsies: 15 non-small cell lung cancers, 15 lung benign lesions and 15 control biopsies. Lung samples were both paraffin embedded for light microscopy study and eponepoxid embedded for transmission electron microscopy. EDX microanalysis was performed on 100 nm thick unstained ultrathin-sections placed on specific copper grids. Our results demonstrated that the EDX technology was particularly efficient in the study of elemental composition of lung tissues, where we found heavy metals, such as Cobalt (Co, Chromium (Cr, Manganese (Mn and Lead (Pb. Furthermore, in malignant lesions we demonstrated the presence of multiple bio-accumulated elements. In fact, a high rate of lung cancers was associated with the presence of 3 or more bio-accumulated elements compared to benign lesions and control tissue (91.7%, 0%, 8.3%, respectively. The environmental impact on pulmonary carcinogenesis could be better clarified by demonstrating the presence of polluting agents in lung tissues. The application of EDX microanalysis on biological tissuescould shed new light in the study of the possible bioaccumulation of polluting agents in different human organs and systems.

  11. Thromboxane synthase suppression induces lung cancer cell apoptosis via inhibiting NF-κB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accumulating evidence shows that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induced apoptosis in cancer cells. TXS inhibitor 1-Benzylimidzole (1-BI) can trigger apoptosis in lung cancer cells but the mechanism is not fully defined. In this study, lung cancer cells were treated with 1-BI. In this study, the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured and NF-κB activity was determined in human lung cancer cells. The roles of ROS and NF-κB in 1-BI-mediated cell death were analyzed. The results showed that 1-BI induced ROS generation but decreased the activity of NF-κB by reducing phosphorylated IκBα (p-IκBα) and inhibiting the translocation of p65 into the nucleus. In contrast to 1-BI, antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) stimulated cell proliferation and significantly protected the cells from 1-BI-mediated cell death by neutralizing ROS. Collectively, apoptosis induced by 1-BI is associated with the over-production of ROS and the reduction of NF-κB. Antioxidants can significantly block the inhibitory effect of 1-BI.

  12. Thromboxane synthase suppression induces lung cancer cell apoptosis via inhibiting NF-{kappa}B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Kin Chung; Li, Ming-Yue; Leung, Billy C.S.; Hsin, Michael K.Y. [Department of Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong); Mok, Tony S.K. [Department of Clinical Oncology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong); Underwood, Malcolm J. [Department of Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong); Chen, George G., E-mail: gchen@cuhk.edu.hk [Department of Surgery, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong)

    2010-12-10

    Accumulating evidence shows that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induced apoptosis in cancer cells. TXS inhibitor 1-Benzylimidzole (1-BI) can trigger apoptosis in lung cancer cells but the mechanism is not fully defined. In this study, lung cancer cells were treated with 1-BI. In this study, the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured and NF-{kappa}B activity was determined in human lung cancer cells. The roles of ROS and NF-{kappa}B in 1-BI-mediated cell death were analyzed. The results showed that 1-BI induced ROS generation but decreased the activity of NF-{kappa}B by reducing phosphorylated I{kappa}B{alpha} (p-I{kappa}B{alpha}) and inhibiting the translocation of p65 into the nucleus. In contrast to 1-BI, antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) stimulated cell proliferation and significantly protected the cells from 1-BI-mediated cell death by neutralizing ROS. Collectively, apoptosis induced by 1-BI is associated with the over-production of ROS and the reduction of NF-{kappa}B. Antioxidants can significantly block the inhibitory effect of 1-BI.

  13. Significance of tumor markers in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mumbarkar, P. P.; Raste, A. S.; Ghadge, M. S.

    2006-01-01

    The objective was to test the utility of the cytokeratins CYFRA 21-1, tissue polypeptide specific antigen (TPS), Neuron specific enolase (NSE) and Carcino Embryonic antigen (CEA) in patients with lung cancer and in the pleural fluid of the patients with lung cancer and also the predicting ability of these tumor markers with respect to the histological types [including non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC)] and pathological stages. 40 normal subjects and 222 case...

  14. COPD promotes migration of A549 lung cancer cells: the role of chemokine CCL21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuźnar-Kamińska B

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Kuźnar-Kamińska,1 Justyna Mikuła-Pietrasik,2 Patrycja Sosińska,2 Krzysztof Książek,2 Halina Batura-Gabryel1 1Department of Pulmonology, Allergology and Respiratory Oncology, 2Department of Pathophysiology, Poznań University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, Poland Abstract: Patients with COPD develop lung cancer more frequently than healthy smokers. At the same time, molecular mediators promoting various aspects of cancer cell progression are still elusive. In this report, we examined whether COPD can be coupled with increased migration of non-small-cell lung cancer cells A549 and, if so, whether this effect may be related to altered production and activity of chemokines CCL21, CXCL5, and CXCL12. The study showed that the migration of A549 cells through the polycarbonate membrane and basement membrane extract toward a chemotactic gradient elicited by serum from patients with COPD was markedly higher as compared with serum from healthy donors. The concentration of CCL21 and CXCL12, but not CXCL5, in serum from patients with COPD was also increased. Experiments in which CCL21- and CXCL12-dependent signaling was blocked revealed that increased migration of the cancer cells upon treatment with serum from patients with COPD was mediated exclusively by CCL21. Collectively, our results indicate that COPD may contribute to the progression of lung cancer via CCL21-dependent intensification of cancer cell migration. Keywords: chemokines, COPD, lung cancer, migration

  15. Investigating the Radioresistant Properties of Lung Cancer Stem Cells in the Context of the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ryan; Sethi, Pallavi; Jyoti, Amar; McGarry, Ronald; Upreti, Meenakshi

    2016-02-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for ~85% of all lung cancer. While recent research has shown that cancer stem cells (CSC) exhibit radioresistant and chemoresistant properties, current cancer therapy targets the bulk of the tumor burden without accounting for the CSC and the contribution of the tumor microenvironment. CSC interaction with the stroma enhances NSCLC survival, thus limiting the efficacy of treatment. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of CSC and the microenvironment in conferring radio- or chemoresistance in an in vitro tumor model for NSCLC. The novel in vitro three-dimensional (3D) NSCLC model of color-coded tumor tissue analogs (TTA) that we have developed is comprised of human lung adenocarcinoma cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells and NSCLC cancer stem cells maintained in low oxygen conditions (5% O2) to recapitulate the physiologic conditions in tumors. Using this model, we demonstrate that a single 5 Gy radiation dose does not inhibit growth of TTA containing CSC and results in elevated expression of cytokines (TGF-α, RANTES, ENA-78) and factors (vimentin, MMP and TIMP), indicative of an invasive and aggressive phenotype. However, combined treatment of single dose or fractionated doses with cisplatin was found to either attenuate or decrease the proliferative effect that radiation exposure alone had on TTA containing CSC maintained in hypoxic conditions. In summary, we utilized a 3D NSCLC model, which had characteristics of the tumor microenvironment and tumor cell heterogeneity, to elucidate the multifactorial nature of radioresistance in tumors. PMID:26836231

  16. The Impact of Genomic Profiling for Novel Cancer Therapy--Recent Progress in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jingwu; Zhang, Xiaoli

    2016-01-20

    There is high expectation for significant improvements in cancer patient care after completion of the human genome project in 2003. Through pains-taking analyses of genomic profiles in cancer patients, a number of targetable gene alterations have been discovered, with some leading to novel therapies, such as activating mutations of EGFR, BRAF and ALK gene fusions. As a result, clinical management of cancer through targeted therapy has finally become a reality for a subset of cancers, such as lung adenocarcinomas and melanomas. In this review, we summarize how gene mutation discovery leads to new treatment strategies using non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as an example. We also discuss possible future implications of cancer genome analyses. PMID:26842989

  17. Non-small-cell lung cancer resectability: diagnostic value of PET/MR.

    OpenAIRE

    Fraioli, F.; Screaton, N J; Janes, S. M.; Win, T; Menezes, L.; Kayani, I.; Syed, R; Zaccagna, F.; O'Meara, C.; Barnes, A.; Bomanji, J B; Punwani, S.; Groves, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the diagnostic performance of PET/MR in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods Fifty consecutive consenting patients who underwent routine 18F-FDG PET/CT for potentially radically treatable lung cancer following a staging CT scan were recruited for PET/MR imaging on the same day. Two experienced readers, unaware of the results with the other modalities, interpreted the PET/MR images independently. Discordances were resolved in consensus. PET/MR TNM staging was com...

  18. TENIPOSIDE FOR BRAIN METASTASES OF SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER - A PHASE-II STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POSTMUS, PE; SMIT, EF; HAAXMAREICHE, H; VANZANDWIJK, N; ARDIZZONI, A; QUOIX, E; KIRKPATRICK, A; SAHMOUD, T; GIACCONE, G

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Here we report the results of a phase II study of teniposide, one of the most active drugs against small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), in patients with brain metastases. Patients and Methods: Patients with SCLC who presented with brain metastases at diagnosis (n = 11) or during follow-up evaluat

  19. Targeting Transcriptional Addictions in Small Cell Lung Cancer with a Covalent CDK7 Inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Camilla L; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Abraham, Brian J;

    2014-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive disease with high mortality, and the identification of effective pharmacological strategies to target SCLC biology represents an urgent need. Using a high-throughput cellular screen of a diverse chemical library, we observe that SCLC is sensitive to ...

  20. A case of metastasis-induced acute pancreatitis in a patient with small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yamanashi, Keiji; Marumo, Satoshi; Saitoh, Motoh; Kato, Motokazu

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We report a rare case of metastasis-induced acute pancreatitis (MIAP) from small cell lung cancer (SCLC) diagnosed on autopsy, indicating a diagnosis of MIAP with SCLC. Our case suggests that MIAP can arise as a complication of SCLC and has an extremely poor prognosis.

  1. Customising chemotherapy in advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer: daily practice and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmar, A C; Sorensen, J B

    2011-01-01

    Treating patients with advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a daunting task but during recent years new options have emerged. By tailoring treatment using either information on histological subtypes of NSCLC or biomarkers it is now possible to improve outcome and maintain stable quality of...

  2. Spontaneous pneumothorax due to bronchopleural fistula following reirradiation for locoregionally recurrent squamous cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Takayo; Suzumura, Tomohiro; Sugiura, Takamune; Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Yonesaka, Kimio; Makihara, Masaru; Tsukuda, Hiroshi; Tada, Takuhito; Fukuoka, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax following radiotherapy for pulmonary malignancy is an unusual clinical condition. Here, we report a case of a 78-year-old male suffering from dyspnea during radiotherapy for squamous cell lung cancer of the right main bronchus. Imaging studies and fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed that pneumothorax was due to a bronchopleural fistula. PMID:27190612

  3. PET/CT for staging and monitoring non small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rankin, Sheila

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Correct staging of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is vital for appropriate management. Initial staging is usually performed with computerised tomography (CT), but increasingly functional imaging using integrated positron emission tomography and CT (PET/CT) is being used to provide more accurate staging, guide biopsies, assess response to therapy and identify recurrent disease.

  4. Tumor-associated neutrophils stimulate T cell responses in early-stage human lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy B.; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik S.; Quatromoni, Jon G.; Stephen, Tom Li; Ranganathan, Anjana; Deshpande, Charuhas; Akimova, Tatiana; Vachani, Anil; Litzky, Leslie; Hancock, Wayne W.; Conejo-Garcia, José R.; Feldman, Michael; Albelda, Steven M.; Singhal, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Infiltrating inflammatory cells are highly prevalent within the tumor microenvironment and mediate many processes associated with tumor progression; however, the contribution of specific populations remains unclear. For example, the nature and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in the cancer microenvironment is largely unknown. The goal of this study was to provide a phenotypic and functional characterization of TANs in surgically resected lung cancer patients. We found that TANs constituted 5%–25% of cells isolated from the digested human lung tumors. Compared with blood neutrophils, TANs displayed an activated phenotype (CD62LloCD54hi) with a distinct repertoire of chemokine receptors that included CCR5, CCR7, CXCR3, and CXCR4. TANs produced substantial quantities of the proinflammatory factors MCP-1, IL-8, MIP-1α, and IL-6, as well as the antiinflammatory IL-1R antagonist. Functionally, both TANs and neutrophils isolated from distant nonmalignant lung tissue were able to stimulate T cell proliferation and IFN-γ release. Cross-talk between TANs and activated T cells led to substantial upregulation of CD54, CD86, OX40L, and 4-1BBL costimulatory molecules on the neutrophil surface, which bolstered T cell proliferation in a positive-feedback loop. Together our results demonstrate that in the earliest stages of lung cancer, TANs are not immunosuppressive, but rather stimulate T cell responses. PMID:25384214

  5. CXCR4/CXCL12 in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Metastasis to the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastiano Cavallaro

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer represents the leading cause of cancer-related mortality throughout the world. Patients die of local progression, disseminated disease, or both. At least one third of the people with lung cancer develop brain metastases at some point during their disease, even often before the diagnosis of lung cancer is made. The high rate of brain metastasis makes lung cancer the most common type of tumor to spread to the brain. It is critical to understand the biologic basis of brain metastases...

  6. SSX2-4 expression in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, K B V; Pøhl, M; Olsen, K E; Nielsen, O; Ditzel, H J; Gjerstorff, M F

    2014-01-01

    The expression of cancer/testis antigens SSX2, SSX3, and SSX4 in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) was examined, since they are considered promising targets for cancer immunotherapy due to their immunogenicity and testis-restricted normal tissue expression. We characterized three SSX antibodies......-4 expression was only detected in 5 of 143 early-stage NSCLCs, which is rare compared to other cancer/testis antigens (e.g. MAGE-A and GAGE). However, further studies are needed to determine whether SSX can be used as a prognostic or predictive biomarker in NSCLC....

  7. The Proangiogenic Phenotype of Natural Killer Cells in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Bruno

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment can polarize innate immune cells to a proangiogenic phenotype. Decidual natural killer (dNK cells show an angiogenic phenotype, yet the role for NK innate lymphoid cells in tumor angiogenesis remains to be defined. We investigated NK cells from patients with surgically resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and controls using flow cytometric and functional analyses. The CD56+CD16- NK subset in NSCLC patients, which represents the predominant NK subset in tumors and a minor subset in adjacent lung and peripheral blood, was associated with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, placental growth factor (PIGF, and interleukin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8 production. Peripheral blood CD56+CD16- NK cells from patients with the squamous cell carcinoma (SCC subtype showed higher VEGF and PlGF production compared to those from patients with adenocarcinoma (AdC and controls. Higher IL-8 production was found for both SCC and AdC compared to controls. Supernatants derived from NSCLC CD56+CD16- NK cells induced endothelial cell chemotaxis and formation of capillary-like structures in vitro, particularly evident in SCC patients and absent from controls. Finally, exposure to transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1, a cytokine associated with dNK polarization, upregulated VEGF and PlGF in peripheral blood CD56+CD16- NK cells from healthy subjects. Our data suggest that NK cells in NSCLC act as proangiogenic cells, particularly evident for SCC and in part mediated by TGFβ1.

  8. Effects on prognosis of hematologic parameters in patients with small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nigar Dirican; Ceyda Anar; sule Atalay; Onder Ozturk; H.Ahmet Bircan; Munire Cakir; Ahmet Akkaya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) are prognostic factors for various types of cancer. In this study, we assessed the association of NLR and PLR with the prognosis of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) in patients who received the standard treatment. Material and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed patients who were diagnosed with SCLC and treated with the standard chemotherapy at Suleyman Demirel University Chest Diseases and Dr. Suat Sere...

  9. New targeted treatments for non-small-cell lung cancer – role of nivolumab

    OpenAIRE

    Baas, Paul; Muller,Mirte; van den Heuvel,Michel; Zago,Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Giulia Zago,1,2,* Mirte Muller,1,* Michel van den Heuvel,1 Paul Baas1 1Department of Thoracic Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (NKI-AvL), Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 2Medical Oncology 2, Istituto Oncologico Veneto (IOV), Padova, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is often diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease, where it is no longer amenable to curative treatment. During the last decades, the ...

  10. Exosomes: Decreased Sensitivity of Lung Cancer A549 Cells to Cisplatin

    OpenAIRE

    Xia Xiao; Shaorong Yu; Shuchun Li; Jianzhong Wu; Rong Ma; Haixia Cao; Yanliang Zhu; Jifeng Feng

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes are small extracellular membrane vesicles of endocytic origin released by many cells that could be found in most body fluids. The main functions of exosomes are cellular communication and cellular waste clean-up. This study was conducted to determine the involvement of exosomes in the regulation of sensitivity of the lung cancer cell line A549 to cisplatin (DDP). When DDP was added to A549 cells, exosomes secretion was strengthened. Addition of the secreted exosomes to other A549 cel...

  11. EBUS-TBNA gives adequate tissue information on cell type in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, MKY; Lam, D; IP, M; Ho, J.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In formulating systemic treatment in patients with advanced stage lung cancer, it is now considered imperative to know the cell type such as squamous carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and large cell carcinoma as chemotherapeutic agents would be tailored to treat different cell types. In the authors’ centre, the adoption of using epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) as the firstline treatment has been the treatment of choice in patients shown to have a...

  12. Silencing of AP-4 inhibits proliferation, induces cell cycle arrest and promotes apoptosis in human lung cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    HU, XUANYU; GUO, WEI; CHEN, SHANSHAN; XU, YIZHUO; LI, PING; WANG, HUAQI; CHU, HEYING; LI, JUAN; DU, YUWEN; CHEN, XIAONAN; ZHANG, GUOJUN; ZHAO, GUOQIANG

    2016-01-01

    Activating enhancer-binding protein (AP)-4 is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, and is involved in tumor biology. However, the role of AP-4 in human lung cancer remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, the expression of AP-4 in human lung cancer tissues and cells was investigated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and it was observed that the level of AP-4 was increased in tumor tissues and cells compared with their normal counterparts. AP-4 expression was knocked down by transfection with a specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) in lung cancer cells, and this indicated that siRNA-mediated silencing of AP-4 inhibited cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase and induced apoptosis by modulating the expression of p21 and cyclin D1. The results of the present study suggest that AP-4 may be an oncoprotein that has a significant role in lung cancer, and that siRNA-mediated silencing of AP-4 may have therapeutic potential as a strategy for the treatment of lung cancer.

  13. Effects of navelbine and docetaxel on gene expression in lung cancer cell strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li CAI; Hai-ying DONG; Guang-jie SUI

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To search genes sensitivity to the anti-cancer drugs navelbine (NVB) and docetaxel (DOC) in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell strains. Methods: The sensitivity of 4 strains of SCLC and 6 strains of NSCLC to NVB and DOC was evaluated using the MTT assay. The expression of 1291 sensitive-related genes to the anti-cancer drugs in 10 lung cancer cell strains was measured using cDNA macroarrays and the relationship was analyzed.Results: In total, there were 56 (r≥0.4) genes sensitive to NVB and DOC. For NVB: 36 genes were sensitive to NVB, 20 co-expressed genes between the SCLC+NSCLC set and the NSCLC set; 27 expressed genes and 7 specially expressed genes in the SCLC+NSCLC set; and 29 expressed genes and 9 specially expressed genes in the NSCLC set. For DOC, 50 genes were sensitive to DOC, 12co-expressed genes between the SCLC+NSCLC set and the NSCLC set; 24expressed genes and 12 specially expressed genes in the SCLC+NSCLC set; and 38 expressed genes and 26 specially expressed genes in the NSCLC set. The genes sensitive to NVB and DOC in lung-cancer cell stains were mainly divided into the following 4 categories: signal transduction molecules, cell factors, transcription factors and metabolism-related enzymes and inhibitors. Conclusions:There were obvious differences in genes related to NVB and DOC between SCLC and NSCLC cell strains, but the same as categories of function.

  14. Changes in Functional Lung Regions During the Course of Radiation Therapy and Their Potential Impact on Lung Dosimetry for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Xue [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Frey, Kirk [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Matuszak, Martha; Paul, Stanton; Ten Haken, Randall [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Yu, Jinming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Kong, Feng-Ming, E-mail: fkong@gru.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To study changes in functional activity on ventilation (V)/perfusion (Q) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) during radiation therapy (RT) and explore the impact of such changes on lung dosimetry in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Fifteen NSCLC patients with centrally located tumors were enrolled. All patients were treated with definitive RT dose of ≥60 Gy. V/Q SPECT-CT scans were performed prior to and after delivery of 45 Gy of fractionated RT. SPECT images were used to define temporarily dysfunctional regions of lung caused by tumor or other potentially reversible conditions as B3. The functional lung (FL) was defined on SPECT by 2 separate approaches: FL1, a threshold of 30% of the maximum uptake of the patient's lung; and FL2, FL1 plus B3 region. The impact of changes in FL between initiation of RT and delivery of 45 Gy on lung dosimetry were analyzed. Results: Fourteen patients (93%) had larger FL2 volumes than FL1 pre-RT (P<.001). Dysfunctional lung became functional in 11 patients (73%) on V SPECT and in 10 patients (67%) on Q SPECT. The dosimetric parameters generated from CT-based anatomical lung had significantly lower values in FL1 than FL2, with a median reduction in the volume of lung receiving a dose of at least 20 Gy (V{sub 20}) of 3%, 5.6%, and mean lung dose of 0.95 and 1.55 on V and Q SPECT respectively. Conclusions: Regional ventilation and perfusion function improve significantly during RT in centrally located NSCLC. Lung dosimetry values vary notably between different definitions of functional lung.

  15. Changes in Functional Lung Regions During the Course of Radiation Therapy and Their Potential Impact on Lung Dosimetry for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study changes in functional activity on ventilation (V)/perfusion (Q) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) during radiation therapy (RT) and explore the impact of such changes on lung dosimetry in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Fifteen NSCLC patients with centrally located tumors were enrolled. All patients were treated with definitive RT dose of ≥60 Gy. V/Q SPECT-CT scans were performed prior to and after delivery of 45 Gy of fractionated RT. SPECT images were used to define temporarily dysfunctional regions of lung caused by tumor or other potentially reversible conditions as B3. The functional lung (FL) was defined on SPECT by 2 separate approaches: FL1, a threshold of 30% of the maximum uptake of the patient's lung; and FL2, FL1 plus B3 region. The impact of changes in FL between initiation of RT and delivery of 45 Gy on lung dosimetry were analyzed. Results: Fourteen patients (93%) had larger FL2 volumes than FL1 pre-RT (P<.001). Dysfunctional lung became functional in 11 patients (73%) on V SPECT and in 10 patients (67%) on Q SPECT. The dosimetric parameters generated from CT-based anatomical lung had significantly lower values in FL1 than FL2, with a median reduction in the volume of lung receiving a dose of at least 20 Gy (V20) of 3%, 5.6%, and mean lung dose of 0.95 and 1.55 on V and Q SPECT respectively. Conclusions: Regional ventilation and perfusion function improve significantly during RT in centrally located NSCLC. Lung dosimetry values vary notably between different definitions of functional lung

  16. Inhibition of lung cancer cell proliferation mediated by human mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Li; Hui Tian; Zhitao Chen; Weiming Yue; Shuhai Li; Wenjun Li

    2011-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells(hMSCs)are mostly studied for their potential clinical use.Recently,much attention in the field of cancer research has been paid to hMSCs.In this study,we investigated the influence of hMSCs on the proliferation of lung cancer cell lines SK- MES-1 and A549 in vitro and in vivo by using a co-culture system and the hMSCs-conditioned medium.Our results demonstrated that hMSCs could inhibit the proliferation of SK-MES-1 and A549 cells,and induce the apoptosis of tumor cells in vitro via some soluble factors.Animal study showed that these soluble factors from hMSCs could sup- press tumorigenesis and tumor angiogenesis by treating preliminarily tumor cells with the hMSCs-conditioned medium.The downregulated expression of vascular endo- thelial growth factor in tumor cells might be the mechan- ism of interference in tumor angiogenesis,which was verified by western blot analysis and immunohistochemis- try assay.Taken together,our results suggested that the hMSCs could inhibit tumor cell growth by secreting some soluble factors.

  17. Myc Is a Metastasis Gene for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rapp, U R; Korn, C.; Ceteci, F.; Karreman, C; Luetkenhaus, K.; Serafin, V; Zanucco, E.; Castro, I.; Potapenko, T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Metastasis is a process by which cancer cells learn to form satellite tumors in distant organs and represents the principle cause of death of patients with solid tumors. NSCLC is the most lethal human cancer due to its high rate of metastasis. Methodology/Principal Findings Lack of a suitable animal model has so far hampered analysis of metastatic progression. We have examined c-MYC for its ability to induce metastasis in a C-RAF-driven mouse model for non-small-cell lung cancer. c...

  18. Validation of an algorithm able to differentiate small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients by means of a tumour marker panel: analysis of the errors.

    OpenAIRE

    Paone, G; De Angelis, G.; Portalone, L.; Greco, S.; Giosué, S.; Taglienti, A.; Bisetti, A; Ameglio, F.

    1997-01-01

    By means of a mathematical score previously generated by discriminant analysis on 90 lung cancer patients, a new and larger group of 261 subjects [209 with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 52 with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC)] was analysed to confirm the ability of the method to distinguish between these two types of cancers. The score, which included the serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and CYFRA-21.1 levels, permitted correct classification of 93% of the patients. When the misclas...

  19. TRIM31 is downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer and serves as a potential tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Yue; Bai, Xue; Peng, Yang; He, Ping

    2014-06-01

    The present study aims to investigate expression pattern and biological roles of TRIM31 in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We examined TRIM31 expression in 116 NSCLC tissues and 20 corresponding normal lung tissues by immumohistochemistry. We found TRIM31 downregulation in 47 out of 116 (40.5 %) cancer samples, which correlated with tumor status (p=0.0132), advanced p-TNM stage (p=0.001), and nodal metastasis (p=0.0382). TRIM31 expression was lower in lung cancer cell lines than normal bronchial cell line HBE. Transfection of TRIM31 plasmid was performed in H157 and H1299 cells. TRIM31 overexpression inhibited cell growth rate and colony formation ability in both cell lines. In addition, expression of cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 and cyclin E were decreased after TRIM31 transfection. In conclusion, TRIM31 might serve as a tumor suppressor in non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:24566900

  20. CRKL promotes lung cancer cell invasion through ERK-MMP9 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fu; Chengyao, Xie; Qingchang, Li; Qianze, Dong; Enhua, Wang; Yan, Wang

    2015-06-01

    CRKL is recently defined as a new oncogene, which plays a role in the lung cancer progression. However, the potential mechanism of CRKL in human non-small cell lung cancer cell invasion is obscure. We investigated the potential mechanism of CRKL in lung cancer cell invasion using immunohistochemistry, plasmid transfection, Western blotting, real-time PCR, matrigel invasion assay, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, and luciferase reporter assay. CRKL expression is higher in lymph node metastatic tumor compared with primary tumor. CRKL overexpression enhanced cell invasion and MMP9 expression in both HBE and H1299 cell lines. There was a significant correlation between CRKL overexpression and high MMP9 expression in primary tumors. MMP-9 antibody treatment significantly blocked cell invasion. CRKL overexpression also activated AP-1 luciferase reporter activity, ERK phosphorylation and association of c-fos to MMP9 promoter. Treatment with ERK inhibitor PD98059 in cells with CRKL transfection inhibited ERK activity, cell invasion, and MMP9 expression. These results suggested that overexpression of CRKL promoted cell invasion through upregulation of MMP9 expression and activation of ERK pathway. PMID:24664993

  1. High expression of HIF-2α and its anti-radiotherapy effect in lung cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J C; He, F; Yi, W; Wan, M H; Li, R; Wei, X; Wu, R; Niu, D L

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-2 alpha (HIF-2α) has been shown to regulate cell stemness, although the expression and effects of HIF-2α in lung cancer stem cells remained unclear. This study investigated HIF-2α expression in lung cancer stem cells, as well as the relationship between HIF-2α expression and radioresistance in lung cancer cells. Stem-like cells (CD133(+)) in the non-small-cell lung cancer cell line A549 were enriched by serum-free culture conditions, and CD133(+) cells were sorted via fluorescence-activated cell sorting. A549 cells were treated with middle-infrared radiation, and the level of HIF-2α expression was determined by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay and western blot analysis. The level of HIF-2α expression in tissue sections from 50 cases of clinically confirmed non-small-cell lung cancer was determined via immunohistochemical analysis, and its correlation with prognosis after radiotherapy was analyzed. HIF-2α levels in CD133(+) cells were significantly higher than those in CD133(-) cells (P = 0.032). However, after radiation treatment, these levels were significantly upregulated in both CD133(+) and CD133(-) cells (P = 0.031 and P = 0.023, respectively). After irradiation, the proportions of apoptotic, dead, and autophagic CD133(+) A549 cells were considerably lower than those of CD133(-) A549 cells (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the recovery of carcinoembryonic antigen to pre-radiation levels was more rapid in lung cancer patients with high levels of HIF-2α expression, and these patients had shorter survival times (P = 0.018). HIF-2α is highly expressed in lung cancer stem cells, which may lead to radioresistance. In conclusion, HIF-2α is a potential prognostic marker for lung cancer. PMID:26782458

  2. EGFR-dependent Impact of Indol-3-Carbinol on Radiosensitivity 
of Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao XIAO

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Indole-3-carbinol (I3C is a naturally occurring phytochemical found in cruciferous vegetables. The aim of the present study is to investigate the influence of I3C on radiosensitivity in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-positive and EGFR-negative lung cancer cell lines. Methods Human lung adenocarcinoma NIH-H1975 cells and human lung squamous carcinoma NIH-H226 and NIH-H520 cells were routinely cultured in RPMI-1640. MTT assay and clonogenic assay were used to detect cell growth and survival, respectively. Western blot and RT-PRC assay was employed to detect EGFR protein and mRNA expression. Results 5 μmol/L of I3C significantly reduced radiosensitivity of EGFR-positive NIH-H1975 and NIH-H226 cells, but failed to affect radiosensitivity of EGFR-negative NIH-H520 cells. Furthermore, I3C caused an increased expression of total EGFR and pEGFR (Y845 protein in NIH-H1975 and NIH-H226 cell lines, but not in NIH-H520 cell line. A reduction of EGFR expression by EGFR-siRNA significantly inhibited I3C-caused radioresistance in NIH-H1975 cells. Conclusion Our data presented here for the first time demonstrate that I3C reduces radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells by mediating EGFR expression, indicating that EGFR may be an important target for I3C-mediated radioresistance in lung cancer.

  3. Peripheral blood stem cell harvest in patients with limited stage small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemotherapy plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) induced mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) was performed in patients with limited stage small-cell lung cancer. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin/etoposide or cisplatin/adriamycin/etoposide. The amounts of CD34 positive cells and granulocyte-macrophage colony forming units (CFU-GM) collected during 2-3 courses of apheresis were 3.1±2.9 x 106/kg (n=10) and 3.1±1.5 x 105/kg (n=8) , respectively. Adequate amounts of PBSC were also harvested even in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Eight patients were successfully treated with high-dose chemotherapy consisting of ifosfamide, carboplatin and etoposide with PBSC transfusion. The patients'-bone marrow reconstruction was rapid and no treatment-related death was observed. (author)

  4. Interleukin-17-induced EMT promotes lung cancer cell migration and invasion via NF-κB/ZEB1 signal pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Kuo; Li, Ming-Ming; Shen, Jing; Liu, Fang; Cao, Jing-Yan; Jin, Shi; Yu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokine interleukin-17 (IL-17) has been associated with the risk of progressive cancers including lung cancer. However, it remains unclear how IL-17 may contribute to the invasion and development of these inflammation-associated malignancies. Here we aimed to investigate the role of IL-17 in lung cancer cell development. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been recently proposed as a developmental process which plays an important role in cancer progression and metastases...

  5. Clinical test on circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood of lung cancer patients, based on novel immunomagnetic beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Daoyun; Guo, Hongyin; Zhang, Lianbin; Zhou, Wenpeng

    2016-05-01

    This paper aims to establish a novel and highly sensitive method to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the peripheral blood of patients with lung cancer. This therefore enables the discovery of invisible micrometastasis in the early stage of lung cancer, leading to better prognostic assessments of lung cancer and detection of the post-operative tumor recurrence and metastasis, treatment options, and evaluation of curative effects. In this research study, various lung cancer cells were mixed with adult blood samples to simulate blood samples of tumor patients. With novel test methods, CTCs in peripheral blood of lung cancer patients were calculated, after the reaction between the cells obtained from the mix and EpCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule) antibodies which were marked by immunomagnetic beads. The results showed that 18 out of 42 (42.9%) lung cancer patients had a positive CTCs, which increased with tumor enlargement or metastasis. CTCs were not detected in a total of 20 blood samples from healthy volunteers. This indicated that the technology of novel immunomagnetic bead-enrichment could effectively separate and identify CTCs in peripheral blood of lung cancer patients, which is of great clinical value for prognostic assessments and treatment guidance of lung cancer. PMID:25682839

  6. Chemotherapy related toxicity in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahl Amit

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: For inoperable non-small cell lung cancer combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy plays an important role as a therapeutic modality. The aim of the present study was to analyze neoadjuvant chemotherapy related acute toxicity in locally advanced lung cancer (stage IIIA and IIIB in Indian patients using Cisplatin and Etoposide combination chemotherapy. Material and methods: Forty patients of locally advanced Non small cell lung cancer received three cycles neoadjuvant chemotherapy using Injection Cisplatin and Etoposide. The patients were taken for Radical radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gray over 30 fractions in conventional fractionation after completing chemotherapy. Chemotherapy associated toxicity was assessed using common toxicity criteria (CTC v2.0 Results: Forty patients were available for final evaluation. Median age of presentation of patients was fifty-six years. Thirteen patients had Non small cell lung cancer stage IIIA while twenty-seven patients had Stage IIIB disease. Anemia was the most common hematological toxicity observed (seen in 81% of patients. Nausea and vomiting were the most common non -hematological toxicity seen. Sensory neuropathy was seen in 38%of patients. 88% patients developed alopecia. Seven patients developed febrile neutropenias. Conclusion: Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy using Cisplatin and Etoposide continues to be a basic regimen in the Indian set up despite availability of higher molecules, since it is cost effective, well tolerated and therapeutically effective. Blood transfusions, growth factors and supportive care can be used effectively to over come toxicity associated with this regimen.

  7. Digitoxin and a synthetic monosaccharide analog inhibit cell viability in lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanisms of digitoxin-inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer (NCI-H460) cells remain unclear. Understanding how digitoxin or derivate analogs induce their cytotoxic effect below therapeutically relevant concentrations will help in designing and developing novel, safer and more effective anti-cancer drugs. In this study, NCI-H460 cells were treated with digitoxin and a synthetic analog D6-MA to determine their anti-cancer activity. Different concentrations of digitoxin and D6-MA were used and the subsequent changes in cell morphology, viability, cell cycle, and protein expressions were determined. Digitoxin and D6-MA induced dose-dependent apoptotic morphologic changes in NCI-H460 cells via caspase-9 cleavage, with D6-MA possessing 5-fold greater potency than digitoxin. In comparison, non-tumorigenic immortalized bronchial and small airway epithelial cells displayed significantly less apoptotic sensitivity compared to NCI-H460 cells suggesting that both digitoxin and D6-MA were selective for NSCLC. Furthermore, NCI-H460 cells arrested in G(2)/M phase following digitoxin and D6-MA treatment. Post-treatment evaluation of key G2/M checkpoint regulatory proteins identified down-regulation of cyclin B1/cdc2 complex and survivin. Additionally, Chk1/2 and p53 related proteins experienced down-regulation suggesting a p53-independent cell cycle arrest mechanism. In summary, digitoxin and D6-MA exert anti-cancer effects on NCI-H460 cells through apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, with D6-MA showing at least 5-fold greater potency relative to digitoxin. -- Highlights: ► Digitoxin and synthetic analog D6-MA induced apoptotic morphologic changes in NCI-H460 cells in a dose-dependent manner. ► Apoptotic cell death induced by analog was 5-fold more potent when compared to digitoxin. ► NCI-H460 cells arrested in G(2)/M phase following digitoxin (≥ 5 nM) and analog (≥ 1 nM) treatment. ► Digitoxin inhibited the expression of cyclin

  8. Digitoxin and a synthetic monosaccharide analog inhibit cell viability in lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elbaz, Hosam A. [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Stueckle, Todd A. [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV26506 (United States); Wang, Hua-Yu Leo; O' Doherty, George A. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Lowry, David T.; Sargent, Linda M.; Wang, Liying [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV26506 (United States); Dinu, Cerasela Zoica, E-mail: cerasela-zoica.dinu@mail.wvu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Rojanasakul, Yon, E-mail: yrojan@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms of digitoxin-inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer (NCI-H460) cells remain unclear. Understanding how digitoxin or derivate analogs induce their cytotoxic effect below therapeutically relevant concentrations will help in designing and developing novel, safer and more effective anti-cancer drugs. In this study, NCI-H460 cells were treated with digitoxin and a synthetic analog D6-MA to determine their anti-cancer activity. Different concentrations of digitoxin and D6-MA were used and the subsequent changes in cell morphology, viability, cell cycle, and protein expressions were determined. Digitoxin and D6-MA induced dose-dependent apoptotic morphologic changes in NCI-H460 cells via caspase-9 cleavage, with D6-MA possessing 5-fold greater potency than digitoxin. In comparison, non-tumorigenic immortalized bronchial and small airway epithelial cells displayed significantly less apoptotic sensitivity compared to NCI-H460 cells suggesting that both digitoxin and D6-MA were selective for NSCLC. Furthermore, NCI-H460 cells arrested in G(2)/M phase following digitoxin and D6-MA treatment. Post-treatment evaluation of key G2/M checkpoint regulatory proteins identified down-regulation of cyclin B1/cdc2 complex and survivin. Additionally, Chk1/2 and p53 related proteins experienced down-regulation suggesting a p53-independent cell cycle arrest mechanism. In summary, digitoxin and D6-MA exert anti-cancer effects on NCI-H460 cells through apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, with D6-MA showing at least 5-fold greater potency relative to digitoxin. -- Highlights: ► Digitoxin and synthetic analog D6-MA induced apoptotic morphologic changes in NCI-H460 cells in a dose-dependent manner. ► Apoptotic cell death induced by analog was 5-fold more potent when compared to digitoxin. ► NCI-H460 cells arrested in G(2)/M phase following digitoxin (≥ 5 nM) and analog (≥ 1 nM) treatment. ► Digitoxin inhibited the expression of cyclin

  9. IARS2 silencing induces non-small cell lung cancer cells proliferation inhibition, cell cycle arrest and promotes cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, J; Liu, W; Li, R; Liu, J; Zhang, Y; Tang, W; Wang, K

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential role of Ileucyl-tRNA synthetase (IARS2) silencing in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The silencing of IARS2 in H1299 cells and A549 cells were performed by lentivirus encoding shRNAs. The efficiency of IARS2 silencing was detected by quantitative real time PCR and western blot. The effects of IARS2 silencing on cell growth, cell apoptosis, cell cycle and cell colony formation ability were assessed by cells counting, MTT assay, flow cytometer analysis and soft agar colony formation assay, respectively. Compared with negative control group, IARS2 was significantly knockdown by transfection with lentivirus encoding shRNA of IARS2. The IARS2 silencing significantly inhibited the cells proliferation and cells colony formation ability, induced cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and promoted cell apoptosis. IARS2 silencing induced NSCLC cells growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and promoted cell apoptosis. These results suggest that IARS2 may be a novel target for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:26639235

  10. Transcriptome Analysis of Individual Stromal Cell Populations Identifies Stroma-Tumor Crosstalk in Mouse Lung Cancer Model

    OpenAIRE

    Hyejin Choi; Jianting Sheng; Dingcheng Gao; Fuhai Li; Anna Durrans; Seongho Ryu; Sharrell B. Lee; Navneet Narula; Shahin Rafii; Olivier Elemento; Nasser K. Altorki; Stephen T.C. Wong; Vivek Mittal

    2015-01-01

    Emerging studies have begun to demonstrate that reprogrammed stromal cells play pivotal roles in tumor growth, metastasis, and resistance to therapy. However, the contribution of stromal cells to non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has remained underexplored. We used an orthotopic model of Kras-driven NSCLC to systematically dissect the contribution of specific hematopoietic stromal cells in lung cancer. RNA deep-sequencing analysis of individually sorted myeloid lineage and tumor epithelial c...

  11. 肺干细胞、肺癌干细胞与肺癌★%Lung stem cells, lung cancer stem cells and lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯晓延; 杜振宗

    2012-01-01

      背景:随着肿瘤干细胞理论的出现,近年来通过杀死肿瘤干细胞而治疗肿瘤的研究逐渐兴起,并取得一定的进展。目的:综述肺干细胞、肺癌干细胞及肺癌的研究进展。方法:应用计算机检索中国全文期刊数据库及 PubMed 相关文献,检索词分别为“肺癌干细胞、肺癌、肺干细胞”,“lung stem cel ,lung cancer stem cel ,lung cancer,cancer stem cel ”,并限定语言为英语和中文,最终入选32篇文章进行综述。结果与结论:肺癌干细胞可能起源于正常肺组织干细胞,而肺癌干细胞可能是肺癌发生的重要因素。随着对肺癌干细胞研究的深入,肺癌治疗将会进入一个崭新的阶段。%10.3969/j.issn.2095-4344.2012.32.031

  12. Epigenetics of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Langevin, Scott M; Kratzke, Robert A.; Kelsey, Karl T.

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States. Epigenetic alterations, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and non-coding RNA expression, have widely been reported in the literature to play a major role in the genesis of lung cancer. The goal of this review is to summarize the common epigenetic changes associated with lung cancer to give some clarity to its etiology, and provide an overview of the potential translational applications of these ...

  13. Expression of T cell factor-4 in non-small-cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chun-yan; WANG Yan; CUI Ze-shi; WANG En-hua

    2005-01-01

    Background T cell factor- 4 (TCF- 4) plays an important role in development and carcinogenesis. Recently, the role of TCF- 4 has been described in colon cancer and other cancers. However, whether TCF- 4 plays a similar role in lung cancer is unknown. To answer this question, we studied the expression of TCF- 4 protein and mRNA in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the relation of TCF- 4 expression pattern to histological type and cell differentiation. Methods Tissue samples from sixty cases of pathologically diagnosed NSCLC and eight normal tissue samples were obtained between September 2001 and March 2003. Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the distribution of TCF- 4 protein. The staining patterns of the tumors were divided into 4 categories: nuclear staining alone or nuclear staining greater than cytoplasmic staining; cytoplasmic staining or cytoplasmic staining greater than nuclear staining; equal nuclear and cytoplasmic staining; no nuclear staining or cytoplasmic staining. The integrated optical density (OD) values of all sections were analyzed by UIC MetaMorph image analysis software. The expression of TCF- 4 mRNA was detected by one-step reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The integrated density values of the PCR products were analyzed semi-quantitatively.Results Immunohistochemistry showed that there was no expression of TCF- 4 in normal tissue. However, TCF- 4 was expressed in 86.7% (52/60) of NSCLC samples, mainly in the nuclei of tumor cells. Furthermore, there was a significant difference in TCF- 4 localization patterns between squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas (P<0.05). The integrated OD values of TCF- 4 expression was significantly higher in tumors with moderate-poor cell differentiation than in well differentiated tumors (51.63±6.67 vs 46.13±12.31, P<0.01). There was no TCF- 4 mRNA expression in normal tissue. However, 63.9% (23/36) of carcinoma samples expressed TCF- 4 mRNA. TCF- 4 mRNA expression was

  14. Downregulated TIPE2 is associated with poor prognosis and promotes cell proliferation in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuexia [Intensive Care Unit, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China); Li, Xiaohui [Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou, Henan 450003 (China); Liu, Gang; Sun, Rongqing; Wang, Lirui [Intensive Care Unit, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China); Wang, Jing, E-mail: jing_wang1980@163.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China); Wang, Hongmin, E-mail: hmwangzz@126.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China)

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • TIPE2 is down-regulated in NSCLC tissues. • TIPE2 inhibits NSCLC cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion. • TIPE2 reduces the anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL protein and mesenchymal marker N-cadherin expression. - Abstract: The present study aims to investigate the expression pattern of TIPE2 protein and its clinical significance in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We investigated the expression levels of TIPE2 in 96 NSCLC tumor samples by immunohistochemistry and then analyzed its clinical significance. Furthermore, the role of TIPE2 on the biological properties of the NSCLC cell line H1299 and A549 was experimentally tested in vitro and in vivo. We found that the expression level of TIPE2 was significantly higher in normal lung tissues compared with NSCLC tissues (P < 0.001), and TIPE2 downregulation was significantly correlated with advanced TNM stage (P = 0.006). TIPE2 expression was lower in lung cancer cell lines than normal bronchial cell line HBE. Transfection of TIPE2 plasmid was performed in H1299 and A549 cells. TIPE2 overexpression inhibited lung cancer cell proliferation, colony formation and cell invasive in vitro, and prevented lung tumor growth in vivo. In addition, TIPE2 transfection reduced the anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL protein and mesenchymal marker N-cadherin expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that TIPE2 might serve as a tumor suppressor in NSCLC progression.

  15. Downregulated TIPE2 is associated with poor prognosis and promotes cell proliferation in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • TIPE2 is down-regulated in NSCLC tissues. • TIPE2 inhibits NSCLC cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion. • TIPE2 reduces the anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL protein and mesenchymal marker N-cadherin expression. - Abstract: The present study aims to investigate the expression pattern of TIPE2 protein and its clinical significance in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We investigated the expression levels of TIPE2 in 96 NSCLC tumor samples by immunohistochemistry and then analyzed its clinical significance. Furthermore, the role of TIPE2 on the biological properties of the NSCLC cell line H1299 and A549 was experimentally tested in vitro and in vivo. We found that the expression level of TIPE2 was significantly higher in normal lung tissues compared with NSCLC tissues (P < 0.001), and TIPE2 downregulation was significantly correlated with advanced TNM stage (P = 0.006). TIPE2 expression was lower in lung cancer cell lines than normal bronchial cell line HBE. Transfection of TIPE2 plasmid was performed in H1299 and A549 cells. TIPE2 overexpression inhibited lung cancer cell proliferation, colony formation and cell invasive in vitro, and prevented lung tumor growth in vivo. In addition, TIPE2 transfection reduced the anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL protein and mesenchymal marker N-cadherin expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that TIPE2 might serve as a tumor suppressor in NSCLC progression

  16. Downregulating microRNA-144 mediates a metabolic shift in lung cancer cells by regulating GLUT1 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, MIN; GAO, JUN; HUANG, QIN; JIN, YANFENG; WEI, ZHONGHUA

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. Increasing evidence has found that cancer metabolism alternations represent a critical hallmark for lung cancer. There is an urgent requirement to understand and dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer metabolism for lung cancer therapy. It remains largely unknown whether the deregulation of miRNAs contributes to the cancer metabolism. The present study aimed to investigate the role of miR-144 in lung cancer. Glucose uptake rate and lactate production assays demonstrated that miR-144 expression is decreased and therefore enhances the aerobic metabolism in lung cancer cells. In addition, western blot analysis revealed that miR-144 performs this function by increasing the expression of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), leading to an increase in glucose uptake and lactate production. Furthermore, cell viability assays demonstrated that the altered metabolism induced by miR-144 results in the rapid growth of cancer cells. In conclusion, these results identify miR-144 as a molecular switch involved in the orchestration of the Warburg effect in lung cancer cells via targeting the expression of GLUT1. PMID:27313692

  17. Interpretation of NCCN Guidelines:General Therapies on Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (Version 6. 2015)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xin-en

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in China and ranks the ifrst of cancer-related death. The major etiological agent of lung cancer is an industry-made and promoted addictive product, so lung cancer is considered to be a unique disease in all cancers. Effective policies for public health are required to prevent the smoking initiation so as to reduce the mortality of lung cancer, so Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has introduced a series of measures to monitor the tobacco products. As to patients with strong suspicion of lung cancer in stageⅠ-Ⅱ, a preoperative biopsy is needed and intra-operative diagnosis is necessary before pneumonectomy, bilobectomy or lobectomy if the preoperative tissue diagnosis is not obtained. However, lung cancer still cannot be easily diagnosed and cured, so the annual improvement and update of new therapeutic protocols and the development of new agents is of great significance. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for about 80% of all lung cancer, and above 75% NSCLC patients are in middle-advanced stage when diagnosed, so they have lost the optimal therapeutic opportunity and the 5-year survival rate is relatively low. Therefore, this study mainly interpreted the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines on the general therapies on NSCLC, hoping to provide references for the treatment of NSCLC patients and prolong their long-term survival.

  18. Metachronous lung cancer that presented as bilateral synchronous lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kocaturk, Celalettin Ibrahim; Cansever, Levent; Kanmaz, Dilek Zehra; Bedirhan, Mehmet Ali

    2013-01-01

    Every patient undergoing curative treatment for primary lung cancer is a candidate for metachronous lung cancer, with a reported risk of 5% per year. The majority of cases are stage I patients. Patients who undergo resection for lung cancer should be followed regularly. A metachronous lung cancer that develops as bilateral synchronous lung cancer is very rare.

  19. Expression of Syk in non-small cell lung cancer and its relationship with clinicopathological parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fen LAN; Shengdao XIONG; Weining XIONG; Guopeng XU; Xiaoxia LU

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to research the expression of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the relationship between Syk and clinico-pathologic factors and p53. Immunohistochemistry was applied to detect the expression of Syk and p53 protein in 39 cases of NSCLC (23 cases of lung squamous cell can-cer, 16 cases of lung adenocarcinoma) and tumor-sur-rounding normal lung tissues. The positive rate of Syk was 46.15% (18/39) and 100% (39/39) in NSCLC and tumor-surrounding normal lung tissues, respectively. The expres-sion level of Syk in NSCLC was significantly lower than that in tumor-surrounding normal lung tissues (P = 0.000). The Syk expression was positively correlated with the p53 expression in NSCLC specimens (P = 0.025). There was no significant association between Syk expression and lymph node metastasis, differentiation degree, tumor size and tumor node metastasis (TNM). The present study demonstrated that Syk was aberrantly expressed in the NSCLC and might have a significant impact on tumor growth and progression.

  20. Role of Metallothionein1H in Cisplatin Resistance of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-fang Hou; Qing-xia Fan; Liu-xing Wang; Shi-xin Lu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Despite platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy has improved greatly patients' outcomes, drug resistance poses a major impediment to the successful use of such an effective agent. Metallothioneins(MTs) are known to play putative roles in cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, drug resistance and prognosis. The present studiy was to investigte the role of metallethioein1H(MT1H) in cisplatin resistance of human non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC) cell lines in vitro or its possible molecular mechanisms. Methods: MT1H mRNA expression in A549 and A549/DDP cells was detected by RT-PCR. A recombinant eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1(-)-MT1H was constructed and transfected into A549 cells which express no MT1H. MT1H siRNA was transfected into A549/DDP cells which express MT1H highly. MT1H expression was detected by RT-PCR and Immunoblot. The chemosensitivity to cisplatin was assessed by MTT assay. Apoptosis rate was determined by Tunel and FCM. Bcl-2 and Bax were determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: MT1H mRNA was expressed in A549/DDP but not in A549. After transfection of MT1H, MT1H expression was enhanced and the chemosensitivity to cisplatin was decreased in A549 cells. Inversely, after transfection of MT1H siRNA, MT1H expression was decreased and the chemosensitivity to cisplatin was increased in A549/DDP. The apoptosis rate induced by cisplatin was increased and Bcl-2 was down-regulated but Bax showed little change in A549/DDP cells interferred with MT1H siRNA. Conclusion: MT1H overexpression can promote drug resistance in A549 cells . Down-regulation of MT1H interfered with siRNA can effectively reverses the drug resistance in A549/DDP cells by down-regulating the expression of Bcl-2 and increasing cisplatin induced apoptosis. SiRNA targeting MT1H combined with chemotherapy may be a very promising strategy for treatment of lung cancer.

  1. Non-small cell lung cancer in never smokers: a clinical entity to be identified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilka Lopes Santoro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: It has been recognized that patients with non-small cell lung cancer who are lifelong never-smokers constitute a distinct clinical entity. The aim of this study was to assess clinical risk factors for survival among neversmokers with non-small cell lung cancer. METHODS: All consecutive non-small cell lung cancer patients diagnosed (n = 285 between May 2005 and May 2009 were included. The clinical characteristics of never-smokers and ever-smokers (former and current were compared using chi-squared or Student's t tests. Survival curves were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and log-rank tests were used for survival comparisons. A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was evaluated by adjusting for age (continuous variable, gender (female vs. male, smoking status (never- vs. ever-smoker, the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale (continuous variable, histological type (adenocarcinoma vs. non-adenocarcinoma, AJCC staging (early vs. advanced staging, and treatment (chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy vs. the best treatment support. RESULTS: Of the 285 non-small cell lung cancer patients, 56 patients were never-smokers. Univariate analyses indicated that the never-smoker patients were more likely to be female (68% vs. 32% and have adenocarcinoma (70% vs. 51%. Overall median survival was 15.7 months (95% CI: 13.2 to 18.2. The never-smoker patients had a better survival rate than their counterpart, the ever-smokers. Never-smoker status, higher Karnofsky Performance Status, early staging, and treatment were independent and favorable prognostic factors for survival after adjusting for age, gender, and adenocarcinoma in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Epidemiological differences exist between never- and ever-smokers with lung cancer. Overall survival among never-smokers was found to be higher and independent of gender and histological type.

  2. Expression of G-protein inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs) in lung cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous data from our laboratory has indicated that there is a functional link between the β-adrenergic receptor signaling pathway and the G-protein inwardly rectifying potassium channel (GIRK1) in human breast cancer cell lines. We wanted to determine if GIRK channels were expressed in lung cancers and if a similar link exists in lung cancer. GIRK1-4 expression and levels were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR. GIRK protein levels were determined by western blots and cell proliferation was determined by a 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) assay. GIRK1 mRNA was expressed in three of six small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines, and either GIRK2, 3 or 4 mRNA expression was detected in all six SCLC cell lines. Treatment of NCI-H69 with β2-adrenergic antagonist ICI 118,551 (100 μM) daily for seven days led to slight decreases of GIRK1 mRNA expression levels. Treatment of NCI-H69 with the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol (10 μM) decreased growth rates in these cells. The GIRK inhibitor U50488H (2 μM) also inhibited proliferation, and this decrease was potentiated by isoproterenol. In the SCLC cell lines that demonstrated GIRK1 mRNA expression, we also saw GIRK1 protein expression. We feel these may be important regulatory pathways since no expression of mRNA of the GIRK channels (1 & 2) was found in hamster pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, a suggested cell of origin for SCLC, nor was GIRK1 or 2 expression found in human small airway epithelial cells. GIRK (1,2,3,4) mRNA expression was also seen in A549 adenocarcinoma and NCI-H727 carcinoid cell lines. GIRK1 mRNA expression was not found in tissue samples from adenocarcinoma or squamous cancer patients, nor was it found in NCI-H322 or NCI-H441 adenocarcinoma cell lines. GIRK (1,3,4) mRNA expression was seen in three squamous cell lines, GIRK2 was only expressed in one squamous cell line. However, GIRK1 protein expression was not seen in any non-SCLC cells

  3. SHP1-mediated cell cycle redistribution inhibits radiosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioresistance is the common cause for radiotherapy failure in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and the degree of radiosensitivity of tumor cells is different during different cell cycle phases. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of cell cycle redistribution in the establishment of radioresistance in NSCLC, as well as the signaling pathway of SH2 containing Tyrosine Phosphatase (SHP1). A NSCLC subtype cell line, radioresistant A549 (A549S1), was induced by high-dose hypofractionated ionizing radiations. Radiosensitivity-related parameters, cell cycle distribution and expression of cell cycle-related proteins and SHP1 were investigated. siRNA was designed to down-regulate SHP1expression. Compared with native A549 cells, the proportion of cells in the S phase was increased, and cells in the G0/G1 phase were consequently decreased, however, the proportion of cells in the G2/M phase did not change in A549S1 cells. Moreover, the expression of SHP1, CDK4 and CylinD1 were significantly increased, while p16 was significantly down-regulated in A549S1 cells compared with native A549 cells. Furthermore, inhibition of SHP1 by siRNA increased the radiosensitivity of A549S1 cells, induced a G0/G1 phase arrest, down-regulated CDK4 and CylinD1expressions, and up-regulated p16 expression. SHP1 decreases the radiosensitivity of NSCLC cells through affecting cell cycle distribution. This finding could unravel the molecular mechanism involved in NSCLC radioresistance

  4. Secondary osteosarcoma developing 10 years after chemoradiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagishita, Shigehiro; Horinouchi, Hidehito; Yorozu, Takashi; Kitazono, Satoru; Mizugaki, Hidenori; Kanda, Shintaro; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Mori, Taisuke; Tsuta, Koji; Sumi, Minako; Tamura, Tomohide

    2014-02-01

    A 53-year-old female patient was admitted with pain and a progressively enlarging mass in the right upper chest. Chest computed tomography revealed a mass lesion in the region of the right upper ribs. Ten years prior to this admission, the patient had undergone right lobectomy for lung adenocarcinoma. One year after the surgery, follow-up computed tomography had revealed tumor recurrence in the mediastinal and supraclavicular lymph nodes, and the patient had been treated by chemoradiotherapy. Thereafter, regular follow-up had revealed no evidence of recurrence of the non-small-cell lung cancer. Histopathological findings revealed proliferation of spindle-shaped malignant tumor cells in a background of osteoid, consistent with the diagnosis of osteosarcoma. The location of the tumor was consistent with the radiation field. Based on the clinicopathological findings, the patient was diagnosed as having secondary osteosarcoma occurring as a result of the chemoradiotherapy administered previously for the recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer. Unfortunately, the patient died of rapid progression of the osteosarcoma within a week of admission to the hospital. The autopsy revealed contiguous invasion by the tumor of the heart, with massive thrombus formation. The peripheral pulmonary arteries were diffusely occluded by metastatic tumors. Our case serves to highlight the risk of development of secondary sarcoma as a life-threatening late complication after chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, even after complete cure of the primary tumor. PMID:24338556

  5. Gender-related disparities in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paggi, Marco G; Vona, Rosa; Abbruzzese, Claudia; Malorni, Walter

    2010-12-01

    Epidemiological studies clearly outline some disparities in cancer onset, progression as well as prognosis and therapeutic response between sexes. In particular, in lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death, at least in Western countries, a gender disparity appears now to emerge, especially for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Such a disparity is apparently due to a variety of mechanisms, ranging from genetic and epigenetic differences to gender-specific lifestyle as well as to behavioral causes and, clearly, to sex hormones activity. Here we briefly recapitulate gender differences in terms of risk factors, histopathological features and pathogenetic mechanisms in NSCLC, and hypothesize that a gender-oriented pharmacology could beneficially impact on innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:20826048

  6. Identification of Serum Peptidome Signatures of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klupczynska, Agnieszka; Swiatly, Agata; Hajduk, Joanna; Matysiak, Jan; Dyszkiewicz, Wojciech; Pawlak, Krystian; Kokot, Zenon J

    2016-01-01

    Due to high mortality rates of lung cancer, there is a need for identification of new, clinically useful markers, which improve detection of this tumor in early stage of disease. In the current study, serum peptide profiling was evaluated as a diagnostic tool for non-small cell lung cancer patients. The combination of the ZipTip technology with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) for the analysis of peptide pattern of cancer patients (n = 153) and control subjects (n = 63) was presented for the first time. Based on the observed significant differences between cancer patients and control subjects, the classification model was created, which allowed for accurate group discrimination. The model turned out to be robust enough to discriminate a new validation set of samples with satisfactory sensitivity and specificity. Two peptides from the diagnostic pattern for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were identified as fragments of C3 and fibrinogen α chain. Since ELISA test did not confirm significant differences in the expression of complement component C3, further study will involve a quantitative approach to prove clinical utility of the other proteins from the proposed multi-peptide cancer signature. PMID:27043541

  7. Up-regulation of fas reverses cisplatin resistance of human small cell lung cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Wei

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aim Fas/FasL system is a major regulator of apoptosis. The mechanisms by which Fas mediates cisplatin resistance remain unclear. The aim of this study is to explore the effect of Fas over-expression on cisplatin resistance of small cell lung cancer cells and its possible mechanisms. Materials and methods Fas was over-expressed in H446/CDDP cells by infection with the adenoviruses containing Fas. Sensitivity of Fas-overexpressed H446/CDDP cells to cisplatin was evaluated using MTT assay. Expressions of Fas, GST-π and ERCC1 were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Apoptosis rate was examined by FACS. Results Over-expression of Fas in H446/CDDP cells significantly decreased the expressions of GST-π and ERCC1 at mRNA and protein levels, and increased the cell apoptosis. Furthermore, up-regulation of Fas significantly decreased the tolerance of H446/CDDP cells to cisplatin. Conclusion Over-expression of Fas reverses drug resistance of H446/CDDP cells, possibly due to the increased cell sensitivity to apoptosis and the decreased expressions of GST-π and ERCC1.

  8. CDK-associated Cullin 1 promotes cell proliferation with activation of ERK1/2 in human lung cancer A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •CDK-associated Cullin 1 (CAC1) expression increases in human lung carcinoma. •CAC1 promotes the proliferation of lung cancer A549 cells. •CAC1 promotes human lung cancer A549 cell proliferation with activation of ERK1/2. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death in the world, but the mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of CDK-associated Cullin 1 (CAC1) in lung cancer, the effect of CAC1 on the proliferation of human lung cancer A549 cells, and the activation of signaling pathways of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Results showed that CAC1 expression was higher levels in human lung carcinoma than normal lung tissue, and CAC1 siRNA reduced the proliferation of lung cancer A549 cells by decreasing cell activity and cell division in vitro. The proportion of cells treated with CAC1 siRNA increased in the G1 phase and decreased in the S and G2/M phase, indicative of G1 cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, the proportions of early/late apoptosis in lung cancer A549 cells were enhanced with CAC1 siRNA treatment. It was also found that activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 signaling pathways were involved in the proliferation of A549 cells. After CAC1 siRNA treatment, p-ERK1/2 levels decreased, and meanwhile p-p38 level increased, A549 cell proliferation increased when ERK1/2 signaling is activated by PMA. Our findings demonstrated that CAC1 promoted the proliferation of human lung cancer A549 cells with activation of ERK1/2 signaling pathways, suggesting a potential cure target for treatment of human lung cancer

  9. CDK-associated Cullin 1 promotes cell proliferation with activation of ERK1/2 in human lung cancer A549 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Tian Jun [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi’an 710061 (China); Gao, Fei [Hua-shan Central Hospital of Xi’an, Xi’an 710043 (China); Yang, Tian; Thakur, Asmitanand; Ren, Hui; Li, Yang; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Ting [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi’an 710061 (China); Chen, Ming Wei, E-mail: xjtucmw@163.com [Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi’an 710061 (China)

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •CDK-associated Cullin 1 (CAC1) expression increases in human lung carcinoma. •CAC1 promotes the proliferation of lung cancer A549 cells. •CAC1 promotes human lung cancer A549 cell proliferation with activation of ERK1/2. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death in the world, but the mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of CDK-associated Cullin 1 (CAC1) in lung cancer, the effect of CAC1 on the proliferation of human lung cancer A549 cells, and the activation of signaling pathways of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Results showed that CAC1 expression was higher levels in human lung carcinoma than normal lung tissue, and CAC1 siRNA reduced the proliferation of lung cancer A549 cells by decreasing cell activity and cell division in vitro. The proportion of cells treated with CAC1 siRNA increased in the G1 phase and decreased in the S and G2/M phase, indicative of G1 cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, the proportions of early/late apoptosis in lung cancer A549 cells were enhanced with CAC1 siRNA treatment. It was also found that activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 signaling pathways were involved in the proliferation of A549 cells. After CAC1 siRNA treatment, p-ERK1/2 levels decreased, and meanwhile p-p38 level increased, A549 cell proliferation increased when ERK1/2 signaling is activated by PMA. Our findings demonstrated that CAC1 promoted the proliferation of human lung cancer A549 cells with activation of ERK1/2 signaling pathways, suggesting a potential cure target for treatment of human lung cancer.

  10. Diet and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, P; Lange, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cigarette smoking is of key importance, factors such as diet also play a role in the development of lung cancer. MedLine and Embase were searched with diet and lung cancer as the key words. Recently published reviews and...... large well designed original articles were preferred to form the basis for the present article. A diet rich in fruit and vegetables reduces the incidence of lung cancer by approximately 25%. The reduction is of the same magnitude in current smokers, ex-smokers and never smokers. Supplementation with...... vitamins A, C and E and beta-carotene offers no protection against the development of lung cancer. On the contrary, beta-carotene supplementation has, in two major randomised intervention trials, resulted in an increased mortality. Smoking remains the leading cause of lung cancer. The adverse effects are...

  11. Diet and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, P; Lange, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cigarette smoking is of key importance, factors such as diet also play a role in the development of lung cancer. MedLine and Embase were searched with diet and lung cancer as the key words. Recently published reviews...... and large well designed original articles were preferred to form the basis for the present article. A diet rich in fruit and vegetables reduces the incidence of lung cancer by approximately 25%. The reduction is of the same magnitude in current smokers, ex-smokers and never smokers. Supplementation...... with vitamins A, C and E and beta-carotene offers no protection against the development of lung cancer. On the contrary, beta-carotene supplementation has, in two major randomised intervention trials, resulted in an increased mortality. Smoking remains the leading cause of lung cancer. The adverse effects...

  12. Ranolazine inhibits NaV1.5-mediated breast cancer cell invasiveness and lung colonization

    OpenAIRE

    Driffort, Virginie; Gillet, Ludovic; Bon, Emeline; Marionneau-Lambot, Séverine; Oullier, Thibauld; Joulin, Virginie; Collin, Christine; Pagès, Jean-Christophe; Jourdan, Marie-Lise; Chevalier, Stéphan; Bougnoux, Philippe; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves; Besson, Pierre; Roger, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Background NaV1.5 voltage-gated sodium channels are abnormally expressed in breast tumours and their expression level is associated with metastatic occurrence and patients’ death. In breast cancer cells, NaV1.5 activity promotes the proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix and enhances cell invasiveness. Findings In this study, we showed that the extinction of NaV1.5 expression in human breast cancer cells almost completely abrogated lung colonisation in immunodepressed mice (NMRI ...

  13. Genetic and Prognostic Differences of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer between Elderly Patients and Younger Counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Kenichi; Tomizawa, Kenji; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Ito, Simon; Kitahara, Hirokazu; Shimamatsu, Shinichiro; Kohno, Mikihiro; Yoshida, Tsukihisa; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Yatabe, Yasushi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2012-12-01

    Many elderly patients suffer from lung cancers, but it is not clear if their lung cancers differ from those of younger patients. In this study, we compared genetic and prognostic characteristics of lung cancers of patients aged ≥75 years with those of patients aged ≤ 64 years. In the genetic analysis, we explored 292 surgically treated non-squamous cell lung cancers with known mutational status of epidermal growth factor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). In the prognostic analysis, we retrospectively analyzed 405 surgically treated non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) before the era of routine clinical application of post-surgical adjuvant chemotherapy. Postsurgical recurrence-free survival (RFS) was compared between elderly patients and younger counterparts. The genetic analysis showed elderly non-squamous cell lung cancer patients to have higher prevalence of EGFR mutations (53.1 % vs 42.0%, P = 0.15) and lower prevalence of the ALK translocation (0 % vs 4.5%, P = 0.23) than their younger counterparts. The prognostic analysis showed postsurgical RFS was similar between the elderly NSCLC patients and the younger patients. However in multivariate analysis, adjusting for gender, smoking status, pathological stage, and histology, elderly patients had significantly worse prognoses (HR 1.57, 95% CI, 1.08-2.29; P = 0.02) compared with younger patients. These results suggest differences in genetic and prognostic aspects between elderly lung cancer patients and younger lung cancer patients. PMID:23251849

  14. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Berman, Abigail T.; Sara St. James; Ramesh Rengan

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung canc...

  15. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A Regulates the Secretion of Different Angiogenic Factors in Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frezzetti, Daniela; Gallo, Marianna; Roma, Cristin; D'Alessio, Amelia; Maiello, Monica R; Bevilacqua, Simona; Normanno, Nicola; De Luca, Antonella

    2016-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) is one of the main mediators of angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Recently, it has been described an autocrine feed-forward loop in NSCLC cells in which tumor-derived VEGFA promoted the secretion of VEGFA itself, amplifying the proangiogenic signal. In order to investigate the role of VEGFA in lung cancer progression, we assessed the effects of recombinant VEGFA on proliferation, migration, and secretion of other angiogenic factors in A549, H1975, and HCC827 NSCLC cell lines. We found that VEGFA did not affect NSCLC cell proliferation and migration. On the other hand, we demonstrated that VEGFA not only produced a strong and persistent increase of VEGFA itself but also significantly induced the secretion of a variety of angiogenic factors, including follistatin (FST), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), angiopoietin-2 (ANGPT2), granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), interleukin (IL)-8, leptin (LEP), platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1), and platelet-derived growth factor bb (PDGF-BB). PI3K/AKT, RAS/ERK, and STAT3 signalling pathways were found to mediate the effects of VEGFA in NSCLC cell lines. We also observed that VEGFA regulation mainly occurred at post-transcriptional level and that NSCLC cells expressed different isoforms of VEGFA. Collectively, our data suggested that VEGFA contributes to lung cancer progression by inducing a network of angiogenic factors, which might offer potential for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26542886

  16. Targeting PD-L1 for non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, Emily; Horn, Leora

    2016-06-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. For decades, cytotoxic chemotherapy has been the mainstay of treatment for the majority of patients, yet median survival remains poor and side effects from chemotherapy are not trivial. Immune checkpoint inhibitors, which exert antitumor effects by inhibiting negative T-cell regulators, are changing the landscape of treatment options for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The anti-PD-1 antibodies nivolumab and pembrolizumab are approved by the US FDA for treatment of patients with NSCLC and other tumor types. Additional agents are in clinical development. This review provides an update on the PD-1 and PD-L1 immune checkpoint inhibitors currently being evaluated in NSCLC patients. PMID:27197542

  17. FoxM1 mediated resistance to gefitinib in non-small-cell lung cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nuo XU; Xin ZHANG; Xun WANG; Hai-yan GE; Xiao-ying WANG; David GARFIELD; Ping YANG; Yuan-lin SONG; Chun-xue BAI

    2012-01-01

    Gefitinib is effective in only approximately 20% of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC),and the underlying mechanism remains unclear.FoxM1 is upregulated in NSCLC and associated with a poor prognosis in NSCLC patients.In this study,we examined the possible role of FoxM1 in gefitinib resistance and the related mechanisms.Methods:Gefitinib resistant human lung adenocarcinoma cell line SPC-A-1 and gefitinib-sensitive human lung mucoepidermoid carcinoma cell line NCI-H292 were used.mRNA and protein expression of FoxM1 and other factors were tested with quantitative RT PCR and Western blot analysis.RNA interference was performed to suppress FoxM1 expression in SPC-A-1 cells,and lentiviral infection was used to overexpress FoxM1 in H292 cells.MTT assay and flow cytometry were used to examine the proliferation and apoptosis of the cells.Results:Treatment of SPC-A-1 cells with gefitinib (1 and 10 μmol/L) upregulated the expression of FoxM1 in time- and concentrationdependent manners,while gefrtinib (1 μmol/L) downregulated in H292 cells.In SPC-A-1 cells treated with gefitinib (1 μmol/L),the expression of several downstream targets of FoxM1,including survivin,cyclin B1,SKP2,PLK1,Aurora B kinase and CDC25B,were significantly upregulated.Overexpression of FoxM1 increased the resistance in H292 cells,while attenuated FoxM1 expression restored the sensitivity to gefitinib in SPC-A-1 cells by inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis.Conclusion:The results suggest that FoxM1 plays an important role in the resistance of NSCLC cells to gefitinib in vitro.FoxM1 could be used as a therapeutic target to overcome the resistance to gefitinib.

  18. The Distribution of Human Stem Cell–like Memory T Cell in Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hai; Gu, Yong; Sheng, Si Yuan; Lu, Chuan Gang; Zou, Jian Yong

    2016-01-01

    Human stem cell–like memory T (Tscm) cells are long-lived, self-renewing memory lymphocytes that can differentiate into effector cells and mediate strong antitumour response in murine model. The distribution and function of Tscm cells in human lung cancer remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the properties of human Tscm cells in the blood and lymph node of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. There were more CD4+ Tscm cells in blood from NSCLC patients than from healthy donors, fewer CD4+ and CD8+ TSCM cells in blood than in lymph node from NSCLC patients. To further analyze their properties, we stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from NSCLC patients by mitogens to examine cytokine production. Our data suggest that both CD4 and CD8 Tscm cells in blood produced interferon-γ significantly increased in NSCLC patients compare with healthy subjects. In addition, fewer Tscm cells produced interferon-γ in lymph node than in blood from NSCLC patients. Our results strongly suggest that the distribution and function of CD4 Tscm cells in NSCLC patients is upregulated. Understanding of the properties of stem-like memory T cells will supply a good rationale for designing the new adoptive immunotherapy in cancer. PMID:27244531

  19. The number and microlocalization of tumor-associated immune cells are associated with patient's survival time in non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Shangfu; Ma Junliang; Pu Qiang; Yu Nanbin; Che Guowei; Liu Lunxu; Dai Fuqiang; Ma Lin; You Zongbing

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Tumor microenvironment is composed of tumor cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and infiltrating immune cells. Tumor-associated immune cells may inhibit or promote tumor growth and progression. This study was conducted to determine whether the number and microlocalization of macrophages, mature dendritic cells and cytotoxic T cells in non-small cell lung cancer are associated with patient's survival time. Methods Ninety-nine patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSC...

  20. Clinicopathological characteristics of resected adenosquamous cell carcinoma of the lung: Risk of coexistent double cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanagiri Takeshi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background adenosquamous carcinoma (ADSQ of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is a rare disease and the biological behavior and clinicopathological characteristics have not yet been thoroughly described. Method This study reviewed the patient charts of 11 (1.6% ADSQ cases among 779 patients with primary lung cancer who underwent a lung resection. The characteristics and clinicopathological factors were evaluated retrospectively. Results Six of the 11 patients with ADSQ were male and five were female. The mean age was 67.3 years' olds. Three patients had pathological stage IA, one patient each had stage IB and IIA, five patients had stage IIIA, and one patient stage IIIB. Five patients had coexistent double cancer including 2 gastric, 1 rectal, 1 prostate and 1 bladder cancer. ADSQ was found less frequently in males than squamous cell carcinoma (SQ. ADSQ was found more frequently in older patients, with advanced stage, advanced T status, and lymph node metastases than adenocarcinoma (AD. The proportion with coexistent double cancer of AD, SQ, and ADSQ were 21.1, 17.6, and 45.5%, respectively. ADSQ had a significantly correlation with double cancer (ADSQ vs. non- ADSQ p = 0.03. A multivariate analysis showed no significant prognostic difference between the patients with ADSQ and non- ADSQ. Conclusions In this study, cases with ADSQ showed no significantly prognostic difference in comparison to AD and SQ. However, surgeons must be cautious of any coexistent double cancer because approximately half of all patients with ADSQ of the lung have double cancer.

  1. Novel and natural knockout lung cancer cell lines for the LKB1/STK11 tumor suppressor gene

    OpenAIRE

    Carretero, J.; Medina, P.P. (Pedro P.); Pio, R. (Rubén); Montuenga, L M; Sanchez-Cespedes, M.

    2004-01-01

    Germline mutations of the LKB1 gene are responsible for Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), an autosomal dominant inherited disorder bestowing an increased risk of cancer. We have recently demonstrated that LKB1 inactivating mutations are not confined to PJS, but also appear in lung adenocarcinomas of sporadic origin, including primary tumors and lung cancer cell lines. To accurately determine the frequency of inactivating LKB1 gene mutations in lung tumors we have sequenced the complete coding reg...

  2. Role of ATG10 expression quantitative trait loci in non-small cell lung cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kaipeng; Liang, Cheng; Li, Qin; Yan, Caiwang; Wang, Cheng; Gu, Yayun; Zhu, Meng; Du, Fangzhi; Wang, Hui; Dai, Juncheng; Liu, Xiao'an; Jin, Guangfu; Shen, Hongbing; Ma, Hongxia; Hu, Zhibin

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this article was to evaluate whether genetic variants in autophagy-related genes affect the overall survival (OS) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. We analyzed 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in core autophagy-related genes for OS in 1,001 NSCLC patients. Three promising SNPs in ATG10 were subsequently annotated by the expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) and methylation quantitative trait loci (meQTL) analyses based on Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) datasets. We observed that the variants of rs10514231, rs1864182 and rs1864183 were associated with poor lung cancer survival (HR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.07-1.65; HR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.13-1.81; HR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.14-1.68, respectively) and positively correlated with ATG10 expression (all p lung cancer patients in TCGA dataset (HR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.33-3.29). Moreover, the variants of rs10514231 and rs1864182 were associated with the increased methylation levels of cg17942617 (meQTL), which in turn contributed to the elevated ATG10 expression and decreased survival time. Further functional assays revealed that ATG10 facilitated lung cancer cell proliferation and migration. Our findings suggest that eQTL/meQTL variations of ATG10 could influence lung cancer survival through regulating ATG10 expression. PMID:27225307

  3. Matrix Metalloproteinase-10 Is Required for Lung Cancer Stem Cell Maintenance, Tumor Initiation and Metastatic Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Verline Justilien; Regala, Roderick P.; I-Chu Tseng; Walsh, Michael P.; Jyotica Batra; Radisky, Evette S.; Murray, Nicole R.; Fields, Alan P.

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (Mmps) stimulate tumor invasion and metastasis by degrading the extracellular matrix. Here we reveal an unexpected role for Mmp10 (stromelysin 2) in the maintenance and tumorigenicity of mouse lung cancer stem-like cells (CSC). Mmp10 is highly expressed in oncosphere cultures enriched in CSCs and RNAi-mediated knockdown of Mmp10 leads to a loss of stem cell marker gene expression and inhibition of oncosphere growth, clonal expansion, and transformed growth in vitro. ...

  4. A Laboratory Prognostic Index Model for Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Arife Ulas; Fatma Paksoy Turkoz; Kamile Silay; Saadet Tokluoglu; Nilufer Avci; Berna Oksuzoglu; Necati Alkis

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to establish a laboratory prognostic index (LPI) in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients based on hematologic and biochemical parameters and to analyze the predictive value of LPI on NSCLC survival. Patients and Methods The study retrospectively reviewed 462 patients with advanced NSCLC diagnosed between 2000 and 2010 in a single institution. We developed an LPI that included serum levels of white blood cells (WBC), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), albumin, calciu...

  5. The ALK inhibitor ceritinib overcomes crizotinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Friboulet, Luc; Li, Nanxin; Katayama, Ryohei; Lee, Christian C.; Gainor, Justin F.; Crystal, Adam S.; Michellys, Pierre-Yves; Awad, Mark M.; Yanagitani, Noriko; Kim, Sungjoon; Pferdekamper, AnneMarie C.; Li, Jie; Kasibhatla, Shailaja; Sun, Frank; Sun, Xiuying

    2014-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) harboring anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements invariably develop resistance to the ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) crizotinib. Herein, we report the first preclinical evaluation of the next-generation ALK TKI, ceritinib (LDK378) in the setting of crizotinib resistance. Interrogation of in vitro and in vivo models of acquired resistance to crizotinib, including cell lines established from biopsies of crizotinib-resistant NSCLC patients r...

  6. ERK phosphorylation is predictive of resistance to IGF-1R inhibition in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zinn, Rebekah L.; Gardner, Eric E; Marchionni, Luigi; Murphy, Sara C.; Dobromilskaya, Irina; Hann, Christine L.; Rudin, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    New therapies are critically needed to improve the outcome for patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). IGF-1R inhibition is a potential treatment strategy for SCLC: the IGF-1R pathway is commonly upregulated in SCLC, and has been associated with inhibition of apoptosis and stimulation of proliferation through downstream signaling pathways including PI3K-Akt and MAPK. To evaluate potential determinants of response to IGF-1R inhibition, we assessed the relative sensitivity of 19 SCLC cell ...

  7. The potential diagnostic power of circulating tumor cell analysis for non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kirsty; Pailler, Emma; Faugeroux, Vincent; Taylor, Melissa; Oulhen, Marianne; Auger, Nathalie; Planchard, David; Soria, Jean-Charles; Lindsay, Colin R; Besse, Benjamin; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    In non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), genotyping tumor biopsies for targetable somatic alterations has become routine practice. However, serial biopsies have limitations: they may be technically difficult or impossible and could incur serious risks to patients. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) offer an alternative source for tumor analysis that is easily accessible and presents the potential to identify predictive biomarkers to tailor therapies on a personalized basis. Examined here is our current knowledge of CTC detection and characterization in NSCLC and their potential role in EGFR-mutant, ALK-rearranged and ROS1-rearranged patients. This is followed by discussion of the ongoing issues such as the question of CTC partnership as diagnostic tools in NSCLC. PMID:26564313

  8. The Expression and Biological Significance of PD-L1 on Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng CHEN

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Tumor-associated PD-L1 expression was recently shown to promote T-cell apoptosis and proposed as a potential mechanism of immune evasion by tumors. On the basis of the ability of tumor-associated PD-L1 to mediate activated T-cell death, it is likely that manipulation of the PD-L1 pathway at defined time points during the development of the T-cell antitumor immune response can enhance the efficacy of T-cell-based immunotherapy. Here, the levels of expression of PD-L1 on lung cancer cell lines and its role in interaction of CTL and target cells was investigated. Methods Human PBMC derived DCs were loaded with apoptotic tumor cells and stimulated by CD40 mAb (5C11. Tumor specific CTL was generated in vitro by autologous T cells co-cultured with mature DCs. Expression of PD-L1 on lung cancer cell lines H1299 and A549 were analyzed by FCM. JAM assay was used to detect the cytolytic activity of CTL with or without blocking PD-L1 by PD-L1 mAb respectively. The concentrations of IFN-γ in supernatants from distinct groups were analyzed by ELISA. Results Tumor cells-loaded mature DCs could induce the generation of the tumor specific CTL. Expression of PD-L1 was low on A549 cell, but high on H1299 cell. Blockade of PD-L1 on A549 could not improve cytolytic effect of CTL on target cells and IFN-γ production, but fragmentation of H1299 cells and IFN-γ production were significantly enhanced by the combination of PD-L1 mAb and CTL. Conclusion Expression of PD-L1 on lung cancer cell line can decrease the cytolytic effect of CTL on target cells.

  9. What are we able to achieve in the treatment of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer today?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several meta analyses published in the beginning of the 1990s confirmed effectivity of chemotherapy in comparison with best supportive care in advanced/metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: the median survival time was prolonged by 6 weeks - 2 months, and the number of patients surviving one year increased by about 10%. Influence of these meta analyses on perception of non-small cell lung cancer chemotherapy as an indicated but less effective treatment continues until today in some extend. Image of the advanced non-small cell lung cancer treatment has improved during the last years markedly, mainly due to new treatment possibilities discussed in this case report. (author)

  10. IL-24 Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion by Disrupting The SDF-1/CXCR4 Signaling Axis

    OpenAIRE

    Panneerselvam, Janani; Jin, Jiankang; Shanker, Manish; Lauderdale, Jason; Bates, Jonathan; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Yan D.; Stephen J Archibald; Timothy J. Hubin; Ramesh, Rajagopal

    2015-01-01

    Background The stromal cell derived factor (SDF)-1/chemokine receptor (CXCR)-4 signaling pathway plays a key role in lung cancer metastasis and is molecular target for therapy. In the present study we investigated whether interleukin (IL)-24 can inhibit the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis and suppress lung cancer cell migration and invasion in vitro. Further, the efficacy of IL-24 in combination with CXCR4 antagonists was investigated. Methods Human H1299, A549, H460 and HCC827 lung cancer cell lines were u...

  11. Prognostic impact of serum albumin levels on the recurrence of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Jin; Li Zhao; Fang Peng

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer who have undergone complete surgical resection harbor a 30% risk for tumor recurrence. Thus, the identification of factors that are predictive for tumor recurrence is urgently needed. The aim of this study was to test the prognostic value of serum albumin levels on tumor recurrence in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Stage I non-small cell lung cancer patients who underwent complete surgical resection of the...

  12. Cyclophosphamide or Denileukin Diftitox Followed By Expanding a Patient's Own T Cells in the Laboratory in Treating Patients With HER-2/Neu Overexpressing Metastatic Breast Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With HER-2/Neu Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-07

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  13. Effect of plasmid-mediated RNA interference targeting telomerase reverse transcriptase on lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Linhu; Deng, Zhansheng; Zhang, Yangde; Shao, Wenlong; Qiu, Yuan; Cui, Dong; Huang, Donghai

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, a plasmid-mediated siRNA interference vector targeting the hTERT gene was constructed and stably transfected into H1299 lung cancer cells. Using real-time quantitative fluorescent PCR technology, western blotting and flow cytometry-based cell cycle profiling, the silencing effect of this vector and its inhibitory effect on proliferation in lung cancer cells were explored. Based upon the results of our previous study, a pair of siRNA sequences was selected, and a DNA template primer was designed and synthesized. After cloning of the template primer into the promoter of the pGenesil-1.1 expression vector, the constructed interference vector was validated using enzyme digestion and gene sequencing. The recombinant interference vector and empty vector were separately transfected into H1299 lung cancer cells with cationic liposomes, and stable monoclonally transfected cells were obtained after selection with G418. After stable transfection, hTERT mRNA and protein expression levels were detected using real-time RT-PCR technology and western blotting. Using the MTT method and a colony formation assay, the growth and proliferation of the stably transfected lung cancer cells were determined. Changes in the cell cycle profile of the stably transfected lung cancer cells were detected using flow cytometry. An interference vector targeting the hTERT gene (pGenesil.1-hTERT) was successfully constructed. Enzyme digestion and gene sequencing confirmed that the sequence insertion met the criteria of the design. After transfection of H1299 cells with pGenesil.1-hTERT or an empty vector, the stably transfected monoclonal cell lines H1299-pGenesil.1-hTERT and H1299-pGenesil.1 were obtained. Compared to the control cells transfected with the empty vector, the H1299-pGenesil.1-hTERT cells had significantly lower mRNA expression of hTERT (93.97±0.83% inhibition, with PH1299-pGenesil.1-hTERT cells was significantly lower compared to that in H1299-pGenesil.1 cells

  14. The Importance of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor as a Marker of Angiogenesis and Lymphangiogenesis in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Andrei Suciu Bogdan; Lorand Denes; Ioana Hălmaciu; Tibor Mezei; Klara Brînzaniuc; Leonard Azamfirei

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the main cause of cancer death both in men and women. In spite of progress seen in the early diagnosis of lung cancer, and implementation of new treatment principles for these patients, 5 year survival of non-small cell lung cancer patients undergoing surgery is low. Introduction of anti-angiogenic therapy administered concomitantly with conventional chemotherapy agents represented practically the first success seen in the treatment of lung cancer in the last 20 years. The aim ...

  15. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  16. In Situ Characterizing Membrane Lipid Phenotype of Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines Using Mass Spectrometry Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Manwen; Guo, Shuai; Ren, Junling; Li, Zhili

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal lipid metabolisms are closely associated with cancers. In this study, mass spectrometry was employed to in situ investigate the associations of membrane lipid phenotypes of six human lung cancer cell lines (i.e., A549, H1650, H1975 from adenocarcinoma, H157 and H1703 from squamous cell carcinomas, and H460 from a large cell carcinoma) with cancer cell types and finally total 230 lipids were detected. Based these 230 lipids, partial least-square discriminant analysis indicated that fifteen lipids (i.e., PE 18:0_18:1, PI 18:0_20:4, SM 42:2, PE 16:0_20:4, PE 36:2, PC 36:2, SM 34:1, PA 38:3,C18:0, C22:4, PA 34:2, C20:5, C20:2, C18:2, and CerP 36:2) with variable importance in the projection (VIP) value of > 1.0 could be used to differentiate six cancer cell lines with the Predicted Residual Sum of Square (PRESS) score of 0.1974. Positive correlation between polyunsaturated fatty acids (i.e., C20:4, C22:4, C22:5, and C22:6) and polyunsaturated phospholipids (PE 16:0_20:4, PE 38:4, and PI 18:0_20:4) was observed in lung adenocarcinoma cells, especially for H1975 cells. Three adenocarcinoma cell lines (i.e., A549, H1650, and H1975) could be differentiated from other lung cancer cell lines based on the expression of C18:1, C20:1, C20:2, C20:5, and C22:6.

  17. Nicotine Induced Lung Cancer Cells Epithelial-mesenchymal Transition 
and Promote Its Vitro Invasion Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxu HOU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Our previous study found that nicotine could induce lung cancer cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between nicotine-induced EMT and lung cancer invasion and metastasis. Methods Real-time PCR and Western blot were used to detect the expression changes of EMT-related markers, E-cadherin and Vimentin, in A549 lung cancer cells treated with nicotine; The transposition of β-catenin protein expression was determined by immunofluorescence; Scratch test and Transwell invasion assay were used to detect the effects of nicotine on lung cancer cell migration and invasion. Results Nicotine can significantly down-regulate the expressional level of E-cadherin mRNA and protein of A549 cells in a manner of dose and time-dependent (P<0.01, P<0.01; Nicotine can significantly up-regulate the expressional level of Vimentin mRNA and protein of A549 cells in a manner of dose and time-dependent (P<0.01, P<0.01; Immunofluorescence results showed that β-catenin protein was significantly transfered to nucleus; Scratch test and Transwell assay showed that Nicotine could remarkably increase the migration and invasion potential of lung cancer cells (P<0.01, P<0.01. Conclusion Nicotine can induce cancer cells EMT, and promote the invasion and metastasis ability of lung cancer cells.

  18. Current trends of the external radiotherapy in treatment of non small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-small cell lung cancer belongs to the most frequent malign cancer on the world. Local and loco-regional methods of therapy are for this form of cancer highly important. Dominant position has radiation therapy, which is treating 60 % of all patients. Author provides an overview about the conventional and non-conventional sources of radiation, mainly about linear accelerator, which is used in therapy of NSCLC. This article offers basic information about conventional radiotherapy; it evaluates the fractional modes and doses used for curative and palliative radiation therapy. (author)

  19. EFEMP1 Suppresses Growth and Invasion of Lung Cancer Cells 
by Downregulating Matrix Metalloproteinase-7 Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Yuanyuan LANG; Meng, Jie; Song, Xiaomeng; Chen, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective EFEMP1, a member of fibulin family proteins, is a very important extracellular matrix protein which is involved in cell metabolism and its role in tumor occurrence and progression is still poorly understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the functional effect and mechanism of EFEMP1 in lung cancer cell growth and invasion. Methods EFEMP1 expression in lung cancer cells was determined by Western blot. The promoter methylation status of EFEMP1 was detected by ...

  20. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Ann G; Cote, Michele L

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the most common causes of cancer death despite understanding the major cause of the disease: cigarette smoking. Smoking increases lung cancer risk 5- to 10-fold with a clear dose-response relationship. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among nonsmokers increases lung cancer risk about 20%. Risks for marijuana and hookah use, and the new e-cigarettes, are yet to be consistently defined and will be important areas for continued research as use of these products increases. Other known environmental risk factors include exposures to radon, asbestos, diesel, and ionizing radiation. Host factors have also been associated with lung cancer risk, including family history of lung cancer, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and infections. Studies to identify genes associated with lung cancer susceptibility have consistently identified chromosomal regions on 15q25, 6p21 and 5p15 associated with lung cancer risk. Risk prediction models for lung cancer typically include age, sex, cigarette smoking intensity and/or duration, medical history, and occupational exposures, however there is not yet a risk prediction model currently recommended for general use. As lung cancer screening becomes more widespread, a validated model will be needed to better define risk groups to inform screening guidelines. PMID:26667337