WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell landfill methane

  1. Bio-tarp alternative daily cover prototypes for methane oxidation atop open landfill cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bryn L; Besnard, Fabien; Bogner, Jean; Hilger, Helene

    2011-05-01

    Final landfill covers are highly engineered to prevent methane release into the atmosphere. However, methane production begins soon after waste placement and is an unaddressed source of emissions. The methane oxidation capacity of methanotrophs embedded in a "bio-tarp" was investigated as a means to mitigate methane release from open landfill cells. The bio-tarp would also serve as an alternative daily cover during routine landfill operation. Evaluations of nine synthetic geotextiles identified two that would likely be suitable bio-tarp components. Pilot tarp prototypes were tested in continuous flow systems simulating landfill gas conditions. Multilayered bio-tarp prototypes consisting of alternating layers of the two geotextiles were found to remove 16% of the methane flowing through the bio-tarp. The addition of landfill cover soil, compost, or shale amendments to the bio-tarp increased the methane removal up to 32%. With evidence of methane removal in a laboratory bioreactor, prototypes were evaluated at a local landfill using flux chambers installed atop intermediate cover at a landfill. The multilayered bio-tarp and amended bio-tarp configurations were all found to decrease landfill methane flux; however, the performance efficacy of bio-tarps was not significantly different from controls without methanotrophs. Because highly variable methane fluxes at the field site likely confounded the test results, repeat field testing is recommended under more controlled flux conditions. PMID:21354776

  2. Reducing Open Cell Landfill Methane Emissions with a Bioactive Alternative Daily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helene Hilger; James Oliver; Jean Bogner; David Jones

    2009-03-31

    Methane and carbon dioxide are formed in landfills as wastes degrade. Molecule-for-molecule, methane is about 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the earth's atmosphere, and thus, it is the methane emissions from landfills that are scrutinized. For example, if emissions composed of 60% methane and 40% carbon dioxide were changed to a mix that was 40% methane and 60% carbon dioxide, a 30% reduction in the landfill's global warming potential would result. A 10% methane, 90% carbon dioxide ratio will result in a 75% reduction in global warming potential compared to the baseline. Gas collection from a closed landfill can reduce emissions, and it is sometimes combined with a biocover, an engineered system where methane oxidizing bacteria living in a medium such as compost, convert landfill methane to carbon dioxide and water. Although methane oxidizing bacteria merely convert one greenhouse gas (methane) to another (carbon dioxide), this conversion can offer significant reductions in the overall greenhouse gas contribution, or global warming potential, associated with the landfill. What has not been addressed to date is the fact that methane can also escape from a landfill when the active cell is being filled with waste. Federal regulations require that newly deposited solid waste to be covered daily with a 6 in layer of soil or an alternative daily cover (ADC), such as a canvas tarp. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of immobilizing methane oxidizing bacteria into a tarp-like matrix that could be used for alternative daily cover at open landfill cells to prevent methane emissions. A unique method of isolating methanotrophs from landfill cover soil was used to create a liquid culture of mixed methanotrophs. A variety of prospective immobilization techniques were used to affix the bacteria in a tarp-like matrix. Both gel encapsulation of methanotrophs and gels with liquid cores containing methanotrophs were readily

  3. Methane emissions from MBT landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Compilation of methane generation potential of mechanical biological treated (MBT) municipal solid waste. • Impacts and kinetics of landfill gas production of MBT landfills, approach with differentiated half-lives. • Methane oxidation in the waste itself and in soil covers. • Estimation of methane emissions from MBT landfills in Germany. - Abstract: Within the scope of an investigation for the German Federal Environment Agency (“Umweltbundesamt”), the basics for the estimation of the methane emissions from the landfilling of mechanically and biologically treated waste (MBT) were developed. For this purpose, topical research including monitoring results regarding the gas balance at MBT landfills was evaluated. For waste treated to the required German standards, a methane formation potential of approximately 18–24 m3 CH4/t of total dry solids may be expected. Monitoring results from MBT landfills show that a three-phase model with differentiated half-lives describes the degradation kinetics in the best way. This is due to the fact that during the first years of disposal, the anaerobic degradation processes still proceed relatively intensively. In addition in the long term (decades), a residual gas production at a low level is still to be expected. Most of the soils used in recultivation layer systems at German landfills show a relatively high methane oxidation capacity up to 5 l CH4/(m2 h). However, measurements at MBT disposal sites indicate that the majority of the landfill gas (in particular at non-covered areas), leaves the landfill body via preferred gas emission zones (hot spots) without significant methane oxidation. Therefore, rather low methane oxidation factors are recommended for open and temporarily covered MBT landfills. Higher methane oxidation rates can be achieved when the soil/recultivation layer is adequately designed and operated. Based on the elaborated default values, the First Order Decay (FOD) model of the IPCC

  4. Methane Emissions from Icelandic Landfills

    OpenAIRE

    Guðrún Meyvantsdóttir 1982

    2014-01-01

    Landfilling of biodegradable organic waste results in the generation of methane, along with other gases. If the gas is not collected through a recovery system, it will migrate through pores in the landfill cover and be released into the atmosphere, where it contributes to the global greenhouse gas budget. This study presents the first direct measurements of CH4 emissions from Icelandic landfill surface-covers. The main objective was to obtain evidence on the occurrence and scale of CH4 emissi...

  5. Quantification of methane emissions from danish landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Mønster, Jacob; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Whole-landfill methane emission was quantified using a tracer technique that combines controlled tracer gas release from the landfill with time-resolved concentration measurements downwind of the landfill using a mobile high-resolution analytical instrument. Methane emissions from 13 Danish...... landfills varied between 2.6 and 60.8 kg CH4 h–1. The highest methane emission was measured at the largest (in terms of disposed waste amounts) of the 13 landfills, whereas the lowest methane emissions (2.6-6.1 kgCH4 h–1) were measured at the older and smaller landfills. At two of the sites, which had gas...... collection, emission measurements showed that the gas collection systems only collected between 30-50% of the methane produced (assuming that the produced methane equalled the sum of the emitted methane and the collected methane). Significant methane emissions were observed from disposed shredder waste. At...

  6. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Don Augenstein; Ramin Yazdani; Rick Moore; Michelle Byars; Jeff Kieffer; Professor Morton Barlaz; Rinav Mehta

    2000-02-26

    Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with

  7. Greenhouse effect contributions of US landfill methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The greenhouse effect has recently been receiving a great deal of scientific and popular attention. The term refers to a cause-and-effect relationship in which ''heat blanketing'' of the earth, due to trace gas increases in the atmosphere, is expected to result in global warming. The trace gases are increasing as the result of human activities. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the trace gas contributing most importantly to the ''heat blanketing'' and currently receives the most attention. Less widely recognized has been the high importance of methane (CH4). Methane's contribution to the increased heat blanketing occurring since 1980 is estimated to be over a third as much as that of carbon dioxide. Gas from landfills has in turn been recognized to be a source of methane to the atmospheric buildup. However the magnitude of the landfill methane contribution, and the overall significance of landfill methane to the greenhouse phenomenon has been uncertain and the subject of some debate. (Author)

  8. Landfill gas cleanup for fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    EPRI is to test the feasibility of using a carbonate fuel cell to generate electricity from landfill gas. Landfills produce a substantial quantity of methane gas, a natural by-product of decaying organic wastes. Landfill gas, however, contains sulfur and halogen compounds, which are known contaminants to fuel cells and their fuel processing equipment. The objective of this project is to clean the landfill gas well enough to be used by the fuel cell without making the process prohibitively expensive. The cleanup system tested in this effort could also be adapted for use with other fuel cells (e.g., solid oxide, phosphoric acid) running on landfill gas.

  9. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Don Augenstein

    1999-01-11

    ''Conventional'' waste landfills emit methane, a potent greenhouse gas, in quantities such that landfill methane is a major factor in global climate change. Controlled landfilling is a novel approach to manage landfills for rapid completion of total gas generation, maximizing gas capture and minimizing emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated and brought to much earlier completion by improving conditions for biological processes (principally moisture levels) in the landfill. Gas recovery efficiency approaches 100% through use of surface membrane cover over porous gas recovery layers operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project's results at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California are, to date, highly encouraging. Two major controlled landfilling benefits would be the reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions.

  10. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Don Augenstein

    2001-02-01

    The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

  11. Methane recovery from landfill in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaolai, L.

    1996-12-31

    GEF has approved a special project for a demonstration project for Methane Recovery from the Urban Refuse Land Fill. This paper will introduce the possibility of GHG reduction from the landfill in China, describe the activities of the GEF project, and the priorities for international cooperation in this field. The Global Environment Facility (GEF) approved the project, China Promoting Methane Recovery and Unlization from Mixed Municipal Refuse, at its Council meeting in last April. This project is the first one supported by international organization in this field.

  12. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons[tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional

  13. A decision support tool for landfill methane generation

    OpenAIRE

    Emkes, Harriet

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on providing a decision support tool (DST) to enhance methane generation at individual landfill sites. To date there is no decision support tool (DST) available to provide landfill decision makers with clear and simplified information for decision makers to understand what is happening within a landfill site, to assess its performance and to be aware of potential remedies to any issues. The current lack in understanding stems from the complexity of the lan...

  14. Methane emission quantification from landfills using a double tracer approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Samuelsson, J.; Fredenslund, Anders Michael;

    2007-01-01

    A tracer method was successfully used for quantification of the whole methane (CH4) emission from Fakse landfill. By using two different tracers the emission from different sections of the landfill could be quantified. Furthermore, is was possible to determine the emissions from local on site...

  15. Estimation method for national methane emission from solid waste landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Gaikwad, S. A.; Shekdar, A. V.; Kshirsagar, P. S.; Singh, R. N.

    In keeping with the global efforts on inventorisation of methane emission, municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills are recognised as one of the major sources of anthropogenic emissions generated from human activities. In India, most of the solid wastes are disposed of by landfilling in low-lying areas located in and around the urban centres resulting in generation of large quantities of biogas containing a sizeable proportion of methane. After a critical review of literature on the methodology for estimation of methane emissions, the default methodology has been used in estimation following the IPCC guidelines 1996. However, as the default methodology assumes that all potential methane is emitted in the year of waste deposition, a triangular model for biogas from landfill has been proposed and the results are compared. The methodology proposed for methane emissions from landfills based on a triangular model is more realistic and can very well be used in estimation on global basis. Methane emissions from MSW landfills for the year AD 1980-1999 have been estimated which could be used in computing national inventories of methane emission.

  16. Superficial Methane Emissions from a Landfill in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauri-Riancho María Rosa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available On worldwide scale, one of the most important anthropogenic methane sources is landfill disposal for solid wastes. The main goal of this work was to quantify methane emissions at one landfill built in Merida, Mexico. This sit had venting wells by which a passive control for biogas movement was exerted. At the venting wells, methane concentrations were measured monthly during a 6 months period, Methane surface emission rate was estimated with the close chamber technique. Obtained results indicated that there are both spatial and seasonal variations in biogas composition. The average methane value during the monitoring period was 21.9% (12.7 to 32.5 V/V and the surface flow rate was in the range of 0 to 6,004 g CH4 m–2 d–1, with an average value of 1,480 g CH4 m–2 d–1, which is a high value in respect to these reported in publications.

  17. Detection and quantification of methane leakage from landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljungberg, Sven-Aake; Maartensson, Stig-Goeran (Univ. of Gaevle, Gaevle (Sweden)); Meijer, Jan-Erik; Rosqvist, Haakan (NSR AB, Helsingborg (Sweden))

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this project was to detect gas leakage and to measure and quantify methane emission from landfills using modern remote sensing techniques. In this project, a handheld laser instrument and an IR camera were used. The overall objective was to develop cost-effective methods for detecting and quantifying methane emissions from landfills. There are many methods available for measuring the methane concentration in air, both from close-up and from long distances. Combined with the use of a tracer gas, the methane emission from entire landfills can be measured relatively accurately. A number of methods are used to detect leakage from parts of landfill surfaces, but there are few methods for quantifying leakage from sub-zones. Field measurements with the laser instrument and the IR camera were carried out at seven Swedish landfills and two landfills in France. The investigated surfaces at the Swedish landfills were divided into different zones, such as top surface, slope, crest and toe of slope. The field measurements in France were taken over entire landfills. The methane emission varied between the different landfills in the project, and also between the different landfill zones. The results from repeated field measurements indicated that a landfill with a final cap and a successful gas recovery system produces barely measurable emissions. The weak points at a landfill are generally slopes, including crests and toes of slopes. Where the covering of the waste is inadequate, leakage often occurs at lift joints and in areas where waste protrudes through the cover. Other weak points are deficiencies in the gas recovery system. Leachate systems can lead landfill gas and thereby cause methane leakage. Along with wind velocity and variations in atmospheric pressure, moisture content in the ground is an important factor that affects methane emissions from landfill surfaces. Results from field measurements of the same feature/surface at different points in time and

  18. Gas Production Potential in the Landfill of Tehran by Landfill Methane Outreach Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pazoki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Landfilling is the most common way of municipal solid waste (MSW disposal in Iran. Many countries have targeted landfill methane recovery among greenhouse gas mitigation strategies, since methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide. Major questions remain with respect to actual methane production rates in field settings as well as the relative mass of methane that is recovered, emitted, oxidized by methanotrophic bacteria, laterally migrated, or temporarily stored within the landfill volume. Landfill gas (LFG consists of 50% - 60 vol% methane and 30% - 40 vol% carbon dioxide as well as trace amounts of numerous chemical compounds such as aromatics, chlorinated organic compounds and sulfur compounds. Landfill methane outreach program (LMOP is a voluntary assistance program which helps reduce methane emissions from landfills by encouraging the recovery and the beneficial use of LFG as an energy resource. Objectives In this study, the volume of LFG of Tehran by landfill methane outreach program (LMOP software was calculated. In addition, the relationship between the time of gas collection system operation and the volume of LFG production was evaluated. Materials and Methods The LMOP software was used. The available information and some presumptions were used to operate the software. The composition of the solid waste collected from the landfill of Tehran had specific details. A large amount of it was organic materials, which was about 67.8%. These materials have a good potential to produce gas. In addition, LMOP Colombia model uses the first-order equations in all the analytical equations. Furthermore, it is assumed that the landfill operation time is 30 years and the process is considered in two conditions; first, the gas was recovered in 2000, and second, the process started in 2015. Results The modeling results showed that for the gas recovery starting in 2000 and 2015, the power generation would be 2

  19. The influence of atmospheric pressure on landfill methane emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfills are the largest source of anthropogenic methane (CH4) emissions to the atmosphere in the United States. However, few measurements of whole landfill CH4 emissions have been reported. Here, we present the results of a multi-season study of whole landfill CH4 emissions using atmospheric tracer methods at the Nashua, New Hampshire Municipal landfill in the northeastern United States. The measurement data include 12 individual emission tests, each test consisting of 5-8 plume measurements. Measured emissions were negatively correlated with surface atmospheric pressure and ranged from 7.3 to 26.5 m3 CH4 min-1. A simple regression model of our results was used to calculate an annual emission rate of 8.4x106 m3 CH4 year-1. These data, along with CH4 oxidation estimates based on emitted landfill gas isotopic characteristics and gas collection data, were used to estimate annual CH4 generation at this landfill. A reported gas collection rate of 7.1x106 m3 CH4 year-1 and an estimated annual rate of CH4 oxidation by cover soils of 1.2x106 m3 CH4 year-1 resulted in a calculated annual CH4 generation rate of 16.7x106 m3 CH4 year-1. These results underscore the necessity of understanding a landfill's dynamic environment before assessing long-term emissions potential

  20. Methane emissions from the Nauerna landfill site, Netherlands. November 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane concentrations in plumes resulting from emissions from a landfill at Nauerna, west of Amsterdam, Netherlands, were measured in November 1999. This was the third experiment of its kind at the Nauerna landfill. The total methane emission of the landfill was estimated using measurements of the methane concentration in the plume downwind of the landfill. These measurements were performed using a tunable diode laser, mounted in a van. A set of 10 plume measurements was obtained. The emission was estimated by fitting the calculated methane concentrations obtained with a gaussian plume model with the actually observed concentrations along the measurement path. The emission estimated from the plume measurements at Nauerna amounted to 109 ± 33 g CH4 s-1. This is equivalent to an annual emission level of 3.4 kton CH4/y. The standard deviation of the 10 different estimates is significantly larger compared to the levels obtained in 1997 and 1998. This is due to the fact that the measurement path had to be changed. Part of the measurement path used in the last two years could not be used anymore because of the development of a new harbour. As a result, a part of the measurement path is not perpendicular but parallel to the plume axis. Variations in wind direction have a more pronounced effect on the concentrations on this part of the path which caused the variation in the subsequent emission estimates. The emission levels in 1999 were significantly higher than obtained in 1997 and 1998. Also the main source area on the landfill changed from the south east to the middle on the south side compared to the previous years. There are three possible reasons that can explain the high emission level : (1) The fresh waste that is deposited on the landfill shows a relatively high emission; (2) The air pressure showed a minimum of 1000 mbar the day before measurements. This might have lead to enhanced venting of the landfill; and (3) The average temperature was only 2C (compared

  1. Quantification of methane emissions from 15 Danish landfills using the mobile tracer dispersion method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønster, Jacob; Samuelsson, Jerker; Kjeldsen, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    chosen to represent the different stages of the lifetime of a landfill, including open, active, and closed covered landfills, as well as those with and without gas extraction for utilisation or flaring. Measurements also included landfills with biocover for oxidizing any fugitive methane. Methane...... emission rates ranged from 2.6 to 60.8 kg h(-1), corresponding to 0.7-13.2 g m(-2) d(-1), with the largest emission rates per area coming from landfills with malfunctioning gas extraction systems installed, and the smallest emission rates from landfills closed decades ago and landfills with an engineered...... biocover installed. Landfills with gas collection and recovery systems had a recovery efficiency of 41-81%. Landfills where shredder waste was deposited showed significant methane emissions, with the largest emission from newly deposited shredder waste. The average methane emission from the landfills was...

  2. Microbial methane oxidation processes and technologies for mitigation of landfill gas emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter; Bogner, J.E.;

    2009-01-01

    Landfill gas containing methane is produced by anaerobic degradation of organic waste. Methane is a strong greenhouse gas and landfills are one of the major anthropogenic sources of atmospheric methane. Landfill methane may be oxidized by methanotrophic microorganisms in soils or waste materials...... utilizing oxygen that diffuses into the cover layer from the atmosphere. The methane oxidation process, which is governed by several environmental factors, can be exploited in engineered systems developed for methane emission mitigation. Mathematical models that account for methane oxidation can be used to...

  3. Methane Emission Estimates from Landfills Obtained with Dynamic Plume Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane emissions from 3 different landfills in the Netherlands were estimated using a mobile Tuneable Diode Laser system (TDL). The methane concentration in the cross section of the plume is measured downwind of the source on a transect perpendicular to the wind direction. A gaussian plume model was used to simulate the concentration levels at the transect. The emission from the source is calculated from the measured and modelled concentration levels.Calibration of the plume dispersion model is done using a tracer (N2O) that is released from the landfill and measured simultaneously with the TDL system. The emission estimates for the different locations ranged from 3.6 to 16 m3 ha-1 hr-1 for the different sites. The emission levels were compared to emission estimates based on the landfill gas production models. This comparison suggests oxidation rates that are up to 50% in spring and negligible in November. At one of the three sites measurements were performed in campaigns in 3 consecutive years. Comparison of the emission levels in the first and second year showed a reduction of the methane emission of about 50% due to implementation of a gas extraction system. From the second to the third year emissions increased by a factor of 4 due to new land filling. Furthermore measurements were performed in winter when oxidation efficiency was reduced. This paper describes the measurement technique used, and discusses the results of the experimental sessions that were performed

  4. Use of a biologically active cover to reduce landfill methane emissions and enhance methane oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Jennifer C; Chanton, Jeff; Abichou, Tarek; Powelson, David; Yuan, Lei; Escoriza, Sharon; Bogner, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Biologically-active landfill cover soils (biocovers) that serve to minimize CH4 emissions by optimizing CH4 oxidation were investigated at a landfill in Florida, USA. The biocover consisted of 50 cm pre-composted yard or garden waste placed over a 10-15 cm gas distribution layer (crushed glass) over a 40-100 cm interim cover. The biocover cells reduced CH4 emissions by a factor of 10 and doubled the percentage of CH4 oxidation relative to control cells. The thickness and moisture-holding capacity of the biocover resulted in increased retention times for transported CH4. This increased retention of CH4 in the biocover resulted in a higher fraction oxidized. Overall rates between the two covers were similar, about 2g CH4 m(-2)d(-1), but because CH4 entered the biocover from below at a slower rate relative to the soil cover, a higher percentage was oxidized. In part, methane oxidation controlled the net flux of CH4 to the atmosphere. The biocover cells became more effective than the control sites in oxidizing CH4 3 months after their initial placement: the mean percent oxidation for the biocover cells was 41% compared to 14% for the control cells (p<0.001). Following the initial 3 months, we also observed 29 (27%) negative CH4 fluxes and 27 (25%) zero fluxes in the biocover cells but only 6 (6%) negative fluxes and 22 (21%) zero fluxes for the control cells. Negative fluxes indicate uptake of atmospheric CH4. If the zero and negative fluxes are assumed to represent 100% oxidation, then the mean percent oxidation for the biocover and control cells, respectively, for the same period would increase to 64% and 30%. PMID:17005386

  5. Methane mass balance at three landfill sites: What is the efficiency of capture by gas collection systems?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many developed countries have targeted landfill methane recovery among greenhouse gas mitigation strategies, since methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide. Major questions remain with respect to actual methane production rates in field settings and the relative mass of methane that is recovered, emitted, oxidized by methanotrophic bacteria, laterally migrated, or temporarily stored within the landfill volume. This paper presents the results of extensive field campaigns at three landfill sites to elucidate the total methane balance and provide field measurements to quantify these pathways. We assessed the overall methane mass balance in field cells with a variety of designs, cover materials, and gas management strategies. Sites included different cell configurations, including temporary clay cover, final clay cover, geosynthetic clay liners, and geomembrane composite covers, and cells with and without gas collection systems. Methane emission rates ranged from -2.2 to >10,000 mg CH4 m-2 d-1. Total methane oxidation rates ranged from 4% to 50% of the methane flux through the cover at sites with positive emissions. Oxidation of atmospheric methane was occurring in vegetated soils above a geomembrane. The results of these studies were used as the basis for guidelines by the French environment agency (ADEME) for default values for percent recovery: 35% for an operating cell with an active landfill gas (LFG) recovery system, 65% for a temporary covered cell with an active LFG recovery system, 85% for a cell with clay final cover and active LFG recovery, and 90% for a cell with a geomembrane final cover and active LFG recovery

  6. Mitigation of methane emission from an old unlined landfill in Klintholm, Denmark using a passive biocover system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Pedersen, Rasmus Broe [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Petersen, Per Haugsted [Ramboll Denmark A/S, DK-5100 Odense C (Denmark); Jørgensen, Jørgen Henrik Bjerre [Klintholm I/S, DK-5874 Hasselager (Denmark); Ucendo, Inmaculada Maria Buendia; Mønster, Jacob G. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Samuelsson, Jerker [FluxSense AB/Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Kjeldsen, Peter, E-mail: pekj@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • An innovative biocover system was constructed on a landfill cell to mitigate the methane emission. • The biocover system had a mitigation efficiently of typically 80%. • The system also worked efficiently at ambient temperatures below freezing. • A whole landfill emission measurement tool was required to document the biocover system efficiency. - Abstract: Methane generated at landfills contributes to global warming and can be mitigated by biocover systems relying on microbial methane oxidation. As part of a closure plan for an old unlined landfill without any gas management measures, an innovative biocover system was established. The system was designed based on a conceptual model of the gas emission patterns established through an initial baseline study. The study included construction of gas collection trenches along the slopes of the landfill where the majority of the methane emissions occurred. Local compost materials were tested as to their usefulness as bioactive methane oxidizing material and a suitable compost mixture was selected. Whole site methane emission quantifications based on combined tracer release and downwind measurements in combination with several local experimental activities (gas composition within biocover layers, flux chamber based emission measurements and logging of compost temperatures) proved that the biocover system had an average mitigation efficiency of approximately 80%. The study showed that the system also had a high efficiency during winter periods with temperatures below freezing. An economic analysis indicated that the mitigation costs of the biocover system were competitive to other existing greenhouse gas mitigation options.

  7. Comparison of Methods to Assess the Fate of Methane in a Landfill-Cover Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, K. E.; Schroth, M. H.; Eugster, W.; Niklaus, P.; Oester, P.; Zeyer, J.

    2008-12-01

    A substantial fraction of the greenhouse gas methane released into the atmosphere is produced in terrestrial environments such as wetlands, rice paddy fields, and landfills. However, the amount of methane that is emitted from these environments is often reduced by microbial methane oxidation, mediated by methanotrophic microorganisms. Methanotrophs are ubiquitous in soils and represent the largest biological sink for methane. We performed a series of field experiments in summer 2008 to compare several state-of- the-art methods to assess the fate of methane in a landfill-cover soil near Liestal (BL), Switzerland. Methods employed included eddy-covariance and field-chamber measurements to quantify net methane flux at the landfill surface. In addition, methane concentrations at the landfill surface were monitored using a portable methane detector. Methane fluxes within the cover soil were estimated from methane-concentration profiles in conjunction with radon measurements. Additionally, gas push-pull tests were employed for in-situ quantification of methane oxidation in the cover soil. Finally, methane stable-carbon-isotope measurements were conducted to corroborate methane oxidation in the cover soil. Preliminary results indicate that each method provides unique information, and when combined, the data provide detailed insight in the fate of methane in the cover soil. The investigated landfill-cover soil appears to be ordinarily a net sink for methane. However, it can quickly turn into a net source of methane under adverse meteorological conditions.

  8. Landfill methane emission mitigation – How to construct and document a full‐scale biocover system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Landfills receiving organic wastes produce biogas (landfill gas – LFG) containing methane (CH4). Landfills are significant sources of methane, which contributes to climate change. As an alternative to gas utilization systems or as a follow‐on technology when a gas utilization system gets non......‐cost‐effective, bio‐mitigation systems may be implemented. Bio‐mitigation systems are defined here as systems based on microbial removal processes implemented at landfills to reduce emission of methane (or other harmful substances). In respect to CH4, experiments have documented that a very high methane oxidation...... rate can be obtained in soils, compost and other materials, high enough to significant reduce the methane emission from landfills. The process has been scaled up by DTU Environment to a full‐scale implemented technology at two Danish landfills. Now the Danish government has decided to establish bio...

  9. Characterization of methane oxidation by a methanotroph isolated from a landfill cover soil, South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Yi, Taewoo; Moon, Kyung-Eun; Park, Hyunjung; Ryu, Hee Wook; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2011-07-01

    A methane-oxidizing bacterium was isolated from the enriched culture of a landfill cover soil. The closest relative of the isolate, designated M6, is Methylocystis sp. Based on a kinetic analysis, the maximum specific methane oxidation rate and saturation constant were 4.93 mmol·g--dry cell weight--1·h⁻¹ and 23 microM, respectively. This was the first time a kinetic analysis was performed using pure methanotrophic culture. The methane oxidation by M6 was investigated in the presence of aromatic (m- and p-xylene and ethylbenzene) or sulfur (hydrogen sulfide, dimethyl sulfide, methanthiol) compounds. The methane oxidation was inhibited by the presence of aromatic or sulfur compounds. PMID:21791963

  10. Gradient packing bed bio-filter for landfill methane mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obulisamy, Parthiba Karthikeyan; Sim Yan May, Jane; Rajasekar, Balasubramanian

    2016-10-01

    We assessed the suitability of various biogenic materials for development of a gradient packed bed bio-filter to mitigate the methane (CH4) emission from landfills. Five different biogenic materials (windrow compost-WC; vermicompost-VC; landfill top cover-LTC; landfill bottom soil-LBS; and river soil sediment-SS) were screened. Among these materials, the VC showed a better CH4 oxidation potential (MOP) of 12.6μg CH4 gdw(-1)h(-1). Subsequently, the VC was used as a packing material along with wood chips in proto-type bio-filters. Wood chips were mixed at 5-15% to form three distinct gradients in a test bio-filter. Under the three different CH4 loading rates of 33, 44 and 55 gCH4 m(-3)h(-1), the achieved MOPs were 31, 41, and 47gCH4 m(-3)h(-1), respectively. The gradient packed bed bio-filter is effective for landfill CH4 mitigation than the conventional bio-filter as the latter shows gas channeling effects with poor MOPs. PMID:26883060

  11. Integrating landfill bioreactors, partial nitritation and anammox process for methane recovery and nitrogen removal from leachate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Faqian; Su, Xiaomei; Kang, Tingting; Wu, Songwei; Yuan, Mengdong; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Xiayun; Xu, Fang; Wu, Weixiang

    2016-06-01

    A new process consisting of a landfill bioreactor, partial-nitritation (PN) and the anammox process has been developed for landfill leachate treatment. In this study, the landfill bioreactor exhibited excellent performance in methane-rich biogas recovery, with a specific biogas yield of 0.47 L gas g‑1 COD and methane percentages of 53–76%. PN was achieved in the aerobic reactor by high free ammonia (101 ± 83 mg NH3 L‑1) inhibition for nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, and the desired PN effluent composition (effluent nitrite: ammonium ratio of 1.1 ± 0.3) was controlled by adjusting the alkalinity concentration per unit of ammonium oxidized to approximately 14.3 mg CaCO3 mg‑1 N in the influent. The startup of anammox process was successfully achieved with a membrane bioreactor in 160 d, and a maximum nitrogen removal rate of 216 mg N L‑1 d‑1 was attained for real landfill leachate treatment. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction results confirmed that the cell-specific anammox activity was approximately 68–95 fmol N cell‑1 d‑1, which finally led to the stable operation of the system.

  12. Evaluation of methane oxidation activity in waste biocover soil during landfill stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruo; Wang, Jing; Xia, Fang-Fang; Mao, Li-Juan; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2012-10-01

    Biocover soil has been demonstrated to have high CH(4) oxidation capacity and is considered as a good alternative cover material to mitigate CH(4) emission from landfills, yet the response of CH(4) oxidation activity of biocover soils to the variation of CH(4) loading during landfill stabilization is poorly understood. Compared with a landfill cover soil (LCS) collected from Hangzhou Tianziling landfill cell, the development of CH(4) oxidation activity of waste biocover soil (WBS) was investigated using simulated landfill systems in this study. Although a fluctuation of influent CH(4) flux occurred during landfill stabilization, the WBS covers showed a high CH(4) removal efficiency of 94-96% during the entire experiment. In the LCS covers, the CH(4) removal efficiencies varied with the fluctuation of CH(4) influent flux, even negative ones occurred due to the storage of CH(4) in the soil porosities after the high CH(4) influent flux of ~137 gm(-2) d(-1). The lower concentrations of O(2) and CH(4) as well as the higher concentration of CO(2) were observed in the WBS covers than those in the LCS covers. The highest CH(4) oxidation rates of the two types of soil covers both occurred in the bottom layer (20-30 cm). Compared to the LCS, the WBS showed higher CH(4) oxidation activity and methane monooxygenase activity over the course of the experiment. Overall, this study indicated the WBS worked well for the fluctuation of CH(4) influent flux during landfill stabilization. PMID:22776254

  13. Methane oxidation at low temperatures in soil exposed to landfill gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Mette; Linderød, L.; Jensen, Pernille Erland; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2000-01-01

    soil moisture regimes, At 2 degreesC the methane oxidation rates were 0.005 to 0.17 mu mol g(-1) h(-1), and calculations showed that it was possible to oxidize all the produced methane at older landfills, even during the winter. Therefore, methane oxidation in top covers of landfills is an alternative...... cannot be extrapolated to soils exposed to high methane concentrations. Four sandy soils with different organic matter content (1-9% w/w) from two landfills in Denmark were investigated in batch experiments in the laboratory to determine the response of methane oxidation at low temperatures and different...... to gas recovery at smaller and older landfills in northern Europe. Equations have been developed that describe the dependency of temperature and soil moisture content for each soil. The oxidation rates depended significantly on the soils (and thereby organic matter content), temperature, and soil...

  14. Evaluation and modeling of biochemical methane potential (BMP) of landfilled solid waste: a pilot scale study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilgili, M Sinan; Demir, Ahmet; Varank, Gamze

    2009-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to present a comparison of landfill performance with respect to solids decomposition. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) test was used to determine the initial and the remaining CH(4) potentials of solid wastes during 27 months of landfilling operation in two pilot...... scale landfill reactors. The initial methane potential of solid wastes filled to the reactors was around 0.347 L/CH(4)/g dry waste, which decreased with operational time of landfill reactors to values of 0.117 and 0.154 L/CH(4)/g dry waste for leachate recirculated (R1) and non-recirculated (R2...

  15. Methane from landfills in Sweden. Final report; Metan fraan avfallsupplag i Sverige. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsson, Jerker [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Galle, Bo; Boerjesson, Gunnar [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Water and Environmental Studies

    2006-01-15

    Three years of measurements has been conducted at seven Swedish landfills, quantifying methane emission, methane oxidation and methane production. The measurements reveal a large span between the sites in terms of gas recovery efficiency, 29-78% during normal operation. The fraction of the totally produced methane that is eventually leaking out to the atmosphere, was found to vary between 21-68%. Regarding methane oxidation, the study shows that of the methane going from the landfill interior towards the atmosphere, 6-43% is oxidised to CO{sub 2} in the different landfill cover soils. The highest methane oxidation was found in closed landfills during summertime, and the lowest at active landfills during wintertime, due to the strong temperature dependence of the oxidation. The equipment developed for methane emission measurements is based on time resolved concentration measurements with FTIR spectroscopy in combination with tracer gas releases from the surface of the landfill. The method has proven to be able to state the methane emission from the landfills with high accuracy, {+-}18% of the emission estimate (95% confidence interval). This is in line with what has been achieved in the literature for fugitive emission sources. The system has also proven to be useful for on site leak search. The precision for the methane production measurement was demonstrated to be high, down to {+-}4.2%. This enables trend studies and verification of improvement measures taken at the landfill sites. In terms of absolute accuracy for the production estimate, a 95%-confidence interval of down to (-6.0%, +6.2%) has been achieved. At times of strong methane oxidation the uncertainties increase, particularly if the emission is high. The gas production at the landfill site is therefore preferably measured during autumn-winter-spring when the temperature and the methane oxidation are low. The methane oxidation has been measured by carbon isotope technique, utilising the enrichment in

  16. Estimating methane gas generation from Devil's swamp landfill using greenhouse gas emission models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, Ayodeji Thompson

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) has been a key issue in the study, design, and management of landfills. Landfill gas (LFG) is considered either as a significant source of renewable energy (if extracted and processed accordingly) or significant source of pollution and risk (if not mitigated or processed). A municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill emits a significant amount of methane, a potent GHG. Thus, quantification and mitigation of GHG emissions is an important area of study in engineering and other sciences related to landfill technology and management. The present study will focus on estimating methane generation from Devils swamp landfill (DSLF), a closed landfill in Baton Rouge, LA. The landfill operated for 53 years (1940-1993) and contains both industrial and municipal waste products. Since the Clean Air Act of 1963, landfills are now classified as New Source Performance Standard (NSPS) waste (i.e., waste that will decompose to generate LFG). Currently, the DSLF is being used as source of renewable energy through the "Waste to Energy" program. For this study, to estimate the methane potential in the DSLF, it is important to determine the characteristics and classification of the landfill's wastes. The study uses and compares different GHG modeling tools---LandGEM, a multiphase model, and a simple first-order model---to estimate methane gas emission and compare results with the actual emissions from the DSLF. The sensitivity of the methane generation rate was analyzed by the methane generation models to assess the effects of variables such as initial conditions, specific growth rate, and reaction rate constants. The study concludes that methane (L0) and initial organic concentration in waste (k) are the most important parameters when estimating methane generation using the models.

  17. Methane oxidation and degradation of organic compounds in landfill soil covers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    -order kinetics and occurred in parallel with the oxidation of methane. TeCM, CFC-11, and CFC-12 were not degradable in presence of oxygen and degradation of these compounds in the oxidative zone in landfill top covers is therefore expected to be limited. However these compounds were found degradable in the......High rates of methane oxidation and degradation of the lowed halogenated methanes (TCM and DCM) and HCFCs (HCFC-21 and HCFC-22) were found in an investigation of the oxidation of methane and halogenated organic compunds (HOCs) in landfill gas affected soil. The degradation followed zero...... anaerobic zone in the lower part of soil columns permeated with artificial landfill gas. The lesser-chlorinated compounds were degraded in the upper oxic zone with overlapping gradients of methane and oxygen. Methane oxidation and degradation of HOCs in the top-soils may play a very important role in...

  18. Characterization of uncertainty in estimation of methane collection from select U.S. landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Nagpure, Ajay S; DeCarolis, Joseph F; Barlaz, Morton A

    2015-02-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas generated from the anaerobic decomposition of waste in landfills. If captured, methane can be beneficially used to generate electricity. To inventory emissions and assist the landfill industry with energy recovery projects, the U.S. EPA developed the Landfill Gas Emissions Model (LandGEM) that includes two key parameters: the first-order decay rate (k) and methane production potential (L0). By using data from 11 U.S. landfills, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to quantify the effect of uncertainty in gas collection efficiency and municipal solid waste fraction on optimal k values and collectable methane. A dual-phase model and associated parameters were also developed to evaluate its performance relative to a single-phase model (SPM) similar to LandGEM. The SPM is shown to give lower error in estimating methane collection, with site-specific best-fit k values. Most of the optimal k values are notably greater than the U.S. EPA's default of 0.04 yr(-1), which implies that the gas generation decreases more rapidly than predicted at the current default. We translated the uncertainty in collectable methane into uncertainty in engine requirements and potential economic losses to demonstrate the practical significance to landfill operators. The results indicate that landfill operators could overpay for engine capacity by $30,000-780,000 based on overestimates of collectable methane. PMID:25604252

  19. [Depth Profiles of Methane Oxidation Kinetics and the Related Methanotrophic Community in a Simulated Landfill Cover].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zhi-lin; Zhao, Tian-tao; Gao, Yan-hui; He, Zhi; Yang, Xu; Peng, Xu-ya

    2015-11-01

    Simulated landfill cover with real time online monitoring system was developed using cover soils. Then the system started and the concentrations of bio-gas in various depths were continuously monitored, and it was found that the system ran continually and stably after 2-3 h when methane flux changed. After that, the relationship between regularity of methane oxidation and methane flux in landfill cover was analyzed. The results indicated that concentration of oxygen decreased with increasing methane flux when the depth was deeper than 20 cm, and no obvious correlation between oxygen concentration in landfill cover surface and methane flux, however, methane oxidation rate showed positive correlation with methane flux in various depths (range of R2 was 0.851-0.999). Kinetics of CH4 oxidation in landfill cover was fitted by CH4 -O2 dual-substrate model (range of R2 was 0.902-0.955), the half-saturation constant K(m) increasing with depth was 0.157-0.729 in dynamic condition. Finally, methanotrophs community structure in original cover soil sample and that in simulated landfill cover were investigated by high-throughout sequencing technology, and the statistics indicated that the abundance and species of methanotrophs in simulated landfill cover significantly increased compared with those in original cover soil sample, and type I methanotrophs including Methylobacter and Methylophilaceae and type II methanotrophs Methylocystis were dominant species. PMID:26911022

  20. Assessing methods to estimate emissions of non-methane organic compounds from landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saquing, Jovita M.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Yazdani, Ramin;

    2014-01-01

    The non-methane organic compound (NMOC) emission rate is used to assess compliance with landfill gas emission regulations by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). A recent USEPA Report (EPA/600/R-11/033) employed a ratio method to estimate speciated NMOC emissions (i.......e., individual NMOC emissions): speciated NMOC emissions=measured methane (CH4) emission multiplied by the ratio of individual NMOCs concentration relative to CH4 concentration (CNMOCs/CCH4) in the landfill header gas. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate the efficacy of the ratio method in...... estimating speciated NMOC flux from landfills; (2) determine for what types of landfills the ratio method may be in error and why, using recent field data to quantify the spatial variation of (CNMOCs/CCH4) in landfills; and (3) formulate alternative models for estimating NMOC emissions from landfills for...

  1. A national landfill methane budget for Sweden based on field measurements, and an evaluation of IPCC models

    OpenAIRE

    Börjesson, Gunnar; Samuelsson, Jerker; Chanton, Jeffrey; Adolfsson, Rolf; Galle, Bo; Svensson, Bo H.

    2011-01-01

    Seven Swedish landfills were investigated from 2001 to 2003. On each landfill, a measure of the total methane production was calculated from data on: (1) methane emissions (leakage); (2) methane oxidation and (3) from gas recovery. Methane emissions were determined via a tracer gas (N2O) release-based remote sensing method. N2O and CH4 were measured with an Fourier Transform infrared detector at a distance of more than 1 km downwind from the landfills. Methane oxidation in the landfill cover...

  2. A national landfill methane budget for Sweden based on field measurements, and an evaluation of IPCC models

    OpenAIRE

    Borjesson, Gunnar; Samuelsson, Jerker; Chanton, Jeffrey; Adolfsson, Rolf; Galle, Bo; Svensson, Bo

    2009-01-01

    Seven Swedish landfills were investigated from 2001 to 2003. On each landfill, a measure of the total methane production was calculated from data on: (1) methane emissions (leakage); (2) methane oxidation and (3) from gas recovery. Methane emissions were determined via a tracer gas (N2O) release-based remote sensing method. N2O and CH4 were measured with an Fourier Transform infrared detector at a distance of more than 1 km downwind from the landfills. Methane oxidation in the landfill covers...

  3. Temperatures In Compost Landfill Covers As Result Of Methane Oxidation And Compost Respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Merono, A. R.; Pedersen, Rasmus Broen; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of the temperature on methane (CH4) oxidation and respiration in compost sampled at a full scale biocover implemented at Klintholm landfill exhibiting high temperatures. Compost material was collected at Klintholm landfill and incubated with and without CH4 i...

  4. Estimating methane emissions from landfills based on rainfall, ambient temperature, and waste composition: The CLEEN model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanjekar, Richa V; Bhatt, Arpita; Altouqui, Said; Jangikhatoonabad, Neda; Durai, Vennila; Sattler, Melanie L; Hossain, M D Sahadat; Chen, Victoria

    2015-12-01

    Accurately estimating landfill methane emissions is important for quantifying a landfill's greenhouse gas emissions and power generation potential. Current models, including LandGEM and IPCC, often greatly simplify treatment of factors like rainfall and ambient temperature, which can substantially impact gas production. The newly developed Capturing Landfill Emissions for Energy Needs (CLEEN) model aims to improve landfill methane generation estimates, but still require inputs that are fairly easy to obtain: waste composition, annual rainfall, and ambient temperature. To develop the model, methane generation was measured from 27 laboratory scale landfill reactors, with varying waste compositions (ranging from 0% to 100%); average rainfall rates of 2, 6, and 12 mm/day; and temperatures of 20, 30, and 37°C, according to a statistical experimental design. Refuse components considered were the major biodegradable wastes, food, paper, yard/wood, and textile, as well as inert inorganic waste. Based on the data collected, a multiple linear regression equation (R(2)=0.75) was developed to predict first-order methane generation rate constant values k as functions of waste composition, annual rainfall, and temperature. Because, laboratory methane generation rates exceed field rates, a second scale-up regression equation for k was developed using actual gas-recovery data from 11 landfills in high-income countries with conventional operation. The Capturing Landfill Emissions for Energy Needs (CLEEN) model was developed by incorporating both regression equations into the first-order decay based model for estimating methane generation rates from landfills. CLEEN model values were compared to actual field data from 6 US landfills, and to estimates from LandGEM and IPCC. For 4 of the 6 cases, CLEEN model estimates were the closest to actual. PMID:26346020

  5. Spatial Variability of Soil Properties and Their Effect on Methane Generation, Oxidation, and Emission from Soils Covering Landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, P. T.; Mei, C.; Yazdani, R.; Han, B.; Mostafid, M.

    2013-12-01

    Soils covering landfills mitigate gas emissions from degrading refuse, particularly emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. To enhance the oxidative capacity of these soils, materials with high organic matter are proposed for landfill covers, e.g., compost and aged greenwaste. We report field tests of these materials in pilot-scale test cells. While moisture conditions and gas transport were initially uniform, after one year significant spatial variability of gas flow developed that was associated with spatially variable dry bulk density and volumetric water content. For a test cell with organic matter content of 38%, a single-domain porous medium model was adequate for describing water retention and continuum modeling was capable of describing spatially variable gas flow and methane oxidation. A second test cell with organic matter of 61% was best described as a dual-domain porous medium, and continuum modeling was inadequate for describing spatially variable gas flow. Here, the dual-domain medium resulted in significant subgrid scale variability in moisture conditions that affected gas transport and methane oxidation. The results from these field tests suggest that proposed one-dimensional models of gas transport and methane oxidation in landfill cover soils may be inadequate for soils composed of high organic matter that require dual-domain models for water retention.

  6. Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm-3, reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100 g CH4 m-2 d-1, covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH4 m-2 d-1 and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity and diffusive ingress of atmospheric air

  7. Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachor, Ingke; Gebert, Julia; Gröngröft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2011-05-01

    The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm(-3), reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100g CH(4)m(-2)d(-1), covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH(4)m(-2)d(-1) and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity and diffusive ingress of

  8. Methane flux and oxidation at two types of intermediate landfill covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane emissions were measured on two areas at a Florida (USA) landfill using the static chamber technique. Because existing literature contains few measurements of methane emissions and oxidation in intermediate cover areas, this study focused on field measurement of emissions at 15-cm-thick non-vegetated intermediate cover overlying 1-year-old waste and a 45-cm-thick vegetated intermediate cover overlying 7-year-old waste. The 45 cm thick cover can also simulate non-engineered covers associated with older closed landfills. Oxidation of the emitted methane was evaluated using stable isotope techniques. The arithmetic means of the measured fluxes were 54 and 22 g CH4 m-2 d-1 from the thin cover and the thick cover, respectively. The peak flux was 596 g m-2 d-1 for the thin cover and 330 g m-2 d-1 for the thick cover. The mean percent oxidation was significantly greater (25%) at the thick cover relative to the thin cover (14%). This difference only partly accounted for the difference in emissions from the two sites. Inverse distance weighing was used to describe the spatial variation of flux emissions from each cover type. The geospatial mean flux was 21.6 g m-2 d-1 for the thick intermediate cover and 50.0 g m-2 d-1 for the thin intermediate cover. High emission zones in the thick cover were fewer and more isolated, while high emission zones in the thin cover were continuous and covered a larger area. These differences in the emission patterns suggest that different CH4 mitigation techniques should be applied to the two areas. For the thick intermediate cover, we suggest that effective mitigation of methane emissions could be achieved by placement of individualized compost cells over high emission zones. Emissions from the thin intermediate cover, on the other hand, can be mitigated by placing a compost layer over the entire area

  9. Methane flux and oxidation at two types of intermediate landfill covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abichou, Tarek; Chanton, Jeffery; Powelson, David; Fleiger, Jill; Escoriaza, Sharon; Lei, Yuan; Stern, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Methane emissions were measured on two areas at a Florida (USA) landfill using the static chamber technique. Because existing literature contains few measurements of methane emissions and oxidation in intermediate cover areas, this study focused on field measurement of emissions at 15-cm-thick non-vegetated intermediate cover overlying 1-year-old waste and a 45-cm-thick vegetated intermediate cover overlying 7-year-old waste. The 45 cm thick cover can also simulate non-engineered covers associated with older closed landfills. Oxidation of the emitted methane was evaluated using stable isotope techniques. The arithmetic means of the measured fluxes were 54 and 22 g CH(4) m(-2)d(-1) from the thin cover and the thick cover, respectively. The peak flux was 596 g m(-2)d(-1) for the thin cover and 330 g m(-2)d(-1) for the thick cover. The mean percent oxidation was significantly greater (25%) at the thick cover relative to the thin cover (14%). This difference only partly accounted for the difference in emissions from the two sites. Inverse distance weighing was used to describe the spatial variation of flux emissions from each cover type. The geospatial mean flux was 21.6 g m(-2)d(-1) for the thick intermediate cover and 50.0 g m(-2)d(-1) for the thin intermediate cover. High emission zones in the thick cover were fewer and more isolated, while high emission zones in the thin cover were continuous and covered a larger area. These differences in the emission patterns suggest that different CH(4) mitigation techniques should be applied to the two areas. For the thick intermediate cover, we suggest that effective mitigation of methane emissions could be achieved by placement of individualized compost cells over high emission zones. Emissions from the thin intermediate cover, on the other hand, can be mitigated by placing a compost layer over the entire area. PMID:16426833

  10. Quantification of parameters influencing methane generation due to biodegradation of municipal solid waste in landfills and laboratory experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Xunchang; Zekkos, Dimitrios; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2016-09-01

    The energy conversion potential of municipal solid waste (MSW) disposed of in landfills remains largely untapped because of the slow and variable rate of biogas generation, delayed and inefficient biogas collection, leakage of biogas, and landfill practices and infrastructure that are not geared toward energy recovery. A database consisting of methane (CH4) generation data, the major constituent of biogas, from 49 laboratory experiments and field monitoring data from 57 landfills was developed. Three CH4 generation parameters, i.e., waste decay rate (k), CH4 generation potential (L0), and time until maximum CH4 generation rate (tmax), were calculated for each dataset using U.S. EPA's Landfill Gas Emission Model (LandGEM). Factors influencing the derived parameters in laboratory experiments and landfills were investigated using multi-linear regression analysis. Total weight of waste (W) was correlated with biodegradation conditions through a ranked classification scheme. k increased with increasing percentage of readily biodegradable waste (Br0 (%)) and waste temperature, and reduced with increasing W, an indicator of less favorable biodegradation conditions. The values of k obtained in the laboratory were commonly significantly higher than those in landfills and those recommended by LandGEM. The mean value of L0 was 98 and 88L CH4/kg waste for laboratory and field studies, respectively, but was significantly affected by waste composition with ranges from 10 to 300L CH4/kg. tmax increased with increasing percentage of biodegradable waste (B0) and W. The values of tmax in landfills were higher than those in laboratory experiments or those based on LandGEM's recommended parameters. Enhancing biodegradation conditions in landfill cells has a greater impact on improving k and tmax than increasing B0. Optimizing the B0 and Br0 values of landfilled waste increases L0 and reduces tmax. PMID:26525969

  11. Methane Gas Utilization Project from Landfill at Ellery (NY)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantelis K. Panteli

    2012-01-10

    Landfill Gas to Electric Energy Generation and Transmission at Chautauqua County Landfill, Town of Ellery, New York. The goal of this project was to create a practical method with which the energy, of the landfill gas produced by the decomposing waste at the Chautauqua County Landfill, could be utilized. This goal was accomplished with the construction of a landfill gas to electric energy plant (originally 6.4MW and now 9.6MW) and the construction of an inter-connection power-line, from the power-plant to the nearest (5.5 miles) power-grid point.

  12. Comparison of Field Measurements to Methane Emissions Models at a New Landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Cruz, Florentino B; Green, Roger B; Hater, Gary R; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Thoma, Eben D; Harvey, Tierney A; Barlaz, Morton A

    2016-09-01

    Estimates of methane emissions from landfills rely primarily on models due to both technical and economic limitations. While models are easy to implement, there is uncertainty due to the use of parameters that are difficult to validate. The objective of this research was to compare modeled emissions using several greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reporting protocols including: (1) Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC); (2) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program (EPA GHGRP); (3) California Air Resources Board (CARB); and (4) Solid Waste Industry for Climate Solutions (SWICS), with measured emissions data collected over three calendar years from a young landfill with no gas collection system. By working with whole landfill measurements of fugitive methane emissions and methane oxidation, the collection efficiency could be set to zero, thus eliminating one source of parameter uncertainty. The models consistently overestimated annual methane emissions by a factor ranging from 4-31. Varying input parameters over reasonable ranges reduced this range to 1.3-8. Waste age at the studied landfill was less than four years and the results suggest the need for measurements at additional landfills to evaluate the accuracy of the tested models to young landfills. PMID:27455372

  13. Turning a Liability into an Asset: Landfill Methane Recovery in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    Solid waste disposal sites are not often seen as opportunities for energy solutions. The waste that is disposed in open dumps and landfills generates methane and other gases as it decomposes, causing concerns about explosions, odours, and, increasingly, about the contribution of methane to global climate change. However, the liability of landfill gas (LFG) can be turned into an asset. Many countries regularly capture LFG as a strategy to improve landfill safety, generate electricity, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and to earn carbon emission reduction credits (e.g. 40% for the United States, 25% for Australia). Many projects in developing countries are taking advantage of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) to earn carbon credits by capturing and combusting methane (e.g., the Sudokwon Landfill in Republic of South Korea, the Bandeirantes Landfill in Brazil and the Nanjing Tianjingwa Landfill in China). These Landfill Gas to Energy (LFGE) projects provide a valuable service to the environment and a potentially profitable business venture, providing benefits to local and regional communities.

  14. Effects of earthworm cast and powdered activated carbon on methane removal capacity of landfill cover soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soyoung; Lee, Incheol; Cho, Changhwan; Sung, Kijune

    2008-01-01

    Landfill gases could be vented through a layer of landfill cover soil that could serve as a biofilter to oxidize methane to carbon dioxide and water. Properly managed landfill cover soil layers may reduce atmospheric CH4 emissions from landfills. In the present study, the effects of earthworm cast and powdered activated carbon (PAC) on the CH4 removal capacity of the landfill cover soil was investigated. For this purpose, column and batch tests were conducted using three different materials: typical landfill cover soil, landfill cover soil amended with earthworm cast, and landfill cover soil amended with PAC. The maximum CH4 removal rate of the columns filled with landfill cover soil amended with earthworm cast was 14.6mol m(-2)d(-1), whereas that of the columns filled with typical landfill cover soil was 7.4mol m(-2)d(-1). This result shows that amendment with earthworm cast could stimulate the CH4-oxidizing capacity of landfill cover soil. The CH4 removal rate of the columns filled with landfill cover soil amended with PAC also showed the same removal rate, but the vertical profile of gas concentrations in the columns and the methanotrophic population measured in the microbial assay suggested that the decrease of CH4 concentration in the columns is mainly due to sorption. Based on the results from this study, amendment of landfill cover soil with earthworm cast and PAC could improve its CH4 removal capacity and thus achieve a major reduction in atmospheric CH4 emission as compared with the same landfill cover soil without any amendment. PMID:17764722

  15. Enhanced methane recovery by food waste leachate injection into a landfill in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Shishir Kumar; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Hang-Sik; Cho, Si-Kyung; Yoon, Seok-Pyo; Park, Hung-Suck

    2011-01-01

    The current food waste leachate (FWL) disposal practice in Korea warrants urgent attention and necessary action to develop an innovative and sustainable disposal strategy, which is both environmentally friendly and economically beneficial. In this study, methane production by FWL injection into a municipal solid waste landfill with landfill gas (LFG) recovery facility was evaluated for a period of more than 4 months. With the target of recovering LFG with methane content ~50%, optimum LFG extraction rate was decided by a trial and error approach during the field investigation in five different phases. The results showed that, upon FWL injection, LFG extraction rate of ~20 m(3)/h was reasonable to recover LFG with methane content ~58%. Considering the estimated methane production potential of 31.7 m(3) CH(4) per ton of FWL, methane recovery from the landfill was enhanced by 14%. The scientific findings of this short-term investigation indicates that FWL can be injected into the existing sanitary landfills to tackle the present issue and such landfills with efficient liner and gas collection facility can be utilized as absolute and sustainable environmental infrastructures. PMID:21621994

  16. Estimation of Methane Emissions from Municipal Solid Waste Landfills in China Based on Point Emission Sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Bo-Feng; LIU Jian-Guo; GAO Qing-Xian; NIE Xiao-Qin; CAO Dong; LIU Lan-Cui; ZHOU Ying; ZHANG Zhan-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The methane (CH4) emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills in China in 2007 were estimated based on database of the three-dimensional emission factors matrix and point sources, by an IPCC recommended FOD (first-order decay) model. The location, capacity and age of landfills constitute the three dimensions of the emission factors matrix, which were obtained by laboratory analysis and in situ investigation. Key parameters such as waste composition, degradable organic carbon ratio, CH4 correction factor, oxidation factor and recovery rate, were carefully analyzed in terms of these three dimensions. The point sources database consists of 2,107 MSW landfills in cities and towns of China in 2007. The results show that the CH4 emissions from MSW landfills were 1.186 Mt in 2007. Compared with the CH4 emissions of 2.20 Mt in 2005, the significant discrepancy mainly comes from statistical data of landfills, e.g., number of landfills and amount of waste disposed in landfills. CH4 emissions were lower than 700 t for most of the landfills, whereas there were 279 landfills with emissions larger than 1,000 t, and only 10 landfills with emissions larger than 10,000 t. Jiangsu province ranks the largest emitter with 98,700 t while Tibet is the smallest emitter with 2,100 t. In general, the emissions from eastern provinces, such as Jiangsu, Guangdong and Zhejiang, were larger than those from western provinces, such as Ningxia, Tibet and Qinghai.

  17. Lateral gas transport in soil adjacent to an old landfill: factors governing emissions and methane oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Mette; Kjeldsen, Peter; Holst, Helle;

    2001-01-01

    observed. This was attributed to methane oxidation. Diurnal measurements during a drop in barometric pressure showed that the fluxes of landfill gas changed dramatically within a very short time. The concentrations and the soil moisture content in the upper part of the soil profile had significant...... influence on the fluxes, as did the distance from the landfill border, temperature, barometric pressure and the pressure gradient. Statistical analyses proved that soil moisture described the largest part of the variation. No methane at all emitted during the summer. Calculations and isotope analyses showed......Field investigations of lateral gas transport and subsequent emissions in soil adjacent to an old landfill in Denmark have been conducted during a one-year period. A significant seasonal variation in the emissions with high carbon dioxide and low methane fluxes in the summer (May to October) was...

  18. Operating a fuel cell using landfill gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trippel, C.E.; Preston, J.L. Jr.; Trocciola, J.; Spiegel, R.

    1996-12-31

    An ONSI PC25{trademark}, 200 kW (nominal capacity) phosphoric acid fuel cell operating on landfill gas is installed at the Town of Groton Flanders Road landfill in Groton, Connecticut. This joint project by the Connecticut Light & Power Company (CL&P) which is an operating company of Northeast Utilities, the Town of Groton, International Fuel Cells (IFC), and the US EPA is intended to demonstrate the viability of installing, operating and maintaining a fuel cell operating on landfill gas at a landfill site. The goals of the project are to evaluate the fuel cell and gas pretreatment unit operation, test modifications to simplify the GPU design and demonstrate reliability of the entire system.

  19. USING LANDFILL GAS IN FUEL CELLS - A STEP CLOSER TO COMMERICAL REALITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The article discusses Phase II and Phase III results of a U.S. EPA program underway at International Fuel Cells Corporation. The program involves controlling methane emissions from landfills using a fuel cell. The fuel cell would reduce air emissions affecting global warming, aci...

  20. Specific model for the estimation of methane emission from municipal solid waste landfills in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Nimchuk, Nick; Kumar, Rakesh; Zietsman, Josias; Ramani, Tara; Spiegelman, Clifford; Kenney, Megan

    2016-09-01

    The landfill gas (LFG) model is a tool for measuring methane (CH4) generation rates and total CH4 emissions from a particular landfill. These models also have various applications including the sizing of the LFG collection system, evaluating the benefits of gas recovery projects, and measuring and controlling gaseous emissions. This research paper describes the development of a landfill model designed specifically for Indian climatic conditions and the landfill's waste characteristics. CH4, carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2) and temperature were considered as the prime factor for the development of this model. The developed model was validated for three landfill sites in India: Shillong, Kolkata, and Jaipur. The autocorrelation coefficient for the model was 0.915, while the R(2) value was 0.429. PMID:27343450

  1. Evaluation of respiration in compost landfill biocovers intended for methane oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Pedicone, Alessio; Pedersen, Gitte Bukh; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    A low-cost alternative approach to reduce landfill gas (LFG) emissions is to integrate compost into the landfill cover design in order to establish a biocover that is optimized for biological oxidation of methane (CH4). A laboratory and field investigation was performed to quantify respiration in...... throughout the compost layer, and CO2 concentrations exceeded 20% at a depth of 40cm below the surface of the biowindow. Overall, the results showed that respiration of compost material placed in biowindows might generate significant CO2 emissions. In landfill compost covers, methanotrophs carrying out CH4...... an experimental compost biocover in terms of oxygen (O2) consumption and carbon dioxide (CO2) production and emission rates. O2 consumption and CO2 production rates were measured in batch and column experiments containing compost sampled from a landfill biowindow at Fakse landfill in Denmark. Column...

  2. Quantification of multiple methane emission sources at landfills using a double tracer technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Samuelsson, J.; Fredenslund, Anders Michael;

    2011-01-01

    A double tracer technique was used successfully to quantify whole-site methane (CH4) emissions from Fakse Landfill. Emissions from different sections of the landfill were quantified by using two different tracers. A scaled-down version of the tracer technique measuring close-by to localized sources...... having limited areal extent was also used to quantify emissions from on-site sources at the landfill facility, including a composting area and a sewage sludge storage pit. Three field campaigns were performed. At all three field campaigns an overall leak search showed that the CH4 emissions from the old...

  3. Atmospheric emissions and attenuation of non-methane organic compounds in cover soils at a French landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheutz, C; Bogner, J; Chanton, J P; Blake, D; Morcet, M; Aran, C; Kjeldsen, P

    2008-01-01

    In addition to methane (CH(4)) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)), landfill gas may contain more than 200 non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) including C(2+)-alkanes, aromatics, and halogenated hydrocarbons. Although the trace components make up less than 1% v/v of typical landfill gas, they may exert a disproportionate environmental burden. The objective of this work was to study the dynamics of CH(4) and NMOCs in the landfill cover soils overlying two types of gas collection systems: a conventional gas collection system with vertical wells and an innovative horizontal gas collection layer consisting of permeable gravel with a geomembrane above it. The 47 NMOCs quantified in the landfill gas samples included primarily alkanes (C(2)-C(10)), alkenes (C(2)-C(4)), halogenated hydrocarbons (including (hydro)chlorofluorocarbons ((H)CFCs)), and aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEXs). In general, both CH(4) and NMOC fluxes were all very small with positive and negative fluxes. The highest percentages of positive fluxes in this study (considering all quantified species) were observed at the hotspots, located mainly along cell perimeters of the conventional cell. The capacity of the cover soil for NMOC oxidation was investigated in microcosms incubated with CH(4) and oxygen (O(2)). The cover soil showed a relatively high capacity for CH(4) oxidation and simultaneous co-oxidation of the halogenated aliphatic compounds, especially at the conventional cell. Fully substituted carbons (TeCM, PCE, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, HFC-134a, and HCFC-141b) were not degraded in the presence of CH(4) and O(2). Benzene and toluene were also degraded with relative high rates. This study demonstrates that landfill soil covers show a significant potential for CH(4) oxidation and co-oxidation of NMOCs. PMID:18032020

  4. Neural Network Modeling and Prediction of Methane Fraction in Biogas from Landfill Bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ghavidel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives:A number of different technologies have recently been studied todetermine the best use of biogas, however, to choose optimize technologies of using biogas for energy recovery it is necessary to monitor and predict the methane percentage of biogas. In this study, a method is proposed for predicting the methane fraction in landfill gas originating from Labscalelandfill bioreactors, based on neural network."nMaterials and Methods: In this study, two different systems were applied, to predict the methane fraction in landfill gas as a final product of anaerobic digestion, we used the leachate specifications as input parameters. In system I (C1, the leachate generated from a fresh-waste reactor was drained to recirculation tank, and recycled. In System II (C2, the leachate generated from a fresh waste landfill reactor was fed through a well-decomposed refuse landfill reactor, and at the same time, the leachate generated from a well-decomposed refuse landfill reactor recycled to a fresh waste landfill reactor."nResults: There is very good agreement in the trends between forecasted and measured data. R valuesare 0.999 and 0.997, and the obtained Root mean square error values are 1.098 and 2.387 for training and test data, respectively"nConclusion: The proposed method can significantly predict the methane fraction in landfill gasoriginating and, consequently, neural network can be use to optimize the dimensions of a plant using biogas for energy (i.e. heat and/or electricity recovery and monitoring system.

  5. The Application Of Biofilter System For Reduction Of Methane Emissions From Modern Sanitary Landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, K.; Park, S.

    2007-12-01

    Increased atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHG) caused by anthropogenic activities has been related to global climate change. Methane, the second most important GHG after CO2, is 21 times more effective at trapping heat than CO2. Therefore, methane emission control is of utmost importance for global warming reduction. To minimize leachate production and protect groundwater resources, modern sanitary landfills are equipped with composite covers and gas collection systems. Methane from modern sanitary landfills is vented directly to the atmosphere, except for some of the largest landfills where it is recovered as energy and burned at the site. However, the efficiency of energy recovery systems in larger landfills is reduced as the amount of CH4 generated from landfill begins to decrease. In this study, the performance of a lab-scale model biofilter system was investigated to treat CH4 gas emitted from modern sanitary landfills by conducting batch and column experiments using landfill cover soil amended with earthworm cast as the filter bed medium. From the batch experiments to measure the influence of moisture content and temperature of the filter medium on CH4 removal capacity of a biofilter system, the optimum moisture content and temperature were found to be 10-15% by weight and 25-35°C, respectively. The column experiment was conducted to measure the influence of inlet CH4 concentration and CH4 loading rate on CH4 removal capacity of a biofilter system. As the inlet CH4 concentration decreased, the percentage of CH4 oxidized increased. Up to a CH4 loading rate of 2785 g CH4 m3 h- 1 (EBRT = 7.7 min), the CH4 removal efficiency of the biofilter was able to reach 100%. Based on the results of the study, the installation of a properly managed biofilter system should be capable of achieving a reduction in atmospheric CH4 emissions from modern sanitary landfills at low CH4 generation stage.

  6. Methane oxidation in Swedish landfills quantified with the stable carbon isotope technique in combination with an optical method for emitted methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börjesson, Gunnar; Samuelsson, Jerker; Chanton, Jeffrey

    2007-10-01

    Methane budgets (production = emissions + oxidation + recovery) were estimated for six landfill sites in Sweden. Methane oxidation was measured in downwind plumes with a stable isotope technique (Chanton, J. P., et al., Environ. Sci Technol. 1999, 33, 3755-3760.) Positions in plumes for isotope sampling as well as methane emissions were determined with an optical instrument (Fourier Transform InfraRed) in combination with N20 as tracer gas (Galle, B., et al., Environ. Sci Technol. 2001, 35, 21-25.) Two landfills had been closed for years prior to the measurements, while four were active. Measurements at comparable soil temperatures showed that the two closed landfills had a significantly higher fraction of oxidized methane (38-42% of emission) relative to the four active landfills (4.6-15% of emission). These results highlight the importance of installing and maintaining effective landfill covers and also indicate that substantial amounts of methane escape from active landfills. Based on these results we recommend that the IPCC default values for methane oxidation in managed landfills could be set to 10% for active sites and 20% for closed sites. Gas recovery was found to be highly variable at the different sites, with values from 14% up to 65% of total methane production. The variance can be attributed to different waste management practices. PMID:17969681

  7. Estimating methane production rates in bogs and landfills by deuterium enrichment of pore water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, D.I.; Chanton, J.P.; Glaser, P.H.; Chasar, L.S.; Rosenberry, D.O.

    2001-01-01

    Raised bogs and municipal waste landfills harbor large populations of methanogens within their domed deposits of anoxic organic matter. Although the methane emissions from these sites have been estimated by various methods, limited data exist on the activity of the methanogens at depth. We therefore analyzed the stable isotopic signature of the pore waters in two raised bogs from northern Minnesota to identify depth intervals in the peat profile where methanogenic metabolism occurs. Methanogenesis enriched the deuterium (2H) content of the deep peat pore waters by as much as +11% (Vienna Standard Mean Sea Water), which compares to a much greater enrichment factor of +70% in leachate from New York City's Fresh Kills landfill. The bog pore waters were isotopically dated by tritium (3H) to be about 35 years old at 1.5 m depth, whereas the landfill leachate was estimated as ~ 17 years old from Darcy flow calculations. According to an isotopic mass balance the observed deuterium enrichment indicates that about 1.2 g of CH4m-3 d-1 were produced within the deeper peat, compared to about 2.8 g CH4 m-3 d-1 in the landfill. The values for methane production in the bog peat are substantially higher than the flux rates measured at the surface of the bogs or at the landfill, indicating that deeper methane production may be much higher than was previously assumed.

  8. Lateral gas transport in soil adjacent to an old landfill: factors governing emissions and methane oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Mette; Kjeldsen, Peter; Holst, Helle; Chanton, J.

    2001-01-01

    Field investigations of lateral gas transport and subsequent emissions in soil adjacent to an old landfill in Denmark have been conducted during a one-year period. A significant seasonal variation in the emissions with high carbon dioxide and low methane fluxes in the summer (May to October) was...

  9. Spatial variability of soil gas concentration and methane oxidation capacity in landfill covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röwer, Inga Ute; Geck, Christoph; Gebert, Julia; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2011-05-01

    In order to devise design criteria for biocovers intended to enhance the microbial oxidation of landfill methane it is critical to understand the factors influencing gas migration and methane oxidation in landfill cover soils. On an old municipal solid waste landfill in north-western Germany soil gas concentrations (10, 40, 90 cm depth), topsoil methane oxidation capacity and soil properties were surveyed at 40 locations along a 16 m grid. As soil properties determine gas flow patterns it was hypothesized that the variability in soil gas composition and the subsequent methanotrophic activity would correspond to the variability of soil properties. Methanotrophic activity was found to be subject to high spatial variability, with values ranging between 0.17 and 9.80 g CH(4)m(-2)h(-1)(.) Considering the current gas production rate of 0.03 g CH(4)m(-2)h(-1), the oxidation capacity at all sampled locations clearly exceeded the flux to the cover, and can be regarded as an effective instrument for mitigating methane fluxes. The methane concentration in the cover showed a high spatial heterogeneity with values between 0.01 and 0.32 vol.% (10 cm depth), 22.52 vol.% (40 cm), and 36.85 vol.% (90 cm). The exposure to methane raised the oxidation capacity, suggested by a statistical correlation to an increase in methane concentration at 90 cm depth. Methane oxidation capacity was further affected by the methanotroph bacteria pH optimum and nutrient availability, and increased with decreasing pH towards neutrality, and increased with soluble ion concentration). Soil methane and carbon dioxide concentration increased with lower flow resistance of the cover, as represented by the soil properties of a reduced bulk density, increase in air capacity and in relative ground level. PMID:20943363

  10. Reduction of methane emission from landfills using bio-mitigation systems – from lab tests to full scale implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    open or closed bed biofilter systems. The objective of this paper is to describe the relationship between research on process understanding of the oxidation of landfill gas contained methane and the up-scale to full bio-mitigation systems implemented at landfills. The oxidation of methane is controlled......Landfills are significant sources of methane, which contributes to climate change. As an alternative to mitigation by gas utilization systems, bio-mitigation systems may be implemented. Such systems are based on microbial methane oxidation in full surface biological covers, so-called biocovers, or...... by several environmental factors such as soil texture, temperature, soil moisture content, methane and oxygen supply, and nutrients, and both soils and compost materials have been shown to exhibit high methane oxidation rates. For compost materials high methane oxidation is observed even during cold...

  11. Mitigation of methane emission from Fakse landfill using a biowindow system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Fredenslund, Anders Michael; Chanton, Jeffrey;

    2011-01-01

    Landfills are significant sources of atmospheric methane (CH4) that contributes to climate change, and therefore there is a need to reduce CH4 emissions from landfills. A promising cost efficient technology is to integrate compost into landfill covers (so-called “biocovers”) to enhance biological...... oxidation of CH4. A full scale biocover system to reduce CH4 emissions was installed at Fakse landfill, Denmark using composted yard waste as active material supporting CH4 oxidation. Ten biowindows with a total area of 5000m2 were integrated into the existing cover at the 12ha site. To increase CH4 load to...... the biowindows, leachate wells were capped, and clay was added to slopes at the site. Point measurements using flux chambers suggested in most cases that almost all CH4 was oxidized, but more detailed studies on emissions from the site after installation of the biocover as well as measurements of...

  12. Methane oxidation at low temperatures in soil exposed to landfill gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Mette; Linderød, L.; Jensen, Pernille Erland;

    2000-01-01

    to gas recovery at smaller and older landfills in northern Europe. Equations have been developed that describe the dependency of temperature and soil moisture content for each soil. The oxidation rates depended significantly on the soils (and thereby organic matter content), temperature, and soil...... moisture content. Soil moisture was the most important factor. However, high Q(10) values indicate that temperature also was important. The four soils tested had optimum soil moisture content between 11 and 32%. At increasing organic matter content, both the optimal soil moisture content and the maximum......Soil exposed to elevated methane concentrations can develop a high capacity for methane oxidation. Methane oxidation at high and low methane concentrations is performed by different types of methanotrops and therefore oxidation rates found at low temperatures at the atmospheric methane content...

  13. Livingston Parish Landfill Methane Recovery Project (Feasibility Study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Steven

    2012-11-15

    The Woodside Landfill is owned by Livingston Parish, Louisiana and is operated under contract by Waste Management of Louisiana LLC. This public owner/private operator partnership is commonplace in the solid waste industry today. The landfill has been in operation since approximately 1988 and has a permitted capacity of approximately 41 million cubic yards. Based on an assumed in-place waste density of 0.94 ton per cubic yard, the landfill could have an expected design capacity of 39.3 million tons. The landfill does have an active landfill gas collection and control system (LFGCCS) in place because it meets the minimum thresholds for the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). The initial LFGCS was installed prior to 2006 and subsequent phases were installed in 2007 and 2010. The Parish received a grant from the United States Department of Energy in 2009 to evaluate the potential for landfill gas recovery and utilization at the Woodside Landfill. This includes a technical and economic feasibility study of a project to install a landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) plant and to compare alternative technologies. The LFGTE plant can take the form of on-site electrical generation, a direct use/medium Btu option, or a high-Btu upgrade technology. The technical evaluation in Section 2 of this report concludes that landfill gas from the Woodside landfill is suitable for recovery and utilization. The financial evaluations in sections 3, 4, and 5 of this report provide financial estimates of the returns for various utilization technologies. The report concludes that the most economically viable project is the Electricity Generation option, subject to the Parish’s ability and willingness to allocate adequate cash for initial capital and/or to obtain debt financing. However, even this option does not present a solid return: by our estimates, there is a 19 year simple payback on the electricity generation option. All of the energy recovery options discussed in this report

  14. Observations on the methane oxidation capacity of landfill soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanton, Jeffrey; Abichou, Tarek; Langford, Claire; Spokas, Kurt; Hater, Gary; Green, Roger; Goldsmith, Doug; Barlaz, Morton A

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the role of CH(4) loading to a landfill cover in the control of CH(4) oxidation rate (gCH(4)m(-2)d(-1)) and CH(4) oxidation efficiency (% CH(4) oxidation) in a field setting. Specifically, we wanted to assess how much CH(4) a cover soil could handle. To achieve this objective we conducted synoptic measurements of landfill CH(4) emission and CH(4) oxidation in a single season at two Southeastern USA landfills. We hypothesized that percent oxidation would be greatest at sites of low CH(4) emission and would decrease as CH(4) emission rates increased. The trends in the experimental results were then compared to the predictions of two differing numerical models designed to simulate gas transport in landfill covers, one by modeling transport by diffusion only and the second allowing both advection and diffusion. In both field measurements and in modeling, we found that percent oxidation is a decreasing exponential function of the total CH(4) flux rate (CH(4) loading) into the cover. When CH(4) is supplied, a cover's rate of CH(4) uptake (gCH(4)m(-2)d(-2)) is linear to a point, after which the system becomes saturated. Both field data and modeling results indicate that percent oxidation should not be considered as a constant value. Percent oxidation is a changing quantity and is a function of cover type, climatic conditions and CH(4) loading to the bottom of the cover. The data indicate that an effective way to increase the % oxidation of a landfill cover is to limit the amount of CH(4) delivered to it. PMID:20889326

  15. An analytical model for estimating the reduction of methane emission through landfill cover soils by methane oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yijun; Su, Yao; Wu, Yun; Liu, Weiping; He, Ruo

    2015-01-01

    Landfill is an important source of atmospheric methane (CH4). In this study, the development and partial validation are presented for an analytical model for predicting the reduction of CH4 emission in landfill cover soils by CH4 oxidation. The model combines an analytic solution of a coupled oxygen (O2) and CH4 soil gas transport in landfill covers with a piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation, including the influences of environmental factors such as cover soil thickness, CH4 oxidation and CH4 production rate. Comparison of soil gas concentration profiles with a soil column experiment is provided for a partial validation, and then this model is applied to predict the reduction of CH4 emission through landfill covers in several other cases. A discussion is provided to illustrate the roles of soil layer thickness, reaction rate constant for CH4 oxidation and CH4 production rate in determining CH4 emissions. The results suggest that the increase of cover soil thickness cannot always increase CH4 oxidation rates or removal efficiency, which becomes constant if the thickness of landfill cover soil is larger than a limit. PMID:25464331

  16. Methane production from food waste leachate in laboratory-scale simulated landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Shishir Kumar; Park, Jun Mo; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Park, Hung-Suck

    2010-01-01

    Due to the prohibition of food waste landfilling in Korea from 2005 and the subsequent ban on the marine disposal of organic sludge, including leachate generated from food waste recycling facilities from 2012, it is urgent to develop an innovative and sustainable disposal strategy that is eco-friendly, yet economically beneficial. In this study, methane production from food waste leachate (FWL) in landfill sites with landfill gas recovery facilities was evaluated in simulated landfill reactors (lysimeters) for a period of 90 d with four different inoculum-substrate ratios (ISRs) on volatile solid (VS) basis. Simultaneous biochemical methane potential batch experiments were also conducted at the same ISRs for 30 d to compare CH(4) yield obtained from lysimeter studies. Under the experimental conditions, a maximum CH(4) yield of 0.272 and 0.294 L/g VS was obtained in the batch and lysimeter studies, respectively, at ISR of 1:1. The biodegradability of FWL in batch and lysimeter experiments at ISR of 1:1 was 64% and 69%, respectively. The calculated data using the modified Gompertz equation for the cumulative CH(4) production showed good agreement with the experimental result obtained from lysimeter study. Based on the results obtained from this study, field-scale pilot test is required to re-evaluate the existing sanitary landfills with efficient leachate collection and gas recovery facilities as engineered bioreactors to treat non-hazardous liquid organic wastes for energy recovery with optimum utilization of facilities. PMID:20227867

  17. Evaluation of methane emissions from Palermo municipal landfill: Comparison between field measurements and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bella, Gaetano; Di Trapani, Daniele; Viviani, Gaspare

    2011-08-01

    Methane (CH(4)) diffuse emissions from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills represent one of the most important anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gas. CH(4) is produced by anaerobic biodegradation of organic matter in landfilled MSW and constitutes a major component of landfill gas (LFG). Gas recovery is a suitable method to effectively control CH(4) emissions from landfill sites and the quantification of CH(4) emissions represents a good tool to evaluate the effectiveness of a gas recovery system in reducing LFG emissions. In particular, LFG emissions can indirectly be evaluated from mass balance equations between LFG production, recovery and oxidation in the landfill, as well as by a direct approach based on LFG emission measurements from the landfill surface. However, up to now few direct measurements of landfill CH(4) diffuse emissions have been reported in the technical literature. In the present study, both modeling and direct emission measuring methodologies have been applied to the case study of Bellolampo landfill located in Palermo, Italy. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate CH(4) diffuse emissions, based on direct measurements carried out with the flux accumulation chamber (static, non-stationary) method, as well as to obtain the CH(4) contoured flux map of the landfill. Such emissions were compared with the estimate achieved by means of CH(4) mass balance equations. The results showed that the emissions obtained by applying the flux chamber method are in good agreement with the ones derived by the application of the mass balance equation, and that the evaluated contoured flux maps represent a reliable tool to locate areas with abnormal emissions in order to optimize the gas recovery system efficiency. PMID:21482094

  18. The impact of a 50% reduction of solid waste disposal in Canada on methane emissions from landfills in 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada's Green Plan established a goal of 50% reduction in municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal between 1988 and the year 2000. Canada has also committed to stabilizing greenhouse gas emissions at 1990 levels by 2000. MSW landfills are targeted since they account for a significant portion of anthropogenic methane emissions. Current composition and quantities of MSW were estimated. Using five scenarios for achieving a 50% reduction of waste disposed, the quantities and composition of waste managed were estimated through to the year 2000. A first-order decay model was used to estimate methane emissions from landfills of each scenario by varying the methane generation potential (Lo) based on the amount of biodegradable carbon in the MSW stream. Despite the overall reduction in waste, methane emissions are still projected on increase between 1990 and 2000 for scenarios with 25 to 45% of waste going to landfill in 2000. The estimated increases in methane emissions range from 2% for the high composting scenario to 16% for the high landfill scenario. In general, emissions peak during the 1990's and are decreasing by 2000. The projected increase in emissions is due to the 65--75% contribution of MSW landfilled before 1990. In conclusion, a significant reduction in methane emissions from landfills by 2000 will require methane recovery systems in addition to MSW reduction initiatives

  19. Modelling of stable isotope fractionation by methane oxidation and diffusion in landfill cover soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique to measure biological methane oxidation in landfill cover soils that is gaining increased interest is the measurement of stable isotope fractionation in the methane. Usually to quantify methane oxidation, only fractionation by oxidation is taken into account. Recently it was shown that neglecting the isotope fractionation by diffusion results in underestimation of the methane oxidation. In this study a simulation model was developed that describes gas transport and methane oxidation in landfill cover soils. The model distinguishes between 12CH4, 13CH4, and 12CH3D explicitly, and includes isotope fractionation by diffusion and oxidation. To evaluate the model, the simulations were compared with column experiments from previous studies. The predicted concentration profiles and isotopic profiles match the measured ones very well, with a root mean square deviation (RMSD) of 1.7 vol% in the concentration and a RMSD of 0.8 per mille in the δ13C value, with δ13C the relative 13C abundance as compared to an international standard. Overall, the comparison shows that a model-based isotope approach for the determination of methane oxidation efficiencies is feasible and superior to existing isotope methods

  20. Methane oxidation in a boreal climate in an experimental landfill cover composed from mechanically-biologically treated waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einola, J-K M; Sormunen, K M; Rintala, J A

    2008-12-15

    The present study evaluated microbial methane (CH4) oxidation in a boreally located outdoor landfill lysimeter (volume 112 m3, height 3.9 m) filled with mechanically-biologically treated waste (MBT residual) and containing a cover layer made from the same MBT residual. The calculations based on gas emission and pore gas measurements showed that, between April and October 2005, a significant proportion (> 96%) of the methane produced (landfill covers in field conditions in a boreal climate. PMID:18823644

  1. Mitigation of methane emission from an old unlined landfill in Klintholm, Denmark using a passive biocover system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Pedersen, Rasmus Broen; Petersen, Per Haugsted;

    2014-01-01

    usefulness as bioactive methane oxidizing material and a suitable compost mixture was selected. Whole site methane emission quantifications based on combined tracer release and downwind measurements in combination with several local experimental activities (gas composition within biocover layers, flux......Methane generated at landfills contributes to global warming and can be mitigated by biocover systems relying on microbial methane oxidation. As part of a closure plan for an old unlined landfill without any gas management measures, an innovative biocover system was established. The system was...... designed based on a conceptual model of the gas emission patterns established through an initial baseline study. The study included construction of gas collection trenches along the slopes of the landfill where the majority of the methane emissions occurred. Local compost materials were tested as to their...

  2. Scaling methane oxidation: From laboratory incubation experiments to landfill cover field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluating field-scale methane oxidation in landfill cover soils using numerical models is gaining interest in the solid waste industry as research has made it clear that methane oxidation in the field is a complex function of climatic conditions, soil type, cover design, and incoming flux of landfill gas from the waste mass. Numerical models can account for these parameters as they change with time and space under field conditions. In this study, we developed temperature, and water content correction factors for methane oxidation parameters. We also introduced a possible correction to account for the different soil structure under field conditions. These parameters were defined in laboratory incubation experiments performed on homogenized soil specimens and were used to predict the actual methane oxidation rates to be expected under field conditions. Water content and temperature corrections factors were obtained for the methane oxidation rate parameter to be used when modeling methane oxidation in the field. To predict in situ measured rates of methane with the model it was necessary to set the half saturation constant of methane and oxygen, Km, to 5%, approximately five times larger than laboratory measured values. We hypothesize that this discrepancy reflects differences in soil structure between homogenized soil conditions in the lab and actual aggregated soil structure in the field. When all of these correction factors were re-introduced into the oxidation module of our model, it was able to reproduce surface emissions (as measured by static flux chambers) and percent oxidation (as measured by stable isotope techniques) within the range measured in the field.

  3. Methane and carbon dioxide emissions from closed landfill in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I-Chu; Hegde, Ullas; Chang, Cheng-Hsiung; Yang, Shang-Shyng

    2008-02-01

    The atmospheric concentrations and emission rates of CH(4) and CO(2) were studied at three sites of the Fu-Der-Kan closed landfill and after as the multi-use recreational park in northern Taiwan. Atmospheric CH(4) and CO(2) concentrations of closed landfill were 1.7-4.6 and 324-409ppm, respectively. CH(4) and CO(2) emission rates ranged from 8.8 to 163mg m(-2)h(-1) and from 495 to 1531mg m(-2)h(-1), respectively. Diurnal variation was noted with higher values at night than those in daytime. After creation of the park, atmospheric CH(4) and CO(2) concentrations were 1.8-3.1 and 332-441ppm, respectively. CH(4) and CO(2) emission rates ranged from -1.1 to 2.3mg m(-2)h(-1) and from -135 to 301mg m(-2)h(-1), respectively. There were no notable diurnal variations in either atmospheric concentrations or emission rates. PMID:17905410

  4. Development of an empirical model of methane emissions from landfills. Final report Mar-Dec 91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report gives results of a field study of 21 U.S. landfills with gas recovery systems, to gather information that can be used to develop an empirical model of methane (CH4) emissions. Site-specific information includes average CH4 recovery rate, landfill size, tons of refuse (refuse mass), average age of the refuse, and climate. A correlation analysis showed that refuse mass was positively linearly correlated with landfill depth, volume, area, and well depth. Regression of the CH4 recovery rate on depth, refuse mass, and volume was significant, but depth was the best predictive variable (R2 = 0.53). Refuse mass was nearly as good (R2 = 0.50). None of the climate variables (precipitation, average temperature, dewpoint) were correlated with the CH4 recovery rate or with CH4 recovery per metric ton of refuse. Much of the variability in CH4 recovery remains unexplained, and is likely due to between-site differences in landfill construction, operation, and refuse composition. A model for global landfill emissions estimation is proposed

  5. Methane oxidation in landfill cover soils, is a 10% default value reasonable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanton, Jeffrey P; Powelson, David K; Green, Roger B

    2009-01-01

    We reviewed literature results from 42 determinations of the fraction of methane oxidized and 30 determinations of methane oxidation rate in a variety of soil types and landfill covers. Both column measurements and in situ field measurements were included. The means for the fraction of methane oxidized on transit across the soil covers ranged from 22 to 55% from clayey to sandy material. Mean values for oxidation rate ranged from 3.7 to 6.4 mol m(-2) d(-1) (52-102 g m(-2) d(-1)) for the different soil types. The overall mean fraction oxidized across all studies was 36% with a standard error of 6%. The overall mean oxidation rate across all studies was 4.5 mol m(-2) d(-1) +/- 1.0 (72 +/- 16 g m(-2)d(-1)). For the subset of 15 studies conducted over an annual cycle the fraction of methane oxidized ranged from 11 to 89% with a mean value of 35 +/- 6%, nearly identical to the overall mean. Nine of these studies were conducted in north Florida at 30 degrees N latitude and had a fraction oxidized of 27 +/- 4%. Five studies were conducted in northern Europe ( approximately 50-55 degrees N) and exhibited an average of 54 +/- 14%. One study, conducted in New Hampshire, had a value of 10%. The results indicate that the fraction of methane oxidized in landfill greater than the default value of 10%. Of the 42 determinations of methane oxidation reported, only four report values of 10% or less. PMID:19244486

  6. EPA's landfill methane outreach program: demonstration of the new E-PLUS economic evaluation model: future trends and activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfills contain most of the municipal solid waste (MSW) generated in the United States. As this landfilled MSW decomposes, it produces landfill gas (LFG), containing approximately 50% methane, 43-47% carbon dioxide, and 3-7% non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs). Federal regulations require affected landfills to collect and combust their LFG emissions in order to destroy NMOCs, as they are important precursors to local smog. Since 1994, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Landfill Methane Outreach Program (LMOP) has been working to promote LFG-to-energy as a cost-effective way to reduce emissions of methane - a potent greenhouse gas. The LMOP's latest tool is ''E-PLUS'', Windows-compatible software that can be used to screen potential LFG-to-energy projects. E-PLUS, the Energy Project Landfill Gas Utilization Software, is capable of evaluating the economic feasibility of two energy recovery technologies based on potential LFG emissions estimates. This paper provides an overview of E-PLUS and describes its features and functions in detail. (author)

  7. The landfill gas timeline: the Brogborough test cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caine, M.; Campell, D.; Santen, A. van [AEA Technology Environment, National Environmental Centre, Culham Science and Engineering Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    1999-07-01

    The Brogborough test cells were initiated in 1986 to demonstrate several robust and easily applied techniques for accelerating waste degradation in landfill, principally as a means of enhancing energy recovery from landfill gas. This paper maps the project up to July 1998. The main conclusions are listed below. The Brogborough test cells data set includes over 9-years continuous flow data - longer than any other large scale landfill test programme. Specific yield data are 2 to 3 times higher than published data from commercial landfills - even from the control cells - indicating increased recovery as a result of the idealized landfill engineering and gas abstraction systems in place. Cells 5 and 6 (in situ treatments) produced more rapid methanogenesis, as designed. Cells 3 and 4 (applied treatments) have shown statistically significant enhancement in landfill gas production rates relative to the control cell of 20 to 30% in specific yield. Total yields have exceeded 113 m{sup 3} t{sup -1}. (au)

  8. Landfill methane oxidation across climate types in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanton, Jeffrey; Abichou, Tarek; Langford, Claire; Hater, Gary; Green, Roger; Goldsmith, Doug; Swan, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    Methane oxidation in landfill covers was determined by stable isotope analyses over 37 seasonal sampling events at 20 landfills with intermediate covers over four years. Values were calculated two ways: by assuming no isotopic fractionation during gas transport, which produces a conservative or minimum estimate, and by assuming limited isotopic fractionation with gas transport producing a higher estimate. Thus bracketed, the best assessment of mean oxidation within the soil covers from chamber captured emitted CH(4) was 37.5 ± 3.5%. The fraction of CH(4) oxidized refers to the fraction of CH(4) delivered to the base of the cover that was oxidized to CO(2) and partitioned to microbial biomass instead of being emitted to the atmosphere as CH(4) expressed as a percentage. Air samples were also collected at the surface of the landfill, and represent CH(4) from soil, from leaking infrastructure, and from cover defects. A similar assessment of this data set yields 36.1 ± 7.2% oxidation. Landfills in five climate types were investigated. The fraction oxidized in arid sites was significantly greater than oxidation in mediterranean sites, or cool and warm continental sites. Sub tropical sites had significantly lower CH(4) oxidation than the other types of sites. This relationship may be explained by the observed inverse relationship between cover loading and fractional CH(4) oxidation. PMID:21133420

  9. Characterization of methane, benzene and toluene-oxidizing consortia enriched from landfill and riparian wetland soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Park, Hyunjung; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2010-12-15

    The microbial oxidations of methane (M) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were compared with those of M and VOCs alone after enriching soil samples with M and/or VOCs. Landfill cover and riparian wetland soils from which M and VOCs were simultaneously emitted were selected as representative samples. Benzene (B) and toluene (T) were employed as the model VOCs. With the landfill soil consortia, the rate of M oxidation decreased from 4.15-5.56 to 2.26-3.42 μmol g-dry soil(-1)h(-1) in the presence of both B and T, but with the wetland soil consortia the rate of M oxidation (3.09 μmol g-dry soil(-1)h(-1)) in the mixture of M as well as both B and T was similar to that of M alone (3.04 μmol g-dry soil(-1)h(-1)). Compared with the methanotrophic community with M alone, the portion of type II methanotrophs was greater in the landfill consortia; whereas, the proportion in wetland consortia was less in the presence of both B and T. The oxidations of B and T were stimulated by the presence of M with both the landfill and wetland consortia. There were no correlations between the oxidation rate of M and those of B and T with the gene copy numbers of pmoA and tmoA responsible for the oxidations. PMID:20832163

  10. A national landfill methane budget for Sweden based on field measurements, and an evaluation of IPCC models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börjesson, Gunnar; Samuelsson, Jerker; Chanton, Jeffrey; Adolfsson, Rolf; Galle, Bo; Svensson, Bo H.

    2009-04-01

    Seven Swedish landfills were investigated from 2001 to 2003. On each landfill, a measure of the total methane production was calculated from data on: (1) methane emissions (leakage); (2) methane oxidation and (3) from gas recovery. Methane emissions were determined via a tracer gas (N2O) release-based remote sensing method. N2O and CH4 were measured with an Fourier Transform infrared detector at a distance of more than 1 km downwind from the landfills. Methane oxidation in the landfill covers was measured with the stable carbon isotope method. The efficiency in gas recovery systems proved to be highly variable, but on an average, 51% of the produced landfill gas was captured. A first-order decay model, based on four fractions (waste from households and parks, sludges and industrial waste), showed that the use of a degradable organic carbon fraction (DOCf) value of 0.54, in accordance with the default value for DOCf of 0.50 in the latest IPCC model, gave an emission estimate similar to the official national reports.

  11. Production of electricity using methane generated from landfill site at Mehmood Booti, Lahore, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was conducted to find out the potential of municipal solid waste of Lahore to generate electricity from the methane gas produced during anaerobic decomposition of rapidly decomposable organic waste fraction separated from the MSW i.e., food and yard waste. The objectives of the study were to determine the composition of waste in order to find out the emission of methane from its decomposition and to calculate the amount of electricity that can be generated using this methane. The study was conducted with a multi-method approach, including direct field observation, questionnaire-based surveys, and document surveys. The findings of the study highlight that municipal solid waste of Lahore, is composed of 28.3% recycle able waste (paper, tetra pack, textiles, wood and straw, plastic and polythene, glass and metal, rubber and leather), 32.7% inert material (bricks, stones and miscellaneous wastes) and 39.4% rapidly decompose able organic matter named as compostables (food and yard wastes). Gas produced during the anaerobic decomposition of food and yard waste comprises of 51.54% methane and 48.46% carbon dioxide gas. Further calculations reveal that 24 MW electricity could be produced from methane emitted from Mehmood Booti landfill site. More extensive research and application of the research work can be very useful to humans as well as to the environment. (author)

  12. Above- and below-ground methane fluxes and methanotrophic activity in a landfill-cover soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We quantify above- and below-ground CH4 fluxes in a landfill-cover soil. ► We link methanotrophic activity to estimates of CH4 loading from the waste body. ► Methane loading and emissions are highly variable in space and time. ► Eddy covariance measurements yield largest estimates of CH4 emissions. ► Potential methanotrophic activity is high at a location with substantial CH4 loading. - Abstract: Landfills are a major anthropogenic source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4). However, much of the CH4 produced during the anaerobic degradation of organic waste is consumed by methanotrophic microorganisms during passage through the landfill-cover soil. On a section of a closed landfill near Liestal, Switzerland, we performed experiments to compare CH4 fluxes obtained by different methods at or above the cover-soil surface with below-ground fluxes, and to link methanotrophic activity to estimates of CH4 ingress (loading) from the waste body at selected locations. Fluxes of CH4 into or out of the cover soil were quantified by eddy-covariance and static flux-chamber measurements. In addition, CH4 concentrations at the soil surface were monitored using a field-portable FID detector. Near-surface CH4 fluxes and CH4 loading were estimated from soil–gas concentration profiles in conjunction with radon measurements, and gas push–pull tests (GPPTs) were performed to quantify rates of microbial CH4 oxidation. Eddy-covariance measurements yielded by far the largest and probably most representative estimates of overall CH4 emissions from the test section (daily mean up to ∼91,500 μmol m−2 d−1), whereas flux-chamber measurements and CH4 concentration profiles indicated that at the majority of locations the cover soil was a net sink for atmospheric CH4 (uptake up to −380 μmol m−2 d−1) during the experimental period. Methane concentration profiles also indicated strong variability in CH4 loading over short distances in the cover soil, while

  13. Estimating methane emission and oxidation from two temporary covers on landfilled MBT treated waste

    OpenAIRE

    Bour, Olivier; Zdanevitch, Isabelle; Briand, Mark; Llinas, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Surface gaseous emissions and upper layer waste gas composition were measured on two French MBT plants with aerobic pre-treatment process. The goals were to characterize the gaseous emissions, and to assess the efficiency of the upper layer to oxidize the methane flux coming from the residual organic fraction. The first plant was operated without recovery of organic fraction and with concentration of the fine fraction in a cell. The methane fluxes were high and the oxidized methane fraction w...

  14. Evaluation of respiration in compost landfill biocovers intended for methane oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Pedicone, Alessio; Pedersen, Gitte Bukh; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-05-01

    A low-cost alternative approach to reduce landfill gas (LFG) emissions is to integrate compost into the landfill cover design in order to establish a biocover that is optimized for biological oxidation of methane (CH(4)). A laboratory and field investigation was performed to quantify respiration in an experimental compost biocover in terms of oxygen (O(2)) consumption and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) production and emission rates. O(2) consumption and CO(2) production rates were measured in batch and column experiments containing compost sampled from a landfill biowindow at Fakse landfill in Denmark. Column gas concentration profiles were compared to field measurements. Column studies simulating compost respiration in the biowindow showed average CO(2) production and O(2) consumption rates of 107 ± 14 gm(-2)d(-1) and 63 ± 12 gm(-2)d(-1), respectively. Gas profiles from the columns showed elevated CO(2) concentrations throughout the compost layer, and CO(2) concentrations exceeded 20% at a depth of 40 cm below the surface of the biowindow. Overall, the results showed that respiration of compost material placed in biowindows might generate significant CO(2) emissions. In landfill compost covers, methanotrophs carrying out CH(4) oxidation will compete for O(2) with other aerobic microorganisms. If the compost is not mature, a significant portion of the O(2) diffusing into the compost layer will be consumed by non-methanotrophs, thereby limiting CH(4) oxidation. The results of this study however also suggest that the consumption of O(2) in the compost due to aerobic respiration might increase over time as a result of the accumulation of biomass in the compost after prolonged exposure to CH(4). PMID:21292472

  15. Mitigation of methane emission from Fakse landfill using a biowindow system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfills are significant sources of atmospheric methane (CH4) that contributes to climate change, and therefore there is a need to reduce CH4 emissions from landfills. A promising cost efficient technology is to integrate compost into landfill covers (so-called 'biocovers') to enhance biological oxidation of CH4. A full scale biocover system to reduce CH4 emissions was installed at Fakse landfill, Denmark using composted yard waste as active material supporting CH4 oxidation. Ten biowindows with a total area of 5000 m2 were integrated into the existing cover at the 12 ha site. To increase CH4 load to the biowindows, leachate wells were capped, and clay was added to slopes at the site. Point measurements using flux chambers suggested in most cases that almost all CH4 was oxidized, but more detailed studies on emissions from the site after installation of the biocover as well as measurements of total CH4 emissions showed that a significant portion of the emission quantified in the baseline study continued unabated from the site. Total emission measurements suggested a reduction in CH4 emission of approximately 28% at the end of the one year monitoring period. This was supported by analysis of stable carbon isotopes which showed an increase in oxidation efficiency from 16% to 41%. The project documented that integrating approaches such a whole landfill emission measurements using tracer techniques or stable carbon isotope measurements of ambient air samples are needed to document CH4 mitigation efficiencies of biocover systems. The study also revealed that there still exist several challenges to better optimize the functionality. The most important challenges are to control gas flow and evenly distribute the gas into the biocovers.

  16. Mitigation of methane emission from Fakse landfill using a biowindow system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Fredenslund, Anders M; Chanton, Jeffrey; Pedersen, Gitte Bukh; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Landfills are significant sources of atmospheric methane (CH(4)) that contributes to climate change, and therefore there is a need to reduce CH(4) emissions from landfills. A promising cost efficient technology is to integrate compost into landfill covers (so-called "biocovers") to enhance biological oxidation of CH(4). A full scale biocover system to reduce CH(4) emissions was installed at Fakse landfill, Denmark using composted yard waste as active material supporting CH(4) oxidation. Ten biowindows with a total area of 5000 m(2) were integrated into the existing cover at the 12 ha site. To increase CH(4) load to the biowindows, leachate wells were capped, and clay was added to slopes at the site. Point measurements using flux chambers suggested in most cases that almost all CH(4) was oxidized, but more detailed studies on emissions from the site after installation of the biocover as well as measurements of total CH(4) emissions showed that a significant portion of the emission quantified in the baseline study continued unabated from the site. Total emission measurements suggested a reduction in CH(4) emission of approximately 28% at the end of the one year monitoring period. This was supported by analysis of stable carbon isotopes which showed an increase in oxidation efficiency from 16% to 41%. The project documented that integrating approaches such a whole landfill emission measurements using tracer techniques or stable carbon isotope measurements of ambient air samples are needed to document CH(4) mitigation efficiencies of biocover systems. The study also revealed that there still exist several challenges to better optimize the functionality. The most important challenges are to control gas flow and evenly distribute the gas into the biocovers. PMID:21345663

  17. Release and fate of fluorocarbons in a shredder residue landfill cell: 2. Field investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Fredenslund, Anders M; Nedenskov, Jonas; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2010-11-01

    The shredder residues from automobiles, home appliances and other metal containing products are often disposed in landfills, as recycling technologies for these materials are not common in many countries. Shredder waste contains rigid and soft foams from cushions and insulation panels blown with fluorocarbons. The objective of this study was to determine the gas composition, attenuation, and emission of fluorocarbons in a monofill shredder residue landfill cell by field investigation. Landfill gas generated within the shredder waste primarily consisted of CH(4) (27%) and N(2) (71%), without CO(2), indicating that the gas composition was governed by chemical reactions in combination with anaerobic microbial reactions. The gas generated also contained different fluorocarbons (up to 27 μg L(-1)). The presence of HCFC-21 and HCFC-31 indicated that anaerobic degradation of CFC-11 occurred in the landfill cell, as neither of these compounds has been produced for industrial applications. This study demonstrates that a landfill cell containing shredder waste has a potential for attenuating CFC-11 released from polyurethane (PUR) insulation foam in the cell via aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation processes. In deeper, anaerobic zones of the cell, reductive dechlorination of CFCs to HCFCs was evident, while in the shallow, oxic zones, there was a high potential for biooxidation of both methane and lesser chlorinated fluorocarbons. These findings correlated well with both laboratory results (presented in a companion paper) and surface emission measurements that, with the exception from a few hot spots, indicated that surface emissions were negative or below detection. PMID:20444588

  18. Effect of substrate interaction on oxidation of methane and benzene in enriched microbial consortia from landfill cover soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Park, Hyunjung; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of methane and benzene during oxidation in enriched methane-oxidizing consortium (MOC) and in benzene-oxidizing consortium (BOC) from landfill cover soil was characterized. Oxidation of both methane and benzene occurred in the MOC due to the coexistence of bacteria responsible for benzene oxidation, as well as methanotrophs, whereas in the BOC, only benzene was oxidized, not methane. Methane oxidation rates in the MOC were decreased with increasing benzene/methane ratio (mol/mol), indicating its methane oxidation was inhibited by the benzene coexistence. Benzene oxidation rates in the MOC, however, were increased with increasing benzene/methane ratio. The benzene oxidation in the BOC was not affected by the coexistence of methane or by the ratio of methane/benzene ratio (mol/mol). No effect of methane or benzene was found on the dynamics of functional genes, such as particulate methane monooxygenase and toluene monooxygenase, in association with oxidation of methane and benzene in the MOC and BOC. PMID:21847790

  19. Variation of Coenzyme F420 Activity and Methane Yield in Landfill Simulation of Organic Waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Yun-huan; SANG Shu-xun; HUANG Hua-zhou; LIU Xiao-juan; OUYANG Jin-bao

    2007-01-01

    A simulated landfill anaerobic bioreactor was used to characterize the anaerobic biodegradation and biogas generation of organic waste which was mainly composed of residuals of vegetables and foods. We investigated the dynamics of the coenzyme F420 activity and determined correlations between biogas yields, methane yields, methane concentration and coenzyme F420 activity. The experiment was carried out under different conditions from control without any treatment, addition of Fe3+, microorganism inoculation to a combination of Fe3+ addition and inoculation at a temperature of 36±2 ℃. The experiment was lasted 120 d and coenzyme F420 activity was analyzed using ultraviolet spectrophotometry. Experimental results indicated that activity of the coenzyme F420 treated by Fe3+ and microorganism inoculation increased substantially. The waste treated by inoculation had the greatest increase. When the waste was treated by Fe3+, inoculation and the combination of Fe3+ and inoculation, biogas yields increased by 46.9%, 132.6% and 153.1%, respectively; while the methane yields increased 4, 97 and 98 times. Methane concentration varied between 0 and 6% in the control reactor, from 0 to 14% for waste treated by the addition of Fe3+, from 0 to 59% for waste treated by inoculation and from 0 to 63% for waste treated by Fe3+ addition and inoculation. Correlations between coenzyme F420 activity and biogas production, methane production and methane concentration proved to be positively significant (p<0.05), except for the control. Consequently, coenzyme F420 activity could be used as an index for monitoring the ac-tivity of methanogens during anaerobic biodegradation of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

  20. Can a breathing biocover system enhance methane emission reduction from landfill?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen-Jing; Chi, Zi-Fang; Mou, Zi-Shen; Long, Yu-Yang; Wang, Hong-Tao; Zhu, Yong

    2011-07-15

    Based on the aerothermodynamic principles, a kind of breathing biocover system was designed to enhance O(2) supply efficiency and methane (CH(4)) oxidation capacity. The research showed that O(2) concentration (v/v) considerably increased throughout whole profiles of the microcosm (1m) equipped with passive air venting system (MPAVS). When the simulated landfill gas SLFG flow was 771 g m(-3) d(-1) and 1028 g m(-3) d(-1), the O(2) concentration in MPAVS increased gradually and tended to be stable at the atmospheric level after 10 days. The CH(4) oxidation rate was 100% when the SLFG flow rate was no more than 1285 g m(-3) d(-1), which also was confirmed by the mass balance calculations. The breathing biocover system with in situ self-oxygen supply can address the problem of O(2) insufficient in conventional landfill covers and/or biocovers. The proposed system presents high potential for improving CH(4) emission reduction in landfills. PMID:21592654

  1. Adsorption and transport of methane in landfill cover soil amended with waste-wood biochars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadasivam, Bala Yamini; Reddy, Krishna R

    2015-08-01

    The natural presence of methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB) in landfill soils can stimulate the bio-chemical oxidation of CH4 to CO2 and H2O under suitable environmental conditions. This mechanism can be enhanced by amending the landfill cover soil with organic materials such as biochars that are recalcitrant to biological degradation and are capable of adsorbing CH4 while facilitating the growth and activity of MOB within their porous structure. Several series of batch and small-scale column tests were conducted to quantify the CH4 sorption and transport properties of landfill cover soil amended with four types of waste hardwood biochars under different levels of amendment percentages (2, 5 and 10% by weight), exposed CH4 concentrations (0-1 kPa), moisture content (dry, 25% and 75% water holding capacity), and temperature (25, 35 and 45 °C). The linear forms of the pseudo second-order kinetic model and the Langmuir isotherm model were used to determine the kinetics and the maximum CH4 adsorption capacity of cover materials. The maximum CH4 sorption capacity of dry biochar-amended soils ranged from 1.03 × 10(-2) to 7.97 × 10(-2) mol kg(-1) and exhibited a ten-fold increase compared to that of soil with 1.9 × 10(-3) mol kg(-1). The isosteric heat of adsorption for soil was negative and ranged from -30 to -118 kJ/mol, while that of the biochar-amended soils was positive and ranged from 24 to 440 kJ/mol. The CH4 dispersion coefficients for biochar-amended soils obtained through predictive transport modeling indicated that amending the soil with biochar enhanced the methane transport rates by two orders of magnitude, thereby increasing their potential for enhanced exchange of gases within the cover system. Overall, the use of hardwood biochars as a cover soil amendment to reduce methane emissions from landfills appears to be a promising alternative to conventional soil covers. PMID:25935750

  2. Determination of environmental factors influencing methane oxidation in a sandy landfill cover soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J R; Moon, S; Ahn, Y M; Kim, J Y; Nam, K

    2005-01-01

    It is advantageous to use coarse soils as landfill cover because they allow better aeration of the biologically active zone. In this study, therefore, patterns of methane oxidation were investigated under various environmental conditions including soil moisture content, temperature, and the addition of NH4+ in a sandy landfill cover soil. The kinetics of CH4 oxidation was also studied at different moisture contents and temperatures. Soil moisture content of 10% (wt/wt) resulted in the maximum CH4 oxidation rate (19.2-22.4 nmol gsoil DW(-1) min(-1)). A Vmax value was not significantly different when the moisture content was more than 10%, but a Km value increased from 5.23 to 75.24 microM as the moisture content increased. The ratio of Vmax to Km was the highest at 10% moisture content. The CH4 oxidation rate increased as the incubation temperature increased, and Q10 values and optimum temperature were determined to be 2.57-2.69 and 30 degrees C, respectively. Both Vmax and Km values decreased at the temperatures below and above 30 degrees C. The addition of various levels of NH4+ resulted in increased or decreased CH4 oxidation rates, however, the initiation of appreciable CH4 oxidation was delayed with increasing amounts of NH4+ application in all samples tested. Among the environmental variables tested, moisture content control seems to be the most important and an efficient means of managing methane oxidation when sandy soils are used in landfill cover. PMID:15747604

  3. Methane emissions from 20 landfills across the United States using vertical radial plume mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, C Douglas; Chanton, Jeffrey; Abichou, Tarek; Swan, Nathan; Green, Roger; Haters, Gary

    2012-02-01

    Landfill fugitive methane emissions were quantified as a function of climate type and cover type at 20 landfills using US. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Other Test Method (OTM)-10 vertical radial plume mapping (VRPM) with tunable diode lasers (TDLs). The VRPM data were initially collected as g CH4/sec emission rates and subsequently converted to g CH4/m2/ day rates using two recently published approaches. The first was based upon field tracer releases of methane or acetylene and multiple linear regression analysis (MLRM). The second was a virtual computer model that was based upon the Industrial Source Complex (ISC3) and Pasquill plume stability class models (PSCMs). Calculated emission results in g CH4/m2/day for each measured VRPM with the two approaches agreed well (r2 = 0.93). The VRPM data were obtained from the working face, temporary soil, intermediate soil, and final soil or synthetic covers. The data show that methane emissions to the atmosphere are a function of climate and cover type. Humid subtropical climates exhibited the highest emissions for all cover types at 207, 127, 102, and 32 g CH4/m2/day, for working face (no cover), temporary, intermediate, and final cover, respectively. Humid continental warm summers showed 67, 51, and 27 g CH4/m2/day for temporary, intermediate, and final covers. Humid continental cool summers were 135, 40, and 26 g CH4/m2/day for the working face, intermediate, and final covers. Mediterranean climates were examined for intermediate and final covers only and found to be 11 and 6 g CH4/m2/day, respectively, whereas semiarid climates showed 85, 11, 3.7, and 2.7 g CH4/m2/day for working face, temporary, intermediate, and final covers. A closed, synthetically capped landfill covered with soil and vegetation with a gas collection system in a humid continental warm summer climate gave mostly background methane readings and average emission rates of only 0.09 g CH4/m2/day flux when measurable. PMID:22442934

  4. Children Living near a Sanitary Landfill Have Increased Breath Methane and Methanobrevibacter smithii in Their Intestinal Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Bezerra de Araujo Filho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the breath CH4 excretion and concentration of M. smithii in intestinal microbiota of schoolchildren from 2 slums. One hundred and eleven children from a slum near a sanitary landfill, 35 children of a slum located away from the sanitary landfill, and 32 children from a high socioeconomic level school were included in the study. Real-time PCR was performed to quantify the M. smithii nifH gene and it was present in the microbiota of all the participating children, with higher P<0.05 concentrations in those who lived in the slum near the landfill (3.16×107 CFU/g of feces, comparing with the children from the slum away from the landfill (2.05×106 CFU/g of feces and those from the high socioeconomic level group (3.93×105 CFU/g of feces. The prevalence of children who present breath methane was 53% in the slum near the landfill, 31% in the slum further away from the landfill and, 22% in the high socioeconomic level group. To live near a landfill is associated with higher concentrations of M. smithii in intestinal microbiota, comparing with those who live away from the landfill, regardless of their socioeconomics conditions.

  5. Quantifying methane oxidation in a landfill-cover soil by gas push-pull tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane (CH4) oxidation by aerobic methanotrophs in landfill-cover soils decreases emissions of landfill-produced CH4 to the atmosphere. To quantify in situ rates of CH4 oxidation we performed five gas push-pull tests (GPPTs) at each of two locations in the cover soil of the Lindenstock landfill (Liestal, Switzerland) over a 4 week period. GPPTs consist of the injection of a gas mixture containing CH4, O2 and noble gas tracers followed by extraction from the same location. Quantification of first-order rate constants was based upon comparison of breakthrough curves of CH4 with either Ar or CH4 itself from a subsequent inactive GPPT containing acetylene as an inhibitor of CH4 oxidation. The maximum calculated first-order rate constant was 24.8 ± 0.8 h-1 at location 1 and 18.9 ± 0.6 h-1 at location 2. In general, location 2 had higher background CH4 concentrations in vertical profile samples than location 1. High background CH4 concentrations in the cover soil during some experiments adversely affected GPPT breakthrough curves and data interpretation. Real-time PCR verified the presence of a large population of methanotrophs at the two GPPT locations and comparison of stable carbon isotope fractionation of CH4 in an active GPPT and a subsequent inactive GPPT confirmed that microbial activity was responsible for the CH4 oxidation. The GPPT was shown to be a useful tool to reproducibly estimate in situ rates of CH4 oxidation in a landfill-cover soil when background CH4 concentrations were low.

  6. A fully coupled model for water-gas-heat reactive transport with methane oxidation in landfill covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C W W; Feng, S; Liu, H W

    2015-03-01

    Methane oxidation in landfill covers is a complex process involving water, gas and heat transfer as well as microbial oxidation. The coupled phenomena of microbial oxidation, water, gas, and heat transfer are not fully understood. In this study, a new model is developed that incorporates water-gas-heat coupled reactive transport in unsaturated soil with methane oxidation. Effects of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat are included. The model is calibrated using published data from a laboratory soil column test. Moreover, a series of parametric studies are carried out to investigate the influence of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat, initial water content on methane oxidation efficiency. Computed and measured results of gas concentration and methane oxidation rate are consistent. It is found that the coupling effects between water-gas-heat transfer and methane oxidation are significant. Ignoring microbial oxidation-generated water and heat can result in a significant difference in methane oxidation efficiency by 100%. PMID:25489976

  7. Kinetics of biological methane oxidation in the presence of non-methane organic compounds in landfill bio-covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this experimental program, the effects of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) on the biological methane (CH4) oxidation process were examined. The investigation was performed on compost experiments incubated with CH4 and selected NMOCs under different environmental conditions. The selected NMOCs had different concentrations and their effects were tested as single compounds and mixtures of compounds. The results from all experimental sets showed a decrease in CH4 oxidation capacity of the landfill bio-cover with the increase in NMOCs concentrations. For example, in the experiment using compost with 100% moisture content at 35 deg. C without any NMOCs the Vmax value was 35.0 μg CH4h-1gwetwt-1. This value was reduced to 19.1 μg CH4h-1gwetwt-1 when mixed NMOCs were present in the batch reactors under the same environmental conditions. The experimental oxidation rates of CH4 in the presence of single and mixed NMOCs were modeled using the uncompetitive inhibition model and kinetic parameters, including the dissociation constants, were obtained. Additionally, the degradation rates of the NMOCs and co-metabolic abilities of methanotrophic bacteria were estimated.

  8. Kinetics of biological methane oxidation in the presence of non-methane organic compounds in landfill bio-covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanna, Muna; Warith, Mostafa; Fernandes, Leta

    2010-02-01

    In this experimental program, the effects of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) on the biological methane (CH4) oxidation process were examined. The investigation was performed on compost experiments incubated with CH4 and selected NMOCs under different environmental conditions. The selected NMOCs had different concentrations and their effects were tested as single compounds and mixtures of compounds. The results from all experimental sets showed a decrease in CH4 oxidation capacity of the landfill bio-cover with the increase in NMOCs concentrations. For example, in the experiment using compost with 100% moisture content at 35 degrees C without any NMOCs the V(max) value was 35.0 microg CH4 h(-1)gwet wt(-1). This value was reduced to 19.1 microg CH4 h(-1) gwet wt(-1) when mixed NMOCs were present in the batch reactors under the same environmental conditions. The experimental oxidation rates of CH4 in the presence of single and mixed NMOCs were modeled using the uncompetitive inhibition model and kinetic parameters, including the dissociation constants, were obtained. Additionally, the degradation rates of the NMOCs and co-metabolic abilities of methanotrophic bacteria were estimated. PMID:19896356

  9. Quantification of landfill methane using modified Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's waste model and error function analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindan, Siva Shangari; Agamuthu, P

    2014-10-01

    Waste management can be regarded as a cross-cutting environmental 'mega-issue'. Sound waste management practices support the provision of basic needs for general health, such as clean air, clean water and safe supply of food. In addition, climate change mitigation efforts can be achieved through reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from waste management operations, such as landfills. Landfills generate landfill gas, especially methane, as a result of anaerobic degradation of the degradable components of municipal solid waste. Evaluating the mode of generation and collection of landfill gas has posted a challenge over time. Scientifically, landfill gas generation rates are presently estimated using numerical models. In this study the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Waste Model is used to estimate the methane generated from a Malaysian sanitary landfill. Key parameters of the model, which are the decay rate and degradable organic carbon, are analysed in two different approaches; the bulk waste approach and waste composition approach. The model is later validated using error function analysis and optimum decay rate, and degradable organic carbon for both approaches were also obtained. The best fitting values for the bulk waste approach are a decay rate of 0.08 y(-1) and degradable organic carbon value of 0.12; and for the waste composition approach the decay rate was found to be 0.09 y(-1) and degradable organic carbon value of 0.08. From this validation exercise, the estimated error was reduced by 81% and 69% for the bulk waste and waste composition approach, respectively. In conclusion, this type of modelling could constitute a sensible starting point for landfills to introduce careful planning for efficient gas recovery in individual landfills. PMID:25323145

  10. Biodegradation of methane, benzene, and toluene by a consortium MBT14 enriched from a landfill cover soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Park, Hyunjung; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2013-01-01

    In this study, landfill cover soil was used as an inoculum source to enrich a methane, benzene, and toluene-degrading consortium MBT14. Under a single substrate, the maximum degradation rates of methane, benzene and toluene were 1.96, 0.15, and 0.77 mmole g-DCW(-1) h(-1), respectively. Although the coexistence of benzene and toluene inhibited the methane degradation rates, the consortium was able to simultaneously degrade methane, benzene and toluene. Methane had an insignificant effect on benzene or toluene degradation. Based on 16S rDNA sequencing analysis, Cupriavidus spp. are dominant in the consortium MBT14. The combined results of this study indicate that the consortium MBT 14 is a promising bioresource for removing CH(4), benzene, and toluene from a variety of environments. PMID:23245302

  11. Field assessment of semi-aerobic condition and the methane correction factor for the semi-aerobic landfills provided by IPCC guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Sangjae [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Anwoo [Korea Environment Corporation, 42 Hwangyeong-ro, Seo-gu, Incheon 404-170 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Seung-Muk [Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Young, E-mail: jaeykim@snu.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} + CO{sub 2}% are proposed as indices to evaluate semi-aerobic landfills. • A landfill which CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} > 1.0 is difficult to be categorized as semi-aerobic landfill. • Field conditions should be carefully investigated to determine landfill types. • The MCF default value for semi-aerobic landfills underestimates the methane emissions. - Abstract: According to IPCC guidelines, a semi-aerobic landfill site produces one-half of the amount of CH{sub 4} produced by an equally-sized anaerobic landfill site. Therefore categorizing the landfill type is important on greenhouse gas inventories. In order to assess semi-aerobic condition in the sites and the MCF value for semi-aerobic landfill, landfill gas has been measured from vent pipes in five semi-aerobically designed landfills in South Korea. All of the five sites satisfied requirements of semi-aerobic landfills in 2006 IPCC guidelines. However, the ends of leachate collection pipes which are main entrance of air in the semi-aerobic landfill were closed in all five sites. The CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} ratio in landfill gas, indicator of aerobic and anaerobic decomposition, ranged from 1.08 to 1.46 which is higher than the values (0.3–1.0) reported for semi-aerobic landfill sites and is rather close to those (1.0–2.0) for anaerobic landfill sites. The low CH{sub 4} + CO{sub 2}% in landfill gas implied air intrusion into the landfill. However, there was no evidence that air intrusion has caused by semi-aerobic design and operation. Therefore, the landfills investigated in this study are difficult to be classified as semi-aerobic landfills. Also MCF of 0.5 may significantly underestimate methane emissions compared to other researches. According to the carbon mass balance analyses, the higher MCF needs to be proposed for semi-aerobic landfills. Consequently, methane emission estimate should be based on field evaluation for the semi-aerobically designed landfills.

  12. Ammonium-dependent regulation of aerobic methane-consuming bacteria in landfill cover soil by leachate irrigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Lü; Pinjing He; Min Guo; Na Yang; Liming Shao

    2012-01-01

    The impacts of landfill leachate irrigation on methane oxidation activities and methane-consuming bacteria populations were studied by incubation of landfill cover soils with leachate and (NH4)2SO4 solution at different ammonium concentrations.The community structures and abundances of methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were examined by PCRDGGE and real-time PCR.Compared with the pure (NH4)2SO4 solution,leachate addition was found to have a positive effect on methane oxidation activity.In terms of the irrigation amount,ammonium in leachate was responsible for the actual inhibition of leachate.The extent of inhibitory effect mainly depended on its ammonium concentration.The suppression of the predominant methaneconsuming bacteria,type Ⅰ MOB,was responsible for the decreased methane oxidation activity by ammonium inhibition.Methaneconsuming bacteria responded diversely in abundance to ammonium.The abundance of type Ⅰ MOB decreased by fivefold; type Ⅱ MOB showed stimulation response of fivefold magnification upon the first addition but lessened to be lower than the original level after the second addition; the amount of AOB was stimulated to increase for 20-30 times gradually.Accumulated nitrate from nitrification strengthened the ammonium inhibition on type Ⅰ and type Ⅱ MOB,as a result,repetitive irrigation was unfavorable for methane oxidation.

  13. Enhancement of methane production and bio-stabilisation of municipal solid waste in anaerobic bioreactor landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali Sandip, T; Khare Kanchan, C; Biradar Ashok, H

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the experiment was to enhance biodegradation and methane production of municipal solid waste (MSW). Two groups of simulated anaerobic bioreactor landfill were used; one group of mixed MSW with three bioreactors (R1, R2 and R3) and second group was compostable MSW with two bioreactors (R4 and R5). The different combinations of operational parameters were aeration with addition of aerobic microbial culture, anaerobic sludge, coarse gravel mixing, intermediate soil cover and varied leachate recirculation rate. The results observed at the end of 270days prevail that the process combination of above operational parameters adopted in compostable MSW bioreactor was more efficient approach for stabilization of MSW. It has accelerated the methane production rate (141.28Lkg(-1)dry waste) by 25%. It was also observed that the degradation time of MSW was reduced by 25% compared to maximum values quoted in the literature. The nonlinear regression of the cumulative biogas production and digestion time shows that Gompertz growth equation fits the results well. PMID:22342079

  14. Methane oxidation in homogenous soil covers of landfills: a finite – element analysis of the influence of gas diffusion coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Zygmunt M; Stępniewski W.

    2000-01-01

    Methane produced in municipal landfills covered with a soil layer diffuses to the atmosphere. Counterdiffusion of oxygen down the soil creates an oxic zone where biochemical oxidation of methane by methanotrophic microorganisms can take place. Oxidation is possible only in that part of the oxic zone where both the substrates, i.e., methane ond oxygen are present simultanously. Biochemical oxidation of methane is governed by Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The solution of the equation system compri...

  15. Assessment of zonal distribution of methane on MSW landfills in northern regions for its usage in local power engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Chusov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Municipal solid waste (MSW landfills located in regions of Russia with low temperatures and relatively low rainfall averages are considered unpromising in terms of their biogas potential; however, these claims have not been substantiated. Assessment of the biogas potential of such landfills requires special field research for analyzing biogas composition and emission speed, which could define the processes taking place inside a landfill. We should note that the use of mathematical models that do not take into account the specifics of a particular landfill makes it impossible to get detailed and reliable information about its biogas potential. This work contains the results of research conducted for assessing the biogas potential of three municipal solid waste landfills located in various zones of the Northwestern Federal District with Atlantic continental and moderately continental climate. The research showed that biochemical processes of waste decomposition accompanied by the emission of biogas with high (50 vol% and above methane content are possible even in areas with a relatively cold climate. This confirms the presence of the energy potential of these landfills, which can be used for the needs of heat, electricity and gas supply to the population, etc.

  16. Release and fate of fluorocarbons in a shredder residue landfill cell: 1. Laboratory experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Fredenslund, Anders M; Nedenskov, Jonas; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2010-11-01

    The shredder residues from automobiles, home appliances and other metal-containing products are often disposed in landfills, as recycling technologies for these materials are not common in many countries. Shredder waste contains rigid and soft foams from cushions and insulation panels blown with fluorocarbons. The objective of this study was to use laboratory experiments to estimate fluorocarbon release and attenuation processes in a monofill shredder residue (SR) landfill cell. Waste from the open SR landfill cell at the AV Miljø landfill in Denmark was sampled at three locations. The waste contained 1-3% metal and a relatively low fraction of rigid polyurethane (PUR) foam particles. The PUR waste contained less blowing agent (CFC-11) than predicted from a release model. However, CFC-11 was steadily released in an aerobic bench scale experiment. Anaerobic waste incubation bench tests showed that SRSR produced significant methane (CH(4)), but at rates that were in the low end of the range observed for municipal solid waste. Aerobic and anaerobic batch experiments showed that processes in SRSR potentially can attenuate the fluorocarbons released from the SRSR itself: CFC-11 is degraded under anaerobic conditions with the formation of degradation products, which are being degraded under CH(4) oxidation conditions prevailing in the upper layers of the SR. PMID:20435458

  17. Did state renewable portfolio standards induce technical change in methane mitigation in the U.S. landfill sector?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhotal, Katherine Casey

    Landfill gas (LFG) projects use the gas created from decomposing waste, which is approximately 49% methane, and substitute it for natural gas in engines, boilers, turbines, and other technologies to produce energy or heat. The projects are beneficial in terms of increased safety at the landfill, production of a cost-effective source of energy or heat, reduced odor, reduced air pollution emissions, and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. However, landfills sometimes face conflicting policy incentives. The theory of technical change shows that the diffusion of a technology or groups of technologies increases slowly in the beginning and then picks up speed as knowledge and better understanding of using the technology diffuses among potential users. Using duration analysis, data on energy prices, State and Federal policies related to landfill gas, renewable energy, and air pollution, as well as control data on landfill characteristics, I estimate the influence and direction of influence of renewable portfolio standards (RPS). The analysis found that RPS positively influences the diffusion of landfill gas technologies, encouraging landfills to consider electricity generation projects over direct sales of LFG to another facility. Energy price increases or increased revenues for a project are also critical. Barriers to diffusion include air emission permits in non-attainment areas and policies, such as net metering, which promote other renewables over LFG projects. Using the estimates from the diffusion equations, I analyze the potential influence of a Federal RPS as well as the potential interaction with a Federal, market based climate change policy, which will increase the revenue of a project through higher energy sale prices. My analysis shows that a market based climate change policy such as a cap-and-trade or carbon tax scheme would increase the number of landfill gas projects significantly more than a Federal RPS.

  18. Effect of bio-cover equipped with a novel passive air diffusion system on methane emission reduciton from landfill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, W.J.; Mou, Zishen

    2011-01-01

    Based on the aerothermodynamic principles, a kind of breathing bio-cover system was designed to enhance oxygen (O2) supply efficiency and methane (CH4) oxidation capacity. The research showed that O2 concentration (v/v) considerably increased throughout whole profiles of the microcosm (1m) equipped...... with passive air diffusion system (MPADS). When the simulated landfill gas SLFG flow was 771 and 1028 gm−3 d−1, the O2 concentration in MPADS increased gradually and tended to be stable at the atmospheric level after 10 days. The CH4 oxidation rate was 100% when the SLFG flow rate was no more than 1285 gm−3 d......−1, which also was confirmed by the mass balance calculations. The breathing bio-cover system with in situ self-oxygen supply can address the problem of O2 insufficient in conventional landfill bio-cover. The proposed system presents high potential for improving CH4 emission reduction in landfills....

  19. Development of a purpose built landfill system for the control of methane emissions from municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedla, Sudhakar; Parikh, Jyoti K

    2002-01-01

    In the present paper, a new system of purpose built landfill (PBLF) has been proposed for the control of methane emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW), by considering all favourable conditions for improved methane generation in tropical climates. Based on certain theoretical considerations multivariate functional models (MFMs) are developed to estimate methane mitigation and energy generating potential of the proposed system. Comparison was made between the existing waste management system and proposed PBLF system. It has been found that the proposed methodology not only controlled methane emissions to the atmosphere but also could yield considerable energy in terms of landfill gas (LFG). Economic feasibility of the proposed system has been tested by comparing unit cost of waste disposal in conventional as well as PBLF systems. In a case study of MSW management in Mumbai (INDIA), it was found that the unit cost of waste disposal with PBLF system is seven times lesser than that of the conventional waste management system. The proposed system showed promising energy generation potential with production of methane worth of Rs. 244 millions/y ($5.2 million/y). Thus, the new waste management methodology could give an adaptable solution for the conflict between development, environmental degradation and natural resources depletion. PMID:12092759

  20. Greenhouse gas reduction by recovery and utilization of landfill methane and CO{sub 2} technical and market feasibility study, Boului Landfill, Bucharest, Romania. Final report, September 30, 1997--September 19, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, W.J.; Brown, W.R.; Siwajek, L. [Acrion Technologies, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Sanders, W.I. [Power Management Corp., Bellevue, WA (United States); Botgros, I. [Petrodesign, SA, Bucharest (Romania)

    1998-09-01

    The project is a landfill gas to energy project rated at about 4 megawatts (electric) at startup, increasing to 8 megawatts over time. The project site is Boului Landfill, near Bucharest, Romania. The project improves regional air quality, reduces emission of greenhouse gases, controls and utilizes landfill methane, and supplies electric power to the local grid. The technical and economic feasibility of pre-treating Boului landfill gas with Acrion`s new landfill gas cleanup technology prior to combustion for power production us attractive. Acrion`s gas treatment provides several benefits to the currently structured electric generation project: (1) increase energy density of landfill gas from about 500 Btu/ft{sup 3} to about 750 Btu/ft{sup 3}; (2) remove contaminants from landfill gas to prolong engine life and reduce maintenance;; (3) recover carbon dioxide from landfill gas for Romanian markets; and (4) reduce emission of greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide. Greenhouse gas emissions reduction attributable to successful implementation of the landfill gas to electric project, with commercial liquid CO{sub 2} recovery, is estimated to be 53 million metric tons of CO{sub 2} equivalent of its 15 year life.

  1. Modeling the effects of vegetation on methane oxidation and emissions through soil landfill final covers across different climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abichou, Tarek; Kormi, Tarek; Yuan, Lei; Johnson, Terry; Francisco, Escobar

    2015-02-01

    Plant roots are reported to enhance the aeration of soil by creating secondary macropores which improve the diffusion of oxygen into soil as well as the supply of methane to bacteria. Therefore, methane oxidation can be improved considerably by the soil structuring processes of vegetation, along with the increase of organic biomass in the soil associated with plant roots. This study consisted of using a numerical model that combines flow of water and heat with gas transport and oxidation in soils, to simulate methane emission and oxidation through simulated vegetated and non-vegetated landfill covers under different climatic conditions. Different simulations were performed using different methane loading flux (5-200 g m(-2) d(-1)) as the bottom boundary. The lowest modeled surface emissions were always obtained with vegetated soil covers for all simulated climates. The largest differences in simulated surface emissions between the vegetated and non-vegetated scenarios occur during the growing season. Higher average yearly percent oxidation was obtained in simulations with vegetated soil covers as compared to non-vegetated scenario. The modeled effects of vegetation on methane surface emissions and percent oxidation were attributed to two separate mechanisms: (1) increase in methane oxidation associated with the change of the physical properties of the upper vegetative layer and (2) increase in organic matter associated with vegetated soil layers. Finally, correlations between percent oxidation and methane loading into simulated vegetated and non-vegetated covers were proposed to allow decision makers to compare vegetated versus non-vegetated soil landfill covers. These results were obtained using a modeling study with several simplifying assumptions that do not capture the complexities of vegetated soils under field conditions. PMID:25475118

  2. FUEL CELL OPERATION ON LANDFILL GAS AT PENROSE POWER STATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This demonstration test successfully demonstrated operation of a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell (FC) on landfill gas (LG) at the Penrose Power Station in Sun Valley, CA. Demonstration output included operation up to 137 kW; 37.1% efficiency at 120 kW; exceptionally low sec...

  3. Pretreated Landfill Gas Conversion Process via a Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Renewable Combined Fuel Cell-Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Ziaka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new landfill gas-based reforming catalytic processing system for the conversion of gaseous hydrocarbons, such as incoming methane to hydrogen and carbon oxide mixtures, is described and analyzed. The exit synthesis gas (syn-gas is fed to power effectively high-temperature fuel cells such as SOFC types for combined efficient electricity generation. The current research work is also referred on the description and design aspects of permreactors (permeable reformers carrying the same type of landfill gas-reforming reactions. Membrane reactors is a new technology that can be applied efficiently in such systems. Membrane reactors seem to perform better than the nonmembrane traditional reactors. The aim of this research includes turnkey system and process development for the landfill-based power generation and fuel cell industries. Also, a discussion of the efficient utilization of landfill and waste type resources for combined green-type/renewable power generation with increased processing capacity and efficiency via fuel cell systems is taking place. Moreover, pollution reduction is an additional design consideration in the current catalytic processors fuel cell cycles.

  4. Methane emissions from MSW landfill with sandy soil covers under leachate recirculation and subsurface irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Houhu; He, Pinjing; Shao, Liming

    CH 4 emissions and leachate disposal are recognized as the two major concerns in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. Recently, leachate recirculation was attempted to accelerate land-filled waste biodegradation and thus enhanced landfill gas generation. Leachate irrigation was also conducted for volume reduction effectively. Nevertheless, the impacts of leachate recirculation and irrigation on landfill CH 4 emissions have not been previously reported. A field investigation of landfill CH 4 emissions was conducted on selected sandy soil cover with leachate recirculation and subsurface irrigation based on whole year around measurement. The average CH 4 fluxes were 311±903, 207±516, and 565±1460 CH 4 m -2 h -1 from site A without leachate recirculation and subsurface irrigation, lift B2 with leachate subsurface irrigation, and lift B1 with both leachate recirculation and subsurface irrigation, respectively. Both gas recovery and cover soil oxidation minimized CH 4 emissions efficiently, while the later might be more pronounced when the location was more than 5 m away from gas recovery well. After covered by additional clay soil layer, CH 4 fluxes dropped by approximately 35 times in the following three seasons compared to the previous three seasons in lift B2. The diurnal peaks of CH 4 fluxes occurred mostly followed with air or soil temperature in the daytimes. The measured CH 4 fluxes were much lower than those of documented data from the landfills, indicating that the influences of leachate recirculation and subsurface irrigation on landfill CH 4 emissions might be minimized with the help of a well-designed sandy soil cover. Landfill cover composed of two soil layers (clay soil underneath and sandy soil above) is suggested as a low-cost and effective alternative to minimize CH 4 emissions.

  5. Evaluation of simultaneous biodegradation of methane and toluene in landfill covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yao; Zhang, Xuan; Wei, Xiao-Meng; Kong, Jiao-Yan; Xia, Fang-Fang; Li, Wei; He, Ruo

    2014-06-15

    The biodegradation of CH4 and toluene in landfill cover soil (LCS) and waste biocover soil (WBS) was investigated with a serial toluene concentration in the headspace of landfill cover microcosms in this study. Compared with the LCS sample, the higher CH4 oxidation activity and toluene-degrading capacity occurred in the WBS sample. The co-existence of toluene in landfill gas would positively or negatively affect CH4 oxidation, mainly depending on the toluene concentrations and exposure time. The nearly complete inhibition of toluene on CH4 oxidation was observed in the WBS sample at the toluene concentration of ∼ 80,000 mg m(-3), which was about 10 times higher than that in the LCS sample. The toluene degradation rates in both landfill covers fitted well with the Michaelis-Menten model. These findings showed that WBS was a good alternative landfill cover material to simultaneously mitigate emissions of CH4 and toluene from landfills to the atmosphere. PMID:24801894

  6. Landfill gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the UK Government's initiative for stimulating renewable energy through the Non-Fossil Fuel Obligation (NFFO), the UK landfill gas industry has more than trebled in size in just 4 years. As a result, UK companies are now in a strong position to offer their skills and services overseas. Ireland, Greece and Spain also resort heavily to disposal to landfill. Particularly rapid growth of the landfill gas market is expected in the OECD-Pacific and NAFTA areas. The article explains that landfill gas is a methane-rich mixture produced by anaerobic decomposition of organic wastes in landfills: under optimum conditions, up to 500 cubic meters of gas can be obtained from 1 tonne of biodegradable waste. Data on the number and capacity of sites in the UK are given. The Landfill Gas Association runs courses to counteract the skills shortage in the UK, and tailored courses for overseas visitors are planned

  7. Mitigation of methane emissions in a pilot-scale biocover system at the av miljø landfill, denmark: system design and gas distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Skov, B.; Cassini, Filippo;

    2013-01-01

    Greenhouse gas mitigation at landfills by methane oxidation in engineered biocover systems is believed to be a cost effective technology but so far a full quantitative evaluation of the efficiency of the technology in full scale has only been carried out in a few cases. A third generation semi-pa...

  8. Life-cycle-assessment of fuel-cells-based landfill-gas energy conversion technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunghi, P.; Bove, R.; Desideri, U.

    Landfill-gas (LFG) is produced as result of the biological reaction of municipal solid waste (MSW). This gas contains about 50% of methane, therefore it cannot be released into the atmosphere as it is because of its greenhouse effect consequences. The high percentage of methane encouraged researchers to find solutions to recover the related energy content for electric energy production. The most common technologies used at the present time are internal combustion reciprocating engines and gas turbines. High conversion efficiency guaranteed by fuel cells (FCs) enable to enhance the energy recovery process and to reduce emissions to air, such as NO x and CO. In any case, in order to investigate the environmental advantages associated with the electric energy generation using fuel cells, it is imperative to consider the whole "life cycle" of the system, "from cradle-to-grave". In fact, fuel cells are considered to be zero-emission devices, but, for example, emissions associated with their manufacture or for hydrogen production must be considered in order to evaluate all impacts on the environment. In the present work a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) system for LFG recovery is considered and a life cycle assessment (LCA) is conducted for an evaluation of environmental consequences and to provide a guide for further environmental impact reduction.

  9. A GLOBAL METHANE EMISSIONS PROGRAM FOR LANDFILLS, COAL MINES, AND NATURAL GAS SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives the scope and methodology of EPA/AEERL's methane emissions studies and discloses data accumulated thus far in the program. Anthropogenic methane emissions are a principal focus in AEERL's global climate research program, including three major sources: municipal so...

  10. A logistic model for the prediction of the influence of water on the solid waste methanization in landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommier, S; Chenu, D; Quintard, M; Lefebvre, X

    2007-06-15

    This article deals with the impact of water content of solid waste on biogas production kinetics in landfills. This impact has been proved in the laboratory thanks to anaerobic biodegradation experiments on paper/cardboard waste samples. A strong dependence with the moisture level was observed for both kinetic rates and maximum methane production. In this article, a logistic model is proposed to simulate the biogas production rate. It is chosen as simple as possible in order to allow for a correct identification of the model parameters given the experimental data available. The moisture dependency is introduced through a linear weighing of the biomass specific growth rate and of the amount of accessible organic substrate. It is directly linked to physical properties of the waste: the holding capacity and the minimal moisture level allowing the presence of free water. PMID:17149769

  11. Estudos sobre a oxidação aeróbia do metano na cobertura de três aterros sanitários no Brasil Studies on the aerobic methane oxidation at three sanitary landfills covers in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Echevenguá Teixeira

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A oxidação biológica e aeróbia do metano em materiais de cobertura de aterros de resíduos sólidos urbanos é uma das alternativas para se minimizarem as emissões dos gases de efeito estufa. Este artigo tem como objetivo avaliar a oxidação biológica do metano em material de cobertura de três aterros brasileiros (dois municipais e uma célula experimental. O trabalho consistiu na coleta de amostras dos solos, as quais foram caracterizadas através de ensaios geotécnicos e microbiológicos. Em laboratório, avaliou-se o consumo de metano de uma amostra de cada aterro. Os resultados revelaram a presença de bactérias metanotróficas e consumo de metano em laboratório, o que sugere que exista uma relação inversa entre o grau de saturação no momento da coleta e o número de bactérias metanotróficas.The biological and aerobic oxidation of methane within the soil cover of municipal solid waste landfills is one an alternative to minimize emissions of greenhouse effect gases. This study aims at assess the biological oxidation of methane within the final cover of three landfills in Brazil (two municipal ones and one experimental cell. The soil samples obtained from the landfill cover were characterized by geotechnical and microbiological tests. In the laboratory the consumption of methane from each sample were evaluated. The results revealed the presence of methanotrophic bacteria and consumption of methane in the laboratory was observed, which also suggest that there is an inverse relation between the degree of saturation at the time of sampling and the number of methanotrophic bacteria.

  12. Mechanically-biologically treated municipal solid waste as a support medium for microbial methane oxidation to mitigate landfill greenhouse emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einola, Juha-Kalle M; Karhu, A Elina; Rintala, Jukka A

    2008-01-01

    The residual fraction of mechanically-biologically treated municipal solid waste (MBT residual) was studied in the laboratory to evaluate its suitability and environmental compatibility as a support medium in methane (CH(4)) oxidative biocovers for the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions from landfills. Two MBT residuals with 5 and 12 months total (aerobic) biological stabilisation times were used in the study. MBT residual appeared to be a favourable medium for CH(4) oxidation as indicated by its area-based CH(4) oxidation rates (12.2-82.3 g CH(4) m(-2) d(-1) at 2-25 degrees C; determined in CH(4)-sparged columns). The CH(4) oxidation potential (determined in batch assays) of the MBT residuals increased during the 124 d column experiment, from solid (L/S) ratio of 10:1, suggest a potential for leachate pollutant emissions which should be considered in plans to utilise MBT residual. In conclusion, the laboratory experiments suggest that MBT residual can be utilised as a support medium for CH(4) oxidation, even at low temperatures, to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from landfills. PMID:17360174

  13. Stimulation of methane oxidation potential and effects on vegetation growth by bottom ash addition in a landfill final evapotranspiration cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gil Won; Ho, Adrian; Kim, Pil Joo; Kim, Sang Yoon

    2016-09-01

    The landfilling of municipal solid waste is a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4), contributing up to 20% of total anthropogenic CH4 emissions. The evapotranspiration (ET) cover system, an alternative final cover system in waste landfills, has been considered to be a promising way to mitigate CH4 emissions, as well as to prevent water infiltration using vegetation on landfill cover soils. In our previous studies, bottom ash from coal-fired power plants was selected among several industrial residues (blast furnace slag, bottom ash, construction waste, steel manufacture slag, stone powder sludge, and waste gypsum) as the best additive for ET cover systems, with the highest mechanical performance achieved for a 35% (wtwt(-1)) bottom ash content in soil. In this study, to evaluate the field applicability of bottom ash mixed soil as ET cover, four sets of lysimeters (height 1.2m×width 2m×length 6m) were constructed in 2007, and four different treatments were installed: (i) soil+bottom ash (35% wtwt(-1)) (SB); (ii) soil+compost (2% wtwt(-1), approximately corresponding to 40Mgha(-1) in arable field scale) (SC); (iii) soil+bottom ash+compost (SBC); and (iv) soil only as the control (S). The effects of bottom ash mixing in ET cover soil on CH4 oxidation potential and vegetation growth were evaluated in a pilot ET cover system in the 5th year after installation by pilot experiments using the treatments. Our results showed that soil properties were significantly improved by bottom ash mixing, resulting in higher plant growth. Bottom ash addition significantly increased the CH4 oxidation potential of the ET cover soil, mainly due to improved organic matter and available copper concentration, enhancing methanotrophic abundances in soil amended with bottom ash. Conclusively, bottom ash could be a good alternative as a soil additive in the ET cover system to improve vegetation growth and mitigate CH4 emission impact in the waste landfill system. PMID:27067424

  14. Improving the aeration of critical fine-grained landfill top cover material by vegetation to increase the microbial methane oxidation efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Sonja; Brunke, Paul; Gebert, Julia; Jager, Johannes

    2011-05-01

    The natural methane oxidation potential of methanotrophic bacteria in landfill top covers is a sustainable and inexpensive method to reduce methane emissions to the atmosphere. Basically, the activity of methanotrophic bacteria is limited by the availability of oxygen in the soil. A column study was carried out to determine whether and to what extent vegetation can improve soil aeration and maintain the methane oxidation process. Tested soils were clayey silt and mature compost. The first soil is critical in light of surface crusting due to vertical erosion of an integral part of fine-grained material, blocking pores required for the gas exchange. The second soil, mature compost, is known for its good methane oxidation characteristics, due to high air-filled porosity, favorable water retention capacity and high nutrient supply. The assortment of plants consisted of a grass mixture, Canadian goldenrod and a mixture of leguminous plants. The compost offered an excellent methane oxidation potential of 100% up to a CH(4)-input of 5.6l CH(4)m(-2)h(-1). Whereas the oxidation potential was strongly diminished in the bare control column filled with clayey silt even at low CH(4)-loads. By contrast the planted clayey silt showed an increased methane oxidation potential compared to the bare column. The spreading root system forms secondary macro-pores, and hence amplifies the air diffusivity and sustain the oxygen supply to the methanotrophic bacteria. Water is produced during methane oxidation, causing leachate. Vegetation reduces the leachate by evapotranspiration. Furthermore, leguminous plants support the enrichment of soil with nitrogen compounds and thus improving the methane oxidation process. In conclusion, vegetation is relevant for the increase of oxygen diffusion into the soil and subsequently enhances effective methane oxidation in landfill cover soils. PMID:21169005

  15. Accumulation chamber measurements of methane fluxes from natural environments and landfills

    OpenAIRE

    Cardellini, C.; Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita` di Perugia, Piazza dell’Universita 1, 06100 Perugia; Chiodini, G.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Frondini, F.; Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università di Perugia, Piazza dell'Università, 06123 Perugia, Italy; Granieri, D.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia; Lewicki, J.; Department of Geosciences, Penn State University, University Park, USA; Peruzzi, L.; Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita` di Perugia

    2003-01-01

    Direct measurement of present day CH4 diffuse degassing from the soil represents an effective tool to better estimate the degassing rate of individual sources and to calibrate global Earth degassing estimates. While many data exist on CH4 emissions from ecosystems, agricultural soils and landfills, few estimates of CH4 emissions from volcanic-geothermal areas have been performed. The authors report results and discuss applications of accumulation-chamber measurements of soil CH4 a...

  16. Mitigating methane emissions and air intrusion in heterogeneous landfills with a high permeability layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoojin; Imhoff, Paul T; Augenstein, Don; Yazdani, Ramin

    2011-05-01

    Spatially variable refuse gas permeability and landfill gas (LFG) generation rate, cracking of the soil cover, and reduced refuse gas permeability because of liquid addition can all affect CH(4) collection efficiency when intermediate landfill covers are installed. A new gas collection system that includes a near-surface high permeability layer beneath the landfill cover was evaluated for enhancing capture of LFG and mitigating CH(4) emissions. Simulations of gas transport in two-dimensional domains demonstrated that the permeable layer reduces CH(4) emissions up to a factor of 2 for particular spatially variable gas permeability fields. When individual macrocracks formed in the cover soil and the permeable layer was absent, CH(4) emissions increased to as much as 24% of the total CH(4) generated, double the emissions when the permeable layer was installed. CH(4) oxidation in the cover soil was also much more uniform when the permeable layer was present: local percentages of CH(4) oxidized varied between 94% and 100% across the soil cover with the permeable layer, but ranged from 10% to 100% without this layer for some test cases. However, the permeable layer had a minor effect on CH(4) emissions and CH(4) oxidation in the cover soil when the ratio of the gas permeability of the cover soil to the mean refuse gas permeability ≤ 0.05. The modeling approach employed in this study may be used to assess the utility of other LFG collection systems and management practices. PMID:20880688

  17. The effect of precipitation on municipal solid waste decomposition and methane production in simulated landfill bioreactor with leachate recirculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawinee Chaiprasert

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate MSW degradation and methane production in a simulated landfill bioreactor with leachate recirculation under conditions with and without water addition at the representative level of annual precipitation. Experiments were carried out in four simulated reactors using 0.3 m diameter PVC pipe of 1.25 m height. Two leachate recirculation reactors were operated with water addition and the other two were operated without water addition. The results showed that leachate recirculation with precipitation led to greater performance in terms of accelerated biological stabilization and the onset of methanogenesis. In the reactors operated with precipitation, the reduction of COD was 24-54 times higher than that in reactors without precipitation. The percentage of waste decomposition was 59.0-61.4% and the methane production rate was 0.479-0.638 l/kg dry waste/day at the stabilization phase in the reactors operated with precipitation. Conversely, 19.6-22.4% of waste decomposition and 0.01 l/kg dry waste of methane production were found in reactors operated without precipitation. In this experiment, the feasibility of introducing moisture only by leachate recirculation, with no precipitation, seemed to be unsuitable for recirculation due to the high concentration of leachate pollutant. A large quantity of buffering chemical was used. Therefore, during the hydrolysis and acidogenesis phases, precipitation or water added was important for the waste decomposition as to dilute and flush out high TVA concentration and create a favorable environment for methanogenesis.

  18. Spatial patterns of methane oxidation and methanotrophic diversity in landfill cover soils of southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zi-Fang; Lu, Wen-Jing; Wang, Hong-Tao

    2015-04-01

    Aerobic CH4 oxidation is an important CH4 sink in landfills. To investigate the distribution and community diversity of methanotrophs and link with soil characteristics and operational parameters (e.g., concentrations of O2, CH4), cover soil samples were collected at different locations and depths from the Mengzi semi-aerobic landfill (SAL) in Yunnan Province of southern China. Specific PCR followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and realtime PCR were used to examine methanotrophs in the landfill cover soils. The results showed that different locations did harbor distinct methanotroph communities. Methanotrophs were more abundant in areas near the venting pipes because of the higher O2 concentrations. The depth of 20-25 cm, where the ratio of the CH4 to O2 was within the range from 1.3 to 8.6, was more conducive to the growth of CH4-oxidizing bacteria. Type II methanotrophs dominated in all samples compared with Type I methanotrophs, as evidenced by the high ratio of Type II to Type I methanotrophic copy numbers (from 1.76 to 11.60). The total copy numbers of methanotrophs detected were similar to other ecosystems, although the CH4 concentration was much higher in SAL cover soil. Methylobacter and Methylocystis were the most abundant Type I and Type II methanotrophs genera, respectively, in the Mengzi SAL. The results suggested that SALs could provide a special environment with both high concentrations of CH4 and O2 for methanotrophs, especially around the vertical venting pipes. PMID:25341468

  19. An integrated system for hydrogen and methane production during landfill leachate treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text': The patent-pending integrated waste-to-energy system comprises both a novel biohydrogen reactor with a gravity settler (Biohydrogenator, Hafez et al., 2009), followed by a second stage conventional anaerobic digester for the production of methane gas. This chemical-free process has been tested with a synthetic wastewater/leachate solution, and was operated at 37oC for 45 days. The biohydrogenator (system (A), stage 1) steadily produced hydrogen with no methane during the experimental period. The maximum hydrogen yield was 400 ml H2 / g glucose with an average of 345 ml H2 / g glucose, as compared to 141 and 118 ml H2 / g glucose for two consecutive runs done in parallel using a conventional continuously stirrer tank reactor (System (B)). The maximum and average hydrogen production rates in system (A) were 22 and 19 L H2/d, the maximum yield was 2.8 mol H2 /mol glucose higher than 1.6-2.3 mol H2 /mol glucose reported for continuous-flow reactors. The methane yield for the second stage in system (A) approached a maximum value of 426 ml CH4/ gCOD removed. (author)

  20. Spatial variability of nitrous oxide and methane emissions from an MBT landfill in operation: strong N2O hotspots at the working face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harborth, Peter; Fuss, Roland; Münnich, Kai; Flessa, Heinz; Fricke, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    Mechanical biological treatment (MBT) is an effective technique, which removes organic carbon from municipal solid waste (MSW) prior to deposition. Thereby, methane (CH4) production in the landfill is strongly mitigated. However, direct measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from full-scale MBT landfills have not been conducted so far. Thus, CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from a German MBT landfill in operation as well as their concentrations in the landfill gas (LFG) were measured. High N2O emissions of 20-200gCO2eq.m(-2)h(-1) magnitude (up to 428mgNm(-2)h(-1)) were observed within 20m of the working face. CH4 emissions were highest at the landfill zone located at a distance of 30-40m from the working face, where they reached about 10gCO2eq.m(-2)h(-1). The MBT material in this area has been deposited several weeks earlier. Maximum LFG concentration for N2O was 24.000ppmv in material below the emission hotspot. At a depth of 50cm from the landfill surface a strong negative correlation between N2O and CH4 concentrations was observed. From this and from the distribution pattern of extractable ammonium, nitrite, and nitrate it has been concluded that strong N2O production is associated with nitrification activity and the occurrence of nitrite and nitrate, which is initiated by oxygen input during waste deposition. Therefore, CH4 mitigation measures, which often employ aeration, could result in a net increase of GHG emissions due to increased N2O emissions, especially at MBT landfills. PMID:23453435

  1. Methane oxidation potential of boreal landfill cover materials: The governing factors and enhancement by nutrient manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maanoja, Susanna T; Rintala, Jukka A

    2015-12-01

    Methanotrophs inhabiting landfill covers are in a crucial role in mitigating CH4 emissions, but the characteristics of the cover material or ambient temperature do not always enable the maximal CH4 oxidation potential (MOP). This study aimed at identifying the factors governing MOPs of different materials used for constructing biocovers and other cover structures. We also tested whether the activity of methanotrophs could be enhanced at cold temperature (4 and 12°C) by improving the nutrient content (NO3(-), PO4(3-), trace elements) of the cover material. Compost samples from biocovers designed to support CH4 oxidation were exhibiting the highest MOPs (4.16 μmol CH4 g dw(-1) h(-1)), but also the soil samples collected from other cover structures were oxidising CH4 (0.41 μmol CH4 g dw(-1) h(-1)). The best predictors for the MOPs were the NO3(-) content and activity of heterotrophic bacteria at 72.8%, which were higher in the compost samples than in the soil samples. The depletion of NO3(-) from the landfill cover material limiting the activity of methanotrophs could not be confirmed by the nutrient manipulation assay at 4°C as the addition of nitrogen decreased the MOPs from 0.090 μmol CH4 g dw(-1) h(-1) to 0.096 μmol CH4 g dw(-1)h(-1)) suggesting that this was attributable to stimulation of the enzymatic activity of the psychrotolerant methanotrophs. PMID:26298483

  2. Capacity for Methane Oxidation in Landfill Cover Soils Measured in Laboratory-Scale Soil Microcosms

    OpenAIRE

    Kightley, D.; Nedwell, D. B.; Cooper, M.

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory-scale soil microcosms containing different soils were permeated with CH(inf4) for up to 6 months to investigate their capacity to develop a methanotrophic community. Methane emissions were monitored continuously until steady states were established. The porous, coarse sand soil developed the greatest methanotrophic capacity (10.4 mol of CH(inf4) (middot) m(sup-2) (middot) day(sup-1)), the greatest yet reported in the literature. Vertical profiles of O(inf2), CH(inf4), and methanotr...

  3. Responses of oxidation rate and microbial communities to methane in simulated landfill cover soil microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruo; Ruan, Aidong; Jiang, Chenjing; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2008-10-01

    CH4 oxidation capacities and microbial community structures developed in response to the presence of CH4 were investigated in two types of landfill cover soil microcosms, waste soil (fine material in stabilized waste) and clay soil. CH4 emission fluxes were lower in the waste soil cover over the course of the experiment. After exposure to CH4 flow for 120 days, the waste soil developed CH4 oxidation capacity from 0.53 to 11.25-13.48micromol CH4gd.w.(-1)h(-1), which was ten times higher than the clay soil. The topsoils of the two soil covers were observed dried and inhibited CH4 oxidation. The maximum CH4 oxidation rate occurred at the depth of 10-20cm in the waste soil cover (the middle layer), whereas it took place mainly at the depth of 20-30cm in the clay soil cover (the bottom layer). The amounts of the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarks 16:1omega8c and 18:1omega8c for type I and II methanotrophs, respectively, showed that type I methanotrophic bacteria predominated in the clay soil, while the type II methanotrophic bacteria were abundant in the waste soil, and the highest population in the middle layer. The results also indicated that a greater active methanotrophic community was developed in the waste soil relative to the clay soil. PMID:18294841

  4. Initial results of detected methane emissions from landfills in the Los Angeles Basin during the COMEX campaign by the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) instrument and a greenhouse gas in-situ analyser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautwurst, Sven; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Kolyer, Richard; Jonsson, Haflidi; Krings, Thomas; Horstjann, Markus; Leifer, Ira; Vigil, Sam; Buchwitz, Michael; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Fladeland, Matthew M.; Burrows, John P.; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2015-04-01

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas beside carbon dioxide (CO2). Significant contributors to the global methane budget are fugitive emissions from landfills. Due to the growing world population, it is expected that the amount of waste and, therefore, waste disposal sites will increase in number and size in parts of the world, often adjacent growing megacities. Besides bottom-up modelling, a variety of ground based methods (e.g., flux chambers, trace gases, radial plume mapping, etc.) have been used to estimate (top-down) these fugitive emissions. Because landfills usually are large, sometimes with significant topographic relief, vary temporally, and leak/emit heterogeneously across their surface area, assessing total emission strength by ground-based techniques is often difficult. In this work, we show how airborne based remote sensing measurements of the column-averaged dry air mole fraction of CH4 can be utilized to estimate fugitive emissions from landfills in an urban environment by a mass balance approach. Subsequently, these emission rates are compared to airborne in-situ horizontal cross section measurements of CH4 taken within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) upwind and downwind of the landfill at different altitudes immediately after the remote sensing measurements were finished. Additional necessary parameters (e.g., wind direction, wind speed, aerosols, dew point temperature, etc.) for the data inversion are provided by a standard instrumentation suite for atmospheric measurements aboard the aircraft, and nearby ground-based weather stations. These measurements were part of the CO2 and Methane EXperiment (COMEX), which was executed during the summer 2014 in California and was co-funded by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The remote sensing measurements were taken by the Methane Airborne MAPper (MAMAP) developed and operated by the University of Bremen and

  5. Spatial variability of nitrous oxide and methane emissions from an MBT landfill in operation: Strong N{sub 2}O hotspots at the working face

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harborth, Peter, E-mail: p.harborth@tu-bs.de [Department of Waste and Resource Management, Leichtweiß-Institute for Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany); Fuß, Roland [Institute of Climate-Smart Agriculture, Johann Heinrich von Thünen Institute, Braunschweig (Germany); Münnich, Kai [Department of Waste and Resource Management, Leichtweiß-Institute for Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany); Flessa, Heinz [Institute of Climate-Smart Agriculture, Johann Heinrich von Thünen Institute, Braunschweig (Germany); Fricke, Klaus [Department of Waste and Resource Management, Leichtweiß-Institute for Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► First measurements of N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} emissions from an MBT landfill. ► High N{sub 2}O emissions from recently deposited material. ► N{sub 2}O emissions associated with aeration and the occurrence of nitrite and nitrate. ► Strong negative correlation between CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O production activity. - Abstract: Mechanical biological treatment (MBT) is an effective technique, which removes organic carbon from municipal solid waste (MSW) prior to deposition. Thereby, methane (CH{sub 4}) production in the landfill is strongly mitigated. However, direct measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from full-scale MBT landfills have not been conducted so far. Thus, CH{sub 4} and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions from a German MBT landfill in operation as well as their concentrations in the landfill gas (LFG) were measured. High N{sub 2}O emissions of 20–200 g CO{sub 2} eq. m{sup −2} h{sup −1} magnitude (up to 428 mg N m{sup −2} h{sup −1}) were observed within 20 m of the working face. CH{sub 4} emissions were highest at the landfill zone located at a distance of 30–40 m from the working face, where they reached about 10 g CO{sub 2} eq. m{sup −2} h{sup −1}. The MBT material in this area has been deposited several weeks earlier. Maximum LFG concentration for N{sub 2}O was 24.000 ppmv in material below the emission hotspot. At a depth of 50 cm from the landfill surface a strong negative correlation between N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} concentrations was observed. From this and from the distribution pattern of extractable ammonium, nitrite, and nitrate it has been concluded that strong N{sub 2}O production is associated with nitrification activity and the occurrence of nitrite and nitrate, which is initiated by oxygen input during waste deposition. Therefore, CH{sub 4} mitigation measures, which often employ aeration, could result in a net increase of GHG emissions due to increased N{sub 2}O emissions, especially at MBT landfills.

  6. Assessment of zonal distribution of methane on MSW landfills in northern regions for its usage in local power engineering

    OpenAIRE

    A.N. Chusov; V.I. Maslikov; D.V. Molodtsov; V.V. Zhazhkov; O.A. Riabuokhin

    2015-01-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills located in regions of Russia with low temperatures and relatively low rainfall averages are considered unpromising in terms of their biogas potential; however, these claims have not been substantiated. Assessment of the biogas potential of such landfills requires special field research for analyzing biogas composition and emission speed, which could define the processes taking place inside a landfill. We should note that the use of mathematical models tha...

  7. Observations from using models to fit the gas production of varying volume test cells and landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamborn, Julia

    2012-12-01

    Landfill operators are looking for more accurate models to predict waste degradation and landfill gas production. The simple microbial growth and decay models, whilst being easy to use, have been shown to be inaccurate. Many of the newer and more complex (component) models are highly parameter hungry and many of the required parameters have not been collected or measured at full-scale landfills. This paper compares the results of using different models (LANDGEM, HBM, and two Monod models developed by the author) to fit the gas production of laboratory scale, field test cell and full-scale landfills and discusses some observations that can be made regarding the scalability of gas generation rates. The comparison of these results show that the fast degradation rate that occurs at laboratory scale is not replicated at field-test cell and full-scale landfills. At small scale, all the models predict a slower rate of gas generation than actually occurs. At field test cell and full-scale a number of models predict a faster gas generation than actually occurs. Areas for future work have been identified, which include investigations into the capture efficiency of gas extraction systems and into the parameter sensitivity and identification of the critical parameters for field-test cell and full-scale landfill predication. PMID:22796013

  8. Availability and properties of materials for the Fakse Landfill biocover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gitte Bukh; Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Methane produced in landfills can be oxidized in landfill covers made of compost; often called biocovers. Compost materials originating from seven different sources were characterized to determine their methane-oxidizing capacity and suitability for use in a full-scale biocover at Fakse Landfill in......-cost and effective method for comparing compost sources for suitability of use in landfill biocovers....

  9. Sustainable landfilling in tropical conditions: comparison between open and closed cell approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvanathan, C; Karthikeyan, Obuli P; Park, K H

    2011-04-01

    Two landfill test cells were constructed in a tropical climate using locally available low-cost materials. One cell was operated without a cover on the municipal solid waste to simulate 'open landfill' conditions and the other cell was covered to create 'closed landfill' conditions. Both test cells were monitored over a period of 290 days under rainy, dry and artificial wetting conditions. Due to the relatively high compaction density of waste in the closed test cell, the substrate settlement was gradual and comparatively lower than in the open test cell. Multiple top covers in the closed test cell resulted in significant run-off of incident precipitation during the rainy season, which delayed the waste stabilization and subsequently produced a lesser volume of leachate. On the other hand, operation of the open test cell was found to be advantageous in terms of leachate management and substrate settlement along with waste stabilization pattern. Infiltration of rain-water into the waste mass leached out the maximum organic pollutants and oxidized the nitrogen content, which is deemed to be a benefit of operating an open cell landfill under tropical conditions. Artificial wetting during dry periods by recirculation of stored leachate notably accelerated the waste stabilization and secondary substrate settlement in the open test cell. The continuous monitoring of ground-water quality from the site showed only seasonal variations. PMID:20855353

  10. Superficial methane emissions from a landfill in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico; Emisiones superficiales de metano en un relleno sanitario en Merida, Yucatan, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauri-Riancho, Maria Rosa [Universidad Autonoma de Yucatan, Yucatan (Mexico)]. E-mail: sriancho@uady.mx; Stentiford, Edward I. [University of Leeds (UK)]. E-mail: e.i.stentiford@leeds.ac.uk; Gamboa-Marrufo, Mauricio; Reza-Bacelis, Gabriela; Cahuich-Poot, Nayla; Mendez-Novelo, Roger [Universidad Autonoma de Yucatan, Yucatan (Mexico)]. E-mails: gmarrufo@uady.mx; gabriela.reza@proactiva.com.mx; nayre63@hotmail.com; mnovelo@uady.mx

    2013-07-15

    On worldwide scale, one of the most important anthropogenic methane sources is landfill disposal for solid wastes. The main goal of this work was to quantify methane emissions at one landfill built in Merida, Mexico. This site had venting wells by which a passive control for biogas movement was exerted. At the venting wells, methane concentrations were measured monthly during a 6 months period. Methane surface emission rate was estimated with the close chamber technique. Obtained results indicated that there are both spatial and seasonal variations in biogas composition. The average methane value during the monitoring period was 21.9% (12.7 to 32.5 V/V) and the surface flow rate was in the range of 0 to 6,004 g CH{sub 4} m-2 d-1, with an average value of 1,480 g CH{sub 4} m-2 d-1, which is a high value in respect to these reported in publications. [Spanish] Entre las fuentes antropogenicas mas importantes de metano a escala mundial se encuentra la disposicion final de los residuos solidos. El objetivo de este trabajo fue cuantificar las emisiones de metano provenientes de un relleno sanitario en Merida, Mexico, en el que el movimiento del biogas se controlaba pasivamente utilizando pozos de venteo. Las concentraciones de metano se midieron mensualmente en los pozos de venteo del sitio a lo largo de un periodo de 6 meses. La tasa de emision superficial de metano se determino utilizando la tecnica de camara cerrada. Los resultados indicaron que existen variaciones considerables tanto espaciales como estacionales de la composicion del biogas proveniente de los pozos de venteo con un promedio de concentracion de metano en el sitio, durante todo el periodo de monitoreo, de 21.9% (12.7 a 32.5 V/V). Los flujos superficiales de gas medidos en diversos puntos a lo largo de la superficie del relleno sanitario tuvieron un promedio de 1,480 g CH{sub 4} m-2 d-1, lo que se considero un valor muy alto cuando se comparo con la informacion hallada en la literatura. El intervalo

  11. Children Living near a Sanitary Landfill Have Increased Breath Methane and Methanobrevibacter smithii in Their Intestinal Microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Humberto Bezerra de Araujo Filho; Mirian Silva Carmo-Rodrigues; Carolina Santos Mello; Lígia Cristina Fonseca Lahoz Melli; Soraia Tahan; Antonio Carlos Campos Pignatari; Mauro Batista Morais

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the breath CH4 excretion and concentration of M. smithii in intestinal microbiota of schoolchildren from 2 slums. One hundred and eleven children from a slum near a sanitary landfill, 35 children of a slum located away from the sanitary landfill, and 32 children from a high socioeconomic level school were included in the study. Real-time PCR was performed to quantify the M. smithii nifH gene and it was present in the microbiota of all the participating children, with high...

  12. Methane emissions from sanitary landfills in Italy. Evaluation and forecasting; Le emissioni di metano dalle discariche di rifiuti in Italia: stima e scenari futuri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colombari, F.; De Lauretis, R.; De Stefanis, P.; Gaudioso, D. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1998-07-01

    The report estimates the methane emissions from landfills by three different methodologies derived from IPCC experiences. A detailed evaluation of solid waste production (MSW) composition is shown in order to update results obtained from old researches. Finally it shows a prediction of MSW production from 1996 to 2011 in different scenarios related to MSW management strategies. [Italian] Il rapporto analizza la stima della quantita' di metano generato dalle discariche di rifiuti utilizzando tre differenti metodologie di calcolo, derivanti dalle conoscenze scientifiche dell'IPCC, dopo aver approfondito la composizione dei rifiuti. Riporta infine per il periodo 1996-2011, la stima della produzione e dello smaltimento dei rifiuti e la predisposizione di diversi scenari futuri di emissione del metano, relativi a differenti scelte all'interno del sistema di gestione dei rifiuti.

  13. Landfill leachate treatment in assisted landfill bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Pin-jing; QU Xian; SHAO Li-ming; LEE Duu-jong

    2006-01-01

    Landfill is the major disposal route of municipal solid waste(MSW) in most Asian countries. Leachate from landfill presents a strong wastewater that needs intensive treatment before discharge. Direct recycling was proposed as an effective alternative for leachate treatment by taking the landfill as a bioreactor. This process was proved not only considerably reducing the pollution potential of leachate, but also enhancing organic degradation in the landfill. However, as this paper shows, although direct leachate recycling was effective in landfilled MSW with low food waste fraction (3.5%, w/w), it failed in MSW containing 54% food waste, as normally noted in Asian countries. The initial acid stuck would inhibit methanogenesis to build up, hence strong leachate was yielded from landfill to threaten the quality of receiving water body. We demonstrated the feasibility to use an assisted bioreactor landfill, with a well-decomposed refuse layer as ex-situ anaerobic digester to reducing COD loading in leachate. By doing so, the refuse in simulated landfill column (2.3 m high) could be stabilized in 30 weeks while the COD in leachate reduced by 95%(61000 mg/L to 3000 mg/L). Meanwhile, the biogas production was considerably enhanced, signaling by the much greater amount and much higher methane content in the biogas.

  14. Landfill leachate treatment in assisted landfill bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Pin-Jing; Qu, Xian; Shao, Li-Ming; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2006-01-01

    Landfill is the major disposal route of municipal solid waste (MSW) in most Asian countries. Leachate from landfill presents a strong wastewater that needs intensive treatment before discharge. Direct recycling was proposed as an effective alternative for leachate treatment by taking the landfill as a bioreactor. This process was proved not only considerably reducing the pollution potential of leachate, but also enhancing organic degradation in the landfill. However, as this paper shows, although direct leachate recycling was effective in landfilled MSW with low food waste fraction (3.5%, w/w), it failed in MSW containing 54% food waste, as normally noted in Asian countries. The initial acid stuck would inhibit methanogenesis to build up, hence strong leachate was yielded from landfill to threaten the quality of receiving water body. We demonstrated the feasibility to use an assisted bioreactor landfill, with a well-decomposed refuse layer as ex-situ anaerobic digester to reducing COD loading in leachate. By doing so, the refuse in simulated landfill column (2.3 m high) could be stabilized in 30 weeks while the COD in leachate reduced by 95% (61000 mg/L to 3000 mg/L). Meanwhile, the biogas production was considerably enhanced, signaling by the much greater amount and much higher methane content in the biogas. PMID:20050569

  15. Seasonal greenhouse gas emissions (methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide) from engineered landfills: daily, intermediate, and final California cover soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogner, Jean E; Spokas, Kurt A; Chanton, Jeffrey P

    2011-01-01

    Compared with natural ecosystems and managed agricultural systems, engineered landfills represent a highly managed soil system for which there has been no systematic quantification of emissions from coexisting daily, intermediate, and final cover materials. We quantified the seasonal variability of CH, CO, and NO emissions from fresh refuse (no cover) and daily, intermediate, and final cover materials at northern and southern California landfill sites with engineered gas extraction systems. Fresh refuse fluxes (g m d [± SD]) averaged CH 0.053 (± 0.03), CO 135 (± 117), and NO 0.063 (± 0.059). Average CH emissions across all cover types and wet/dry seasons ranged over more than four orders of magnitude (cover types, including both final covers, averaging cover (50 cm) had the highest CH fluxes. For both the intermediate (50-100 cm) and final (>200 cm) cover materials, below which methanogenesis was well established, the variability in gaseous fluxes was attributable to cover thickness, texture, density, and seasonally variable soil moisture and temperature at suboptimal conditions for CH oxidation. Thin daily covers (30 cm local soil) and fresh refuse generally had the highest CO and NO fluxes, indicating rapid onset of aerobic and semi-aerobic processes in recently buried refuse, with rates similar to soil ecosystems and windrow composting of organic waste. This study has emphasized the need for more systematic field quantification of seasonal emissions from multiple types of engineered covers. PMID:21546687

  16. Trends for Methane Oxidation at Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleis, Jesper; Jones, Glenn; Abild-Pedersen, Frank;

    2009-01-01

    First-principles calculations are used to predict a plausible reaction pathway for the methane oxidation reaction. In turn, this pathway is used to obtain trends in methane oxidation activity at solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode materials. Reaction energetics and barriers for the elementary...... reaction steps on both the close-packed Ni{111} and stepped Ni{211} surfaces are presented. Quantum-mechanical calculations augmented with thermodynamic corrections allow appropriate treatment of the elevated temperatures in SOFCs. Linear scaling relationships are used to extrapolate the results from the...

  17. Methane production in anaerobic digestion of organic waste from Recife (Brazil landfill: evaluation in refuse of diferent ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. N. Schirmer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on monitoring the generation of biogas by biochemical methane potential (BMP assays, commonly used to assess anaerobic biodegradability of solid and liquid wastes under controlled conditions. The experiment employed 5 g of substrate of both refuses (fresh and one-year-old wastes, digested with 250 mL of inoculum in 1 L flasks as bioreactors (all of them in triplicate, operating under batch conditions at ± 35 ºC. Despite the difference of age of both refuses evaluated, there was no significant differences in volume (near 1800 mL and composition (55% methane of biogas generated in 80 days of incubation under mesophilic conditions. The important parameters of both refuses (such as moisture content, volatile solids and chemical oxygen demand also showed very similar initial values.

  18. Effect of landfill leachate on cell cycle, micronucleus, and sister chromatid exchange in Triticum aestivum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Guangke; Yun Yang; Li Hongyan [Center of Environment Science and Engineering, College of Environment and Resource, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China); Sang Nan [Center of Environment Science and Engineering, College of Environment and Resource, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China)], E-mail: sangnan_lgkcarl@yahoo.com.cn

    2008-06-30

    With increasing use of municipal solid waste landfills for waste disposal, the leachate generated has become a serious environmental concern. Therefore, it is important to set up simple and accurate methods for monitoring leachate toxicity. In the present study, the physiological and genetic toxicity of the leachate, generated from Xingou Municipal Landfill in China, were investigated with Triticum aestivum (wheat) bioassay. The results indicate that the lower leachate concentrations stimulated the germination, growth and cell division, and did not induce obvious increase in micronucleus (MN) frequency in root tips; while the higher concentrations inhibited the processes, and significantly augmented the MN frequency in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In addition, pycnotic cells (PNC) and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) occurred in root tips at all leachate concentrations tested, and the frequencies had positive relation with the treatment concentration and time. The results imply that components of leachate from the landfill may be genotoxic in plant cells, and exposure to leachate in the aquatic environment may pose a potential genotoxic risk to organisms. The results also suggest that the wheat bioassay is efficient, simple and reproducible in monitoring genotoxicity of the leachate.

  19. Effect of landfill leachate on cell cycle, micronucleus, and sister chromatid exchange in Triticum aestivum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With increasing use of municipal solid waste landfills for waste disposal, the leachate generated has become a serious environmental concern. Therefore, it is important to set up simple and accurate methods for monitoring leachate toxicity. In the present study, the physiological and genetic toxicity of the leachate, generated from Xingou Municipal Landfill in China, were investigated with Triticum aestivum (wheat) bioassay. The results indicate that the lower leachate concentrations stimulated the germination, growth and cell division, and did not induce obvious increase in micronucleus (MN) frequency in root tips; while the higher concentrations inhibited the processes, and significantly augmented the MN frequency in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In addition, pycnotic cells (PNC) and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) occurred in root tips at all leachate concentrations tested, and the frequencies had positive relation with the treatment concentration and time. The results imply that components of leachate from the landfill may be genotoxic in plant cells, and exposure to leachate in the aquatic environment may pose a potential genotoxic risk to organisms. The results also suggest that the wheat bioassay is efficient, simple and reproducible in monitoring genotoxicity of the leachate

  20. Landfill gas management in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfill gas produced from solid waste landfills is one of the most significant sources of anthropogenic methane in Canada. Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is 24.5 times more powerful than carbon dioxide by weight in terms of global climate change. Landfill gas recovery plays an important role in Canada's commitment to stabilize greenhouse gas emissions at 1990 levels by the year 2000 under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Landfill gas is a potentially harmful emission that can be converted into a reliable environmentally-sustainable energy source used to generate electricity, fuel industries and heat buildings. The recovery and utilization of landfill gas is a win-win situation which makes good sense from local, regional and global perspectives. It provides the benefits of (1) reducing the release of greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming; (2) limiting odors; (3) controlling damage to vegetation; (4) reducing risks from explosions, fires and asphyxiation; (5) converting a harmful emission into a reliable energy source; and (6) creating a potential source of revenue and profit. Canadian landfills generate about 1 million tons of methane every year; the equivalent energy of 9 million barrels of oil (eight oil super tankers), or enough energy to meet the annual heating needs of more than half a million Canadian homes. Currently, twenty-seven facilities recover and combust roughly 25% of the methane generated by Canadian landfills producing about 3.2 PJ (1015 Joules) of energy including 80 MW of electricity and direct fuel for nearby facilities (e.g., cement plants, gypsum board manufacturers, recycling facilities, greenhouses). This paper reviews landfill gas characteristics; environmental, health and safety impacts; landfill gas management in Canada; the costs of landfill gas recovery and utilization systems; and on-going projects on landfill gas utilization and flaring

  1. Liquid balance monitoring inside conventional, Retrofit, and bio-reactor landfill cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The Retrofit, Control, and As-Built cells received 48, 14, and 213 L Mg−1 (liters of liquids per metric ton of waste). • The leachate collection system yielded 60, 57 and 198 L Mg−1 from the Retrofit, Control, and As-Built cells. • The head on liner in all cells was below regulatory limits. • Measured moisture content of the waste samples was consistent with that calculated from accumulated liquid by balance. • The in-place saturated hydraulic conductivity of the MSW was calculated to be in the range of 10−8 to 10−7 m s−1. - Abstract: The Outer Loop landfill bioreactor (OLLB) in Louisville, KY, USA has been the site of a study to evaluate long-term bioreactor performance at a full-scale operational landfill. Three types of landfill units were studied including a conventional landfill (Control cell), a new landfill area that had an air addition and recirculation piping network installed as waste was being placed (As-Built cell), and a conventional landfill that was modified to allow for liquids recirculation (Retrofit cell). During the monitoring period, the Retrofit, Control, and As-Built cells received 48, 14, and 213 L Mg−1 (liters of liquids per metric ton of waste), respectively. The leachate collection system yielded 60, 57 and 198 L Mg−1 from the Retrofit, Control, and As-Built cells, respectively. The head on liner in all cells was below regulatory limits. In the Control and As-Built cells, leachate head on liner decreased once waste placement stopped. The measured moisture content of the waste samples was consistent with that calculated from the estimate of accumulated liquid by the liquid balance. Additionally, measurements on excavated solid waste samples revealed large spatial variability in waste moisture content. The degree of saturation in the Control cells decreased from 85% to 75%. The degree of saturation increased from 82% to 83% due to liquids addition in the Retrofit cells and decreased back to 80% once

  2. Mixed waste landfill cell construction at energy solutions LLC: a regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small percentage of the property that EnergySolutions' (formerly Envirocare) operates at Clive, Utah is permitted by the State of Utah as a treatment, storage and disposal facility for mixed waste. Mixed Waste is defined as a hazardous waste (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 261.3) that also has a radioactive component. Typically, the waste EnergySolutions receives at its mixed waste facility is contaminated with heavy metals and organic compounds while also contaminated with radioactivity. For EnergySolutions, the largest generator of mixed waste is the United States Department of Energy. However, EnergySolutions also accepts a wide variety of mixed waste from other generators. For many wastes, EnergySolutions goes through the process of characterization and acceptance (if appropriate) of the waste, treating the waste (if necessary), confirmation that the waste meets Land Disposal Restriction, and disposal of the waste in its mixed waste landfill cell (MWLC). EnergySolutions originally received its State-issued Part B (RCRA) permit in 1990. The Permit allows a mixed waste landfill cell footprint that covers roughly 10 hectares and includes 20 individual 'sumps'. EnergySolutions chose to build small segments of the landfill cell as waste receipts dictated. Nearly 16 years later, EnergySolutions has just completed its Phase V construction project. 18 of the 20 sumps in the original design have been constructed. The last two sumps are anticipated to be its Phase VI construction project. Further expansion of its mixed waste disposal landfill capacity beyond the current design would require a permit modification request and approval by the Executive Secretary of the Utah Solid and Hazardous Waste Control Board. Construction of the landfill cell is governed by the Construction Quality Assurance/Quality Control manual of its State-issued Permit. The construction of each sump is made up of (from the bottom up): a foundation; three feet of engineered clay

  3. Estimation of Landfill Methane Gas Emissions from the Mallam No.1 and Oblogo No.1 Dumpsites in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodwo Beedu Keelson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to estimate the theoretical methane gas emissions from two of the largest abandoned dumpsites in the Greater Accra metropolis from 1991 – 2035 using two first order decay models i.e. the LandGEM and BC MOE LFG generation estimation tool. Generally, the BC MOE LFG generation estimation tool results were slightly higher than those obtained using the LandGEM. However, both models predicted the time of peak production as occurring in 2002 and 2008 for the Mallam No.1 and Oblogo No.1 dumpsites respectively. The total combined peak annual methane production from the Oblogo No.1 and Mallam No.1 dumpsite within the study time frame was estimated to be in excess of 17,000 metric tonnes. The findings of this study seem to suggest that the two dumpsites especially the Mallam No.1 site are fast approaching the stabilization phase where there would be a drastic reduction in gas production.

  4. Landfill gas management facilities design guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-03-15

    In British Columbia, municipal solid waste landfills generate over 1000 tonnes of methane per year; landfill gas management facilities are required to improve the environmental performance of solid waste landfills. The aim of this document, developed by the British Columbia Ministry of the Environment, is to provide guidance for the design, installation, and operation of landfill gas management facilities to address odor and pollutant emissions issues and also address health and safety issues. A review of technical experience and best practices in landfill gas management facilities was carried out, as was as a review of existing regulations related to landfill gas management all over the world. This paper provides useful information to landfill owners, operators, and other professionals for the design of landfill gas management facilities which meet the requirements of landfill gas management regulations.

  5. Controlling landfill processes; Kaatopaikan prosessien ohjaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mroueh, U.M. [VTT Processes, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-07-01

    The present landfills contain high amounts of biodegradable wastes and are remarkable sources of greenhouse gases and water pollutants. In near future at least in the European Union landfilling of only pre-treated municipal solid waste (mechanical biological treated waste, ashes) will be allowed in order to significantly reduce environmental pollution from landfills. However, both in the present and future landfills new measures are needed to more efficiently prevent environmental pollution from landfills. In the present research we studied and developed procedures and technologies to follow and to control various processes in the present and future landfills. The work was carried out in the field conditions in two present landfills and in the future pilot landfills. It was shown, e.g. that industrial process control manners including on line measurements of water quality and pc-control of water recirculation can be applied in the landfills and that fibre optic cable technology can be used in the landfill to measure temperature and moisture profiles. Also factors affecting the greenhouse gas and leaching potential of organic material, nutrients and metals of different waste types was demonstrated. The methane oxidizing cover layers were shown to have capacity to significantly reduce methane emission both from the present and future landfills even at temperatures down to 2-5 deg C. Several factors to be used in the design of future landfills were also established. Finally, all the produced knowledge and technology will be used to present concepts for operating different types of landfills. (orig.)

  6. Assessing methane oxidation under landfill covers and its contribution to the above atmospheric CO2 levels: The added value of the isotope (δ13C and δ18O CO2; δ13C and δD CH4) approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Comparison of the isotope and mass balance approaches to evaluate the level of methane oxidation within a landfill. ► The level of methane oxidation is not homogenous under the landfill cover and is strongly correlated to the methane flux. ► Isotope tracking of the contribution of the methane oxidation to the CO2 concentrations in the ambient air. - Abstract: We are presenting here a multi-isotope approach (δ13C and δ18O of CO2; δ13C and δD of CH4) to assess (i) the level(s) of methane oxidation during waste biodegradation and its migration through a landfill cover in Sonzay (France), and (ii) its contribution to the atmospheric CO2 levels above the surface. The isotope approach is compared to the more conventional mass balance approach. Results from the two techniques are comparable and show that the CH4 oxidation under the landfill cover is heterogenous, with low oxidation percentages in samples showing high biogas fluxes, which was expected in clay covers presenting fissures, through which CH4 is rapidly transported. At shallow depth, more immobile biogas pockets show a higher level of CH4 oxidation by the methanotrophic bacteria. δ13C of CO2 samples taken at different heights (from below the cover up to 8 m above the ground level) were also used to identify and assess the relative contributions of its main sources both under the landfill cover and in the surrounding atmosphere.

  7. Modelling of landfill gas adsorption with bottom ash for utilization of renewable energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Chen

    2011-10-06

    Energy crisis, environment pollution and climate change are the serious challenges to people worldwide. In the 21st century, human being is trend to research new technology of renewable energy, so as to slow down global warming and develop society in an environmentally sustainable method. Landfill gas, produced by biodegradable municipal solid waste in landfill, is a renewable energy source. In this work, landfill gas utilization for energy generation is introduced. Landfill gas is able to produce hydrogen by steam reforming reactions. There is a steam reformer equipment in the fuel cells system. A sewage plant of Cologne in Germany has run the Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells power station with biogas for more than 50,000 hours successfully. Landfill gas thus may be used as fuel for electricity generation via fuel cells system. For the purpose of explaining the possibility of landfill gas utilization via fuel cells, the thermodynamics of landfill gas steam reforming are discussed by simulations. In practice, the methane-riched gas can be obtained by landfill gas purification and upgrading. This work investigate a new method for upgrading-landfill gas adsorption with bottom ash experimentally. Bottom ash is a by-product of municipal solid waste incineration, some of its physical and chemical properties are analysed in this work. The landfill gas adsorption experimental data show bottom ash can be used as a potential adsorbent for landfill gas adsorption to remove CO{sub 2}. In addition, the alkalinity of bottom ash eluate can be reduced in these adsorption processes. Therefore, the interactions between landfill gas and bottom ash can be explained by series reactions accordingly. Furthermore, a conceptual model involving landfill gas adsorption with bottom ash is developed. In this thesis, the parameters of landfill gas adsorption equilibrium equations can be obtained by fitting experimental data. On the other hand, these functions can be deduced with theoretical approach

  8. Microbial electrolysis cells for production of methane from CO2: long-term performance and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Eerten-Jansen, van, M.C.A.A.; Heijne, ter, A.; C J N Buisman; Hamelers, H.V.M.

    2012-01-01

    A methane-producing microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) is a technology to convert CO2 into methane, using electricity as an energy source and microorganisms as the catalyst. A methane-producing MEC provides the possibility to increase the fuel yield per hectare of land area, when the CO2 produced in biofuel production processes is converted to additional fuel methane. Besides increasing fuel yield per hectare of land area, this also results in more efficient use of land area, water, and nutrie...

  9. The implementation of artificial neural networks to model methane oxidation in landfill soil covers[Includes the CSCE forum on professional practice and career development : 1. international engineering mechanics and materials specialty conference : 1. international/3. coastal, estuarine and offshore engineering specialty conference : 2. international/8. construction specialty conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeto, A.; Albanna, M.; Warith, M. [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2009-07-01

    The disposal of solid waste significantly contributes to the total anthropogenic emissions of methane (CH{sub 4}), a greenhouse gas that negatively affects climate change. The oxidation of methane in landfill bio-covers takes place through the use of methanotrophic bacteria which provides a sink for methane. The rate at which methane is biologically oxidized depends on several parameters. This study provided a better understanding of the oxidation of methane in landfill soil covers through modeling methane oxidation with artificial neural networks (ANNs). An ANN was trained and tested to model methane oxidation in various batch scale systems for 3 types of soils. Input data consisted of temperature, moisture content, soil composition and the nutrient content added to the system. Model results were in good agreement with experimental results reported by other researchers. It was concluded that the use of ANNs to model methane oxidation in batch scale bio-covers can address the large number of complicated physical and biochemical processes that occur within the landfill bio-cover. 10 refs., 7 tabs., 5 figs.

  10. Landfill Mining of Shredder Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jette Bjerre; Hyks, Jiri; Shabeer Ahmed, Nassera;

    In Denmark, shredder residues (SR) are classified as hazardous waste and until January 2012 the all SR were landfilled. It is estimated that more than 1.8 million tons of SR have been landfilled in mono cells. This paper describes investigations conducted at two Danish landfills. SR were excavated...

  11. Landfilling: Hydrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Beaven, R.

    Landfill hydrology deals with the presence and movement of water through a landfill. The main objective in landfill hydrology is usually to predict leachate generation, but the presence and movement of water in a landfill also affect the degradation of the waste, the leaching of pollutants and the...... geotechnical stability of the fill. Understanding landfill hydrology is thus important for many aspects of landfill, in particular siting, design and operation. The objective of this chapter is to give a basic understanding of the hydrology of landfills, and to present ways to estimate leachate quantities...... under specific circumstances. Initially a general water balance equation is defined for a typical landfill, and the different parts of the water balance are discussed. A separate section discusses water flow and the hydrogeology of landfilled wastes and considers the impact of water short-circuiting. In...

  12. Impact of nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation on gaseous releases from a landfill bioreactor cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallec, G; Bureau, C; Peu, P; Benoist, J C; Lemunier, M; Budka, A; Presse, D; Bouchez, T

    2009-07-01

    This study evaluates the impact of nitrate injection on a full scale landfill bioreactor through the monitoring of gaseous releases and particularly N(2)O emissions. During several weeks, we monitored gas concentrations in the landfill gas collection system as well as surface gas releases with a series of seven static chambers. These devices were directly connected to a gas chromatograph coupled to a flame ionisation detector and an electron capture detector (GC-FID/ECD) placed directly on the field. Measurements were performed before, during and after recirculation of raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate. Raw leachate recirculation did not have a significant effect on the biogas concentrations (CO(2), CH(4) and N(2)O) in the gas extraction network. However, nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation induced a marked increase of the N(2)O concentrations in the gas collected from the recirculation trench (100-fold increase from 0.2 ppm to 23 ppm). In the common gas collection system however, this N(2)O increase was no more detectable because of dilution by gas coming from other cells or ambient air intrusion. Surface releases through the temporary cover were characterized by a large spatial and temporal variability. One automated chamber gave limited standard errors over each experimental period for N(2)O releases: 8.1 +/- 0.16 mg m(-2) d(-1) (n = 384), 4.2 +/- 0.14 mg m(-2) d(-1) (n = 132) and 1.9 +/- 0.10 mg m(-2) d(-1) (n = 49), during, after raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation, respectively. No clear correlation between N(2)O gaseous surface releases and recirculation events were evidenced. Estimated N(2)O fluxes remained in the lower range of what is reported in the literature for landfill covers, even after nitrate injection. PMID:19297142

  13. Impact of nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation on gaseous releases from a landfill bioreactor cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluates the impact of nitrate injection on a full scale landfill bioreactor through the monitoring of gaseous releases and particularly N2O emissions. During several weeks, we monitored gas concentrations in the landfill gas collection system as well as surface gas releases with a series of seven static chambers. These devices were directly connected to a gas chromatograph coupled to a flame ionisation detector and an electron capture detector (GC-FID/ECD) placed directly on the field. Measurements were performed before, during and after recirculation of raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate. Raw leachate recirculation did not have a significant effect on the biogas concentrations (CO2, CH4 and N2O) in the gas extraction network. However, nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation induced a marked increase of the N2O concentrations in the gas collected from the recirculation trench (100-fold increase from 0.2 ppm to 23 ppm). In the common gas collection system however, this N2O increase was no more detectable because of dilution by gas coming from other cells or ambient air intrusion. Surface releases through the temporary cover were characterized by a large spatial and temporal variability. One automated chamber gave limited standard errors over each experimental period for N2O releases: 8.1 ± 0.16 mg m-2 d-1 (n = 384), 4.2 ± 0.14 mg m-2 d-1 (n = 132) and 1.9 ± 0.10 mg m-2 d-1 (n = 49), during, after raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation, respectively. No clear correlation between N2O gaseous surface releases and recirculation events were evidenced. Estimated N2O fluxes remained in the lower range of what is reported in the literature for landfill covers, even after nitrate injection.

  14. Controlling landfill processes; Kaatopaikan prosessien ohjaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sormunen, K.; Rintala, J.; Einola, J. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland); Mroueh, U.M.; Laine- Ylijoki, J.; Kaartinen, T.; Wahlstroem, M. [VTT Processes, Espoo (Finland); Ettala, M. [Matti Ettala Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this project is to develop methods to control the processes occurring in the present and future landfills in order to enhance waste stabilisation and to minimise the emission to atmosphere and water. The process control (operation as bioreactor) is studied in three test sites in actual landfills, which have been instrumented for monitoring the process conditions. Besides operating the landfills as bioreactor also the greenhouse gas emissions are measured as well as the potential for methane oxidation in landfill cover. Also the characteristics of the wastes to be landfilled in the future have been studied. (orig.)

  15. Molten carbonate fuel cell: An experimental analysis of a 1 kW system fed by landfill gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel cylindrical geometry 1 kW MCFC is analysed. • A description of the considered experimental set-up is provided. • The results of a suitable experimental campaign are discussed. • The MCFC is fed by hydrogen, landfill gas and different mixtures of them. • A comparative analysis of the so fuelled MCFC performance results is performed. - Abstract: In this paper the results of an on-site experimental analysis carried out on a Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) fed by different fuels (hydrogen, landfill gas and different mixtures of them) are presented. The examined MCFC is one of the experimental devices of an innovative power plant located at the urban landfill of Giugliano in Campania (Naples, Italy). Here, electricity is produced through four cogenerative reciprocating engines and one cogenerative gas turbine fed by landfill gas, operating since 2003. At the same site, two different fuel cells are installed for scientific purposes. During the considered experimental campaign, the MCFC is initially supplied by hydrogen for testing the system at the best operating conditions. Afterward, the fuel cell is fed by mixtures of different ratios of hydrogen and reformed landfill gas. For this reason, the system is equipped with an external reformer and a suitable gas cleaning. In order to analyse the system energy performance under varying electricity loads (obtained through an electronic device), several tests were carried out. In addition, several stress tests were also performed aiming at analysing the system endurance when fed by landfill gas. The experimental results concerning the produced electric currents and voltages show satisfactory performance of the system, while the obtained operating temperatures and cell reliability still need to be improved

  16. Landfilling: Hydrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Beaven, R.

    under specific circumstances. Initially a general water balance equation is defined for a typical landfill, and the different parts of the water balance are discussed. A separate section discusses water flow and the hydrogeology of landfilled wastes and considers the impact of water short-circuiting. In......Landfill hydrology deals with the presence and movement of water through a landfill. The main objective in landfill hydrology is usually to predict leachate generation, but the presence and movement of water in a landfill also affect the degradation of the waste, the leaching of pollutants and the...

  17. Comparison between controlled landfill reactor and conditioned landfill bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Feng; Chen, Wan-Zhi; Song, Fu-Zhong; Li, Xiao-Peng; Zhang, Guo-Qing

    2004-01-01

    Bioreactor landfills allow a more active landfill management that recognizes the biological, chemical and physical processes involved in a landfill environment. The laboratory-scale simulators of landfill reactors treating municipal solid wastes were studied, the effect of solid waste size, leachate recirculation, nutrient balance, pH value, moisture content and temperature on the rate of municipal solid waste (MSW) biodegradation were determined, and it indicated the optimum pH value, moisture content and temperature decomposing MSW. The results of waste biodegradation were compared with that of the leachate-recirculated landfill simulator and conservative sanitary landfill simulator. In the control experiment the antitheses of a decreasing trend of the organic load, measured as biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand, was shown. An obvious enhancement of effective disposal from conservative sanitary landfill (CSL) simulator, to the leachate-recirculated landfill (LRL) simulator and to the conditioned bioreactor landfill (CBL) simulator would be noted, through displaying the compared results of solid waste settlement, heavy metal concentration in leachate, methane production rate, biogas composition, BOD and COD as well as their ratio. PMID:15559832

  18. Comparison between controlled landfill reactor and conditioned landfill bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Feng; CHEN Wan-zhi; SONG Fu-zhong; LI Xiao-peng; ZHANG Guo-qing

    2004-01-01

    Bioreactor landfills allow a more active landfill management that recognizes the biological, chemical and physical processes involved in a landfill environment. The results of laboratory-scale simulators of landfill reactors treating municipal solid wastes were studied, the effect of solid waste size, leachate recirculation, nutrient balance, pH value, moisture content and temperature on the rate of municipal solid waste(MSW) biodegradation were determined, and it indicated the optimum pH value, moisture content and temperature can used to decompose MSW. The results of waste biodegradation were compared with that of the simulators of the leachate-recirculated landfill and conservative sanitary landfill. In the control experiment the antitheses of a decreasing trend of the organic load, measured as biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand, was shown, and heavy metals concentration was observed. An obvious enhancement of effective disposal from simulator of conservative sanitary landfill(CSL), to that of leachate-recirculated landfill(LRL) and to that of conditioned bioreactor landfill(CBL) would be noted, through displaying the compared results of solid waste settlement, heavy metal concentration in leachate, methane production rate, biogas composition, BOD and COD as well as their ratio.

  19. Landfill gas generation assessment procedure guidance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-03-15

    Landfill gas (LFG) at municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills is generated as a result of physical, chemical, and microbial processes occurring within the waste. The purpose of this guidelines document was to provide a procedure for the assessment of LFG generation at MSW landfills in British Columbia and to provide guidelines for landfill owners and operators to comply with the 2008 British Columbia landfill gas management regulation. The study used a regulatory-based model. This paper outlined the requirement to complete a landfill gas generation assessment. It included previous landfill gas generation assessments as well as information on historical waste tonnage, projected waste tonnage, waste characteristics, meteorological data, and water addition. Landfill gas generation parameter selection was also discussed in terms of waste categorization; methane generation potential; landfill gas generation rate; and water addition factor. Other topics that were addressed included landfill gas and methane generation estimate; landfill gas generation assessment reporting; and a solid waste composition study. 13 refs., 6 tabs., 1 fig., 6 appendices.

  20. Ageing landfills

    OpenAIRE

    Östman, Monica

    2008-01-01

    In Sweden, a large number of closed landfills containing a mixture of household waste and waste from industries and other sources exist. These landfills originate from a time when regulations were less strict and contain large amounts of organic material derived from household waste, plus large amounts of metals. This partly decomposed organic material can contribute to the stability of the landfill by retaining metals. When landfills are closed they are covered to create strictly anaerobic c...

  1. Measuring Water in Bioreactor Landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, B.; Gallagher, V. N.; Imhoff, P. T.; Yazdani, R.; Chiu, P.

    2004-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas, and landfills are the largest anthropogenic source in many developed countries. Bioreactor landfills have been proposed as one means of abating greenhouse gas emissions from landfills. Here, the decomposition of organic wastes is enhanced by the controlled addition of water or leachate to maintain optimal conditions for waste decomposition. Greenhouse gas abatement is accomplished by sequestration of photosynthetically derived carbon in wastes, CO2 offsets from energy use of waste derived gas, and mitigation of methane emission from the wastes. Maintaining optimal moisture conditions for waste degradation is perhaps the most important operational parameter in bioreactor landfills. To determine how much water is needed and where to add it, methods are required to measure water within solid waste. However, there is no reliable method that can measure moisture content simply and accurately in the heterogeneous environment typical of landfills. While well drilling and analysis of solid waste samples is sometimes used to determine moisture content, this is an expensive, time-consuming, and destructive procedure. To overcome these problems, a new technology recently developed by hydrologists for measuring water in the vadose zone --- the partitioning tracer test (PTT) --- was evaluated for measuring water in solid waste in a full-scale bioreactor landfill in Yolo County, CA. Two field tests were conducted in different regions of an aerobic bioreactor landfill, with each test measuring water in ≈ 250 ft3 of solid waste. Tracers were injected through existing tubes inserted in the landfill, and tracer breakthrough curves were measured through time from the landfill's gas collection system. Gas samples were analyzed on site using a field-portable gas chromatograph and shipped offsite for more accurate laboratory analysis. In the center of the landfill, PTT measurements indicated that the fraction of the pore space filled with water

  2. Rapid digestion of shredded MSW by sequentially flooding and draining small landfill cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, William P; Xie, Sihuang; Patel, Miheka

    2016-09-01

    This paper compares the digestion of a packed bed of shredded municipal waste using a flood and drain regime against a control digestion of similarly prepared material using a trickle flow regime. All trials were performed on shallow (2m) beds of the sub-8cm fraction of shredded mixed MSW, encapsulated in a polyethylene bladder. The control cell (Cell 1) was loaded with 1974 tonnes shredded municipal waste and produced 76±9m(3) CH4dryt(-1) (45±2m(3) CH4 'as received't(-1)) over 200days in response to a daily recirculation of the leachate inventory which was maintained at 60m(3). The flood and drain operation was performed on two co-located cells (Cell 2 and Cell 3) that were loaded simultaneously with 1026 and 915 tonnes of the sub-8cm fraction of shredded mixed MSW, with a third empty cell used as a reservoir for 275m(3) of mature landfill leachate. Cell 2 was first digested in isolation by flooding and draining once per week to avoid excessive souring. Gas production from Cell 2 peaked and declined to a steady residual level in 150days. Cell 3 was flooded and drained for the first time 186days after the commencement of Cell 2, using the same inventory of leachate which was now exchanged between the cells, such that each cell was flooded and drained twice per week. Biogas production from Cell 3 commenced immediately with flooding, peaking and reducing to a residual level within 100days. The average CH4 yield from Cells 2 and 3 was 123±15m(3)dryt(-1) (92±2m(3) 'as received't(-1), equal to 95% of the long term (2month) BMP yield. PMID:26718389

  3. The co-oxidation of methane and dichloromethane in landfill bio-cover[Includes the CSCE forum on professional practice and career development : 1. international engineering mechanics and materials specialty conference : 1. international/3. coastal, estuarine and offshore engineering specialty conference : 2. international/8. construction specialty conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagher, E.; Albanna, M.; Fernandes, L.; Warith, M. [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Faculty of Engineering

    2009-07-01

    Solid waste landfills are responsible for 13 per cent of the annual global anthropogenic methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions. Landfill bio-cover systems using methanotrophic bacteria to oxidize CH{sub 4} to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and water (H{sub 2}O) is a cost effective solution for the attenuation of these fugitive greenhouse gases (GHGs). This study analyzed the affect of dichloromethane (DCM), a volatile organic compound (VOC), on the rate of methane oxidation at several environmental conditions. Compost from Trail Road, a municipal landfill in Ottawa, was used in batch experiments. Gas chromatography was used to measure the concentrations of CH{sub 4} in the absence of DCM, and under varying DCM concentrations and atmospheric temperatures. The oxidation of DCM by the methanotrophs in the presence as well as absence of CH{sub 4} was also observed, and their oxidation rates determined. The study showed that the presence of DCM plays a very significant role on the oxidative capacity of CH{sub 4} under closed conditions on a laboratory scale. The study also showed that it will be important to restrict the type of waste that can be dumped in landfills. Controlling the industrial waste of non-methane organic carbon (NMOC) dumped into municipal landfills is crucial if CH{sub 4} is to be oxidized by a bio-cover. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Landfill gas and the greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased concentrations of greenhouse gases are believed to be largely attributable to anthropogenic activities. Atmospheric methane concentrations are currently increasing at a rate of 1% per year. Methane is responsible for almost 20% of current increases in commitment to global warming. Major anthropogenic sources of methane include landfills, coal mining, and the production and distribution of natural gas. Early analysis of the global methane sources indicates potential for stabilization through the prevention/mitigation of some portions of the anthropogenic sources. This paper presents an overview of the current understanding of methane emissions from landfills that contribute to global climate change. The factors affecting landfill emissions are described and the uncertainties are identified. (author)

  5. Methane oxidation kinetics of bio-cover sewage sludge modified by coal ash for landfill%垃圾填埋场覆盖材料改性污泥的甲烷氧化动力学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丹; 赵玲; 尹平河; 肖娟宜; 黄思明

    2012-01-01

    在实验室模拟条件下,以粉煤灰改性污泥为垃圾填埋场生物覆盖材料,分析了初始甲烷浓度、初始氧气浓度对甲烷氧化效率的影响,并测定了甲烷氧化动力学方程及动力学参数,旨在为材料实际工程应用提供理论依据.结果表明:初始CH4、O2浓度制约生物覆盖材料的甲烷氧化效率,初始CH4、O2浓度越高,材料甲烷氧化能力越强;甲烷氧化过程符合2级动力学方程-dV(CH4)/dt=kV(CH4)V(O2);利用Michaelis-Menten模型得出覆盖层材料的最大氧化速率Vmax为2.54 μmol g-1h-1,半速常数Km为0.49 μmol.%In this study, laboratory-scale experiments were carried out to examine the effects of initial methane and oxygen contents on methane oxidation efficiency in landfill bio-cover sewage sludge, and the kinetic equation and corresponding parameters were also determined, aiming to provide scientific basis for the practical engineering application. The results showed that the methane and oxygen contents strongly affected the methane oxidation efficiency. The higher methane and oxygen contents resulted in stronger methane oxidation efficiency. The kinetics of methane oxidation was - dV( CH4)/di = kV{ CH4 ) V( 02) , which fit the second-order reaction. As calculated from Michaelis-Menten equation, the largest methane oxidation rate ( Kmax ) was 2. 54 μmol g ‐ 1h‐ 1, and the half saturation constant ( Km ) was found at 0. 49 μmol.

  6. Investigation of Integrated Subsurface Processing of Landfill Gas and Carbon Sequestration, Johnson County, Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. David Newell; Timothy R. Carr

    2007-03-31

    The Johnson County Landfill in Shawnee, KS is operated by Deffenbaugh Industries and serves much of metropolitan Kansas City. Refuse, which is dumped in large plastic-underlined trash cells covering several acres, is covered over with shale shortly after burial. The landfill waste, once it fills the cell, is then drilled by Kansas City LFG, so that the gas generated by anaerobic decomposition of the refuse can be harvested. Production of raw landfill gas from the Johnson County landfill comes from 150 wells. Daily production is approximately 2.2 to 2.5 mmcf, of which approximately 50% is methane and 50% is carbon dioxide and NMVOCs (non-methane volatile organic compounds). Heating value is approximately 550 BTU/scf. A upgrading plant, utilizing an amine process, rejects the carbon dioxide and NMVOCs, and upgrades the gas to pipeline quality (i.e., nominally a heating value >950 BTU/scf). The gas is sold to a pipeline adjacent to the landfill. With coal-bearing strata underlying the landfill, and carbon dioxide a major effluent gas derived from the upgrading process, the Johnson County Landfill is potentially an ideal setting to study the feasibility of injecting the effluent gas in the coals for both enhanced coalbed methane recovery and carbon sequestration. To these ends, coals below the landfill were cored and then were analyzed for their thickness and sorbed gas content, which ranged up to 79 scf/ton. Assuming 1 1/2 square miles of land (960 acres) at the Johnson County Landfill can be utilized for coalbed and shale gas recovery, the total amount of in-place gas calculates to 946,200 mcf, or 946.2 mmcf, or 0.95 bcf (i.e., 985.6 mcf/acre X 960 acres). Assuming that carbon dioxide can be imbibed by the coals and shales on a 2:1 ratio compared to the gas that was originally present, then 1682 to 1720 days (4.6 to 4.7 years) of landfill carbon dioxide production can be sequestered by the coals and shales immediately under the landfill. Three coal--the Bevier

  7. Mill Seat Landfill Bioreactor Renewable Green Power (NY)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton & Loguidice, P.C.

    2010-01-07

    The project was implemented at the Mill Seat landfill located in the Town of Bergen, Monroe County, New York. The landfill was previously equipped with a landfill gas collection system to collect methane gas produced by the bioreactor landfill and transport it to a central location for end use. A landfill gas to energy facility was also previously constructed at the site, which utilized generator engines, designed to be powered with landfill methane gas, to produce electricity, to be utilized on site and to be sold to the utility grid. The landfill gas generation rate at the site had exceeded the capacity of the existing generators, and the excess landfill gas was therefore being burned at a candlestick flare for destruction. The funded project consisted of the procurement and installation of two (2) additional 800 KW Caterpillar 3516 generator engines, generator sets, switchgear and ancillary equipment.

  8. Assessing methane oxidation under landfill covers and its contribution to the above atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels: The added value of the isotope ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O CO{sub 2}; {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}D CH{sub 4}) approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widory, D., E-mail: d.widory@brgm.fr [BRGM, 3 ave Claude Guillemin, 45000 Orleans (France); Proust, E.; Bellenfant, G. [BRGM, 3 ave Claude Guillemin, 45000 Orleans (France); Bour, O. [INERIS, Parc Technologique ALATA, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of the isotope and mass balance approaches to evaluate the level of methane oxidation within a landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The level of methane oxidation is not homogenous under the landfill cover and is strongly correlated to the methane flux. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isotope tracking of the contribution of the methane oxidation to the CO{sub 2} concentrations in the ambient air. - Abstract: We are presenting here a multi-isotope approach ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O of CO{sub 2}; {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}D of CH{sub 4}) to assess (i) the level(s) of methane oxidation during waste biodegradation and its migration through a landfill cover in Sonzay (France), and (ii) its contribution to the atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels above the surface. The isotope approach is compared to the more conventional mass balance approach. Results from the two techniques are comparable and show that the CH{sub 4} oxidation under the landfill cover is heterogenous, with low oxidation percentages in samples showing high biogas fluxes, which was expected in clay covers presenting fissures, through which CH{sub 4} is rapidly transported. At shallow depth, more immobile biogas pockets show a higher level of CH{sub 4} oxidation by the methanotrophic bacteria. {delta}{sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} samples taken at different heights (from below the cover up to 8 m above the ground level) were also used to identify and assess the relative contributions of its main sources both under the landfill cover and in the surrounding atmosphere.

  9. Perspective of harnessing energy from landfill leachate via microbial fuel cells: novel biofuels and electrogenic physiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong; Wang, Ting; Huang, Xinghua; Dolfing, Jan; Xie, Bing

    2015-10-01

    Organic carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur are highly concentrated in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill leachate, which usually frustrates conventional leachate treatment technologies from the perspective of energy costs. Therefore, the possibility of converting leachate to a new energy source via microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has been examined recently. This paper summarizes the power output and energy recovery efficiency of the leachate-fed MFCs according to different feeding patterns, cell structures, and loading rates. Also, we assess potential energy-generating chemicals in leachate like nitrogen and sulfur compounds and propose alternative pathways, which may lift strict ratios between organic carbon and nitrogen content in conventional denitrification of leachate and are expected to achieve a higher voltage than traditional organic-oxygen based cells. Although currently power output of leachate-fed MFCs is limited, it seems well possible that dynamic characteristics of MSW leachates and microbial physiologies underlying some bio-electrochemically efficient activities (e.g., direct interspecies electron transfer) could be stimulated in MFC systems to improve the present status. PMID:26239072

  10. Bioreactor landfill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hao; XING Kai; Anthony Adzomani

    2004-01-01

    Following the population expansion, there is a growing threat brought by municipal solid waste (MSW) against environment and human health. Sanitary landfill is the most important method of MSW disposal in China. In contrast to the conventional landfill, this paper introduces a new technique named bioreactor landfill (BL). Mechanisms, operation conditions as well as the advantages and disadvantages of BL are also discussed in this paper.

  11. Methanotrophs and methanotrophic activity in engineered landfill biocovers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait-Benichou, S; Jugnia, Louis-B; Greer, Charles W; Cabral, Alexandre R

    2009-09-01

    The dynamics and changes in the potential activity and community structure of methanotrophs in landfill covers, as a function of time and depth were investigated. A passive methane oxidation biocover (PMOB-1) was constructed in St-Nicéphore MSW Landfill (Quebec, Canada). The most probable number (MPN) method was used for methanotroph counts, methanotrophic diversity was assessed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting of the pmoA gene and the potential CH(4) oxidation rate was determined using soil microcosms. Results of the PMOB-1 were compared with those obtained for the existing landfill cover (silty clay) or a reference soil (RS). During the monitoring period, changes in the number of methanotrophic bacteria in the PMOB-1 exhibited different developmental phases and significant variations with depth. In comparison, no observable changes over time occurred in the number of methanotrophs in the RS. The maximum counts measured in the uppermost layer was 1.5x10(9) cells g dw(-1) for the PMOB-1 and 1.6x10(8) cells g dw(-1) for the RS. No distinct difference was observed in the methanotroph diversity in the PMOB-1 or RS. As expected, the potential methane oxidation rate was higher in the PMOB-1 than in the RS. The maximum potential rates were 441.1 and 76.0 microg CH(4) h(-1) g dw(-1) in the PMOB and RS, respectively. From these results, the PMOB was found to be a good technology to enhance methane oxidation, as its performance was clearly better than the starting soil that was present in the landfill site. PMID:19477627

  12. Yolo County's Accelerated Anaerobic and Aerobic Composting (Full-Scale Controlled Landfill Bioreactor) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, R.; Kieffer, J.; Akau, H.; Augenstein, D.

    2002-12-01

    elimination of methane production and acceleration of waste decomposition. In the first phase of this project a 12-acre module that contains a 9.5-acre anaerobic cell and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell has been constructed and filled with over 220,000 tons of municipal solid waste. Water and leachate addition began in April 2002 and to date less than 200,000 gallons of liquid has been added to the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell. The waste filling phase of the aerobic cell was completed in June of 2002 and a 12-inches soil cover and 12-inches of greenwaste compost cover was placed on top of the cell. A vacuum will be applied to the piping within the waste to draw air through the landfill. Instrumentations have been installed to monitor the following parameters: waste temperature, moisture, leachate volumes, leachate hydraulic head over the primary liner, leachate composition, gas volumes and composition. A supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system has been installed to monitor and control the operation of the bioreactor cells. Waste samples were taken from each cell for laboratory testing in early June 2002.

  13. Catalytic reduction of NO by methane using a Pt/C/polybenzimidazole/Pt/C fuel cell

    OpenAIRE

    Petrushina, Irina; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Refshauge, Rasmus; Bjerrum, Niels; Bandur, Viktor

    2007-01-01

    The catalytic NO reduction by methane was studied using a (NO,CH4,Ar),Pt|polybenzimidazole(PBI)–H3PO4|Pt,(H2,Ar) fuel cell at 135 and 165°C. It has been found that, without any reducing agent (like CH4), NO can be electrochemically reduced in the (NO, Ar), Pt/C|PBI–H3PO4|Pt/C, (H2,Ar) fuel cell with participation of H+ or electrochemically produced hydrogen. When added, methane partially suppresses the electrochemical reduction of NO. Methane outlet concentration monitoring has shown the CH4 ...

  14. Evaluation of Partitioning Gas Tracer Tests for Measuring Water in Landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, P. T.; Han, B.; Jafarpour, Y.; Gallagher, V. N.; Chiu, P. C.; Fluman, D. A.; Vasuki, N. C.; Yazdani, R.; Augenstein, D.; Cohen, K. K.

    2003-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas, and landfills are the largest anthropogenic source in many developed countries. Bioreactor landfills have been proposed as one means of abating greenhouse gas emissions from landfills. Here, the decomposition of organic wastes is enhanced by the controlled addition of water or leachate to maintain optimal conditions for waste decomposition. Greenhouse gas abatement is accomplished by sequestration of photosynthetically derived carbon in wastes, CO2 offsets from energy use of waste derived gas, and mitigation of methane emission from the wastes. An important issue in the operation of bioreactor landfills is knowing how much water to add and where to add it. Accurate methods for measuring the amount of water in landfills would be valuable aids for implementing leachate recirculation systems. Current methods for measuring water are inadequate, though, since they provide point measurements and are frequently affected by heterogeneity of the solid waste composition and solid waste compaction. The value of point measurements is significantly reduced in systems where water flows preferentially, such as in landfills. Here, spatially integrated measurements might be of greater value. We are evaluating a promising technology, the partitioning gas tracer test, to measure the water saturation within landfills, the amount of free water in solid waste divided by the volume of the voids. The partitioning gas tracer test was recently developed by researchers working in the vadose zone. We report the results from laboratory and field tests designed to evaluate the partitioning gas tracer test within an anaerobic landfill operated by the Delaware Solid Waste Authority. Vertical wells were installed within the landfill to inject and extract tracer gases. Gas flow and tracer gas movement in the solid waste were controlled by the landfill's existing gas collection system, which included vertical wells installed throughout the landfill through

  15. Project identification for methane reduction options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses efforts directed at reduction in emission of methane to the atmosphere. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, which on a 20 year timeframe may present a similar problem to carbon dioxide. In addition, methane causes additional problems in the form of smog and its longer atmospheric lifetime. The author discusses strategies for reducing methane emission from several major sources. This includes landfill methane recovery, coalbed methane recovery, livestock methane reduction - in the form of ruminant methane reduction and manure methane recovery. The author presents examples of projects which have implemented these ideas, the economics of the projects, and additional gains which come from the projects.

  16. Feasibility of atmospheric methane removal using methanotrophic biotrickling filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sukhwan; Carey, Jeffrey N.; Semrau, Jeremy D. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2009-07-15

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential {proportional_to}23 times that of carbon dioxide. Here, we describe the modeling of a biotrickling filtration system composed of methane-consuming bacteria, i.e., methanotrophs, to assess the utility of these systems in removing methane from the atmosphere. Model results indicate that assuming the global average atmospheric concentration of methane, 1.7 ppmv, methane removal is ineffective using these methanotrophic biofilters as the methane concentration is too low to enable cell survival. If the concentration is increased to 500-6,000 ppmv, however, similar to that found above landfills and in concentrated animal feeding operations (factory farms), 4.98-35.7 tons of methane can be removed per biofilter per year assuming biotrickling filters of typical size (3.66 m in diameter and 11.5 m in height). Using reported ranges of capital, operational, and maintenance costs, the cost of the equivalent ton of CO{sub 2} removal using these systems is $90-$910 ($2,070-$20,900 per ton of methane), depending on the influent concentration of methane and if heating is required. The use of methanotrophic biofilters for controlling methane emissions is technically feasible and, provided that either the costs of biofilter construction and operation are reduced or the value of CO{sub 2} credits is increased, can also be economically attractive. (orig.)

  17. Study on Production of Hydrogen from Methane for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋正昶; 李传统

    2001-01-01

    The hydrogen production from methane for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was studied experimentally. The conversion rate of methane under different steam-carbon ratios, the effect of the different excess air ratios on the constituents of the gas produced, the permeability of hydrogen under different pressure differences, and the effect of different system pressure on the reaction enthalpy of hydrogen were obtained. The results lay the basis for the production of hydrogen applicable to PEMFC, moreover, provide a new way for the comprehensive utilization of the coal bed methane.

  18. Generating CO2-credits through landfill in situ aeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfills are some of the major anthropogenic sources of methane emissions worldwide. The installation and operation of gas extraction systems for many landfills in Europe and the US, often including technical installations for energy recovery, significantly reduced these emissions during the last decades. Residual landfill gas, however, is still continuously produced after the energy recovery became economically unattractive, thus resulting in ongoing methane emissions for many years. By landfill in situ aeration these methane emissions can be widely avoided both, during the aeration process as well as in the subsequent aftercare period. Based on model calculations and online monitoring data the amount of avoided CO2-eq. can be determined. For an in situ aerated landfill in northern Germany, acting as a case study, 83-95% (depending on the kind and quality of top cover) of the greenhouse gas emission potential could be reduced under strictly controlled conditions. Recently the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) has approved a new methodology on the 'Avoidance of landfill gas emissions by in situ aeration of landfills' (). Based on this methodology landfill aeration projects might be considered for generation of Certified Emission Reductions (CERs) in the course of CDM projects. This paper contributes towards an evaluation of the potential of landfill aeration for methane emissions reduction.

  19. Methane Steam Reforming over an Ni-YSZ Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode in Stack Configuration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, David; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Hendriksen, Peter Vang;

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics of catalytic steam reforming of methane over an Ni-YSZ anode of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) have been investigated with the cell placed in a stack configuration. In order to decrease the degree of conversion, a single cell stack with reduced area was used. Measurements were...... performed in the temperature range 600-800 degrees C and the partial pressures of all reactants and products were varied. The obtained rates could be well fitted with a power law expression (r proportional to P-CH4(0.7)). A simple model is presented which is capable of predicting the methane conversion in a...

  20. Ceria catalyst for inert-substrate-supported tubular solid oxide fuel cells running on methane fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai; Kim, Bok-Hee; Du, Yanhai; Xu, Qing; Ahn, Byung-Guk

    2016-05-01

    A ceria catalyst is applied to an inert-substrate supported tubular single cell for direct operation on methane fuel. The tubular single cell comprises a porous yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) supporter, a Ni-Ce0.8Sm0.2O1.9 anode, a YSZ/Ce0.8Sm0.2O1.9 bi-layer electrolyte, and a La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ cathode. The ceria catalyst is incorporated into the porous YSZ supporter layer by a cerium nitrate impregnation. The effects of ceria on the microstructure and electrochemical performance of the tubular single cell are investigated with respect to the number of impregnations. The optimum number of impregnations is determined to be four based on the maximum power density and polarization property of the tubular single cell in hydrogen and methane fuels. At 700 °C, the tubular single cell shows similar maximum power densities of ∼260 mW cm-2 in hydrogen and methane fuels, respectively. Moreover, the ceria catalyst significantly improves the performance stability of the cell running on methane fuel. At a current density of 350 mA cm-2, the single cell shows a low degradation rate of 2.5 mV h-1 during the 13 h test in methane fuel. These results suggest the feasibility of applying the ceria catalyst to the inert-substrate supported tubular single cell for direct operation on methane fuel.

  1. 40 CFR 270.21 - Specific part B information requirements for landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... under § 270.14(b)(5); (d) A description of how each landfill, including the liner and cover systems... engineering report describing the final cover which will be applied to each landfill or landfill cell at... each landfill or landfill cell; (b) Detailed plans and an engineering report describing how...

  2. Soil gas investigations at the Sanitary Landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A soil gas survey was performed at the 740-G Sanitary Landfill of Savannah River Plant during December, 1990. The survey monitored the presence and distribution of the C1C4 hydrocarbons; the C5-C10 normal paraffins; the aromatic hydrocarbons, BTXE; selected chlorinated hydrocarbons; and mercury. Significant levels of several of these contaminants were found associated with the burial site. In the northern area of the Landfill, methane concentrations ranged up to 63% of the soil gas and were consistently high on the western side of the access road. To the east of the access road in the northern and southern area high concentrations of methane were encountered but were not consistently high. Methane, the species found in highest concentration in the landfill, was generated in the landfill as the result of biological oxidation of cellulose and other organics to carbon dioxide followed by reduction of the carbon dioxide to methane. Distributions of other species are the result of burials in the landfill of solvents or other materials

  3. Characterization and Energy Generation of Sharda Landfill at Agra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohail Ayub

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Most of the global municipal solid waste is dumped in non regulated landfills and the generated methane is emitted to the atmosphere which has global warming potential. Some of the modern regulated landfills attempt to capture and utilize landfill gas. An attempt has been made in this study for the recovery of energy potential of Shadra site. This includes different methodologies to determine the feasibility of recovery project. The laboratory results show that the percentage by volume of methane is 51%. The landfill gas (LFG generation is very low (i.e. low-range recovery scenario and it is un-economical to recover such low flow gases produced in landfill. So, this reveals that flaring is only the option to reduce the global warming potential (GWP and also the problems of odour in the vicinity of landfill.

  4. THE EMISSION POTENTIAL FROM MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILL IN JORDAN

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Aljaradin; Kenneth M. Persson

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive study was conducted to monitor the emission potential from solid waste landfilled in Jordan over a period of 292 days using an anaerobic lysimeter. A 30 kg waste sample reflecting the typical municipal solid waste (MSW) streams generated in Jordan was used to simulate the influence of climate on the emission potential of landfills located in semi-arid areas. The experimental results demonstrated that a significant amount of leachate and landfill gas was produced. The methane c...

  5. INPP Landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to propose the basic design for final disposal of Very Low Level Radioactive Waste (VLLW) produced at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant and at other small waste producers in Lithuania. Considering the safety for the environment, as well as the construction costs, it has been decided that the repository will be of a landfill type based on the same design principles as similar authorised facilities in other countries. It has also been decided that the location of the landfill shall be in the vicinity of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP)

  6. 垃圾渗滤液发酵产氢和产甲烷特性研究%Bio-production of hydrogen and methane from landfill leachate by anaerobic fermentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐乔根; 傅木星; 苏泱洲; 汪敏; 潘建国

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of hydrogen and methane production from landfill leachate by anaerobic fermentation at 37 ℃ and pH 7. 0 was studied. The experimental results suggested that during the process of leachate anaerobic fermentation,the maximum cumulative production of hydrogen and methane was 24. 33,91. 95 mL (counted by per gram of COD) respectively; there was a lag phase a in the process of hydrogen production,while the methane production process appear no lag phase. Large amount of volatile organic acids and ethanol were found in the ultimate liquid product in hydrogen production process with the concentration of ethanol,acetate and butyrate was 487. 23,1 175. 21, 1 225. 78 mg/L respectively. Compared with hydrogen production process,ethanol,acetate and butyrate production of methane production process was relatively low,the concentration of was 256. 38,106. 73,107. 42 mg/L respectively. The ultimate mixture of hydrogen production process was strong acidic, the pH value was 4. 21. While, in methane production process,the ultimate mixture was close to neutral, the pH value was 6. 32. The removal rate of COD in methane production process was 41. 78% , which was higher than that of hydrogen production process (32. 14%). This might be the acetate in ultimate mixture of hydrogen production process could be utilized by methanogenesis and further be biodegrade.%以实际垃圾渗滤液作为厌氧发酵基质,研究了初始pH为7.0、中温(37℃)条件下的发酵产氢、产甲烷特性.结果表明,利用垃圾渗滤液作为基质发酵产氢或甲烷时,氢气的最大累积产量为24.33 mL(以每克COD计,下同),甲烷的最大累积产量为91.59 mL,产氢发酵在初期存在明显的迟滞期,但是产甲烷发酵不存在明显迟滞期;产氢发酵的液相末端产物中含有大量的挥发性有机酸和乙醇,乙醇、乙酸、丁酸质量浓度分别为487.23、1175.21、1225.78 mg/L,相比产氢发酵,产甲烷发酵的液相末端产物中乙

  7. Evolution on qualities of leachate and landfill gas in the semi-aerobic landfill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Qifei; YANG Yufei; PANG Xiangrui; WANG Qi

    2008-01-01

    To study the characteristics of stabilization in semi-aerobic landfill, large-scale simulated landfill was constructed based on the semi-aerobic landfill theory. Consequently, the concentrations of chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen, and nitrite nitrogen, and the pH value in leachate, as well as the component contents of landfill gas composition (methane, carbon dioxide, and oxygen) in landfill were regularly monitored for 52 weeks. The results showed that COD and ammonia concentrations declined rapidly and did not show the accumulating rule like anaerobic landfill, and remained at about 300 and 100 mg/L, respectively, after 48 weeks. Meanwhile, the descending rate reached 98.9% and 96.9%, respectively. Nitrate concentration increased rapidly after 24 weeks and fluctuated between 220-280 mg/L after 43 weeks. The pH values were below 7 during the first 8 weeks and after that leachates appeared to be alkaline. Carbon dioxide was the main composition in landfill gas and its concentration remained at a high level through the whole stabilization process. The average contents of carbon dioxide, oxygen, and methane varied between 19 vol.%-28 vol.%, 2 vol.%-8 vol.%, and 5 vol.%-13 vol.%, respectively. A relative equilibrium was reached after 48 weeks. The highest temperature in the landfill chamber could amount to 75.8 degrees centigrade.

  8. Landfill leachate sludge use as soil additive prior and after electrocoagulation treatment: A cytological assessment using CHO-k1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozesk, M; Bonomo, M M; Rocha, L D; Duarte, I D; Zanezi, E R L; Jesus, H C; Fernandes, M N; Matsumoto, S T

    2016-09-01

    Electrocoagulation has recently attracted attention as a potential technique for treating toxic effluents due to its versatility and environmental compatibility, generating a residue chemically suitable to be used as a soil additive. In the present study, landfill leachate sludge hazardous effects were investigated prior and after electrocoagulation process using in vitro assays with the mammalian cells CHO-k1. An integrated strategy for risk assessment was used to correctly estimate the possible adverse landfill leachate sludge effects on human health and ecosystem. Electrocoagulation process proved to be an effective treatment due to possibility to improve effluent adverse characteristics and produce sludge with potential to be used as soil additive. Despite low cytoxicity, the residue presented genotoxic and mutagenic effects, indicating a capacity to induce genetic damages, probably due to induction of polyploidization process in cells. The observed effects demand an improvement of waste management methods for reduce negative risks of landfill leachate sludge application. PMID:27243586

  9. Evaluating Gas Emissions From Landfills – Which Methodologies Can Be Used?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Many methodologies exist to measure whole landfill methane emission as alternatives to imprecise estimation of the methane emission using existing landfill gas generation models. An overview of the different measurement methodologies is given, and suggestions to the most promising methodologies a...

  10. Feasibility study: utilization of landfill gas for a vehicle fuel system, Rossman's landfill, Clackamas County, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    In 1978, a landfill operator in Oregon became interested in the technical and economic feasibility of recovering the methane generated in the landfill for the refueling of vehicles. DOE awarded a grant for a site-specific feasibility study of this concept. This study investigated the expected methane yield and the development of a conceptual gas-gathering system; gas processing, compressing, and storage systems; and methane-fueled vehicle systems. Cost estimates were made for each area of study. The results of the study are presented. Reasoning that gasoline prices will continue to rise and that approximately 18,000 vehicles in the US have been converted to operate on methane, a project is proposed to use this landfill as a demonstration site to produce and process methane and to fuel a fleet (50 to 400) vehicles with the gas produced in order to obtain performance and economic data on the systems used from gas collection through vehicle operation. (LCL)

  11. Two isozymes of particulate methane monooxygenase with different methane oxidation kinetics are found in Methylocystis sp. strain SC2

    OpenAIRE

    Baani, Mohamed; Liesack, Werner

    2008-01-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) attenuate methane emission from major sources, such as wetlands, rice paddies, and landfills, and constitute the only biological sink for atmospheric methane in upland soils. Their key enzyme is particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO), which converts methane to methanol. It has long been believed that methane at the trace atmospheric mixing ratio of 1.75 parts per million by volume (ppmv) is not oxidized by the methanotrophs cultured to date, but ra...

  12. Measurement of representative landfill gas migration samples at landfill perimeters: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Breda M. Kiernan; Beirne, Stephen; Fay, Cormac; Diamond, Dermot

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a fully integrated autonomous system based on existing infrared sensing technology capable of monitoring landfill gas migration (specifically carbon dioxide and methane) at landfill sites. Sampling using the described system was validated against the industry standard, GA2000 Plus hand held device, manufactured by Geotechnical Instruments Inc. As a consequence of repeated sampling during validation experiments, fluctuations in the gas mixtures became ap...

  13. Improved methodology to assess modification and completion of landfill gas management in the aftercare period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jeremy W F; Crest, Marion; Barlaz, Morton A; Spokas, Kurt A; Kerman, Anna; Yuan, Lei

    2012-12-01

    Municipal solid waste landfills represent the dominant option for waste disposal in many parts of the world. While some countries have greatly reduced their reliance on landfills, there remain thousands of landfills that require aftercare. The development of cost-effective strategies for landfill aftercare is in society's interest to protect human health and the environment and to prevent the emergence of landfills with exhausted aftercare funding. The Evaluation of Post-Closure Care (EPCC) methodology is a performance-based approach in which landfill performance is assessed in four modules including leachate, gas, groundwater, and final cover. In the methodology, the objective is to evaluate landfill performance to determine when aftercare monitoring and maintenance can be reduced or possibly eliminated. This study presents an improved gas module for the methodology. While the original version of the module focused narrowly on regulatory requirements for control of methane migration, the improved gas module also considers best available control technology for landfill gas in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, air quality, and emissions of odoriferous compounds. The improved module emphasizes the reduction or elimination of fugitive methane by considering the methane oxidation capacity of the cover system. The module also allows for the installation of biologically active covers or other features designed to enhance methane oxidation. A methane emissions model, CALMIM, was used to assist with an assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of landfill covers. PMID:22884579

  14. Methane Tracking and Mitigation Options - EPA CMOP

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains the sub-model for EPA's MARKAL model, which tracks methane emissions from the energy system, and limited other sources (landfills and manure...

  15. Methane Detector With Plastic Fresnel Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    Laser detector for natural gas leaks modified by substitution of molded plastic lens for spherical mirror. By measuring relative attenuation at two wavelengths, detector used to check for methane escaping from pipelines above or below ground and from landfill.

  16. Numerical modelling of methane-powered micro-tubular, single-chamber solid oxide fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhtar, N. [School of Applied Mathematics, University of Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Decent, S.P. [School of Applied Mathematics, University of Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Kendall, K. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-01

    An experimentally validated, two-dimensional, axisymmetric, numerical model of micro-tubular, single-chamber solid oxide fuel cell (MT-SC-SOFC) has been developed. The model incorporates methane full combustion, steam reforming, dry reforming and water-gas shift reaction followed by electrochemical oxidation of produced hydrogen within the anode. On the cathode side, parasitic combustion of methane along with the electrochemical oxygen reduction is implemented. The results show that the poor performance of single-chamber SOFC as compared to the conventional (dual-chamber) SOFC (in case of micro-tubes) is due to the mass transport limitation on the anode side. The gas velocity inside the micro-tube is far too low when compared to the gas-chamber inlet velocity. The electronic current density is also non-uniform over the cell length, mainly due to the short length of the anode current collector located at the cell outlet. Furthermore, the higher temperature near the cell edges is due to the methane combustion (very close to the cell inlet) and current collection point (at the cell outlet). Both of these locations could be sensitive to the silver current collecting wire as silver may rupture due to cell overheating. (author)

  17. Catalytic reduction of NO by methane using a Pt/C/polybenzimidazole/Pt/C fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrushina, Irina; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Refshauge, Rasmus;

    2007-01-01

    The catalytic NO reduction by methane was studied using a (NO,CH4,Ar),Pt|polybenzimidazole(PBI)–H3PO4|Pt,(H2,Ar) fuel cell at 135 and 165°C. It has been found that, without any reducing agent (like CH4), NO can be electrochemically reduced in the (NO, Ar), Pt/C|PBI–H3PO4|Pt/C, (H2,Ar) fuel cell...

  18. Biogas generation in landfills. Equilibria, rates and yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakesson, M.

    1997-05-01

    Landfilling in `cells` has become more common in recent years. Different waste streams are guided to different cells, among which the biocell is a landfill designed for biogas production. In this thesis, the dependence of biogas generation on waste composition was investigated. Six 8,000 m{sup 3} test cells, with contents ranging from mainly commercial waste to pure domestic waste and equipped with gas extraction systems and bottom plastic liners, were monitored for seven years. Great emphasis was given to the characterization of conversion processes and governing mechanism in the topics of bio-energetics, kinetics and capacities. A thermodynamic model, in which the oxidations of volatile fatty acids (VFA) (2methane production rates and internal conditions observed during a two year period, demonstrated that high biogas rates corresponded with low VFA levels. To explain the discrepancies between theoretical methane potentials and quantified yields (in this study found to be 150-200 and 40-70 Nm{sup 3}/dry tonne, respectively), the possible nutritional limitation was investigated. Pools and emissions of chemical oxygen demand, N, P and K were quantified. Biomass pools were estimated from methane yields, growth yield coefficients, and bacterial mineral contents. However, results from commercial waste test cells showed that the assimilation of P exceeded the refuse content, which suggests the turnover of microbial biomass and questions the notion of nutritional limitation. In sum, the results showed that the advantages of a reduced content of readily biodegradable material, achieved by guidance or pretreatment, encompass several aspects of the performance. 84 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab

  19. PERFORMA OKSIDASI METAN PADA REAKTOR KONTINYU DENGAN PENINGKATAN KETEBALAN LAPISAN BIOCOVER LANDFILL

    OpenAIRE

    Opy Kurniasari; Tri Padmi; Edwan Kardena; Enri Damanhuri

    2013-01-01

    PERFORMANCE OF METHANE OXIDATION IN CONTINUOUS REACTOR BY BIOCOVER LANDFILL FILM THICKNESS IMPROVEMENT. Municipal solid waste (MSW) handling in Indonesia is currently highly dependent on landfilling at the final disposal facility (TPA), which generally operated in layer-by-layer basis, allowing the anaerobic (absent of oxygen) process. This condition will certainly generate biogas in the form of methane (CH4) and CO2. Methane is a greenhouse gas with a global warming potential greater than CO...

  20. Methane Production in Microbial Reverse-Electrodialysis Methanogenesis Cells (MRMCs) Using Thermolytic Solutions

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Xi

    2014-08-05

    The utilization of bioelectrochemical systems for methane production has attracted increasing attention, but producing methane in these systems requires additional voltage to overcome large cathode overpotentials. To eliminate the need for electrical grid energy, we constructed a microbial reverse- electrodialysis methanogenesis cell (MRMC) by placing a reverse electrodialysis (RED) stack between an anode with exoelectrogenic microorganisms and a methanogenic biocathode. In the MRMC, renewable salinity gradient energy was converted to electrical energy, thus providing the added potential needed for methane evolution from the cathode. The feasibility of the MRMC was examined using three different cathode materials (stainless steel mesh coated with platinum, SS/Pt; carbon cloth coated with carbon black, CC/CB; or a plain graphite fiber brush, GFB) and a thermolytic solution (ammonium bicarbonate) in the RED stack. A maximum methane yield of 0.60 ± 0.01 mol-CH 4/mol-acetate was obtained using the SS/Pt biocathode, with a Coulombic recovery of 75 ± 2% and energy efficiency of 7.0 ± 0.3%. The CC/CB biocathode MRMC had a lower methane yield of 0.55 ± 0.02 mol-CH4/mol-acetate, which was twice that of the GFB biocathode MRMC. COD removals (89-91%) and Coulombic efficiencies (74-81%) were similar for all cathode materials. Linear sweep voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests demonstrated that cathodic microorganisms enhanced electron transfer from the cathode compared to abiotic controls. These results show that the MRMC has significant potential for production of nearly pure methane using low-grade waste heat and a source of waste organic matter at the anode. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  1. Methane Steam Reforming over an Ni-YSZ Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode in Stack Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mogensen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of catalytic steam reforming of methane over an Ni-YSZ anode of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC have been investigated with the cell placed in a stack configuration. In order to decrease the degree of conversion, a single cell stack with reduced area was used. Measurements were performed in the temperature range 600–800°C and the partial pressures of all reactants and products were varied. The obtained rates could be well fitted with a power law expression (r ∝PCH40.7. A simple model is presented which is capable of predicting the methane conversion in a stack configuration from intrinsic kinetics of the anode support material. The predictions are compared with the stack measurements presented here, and good agreement is observed.

  2. Landfills, landfill, Published in 2004, Duchesne County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Landfills dataset, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2004. It is described as 'landfill'. Data by this publisher are often provided in...

  3. Emissions and leachate recycling at Seutula landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to examine the degradation process and the leachate and gas emissions at Seutula landfill Vantaa The influences on leachate recycling to gas production and on the power production and also the influences on landfill water and the quality of leachate was found out. The situation at the landfill before leachate recirculation was studied. In the literature part of this study the landfill gas generation, different phases of the landfill and factors effecting them were examined. The quality of leachate, leachate recirculation and advantages of recirculation were studied. Different kind of gas collection methods, gas utilization, advantages and disadvantages of gas collection and the future of utilization were studied. Methods for measuring methane emissions through the landfill surface was a central part of the literature section. Also the future of measuring techniques were studied. In the experimental part of this study the quantity and quality of collected gas were measured. Also emitted methane was measured. Water samples were taken from landfill water and leachate during 1998. Samples were analysed in situ and in laboratory. The changes of landfill water height were measured. The degradation phase of the landfill varied, a part of waste filling was in an acidogenic phase and most part of it was in a stable methanogenic phase because the landfill is not homogenous. The concentration of landfill water and leachate are about the same than in Finland average. The most remarkable correlation from analysed results was between BOD/COD-ratio and temperature. When the temperature increased, the BOD/COD-ratio decreased. Emitted gas in the gas collection area was rather low, about 10 kW. The power production of the collected gas was in average 2 800 kW. In areas 1 and 3 where leachate was recirculated, the recovered gas efficiencies increased 55% and 70%, respectively, but in a reference area without recirculation the increase was 12%. Recommendation

  4. Modeling and parametric simulations of solid oxide fuel cells with methane carbon dioxide reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A 2D model is developed for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). ► CH4 reforming by CO2 (MCDR) is included. ► SOFC with MCDR shows comparable performance with methane steam reforming SOFC. ► Increasing CO electrochemical oxidation greatly enhances the SOFC performance. ► Effects of potential and temperature on SOFC performance are also discussed. - Abstract: A two-dimensional model is developed to simulate the performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) fed with CO2 and CH4 mixture. The electrochemical oxidations of both CO and H2 are included. Important chemical reactions are considered in the model, including methane carbon dioxide reforming (MCDR), reversible water gas shift reaction (WGSR), and methane steam reforming (MSR). It’s found that at a CH4/CO2 molar ratio of 50/50, MCDR and reversible WGSR significantly influence the cell performance while MSR is negligibly small. The performance of SOFC fed with CO2/CH4 mixture is comparable to SOFC running on CH4/H2O mixtures. The electric output of SOFC can be enhanced by operating the cell at a low operating potential or at a high temperature. In addition, the development of anode catalyst with high activity towards CO electrochemical oxidation is important for SOFC performance enhancement. The model can serve as a useful tool for optimization of the SOFC system running on CH4/CO2 mixtures

  5. The presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the inoculum improves methane gas production in microbial electrolysis cells.

    KAUST Repository

    Siegert, Michael

    2014-01-01

    High current densities in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) result from the predominance of various Geobacter species on the anode, but it is not known if archaeal communities similarly converge to one specific genus. MECs were examined here on the basis of maximum methane production and current density relative to the inoculum community structure. We used anaerobic digester (AD) sludge dominated by acetoclastic Methanosaeta, and an anaerobic bog sediment where hydrogenotrophic methanogens were detected. Inoculation using solids to medium ratio of 25% (w/v) resulted in the highest methane production rates (0.27 mL mL(-1) cm(-2), gas volume normalized by liquid volume and cathode projected area) and highest peak current densities (0.5 mA cm(-2)) for the bog sample. Methane production was independent of solid to medium ratio when AD sludge was used as the inoculum. 16S rRNA gene community analysis using pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR confirmed the convergence of Archaea to Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter, and of Bacteria to Geobacter, despite their absence in AD sludge. Combined with other studies, these findings suggest that Archaea of the hydrogenotrophic genera Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter are the most important microorganisms for methane production in MECs and that their presence in the inoculum improves the performance.

  6. High power-density single-chamber fuel cells operated on methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Zongping; Mederos, Jennifer; Chueh, William C.; Haile, Sossina.M. [Materials Science, Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2006-11-08

    Single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SC-SOFCs) incorporating thin-film Sm{sub 0.15}Ce{sub 0.85}O{sub 1.925} (SDC) as the electrolyte, thick Ni+SDC as the (supporting) anode and SDC+BSCF (Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}}) as the cathode were operated in a mixture of methane, oxygen and helium at furnace temperatures of 500-650{sup o}C. Because of the exothermic nature of the oxidation reactions that occur at the anode, the cell temperature was as much as 150{sup o}C greater than the furnace temperature. Overall, the open circuit voltage was only slightly sensitive to temperature and gas composition, varying from {approx}0.70 to {approx}0.78V over the range of conditions explored. In contrast, the power density strongly increased with temperature and broadly peaked at a methane to oxygen ratio of {approx}1:1. At a furnace temperature of 650{sup o}C (cell temperature {approx}790{sup o}C), a peak power density of 760mWcm{sup -2} was attained using a mixed gas with methane, oxygen and helium flow rates of 87, 80 and 320mLmin{sup -1} [STP], respectively. This level of power output is the highest reported in the literature for single chamber fuel cells and reflects the exceptionally high activity of the BSCF cathode for oxygen electro-reduction and its low activity for methane oxidation. (author)

  7. Methane Steam Reforming over an Ni-YSZ Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode in Stack Configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Mogensen, D.; J.-D. Grunwaldt; Hendriksen, P. V.; J. U. Nielsen; K. Dam-Johansen

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics of catalytic steam reforming of methane over an Ni-YSZ anode of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) have been investigated with the cell placed in a stack configuration. In order to decrease the degree of conversion, a single cell stack with reduced area was used. Measurements were performed in the temperature range 600-800 degrees C and the partial pressures of all reactants and products were varied. The obtained rates could be well fitted with a power law expression (r proportional ...

  8. Mobile measurement of methane: plumes, isotopes and inventory verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, D.; Zazzeri, G.; Fisher, R. E.; France, J.; Al-Shalaan, A.; Lanoisellé, M.; Nisbet, E. G.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2013 the RHUL group has been identifying methane plumes from major UK sources using a Picarro 2301 coupled to the A0941 mobile module. Once identified the plumes have been sampled by filling Tedlar or Flexfoil bags for later carbon isotopic analysis by high-precision IRMS. This method has ben successfully deployed to isotopically characterize the main anthropogenic methane emitters in the UK (natural gas, coal, landfill, wastewater treatment, cattle; Zazzeri et al., 2015) and during overseas campaigns in eastern Australia (coal, cattle, legacy gas wells) and Kuwait (landfill, wastewater treatment, oil refineries, cattle, camels). This has identified strong similarities of isotopic signature for some sources (landfill, cattle), but large variations for others (natural gas, coal), which must be isotopically resolved at regional scale. Both landfill and natural gas emissions in SE England have tightly-constrained δ13C signatures, averaging -58 ± 3‰ and -36 ± 2‰, respectively, the latter being characteristic of homogenised North Sea gas supply. In contrast, signatures for coal mines in England and Wales fall in a range of 51.2 ± 0.3‰ to 30.9 ± 1.4‰, but can be tightly constrained by region. On a local scale in west London, repeat surveys in the boroughs of Hounslow and Runnymede have been made for comparison with the latest 1x1 km grid UK inventories for 2009 and 2012, which are subdivided by UNECE categories. An excess methane map can be derived for comparison with inventory emissions maps by identifying daily background and binning the excess values from mobile measurements by grid-square. This shows that the spatial distribution of emissions in the UK 2012 inventory is a big improvement on that of 2009. It also suggests that there is an overestimation of emissions from old landfills (closed before 2000 and reliant on a topsoil cap for oxidation), and an underestimation on emissions from currently active landfill cells. Zazzeri, G. et al. (2015

  9. Nitrogen removal in the bioreactor landfill system with intermittent aeration at the top of landfilled waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High ammonia concentration of recycled landfill leachate makes it very difficult to treat. In this work, a vertical aerobic/anoxic/anaerobic lab-scale bioreactor landfill system, which was constructed by intermittent aeration at the top of landfilled waste, as a bioreactor for in situ nitrogen removal was investigated during waste stabilization. Intermittent aeration at the top of landfilled waste might stimulate the growth of nitrifying bacteria and denitrifying bacteria in the top and middle layers of waste. The nitrifying bacteria population for the landfill bioreactor with intermittent aeration system reached between106 and 108 cells/dry g waste, although it decreased 2 orders of magnitude on day 30, due to the inhibitory effect of the acid environment and high organic matter in the landfilled waste. The denitrifying bacteria population increased by between 4 and 13 orders of magnitude compared with conventional anaerobic landfilled waste layers. Leachate NO3--N concentration was very low in both two experimental landfill reactors. After 105 days operation, leachate NH4+-N and TN concentrations for the landfill reactor with intermittent aeration system dropped to 186 and 289 mg/l, respectively, while they were still kept above 1000 mg/l for the landfill reactor without intermittent aerobic system. In addition, there is an increase in the rate of waste stabilization as well as an increase of 12% in the total waste settlement for the landfill reactor with intermittent aeration system

  10. High Efficiency Direct Methane Solid Oxide Fuel Cell System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has a defined need for energy dense and highly efficient energy storage and power delivery systems for future space missions. Compared to other fuel cell...

  11. Methane-free biogas for direct feeding of solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, P.; Lanzini, A.; Santarelli, M.; Calì, M.; Sagnelli, F.; Boulanger, A.; Scaletta, A.; Zitella, P.

    This paper deals with the experimental analysis of the performance and degradation issues of a Ni-based anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell fed by a methane-free biogas from dark-anaerobic digestion of wastes by pastry and fruit shops. The biogas is produced by means of an innovative process where the biomass is fermented with a pre-treated bacteria inoculum (Clostridia) able to completely inhibit the methanization step during the fermentation process and to produce a H 2/CO 2 mixture instead of conventional CH 4/CO 2 anaerobic digested gas (bio-methane). The proposed biogas production route leads to a biogas composition which avoids the need of introducing a reformer agent into or before the SOFC anode in order to reformate it. In order to analyse the complete behaviour of a SOFC with the bio-hydrogen fuel, an experimental session with several H 2/CO 2 synthetic mixtures was performed on an anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell with a Ni-based anode. It was found that side reactions occur with such mixtures in the typical thermodynamic conditions of SOFCs (650-800 °C), which have an effect especially at high currents, due to the shift to a mixture consisting of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and water. However, cells operated with acceptable performance and carbon deposits (typical of a traditional hydrocarbon-containing biogas) were avoided after 50 h of cell operation even at 650 °C. Experiments were also performed with traditional bio-methane from anaerobic digestion with 60/40 vol% of composition. It was found that the cell performance dropped after few hours of operation due to the formation of carbon deposits. A short-term test with the real as-produced biogas was also successfully performed. The cell showed an acceptable power output (at 800 °C, 0.35 W cm -2 with biogas, versus 0.55 W cm -2 with H 2) although a huge quantity of sulphur was present in the feeding fuel (hydrogen sulphide at 103 ppm and mercaptans up to 10 ppm). Therefore, it

  12. Methane-free biogas for direct feeding of solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, P.; Lanzini, A.; Santarelli, M.; Cali, M. [Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Sagnelli, F.; Boulanger, A.; Scaletta, A.; Zitella, P. [BioEnergy Lab, Environment Park S.p.A., Via Livorno 60, 10144 Turin (Italy)

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the experimental analysis of the performance and degradation issues of a Ni-based anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell fed by a methane-free biogas from dark-anaerobic digestion of wastes by pastry and fruit shops. The biogas is produced by means of an innovative process where the biomass is fermented with a pre-treated bacteria inoculum (Clostridia) able to completely inhibit the methanization step during the fermentation process and to produce a H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixture instead of conventional CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} anaerobic digested gas (bio-methane). The proposed biogas production route leads to a biogas composition which avoids the need of introducing a reformer agent into or before the SOFC anode in order to reformate it. In order to analyse the complete behaviour of a SOFC with the bio-hydrogen fuel, an experimental session with several H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} synthetic mixtures was performed on an anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell with a Ni-based anode. It was found that side reactions occur with such mixtures in the typical thermodynamic conditions of SOFCs (650-800 C), which have an effect especially at high currents, due to the shift to a mixture consisting of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and water. However, cells operated with acceptable performance and carbon deposits (typical of a traditional hydrocarbon-containing biogas) were avoided after 50 h of cell operation even at 650 C. Experiments were also performed with traditional bio-methane from anaerobic digestion with 60/40 vol% of composition. It was found that the cell performance dropped after few hours of operation due to the formation of carbon deposits. A short-term test with the real as-produced biogas was also successfully performed. The cell showed an acceptable power output (at 800 C, 0.35 W cm{sup -2} with biogas, versus 0.55 W cm{sup -2} with H{sub 2}) although a huge quantity of sulphur was present in the feeding fuel (hydrogen sulphide at 103 ppm and

  13. The safe disposal of landfill gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodegradable wastes deposited in landfill sites are decomposed by microbial activity to produce water and a mixture of methane and carbon dioxide. This gas can migrate from the landfill site presenting hazards and an odor problem. If the gas cannot be commercially utilized it must be disposed of in a safe and economic manner by flaring. This paper briefly outlines the generation of the gas and its potential hazards. The need for gas control is discussed along with methods for the disposal of the extracted gas

  14. Earthworm activity in a simulated landfill cover soil shifts the community composition of active methanotrophs

    OpenAIRE

    Kumaresan, Deepak; Héry, Marina; Bodrossy, Levente; Singer, Andrew C.; Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; Thompson, Ian P.; Murrell, J. Colin

    2011-01-01

    Landfills represent a major source of methane into the atmosphere. In a previous study, we demonstrated that earthworm activity in landfill cover soil can increase soil methane oxidation capacity (Héry et al., 2008). In this study, a simulated landfill cover soil mesocosm (1 m x 0.15 m) was used to observe the influence of earthworms (Eisenia veneta) on the active methanotroph community composition, by analyzing the expression of the pmoA gene, which is responsible for methane oxidation. mRN...

  15. Optimization of dry reforming of methane over Ni/YSZ anodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Cosimo; Lanzini, Andrea; Leone, Pierluigi; Santarelli, Massimo; Brandon, Nigel P.

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates the catalytic properties of Ni/YSZ anodes as electrodes of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) to be operated under direct dry reforming of methane. The experimental test rig consists of a micro-reactor, where anode samples are characterized. The gas composition at the reactor outlet is monitored using a mass spectrometer. The kinetics of the reactions occurring over the anode is investigated by means of Isotherm reactions and Temperature-programmed reactions. The effect of the variation of temperature, gas residence time and inlet carbon dioxide-methane volumetric ratio is analyzed. At 800 °C, the best catalytic performance (in the carbon safe region) is obtained for 1.5 reactions, respectively. In other ranges, dry reforming and reverse water gas shift are the dominant reactions and the inlet feed reaches almost the equilibrium condition provided that a sufficient gas residence time is obtained.

  16. Kinetics of (reversible) internal reforming of methane in solid oxide fuel cells under stationary and APU conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermann, H.; Sawady, W.; Reimert, R.; Ivers-Tiffée, E.

    The internal reforming of methane in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is investigated and modeled for flow conditions relevant to operation. To this end, measurements are performed on anode-supported cells (ASC), thereby varying gas composition (y CO = 4-15%, yH2 = 5 - 17 % , yCO2 = 6 - 18 % , yH2O = 2 - 30 % , yCH4 = 0.1 - 20 %) and temperature (600-850 °C). In this way, operating conditions for both stationary applications (methane-rich pre-reformate) as well as for auxiliary power unit (APU) applications (diesel-POX reformate) are represented. The reforming reaction is monitored in five different positions alongside the anodic gas channel by means of gas chromatography. It is shown that methane is converted in the flow field for methane-rich gas compositions, whereas under operation with diesel reformate the direction of the reaction is reversed for temperatures below 675 °C, i.e. (exothermic) methanation occurs along the anode. Using a reaction model, a rate equation for reforming could be derived which is also valid in the case of methanation. By introducing this equation into the reaction model the methane conversion along a catalytically active Ni-YSZ cermet SOFC anode can be simulated for the operating conditions specified above.

  17. Assessing methane oxidation under landfill covers and its contribution to the above atmospheric CO₂ levels: the added value of the isotope (δ¹³C and δ¹⁸O CO₂; δ¹³C and δD CH₄) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widory, D; Proust, E; Bellenfant, G; Bour, O

    2012-09-01

    We are presenting here a multi-isotope approach (δ¹³C and δ¹⁸O of CO₂; δ¹³C and δD of CH₄) to assess (i) the level(s) of methane oxidation during waste biodegradation and its migration through a landfill cover in Sonzay (France), and (ii) its contribution to the atmospheric CO₂ levels above the surface. The isotope approach is compared to the more conventional mass balance approach. Results from the two techniques are comparable and show that the CH₄ oxidation under the landfill cover is heterogenous, with low oxidation percentages in samples showing high biogas fluxes, which was expected in clay covers presenting fissures, through which CH₄ is rapidly transported. At shallow depth, more immobile biogas pockets show a higher level of CH₄ oxidation by the methanotrophic bacteria. δ¹³C of CO₂ samples taken at different heights (from below the cover up to 8m above the ground level) were also used to identify and assess the relative contributions of its main sources both under the landfill cover and in the surrounding atmosphere. PMID:22608681

  18. Methane Steam Reforming Kinetics in Operating Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, L.

    2014-01-01

    By 2040, electricity generation will account for more than 40 % of global energy consumption. Gains in efficiency through energy-saving practices and technologies – such as hybrid vehicles and new, high efficiency natural gas power plants – will temper demand growth and curb emissions. Different from the conventional thermal power plants, fuel cells are potentially more efficient than traditional heat engines since they are not limited by the maximum efficiency of the Carnot cycle. Rather, th...

  19. Improved methodology to assess modification and completion of landfill gas management in the aftercare period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Performance-based evaluation of landfill gas control system. ► Analytical framework to evaluate transition from active to passive gas control. ► Focus on cover oxidation as an alternative means of passive gas control. ► Integrates research on long-term landfill behavior with practical guidance. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste landfills represent the dominant option for waste disposal in many parts of the world. While some countries have greatly reduced their reliance on landfills, there remain thousands of landfills that require aftercare. The development of cost-effective strategies for landfill aftercare is in society’s interest to protect human health and the environment and to prevent the emergence of landfills with exhausted aftercare funding. The Evaluation of Post-Closure Care (EPCC) methodology is a performance-based approach in which landfill performance is assessed in four modules including leachate, gas, groundwater, and final cover. In the methodology, the objective is to evaluate landfill performance to determine when aftercare monitoring and maintenance can be reduced or possibly eliminated. This study presents an improved gas module for the methodology. While the original version of the module focused narrowly on regulatory requirements for control of methane migration, the improved gas module also considers best available control technology for landfill gas in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, air quality, and emissions of odoriferous compounds. The improved module emphasizes the reduction or elimination of fugitive methane by considering the methane oxidation capacity of the cover system. The module also allows for the installation of biologically active covers or other features designed to enhance methane oxidation. A methane emissions model, CALMIM, was used to assist with an assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of landfill covers.

  20. Availability and properties of materials for the Fakse Landfill biocover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Gitte Bukh; Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Methane produced in landfills can be oxidized in landfill covers made of compost; often called biocovers. Compost materials originating from seven different sources were characterized to determine their methane-oxidizing capacity and suitability for use in a full-scale biocover at Fakse Landfill in Denmark. Methane oxidation rates were determined in batch incubations. Based on material availability, characteristics, and the results of batch incubations, five of the seven materials were selected for further testing in column incubations. Three of the best performing materials showed comparable average methane oxidation rates: screened garden waste compost, sewage sludge compost, and an unscreened 4-year old garden waste compost (120, 112, and 108 gm(-2)d(-1), respectively). On the basis of these results, material availability and cost, the unscreened garden waste compost was determined to be the optimal material for the biocover. Comparing the results to criteria given in the literature it was found that the C/N ratio was the best indicator of the methane oxidation capacity of compost materials. The results of this work indicate that batch incubations measuring methane oxidation rates offer a low-cost and effective method for comparing compost sources for suitability of use in landfill biocovers. PMID:21185710

  1. Impact of different plants on the gas profile of a landfill cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Plants influence gas profile and methane oxidation in landfill covers. → Plants regulate water content and increase the availability of oxygen for methane oxidation. → Plant species with deep roots like alfalfa showed more stimulation of methane oxidation than plants with shallow root systems like grasses. - Abstract: Methane is an important greenhouse gas emitted from landfill sites and old waste dumps. Biological methane oxidation in landfill covers can help to reduce methane emissions. To determine the influence of different plant covers on this oxidation in a compost layer, we conducted a lysimeter study. We compared the effect of four different plant covers (grass, alfalfa + grass, miscanthus and black poplar) and of bare soil on the concentration of methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen in lysimeters filled with compost. Plants were essential for a sustainable reduction in methane concentrations, whereas in bare soil, methane oxidation declined already after 6 weeks. Enhanced microbial activity - expected in lysimeters with plants that were exposed to landfill gas - was supported by the increased temperature of the gas in the substrate and the higher methane oxidation potential. At the end of the first experimental year and from mid-April of the second experimental year, the methane concentration was most strongly reduced in the lysimeters containing alfalfa + grass, followed by poplar, miscanthus and grass. The observed differences probably reflect the different root morphology of the investigated plants, which influences oxygen transport to deeper compost layers and regulates the water content.

  2. Methane Dynamics in Flooded Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas with a heat trapping capacity 34 times greater than that of carbon dioxide on a100 year time scale. Known anthropogenic CH4 sources include livestock production, rice agriculture, landfills, and natural gas m...

  3. Coal Mine Methane in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This paper discusses coal mine methane emissions (CMM) in the Russian Federation and the potential for their productive utilisation. It highlights specific opportunities for cost-effective reductions of CMM from oil and natural gas facilities, coal mines and landfills, with the aim of improving knowledge about effective policy approaches.

  4. Methane on the greenhouse agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Kathleen B.; Hoffman, John S.; Thompson, Anne M.

    1991-01-01

    Options for reducing methane emissions, which could have a significant effect on global warming, are addressed. Emissions from landfills, coal mining, oil and natural gas systems, ruminants, animal wastes and wastewater, rice cultivation, and biomass burning are considered. Methods for implementing these emission reductions are discussed.

  5. Diamond dissolution and the production of methane and other carbon-bearing species in hydrothermal diamond-anvil cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I.-Ming; Anderson, Alan J.

    2009-01-01

    Raman analysis of the vapor phase formed after heating pure water to near critical (355-374 ??C) temperatures in a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC) reveals the synthesis of abiogenic methane. This unexpected result demonstrates the chemical reactivity of diamond at relatively low temperatures. The rate of methane production from the reaction between water and diamond increases with increasing temperature and is enhanced by the presence of a metal gasket (Re, Ir, or Inconel) which is compressed between the diamond anvils to seal the aqueous sample. The minimum detection limit for methane using Raman spectroscopy was determined to be ca. 0.047 MPa, indicating that more than 1.4 nanograms (or 8.6 ?? 10-11 mol) of methane were produced in the HDAC at 355 ??C and 30 MPa over a period of ten minutes. At temperatures of 650 ??C and greater, hydrogen and carbon dioxide were detected in addition to methane. The production of abiogenic methane, observed in all HDAC experiments where a gasket was used, necessitates a reexamination of the assumed chemical systems and intensive parameters reported in previous hydrothermal investigations employing diamonds. The results also demonstrate the need to minimize or eliminate the production of methane and other carbonic species in experiments by containing the sample within a HDAC without using a metal gasket.

  6. Landfill mining : a review of three decades of research

    OpenAIRE

    Krook, Joakim; Svensson, Niclas; Eklund, Mats; Johansson, Nils; Frändegård, Per

    2010-01-01

    Landfills have historically been seen as the ultimate solution for storing waste at minimum cost. It is now a well-established fact however that such deposits have related implications such as long-term methane emissions, local pollution concerns and limitations on urban development. Landfill mining has been suggested as a strategy to address such resource and pollution problems and in principle means the excavation, processing, treatment and/or recycling of deposited materials. This study in...

  7. Landfill gas: energy and environmental themes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfill gas (LFG) is a methane rich biogas produced as a consequence of the natural decomposition of organic waste materials in landfill. The gas is not an ideal fuel since it arises in the form of a cocktail of many different gases some of which have corrosive and toxic properties. However, many projects have demonstrated that LFG is a most useful fuel and worldwide savings have surpassed the 2 million tonnes of coal equivalent per annum (mtcepa) level. LFG does present a number of environmental problems if left uncontrolled. Locally, LFG can escape from a site and cause fires or even explosions if allowed to build-up in sufficient quantities. In a global context, LFG because of its high methane content, is a potent source of 'Greenhouse' gases -that is gases which add to the potential for global warming. Because of these problems there has been the steady realisation that gas control at sites is essential. (author)

  8. Methods of Sensing Land Pollution from Sanitary Landfills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosanov, Myron Ellis; Bowerman, Frank R.

    1971-01-01

    Major cities are congested and large sites suitable for landfill development are limited. Methane and other gases are produced at most sanitary landfills and dumps. These gases may migrate horizontally and vertically and have caused fatalities. Monitoring these gases provides data bases for design and construction of safe buildings on and adjacent to landfills. Methods of monitoring include: (1) a portable combustible gas indicator; and (2) glass flasks valved to allow simultaneous exhaust of the flask and aspiration of the sample into the flask. Samples are drawn through tubing from probes as deep as twenty-five feet below the surface.

  9. Onset of methanogenesis in landfilled MSW.

    OpenAIRE

    Barry, D. L.; Smith, Richard; Harries, C

    2004-01-01

    This research project (Barry et al. 2003, 2004a and 2004b) assessed the time period for the onset of methanogenesis and examined the scale of methane (CH4) fluxing from waste surfaces during the waste placement phases before gas control systems were installed. The gas regime at one landfill site was monitored over a 16-month period via a series of probes and perforated pipes installed at three different layers as waste disposal operations progressed. Bulk gas concentration data...

  10. Landfilling: Environmental Issues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Manfredi, Simone; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Waste disposed of in a landfill is by its nature different from the material found in the surroundings of the landfill and thereby the landfill may potentially affect the surrounding environment. This may be in terms of attracting or repelling flora and fauna from the area and through the emission...

  11. Landfilling: Concepts and Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Scharff, H.; Hjelmar, O.

    2011-01-01

    Landfilling of waste historically has been the main management route for waste, and in many parts of the world it still is. Landfills have developed from open polluting dumps to modern highly engineered facilities with sophisticated control measures and monitoring routines. However, in spite of a...... landfilling are described in Chapter 10.2 while specific types of landfilling technology are described in Chapter 10.5 (mineral waste landfill), Chapter 10.6 (reactor landfill) and Chapter 10.7 (pretreated waste landfill).......Landfilling of waste historically has been the main management route for waste, and in many parts of the world it still is. Landfills have developed from open polluting dumps to modern highly engineered facilities with sophisticated control measures and monitoring routines. However, in spite of all...... new approaches and technological advancement the landfill still is a long lasting accumulation of waste in the environment. Much of current landfill design and technology has been introduced as a reaction to problems encountered at actual landfills. The solution was in many cases sought in isolation...

  12. Characterization, Concentrations and Emission Rates of Volatile Organic Compounds from Two Major Landfill Sites in Kuwait

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad AlAhmad; Marwan Dimashki; Abdallah Nassour; Michael Nelles

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: The emission of pollutants from landfill sites in Kuwait is of major concern due to the associated adverse environmental and health impacts. There are 18 landfill sites in Kuwait which are contributing to the emission of atmospheric pollutants including; methane, carbon dioxide and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). Approach: Determine the concentration and composition of VOCs in LFG emissions from two major landfill sites in Kuwait and to investigate the influence of the "...

  13. Approaches to assess biocover performance on landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber-Humer, M; Röder, S; Lechner, P

    2009-07-01

    Methane emissions from active or closed landfills can be reduced by means of methane oxidation enhanced in properly designed landfill covers, known as "biocovers". Biocovers usually consist of a coarse gas distribution layer to balance gas fluxes placed beneath an appropriate substrate layer. The application of such covers implies use of measurement methods and evaluation approaches, both during the planning stage and throughout the operation of biocovers in order to demonstrate their efficiency. Principally, various techniques, commonly used to monitor landfill surface emissions, can be applied to control biocovers. However, particularly when using engineered materials such as compost substrates, biocovers often feature several altered, specific properties when compared to conventional covers, e.g., respect to gas permeability, physical parameters including water retention capacity and texture, and methane oxidation activity. Therefore, existing measuring methods should be carefully evaluated or even modified prior to application on biocovers. This paper discusses possible strategies to be applied in monitoring biocover functionality. On the basis of experiences derived from investigations and large-scale field trials with compost biocovers in Austria, an assessment approach has been developed. A conceptual draft for monitoring biocover performance and recommendations for practical application are presented. PMID:19282167

  14. Assessing the Role of Renewable Energy Policies in Landfill Gas Energy Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shanjun; Kyul Yoo, Han; Shih, Jhih-Shyang; Palmer, Karen; Macauley, Molly K.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is the second most prevalent greenhouse gas and has a global warming potential at least 28 times as high as carbon dioxide. Municipal solid waste landfills are reported to be the third-largest source of anthropogenic methane emissions in the United States, responsible for 18 percent of emissions in 2011. Capturing landfill gas for use as an energy source for electricity or heat produces alternative energy as well as environmental benefits. A host of federal and state policies encourag...

  15. Cooling of a Diesel Reformate Fuelled Solid Oxide Fuel Cell by Internal Reforming of Methane: A Modelling Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xiaowei; Alexander Kromp

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a system combining a diesel reformer using catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) with the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) for Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) applications is modeled with respect to the cooling effect provided by internal reforming of methane in anode gas channel.A model mixture consisting of 80% n-hexadecane and 20% 1-methylnaphthalin is used to simulate the commercial diesel.The modelling consists of several steps.First,equilibrium gas composition at the exit of CPOX reformer is modelled in terms oxygen to carbon (O/C) ratio,fuel utilization ratio and anode gas recirculation.Second,product composition,especially methane content,is determined for the methanation process at the operating temperatures ranging from 500 ℃ to 520 ℃.Finally,the cooling power provided by internal reforming of methane in SOFC fuel channel is calculated for two concepts to increase the methane content of the diesel reformate.The results show that the first concept,operating the diesel reformer at low O/C ratio and/or recirculation ratio,is not realizable due to high probability of coke formation,whereas the second concept,combining a methanation process with CPOX,can provide a significant cooling effect in addition to the conventional cooling concept which needs higher levels of excess air.

  16. Estimates of solid waste disposal rates and reduction targets for landfill gas emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jon T.; Townsend, Timothy G.; Zimmerman, Julie B.

    2016-02-01

    Landfill disposal of municipal solid waste represents one of the largest anthropogenic global methane emission sources, and recent policy approaches have targeted significant reductions of these emissions to combat climate change in the US (ref. ). The efficacy of active gas collection systems in the US was examined by analysing performance data, including fire occurrence, from more than 850 landfills. A generalized linear model showed that the operating status of a landfill--open and actively receiving waste or closed--was the most significant predictor of collection system performance. Gas collection systems at closed landfills were statistically significantly more efficient (p < 0.001) and on average 17 percentage points more efficient than those at open landfills, but open landfills were found to represent 91% of all landfill methane emissions. These results demonstrate the clear need to target open landfills to achieve significant near-term methane emission reductions. This observation is underscored by landfill disposal rates in the US significantly exceeding previously reported national estimates, with this study reporting 262 million tonnes in the year 2012 compared with 122 million tonnes in 2012 as estimated by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

  17. Landfill gas: development guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Guide produced as part of the UK DTI's New and Renewable Energy Programme provides information which forms a framework enabling landfill gas to be exploited fully as a renewable energy resource. The eight chapters cover the resource base of landfill gas in the UK in the wider context, the technology for energy recovery from landfill gas, the utilisation options for landfill gas, the various project development arrangements and their implementation, the assessment of a site's landfill gas resource, the factors which influence the project economies, financing aspects and the management of project liabilities and finally the national waste disposal policy and required consents followed by the overall process for project mobilisation. (UK)

  18. Ultrasound assisted biogas production from landfill leachate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Effect of low frequency ultrasound pretreatment on leachate was investigated. • Three different ultrasound energy inputs (200, 400 and 600 W/l) was applied. • Low-frequency ultrasound treatment increased soluble COD in landfill leachate. • Application of ultrasound to leachate increased biogas production about 40%. • Application of ultrasound to leachate increased total methane production rate about 20%. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to increase biogas production and methane yield from landfill leachate in anaerobic batch reactors by using low frequency ultrasound as a pretreatment step. In the first part of the study, optimum conditions for solubilization of organic matter in leachate samples were investigated using various sonication durations at an ultrasound frequency of 20 kHz. The level of organic matter solubilization during ultrasonic pretreatment experiments was determined by calculating the ratio of soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD) to total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD). The sCOD/tCOD ratio was increased from 47% in raw leachate to 63% after 45 min sonication at 600 W/l. Non-parametric Friedman’s test indicated that ultrasonic pretreatment has a significant effect on sCOD parameter for leachate (p < 0.05). In the second part of the study, anaerobic batch reactors were operated for both ultrasonically pretreated and untreated landfill leachate samples in order to assess the effect of sonication on biogas and methane production rate. In anaerobic batch reactor feed with ultrasonically pretreated leachate, 40% more biogas was obtained compared to the control reactor. For statistical analysis, Mann–Whitney U test was performed to compare biogas and methane production rates for raw and pretreated leachate samples and it has been found that ultrasonic pretreatment significantly enhanced biogas and methane production rates from leachate (p < 0.05) in anaerobic batch reactors. The overall results showed that low frequency

  19. Ultrasound assisted biogas production from landfill leachate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oz, Nilgün Ayman, E-mail: nilgunayman@comu.edu.tr; Yarimtepe, Canan Can

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Effect of low frequency ultrasound pretreatment on leachate was investigated. • Three different ultrasound energy inputs (200, 400 and 600 W/l) was applied. • Low-frequency ultrasound treatment increased soluble COD in landfill leachate. • Application of ultrasound to leachate increased biogas production about 40%. • Application of ultrasound to leachate increased total methane production rate about 20%. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to increase biogas production and methane yield from landfill leachate in anaerobic batch reactors by using low frequency ultrasound as a pretreatment step. In the first part of the study, optimum conditions for solubilization of organic matter in leachate samples were investigated using various sonication durations at an ultrasound frequency of 20 kHz. The level of organic matter solubilization during ultrasonic pretreatment experiments was determined by calculating the ratio of soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD) to total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD). The sCOD/tCOD ratio was increased from 47% in raw leachate to 63% after 45 min sonication at 600 W/l. Non-parametric Friedman’s test indicated that ultrasonic pretreatment has a significant effect on sCOD parameter for leachate (p < 0.05). In the second part of the study, anaerobic batch reactors were operated for both ultrasonically pretreated and untreated landfill leachate samples in order to assess the effect of sonication on biogas and methane production rate. In anaerobic batch reactor feed with ultrasonically pretreated leachate, 40% more biogas was obtained compared to the control reactor. For statistical analysis, Mann–Whitney U test was performed to compare biogas and methane production rates for raw and pretreated leachate samples and it has been found that ultrasonic pretreatment significantly enhanced biogas and methane production rates from leachate (p < 0.05) in anaerobic batch reactors. The overall results showed that low frequency

  20. Estimation of mass transport parameters of gases for quantifying CH4 oxidation in landfill soil covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane (CH4), which is one of the most abundant anthropogenic greenhouse gases, is produced from landfills. CH4 is biologically oxidized to carbon dioxide, which has a lower global warming potential than methane, when it passes through a cover soil. In order to quantify the amount of CH4 oxidized in a landfill cover soil, a soil column test, a diffusion cell test, and a mathematical model analysis were carried out. In the column test, maximum oxidation rates of CH4 (Vmax) showed higher values in the upper part of the column than those in the lower part caused by the penetration of O2 from the top. The organic matter content in the upper area was also higher due to the active microbial growth. The dispersion analysis results for O2 and CH4 in the column are counter-intuitive. As the upward flow rate of the landfill gas increased, the dispersion coefficient of CH4 slightly increased, possibly due to the effect of mechanical dispersion. On the other hand, as the upward flow rate of the landfill gas increased, the dispersion coefficient of O2 decreased. It is possible that the diffusion of gases in porous media is influenced by the counter-directional flow rate. Further analysis of other gases in the column, N2 and CO2, may be required to support this hypothesis, but in this paper we propose the possibility that the simulations using the diffusion coefficient of O2 under the natural condition may overestimate the penetration of O2 into the soil cover layer and consequently overestimate the oxidation of CH4

  1. Estimation of mass transport parameters of gases for quantifying CH4 oxidation in landfill soil covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, J; Moon, S; Nam, K; Kim, Y-J; Kim, J Y

    2009-02-01

    Methane (CH(4)), which is one of the most abundant anthropogenic greenhouse gases, is produced from landfills. CH(4) is biologically oxidized to carbon dioxide, which has a lower global warming potential than methane, when it passes through a cover soil. In order to quantify the amount of CH(4) oxidized in a landfill cover soil, a soil column test, a diffusion cell test, and a mathematical model analysis were carried out. In the column test, maximum oxidation rates of CH(4) (V(max)) showed higher values in the upper part of the column than those in the lower part caused by the penetration of O(2) from the top. The organic matter content in the upper area was also higher due to the active microbial growth. The dispersion analysis results for O(2) and CH(4) in the column are counter-intuitive. As the upward flow rate of the landfill gas increased, the dispersion coefficient of CH(4) slightly increased, possibly due to the effect of mechanical dispersion. On the other hand, as the upward flow rate of the landfill gas increased, the dispersion coefficient of O(2) decreased. It is possible that the diffusion of gases in porous media is influenced by the counter-directional flow rate. Further analysis of other gases in the column, N(2) and CO(2), may be required to support this hypothesis, but in this paper we propose the possibility that the simulations using the diffusion coefficient of O(2) under the natural condition may overestimate the penetration of O(2) into the soil cover layer and consequently overestimate the oxidation of CH(4). PMID:18804363

  2. Landfill Top Covers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    however, top covers may be the only environmental protection measure. In some landfill regulations (for instance the Subtitle D landfills receiving municipal solid waste in the USA) it is required to minimize infiltration into the waste layers. Therefore top covers containing liner components such as......The purpose of the final cover of a landfill is to contain the waste and to provide for a physical separation between the waste and the environment for protection of public health. Most landfill covers are designed with the primary goal to reduce or prevent infiltration of precipitation into the...... landfill in order to minimize leachate generation. In addition the cover also has to control the release of gases produced in the landfill so the gas can be ventilated, collected and utilized, or oxidized in situ. The landfill cover should also minimize erosion and support vegetation. Finally the cover is...

  3. THE EMISSION POTENTIAL FROM MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILL IN JORDAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Aljaradin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study was conducted to monitor the emission potential from solid waste landfilled in Jordan over a period of 292 days using an anaerobic lysimeter. A 30 kg waste sample reflecting the typical municipal solid waste (MSW streams generated in Jordan was used to simulate the influence of climate on the emission potential of landfills located in semi-arid areas. The experimental results demonstrated that a significant amount of leachate and landfill gas was produced. The methane content was found to be more than 45% and the leachate produced reached 15.7 l after 200 days. However, after 260 days the gas and leachate production rate became negligible. A significant amount of heavy metal traces was found in the leachate due to mixed waste disposal. Changes in biogas and leachate quality parameters in the lysimeter revealed typical landfill behaviour trends, the only difference being that they developed much more quickly. In view of current landfill practices in Jordan and the effect of climate change, the results suggest that landfill design and operational modes need to be adjusted in order to achieve sustainability. For this reason, optimized design parameters and operational scenarios for sustainable landfill based on the country’s climatic conditions and financial as well as technical potential are recommended as a primary reference for future landfills in Jordan as well as in similar regions and climates.

  4. Investigation of methane steam reforming in planar porous support of solid oxide fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adopting the porous support in integrated-planar solid oxide fuel cell (IP-SOFC) can reduce the operating temperature by reducing thickness of electrolyte layer, and also, provide internal reforming environment for hydrogen-rich fuel gas. The distributions of reactant and product components, and temperature of methane steam reforming for IP-SOFC were investigated by the developed physical and mathematical model with thermodynamic analysis, in which eleven possible reaction mechanisms were considered by the source terms and Arrhenius relationship. Numerical simulation of the model revealed that the progress of reforming reaction and the distribution of the product, H2, were influenced by the operating conditions, included that of temperature, ratio of H2O and CH4, as well as by the porosity of the supporting material. The simulating results indicate that the methane conversion rate can reach its maximum value under the operating temperature of 800 deg. C and porosity of ε = 0.4, which rather approximate to the practical operating conditions of IP-SOFC. In addition, characteristics of carbon deposition on surface of catalyst were discussed under various operating conditions and configuration parameters of the porous support. The present works provided some theoretical explanations to the numerous experimental observations and engineered practices

  5. The potential for aeration of MSW landfills to accelerate completion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfilling is a popular waste disposal method, but, as it is practised currently, it is fundamentally unsustainable. The low short-term financial costs belie the potential long-term environmental costs, and traditional landfill sites require long-term management in order to mitigate any possible environmental damage. Old landfill sites might require aftercare for decades or even centuries, and in some cases remediation may be necessary. Biological stabilisation of a landfill is the key issue; completion criteria provide a yardstick by which the success of any new technology may be measured. In order for a site to achieve completion it must pose no risk to human health or the environment, meaning that attenuation of any emissions from the site must occur within the local environment without causing harm. Remediation of old landfill sites by aerating the waste has been undertaken in Germany, the United States, Italy and The Netherlands, with considerable success. At a pilot scale, aeration has also been used in newly emplaced waste to accelerate stabilisation. This paper reviews the use of aerobic landfill worldwide, and assesses the ways in which the use of aerobic landfill techniques can decrease the risks associated with current landfill practices, making landfill a more sustainable waste disposal option. It focuses on assessing ways to utilise aeration to enhance stabilisation. The results demonstrated that aeration of old landfill sites may be an efficient and cost-effective method of remediation and allow the date of completion to be brought forward by decades. Similarly, aeration of newly emplaced waste can be effective in enhancing degradation, assisting with completion and reducing environmental risks. However, further research is required to establish what procedure for adding air to a landfill would be most suitable for the UK and to investigate new risks that may arise, such as the possible emission of non-methane organic compounds

  6. Self-powered denitration of landfill leachate through ammonia/nitrate coupled redox fuel cell reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huimin; Xu, Wei; Feng, Daolun; Liu, Zhanmeng; Wu, Zucheng

    2016-03-01

    In order to explore the feasibility of energy-free denitrifying N-rich wastewater, a self-powered device was uniquely assembled, in which ammonia/nitrate coupled redox fuel cell (CRFC) reactor was served as removing nitrogen and harvesting electric energy simultaneously. Ammonia is oxidized at anodic compartment and nitrate is reduced at cathodic compartment spontaneously by electrocatalysis. In 7.14 mM ammonia+0.2M KOH anolyte and 4.29 mM KNO3+0.1M H2SO4 catholyte, the nitrate removal efficiency was 46.9% after 18 h. Meanwhile, a maximum power density of 170 mW m(-2) was achieved when applying Pd/C cathode. When NH4Cl/nitrate and ammonia/nitrite CRFCs were tested, 26.2% N-NH4Cl and 91.4% N-NO2(-) were removed respectively. Nitrogen removal efficiency for real leachate at the same initial NH3-N concentration is 22.9% and nitrification of ammonia in leachate can be used as nitrate source. This work demonstrated a new way for N-rich wastewater remediation with electricity generation. PMID:26720140

  7. Transport and reaction processes affecting the attenuation of landfill gas in cover soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K.U.; Scheutz, Charlotte;

    2008-01-01

    Methane and trace organic gases produced in landfill waste are partly oxidized in the top 40 cm of landfill cover soils under aerobic conditions. The balance between the oxidation of landfill gases and the ingress of atmospheric oxygen into the soil cover determines the attenuation of emissions of...... emission to the atmosphere. Oxygen supply into the soil column is driven exclusively by diffusion, whereas advection outward offsets part of the diffusive contribution. In the reaction zone, methane consumption reduces the pressure gradient, further decreasing the significance of advection near the top of...

  8. Methane emissions in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane is the most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide. Detailed national emission estimates are needed to narrow the gap between world emission estimates and budget results from atmospheric chemistry. These estimates have to be based on sound emission factors and better extrapolation of methane measurement results. The article identifies the most important sources of methane in the Netherlands as landfills, ruminants, manure and the production, distribution and combustion of gas. It explains that emissions from landfills will decrease as a result of policies to reduce landfilling. The encouragement of increased internal use of otherwise vented gas on oil and gas production platforms and the planned extra maintenance of destribution networks should further decrease emissions. Policies to reduce milk and beef surplus and the introduction of new types of stabling and manure handling systems will reduce emissions in the agriculture sector. These measures should produce a total reduction of methane of 20% in 2000 with respect to 1990 levels. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Artificial sweeteners as potential tracers of municipal landfill leachate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artificial sweeteners are gaining acceptance as tracers of human wastewater in the environment. The 3 artificial sweeteners analyzed in this study were detected in leachate or leachate-impacted groundwater at levels comparable to those of untreated wastewater at 14 of 15 municipal landfill sites tested, including several closed for >50 years. Saccharin was the dominant sweetener in old (pre-1990) landfills, while newer landfills were dominated by saccharin and acesulfame (introduced 2 decades ago; dominant in wastewater). Cyclamate was also detected, but less frequently. A case study at one site illustrates the use of artificial sweeteners to identify a landfill-impacted groundwater plume discharging to a stream. The study results suggest that artificial sweeteners can be useful tracers for current and legacy landfill contamination, with relative abundances of the sweeteners potentially providing diagnostic ability to distinguish different landfills or landfill cells, including crude age-dating, and to distinguish landfill and wastewater sources. -- Highlights: • Artificial sweeteners detected at 14 of 15 municipal landfill sites. • Concentrations comparable to wastewater even at sites closed for >50 yr. • Saccharin elevated at all sites; potentially diagnostic of landfill impacts. • Potential for age-dating recent (past 2 decades) waste with acesulfame. -- Artificial sweeteners may be useful for tracing landfill leachate contamination and distinguishing it from wastewater impacts

  10. Influence of supplemental heat addition on performance of pilot-scale bioreactor landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mohamed; Kennedy, Kevin; Narbaitz, Roberto; Warith, Mostafa; Sartaj, Majid

    2014-02-01

    Implementation of supplemental heat addition as a means of improving bioreactor landfill performance was investigated. The experimental work was conducted with two pilot-scale bioreactor setups (control cell and heated cell) operated for 280 days. Supplemental heat was introduced by recirculating leachate heated up to 35 °C compared to the control which used similar quantities of leachate at room temperature (21 ± 1 °C). The temporal and spatial effects of recirculating heated leachate on the landfill internal temperature were determined, and performance was assessed in terms of leachate parameters and biogas production. Recirculation of heated leachate helped establish balanced anaerobic microbial consortia that led to earlier (70 days) and greater (1.4-fold) organic matter degradation rates, as well as threefold higher methane production compared to the non-heated control. Despite the significant enhancements in performance resulting from supplemental heat addition, heated leachate recirculation did not significantly impact waste temperatures, and the effects were mainly restricted to short periods after recirculation and mostly at the upper layers of the waste. These findings suggest that improvements in bioreactor landfill performance may be achieved without increasing the temperature of the whole in-place waste, but rather more economically by raising the temperature at the leachate/waste interface which is also exposed to the maximum moisture levels within the waste matrix. PMID:23780222

  11. Prediction of landfill leachate amount using HELP model Case study: Semnan landfill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ghavidel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Objectives:. Owing to the non-seperated municipal solid wastes the leachate form in land fills contain high amounts of heavy metalls and toxic substances Hence, leachate treatment is a serious problem. In order to design leachate treatment and collection systems, estimation of quality and quantity of leachate is of high necessity. Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP Model was used to estimate leachate generation in the lined landfill cells for a variety of conditions. The HELP program is a quasi-two-dimensional hydrologic model for conducting water balance analysis of landfills, cover systems, and other solid waste containment facilities. In this paper HELP program is used to predict leachate generating in Semnan landfill after its operational life."nMaterials and Methods: HELP model use weather, soil and design data to estimate leachate quantity. The meteorological data were obtained from semnan Atmospheric Data Centre. Soil mechanics examinations in the landfill area were applied to achieve soil data. In addition, design parameters were based on Semnan landfill design specifications. Semnan landfill capacity is designed so as to accommodate municipal solid wastes generated during the next 25 years."nResults: In this study result indicated that precipitation and evapotranspiration has the most influenced on leachate generation increase and decrease, respectively. 82% of annual precipitation isn't percolated into Semnan landfill due to evapotranspiration. HELP Model simulations were indicated that the maximum and average value of leachate height above barrier layer is 36 and 3mm,respectively."nConclusion: Semnan landfill is designed under minimum standard condition. Therefore, low height of leachate generated is due to area weather. The precipitation amount is low while the evapotranspiration amount is high in this area. High evapotranspiration is due to high temperature and solar radiation in Semnan

  12. Landfill Gas Capture Opportunity in Sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Ouedraogo, Fatimata

    2005-01-01

    This study entitled, Landfill gas capture opportunity in Sub-Saharan Africa, analyzes urban waste in both quantitative and qualitative terms in selected Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries to find out if available methane from municipal waste could be used as a supplementary energy source and evaluate whether potential waste-to-energy (WTE) project candidates meet a certain level of cost e...

  13. Modeling lateral gas transport in soil adjacent to an old landfill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, T.G.; Christophersen, Mette; Moldrup, P.; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2001-01-01

    , and atmospheric pressure variations. Gas diffusivity and air permeability were measured on undisturbed samples collected at an agricultural field adjacent to an old Danish municipal landfill. Empirical expressions for predicting gas diffusivity and air permeability from soil-water content were fitted...... permeability and soil-water content. Methane oxidation rate and atmospheric pressure variations had some effects, especially on the gas flux, whereas gas diffusion was not important.......Lateral migration of landfill gases in soils surrounding old (closed) municipal landfills can lead to explosion hazards and damage to vegetation. Landfill gas production and migration is controlled by microbial activity and soil physical properties such as gas (air) permeability, gas diffusivity...

  14. LIQUID NATURAL GAS (LNG): AN ALTERNATIVE FUEL FROM LANDFILL GAS (LFG) AND WASTEWATER DIGESTER GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VANDOR,D.

    1999-03-01

    This Research and Development Subcontract sought to find economic, technical and policy links between methane recovery at landfill and wastewater treatment sites in New York and Maryland, and ways to use that methane as an alternative fuel--compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquid natural gas (LNG) -- in centrally fueled Alternative Fueled Vehicles (AFVs).

  15. Lateral gas transport in soil adjacent to an old landfill: factors governing gas migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Mette; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Field experiments investigating lateral gas transport in soil adjacent to an old landfill in Denmark during a one-year period were conducted. A significant seasonal variation, with low concentrations of methane and high concentrations of carbon dioxide in the summer, caused by methane oxidation was...

  16. Landfill gas issues affecting the design and operation of waste to energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A common location for waste to energy (WTE) facilities is adjacent to an existing landfill. This is an appropriate place to site WTE facilities, given that solid waste is already directed to the landfill site, and bypass refuse and ash generated by the WTE facility can readily be disposed at the existing landfill. Often, however, the existing landfill is unlined, and is generating landfill gas (LFG) in sufficient quantities and pressures to create lateral LFG migration. Such LFG migration must be addressed in the design of the WTE facility. LFG is composed of approximately equal parts of methane and carbon dioxide. Since methane is explosive under certain conditions, its accumulation within onsite structures must be controlled. Alternatives for LFG migration control include perimeter extraction systems, and active and passive subslab systems for individual facility buildings. In this paper advantages and disadvantages of the various control system types are discussed. LFG control and safety during plant construction also are addressed

  17. Aerobic landfill bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgins, Mark P; Bessette, Bernard J; March, John; McComb, Scott T.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

  18. Total Column Methane Retrievals Using the Tropospheric Infrared Mapping Spectrometer Over Sunglint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, N.; Kumer, J.; Rairden, R.; Jablonski, K.

    2012-07-01

    Because it is a greenhouse gas, the detection of methane concentrations is a global issue. Additionally, the presence of methane is indicative of potential valuable petroleum and natural gas deposits. Therefore methane seep detection is useful for petroleum exploration around the world. The detection of methane, and other absorbing gases, over water is an issue for passive systems because one is seeking to detect an absorbing gas over an absorbing surface. The solution to this dilemma is to use the sun/sensor geometry for sun glint off of water to measure the absorbing gas over a reflecting surface, and therefore significantly increase the signal to noise of the measurement being taken. In September of 2010 Lockheed Martin performed a proof of concept by demonstrating from an airship over San Francisco Bay the capability of the Tropospheric Infrared Mapping Spectrometer's (TIMS) hyper spectral sensor to passively measure methane, CO, and water vapor over sunglint water. The Lockheed Martin prototype TIMS sensor system is a hyper spectral grating spectrometer instrument that operates in the 2.3 micron spectral region at 0.25 cm-1 resolution. The Lockheed Martin retrieval algorithm developed applies the kCARTA (kCompressed Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Algorithm) with Jacobians, with the HITRAN 2008 lineshape parameters, to retrieve the total column amount of atmospheric species along with the calibrated TIMS sensors radiometric input. A cell with known amount of methane was placed into the input to the TIMS to simulate atmospheric enhancements near the water surface. The amount in the cell was retrieved well within the uncertainty of 1% of the amount in the cell. Multi frame retrievals on data in which the cell was not placed into the input beam demonstrated 1% precision. In addition, in situ surface measurements were done over a landfill park, where measurements of methane were taken over known hotspots. This research allows for the future development of a system

  19. Modelling the behaviour of mechanical biological treatment outputs in landfills using the GasSim model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, S M; Bateson, T; Gronow, J R; Voulvoulis, N

    2010-03-15

    The pretreatment of the biodegradable components of municipal solid waste (MSW) has been suggested as a method of reducing landfill gas emissions. Mechanical biological treatment (MBT) is the technology being developed to provide this reduction in biodegradability, either as an alternative to source segregated collection or for dealing with residual MSW which still contains high levels of biodegradable waste. The compost like outputs (CLOs) from MBT plants can be applied to land as a soil conditioner; treated to produce a solid recovered fuel (SRF) or landfilled. In this study the impact that landfilling of these CLOs will have on gaseous emissions is investigated. It is important that the gas production behaviour of landfilled waste is well understood, especially in European member states where the mitigation of gaseous emissions is a legal requirement. Results of an experiment carried out to characterise the biodegradable components of pretreated biowastes have been used with the GasSim model to predict the long term emissions behaviour of landfills accepting these wastes, in varying quantities. The landfill directive also enforces the mitigation of potential methane emissions from landfills, and the ability of landfill operators to capture gaseous emissions from low emitting landfills of the future is discussed, as well as new techniques that could be used for the mitigation of methane generation. PMID:20092874

  20. Potential of Immobilized Whole-Cell Methylocella tundrae as a Biocatalyst for Methanol Production from Methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardina, Primata; Li, Jinglin; Patel, Sanjay K S; Kim, In-Won; Lee, Jung-Kul; Selvaraj, Chandrabose

    2016-07-28

    Methanol is a versatile compound that can be biologically synthesized from methane (CH4) by methanotrophs using a low energy-consuming and environment-friendly process. Methylocella tundrae is a type II methanotroph that can utilize CH4 as a carbon and energy source. Methanol is produced in the first step of the metabolic pathway of methanotrophs and is further oxidized into formaldehyde. Several parameters must be optimized to achieve high methanol production. In this study, we optimized the production conditions and process parameters for methanol production. The optimum incubation time, substrate, pH, agitation rate, temperature, phosphate buffer and sodium formate concentration, and cell concentration were determined to be 24 h, 50% CH4, pH 7, 150 rpm, 30°C, 100 mM and 50 mM, and 18 mg/ml, respectively. The optimization of these parameters significantly improved methanol production from 0.66 to 5.18 mM. The use of alginate-encapsulated cells resulted in enhanced methanol production stability and reusability of cells after five cycles of reuse under batch culture conditions. PMID:27012239

  1. Characterization of fine fraction mined from two Finnish landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönkäre, Tiina J; Palmroth, Marja R T; Rintala, Jukka A

    2016-01-01

    A fine fraction (FF) was mined from two Finnish municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills in Kuopio (1- to 10-year-old, referred as new landfill) and Lohja (24- to 40-year-old, referred as old landfill) in order to characterize FF. In Kuopio the FF (volatile solids, VS) and the biochemical methane potential (BMP) of FF were lower in the old landfill (VS/TS 12.8±7.1% and BMP 5.8±3.4 m(3)CH4/t TS) than in the new landfill (VS/TS 21.3±4.3% and BMP 14.4±9.9 m(3)CH4/t TS), and both were lower compared with fresh MSW. In the Kuopio landfill materials were also mechanically sieved in the full scale plant in two size fraction characterization of FF is important to find possible methods for using or disposing FF mined from landfills. PMID:25817722

  2. Methanotrophy in London, UK, Landfill Topsoil: Microbiology, Stable Carbon Isotopes, Seasonal Variation and Laboratory Model Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriskantharajah, S.; Fisher, R.; Lowry, D.; Grassineau, N.; Nisbet, E. G.

    2004-12-01

    Landfill is a major source of methane emissions into the atmosphere. Aerobic soil is also a good sink of methane, as it is inhabited by methane consuming bacteria, methanotrophs. Methanotrophic bacteria were cultured from landfill soil samples. Three genera of methanotrophs were cultured: Methylocaldum, Methylosinus and Methylomonas. Interestingly, the only established members of the Methylocaldum genus are all thermophilic, whilst those isolated in this study are mesophilic. This suggests that those Methylocaldum methanotrophs found in landfills may have migrated from hot spring natural settings. Representatives of each genera were inoculated into a simple topsoil model and subjected to variations in temperature, methane concentration and incubation periods. As expected, temperature greatly affected methane oxidation, but methane concentration affected the rate of oxidation far more than expected. The model study implies that the complete combustion of methane to carbon dioxide is greatly affected by temperature and methane availability, whilst the effect on the uptake of methane is not as great. Seasonal variations in methane concentrations within the topsoil were monitored over a one year period from November 2002 to October 2003 and show that methane flow through the topsoil, and consequently methanotrophy, is strongly controlled by meteorology, mainly air temperature and pressure. Generally, methanotrophy was low during colder months and higher at during warmer months, but changes in air pressure complicate this by controlling the rate of flow of methane through the topsoil. δ 13C analyses of methane and carbon dioxide emitted from landfill topsoil showed that there was a great deal of methanotrophic activity during the warmer months of 2003, with most fractionation of residual methane occurring during August. During the heat wave experienced in the UK in August 2003, the δ 13C from borehole samples of methane in the anaerobic zone shifted from -57‰ to -16

  3. The impact of municipal solid waste landfills in Suceava County on air quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru MIHĂILĂ

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The location of municipal solid waste (MSW landfills in inappropriate places is a serious risk to the quality of all environmental factors. These waste disposal sites can become major sources of air quality deterioration through emissions of toxic gas resulted from anaerobic decomposition of organic waste. The paper discusses in detail the qualitative and quantitative effects of municipal waste landfills of the main urban settlements in Suceava County (Suceava City municipal landfill and Gura Humorului, Rădăuţi, Siret, Câmpulung Moldovenesc, Fălticeni and Vatra Dornei urban waste landfills on air quality. The dispersion of methane emitted from the largest MSW landfill in the county, the Suceava municipal landfill respectively, is also presented, taking into account seasonal, daytime and nighttime meteorological parameters

  4. Decomposition of forest products buried in landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This study tracked chemical changes of wood and paper in landfills. • A decomposition index was developed to quantify carbohydrate biodegradation. • Newsprint biodegradation as measured here is greater than previous reports. • The field results correlate well with previous laboratory measurements. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to investigate the decomposition of selected wood and paper products in landfills. The decomposition of these products under anaerobic landfill conditions results in the generation of biogenic carbon dioxide and methane, while the un-decomposed portion represents a biogenic carbon sink. Information on the decomposition of these municipal waste components is used to estimate national methane emissions inventories, for attribution of carbon storage credits, and to assess the life-cycle greenhouse gas impacts of wood and paper products. Hardwood (HW), softwood (SW), plywood (PW), oriented strand board (OSB), particleboard (PB), medium-density fiberboard (MDF), newsprint (NP), corrugated container (CC) and copy paper (CP) were buried in landfills operated with leachate recirculation, and were excavated after approximately 1.5 and 2.5 yr. Samples were analyzed for cellulose (C), hemicellulose (H), lignin (L), volatile solids (VS), and organic carbon (OC). A holocellulose decomposition index (HOD) and carbon storage factor (CSF) were calculated to evaluate the extent of solids decomposition and carbon storage. Samples of OSB made from HW exhibited cellulose plus hemicellulose (C + H) loss of up to 38%, while loss for the other wood types was 0–10% in most samples. The C + H loss was up to 81%, 95% and 96% for NP, CP and CC, respectively. The CSFs for wood and paper samples ranged from 0.34 to 0.47 and 0.02 to 0.27 g OC g−1 dry material, respectively. These results, in general, correlated well with an earlier laboratory-scale study, though NP and CC decomposition measured in this study were higher than

  5. Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeremy Semrau; Sung-Woo Lee; Jeongdae Im; Sukhwan Yoon; Michael Barcelona

    2010-09-30

    The overall objective of this project, 'Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils' was to develop effective, efficient, and economic methodologies by which microbial production of nitrous oxide can be minimized while also maximizing microbial consumption of methane in landfill cover soils. A combination of laboratory and field site experiments found that the addition of nitrogen and phenylacetylene stimulated in situ methane oxidation while minimizing nitrous oxide production. Molecular analyses also indicated that methane-oxidizing bacteria may play a significant role in not only removing methane, but in nitrous oxide production as well, although the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea to nitrous oxide production can not be excluded at this time. Future efforts to control both methane and nitrous oxide emissions from landfills as well as from other environments (e.g., agricultural soils) should consider these issues. Finally, a methanotrophic biofiltration system was designed and modeled for the promotion of methanotrophic activity in local methane 'hotspots' such as landfills. Model results as well as economic analyses of these biofilters indicate that the use of methanotrophic biofilters for controlling methane emissions is technically feasible, and provided either the costs of biofilter construction and operation are reduced or the value of CO{sub 2} credits is increased, can also be economically attractive.

  6. Microbial mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions from landfill cover soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Woo

    Landfills are one of the major sources of methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential (GWP) ˜23 times higher than that of carbon dioxide (CO2). Although some effective strategies have been formulated to prevent methane emissions from large landfills, many landfills allow methane to be freely emitted to the atmosphere. In such situations, it is often proposed to stimulate methanotrophs, a group of bacteria that consume methane, in the cover soil to prevent fugitive methane emissions. Several factors, however, must be addressed to make such a biogenic removal mechanism effective. First, methanotrophic activity can be inhibited by nonmethane organic compounds (NMOCs) that are commonly found in landfill soil gas. Second, although methanotrophs can be easily stimulated with the addition of nitrogenous fertilizers, biogenic production of nitrous oxide with a GWP ˜296 times higher than that of carbon dioxide, is also stimulated. To consider these issues, two general areas of research were performed. First, a dimensionless number was developed based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics that describes the effects of the presence of multiple NMOCs on methanotrophic growth and survival. This model was validated via experimental measurements of methanotrophic growth in the presence of varying amounts of NMOCs. Second, the effects of nutrient amendments on methane oxidation and nitrous oxide production were examined by constructing soil microcosms using landfill cover soils. Here, it was shown that the addition of ammonium in the presence of phenylacetylene stimulated methane oxidation but inhibited nitrous oxide production. Furthermore, to understand the methanotrophic community structure and activity in response to these amendments, DNA microarray and transcript analyses were performed. The results indicated the predominance of Type II methanotrophs but that Type I methanotrophs responded more significantly to these amendments. Also, substantial activity

  7. Landfill gas: from harmful emission to reliable energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfill gas produced from solid waste landfills is one of the most significant sources of anthropogenic methane in Canada. Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is 24.5 times more powerful than carbon dioxide by weight in terms of global climate change. Landfill gas recovery plays an important role in Canada's commitment to stabilise greenhouse gas emissions at 1990 levels by the year 2000 under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Landfill gas is a potentially harmful emission that can be converted into a reliable environmentally-sustainable energy source used to generate electricity, fuel industries and heat buildings. The recovery and utilisation of landfill gas is a win-win situation which makes good sense from local, regional and global perspectives. It provides the benefits of 1) reducing the release of greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming; 2) limiting odours, 3) controlling damage to vegetation, 4) reducing risks from explosions, fires and asphyxiation; 5) converting a harmful emission into a reliable energy source; and 6) creating a potential source of revenue and profit. (Author)

  8. Economic and environmental benefits of landfill gas utilisation in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abushammala, Mohammed Fm; Qazi, Wajeeha A; Azam, Mohammed-Hasham; Mehmood, Umais A; Al-Mufragi, Ghithaa A; Alrawahi, Noor-Alhuda

    2016-08-01

    Municipal solid waste disposed in landfill sites decomposes under anaerobic conditions and produces so-called landfill-gas, which contains 30%-40% of carbon dioxide (CO2) and 50%-60% of methane (CH4). Methane has the potential of causing global warming 25 times more than CO2 Therefore, migration of landfill-gas from landfills to the surrounding environment can potentially affect human life and environment. Thus, this research aims to determine municipal solid waste generation in Oman over the years 1971-2030, to quantify annual CH4 emissions inventory that resulted from this waste over the same period of time, and to determine the economic and environmental benefits of capturing the CH4 gas for energy production. It is found that cumulative municipal solid waste landfilled in Oman reaches 3089 Giga gram (Gg) in the year 2030, of which approximately 85 Gg of CH4 emissions are produced in the year 2030. The study also found that capturing CH4 emissions between the years 2016 and 2030 could attract revenues of up to US$333 million and US$291 million from the carbon reduction and electricity generation, simultaneously. It is concluded that CH4 emissions from solid waste in Oman increases enormously with time, and capture of this gas for energy production could provide a sustainable waste management solution in Oman. PMID:26922087

  9. Coal Mine Methane in Russia [Russian Version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This paper discusses coal mine methane emissions (CMM) in the Russian Federation and the potential for their productive utilisation. It highlights specific opportunities for cost-effective reductions of CMM from oil and natural gas facilities, coal mines and landfills, with the aim of improving knowledge about effective policy approaches.

  10. A review on utilization of combustible waste gas (II):Landfill gas,flare gas,associated gas and coalbed methane%可燃废气利用技术研究进展(Ⅱ):填埋气、火炬气、伴生天然气和煤矿瓦斯

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王一坤; 陈国辉; 雷小苗; 王长安; 邓磊; 车得福

    2014-01-01

    The utilization of combustible waste gas is an important way of energy conservation and emission reduction.The progress in utilization technologies of landfill gas,flare gas,associated gas and coalbed methane has been presented.Due to the very low utilization ratio and insufficient resourceful utilization of landfill gas,the waste landfill treatment of which the leachate treatment and efficient LFG extraction and utilization are the key technologies should be widely popularized.Generally,the flare gas is fired to provide heat which is then recycled by waste heat boiler.Sometimes it can be directly burned in gas turbine for power generation.With low yield,the associated gas can be used as the inj ection fluid for oil production,or for field power generation.When the yield is high and stable,the associated gas can be transported by pipe-lines,liquid natural gas (LNG)and compressed natural gas (CNG)ships.The optimal utilization of low concentration coalbed methane is for gas-steam combined cycle power generation,of which the power gen-eration efficiency can reach up to higher than 45%.Usually,the coalbed methane is applied as assistant air in mine-mouth power plants,for the technical requirements and cost of this method are the lowest.%可燃废气利用是实现我国节能减排的重要途径之一。介绍了目前填埋气、火炬气、伴生天然气和煤矿瓦斯几种可燃废气的利用技术和工业应用现状。其中:填埋气的利用率很低,资源化利用技术不足,需大力推广以渗滤液处理、高效LFG抽排及利用为核心的填埋垃圾处理工艺;火炬气通常引入燃油或燃气锅炉加以利用,也可以将火炬气燃烧后利用余热锅炉回收热量,或者作为中等热值的气体,直接引入燃气轮机燃烧发电;伴生天然气的产量不高时,可以将其回注驱油或就地发电,产量高且稳定时,可以采用管道输送、液化天然气(LNG)和压缩天然气(CNG

  11. Prediction of landfill leachate amount using HELP model Case study: Semnan landfill

    OpenAIRE

    A Ghavidel; M.J Zoqi

    2011-01-01

    "nBackground and Objectives:. Owing to the non-seperated municipal solid wastes the leachate form in land fills contain high amounts of heavy metalls and toxic substances Hence, leachate treatment is a serious problem. In order to design leachate treatment and collection systems, estimation of quality and quantity of leachate is of high necessity. Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) Model was used to estimate leachate generation in the lined landfill cells for a variety of co...

  12. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Nineteenth Avenue Landfill, Phoenix, AZ. (First remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 213-acre Nineteenth Avenue Landfill is in an industrial area of Maricopa County, Phoenix, Arizona. State permitted landfill operations were conducted from 1957 to 1979 during which time approximately nine million cubic yards of municipal refuse, solid and liquid industrial wastes, and some medical wastes and materials containing low levels of radioactivity were deposited in the landfill. The State ordered the landfill closed in 1979 due to the periodic inundation of the landfill by flood waters from the Salt River Channel. Subsequently, the city covered the site with fill, stockpiled soil for final capping, installed ground water monitoring wells, built berms around the landfill, and installed a methane gas collection system. The remedial action is designed to mitigate threats resulting from flooding of the landfill, which has occurred intermittently since 1965. The primary contaminants of concern in the soil/refuse include VOCs such as toluene and xylenes

  13. Auto generation plant of Artigas landfill (Bilbao, Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disposition of MSW in the landfill generates a mixture of gases or biogas, its primary content is methane (50-60%) which has a very important energetic value, that can be very useful. In this sense, the present work point out the characteristics of the auto generation electrical plant of Artigas landfill, just like the results of the analytical study of the past two years. In this project which was partly funded by the UE, have participated Excmo. Ayuntamiento de Bilbao, EVE and CIEMAT. (Author) 6 refs

  14. Evaluation of an integrated methane autothermal reforming and high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the performance and efficiency of an integrated autothermal reforming and HT-PEMFC (high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell) system fueled by methane. Effect of the inclusion of a CO (carbon monoxide) removal process on the integrated HT-PEMFC system was considered. An increase in the S/C (steam-to-carbon) ratio and the reformer temperature can enhance the hydrogen fraction while the CO formation reduces with increasing S/C ratio. The fuel processor efficiency of the methane autothermal reformer with a WGS (water gas shift reactor) reactor, as the CO removal process, is higher than that without a WGS reactor. A higher fuel processor efficiency can be obtained when the feed of the autothermal reformer is preheated to the reformer temperature. Regarding the cell performance, the reformate gas from the methane reformer operated at Tin = TR and with a high S/C ratio is suitable for the HT-PEMFC system without a WGS reactor. When considering the HT-PEMFC system with a WGS reactor, the CO poisoning has less significant impact on the cell performance and the system can be operated over a broader range to minimize the required total active area. A WGS reactor is necessary for the methane autothermal reforming and HT-PEMFC integrated system with regard to the system efficiency. - Highlights: • An integrated autothermal reforming and HT-PEMFC system was studied. • The HT-PEMFC system with and without a CO removal process was considered. • Parametric analysis was performed to obtain a high system efficiency. • The HT-PEMFC system with the WGS reactor can be run over a broader range. • The efficiencies of the HT-PEMFC systems without and with a WGS reactor were reported

  15. Lateral migration and offsite surface emission of landfill gas at City of Montreal Landfill Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzidis, Jean-Pierre; Héroux, Martin; Nastev, Miroslav; Guy, Christophe

    2008-04-01

    An evaluation of lateral landfill gas migration was carried out at the Saint-Michel Environmental Complex in Montreal, City of Montreal Landfill Site, Canada, between 2003 and 2005. Biogas concentration measurements and gas-pumping tests were conducted in multilevel wells installed in the backfilled overburden beside the landfill site. A migration event recorded in autumn 2004 during the maintenance shutdown of the extraction system was simulated using TOUGH-LGM software. Eleven high-density instantaneous surface monitoring (ISM) surveys of methane were conducted on the test site. Gas fluxes were calculated by geostatistical analyses of ISM data correlated to dynamic flux chamber measurements. Variograms using normal transformed data showed good structure, and kriged estimates were much better than inverse distance weighting, due to highly skewed data. Measurement-based estimates of yearly off-site surface emissions were two orders of magnitude higher than modelled advective lateral methane flux. Nucleodensimeter measurements of the porosity were abnormally high, indicating that the backfill was poorly compacted. Kriged porosity maps correlated well with emission maps and areas with vegetation damage. Pumping tests analysis revealed that vertical permeability was higher than radial permeability. All results suggest that most of the lateral migration and consequent emissions to the atmosphere were due to the existence of preferential flow paths through macropores. In December 2006, two passively vented trenches were constructed on the test site. They were successful in countering lateral migration. PMID:18578151

  16. Landfill gas management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of landfill gas (LFG) is the inevitable consequence of the disposal of any biodegradable waste in a landfill. While controlled landfill techniques provide an environmentally acceptable method for disposing of the community's solid waste at a significant lower cost than other methods, there is a need to control LFG to minimise environmental impact and possible public safety hazards. This paper presents a brief discussion of the mechanisms of LFG formation, its composition and factors affecting its generation rate. The total contribution to greenhouse gases directly attributable to landfill gas (mainly CH4 and CO2) is estimated at 1.4% but it is considered to be potentially a controlable source. 6 refs., 1 tab

  17. Impact of different plants on the gas profile of a landfill cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenauer, Thomas G; Watzinger, Andrea; Riesing, Johann; Gerzabek, Martin H

    2011-05-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas emitted from landfill sites and old waste dumps. Biological methane oxidation in landfill covers can help to reduce methane emissions. To determine the influence of different plant covers on this oxidation in a compost layer, we conducted a lysimeter study. We compared the effect of four different plant covers (grass, alfalfa+grass, miscanthus and black poplar) and of bare soil on the concentration of methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen in lysimeters filled with compost. Plants were essential for a sustainable reduction in methane concentrations, whereas in bare soil, methane oxidation declined already after 6 weeks. Enhanced microbial activity - expected in lysimeters with plants that were exposed to landfill gas - was supported by the increased temperature of the gas in the substrate and the higher methane oxidation potential. At the end of the first experimental year and from mid-April of the second experimental year, the methane concentration was most strongly reduced in the lysimeters containing alfalfa+grass, followed by poplar, miscanthus and grass. The observed differences probably reflect the different root morphology of the investigated plants, which influences oxygen transport to deeper compost layers and regulates the water content. PMID:20888746

  18. Groundwater geochemistry of a municipal landfill in Araras, SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Frederico de Castro Alves 1

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A contaminated area associated with a residential unlined landfill, located in Araras, was investigated. The aim of this work was to develop a hydrogeological and geochemical conceptual model in order to identify the redox zones related to the landfill and to explain the main processes resulting from the impact of leachates on the local groundwaters and soil. The work consisted of a surface geological mapping, geophysical survey with electric tomography, logging of subsoil boreholes, an installation of monitoring wells and soil, gas, leachate and groundwater samples analyses. The results show that the Araras landfill is in the methanogenic phase and promotes alterations in local groundwater quality. The main parameters of environmental interest identified in the leachate were total dissolved solids, biochemical oxygen demand, ammonium, methane, Na, Cl, Fe, Mn, Ba, B, Co and Cd. According to criteria specifically developed for this landfill, the following redox zones were identified in the groundwater: (i aerobic, located upgradient from the landfill; (ii methanogenic, downgradient from the landfill; (iii iron and/or manganese reduction, located between the methanogenic zone and the Araras river. Bypassing the iron and/or manganese redox zone, the existence of a denitrification zone was inferred. Besides the redox reactions in these zones, other processes that mitigate the impact of leachate into groundwater were also discovered: dilution, degradation by the action of surface microorganisms, dispersion, ionic exchange, formation of organic and inorganic complexes, dissolution and precipitation.

  19. Methane Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Methane (CH4) flux is the net rate of methane exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS LandCarbon project...

  20. Landfill mining: A critical review of two decades of research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We analyze two decades of landfill mining research regarding trends and topics. ► So far landfill mining has mainly been used to solve waste management issues. ► A new perspective on landfills as resource reservoirs is emerging. ► The potential of resource extraction from landfills is significant. ► We outline several key challenges for realization of resource extraction from landfills. - Abstract: Landfills have historically been seen as the ultimate solution for storing waste at minimum cost. It is now a well-known fact that such deposits have related implications such as long-term methane emissions, local pollution concerns, settling issues and limitations on urban development. Landfill mining has been suggested as a strategy to address such problems, and in principle means the excavation, processing, treatment and/or recycling of deposited materials. This study involves a literature review on landfill mining covering a meta-analysis of the main trends, objectives, topics and findings in 39 research papers published during the period 1988–2008. The results show that, so far, landfill mining has primarily been seen as a way to solve traditional management issues related to landfills such as lack of landfill space and local pollution concerns. Although most initiatives have involved some recovery of deposited resources, mainly cover soil and in some cases waste fuel, recycling efforts have often been largely secondary. Typically, simple soil excavation and screening equipment have therefore been applied, often demonstrating moderate performance in obtaining marketable recyclables. Several worldwide changes and recent research findings indicate the emergence of a new perspective on landfills as reservoirs for resource extraction. Although the potential of this approach appears significant, it is argued that facilitating implementation involves a number of research challenges in terms of technology innovation, clarifying the conditions for

  1. Porous medium burners for the combustion of gases from landfills. The direct simulation approach

    OpenAIRE

    Malico, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Landfill methane recovery associated to its conversion to carbon dioxide through combustion is a common greenhouse gas mitigation strategy in developed countries. The typically low and fluctuating energy content of landfill gas makes combustion challenging. Among the several possible energy conversion technologies, innovative porous burners are a potential option. These burners offer a set of advantages when compared to free flame burners, but are still under investigation. The development...

  2. Electrostatic Separation of Biowaste: An Approach for Landfills Reduction in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Koonchun Lai; Sooking Lim; Pehchiong Teh; Kimho Yeap

    2015-01-01

    Leachate and methane production due to the landfilling of biowaste has become an environmental threat. This study targets to investigate the extractability of biowaste from waste mixture as an approach of reduction of solid waste and landfill. A statistical analysis was conducted to analyze the performance of electrostatically waste separation. Individual and interactive effects of independent factors, namely rotation speed; electrical potential and electrodes interval on separation efficienc...

  3. Assessing a prospective landfill gas to energy project in Agadir, Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    Sabri, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to appraise and to establish an actual and concrete business opportunity in the field of MSW management, utilizing Landfill Gas and generating green energy in Morocco, in particular in Greater Agadir City and in the perspective of technology transfer. A special focus is on the LFGTE technology and expertise available in Scandinavia, represented by a selected Swedish company Biogas Systems Ab, pioneers in Converting Landfill Methane to Electricity. One part of the Auth...

  4. Energy production from marine biomass: Fuel cell power generation driven by methane produced from seaweed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, S.; Imou, K. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Biological and Environmental Engineering; Jonouchi, K. [Yanmar Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Human Resources

    2008-07-01

    Global warming has become one of the most serious environmental problems. To cope with the problem, it is necessary to substitute renewable energy for nonrenewable fossil fuel. Biomass, which is one of the renewable energies, is considered to be carbon-neutral, meaning that the net CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere remains unchanged provided the CO{sub 2} emitted by biomass combustion and that fixed by photosynthesis are balanced. Biomass is also unique because it is the only organic matter among renewable energies. In other words, fuels and chemicals can be produced from biomass in addition to electricity and heat. Marine biomass has attracted less attention than terrestrial biomass for energy utilization so far, but is work considering especially for a country like Japan which has long available coastlines. This paper discusses the utilization of marine biomass as an energy resource in Japan. A marine biomass energy system in Japan was proposed consisting of seaweed cultivation (Laminaria japonica) at offshore marine farms, biogas production via methane fermentation of the seaweeds, and fuel cell power generation driven by the generated biogas. The authors estimated energy output, energy supply potential, and CO{sub 2} mitigation in Japan on the basis of the proposed system. As a result, annual energy production was estimated to be 1.02 x 10{sup 9} kWh/yr at nine available sites. Total CO{sub 2} mitigation was estimated to be 1.04 x 10{sup 6} tonnes per annum at the nine sites. However, the CO{sub 2} emission for the construction of relevant facilities is not taken into account in this paper. The estimated CO{sub 2} mitigation is equivalent to about 0.9% of the required CO{sub 2} mitigation for Japan per annum under the Kyoto Protocol framework.

  5. Genotoxicity assessment of membrane concentrates of landfill leachate treated with Fenton reagent and UV-Fenton reagent using human hepatoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guifang; Lu, Gang; Yin, Pinghe; Zhao, Ling; Yu, Qiming Jimmy

    2016-04-15

    Membrane concentrates of landfill leachates contain organic and inorganic contaminants that could be highly toxic and carcinogenic. In this paper, the genotoxicity of membrane concentrates before and after Fenton and UV-Fenton reagent was assessed. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity was determined by using the methods of methyltetrazolium (MTT), cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) and comet assay in human hepatoma cells. MTT assay showed a cytotoxicity of 75% after 24h of exposure to the highest tested concentration of untreated concentrates, and no cytotoxocity for UV-Fenton and Fenton treated concentrates. Both CBMN and comet assays showed increased levels of genotoxicity in cells exposed to untreated concentrates, compared to those occurred in cells exposed to UV-Fenton and Fenton reagent treated concentrates. There was no significant difference between negative control and UV-Fenton treated concentrates for micronucleus and comet assay parameters. UV-Fenton and Fenton treatment, especially the former, were effective methods for degradation of bisphenol A and nonylphenol in concentrates. These findings showed UV-Fenton and Fenton reaction were effective methods for treatment of such complex concentrates, UV-Fenton reagent provided toxicological safety of the treated effluent, and the genotoxicity assays were found to be feasible tools for assessment of toxicity risks of complex concentrates. PMID:26780702

  6. Effect of leachate recycle and inoculation on microbial characteristics of municipal refuse in landfill bioreactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Population development of key groups of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria involved in municipal refuse decomposition under laboratory landfill bioreactors with and without leachate recycle adinoculation was measured since modeling municipal refuse was landfilled in bioreactors for about 210 days. Hydrolytic fermentative bacteria (HFB), hydrogen-producing acetogenic bacteria (HPAB), methane-producing bacteria (MPB), sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), anaerobic and aerobic cellulolytic bacteria and denitrabacteria were enumerated by the most probable number technique. The results showed that the dominant microorganismgroups were the methanogenic bacteria including hydrolytic fermentative, hydrogen-producing acetogenic and methane-producing bacteria. They were present in fresh refuse but at low values and positively affected by leachate recycle and refuse inoculation. The amounts of HFB or HPAB in digesters D4 and D5 operated with noculation and leachate recycle reached their maximum values of1010-1012 cells/g dry refuse for HFB or 105-106 cells/g dry refuse for HPAB on day 60, in digester D3 operated with leachate recycle on day 120 for HFB (109 cells/g dry refuse) or on day 90 for HPAB (105 cells/g dry refuse), and in digesters D1 and D2 on day 210 for HFB (109 cells/g dry refuse) or on day 90 for HPAB (104-106 cells/g dry refuse). The population of methane-producing bacteria in digesters D4 and D5 sharply increased on days 60 and 90 respectively, however in igesters D1, D2 and D3 on day 120. Leachate recycle and inoculation changed the cellulolytic microorganisms composition of refuse ecosystem, the higher amounts of anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria were measured in digesters D4 and D5 (107 cells/g dry refuse), followed by digesters D3 (106 cells/g dry refuse), D2 or D1(104 cells/g dry refuse). However, the amounts of aerobic cellulolytic bacteria were much lower than that of anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria. And it was higher in digester D3 than those in digesters D1, D2

  7. Assessing Emissions of Volatile Organic Componds from Landfills Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Fahime Khademi; Mohammad Reza Samaei; Kourosh Azizi; Abbas Shahsavani; Hassan Hashemi; Aida Iraji; Abdolkhalegh Miri

    2016-01-01

    Background: Biogas is obtained by anaerobic decomposition of organic wastes buried materials used to produce electricity, heat and biofuels. Biogas is at the second place for power generation after hydropower and in 2000 about 6% of the world power generation was allocated to biogas. Biogas is composed of 40–45 vol% CO2, 55–65 vol% CH4, and about 1% non-methaneVOCs, and non-methane volatile organic compounds. Emission rates are used to evaluate the compliance with landfil...

  8. Gas Transport Parameters for Landfill Final Cover Soil: Measurements and Model Modification by Dry Bulk Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramarachchi, P. N.; Kawamoto, K.; Hamamoto, S.; Nagamori, M.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2011-12-01

    Landfill sites have been emerging in greenhouse warming scenarios as a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4). Until recently, landfill management strategies have mainly addressed the problem of preventing groundwater contamination and reduction of leachate generation. Being one of the largest sources of anthropogenic CH4 emission, the final cover system should also be designed for minimizing the greenhouse gases migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding the landfill while securing the hydraulic performance. Compared to the intensive research efforts on hydraulic performances of landfill final cover soil, few studies about gas transport characteristics of landfill cover soils have been done. However, recent soil-gas studies implied that the effects of soil physical properties such as bulk density (i.e., compaction level), soil particle size are key parameters to understand landfill gaseous performance. The gas exchange through the final cover soils is controlled by advective and diffusive gas transport. Air permeability (ka) governs the advective gas transport while the soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) governs diffusive gas transport. In this study, the effects of compaction level and particle size fraction effects on ka and Dp for landfill final cover soil was investigated. The disturbed soil samples were taken from landfill final cover in Japan. A compaction tests were performed for the soil samples with two different size fractions (landfill final cover soil.

  9. Bacterial community composition and abundance in leachate of semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfills

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Bo Yue; Qi Wang; Zechun Huang; Qifei Huang; Zengqiang Zhang

    2011-01-01

    The abundance and phylogenetic composition of bacterial community in leachate of semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfill were compared through real-time polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.In semi-aerobic landfill scenario,the bacterial 16S rRNA copy numbers in leachate had no significant reduction from initial stage to stable period.In the scenario of anaerobic landfill,the largest bacterial 16S rRNA gene copy number was found in leachate at initial stage,but it reduced significantly at stable period.Moreover,methane-oxidizing bacteria population in stable period was lower than that in initial period in both two landfill processes.However,semi-aerobic landfill leachate had more methanotrophic bacteria populations than that in the anaerobic one.Furthermore,according to the sequences and phylogenetic analysis,obvious difference could be detected in bacterial community composition in different scenarios.Proteobacteria and bacteroidetes took up a dominantly higher proportion in semi-aerobic landfill leachate.To summarize up,different landfill methods and its landfill ages had crucial impacts on bacterial abundance and composition in leachate of semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfills.

  10. Environmental and human risk assessment of landfill leachate: An integrated approach with the use of cytotoxic and genotoxic stress indices in mussel and human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Landfill leachate poses a threat for aquatic biota and humans. • Leachate induces cytotoxic and oxidative effects on mussel hemocytes. • Increased levels of DNA damage were observed both in vivo and in vitro in hemocytes. • Leachate low doses enhance MN formation in human lymphocyte cultures. • Potential leachate aneugenic activity was detected in human lymphocytes. -- Abstract: The present study investigates leachate hazardous effects on marine biota and human cells, with the use of a battery of assays, both under in vivo and in vitro conditions. According to the results, mussels exposed for 4 days to 0.01 and 0.1% (v/v) of leachate showed increased levels of DNA damage and micronuclei (MN) frequencies in their hemocytes. Similarly, enhanced levels of DNA damage were also observed in hemocytes treated in vitro with relevant concentrations of leachate, followed by a significant enhancement of both superoxide anions (·O2−) and lipid peroxidation products (malondialdehyde/MDA). On the other hand, human lymphocyte cultures treated with such a low concentrations of leachate (0.1, 0.2 and 1%, v/v), showed increased frequencies of MN formation and large MN size ratio, as well as decreased cell proliferation, as indicated by the use of the cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) assay and Cytokinesis Block Proliferation Index (CBPI) respectively. These findings showed the clear-cut genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of leachate on both cellular types, as well as its potential aneugenic activity in human lymphocytes

  11. Environmental and human risk assessment of landfill leachate: An integrated approach with the use of cytotoxic and genotoxic stress indices in mussel and human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toufexi, Eirini; Tsarpali, Vasiliki [Section of Animal Biology, Department of Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of Patras, GR 26500 Patras (Greece); Efthimiou, Ioanna; Vidali, Maria-Sophia; Vlastos, Dimitris [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 Seferi Str., GR 30100 Agrinio (Greece); Dailianis, Stefanos, E-mail: sdailianis@upatras.gr [Section of Animal Biology, Department of Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of Patras, GR 26500 Patras (Greece)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Landfill leachate poses a threat for aquatic biota and humans. • Leachate induces cytotoxic and oxidative effects on mussel hemocytes. • Increased levels of DNA damage were observed both in vivo and in vitro in hemocytes. • Leachate low doses enhance MN formation in human lymphocyte cultures. • Potential leachate aneugenic activity was detected in human lymphocytes. -- Abstract: The present study investigates leachate hazardous effects on marine biota and human cells, with the use of a battery of assays, both under in vivo and in vitro conditions. According to the results, mussels exposed for 4 days to 0.01 and 0.1% (v/v) of leachate showed increased levels of DNA damage and micronuclei (MN) frequencies in their hemocytes. Similarly, enhanced levels of DNA damage were also observed in hemocytes treated in vitro with relevant concentrations of leachate, followed by a significant enhancement of both superoxide anions (·O{sub 2}{sup −}) and lipid peroxidation products (malondialdehyde/MDA). On the other hand, human lymphocyte cultures treated with such a low concentrations of leachate (0.1, 0.2 and 1%, v/v), showed increased frequencies of MN formation and large MN size ratio, as well as decreased cell proliferation, as indicated by the use of the cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) assay and Cytokinesis Block Proliferation Index (CBPI) respectively. These findings showed the clear-cut genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of leachate on both cellular types, as well as its potential aneugenic activity in human lymphocytes.

  12. Public health and landfill sites

    OpenAIRE

    Staines, Anthony; Crowley, D.; Bruen, M.; O'Connor, P.

    2004-01-01

    Landfill management is a complex discipline, requiring very high levels of organisation, and considerable investment. Until the early 1990’s most Irish landfill sites were not managed to modern standards. Illegal landfill sites are, of course, usually not managed at all. Landfills are very active. The traditional idea of ‘put it in the ground and forget about it’ is entirely misleading. There is a lot of chemical and biological activity underground. This produces complex changes in the che...

  13. Distribution of Redox-Sensitive Groundwater Quality Parameters Downgradient of a Landfill (Grindsted, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Rügge, Kirsten; Pedersen, Jørn K.; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1995-01-01

    The leachate plume stretching 300 m downgradient from the Grindsted Landfill (Denmark) has been characterized in terms of redox-sensitive groundwater quality parameters along two longitudinal transects (285 samples). Variations in the levels of methane, sulfide, iron(ll), manganese(ll), ammonium......, dinitrogen oxide, nitrite, nitrate, and oxygen in the groundwater samples indicate that methane production, sulfate reduction, iron reduction, manganese reduction, and nitrate reduction take place in the plume. Adjacent to the landfill, methanogenic and sulfatereducing zones were identified, while aerobic...... attenuation processes in the plume....

  14. Landfill gas-fired power plant pays cost of operating landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on recovery of energy from refuse that has become increasingly attractive in the past decade. The continuing urbanization of our society has created major challenges in the disposal of our waste products. Because of public concern over the potential presence of toxins, and for other environmental reasons, management and regulation of active and inactive landfills have become much more stringent and costly. Palos Verdes landfill, owned jointly by the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts and Los Angeles County, is located about three miles from the Pacific Ocean in the city of Rolling Hills Estates, Calif. The landfill was closed in 1980. The garbage was covered with six to eight feet of soil, and the area was landscaped. Part of this area has already been developed as the South Coast Botanical Gardens and Ernie Howlett Park. The remainder is scheduled to become a golf course. As refuse decays within a landfill, the natural anaerobic biological reaction generates a low-Btu methane gas along with carbon dioxide, known as landfill gas (LFG). The gas also contains other less desirable trace components generated by the decomposing garbage. Uncontrolled, these gases migrate to the surface and escape into the atmosphere where they generate environmental problems, including objectionable odors. The Sanitation Districts have installed a matrix of gas wells and a gas collection system to enable incineration of the gas in flares. This approach reduced aesthetic, environmental and safety concerns. However, emissions from the flares were still a problem. The Sanitation Districts then looked at alternatives to flaring the gas, one of which was electrical generation. Since the Sanitation Districts have no on-site use for thermal energy, power generation for use in the utility grid was deemed the most feasible alternative

  15. Research, development and demonstration in the design of sanitary landfill to optimize the generation and capture of compressible gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosanov, M. E.; Teeple, F. E.; Buesch, S. C.

    1982-02-01

    The influences of selected factors on the generation and recovery of methane gas from sanitary landfills were investigated. The factors included encapsulation, shredding, air classifying, moisture, and pH. Facilities consisting of six model sanitary landfill cells, each with a capacity of approximately 450 cubic yards of municipal waste, and auxiliary subsystems were constructed. Municipal waste in each cell is contained in a 30-mil thick polyvinly chloride plastic sheeting forming a virtually gas-tight envelope. Two cells were filled with as-collected urban waste, two with shredded waste, and two with shredded and air classified waste, constituting three pairs of cells. One of each pair is a control cell with the other used as an experimental variable. Systems were provided for adding measured amounts of water, removing and recirculating leachate, and for extracting gas and measuring gas flow. During testing, gas production and internal cell characteristics were measured to determine the effects of mechanical processing, moisture content, and leachate pH.

  16. Analysis of the economic potential of the landfill in the municipality of Chapeco - SC, Brazil; Analise do potencial economico do aterro sanitario do municipio de Chapeco - SC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cansian, Maricy Moreno, Email: maricymc@gmail.com

    2006-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate the economic and environmental viability of the exploitation of methane gas (CH4) - biogas - concentrated at the bottom of the mountains of waste from landfill Chapeco for power generation. The landfill receives approximately of 80 tons / day, the vast majority of domestic origin.

  17. Energy sector methane recovery and use: the importance of policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tom Kerr; Michelle Hershman

    2009-08-15

    To raise awareness about appropriate policy options to advance methane recovery and use in the energy sector, the IEA has conducted a series of analyses and studies over the past few years. This report continues IEA efforts by providing policy makers with examples and best practices in methane mitigation policy design and implementation. This report offers an overview of four types of methane mitigation projects that have the strongest links to the energy sector: oil and gas methane recovery and reduction of leaks and losses; coal mine methane; landfill methane; and manure methane recovery and use. It identifies successful policies that have been used to advance these important projects. This information is intended to guide policy makers as they search for low-cost, near-term solutions to climate change. 38 refs., 10 figs., 1 app.

  18. Characterization of dissolved organic matter during landfill leachate treatment by sequencing batch reactor, aeration corrosive cell-Fenton, and granular activated carbon in series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfill leachate is generally characterized as a complex recalcitrant wastewater containing high concentration of dissolved organic matter (DOM). A combination of sequencing batch reactor (SBR) + aeration corrosive cell-Fenton (ACF) + granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption in series was proposed for the purpose of removing pollutants in the leachate. Fractionation was also performed to investigate the composition changes and characteristics of the leachate DOM in each treatment process. Experimental results showed that organic matter, in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD), 5-day biological oxygen demand (BOD5), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), was reduced by 97.2%, 99.1%, and 98.7%, respectively. To differentiate the DOM portions, leachates were separated into five fractions by XAD-8 and XAD-4 resins: hydrophobic acid (HPO-A), hydrophobic neutral (HPO-N), transphilic acid (TPI-A), transphilic neutral (TPI-N), and hydrophilic fraction (HPI). The predominant fraction in the raw leachate was HPO-A (36% of DOC), while the dominant fraction in the final effluent was HPI (53% of DOC). Accordingly, macromolecules were degraded to simpler ones in a relatively narrow range below 1000 Da. Spectral and chromatographic analyses also showed that most humic-like substances in all fractions were effectively removed during the treatments and led to a simultaneous decrease in aromaticity.

  19. Landfill mining: a critical review of two decades of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krook, Joakim; Svensson, Niclas; Eklund, Mats

    2012-03-01

    Landfills have historically been seen as the ultimate solution for storing waste at minimum cost. It is now a well-known fact that such deposits have related implications such as long-term methane emissions, local pollution concerns, settling issues and limitations on urban development. Landfill mining has been suggested as a strategy to address such problems, and in principle means the excavation, processing, treatment and/or recycling of deposited materials. This study involves a literature review on landfill mining covering a meta-analysis of the main trends, objectives, topics and findings in 39 research papers published during the period 1988-2008. The results show that, so far, landfill mining has primarily been seen as a way to solve traditional management issues related to landfills such as lack of landfill space and local pollution concerns. Although most initiatives have involved some recovery of deposited resources, mainly cover soil and in some cases waste fuel, recycling efforts have often been largely secondary. Typically, simple soil excavation and screening equipment have therefore been applied, often demonstrating moderate performance in obtaining marketable recyclables. Several worldwide changes and recent research findings indicate the emergence of a new perspective on landfills as reservoirs for resource extraction. Although the potential of this approach appears significant, it is argued that facilitating implementation involves a number of research challenges in terms of technology innovation, clarifying the conditions for realization and developing standardized frameworks for evaluating economic and environmental performance from a systems perspective. In order to address these challenges, a combination of applied and theoretical research is required. PMID:22083108

  20. Financing landfill gas projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems of financing landfill gas projects in the UK in the last few years are discussed. The approach of the author in setting up a company to finance such projects in the power generation field and a separate company to design and supply turnkey packages is reported. (UK)

  1. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: LANDFILL COVERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfill covers are used at Superfund sites to minimize surface water infiltration and control gas migration. In many cases covers are used in conjunction with other waste treatment technologies, such as slurry walls, ground water pump-and-treat systems, and gas collection. This ...

  2. Sustainable Approach for Landfill Management at Final Processing Site Cikundul in Sukabumi City, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Darwati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main problem of landfill management in Indonesia is the difficulty in getting a location for Final Processing Sites (FPS due to limited land and high land prices. Besides, about 95% of existing landfills are uncontrolled dumping sites, which could potentially lead to water, soil and air pollution. Based on data from the Ministry of Environment (2010, The Act of the Republic of Indonesia Number 18 Year 2008 Concerning Solid Waste Management, prohibits open dumping at final processing sites and in ratification, the Local Governments have to convert the open dump sites into controlled or sanitary landfill. The Research Institute for Human Settlements has been conducting multi-year researches related to the rehabilitation of dumpsites toward sustainable landfill. The research methods are literature reviews, experiments, laboratory analysis and field observations. A pilot model of dumpsite rehabilitation was carried out in 2010 at the Final Processing Site at Cikundul in Sukabumi City, consisting of (1 mining landfill (2 construction of landfill cells in a former mining area with a semi aerobic landfill and an anaerobic landfill and (3 landfill operations using decomposed material from landfill mining as a soil cover. The purpose of the study is to develop a sustainable approach for landfill management and rehabilitation through landfill mining and implementation of semi aerobic landfill. Findings in the construction of landfill mining indicate that (1 the construction of landfill mining is constrained by leachate that is trapped in a pile of waste, therefore, the leachate needs to be pumped to leachate treatment installations, (2 the volume of waste excavation is expanding due to the high plastic content of about 26% in landfills (3 the potency of decomposed materials from landfill mining is 40–83% for landfill operations or greening.. The performance of landfill systems shows that leachate quality of semi aerobic landfill tends to be lower

  3. Construction and evaluation of simulated pilot scale landfill lysimeter in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafizul, Islam M; Howlader, Milon Kanti; Alamgir, Muhammed

    2012-11-01

    This research concentrates the design, construction and evaluation of simulated pilot scale landfill lysimeter at KUET campus, Khulna, Bangladesh. Both the aerobic and anaerobic conditions having a base liner and two different types of cap liner were simulated. After the design of a reference cell, the construction of landfill lysimeter was started in January 2008 and completed in July 2008. In all construction process locally available civil construction materials were used. The municipal solid waste (MSW) of 2800-2985 kg having the total volume of 2.80 m(3) (height 1.6 m) and moisture content of 65% was deposited in each lysimeter by applying required compaction energy. In contrast, both the composition in terms of methane (CH(4)), carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and oxygen (O(2)) as well as the flow rate of landfill gas (LFG) generated from MSW in landfill lysimeter were measured and varied significantly in relation to the variation of lysimeter operational condition. Moreover, anaerobic lysimeter-C shows the highest composition of LFG in compare to the anaerobic lysimeter-B due to the providing of lower compaction of cap liner in anaerobic lysimeter-C. Here, it is interesting to note that in absence of compacted clay liner (CCL) and hence percolation of rainwater that facilitates rapid degradation of MSW in aerobic lysimeter-A has resulted in the highest settlement than that of anaerobic landfill lysimeter-B and C. Moreover, in case of anaerobic lysimeter-B and C, the leachate generation was lower than that of aerobic lysimeter-A due to the providing of cap liner in anaerobic lysimeter-B and C, played an important role to reduce the percolation of rainwater. The study also reveals that the leachate pollution index (LPI) has decreased in relation to the increasing of elapsed period as well as the LPI for collection system of aerobic lysimeter-A was higher than that of the collection system of anaerobic lysimeter-B and C. Finally, it can be depicted that LPI for lysimeter

  4. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-09-30

    This corrective action plan proposes the closure method for the area 9 unexploded Ordnance landfill, corrective action unit 453 located at the Tonopah Test Range. The area 9 UXO landfill consists of corrective action site no. 09-55-001-0952 and is comprised of three individual landfill cells designated as A9-1, A9-2, and A9-3. The three landfill cells received wastes from daily operations at area 9 and from range cleanups which were performed after weapons testing. Cell locations and contents were not well documented due to the unregulated disposal practices commonly associated with early landfill operations. However, site process knowledge indicates that the landfill cells were used for solid waste disposal, including disposal of UXO.

  5. Acceleration of aged-landfill stabilization by combining partial nitrification and leachate recirculation: A field-scale study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • To solve the drawbacks (NH4+ accumulation) of leachate recirculation, ex-situ SBR was applied. • Produced NO2− was recirculated and denitrified to N2 in landfill with insufficient carbon source. • Despite the inhibition of methanogenesis by DO and nitrate, CH4 fraction eventually increased. - Abstract: Leachate recirculation for rapid landfill stabilization can result in the accumulation of high-strength ammonium. An on-site sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was therefore, applied to oxidize the ammonium to nitrite, which was then recirculated to the landfill for denitrification to nitrogen gas. At relatively higher ammonium levels, nitrite accumulated well in the SBR; the nitrite was denitrified stably in the landfill, despite an insufficient biodegradable carbon source in the leachate. As the leachate was recirculated, the methane and carbon dioxide contents produced from the landfill fluctuated, implying that the organic acids and hydrogen produced in the acid production phase acted as the carbon source for denitrification in the landfill. Leachate recirculation combined with ex-situ partial nitrification of the leachate may enhance the biodegradation process by: (a) removing the nitrogen that is contained with the leachate, and (b) accelerating landfill stabilization, because the biodegradation efficiency of landfill waste is increased by supplying sufficient moisture and its byproducts are used as the carbon source for denitrification. In addition, partial nitrification using an SBR has advantages for complete denitrification in the landfill, since the available carbon source is in short supply in aged landfills

  6. Brownfields and health risks--air dispersion modeling and health risk assessment at landfill redevelopment sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofungwu, Joseph; Eget, Steven

    2006-07-01

    Redevelopment of landfill sites in the New Jersey-New York metropolitan area for recreational (golf courses), commercial, and even residential purposes seems to be gaining acceptance among municipal planners and developers. Landfill gas generation, which includes methane and potentially toxic nonmethane compounds usually continues long after closure of the landfill exercise phase. It is therefore prudent to evaluate potential health risks associated with exposure to gas emissions before redevelopment of the landfill sites as recreational, commercial, and, especially, residential properties. Unacceptably high health risks would call for risk management measures such as limiting the development to commercial/recreational rather than residential uses, stringent gas control mechanisms, interior air filtration, etc. A methodology is presented for applying existing models to estimate residual landfill hazardous compounds emissions and to quantify associated health risks. Besides the toxic gas constituents of landfill emissions, other risk-related issues concerning buried waste, landfill leachate, and explosive gases were qualitatively evaluated. Five contiguously located landfill sites in New Jersey intended for residential and recreational redevelopment were used to exemplify the approach. PMID:16869439

  7. Tracer method to measure landfill gas emissions from leachate collection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredenslund, Anders M; Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes a method developed for quantification of gas emissions from the leachate collection system at landfills and present emission data measured at two Danish landfills with no landfill gas collection systems in place: Fakse landfill and AV Miljø. Landfill top covers are often designed to prevent infiltration of water and thus are made from low permeable materials. At such sites a large part of the gas will often emit through other pathways such as the leachate collection system. These point releases of gaseous constituents from these locations cannot be measured using traditional flux chambers, which are often used to measure gas emissions from landfills. Comparing tracer measurements of methane (CH(4)) emissions from leachate systems at Fakse landfill and AV Miljø to measurements of total CH(4) emissions, it was found that approximately 47% (351 kg CH(4) d(-1)) and 27% (211 kg CH(4) d(-1)), respectively, of the CH(4) emitting from the sites occurred from the leachate collection systems. Emission rates observed from individual leachate collection wells at the two landfills ranged from 0.1 to 76 kg CH(4) d(-1). A strong influence on emission rates caused by rise and fall in atmospheric pressure was observed when continuously measuring emission from a leachate well over a week. Emission of CH(4) was one to two orders of magnitude higher during periods of decreasing pressure compared to periods of increasing pressure. PMID:20378325

  8. Waste management in the Irkutsk Region, Siberia, Russia: environmental assessment of current practice focusing on landfilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starostina, Vlada; Damgaard, Anders; Rechberger, Helmut; Christensen, Thomas H

    2014-05-01

    The municipal waste management system of the region of Irkutsk is described and a life cycle assessment (LCA) performed to assess the environmental performance of the system. Annually about 500 000 tons of waste are managed. The waste originates from three sources: household waste (27%), commercial waste (23%) and office & institutional waste (44%). Other waste of unknown composition constitutes 6%. Only 3% of the waste is recycled; 97% of the municipal waste is disposed of at the old Alexandrovsky landfill. The environmental impact from the current system is dominated by the landfill, which has no gas or leachate collection system. The global warming contribution is due to the emission of methane of the order of 420 000 tons CO2-equivalents per year. Collection and transport of the waste are insignificant compared with impacts from the landfill. As the old landfill runs out of capacity in a few years, the LCA modelling showed that introduction of a new and modern landfill with gas and leachate collection could improve the performance of the waste management system significantly. Collection of landfill gas and utilization for 30 years for electricity production (gas turbine) would reduce the global warming completely and result in a net saving of 100 000 CO2-equivalents per year due to storage of biogenic carbon in the landfill beyond 100 years. Considering other first-order degradation rates for the landfilled organic matter did not overtly affect the results, while assumptions about the top cover oxidation of methane significantly affected the results. This shows the importance of controlling the gas escape from the landfill. PMID:24692457

  9. Methane Production Quantification and Energy Estimation for Bangalore Municipal Solid Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A.; Dand, R.; Lakshmikanthan, P.; Babu, G. L. Sivakumar

    2014-01-01

    Landfills are considered as cornerstone of solid waste management. Landfill gas (LFG) and leachate are principal outputs from landfills. Methane, occupying significant volume of landfill gas, has considerable potential as a source of energy replacing enormous amounts of fossil fuels currently in use. Gas extraction and utilization systems need to be designed and implemented in order to exploit this resource. Assessment of economic viability of these systems necessitates estimation of gas released and its energy potential. Gas quantification and energy estimation for municipal solid waste (MSW) of Bangalore city was carried out using five independent methodologies. A small scale experiment was conducted to monitor the gas generation and the results were compared and analysed. Results show that significant energy can be harnessed from the MSW if requisite LFG management systems are installed. The use of methane as an energy source maximizes the extraction of useful resources from landfills, minimizes the global warming and offsets significant amount of fossil fuels.

  10. Investigating observational constraints on the contemporary methane budget

    OpenAIRE

    Monteil, G. A.

    2014-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is an important greenhouse gas, naturally produced by bio-degradation of organic material (mainly in wetlands), by continuous and eruptive releases from mud volcanoes, and by combustion of organic material in forest and peat fires. Large quantities of methane are also emitted by human activities, related to agriculture (cattle farming, rice cultivation), waste management (landfills, water treatment plants), and energy production and use (extraction of fossil fuels). As a result ...

  11. Enhanced methane production using pulsed electric field pre-treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Safavi, Seyedeh Masoumeh, 1987-

    2015-01-01

    An experimental study with pulsed electric field (PEF) pre-treatment was conducted to investigate its effect on methane production. PEF pre-treatment converts organic solids into soluble and colloidal forms increasing bioavailability for anaerobic microorganisms participating in methane generation process. The substrates tested were pig slurry (PS), landfill leachate (LL) and fruit/vegetables (FV). Operating parameters were varied from 15 to 50 kWh/m3 to show the influence of treatment on met...

  12. Tritium distribution in leachates from domestic solid waste landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is for the purpose of investigating the tritium distribution in the leachates, the raw and treated leachates and the condensates of the methane gas, which have occurred from domestic solid waste landfills. Also it aims to measure the tritium distribution level on the colloid size of the leachates, the raw and treated leachates. It was found that the major inorganic contaminants of the leachates were Na, K, Ca, Mg, NH4+-N and Cl-. The mean tritium level of the raw leachates of the investigated 13 landfill sites for 6 months was 17∼1196 TU. It corresponded to a several scores or hundreds of magnitude higher value than that of the normal environmental sample level except for two landfill sites. Also such a high concentration of the tritium was found in the treated leachates and methane gas condensates as well. Nevertheless it is important to emphasize that the tritium level which was found in this research is about 100 times lower than the tritium limit for the drinking water quality. And most of the tritium existed in the dissolved colloid of the leachate of which the colloid size is below 0.45 μm. Also, according to the tritium analysis results of the leachates after filtration with 0.45μm membrane filter for some landfills, it is likely that some tritium of the leachate would be distributed in a colloid size over 0.45μm. In general the relationship between the tritium and other contaminants in the raw leachate was low, but it was relatively high between the tritium and TOC. However, the tritium content in the leachate had no meaningful relationship with the scale, hydrological characteristics and age of the landfill

  13. Effective monitoring of landfills: flux measurements and thermography enhance efficiency and reduce environmental impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a methodology for estimating the behaviour of a landfill system in terms of biogas release to the atmosphere. Despite the various positions towards the impact of methane on global warming, there is a general agreement about the fact that methane from landfill represents about 23% of the total anthropogenic CH4 released to the atmosphere. Despite the importance of this topic, no internationally accepted protocol exists to quantify the leakage of biogas from the landfill cover. To achieve this goal, this paper presents a field method based on accumulation chamber flux measurements. In addition, the results obtained from a nine-year-long monitoring activity on an Italian municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill are presented. The connection between such flux measurements of biogas release and thermal anomalies detected by infrared radiometry is also discussed. The main overall benefit of the presented approach is a significant increase in the recovered energy from the landfill site by means of an optimal collection of biogas, which implies a reduction of the total anthropogenic methane originated from the disposal of waste. (paper)

  14. Effective monitoring of landfills: flux measurements and thermography enhance efficiency and reduce environmental impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglini, Raffaele; Raco, Brunella; Scozzari, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    This work presents a methodology for estimating the behaviour of a landfill system in terms of biogas release to the atmosphere. Despite the various positions towards the impact of methane on global warming, there is a general agreement about the fact that methane from landfill represents about 23% of the total anthropogenic CH4 released to the atmosphere. Despite the importance of this topic, no internationally accepted protocol exists to quantify the leakage of biogas from the landfill cover. To achieve this goal, this paper presents a field method based on accumulation chamber flux measurements. In addition, the results obtained from a nine-year-long monitoring activity on an Italian municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill are presented. The connection between such flux measurements of biogas release and thermal anomalies detected by infrared radiometry is also discussed. The main overall benefit of the presented approach is a significant increase in the recovered energy from the landfill site by means of an optimal collection of biogas, which implies a reduction of the total anthropogenic methane originated from the disposal of waste.

  15. Enhanced landfill mining - a future perspective of landfilling

    OpenAIRE

    GEYSEN, D; Jones, P.; Van Acker, K; Van Passel, S.; Crabs, M.; Eyckmans, J; De Blonde, M.; Vrancken, K.; Laenen, B.; Laevers, P.; Ballard, M.; Bijnens, S.; Sips, K.; Umans, L.; Roos, J.

    2009-01-01

    Governments and co-operations are aware of the fact that more sustainable consumption and production practices are required. Efforts are being made to produce less waste while increasing the recycling ratio. Concurrently, it is of importance to place landfilling in a sustainable context. The present paper discusses a novel concept where a landfill is no longer considered as a final solution but rather as a ‘temporary storage place, awaiting future valorisation’. Enhanced Landfill Mining (ELFM...

  16. Comparison between two methane reforming models applied to a quasi-two-dimensional planar solid oxide fuel cell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Up to recently 2-D solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) modelling efforts were based on global kinetic approaches for the methane steam reforming and water gas shift reactions (WGS) or thermodynamic equilibrium. Lately detailed models for elementary heterogeneous chemical kinetics of reforming (HCR) over Ni-YSZ anode became available in literature. Both approaches were employed in a quasi 2-D model of a planar high temperature electrolyte supported (ESC) SOFC and simulations were carried out for three different fuel gas compositions: pre-reformed natural gas (high CH4 content), and two different biomass derived producer gases (low CH4 content). The results show that the HCR predicts much slower reforming rates which leads to a more evenly distributed solid temperature but smaller power output and thus electrical efficiency. The two models result into predictions that differ greatly if high methane content fuels are used and for such cases the decision upon the modelling scheme to follow should be based on experimental investigations.

  17. Energy utilization from landfill biogas; Aproveitamento energetico do biogas de aterros sanitarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candiani, Giovano [Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Energia; Hoffmann, Gustavo; Silva, Elissandro Rocha da; Moreira, Joao M.L.; Tomioka, Jorge

    2008-07-01

    Landfills for solid waste disposal are used in Brazil and in most of countries in the world. The organic part of the solid wastes produces gas out of the decomposition of its organic content. This gas, named biogas and mostly made of carbon dioxide and methane, may be collected and used as an energy source due the methane presence. In this work we analyze the possible energy utilization of landfill biogas in Brazil in which the organic content of the solid waste is about 60%. The use of biogas as energy source can reduce the greenhouse gas emissions and improve the sanitation conditions of landfills. Moreover, it allows financial gains through selling of energy and carbon credits. In order to make possible the biogas utilization it is necessary to recognize the differences among the many landfills which exist in the country. There are the large and small landfills. The large ones usually have good instrumentation and gas exhaustion systems while the small ones have passive exhaustion systems and very few field instrumentation. The small landfills need to improve their instrumentation system and to incorporate exhaustion systems. (author)

  18. The Landfill Gas-to-Energy Initiative for Latin America and the Caribbean

    OpenAIRE

    Terraza, Horacio; Grajales, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of the Landfill Gas-to-Energy (LFGTE) Initiative in Latin America and the Caribbean are to. 1) contribute to the maximization of methane emissions reductions and the development of carbon trading opportunities; 2) promote LFGTE investment in Latin America and the Caribbean to improve solid waste management practices in the region; 3) create awareness of LFGTE opportunities; ...

  19. Electrostatic Separation of Biowaste: An Approach for Landfills Reduction in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koonchun Lai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Leachate and methane production due to the landfilling of biowaste has become an environmental threat. This study targets to investigate the extractability of biowaste from waste mixture as an approach of reduction of solid waste and landfill. A statistical analysis was conducted to analyze the performance of electrostatically waste separation. Individual and interactive effects of independent factors, namely rotation speed; electrical potential and electrodes interval on separation efficiency were assessed. Optimal operational conditions were deduced as 60 rpm rotation speed, 30 kV supply potential and 54 mm electrodes interval. Under these conditions, biowaste separation efficiency of 83.88% was experimentally achieved. Separation efficiency of non-biowaste was 89.51% under same operational condition. These results fitted well with the predicted model. Results in this study conclude the electrostatic separation could be an effective pre-treatment alternative in dealing with leachate and methane problems of landfilled biowaste.

  20. Phytoremediation of landfill leachate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leachate emissions from landfill sites are of concern, primarily due to their toxic impact when released unchecked into the environment, and the potential for landfill sites to generate leachate for many hundreds of years following closure. Consequently, economically and environmentally sustainable disposal options are a priority in waste management. One potential option is the use of soil-plant based remediation schemes. In many cases, using either trees (including short rotation coppice) or grassland, phytoremediation of leachate has been successful. However, there are a significant number of examples where phytoremediation has failed. Typically, this failure can be ascribed to excessive leachate application and poor management due to a fundamental lack of understanding of the plant-soil system. On balance, with careful management, phytoremediation can be viewed as a sustainable, cost effective and environmentally sound option which is capable of treating 250 m3 ha-1 yr-1. However, these schemes have a requirement for large land areas and must be capable of responding to changes in leachate quality and quantity, problems of scheme establishment and maintenance, continual environmental monitoring and seasonal patterns of plant growth. Although the fundamental underpinning science is well understood, further work is required to create long-term predictive remediation models, full environmental impact assessments, a complete life-cycle analysis and economic analyses for a wide range of landfill scenarios

  1. Temporal variability of soil gas composition in landfill covers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebert, Julia; Rachor, Ingke; Gröngröft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2011-05-01

    In order to assess the temporal variability of the conditions for the microbial oxidation of methane in landfill cover soils and their driving variables, gas composition at non-emissive and strongly emissive locations (hotspots) was monitored on a seasonal, daily and hourly time scale on an old, unlined landfill in northern Germany. Our study showed that the impact of the various environmental factors varied with the mode of gas transport and with the time scale considered. At non-emissive sites, governed by diffusive gas transport, soil gas composition was subject to a pronounced seasonal variation. A high extent of aeration, low methane concentrations and a high ratio of CO(2) to CH(4) were found across the entire depth of the soil cover during the warm and dry period, whereas in the cool and moist period aeration was less and landfill gas migrated further upward. Statistically, variation in soil gas composition was best explained by the variation in soil temperature. At locations dominated by advective gas transport and showing considerable emissions of methane, this pattern was far less pronounced with only little increase in the extent of aeration during drier periods. Here, the change of barometric pressure was found to impact soil gas composition. On a daily scale under constant conditions of temperature, gas transport at both types of locations was strongly impacted by the change in soil moisture. On an hourly scale, under constant conditions of temperature and moisture, gas migration was impacted most by the change in barometric pressure. It was shown that at diffusion-dominated sites complete methane oxidation was achieved even under adverse wintry conditions, whereas at hotspots, even under favorable dry and warm conditions, aerobic biological activity can be limited to the upper crust of the soil. PMID:21074982

  2. Process for separating nitrogen from methane using microchannel process technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee; Qiu, Dongming; Dritz, Terence Andrew; Neagle, Paul; Litt, Robert Dwayne; Arora, Ravi; Lamont, Michael Jay; Pagnotto, Kristina M.

    2007-07-31

    The disclosed invention relates to a process for separating methane or nitrogen from a fluid mixture comprising methane and nitrogen, the process comprising: (A) flowing the fluid mixture into a microchannel separator, the microchannel separator comprising a plurality of process microchannels containing a sorption medium, the fluid mixture being maintained in the microchannel separator until at least part of the methane or nitrogen is sorbed by the sorption medium, and removing non-sorbed parts of the fluid mixture from the microchannel separator; and (B) desorbing the methane or nitrogen from the sorption medium and removing the desorbed methane or nitrogen from the microchannel separator. The process is suitable for upgrading methane from coal mines, landfills, and other sub-quality sources.

  3. Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID) is to demonstrate, in contaminated sites, new technologies for clean-up of chemical and mixed waste landfills that are representative of many sites throughout the DOE Complex and the nation. When implemented, these new technologies promise to characterize and remediate the contaminated landfill sites across the country that resulted from past waste disposal practices. Characterization and remediation technologies are aimed at making clean-up less expensive, safer, and more effective than current techniques. This will be done by emphasizing in-situ technologies. Most important, MWLID's success will be shared with other Federal, state, and local governments, and private companies that face the important task of waste site remediation. MWLID will demonstrate technologies at two existing landfills. Sandia National Laboratories' Chemical Waste Landfill received hazardous (chemical) waste from the Laboratory from 1962 to 1985, and the Mixed-Waste Landfill received hazardous and radioactive wastes (mixed wastes) over a twenty-nine year period (1959-1988) from various Sandia nuclear research programs. Both landfills are now closed. Originally, however, the sites were selected because of Albuquerque's and climate and the thick layer of alluvial deposits that overlay groundwater approximately 480 feet below the landfills. This thick layer of ''dry'' soils, gravel, and clays promised to be a natural barrier between the landfills and groundwater

  4. The decay of wood in landfills in contrasting climates in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We examine decay in wood from landfills in contrasting environments in Australia. • Analysis is based on changes in chemical composition and microscopy. • Climate did not influence levels of decay observed. • Microscopy of retrieved samples revealed most of the decay was aerobic in nature. • Current default factors for wood decay in landfills overestimate methane emissions. - Abstract: Wood products in landfill are commonly assumed to decay within several decades, returning the carbon contained therein to the atmosphere, with about half the carbon released as methane. However, the rate and extent of decay is not well known, as very few studies have examined the decay of wood products in landfills. This study reports on the findings from landfill excavations conducted in the Australian cities of Sydney and Cairns located in temperate and tropical environments, respectively. The objective of this study was to determine whether burial of the wood in warmer, more tropical conditions in Cairns would result in greater levels of decay than occurs in the temperate environment of Sydney. Wood samples recovered after 16–44 years in landfill were examined through physical, chemical and microscopic analyses, and compared with control samples to determine the carbon loss. There was typically little or no decay in the wood samples analysed from the landfill in Sydney. Although there was significant decay in rainforest wood species excavated from Cairns, decay levels for wood types that were common to both Cairns and Sydney landfills were similar. The current Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2006) default decay factor for organic materials in landfills is 50%. In contrast, the carbon loss determined for Pinus radiata recovered from Sydney and Cairns landfills was 7.9% and 4.4%, respectively, and 0% for Agathis sp. This suggests that climate did not influence decay, and that the more extensive levels of decay observed for some wood samples

  5. The decay of wood in landfills in contrasting climates in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ximenes, Fabiano, E-mail: fabiano.ximenes@dpi.nsw.gov.au [Forest Science, Agriculture NSW, New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, Level 12, 10 Valentine Ave, Parramatta, NSW 2150 (Australia); Björdal, Charlotte [Department of Conservation, Gothenburg University, Guldhedsgatan 5A, Box 130, SE-405 30 Göteborg (Sweden); Cowie, Annette [NSW Department of Primary Industries, Beef Industry Centre, Trevenna Rd., University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351 (Australia); Barlaz, Morton [Dept. of Civil, Construction, & Environmental Eng., North Carolina State University, Box 7908, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • We examine decay in wood from landfills in contrasting environments in Australia. • Analysis is based on changes in chemical composition and microscopy. • Climate did not influence levels of decay observed. • Microscopy of retrieved samples revealed most of the decay was aerobic in nature. • Current default factors for wood decay in landfills overestimate methane emissions. - Abstract: Wood products in landfill are commonly assumed to decay within several decades, returning the carbon contained therein to the atmosphere, with about half the carbon released as methane. However, the rate and extent of decay is not well known, as very few studies have examined the decay of wood products in landfills. This study reports on the findings from landfill excavations conducted in the Australian cities of Sydney and Cairns located in temperate and tropical environments, respectively. The objective of this study was to determine whether burial of the wood in warmer, more tropical conditions in Cairns would result in greater levels of decay than occurs in the temperate environment of Sydney. Wood samples recovered after 16–44 years in landfill were examined through physical, chemical and microscopic analyses, and compared with control samples to determine the carbon loss. There was typically little or no decay in the wood samples analysed from the landfill in Sydney. Although there was significant decay in rainforest wood species excavated from Cairns, decay levels for wood types that were common to both Cairns and Sydney landfills were similar. The current Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2006) default decay factor for organic materials in landfills is 50%. In contrast, the carbon loss determined for Pinus radiata recovered from Sydney and Cairns landfills was 7.9% and 4.4%, respectively, and 0% for Agathis sp. This suggests that climate did not influence decay, and that the more extensive levels of decay observed for some wood samples

  6. Differences in volatile methyl siloxane (VMS) profiles in biogas from landfills and anaerobic digesters and energetics of VMS transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tansel, Berrin, E-mail: tanselb@fiu.edu; Surita, Sharon C.

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • In the digester gas, D4 and D5 comprised the 62% and 27% if siloxanes, respectively. • In landfill gas, the bulk of siloxanes were TMSOH (58%) followed by D4 (17%). • Methane utilization may be a possible mechanism for TMSOH formation in the landfills. • The geometric configurations of D4 and D5 molecules make them very stable. - Abstract: The objectives of this study were to compare the types and levels of volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS) present in biogas generated in the anaerobic digesters and landfills, evaluate the energetics of siloxane transformations under anaerobic conditions, compare the conditions in anaerobic digesters and municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills which result in differences in siloxane compositions. Biogas samples were collected at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant and South Dade Landfill in Miami, Florida. In the digester gas, D4 and D5 comprised the bulk of total siloxanes (62% and 27%, respectively) whereas in the landfill gas, the bulk of siloxanes were trimethylsilanol (TMSOH) (58%) followed by D4 (17%). Presence of high levels of TMSOH in the landfill gas indicates that methane utilization may be a possible reaction mechanism for TMSOH formation. The free energy change for transformation of D5 and D4 to TMSOH either by hydrogen or methane utilization are thermodynamically favorable. Either hydrogen or methane should be present at relatively high concentrations for TMSOH formation which explains the high levels present in the landfill gas. The high bond energy and bond distance of the Si–O bond, in view of the atomic sizes of Si and O atoms, indicate that Si atoms can provide a barrier, making it difficult to break the Si–O bonds especially for molecules with specific geometric configurations such as D4 and D5 where oxygen atoms are positioned inside the frame formed by the large Si atoms which are surrounded by the methyl groups.

  7. Differences in volatile methyl siloxane (VMS) profiles in biogas from landfills and anaerobic digesters and energetics of VMS transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • In the digester gas, D4 and D5 comprised the 62% and 27% if siloxanes, respectively. • In landfill gas, the bulk of siloxanes were TMSOH (58%) followed by D4 (17%). • Methane utilization may be a possible mechanism for TMSOH formation in the landfills. • The geometric configurations of D4 and D5 molecules make them very stable. - Abstract: The objectives of this study were to compare the types and levels of volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS) present in biogas generated in the anaerobic digesters and landfills, evaluate the energetics of siloxane transformations under anaerobic conditions, compare the conditions in anaerobic digesters and municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills which result in differences in siloxane compositions. Biogas samples were collected at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant and South Dade Landfill in Miami, Florida. In the digester gas, D4 and D5 comprised the bulk of total siloxanes (62% and 27%, respectively) whereas in the landfill gas, the bulk of siloxanes were trimethylsilanol (TMSOH) (58%) followed by D4 (17%). Presence of high levels of TMSOH in the landfill gas indicates that methane utilization may be a possible reaction mechanism for TMSOH formation. The free energy change for transformation of D5 and D4 to TMSOH either by hydrogen or methane utilization are thermodynamically favorable. Either hydrogen or methane should be present at relatively high concentrations for TMSOH formation which explains the high levels present in the landfill gas. The high bond energy and bond distance of the Si–O bond, in view of the atomic sizes of Si and O atoms, indicate that Si atoms can provide a barrier, making it difficult to break the Si–O bonds especially for molecules with specific geometric configurations such as D4 and D5 where oxygen atoms are positioned inside the frame formed by the large Si atoms which are surrounded by the methyl groups

  8. Acceleration of aged-landfill stabilization by combining partial nitrification and leachate recirculation: a field-scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jinwook; Kim, Seungjin; Baek, Seungcheon; Lee, Nam-Hoon; Park, Seongjun; Lee, Junghun; Lee, Heechang; Bae, Wookeun

    2015-03-21

    Leachate recirculation for rapid landfill stabilization can result in the accumulation of high-strength ammonium. An on-site sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was therefore, applied to oxidize the ammonium to nitrite, which was then recirculated to the landfill for denitrification to nitrogen gas. At relatively higher ammonium levels, nitrite accumulated well in the SBR; the nitrite was denitrified stably in the landfill, despite an insufficient biodegradable carbon source in the leachate. As the leachate was recirculated, the methane and carbon dioxide contents produced from the landfill fluctuated, implying that the organic acids and hydrogen produced in the acid production phase acted as the carbon source for denitrification in the landfill. Leachate recirculation combined with ex-situ partial nitrification of the leachate may enhance the biodegradation process by: (a) removing the nitrogen that is contained with the leachate, and (b) accelerating landfill stabilization, because the biodegradation efficiency of landfill waste is increased by supplying sufficient moisture and its byproducts are used as the carbon source for denitrification. In addition, partial nitrification using an SBR has advantages for complete denitrification in the landfill, since the available carbon source is in short supply in aged landfills. PMID:25531070

  9. TOTAL COLUMN METHANE RETRIEVALS USING THE TROPOSPHERIC INFRARED MAPPING SPECTROMETER OVER SUNGLINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Larsen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Because it is a greenhouse gas, the detection of methane concentrations is a global issue. Additionally, the presence of methane is indicative of potential valuable petroleum and natural gas deposits. Therefore methane seep detection is useful for petroleum exploration around the world. The detection of methane, and other absorbing gases, over water is an issue for passive systems because one is seeking to detect an absorbing gas over an absorbing surface. The solution to this dilemma is to use the sun/sensor geometry for sun glint off of water to measure the absorbing gas over a reflecting surface, and therefore significantly increase the signal to noise of the measurement being taken. In September of 2010 Lockheed Martin performed a proof of concept by demonstrating from an airship over San Francisco Bay the capability of the Tropospheric Infrared Mapping Spectrometer's (TIMS hyper spectral sensor to passively measure methane, CO, and water vapor over sunglint water. The Lockheed Martin prototype TIMS sensor system is a hyper spectral grating spectrometer instrument that operates in the 2.3 micron spectral region at 0.25 cm-1 resolution. The Lockheed Martin retrieval algorithm developed applies the kCARTA (kCompressed Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Algorithm with Jacobians, with the HITRAN 2008 lineshape parameters, to retrieve the total column amount of atmospheric species along with the calibrated TIMS sensors radiometric input. A cell with known amount of methane was placed into the input to the TIMS to simulate atmospheric enhancements near the water surface. The amount in the cell was retrieved well within the uncertainty of 1% of the amount in the cell. Multi frame retrievals on data in which the cell was not placed into the input beam demonstrated 1% precision. In addition, in situ surface measurements were done over a landfill park, where measurements of methane were taken over known hotspots. This research allows for the future

  10. Comparison of potential greenhouse gas emissions from disposal of MSW in sanitary landfills vs. waste-to-energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates the US currently generates about 160 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) per year, and this figure will exceed 200 million tons annually by the year 2000. About 80 percent of the MSW will be disposed of in landfills and waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities, both of which generate greenhouse gases, namely methane and carbon dioxide. This paper provides an introductory level analysis of the potential long term greenhouse gas emissions from these two MSW disposal alternatives. Carbon dioxide credits are derived for fossil fuel offset by WTE and methane emissions are converted to equivalent CO2 emissions in order to derive a single emission figure for comparison of the greenhouse contribution of the two disposal strategies. A secondary analysis is presented to compare the net equivalent CO2 emissions from WTE facilities to those from landfills with methane gas recovery, combustion and energy generation. The conclusion is, that for a given amount of MSW, landfilling contributes to the greenhouse effect about 10 times more than a modern Waste-To-Energy facility. Even with 50% of all landfill methane emissions recovered and converted to electricity, the contribution to the greenhouse effect by the landfill alternative is about 6 times greater than the waste-to-energy alternative

  11. Landfills in Jiangsu province, China, and potential threats for public health: Leachate appraisal and spatial analysis using geographic information system and remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste disposal is of growing environmental and public health concern in China where landfilling is the predominant method of disposal. The assessment of potential health hazards posed by existing landfills requires sound information, and processing of a significant amount of spatial data. Geographical information system (GIS) and remote sensing (RS) are valuable tools for assessing health impacts due to landfills. The aims of this study were: (i) to analyze the leachate and gas emissions from landfills used for domestic waste disposal in a metropolitan area of Jiangsu province, China, (ii) to investigate remotely-sensed environmental features in close proximity to landfills, and (iii) to evaluate the compliance of their location and leachate quality with the relevant national regulations. We randomly selected five landfills in the metropolitan areas of Wuxi and Suzhou city, Jiangsu province, established a GIS database and examined whether data were in compliance with national environmental and public health regulations. The leachates of the sampled landfills contained heavy metals (Pb, As, Cr6+ and Hg) and organic compounds in concentrations considered harmful to human health. Measured methane concentrations on landfill surfaces were low. Spatial analysis of the location of landfills with regard to distance from major water bodies, sensible infrastructure and environmental conditions according to current national legislation resulted in the rejection of four of the five sites as inappropriate for landfills. Our results call for rigorous evaluation of the spatial location of landfills in China that must take into consideration environmental and public health criteria

  12. Subsurface investigation in Sarimukti landfill using DC resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirana, Kartika Hajar; Susanto, Kusnahadi; Susilawati, Anggie

    2015-09-01

    Layering process in landfill will produce leachate that produced by the entry of a mixture of rain water or ground water into the piles solid waste. In Sarimukti landfill, leachate from landfill channeled through a pipe to the leachate pond that planted beneath the soil surface. If the pipe is leaking, the leachate will contaminate the surrounding soil and may also to contaminate groundwater. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate subsurface conditions. One type of subsurface investigation can be determined by measuring the resistivity by using DC resistivity method. Resistivity measured in Sarimukti landfill with semigriding design including 8 lines perpendicular to each other. The result show there is resistivity contrast of materials, such as the solid waste, soil, water content that is predicted as leachate, and methane gas. The range of resistivity values are from 1 Ωm to 500 Ωm with variations of depth in according to line lenght. The resistivity values respectively: leachate is 1 to 10 Ωm; Wet soil is 10 to 100 Ωm; wet waste is 100 to 400 Ωm; gas is > 400 Ωm. Then, leachate was found at depth of 25 meters and wet soil is predicted as aquifer layer with 70 meters depth. The resistivity of aquifer layer is 1 to 20 Ωm and covered by silt clay as clay cap. Thus, it can predicted that leachate not seep into the aquifer layer.

  13. Biochemically enhanced methane production from coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opara, Aleksandra

    For many years, biogas was connected mostly with the organic matter decomposition in shallow sediments (e.g., wetlands, landfill gas, etc.). Recently, it has been realized that biogenic methane production is ongoing in many hydrocarbon reservoirs. This research examined microbial methane and carbon dioxide generation from coal. As original contributions methane production from various coal materials was examined in classical and electro-biochemical bench-scale reactors using unique, developed facultative microbial consortia that generate methane under anaerobic conditions. Facultative methanogenic populations are important as all known methanogens are strict anaerobes and their application outside laboratory would be problematic. Additional testing examined the influence of environmental conditions, such as pH, salinity, and nutrient amendments on methane and carbon dioxide generation. In 44-day ex-situ bench-scale batch bioreactor tests, up to 300,000 and 250,000 ppm methane was generated from bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste respectively, a significant improvement over 20-40 ppm methane generated from control samples. Chemical degradation of complex hydrocarbons using environmentally benign reagents, prior to microbial biodegradation and methanogenesis, resulted in dissolution of up to 5% bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste and up to 25% lignite in samples tested. Research results confirm that coal waste may be a significant underutilized resource that could be converted to useful fuel. Rapid acidification of lignite samples resulted in low pH (below 4.0), regardless of chemical pretreatment applied, and did not generate significant methane amounts. These results confirmed the importance of monitoring and adjusting in situ and ex situ environmental conditions during methane production. A patented Electro-Biochemical Reactor technology was used to supply electrons and electron acceptor environments, but appeared to influence methane generation in a

  14. N 2O emissions at municipal solid waste landfill sites: Effects of CH 4 emissions and cover soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Houhu; He, Pinjing; Shao, Liming

    Municipal solid waste landfills are the significant anthropogenic sources of N 2O due to the cooxidation of ammonia by methane-oxidizing bacteria in cover soils. Such bacteria could be developed through CH 4 fumigation, as evidenced by both laboratory incubation and field measurement. During a 10-day incubation with leachate addition, the average N 2O fluxes in the soil samples, collected from the three selected landfill covers, were multiplied by 1.75 ( p 0.05). The annual average N 2O flux was 176 ± 566 μg N 2O-N m -2 h -1 ( p mitigate landfill N 2O emissions.

  15. Potential application of biocover soils to landfills for mitigating toluene emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yao; Pei, Junshen; Tian, Baohu; Fan, Fengxi; Tang, Mengling; Li, Wei; He, Ruo

    2015-12-15

    Biocover soils have been demonstrated to be a good alternative cover material to mitigate CH4 emission from landfills. To evaluate the potential of biocover soil in mitigating emissions of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) from landfills, simulated cover soil columns with the influx of toluene (chosen as typical of NMVOCs) concentrations of 102-1336 mg m(-3) in the presence or absence of the major landfill gas components (i.e., CH4 and CO2) were conducted in this study. In the two experimental materials (waste biocover soils (WBS) and landfill cover soils (LCS)), higher toluene reduction was observed in WBS with respect to LCS. After the introduction of landfill gas, an increase of microbial diversity and relative abundance of toluene-degrading bacteria and methanotrophs occurred in WBS. To illustrate the role of toluene-degrading activity in mitigating toluene emissions through landfill covers, an analytical model was developed by incorporating the steady-state vapor transport with the first-order kinetics of aerobic biodegradation limited by O2 availability. This study demonstrated that biocover soils have great potential in applying to landfills for mitigating toluene emission to the atmosphere. PMID:26073517

  16. Landfill gas from environment to energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfill gas is an alternative source of energy which can be commercially exploited wherever municipal solid wastes are disposed of in sanitary landfills. In this context, it was decided to launch a comprehensive study on the subject of energy valorization of landfill gas. The main topics dealt with in the study, which is supported by a comprehensive literature survey and six detailed case-studies, include; (i) the environmental impact of landfill gas, (ii) the process of landfill gas genesis and the technology of landfill gas control by its exploitation, (iii) the monitoring of landfill gas emissions, (iv) the policies and legal aspects of landfill gas in the European Community and in the world, (v) the estimation of landfill gas potentials and economics of landfill gas control and exploitation, (vi) the status of landfill gas exploitation in the European Community and in the world. (authors). refs., figs., tabs

  17. Landfill Construction and Capacity Expansion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andre, F.J.; Cerda, E.

    2003-01-01

    We study the optimal capacity and lifetime of landfills taking into account their sequential nature.Such an optimal capacity is characterized by the so-called Optimal Capacity Condition.Particular versions of this condition are obtained for two alternative settings: first, if all the landfills are t

  18. A robust NiO-Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9 anode for direct-methane solid oxide fuel cell

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Dong

    2015-07-02

    In order to directly use methane without a reforming process, NiO-Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9 (NiO-SDC) nanocomposite anode are successfully synthesized via a one-pot, surfactant-assisted co-assembly approach for direct-methane solid oxide fuel cells. Both NiO with cubic phase and SDC with fluorite phase are obtained at 550 °C. Both NiO nanoparticles and SDC nanoparticles are highly monodispersed in size with nearly spherical shapes. Based on the as-synthesized NiO-SDC, two kinds of single cells with different micro/macro-porous structure are successfully fabricated. As a result, the cell performance was improved by 40%-45% with the new double-pore NiO-SDC anode relative to the cell performance with the conventional NiO-SDC anode due to a wider triple-phase-boundary (TPB) area. In addition, no significant degradation of the cell performance was observed after 60 hours, which means an increasing of long term stability. Therefore, the as-synthesized NiO-SDC nanocomposite is a promising anode for direct-methane solid oxide fuel cells.

  19. Remote Real-Time Monitoring of Subsurface Landfill Gas Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan F. Smeaton

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The cost of monitoring greenhouse gas emissions from landfill sites is of major concern for regulatory authorities. The current monitoring procedure is recognised as labour intensive, requiring agency inspectors to physically travel to perimeter borehole wells in rough terrain and manually measure gas concentration levels with expensive hand-held instrumentation. In this article we present a cost-effective and efficient system for remotely monitoring landfill subsurface migration of methane and carbon dioxide concentration levels. Based purely on an autonomous sensing architecture, the proposed sensing platform was capable of performing complex analytical measurements in situ and successfully communicating the data remotely to a cloud database. A web tool was developed to present the sensed data to relevant stakeholders. We report our experiences in deploying such an approach in the field over a period of approximately 16 months.

  20. The effect of landfill biogas on vegetal growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez-Yañez Juan Manuel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The plants carry out the gaseous exchange during the photosynthesis and the respiration, however the stomal opening of the leaves or the flow through lenticels in the root are not selective, the anthropogenic biogas emissions enter to vegetable tissues altering its normal physiology. In landfill sites roots plants are exposed to a flow of a variable concentration of biogas, mainly composed by methane (CH4 50-60% and carbon dioxide (CO2 40-55%, product of the anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (MSW. Biogas, according to its concentration and exposure time is likely to exert a negative effect on plant root growth; however, the mechanism is largely unknown. The aim of this revision was to revise the state of the art of the negative effect of biogas on plants that are close to landfill sites.

  1. Understanding leachate flow in municipal solid waste landfills by combining time-lapse ERT and subsurface flow modelling - Part I: Analysis of infiltration shape on two different waste deposit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, M; Clément, R; Moreau, S; Duquennoi, C; Loisel, S; Touze-Foltz, N

    2016-09-01

    Landfill bioreactors are based on an acceleration of in-situ waste biodegradation by performing leachate recirculation. To quantify the water content and to evaluate the leachate injection system, in-situ methods are required to obtain spatially distributed information, usually electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). In a previous study, the MICS (multiple inversions and clustering strategy) methodology was proposed to improve the hydrodynamic interpretation of ERT results by a precise delimitation of the infiltration area. In this study, MICS was applied on two ERT time-lapse data sets recorded on different waste deposit cells in order to compare the hydrodynamic behaviour of leachate flow between the two cells. This comparison is based on an analysis of: (i) the volume of wetted waste assessed by MICS and the wetting rate, (ii) the infiltration shapes and (iii) the pore volume used by the leachate flow. This paper shows that leachate hydrodynamic behaviour is comparable from one waste deposit cell to another with: (i) a high leachate infiltration speed at the beginning of the infiltration, which decreases with time, (ii) a horizontal anisotropy of the leachate infiltration shape and (iii) a very small fraction of the pore volume used by the leachate flow. This hydrodynamic information derived from MICS results can be useful for subsurface flow modelling used to predict leachate flow at the landfill scale. PMID:27103399

  2. The electric energy potential of landfill biogas in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increases in a country's energy capacity are related to its gross domestic product (GDP). In Brazil, increases in income and the consumption of goods and services have led to an increase in the generation of solid waste (SW), which is sent to landfills as a method of treatment and final disposal. The purpose of this study was to facilitate an increase in energy generation from renewable resources, specifically from landfills via thermal biogas plants, and the research was divided into two phases. The first phase involved the assessment of the potential population size contributing to the landfill, which could result in the installation of a financially viable enterprise to generate electricity in Brazil. Next, an estimate of the costs associated with the generation and collection of solid waste in Brazil was predicted by GDP prognoses, the latter being in accordance with the National Energy Balance (Balanço Energético Nacional – BEN) plan created by the Mines and Energy Ministry of Brazil (Ministério de Minas e Energia do Brasil – MME). The net present value (NPV) and internal rate of return (IRR) of each enterprise scenario was used in the first stage to assess the plan's financial viability. In the second stage, estimation curves such as logistics, decreasing rate of growth, and logarithmic curves were used to establish relationships between the generation scenarios and the projected collection of SW and projected GDP. Thus, a range of possible landfill biogas/methane generation values and installed energy capacities were created, considering the extreme maximum and minimum values. These values were related to the energy sources from residual fuels reported by BEN. The results demonstrated that such values still represented a small percentage (0.00020% in 2010 and 0.44496–0.81042% in 2030) of the projected energy generation from residual fuels. Thus, an urgent need was identified to formulate policies that would encourage landfills as a

  3. Activity and structure of methanotrophic communities in landfill cover soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebert, Julia; Singh, Brajesh Kumar; Pan, Yao; Bodrossy, Levente

    2009-10-01

    The composition of the methanotrophic community in soil covers on five landfills in Northern and Eastern Germany was investigated by means of diagnostic microarray and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), both targeting the pmoA gene of methanotrophs. Physical and chemical properties of the 15 sampled soil profiles varied greatly, thus providing for very different environmental conditions. The potential methane oxidation activity, assessed using undisturbed soil cores, varied between 0.2 and 28 µg CH4 gdw (-1)  h(-1) , the latter amounting to 426 g CH4 m(-2)  h(-1) . Total nitrogen was found to be the soil variable correlating most strongly with methanotrophic activity. Explaining close to 50% of the observed variability, this indicates that on the investigated sites activity and thus abundance of methanotrophs may have been nitrogen-limited. Variables that enhance organic matter and thus nitrogen accumulation, such as field capacity, also positively impacted methanotrophic activity. In spite of the great variability of soil properties and different geographic landfill location, both microarray and T-RFLP analysis suggested that the composition of the methanotrophic community on all five sites, in all profiles and across all depths was similar. Methylocystis, Methylobacter and Methylococcus species, including Methylococcus-related uncultivated methanotrophs, were predominantly detected among type II, Ia and Ib methanotrophs, respectively. This indicates that the high methane fluxes typical for landfill environments may be the most influential driver governing the community composition, or other variables not analysed in this study. Principal component analysis suggested that community diversity is most influenced by the site from which the samples were taken and second, from the location on the individual sites, i.e. the soil profile. Landfill and individual profiles reflect the combined impact of all effective variables, including

  4. Assessing Emissions of Volatile Organic Componds from Landfills Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahime Khademi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biogas is obtained by anaerobic decomposition of organic wastes buried materials used to produce electricity, heat and biofuels. Biogas is at the second place for power generation after hydropower and in 2000 about 6% of the world power generation was allocated to biogas. Biogas is composed of 40–45 vol% CO2, 55–65 vol% CH4, and about 1% non-methaneVOCs, and non-methane volatile organic compounds. Emission rates are used to evaluate the compliance with landfill gas emission regulations by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA. BTEX comounds affect the air quality and may be harmful to human health. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene isomers that are generally called BTEX compounds are the most abundant VOCs in biogas. Methods: Sampling of VOCs in biogas vents was operated passively or with Tedlar bags. 20 samples were collected from 40 wells of old and new biogas sites of Shiraz’ landfill. Immediately after sampling, the samples were transferred to the laboratory. Analysis of the samples was performed with GC-MS. Results: The results showed that in the collection of the old and new biogas sites, the highest concentration of VOCs was observed in toluene (0.85ppm followed by benzene (0.81ppm, ethylbenzene (0.13ppm and xylene (0.08ppm. Conclusion: The results of the study showed that in all samples, most available compounds in biogas vents were aromatic hydrocarbon compounds.These compounds’ constituents originate from household hazardous waste materials deposited in the landfill or from biological/chemical decomposition processes within the landfill.

  5. Biogeochemical evolution of a landfill leachate plume, Norman, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Bohlke, Johnkarl F.; Masoner, Jason R.; Breit, George N.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Tuttle, Michele L.W.; Jaeschke, Jeanne B.

    2011-01-01

    Leachate from municipal landfills can create groundwater contaminant plumes that may last for decades to centuries. The fate of reactive contaminants in leachate-affected aquifers depends on the sustainability of biogeochemical processes affecting contaminant transport. Temporal variations in the configuration of redox zones downgradient from the Norman Landfill were studied for more than a decade. The leachate plume contained elevated concentrations of nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC) (up to 300 mg/L), methane (16 mg/L), ammonium (650 mg/L as N), iron (23 mg/L), chloride (1030 mg/L), and bicarbonate (4270 mg/L). Chemical and isotopic investigations along a 2D plume transect revealed consumption of solid and aqueous electron acceptors in the aquifer, depleting the natural attenuation capacity. Despite the relative recalcitrance of NVDOC to biodegradation, the center of the plume was depleted in sulfate, which reduces the long-term oxidation capacity of the leachate-affected aquifer. Ammonium and methane were attenuated in the aquifer relative to chloride by different processes: ammonium transport was retarded mainly by physical interaction with aquifer solids, whereas the methane plume was truncated largely by oxidation. Studies near plume boundaries revealed temporal variability in constituent concentrations related in part to hydrologic changes at various time scales. The upper boundary of the plume was a particularly active location where redox reactions responded to recharge events and seasonal water-table fluctuations. Accurately describing the biogeochemical processes that affect the transport of contaminants in this landfill-leachate-affected aquifer required understanding the aquifer's geologic and hydrodynamic framework.

  6. Biogeochemical evolution of a landfill leachate plume, Norman, Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzarelli, I M; Böhlke, J K; Masoner, J; Breit, G N; Lorah, M M; Tuttle, M L W; Jaeschke, J B

    2011-01-01

    Leachate from municipal landfills can create groundwater contaminant plumes that may last for decades to centuries. The fate of reactive contaminants in leachate-affected aquifers depends on the sustainability of biogeochemical processes affecting contaminant transport. Temporal variations in the configuration of redox zones downgradient from the Norman Landfill were studied for more than a decade. The leachate plume contained elevated concentrations of nonvolatile dissolved organic carbon (NVDOC) (up to 300 mg/L), methane (16 mg/L), ammonium (650 mg/L as N), iron (23 mg/L), chloride (1030 mg/L), and bicarbonate (4270 mg/L). Chemical and isotopic investigations along a 2D plume transect revealed consumption of solid and aqueous electron acceptors in the aquifer, depleting the natural attenuation capacity. Despite the relative recalcitrance of NVDOC to biodegradation, the center of the plume was depleted in sulfate, which reduces the long-term oxidation capacity of the leachate-affected aquifer. Ammonium and methane were attenuated in the aquifer relative to chloride by different processes: ammonium transport was retarded mainly by physical interaction with aquifer solids, whereas the methane plume was truncated largely by oxidation. Studies near plume boundaries revealed temporal variability in constituent concentrations related in part to hydrologic changes at various time scales. The upper boundary of the plume was a particularly active location where redox reactions responded to recharge events and seasonal water-table fluctuations. Accurately describing the biogeochemical processes that affect the transport of contaminants in this landfill-leachate-affected aquifer required understanding the aquifer's geologic and hydrodynamic framework. PMID:21314684

  7. ENGINEERING ASPECTS OF LANDFILLING MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Sanitary landfilling is the most important method of municipalsolid waste disposal in China. Landfill sites are always set up in mountain valley, on plain or beside seashore. A complete landfill consists of base system, cover system, and leachate collection and gas extraction system. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art landfilling technology in China and collection discusses research projects for engineers.

  8. Assessing the role of renewable energy policies in landfill gas to energy projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane (CH4) is the second most prevalent greenhouse gas and has a global warming potential at least 28 times as high as carbon dioxide (CO2). In the United States, Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills are reported to be the third-largest source of human-made methane emissions, responsible for 18% of methane emissions in 2011. Capturing landfill gas (LFG) for use as an energy source for electricity or heat produces alternative energy as well as environmental benefits. A host of federal and state policies encourage the development of landfill gas to energy (LFGE) projects. This research provides the first systematic economic assessment of the role of these policies on adoption decisions. Results suggest that Renewable Portfolio Standards and investment tax credits have contributed to the development of these projects, accounting for 13 of 277 projects during our data period from 1991 to 2010. These policy-induced projects lead to 10.4 MMTCO2e reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and a net benefit of $41.8 million. - Highlights: • Examine the role of renewable energy policies in landfill gas to energy projects • Renewable Portfolio Standards and investment tax credit had impacts. • Investment tax credit policy is cost-effectiveness in promoting these projects. • Policy-induced projects lead to significant environmental benefits

  9. The use of stable isotopes to trace the impact of landfill gases on environmental waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of anaerobic fermentation leading to methanogenisis in landfills produces isotopically depleted methane and isotopically enriched carbon dioxide. While the inflammability of methane is a recognised environmental hazard, the impact of the carbon dioxide produced has not been recognised. Unlike methane, the carbon dioxide is very soluble in waters it comes in contact with and unlike leachates it is not contained by the engineered structure of modern landfills. The carbon dioxide gas has the potential of dissolving in ground waters, lowering their pH and degrading their water quality. We have used up to +13 per thousand delta/sup 13/C values of the CO/sub 2/ gas to trace and quantify the effect of the enhanced P/sub CO2/ on groundwater. The downstream consequences of enhanced P/sub CO2/ on groundwater quality also depend on matrix lithology, being more significant for basaltic environments such as those typical of Auckland landfills than for the rhyolitic sands and gravels common in Waikato landfills. (author)

  10. Biogas production enhancement using semi-aerobic pre-aeration in a hybrid bioreactor landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Raffaello; Morello, Luca; Raga, Roberto; Cerminara, Giulia

    2016-09-01

    Landfilling continues to be one of the main methods used in managing Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) worldwide, particularly in developing countries. Although in many countries national legislation aims to reduce this practice as much as possible, landfill is a necessary and unavoidable step in closing the material cycle. The need for innovative waste management techniques to improve landfill management and minimize the adverse environmental impact produced has resulted in an increasing interest in innovative systems capable of accelerating waste stabilization. Landfill bioreactors allow decomposition kinetics to be increased and post-operational phase to be shortened; in particular, hybrid bioreactors combine the benefits afforded by both aerobic and anaerobic processes. Six bioreactor simulators were used in the present study: four managed as hybrid, with an initial semi-aerobic phase and a second anaerobic phase, and two as anaerobic control bioreactors. The main goal of the first aerated phase is to reduce Volatile Fatty Acids (VFA) in order to increase pH and enhance methane production during the anaerobic phase; for this reason, air injection was stopped only when these parameters reached the optimum range for methanogenic bacteria. Biogas and leachate were constantly monitored throughout the entire methanogenic phase with the aim of calibrating a Gompertz Model and evaluating the effects of pre-aeration on subsequent methane production. The results showed that moderate and intermittent pre-aeration produces a positive effect both on methane potential and in the kinetics of reaction. PMID:26531047

  11. Landfills as critical infrastructures: synergy between non-invasive monitoring technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scozzari, Andrea; Raco, Brunella; Battaglini, Raffaele

    2014-05-01

    This work deals with a methodology for estimating the behaviour of a landfill system by means of the integration between two different non-invasive technologies. In fact, there is a widespread agreement on the fact that these infrastructures produce about 23% of the total anthropogenic methane released to the atmosphere. Despite that, there's still no internationally accepted protocol to quantify the leakage of biogas from a landfill with a common standard approach. This work proposes an assessment of the performance of a landfill system in terms of biogas release to the atmosphere. Such evaluation is performed by means of a direct measurement of gas flux with the accumulation chamber method, combined with the detection of thermal anomalies by infrared radiometry. In order to derive flux maps from a set of punctual measurements and calculate an overall quantity of emitted gas, a geostatistical technique is necessarily applied and briefly illustrated. A case study regarding an infrastructure located in Tuscany (Italy) is shown, where a discussion about the evolution of the landfill site through successive campaigns is also suggested. The role played by infrared thermography and its synergy with direct flux measurements is clearly perceivable in this context. The main benefit of the presented approach is a significant increase of the energy recovered from the landfill sites by optimising the collection of biogas, which implies a reduction of the total anthropogenic methane originated from the disposal of wastes released to the atmosphere.

  12. Vertical profiles of community abundance and diversity of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and bacteria in a simple waste landfill in north China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jun; Ding, Linjie; Wang, Xu; Chi, Zifang; Lei, Jiansen

    2015-03-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) is considered to be an important sink of CH4 in habitats as marine sediments. But, few studies focused on AMO in landfills which may be an important sink of CH4 derived from waste fermentation. To show evidence of AMO and to uncover function anaerobic methanotroph (ANME) community in landfill, different age waste samples were collected in Jinqianpu landfill located in north China. Through high-throughput sequencing, Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales archaea associated with ANME and reverse methanogenic archaea of Methanosarcina and Methanobacterium were detected. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) (Desulfobulbus and Desulfococcus) which could couple with ANME-conducting AMO were also found. But, the community structure of ANME had no significant difference with depths. From the results of investigation, we can come to a conclusion that sulfate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (SR-DAMO) would be the dominant AMO process in the landfill, while iron-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (M/IR-DAMO) process was weak though concentration of ferric iron was large in the landfill. Denitrification-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (NR-DAMO) was negative because of lack of nitrate and relevant function microorganisms in the landfill. Results also indicate that CH4 mitigation would have higher potential by increasing electron acceptor contents and promoting the growth of relevant function microorganisms. PMID:25561057

  13. Agricultural methanization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having briefly outlined the interest of the development of methanization of agricultural by-products in the context of struggle against climate change, and noticed that France is only now developing this sector as some other countries already did, this publication describes the methanization process also called anaerobic digestion, which produces a digestate and biogas. Advantages for the agriculture sector are outlined, as well as drawbacks and recommendations (required specific technical abilities, an attention to the use of energetic crops, an improved economic balance which still depends on public subsidies, competition in the field of waste processing). Actions undertaken by the ADEME are briefly evoked

  14. The effect of landfill biogas on vegetal growth

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez-Yañez Juan Manuel; Baltierra-Trejo Eduardo; Márquez-Benavides Liliana

    2012-01-01

    The plants carry out the gaseous exchange during the photosynthesis and the respiration, however the stomal opening of the leaves or the flow through lenticels in the root are not selective, the anthropogenic biogas emissions enter to vegetable tissues altering its normal physiology. In landfill sites roots plants are exposed to a flow of a variable concentration of biogas, mainly composed by methane (CH4) 50-60% and carbon dioxide (CO2) 40-55%, product of the anaerobic digestion of the o...

  15. Reduction of Non-CO2 Gas Emissions Through The In Situ Bioconversion of Methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, A R; Mukhopadhyay, B; Balin, D F

    2012-09-06

    The primary objectives of this research were to seek previously unidentified anaerobic methanotrophs and other microorganisms to be collected from methane seeps associated with coal outcrops. Subsurface application of these microbes into anaerobic environments has the potential to reduce methane seepage along coal outcrop belts and in coal mines, thereby preventing hazardous explosions. Depending upon the types and characteristics of the methanotrophs identified, it may be possible to apply the microbes to other sources of methane emissions, which include landfills, rice cultivation, and industrial sources where methane can accumulate under buildings. Finally, the microbes collected and identified during this research also had the potential for useful applications in the chemical industry, as well as in a variety of microbial processes. Sample collection focused on the South Fork of Texas Creek located approximately 15 miles east of Durango, Colorado. The creek is located near the subsurface contact between the coal-bearing Fruitland Formation and the underlying Pictured Cliffs Sandstone. The methane seeps occur within the creek and in areas adjacent to the creek where faulting may allow fluids and gases to migrate to the surface. These seeps appear to have been there prior to coalbed methane development as extensive microbial soils have developed. Our investigations screened more than 500 enrichments but were unable to convince us that anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) was occurring and that anaerobic methanotrophs may not have been present in the samples collected. In all cases, visual and microscopic observations noted that the early stage enrichments contained viable microbial cells. However, as the levels of the readily substrates that were present in the environmental samples were progressively lowered through serial transfers, the numbers of cells in the enrichments sharply dropped and were eliminated. While the results were disappointing we acknowledge that

  16. The impact of daily covers on sidewall leakage in landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welker, A. L. [Villanova Univ., Dept. of Civil Engineering, PA (United States)

    2000-09-01

    Typically, sanitary landfills are covered by 15 cm of locally available soil on a daily basis. This practice is intended to limit short term negative effects of the waste material on the above-ground environment such as odor, fire, or vermin attraction. Daily placement of compacted soil creates low hydraulic conductivity stratifying layers within the landfill which, in due course, may result in side-slope seepage, decreased stability and decreased efficiency of methane gas venting. The expense of soil acquisitions and the the diminishing availability of landfill space increases the need for alternative materials to replace the daily cover. This paper examines the the threat of sidewall landfill leakage for a hypothetical landfill with traditional soil cover and an alternative daily cover, to demonstrate that the threat of sidewall leakage is real and can be decreased with the use of alternative material as the daily cover such as crushed glass, sludge from waste-water treatment plants, industrial waste, foams and various geosynthetics. At the same time, results of the modelling study showed that with proper drainage sidewall seepage will not occur even with a daily cover that has a hydraulic conductivity two orders of magnitude smaller than the waste, despite positive pressure building up on top of the daily cover. These results imply that the threat of sidewall leakage is minimal, and while alternative daily cover material would help to reduce it even further, their use is most likely to be the result of economic, not technical, considerations. 12 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  17. State-of-the-art synthetic membrane for capping landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very Low Density Polyethylene (VLDPE) has emerged as a superior capping material for landfill closures. Landfills must be capped by a material which will undergo substantial deformation in areas of localized settlement prior to rupture. Methane and hydrogen sulfide gases must be contained and directed to collection points without permeating the landfill cap. Vegetative growth in the cover sods will be protected by the gas impermeability of the geosynthetic membrane. VLDPE compounded with carbon black is minimally affected by radiation and is inert to ultraviolet rays. This property sustains VLDPE's ability to retard gas permeation at levels superior to other geosynthetics. Cover soil stability on long cap slopes in all weather conditions is crucial. It has been demonstrated in the laboratory and in full-scale, on-site test conditions that VLDPE exhibits friction characteristics equaling or exceeding other synthetics used for this purpose without diminishing physical and chemical properties. Large-scale, multiaxial stress tests have demonstrated the ability of VLDPE to deflect substantially in all directions of a potential settlement area. Only PVC can equal the elastic deformation properties of VLDPE, but PVC is more gas-permeable susceptible to degradation due to natural soil radiation or ultraviolet light and heat. Test results are presented to illustrate these points. The geosynthetic cap membrane must prevent water percolation into the landfill to prevent the formation of hazardous leachates. The use of a VLDPE cap reduces the depth of cap soils, thus increasing landfill volume. The economics and reduction in long-term liabilities of closure costs are enhanced by the use of VLDPE in the cap system. Since the expected half-life of polyethylene exceeds hundreds of years, the inclusion of VLDPE in the cap system will provide pollution security for many generations

  18. Enhanced methane production in an anaerobic digestion and microbial electrolysis cell coupled system with co-cultivation of Geobacter and Methanosarcina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qi; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Zhan, Guoqiang; Bo, Tao; Yang, Yanfei; Tao, Yong; He, Xiaohong; Li, Daping; Yan, Zhiying

    2016-04-01

    The anaerobic digestion (AD) and microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) coupled system has been proved to be a promising process for biomethane production. In this paper, it was found that by co-cultivating Geobacter with Methanosarcina in an AD-MEC coupled system, methane yield was further increased by 24.1%, achieving to 360.2mL/g-COD, which was comparable to the theoretical methane yield of an anaerobic digester. With the presence of Geobacter, the maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate (216.8mg COD/(L·hr)) and current density (304.3A/m(3)) were both increased by 1.3 and 1.8 fold compared to the previous study without Geobacter, resulting in overall energy efficiency reaching up to 74.6%. Community analysis demonstrated that Geobacter and Methanosarcina could coexist together in the biofilm, and the electrochemical activities of both were confirmed by cyclic voltammetry. Our study observed that the carbon dioxide content in total gas generated from the AD reactor with Geobacter was only half of that generated from the same reactor without Geobacter, suggesting that Methanosarcina may obtain the electron transferred from Geobacter for the reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. Taken together, Geobacter not only can improve the performance of the MEC system, but also can enhance methane production. PMID:27090713

  19. Nitrification of Landfill Leachate by Biofilm Columns

    OpenAIRE

    Clabaugh, Matthew McConnell

    2001-01-01

    NITRIFICATION OF LANDFILL LEACHATE BY BIOFILM COLUMNS by Matthew M. Clabaugh J.T. Novak, Chairman Department of Environmental Engineering (ABSTRACT) Landfill leachate characteristics vary depending on the operation type of the landfill and the age of the landfill. At landfills operated as bioreactors, where leachate recirculation is practiced, leachate ammonia nitrogen concentrations may accumulate to extremely higher levels than during single pass leaching, thereby requi...

  20. Characterization, Concentrations and Emission Rates of Volatile Organic Compounds from Two Major Landfill Sites in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad AlAhmad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The emission of pollutants from landfill sites in Kuwait is of major concern due to the associated adverse environmental and health impacts. There are 18 landfill sites in Kuwait which are contributing to the emission of atmospheric pollutants including; methane, carbon dioxide and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs. Approach: Determine the concentration and composition of VOCs in LFG emissions from two major landfill sites in Kuwait and to investigate the influence of the "In-Situ Aerobic Stabilization" on the reduction of VOCs emission. VOCs samples were collected during an intensive, short-term field sampling campaign conducted in 2010 where 50 individual volatile organic compounds were identified and quantified in landfill gas samples collected from the two landfill sites and the Project Area. Results: The concentration levels of VOCs were found to be significantly different within the same landfill site; however, the average total VOCs emissions were comparable between the two landfill sites. Concentration of total VOCs (i.e., sum of 50 compounds in LFG emissions varied between 9.4-67.2 ppm in Jleeb Al-Shuyoukh landfill site and from 15.4-57.7 ppm in Al-Qurain landfill site. Annual emissions of the well-known five VOCs (i.e., benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-, o- and p-xylenes and styrene were also computed for each vent pipe from Jleeb Al-Shuyoukh landfill using the measured average concentrations and LFG flow rates. The results, if calculated in terms of the average ΣBTEX+S quantity emitted per vent pipe per year, showed that the magnitude of ΣBTEX+S emissions ranged between 0.108 -11.686 g y−1. Conclusion: The results of this pilot project demonstrated that the “in-situ aerobic stabilization method” applied on old solid waste deposits in the project area of Jleeb Al-Shuyoukh landfill can significantly reduce the average VOCs concentration in LFG emissions from high-productivity wells in the project

  1. Landfill Mining: Prospecting metal in Gärstad landfill

    OpenAIRE

    Tanha, Ariana; Zarate, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    All processes in society produce waste. In nature, the waste is normally used as a resource for another process, but in human societies waste is often discarded. These discarded materials end up in places for depositing waste known as landfills. The increase in population, and humans’ tendency to improve their quality of life, has led to an increase in consumption of material. More material consumption means generating more waste, and more waste means bigger landfills. The increasing size of ...

  2. PERFORMA OKSIDASI METAN PADA REAKTOR KONTINYU DENGAN PENINGKATAN KETEBALAN LAPISAN BIOCOVER LANDFILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opy Kurniasari

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available PERFORMANCE OF METHANE OXIDATION IN CONTINUOUS REACTOR BY BIOCOVER LANDFILL FILM THICKNESS IMPROVEMENT. Municipal solid waste (MSW handling in Indonesia is currently highly dependent on landfilling at the final disposal facility (TPA, which generally operated in layer-by-layer basis, allowing the anaerobic (absent of oxygen process. This condition will certainly generate biogas in the form of methane (CH4 and CO2. Methane is a greenhouse gas with a global warming potential greater than CO2, and can absorb infrared radiation 23 times more efficient than CO2 in the period of over 100 years. One way that can be done to reduce methane gas from landfills that escape into nature is to oxidize methane by utilizing landfill cover material (biocover as methane-oxidizing microorganism media. Application of compost as landfill cover material is a low-cost approach to reduce emissions so are suitable for developing countries. The compost used in this study was compost landfill mining, which is degraded naturally in landfill. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of biocover to oxidize the methane on a certain layer thickness with a continuous flow conditions. Three column reactors were used, which were made of flexy glass measuring 70 cm in high and 15 cm in diameter. The methane flowed from the bottom of the reactor continuously at a flow rate of 5 ml/minute. The columns were filled with biocover compost landfill mining with layer thickness of 5, 25, 35 and 60 cm. The results showed that the thicker layer of biocover, the higher the efficiency of methane oxidation. The oxidation efficiency obtained in each layer thickness of 15, 25, 35 and 60 cm was 56.43%, 63.69%, 74.58% and 80, 03% respectively, with the rate of oxidation of 0.29 mol m-2 d-1 and the fraction of oxidation of 99%. The oxidation result was supported by the identification of bacteria isolated in this experiment, namely metanotrophic bacteria that have the ability to oxidize

  3. Autonomous remote gas sensor network platforms with applications in landfill, wastewater and ambient air quality measurement

    OpenAIRE

    McNamara, Eoghan; Nardi Pinto, Camila; Collins, Fiachra; Fay, Cormac; Fregonezi Paludetti, Lizandra; Zanoni Nubiato, Keni; Xavier Costa, Ernane; Morgado, Marcelo; Diamond, Dermot

    2013-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) are produced by anaerobes on decaying matter. This gas production is present in landfill sites and in anaerobic lagoons in waste water treatment plants (WWTP). Monitoring gas production is important as CO2 can collect in low lying areas and asphyxiates, CH4 is flammable in the 5%-15% v/v gas/air region. Both CO2 and CH4 are greenhouse gases, CH4 having 25 times the global warming potential of CO2. At landfill site perimeters, CO2 and CH4 must not exceed ...

  4. Landfill gas at 0.17 NOK/kWh from Norwegian plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article relates briefly to the utilization of bio gas from sanitary landfills in Norway. The annual cost of investment for the energy parts of plants is on an average of 0.9 NOK/kWh, and the total investment about 2.2 NOK/kWh. The calculated energy price for the recovery of 1 kWh of thermal energy from bio gas shows to be about 0.17 NOK/kWh. Bio gas from landfills consists of methane (40-55%) and carbon dioxide (25-40%), and the recovered volume of gas per ton of waste is 2.8 Nm3. 1 fig

  5. Emission assessment at the Burj Hammoud inactive municipal landfill: Viability of landfill gas recovery under the clean development mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► LFG emissions are measured at an abandoned landfill with highly organic waste. ► Mean headspace and vent emissions are 0.240 and 0.074 l CH4/m2 hr, respectively. ► At sites with high food waste content, LFG generation drops rapidly after site closure. ► The viability of LFG recovery for CDMs in developing countries is doubtful. - Abstract: This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conducted and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH4 flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.188 ± 0.014, 0.224 ± 0.012 and 0.237 ± 0.008 l CH4/m2 hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24 l/m2 hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.06–0.89 l/m2 hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.42–2.46 l/m2 hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L0) values in the range of 19.8–102.6 m3/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4 yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste.

  6. Energetic utilization of biogas arising of sanitary landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biogas is the gaseous product that is obtained from the fermentation of biodegradable organic matter; this process is known as anaerobic digestion. In this exposition, the formation process of biogas is described in its three continuos phases: 1. Hydrolysis phase, 2. Phase of acid generation and the acetic acid generation and 3. Phase of methane generation. Also, the biogas composition (methane, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and traces) is present. Different types of anaerobic digestion as discontinuous digestion, continuo digestion, digestion with suspended biomass, digestion with adhered biomass, and digestion of two phases are shown. Finally, the process that occur in a landfill and its different phases of aerobic and anaerobic decomposition, are describe from its initial stage until the biogas generation

  7. Performance of Ni-Fe/gadolinium-doped CeO{sub2} anode supported tubular solid oxide fuel cells using steam reforming of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, B.; Suzuki, T.; Hamamoto, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Sumi, H.; Fujishiro, Y.; Ingram, B. J.; Carter, J. D. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology)

    2012-03-15

    Iron nanoparticles (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were added to NiO/gadolinium-doped CeO{sub 2} (GDC) anode supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) for the direct methane-water fuel operation. The cell was co-sintered at 1400 C, and the anode porosity is 31.8%. The main size corresponding to peak volume is around 1.5 {mu}m. When steam and methane directly fed to the cell, the power density is about 0.57 W cm{sup -2} at 650 C. It is the familiar performance for H{sub 2} operation (4 times of flow rate) with same fuel utilization. Compare with the testing temperature of 600 and 650 C, there is almost no carbon fiber deposition at 700 C with steam/methane (S/C) of 5. At the same time, fuel operation of high value of S/C (=3.3) resulted in fiber-like deposition and degradation of power performance based on loading test results.

  8. Alternative anode materials for methane oxidation in solid oxide fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sfeir, Joseph; Grätzel, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Fuel Cells are electrochemical devices that are able to directly convert chemical energy to electrical energy, without any Carnot limitation. Hence, their energy efficiencies are relatively high. Among the various types of fuel cells, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are operated at high temperatures and in principle can run on various fuels such as natural gas and hydrogen. As natural gas is sought to become one of the main fuels of the next decades, its direct feed to a SOFC is desirable as th...

  9. Landfill gas: planning and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is no legislation in the UK that relates directly to landfill gas. However, various pieces of legislation do exist which control all aspects of landfill and therefore, indirectly, landfill gas. This legislation includes Planning Acts, The Control of Pollution Act, Health and Safety at Work Acts, and Public Health Acts, and affects landfill gas throughout the life of the site - from planning stage to long after the last load has been deposited and restoration has been carried out. Responsibility for ensuring compliance with these various Acts lies with a variety of Authorities, including Plannning Authorities, Waste Disposal Authorities, and Environmental Health Authorities. Responsibility for actual compliance with the Acts lies with the operator, for active sites, and the landowner in the case of closed sites. (author)

  10. THE "CHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND / TOTAL VOLATILE ACIDS" RATIO AS AN ANAEROBIC TREATABILITY INDICATOR FOR LANDFILL LEACHATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Contrera

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In some operational circumstances a fast evaluation of landfill leachate anaerobic treatability is necessary, and neither Biochemical Methane Potential nor BOD/COD ratio are fast enough. Looking for a fast indicator, this work evaluated the anaerobic treatability of landfill leachate from São Carlos-SP (Brazil in a pilot scale Anaerobic Sequence Batch Biofilm Reactor (AnSBBR. The experiment was conducted at ambient temperature in the landfill area. After the acclimation, at a second stage of operation, the AnSBBR presented efficiency above 70%, in terms of COD removal, utilizing landfill leachate without water dilution, with an inlet COD of about 11,000 mg.L-1, a TVA/COD ratio of approximately 0.6 and reaction time equal to 7 days. To evaluate the landfill leachate biodegradability variation over time, temporal profiles of concentration were performed in the AnSBBR. The landfill leachate anaerobic biodegradability was verified to have a direct and strong relationship to the TVA/COD ratio. For a TVA/CODTotal ratio lower than 0.20, the biodegradability was considered low, for ratios between 0.20 and 0.40 it was considered medium, and above 0.40 it was considered high.

  11. Control of PCDDs/PCDFs, PCBs and PAHs emissions in exhaust of landfill gas fed engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idczak, F.; Dengis, P.; Duchateau, P.; Petitjean, S. [ISSeP, Liege (Belgium)

    2004-09-15

    Wallonia in Belgium, like many countries around the world, planned to reduce amounts of waste generated by human activity and stored in landfills. Since they experienced a couple of crisis situations in the past, both with former and presently used landfill sites, authorities launched a demanding landfill monitoring program which covers now 9 out of the 10 major sites. Biogas produced in these landfills are collected and eliminated in two different ways. Either simply burned in a flare, or, when the methane grade and flow are high enough, the biogas can be burned in electricity producing engines. This later use represents an energy recovery from the waste. In the context of difficulty for landfill sites to be accepted by the public (the well-known NIMBY phenomenon), the question has been raised whether combustion of the biogas did not entail production of dioxins and other polyaromatic compounds. For the exhaust gases of engines operated with biogas, a check on the presence of dioxins and associated organic pollutants, composed of three different runs or days of sampling for each of 5 landfill sites was performed upon demand of responsible authorities.

  12. Effects of trace volatile organic compounds on methane oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilai Chiemchaisri

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs on methane oxidation in landfill cover soils were examined. The batch experiments were conducted using single and mixed VOCs, such as, dichloromethane (DCM, trichloroethylene (TCE, tetrachloroethylene (PCE, and benzene. The results from all combinations showed a decrease in methane oxidation rate with increase in VOC concentrations. Moreover, inhibition effects of TCE and DCM were found higher than benzene and PCE. The reduction of methane oxidation by benzene and PCE could be attributed to the toxicity effect, whereas TCE and DCM were found to exhibit the competitive-inhibition effect. When the soil was mixed with DCM, no methane oxidation was found. Damage to the cell’s internal membrane was found in a methanotrophic culture exposed to VOC gases which is the attachment site of a key enzyme needed for methane oxidationOs efeitos dos compostos orgânicos voláteis (VOCs na oxidação do metano em camadas superficiais do solo. Os experimentos foram conduzidos usando somente VOCs ou mistura do mesmo, como, diclorometano (DCM, tricloroetileno (TCE, tetracloroetileno (PCE, e benzeno. Os resultados de todas as combinações mostraram uma diminuição na taxa da oxidação do metano com aumento nas concentrações de VOC. Além disso, os efeitos da inibição de TCE e de DCM foram mais elevados do que do benzeno e PCE. A redução da oxidação do metano pelo benzeno e PCE poderia ser atribuída ao efeito da toxicidade, visto que TCE e DCM exibiram o efeito de competição-inibição. Quando o solo foi misturado com o DCM, nenhuma oxidação do metano foi encontrada. Os danos à membrana interna celular foi observada em uma cultura metanotrófica exposta aos gases de VOC que é o local de ligação de uma enzima chave necessário para a oxidação do metano.

  13. The Boston Methane Project: Mapping Surface Emissions to Inform Atmospheric Estimation of Urban Methane Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, N.; Crosson, E.; Down, A.; Hutyra, L.; Jackson, R. B.; McKain, K.; Rella, C.; Raciti, S. M.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Lost and unaccounted natural gas can amount to over 6% of Massachusetts' total annual greenhouse gas inventory (expressed as equivalent CO2 tonnage). An unknown portion of this loss is due to natural gas leaks in pipeline distribution systems. The objective of the Boston Methane Project is to estimate the overall leak rate from natural gas systems in metropolitan Boston, and to compare this flux with fluxes from the other primary methane emissions sources. Companion talks at this meeting describe the atmospheric measurement and modeling framework, and chemical and isotopic tracers that can partition total atmospheric methane flux into natural gas and non-natural gas components. This talk focuses on estimation of surface emissions that inform the atmospheric modeling and partitioning. These surface emissions include over 3,300 pipeline natural gas leaks in Boston. For the state of Massachusetts as a whole, the amount of natural gas reported as lost and unaccounted for by utility companies was greater than estimated landfill emissions by an order of magnitude. Moreover, these landfill emissions were overwhelmingly located outside of metro Boston, while gas leaks are concentrated in exactly the opposite pattern, increasing from suburban Boston toward the urban core. Work is in progress to estimate spatial distribution of methane emissions from wetlands and sewer systems. We conclude with a description of how these spatial data sets will be combined and represented for application in atmospheric modeling.

  14. CYANOBACTERIA FOR MITIGATING METHANE EMISSION FROM SUBMERGED PADDY FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upasana Mishra; Shalini Anand [Department of Environmental Studies, Inderprastha Engineering College, Sahibabad, Ghaziabad (India)

    2008-09-30

    Atmospheric methane, a potent greenhouse gas with high absorption potential for infrared radiation, is responsible for one forth of the total anticipated warming. It is forming a major part of green house gases, next after carbon dioxide. Its concentration has been increasing alarmingly on an average at the rate of one percent per year. Atmospheric methane, originating mainly from biogenic sources such as paddy fields, natural wetlands and landfills, accounts for 15-20% of the world's total anthropogenic methane emission. With intensification of rice cultivation in coming future, methane emissions from paddy fields are anticipated to increase. India's share in world's rice production is next after to China and likewise total methane emission from paddy fields also. Methane oxidation through planktophytes, particularly microalgae which are autotrophic and abundant in rice rhizospheres, hold promise in controlling methane emission from submerged paddy fields. The present study is focused on the role of nitrogen fixing, heterocystous cyanobacteria and Azolla (a water fern harboring a cyanobacterium Anabaena azollae) as biological sink for headspace concentration of methane in flooded soils. In this laboratory study, soil samples containing five potent nitrogen fixer cyanobacterial strains from paddy fields, were examined for their methane reducing potential. Soil sample without cyanobacterial strain was tested and taken as control. Anabaena sp. was found most effective in inhibiting methane concentration by 5-6 folds over the control. Moist soil cores treated with chemical nitrogen, urea, in combination with cyanobacteria mixture, Azolla microphylla or cyanobacteria mixture plus Azolla microphylla exhibited significance reduction in the headspace concentration of methane than the soil cores treated with urea alone. Contrary to other reports, this study also demonstrates that methane oxidation in soil core samples from paddy fields was stimulated by

  15. Methane steam reforming kinetics over Ni-YSZ anodematerials for Solid Oxide FuelCells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, David

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) is a technology with great potential. Its high efficiency makes it a relevant alternative to existing technologies for utilizing fossil fuels and its fuel versatility makes it invaluable in the transition from a fossil fuel based energy system to on based on renewable...... energy. The overall efficiency of a fuel cell system operating on natural gas can be significantly improved by having part of the steam reforming take place inside the SOFC stack. In order to avoid large temperature gradients as a result of the highly endothermal steam reforming reaction, the amount of...

  16. Methane steam reforming kinetics over Ni-YSZ anode materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, David

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) is a technology with great potential. Its high efficiency makes it a relevant alternative to existing technologies for utilizing fossil fuels and its fuel versatility makes it invaluable in the transition from a fossil fuel based energy system to on based on renewable...... energy. The overall efficiency of a fuel cell system operating on natural gas can be significantly improved by having part of the steam reforming take place inside the SOFC stack. In order to avoid large temperature gradients as a result of the highly endothermal steam reforming reaction, the amount of...

  17. Ni modified ceramic anodes for direct-methane solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Guoliang; Chen, Fanglin

    2016-01-19

    In accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a method for fabricating a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The method includes synthesizing a composition having a perovskite present therein. The method further includes applying the composition on an electrolyte support to form an anode and applying Ni to the composition on the anode.

  18. Electrochemical performance of a solid oxide fuel cell with an anode based on Cu-Ni/CeO2 for methane direct oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornés, Aitor; Escudero, María J.; Daza, Loreto; Martínez-Arias, Arturo

    2014-03-01

    A CuNi-CeO2/YSZ/LSF solid oxide fuel cell has been fabricated and tested with respect to its electrochemical activity for direct oxidation of dry methane. The electrodes have been prepared by impregnation of corresponding porous YSZ layers, using reverse microemulsions as impregnating medium for the anode (constituted by Cu-Ni at 1:1 atomic ratio in combination with CeO2). On the basis of I-V electrochemical testing complemented by impedance spectroscopy (IS) measurements it is shown the ability of the SOFC for direct oxidation of methane in a rather stable way. Differences in the behavior as a function of operating temperature (1023-1073 K) are also revealed and examined on the basis of analysis of IS spectra.

  19. Effects of exogenous aerobic bacteria on methane production and biodegradation of municipal solid waste in bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Sai; Liu, Lei; Xue, Qiang; Yuan, Zhiming

    2016-09-01

    Landfill is the most common and efficient ways of municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal and the landfill biogas, mostly methane, is currently utilized to generate electricity and heat. The aim of this work is to study the effects and the role of exogenous aerobic bacteria mixture (EABM) on methane production and biodegradation of MSW in bioreactors. The results showed that the addition of EABM could effectively enhance hydrolysis and acidogenesis processes of MSW degradation, resulting in 63.95% reduction of volatile solid (VS), the highest methane production rate (89.83Lkg(-1) organic matter) ever recorded and a threefold increase in accumulative methane production (362.9L) than the control (127.1L). In addition, it is demonstrated that white-rot fungi (WRF) might further promote the methane production through highly decomposing lignin, but the lower pH value in leachate and longer acidogenesis duration may cause methane production reduced. The data demonstrated that methane production and biodegradation of MSW in bioreactors could be significantly enhanced by EABM via enhanced hydrolysis and acidogenesis processes, and the results are of great economic importance for the future design and management of landfill. PMID:26601890

  20. An experimental study with bioreactor-landfill system%生物反应器填埋场的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王君琴; 沈东升

    2003-01-01

    In this study, a methane bioreactor-landfill system was utilized to treat municipal solid waste (MSW). Through analyzing and detecting the pollutant(CODcr) in the bioreactor-landfill system, a simulated mathematic formulaof waste degradation was established. After treated with this system, the CODcr and VFA concentrations in MSW could be decreased from more than 20000 and 7000 mg·L-1 to less than 1500 and 200 mg·L-1, respec-tively.

  1. Methane mitigation in cities: how new measurements and partnerships can contribute to emissions reduction strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, F. M.; Bush, S. E.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Lai, C. T.; Rambo, J. P.; Wiggins, E. B.; Miu, J. C. L.; Carranza, V.; Randerson, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    Cities generate a large fraction of anthropogenic methane emissions that are increasing with urbanization and greater reliance on natural gas as fuel. New measurements of methane in cities suggest an as-yet unrealized potential for city-scale methane mitigation. We present high-resolution methane observations from four cities in North America to demonstrate the utility of methane surveys for identifying urban methane sources. We used portable, continuous on-road measurements to determine the spatial distribution of methane in Fairbanks, Los Angeles, Salt Lake City, and San Diego. Across cities, methane tended to be highly concentrated in space, suggesting discrete, point emission sources. Elevated methane levels were found near known emission sources, such as landfills, wastewater treatment facilities, and natural gas-fueled power plants, and revealed the location of fugitive leaks in natural gas infrastructure. The mix of sources and sizes of methane leaks varied among cities, highlighting a need for locally adaptive emissions regulation. Urban methane observations can inform anthropogenic processes in development of methane mitigation strategies. We discuss specific examples of how continuous atmospheric measurements can enhance the design of mitigation strategies in these cities, and potential contributions of these approaches to cross-sectoral efforts to reduce methane emissions at the city level.

  2. Application of Deuterium and Oxygen-18 to Trace Leachate Movement in Bantar Gebang Sanitary Landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bantar Gebang landfill was constructed in 1986 with total area of 108 ha and approximately 6000 ton/day solid waste is disposed to this landfill. Mostly, the people living surrounding landfill get afraid of impact of the hazardous chemicals produced by waste disposal to their health. The purpose of this investigation was to study the migration of leachate to Cibitung River water and shallow groundwaters near to the river. It is possible to be done because chemical contents and isotopic characteristics of municipal landfill leachate are unique, relative to aqueous media in the most natural environments. Laser absorption method developed by the LGR (Los Gatos Research) was used to measure absolute abundances of 2HHO, HH18O and HHO in a number of water samples. In-situ measurements were also conducted as an additional parameter besides their isotopes. The δ2H of the H2O in landfill leachate was significantly enriched, with values of - 22.6 0/00 to + 4.3 0/00. This deuterium enrichment was undoubtedly due to the extensive production of microbial methane within the limited reservoir of the landfill. However, the enriched deuterium value in leachate was not detected in the river which still had depleted values. It was probably caused by the amount of natural water in the river was comparatively large, with respect to limited leachate discarded to the river. The electrical conductivity of the leachate was higher (3200 to 7600 μS) and the decreasing values were still monitored in the river to approximately 12 km after streaming the landfills. The effect of the high electrical conductivity and enriched deuterium of leachate was not clearly indicated in the groundwater samples which still represented the local precipitation recharge, except a monitoring well located in Bantar Gebang landfill area which has an indication of leachate contamination. (author)

  3. Application of Deuterium and Oxygen-18 to Trace Leachate Movement in Bantar Gebang Sanitary Landfill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R. Pujiindiyati

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bantar Gebang landfill was constructed in 1986 with total area of 108 ha and approximately 6000 ton/day solid waste is disposed to this landfill. Mostly, the people living surrounding landfill get afraid of impact of the hazardous chemicals produced by waste disposal to their health. The purpose of this investigation was to study the migration of leachate to Cibitung River water and shallow groundwaters near to the river. It is possible to be done because chemical contents and isotopic characteristics of municipal landfill leachate are unique, relative to aqueous media in the most natural environments. Laser absorption method developed by the LGR (Los Gatos Research was used to measure absolute abundances of 2HHO, HH18O and HHO in a number of water samples. In-situ measurements were also conducted as an additional parameter besides their isotopes. The δ2H of the H2O in landfill leachate was significantly enriched, with values of - 22.6 ‰ to + 4.3 ‰. This deuterium enrichment was undoubtedly due to the extensive production of microbial methane within the limited reservoir of the landfill. However, the enriched deuterium value in leachate was not detected in the river which still had depleted values. It was probably caused by the amount of natural water in the river was comparatively large, with respect to limited leachate discarded to the river.The electrical conductivity of the leachate was higher (3200 to 7600 S and the decreasing values were still monitored in the river to approximately 12 km after streaming the landfills. The effect of the high electrical conductivity and enriched deuterium of leachate was not clearly indicated in the groundwater samples which still represented the local precipitation recharge, except a monitoring well located in Bantar Gebang landfill area which has an indication of leachate contamination.

  4. Microbial fuel cells using natural pyrrhotite as the cathodic heterogeneous Fenton catalyst towards the degradation of biorefractory organics in landfill leachate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yan; Lu, Anhuai; Ding, Hongrui; Wang, Xin; Wang, Changqiu; Zeng, Cuiping; Yan, Yunhua [The Key Laboratory of Orogenic Belts and Crustal Evolution, School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2010-07-15

    An investigation aimed at checking the integration of cathodic pyrrhotite Fenton's reaction with anodic microbial respiration for the enhancement of MFC performance and treatment of a real landfill leachate was carried out. The MFC equipped with a pyrrhotite-coated graphite-cathode generated the maximum power density of 4.2 W/m{sup 3} that was 133% higher than graphite-cathode. Concomitantly, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) showed that the polarization resistance of pyrrhotite-cathode (92 {omega}) was much lower than the graphite-cathode (1057 {omega}), indicating that the cathodic overpotential was significantly lowered, probably due to the occurrence of pyrrhotite Fenton's reaction. The in situ generation of Fenton's reagents (Fe{sup 2+} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) at the pyrrhotite-cathode was demonstrated by the cyclic voltammetry measurement. Besides, reactive oxygen species produced from the pyrrhotite Fenton's reaction were detected and demonstrated to be vital to the enhancement of MFC power output. Further, the effectiveness of this system was examined by treating an old-aged landfill leachate. 77% of color and 78% of COD were removed from the original leachate, indicating that the pyrrhotite not only acted as a cost-effective cathodic catalyst for MFCs in power generation, but also extended the practical merits of traditional MFCs towards advanced oxidation of biorefractory pollutants. (author)

  5. Performance analysis of energy recovery in an Italian municipal solid waste landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to assess the techno-economic viability of the use of fuel cell as an alternative technology for landfill gas energy recovery. The case of an Italian municipal solid waste landfill is analyzed. The landfill was opened in 1998 and in 2001 the energy recovery facility started operation. The current landfill gas conversion system is based on internal combustion engine technology. However, the drawbacks of internal combustion engine in terms of conversion efficiency and air emissions are widely acknowledged. Some authors have proposed molten carbonate fuel cell as one of the most interesting solution for landfill gas energy recovery for the near future. Fuel cells have proven capable of providing superior energy efficiency and environmental performance, but their widespread use is constrained by the capital cost required. Using actual data from the landfill, a comparison between the current energy recovery system and a hypothetical alternative solution based on molten carbonate fuel cell is performed. The analysis assesses the cost-effectiveness of the two solutions, considering also some environmental externalities usually not included in traditional economic assessment. The main strengths and weaknesses of the two landfill gas energy recovery systems are highlighted and some new insights into molten carbonate fuel cell overall sustainability are provided.

  6. Town of Edinburg landfill reclamation demonstration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfill reclamation is the process of excavating a solid waste landfill to recover materials, reduce environmental impacts, restore the land resource, and, in some cases, extend landfill life. Using conventional surface mining techniques and specialized separation equipment, a landfill may be separated into recyclable material, combustible material, a soil/compost fraction and residual waste. A landfill reclamation demonstration project was hosted at the Town of Edinburg municipal landfill in northwest Saratoga County. The report examines various separation techniques employed at the site and appropriate uses for reclaimed materials. Specifications regarding engineered work plans, health and safety monitoring, and contingency preparedness are discussed. Major potential applications and benefits of using landfill reclamation technology at existing landfills are identified and discussed. The research and development aspect of the report also examines optimal screening technologies, site selection protocol and the results of a test burn of reclaimed waste at a waste-to-energy facility. Landfill reclamation costs are developed, and economic comparisons are made between reclamation costs and conventional landfill closure costs, with key criteria identified. The results indicate that, although dependent on site-specific conditions and economic factors, landfill reclamation can be a technically and economically feasible alternative or companion to conventional landfill closure under a range of favorable conditions. Feasibility can be determined only after an investigation of the variety of landfill conditions and reclamation options

  7. Landfill gas generation and emission at danish waste disposal sites receiving waste with a low organic waste content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mou, Zishen; Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    two models are multi-phase models, which defines waste fractions into traditional MSW and low-organic waste categories, respectively. Both the LandGEM and the IPCC model estimated significantly larger methane (CH4) generation in comparison to the Afvalzorg model. The Afvalzorg model could better show......The landfill gas (LFG) generation from four Danish landfills was estimated using three first-order-decay (FOD) models; the LandGEM model (developed by the US EPA), the IPCC (developed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) and the Afvalzorg model (developed by a Dutch company). The last...... the influence of not only the total disposed waste amount, but also various waste categories, and was found more suitable to estimate LFG generation from landfills receiving low-organic waste. Four major waste categories currently being disposed at Danish landfills (mixed bulky, shredder, dewatered sludge...

  8. An anaerobic field injection experiment in a landfill leachate plume (Grindsted, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Ludvigsen, L.;

    1999-01-01

    Redox conditions may be environmental factors which affect the fate of the xenobiotic organic compounds. Therefore the redox conditions were characterized in an anaerobic, leachate-contaminated aquifer 15–60 m downgradient from the Grindsted Landfill, Denmark, where an field injection experiment...... time during the experimental period of 924 days owing to variations in the leachate from the landfill. However, no indication of change in the redox environment resulting from the field injection experiment or natural variation was observed in the individual sampling points. The methane, Fe......, Fe(III) was the dominant electron acceptor in the region of the aquifer, which was investigated. Because of the complexity of a landfill leachate plume, several redox processes may occur simultaneously, and an array of methods must be applied for redox characterization in such multicomponent systems....

  9. Evaluation of potential opportunities for electric power generation from landfill gas at “Tsalapitsa”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganev Ivaylo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Potential opportunities for electric power generation from landfill gas (LFG utilization were estimated for the second largest landfill site in Bulgaria, situated near the city of Plovdiv. The work performed was based on detailed analysis of experimentally obtained and model-predicted features of the “Tsalapitsa” landfill site. The study presents a short description of the site, the global characteristics of the disposed municipal solid waste, and the experimentally obtained methane composition of the LFG. Based on the above described observations, the potential for LFG recovery at “Tsalapitsa” was determined, together with that for electric power generation for the next 25 years. A set of recommendations was then developed regarding the parameters required for the installation of electric power generation from LFG in Plovdiv.

  10. Acceleration of aged-landfill stabilization by combining partial nitrification and leachate recirculation: A field-scale study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jinwook [R& D Center, Samsung Engineering Co., Ltd., 415-10 Woncheon-dong, Youngtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 443-823 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seungjin; Baek, Seungcheon [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hanyang University, Sa 3-dong, Sangnok-gu, Ansan, Gyeonggi-do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Nam-Hoon [Department of Environmental & Energy Engineering, Anyang University, 22 Samdeok-ro, 37 Beon-gil, Manan-gu, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do 430-714 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seongjun; Lee, Junghun; Lee, Heechang [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hanyang University, Sa 3-dong, Sangnok-gu, Ansan, Gyeonggi-do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Wookeun, E-mail: wkbae@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hanyang University, Sa 3-dong, Sangnok-gu, Ansan, Gyeonggi-do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • To solve the drawbacks (NH{sub 4}{sup +} accumulation) of leachate recirculation, ex-situ SBR was applied. • Produced NO{sub 2}{sup −} was recirculated and denitrified to N{sub 2} in landfill with insufficient carbon source. • Despite the inhibition of methanogenesis by DO and nitrate, CH{sub 4} fraction eventually increased. - Abstract: Leachate recirculation for rapid landfill stabilization can result in the accumulation of high-strength ammonium. An on-site sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was therefore, applied to oxidize the ammonium to nitrite, which was then recirculated to the landfill for denitrification to nitrogen gas. At relatively higher ammonium levels, nitrite accumulated well in the SBR; the nitrite was denitrified stably in the landfill, despite an insufficient biodegradable carbon source in the leachate. As the leachate was recirculated, the methane and carbon dioxide contents produced from the landfill fluctuated, implying that the organic acids and hydrogen produced in the acid production phase acted as the carbon source for denitrification in the landfill. Leachate recirculation combined with ex-situ partial nitrification of the leachate may enhance the biodegradation process by: (a) removing the nitrogen that is contained with the leachate, and (b) accelerating landfill stabilization, because the biodegradation efficiency of landfill waste is increased by supplying sufficient moisture and its byproducts are used as the carbon source for denitrification. In addition, partial nitrification using an SBR has advantages for complete denitrification in the landfill, since the available carbon source is in short supply in aged landfills.

  11. Effects of biochar amendment on geotechnical properties of landfill cover soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Krishna R; Yaghoubi, Poupak; Yukselen-Aksoy, Yeliz

    2015-06-01

    Biochar is a carbon-rich product obtained when plant-based biomass is heated in a closed container with little or no available oxygen. Biochar-amended soil has the potential to serve as a landfill cover material that can oxidise methane emissions for two reasons: biochar amendment can increase the methane retention time and also enhance the biological activity that can promote the methanotrophic oxidation of methane. Hydraulic conductivity, compressibility and shear strength are the most important geotechnical properties that are required for the design of effective and stable landfill cover systems, but no studies have been reported on these properties for biochar-amended landfill cover soils. This article presents physicochemical and geotechnical properties of a biochar, a landfill cover soil and biochar-amended soils. Specifically, the effects of amending 5%, 10% and 20% biochar (of different particle sizes as produced, size-20 and size-40) to soil on its physicochemical properties, such as moisture content, organic content, specific gravity and pH, as well as geotechnical properties, such as hydraulic conductivity, compressibility and shear strength, were determined from laboratory testing. Soil or biochar samples were prepared by mixing them with 20% deionised water based on dry weight. Samples of soil amended with 5%, 10% and 20% biochar (w/w) as-is or of different select sizes, were also prepared at 20% initial moisture content. The results show that the hydraulic conductivity of the soil increases, compressibility of the soil decreases and shear strength of the soil increases with an increase in the biochar amendment, and with a decrease in biochar particle size. Overall, the study revealed that biochar-amended soils can possess excellent geotechnical properties to serve as stable landfill cover materials. PMID:25898984

  12. Performance evaluation and comparison of fuel processors integrated with PEM fuel cell based on steam or autothermal reforming and on CO preferential oxidation or selective methanation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Modeling of different fuel processors integrated with PEM fuel cell stack. • Steam or autothermal reforming + CO selective methanation or preferential oxidation. • Reforming of different hydrocarbons: gasoline, light diesel oil, natural gas. • 5 kWe net systems comparison via energy efficiency and primary fuel rate consumed. • Highest net efficiency: steam reformer + CO selective methanation based system. - Abstract: The performances of four different auxiliary power unit (APU) schemes, based on a 5 kWe net proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEM-FC) stack, are evaluated and compared. The fuel processor section of each APU is characterized by a reformer (autothermal ATR or steam SR), a non-isothermal water gas shift (NI-WGS) reactor and a final syngas catalytic clean-up step: the CO preferential oxidation (PROX) reactor or the CO selective methanation (SMET) one. Furthermore, three hydrocarbon fuels, the most commonly found in service stations (gasoline, light diesel oil and natural gas) are considered as primary fuels. The comparison is carried out examining the results obtained by a series of steady-state system simulations in Aspen Plus® of the four different APU schemes by varying the fed fuel. From the calculated data, the performance of CO-PROX is not very different compared to that of the CO-SMET, but the performance of the SR based APUs is higher than the scheme of the ATR based APUs. The most promising APU scheme with respect to an overall performance target is the scheme fed with natural gas and characterized by a fuel processor chain consisting of SR, NI-WGS and CO-SMET reactors. This processing reactors scheme together with the fuel cell section, notwithstanding having practically the same energy efficiency of the scheme with SR, NI-WGS and CO-PROX reactors, ensures a less complex scheme, higher hydrogen concentration in the syngas, lower air mass rate consumption, the absence of nitrogen in the syngas and higher potential power

  13. Evaluation Of Landfill Gas Decay Constant For Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Operated As Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prediction of the rate of gas production from bioreactor landfills is important to optimize energy recovery and to estimate greenhouse gas emissions. Landfill gas (LFG) composition and flow rate were monitored for four years for a conventional and two bioreactor landfill landfil...

  14. Landfill aeration for emission control before and during landfill mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raga, Roberto; Cossu, Raffaello; Heerenklage, Joern; Pivato, Alberto; Ritzkowski, Marco

    2015-12-01

    The landfill of Modena, in northern Italy, is now crossed by the new high velocity railway line connecting Milan and Bologna. Waste was completely removed from a part of the landfill and a trench for the train line was built. With the aim of facilitating excavation and further disposal of the material extracted, suitable measures were defined. In order to prevent undesired emissions into the excavation area, the aerobic in situ stabilisation by means of the Airflow technology took place before and during the Landfill Mining. Specific project features involved the pneumatic leachate extraction from the aeration wells (to keep the leachate table low inside the landfill and increase the volume of waste available for air migration) and the controlled moisture addition into a limited zone, for a preliminary evaluation of the effects on process enhancement. Waste and leachate were periodically sampled in the landfill during the aeration before the excavation, for quality assessment over time; the evolution of biogas composition in the landfill body and in the extraction system for different plant set-ups during the project was monitored, with specific focus on uncontrolled migration into the excavation area. Waste biological stability significantly increased during the aeration (waste respiration index dropped to 33% of the initial value after six months). Leachate head decreased from 4 to 1.5m; leachate recirculation tests proved the beneficial effects of moisture addition on temperature control, without hampering waste aerobization. Proper management of the aeration plant enabled the minimization of uncontrolled biogas emissions into the excavation area. PMID:26445364

  15. Sanitary Landfill Supplemental Test Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the performance of the Sanitary Landfill Supplemental Test data, an evaluation of applicability, conclusions, recommendations, and related information for implementation of this remediation technology at the SRS Sanitary Landfill

  16. Thermodynamic Analysis of Methane-fueled Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Considering CO Electrochemical Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiong Sun; Keqing Zheng; Meng Ni⁎

    2014-01-01

    abstract Thermodynamic analyses in the literature have shown that solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with proton conducting electrolyte (H-SOFC) exhibited higher performance than SOFC with oxygen ion conducting electrolyte (O-SOFC). However, these studies only consider H2 electrochemical oxidation and totally neglect the contribution of CO electrochemical oxidation in O-SOFC. In this short communication, a thermodynamic model is developed to compare the theoretically maximum efficiencies of H-SOFC and O-SOFC, considering the electrochemical oxidation of CO in O-SOFC anode. It is found that O-SOFC exhibits a higher maximum efficiency than H-SOFC due to the contribution from CO electrochemical oxidation, which is contrary to the common understanding of electrolyte effect on SOFC performance. The effects of operating temperature and fuel utilization factor on the theoretical efficiency of SOFC are also analyzed and discussed.

  17. Can soil gas profiles be used to assess microbial CH4 oxidation in landfill covers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebert, Julia; Röwer, Inga Ute; Scharff, Heijo; Roncato, Camila D L; Cabral, Alexandre R

    2011-05-01

    A method is proposed to estimate CH(4) oxidation efficiency in landfill covers, biowindows or biofilters from soil gas profile data. The approach assumes that the shift in the ratio of CO(2) to CH(4) in the gas profile, compared to the ratio in the raw landfill gas, is a result of the oxidation process and thus allows the calculation of the cumulative share of CH(4) oxidized up to a particular depth. The approach was validated using mass balance data from two independent laboratory column experiments. Values corresponded well over a wide range of oxidation efficiencies from less than 10% to nearly total oxidation. An incubation experiment on 40 samples from the cover soil of an old landfill showed that the share of CO(2) from respiration falls below 10% of the total CO(2) production when the methane oxidation capacity is 3.8 μg CH(4)g(dw)(-1)h(-1) or higher, a rate that is often exceeded in landfill covers and biofilters. The method is mainly suitable in settings where the CO(2) concentrations are not significantly influenced by processes such as respiration or where CH(4) loadings and oxidation rates are high enough so that CO(2) generated from CH(4) oxidation outweighs other sources of CO(2). The latter can be expected for most biofilters, biowindows and biocovers on landfills. This simple method constitutes an inexpensive complementary tool for studies that require an estimation of the CH(4) oxidation efficiency values in methane oxidation systems, such as landfill biocovers and biowindows. PMID:21074981

  18. Influence of the set anode potential on the performance and internal energy losses of a methane-producing microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villano, Marianna; Ralo, Cláudia; Zeppilli, Marco; Aulenta, Federico; Majone, Mauro

    2016-02-01

    The effect of the set anode potential (between + 200 mV and - 200 mV vs. SHE, standard hydrogen electrode) on the performance and distribution of internal potential losses has been analyzed in a continuous-flow methane-producing microbial electrolysis cell (MEC).Both acetate removal rate (at the anode) and methane generation rate (at the cathode) were higher (1 gCOD/L day and 0.30 m(3)/m(3) day, respectively) when the anode potential was controlled at + 200 mV. However, both the yields of acetate conversion into current and current conversion into methane were very high (72-90%) under all the tested conditions. Moreover, the sum of internal potential losses decreased from 1.46 V to 0.69 V as the anode potential was decreased from + 200 mV to - 200 mV, with cathode overpotentials always representing the main potential losses. This was likely to be due to the high energy barrier which has to be overcome in order to activate the cathode reaction. Finally, the energy efficiency correspondingly increased reaching 120% when the anode was controlled at - 200 mV. PMID:26342333

  19. Modelling the Potential Biogas Productivity Range from a MSW Landfill for Its Sustainable Exploitation

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Cristina Rada; Marco Ragazzi; Paolo Stefani; Marco Schiavon; Vincenzo Torretta

    2015-01-01

    A model of biogas generation was modified and applied to the case of a sanitary landfill in Italy. The modifications considered the role of the temperature field normally established within each layer of waste. It must be pointed out the temperature affects the anaerobic biodegradation kinetics. In order to assess the effect of moisture on the waste biodegradation rate, on the bacteria process and then on the methane production, the model was compared with the LandGEM one. Information on the ...

  20. Quantifying Methane Fluxes Simply and Accurately: The Tracer Dilution Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rella, Christopher; Crosson, Eric; Green, Roger; Hater, Gary; Dayton, Dave; Lafleur, Rick; Merrill, Ray; Tan, Sze; Thoma, Eben

    2010-05-01

    Methane is an important atmospheric constituent with a wide variety of sources, both natural and anthropogenic, including wetlands and other water bodies, permafrost, farms, landfills, and areas with significant petrochemical exploration, drilling, transport, or processing, or refining occurs. Despite its importance to the carbon cycle, its significant impact as a greenhouse gas, and its ubiquity in modern life as a source of energy, its sources and sinks in marine and terrestrial ecosystems are only poorly understood. This is largely because high quality, quantitative measurements of methane fluxes in these different environments have not been available, due both to the lack of robust field-deployable instrumentation as well as to the fact that most significant sources of methane extend over large areas (from 10's to 1,000,000's of square meters) and are heterogeneous emitters - i.e., the methane is not emitted evenly over the area in question. Quantifying the total methane emissions from such sources becomes a tremendous challenge, compounded by the fact that atmospheric transport from emission point to detection point can be highly variable. In this presentation we describe a robust, accurate, and easy-to-deploy technique called the tracer dilution method, in which a known gas (such as acetylene, nitrous oxide, or sulfur hexafluoride) is released in the same vicinity of the methane emissions. Measurements of methane and the tracer gas are then made downwind of the release point, in the so-called far-field, where the area of methane emissions cannot be distinguished from a point source (i.e., the two gas plumes are well-mixed). In this regime, the methane emissions are given by the ratio of the two measured concentrations, multiplied by the known tracer emission rate. The challenges associated with atmospheric variability and heterogeneous methane emissions are handled automatically by the transport and dispersion of the tracer. We present detailed methane flux

  1. Quantitative Study of Biogas Generation Potential from Different Landfill Sites of Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikash Adhikari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research paper was study of waste composition and quantitative analysis of biogas generation potential with its recovery at Sisdole, Pokhara and Karaute Dada landfill sites (LFS of Nepal. The waste management practice in LFS are significant deciding factors for the assessment of environmental impacts caused including the release of green house gases like methane, carbondioxide etc to the atmosphere, that could contribute significantly to global warming and climate change. The total waste disposed to Sisdole LFS, Pokhara LFS and Karaute Dada LFS are 410, 80 and 7.8 tons respectively.  The waste composition was studied onsite with waste reduction method and analyzed for their composition. The organic component of wastes was found high as 61.6%, 52.5% and 65% at Sisdole, Pokhara and Karaute Dada LFS respectively. The biogas potential at these landfill sites were 12157.78 cum, 851.99 cum and 169 cum of biogas per day in Sisdole, Pokhara and Karaute Dada LFS respectively. 4.68, 0.33 and 0.07 MW energy per day can be generated from these amounts of biogas produced in Sisdole, Pokhara and Karaute Dada LFS respectively. Proper gas collection system can be the source of income from these landfill sites and help to mitigate the adverse impact of methane that is being released from these landfill sites

  2. Astronomy on a Landfill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venner, Laura

    2008-09-01

    Engaging "K-to-Gray” audiences (children, families, and older adults) in astronomical activities is one of the main goals of the NJMC Center for Environmental and Scientific Education and the William D. McDowell Observatory located in Lyndhurst, NJ. Perched atop a closed and reclaimed municipal solid waste landfill, our new LEED - certified building (certification pending) and William D. McDowell observatory will assist in bringing the goals of IYA 2009 to the approximately 25,000 students and 15,000 adults that visit our site from the NY/NJ region each year. Diversifying our traditional environmental science offerings, we have incorporated astronomy into our repertoire with "The Sun Through Time” module, which includes storytelling, cultural astronomy, telescope anatomy, and other activities that are based on the electromagnetic spectrum and our current knowledge of the sun. These lessons have also been modified to bring astronomy to underserved communities, specifically those individuals that have dexterity or cognitive ability differences. The program is conducted in a classroom setting and is designed to meet New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards. With the installation of our new 20” telescope, students and amateur astronomers will be given the opportunity to perform rudimentary research. In addition, a program is in development that will allow individuals to measure local sky brightness and understand the effects of light pollution on astronomical viewing. Teaching astronomy in an urban setting presents many challenges. All individuals, regardless of ability level or location, should be given the opportunity to be exposed to the wonders of the universe and the MEC/CESE has been successful in providing those opportunities.

  3. Qualitative Research and Evaluation of Landfill Leachate

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Kačinskaja; Kristina Bazienė; Saulius Vasarevičius

    2013-01-01

    Currently, depositing municipal waste in landfills is the dominating method in Lithuania. A large amount of landfill leachate is the main environmental problem. Municipal waste landfill leachate is characterized by high biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) containing a number of heavy metals and concentration of organic compounds. The colmatation of landfill leachate collection systems is another burning problem that occurs due to certain characteristics of leachate such as suspended solids, an in...

  4. An AEM survey of a leaking landfill

    OpenAIRE

    Beamish, D

    2005-01-01

    This study presents results obtained from a remarkably small-scale helicopter airborne electromagnetic (AEM) survey of a closed landfill. The landfill, occupying a former quarry, is situated among shallow, worked-out coal seams (pillar and stall workings) and was located over at least two mineshafts that occupied the quarry floor. The landfill was known to be leaking from an extensive borehole investigation that took place in the 1970’s, when the landfill was active. Redevelopment issues and ...

  5. Preface for the Special Column of Methane Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Wang

    2009-01-01

    @@ Methane is the main constituent of natural gas, coal-bed gas, landfill gas and methane hydrate resources. These resources may be used more efficiently as clean fuels or as chemical feedstocks if methane can be effectively transformed into liquid fuels or chemicals. However, methane only possesses C-H bonds and is a very stable organic molecule hard to functionalize. The C-H activation, particularly the selective functionalization of C-H bonds in saturated hydrocarbons, remains a difficult challenge in chemistry. The present technology for chemical utilization of methane involves the steam reforming of methane to synthesis gas and the subsequent transformation of synthesis gas to methanol or hydrocarbon fuels via methanol synthesis or Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. However, the steam reforming of methane is a high-cost process. The development of more efficient and economical processes for methane transformation is a dream of all chemists and chemical engineers. I think that this is also one of the most important themes of the Journal of Natural Gas Chemistry.

  6. Methane Hotspots in the Los Angeles Megacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Bush, S.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Lai, C.; Kort, E. A.; Blake, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Airborne observations show that Los Angeles (LA) is a large source of methane to the atmosphere, yet the sources of excess methane from the urban area are poorly constrained. We used a mobile laboratory, a Ford Transit van equipped with cavity ring down spectrometers (Picarro, Inc.), to measure greenhouse gases (CH4, CO2, and CO) mole fractions in LA. On-road surveys across the LA Basin were conducted seasonally to determine patterns of CH4 enrichment in space and over time, with a focus on quantifying methane leaks from known sources. We found fugitive leaks and elevated CH4 concentrations throughout the LA Basin. Some were associated with known sources, such as landfills, wastewater treatment, and oil and gas infrastructure, while others had an unknown origin. Urban CH4 enrichment varied over the course of the year, largely due to seasonal changes in meteorological conditions. Nevertheless, our mobile surveys revealed CH4 hotspots (>200 ppb elevated with respect to background levels) that persisted among seasons. High CH4 concentrations were most easily predicted by proximity to methane sources, particularly near the coast, while elevated CH4 levels were more evenly dispersed in inland areas. CH4 hotspots had a disproportionate impact on excess methane relative to the area they accounted for, typically providing more than a quarter of excess methane measured on a transect. These data improve estimates of the relative roles of specific leaks and emission sectors to LA's excess methane. Depending on the cost of reducing these CH4 leaks, a focus on CH4 emissions may prove an effective way to reduce LA's greenhouse gas emissions in the near term.

  7. Spatially explicit methane inventory for Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Rebecca; Bretscher, Daniel; DelSontro, Tonya; Eugster, Werner; Henne, Stephan; Henneberger, Ruth; Künzle, Thomas; Merbold, Lutz; Neininger, Bruno; Schellenberger, Andreas; Schroth, Martin; Buchmann, Nina; Brunner1, Dominik

    2013-04-01

    Spatially explicit greenhouse gas inventories are gaining in importance as a tool for policy makers to plan and control mitigation measures, and are a required input for atmospheric models used to relate atmospheric concentration measurements with upstream sources. In order to represent the high spatial heterogeneity in Switzerland, we compiled the national methane inventory into a 500 m x 500 m cadaster. In addition to the anthropogenic emissions reported to the United Nation Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), we also included natural and semi-natural methane fluxes, i.e., emissions from lakes and reservoirs, wetlands, wild animals as well as forest uptake. Methane emissions were disaggregated according to geostatistical information about source location and extent. In Switzerland, highest methane emissions originate from the agricultural sector (152 Gg CH4 yr-1), followed by emissions from waste management (16 Gg CH4 yr-1) with highest contributions from landfills, and the energy sector (13 Gg CH4 yr-1) with highest contributions from the distribution of natural gas. Natural and semi-natural emissions only add a small amount (inventory was evaluated against methane concentrations measured from a small research aircraft (METAIR-DIMO) above the Swiss Plateau on 18 different days from May 2009 to August 2010 over. Source sensitivities of the air measured were determined by backward runs of the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART-COSMO. Source sensitivities were multiplied with the methane inventory to derive simulated methane concentration time series. While the pattern of the variations can be reproduced well for some flight days (correlation coefficient up to 0.75), the amplitude of the variations for the simulated time series is underestimated by at least 20% suggesting an underestimation of CH4 emissions by the inventory, which is also concluded from inverse estimation using a Bayesian approach.

  8. A correction in the CDM methodological tool for estimating methane emissions from solid waste disposal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M M O; van Elk, A G P; Romanel, C

    2015-12-01

    Solid waste disposal sites (SWDS) - especially landfills - are a significant source of methane, a greenhouse gas. Although having the potential to be captured and used as a fuel, most of the methane formed in SWDS is emitted to the atmosphere, mainly in developing countries. Methane emissions have to be estimated in national inventories. To help this task the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has published three sets of guidelines. In addition, the Kyoto Protocol established the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) to assist the developed countries to offset their own greenhouse gas emissions by assisting other countries to achieve sustainable development while reducing emissions. Based on methodologies provided by the IPCC regarding SWDS, the CDM Executive Board has issued a tool to be used by project developers for estimating baseline methane emissions in their project activities - on burning biogas from landfills or on preventing biomass to be landfilled and so avoiding methane emissions. Some inconsistencies in the first two IPCC guidelines have already been pointed out in an Annex of IPCC latest edition, although with hidden details. The CDM tool uses a model for methane estimation that takes on board parameters, factors and assumptions provided in the latest IPCC guidelines, while using in its core equation the one of the second IPCC edition with its shortcoming as well as allowing a misunderstanding of the time variable. Consequences of wrong ex-ante estimation of baseline emissions regarding CDM project activities can be of economical or environmental type. Example of the first type is the overestimation of 18% in an actual project on biogas from landfill in Brazil that harms its developers; of the second type, the overestimation of 35% in a project preventing municipal solid waste from being landfilled in China, which harms the environment, not for the project per se but for the undue generated carbon credits. In a simulated landfill - the same

  9. Methane release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swiss Gas Industry has carried out a systematic, technical estimate of methane release from the complete supply chain from production to consumption for the years 1992/1993. The result of this survey provided a conservative value, amounting to 0.9% of the Swiss domestic output. A continuation of the study taking into account new findings with regard to emission factors and the effect of the climate is now available, which provides a value of 0.8% for the target year of 1996. These results show that the renovation of the network has brought about lower losses in the local gas supplies, particularly for the grey cast iron pipelines. (author)

  10. Environmental upgrading of a landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article refers to an experimental study concerning the vegetative upgrading of a closed-down landfill (once used for industrial waste disposal). The aim was to check the possibility of reconstructing or aiding the natural growth of a vegetation in keeping with the surrounding area, in a tried environment such as that of landfills. The original idea contained in the approved project - which meant to generically upgrade the territory by planting species belonging to the grassy layer, shrubs and trees - has, with time, undergone some changes. On the basis of both the knowledge acquired during management and of a more accurate analysis of the territory, the experiment was preferred to aim at finding out which were the species, both continental and Mediterranean, able to gradually adjust to the surrounding landscape, leaving to natural selection the task to decide which species were more suitable to the upgrading of closed-down landfills, and which planting technique was more effective

  11. Landfilling of waste incineration residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Astrup, Thomas; Cai, Zuansi; Chen, D.

    Residues from waste incineration are bottom ashes and air-pollution-control (APC) residues including fly ashes. The leaching of heavy metals and salts from the ashes is substantial and a wide spectrum of leaching tests and corresponding criteria have been introduced to regulate the landfilling of...... the ashes. Leaching test, however, must be selected carefully to provide information relevant for the actual disposal scenario and for evaluating the benefits of pre-treating the residues prior to landfilling. This paper describes research at the Technical University of Denmark addressing some of...... these issues focusing on pH-development in landfilled residues, effects of leaching test conditions on Cr leaching and effects of pre-treatment with FeSO4....

  12. Monitoring of landfill influences on groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Mihael Brenčič

    2004-01-01

    Landfills of waste present serious threat to groundwater. To prevent groundwater pollution from landfill monitoring is performed. Rule of groundwater pollution monitoring from dangerous substances implements principles in Slovene legislation. In everyday practice certain questions arose since validity of the rule. These questions are about responsible parties in monitoring, groundwater distribution in space, target groundwater units, characterization level of the landfill and its surroundings...

  13. LANDFILL BIOREACTOR PERFORMANCE, SECOND INTERIM REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bioreactor landfill is a landfill that is operated in a manner that is expected to increase the rate and extent of waste decomposition, gas generation, and settlement compared to a traditional landfill. This Second Interim Report was prepared to provide an interpretation of fie...

  14. Consequences of raising the height of a landfill in a water-deficient climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blight, G E

    2005-01-01

    A large-scale field experiment has been carried out at the Coastal Park landfill which serves the City of Cape Town, South Africa. The landfill is unlined, and the City Council was under pressure from the central Government to cap and close the existing landfill and to establish an extension to the landfill with a lining to prevent the escape of leachate into the ground water. Measuring cells, installed to measure the rate of leachate flow from the landfill had shown that over a period of 9 years, from 1987 to 1995, leachate flow had averaged only 2% of rainfall. It therefore appeared possible, by increasing the moisture absorption capacity of the landfill, i.e., by increasing its height, to stop the leachate flow completely. If this could be achieved, there would be no need for a lining, and the raising would considerably extend the life of the landfill. The paper describes the experiment and its results, including the effects of the raising on leachate flow, settlement, leachate quality and the potential for polluting ground water, and the landfill's water balance. PMID:15961303

  15. Decomposition and carbon storage of selected paper products in laboratory-scale landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to measure the anaerobic biodegradation of different types of paper products in laboratory-scale landfill reactors. The study included (a) measurement of the loss of cellulose, hemicellulose, organic carbon, and (b) measurement of the methane yields for each paper product. The test materials included two samples each of newsprint (NP), copy paper (CP), and magazine paper (MG), and one sample of diaper (DP). The methane yields, carbon storage factors and the extent of cellulose and hemicellulose decomposition all consistently show that papers made from mechanical pulps (e.g., NPs) are less degradable than those made from chemical pulps where essentially all lignin was chemically removed (e.g., CPs). The diaper, which is not only made from chemical pulp but also contains some gel and plastic, exhibited limited biodegradability. The extent of biogenic carbon conversion varied from 21 to 96% among papers, which contrasts with the uniform assumption of 50% by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) for all degradable materials discarded in landfills. Biochemical methane potential tests also showed that the solids to liquid ratio used in the test can influence the results. - Highlights: • Decomposition of major paper products measured under simulated landfill conditions • Varied decomposition behaviors across paper types governed by pulp types • A copy paper made from eucalyptus exhibited inhibited decomposition

  16. Decomposition and carbon storage of selected paper products in laboratory-scale landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaoming, E-mail: wangxiaoming_cqu@163.com [Key Laboratory of Three Gorges Reservoir Region' s Eco-Environment, Ministry of Education, National Center for International Research of Low-Carbon and Green Buildings, Chongqing University, Chongqing (China); Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); De la Cruz, Florentino B. [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Ximenes, Fabiano [Department of Primary Industries, New South Wales (Australia); Barlaz, Morton A. [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the anaerobic biodegradation of different types of paper products in laboratory-scale landfill reactors. The study included (a) measurement of the loss of cellulose, hemicellulose, organic carbon, and (b) measurement of the methane yields for each paper product. The test materials included two samples each of newsprint (NP), copy paper (CP), and magazine paper (MG), and one sample of diaper (DP). The methane yields, carbon storage factors and the extent of cellulose and hemicellulose decomposition all consistently show that papers made from mechanical pulps (e.g., NPs) are less degradable than those made from chemical pulps where essentially all lignin was chemically removed (e.g., CPs). The diaper, which is not only made from chemical pulp but also contains some gel and plastic, exhibited limited biodegradability. The extent of biogenic carbon conversion varied from 21 to 96% among papers, which contrasts with the uniform assumption of 50% by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) for all degradable materials discarded in landfills. Biochemical methane potential tests also showed that the solids to liquid ratio used in the test can influence the results. - Highlights: • Decomposition of major paper products measured under simulated landfill conditions • Varied decomposition behaviors across paper types governed by pulp types • A copy paper made from eucalyptus exhibited inhibited decomposition.

  17. Scrutinizing compost properties and their impact on methane oxidation efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber-Humer, Marion; Tintner, Johannes; Böhm, Katharina; Lechner, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Methane emissions from active or closed landfills can be reduced by means of microbial methane oxidation enhanced by properly designed landfill covers and engineered biocovers. Composts produced using different waste materials have already been proven to support methane oxidation, and may represent a low-cost alternative to other suitable substrates such as sandy or humic-rich soils, which are frequently not available in sufficient amounts or are too costly. In the present study a data set of 30 different compost materials (different age and input materials) and mixtures, as well as seven soils and mineral substrates were tested to assess methane oxidation rate under similar conditions in a laboratory column set-up. Multivariate data analysis (discriminant analysis) was applied to predict the influence of 21 different parameters (chemical, maturation and physical) on methane oxidation rate in a PLS-DA model. The results show that bulk density, total nutrient content (nitrogen and phosphorus), as well as the quantity and quality (with respect to maturity) of organic matter determined methane oxidation rate in this data set. The model explained 50% of the data variation, indicating how characterisation of oxidation rate by single, even diverse conventional parameters was limited. Thus for the first time, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was applied to a series of samples to better determine the characteristics of methane-oxidising materials. The initial data obtained in this study appear to be most promising. The prediction of specific methane oxidation rate of a potential biocover material from FTIR spectra and multivariate data analyses is a target to be focused on in the future. PMID:21036026

  18. Evaluation of the methane emission from the Braambergen waste deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane concentrations in plumes resulting from emissions from a waste deposit near Almere, Netherlands, were measured in November 1999. The aim of the experiment was to estimate the total methane emission of the landfill. Measurements were made with a tunable diode laser technique in a van. In total, 16 plume measurements were conducted. The emission was estimated by fitting the cross-section of the plume concentration with an atmospheric transport model. The emission estimated from the plume measurements at Braambergen amounted to 48 ± 8 g CH4 s-1. 9 refs

  19.  Distribution and composition of microbial populations in landfill leachate contaminated aquifer (Grindsted, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, L; Albrechtsen, HJ; Ringelberg, DB;

    1999-01-01

    To investigate whether landfill leachates affected the microbial biomass and/or community composition of the extant microbiota, 37 samples were collected along a 305-m transect of a shallow landfill-leachate polluted aquifer. The samples were analyzed for total numbers of bacteria by use of the...... 5.4 × 104 cells/g dw. Populations of sulfate reducers decreased with an increase in horizontal distance from the landfill ranging from a high of 9.0 × 103 cells/g dw to a low of 6 cells/g dw. Iron, manganese, and nitrate reducers were detected throughout the leachate plume all at maximum cell...... AODC, MPN, PLFA, and ATP analyses in the characterization of the extant microbiota within the Grindsted aquifer revealed that as distance increased from the leachate source, viable biomass decreased and community composition shifted. These results led to the conclusion that the landfill leachate...

  20. Emission model for landfills with mechanically-biologically pretreated waste, with the emphasis on modelling the gas balance; Emissionsprognosemodell fuer Deponien mit mechanisch-biologisch vorbehandelten Abfaellen - Schwerpunkt: Modellierung des Gashaushaltes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danhamer, H.

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this work was to determine influence factors on processes going on in landfills with mechanically-biologically pretreated waste (MBP-landfills) in order to predict emissions. For this purpose a computer based model has been developed. The model allows to simulate the gas, water and heat balance as well as settlement processes and was called DESIM2005 (version MB). It is based on theoretical modeling approaches as well as data from lab and reactor experiments. The main focus of model application was to determine factors influencing the gas phase and the emissions of landfill gas and methane during operation and aftercare of MBP-landfills. By performing simulations the effects of changing parameters for the processes gas transport and biological degradation as well as the effects of different qualities in waste pretreatment and of varying landfill operation techniques were investigated. Possibilities for increasing the environmental sustainability of landfills containing mechanically-biologically pretreated waste were shown. (orig.)

  1. Plume mapping and isotopic characterisation of anthropogenic methane sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazzeri, G.; Lowry, D.; Fisher, R. E.; France, J. L.; Lanoisellé, M.; Nisbet, E. G.

    2015-06-01

    Methane stable isotope analysis, coupled with mole fraction measurement, has been used to link isotopic signature to methane emissions from landfill sites, coal mines and gas leaks in the United Kingdom. A mobile Picarro G2301 CRDS (Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy) analyser was installed on a vehicle, together with an anemometer and GPS receiver, to measure atmospheric methane mole fractions and their relative location while driving at speeds up to 80 kph. In targeted areas, when the methane plume was intercepted, air samples were collected in Tedlar bags, for δ13C-CH4 isotopic analysis by CF-GC-IRMS (Continuous Flow Gas Chromatography-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry). This method provides high precision isotopic values, determining δ13C-CH4 to ±0.05 per mil. The bulk signature of the methane plume into the atmosphere from the whole source area was obtained by Keeling plot analysis, and a δ13C-CH4 signature, with the relative uncertainty, allocated to each methane source investigated. Both landfill and natural gas emissions in SE England have tightly constrained isotopic signatures. The averaged δ13C-CH4 for landfill sites is -58 ± 3‰. The δ13C-CH4 signature for gas leaks is also fairly constant around -36 ± 2‰, a value characteristic of homogenised North Sea supply. In contrast, signatures for coal mines in N. England and Wales fall in a range of -51.2 ± 0.3‰ to -30.9 ± 1.4‰, but can be tightly constrained by region. The study demonstrates that CRDS-based mobile methane measurement coupled with off-line high precision isotopic analysis of plume samples is an efficient way of characterising methane sources. It shows that isotopic measurements allow type identification, and possible location of previously unknown methane sources. In modelling studies this measurement provides an independent constraint to determine the contributions of different sources to the regional methane budget and in the verification of inventory source distribution.

  2. Alternatives for landfill leachate management at the Naameh landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text.Leachate generation is an inevitable consequence of solid waste land filling. Leachate is generated as moisture percolates through the waste material, or a successive layers of the landfill are compressed and the initial water content of the refuse is squeezed out of the refuse. The quantity of leachate generation is highly dependent on climatic and hydrologic conditions, site operations and management, internal landfill processes and particularly waste composition. In Lebanon, as in many developing countries, the solid waste fraction of organic nature with high moisture content reaches 70 percent, which will evidently result in elevated generation rates. The uncontrolled infiltration of leachate in the vadoze and the subsequent contamination of soil and ground water resources is considered as the most adverse environmental impact associated with landfills. this paper describes leachate management options that will eliminate or minimize such an impact. the applicability of these options at the Naameh landfill will be evaluated. Relevant biological and physico-chemical treatment processes will be discussed as an economic of their feasibility in Lebanon and leachate recirculation will be emphasized as an economic management option. Finally, a methodology for leachate storage tank sizing will be presented to ensure the proper operation of an overall management plan involving leachate recirculation

  3. The Comet Assay for the Evaluation of Genotoxic Potential of Landfill Leachate

    OpenAIRE

    Kamila Widziewicz; Joanna Kalka; Magdalena Skonieczna; Paweł Madej

    2012-01-01

    Genotoxic assessment of landfill leachate before and after biological treatment was conducted with two human cell lines (Me45 and NHDF) and Daphnia magna somatic cells. The alkali version of comet assay was used to examine genotoxicity of leachate by DNA strand breaks analysis and its repair dynamics. The leachate samples were collected from Zabrze landfill, situated in the Upper Silesian Industrial District, Poland. Statistically significant differences (Kruskal-Wallice ANOVA rank model) wer...

  4. Quantifying capital goods for waste landfilling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Line Kai-Sørensen; Stentsøe, Steen; Willumsen, Hans Christian;

    2013-01-01

    to approximately 260 kg per tonne of waste landfilled. The environmental burdens from the extraction and manufacturing of the materials used in the landfill, as well as from the construction of the landfill, were modelled as potential environmental impacts. For example, the potential impact on global warming was 2.......5 kg carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalents or 0.32 milli person equivalents per tonne of waste. The potential impacts from the use of materials and construction of the landfill are low-to-insignificant compared with data reported in the literature on impact potentials of landfills in operation...

  5. T2LBM Version 1.0: Landfill bioreactor model for TOUGH2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2001-05-22

    The need to control gas and leachate production and minimize refuse volume in landfills has motivated the development of landfill simulation models that can be used by operators to predict and design optimal treatment processes. T2LBM is a module for the TOUGH2 simulator that implements a Landfill Bioreactor Model to provide simulation capability for the processes of aerobic or anaerobic biodegradation of municipal solid waste and the associated flow and transport of gas and liquid through the refuse mass. T2LBM incorporates a Monod kinetic rate law for the biodegradation of acetic acid in the aqueous phase by either aerobic or anaerobic microbes as controlled by the local oxygen concentration. Acetic acid is considered a proxy for all biodegradable substrates in the refuse. Aerobic and anaerobic microbes are assumed to be immobile and not limited by nutrients in their growth. Methane and carbon dioxide generation due to biodegradation with corresponding thermal effects are modeled. The numerous parameters needed to specify biodegradation are input by the user in the SELEC block of the TOUGH2 input file. Test problems show that good matches to laboratory experiments of biodegradation can be obtained. A landfill test problem demonstrates the capabilities of T2LBM for a hypothetical two-dimensional landfill scenario with permeability heterogeneity and compaction.

  6. Modelling of biogas extraction at an Italian landfill accepting mechanically and biologically treated municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, Paolo S; Orsi, Sirio; Gentili, Emiliano; Carlo, Meoni

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents the results of the modelling of the biogas extraction in a full-scale Italian landfill by the USEPA LandGEM model and the Andreottola-Cossu approach. The landfill chosen for this research ('Il Fossetto' plant, Monsummano Terme, Italy) had accepted mixed municipal raw waste for about 15 years. In the year 2003 a mechanical biological treatment (MBT) was implemented and starting from the end of the year 2006, the recirculation in the landfill of the concentrated leachate coming from the internal membrane leachate treatment plant was put into practice. The USEPA LandGEM model and the Andreottola-Cossu approach were chosen since they require only input data routinely acquired during landfill management (waste amount and composition) and allow a simplified calibration, therefore they are potentially useful for practical purposes such as landfill gas management. The results given by the models are compared with measured data and analysed in order to verify the impact of MBT on biogas production; moreover, the possible effects of the recirculation of the concentrated leachate are discussed. The results clearly show how both models can adequately fit measured data even after MBT implementation. Model performance was significantly reduced for the period after the beginning of recirculation of concentrated leachate when the probable inhibition of methane production, due to the competition between methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria, significantly influenced the biogas production and composition. PMID:21930528

  7. T2LBM Version 1.0: Landfill bioreactor model for TOUGH2; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need to control gas and leachate production and minimize refuse volume in landfills has motivated the development of landfill simulation models that can be used by operators to predict and design optimal treatment processes. T2LBM is a module for the TOUGH2 simulator that implements a Landfill Bioreactor Model to provide simulation capability for the processes of aerobic or anaerobic biodegradation of municipal solid waste and the associated flow and transport of gas and liquid through the refuse mass. T2LBM incorporates a Monod kinetic rate law for the biodegradation of acetic acid in the aqueous phase by either aerobic or anaerobic microbes as controlled by the local oxygen concentration. Acetic acid is considered a proxy for all biodegradable substrates in the refuse. Aerobic and anaerobic microbes are assumed to be immobile and not limited by nutrients in their growth. Methane and carbon dioxide generation due to biodegradation with corresponding thermal effects are modeled. The numerous parameters needed to specify biodegradation are input by the user in the SELEC block of the TOUGH2 input file. Test problems show that good matches to laboratory experiments of biodegradation can be obtained. A landfill test problem demonstrates the capabilities of T2LBM for a hypothetical two-dimensional landfill scenario with permeability heterogeneity and compaction

  8. Thermodynamic characteristics of a low concentration methane catalytic combustion gas turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low concentration methane, emitted from coal mines, landfill, animal waste, etc. into the atmosphere, is not only a greenhouse gas, but also a waste energy source if not utilised. Methane is 23 times more potent than CO2 in terms of trapping heat in the atmosphere over a timeframe of 100 years. This paper studies a novel lean burn catalytic combustion gas turbine, which can be powered with about 1% methane (volume) in air. When this technology is successfully developed, it can be used not only to mitigate the methane for greenhouse gas reduction, but also to utilise such methane as a clean energy source. This paper presents our study results on the thermodynamic characteristics of this new lean burn catalytic combustion gas turbine system by conducting thermal performance analysis of the turbine cycle. The thermodynamic data including thermal efficiencies and exergy loss of main components of the turbine system are presented under different pressure ratios, turbine inlet temperatures and methane concentrations.

  9. Landfill gas powers brick production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshalls plc produce high-quality facing bricks using tunnel kilns at the company's Stairfoot Brickworks site, in the UK. The company extracts clay from the adjacent quarries, which are subsequently filled with domestic waste. In 1981 Marshalls decided to exploit the landfill gas (LFG) resource 'on its doorstep'. (author)

  10. Landfilling of waste incineration residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Astrup, Thomas; Cai, Zuansi;

    2002-01-01

    Residues from waste incineration are bottom ashes and air-pollution-control (APC) residues including fly ashes. The leaching of heavy metals and salts from the ashes is substantial and a wide spectrum of leaching tests and corresponding criteria have been introduced to regulate the landfilling of...

  11. Differences in volatile methyl siloxane (VMS) profiles in biogas from landfills and anaerobic digesters and energetics of VMS transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansel, Berrin; Surita, Sharon C

    2014-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the types and levels of volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS) present in biogas generated in the anaerobic digesters and landfills, evaluate the energetics of siloxane transformations under anaerobic conditions, compare the conditions in anaerobic digesters and municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills which result in differences in siloxane compositions. Biogas samples were collected at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant and South Dade Landfill in Miami, Florida. In the digester gas, D4 and D5 comprised the bulk of total siloxanes (62% and 27%, respectively) whereas in the landfill gas, the bulk of siloxanes were trimethylsilanol (TMSOH) (58%) followed by D4 (17%). Presence of high levels of TMSOH in the landfill gas indicates that methane utilization may be a possible reaction mechanism for TMSOH formation. The free energy change for transformation of D5 and D4 to TMSOH either by hydrogen or methane utilization are thermodynamically favorable. Either hydrogen or methane should be present at relatively high concentrations for TMSOH formation which explains the high levels present in the landfill gas. The high bond energy and bond distance of the Si-O bond, in view of the atomic sizes of Si and O atoms, indicate that Si atoms can provide a barrier, making it difficult to break the Si-O bonds especially for molecules with specific geometric configurations such as D4 and D5 where oxygen atoms are positioned inside the frame formed by the large Si atoms which are surrounded by the methyl groups. PMID:25160660

  12. Kinetics of Internal Methane Steam Reforming in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Its Influence on Cell Performance– Coupling Experiments and Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, L.; Pourquie, M.J.B.M.; Thattai, A.; Verkooijen, A.H.M.; Aravind, P.V.

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical modeling tools are useful for predicting the safe operation limits and efficiencies of SOFCs. For a particular SOFC design, variations in internal methane reforming kinetic parameters is expected to affect local gas compositions, local Nernst voltages, current densities and temperature profiles and in turn the safe operation limits and efficiency. However, it is observed that methane reforming kinetic data widely used in SOFC CFD models are often determined from measurements on n...

  13. Biochemical methane production potential from different components of fraction of municipal solid waste

    OpenAIRE

    de Andrés Pérez de Rada, Mª Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    - Issues of management of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (biogas production in landfills, leachates with high concentrations of organics, odour problems). - Porribility of energy production from this fraction by mean of Anaerobic digestion. - Evaluation of the biogas and methane potential productions from single components of the organic fraction of MSW by mean of lab test. - Modelling of cumulative production.

  14. Auto generation plant of Artigas landfill (Bilbao, Spain); Planta de autogeneracion electrica del vertedero de Artigas (Bilbao)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreras, N.; Dorronsoro, J.L.

    1996-06-01

    The disposition of MSW in the landfill generates a mixture of gases or biogas, its primary content is methane (50-60%) which has a very important energetic value, that can be very useful. In this sense, the present work point out the characteristics of the auto generation electrical plant of Artigas landfill, just like the results of the analytical study of the past two years. In this project which was partly funded by the UE, have participated Excmo. Ayuntamiento de Bilbao, EVE and CIEMAT. (Author) 6 refs.

  15. Auto generation plant of Artigas landfill (Bilbao, Spain); Planta de autogeneracion electrica del vertedero de Artigas (Bilbao)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreras, N.; Dorronsoro, J.L.

    1996-07-01

    The disposition of MSW in the landfill generates a mixture of gases or {sup b}iogas{sup ,} its primary content is methane (50-60%) which has a very important energetic value, that can be very useful. In this sense, the present work point out the characteristics of the auto generation electrical plant of Artigas landfill, just like the results of the analytical study of the past two years. In this project which was partly funded by the UE, have participated Excmo. Ayuntamiento de Bilbao, EVE and CIEMAT. (Author) 6 refs.

  16. Corrective action investigation plan for CAU Number 453: Area 9 Landfill, Tonopah Test Range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the environmental sample collection objectives and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the Area 9 Landfill, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 453/Corrective Action (CAS) 09-55-001-0952, which is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 255 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The Area 9 Landfill is located northwest of Area 9 on the TTR. The landfill cells associated with CAU 453 were excavated to receive waste generated from the daily operations conducted at Area 9 and from range cleanup which occurred after test activities

  17. Simulated evapotranspiration from a landfill irrigated with landfill leachate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evapotranspiration from a landfill area, irrigated with leachate water, was simulated with the SOIL model. Three different types of vegetation (bare soil, grass ley, and willow) were used both with and without irrigation. The highest simulated evapotranspiration (604 mm) during the growing season was found from an irrigated willow stand with a high interception capacity. The lowest evapotranspiration (164 mm) was found from the bare soil. The relatively high evapotranspiration from the willow was probably caused by the high LAI (Leaf Area Index) and the low aerodynamic resistance within the willow stand. The results indicate that it is possible to reduce most of the leakage water from a landfill by irrigation of willow stands. 9 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  18. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents in landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of landfills as an in situ biological treatment system represents an alternative for source area remediation with a significant cost saving. The specific objective of this research is to investigate the intrinsic bioattenuation capacity of the landfill ecosystem for chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs). The research was conducted in two complementary systems: simulated landfill bioreactors and batch degradation experiment in serum bottles. Refuse samples excavated from a landfill were tested in laboratory bioreactors designed and operated to facilitate refuse decomposition under landfilling conditions. Each bioreactor was operated with leachate recirculation and gas collection. Target CAHs, tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE), were added to selected reactors and maintained at 20 μM each in leachate to simulate the effect of long-term exposure of refuse microorganisms to CAHs on the degradation potential of these chemicals in landfills. At two different stages of refuse decomposition, active refuse decomposition representing young landfills and maturation phase representing aged landfills, anaerobic microbial cultures were derived from selected bioreactors and tested in serum bottles for their abilities to biodegrade target CAHs. Results of this study suggest that landfills have an intrinsic reductive dechlorination capacity for PCE and TCE. The decomposition of refuse, a source of complex organics, enhances reductive dechlorination by the refuse cultures tested in this study. In addition, the test results suggest that it may be possible to develop engineering strategies to promote both CAHs degradation and refuse decomposition in landfills. (author)

  19. Landfill gas management and end use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfill gas, like sewer and marsh gas, is a biogas. It is generated by the biological decomposition of organic matter in solid waste landfills. Once gas production begins, it can continue for 30 to 50 years or more, until all of the organic matter is completely decomposed. The evolution of landfill gas management in the United States began in the 1970s because of the concerns for health and safety. Over the years, there have been many documented cases of loss of human life or serious injury caused by explosions or accumulations of landfill-derived gases. The federal Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) established the first federal regulatory performance criteria requiring landfill owners and operators to control the escape of landfill gas. These regulations have led to the installation of hundreds of gas control systems at landfill sites across the country. Landfill gas recovery, however, has also been demonstrated to be a profitable venture. The success that the landfill gas recovery industry experienced in the 1970s, 1980s, and, hopefully, in the 1990s, has proven that it is possible to use our landfills in a beneficial manner, while reducing our country's dependence on foreign oil

  20. Identification of Cellulose Breaking Bacteria in Landfill Samples for Organic Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, P. M.; Leung, F. C.

    2015-12-01

    According to the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department, the citizens of Hong Kong disposes 13,500 tonnes of waste to the landfill everyday. Out of the 13,500 tonnes, 3600 tonnes consist of organic waste. Furthermore, due to the limited supply of land for landfills in Hong Kong, it is estimated that landfills will be full by about 2020. Currently, organic wastes at landfills undergo anaerobic respiration, where methane gas, one of the most harmful green house gases, will be released. The management of such waste is a pressing issue, as possible solutions must be presented in this crucial period of time. The Independent Schools Foundation Academy introduced their very own method to manage the waste produced by the students. With an approximate of 1500 students on campus, the school produces 27 metric tonnes of food waste each academic year. The installation of the rocket food composter provides an alternate method of disposable of organic waste the school produces, for the aerobic environment allows for different by-products to be produced, namely compost that can be used for organic farming by the primary school students and subsequently carbon dioxide, a less harmful greenhouse gas. This research is an extension on the current work, as another natural factor is considered. It evaluates the microorganism community present in leachate samples collected from the North East New Territories Landfill, for the bacteria in the area exhibits special characteristics in the process of decomposition. Through the sequencing and analysis of the genome of the bacteria, the identification of the bacteria might lead to a break through on the current issue. Some bacteria demonstrate the ability to degrade lignin cellulose, or assist in the production of methane gas in aerobic respirations. These characteristics can hopefully be utilized in the future in waste managements across the globe.

  1. Environmental state and buffering properties of underground hydrosphere in waste landfill site of the largest petrochemical companies in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musin, R. Kh; Kurlyanov, N. A.; Kalkamanova, Z. G.; Korotchenko, T. V.

    2016-03-01

    The article examines the waste landfill site of PJSC “Nizhnekamskneftekhim” built 1982. Particular attention is paid to the volume of disposed wastes and peculiarities of landfill operation. It has been revealed that the landfill negatively impacts groundwater. The increase in groundwater level and contamination degree is dependent on recharge from infiltration of precipitation that interacts with the waste in the landfill cells. Groundwater contamination follows the longitudinal distribution pattern, with maximum intensity reaching in the nearest area of the landfill. With increasing distance, concentration of all pollutants sharply reduces. Within three kilometers away from the landfill, groundwater turns to its background values indicating its quality. The landfill discharges oil, phenols, formaldehyde, benzol, toluene, xylene, ethylbenzene, and iron and, to a lesser extent, sulfates, chlorides and barium into the underground hydrosphere. The overlimiting concentrations of other components are caused by intensive leaching from the rocks by aggressive carbonic acid water. The concentrations of hydrocarbonates can reach 8 g/l in the groundwater within the landfill and its nearest area, however, under natural conditions, they do not exceed 0.4 g/l. This is only possible in a case of partial activity of carbon dioxide associated with destruction of organic matter disposed in the landfill. One of the processes that play an important role in groundwater quality recovery is mixing of contaminated groundwater with infiltrating precipitation.

  2. Surface emission of landfill gas from solid waste landfill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Won; Shin, Ho-Chul

    The surface emission of landfill gas (LFG) was studied to estimate the amount of LFG efflux from solid waste landfills using an air flux chamber. LFG efflux increased as atmospheric temperature increased during the day, and the same pattern for the surface emission was observed for the change of seasons. LFG efflux rate decreased from summer through winter. The average LFG efflux rates of winter, spring and summer were 0.1584, 0.3013 and 0.8597 m 3 m -2 h -1 respectively. The total amount of surface emission was calculated based on the seasonal LFG efflux rate and the landfill surface area. From the estimates of LFG generation, it is expected that about 30% of the generated LFG may be released through the surface without extraction process. As forced extraction with a blower proceeded, the extraction well pressure decreased from 1100 to -100 mm H 2O, and the LFG surface efflux decreased markedly above 80%. Thus, the utilization of LFG by forced extraction would be the good solution for global warming and air pollution by LFG.

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell technology coupled with methane dry reforming: A viable option for high efficiency plant with reduced CO2 emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays the control of greenhouse gas is probably the most challenging environmental policy issue. Since CO2 is considered the major greenhouse gas (GHG) that contributes to the global warming, enforcing technological strategies aiming to avoid or reuse CO2 emissions becomes crucial, in order to mitigate GHG environmental impact. Currently, solutions conventionally adopted to this purpose are carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies. In this context, instead, the followed strategy aims to further improvements in energetic conversion efficiency with related reduced specific CO2 emissions (per produced kWhe). Therefore, with particular reference to the electric power generation, this paper proposes an innovative energy conversion system, based on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), characterized by higher efficiency and reduced CO2 emission factor respect to an analogous conventional energy plant. In particular, the innovative solution consists of combining SOFC to methane dry reforming technology, while the conventional system refers to steam methane reforming-SOFC coupling. The innovative system performance up to 65% electric efficiency as cited in the paper, was validated through simulations carried out in Aspen Plus environment. - Highlights: • An innovative high efficiency plant with low CO2 emissions is presented. • The new solution combined SOFC to methane dry reforming technology (CDR–SOFC). • A comparison between CDR–SOFC and SMR–SOFC system was carried out in Aspen Plus. • CDR–SOFC efficiency is greater of 6.4% percentage points respect to SMR–SOFC. • A CO2 emission factor reduction of about 10% was achieved by CDR–SOFC plant

  4. Landfill reduction experience in The Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharff, Heijo, E-mail: h.scharff@afvalzorg.nl

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • ‘Zero waste’ initiatives never consider risks, side effects or experience of achieved low levels of landfill. • This paper provides insight into what works and what not. • Where strong gradients in regulations and tax occur between countries, waste will find its way to landfills across borders. • Strong landfill reduction can create a fierce competition over the remaining waste to be landfilled resulting in losses. • At some point a public organisation should take responsibility for the operation of a ‘safety net’ in waste management. - Abstract: Modern waste legislation aims at resource efficiency and landfill reduction. This paper analyses more than 20 years of landfill reduction in the Netherlands. The combination of landfill regulations, landfill tax and landfill bans resulted in the desired landfill reduction, but also had negative effects. A fierce competition developed over the remaining waste to be landfilled. In 2013 the Dutch landfill industry generated €40 million of annual revenue, had €58 million annual costs and therefore incurred an annual loss of €18 million. It is not an attractive option to prematurely end business. There is a risk that Dutch landfill operators will not be able to fulfil the financial obligations for closure and aftercare. Contrary to the polluter pays principle the burden may end up with society. EU regulations prohibiting export of waste for disposal are in place. Strong differentials in landfill tax rate between nations have nevertheless resulted in transboundary shipment of waste and in non-compliance with the self-sufficiency and proximity principles. During the transformation from a disposal society to a recycling society, it is important to carefully plan required capacity and to guide the reorganisation of the landfill sector. At some point, it is no longer profitable to provide landfill services. It may be necessary for public organisations or the state to take responsibility for the

  5. Landfill reduction experience in The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • ‘Zero waste’ initiatives never consider risks, side effects or experience of achieved low levels of landfill. • This paper provides insight into what works and what not. • Where strong gradients in regulations and tax occur between countries, waste will find its way to landfills across borders. • Strong landfill reduction can create a fierce competition over the remaining waste to be landfilled resulting in losses. • At some point a public organisation should take responsibility for the operation of a ‘safety net’ in waste management. - Abstract: Modern waste legislation aims at resource efficiency and landfill reduction. This paper analyses more than 20 years of landfill reduction in the Netherlands. The combination of landfill regulations, landfill tax and landfill bans resulted in the desired landfill reduction, but also had negative effects. A fierce competition developed over the remaining waste to be landfilled. In 2013 the Dutch landfill industry generated €40 million of annual revenue, had €58 million annual costs and therefore incurred an annual loss of €18 million. It is not an attractive option to prematurely end business. There is a risk that Dutch landfill operators will not be able to fulfil the financial obligations for closure and aftercare. Contrary to the polluter pays principle the burden may end up with society. EU regulations prohibiting export of waste for disposal are in place. Strong differentials in landfill tax rate between nations have nevertheless resulted in transboundary shipment of waste and in non-compliance with the self-sufficiency and proximity principles. During the transformation from a disposal society to a recycling society, it is important to carefully plan required capacity and to guide the reorganisation of the landfill sector. At some point, it is no longer profitable to provide landfill services. It may be necessary for public organisations or the state to take responsibility for the

  6. Geosynthetic applications in landfill design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfills are designed to contain waste and to provide protection against discharges of leachate into the environment. Main components of a landfill include a liner system, a leachate collection system, and a cover system. Traditional designs have typically incorporated clay soils for containment and sands with embedded piping for leachate collection. As a result of recent advances in design, geosynthetic materials are now widely used for components. While these materials present cost and feasibility advantages, they also pose significant challenges in stability evaluations, handing during installation, and quality assurance. This paper presents an overview of applications of geosynthetics in design and construction, including: Advantages, disadvantages, design criteria, possible economic benefits of various systems, and related construction considerations. 2 figs., 1 tab

  7. LANDFILL LEACHATES PRETREATMENT BY OZONATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Leszczyński

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the application of ozonation processes for stabilized landfill leachate treatment was investigated. The leachate came from a municipal sanitary landfill located nearby Bielsk Podlaski. The average values of its main parameters were: pH 8.23; COD 870 mgO2/dm3; BOD 90 mgO2/dm3; NH4+ 136.2 mgN/dm3; UV254 absorbance 0.312 and turbidity 14 NTU. The ozone dosages used were in the range of 115.5 to 808.5 mgO3/dm3 of the leachate. The maximum COD, color and UV254 absorbance removal wa.5 mgO3/dm3. After oxidation, the ratio of BOD/COD was increased from 0.1 up to 0.23.

  8. Landfill Gas Conversion to LNG and LCO{sub 2}. Phase II Final Report for January 25, 1999 - April 30, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W. R.; Cook, W. J.; Siwajek, L. A.

    2000-10-20

    This report summarizes work on the development of a process to produce LNG (liquefied methane) for heavy vehicle use from landfill gas (LFG) using Acrion's CO{sub 2} wash process for contaminant removal and CO{sub 2} recovery.

  9. METHANE INCORPORATION BY PROCARYOTIC PHOTOSYNTHETICMICROORGANISMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, Charles J.; Kirk, Martha; Calvin, Melvin

    1970-08-01

    The procaryotic photosynthetic microorganisms Anacystis nidulans, Nostoc and Rhodospirillum rubrum have cell walls and membranes that are resistant to the solution of methane in their lipid components and intracellular fluids. But Anacystis nidulans, possesses a limited bioxidant system, a portion of which may be extracellularly secreted, which rapidly oxidizes methane to carbon dioxide. Small C{sup 14} activities derived from CH{sub 4} in excess of experimental error are detected in all the major biochemical fractions of Anacystis nidulans and Nostoc. This limited capacity to metabolize methane appears to be a vestigial potentiality that originated over two billion years ago in the early evolution of photosynthetic bacteria and blue-green algae.

  10. Modelling tracer dispersion from landfills

    OpenAIRE

    Carpentieri, M.; Giambini, P; Corti, A.

    2008-01-01

    Several wind tunnel experiments of tracer dispersion from reduced-scale landfill models are presented in this paper. Different experimental set-ups, hot-wire anemometry, particle image velocimetry and tracer concentration measurements were used for the characterisation of flow and dispersion phenomena nearby the models. The main aim of these experiments is to build an extensive experimental data set useful for model validation purposes. To demonstrate the potentiality of the experimental data...

  11. The environmental implications of landfill gas control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews the implications for landfill gas control of the Environmental Protection Bill in relation to proposed, existing and closed sites. If the Bill is enacted in its present form these changes will have far reaching implications on the waste management industry and especially those involved in landfill gas monitoring and control. The paper describes the requirements for the management of landfill gas both on and around landfill sites before, during and after the cessation of waste disposal operations. It describes the duties of Waste Regulation Authorities (WRAs) under the Bill in relation to landfill gas including their duties in relation to closed sites. The paper concludes that when the WRAs fulfill these duties the risk of further incidents occurring with landfill gas will be significantly reduced. (author)

  12. Landfill gas in the Dutch perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until 1986 landfill gas had a considerable value because of the relative high energy prices. It appeared also that landfill gas was formed in large quantities. However after the collapse of the energy prices in 1986 many new landfill gas projects were delayed or stopped. Recently, the gas emissions on landfills have attracted attention again, but now because of various environmental aspects. With respect to landfill management a well controlled gas extraction seems to be necessary. Utilisation of the gas is still favourable for economic reasons and because of energy savings. The Dutch policy for the next ten years will be reduction of the amount of waste by prevention and recycling. The organic fraction of the municipal solid waste (refuse from vegetables, fruit and garden), obtained by separation in households, will be composted. The other part will be burnt in incinerators. Only the remaining inert refuse will be deposited on landfills. (author)

  13. Fiber Methane Gas Sensor and Its Application in Methane Outburst Prediction in Coal Mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Sheng Ni; Jun Chang; Tong-Yu Liu; Yan-Fang Li; Yan-Jie Zhao; Qian Wang

    2008-01-01

    Fiber optic methane gas detecting system based on distributed feedback (DFB) laser wavelength scanning technique is demonstrated. Wavelength scan of methane absorption peak at 1665.9 nm is realized by saw tooth modulation of current which is injected to DFB laser. A reference methane gas cell is used to find the methane absorption peak around 1666 rim, and normalization is used to reduce the outside affection such as power drift, fiber loss. Concentration is got by arithmetic processing absorption coefficient of the methane gas. In-situ test is carried out in coal mine and long time precision of 0.05% is achieved. Some spot data of coal mine is introduced. By the system, methane outburst can be measured.

  14. Landfill covers for dry environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large-scale landfill cover field test is currently underway at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. It is intended to compare and document the performance of alternative landfill cover technologies of various costs and complexities for interim stabilization and/or final closure of landfills in arid and semi-arid environments. Test plots of traditional designs recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency for both RCRA Subtitle open-quote C close-quote and open-quote D close-quote regulated facilities have been constructed side-by-side with the alternative covers and will serve as baselines for comparison to these alternative covers. The alternative covers were designed specifically for dry environments. The covers will be tested under both ambient and stressed conditions. All covers have been instrumented to measure water balance variables and soil temperature. An on-site weather station records all pertinent climatological data. A key to acceptance of an alternative environmental technology is seeking regulatory acceptance and eventual permitting. The lack of acceptance by regulatory agencies is a significant barrier to development and implementation of innovative cover technologies. Much of the effort on this demonstration has been toward gaining regulatory and public acceptance

  15. Biochemical Lignin Related Processes in Landfills

    OpenAIRE

    Irani, Ayesha

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine how the key features of bioreactor landfills; increased temperature, moisture and microbial activity, affect the biological stability of the landfill material. In the first part of the study the solubilization and degradation of lignin in paper exposed to these bioreactor landfill conditions are explored. The solubility of the lignin in paper was observed at different temperatures and over 27 weeks at 55°C and the anaerobic bioconversion of offi...

  16. Aerobic Biostabilization of Old MSW Landfills

    OpenAIRE

    M. C. Zanetti

    2008-01-01

    Many years after the end of the cultivation phase, landfills may generate intense odours, toxic and explosive gases and heavily-polluted leachate. A wide-spreading trend in the management of MSW landfills is represented by the forced aeration of wastes in order to achieve the stabilization, reducing the negative environmental impact of uncontrolled sites (old landfills which can be definitely considered as contaminated sites) and the management costs of controlled and working facilities. One ...

  17. Comparison Of Four Landfill Gas Models Using Data From Four Danish Landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønster, Jacob G.; Mou, Zishen; Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Data about type and quantity of waste disposed in four Danish landfills was collected and used on four different landfill gas generation models. This was done to compare the output data in order to evaluate the performance of the four landfill gas models when used on Danish waste types, and to co...

  18. Effect of Copper Speciation on Whole-Cell Soluble Methane Monooxygenase Activity in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b

    OpenAIRE

    Morton, John D.; Hayes, Kim F.; Semrau, Jeremy D.

    2000-01-01

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) activity in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b was found to be more strongly affected as copper-to-biomass ratios changed in a newly developed medium, M2M, which uses pyrophosphate for metal chelation, than in nitrate mineral salts (NMS), which uses EDTA. When M2M medium was amended with EDTA, sMMO activity was similar to that in NMS medium, indicating that EDTA-bound copper had lower bioavailability than pyrophosphate-bound copper. EDTA did not limit the ass...

  19. Landfill Barrier-Overview and Prospect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Liange; Zhao Yongsheng

    2000-01-01

    Landfill is the primary method of waste disposal. The increasing attention focused on the effect of landfill on environment prompts the development of environmental sound landfill system. As the key parts of landfill, the barrier system can provide impermeabilization of leachate and prevent biogas from escaping intotheenvironment. In recent years, the technology pertaining the barrier system developed rapidly. In this paper, new materials used in liners and new concept of barrier construction are reviewed; the mechanisms of leachate through clay liner and geomembrane, the calculation of leaks through liner and the effect of freezing/thaw on liner are discussed.

  20. Congenital anomalies and proximity to landfill sites.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, E

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of congenital anomalies in proximity to municipal landfill sites in the Eastern Region (counties Dublin, Kildare, Wicklow) was examined by small area (district electoral division), distance and clustering tendancies in relation to 83 landfills, five of which were major sites. The study included 2136 cases of congenital anomaly, 37,487 births and 1423 controls between 1986 and 1990. For the more populous areas of the region 50% of the population lived within 2-3 km of a landfill and within 4-5 km for more rural areas. In the area-level analysis, the standardised prevalence ratios, empirical and full Bayesian modelling, and Kulldorff\\'s spatial scan statistic found no association between the residential area of cases and location of landfills. In the case control analysis, the mean distance of cases and controls from the nearest landfill was similar. The odds ratios of cases compared to controls for increasing distances from all landfills and major landfills showed no significant difference from the baseline value of 1. The kernel and K methods showed no tendency of cases to cluster in relationship to landfills. In conclusion, congenital anomalies were not found to occur more commonly in proximity to municipal landfills.

  1. Imaging and characterization of heterogeneous landfills using geophysical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantaki, L.A.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays many countries use landfilling for the management of their waste or for treating old landfills. Emissions from landfills can be harmful to the environment and to human health, making the stabilization of landfills a priority for the landfill communities. Estimation of the emission potential for determination of the aftercare period and improvement of the treatment technologies for the minimization of the aftercare period are examples of problems landfill research groups are now facin...

  2. Does Size Really Matter? Landfill Scale Impacts on Property Values

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Jong Seok; Missios, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The economic advantage of constructing and operating large-scale landfills over small-scale landfills has been used to justify regional landfills as a solution to the municipal waste disposal problem. In addition to the dampening effects on social efforts to divert waste away from landfills, higher external costs of larger landfills may in fact offset the private cost advantages. In this study, the negative effects of a landfill that are capitalized in property values of houses located in the...

  3. Decomposition and carbon storage of hardwood and softwood branches in laboratory-scale landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Barlaz, Morton A

    2016-07-01

    Tree branches are an important component of yard waste disposed in U.S. municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The objective of this study was to characterize the anaerobic biodegradability of hardwood (HW) and softwood (SW) branches under simulated but optimized landfill conditions by measuring methane (CH4) yields, decay rates, the decomposition of cellulose, hemicellulose and organic carbon, as well as carbon storage factors (CSFs). Carbon conversions to CH4 and CO2 ranged from zero to 9.5% for SWs and 17.1 to 28.5% for HWs. When lipophilic or hydrophilic compounds present in some of the HW and SW samples were extracted, some samples showed increased biochemical methane potentials (BMPs). The average CH4 yield, carbon conversion, and CSF measured here, 59.4mLCH4g(-1) dry material, 13.9%, and 0.39gcarbonstoredg(-1) dry material, respectively, represent reasonable values for use in greenhouse gas inventories in the absence of detailed wood type/species data for landfilled yard waste. PMID:27016683

  4. Atmospheric Ozone and Methane in a Changing Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivar S. A. Isaksen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ozone and methane are chemically active climate-forcing agents affected by climate–chemistry interactions in the atmosphere. Key chemical reactions and processes affecting ozone and methane are presented. It is shown that climate-chemistry interactions have a significant impact on the two compounds. Ozone, which is a secondary compound in the atmosphere, produced and broken down mainly in the troposphere and stratosphre through chemical reactions involving atomic oxygen (O, NOx compounds (NO, NO2, CO, hydrogen radicals (OH, HO2, volatile organic compounds (VOC and chlorine (Cl, ClO and bromine (Br, BrO. Ozone is broken down through changes in the atmospheric distribution of the afore mentioned compounds. Methane is a primary compound emitted from different sources (wetlands, rice production, livestock, mining, oil and gas production and landfills.Methane is broken down by the hydroxyl radical (OH. OH is significantly affected by methane emissions, defined by the feedback factor, currently estimated to be in the range 1.3 to 1.5, and increasing with increasing methane emission. Ozone and methane changes are affected by NOx emissions. While ozone in general increase with increases in NOx emission, methane is reduced, due to increases in OH. Several processes where current and future changes have implications for climate-chemistry interactions are identified. It is also shown that climatic changes through dynamic processes could have significant impact on the atmospheric chemical distribution of ozone and methane, as we can see through the impact of Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO. Modeling studies indicate that increases in ozone could be more pronounced toward the end of this century. Thawing permafrost could lead to important positive feedbacks in the climate system. Large amounts of organic material are stored in the upper layers of the permafrost in the yedoma deposits in Siberia, where 2 to 5% of the deposits could be organic material

  5. Methanation; La methanisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2001-07-01

    This issue of the Apesa newsletter deals with the methanation process and the production of biogas: the co-digestion, a tool for the management of organic effluents; the different steps of the methanation process; the worldwide biogas resources; comparative composition of biogas and natural gas; the processing of evaporation condensates from the paper industry; the processing of wine residuary liquors; the economics of methanation; the methanation process as a pre-process for sludges etc.. (J.S.)

  6. Kinetics of Internal Methane Steam Reforming in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Its Influence on Cell Performance– Coupling Experiments and Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, L.; Pourquie, M.J.B.M.; Thattai, A.; Verkooijen, A.H.M.; Aravind, P.V.

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical modeling tools are useful for predicting the safe operation limits and efficiencies of SOFCs. For a particular SOFC design, variations in internal methane reforming kinetic parameters is expected to affect local gas compositions, local Nernst voltages, current densities and temperature

  7. Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daily activities at the Hanford Site generate sanitary solid waste (nonhazardous and nonradioactive) that is transported to and permanently disposed of at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill. This permit application describes the manner in which the solid Waste Landfill will be operated under Washington State Department of Ecology Minimum Functional Standards for Solid Waste Handling, Washington Administrative Code 173-304. The solid Waste Landfill is owned by the US Department of Energy -- Richland Operations Office and is used for disposal of solid waste generated at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site. The jurisdictional health department's permit application form for the Solid Waste Landfill is provided in Chapter 1.0. Chapter 2.0 provides a description of the Hanford Site and the Solid Waste Landfill and reviews applicable locational, general facility, and landfilling standards. Chapter 3.0 discusses the characteristics and quantity of the waste disposed of in the Solid Waste Landfill. Chapter 4.0 reviews the regional and site geology and hydrology and the groundwater and vadose zone quality beneath the landfill. Chapters 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0 contain the plan of operation, closure plan, and postclosure plan, respectively. The plan of operation describes the routine operation and maintenance of the Solid Waste Landfill, the environmental monitoring program, and the safety and emergency plans. Chapter 5.0 also addresses the operational cover, environmental controls, personnel requirements, inspections, recordkeeping, reporting, and site security. The postclosure plan describes requirements for final cover maintenance and environmental monitoring equipment following final closure. Chapter 8.0 discusses the integration of closure and postclosure activities between the Solid Waste Landfill and adjacent Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill. 76 refs., 48 figs, 15 tabs

  8. Assessing the market opportunities of landfill mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zee, D J; Achterkamp, M C; de Visser, B J

    2004-01-01

    Long-term estimates make clear that the amount of solid waste to be processed at landfills in the Netherlands will sharply decline in coming years. Major reasons can be found in the availability of improved technologies for waste recycling and government regulations aiming at waste reduction. Consequently, market size for companies operating landfills shrinks. Among the companies facing the problem is the Dutch company Essent. Given the expected market conditions, it looks for alternative business opportunities. Landfill mining, i.e., the recycling of existing landfills, is considered one of them. Proceeds of landfill mining are related to, for example, recycled materials available for re-use, regained land, and possibilities for a more efficient operation of a landfill. The market for landfill mining is of a considerable size--there are about 3800 landfills located in the Netherlands. Given market size the company faces the dilemma of how to explore this market, i.e., select the most profitable landfills in a fast and efficient way. No existing methods or tools could be found to do so. Therefore, to answer to the problem posed, we propose a step-wise research method for market exploration. The basic idea behind the method is to provide an adequate, cost-saving and timely answer by relying on a series of quick scans. Relevant aspects of a mining project concern the proceeds of regained land and recyclables, the costs of the mining operation and the associated business and environmental risks. The method has been tested for its practical use in a pilot study. The pilot study addressed 147 landfills located in the Dutch Province of Noord-Brabant. The study made clear how method application resulted in the selection of a limited number of high potential landfills in a few weeks, involving minimal research costs. PMID:15381231

  9. Leachate Characterization from a Closed Landfill in Air Hitam, Puchong, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leachate, wastewater that was collected from landfill is known to have pungent smell and may impose serious harm to human health and the environment. Air Hitam, Puchong Sanitary Landfill has stopped its land filling operation since December 2006 and is under post-closure maintenance stages. After several years of stopping its operation, a landfill will still produce leachate hence it needs constant monitoring and maintenance. The main aim of this paper was to characterize leachate produced from Air Hitam, Puchong Closed Landfill, according to several important parameters: pH, temperature, chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammoniacal nitrogen (NH4-N), total organic carbon (TOC), total solids, volatile organic acids (VOA) and heavy metals content, to determine its suitability in producing methane by identifying its phase. Leachate samples were drawn weekly for a period of 3 months from three different ponds, untreated raw leachate pond 1 and treated leachate pond 2 and 3. Results obtained showed that the average values were around 25 degree Celsius, average pH 8, highest COD reading was 5,248 mg/L, TOC highest at 6,797 mg/L, VOA highest at 1,424 mg/L and ammoniacal content of 3.10 mg/L the highest. (author)

  10. Potential methane reservoirs beneath Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadham, J L; Arndt, S; Tulaczyk, S; Stibal, M; Tranter, M; Telling, J; Lis, G P; Lawson, E; Ridgwell, A; Dubnick, A; Sharp, M J; Anesio, A M; Butler, C E H

    2012-08-30

    Once thought to be devoid of life, the ice-covered parts of Antarctica are now known to be a reservoir of metabolically active microbial cells and organic carbon. The potential for methanogenic archaea to support the degradation of organic carbon to methane beneath the ice, however, has not yet been evaluated. Large sedimentary basins containing marine sequences up to 14 kilometres thick and an estimated 21,000 petagrams (1 Pg equals 10(15) g) of organic carbon are buried beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet. No data exist for rates of methanogenesis in sub-Antarctic marine sediments. Here we present experimental data from other subglacial environments that demonstrate the potential for overridden organic matter beneath glacial systems to produce methane. We also numerically simulate the accumulation of methane in Antarctic sedimentary basins using an established one-dimensional hydrate model and show that pressure/temperature conditions favour methane hydrate formation down to sediment depths of about 300 metres in West Antarctica and 700 metres in East Antarctica. Our results demonstrate the potential for methane hydrate accumulation in Antarctic sedimentary basins, where the total inventory depends on rates of organic carbon degradation and conditions at the ice-sheet bed. We calculate that the sub-Antarctic hydrate inventory could be of the same order of magnitude as that of recent estimates made for Arctic permafrost. Our findings suggest that the Antarctic Ice Sheet may be a neglected but important component of the global methane budget, with the potential to act as a positive feedback on climate warming during ice-sheet wastage. PMID:22932387

  11. Methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis in anoxic waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milucka, Jana; Kirf, Mathias; Lu, Lu; Krupke, Andreas; Lam, Phyllis; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Schubert, Carsten J

    2015-09-01

    Freshwater lakes represent large methane sources that, in contrast to the Ocean, significantly contribute to non-anthropogenic methane emissions to the atmosphere. Particularly mixed lakes are major methane emitters, while permanently and seasonally stratified lakes with anoxic bottom waters are often characterized by strongly reduced methane emissions. The causes for this reduced methane flux from anoxic lake waters are not fully understood. Here we identified the microorganisms and processes responsible for the near complete consumption of methane in the anoxic waters of a permanently stratified lake, Lago di Cadagno. Interestingly, known anaerobic methanotrophs could not be detected in these waters. Instead, we found abundant gamma-proteobacterial aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria active in the anoxic waters. In vitro incubations revealed that, among all the tested potential electron acceptors, only the addition of oxygen enhanced the rates of methane oxidation. An equally pronounced stimulation was also observed when the anoxic water samples were incubated in the light. Our combined results from molecular, biogeochemical and single-cell analyses indicate that methane removal at the anoxic chemocline of Lago di Cadagno is due to true aerobic oxidation of methane fuelled by in situ oxygen production by photosynthetic algae. A similar mechanism could be active in seasonally stratified lakes and marine basins such as the Black Sea, where light penetrates to the anoxic chemocline. Given the widespread occurrence of seasonally stratified anoxic lakes, aerobic methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis might have an important but so far neglected role in methane emissions from lakes. PMID:25679533

  12. Field Water Balance of Landfill Final Covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfill covers are critical to waste containment, yet field performance of specific cover designs has not been well documented and seldom been compared in side-by-side testing. A study was conducted to assess the ability of landfill final covers to control percolation into unde...

  13. Imaging scatterers in landfills using seismic interferometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konstantaki, L.A.; Dragnov, D.S.; Heimovaara, T.J.; Ghose, R.

    2013-01-01

    A significant problem with landfills is their aftercare period. A landfill is considered to be safe for the environment only after a relatively long period of time. Until it reaches such a condition, it has to be periodically treated. Not only are treatments very expensive, but they could be dangero

  14. MONITORING APPROACHES FOR BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS - Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experimental bioreactor landfill operations at operating Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills can be approved under the research development and demonstration (RD&D) provisions of 30CFR 258.4. To provide a basis for consistent data collection for future decision-making in suppor...

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF SPECIAL TYPES OF LANDFILLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water quality was monitored for one year at a hillfill, a balefill, a millfill, a strip mine landfill, and a permitted sanitary landfill to determine the impact of each on water quality. The leachate generated by the hillfill was the strongest during initial decomposition. Howeve...

  16. Ecotoxicological investigations on landfill leachates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A battery of different bioassays are set up in order to characterize and determine the risk potential of landfill leachates and defined fractions. The following four project phases can be identified: 1) setting up of the tests, 2) development of a fractioning method, 3) application of the tests to fractions of leachate, 4) chemical analysis of toxic leachate fractions. Selection of the tests, which are described in detail, was preceeded by thorough bibligraphic studies. The tests are currently being used on reference substances. Preliminary testing regarding fractioning and chemical analysis is being done. (orig.)

  17. Toxicological characterization of a novel wastewater treatment process using EDTA-Na2Zn as draw solution (DS) for the efficient treatment of MBR-treated landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Aping; Ren, Yi-Wei; Yang, Li; Xie, Shao-Lin; Jia, Pan-Pan; Zhang, Jing-Hui; Wang, Xiao; Li, Jing; Pei, De-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Landfill leachate has become an important source of environmental pollution in past decades, due to the increase of waste volume. Acute toxic and genotoxic hazards to organisms can be caused by landfill leachate. Thus, how to efficiently recover water from landfill leachate and effectively eliminate combined toxicity of landfill leachate are the most pressing issues in waste management. In this study, EDTA-Na2Zn as draw solution (DS) was used to remove the toxicity of membrane bioreactor-treated landfill leachate (MBR-treated landfill leachate) in forward osmosis (FO) process, and nanofiltration (NF) was designed for recovering the diluted DS. Zebrafish and human cells were used for toxicity assay after the novel wastewater treatment process using EDTA-Na2Zn as DS. Results showed that the water recovery rate of MBR-treated landfill leachate (M-LL) in FO membrane system could achieve 66.5% and 71.2% in the PRO and FO mode respectively, and the diluted DS could be efficiently recovered by NF. Toxicity tests performed by using zebrafish and human cells showed that M-LL treated by EDTA-Na2Zn had no toxicity effect on zebrafish larvae and human cells, but it had very slight effect on zebrafish embryos. In conclusion, all results indicated that EDTA-Na2Zn as DS can effectively eliminate toxicity of landfill leachate and this method is economical and eco-friendly for treatment of different types of landfill leachate. PMID:27108367

  18. Variations of dominant microbial populations in groundwater in response to the leachate from Laogang Landfill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yang-jie; YANG Hong; LI Dao-tang; LIN Zhi-xin

    2005-01-01

    Temporal changes of dominant microbial populations in groundwater in response to the leachate from Shanghai Laogang Landfill were investigated. Concentrations of dissolved redox-relevant species in groundwater suggested that the dominating redox process had changed from denitrification to methane-production/sulfate-reduction due to landfilling. Dominant microbial populations were determined using restriction fragment length polymorphism(RFLP) analyses of 16S rRNA gene libraries, which were further studied by sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. The results indicated that obvious shifts of dominant microbial populations had occurred in groundwater in response to the pollution of leachate. The closest relatives of some dominant clones are accordant with the dominating redox processes determined by hydrochemical analyses, based on the GenBank's indications on the ability to perform redox reactions.