WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell killing effect

  1. Effect of pulsed electron beam on cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extent of repairable and irreparable damage in a living cell produced by ionizing radiation depends on the quality of the radiation. In the case of sparsely ionizing radiation, the dose rate and the pattern of energy deposition of the radiation are the important physical factors which can affect the amount of damage in living cells. In the present study, radio-sensitive and radioresistive bacteria cells were exposed to 8 MeV pulsed electron beam and the efficiency of cell-killing was investigated to evaluate the Do, the mean lethal dose. The dose to the cell was delivered in micro-second pulses at an instantaneous dose rate of 2.6 x 105 Gy s-1. Fricke dosimeter was used to measure the absorbed dose of electron beam. The results were compared with those of gamma rays. The survival curve of radio-resistive Deinococcus-radiodurans (DR) is found to be sigmoidal and the survival response for radio-sensitive Escherichia-coli (E-coli) is found to be exponential without any shoulder. Comparison of Do values indicate that irradiation with pulsed electron beam resulted in more cell-killing than was observed for gamma irradiation. (author)

  2. Differential protective effects of antioxidants against cell killing and mutagenesis of Salmonella typhimurium by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A commercial mixture of phenolic antioxidants containing BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole), BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene) and PG (propyl gallate), commonly used in the food industry, was found to protect Salmonella typhimurium against killing and induction of his+ mutations by gamma radiation. The protective effect was apparent only when irradiation was performed in the presence of oxygen and no protection could be detected in its absence. When each of the components of the antioxidant mixture was tested separately, only PG displayed a protective effects. The amount of protection provided by the mixture of antioxidants was close to the protection afforded by hypoxia. Also, protection against cell killing was very similar in magnitude to protection against induction of mutations. The protective effect could be detected only when antioxidants were added to the cells before irradiation. No protection was afforded upon addition immediately after irradiation. (author)

  3. The killing effect of 4-S-cysteaminylphenol, a newly synthesised melanin precursor, on B16 melanoma cell lines.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, I.; Seki, S.; Ito, S.; Suzuki, S.; Matsubara, O.; Kasuga, T.

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the killing effect of 4-S-cysteaminylphenol (4-S-CAP), a newly synthesised melanin precursor, on B16 melanoma cell lines possessing different melanin-producing activities and found it to be particularly effective in heavily melanised melanoma cells, but less so in moderately melanised melanoma cells, and having no effect on amelanotic melanoma cells and nonmelanoma cells. Thus, it was found that the killing effect of 4-S-CAP is highly dependent upon the synthesis of melanin a...

  4. Killing effect of coexpressing cytosine deaminase and thymidine kinase on rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹慧青; 孟宪敏; 刘冬青; 赵秀文; 丁金凤

    2004-01-01

    Background Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation following arterial injury plays a critical role in a variety of vascular proliferative disorders, such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after balloon angioplasty. Herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-TK)/ganciclovir (GCV) and E.coli cytosine deaminase (CD)/5-fluorocytosine (5-Fc) suicide gene systems have been successfully employed in cardiovascular gene therapy, respectively. We reasoned that coexpression of both HSV-TK with CD suicide genes would lead to increased cell killing. To test this imagine, the adenoviral vectors expressing TK and/or CD genes were developed and tested on vascular smooth muscle cells. Methods Adenoviral vectors, including Ad-EF1α-CD-cytomegolovirus (CMV)-TK coexpressing both CD and TK double suicide genes, Ad-EF1α-CD and Ad-CMV-TK expressing CD and TK respectively, and control vector Ad-CMV-LacZ, were constructed and prepared with homologous recombination in RecA+E.coli cells. Integration and expression of CD and/or TK gene were identified by PCR and Western blot. Primary cultured VSMCs were infected at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 20 with exposure to their matching prodrugs 5-Fc and GCV. Cell mortality was measured by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays. Flow cytometry analysis was used to detect cell death. Apoptotic cells were analyzed using Hoechst 33342 fluorescence dye as a DNA probe. Genomic DNA cleavage of apoptotic VSMCs was tested by agarose gel electrophoresis. Results Recombinant adenovirus expressing CD and/or TK suicide genes were successfully constructed. Both single and double suicide genes could be integrated into adenoviral genome and expressed. Cytotoxic effects of Ad-EF1α-CD-CMV-TK double suicide genes combined with 5-Fc and GCV were higher than those of Ad-CMV-TK and Ad-EF1α-CD single gene groups. The rate of cell survival was only (9±3)% in the Ad-EF1α-CD-CMV-TK group, but (37±3)% in the Ad-CMV-TK and (46±4)% in the Ad-EF1

  5. Enhancing effects of gamma interferon on phagocytic cell association with and killing of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, J. J.; Kierszenbaum, F.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Zlotnik, A.

    1985-01-01

    Results are reported from a study of the influence gamma interferon (GIFN) and interleukin 2 (IL2) have on the capability of P388D1 cells and mouse resident peritoneal macrophages (MPM) to attach to the blood-resident parasites Trypanosoma cruzi and kill them. Cultures of trypomastigote forms of the Tulahuen strain of T. cruzi grown in bovine serum were introduced into peritoneal cells of mice, along with P388D1 cells incubated with GIFN, IL2 and both. Control cells were also maintained. Statistical analysis were then performed on data on counts of the number of dead T. Cruzi cells. The GIFN enhanced the interaction of MPM and P388D1 cells with the surface of T. Cruzi, provided the interaction was given over 12 hr to take place. A depression of the cytotoxicity of P388D1 cells was attributed to mediation by H2O2, an effect partially offset by incubation with the lymphokine GIFN.

  6. Effects of trypsin on X-ray-induced cell killing, chromosome abnormalities and kinetics of DNA repair in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When cells are trypsinized before irradiation a potentiation of X-ray damage may occur. This is known as the 'trypsin effect'. Potentiation of X-ray damage on cell killing was seen in V79 Chinese hamster cells but was marginal in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO K1) cells and not evident in murine Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells. Trypsinization did however increase the number of X-ray-induced chromosomal abnormalities in all 3 lines. To investigate the possibility that trypsin acts by digestion of proteins in chromatin, further experiments were performed to monitor DNA damage and repair. Induction of DNA breaks by X-rays was unaffected by trypsin but trypsinized EAT (suspension) cells repaired single-strand breaks (sbb) less rapidly than controls indicating an inhibitory effect or trypsin on ssb repair. However double-strand break (dsb) repair was unaffected by trypsin. It was also found that the EDTA solution in which the trypsin was dissolved also contributes to the inhibition of dsb repair. The results show that trypsinization can enhance X-ray-induced cell killing, chromosomal damage and DNA repair, the effect varying between cell lines. (author). 37 refs.; 7 figs

  7. Molecular mechanisms of the killing effects on Ehrlich ascites tumor cells by sono-chemical-activated protoporphyrin Ⅸ

    OpenAIRE

    LIU Quan-Hong, XIAO Li-Na; Li, Xiao-ying; Wang, Pan; Wang, Xiao-Bing; Wang, Yu; LI Chen-Di

    2008-01-01

    We studied the Ehrlich ascetic tumor (EAT) cell line killing effects by ultrasound activating protoporphyrin Ⅸ (PPⅨ) and its mechamism. The cellular uptake and subcellular localization of protoporphyrin Ⅸ were estimated by fluorescence photometer and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) respectively. The trypan blue exclusion method was used to analyze the relative viability of EAT cells after ultrasonically activated protoporphyrin Ⅸ. Changes of ultra-microstructure of the treated cell...

  8. Molecular mechanisms of the killing effects on Ehrlich ascites tumor cells by sono-chemical-activated protoporphyrin Ⅸ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Quan-Hong, XIAO Li-Na

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the Ehrlich ascetic tumor (EAT cell line killing effects by ultrasound activating protoporphyrin Ⅸ (PPⅨ and its mechamism. The cellular uptake and subcellular localization of protoporphyrin Ⅸ were estimated by fluorescence photometer and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM respectively. The trypan blue exclusion method was used to analyze the relative viability of EAT cells after ultrasonically activated protoporphyrin Ⅸ. Changes of ultra-microstructure of the treated cells were examined by transmission electron microscopy.Mitochondrial membrane potential(MMP, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, and the level of lipid peroxidation were determined by Rhodamine 123, 2′,7′- dichlorodihydrofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA and thiobarbituric acid reaction method respectively. Results showed that there is a selective uptake and retention of the PPⅨ in tumor cells. CLSM revealed that PPⅨ localize mainly in the mitochondria. In the ultrasound plus PPⅨ group, the survival rate of cells was significantly lower. The ultra-microstructural damage of treated cells was the most remarkable, the loss of mitochondria membrane potential was the most noticeable, levels of ROS and lipid peroxides were remarkably increased. These results indicate that there is significant synergistic killing effect with ultrasound activating PPⅨ. The decreased mitochondria membrane potential and the increased level of lipid peroxidation in the ultrasound plus PPⅨ group may be associated with reactive oxygen species. In summary, reactive oxygen species might be involved in mediating the killing effect of EAT cells in SDT [Acta Zoologica Sinica 54(5: 846– 854, 2008

  9. Synergistic killing effect of chloroquine and androgen deprivation in LNCaP cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Chloroquine synergistically killed LNCaP cells during androgen deprivation treatment. ► Chloroquine inhibited the function of autolysosomes and decreases the cytosolic ATP. ► Chloroquine induced nuclear and DNA fragmentation in androgen deprived LNCaP. ► Chloroquine may be an useful adjuvant in hormone ablation therapy in PCa patients. -- Abstract: Modulation of autophagy is a new paradigm in cancer therapeutics. Recently a novel function of chloroquine (CLQ) in inhibiting degradation of autophagic vesicles has been revealed, which raises the question whether CLQ can be used as an adjuvant in targeting autophagic pro-survival mechanism in prostate cancer (PCa). We previously showed that autophagy played a protective role during hormone ablation therapy, in part, by consuming lipid droplets in PCa cells. In addition, blocking autophagy by genetic and pharmacological means in the presence of androgen deprivation caused cell death in PCa cells. To further investigate the importance of autophagy in PCa survival and dissect the role of CLQ in PCa death, we treated hormone responsive LNCaP cells with CLQ in combination with androgen deprivation. We observed that CLQ synergistically killed LNCaP cells during androgen deprivation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We further confirmed that CLQ inhibited the maturation of autophagic vesicles and decreased the cytosolic ATP. Moreover, CLQ induced nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation, a hallmark of apoptosis, in androgen deprived LNCaP cells. Taken together, our finding suggests that CLQ may be an useful adjuvant in hormone ablation therapy to improve the therapeutic efficacy.

  10. EFFECTS OF CARBOXYMETHLY DEXTRAN MAGNETIC NANOPARTICLES CARRIER SYSTEM ASSOCIATED WITH EXTERNAL MAGNETIC FIELDS ON KILLING TUMOR CELLS AND GENE TRANSFECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Zheng-guo; ZHOU Si-wei; LIU Ji-hong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the preparation of the carboxymethly dextran iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (CDMN) and the effects of CDMN carrier system associated with external magnetic fields on killing tumor cells and gene transfection in vitro. Methods: Epirubicin-CDMN (EPI-CDMN) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) plasmid-CDMN (GFP-CDMN) were prepared by the oxidation-reduction procedure and their characters were detected, respectively. The effects of EPI-CDMN associated with external pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) (10 mT) on killing human bladder cancer BIU-87 cells were studied by MTT assay and Annexin-V/PI double-labeled flow cytometry technique, respectively. And the transfection efficiency of GFP when CDMN were used as gene carrier associated with the external magnetic fields was evaluated under fluorescence microscope in vitro. Results: The diameter of EPI-CDMN and GFP-CDMN were about 8~10 nm and 5~9 nm, respectively, and saturation magnetization were 0.22 emu/g and 0.26 emu/g, respectively. EPI-CDMN associated with PEMFs could significantly inhibit the proliferation of BIU-87 cells and induce cells apoptosis, the growth inhibitory rate and apoptosis rate were (21.82(3.18)% and (16.79(3.37)%, respectively. The transfection efficiency of GFP-CDMN combined with PEMFs was significant higher than that of GFP-CDMN without PEMFs [(45.70(4.32)% vs (35.85(2.16)%, P<0.05]. Conclusion: It seemed that EPI-CDMN associated with external magnetic fields could significantly killed human bladder cancer BIU-87 cells and CDMN could effectively transfer GFP gene into tumors cells with the help of external magnetic fields which provided experimental basis for the magnetic targeting therapy of tumor.

  11. Cell killing by avian leukosis viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Weller, S K; Temin, H M

    1981-01-01

    Infection of chicken cells with a cytopathic avian leukosis virus resulted in the detachment of killed cells from the culture dish. The detached, dead cells contained more unintegrated viral DNA than the attached cells. These results confirm the hypothesis that cell killing after infection with a cytopathic avian leukosis virus is associated with accumulation of large amounts of unintegrated viral DNA. No accumulation of large amounts of integrated viral DNA was found in cells infected with c...

  12. Effects of caffeine on X-irradiated synchronous, asynchronous and plateau phase mouse ascites cells: the importance of progression through the cell cycle for caffeine enhancement of killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine potentiated the killing effect of X-rays on exponentially growing cells giving rise to exponential curves (D0=(0.8+-0.05)Gy) at 4mM and 14 hours treatment. Irradiated plateau phase cells were less sensitive. Exponentially growing cells also became less sensitive to the effects of caffeine when they were incubated in the conditioned medium of plateau phase cells(C-medium) in which cell growth was considerably inhibited. Low caffeine concentrations(2mM) enhanced X-ray induced killing of cells irradiated in G1-,G1/S- or S-phase, but more effectively G2-phase cells. High caffeine concentrations (6mM) enhanced killing of cells in all phases of the cell cycle. Incubation of synchronized populations in C-medium during treatment with caffeine (2mM and 6mM) resulted in less potentiation than in cells treated in fresh medium. The expression of X-ray induced potentially lethal damage caused by 6mM caffeine in cells irradiated in various phases resulted in an exponential survival curve with a mean lethal dose of (0.8+-0.05)Gy, but the time of caffeine treatment necessary to reach this curve was different for cells irradiated in different phases. PLD repair, measured as loss of sensitivity to 6mM caffeine (4 hours treatment) was of 1-2 hours duration. (author)

  13. Dose-rate effects in mammalian cells in culture. III. Comparison of cell killing and cell proliferation during continuous irradiation for six different cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of continuous irradiation over a wide range of dose rates were studied for six different mammalian cell lines in regard to cell survival and proliferation. Cell lines were chosen in which such characteristics as population doubling time, chromosome number, DNA content, acute dose-survival curve parameters, and division delay were as diverse as possible. There was no correlation between the minimum dose rate necessary to stop cell population growth and any of the above listed characteristics, with the exception of division delay following acute doses. In general, the longer the division delay (min/rad), the lower the dose rate required to stop cell population growth. The effects of cell-cycle redistribution during continuous irradiaton in regard to cell survival were dramatic. In some cases a reduction in dose rate resulted in an increase in cell killing for a given total dose. This occurred only when dose rates were sufficient to stop cell population growth and after exposure times sufficient to allow for the occurrence of cell-cycle redistribution

  14. Enhanced killing effects of caffein post-treatment in ultraviolet-light irradiated mouse lymphoma cells: is cAMP a mediator of the effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwashima, Y; Miyachi, Y; Okada, S; Iio, M; Nakamura, N

    1983-01-01

    Effects of post-treatment with caffein, cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) and N6, O2-dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP) were investigated in ultraviolet light (UV)-irradiated mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells. Under conditions where UV or each chemical alone caused only slight cytotoxic effects, caffein post-treatment showed clear synergistic effects in cell killing but not for cAMP or dbcAMP. Subsequently, a mutant clone resistant to cAMP was isolated. This mutant was supposed to be deficient in cAMP-mediated cellular functions. Using the mutant cells, it was found that these cells were also sensitive to caffein post-treatment as wild cells after UV-irradiation. The results imply that the enhanced killing effects by caffein post-treatment in UV irradiated cells is not mediated by cAMP. PMID:6093199

  15. Potassium channels mediate killing by human natural killer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood spontaneously recognize and kill a wide variety of target cells. It has been suggested that ion channels are involved in the killing process because there is a Ca-dependent stage and because killing by presensitized cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which in many respects resembles NK killing, is associated with changes in K and Na transport in the target cell. Using the whole-cell variation of the patch-clamp technique, the authors found a voltage-dependent potassium (K+) current in NK cells. The K+ current was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the K-channel blockers 4-aminopyridine and quinidine and by the traditional Ca-channel blockers verapamil and Cd2+. They tested the effects of ion-channel blockers on killing of two commonly used target cell lines: K562, which is derived from a human myeloid leukemia, and U937, which is derived from a human histiocytic leukemia. Killing of K562 target cells, determined in a standard 51Cr-release assay, was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by verapamil, quinidine, Cd2+, and 4-aminopyridine at concentrations comparable to those that blocked the K+ current in NK cells. In K562 target cells only a voltage-dependent Na= current was found and it was blocked by concentrations of tetrodotoxin that had no effect on killing. Killing of U937 target cells was also inhibited by the two ion-channel blockers tested, quinidine and verapamil. In this cell line only a small K+ current was found that was similar to the one in NK cells. The findings show that there are K channels in NK cells and that these channels play a necessary role in the killing process

  16. Thermal neutron-induced killing effect on HeLa cells modified by a new nucleic acid precursor with boron-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new 10B-containing nucleic acid precursor for neutron capture therapy, 5-carboranyluridine was used to increase the killing effect of thermal neutron beam of Kyoto University Reactor on HeLa S3 cells in vitro. The increase was calculated with four parameters of a linear-quadratic model on dose-survival curve, α, β, a mean inactivation dose (D) and a surviving fraction at 2 Gy irradiation (SF(2)). The results showed that this compound was taken in cells and probably accumulated on cell surface during the incubation of cells and increased the thermal neutron induced killing effect. (author)

  17. In vitro radiobiological evaluation of selective killing effects of 10B1-paraboronophenylalanine.HCl in the thermal neutron capture therapy of malignant melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to clarify the specific affinity of 10B1-p-boronophenylalanine.HCl (10B1-BPA) to melanoma cells, the killing effects of 10B1-BPA in the thermal neutron capture treatment on both cultured melanotic and amelanotic melanoma cells were compared with those on non-melanoma cells, such as Alexander cells, HeLa cells and normal human fibroblasts. Cells in the plateau phase cultured in the usual medium for 4-7 days were incubated with the medium containing 50 μg/ml 10B1-BPA for 20 hours until 2 hours before thermal neutron irradiation. After thermal neutron irradiation, the number of colonies consisting of more than 50 cells was counted to obtain the dose-survival curves. The melanotic cells pre-incubated with 10B1-BPA had more enhanced killing sensitivity to thermal neutron irradiation than amelanotic melanoma cells pre-incubated similarly with 10B1-BPA. 10B1-BPA pre-incubation had no enhanced killing effects on Alexander cells, but had slightly enhanced killing effects on HeLa cells. These results indicate that 10B1-BPA could be incorporated by a specific uptake mechanism of melanoma cells and accumulated within melanotic melanoma cells and that 10B1-BPA at present could be the best chemical for the thermal neutron capture therapy of human malignant melanoma. (Namekawa, K.)

  18. Design of targeted B cell killing agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey V Stepanov

    Full Text Available B cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of both systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Autoreactive B cells not only produce autoantibodies, but also are capable to efficiently present specific autoantigens to T cells. Furthermore, B cells can secrete proinflammatory cytokines and amplify the vicious process of self-destruction. B cell-directed therapy is a potentially important approach for treatment of various autoimmune diseases. The depletion of B cells by anti-CD20/19 monoclonal antibody Retuximab® used in autoimmune diseases therapy leads to systemic side effects and should be significantly improved. In this study we designed a repertoire of genetically engineered B cell killers that specifically affected one kind of cells carrying a respective B cell receptor. We constructed immunotoxins (ITs, fused with c-myc epitope as a model targeting sequence, based on barnase, Pseudomonas toxin, Shiga-like toxin E.coli and Fc domain of human antibody IgGγ1. C-MYC hybridoma cell line producing anti-c-myc IgG was chosen as a model for targeted cell depletion. C-myc sequence fused with toxins provided addressed delivery of the toxic agent to the target cells. We demonstrated functional activity of designed ITs in vitro and showed recognition of the fusion molecules by antibodies produced by targeted hybridoma. To study specificity of the proposed B cells killing molecules, we tested a set of created ITs ex vivo, using C-MYC and irrelevant hybridoma cell lines. Pseudomonas-containing IT showed one of the highest cytotoxic effects on the model cells, however, possessed promiscuous specificity. Shiga-like toxin construct demonstrated mild both cytotoxicity and specificity. Barnase and Fc-containing ITs revealed excellent balance between their legibility and toxic properties. Moreover, barnase and Fc molecules fused with c-myc epitope were able to selectively deplete c-myc-specific B cells and decrease production of anti

  19. Tumor cell killing effect of boronated dipeptide. Boromethylglycylphenylalanine on boron neutron capture therapy for malignant brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takagaki, Masao; Ono, Koji; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kobayashi, Toru [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.; Oda, Yoshifumi; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Spielvogel, B.F.

    1994-03-01

    The killing effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy; BNCT, is dependant on the boron concentration ratio of tumor to normal brain (T/N ratio), and also that of tumor to blood (T/B ratio). The clinical boron carrier of boro-captate (BSH) showed the large T/N ratio of ca. 8, however the T/B ratio was around 1, which indicated nonselective accumulation into tumor. Indeed high boron concentration of blood restrict the neutron irradiation dose in order to circumvent the normal endothelial damage, especially in the case of deeply seated tumor. Phenylalanine analogue of para borono-phenylalanine (BPA) is an effective boron carrier on BNCT for malignant melanoma. For the BNCT on brain tumors, however, BPA concentration in normal brain was reported to be intolerably high. In order to improve the T/N ratio of BPA in brain, therefore, a dipeptide of boromethylglycylphenylalanine (BMGP) was synthesized deriving from trimethylglycine conjugated with BPA. It is expected to be selectively accumulated into tumor with little uptake into normal brain. Because a dipeptide might not pass through the normal blood brain barrier (BBB). Its killing effect on cultured glioma cell, T98G, and its distribution in rat brain bearing 9L glioma have been investigated in this paper. The BNCT effect of BMGP on cultured cells was nearly triple in comparison with DL-BPA. The neutron dose yielding 1% survival ratio were 7x10{sup 12}nvt for BMGP and 2x10{sup 13}nvt for BPA respectively on BNCT after boron loading for 16 hrs in the same B-10 concentration of 20ppm. Quantitative study of boron concentration via the {alpha}-auto radiography and the prompt gamma ray assay on 9L brain tumor rats revealed that T/N ratio and T/B ratio are 12.0 and 3.0 respectively. Those values are excellent for BNCT use. (author).

  20. Novel antioxidants are not toxic to normal tissues but effectively kill cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Aladedunye, Felix; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Li, Dongping; Thomas, James; Kovalchuk, Olga; Przybylski, Roman

    2013-01-01

    Free radicals are formed as a result of cellular processes and play a key role in predisposition to and development of numerous diseases and of premature aging. Recently, we reported the syntheses of a number of novel phenolic antioxidants for possible application in food industry. In the present study, analyses of the cellular processes and molecular gene expression effects of some of the novel antioxidants in normal human tissues and in cancer cells were undertaken. Results indicated that w...

  1. Spermatogonial cell killing by radiolabeled methionine: a comparative study of the effects of Se-17, S-35, and H-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spermatogenesis in the testes of mice offers an effective experimental model to investigate the biological effects and the dosimetry of Auger electron emitters in vivo, aspects that are not yet well understood. Killing of the radiosensitive spermatogonia by intratesticularly localized radionuclides is the biological effect of interest, manifesting as reduced sperm-head population four to six weeks after the initial administration of the radionuclides. The authors present here results of a comparative study of the effects of the Auger-emitter, 75Se, and the beta-emitters, 35S and 3H, when these radionuclides are attached to methionine, and hence distributed similarly in the testis and in the cytoplasmic protein fractions of the spermatogonial cells. The sperm-head survival is assayed on the 36th day post-injection, when the sperm-head population reaches its minimum after the initial intratesticular administration of the radionuclides. In all the three cases, the survival fractions display similar dependence on the conventionally calculated average dose to the organ. These results show the adequacy of conventional dosimetry when 75Se is localized in the cytoplasm of the cells, and emphasize the relative inefficiency of Auger electrons emitted from cytoplasmic decay sites in irradiating the radiosensitive DNA in the cells. 21 references, 4 figures, 4 tables

  2. Effect of gamma-irradiated DNA on DNA polymerase activity: a possible mechanism for cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cell-free assay was developed to measure the effect of γ-irradiated DNA template on the ability of DNA polymerase to copy unirradiated template. Doses as low as 1 krad were able to decrease (approx. 15%) the activity of both bacterial and mammalian DNA polymerases in the assay. The percentage of polymerase activity decreased as the dose received by the template increased. The reduction in DNA polymerase activity was shown to be due to an inhibition of the enzyme by the irradiated DNA. The mechanism for DNA polymerase inhibition was investigated. The interaction between irradiated DNA and DNA polymerase was found to be specific for the enzyme. The inhibition of DNA polymerase occurs prior to or during the initiation of DNA synthesis rather than after initiation of synthesis, i.e., during elongation. As in vitro assay for DNA polymerase α and β in irradiated HeLa cells was developed. The activities of both polymerases decreased as the dose received by the cells increased. Both DNA polymerases were found to recover by 2 hr postirradiation. Since DNA repair capability is intimately connected with cell survival, the observed diminution in DNA polymerase activity, following low doses of radiation, could be highly significant

  3. Killing effect of Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to accelerated carbon ions and RBE determination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIQiang; ZHOUGuang-Ming; 等

    2002-01-01

    Survival curves of Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to accelerated carbon ions with linear energy transfers of 125.5,200 and 700keV/um were measured,respectively,Inactivation cross sections corresponding to the irradiation above were deduced from the V79 cell survival curves.They are 7.86±0.17,10.44±1.11 and 32.32±3.59um2 in turn.With the surviving response of V79 cells to 60Co γ-rays as a reference value,relative biological effectiveness at 10%,20%,50%and 80% survival levels were given for the accelerated carbon ions,The results showed that carbon ions with LET of 125.5keV/um had a higher value of RBE at all the four survival levels than the carbon ions with other LETs.It was prompted that the maximum value of RBE for the V79 cell surviving as the biological endpoint emerged at the LET below 200keV/um for carbon ions.

  4. Killing effect of Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to accelerated carbon ions and RBE determination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Survival curves of Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to accclerated carbon ions with linear energy transfers of 125.5, 200 and 700 keV/μm were measured, respectively. Inactivation cross sections corresponding to the irradiation above were deduced from the V79 cell survival curves. They are 7.86±0.17, 10.44±1.11 and 32.32±3.58 μm2 in turn. With the surviving response of V79 cells to 60Co γ-rays as a reference value, relative biological effectiveness at 10%, 20%, 50% and 80% survival levels were given for the accelerated carbon ions. The results showed that carbon ions with LET of 125.5 keV/μm had a higher value of RBE at all the four survival levels than the carbon ions with other LETs. It was prompted that the maximum value of RBE for the V79 cell surviving as the biological endpoint emerged at the LET below 200 keV/μm for carbon ions.

  5. The Effects of Arolycoricidine and Narciprimine on Tumor Cell Killing and Topoisomerase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buket Bozkurt Sarikaya

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, narciprimine and arolycoricidine were isolated from G. rizehensis Stern (Amaryllidaceae. The structures of the alkaloids were elucidated by spectroscopic methods (1D NMR, EI-MS. Due to the previous reports on anti-cancer activity of this group of alkaloids, we investigated their effects on DNA topoisomerase reactions, which are known as the cellular targets of a number of chemotherapeutical drugs. The results revealed that arolycoricidine and narciprimine were effective in both type I and type II DNA topoisomerase reactions in a dose-dependent manner. Topoisomerase-interfering ability of these alkaloids partially correlated with cytostaticity assays, using HeLa (cervix adenocarcinoma, MCF7 (breast adenocarcinoma and A431 (skin epidermoid carcinoma cells. Our results are discussed in relation to the potential significance of these alkaloids in the course of drug-development studies.

  6. Near-infrared light triggered photodynamic therapy in combination with gene therapy using upconversion nanoparticles for effective cancer cell killing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Kai; Yang, Guangbao; Cheng, Liang; He, Lu; Liu, Yumeng; Li, Yonggang; Guo, Liang; Liu, Zhuang

    2014-07-01

    Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have drawn much attention in cancer imaging and therapy in recent years. Herein, we for the first time report the use of UCNPs with carefully engineered surface chemistry for combined photodynamic therapy (PDT) and gene therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged NaGdF4:Yb,Er UCNPs with multilayered polymer coatings are synthesized via a layer by layer strategy, and then loaded simultaneously with Chlorin e6 (Ce6), a photosensitizing molecule, and small interfering RNA (siRNA), which targets the Plk1 oncogene. On the one hand, under excitation by a near-infrared (NIR) light at 980 nm, which shows greatly improved tissue penetration compared with visible light, cytotoxic singlet oxygen can be generated via resonance energy transfer from UCNPs to photosensitizer Ce6, while the residual upconversion luminescence is utilized for imaging. On the other hand, the silencing of Plk1 induced by siRNA delivered with UCNPs could induce significant cancer cell apoptosis. As the result of such combined photodynamic and gene therapy, a remarkably enhanced cancer cell killing effect is realized. Our work thus highlights the promise of UCNPs for imaging guided combination therapy of cancer.Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have drawn much attention in cancer imaging and therapy in recent years. Herein, we for the first time report the use of UCNPs with carefully engineered surface chemistry for combined photodynamic therapy (PDT) and gene therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged NaGdF4:Yb,Er UCNPs with multilayered polymer coatings are synthesized via a layer by layer strategy, and then loaded simultaneously with Chlorin e6 (Ce6), a photosensitizing molecule, and small interfering RNA (siRNA), which targets the Plk1 oncogene. On the one hand, under excitation by a near-infrared (NIR) light at 980 nm, which shows greatly improved tissue penetration compared with visible light, cytotoxic singlet oxygen can be generated via

  7. Experimental study on the killing effects of 125IUdR to human glioma cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 125IUdR-uptake profile and the cytocidal effects of 125IUdR on human cerebral glioma (SHG44) cells were estimated after incubation with 125IUdR. The killing effects of 125IUdR comparing with Na 125I on SHG44 were estimated by colony forming method. The results showed that the amounts of 125IUdR uptake by SHG44 were growing with the rate of dose of 125IUdR in the medium, relation factor r = 0.9917. Also the concentration of 125IUdR uptake by SHG44 was time-dependent, relation factor r = 0.9859. As the concentration in SHG44 growing, the inhibition effects became stronger, relation factor r = - 0.9736. The LD50 was 8.7 +- 0.12 kBq/ml. The concentration of radioactivity ingestion was significantly stronger in 125IUdR group than that in Na 125I group. The surviving fraction was significantly different between in the 125IUdR group and in Na 125I group at the concentration point 9.0 kBq/ml. 125IUdR may be incorporated in SHG44 cell, and the concentration of 125IUdR ingestion by SHG44 was influenced with the dose in the medium and the culturing time. The prohibitive effects of 125IUdR on SHG44 cell were obvious. The prohibition effects were significantly stronger in 125IUdR group than that in Na 125I group. 125IUdR may be a kind of potential drug in the therapy of human cerebral glioma

  8. Immune Killing Activity of Lymphocytes on Hela Cells Expressing Interleukin-12 In Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiyan WANG; Suhua CHEN

    2008-01-01

    The killing effects of lymphocytes on Hela cells expressing intedeukin-12 (IL-12) in vitro were explored. By using gene transfection technique, full length IL-12 gene was transfected into Hela cells. The expression of IL-12 in Hela cells was detected quantitatively by ELISA; Changes in killing effects of lymphocytes on Hela cells expressing IL-12 were observed by MTT. It was found that Hela cells could express IL-12 between 24h and 72h after transfection. Killing activity of lymphocytes on Hela cells expressing IL-12 was significantly enhanced. It was concluded by cell transfection technique, Hela cells could express IL-12 and were more easily killed by lymphocytes.

  9. Interactions of radioprotectors and oxygen in cultured mammalian cells. I. Dithiothreitol effects on radiation-induced cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioprotection in vitro by sulfhydryl (SH)-containing compounds is usually greater in aerated than in hypoxic cells. This observation has been cited recently as one of the reasons for the relatively greater effectiveness of radioprotectors such WR-2721 in normal tissues compared to tumor cells. It is demonstrated herein, however, that hypoxic V79 cells irradiated in vitro under carefully controlled conditions are protected to a greater extent by low concentrations (1-2 mM) of the SH compound dithiothreitol (DTT) than are aerated cells. The reverse, more general phenomenon is seen at high concentrations of DTT (> 2 mM). This complex SH concentration and oxygenation dependence results in an increase in the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) at low concentrations greater than 2 mM DTT. The possible radiation chemical basis for this finding and its importance to the clinical use of SH-containing radioprotectors are discussed

  10. Dendritic cells loaded with pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs lysates induce antitumor immune killing effect in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yin

    Full Text Available According to the cancer stem cells (CSCs theory, malignant tumors may be heterogeneous in which a small population of CSCs drive the progression of cancer. Because of their intrinsic abilities, CSCs may survive a variety of treatments and then lead to therapeutic resistance and cancer recurrence. Pancreatic CSCs have been reported to be responsible for the malignant behaviors of pancreatic cancer, including suppression of immune protection. Thus, development of immune strategies to eradicate pancreatic CSCs may be of great value for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this study, we enriched pancreatic CSCs by culturing Panc-1 cells under sphere-forming conditions. Panc-1 CSCs expressed low levels of HLA-ABC and CD86, as measured by flow cytometry analysis. We further found that the Panc-1 CSCs modulate immunity by inhibiting lymphocyte proliferation which is promoted by phytohemagglutinin (PHA and anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies. The monocyte derived dendritic cells (DCs were charged with total lysates generated from Panc-1 CSCs obtained from tumor sphere culturing. After co-culturing with lymphocytes at different ratios, the Panc-1 CSCs lysates modified DC effectively promoted lymphocyte proliferation. The activating efficiency reached 72.4% and 74.7% at the ratios of 1∶10 and 1∶20 with lymphocytes. The activated lymphocytes secreted high levels of INF-γ and IL-2, which are strong antitumor cytokines. Moreover, Panc-1 CSCs lysates modified DC induced significant cytotoxic effects of lymphocytes on Panc-1 CSCs and parental Panc-1 cells, respectively, as shown by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH assay. Our study demonstrates that the development of CSCs-based vaccine is a promising strategy for treating pancreatic cancer.

  11. A Sequential Model of Host Cell Killing and Phagocytosis by Entamoeba histolytica

    OpenAIRE

    Adam Sateriale; Huston, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is responsible for invasive intestinal and extraintestinal amebiasis. The virulence of Entamoeba histolytica is strongly correlated with the parasite's capacity to effectively kill and phagocytose host cells. The process by which host cells are killed and phagocytosed follows a sequential model of adherence, cell killing, initiation of phagocytosis, and engulfment. This paper presents recent advances in the cytolytic and phagocytic processes of Ent...

  12. Breast tumor cells isolated from in vitro resistance to trastuzumab remain sensitive to trastuzumab anti-tumor effects in vivo and to ADCC killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kute, Timothy E; Savage, Lori; Stehle, John R; Kim-Shapiro, Jung W; Blanks, Michael J; Wood, James; Vaughn, James P

    2009-11-01

    An understanding of model systems of trastuzumab (Herceptin) resistance is of great importance since the humanized monoclonal antibody is now used as first line therapy with paclitaxel in patients with metastatic Her2 overexpressing breast cancer, and the majority of their tumors has innate resistance or develops acquired resistance to the treatment. Previously, we selected trastuzumab-resistant clonal cell lines in vitro from trastuzumab-sensitive parental BT-474 cells and showed that cloned trastuzumab-resistant cell lines maintain similar levels of the extracellular Her2 receptor, bind trastuzumab as efficiently as the parental cells, but continue to grow in the presence of trastuzumab and display cell cycle profiles and growth rates comparable to parental cells grown in the absence of trastuzumab (Kute et al. in Cytometry A 57:86-93, 2004). We now show that trastuzumab-resistant and trastuzumab-sensitive cells both surprisingly display trastuzumab-mediated growth inhibition in athymic nude mice. This demonstrates that resistance developed in vitro is not predictive of resistance in vivo. The observation that in vitro resistant cells are sensitive to trastuzumab in vivo could be explained by antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Therefore, both parental and trastuzumab-resistant cells were assayed for ADCC in real time on electroplates with and without trastuzumab in the presence of a natural killer cell line (NK-92), and granulocyte or mononuclear cellular fractions isolated from human peripheral blood. Mononuclear cells and NK-92 cells were more effective in killing both parental and trastuzumab-resistant cells in the presence of trastuzumab. Both trastuzumab-resistant cells and trastuzumab-sensitive cells showed similar susceptibility to ADCC despite displaying divergent growth responses to trastuzumab. The granulocyte fraction was able to kill these cells with equal efficacy in the presence or absence of trastuzumab. These results support a model

  13. M-Cell Targeting of Whole Killed Bacteria Induces Protective Immunity against Gastrointestinal Pathogens▿

    OpenAIRE

    Chionh, Yok-Teng; Wee, Janet L. K.; Every, Alison L.; Ng, Garrett Z.; Sutton, Philip

    2009-01-01

    As the majority of human pathogens infect via a mucosal surface, delivery of killed vaccines by mucosal routes could potentially improve protection against many such organisms. Our ability to develop effective killed mucosal vaccines is inhibited by a lack of adjuvants that are safe and effective in humans. The Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) lectin specifically binds M cells lining the murine gastrointestinal tract. We explored the potential for M-cell-targeted vaccination of whole, kill...

  14. Preparation of arsenic trioxide-loaded albuminutes immuno-nanospheres and its specific killing effect on bladder cancer cell in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jie; ZENG Fu-qing; LI Chong; TONG Qiang-song; GAO Xiang; XIE Shu-sheng; YU Li-zhang

    2005-01-01

    Background Recently, arsenic trioxide (As2O3) was considered as a novel anti-tumor agent. However, it showed severe toxicity effect on normal tissue at the same time. To improve its therapeutic efficacy and decrease its toxicity,we prepared arsenic trioxide-loaded albuminutes immuno-nanospheres [As2O3-(HAS-NS)-BDI-1] targeted with nonoclonal antibody (McAb) BDI-1 and tested its specific killing effect against bladder cancer cell. Methods As2O3-HAS-NS was prepared by chemical cross-linking method. Monoclonal antibody BDI-1 was purified with ammonium sulphate saltingout and chromatography. Albuminutes microspheres were conjugated with McAb by SPDP cross-linking method.Concentration of As in As2O3- (HAS-NS)-BDI-1 and As2O3-HAS-NS was measured by atomic fluometry method. As2O3- (HAS-NS)-BDI-1 and its activity were detected by SDS-PAGE reduction electrophoresis, indirect immunofluorescence test, light microscope and scanning electron microscope observation. Acridine orange staining and tritiated thymidine (3H-TdR) incorporation tests were used to indicate specific killing activity of As2O3-(HAS-NS)-BDI-1 in vitro. Results In As2O3- (HAS-NS)-BDI-1 groups, we saw two protein bands in SDS-PAGE reduction electrophoresis.Albuminutes immuno-nanospheres were rounded with clear green fluorescence by immunofluorescence test. Under microscope, we observed that BIU-87 cells were covered with the As2O3- (HAS-NS)-BDI-1 and that As2O3- (HAS-NS)-BDI-1 moved with the BIU-87 cells. The albuminutes immuno-nanospheres were tightly junctioned with the BIU-87 cells.Specific killing activity of As2O3-(HAS-NS)-BDI-1 on bladder tumor cells was observed by acridine orange staining and 3H-TdR incorporation assays. Conclusions As2O3- (HAS-NS)-BDI-1 might bind specifically against BIU-87 cells, thus leading to high activity of killing bladder tumor cells.

  15. Killing effect of TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand regulated by tetracycline on gastric cancer cell line NCI-N87

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Chao Wei; Xin-Juan Wang; Kai-Chen; Lei Zhang; Yu Liang; Xin-Li Lin

    2001-01-01

    AIM To clone the cDNA fragment of human TRAIL (TNFrelated apoptosis inducing ligand) into a tetracyclineregulated gene expression system, the RevTet-On system, transduce expression vectors into a gastric carcinoma cell line-NCl-N87 and examine the effects of controlled expression of TRAIL in vitro on the gastric carcinoma cells. METHODS The full-length cDNA of TRAIL was inserted into a vector under the control of the tetracyclineresponsive element (TRE) to obtain the plasmid pRevTRETRAIL, which was transfected into a packaging cell line PT67. In addition, vector pRev-Tet- On and pRevTRE were also transfected into PT67 separately. After hygromycin and G418 selection, the viral titer was determined. The medium containing retroviral vectors was collected and used to transduce a gastric carcinoma cell line NCI-N87.The resulting cell line NCI-N87-Tet-On-TRE-TRAIL and a control cell line, NCI-N87-Tet-On-TRE, were established.TRAIL expression in the cell line was induced by incubating cells with doxycycline (Dox), which is a tetracycline analogue. The killing effect on gastric carcinoma cells was analyzed after induction. RESULTS The recombinant plasmid pRev-TRE-TRAIL was constructed. After hygromycin or G418 selection, the producer cell lines PT67-TRE, PT67-TRE-TRAIL and PT67TetOn were obtained, with titers of about 108CFU@ L-1 By transducing NCI-N87 cells with retroviral vectors from these cell lines, stable cell lines NCI-N87-Tet-On-TRETRAIL (NN3T) and control cell line NCI-N87-Tet-On-TRE (NN2T) were established. The growth curves of the selected cell lines were the same with the wild type NCIN87. When Dox was added, cell death was obvious in the test groups (29% -77%), whereas no difference was observed in control and wild type cell lines. With the addition of a medium from the test group, human leukemia cell line Jurkat was activated till death (83%), indicating the secretion of active TRAIL proteins from the test cells to the medium. CONCLUSION With the use of the

  16. Double suicide genes selectively kill human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Lunxu; Wang Yanping; Mei Longyong; Jia Weiguo; Che Guowei

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background To construct a recombinant adenovirus containing CDglyTK double suicide genes and evaluate the killing effect of the double suicide genes driven by kinase domain insert containing receptor (KDR) promoter on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Methods Human KDR promoter, Escherichia coli (E. coli) cytosine deaminase (CD) gene and the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (TK) gene were cloned using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Plasmid pKDR-CDglyTK was constructed wi...

  17. Pseudomonas Exotoxin A: optimized by evolution for effective killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eMichalska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas Exotoxin A (PE is the most toxic virulence factor of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This review describes current knowledge about the intoxication pathways of PE. Moreover, PE represents a remarkable example for pathoadaptive evolution, how bacterial molecules have been structurally and functionally optimized under evolutionary pressure to effectively impair and kill their host cells.

  18. Pseudomonas Exotoxin A: optimized by evolution for effective killing

    OpenAIRE

    Michalska, Marta; Wolf, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas Exotoxin A (PE) is the most toxic virulence factor of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This review describes current knowledge about the intoxication pathways of PE. Moreover, PE represents a remarkable example for pathoadaptive evolution, how bacterial molecules have been structurally and functionally optimized under evolutionary pressure to effectively impair and kill their host cells.

  19. Bystander Effects Induced by Continuous Low-Dose-Rate 125I Seeds Potentiate the Killing Action of Irradiation on Human Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate bystander effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) 125I seed irradiation on human lung cancer cells in vitro. Methods and Materials: A549 and NCI-H446 cell lines of differing radiosensitivity were directly exposed to LDR 125I seeds irradiation for 2 or 4 Gy and then cocultured with nonirradiated cells for 24 hours. Induction of micronucleus (MN), γH2AX foci, and apoptosis were assayed. Results: After 2 and 4 Gy irradiation, micronucleus formation rate (MFR) and apoptotic rate of A549 and NCI-H446 cells were increased, and the MFR and apoptotic rate of NCI-H446 cells was 2.1-2.8 times higher than that of A549 cells. After coculturing nonirradiated bystander cells with 125I seed irradiated cells for 24 hours, MFR and the mean number of γH2AX foci/cells of bystander A549 and NCI-H446 cells were similar and significantly higher than those of control (p 125I seeds could induce bystander effects, which potentiate the killing action on tumor cells and compensate for the influence of nonuniform distribution of radiation dosage on therapeutic outcomes

  20. HIV transcription is induced with some forms of cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct', we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. Γ rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that γ-ray-induced apoptotic death requires function p53, which is missing in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture

  1. Quantitation of OH Radical Production from X-ray and Plasma Treatments Seeking for Radiation-Equivalency of Plasma in Clonogenic Cell Killing Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of plasma in medicine has been studied in various ways. Floating electrode dielectic barrier discharge (FE-DBE) plasma is used to sterilize human living tissues and to coagulate blood in wound treatment. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is also used in dentistry for tooth bleaching. Plasma production can be controlled by setting the operational parameters of plasma device. Medical use of plasma is made rather empirically in terms of plasma delivery to body parts under treatment. The following interactions of plasma with components of body parts result in the treatment effect. Production of hydroxyl radicals (·OH) is known to be a key process mediating the interactions between plasma and the body. Hydroxyl radicals mediate the interactions between low-LET radiation and the body as well. In this study, we estimated the OH radical production from plasma injection into distilled water and compared it with that from irradiation of distilled water with X-ray beam. We found out the operational set-up for plasma production that is comparable to radiation dose in clonogenic cell killing effect. The production of OH radicals can be used to infer in some degree the cytotoxic effect of plasma or radiation treatment. According to our observations, plasma and radiation treatments come along with different elements involved in their clonogenic cell killing effects in addition to the OH radical production

  2. Double suicide genes selectively kill human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lunxu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To construct a recombinant adenovirus containing CDglyTK double suicide genes and evaluate the killing effect of the double suicide genes driven by kinase domain insert containing receptor (KDR promoter on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Methods Human KDR promoter, Escherichia coli (E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD gene and the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (TK gene were cloned using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Plasmid pKDR-CDglyTK was constructed with the KDR promoter and CDglyTK genes. A recombinant adenoviral plasmid AdKDR-CDglyTK was then constructed and transfected into 293 packaging cells to grow and harvest adenoviruses. KDR-expressing human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECV304 and KDR-negative liver cancer cell line (HepG2 were infected with the recombinant adenoviruses at different multiplicity of infection (MOI. The infection rate was measured by green fluorescent protein (GFP expression. The infected cells were cultured in culture media containing different concentrations of prodrugs ganciclovir (GCV and/or 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC. The killing effects were measured using two different methods, i.e. annexin V-FITC staining and terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL staining. Results Recombinant adenoviruses AdKDR-CDglyTK were successfully constructed and they infected ECV304 and HepG2 cells efficiently. The infection rate was dependent on MOI of recombinant adenoviruses. ECV304 cells infected with AdKDR-CDglyTK were highly sensitive to GCV and 5-FC. The cell survival rate was dependent on both the concentration of the prodrugs and the MOI of recombinant adenoviruses. In contrast, there were no killing effects in the HepG2 cells. The combination of two prodrugs was much more effective in killing ECV304 cells than GCV or 5-FC alone. The growth of transgenic ECV304 cells was suppressed in the presence of prodrugs. Conclusion AdKDR-CDglyTK/double prodrog system may be a useful

  3. Unraveling the mystery of enhanced cell-killing effect around the Bragg peak region of a double irradiation source 9C-ion beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qiang; Y. Furusawa; M. Kanazawa; A. Kitagawa

    2005-01-01

    An enhanced cell-killing effect at the penetration depths around the Bragg peak of a β-delayed particle decay 9C-ion beam has been observed in our preceding radiobiological experiments in comparison with a therapeutic 12C beam under the same conditions, and RBE values of the 9C beam were revealed to be higher than those of the comparative 12C beam by a factor of up to 2. This study is aimed at investigating the biophysical mechanisms underlying the important experimental phenomenon. First of all, a model for calculating the stopping probability density of the experimentally applied 9C beam is worked out, where all determinants such as the initial momentum spread of the 9C beam, the fluence attenuation with penetration depth due to the projectile-target nuclear reaction and the energy straggling effect are taken into account. On the basis of the calculated 9C-ion stopping distribution, it has been found that the area corresponding to the enhanced cell-killing effect of the 9C beam appears at the stopping region of the incident 9C ions. The stopping 9C-ion density in depth, then, is derived from the calculated probability density. Moreover, taking entrance dose 1 Gy for the 9C beam as an example, the average stopping 9C-ion numbers per cell at various depths are deduced. Meanwhile, the mean lethal damage events induced by the 9C and comparative 12C beams at the depths with almost equal dose-averaged LETs are derived from the measured cell surviving fractions at these depths for the 9C and 12C beams. Under the condition of the same absorbed doses, there are indeed good agreements between the average stopping 9C-ion number pre cell and the difference of the mean lethal damage events between the 9C and 12C beams at the depths of similar dose-averaged LETs. It can be inferred that if a 9C ion comes to rest in a cell, the cell would undergo dying. In view of the decay property of 9C nuclide, clustered damage would be caused in the cell by the emitted low-energy particles

  4. Mechanisms of Dendritic Cell Lysosomal Killing of Cryptococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, Camaron R.; Bui, Hoang; Wormley, Floyd L.; Wozniak, Karen L.

    2012-10-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic pulmonary fungal pathogen that disseminates to the CNS causing fatal meningitis in immunocompromised patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) phagocytose C. neoformans following inhalation. Following uptake, cryptococci translocate to the DC lysosomal compartment and are killed by oxidative and non-oxidative mechanisms. DC lysosomal extracts kill cryptococci in vitro; however, the means of antifungal activity remain unknown. Our studies determined non-oxidative antifungal activity by DC lysosomal extract. We examined DC lysosomal killing of cryptococcal strains, anti-fungal activity of purified lysosomal enzymes, and mechanisms of killing against C. neoformans. Results confirmed DC lysosome fungicidal activity against all cryptococcal serotypes. Purified lysosomal enzymes, specifically cathepsin B, inhibited cryptococcal growth. Interestingly, cathepsin B combined with its enzymatic inhibitors led to enhanced cryptococcal killing. Electron microscopy revealed structural changes and ruptured cryptococcal cell walls following treatment. Finally, additional studies demonstrated that osmotic lysis was responsible for cryptococcal death.

  5. Cell killing and mutation induction on Chinese hamster cells by photoradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applying radiation directly on cells, far-uv is more effective than black light, and black light is more effective than white light in inducing proliferative death and in inducing resistance to 6-thioguanine (6-TG), ouabain and diptheria toxin (DT). Gold light has no killing and mutagenic effects on CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells. Use of filters showed that a small percentage of shorter wavelengths in the far-uv region is responsible for most of the killing and mutagenic effects in the unfiltered broad spectra of black and white light

  6. Cell killing and mutation induction on Chinese hamster cells by photoradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, C.K.C.

    1982-11-01

    Applying radiation directly on cells, far-uv is more effective than black light, and black light is more effective than white light in inducing proliferative death and in inducing resistance to 6-thioguanine (6-TG), ouabain and diptheria toxin (DT). Gold light has no killing and mutagenic effects on CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells. Use of filters showed that a small percentage of shorter wavelengths in the far-uv region is responsible for most of the killing and mutagenic effects in the unfiltered broad spectra of black and white light.

  7. Metabolic requirements for hormone-induced resistance to antibody-complement mediated killing of tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Line-1 guinea pig hepatoma cells are susceptible to killing by anti-Forssman IgM antibody plus guinea pig complement (GPC). When these tumor cells are incubated with insulin, epinephrine, hydrocortisone, or prednisolone, the cells show a marked reduction in their susceptibility to antibody-C-mediated killing. If the ability of the cells to synthesize DNA, RNA, and protein is impaired by pretreatment with metabolic inhibitors, x-irradiation, or culture in nutrient-deficient media, the hormones are no longer effective in rendering the cells resistant to killing. If only DNA synthesis is impaired, but not RNA and protein synthesis, the hormones are effective. The inability of cells inhibited in their macromolecular synthesis to be rendered resistant to killing after hormone treatment is not due to an inability of the cells to bind hormone

  8. Predicting In Silico Which Mixtures of the Natural Products of Plants Might Most Effectively Kill Human Leukemia Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany A. El-Shemy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the analysis of just 13 natural products of plants was to predict the most likely effective artificial mixtures of 2-3 most effective natural products on leukemia cells from over 364 possible mixtures. The natural product selected included resveratrol, honokiol, chrysin, limonene, cholecalciferol, cerulenin, aloe emodin, and salicin and had over 600 potential protein targets. Target profiling used the Ontomine set of tools for literature searches of potential binding proteins, binding constant predictions, binding site predictions, and pathway network pattern analysis. The analyses indicated that 6 of the 13 natural products predicted binding proteins which were important targets for established cancer treatments. Improvements in effectiveness were predicted for artificial combinations of 2 or 3 natural products. That effect might be attributed to drug synergism rather than increased numbers of binding proteins bound (dose effects. Among natural products, the combinations of aloe emodin with mevinolin and honokiol were predicted to be the most effective combination for AML-related predicted binding proteins. Therefore, plant extracts may in future provide more effective medicines than the single purified natural products of modern medicine, in some cases.

  9. Predicting in silico which mixtures of the natural products of plants might most effectively kill human leukemia cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shemy, Hany A; Aboul-Enein, Khalid M; Lightfoot, David A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the analysis of just 13 natural products of plants was to predict the most likely effective artificial mixtures of 2-3 most effective natural products on leukemia cells from over 364 possible mixtures. The natural product selected included resveratrol, honokiol, chrysin, limonene, cholecalciferol, cerulenin, aloe emodin, and salicin and had over 600 potential protein targets. Target profiling used the Ontomine set of tools for literature searches of potential binding proteins, binding constant predictions, binding site predictions, and pathway network pattern analysis. The analyses indicated that 6 of the 13 natural products predicted binding proteins which were important targets for established cancer treatments. Improvements in effectiveness were predicted for artificial combinations of 2 or 3 natural products. That effect might be attributed to drug synergism rather than increased numbers of binding proteins bound (dose effects). Among natural products, the combinations of aloe emodin with mevinolin and honokiol were predicted to be the most effective combination for AML-related predicted binding proteins. Therefore, plant extracts may in future provide more effective medicines than the single purified natural products of modern medicine, in some cases. PMID:23431350

  10. Low Temperature Plasma Kills SCaBER Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barekzi, Nazir; van Way, Lucas; Laroussi, Mounir

    2013-09-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder is a rare type of bladder cancer that forms as a result of chronic irritation of the epithelial lining of the bladder. The cell line used in this study is SCaBER (ATCC® HTB-3™) derived from squamous cell carcinoma of the human urinary bladder. Current treatments of bladder cancer include surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. However, the cost of these treatments, the potential toxicity of the chemotherapeutic agents and the systemic side-effects warrant an alternative to current cancer treatment. This paper represents preliminary studies to determine the effects of biologically tolerant plasma (BTP) on a cell line of human bladder cancer cells. Previous work by our group using the plasma pencil revealed the efficacy of BTP on leukemia cells suspended in solution. Based on these earlier findings we hypothesized that the plasma exposure would elicit a similar programmed cell death in the SCaBER cells. Trypan blue exclusion and MTT assays revealed the cell killing after exposure to BTP. Our study indicates that low temperature plasma generated by ionizing helium gas and the reactive species may be a suitable and safe alternative for cancer therapy.

  11. Nanoassemblies Based on Supramolecular Complexes of Nonionic Amphiphilic Cyclodextrin and Sorafenib as Effective Weapons to Kill Human HCC Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondì, Maria Luisa; Scala, Angela; Sortino, Giuseppe; Amore, Erika; Botto, Chiara; Azzolina, Antonina; Balasus, Daniele; Cervello, Melchiorre; Mazzaglia, Antonino

    2015-12-14

    Sorafenib (Sor), an effective chemiotherapeutic drug utilized against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), robustly interacts with nonionic amphiphilic cyclodextrin (aCD, SC6OH), forming, in aqueous solution, supramolecular complexes that behave as building blocks of highly water-dispersible colloidal nanoassemblies. SC6OH/Sor complex has been characterized by complementary spectroscopic techniques, such as UV-vis, steady-state fluorescence and anisotropy, resonance light scattering and (1)H NMR. The spectroscopic evidences and experiments carried out in the presence of an adamantane derivative, which competes with drug for CD cavity, agree with the entrapment of Sor in aCD, pointing out the role of the aCD cavity in the interaction between drug and amphiphile. Nanoassemblies based on SC6OH/Sor display size of ∼200 nm, negative zeta-potential (ζ = -11 mV), and both maximum loading capacity (LC ∼ 17%) and entrapment efficiency (EE ∼ 100%). Kinetic release profiles show a slower release of Sor from nanoassemblies with respect to the free drug. SC6OH/Sor nanoassemblies have very low hemolytic activity and high efficiency in vitro in decreasing cell growth and viability of HCC cell lines, such as HepG2, Hep3B, and PLC/PRF/5, opening promising chances to their in vivo applications. PMID:26528591

  12. Melanoma stem cells in experimental melanoma are killed by radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: In spite of recently approved B-RAF inhibitors and immunomodulating antibodies, metastatic melanoma has poor prognosis and novel treatments are needed. Melanoma stem cells (MSC) have been implicated in the resistance of this tumor to chemotherapy. Recently we demonstrated in a Phase I clinical trial in patients with metastatic melanoma that radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with 188-Rhenium(188Re)-6D2 antibody to melanin was a safe and effective modality. Here we investigated the interaction of MSC with RIT as a possible mechanism for RIT efficacy. Methods: Mice bearing A2058 melanoma xenografts were treated with either 1.5 mCi 188Re-6D2 antibody, saline, unlabeled 6D2 antibody or 188Re-labeled non-specific IgM. Results: On Day 28 post-treatment the tumor size in the RIT group was 4-times less than in controls (P < 0.001). The tumors were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and FACS for two MSC markers — chemoresistance mediator ABCB5 and H3K4 demethylase JARID1B. There were no significant differences between RIT and control groups in percentage of ABCB5 or JARID1B-positive cells in the tumor population. Our results demonstrate that unlike chemotherapy, which kills tumor cells but leaves behind MSC leading to recurrence, RIT kills MSC at the same rate as the rest of tumor cells. Conclusions: These results have two main implications for melanoma treatment and possibly other cancers. First, the susceptibility of ABCB5 + and JARID1B + cells to RIT in melanoma might be indicative of their susceptibility to antibody-targeted radiation in other cancers where they are present as well. Second, specifically targeting cancer stem cells with radiolabeled antibodies to ABCB5 or JARID1B might help to completely eradicate cancer stem cells in various cancers

  13. Studies on the mechanisms of mammalian cell killing by a freeze-thaw cycle: conditions that prevent cell killing using nucleated freezing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normally a freeze-thaw cycle is a very efficient method of killing mammalian cells. However, this report describes conditions that prevent killing of cultured mammalian cells by nucleated freezing at -24 degrees C. Optimal protection from cell killing at -24 degrees C was obtained in isotonic solutions containing an organic cryoprotectant such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO; 10%, v/v), a saccharide such as sucrose over a broad concentration range from 50 to 150 mM, and glucose. Glycerol was also an effective cryoprotectant but other organic solvents were ineffective, although in some cases they appeared to protect cell membranes, while not protecting other vital components. A wide variety of saccharide structures were effective at protecting cells from freeze-thaw killing, with trehalose being particularly effective. The degree of resistance to killing by a freeze-thaw cycle under these conditions varied widely among different cell lines. If toxicity of DMSO was responsible for this variability of cryoprotection, it must have been due to short-term, not longer term, toxicity of DMSO. Studies on the mechanism by which cells are protected from killing under these conditions indicated that neither vitrification of the medium nor the concentrating of components during freezing were involved. One model not eliminated by the mechanistic studies proposes that the organic solvent cryoprotectant component acts by fluidizing membranes under the thawing conditions, so that any holes produced by ice crystals propagating through membranes can reseal during the thawing process. In this model one of the mechanisms by which the saccharide component could act is by entering the cells and stabilizing vital intracellular components. Consistent with this, a freeze-thaw cycle promoted the uptake of labeled sucrose into cultured cells

  14. Metformin kills and radiosensitizes cancer cells and preferentially kills cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chang W. Song; Hyemi Lee; Dings, Ruud P. M.; Brent Williams; John Powers; Troy Dos Santos; Bo-Hwa Choi; Heon Joo Park

    2012-01-01

    The anti-cancer effects of metformin, the most widely used drug for type 2 diabetes, alone or in combination with ionizing radiation were studied with MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and FSaII mouse fibrosarcoma cells. Clinically achievable concentrations of metformin caused significant clonogenic death in cancer cells. Importantly, metformin was preferentially cytotoxic to cancer stem cells relative to non-cancer stem cells. Metformin increased the radiosensitivity of cancer cells in vitro, ...

  15. Effective Concentration of a Multikinase Inhibitor within Bone Marrow Correlates with In Vitro Cell Killing in Therapy-Resistant Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Chaofeng; Wu, Xiaoyan; Ma, Helen; Tao, Wenjing; Zhang, Guodong; Xia, Xiaojun; Shen, Jianliang; Mai, Junhua; Sun, Tong; Sun, Xiaoping; Arlinghaus, Ralph B; Shen, Haifa

    2016-05-01

    Leukemia cells escape BCR-ABL-targeted therapy by developing mutations, such as T315I, in the p210(BCR-ABL) fusion protein in Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Although most effort has been focused on development of new tyrosine kinase inhibitors, enrichment of these small-molecule inhibitors in the tumor tissue can also have a profound impact on treatment outcomes. Here, we report that a 2-hour exposure of the T315I-mutant CML cells to 10 μmol/L of the multikinase inhibitor TG101209 suppressed BCR-ABL-independent signaling and caused cell-cycle arrest at G2-M. Further increase in drug concentration to 17.5 μmol/L blocked phosphorylation of the mutant BCR-ABL kinase and its downstream JAK2 and STAT5. The effective dosage to overcome therapy resistance identified in an in vitro setting serves as a guidance to develop the proper drug formulation for in vivo efficacy. A targeted formulation was developed to achieve sustained bone marrow TG101209 concentration at or above 17.5 μmol/L for effective killing of CML cells in vivo Potent inhibition of leukemia cell growth and extended survival were observed in two murine models of CML treated with 40 mg/kg intravenously administered targeted TG101209, but not with the untargeted drug at the same dosage. Our finding provides a unique approach to develop treatments for therapy-resistant CML. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 899-910. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26846820

  16. A comparative study of aluminium-chloro-tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine and hematoporphyrin derivative in photodynamic cell killing effect and skin photosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1983, PhotoDynamic Therapy was conducted in patients with super-ficial bladder cancer, especially carcinoma in situ of the bladder. As side effects, skin photosensitivity and reduced bladder capacity were observed as consequence of retention of HematoPorphyrin Derivative in skin and normal portion of the bladder. these adverse reactions have, in part, restricted the development of PDT and underlie the search for alternative photosensitive compounds for clinical use. Aluminium chloro-sulfonated phthalocyanines (AISPc), which can be regarded as azaporphyrins, appear to be more suitable photosensitizers because of their strong absorption and thermal stability in solution, and relatively well defined chemical properties. Moreover, AISPc were reported to be capable of photoinactivating cells in tissue culture, to exhibit good tumor-localizing capacity, and to reduce tumor burden of various murine tumors with light irradiation. Authors therefore are interested in AISPc as second generation photosensitizers for PDT of bladder cancer. In this study, their potency as photosensitizing agents is evaluated in vitro and in vivo systems as compared with HpD. (author). 9 refs., 5 figs

  17. Effect of Regulation of HSV-tk Gene Expression and Tumor Killed Activity with a Single Tetracycline-regulatable Plasmid Vector on HeLa Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qian; DU Zhen-wu; MA Qing-shan; ZHANG Yu-cheng; WU Xiao-dong; YANG Shao-juan; WANG Ya-li; ZHANG Gui-zhen

    2009-01-01

    To construct a single tetracycline-regulatable plasmid vector based on the double tetracycline-regulatable plasmid vector system for regulating HSV-tk gene expression so as to effectively kill HeLa cells. Two tetracycline operator(TetO2) was cloned into pcDNA3.1 and a cassette was made for a cytomegalovirus-type 2 tetracycline oper-ator(CMV-TetO2) promoter, and the obtained vector was named pcDNA3.1-CMV-TetO2. Herpes simplex virus thy-midine kinase(HSV-tk) gene and tetracycline repressor(TR) gene were cloned into pcDNA3.1-CMV-TetO2 and the two genes were linked with internal ribosome entry site(IRES) to gain a vector named pcDNA3.1-CMV-TetO2-HSV-tk-IRES-TR. The HeLa cells were stablly transfected with pcDNA3.1-CMV-TetO2-HSV-tk-IRES-TR plasmid. The expression of HSV-tk and TR were detected by RT-PCR, the tumorcidal activity of HSV-tk/GCV was determined by MTT assay. In Hela cells transfected with the above plasmid vector, HSV-tk gene and TR gene can be expressed lowly and the concentration of GCV producing a 50% decrease in cell viability was about 50 ug/mL without adding deoxycycline; in contrast, the expessions of HSV-tk gene and TR gene increased significantly and the concentration of GCV producing a 50% decrease in cell viability was about 5 u,g/mL with adding deoxycycline. Therefore tetracycline can regulate the expression and tumorcidal activity of HSV-tk gene in HeLa cells with this single plasmid vector.

  18. Adenovirus-mediated FIR demonstrated TP53-independent cell-killing effect and enhanced antitumor activity of carbon-ion beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, M; Matsushita, K; Rahmutulla, B; Yamada, S; Shimada, H; Kubo, S; Hiwasa, T; Matsubara, H; Nomura, F

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy of carbon-ion beam with the far upstream element-binding protein (FBP)-interacting repressor, FIR, which interferes with DNA damage repair proteins, was proposed as an approach for esophageal cancer treatment with low side effects regardless of TP53 status. In vivo therapeutic antitumor efficacy of replication-defective adenovirus (E1 and E3 deleted adenovirus serotype 5) encoding human FIR cDNA (Ad-FIR) was demonstrated in the tumor xenograft model of human esophageal squamous cancer cells, TE-2. Bleomycin (BLM) is an anticancer agent that introduces DNA breaks. The authors reported that Ad-FIR involved in the BLM-induced DNA damage repair response and thus applicable for other DNA damaging agents. To examine the effect of Ad-FIR on DNA damage repair, BLM, X-ray and carbon-ion irradiation were used as DNA damaging agents. The biological effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiotherapy used with carbon-ion irradiation are more expansive than low-LET conventional radiotherapy, such as X-rays or γ rays. High LET radiotherapy is suitable for the local control of tumors because of its high relative biological effectiveness. Ad-FIR enhanced BLM-induced DNA damage indicated by γH2AX in vitro. BLM treatment increased endogenous nuclear FIR expression in TE-2 cells, and P27Kip1 expression was suppressed by TP53 siRNA and BLM treatment. Further, Ad-FIRΔexon2, a dominant-negative form of FIR that lacks exon2 transcriptional repression domain, decreased Ku86 expression. The combination of Ad-FIR and BLM in TP53 siRNA increased DNA damage. Additionally, Ad-FIR showed synergistic cell toxicity with X-ray in vitro and significantly increased the antitumor efficacy of carbon-ion irradiation in the xenograft mouse model of TE-2 cells (P=0.03, Mann-Whitney's U-test) and was synergistic with the sensitization enhancement ratio (SER) value of 1.15. Therefore, Ad-FIR increased the cell-killing activity of the carbon-ion beam that avoids late

  19. Antibacterial activity of silver-killed bacteria: the "zombies" effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakshlak, Racheli Ben-Knaz; Pedahzur, Rami; Avnir, David

    2015-04-01

    We report a previously unrecognized mechanism for the prolonged action of biocidal agents, which we denote as the zombies effect: biocidally-killed bacteria are capable of killing living bacteria. The concept is demonstrated by first killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 with silver nitrate and then challenging, with the dead bacteria, a viable culture of the same bacterium: Efficient antibacterial activity of the killed bacteria is observed. A mechanism is suggested in terms of the action of the dead bacteria as a reservoir of silver, which, due to Le-Chatelier's principle, is re-targeted to the living bacteria. Langmuirian behavior, as well as deviations from it, support the proposed mechanism.

  20. Cancer: repositioned to kill stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Holyoake, Tessa; Vetrie, David

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-resistant cancer stem cells make it hard to cure many forms of the disease. Repositioning an existing drug to tackle this problem could significantly improve treatment for one form of leukaemia.

  1. Sunlight-induced killing of nondividing human cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nondividing populations of human diploid fibroblasts that are DNA excision repair proficient and repair deficient were exposed to mid-day summer sunlight and their survival determined based on their ability to remain attached to a culture vessel surface. Whereas mid- and far-UV wavelengths and sunlamp radiation cause a gradual degeneration and detachment of cells in a dose-dependent manner, sunlight does not promote cell killing in repair proficient cells. Detachment of repair deficient cells is promoted to a limited extent but only at sunlight exposure times that are low with respect to the amount of DNA damage induced. Repair proficient and deficient cells exposed to sunlight for longer times do not detach. Pyrimidine dimer levels in these sunlight irradiated cells were great enough to have promoted detachment had these levels been induced by UV (254 nm) alone. Other photodamage induced by these exposures evidently inhibits the dimer induced cell degeneration that leads to cell detachment. It was concluded that pyrimidine dimers are responsible for cell killing at short sunlight exposure times (80 min) cells are killed by a different mechanism. (author)

  2. Denaturation of membrane proteins and hyperthermic cell killing

    OpenAIRE

    Burgman, Paulus Wilhelmus Johannes Jozef

    1993-01-01

    Summarizing: heat induced denaturation of membrane proteins is probably related to hyperthermic cell killing. Induced resistance of heat sensitive proteins seems to be involved in the development of thermotolerance. Although many questions remain still to be answered, it appears that HSP72, when bound to membrane proteins, is capable of providing heat resistance to these proteins. ... Zie: Summary

  3. Inefficiency of high boron concentrations for cell killing in boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is to investigate the relationship between the cell-killing effect of the 10B(n, α)7Li capture reaction, intracellular boron concentration, and thermal neutron fluence in boron neutron capture therapy using in vitro cell survival based on a clonogenic assay, and biophysical analysis. Our results showed that the cell-killing yield of the 10B(n, α)7Li capture reaction per unit thermal neutron fluence declined with an increase in the intracellular boron concentration above 45 μg/ml 10B. The cell-killing effect was well described using an empirical power function of the intracellular boron concentration, with exponent 0.443. Knowledge of this effect will help in the optimization of BNCT. (author)

  4. Dendritic cells loaded with killed breast cancer cells induce differentiation of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early clinical trials, mostly in the setting of melanoma, have shown that dendritic cells (DCs) expressing tumor antigens induce some immune responses and some clinical responses. A major difficulty is the extension to other tumors, such as breast carcinoma, for which few defined tumor-associated antigens are available. We have demonstrated, using both prostate carcinoma and melanoma as model systems, that DCs loaded with killed allogeneic tumor cell lines can induce CD8+ T cells to differentiate into cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for shared tumor antigens. The present study was designed to determine whether DCs would capture killed breast cancer cells and present their antigens to autologous CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We show that killed breast cancer cells are captured by immature DCs that, after induced maturation, can efficiently present MHC class I and class II peptides to CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes. The elicited CTLs are able to kill the target cells without a need for pretreatment with interferon gamma. CTLs can be obtained by culturing the DCs loaded with killed breast cancer cells with unseparated peripheral blood lymphocytes, indicating that the DCs can overcome any potential inhibitory effects of breast cancer cells. Loading DCs with killed breast cancer cells may be considered a novel approach to breast cancer immunotherapy and to identification of shared breast cancer antigens

  5. Characterization of cell lysis in Pseudomonas putida induced upon expression of heterologous killing genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronchel, M.C.; Molina, L.; Witte, A.; Lutbiz, W.; Molin, Søren; Ramos, J.L.; Rodriguez, Cayo Juan Ramos

    1998-01-01

    Active biological containment systems are based on the controlled expression of killing genes. These systems are of interest for the Pseudomonadaceae because of the potential applications of these microbes as bioremediation agents and biopesticides, The physiological effects that lead to cell death...... upon the induction of expression of two different heterologous killing genes in nonpathogenic Pseudomonas putida KT2440 derivatives have been analyzed, P. putida CMC4 and CMC12 carry in their chromosomes a fusion of the PAl-04/03 promoter to the Escherichia coli gef gene and the phi X174 lysis gene E......, respectively. Expression of the killing genes is controlled by the LacI protein, whose expression is initiated from the XylS-dependent Pm promoter. Under induced conditions, killing of P. putida CMC12 cells mediated by phi X174 lysis protein E was faster than that observed for P. putida CMC4, for which the Gef...

  6. How Taxol/paclitaxel kills cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Weaver, Beth A

    2014-01-01

    Taxol (generic name paclitaxel) is a microtubule-stabilizing drug that is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of ovarian, breast, and lung cancer, as well as Kaposi's sarcoma. It is used off-label to treat gastroesophageal, endometrial, cervical, prostate, and head and neck cancers, in addition to sarcoma, lymphoma, and leukemia. Paclitaxel has long been recognized to induce mitotic arrest, which leads to cell death in a subset of the arrested population. However, r...

  7. Scientific projection paper for mutagenesis, transformation and cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our knowledge about mutagenesis, transformation, and cell killing by ionizing radiation consists of large bodies of data, which are potentially useful in terms of application to human risk assessment and to the constructive use of radiation, as in cancer treatment. The three end-points discussed above are united by at least five significant concepts in radiation research strategy: (1) The inter-relationships among the important end-points, mutation, carcinogenesis, and cell killing. Research on one is meaningful only in the context of information about the other two. (2) The interaction of radiations with other agents in producing these end-points. (3) The mechanisms of action of other environmental mutagenic, carcinogenic, and cytotoxic agents. (4) The use of repair deficient human mutant cells. (5) The study of radiation damage mechanisms. There is no better way to extrapolate laboratory data to the clinical and public worlds than to understand the underlying biological mechanisms that produced the data

  8. Galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine lectin: the coordinator of host cell killing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Douglas R Boettner; Christopher Huston; William A Petri Jr

    2002-11-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an enteric parasite that can kill host cells via a contact-dependent mechanism. This killing involves the amoebic surface protein referred to as the Gal/GalNAc lectin. The Gal/GalNAc lectin binds galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine allowing the adherence of amoebas to host cells. Involvement of the lectin in the pathogenesis of E. histolytica infection will be reviewed in this paper. The lectin has been shown to have very specific and substantial effects on adherence, cytotoxicity, and encystation. There is also possible involvement of the lectin in phagocytosis and caspase activation in host cells.

  9. Snail-Killing Effects of Streptomyces 218 Powder

    OpenAIRE

    V.O. Aina; A.A.J. Adewumi; C.O. Yao; M.Z. Shi; Hu, D. Y.; W.H. Chai

    2012-01-01

    This study is aimed at finding out the snail-killing effects of Streptomyces 218 powder on Oncomelania hupensis snails which are the vectors or intermediate host of Schiltosoma Japonicum (intestinal schistosomiasis) in china the tests were carried out in the laboratory and on the field. The snail-killing effects of Streptomyces218 powder, isolated from snail habitat at Anchang Village of Anxiang country in China was tested using the immersion and spraying methods. The tests on the Oncomelania...

  10. Zika Kills Vital Nervous System Cells in Adult Mice, Study Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160505.html Zika Kills Vital Nervous System Cells in Adult Mice, ... 2016 THURSDAY, Aug. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Zika virus kills neural stem cells in the brains ...

  11. Curcumin and cancer cells: how many ways can curry kill tumor cells selectively?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Jayaraj; Prasad, Sahdeo; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2009-09-01

    Cancer is a hyperproliferative disorder that is usually treated by chemotherapeutic agents that are toxic not only to tumor cells but also to normal cells, so these agents produce major side effects. In addition, these agents are highly expensive and thus not affordable for most. Moreover, such agents cannot be used for cancer prevention. Traditional medicines are generally free of the deleterious side effects and usually inexpensive. Curcumin, a component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), is one such agent that is safe, affordable, and efficacious. How curcumin kills tumor cells is the focus of this review. We show that curcumin modulates growth of tumor cells through regulation of multiple cell signaling pathways including cell proliferation pathway (cyclin D1, c-myc), cell survival pathway (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, cFLIP, XIAP, c-IAP1), caspase activation pathway (caspase-8, 3, 9), tumor suppressor pathway (p53, p21) death receptor pathway (DR4, DR5), mitochondrial pathways, and protein kinase pathway (JNK, Akt, and AMPK). How curcumin selectively kills tumor cells, and not normal cells, is also described in detail. PMID:19590964

  12. Recombinant scorpion insectotoxin AaIT kills specifically insect cells but not human cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence deduced from the amino acid sequence of the scorpion insectotoxin AaIT was chemically synthesized and was expressed in Escherichia coli. The authenticity of this in vitro expressed peptide was confirmed by N-terminal peptide sequencing. Two groups of bioassays, artificial diet incorporation assay and contact insecticidal effect assay, were carried out separately to verify the toxicity of this recombinant toxin. At the end of a 24 h experimental period, more than 60% of the testing diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) larvae were killed in both groups with LCs0 value of 18.4 uM and 0.70 μM respectively. Cytotoxicity assay using cultured Sf9 insect cells and MCF-7 human cells demonstrated that the toxin AaIT had specific toxicity against insect cells but not human cells. Only 0.13 μM recombinant toxin was needed to kill 50% of cultured insect cells while as much as 1.3μM toxin had absolutely no effect on human cells. Insect cells produced obvious intrusions from their plasma membrane before broken up. We infer that toxin AaIT bind to a putative sodium channel in these insect cells and open the channel persistently, which would result in Na+ influx and finally cause destruction of insect cells.

  13. Attachment of killed Mycoplasma gallisepticum cells and membranes to erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To correlate viability with attachment capacity, Mycoplasma gallisepticum cells harvested at different growth phases and treated by various agents were tested for their capacity to attach to human erythrocytes. The results show that viability per se is not essential for M. gallisepticum attachment to erythrocytes, as cells killed by ultraviolet irradiation and membranes isolated by lysing M. gallisepticum cells by various means retained attachment capacity. However, treatment of the mycoplasmas by protein-denaturing agents, such as heart, glutaraldehyde, or prolonged exposure to low pH, drastically affected or even abolished attachment, supporting the protein nature of the mycoplasma membrane components responsible for specific binding to the sialoglycoprotein receptors on the erythrocytes

  14. ABT-737 synergizes with Bortezomib to kill melanoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven N. Reuland

    2012-02-01

    The BH3 mimetic ABT-737 is a potent inhibitor of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bcl-w. The Bcl-2 family modulates sensitivity to anticancer drugs in many cancers, including melanomas. In this study, we examined whether ABT-737 is effective in killing melanoma cells either alone or in combination with a proteasome inhibitor already in clinical use (Bortezomib in vitro and in vivo, and further evaluated the mechanisms of action. Results showed that ABT-737 alone induced modest cytotoxicity in melanoma cells, but only at higher doses. Knock-down of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, or Mcl-1 with siRNAs demonstrated that Mcl-1 is the critical mediator of melanoma's resistance to ABT-737 treatment. However, ABT-737 displayed strong synergistic lethality when combined with Bortezomib. Immunoblot analyses demonstrated that Bortezomib increased expression of Noxa, a pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 member that antagonizes Mcl-1. Additionally, siRNA-mediated inhibition of Noxa expression protected melanoma cells from cytotoxicity induced by the combination treatment. These results demonstrate that Bortezomib synergizes with ABT-737 by neutralizing Mcl-1's function via increased levels of Noxa. In a xenograft mouse model, although drug doses were limited due to toxicity, ABT-737 or Bortezomib slowed melanoma tumor growth compared to the control, and the drug combination significantly decreased growth compared to either drug alone. These data imply that less toxic drugs fulfilling a function similar to Bortezomib to neutralize Mcl-1 are promising candidates for combination with ABT-737 for treating melanomas.

  15. TRAIL-mediated killing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia by plasmacytoid dendritic cell-activated natural killer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lelaidier, Martin; Dìaz-Rodriguez, Yildian; Cordeau, Martine; Cordeiro, Paulo; Haddad, Elie; Herblot, Sabine; Duval, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) still frequently recurs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), underscoring the need to improve the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect. Natural killer (NK) cells reconstitute in the first months following HSCT when leukemia burden is at its lowest, but ALL cells have been shown to be resistant to NK cell-mediated killing. We show here that this resistance is overcome by NK cell stimulation with TLR-9-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC...

  16. Candida albicans killing by RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage cells: effects of Candida genotype, infection ratios, and gamma interferon treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcil, A; Harcus, D; Thomas, D Y; Whiteway, M

    2002-11-01

    Phagocytic cells such as neutrophils and macrophages are potential components of the immune defense that protects mammals against Candida albicans infection. We have tested the interaction between the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 and a variety of mutant strains of C. albicans. We used an end point dilution assay to monitor the killing of C. albicans at low multiplicities of infection (MOIs). Several mutants that show reduced virulence in mouse systemic-infection models show reduced colony formation in the presence of macrophage cells. To permit analysis of the macrophage-Candida interaction at higher MOIs, we introduced a luciferase reporter gene into wild-type and mutant Candida cells and used loss of the luminescence signal to quantify proliferation. This assay gave results similar to those for the end point dilution assay. Activation of the macrophages with mouse gamma interferon did not enhance anti-Candida activity. Continued coculture of the Candida and macrophage cells eventually led to death of the macrophages, but for the RAW 264.7 cell line this was not due to apoptotic pathways involving caspase-8 or -9 activation. In general Candida cells defective in the formation of hyphae were both less virulent in animal models and more sensitive to macrophage engulfment and growth inhibition. However the nonvirulent, hypha-defective cla4 mutant line was considerably more resistant to macrophage-mediated inhibition than the wild-type strain. Thus although mutants sensitive to engulfment are typically less virulent in systemic-infection models, sensitivity to phagocytic macrophage cells is not the unique determinant of C. albicans virulence. PMID:12379711

  17. Characterization of cell lysis in Pseudomonas putida induced upon expression of heterologous killing genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronchel, M.C.; Molina, L.; Witte, A.; Lutbiz, W.; Molin, Søren; Ramos, J.L.; Rodriguez, Cayo Juan Ramos

    1998-01-01

    Active biological containment systems are based on the controlled expression of killing genes. These systems are of interest for the Pseudomonadaceae because of the potential applications of these microbes as bioremediation agents and biopesticides, The physiological effects that lead to cell dea...

  18. Colicin Killing: Foiled Cell Defense and Hijacked Cell Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zamaroczy, Miklos; Chauleau, Mathieu

    The study of bacteriocins, notably those produced by E. coli (and named colicins), was initiated in 1925 by Gratia, who first discovered "un remarquable exemple d'antagonisme entre deux souches de colibacilles". Since this innovating observation, the production of toxic exoproteins has been widely reported in all major lineages of Eubacteria and in Archaebacteria. Bacteriocins belong to the most abundant and most diverse group of these bacterial defense systems. Paradoxically, these antimicrobial cytotoxins are actually powerful weapons in the intense battle for bacterial survival. They are also biotechnologically useful since several bacteriocins are used as preservatives in the food industry or as antibiotics or as potential antitumor agents in human health care. Most colicins kill bacteria in one of two ways. The first type is those that form pores in the phospholipid bilayer of the inner membrane. They are active immediately after their translocation across the outer membrane. The translocation pathway requires generally either the BtuB receptor and the Tol (OmpF/TolABQR) complex, or the FepA, FhuA, or Cir receptor and the Ton (TonB/ExbBD) system. The second type of colicins encodes specific endonuclease activities that target DNA, rRNA, or tRNAs in the cytoplasm. To be active, these colicins require translocation across both the outer and inner membranes. The molecular mechanisms implicated in the complex cascade of interactions, required for the transfers of colicin molecules from the extracellular medium through the different "cellular compartments" (outer membrane, periplasm, inner membrane, and cytoplasm), are still incompletely understood. It is clear, however, that the colicins "hijack" specific cellular functions to facilitate access to their target. In this chapter, following a general presentation of colicin biology, we describe, compare, and update several of the concepts related to colicin toxicity and discuss recent, often unexpected findings

  19. Effect of Shark Liver Oil on Peritoneal Murine Macrophages in Responses to Killed-Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monire Hajimoradi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sShark Liver Oil (SLO is an immunomodulator. Macrophages play a key role in host defense against pathogens like fungi. Candida albicans have mechanisms to escape immune system. We determined the effect of killed-Candida on the in vitro viability of macrophages and the effect of SLO on augmentation of this potency.Materials and MethodsPeritoneal macrophages were separated and cultured (3×105/well. At first, the effect of killed-Candida (200 cells/well on macrophage viability was evaluated, using MTT test. Then, MTT was performed on macrophages stimulated with killed-Candida in the presence of SLO. ResultsKilled-Candida suppressed the ability of MTT reduction and hence macrophages viability (P=0.026, but addition of SLO (100 mg/ml significantly enhanced cell viability (P=0.00. So, SLO could neutralize the inhibitory effect of Candida.ConclusionSimultaneous with cytotoxic effect of killed-Candida cells on macrophages viability, SLO augment macrophages viability. So, it can be applied in candidiasis as a complement.

  20. Role of nitric oxide in Salmonella typhimurium-mediated cancer cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial targeting of tumours is an important anti-cancer strategy. We previously showed that strain SL7838 of Salmonella typhimurium targets and kills cancer cells. Whether NO generation by the bacteria has a role in SL7838 lethality to cancer cells is explored. This bacterium has the mechanism for generating NO, but also for decomposing it. Mechanism underlying Salmonella typhimurium tumour therapy was investigated through in vitro and in vivo studies. NO measurements were conducted either by chemical assays (in vitro) or using Biosensors (in vivo). Cancer cells cytotoxic assay were done by using MTS. Bacterial cell survival and tumour burden were determined using molecular imaging techniques. SL7838 generated nitric oxide (NO) in anaerobic cell suspensions, inside infected cancer cells in vitro and in implanted 4T1 tumours in live mice, the last, as measured using microsensors. Thus, under these conditions, the NO generating pathway is more active than the decomposition pathway. The latter was eliminated, in strain SL7842, by the deletion of hmp- and norV genes, making SL7842 more proficient at generating NO than SL7838. SL7842 killed cancer cells more effectively than SL7838 in vitro, and this was dependent on nitrate availability. This strain was also ca. 100% more effective in treating implanted 4T1 mouse tumours than SL7838. NO generation capability is important in the killing of cancer cells by Salmonella strains

  1. The wavelength dependence of ultraviolet light-induced cell killing and mutagenesis in L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wavelength dependence of ultraviolet radiation-induced cell killing and mutagenicity in L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells has been determined from 235 nm to 313 nm. Cells were irradiated in phosphate buffered saline at 200C. The amount of cell killing was determined by cloning in soft agar medium immediately after irradiation. Mutation frequency was determined, after a 3-day expression time, by cloning in soft agar medium in the presence and the absence of 5-bromo-2' deoxyuridine (BrdUrd). The endpoint used to quantitate lethal effects was the exposure necessary to reduce the surviving fraction to 10%, while the endpoint for mutagenesis was the exposure necessary to increase the frequency of BrdUrd-resistant colonies ten-fold over the background level. Data were corrected for quantum energy and the action spectra for cell killing and mutagenesis were plotted as relative biological effectiveness per quantum vs wavelength, relative to the effect at 265.2 nm. Both action spectra show broad maxima at 270 nm, and are very similar to the action spectra determined by Rothman and Setlow (1979) for pyrimidine dimer formation and cell killing in V-79 cells. (author)

  2. LuIII Parvovirus Selectively and Efficiently Targets, Replicates in, and Kills Human Glioma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Paglino, Justin C.; Ozduman, Koray; van den Pol, Anthony N.

    2012-01-01

    Because productive infection by parvoviruses requires cell division and is enhanced by oncogenic transformation, some parvoviruses may have potential utility in killing cancer cells. To identify the parvovirus(es) with the optimal oncolytic effect against human glioblastomas, we screened 12 parvoviruses at a high multiplicity of infection (MOI). MVMi, MVMc, MVM-G17, tumor virus X (TVX), canine parvovirus (CPV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), rat parvovirus 1A (RPV1A), and H-3 were relatively ineff...

  3. Enhancement of Candida albicans killing activity of separated human epidermal cells by ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet irradiation enhanced the Candida albicans killing activity of freshly separated human epidermal cells in vitro. The simulation was dose-dependent and was not due to soluble extracellular factors acting on non-irradiated epidermal cells. The enhancement of the killing activity remained unchanged when epidermal cells were depleted of Langerhans cells. Protein synthesis inhibitors and prostaglandin antagonists inhibited the ultraviolet-induced augmentation of killing activity. (author)

  4. NK cell-mediated killing of AML blasts. Role of histamine, monocytes and reactive oxygen metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasts recovered from patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) were lysed by heterologeous natural killer (NK) cells treated with NK cell-activating cytokine-induced killing of AML blasts was inhibited by monocytes, recovered from peripheral blood by counterflow centrifugal elutriation. Histamine, at concentrations exceeding 0.1 μM, abrogated the monocyte-induced inhibition of NK cells; thereby, histamine and IL-2 or histamine and IFN-α synergistically induced NK cell-mediated destruction of AML blasts. The effect of histamine was completely blocked by the histamine H2-receptor (H2R) antagonist ranitidine but not by its chemical control AH20399AA. Catalase, a scavenger of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM), reversed the monocyte-induced inhibition of NK cell-mediated killing of blast cells, indicating that the inhibitory signal was mediated by products of the respiratory burst of monocytes. It is concluded that (i) monocytes inhibit anti-leukemic properties of NK cells, (ii) the inhibition is conveyed by monocyte-derived ROM, and (iii) histamine reverses the inhibitory signal and, thereby, synergizes with NK cell-activating cytokines to induce killing of AML blasts. (au) 19 refs

  5. NK cell-mediated killing of AML blasts. Role of histamine, monocytes and reactive oxygen metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, M.; Mellqvist, U.H. [Sahlgren`s Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Medicine, Haematology Section, Goeteborg (Sweden); Hansson, M.; Hermodsson, S.; Hellstrand, K. [Sahlgren`s Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Virology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Blasts recovered from patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) were lysed by heterologeous natural killer (NK) cells treated with NK cell-activating cytokine-induced killing of AML blasts was inhibited by monocytes, recovered from peripheral blood by counterflow centrifugal elutriation. Histamine, at concentrations exceeding 0.1 {mu}M, abrogated the monocyte-induced inhibition of NK cells; thereby, histamine and IL-2 or histamine and IFN-{alpha} synergistically induced NK cell-mediated destruction of AML blasts. The effect of histamine was completely blocked by the histamine H2-receptor (H2R) antagonist ranitidine but not by its chemical control AH20399AA. Catalase, a scavenger of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM), reversed the monocyte-induced inhibition of NK cell-mediated killing of blast cells, indicating that the inhibitory signal was mediated by products of the respiratory burst of monocytes. It is concluded that (i) monocytes inhibit anti-leukemic properties of NK cells, (ii) the inhibition is conveyed by monocyte-derived ROM, and (iii) histamine reverses the inhibitory signal and, thereby, synergizes with NK cell-activating cytokines to induce killing of AML blasts. (au) 19 refs.

  6. Piperlongumine selectively kills cancer cells and increases cisplatin antitumor activity in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jong-Lyel; Kim, Eun Hye; Park, Jin Young; Kim, Ji Won; Kwon, Minsu; Lee, Byung-Heon

    2014-10-15

    Adaptation to cellular stress is not a vital function of normal cells but is required of cancer cells, and as such might be a sensible target in cancer therapy. Piperlongumine is a naturally occurring small molecule selectively toxic to cancer cells. This study assesses the cytotoxicity of piperlongumine and its combination with cisplatin in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) cells in vitro and in vivo. The effect of piperlongumine, alone and in combination with cisplatin, was assessed in human HNC cells and normal cells by measuring growth, death, cell cycle progression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and protein expression, and in tumor xenograft mouse models. Piperlongumine killed HNC cells regardless of p53 mutational status but spared normal cells. It increased ROS accumulation in HNC cells, an effect that can be blocked by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Piperlongumine induced selective cell death in HNC cells by targeting the stress response to ROS, leading to the induction of death pathways involving JNK and PARP. Piperlongumine increased cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in HNC cells in a synergistic manner in vitro and in vivo. Piperlongumine might be a promising small molecule with which to selectively kill HNC cells and increase cisplatin antitumor activity by targeting the oxidative stress response. PMID:25193861

  7. Tumor cell-specific photothermal killing by SELEX-derived DNA aptamer-targeted gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Ramya; Lee, Alexander Sheng Wei; Yap, Lim Wei; Jans, David A.; Wagstaff, Kylie M.; Cheng, Wenlong

    2015-12-01

    Despite widespread availability of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, the killing of tumour cells without affecting healthy surrounding tissue remains elusive, although recent developments in terms of plasmonic nanoparticles capable of photothermal killing have some promise. Here we describe novel DNA aptamer-tethered gold nanorods (GNRs) that act as efficient photothermal therapeutics against tumour cells, but not their isogenic normal cell counterparts. A modified Cell-SELEX process was developed to select a novel DNA aptamer (KW16-13) that specifically recognised and was internalised by cells of the MCF10CA1h human breast ductal carcinoma line but not by those of its isogenic normal counterpart (MCF10A). GNRs conjugated to KW16-13 were readily internalized by the MCF10CA1h tumour cells with minimal uptake by MCF10A normal cells. Upon near infrared (NIR) light irradiation, tumour cell death of >96%, could be effected, compared to 71-fold tumor cell death than GNRs-targeted with a previously described aptamer. This demonstrates the significant potential for aptamer functionalised-GNRs to be used effective and above all selective anti-cancer photothermal therapeutics.Despite widespread availability of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, the killing of tumour cells without affecting healthy surrounding tissue remains elusive, although recent developments in terms of plasmonic nanoparticles capable of photothermal killing have some promise. Here we describe novel DNA aptamer-tethered gold nanorods (GNRs) that act as efficient photothermal therapeutics against tumour cells, but not their isogenic normal cell counterparts. A modified Cell-SELEX process was developed to select a novel DNA aptamer (KW16-13) that specifically recognised and was internalised by cells of the MCF10CA1h human breast ductal carcinoma line but not by those of its isogenic normal counterpart (MCF10A). GNRs conjugated to KW16-13 were readily internalized by the MCF10CA1h tumour cells with minimal

  8. TRAIL-mediated killing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia by plasmacytoid dendritic cell-activated natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelaidier, Martin; Dìaz-Rodriguez, Yildian; Cordeau, Martine; Cordeiro, Paulo; Haddad, Elie; Herblot, Sabine; Duval, Michel

    2015-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) still frequently recurs after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), underscoring the need to improve the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect. Natural killer (NK) cells reconstitute in the first months following HSCT when leukemia burden is at its lowest, but ALL cells have been shown to be resistant to NK cell-mediated killing. We show here that this resistance is overcome by NK cell stimulation with TLR-9-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). NK cell priming with activated pDCs resulted in TRAIL and CD69 up-regulation on NK cells and IFN-γ production. NK cell activation was dependent on IFN-α produced by pDCs, but was not reproduced by IFN-α alone. ALL killing was further enhanced by inhibition of KIR engagement. We showed that ALL lysis was mainly mediated by TRAIL engagement, while the release of cytolytic granules was involved when ALL expressed NK cell activating receptor ligands. Finally, adoptive transfers of activated-pDCs in ALL-bearing humanized mice delayed the leukemia onset and cure 30% of mice. Our data therefore demonstrate that TLR-9 activated pDCs are a powerful tool to overcome ALL resistance to NK cell-mediated killing and to reinforce the GvL effect of HSCT. These results open new therapeutic avenues to prevent relapse in children with ALL. PMID:26320191

  9. Mechanisms of Enhanced Cell Killing at Low Doses: Implications for Radiation Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have shown that cell lethality actually measured after exposure to low-doses of low-LET radiation, is markedly enhanced relative to the cell lethality previously expected by extrapolation of the high-dose cell-killing response. Net cancer risk is a balance between cell transformation and cell kill and such enhanced lethality may more than compensate for transformation at low radiation doses over a least the first 10 cGy of low-LET exposure. This would lead to a non-linear, threshold, dose-risk relationship. Therefore our data imply the possibility that the adverse effects of small radiation doses (<10 cGy) could be overestimated in specific cases. It is now important to research the mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of low-dose hypersensitivity to cell killing, in order to determine whether this can be generalized to safely allow an increase in radiation exposure limits. This would have major cost-reduction implications for the whole EM program

  10. Killed Candida albicans Yeasts and Hyphae Inhibit Gamma Interferon Release by Murine Natural Killer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Murciano, Celia; Villamón, Eva; O'Connor, José-Enrique; Gozalbo, Daniel; Gil, M. Luisa

    2006-01-01

    Killed yeasts and hyphae of Candida albicans inhibit gamma interferon secretion by highly purified murine NK cells in response to the Toll-like receptor ligands lipopolysaccharide and zymosan. This effect, which is also observed in the presence of NK-activating cytokines (interleukin-2 [IL-2], IL-12, and IL-15), may represent a novel mechanism of immune evasion that contributes to the virulence of C. albicans.

  11. Killed Candida albicans yeasts and hyphae inhibit gamma interferon release by murine natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murciano, Celia; Villamón, Eva; O'Connor, José-Enrique; Gozalbo, Daniel; Gil, M Luisa

    2006-02-01

    Killed yeasts and hyphae of Candida albicans inhibit gamma interferon secretion by highly purified murine NK cells in response to the Toll-like receptor ligands lipopolysaccharide and zymosan. This effect, which is also observed in the presence of NK-activating cytokines (interleukin-2 [IL-2], IL-12, and IL-15), may represent a novel mechanism of immune evasion that contributes to the virulence of C. albicans. PMID:16428793

  12. Hypofractionation Results in Reduced Tumor Cell Kill Compared to Conventional Fractionation for Tumors With Regions of Hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Tumor hypoxia has been observed in many human cancers and is associated with treatment failure in radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to quantify the effect of different radiation fractionation schemes on tumor cell killing, assuming a realistic distribution of tumor oxygenation. Methods and Materials: A probability density function for the partial pressure of oxygen in a tumor cell population is quantified as a function of radial distance from the capillary wall. Corresponding hypoxia reduction factors for cell killing are determined. The surviving fraction of a tumor consisting of maximally resistant cells, cells at intermediate levels of hypoxia, and normoxic cells is calculated as a function of dose per fraction for an equivalent tumor biological effective dose under normoxic conditions. Results: Increasing hypoxia as a function of distance from blood vessels results in a decrease in tumor cell killing for a typical radiotherapy fractionation scheme by a factor of 105 over a distance of 130 μm. For head-and-neck cancer and prostate cancer, the fraction of tumor clonogens killed over a full treatment course decreases by up to a factor of ∼103 as the dose per fraction is increased from 2 to 24 Gy and from 2 to 18 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: Hypofractionation of a radiotherapy regimen can result in a significant decrease in tumor cell killing compared to standard fractionation as a result of tumor hypoxia. There is a potential for large errors when calculating alternate fractionations using formalisms that do not account for tumor hypoxia.

  13. Cell killing and mutation induction on Chinese hamster cells by photoradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject matter of this investigation concerns the killing and mutagenic effects induced by far-UV radiation and broad spectra of black, white and gold lights. Applying radiation directly on CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells, far-UV is more effective than black light, and black light is more effective than white light in inducing proliferative death and in inducing resistance to 6-thioguanine (6TG), ouabain and diptheria toxin (DT). Cells in the G1/early S boundary are the most sensitive to far-UV or unfiltered fluorescent lights. When synchronous cells are irradiated with moderate doses of far-UV or unfiltered broad spectra of black light, mutations to 6-TG and ouabain resistance are slightly higher in early S period than in the remaining parts of the cell cycle. Mutation induction of 6-TG, ouabain or DT resistance is increased in the split-dose samples of the asynchronous and synchronous CHO cells. CHO cells predominantly express an error-prone repair mechanism after photoirradiation

  14. Snail-Killing Effects of Streptomyces 218 Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.O. Aina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at finding out the snail-killing effects of Streptomyces 218 powder on Oncomelania hupensis snails which are the vectors or intermediate host of Schiltosoma Japonicum (intestinal schistosomiasis in china the tests were carried out in the laboratory and on the field. The snail-killing effects of Streptomyces218 powder, isolated from snail habitat at Anchang Village of Anxiang country in China was tested using the immersion and spraying methods. The tests on the Oncomelania hupensis snails which are intermediate host of Streptomyces japonicum infection were carried out in the laboratory and in the field. The mean corrected snail mortalities of the immersion technique in the laboratory were 81.70 and 98.63% in 10 ppm of 218 solutions after 24 and 48 h, respectively. The mean corrected snail mortalities of the spraying tests in the laboratory were 82.90 and 87.90% at 3 and 5 days, respectively with 10 g/m2 218 powders. The snail-killing ability of 218 powders on the field determines by immersion and spraying methods were comparable to that of the chemical molluscicide-Niclosamide. The corrected snail mortality at 150 ppm of 218 powder (g/m2 and at 2 ppm of Niclosamide by immersion was 100% at the second time test after 24, 48 and 72 h. In the field spraying test, the mean corrected snail mortality at 100 ppm of 218 powders were 61.96 and 70.00% after 3 and 7 days of spraying respectively. At 2 ppm niclosamide, this was found to be 65.58 and 63.81%, respectively. The effective ingredients for the snail-killing are found to be located in the spore chains. Streptomyces 218 powder, although at higher concentrations, seems to be a promising mollusciciding biological agent. If developed further, this could compliment existing mollusciciding agents.

  15. Nanotechnology for the detection and kill of circulating tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Yuan, Zhou

    2014-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) represent a surrogate biomarker of hematogenous metastases and thus could be considered as a `liquid biopsy' which reveals metastasis in action. But it is absolutely a challenge to detect CTCs due to their extreme rarity. At present, the most common principle is to take advantage of the epithelial surface markers of CTCs which attach to a specific antibody. Antibody-magnetic nanobeads combine with the epithelial surface markers, and then the compound is processed by washing, separation, and detection. However, a proportion of CTC antigen expressions are down-regulated or lost in the process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and thus, this part of CTCs cannot be detected by classical detection methods such as CellSearch. To resolve this problem, some multiple-marker CTC detections have been developed rapidly. Additionally, nanotechnology is a promising approach to kill CTCs with high efficiency. Implantable nanotubes coated with apoptosis-promoting molecules improve the disease-free survival and overall survival. The review introduces some novel CTC detection techniques and therapeutic methods by virtue of nanotechnology to provide a better knowledge of the progress about CTC study.

  16. Glycan elongation beyond the mucin associated Tn antigen protects tumor cells from immune-mediated killing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Lavrsen, Kirstine; Steentoft, Catharina; Vester-Christensen, Malene B; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2013-01-01

    recognized as cancer associated truncated glycans, and are expressed in many adenocarcinomas, e.g. breast- and pancreatic cancer cells. To investigate the role of the cancer associated glycan truncations in immune-mediated killing we created glyco-engineered breast- and pancreatic cancer cells expressing...... and pancreatic cancer cell lines T47D and Capan-1 increases sensitivity to both NK cell mediated antibody-dependent cellular-cytotoxicity (ADCC) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing. In addition, we investigated the association between total cell surface expression of MUC1/MUC16 and NK or...... CTL mediated killing, and observed an inverse correlation between MUC16/MUC1 expression and the sensitivity to ADCC and CTL-mediated killing. Together, these data suggest that up-regulation of membrane bound mucins protects cells from immune mediated killing, and that particular glycosylation steps...

  17. Oncolytic adenoviruses kill breast cancer initiating CD44+CD24-/low cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Minna; Guse, Kilian; Bauerschmitz, Gerd; Virkkunen, Pekka; Tarkkanen, Maija; Tanner, Minna; Hakkarainen, Tanja; Kanerva, Anna; Desmond, Renee A; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2007-12-01

    Cancer stem cells have been indicated in the initiation of tumors and are even found to be responsible for relapses after apparently curative therapies have been undertaken. In breast cancer, they may reside in the CD44(+)CD24(-/low) population. The use of oncolytic adenoviruses presents an attractive anti-tumor approach for eradication of these cells because their entry occurs through infection and they are, therefore, not susceptible to those mechanisms that commonly render stem cells resistant to many drugs. We isolated CD44(+)CD24(-/low) cells from patient pleural effusions and confirmed stem cell-like features including oct4 and sox2 expression and Hoechst 33342 exclusion. CD44(+)CD24(-/low) cells, including the Hoechst excluding subpopulation, could be effectively killed by oncolytic adenoviruses Ad5/3-Delta24 and Ad5.pk7-Delta24. In mice, CD44(+)CD24(-/low) cells formed orthotopic breast tumors but virus infection prevented tumor formation. Ad5/3-Delta24 and Ad5.pk7-Delta24 were effective against advanced orthotopic CD44(+)CD24(-/low)-derived tumors. In summary, Ad5/3-Delta24 and Ad5.pk7-Delta24 can kill CD44(+)CD24(-/low), and also committed breast cancer cells, making them promising agents for treatment of breast cancer. PMID:17848962

  18. Complex interactions of caffeine and its structural analogs with ultraviolet light in cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured the clonogenic survival response of cultured mouse 10 Tsup(1/2) cells exposed to UV light and caffeine post-treatment. When 0.5 and 1 mM caffeine were present for 24 h immediately following UV, the D0 values of the biphasic survival curves suggest that one subpopulation was sensitized and one subpopulation was protected from killing by UV light. A cloned survivor from the radioprotected subpopulation responded to UV plus caffeine in identical manner as the parent cells. When the caffeine exposure was prolonged to 48 h, only the radiosensitizing effect was observed. Two demethylated analogs of caffeine were also tested. The response of 10 Tsup(1/2) cells to 1 mM theophylline present for 24 h after UV irradiation was approximately the same as that for the same treatment with 1 mM caffeine. However, prolonging the theophylline exposure to 48 h failed to produce the same kind of potentiation of cell killing as that observed for caffeine. Xanthine by itself was a toxic to 10 Tsup(1/2) cells as caffeine, but had no synergistic effect as caffeine when given to UV-irradiated cells for 24 or 48 h. It is therefore unlikely that all the effects of caffeine on UV-irradiated cells are mediated by its demethylated metabolites. (orig.)

  19. Effects of lead on the killing mechanisms of polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of lead on the killing mechanisms of rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were investigated, using male Long-Evans rats exposed to 1% lead acetate in the drinking water for varying periods of time to achieve blood lead levels ranging from 20-200 μg/dl. Studies of PMN bacterial and fungal killing activity, chemotaxis and phagocytosis demonstrated that: 1) bactericidal activity of PMN from rats exposed to lead was not altered; 2) chemotactic activity remained within normal limits; 3) the phagocytic ability of the PMN also remained unaltered. In addition to these normal findings, one major abnormality was demonstrated: a significant decrease in the ability of PMN from rats exposed to lead to kill Candida albicans. This defect was not related to age or to length of exposure. It could not be produced by addition of lead to the test system in vitro. Further investigation revealed significant decreases in PMN glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, catalase, and myeloperoxidase activities. These data support two possible mechanisms for the abnormal fungicidal activity of PMN from lead-exposed rats: decrease in ability to reduce oxygen to active metabolites, or reduction in myeloperoxidase activity due to diminshed synthesis of the heme moiety required for its function

  20. "Shock and kill" effects of class I-selective histone deacetylase inhibitors in combination with the glutathione synthesis inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine in cell line models for HIV-1 quiescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altucci Lucia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Latently infected, resting memory CD4+ T cells and macrophages represent a major obstacle to the eradication of HIV-1. For this purpose, "shock and kill" strategies have been proposed (activation of HIV-1 followed by stimuli leading to cell death. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs induce HIV-1 activation from quiescence, yet class/isoform-selective HDACIs are needed to specifically target HIV-1 latency. We tested 32 small molecule HDACIs for their ability to induce HIV-1 activation in the ACH-2 and U1 cell line models. In general, potent activators of HIV-1 replication were found among non-class selective and class I-selective HDACIs. However, class I selectivity did not reduce the toxicity of most of the molecules for uninfected cells, which is a major concern for possible HDACI-based therapies. To overcome this problem, complementary strategies using lower HDACI concentrations have been explored. We added to class I HDACIs the glutathione-synthesis inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, in an attempt to create an intracellular environment that would facilitate HIV-1 activation. The basis for this strategy was that HIV-1 replication decreases the intracellular levels of reduced glutathione, creating a pro-oxidant environment which in turn stimulates HIV-1 transcription. We found that BSO increased the ability of class I HDACIs to activate HIV-1. This interaction allowed the use of both types of drugs at concentrations that were non-toxic for uninfected cells, whereas the infected cell cultures succumbed more readily to the drug combination. These effects were associated with BSO-induced recruitment of HDACI-insensitive cells into the responding cell population, as shown in Jurkat cell models for HIV-1 quiescence. The results of the present study may contribute to the future design of class I HDACIs for treating HIV-1. Moreover, the combined effects of class I-selective HDACIs and the glutathione synthesis inhibitor BSO suggest the

  1. Repurposing a Prokaryotic Toxin-Antitoxin System for the Selective Killing of Oncogenically Stressed Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Mark A; Pimentel, Belén; Bermejo-Rodríguez, Camino; Dionne, Isabelle; Turnbull, Alice; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2016-07-15

    Prokaryotes express intracellular toxins that pass unnoticed to carrying cells until coexpressed antitoxin partners are degraded in response to stress. Although not evolved to function in eukaryotes, one of these toxins, Kid, induces apoptosis in mammalian cells, an effect that is neutralized by its cognate antitoxin, Kis. Here we engineered this toxin-antitoxin pair to create a synthetic system that becomes active in human cells suffering a specific oncogenic stress. Inspired by the way Kid becomes active in bacterial cells, we produced a Kis variant that is selectively degraded in human cells expressing oncoprotein E6. The resulting toxin-antitoxin system functions autonomously in human cells, distinguishing those that suffer the oncogenic insult, which are killed by Kid, from those that do not, which remain protected by Kis. Our results provide a framework for developing personalized anticancer strategies avoiding off-target effects, a challenge that has been hardly tractable by other means thus far. PMID:26230535

  2. Efficient Rejoining of DNA Double-Strand Breaks despite Increased Cell-Killing Effectiveness following Spread-Out Bragg Peak Carbon-Ion Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averbeck, Nicole B; Topsch, Jana; Scholz, Michael; Kraft-Weyrather, Wilma; Durante, Marco; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy of solid tumors with charged particles holds several advantages in comparison to photon therapy; among them conformal dose distribution in the tumor, improved sparing of tumor-surrounding healthy tissue, and an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in the tumor target volume in the case of ions heavier than protons. A crucial factor of the biological effects is DNA damage, of which DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most deleterious. The reparability of these lesions determines the cell survival after irradiation and thus the RBE. Interestingly, using phosphorylated H2AX as a DSB marker, our data in human fibroblasts revealed that after therapy-relevant spread-out Bragg peak irradiation with carbon ions DSBs are very efficiently rejoined, despite an increased RBE for cell survival. This suggests that misrepair plays an important role in the increased RBE of heavy-ion radiation. Possible sources of erroneous repair will be discussed. PMID:26904506

  3. Efficient rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks despite increased cell-killing effectiveness following spread-out Bragg peak carbon-ion irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Bernadette Averbeck

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy of solid tumors with charged particles holds several advantages in comparison to photon therapy; among them conformal dose distribution in the tumor, improved sparing of tumor-surrounding healthy tissue, and an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE in the tumor target-volume in the case of ions heavier than protons. A crucial factor of the biological effects is DNA damage, of which DNA double strand breaks (DSBs are the most deleterious. The reparability of these lesions determines the cell survival after irradiation and thus the RBE. Interestingly, using phosphorylated H2AX as a DSB marker, our data in human fibroblasts revealed that after therapy-relevant spread-out Bragg Peak irradiation with carbon ions DSBs are very efficiently rejoined, despite an increased RBE for cell survival. This suggests that misrepair plays an important role in the increased RBE of heavy-ion radiation. Possible sources of erroneous repair will be discussed.

  4. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated doxorubicin suppresses tumor metastasis by killing circulating tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Senyi; Wu, Qinjie; Zhao, Yuwei; Zheng, Xin; Wu, Ni; Pang, Jing; Li, Xuejing; Bi, Cheng; Liu, Xinyu; Yang, Li; Liu, Lei; Su, Weijun; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2015-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) play a crucial role in tumor metastasis, but it is rare for any chemotherapy regimen to focus on killing CTCs. Herein, we describe doxorubicin (Dox) micelles that showed anti-metastatic activity by killing CTCs. Dox micelles with a small particle size and high encapsulation efficiency were obtained using a pH-induced self-assembly method. Compared with free Dox, Dox micelles exhibited improved cytotoxicity, apoptosis induction, and cellular uptake. In addition, Dox micelles showed a sustained release behavior in vitro, and in a transgenic zebrafish model, Dox micelles exhibited a longer circulation time and lower extravasation from blood vessels into surrounding tissues. Anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities of Dox micelles were investigated in transgenic zebrafish and mouse models. In transgenic zebrafish, Dox micelles inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing zebrafish. Furthermore, Dox micelles suppressed tumor metastasis by killing CTCs. In addition, improved anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities were also confirmed in mouse tumor models, where immunofluorescent staining of tumors indicated that Dox micelles induced more apoptosis and showed fewer proliferation-positive cells. There were decreased side effects in transgenic zebrafish and mice after administration of Dox micelles. In conclusion, Dox micelles showed stronger anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities and decreased side effects both in vitro and in vivo, which may have potential applications in cancer therapy.

  5. Unique type of plasmid maintenance function: postsegregational killing of plasmid-free cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Gerdes, K; Rasmussen, P. B.; Molin, S

    1986-01-01

    The stability locus parB+ of plasmid R1 has been found to specify a unique type of plasmid maintenance function. Two genes, hok (host killing) and sok (suppressor of killing), are required for the stabilizing activity. The hok gene encodes a highly toxic gene product, whose overexpression causes a rapid killing and a concomitant dramatic change in morphology of the host cell. The other gene, sok, was found to encode a product that counteracts the hok gene-mediated killing. The parB+ region wa...

  6. A numerical investigation of the electric and thermal cell kill distributions in electroporation-based therapies in tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo A Garcia

    Full Text Available Electroporation-based therapies are powerful biotechnological tools for enhancing the delivery of exogeneous agents or killing tissue with pulsed electric fields (PEFs. Electrochemotherapy (ECT and gene therapy based on gene electrotransfer (EGT both use reversible electroporation to deliver chemotherapeutics or plasmid DNA into cells, respectively. In both ECT and EGT, the goal is to permeabilize the cell membrane while maintaining high cell viability in order to facilitate drug or gene transport into the cell cytoplasm and induce a therapeutic response. Irreversible electroporation (IRE results in cell kill due to exposure to PEFs without drugs and is under clinical evaluation for treating otherwise unresectable tumors. These PEF therapies rely mainly on the electric field distributions and do not require changes in tissue temperature for their effectiveness. However, in immediate vicinity of the electrodes the treatment may results in cell kill due to thermal damage because of the inhomogeneous electric field distribution and high current density during the electroporation-based therapies. Therefore, the main objective of this numerical study is to evaluate the influence of pulse number and electrical conductivity in the predicted cell kill zone due to irreversible electroporation and thermal damage. Specifically, we simulated a typical IRE protocol that employs ninety 100-µs PEFs. Our results confirm that it is possible to achieve predominant cell kill due to electroporation if the PEF parameters are chosen carefully. However, if either the pulse number and/or the tissue conductivity are too high, there is also potential to achieve cell kill due to thermal damage in the immediate vicinity of the electrodes. Therefore, it is critical for physicians to be mindful of placement of electrodes with respect to critical tissue structures and treatment parameters in order to maintain the non-thermal benefits of electroporation and prevent

  7. Epirubicin-Adsorbed Nanodiamonds Kill Chemoresistant Hepatic Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xin; Low, Xinyi Casuarine; Hou, Weixin; Abdullah, Lissa Nurrul; Toh, Tan Boon; Mohd Abdul Rashid, Masturah; Ho, Dean; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Chemoresistance is a primary cause of treatment failure in cancer and a common property of tumor-initiating cancer stem cells. Overcoming mechanisms of chemoresistance, particularly in cancer stem cells, can markedly enhance cancer therapy and prevent recurrence and metastasis. This study demonstrates that the delivery of Epirubicin by nanodiamonds is a highly effective nanomedicine-based approach to overcoming chemoresistance in hepatic cancer stem cells. The potent physical adsorption of Ep...

  8. Mechanism of the Susceptibility of Remodeled Pulmonary Vessels to Drug‐Induced Cell Killing

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Yasmine F.; Wong, Chi‐Ming; Pavlickova, Ludmila; Liu, Lingling; Trasar, Lobsang; Bansal, Geetanjali; Suzuki, Yuichiro J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension remains a devastating disease without a cure. The major complication of this disease is the abnormal growth of vascular cells, resulting in pulmonary vascular remodeling. Thus, agents, which affect the remodeled vessels by killing unwanted cells, should improve treatment strategies. The present study reports that antitumor drugs selectively kill vascular cells in remodeled pulmonary vessels in rat models of pulmonary hypertension. Methods and Results...

  9. Mitogen-activated Tasmanian devil blood mononuclear cells kill devil facial tumour disease cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gabriella K; Tovar, Cesar; Cooray, Anne A; Kreiss, Alexandre; Darby, Jocelyn; Murphy, James M; Corcoran, Lynn M; Bettiol, Silvana S; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2016-08-01

    Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is a transmissible cancer that has brought the host species, the Tasmanian devil, to the brink of extinction. The cancer cells avoid allogeneic immune recognition by downregulating cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I expression. This should prevent CD8(+) T cell, but not natural killer (NK) cell, cytotoxicity. The reason why NK cells, normally reactive to MHC-negative cells, are not activated to kill DFTD cells has not been determined. The immune response of wild devils to DFTD, if it occurs, is uncharacterised. To investigate this, we tested 12 wild devils with DFTD, and found suggestive evidence of low levels of antibodies against DFTD cells in one devil. Eight of these devils were also analysed for cytotoxicity, however, none showed evidence for cytotoxicity against cultured DFTD cells. To establish whether mimicking activation of antitumour responses could induce cytotoxic activity against DFTD, Tasmanian devil peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were treated with either the mitogen Concanavalin A, the Toll-like receptor agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid or recombinant Tasmanian devil IL-2. All induced the PBMC cells to kill cultured DFTD cells, suggesting that activation does not occur after encounter with DFTD cells in vivo, but can be induced. The identification of agents that activate cytotoxicity against DFTD target cells is critical for developing strategies to protect against DFTD. Such agents could function as adjuvants to induce functional immune responses capable of targeting DFTD cells and tumours in vivo. PMID:27089941

  10. Piperlongumine selectively kills hepatocellular carcinoma cells and preferentially inhibits their invasion via ROS-ER-MAPKs-CHOP

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yong; Liu, Ju Mei; Xiong, Xin Xin; Qiu, Xin Yao; Pan, Feng; Liu, Di; Lan, Shu Jue; Jin, Si; Yu, Shang Bin; Chen, Xiao Qian

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) are highly malignant and aggressive tumors lack of effective therapeutic drugs. Piperlongumine (PL), a natural product isolated from longer pepper plants, is recently identified as a potent cytotoxic compound highly selective to cancer cells. Here, we reported that PL specifically suppressed HCC cell migration/invasion via endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-MAPKs-CHOP signaling pathway. PL selectively killed HCC cells but not normal hepatocytes with an IC50 of 10-20 μM...

  11. Protease activation involved in resistance of human cells to x-ray cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little is known of proteases that play roles in the early steps of X-ray irradiation response. In the present study, we first searched for proteases whose activity is induced in human RSa-R cells after X-ray irradiation. The activity was identified as fibrinolytic, using 125I-labeled fibrin as a substrate. Protease samples were prepared by lysation of cells with a buffer containing MEGA-8. RSa-R cells showed an increased level of protease activity 10 min after X-ray (up to 3 Gy) irradiation. We next examined whether this protease inducibility is causally related with the X-ray susceptibility of cells. Leupeptin, a serine-cysteine protease inhibitor, inhibited the protease activity in samples obtained from X-ray-irradiated RSa-R cells. Treatment of RSa-R cells with the inhibitor before and after X-ray irradiation resulted in an increased susceptibility of the cells to X-ray cell killing. However, the treatment of cells with other inhibitors tested did not modulate the X-ray susceptibility. These results suggest that leupeptin-sensitive proteases are involved in the resistance of human cells to X-ray cell killing. (author)

  12. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 04: What if bystander effects influence cell kill within a target volume? Potential consequences of dose heterogeneity on TCP and EUD on intermediate risk prostate patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro evidence has suggested that radiation induced bystander effects may enhance non-local cell killing which may influence radiotherapy treatment planning paradigms. This work applies a bystander effect model, which has been derived from published in vitro data, to calculate equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumour control probability (TCP) and compare them with predictions from standard linear quadratic (LQ) models that assume a response due only to local absorbed dose. Comparisons between the models were made under increasing dose heterogeneity scenarios. Dose throughout the CTV was modeled with normal distributions, where the degree of heterogeneity was then dictated by changing the standard deviation (SD). The broad assumptions applied in the bystander effect model are intended to place an upper limit on the extent of the results in a clinical context. The bystander model suggests a moderate degree of dose heterogeneity yields as good or better outcome compared to a uniform dose in terms of EUD and TCP. Intermediate risk prostate prescriptions of 78 Gy over 39 fractions had maximum EUD and TCP values at SD of around 5Gy. The plots only dropped below the uniform dose values for SD ∼ 10 Gy, almost 13% of the prescribed dose. The bystander model demonstrates the potential to deviate from the common local LQ model predictions as dose heterogeneity through a prostate CTV is varies. The results suggest the potential for allowing some degree of dose heterogeneity within a CTV, although further investigations of the assumptions of the bystander model are warranted

  13. Hypoxic cell sensitizers and heavy charged particle beams may play complementary roles in killing hypoxic tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of growth delay data of a rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumor system with and without misonidazole and irradiated with spread-peak heavy-ion radiation yields two conclusions that bear on the relative efficacy of the two modes of treatment and imply a complementary role of the two modes which enhances the effects of either given separately. For both carbon and neon ion peak radiation given in four fractions, RBE values for tumor growth delay are significantly greater than the enhancement ratio for an x ray plus misonidazole fractionation scheme. When misonidazole is given in conjunction with the heavy ion beam irradiations, an increased growth delay is seen, greater than when either heavy ions or misonidazole plus x rays are given separately. The interpretation is that heavy ion beams reach and kill hypoxic cells not penetrated by the misonidazole, and some hypoxic cells not killed by the high LET component receive low LET damage which is made lethal by the drug. Thus, the net hypoxic cell killing is enhanced by the high LET beams and in a complementary way by the combination of the drug and the low LET portion of the radiation

  14. A nitroimidazole derivative, PR-350, enhances the killing of pancreatic cancer cells exposed to high-dose irradiation under hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiosensitizing effects of PR-350, a nitroimidazole derivative, were examined concerning the cell killing of human pancreatic cancer cell lines exposed to high doses of gamma-ray irradiation in vitro. The percentages of dead cells were analyzed with a multiwell plate reader to measure the fluorescence intensity of propidium iodide before and after a digitonin treatment. The sensitizing effect of PR-350 on cell killing by high-dose irradiation was confirmed by time-course, dose-dependency, and microscopic observations. In five of seven pancreatic cancer cell lines in which the number of dead cells was determined 5 days after 30 Gy irradiation in the presence of PR-350, the number was significantly increased under hypoxic conditions, but not under aerobic conditions. The selective radiosensitive effect of PR-350 on hypoxic cells was also confirmed by flow cytometry. The results indicate that PR-350 can enhance the killing of pancreatic cancer cells by high-dose irradiation under hypoxia, which supports its clinical radiosensitizing effects when administered during intraoperative irradiation to pancreatic cancer. (author)

  15. Thiolated-2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine protected silver nanoparticles as novel photo-induced cell-killing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangsuwan, Arunee; Kawasaki, Hideya; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have several medical applications as antimicrobial agents such as in drug delivery and cancer therapy. However, AgNPs are of limited use because of their toxicity, which may damage the surrounding healthy tissue. In this study, thiolated-2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC-SH) protected silver nanoparticles (MPC-AgNPs) are prepared as cell-killing agents under UV irradiation. MPC-AgNPs are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-visible spectrophotometry. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band of MPC-AgNPs is observed at 404nm, and the average diameter of the particles is determined at 13.4±2.2nm through transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and at 18.4nm (PDI=0.18) through dynamic light scattering (DLS). Cell viability in contact with MPC-AgNPs is relatively high, and MPC-AgNPs also exhibit a cell-killing effect under UV irradiation. PMID:26752209

  16. The role of DNA repair on cell killing by charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi-Kasai, K.; Murakami, M.; Itsukaichi, H.; Fukutsu, K.; Kanai, T.; Furusawa, Y.; Sato, K.; Ohara, H.; Yatagai, F.

    It can be noted that it is not simple double strand breaks (dsb) but the non-reparable breaks that are associated with high biological effectiveness in the cell killing effect for high LET radiation. Here, we have examined the effectiveness of fast neutrons and low (initial energy = 12 MeV/u) or high (135 MeV/u) energy charged particles on cell death in 19 mammalian cell lines including radiosensitive mutants. Some of the radiosensitive lines were deficient in DNA dsb repair such as LX830, M10, V3, and L5178Y-S cells and showed lower values of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for fast neutrons if compared with their parent cell lines. The other lines of human ataxia-telangiectasia fibroblasts, irs 1, irs 2, irs 3 and irs1SF cells, which were also radiosensitive but known as proficient in dsb repair, showed moderate RBEs. Dsb repair deficient mutants showed low RBE values for heavy ions. These experimental findings suggest that the DNA repair system does not play a major role against the attack of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations. Therefore, we hypothesize that a main cause of cell death induced by high LET radiations is due to non-reparable dsb, which are produced at a higher rate compared to low LET radiations.

  17. The Welfare Effects of Pfiesteria-Related Fish Kills in Seafood Markets: A Contingent Behavior Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Parsons, George R.; Ash O. Morgan; John C. Whitehead; Haab, Timothy C.

    2005-01-01

    We use contingent behavior analysis to study the effects of Pfiesteria related fish kills on the demand for seafood in the Mid-Atlantic region. We use a phone-mail-phone survey to look at the effects of various information provision mechanisms used to ameliorate the effects of misinformation regarding fish kills. A set of demand difference models are estimated based on individual responses to multiple questions about seafood consumption with and without fish kills present and with various hea...

  18. HER2-Specific T Lymphocytes Kill both Trastuzumab-Resistant and Trastuzumab-Sensitive Breast Cell Lines In Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-lin Lin; Xu Liang; Tao Shen; Jun Ren; Xiao-li Wang; Bo Ma; Jun Jia; Ying Yan; Li-jun Di; Yan-hua Yuan; Feng-ling Wan; Yuan-li Lu

    2012-01-01

    Objective:Although the development of trastuzumab has improved the outlook for women with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer,the resistance to anti-HER2 therapy is a growing clinical dilemma.We aim to determine whether HER2-specific T cells generated from dendritic cells (DCs) modified with HER2 gene could effectively kill the HER2-positive breast cancer cells,especially the trastuzumab-resistant cells.Methods:The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy donors,whose HLA haplotypes were compatible with the tumor cell lines,were transfected with reconstructive human adeno-association virus (rhAAV/HER2) to obtain the specific killing activities of T cells,and were evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)releasing assay.Results:Trastuzumab produced a significant inhibiting effect on SK-BR-3,the IC50 was 100ng/ml.MDA-MB-453 was resistant to trastuzumab even at a concentration of 10,000 ng/ml in vitro.HER2-specific T lymphocytes killed effectively SK-BR-3 [(69.86±13.41)%] and MDA-MB-453 [(78.36±10.68)%] at 40:1 (effector:target ratio,E:T),but had no significant cytotoxicity against HER2-negative breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 or MCF-7 (less than 10%).Conclusion:The study showed that HER2-specific T lymphocytes generated from DCs modified by rhAAV/HER2 could kill HER2-positive breast cancer cell lines in a HER2-dependent manner,and result in significantly high inhibition rates on the intrinsic trastuzumab-resistant cell line MDA-MB-453 and the tastuzumab-sensitive cell line SK-BR-3.These results imply that this immunotherapy might be a potential treatment to HER2-positive breast cancer.

  19. Can the two mechanisms of tumor cell killing by radiation be exploited for therapeutic gain?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation killing of tumor cells by ionizing radiation is best described by the linear-quadratic (LQ) model. Research into the underlying mechanisms of α- and β-inactivation has suggested that different molecular targets (DNA in different forms) and different microdosimetric energy deposits (spurs versus electron track-ends) are involved. Clinical protocols with fractionated doses of about 2.0 Gy/day were defined empirically, and we now know that they produce cancer cures mainly by the α-inactivation mechanism. Radiobiology studies indicate that α and β mechanisms exhibit widely different characteristics that should be addressed upfront as clinical fractionation schemes are altered. As radiation treatments attempt to exploit the advantages of larger dose fractions over shorter treatment times, the LQ model can be used to predict iso-effective tumor cell killing and possibly iso-effective normal tissue complications. Linking best estimates of radiobiology and tumor biology parameters with tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models will enable us to improve and optimize cancer treatment protocols, delivering no more fractions than are strictly necessary for a high therapeutic ratio. (author)

  20. NK-cell-dependent killing of colon carcinoma cells is mediated by natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs) and stimulated by parvovirus infection of target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigating how the immune system functions during malignancies is crucial to developing novel therapeutic strategies. Natural killer (NK) cells, an important component of the innate immune system, play a vital role in immune defense against tumors and virus-infected cells. The poor survival rate in colon cancer makes it particularly important to develop novel therapeutic strategies. Oncolytic viruses, in addition to lysing tumor cells, may have the potential to augment antitumor immune responses. In the present study, we investigate the role of NK cells and how parvovirus H-1PV can modulate NK-cell mediated immune responses against colon carcinoma. Human NK cells were isolated from the blood of healthy donors. The cytotoxicity and antibody-mediated inhibition of NK cells were measured in chromium release assays. Phenotypic assessment of colon cancer and dendritic cells was done by FACS. The statistical significance of the results was calculated with Student’s t test (*p <0.05; **, p < 0.01; ***, p < 0.001). We show that IL-2-activated human NK cells can effectively kill colon carcinoma cells. Killing of colon carcinoma cells by NK cells was further enhanced upon infection of the former cells with parvovirus H-1PV. H-1PV has potent oncolytic activity against various tumors, yet its direct killing effect on colon carcinoma cells is limited. The cytotoxicity of NK cells towards colon carcinoma cells, both mock- and H-1PV-infected, was found to be mostly mediated by a combination of natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs), namely NKp30, 44, and 46. Colon carcinoma cells displayed low to moderate expression of NK cell ligands, and this expression was modulated upon H-1PV infection. Lysates of H-1PV-infected colon carcinoma cells were found to increase MHC class II expression on dendritic cells. Altogether, these data suggest that IL-2-activated NK cells actively kill colon carcinoma cells and that this killing is mediated by several natural cytotoxicity receptors

  1. Cell kill by megavoltage protons with high LET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, Vadim Y.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the current study is to develop a radiobiological model which describes the effect of linear energy transfer (LET) on cell survival and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of megavoltage protons. By assuming the existence of critical sites within a cell, analytical expression for cell survival S as a function of LET is derived. The obtained results indicate that in cases where dose per fraction is small, \\ln (S) is a linear–quadratic (LQ) function of dose while both alpha and beta radio-sensitivities are non-linearly dependent on LET. In particular, in the current model alpha increases with increasing LET while beta decreases. Conversely, in the case of large dose per fraction, the LQ dependence of \\ln (S) on dose is invalid. The proposed radiobiological model predicts cell survival probability and RBE which, in general, deviate from the results obtained by using conventional LQ formalism. The differences between the LQ model and that described in the current study are reflected in the calculated RBE of protons.

  2. Induction of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus-Specific Cytotoxic T Cell Killing by Vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patch, J.R.; Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Toka, F.N.;

    2011-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) continues to be a significant threat to the health and economic value of livestock species. This acute infection is caused by the highly contagious FMD virus (FMDV), which infects cloven-hoofed animals including large and small ruminants and swine. Current vaccine...... cytopathic virus. Here, we have used recombinant human adenovirus vectors as a means of delivering FMDV antigens in a T cell-directed vaccine in pigs. We tested the hypothesis that impaired processing of the FMDV capsid would enhance cytolytic activity, presumably by targeting all proteins for degradation...... and effectively increasing the class I MHC/FMDV peptide concentration for stimulation of a CTL response. We compared such a T cell targeting vaccine with the parental vaccine, previously shown to effectively induce a neutralizing antibody response. Our results show induction of FMDV-specific CD8(+) CTL killing...

  3. In vivo tyrosinase mini-gene transfer enhances killing effect of BNCT on amelanotic melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondoh, H.; Mishima, Y. [Mishima Institute for Dermatological Research, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Hiratsuka, J. [Kawasaki Medical School, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Iwakura, M. [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Using accentuated melanogenesis principally occurring within melanoma cells, we have successfully treated human malignant melanoma (Mm) with {sup 10}B-BPA BNCT. Despite this success, there are still remaining issues for poorly melanogenic Mm and further non-pigment cell tumors. We found the selective accumulation of {sup 10}B-BPA to Mm is primarily due to the complex formation of BPA and melanin-monomers activity synthesized within Mm cells. Then, we succeeded in transferring the tyrosinase gene into amelanotic to substantially produce melanin monomers. These cells has demonstrated increased boron accumulation and enhanced killing effect of BNCT. Further, transfection of TRP-2 (DOPAchrome tautomerase) gene into poorly eumelanotic and slightly phenomelanotic Mm cells in culture cell systems also led to increased BPA accumulation. Thereafter, we studied in vivo gene transfer. We transferred the tyrosinase mini-gene by intra-tumor injection into poorly melanotic Mm proliferating subcutaneously in hamster skin, and performed BNCT. Compared to control tumors, gene-transferred tumors showed increased BPA accumulation leading to enhanced killing effect. (author)

  4. In vivo tyrosinase mini-gene transfer enhances killing effect of BNCT on amelanotic melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using accentuated melanogenesis principally occurring within melanoma cells, we have successfully treated human malignant melanoma (Mm) with 10B-BPA BNCT. Despite this success, there are still remaining issues for poorly melanogenic Mm and further non-pigment cell tumors. We found the selective accumulation of 10B-BPA to Mm is primarily due to the complex formation of BPA and melanin-monomers activity synthesized within Mm cells. Then, we succeeded in transferring the tyrosinase gene into amelanotic to substantially produce melanin monomers. These cells has demonstrated increased boron accumulation and enhanced killing effect of BNCT. Further, transfection of TRP-2 (DOPAchrome tautomerase) gene into poorly eumelanotic and slightly phenomelanotic Mm cells in culture cell systems also led to increased BPA accumulation. Thereafter, we studied in vivo gene transfer. We transferred the tyrosinase mini-gene by intra-tumor injection into poorly melanotic Mm proliferating subcutaneously in hamster skin, and performed BNCT. Compared to control tumors, gene-transferred tumors showed increased BPA accumulation leading to enhanced killing effect. (author)

  5. Strong synergy of heat and modulated electromagnetic field in tumor cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyperthermia is an emerging complementary method in radiooncology. Despite many positive studies and comprehensive reviews, the method is not widely accepted as a combination to radiotherapy. Modulated electrohyperthermia (mEHT; capacitive, electric field modulated, 13.56 MHz) has been used in clinical practice for almost 2 decades in Germany, Austria and Hungary. This in vivo study in nude mice xenograft tumors compares mEHT with ''classic'' radiative hyperthermia (radHT). Nude mice were xenografted with HT29 human colorectal carcinoma cells. 28 mice in four groups with seven animals each and two tumors per animal (totally 56 tumors) were included in the present study: group 1 as untreated control; group 2 treated with radHT at 42 C; group 3 treated with mEHT at identical 42 C; group 4 treated with mEHT at 38 C (by intensively cooling down the tumor). 24 h after treatment, animals were sacrificed and the tumor cross sections studied by precise morphological methods for the respective relative amount of ''dead'' tumor cells. The effect of mEHT established a double effect as a synergy between the purely thermal (temperature-dependent) and nonthermal (not directly temperature-dependent) effects. The solely thermal enhancement ratio (TER) of cell killing was shown to be 2.9. The field enhancement ratio (FER) at a constant temperature of 42 C was measured as 3.2. Their complex application significantly increased the therapeutic enhancement to 9.4. mEHT had a remarkable cancer cell-killing effect in a nude mice xenograft model. (orig.)

  6. Strong synergy of heat and modulated electromagnetic field in tumor cell killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andocs, Gabor [Frederic Joliot Curie National Research Inst. for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, Budapest (Hungary)]|[St. Istvan Univ., Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology; Renner, Helmut [Klinikum Nuernberg (Germany). Clinic of Radiooncology; Balogh, Lajos [Frederic Joliot Curie National Research Inst. for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, Budapest (Hungary); Fonyad, Laszlo [Semmelweis Univ., Budapest (Hungary). 1. Dept. of of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research; Jakab, Csaba [St. Istvan Univ., Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Pathology; Szasz, Andras [St. Istvan Univ., Goedoelloe (Hungary). Biotechnics Dept.

    2009-02-15

    Hyperthermia is an emerging complementary method in radiooncology. Despite many positive studies and comprehensive reviews, the method is not widely accepted as a combination to radiotherapy. Modulated electrohyperthermia (mEHT; capacitive, electric field modulated, 13.56 MHz) has been used in clinical practice for almost 2 decades in Germany, Austria and Hungary. This in vivo study in nude mice xenograft tumors compares mEHT with 'classic' radiative hyperthermia (radHT). Nude mice were xenografted with HT29 human colorectal carcinoma cells. 28 mice in four groups with seven animals each and two tumors per animal (totally 56 tumors) were included in the present study: group 1 as untreated control; group 2 treated with radHT at 42 C; group 3 treated with mEHT at identical 42 C; group 4 treated with mEHT at 38 C (by intensively cooling down the tumor). 24 h after treatment, animals were sacrificed and the tumor cross sections studied by precise morphological methods for the respective relative amount of 'dead' tumor cells. The effect of mEHT established a double effect as a synergy between the purely thermal (temperature-dependent) and nonthermal (not directly temperature-dependent) effects. The solely thermal enhancement ratio (TER) of cell killing was shown to be 2.9. The field enhancement ratio (FER) at a constant temperature of 42 C was measured as 3.2. Their complex application significantly increased the therapeutic enhancement to 9.4. mEHT had a remarkable cancer cell-killing effect in a nude mice xenograft model. (orig.)

  7. Synthesis of Multivalent Glycoconjugates Containing the Immunoactive LELTE Peptide: Effect of Glycosylation on Cellular Activation and Natural Killing by Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Renaudet, O.; Křenek, Karel; Bossu, I.; Dumy, P.; Kádek, A.; Adámek, David; Vaněk, O.; Kavan, Daniel; Gažák, Radek; Šulc, Miroslav; Bezouška, K.; Křen, Vladimír

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 19 (2010), s. 6800-6808. ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010; GA MŠk 1M0505; GA AV ČR IAA400200503; GA ČR GA303/09/0477; GA ČR GD305/09/H008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : KILLER-CELLS * TN ANTIGEN * RECEPTOR Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.019, year: 2010

  8. Killing of Brain Tumor Cells by Hypoxia-Responsive Element Mediated Expression of BAX1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Hangjun; Wang, Jingli; Hu, Lily; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Deen, Dennis F

    1999-01-01

    Abstract The presence of radioresistant hypoxic cells in human brain tumors limits the overall effectiveness of conventional fractionated radiation therapy. Tumor-specific therapies that target hypoxic cells are clearly needed. We have investigated the expression of suicide genes under hypoxia by a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE), which can be activated through hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). We transfected plasmids containing multiple copies of HRE into U-87 MG and U-251 MG-NCI human brain tumor cells and tested their ability to induce LacZ gene expression under anoxia. Gene expression under anoxia versus oxia was increased about 12-fold for U-87 MG cells and about fourfold for U-251 MG-NCI cells. At intermediate hypoxic conditions, increased LacZ gene expression in U-87 MG cells was induced by the plasmid that contained three HREs, but not by the plasmid with two HREs. Lastly, when we placed a suicide gene BAX under the control of HREs, cells transfected with the BAX plasmids were preferentially killed through apoptosis under anoxia. Our studies demonstrate that HRE-regulated gene expression is active in brain tumor cells, and that the amount of increased gene expression obtained is dependent on the cell line, the HRE copy number, and the degree of hypoxia. PMID:10933058

  9. Killing of Brain Tumor Cells by Hypoxia-Responsive Element Mediated Expression of BAX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangjun Ruan

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of radioresistant hypoxic cells in human brain tumors limits the overall effectiveness of conventional fractionated radiation therapy. Tumor-specific therapies that target hypoxic cells are clearly needed. We have investigated the expression of suicide genes under hypoxia by a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE, which can be activated through hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1. We transfected plasmids containing multiple copies of HIRE into U-87 MG and U-251 MG-NCI human brain tumor cells and tested their ability to induce LacZ gene expression under anoxia. Gene expression under anoxia versus oxia was increased about 12-fold for U-87 MG cells and about fourfold for U-251 MG-NCI cells. At intermediate hypoxic conditions, increased LacZ gene expression in U-87 MG cells was induced by the plasmid that contained three HREs, but not by the plasmid with two HREs. Lastly, when we placed a suicide gene BAX under the control of HREs, cells transfected with the BAX plasmids were preferentially killed through apoptosis under anoxia. Our studies demonstrate that HRE-regulated gene expression is active in brain tumor cells, and that the amount of increased gene expression obtained is dependent on the cell line, the HIRE copy number, and the degree of hypoxia.

  10. Efficient Rejoining of DNA Double-Strand Breaks despite Increased Cell-Killing Effectiveness following Spread-Out Bragg Peak Carbon-Ion Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Averbeck, Nicole B.; Topsch, Jana; Scholz, Michael; Kraft-Weyrather, Wilma; Durante, Marco; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy of solid tumors with charged particles holds several advantages in comparison to photon therapy; among them conformal dose distribution in the tumor, improved sparing of tumor-surrounding healthy tissue, and an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in the tumor target volume in the case of ions heavier than protons. A crucial factor of the biological effects is DNA damage, of which DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most deleterious. The reparability of these les...

  11. Galactosylated poly(ethyleneglycol)-lithocholic Acid selectively kills hepatoma cells, while sparing normal liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gankhuyag, Nomundelger; Singh, Bijay; Maharjan, Sushila; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Cho, Chong-Su; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-06-01

    Delivering drugs selectively to cancer cells but not to nearby normal cells is a major obstacle in drug therapy. In this study, lithocholic acid (LCA), a potent anti-cancer drug, is converted to two forms of poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG) conjugates, viz., PEG-LCA (PL) and lactobionic acid (LBA) conjugated PEG-LCA (LPL). The latter form contains a galactose ligand in LBA to target the hepatocytes. Both forms are self-assembled to form nanoparticle formulation, and they have high potency than LCA to kill HepG2 cancer cells, sparing normal LO2 cells. Besides, LPL has high specificity to mouse liver cells in vivo. Western blot results confirm that the cell death is occurred through apoptosis induced by LPL nanoparticles. In conclusion, the induction of apoptosis and cell death is much more efficient with LPL nanoparticles than LCA molecules. PMID:25657071

  12. The effect of road kills on amphibian populations

    OpenAIRE

    Hels, Tove; Buchwald,, Erik

    2001-01-01

    The diurnal movement patterns of Triturus vulgaris, T. cristatus, Pelobates fuscus, Bufo bufo, Rana temporaria, and R. arvalis were investigated during five breeding seasons (1994-1998). Two main questions were addressed: 1) What is the probability of an individual amphibian getting killed when crossing the road? and 2) What fraction of the amphibian populations gets killed by traffic? The rate of movement of 203 adult amphibians was recorded. Information on traffic loads was provided, and mo...

  13. A novel transferrin receptor-targeted hybrid peptide disintegrates cancer cell membrane to induce rapid killing of cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transferrin receptor (TfR) is a cell membrane-associated glycoprotein involved in the cellular uptake of iron and the regulation of cell growth. Recent studies have shown the elevated expression levels of TfR on cancer cells compared with normal cells. The elevated expression levels of this receptor in malignancies, which is the accessible extracellular protein, can be a fascinating target for the treatment of cancer. We have recently designed novel type of immunotoxin, termed 'hybrid peptide', which is chemically synthesized and is composed of target-binding peptide and lytic peptide containing cationic-rich amino acids components that disintegrates the cell membrane for the cancer cell killing. The lytic peptide is newly designed to induce rapid killing of cancer cells due to conformational change. In this study, we designed TfR binding peptide connected with this novel lytic peptide and assessed the cytotoxic activity in vitro and in vivo. In vitro: We assessed the cytotoxicity of TfR-lytic hybrid peptide for 12 cancer and 2 normal cell lines. The specificity for TfR is demonstrated by competitive assay using TfR antibody and siRNA. In addition, we performed analysis of confocal fluorescence microscopy and apoptosis assay by Annexin-V binding, caspase activity, and JC-1 staining to assess the change in mitochondria membrane potential. In vivo: TfR-lytic was administered intravenously in an athymic mice model with MDA-MB-231 cells. After three weeks tumor sections were histologically analyzed. The TfR-lytic hybrid peptide showed cytotoxic activity in 12 cancer cell lines, with IC50 values as low as 4.0-9.3 μM. Normal cells were less sensitive to this molecule, with IC50 values > 50 μM. Competition assay using TfR antibody and knockdown of this receptor by siRNA confirmed the specificity of the TfR-lytic hybrid peptide. In addition, it was revealed that this molecule can disintegrate the cell membrane of T47D cancer cells just in 10 min, to effectively

  14. Killing the Electron Cloud Effect in the LHC Arcs

    CERN Document Server

    McIntyre, Peter M

    2005-01-01

    A getter/electrode assembly has been devised to suppress the regeneration mechanism of the electron cloud effect in the arc dipoles of LHC. The assembly consists of a copper foil electrode, supported through an insulating layer on a stainless steel skid, which would rest upon the flat bottom of the beam screen. The electrode is coated with NEG to provide effective pumping of all non-inert gases from the vacuum. Pumping should be enhanced by electron bombardment. By biasing the electrode ~+100 V secondary electrons produced on the surface would be fully re-absorbed, killing the regeneration mechanism. The NEG surface can be regenerated by passing a current through the electrode to heat it to ~240 C. The heat transfer (radiant + conductive) to the beam screen during regeneration is estimated ~10 W/m, within limits to maintain the beam screen at nominal 20 K temperature during regeneration. The entire assembly has been designed so that installation does not require modification of any hardware currently being bu...

  15. Synergistically killing activity of aspirin and histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) on hepatocellular cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaofei; Zhu, Yanshuang [Department of Infectious Diseases, Yiwu Central Hospita, 519 Nan men Street, Yiwu, Jinhua, Zhejing 322000 (China); He, Huabin [Department of Orthopedics, Yiwu Central Hospita, 519 Nan men Street, Yiwu, Jinhua, Zhejing 322000 (China); Lou, Lianqing; Ye, Weiwei; Chen, Yongxin [Department of Infectious Diseases, Yiwu Central Hospita, 519 Nan men Street, Yiwu, Jinhua, Zhejing 322000 (China); Wang, Jinghe, E-mail: Xiaofeili2000@163.com [Department of Infectious Diseases, Yiwu Central Hospita, 519 Nan men Street, Yiwu, Jinhua, Zhejing 322000 (China)

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Novel combination therapy using aspirin and valproic acid (VPA). •Combination of aspirin and VPA elicits synergistic cytotoxic effects. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly reduces the drug dosage required alone. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly inhibit tumor growth. •Lower dose of aspirin in combination therapy will minimize side effects of aspirin. -- Abstract: Aspirin and valproic acid (VPA) have been extensively studied for inducing various malignancies growth inhibition respectively, despite their severe side effects. Here, we developed a novel combination by aspirin and VPA on hepatocellular cancer cells (HCCs). The viability of HCC lines were analyzed by MTT assay, apoptotic analysis of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cell was performed. Real time-PCR and Western blotting were performed to determine the expression of apoptosis related genes and proteins such as Survivin, Bcl-2/Bax, Cyclin D1 and p15. Moreover, orthotopic xenograft tumors were challenged in nude mice to establish murine model, and then therapeutic effect was analyzed after drug combination therapy. The viability of HCC lines’ significantly decreased after drug combination treatment, and cancer cell apoptosis in combination group increasingly induced compared with single drug use. Therapeutic effect was significantly enhanced by combination therapy in tumor volume and tumor weight decrease. From the data shown here, aspirin and VPA combination have a synergistic killing effect on hepatocellular cancers cells proliferation and apoptosis.

  16. Synergistically killing activity of aspirin and histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) on hepatocellular cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Novel combination therapy using aspirin and valproic acid (VPA). •Combination of aspirin and VPA elicits synergistic cytotoxic effects. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly reduces the drug dosage required alone. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly inhibit tumor growth. •Lower dose of aspirin in combination therapy will minimize side effects of aspirin. -- Abstract: Aspirin and valproic acid (VPA) have been extensively studied for inducing various malignancies growth inhibition respectively, despite their severe side effects. Here, we developed a novel combination by aspirin and VPA on hepatocellular cancer cells (HCCs). The viability of HCC lines were analyzed by MTT assay, apoptotic analysis of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cell was performed. Real time-PCR and Western blotting were performed to determine the expression of apoptosis related genes and proteins such as Survivin, Bcl-2/Bax, Cyclin D1 and p15. Moreover, orthotopic xenograft tumors were challenged in nude mice to establish murine model, and then therapeutic effect was analyzed after drug combination therapy. The viability of HCC lines’ significantly decreased after drug combination treatment, and cancer cell apoptosis in combination group increasingly induced compared with single drug use. Therapeutic effect was significantly enhanced by combination therapy in tumor volume and tumor weight decrease. From the data shown here, aspirin and VPA combination have a synergistic killing effect on hepatocellular cancers cells proliferation and apoptosis

  17. 双特异性单抗对胃肠癌的体内杀伤作用%In vivo killing effect of bispecific single-chain antibody on gastric and colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪一; 李荣; 刘巨超; 李力; 梁文涛; 钟苑; 徐迎新

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the killing effect of CIK cells mediated by bispecific single - chain antibody, anti - CD3 and anti - CEA, on gastric and colon cancer cells in vivo. Methods Gastric and colon cancer models in nude mice were established after BGC823 cells from human poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma and SW1116 cells from human moderately differentiated colon adenocarcinoma were planted into nude mice. The mice were divided into 3 groups, which were injected with normal saline, CIK cells and CIK cells plus bispecific antibody, respectively, once every 3 days for 6 times. Then the tumors were removed and weighed, and the inhibition rate in each group was calculated. Results Both the CIK cells and CIK cells plus bispecific single - chain antibody could inhibit tumor growth. Inhibition rates of gastric cancer were 29. 90% and 44. 33% respectively. Inhibition rates of colon cancer were 14. 93% and 38. 81% respectively. Compared with CIK cell group, the size and weight of the tumor were significantly smaller in CIK cells plus bispecific singlechain antibody group. Conclusion CIK cells alone can inhibit tumor cell growth and combination of CIK cells and the bispecific single - chain antibody, anti - CD3 and anti - CEA, is more effective in inhibiting tumor growth.%目的 探讨抗CD3抗CEA双特异性单链抗体介导CIK细胞在体内杀伤胃肠癌的作用.方法 分别将人胃低分化腺癌BGC823细胞和人结肠中分化腺癌SW1116细胞种植裸鼠后,建立裸鼠胃癌及肠癌模型,分为3组分别经尾静脉注入生理盐水、CIK细胞及CIK细胞+双特异性单抗,每3天治疗1次,共6次,取出肿瘤组织称重,并计算出各组的抑瘤率.结果 在体内,CIK组和CIK+双抗组均可抑制肿瘤生长,对胃癌的抑瘤率分别为29.90%和44.33%.对结肠癌的抑瘤率分别为14.93%和38.81%.CIK+双抗组:胃癌及结肠癌的瘤体积、瘤重明显小于CIK组.结论 CIK细胞本身可以抑制肿瘤

  18. Hepatocellular carcinoma cell sensitivity to Vγ9Vδ2 T lymphocyte-mediated killing is increased by zoledronate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugai, Shiori; Yoshikawa, Toshiaki; Iwama, Tatsuaki; Tsuchiya, Nobuhiro; Ueda, Norihiro; Fujinami, Norihiro; Shimomura, Manami; Zhang, Rong; Kaneko, Shin; Uemura, Yasushi; Nakatsura, Tetsuya

    2016-05-01

    The limited efficacy of vaccines in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), due to the low frequency of tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), indicates the importance of innate immune surveillance, which assists acquired immunity by directly recognizing and eliminating HCC. Innate Vγ9Vδ2 T cells have major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted antitumor activity and are activated by phosphoantigens, which are upregulated in cancer cells by the nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, zoledronate (Zol). A better understanding of HCC susceptibility to Zol and downstream γδ T cell-mediated killing is essential to optimize γδ T cell-mediated immunotherapy. This study systematically examined the interactions between γδ T cells and Zol-treated HCC cell lines (HepG2, HLE, HLF, HuH-1, JHH5, JHH7, and Li-7) in vitro. All HCC cell lines expressed the DNAX accessory molecule-1 ligands, poliovirus receptor, and Nectin-2, and γδ T cell-mediated killing of these cells was significantly enhanced by Zol. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of these ligands did not affect the susceptibility to γδ T cell lysis. This killing activity was partly inhibited by mevastatin, an inhibitor of the mevalonate pathway, and markedly reduced by a monoclonal antibody to γ- and δ-chain T cell receptor, indicating that this is crucial for Zol-induced HCC killing. In addition, Zol-treated HCC cell lines triggered γδ T cell proliferation and induced production of Th1 and Th2, but not Th17, cytokines. The Zol concentration that enhanced HCC cell susceptibility to γδ T cell killing was lower than that required to directly inhibit HCC proliferation. Thus, γδ T cells may be important effector cells in the presence of Zol, especially where there are insufficient number of cancer antigen-specific CTLs to eliminate HCC. Our in vitro data support the proposal that Zol-treatment, combined with adaptive γδ T cell immunotherapy, may provide a feasible and effective

  19. Targeting and killing of glioblastoma with activated T cells armed with bispecific antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since most glioblastomas express both wild-type EGFR and EGFRvIII as well as HER2/neu, they are excellent targets for activated T cells (ATC) armed with bispecific antibodies (BiAbs) that target EGFR and HER2. ATC were generated from PBMC activated for 14 days with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody in the presence of interleukin-2 and armed with chemically heteroconjugated anti-CD3×anti-HER2/neu (HER2Bi) and/or anti-CD3×anti-EGFR (EGFRBi). HER2Bi- and/or EGFRBi-armed ATC were examined for in vitro cytotoxicity using MTT and 51Cr-release assays against malignant glioma lines (U87MG, U118MG, and U251MG) and primary glioblastoma lines. EGFRBi-armed ATC killed up to 85% of U87, U118, and U251 targets at effector:target ratios (E:T) ranging from 1:1 to 25:1. Engagement of tumor by EGFRBi-armed ATC induced Th1 and Th2 cytokine secretion by armed ATC. HER2Bi-armed ATC exhibited comparable cytotoxicity against U118 and U251, but did not kill HER2-negative U87 cells. HER2Bi- or EGFRBi-armed ATC exhibited 50—80% cytotoxicity against four primary glioblastoma lines as well as a temozolomide (TMZ)-resistant variant of U251. Both CD133– and CD133+ subpopulations were killed by armed ATC. Targeting both HER2Bi and EGFRBi simultaneously showed enhanced efficacy than arming with a single BiAb. Armed ATC maintained effectiveness after irradiation and in the presence of TMZ at a therapeutic concentration and were capable of killing multiple targets. High-grade gliomas are suitable for specific targeting by armed ATC. These data, together with additional animal studies, may provide the preclinical support for the use of armed ATC as a valuable addition to current treatment regimens

  20. Impact of prolonged fraction dose-delivery time modeling intensity-modulated radiation therapy on hepatocellular carcinoma cell killing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Kang Zheng; Long-Hua Chen; Xiao Yan; Hong-Mei Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the impact of prolonged fraction dosedelivery time modeling intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on cell killing of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) HepG2 and Hep3B cell lines.METHODS: The radiobiological characteristics of human HCC HepG2 and Hep3b cell lines were studied with standard clonogenic assays, using standard linear-quadratic model and incomplete repair model to fit the dose-survival curves. The identical methods were also employed to investigate the biological effectiveness of irradiation protocols modeling clinical conventional fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT, fraction delivery time 3 min) and IMRT with different prolonged fraction delivery time (15, 30, and 45 min). The differences of cell surviving fraction irradiated with different fraction delivery time were tested with paired t-test. Factors determining the impact of prolonged fraction delivery time on cell killing were analyzed.RESULTS: The α/β and repair half-time (T1/2) of HepG2and Hep3b were 3.1 and 7.4 Gy, and 22 and 19 min respectively. The surviving fraction of HepG2 irradiated modeling IMRT with different fraction delivery time was significantly higher than irradiated modeling EBRT and the cell survival increased more pronouncedly with the fraction delivery time prolonged from 15 to 45 min,while no significant differences of cell survival in Hep3b were found between different fraction delivery time protocols.CONCLUSION: The prolonged fraction delivery time modeling IMRT significantly decreased the cell killing in HepG2 but not in Hep3b. The capability of sub-lethal damage repair was the predominant factor determining the cell killing decrease. These effects, if confirmed by clinical studies, should be considered in designing IMRT treatments for HCC.

  1. Selective killing of cancer cells by nanoparticle-assisted ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Kosheleva, Olga K.; Lai, Tsung-Ching; Chen, Nelson G.; Hsiao, Michael; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Intense ultrasound, such as that used for tumor ablation, does not differentiate between cancerous and normal cells. A method combining ultrasound and biocompatible gold or magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) was developed under in vitro conditions using human breast and lung epithelial cells, which causes ultrasound to preferentially destroy cancerous cells. Results Co-cultures of BEAS-2B normal lung cells and A549 cancerous lung cells labeled with green and red fluorescent proteins, res...

  2. Enhanced cell-killing action of cisplatin in the presence of terbium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The literature indicates that the interaction of Tb3+ with DNA modified by the antitumour drug cis-diaminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP) results in substantial enhancement of the fluorescence of this cation, while no enhancement is observed in the case of DNA modified by irradiation with ionizing radiation. This study investigates the effect of Tb3+ on the survival of cultured mammalian cells treated with CDDP. HeLa cells were treated with a combination of 195mPt-CDDP and TbCl3, and the relationship between lethal effect and the numbers of Tb and/or Pt atoms binding to DNA, RNA and proteins was examined. The Tb content in each fraction was determined using instrumental neutron activation analysis. It was found that the cytotoxic effect of CDDP was greatly enhanced by the presence of Tb ions (D0 of CDDP fell from 8.3 μM without Tb to 3.2 μM with 0.75 mM Tb), while no such effect was found in radiation-induced cell-killing. The number of Tb atoms bound to DNA molecules in a cell was calculated to be about 4.5 x 107, namely 1 per 1.400 nucleotides, under that situation. (author)

  3. Preferential killing of cancer cells and activated human T cells using ZnO nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticles are increasingly being recognized for their potential utility in biological applications including nanomedicine. Here we examine the response of normal human cells to ZnO nanoparticles under different signaling environments and compare it to the response of cancerous cells. ZnO nanoparticles exhibit a strong preferential ability to kill cancerous T cells (∼28-35 x) compared to normal cells. Interestingly, the activation state of the cell contributes toward nanoparticle toxicity, as resting T cells display a relative resistance while cells stimulated through the T cell receptor and CD28 costimulatory pathway show greater toxicity in direct relation to the level of activation. Mechanisms of toxicity appear to involve the generation of reactive oxygen species, with cancerous T cells producing higher inducible levels than normal T cells. In addition, nanoparticles were found to induce apoptosis and the inhibition of reactive oxygen species was found to be protective against nanoparticle induced cell death. The novel findings of cell selective toxicity, towards potential disease causing cells, indicate a potential utility of ZnO nanoparticles in the treatment of cancer and/or autoimmunity

  4. Preferential killing of cancer cells and activated human T cells using ZnO nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanley, Cory; Layne, Janet; Feris, Kevin; Wingett, Denise [Department of Biological Sciences, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Punnoose, Alex; Reddy, K M; Coombs, Isaac; Coombs, Andrew [Department of Physics, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725 (United States)], E-mail: denisewingett@boisestate.edu

    2008-07-23

    Nanoparticles are increasingly being recognized for their potential utility in biological applications including nanomedicine. Here we examine the response of normal human cells to ZnO nanoparticles under different signaling environments and compare it to the response of cancerous cells. ZnO nanoparticles exhibit a strong preferential ability to kill cancerous T cells ({approx}28-35 x) compared to normal cells. Interestingly, the activation state of the cell contributes toward nanoparticle toxicity, as resting T cells display a relative resistance while cells stimulated through the T cell receptor and CD28 costimulatory pathway show greater toxicity in direct relation to the level of activation. Mechanisms of toxicity appear to involve the generation of reactive oxygen species, with cancerous T cells producing higher inducible levels than normal T cells. In addition, nanoparticles were found to induce apoptosis and the inhibition of reactive oxygen species was found to be protective against nanoparticle induced cell death. The novel findings of cell selective toxicity, towards potential disease causing cells, indicate a potential utility of ZnO nanoparticles in the treatment of cancer and/or autoimmunity.

  5. A Drosera-bioinspired hydrogel for catching and killing cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shihui; Chen, Niancao; Gaddes, Erin R; Zhang, Xiaolong; Dong, Cheng; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A variety of bioinspired materials have been successfully synthesized to mimic the sophisticated structures or functions of biological systems. However, it is still challenging to develop materials with multiple functions that can be performed synergistically or sequentially. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate a novel bioinspired hydrogel that can interact with cancer cells, functionally similar to Drosera in catching and killing prey. This hydrogel had two layers with the top one functionalized with oligonucleotide aptamers and the bottom one functionalized with double-stranded DNA. The results show that the top hydrogel layer was able to catch target cells with high efficiency and specificity, and that the bottom hydrogel layer could sequester doxorubicin (Dox) for sustained drug release. Importantly, the released Dox could kill 90% of the cells after 1-h residence of the cells on the hydrogel. After the cell release, this bifunctional hydrogel could be regenerated for continuous cell catching and killing. Therefore, the data presented in this study has successfully demonstrated the potential of developing a material system with the functions of attracting, catching and killing diseased cells (e.g., circulating tumor cells) or even invading microorganisms (e.g., bacteria). PMID:26396063

  6. Metabolic events mediating early killing of host cells infected by Shigella flexneri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansonetti, P J; Mounier, J

    1987-07-01

    J774, a continuous macrophage cell-line, was infected by M90T, an invasive isolate of Shigella flexneri serotype 5 and BS176, its non invasive derivative--which does not harbor the 220 kbase virulence plasmid pWR100. Killing of host cells by intracellular M90T, commenced one hour after infection and was completed by 4 hours. Intracellular BS176 did not kill cells during the same period. Cell protein biosynthesis was totally inhibited by both strains within 2 hours of infection thus indicating that shiga-like toxin 1 (SLT1) could not account for early killing. On the other hand a sharp decrease in intracellular ATP was observed after 1 hour in cells infected with M90T. No significant increase in ATPase activity could be detected. A sharp increase in pyruvate production starting immediately after infection indicated impairement in mitochondrial respiration, which accounts for most ATP produced intracellularly. In addition, fermentation appeared to be totally blocked thus leaving no chance of the infected cells regenerating NAD. Concurrent increase in cAMP concentration within the first hour of infection may contribute to the rapid and efficient cell killing. Cells infected by BS176 always showed an intermediate phenotype (i.e. ATP depletion, pyruvate increase, lactate decrease). Early lysis of the phagocytic vacuole by M90T may account for this difference by allowing toxic products of the bacteria to diffuse more efficiently within the cytosol. PMID:2848171

  7. Piperlongumine selectively kills hepatocellular carcinoma cells and preferentially inhibits their invasion via ROS-ER-MAPKs-CHOP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Liu, Ju Mei; Xiong, Xin Xin; Qiu, Xin Yao; Pan, Feng; Liu, Di; Lan, Shu Jue; Jin, Si; Yu, Shang Bin; Chen, Xiao Qian

    2015-03-20

    Hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) are highly malignant and aggressive tumors lack of effective therapeutic drugs. Piperlongumine (PL), a natural product isolated from longer pepper plants, is recently identified as a potent cytotoxic compound highly selective to cancer cells. Here, we reported that PL specifically suppressed HCC cell migration/invasion via endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-MAPKs-CHOP signaling pathway. PL selectively killed HCC cells but not normal hepatocytes with an IC50 of 10-20 µM while PL at much lower concentrations only suppressed HCC cell migration/invasion. PL selectively elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HCC cells, which activated or up-regulated downstream PERK/Ire 1α/Grp78, p38/JNK/Erk and CHOP subsequently. Administration of antioxidants completely abolished PL's effects on cell death and migration/invasion. However, pharmacological inhibition of ER stress-responses or MAPKs signaling pathways with corresponding specific inhibitors only reversed PL's effect on cell migration/invasion but not on cell death. Consistently, knocking-down of CHOP by RNA interference only reversed PL-suppressed HCC cell migration. Finally, PL significantly suppressed HCC development and activated the ER-MAPKs-CHOP signaling pathway in HCC xenografts in vivo. Taken together, PL selectively killed HCC cells and preferentially inhibited HCC cell migration/invasion via ROS-ER-MAPKs-CHOP axis, suggesting a novel therapeutic strategy for the highly malignant and aggressive HCC clinically. PMID:25788268

  8. Paradoxical effects of temperature and solar irradiance on the photodegradation state of killed phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiraux, Rémi; Jeanthon, Christian; Vaultier, Frédéric; Rontani, Jean-François

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the effects of temperature and irradiance on the photodegradation state of killed phytoplankton cells. For this purpose, killed cells of the diatom Chaetoceros neogracilis RCC2022 were irradiated (photosynthetically active radiation) at 36 and 446 J · s(-1)  · m(-2) (for the same cumulative dose of irradiation energy) and at two temperatures (7°C and 17°C). Analyses of specific lipid tracers (fatty acids and sterols) revealed that low temperatures and irradiances increased photooxidative damages of monounsaturated lipids (i.e., palmitoleic acid, cholesterol and campesterol). The high efficiency of type II photosensitized degradation processes was attributed to: (i) the relative preservation of the sensitizer (chlorophyll) at low irradiances allowing a longer production of singlet oxygen and (ii) the slow diffusion rate of singlet oxygen through membranes at low temperatures inducing more damages. Conversely, high temperatures and irradiances induced (i) a rapid degradation of the photosensitizer and a loss of singlet oxygen by diffusion outside the membranes (limiting type II photosensitized oxidation), and (ii) intense autoxidation processes degrading unsaturated cell lipids and oxidation products used as photodegradation tracers. Our results may explain the paradoxical relationship observed in situ between latitude and photodegradation state of phytoplankton cells. PMID:26992328

  9. Phosphodiesterase 5 Inhibitors Enhance Chemotherapy Killing in Gastrointestinal/Genitourinary Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, Laurence; ROBERTS, JANE L.; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Conley, Adam; Durrant, David E.; Das, Anindita; Fisher, Paul B.; Kukreja, Rakesh C.; Grant, Steven; Poklepovic, Andrew; Dent, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The present studies determined whether clinically relevant phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors interacted with clinically relevant chemotherapies to kill gastrointestinal/genitourinary cancer cells. In bladder cancer cells, regardless of H-RAS mutational status, at clinically achievable doses, PDE5 inhibitors interacted in a greater than additive fashion with doxorubicin/mitomycin C/gemcitabine/cisplatin/paclitaxel to cause cell death. In pancreatic tumor cells expressing mutant active K-RA...

  10. Doxorubicin loaded 17β-estradiol based SWNT dispersions for target specific killing of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Moumita; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The present work reports the synthesis of a 17β-estradiol based amphiphiles comprising of polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety linked through succinic acid that non-covalently dispersed (76%) the single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water. The superior exfoliation of carbon nanotubes was characterized by microscopic and spectroscopic studies. Significant stability of these SWNT dispersions was observed in the presence of protein in cell culture media and the nanohybrids were highly biocompatible toward mammalian cells. Anticancer drug doxorubicin loaded on these nanohybrids was selectively delivered within estrogen receptor rich cancer cells, MCF7 (breast cancer cell) and A549 (lung cancer cell). Microscopic studies showed the localization of doxorubicin within the cancer cell nucleus whereas no such localization was observed in ER negative cells. Both these ER positive cancer cells were killed by ∼3 fold higher efficiency than that of ER negative MDA-MB-231 (advanced breast cancer cell) and HeLa cells that are deprived of estrogen receptors. Thus, judiciously designed estradiol based nanohybrids proved to be excellent tool for SWNT dispersion and also for selectively killing of ER positive cancer cells. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time non-covalently modified SWNTs by estradiol based amphiphilic dispersing agent have been used for selective killing of ER positive cancer cells by doxorubicin loaded on dispersed SWNTs. It holds immense promise to be exploited as a cancer therapeutic agent. PMID:26970825

  11. Too Much Protein May Kill Brain Cells As Parkinson's Progresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NINDS (NS038377, NS072187), the JPB Foundation, the Maryland Stem Cell Research Fund (2007-MSCRFI-0420-00, 2009-MSCRFII-0125- ... 2013-MSCRFII-0105-00), and the New York Stem Cell Foundation. For more information ... leading funder of research on the brain and nervous system. The mission ...

  12. Synergistic killing of lung cancer cells by cisplatin and radiation via autophagy and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Ma, Shumei; Liu, Mingbo; Hou, Yufei; Liang, Bing; Su, Xu; Liu, Xiaodong

    2014-06-01

    Cisplatin is a commonly used drug for chemotherapy, however, whether it may be used synergistically with radiotherapy remains unclear. The present study investigated the underlying mechanisms of synergistic killing by radiosensitization and cisplatin, with a focus on the growth inhibition, apoptosis and autophagy of non-small cell human lung cancer cells in vitro and in a tumor xenograft in vivo. A549 cells were used for the in vitro experiments and divided into the following four treatment groups: Sham-irradiated; conventional radiotherapy (CRT) of five doses of 2 Gy every day; hyperfractionated radiotherapy of five doses of 2 Gy (1 Gy twice a day at 4 h intervals) every day; and CRT plus cisplatin. A xenograft tumor-bearing C57BL/6 model was established for the in vivo experiments and the above-mentioned treatments were administered. MTT and colony formation assays were used to detect cell viability and western blotting was performed to detect the levels of protein expression. Monodansylcadaverine staining and the immunofluorescence technique were used to analyze the autophagy rate, while flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry were performed to detect the expression levels of the genes associated with apoptosis and autophagy, including microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAPLC3)-II, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) III, Beclin1, phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-AKT), damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2-associated X protein, caspase-3 and p21. The MTT assay demonstrated that cisplatin exhibits a dose-dependent cytotoxicity in A549 cells and synergizes with radiation to promote the cell-killing effect of radiation. In the xenograft mouse model of Lewis cells, cisplatin plus ionizing radiation (IR) (five doses of 2 Gy) yielded the most significant tumor suppression. The autophagic vacuoles, the ratio of MAPLC3-II to MAPLC3-I (LC3-II/LC3-I) and the levels of Beclin1 were found to increase in all treatment

  13. Maternal decidual macrophages inhibit NK cell killing of invasive cytotrophoblasts during human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Co, Elizabeth C; Gormley, Matthew; Kapidzic, Mirhan; Rosen, David B; Scott, Marvin A; Stolp, Haley A R; McMaster, Michael; Lanier, Lewis L; Bárcena, Alicia; Fisher, Susan J

    2013-06-01

    Human pregnancy is an immunological paradox. Semiallogeneic (fetal) placental cells (extravillous cytotrophoblasts [CTBs]) invade the uterine lining (decidua), which contains a unique decidual natural killer (dNK) cell population, identified by the cell surface phenotype CD56(bright) CD16(-) CD3(-) and CD14(+) CD206(+) macrophages (dMac). Previous reports suggested that human dNK cells are not a threat to the fetoplacental unit because they are anergic. In contrast, here we showed that purified and exogenously stimulated dNK cells are capable killers of cellular targets, including semiallogeneic CTBs. However, dMacs in the decidual leukocyte (DL) population restrained dNK killing through a transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1)-dependent mechanism. Our findings support a new model whereby dNK cells, capable of killing CTBs, are prevented from doing so by neighboring macrophages, thus protecting the fetal cells from NK cell attack. We speculate that this mechanism would inhibit dNK cell-mediated killing, even under conditions where high levels of cytokines may stimulate dNK cells, which could pose a threat to the developing placenta. PMID:23553431

  14. Effects of Vegetation Structure on the Location of Lion Kill Sites in African Thicket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Andrew B.; Tambling, Craig J.; Kerley, Graham I. H.; Asner, Gregory P.

    2016-01-01

    Predator-prey relationships are integral to ecosystem stability and functioning. These relationships are, however, difficult to maintain in protected areas where large predators are increasingly being reintroduced and confined. Where predators make kills has a profound influence on their role in ecosystems, but the relative importance of environmental variables in determining kill sites, and how these might vary across ecosystems is poorly known. We investigated kill sites for lions in South Africa’s thicket biome, testing the importance of vegetation structure for kill site locations compared to other environmental variables. Kill sites were located over four years using GPS telemetry and compared to non-kill sites that had been occupied by lions, as well as to random sites within lion ranges. Measurements of 3D vegetation structure obtained from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) were used to calculate the visible area (viewshed) around each site and, along with wind and moonlight data, used to compare kill sites between lion sexes, prey species and prey sexes. Viewshed area was the most important predictor of kill sites (sites in dense vegetation were twice as likely to be kill sites compared to open areas), followed by wind speed and, less so, moonlight. Kill sites for different prey species varied with vegetation structure, and male prey were killed when wind speeds were higher compared to female prey of the same species. Our results demonstrate that vegetation structure is an important component of predator-prey interactions, with varying effects across ecosystems. Such differences require consideration in terms of the ecological roles performed by predators, and in predator and prey conservation. PMID:26910832

  15. Cardiomyocytes display low mitochondrial priming and are highly resistant toward cytotoxic T-cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiang; Halle, Stephan; Yu, Kai; Mishra, Pooja; Scherr, Michaela; Pietzsch, Stefan; Willenzon, Stefanie; Janssen, Anika; Boelter, Jasmin; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Eder, Matthias; Förster, Reinhold

    2016-06-01

    Following heart transplantation, alloimmune responses can cause graft rejection by damaging donor vascular and parenchymal cells. However, it remains unclear whether cardiomyocytes are also directly killed by immune cells. Here, we used two-photon microscopy to investigate how graft-specific effector CD8(+) T cells interact with cardiomyocytes in a mouse heart transplantation model. Surprisingly, we observed that CD8(+) T cells are completely impaired in killing cardiomyocytes. Even after virus-mediated preactivation, antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells largely fail to lyse these cells although both cell types engage in dynamic interactions. Furthermore, we established a two-photon microscopy-based assay using intact myocardium to determine the susceptibility of cardiomyocytes to undergo apoptosis. This feature, also known as mitochondrial priming reveals an unexpected weak predisposition of cardiomyocytes to undergo apoptosis in situ. These observations together with the early exhaustion phenotype of graft-infiltrating specific T cells provide an explanation why cardiomyocytes are largely protected from direct CD8(+) T-cell-mediated killing. PMID:26970349

  16. Heat damage to DNA polymerases as a possible cause for hyperthermic cell killing and radiosensitization by heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reports in the literature suggest a causal relationship between heat effects on the activity of DNA polymerase β and hyperthermic cell killing. By using thermotolerance as a tool to investigate this possibility it was found that a poor correlation existed between these two parameters, but a good correlation was observed between the decrease in activity of this enzyme and the extent of radiosensitization by heat. To further pursue the role of DNA polymerases in the mechanism of cell killing, step-down heating procedures were introduced. No sensitization of polymerase inactivation was observed with this treatment. From the results of the experiments reported, the authors like to conclude that heat inactivation of DNA polymerase β is not to be considered as the general cause of hypethermic death

  17. Drugs that kill cancer stem-like cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zobalová, Renata; Stantic, M.; Stapelberg, M.; Prokopová, Kateřina; Dong, L.F.; Truksa, Jaroslav; Neužil, Jiří

    1. Rijeka: InTech, 2011 - (Shostak, S.), s. 1-442 ISBN 978-953-307-225-8 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Cancer stem cells * 2,3-dioxygenase * MitoVES * inhibitors of indoleamine Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  18. Mitochondria: An intriguing target for killing tumour-initiating cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yan, B.; Dong, L.; Neužil, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, JAN 2016 (2016), s. 86-93. ISSN 1567-7249 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Tumour-initiating cells * ALPHA-TOCOPHERYL SUCCINATE * Therapeutic resistance * Mitochondria Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.249, year: 2014

  19. Relationship between DNA damage, rejoining and cell killing by radiation in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prevailing hypothesis on the mechanism of radiation-induced cell killing identifies the genetic material deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) as the most important subcellular target at biologically relevant doses. In this review we present new data and summarize the role of the DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) induced by ionizing radiation and DNA dsb rejoining as determinants of cellular radiosensitivity. When cells were irradiated at high dose-rate, two molecular end-points were identified which often correlated with radiosensitivity: (1) the apparent number of DNA dsb induced per Gy per DNA unit and (2) the half-time of the fast component of the DNA dsb rejoining kinetics. These two molecular determinants, not mutually exclusive, may be linked through a common factor such as the conformation of DNA

  20. Piperlongumine selectively kills glioblastoma multiforme cells via reactive oxygen species accumulation dependent JNK and p38 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ju Mei; Pan, Feng; Li, Li; Liu, Qian Rong; Chen, Yong; Xiong, Xin Xin; Cheng, Kejun; Yu, Shang Bin; Shi, Zhi; Yu, Albert Cheung-Hoi; Chen, Xiao Qian

    2013-07-19

    Piperlongumine (PL), a natural alkaloid isolated from the long pepper, may have anti-cancer properties. It selectively targets and kills cancer cells but leaves normal cells intact. Here, we reported that PL selectively killed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells via accumulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) to activate JNK and p38. PL at 20μM could induce severe cell death in three GBM cell lines (LN229, U87 and 8MG) but not astrocytes in cultures. PL elevated ROS prominently and reduced glutathione levels in LN229 and U87 cells. Antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) completely reversed PL-induced ROS accumulation and prevented cell death in LN229 and U87 cells. In LN229 and U87 cells, PL-treatment activated JNK and p38 but not Erk and Akt, in a dosage-dependent manner. These activations could be blocked by NAC pre-treatment. JNK and p38 specific inhibitors, SB203580 and SP600125 respectively, significantly blocked the cytotoxic effects of PL in LN229 and U87 cells. Our data first suggests that PL may have therapeutic potential for one of the most malignant and refractory tumors GBM. PMID:23796709

  1. Effectiveness of Disinfectants in Killing Enterobacter sakazakii in Suspension, Dried on the Surface of Stainless Steel, and in a Biofilm▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hoikyung; Ryu, Jee-Hoon; Beuchat, Larry R.

    2006-01-01

    The effectiveness of 13 disinfectants used in hospitals, day-care centers, and food service kitchens in killing Enterobacter sakazakii in suspension, dried on the surface of stainless steel, and in biofilm was determined. E. sakazakii exhibited various levels of resistance to the disinfectants, depending on the composition of the disinfectants, amount and type of organic matrix surrounding cells, and exposure time. Populations of planktonic cells suspended in water (7.22 to 7.40 log CFU/ml) d...

  2. Ag nanoparticles sensitize IR-induced killing of cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruizhi Xu; Jun Ma; Xinchen Sun; Zhongping Chen; Xiaoli Jiang; Zhirui Guo; Lan Huang; Yang Li; Meng Wang; Changling Wang; Jiwei Liu; Xu Fan; Jiayu Gu; Xi Chen; Yu Zhang; Ning Gu

    2009-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Nanosized particulate systems combining better can-cer diagnosis with therapeutic effect are being designed based on the merging of nanotechnology with cellular and molecular techniques.

  3. BIM mediates synergistic killing of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells by BCL-2 and MEK inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korfi, K; Smith, M; Swan, J; Somervaille, T C P; Dhomen, N; Marais, R

    2016-01-01

    B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) is an aggressive hematological disease that kills ~50% of adult patients. With the exception of some BCR-ABL1(+) patients who benefit from tyrosine kinase inhibitors, there are no effective targeted therapies for adult B-ALL patients and chemotherapy remains first-line therapy despite adverse side effects and poor efficacy. We show that, although the MEK/ERK pathway is activated in B-ALL cells driven by different oncogenes, MEK inhibition does not suppress B-ALL cell growth. However, MEK inhibition synergized with BCL-2/BCL-XL family inhibitors to suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in B-ALL cells. We show that this synergism is mediated by the pro-apoptotic factor BIM, which is dephosphorylated as a result of MEK inhibition, allowing it to bind to and neutralize MCL-1, thereby enhancing BCL-2/BCL-XL inhibitor-induced cell death. This cooperative effect is observed in B-ALL cells driven by a range of genetic abnormalities and therefore has significant therapeutic potential. PMID:27054332

  4. Action spectra for ultraviolet photosensitized killing of mammalian cells by misonidazole and para-nitroacetophenone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinese hamster fibroblasts in monolayer culture were exposed to ulraviolet radiation at 313, 334, 365, 380, and 405 nm in the presence of either misonidazole or para-nitroacetophenone, drugs which act as both photosensitizers and radiosensitizers of cell killing. Survival was measured by a colony-forming assay. The resulting action spectra for cell death photosensitized by the drugs (the reciprocals of the exposures required at each wavelength to reduce cell survival to a given level) closely match their absorption spectra over a range of three orders of magnitude. These results demonstrate that cells can be killed upon excitation of misonidazole or para-nitroacetophenone in the absence of any other types of energy deposition or biomolecular damage

  5. Killing multiple myeloma cells with the small molecule 3-bromopyruvate: implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkowska-Skrobek, Grażyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Lis, Paweł; Bartkowiak, Anna; Gonchar, Mykhailo; Ko, Young H; Pedersen, Peter L; Goffeau, Andre; Ułaszewski, Stanisław

    2014-07-01

    The small molecule 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP), which has emerged recently as the first member of a new class of potent anticancer agents, was tested for its capacity to kill multiple myeloma (MM) cancer cells. Human MM cells (RPMI 8226) begin to lose viability significantly within 8 h of incubation in the presence of 3-BP. The Km (0.3 mmol/l) for intracellular accumulation of 3-BP in MM cells is 24 times lower than that in control cells (7.2 mmol/l). Therefore, the uptake of 3-BP by MM cells is significantly higher than that by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Further, the IC50 values for human MM cells and control peripheral blood mononuclear cells are 24 and 58 µmol/l, respectively. Therefore, specificity and selectivity of 3-BP toward MM cancer cells are evident on the basis of the above. In MM cells the transcription levels of the gene encoding the monocarboxylate transporter MCT1 is significantly amplified compared with control cells. The level of intracellular ATP in MM cells decreases by over 90% within 1 h after addition of 100 µmol/l 3-BP. The cytotoxicity of 3-BP, exemplified by a marked decrease in viability of MM cells, is potentiated by the inhibitor of glutathione synthesis buthionine sulfoximine. In addition, the lack of mutagenicity and its superior capacity relative to Glivec to kill MM cancer cells are presented in this study. PMID:24557015

  6. Mechanisms of Cancer Cell Killing by the Adenovirus E4orf4 Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Kleinberger

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available During adenovirus (Ad replication the Ad E4orf4 protein regulates progression from the early to the late phase of infection. However, when E4orf4 is expressed alone outside the context of the virus it induces a non-canonical mode of programmed cell death, which feeds into known cell death pathways such as apoptosis or necrosis, depending on the cell line tested. E4orf4-induced cell death has many interesting and unique features including a higher susceptibility of cancer cells to E4orf4-induced cell killing compared with normal cells, caspase-independence, a high degree of evolutionary conservation of the signaling pathways, a link to perturbations of the cell cycle, and involvement of two distinct cell death programs, in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm. Several E4orf4-interacting proteins including its major partners, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A and Src family kinases, contribute to induction of cell death. The various features of E4orf4-induced cell killing as well as studies to decipher the underlying mechanisms are described here. Many explanations for the cancer specificity of E4orf4-induced cell death have been proposed, but a full understanding of the reasons for the different susceptibility of cancer and normal cells to killing by E4orf4 will require a more detailed analysis of the complex E4orf4 signaling network. An improved understanding of the mechanisms involved in this unique mode of programmed cell death may aid in design of novel E4orf4-based cancer therapeutics.

  7. Preferential kill of hypoxic EMT6 mammary tumor cells by the bioreductive alkylating agent porfiromycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorelli, A C; Belcourt, M F; Hodnick, W F; Keyes, S R; Pritsos, C A; Rockwell, S

    1995-01-01

    Hypoxic cells in solid tumors represent a therapeutically resistant population that limits the curability of many solid tumors by irradiation and by most chemotherapeutic agents. The oxygen deficit, however, creates an environment conducive to reductive processes; this results in a major exploitable difference between normal and neoplastic tissues. The mitomycin antibiotics can be reductively activated by a number of oxidoreductases, in a process required for the production of their therapeutic effects. Preferential activation of these drugs under hypoxia and greater toxicity to oxygen-deficient cells than to their oxygenated counterparts are obtained in most instances. The demonstration that mitomycin C and porfiromycin, used to kill the hypoxic fraction, in combination with irradiation, to eradicate the oxygenated portion of the tumor, produced enhanced cytodestructive effects on solid tumors in animals has led to the clinical evaluation of the mitomycins in combination with radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. The findings from these clinical trials have demonstrated the value of directing a concerted therapeutic attack on the hypoxic fraction of solid tumors as an approach toward enhancing the curability of localized neoplasms by irradiation. PMID:7572339

  8. Effect of Silicon on Desulfurization of Aluminum-killed Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Debdutta

    Recent reports have suggested that silicon has a beneficial effect on the rate of desulfurization of Al-killed steel. This effect is difficult to understand looking at the overall desulfurization reaction which does not include silicon. However an explanation is proposed by taking into account the (SiO2)/[Si] equilibrium in which some Al reaching the slag-metal interface is used in reducing the SiO2 in the slag. This reaction can be suppressed to some extent if the silicon content of the metal is increased and in doing so, more Al will be available at the slag-metal interface for the desulfurization reaction and this would increase the rate of the desulfurization reaction. A model was developed, assuming the rates are controlled by mass transfer, taking into account the coupled reactions of the reduction of silica, and other unstable oxides, namely iron oxide and manganese oxide, in the slag and desulfurization reaction in the steel by aluminum. The model predicts that increasing silicon increases the rate and extent of desulfurization. Plant data was analyzed to obtain rough estimates of ladle desulfurization rates and also used to validate the model predictions. Experiments have been conducted on a kilogram scale of material in an induction furnace to test the hypothesis. The major conclusions of the study are as follows: The rate and extent of desulfurization improve with increasing initial silicon content in the steel; the effect diminishes at silicon contents higher than approximately 0.2% and with increasing slag basicity. This was confirmed with kilogram-scale laboratory experiments. The effects of the silicon content in the steel (and of initial FeO and MnO in the slag) largely arise from the dominant effects of these reactions on the equilibrium aluminum content of the steel: as far as aluminum consumption or pick-up is concerned, the Si/SiO2 reaction dominates, and desulfurization has only a minor effect on aluminum consumption. The rate is primarily

  9. The role of DNA cluster damage and chromosome aberrations in radiation-induced cell killing: a theoretical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role played by DNA cluster damage and chromosome aberrations in radiation-induced cell killing was investigated, assuming that certain chromosome aberrations (dicentrics, rings and large deletions, or 'lethal aberrations') lead to clonogenic inactivation and that chromosome aberrations are due to micrometre-scale rejoining of chromosome fragments derived from DNA cluster lesions (CLs). The CL yield and the threshold distance governing fragment rejoining were left as model parameters. The model, implemented as a Monte Carlo code called BIANCA (Biophysical Analysis of Cell death and chromosome Aberrations), provided simulated survival curves that were compared with survival data on AG1522 and V79 cells exposed to different radiation types, including heavy ions. The agreement between simulation outcomes and experimental data suggests that lethal aberrations are likely to play an important role in cell killing not only for AG1522 cells exposed to X rays, as already reported by others, but also for other radiation types and other cells. Furthermore, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that the critical DNA lesions leading to cell death and chromosome aberrations are double-strand break clusters ( possibly involving the ∼1000- 10 000 bp scale) and that the effects of such clusters are modulated by micrometre-scale proximity effects during DNA damage processing. (authors)

  10. Microbeam studies of soft X-ray induced bystander cell killing using microbeam X-ray cell irradiation system at CRIEPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation induced bystander response is defined as a response in cells which have not been directly targeted by radiation, but which are in the neighborhood of cells which have been directly exposed. In many cases, the bystander response is saturated with increasing dose and is observed when only one cell in a population is targeted by high-LET particle radiations or ultrasoft X-rays (278 eV). However, in our studies using synchrotron X-ray microbeams (5.35 keV), the bystander cell killing effect in normal human fibroblast WI-38 cells had a parabolic relationship to the irradiating dose and was detected if 5 or more cell nuclei were irradiated. To evaluate the feature of the X-ray-induced bystander cell killing effect at a wider dose range and the existence of photon energy dependence, the effects were assessed by irradiating cell nuclei in confluent WI-38 cells with aluminum K-shell (AlK) X-ray microbeams (1.49 keV). The surviving fraction decreased when only a single cell nucleus was irradiated, suggesting the minimal number of targeted cells to induce the effect may depend on the energy of photons used. In this study, we found that the bystander cell killing effect showed a biphasic relationship to the irradiating dose. The decrease in bystander cell survival at the doses higher than 0.23 Gy was partially suppressed between 2.3 and 7.0 Gy, followed by level-off around 90% above 14 Gy, suggesting that the X-ray-induced bystander response is dose dependent. In addition, NO is one of chief initiators/mediators of the effect at least 0.47 Gy. (author)

  11. Carbon-ion beam irradiation kills X-ray-resistant p53-null cancer cells by inducing mitotic catastrophe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napapat Amornwichet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To understand the mechanisms involved in the strong killing effect of carbon-ion beam irradiation on cancer cells with TP53 tumor suppressor gene deficiencies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: DNA damage responses after carbon-ion beam or X-ray irradiation in isogenic HCT116 colorectal cancer cell lines with and without TP53 (p53+/+ and p53-/-, respectively were analyzed as follows: cell survival by clonogenic assay, cell death modes by morphologic observation of DAPI-stained nuclei, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs by immunostaining of phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX, and cell cycle by flow cytometry and immunostaining of Ser10-phosphorylated histone H3. RESULTS: The p53-/- cells were more resistant than the p53+/+ cells to X-ray irradiation, while the sensitivities of the p53+/+ and p53-/- cells to carbon-ion beam irradiation were comparable. X-ray and carbon-ion beam irradiations predominantly induced apoptosis of the p53+/+ cells but not the p53-/- cells. In the p53-/- cells, carbon-ion beam irradiation, but not X-ray irradiation, markedly induced mitotic catastrophe that was associated with premature mitotic entry with harboring long-retained DSBs at 24 h post-irradiation. CONCLUSIONS: Efficient induction of mitotic catastrophe in apoptosis-resistant p53-deficient cells implies a strong cancer cell-killing effect of carbon-ion beam irradiation that is independent of the p53 status, suggesting its biological advantage over X-ray treatment.

  12. Effect of Ciprofloxacin on Killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Cacchillo, David A.; Walters, John D.

    2002-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a pathogen associated with aggressive periodontitis, resists phagocytic killing by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). It is susceptible to ciprofloxacin, which PMNs actively accumulate. This study tested the hypothesis that ciprofloxacin-loaded PMNs are more effective at killing A. actinomycetemcomitans than control PMNs. Isolated human PMNs were loaded by brief incubation with 0.5 μg of ciprofloxacin/ml. Opsonized bacteria (ATCC 43718) were incubated a...

  13. Clinical-scale laser-based scanning and processing of live cells: selective photothermal killing of fluorescent tumor targets for autologous stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Manfred R.; Hanania, Elie G.; Eisfeld, Timothy; O'Neal, Robert A.; Khovananth, Kevin M.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2001-04-01

    High-dose chemotherapy, followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation, is widely used for the treatment of cancer. However, contaminating tumor cells within HSC harvests continue to be of major concern since re-infused tumor cells have proven to contribute to disease relapse. Many tumor purging methods have been evaluated, but all leave detectable tumor cells in the transplant and result in significant loss of HSCs. These shortcomings cause engraftment delays and compromise the therapeutic value of purging. A novel approach integrating automated scanning cytometry, image analysis, and selective laser-induced killing of labeled cells within a cell mixture is described here. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) cells were spiked into cell mixtures, and fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies were used to label tumor cells within the mixture. Cells were then allowed to settle on a surface, and as the surface was scanned with a fluorescence excitation source, a laser pulse was fired at every detected tumor cell using high-speed beam steering mirrors. Tumor cells were selectively killed with little effect on adjacent non-target cells, demonstrating the feasibility of this automated cell processing approach. This technology has many potential research and clinical applications, one example of which is tumor cell purging for autologous HSC transplantation.

  14. A Drosera-bioinspired hydrogel for catching and killing cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shihui Li; Niancao Chen; Gaddes, Erin R.; Xiaolong Zhang; Cheng Dong; Yong Wang

    2015-01-01

    A variety of bioinspired materials have been successfully synthesized to mimic the sophisticated structures or functions of biological systems. However, it is still challenging to develop materials with multiple functions that can be performed synergistically or sequentially. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate a novel bioinspired hydrogel that can interact with cancer cells, functionally similar to Drosera in catching and killing prey. This hydrogel had two layers with the top one fu...

  15. Invasion and Killing of Human Endothelial Cells by Viridans Group Streptococci

    OpenAIRE

    Stinson, Murray W.; Alder, Susan; Kumar, Sarmishtha

    2003-01-01

    Colonization of the cardiovascular endothelium by viridans group streptococci can result in infective endocarditis and possibly atherosclerosis; however, the mechanisms of pathogenesis are poorly understood. We investigated the ability of selected oral streptococci to infect monolayers of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in 50% human plasma and to produce cytotoxicity. Planktonic Streptococcus gordonii CH1 killed HUVEC over a 5-h period by peroxidogenesis (alpha-hemolysin) and b...

  16. Chelator-Induced Dispersal and Killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cells in a Biofilm†

    OpenAIRE

    Banin, Ehud; Brady, Keith M.; Greenberg, E. Peter

    2006-01-01

    Biofilms consist of groups of bacteria attached to surfaces and encased in a hydrated polymeric matrix. Bacteria in biofilms are more resistant to the immune system and to antibiotics than their free-living planktonic counterparts. Thus, biofilm-related infections are persistent and often show recurrent symptoms. The metal chelator EDTA is known to have activity against biofilms of gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus. EDTA can also kill planktonic cells of Proteobacteria like...

  17. The Effect of Bacteriophage Preparations on Intracellular Killing of Bacteria by Phagocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jończyk-Matysiak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular killing of bacteria is one of the fundamental mechanisms against invading pathogens. Impaired intracellular killing of bacteria by phagocytes may be the reason of chronic infections and may be caused by antibiotics or substances that can be produced by some bacteria. Therefore, it was of great practical importance to examine whether phage preparations may influence the process of phagocyte intracellular killing of bacteria. It may be important especially in the case of patients qualified for experimental phage therapy (approximately half of the patients with chronic bacterial infections have their immunity impaired. Our analysis included 51 patients with chronic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections treated with phage preparations at the Phage Therapy Unit in Wroclaw. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of experimental phage therapy on intracellular killing of bacteria by patients’ peripheral blood monocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils. We observed that phage therapy does not reduce patients’ phagocytes’ ability to kill bacteria, and it does not affect the activity of phagocytes in patients with initially reduced ability to kill bacteria intracellularly. Our results suggest that experimental phage therapy has no significant adverse effects on the bactericidal properties of phagocytes, which confirms the safety of the therapy.

  18. Effect of Legionella pneumophila sonicate on killing of Listeria monocytogenes by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils and monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rechnitzer, C; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Shand, G H

    1993-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila shares with other intracellular pathogens the ability to resist intracellular killing within phagocytes. An increasing number of cellular components of L. pneumophila are proposed as pathogenic factors of the organism. At the site of infection, the phagocytic cells will be ...

  19. Killing of targets by effector CD8 T cells in the mouse spleen follows the law of mass action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganusov, Vitaly V [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In contrast with antibody-based vaccines, it has been difficult to measure the efficacy of T cell-based vaccines and to correlate the efficacy of CD8 T cell responses with protection again viral infections. In part, this difficulty is due to poor understanding of the in vivo efficacy of CD8 T cells produced by vaccination. Using a: recently developed experimental method of in vivo cytotoxicity we have investigated quantitative aspects of killing of peptide-pulsed targets by effector and memory CD8 T cells, specific to three epitopes of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), in the mouse spleen. By analyzing data on killing of targets with varying number of epitope-specific effector and memory CD8 T cells, we find that killing of targets by effectors follows the law of mass-action, that is the death rate of peptide-pulsed targets is proportional to the frequency of CTLs in the spleen. In contrast, killing of targets by memory CD8 T cells does not follow the mass action law because the death rate of targets saturates at high frequencies of memory CD8 T cells. For both effector and memory cells, we also find little support for the killing term that includes the decrease of the death rate of targets with target cell density. Interestingly, our analysis suggests that at low CD8 T cell frequencies, memory CD8 T cells on the per capita basis are more efficient at killing peptide-pulsed targets than effectors, but at high frequencies, effectors are more efficient killers than memory T cells. Comparison of the estimated killing efficacy of effector T cells with the value that is predicted from theoretical physics and based on motility of T cells in lymphoid tissues, suggests that limiting step in the killing of peptide-pulsed targets is delivering the lethal hit and not finding the target. Our results thus form a basis for quantitative understanding of the process of killing of virus-infected cells by T cell responses in tissues and can be used to correlate the

  20. TH17 cells promote microbial killing and innate immune sensing of DNA via interleukin 26

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meller, Stephan; Domizio, Jeremy Di; Voo, Kui S; Friedrich, Heike C; Chamilos, Georgios; Ganguly, Dipyaman; Conrad, Curdin; Gregorio, Josh; Roy, Didier Le; Roger, Thierry; Ladbury, John E; Homey, Bernhard; Watowich, Stanley; Modlin, Robert L; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Liu, Yong-Jun; Arold, Stefan T; Gilliet, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 17–producing helper T cells (TH17 cells) have a major role in protection against infections and in mediating autoimmune diseases, yet the mechanisms involved are incompletely understood. We found that interleukin 26 (IL-26), a human TH17 cell–derived cytokine, is a cationic amphipathic protein that kills extracellular bacteria via membrane-pore formation. Furthermore, TH17 cell–derived IL-26 formed complexes with bacterial DNA and self-DNA released by dying bacteria and host cells. The resulting IL-26–DNA complexes triggered the production of type I interferon by plasmacytoid dendritic cells via activation of Toll-like receptor 9, but independently of the IL-26 receptor. These findings provide insights into the potent antimicrobial and proinflammatory function of TH17 cells by showing that IL-26 is a natural human antimicrobial that promotes immune sensing of bacterial and host cell death. PMID:26168081

  1. The aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin damages DNA bases in Escherichia coli: caffeine potentiates the DNA-damaging effects of kanamycin while suppressing cell killing by ciprofloxacin in Escherichia coli and Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Tina Manzhu; Yuan, Jessica; Nguyen, Angelyn; Becket, Elinne; Yang, Hanjing; Miller, Jeffrey H

    2012-06-01

    The distribution of mutants in the Keio collection of Escherichia coli gene knockout mutants that display increased sensitivity to the aminoglycosides kanamycin and neomycin indicates that damaged bases resulting from antibiotic action can lead to cell death. Strains lacking one of a number of glycosylases (e.g., AlkA, YzaB, Ogt, KsgA) or other specific repair proteins (AlkB, PhrB, SmbC) are more sensitive to these antibiotics. Mutants lacking AlkB display the strongest sensitivity among the glycosylase- or direct lesion removal-deficient strains. This perhaps suggests the involvement of ethenoadenine adducts, resulting from reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation, since AlkB removes this lesion. Other sensitivities displayed by mutants lacking UvrA, polymerase V (Pol V), or components of double-strand break repair indicate that kanamycin results in damaged base pairs that need to be removed or replicated past in order to avoid double-strand breaks that saturate the cellular repair capacity. Caffeine enhances the sensitivities of these repair-deficient strains to kanamycin and neomycin. The gene knockout mutants that display increased sensitivity to caffeine (dnaQ, holC, holD, and priA knockout mutants) indicate that caffeine blocks DNA replication, ultimately leading to double-strand breaks that require recombinational repair by functions encoded by recA, recB, and recC, among others. Additionally, caffeine partially protects cells of both Escherichia coli and Bacillus anthracis from killing by the widely used fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin. PMID:22391551

  2. The Welfare Effects of Pfiesteria-Related Fish Kills: A Contingent Behavior Analysis of Seafood Consumers

    OpenAIRE

    Parsons, George R.; Morgan, Ash; John C. Whitehead; Haab, Timothy C.

    2006-01-01

    We use contingent behavior analysis to study the effects of pfiesteria-related fish kills on the demand for seafood in the Mid-Atlantic region. We estimate a set of demand difference models based on individual responses to questions about seafood consumption in the presence of fish kills and with different amounts of information provided about health risks. We use a random-effects Tobit model to control for correlation across each observation and to account for censoring. We find that (i) pfi...

  3. A comparison of cell killing by heat and/or x rays in Chinese hamster V79 cells, Friend erythroleukemia mouse cells, and human thymocyte MOLT-4 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation and/or heat sensitivity of Chinese hamster V79 cells, Friend erythroleukemia (FELC) mouse cells, and MOLT-4 human transformed thymocytes were compared. MOLT-4 cells were more radiosensitive (D/sub o/=0.50 Gy) than FELC (D/sub o/ = 0.65 Gy) and V79 cells (D/sub o/ = 1.43 Gy). Arrhenius analysis showed that MOLT-4 cells were more heat sensitive than FELC or V79 cells below 42.00C, but more heat resistant at higher temperatures. In addition, the MOLT-4 cells showed a single-heat inactivation energy between 41.0 and 45.00C, while FELC and V79 cells both showed a transition in the inactivation energy at about 43.0 and 43.50C, respectively. These differences may be related to the fact that the upper temperature limit for the development of thermal tolerance during continuous heating was lower for MOLT-4 cells than for FELC or V79 cells. Killing of FELC and V79 cells was dependent on the sequence in which heat and X rays were applied, but the greatest effect was obtained when both treatments were given simultaneously. Recovery occurred when treatments were separated by incubation at 37.00C. The MOLT-4 cells did not show a sequence dependence for heating and irradiation. Survival of MOLT-4 cells after heating and/or irradiation was compared using trypan blue dye exclusion or colony formation. Both assays showed similar qualitative responses, but survival levels measured by the trypan blue assay were much higher than those determined from the colony-forming assay

  4. Influence of p53 abrogation on penclomedine and radiation-induced cell kill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Penclomedine [(3.5-dichloro-2,4-dimethoxy-6-trichloromethyl)pyridine], a synthetic pyridine derivative, has documented activity against human and murine tumor cells and is currently being investigated in Phase I clinical trials. Cells exposed to Penclomedine reveal abundant chromosomal aberrations suggesting that its mechanism of action may be through DNA alkylation. Since p53 is considered to be a DNA damage responsive element, we investigated the influence of p53 abrogation on Penclomedine sensitivity, on sensitivity to ionizing radiation and to both modalities combined. Material and Methods: Three malignant cell lines, derived from a human colorectal carcinoma, were used in this study: RKO cells which contain wild-type p53 alleles, RKO cells transfected with an over expressed mutant p53 transgene (p53.13) and RKO cells transfected with an over expressed HPV-16 E6 gene (RC 10.03) resulting in abrogation of normal p53 function. Cells were exposed to increasing concentrations of Penclomedine (0-120 μg/ml) for variable periods of time (4, 6, 8, 12, 24 hours) as well as to graded doses of ionizing radiation (0-8 Gy), either alone or following 24 hour exposure to Penclomedine. Cell viability was monitored by the colony-forming assay and Trypan blue exclusion. Cell numbers were counted using a hemocytometer and Coulter counter. Both asynchronous and synchronized cell populations were studied with synchrony attained by mitotic shake off. S phase cell determination was by anti-BrdU immuno labeling. Results: Each cell line exhibited a dose and time-dependent reduction in cell viability following Penclomedine treatment. However, RC 10.03 cells showed a dramatic enhancement in cell kill compared to the parental RKO cells (P<0.05). No significant difference in radiation sensitivity amongst the 3 cell lines was observed when cells were exposed either as an asynchronous population or in early G1. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that radiation

  5. Patients with discordant responses to antiretroviral therapy have impaired killing of HIV-infected T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekar Natesampillai

    Full Text Available In medicine, understanding the pathophysiologic basis of exceptional circumstances has led to an enhanced understanding of biology. We have studied the circumstance of HIV-infected patients in whom antiretroviral therapy results in immunologic benefit, despite virologic failure. In such patients, two protease mutations, I54V and V82A, occur more frequently. Expressing HIV protease containing these mutations resulted in less cell death, caspase activation, and nuclear fragmentation than wild type (WT HIV protease or HIV protease containing other mutations. The impaired induction of cell death was also associated with impaired cleavage of procaspase 8, a requisite event for HIV protease mediated cell death. Primary CD4 T cells expressing I54V or V82A protease underwent less cell death than with WT or other mutant proteases. Human T cells infected with HIV containing these mutations underwent less cell death and less Casp8p41 production than WT or HIV containing other protease mutations, despite similar degrees of viral replication. The reductions in cell death occurred both within infected cells, as well as in uninfected bystander cells. These data indicate that single point mutations within HIV protease which are selected in vivo can significantly impact the ability of HIV to kill CD4 T cells, while not impacting viral replication. Therefore, HIV protease regulates both HIV replication as well as HIV induced T cell depletion, the hallmark of HIV pathogenesis.

  6. DNA polymerase activity in heat killing and hyperthermic radiosensitization of mammalian cells as observed after fractionated heat treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorritsma, J B; Burgman, P; Kampinga, H H; Konings, A W

    1986-03-01

    Possible relations between hyperthermic inactivation of alpha and beta DNA polymerase activity and hyperthermic cell killing or hyperthermic radiosensitization were investigated. Ehrlich Ascites Tumor (EAT) cells and HeLa S3 cells were treated with fractionated doses of hyperthermia. The heating schedules were chosen such that the initial heat treatment resulted in either thermotolerance or thermosensitization (step-down heating) for the second heat treatment. The results show that for DNA polymerase activity and heat radiosensitization (cell survival) no thermotolerance or thermosensitization is observed. Thus hyperthermic cell killing and DNA polymerase activity are not correlated. The correlation of hyperthermic radiosensitization and DNA polymerase activity was substantially less than observed in previous experiments with normotolerant and thermotolerant HeLa S3 cells. We conclude that alpha and beta DNA polymerase inactivation is not always the critical cellular process responsible for hyperthermic cell killing or hyperthermic radiosensitization. Other possible cellular systems that might determine these processes are discussed. PMID:3754338

  7. DNA polymerase activity in heat killing and hyperthermic radiosensitization of mammalian cells as observed after fractionated heat treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorritsma, J.B.; Burgman, P.; Kampinga, H.H.; Konings, A.W.

    1986-03-01

    Possible relations between hyperthermic inactivation of alpha and beta DNA polymerase activity and hyperthermic cell killing or hyperthermic radiosensitization were investigated. Ehrlich Ascites Tumor (EAT) cells and HeLa S3 cells were treated with fractionated doses of hyperthermia. The heating schedules were chosen such that the initial heat treatment resulted in either thermotolerance or thermosensitization (step-down heating) for the second heat treatment. The results show that for DNA polymerase activity and heat radiosensitization (cell survival) no thermotolerance or thermosensitization is observed. Thus hyperthermic cell killing and DNA polymerase activity are not correlated. The correlation of hyperthermic radiosensitization and DNA polymerase activity was substantially less than observed in previous experiments with normotolerant and thermotolerant HeLa S3 cells. We conclude that alpha and beta DNA polymerase inactivation is not always the critical cellular process responsible for hyperthermic cell killing or hyperthermic radiosensitization. Other possible cellular systems that might determine these processes are discussed.

  8. Mammalian cells are not killed by DNA single-strand breaks caused by hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell killing by ionizing radiation has been shown to be caused by hydroxyl free radicals formed by water radiolysis. The authors have previously suggested that the killing is not caused by individual OH free radicals but by the interaction of volumes of high radical density with DNA to cause locally multiple damaged sites (LMDS). Here they test this hypothesis using hydrogen dioxide as an alternate source of OH radicals. The route to OH production from H2O2 is expected to cause singly damaged sites rather than LMDS. Chinese hamster V79-171 cells were treated with H2O2 at varying concentrations for varying times at 00C. The yield of DNA damage produced increases with increasing concentration of H2O2 and with time of exposure. H2O2 is efficient in producing single-strand breaks; treatment with 50 μM for 30 min produces damage equivalent to that formed by 10 Gy of α irradiation. In the presence of a hydroxyl radical scavenger, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the yield of damage decreases with increasing DMSO concentration consistent with the scavenging of hydroxyl radicals. In contrast to DNA damage production, cell killing by H2O2 treatment at 00C is inefficient. The conclusion drawn is that individual DNA damage sites are ineffectual in killing cells. Mechanisms are suggested for killing at 00C at high concentrations and for the efficient cell killing by H2O2 at 370C at much lower concentrations

  9. Differences in estimates of cisplatin-induced cell kill in vitro between colorimetric and cell count/colony assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Eva; Kjellén, Elisabeth; Wahlberg, Peter; Wennerberg, Johan; Kjellström, Johan H

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate some bioassays that are different in principle: cell counting, colony forming assay, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT), sulforhodamine B (SRB), crystal violet, and alamarBlue, with respect to their ability to measure cisplatin-induced cell death of in vitro-cultivated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Cisplatin was applied in concentrations of 1.0, 5.0, 10.0, 50.0, and 100 microM. The cells were incubated for 1 h, and the cell survival was measured 5 d after treatment. We found the colorimetric assays and cell counting to be comparable. The colony forming assay indicated a higher degree of cell kill compared with the other techniques. Measurement of cell survival after treatment with cisplatin can be done by use of any of the above tested assays. However, the majority of SCCHN cell lines available do not form colonies easily, or at all. Therefore, comparing the chemosensitivity between such cell lines is limited to alternative assays. In this respect, any of the tested colorimetric assays can be used. However, they seem to underestimate cell kill. Cell counting is also an alternative. This technique, however, is time consuming and operator dependent, as in the case of manual counting, or relatively expensive when counting is performed electronically, compared with the colorimetric assays. PMID:17316066

  10. Salvadora persica (MISWAK) : An effective way of killing oral pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Sofrata, Abier Hamed

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical removal of dental plaque is regarded as an effective means of controlling the progression of dental caries and periodontal disease. The habitual use of chewing sticks (Miswak) as an oral hygiene method is still wildly spread throughout parts of Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Thus, the World Health Organization recommends and encourages the use of chewing sticks as an effective oral hygiene tool in areas where it is customary. As Salvadora persica (Arak) is one...

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Macrophages: A Potential Way to Identify Novel Proteins Associated with Activation of Macrophages for Tumor Cell Killing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingbing Zhang; Haoxuan Zhu; Yanni Lun; Dongmei Yan; Leyang Yu; Bairong Du; Xun Zhu

    2007-01-01

    One major mechanism through which macrophages effectively kill tumor cells requires cell to cell contact,indicating that certain molecules expressed on cell surface of activated macrophages may mediate the tumoricidal capability. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and nitric oxide (NO) are the two classical mediators of tumor cell death.However, evidence of discrepancy is accumulating indicating these known mediators do not appear to account for the broad and potent tumoricidal activity of macrophages. To obtain a full repertoire of tumoricidal activationassociated membrane proteins, we combined one-dimensional SDS-PAGE with capillary liquid chromatographytandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Using this technique, we identified 454 activated macrophage specifically expressed proteins with extremely high confidence, including most known activation markers of macrophages,such as NO synthase (iNOS), Ym1, cyclooxygenase, etc. Membrane bound TNF-α was also identified on activated macrophages. However, it was also detected on thioglycolate elicited macrophages, indicating this molecule may not play a key role in conjugation-dependent tumor cell killing. In contrast, although NO has not been assigned as an effector molecule of conjugation-dependent tumoricidal pathway, iNOS was identified from membrane fraction of activated macrophages, suggesting NO may be involved in conjugation-dependent tumoricidal mechanism,because iNOS association with plasma membrane is ideally suited to deliver NO directly into the contacted tumor cells. This research provides not only new insights into macrophage conjugation-dependent tumoricidal mechanisms, but also a valuable data set of macrophage activation associated membrane proteins, thus providing better understanding of the functional mechanisms of macrophages in anti-tumor and other biological processes.

  12. Selective killing of methotrexate-resistant cells carrying amplified dihydrofolate reductase genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the selective killing of methotrexate (MTX)-resistant cells has been developed. The selection is based on the incorporation of tritiated deoxyuridine into the DNA of MTX-resistant cells but not normal MTX-sensitive cells in the presence of the drug. A Chinese hamster ovary cell mutant that overproduces dihydrofolate reductase was used as an example of a MTX-resistant cell line. In this system, a 10,000-fold enrichment for wild-type MTX-sensitive cells could be achieved after 24 hr of exposure to the drug combination. This selection technique was applied to the isolation of MTX-sensitive segregants from hybrid cells formed between the MTX-resistant mutant and wild-type cells. The loss of MTX resistance and dihydrofolate reductase overproduction was always accompanied by the loss of a homogeneously staining region on chromosome 2 of the resistant parent that contains the amplified genes specifying this enzyme. While this region is always lost, other parts of chromosome 2 are almost always retained, suggesting that deletion rather than chromosome loss underlies marker segregation in this case. When the selection was applied to the resistant mutant itself, no MTX-sensitive revertants were obtained among 10(5) cells screened, attesting to the stability of gene amplification in this clone. It is suggested that this combination of drugs may be useful for the elimination of MTX-resistant tumor cells that develop after MTX chemotherapy

  13. Curcumin and Cancer Cells: How Many Ways Can Curry Kill Tumor Cells Selectively?

    OpenAIRE

    Ravindran, Jayaraj; Prasad, Sahdeo; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is a hyperproliferative disorder that is usually treated by chemotherapeutic agents that are toxic not only to tumor cells but also to normal cells, so these agents produce major side effects. In addition, these agents are highly expensive and thus not affordable for most. Moreover, such agents cannot be used for cancer prevention. Traditional medicines are generally free of the deleterious side effects and usually inexpensive. Curcumin, a component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), is one ...

  14. The engineered thymidylate kinase (TMPK/AZT enzyme-prodrug axis offers efficient bystander cell killing for suicide gene therapy of cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeya Sato

    Full Text Available We previously described a novel suicide (or 'cell fate control' gene therapy enzyme/prodrug system based on an engineered variant of human thymidylate kinase (TMPK that potentiates azidothymidine (AZT activation. Delivery of a suicide gene sequence into tumors by lentiviral transduction embodies a cancer gene therapy that could employ bystander cell killing as a mechanism driving significant tumor regression in vivo. Here we present evidence of a significant bystander cell killing in vitro and in vivo mediated by the TMPK/AZT suicide gene axis that is reliant on the formation of functional gap-junctional intercellular communications (GJICs. Potentiation of AZT activation by the engineered TMPK expressed in the human prostate cancer cell line, PC-3, resulted in effective bystander killing of PC-3 cells lacking TMPK expression--an effect that could be blocked by the GJIC inhibitor, carbenoxolone. Although GJICs are mainly formed by connexins, a new family of GJIC molecules designated pannexins has been recently identified. PC-3 cells expressed both connexin43 (Cx43 and Pannexin1 (Panx1, but Panx1 expression predominated at the plasma membrane, whereas Cx43 expression was primarily localized to the cytosol. The contribution of bystander effects to the reduction of solid tumor xenografts established by the PC-3 cell line was evaluated in an animal model. We demonstrate the contribution of bystander cell killing to tumor regression in a xenograft model relying on the delivery of expression of the TMPK suicide gene into tumors via direct intratumoral injection of recombinant therapeutic lentivirus. Taken together, our data underscore that the TMPK/AZT enzyme-prodrug axis can be effectively utilized in suicide gene therapy of solid tumors, wherein significant tumor regression can be achieved via bystander effects mediated by GJICs.

  15. Depression of hyperthermic potentiation in cell killing of ultraviolet light-irradiated Dictyostelium discoideum by pre-heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat treatment at 300C for 15 min immediately after ultraviolet (UV) irradiation enhanced cell killing of Dictyostelium discoideum. However, when the cells were heated at 300C for 15 min and then cultured for more than 10 min at 230C prior to UV exposure, the hyperthermic potentiation in cell killing was depressed. When these preheated cells were cultured in the presence of cycloheximide, the depression of the hyperthermic potentiation disappeared. These results suggest that the depression in hyperthermic potentiation may be the result of the induction of some heat-shock-type proteins. (author)

  16. TH17 cells promote microbial killing and innate immune sensing of DNA via interleukin 26

    KAUST Repository

    Meller, Stephan

    2015-07-13

    Interleukin 17-producing helper T cells (TH 17 cells) have a major role in protection against infections and in mediating autoimmune diseases, yet the mechanisms involved are incompletely understood. We found that interleukin 26 (IL-26), a human TH17 cell-derived cytokine, is a cationic amphipathic protein that kills extracellular bacteria via membrane-pore formation. Furthermore, TH17 cell-derived IL-26 formed complexes with bacterial DNA and self-DNA released by dying bacteria and host cells. The resulting IL-26-DNA complexes triggered the production of type I interferon by plasmacytoid dendritic cells via activation of Toll-like receptor 9, but independently of the IL-26 receptor. These findings provide insights into the potent antimicrobial and proinflammatory function of TH17 cells by showing that IL-26 is a natural human antimicrobial that promotes immune sensing of bacterial and host cell death. © 2015 Nature America, Inc.

  17. A leukocyte antigen, Leu-13, is involved in induction of resistance of human cells to x-ray cell killing by interferon-α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously reported on human interferon (HuIFN)-induced resistance of human cells to X-ray and UV cell killing. In this study, we searched for the genes whose expression is responsible for the resistance, using a PCR-based mRNA differential display method and Northern blotting analysis. RSa cells were used for this analysis, because they show increased resistance to X-ray- and UV-caused cell killing by HuIFN-α treatment prior to irradiation. Messenger RNA expression levels for Leu-13, a leukocyte antigen, were markedly up-regulated in RSa cells after HuIFN-α treatment. Furthermore, pretreatment of RSa cells with antisense oligonucleotides for Leu-13 mRNA resulted in the suppression of the HuIFN-α-induced resistance of the cells to X-ray cell killing, but did not modulate HuIFN-α-induced resistance to UV cell killing. These results suggest that Leu-13 is involved in HuIFN-α-induced resistance of human cells to X-ray cell killing, but not to UV cell killing. (author)

  18. Selective enhancement of hypoxic cell killing by tempol-regulated suicide gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagiya, Go; Ogawa, Ryohei; Choudhuri, Rajani; Cook, John A; Hatashita, Masanori; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Koda, Kana; Yamashita, Kei; Kubo, Makoto; Kawakami, Fumitaka; Mitchell, James B

    2015-08-01

    The presence of hypoxic regions within solid tumors is caused by an imbalance between cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Such regions may facilitate the onset of recurrence after radiation therapy and chemotherapy, as hypoxic cells show resistance to these treatments. We found that tempol, a nitroxide, strongly induces the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, particularly under conditions of hypoxia. We, therefore, evaluated whether tempol enhances the gene expression via HIF-1α, potentially leading to various applications for cancer gene therapy targeting hypoxic cells. Consequently, following treatment with tempol under hypoxia, the luciferase (Luc) activity in the cells transfected with the plasmid containing the luc gene with the oxygen-dependent degradation domain and a promoter composed of hypoxia-responsive elements increased up to approximately 10-fold compared to that observed in cells treated identically with the exception of tempol. The plasmid constructed by replacing the luc gene with the fcy::fur fusion gene as a suicide gene, strongly induced the accumulation of the Fcy::Fur fusion protein, only when incubated in the presence of the hypoxic mimic CoCl2 and tempol. The transfected cells were successfully killed with the addition of 5-fluorocytosine to the cell culture according to the fcy::fur fusion gene expression. As similar but lesser enhancement of the Luc activity was also observed in solid tumor tissues in nude mice, this strategy may be applied for hypoxic cancer eradication. PMID:26034980

  19. Antibacterial Surface Design of Titanium-Based Biomaterials for Enhanced Bacteria-Killing and Cell-Assisting Functions Against Periprosthetic Joint Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaxing; Li, Jinhua; Qian, Shi; Guo, Geyong; Wang, Qiaojie; Tang, Jin; Shen, Hao; Liu, Xuanyong; Zhang, Xianlong; Chu, Paul K

    2016-05-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the formidable and recalcitrant complications after orthopedic surgery, and inhibiting biofilm formation on the implant surface is considered crucial to prophylaxis of PJI. However, it has recently been demonstrated that free-floating biofilm-like aggregates in the local body fluid and bacterial colonization on the implant and peri-implant tissues can coexist and are involved in the pathogenesis of PJI. An effective surface with both contact-killing and release-killing antimicrobial capabilities can potentially abate these concerns and minimize PJI caused by adherent/planktonic bacteria. Herein, Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are embedded in titania (TiO2) nanotubes by anodic oxidation and plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) to form a contact-killing surface. Vancomycin is then incorporated into the nanotubes by vacuum extraction and lyophilization to produce the release-killing effect. A novel clinical PJI model system involving both in vitro and in vivo use of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST239 is established to systematically evaluate the antibacterial properties of the hybrid surface against planktonic and sessile bacteria. The vancomycin-loaded and Ag-implanted TiO2 nanotubular surface exhibits excellent antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects against planktonic/adherent bacteria without appreciable silver ion release. The fibroblasts/bacteria cocultures reveal that the surface can help fibroblasts to combat bacteria. We first utilize the nanoarchitecture of implant surface as a bridge between the inorganic bactericide (Ag NPs) and organic antibacterial agent (vancomycin) to achieve total victory in the battle of PJI. The combination of contact-killing and release-killing together with cell-assisting function also provides a novel and effective strategy to mitigate bacterial infection and biofilm formation on biomaterials and has large potential in orthopedic applications. PMID:27054673

  20. Photoreactivation of UV induced cell killing, chromosome aberrations, sister chromatide exchanges, mutations and pyrimidine dimers in Xenopus laevis fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fibroblasts from Xenopus laevis, which posses photoreactivating enzyme were used to study the influence of photoreactivating light on the frequency of pyrimidine dimers in DNA, chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges, cell killing and the induction of gene mutations (ouabain-resistance) induced by 254 nm ultraviolet irradiation. The frequency of all biological endpoints studied were reduced following exposure to photoreactivating light parallel to the reduction in the frequencies of pyrimidine dimers (determined as endonuclease sensitive sites). However, there was not always an absolute quantitative relationship between the reduction in the frequency of pyrimidine dimers and the reduction in the biological effects. This probably reflects a fast fixation process for the biological effects prior to removal of the dimers by photoreactivation. (orig.)

  1. 220D-F2 from Rubus ulmifolius kills Streptococcus pneumoniae planktonic cells and pneumococcal biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila J Talekar

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus forms organized biofilms to persist in the human nasopharynx. This persistence allows the pneumococcus to produce severe diseases such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia and meningitis that kill nearly a million children every year. While bacteremia and meningitis are mediated by planktonic pneumococci, biofilm structures are present during pneumonia and otitis media. The global emergence of S. pneumoniae strains resistant to most commonly prescribed antibiotics warrants further discovery of alternative therapeutics. The present study assessed the antimicrobial potential of a plant extract, 220D-F2, rich in ellagic acid, and ellagic acid derivatives, against S. pneumoniae planktonic cells and biofilm structures. Our studies first demonstrate that, when inoculated together with planktonic cultures, 220D-F2 inhibited the formation of pneumococcal biofilms in a dose-dependent manner. As measured by bacterial counts and a LIVE/DEAD bacterial viability assay, 100 and 200 µg/ml of 220D-F2 had significant bactericidal activity against pneumococcal planktonic cultures as early as 3 h post-inoculation. Quantitative MIC's, whether quantified by qPCR or dilution and plating, showed that 80 µg/ml of 220D-F2 completely eradicated overnight cultures of planktonic pneumococci, including antibiotic resistant strains. When preformed pneumococcal biofilms were challenged with 220D-F2, it significantly reduced the population of biofilms 3 h post-inoculation. Minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC50 was obtained incubating biofilms with 100 µg/ml of 220D-F2 for 3 h and 6 h of incubation. 220D-F2 also significantly reduced the population of pneumococcal biofilms formed on human pharyngeal cells. Our results demonstrate potential therapeutic applications of 220D-F2 to both kill planktonic pneumococcal cells and disrupt pneumococcal biofilms.

  2. 220D-F2 from Rubus ulmifolius kills Streptococcus pneumoniae planktonic cells and pneumococcal biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talekar, Sharmila J; Chochua, Sopio; Nelson, Katie; Klugman, Keith P; Quave, Cassandra L; Vidal, Jorge E

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) forms organized biofilms to persist in the human nasopharynx. This persistence allows the pneumococcus to produce severe diseases such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia and meningitis that kill nearly a million children every year. While bacteremia and meningitis are mediated by planktonic pneumococci, biofilm structures are present during pneumonia and otitis media. The global emergence of S. pneumoniae strains resistant to most commonly prescribed antibiotics warrants further discovery of alternative therapeutics. The present study assessed the antimicrobial potential of a plant extract, 220D-F2, rich in ellagic acid, and ellagic acid derivatives, against S. pneumoniae planktonic cells and biofilm structures. Our studies first demonstrate that, when inoculated together with planktonic cultures, 220D-F2 inhibited the formation of pneumococcal biofilms in a dose-dependent manner. As measured by bacterial counts and a LIVE/DEAD bacterial viability assay, 100 and 200 µg/ml of 220D-F2 had significant bactericidal activity against pneumococcal planktonic cultures as early as 3 h post-inoculation. Quantitative MIC's, whether quantified by qPCR or dilution and plating, showed that 80 µg/ml of 220D-F2 completely eradicated overnight cultures of planktonic pneumococci, including antibiotic resistant strains. When preformed pneumococcal biofilms were challenged with 220D-F2, it significantly reduced the population of biofilms 3 h post-inoculation. Minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC)50 was obtained incubating biofilms with 100 µg/ml of 220D-F2 for 3 h and 6 h of incubation. 220D-F2 also significantly reduced the population of pneumococcal biofilms formed on human pharyngeal cells. Our results demonstrate potential therapeutic applications of 220D-F2 to both kill planktonic pneumococcal cells and disrupt pneumococcal biofilms. PMID:24823499

  3. Adenoviral E4orf3 and E4orf6 Proteins, But Not E1B55K, Increase Killing of Cancer Cells by Radiotherapy in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is widely used for treatment of many tumor types, but it can damage normal tissues. It has been proposed that cancer cells can be selectively sensitized to radiation by adenovirus replication or by using radiosensitizing transgenes. Adenoviral proteins E1B55K, E4orf3, and E4orf6 play a role in radiosensitization, by targeting the Mre11, Rad50, and NBS1 complex (MRN) and inhibiting DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. We hypothesize that combined with irradiation, these adenoviral proteins increase cell killing through the impairment of DSB repair. Methods and Materials: We assessed the radiosensitizing/additive potential of replication-deficient adenoviruses expressing E1B55K, E4orf3, and E4orf6 proteins. Combination treatments with low-dose external photon beam radiotherapy were studied in prostate cancer (PC-3MM2 and DU-145), breast cancer (M4A4-LM3), and head and neck cancer (UT-SCC8) cell lines. We further demonstrated radiosensitizing or additive effects in mice with PC-3MM2 tumors. Results: We show enhanced cell killing with adenovirus and radiation combination treatment. Co-infection with several of the viruses did not further increase cell killing, suggesting that both E4orf6 and E4orf3 are potent in MRN inhibition. Our results show that adenoviral proteins E4orf3 and E4orf6, but not E1B55K, are effective also in vivo. Enhanced cell killing was due to inhibition of DSB repair resulting in persistent double-strand DNA damage, indicated by elevated phospho-H2AX levels at 24 h after irradiation. Conclusions: This knowledge can be applied for improving the treatment of malignant tumors, such as prostate cancer, for development of more effective combination therapies and minimizing radiation doses and reducing side effects.

  4. Distinct roles of Ape1 protein, an enzyme involved in DNA repair, in high or low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation-induced cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Xiang; Chen, Guangnan; Zhang, Xiangming; Tang, Xiaobing; Park, Dongkyoo; Cucinotta, Francis A; Yu, David S; Deng, Xingming; Dynan, William S; Doetsch, Paul W; Wang, Ya

    2014-10-31

    High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation from space heavy charged particles or a heavier ion radiotherapy machine kills more cells than low LET radiation, mainly because high LET radiation-induced DNA damage is more difficult to repair. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is the ratio of the effects generated by high LET radiation to low LET radiation. Previously, our group and others demonstrated that the cell-killing RBE is involved in the interference of high LET radiation with non-homologous end joining but not homologous recombination repair. This effect is attributable, in part, to the small DNA fragments (≤40 bp) directly produced by high LET radiation, the size of which prevents Ku protein from efficiently binding to the two ends of one fragment at the same time, thereby reducing non-homologous end joining efficiency. Here we demonstrate that Ape1, an enzyme required for processing apurinic/apyrimidinic (known as abasic) sites, is also involved in the generation of small DNA fragments during the repair of high LET radiation-induced base damage, which contributes to the higher RBE of high LET radiation-induced cell killing. This discovery opens a new direction to develop approaches for either protecting astronauts from exposure to space radiation or benefiting cancer patients by sensitizing tumor cells to high LET radiotherapy. PMID:25210033

  5. Human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells efficiently kill influenza virus-infected lung alveolar epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Xiang, Zheng; Feng, Ting; Li, Jinrong; Liu, Yinping; Fan, Yingying; Lu, Qiao; Yin, Zhongwei; Yu, Meixing; Shen, Chongyang; Tu, Wenwei

    2013-01-01

    γδ-T cells play an indispensable role in host defense against different viruses, including influenza A virus. However, whether these cells have cytotoxic activity against influenza virus-infected lung alveolar epithelial cells and subsequently contribute to virus clearance remains unknown. Using influenza virus-infected A549 cells, human lung alveolar epithelial cells, we investigated the cytotoxic activity of aminobisphosphonate pamidronate (PAM)-expanded human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells and their underlying mechanisms. We found that PAM could selectively activate and expand human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells. PAM-expanded human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells efficiently killed influenza virus-infected lung alveolar epithelial cells and inhibited virus replication. The cytotoxic activity of PAM-expanded Vγ9Vδ2-T cells was dependent on cell-to-cell contact and required NKG2D activation. Perforin–granzyme B, tumor-necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and Fas–Fas ligand (FasL) pathways were involved in their cytotoxicity. Our study suggests that targeting γδ-T cells by PAM can potentially offer an alternative option for the treatment of influenza virus. PMID:23353835

  6. Ferritin-iron increases killing of Chinese hamster ovary cells by X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stationary-phase Chinese hamster ovary cells were cultured in medium containing ferritin (∼19% iron by weight) added at concentrations ranging from 0 to 128 μg/ml. One set of cultures was unirradiated, another set exposed to 4.0 Gy of X-ray. Clonogenic cell survival was assessed in each set of cultures. In the absence of added ferritin, 4.0 Gy killed approximately 50% of the cells. In the absence of radiation, ferritin was not toxic at less than 48 μg/ml; above 48 μg/ml, toxicity increased with concentration. Apoferritin was not toxic at any concentration tested (up to 1000 μg/ml). Although 32 μg/ml ferritin, reflecting only a 3-6 fold increase in iron concentration over normal serum, was not toxic, it reduced survival of X-irradiated cells by an additional 75%. These results indicate that a sublethal concentration of ferritin can be a potent radiosensitizer. (Author)

  7. Comparative Killing Rates of Fluoroquinolones and Cell Wall-Active Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Fung-Tomc, Joan C.; Gradelski, Elizabeth; Valera, Lourdes; Kolek, Benjamin; Bonner, Daniel P.

    2000-01-01

    Killing rates of fluoroquinolones, β-lactams, and vancomycin were compared against Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus aureus, pneumococci, streptococci, and Enterococcus faecalis. The times required for fluoroquinolones to decrease viability by 3 log10 were 1.5 h for Enterobacteriaceae, 4 to 6 h for staphylococci, and ≥6 h for streptococci and enterococci. Thus, the rate of killing by fluoroquinolones is organism group dependent; overall, they killed more rapidly than β-lactams and vancomycin...

  8. A partner monoclonal antibody to Moab 730 kills 100% of DU145 and PC3 androgen-independent cancer cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hemant Kumar Vyas; Rahul Pal; Nirmal K Lohiya; G P Talwar

    2009-12-01

    A number of therapeutic options are available for patients with prostate carcinoma till the time that the tumour is hormone dependent. However, no fully effective therapy is available for the treatment of androgen-independent prostate carcinomas. Antibodies directed at epitopes unique to or overexpressed on the cancer cells could be of therapeutic utility. A monoclonal antibody (Moab) 2C4 has been generated, which binds with cells of two androgenindependent prostate cancers, DU145 and PC3, and does not bind to peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) of healthy donors. This antibody, along with the previously developed Moab 730, kills 100% of both DU145 and PC3 cells in the presence of complement and does not have a deleterious effect on PBLs of healthy males. The anti-tumour action of the two antibodies prevents the establishment of DU145 cell tumour in nude mice in vivo. Moab 2C4 in combination with 730 has potential for use as therapy for androgen-independent cancers.

  9. Enhanced effect of CD8++ T cells activated by tumor lysate -pulsed DCs on killing autologous tumor cells%通过肿瘤致敏的DCs活化的CD8+T细胞可有效地杀死肿瘤细胞

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐小龙; 江振友; 蔡淑玉

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the ability of dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with tumor lysate to initiate cell mediated immune responses by stimulating naive T cells, and the efficiency of activated T cells to kill autologous tumor cells in vitro. METHODS: The peripheral blood lymphocytes and monocytes were obtained from the advanced renal cell carcinoma patient by eonglutination method. The immature dendritic cells were generated in the presence of interleukin -4(IL-4) and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from monocytes of healthy individuals.These cells were pulsed with tumor lysate or not. Induction of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes(CTLs) response by mature dendritic cells (mDCs) was evaluated by the CD95(Fas) expression assay through FCM and the cytotoxic assay a gninst autolognns human tumor cells. RESULTS: Human immature dendritic cells and T cells obtained from healthy donors were stimulated with tumor- pulsed dendritic cells. The immature dendritic cells were applied to the cytotoxicity assay a gainst target autologons tumor cells. The CD95 (Fas) expression, IFN-γ, and TNF -α secreted by the CTLs in tumor lysate-plused DC group were higher than those of other groups. The capacity of the CTLs to kill autolognns tumor cells was significantly different(P<0. 05). Antigen-specific DCs vaccine can induce T cells activation and proliferation, thus we can obtain higher proportion of tumor specific cytotoxic T cells(CTLs), and enhance the CTLs to secret IFN-γ and TNF-α. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that monocyte-derived human dendritic cells pulsed with tumor lysate could in duce the specific antitumor effect against autologons tumors. This in vitro model offers a new and simple approach to the development of DC + CTL - based immunotherapy.%目的:探索肿瘤裂解物负载的DCs诱导活化的初始T细胞介导细胞免疫及活化的T细胞杀死肿瘤细胞的能力.方法:应用黏附法分离外周血中的淋巴细胞

  10. Combining carbon ion irradiation and non-homologous end-joining repair inhibitor NU7026 efficiently kills cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our previous data demonstrated that targeting non-homologous end-joining repair (NHEJR) yields a higher radiosensitivity than targeting homologous recombination repair (HRR) to heavy ions using DNA repair gene knockouts (KO) in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF). In this study, we determined if combining the use of an NHEJR inhibitor with carbon (C) ion irradiation was more efficient in killing human cancer cells compared with only targeting a HRR inhibitor. The TP53-null human non-small cell lung cancer cell line H1299 was used for testing the radiosensitizing effect of NHEJR-related DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) inhibitor NU7026, HRR-related Rad51 inhibitor B02, or both to C ion irradiation using colony forming assays. The mechanism underlying the inhibitor radiosensitization was determined by flow cytometry after H2AX phosphorylation staining. HRR-related Rad54-KO, NHEJR-related Lig4-KO, and wild-type TP53-KO MEF were also included to confirm the suppressing effect specificity of these inhibitors. NU7026 showed significant sensitizing effect to C ion irradiation in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, B02 showed a slight sensitizing effect to C ion irradiation. The addition of NU7026 significantly increased H2AX phosphorylation after C ion and x-ray irradiations in H1299 cells, but not B02. NU7026 had no effect on radiosensitivity to Lig4-KO MEF and B02 had no effect on radiosensitivity to Rad54-KO MEF in both irradiations. These results suggest that inhibitors targeting the NHEJR pathway could significantly enhance radiosensitivity of human cancer cells to C ion irradiation, rather than targeting the HRR pathway. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-015-0536-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  11. PD-L1 Expression on Retrovirus-Infected Cells Mediates Immune Escape from CD8+ T Cell Killing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilseyar Akhmetzyanova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic CD8+ T Lymphocytes (CTL efficiently control acute virus infections but can become exhausted when a chronic infection develops. Signaling of the inhibitory receptor PD-1 is an important mechanism for the development of virus-specific CD8+ T cell dysfunction. However, it has recently been shown that during the initial phase of infection virus-specific CD8+ T cells express high levels of PD-1, but are fully competent in producing cytokines and killing virus-infected target cells. To better understand the role of the PD-1 signaling pathway in CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity during acute viral infections we analyzed the expression of the ligand on retrovirus-infected cells targeted by CTLs. We observed increased levels of PD-L1 expression after infection of cells with the murine Friend retrovirus (FV or with HIV. In FV infected mice, virus-specific CTLs efficiently eliminated infected target cells that expressed low levels of PD-L1 or that were deficient for PD-L1 but the population of PD-L1high cells escaped elimination and formed a reservoir for chronic FV replication. Infected cells with high PD-L1 expression mediated a negative feedback on CD8+ T cells and inhibited their expansion and cytotoxic functions. These findings provide evidence for a novel immune escape mechanism during acute retroviral infection based on PD-L1 expression levels on virus infected target cells.

  12. A Numerical Investigation of the Electric and Thermal Cell Kill Distributions in Electroporation-Based Therapies in Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo A Garcia; Davalos, Rafael V.; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2014-01-01

    Electroporation-based therapies are powerful biotechnological tools for enhancing the delivery of exogeneous agents or killing tissue with pulsed electric fields (PEFs). Electrochemotherapy (ECT) and gene therapy based on gene electrotransfer (EGT) both use reversible electroporation to deliver chemotherapeutics or plasmid DNA into cells, respectively. In both ECT and EGT, the goal is to permeabilize the cell membrane while maintaining high cell viability in order to facilitate drug or gene t...

  13. The killing effect of laser and hematoporphyrin on tumor cells%激光和血卟啉对肿瘤细胞的杀伤作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雍政; 何冰; 王萧

    2011-01-01

    [目的]研究激光和血卟啉对肿瘤细胞的杀伤特点.[方法]体外应用K562和MCF7细胞观察不同浓度血卟啉和不同激光强度对细胞的杀伤特点及其激光束杀伤细胞的分布特性;体外培养S180肉瘤细胞接种健康小鼠建立荷瘤小鼠模型,观察静脉注射血卟啉0.5和12h后激光照射对肿瘤的杀伤作用.[结果]在固定的血卟啉浓度或激光强度下,随着激光强度或血卟啉浓度的增加,对肿瘤细胞的杀伤作用成线性作用增强(R2=0.9967,R2=0.9994),其中杀伤作用=血卟啉浓度(μg/ml)×激光能量(J);激光束对细胞的杀伤作用存在明显的不均匀性;荷瘤小鼠在给药后0.5 h给与激光治疗效果好于给药后12h.[结论]血卟啉浓度和激光剂量对肿瘤的杀伤作用存在线性量效关系且激光束对细胞杀伤作用存在明显的不均匀性,该结果为制定最佳的临床治疗方案提供了依据.%[Objective] To investigate the effect of He-Ne laser and hematoporphyrin derivative on tumor cells. [Methods] Fixing up laser energy or hematoporphyrin of the injury character on K562 cells and MCF7 cells in vitro was observed. The photodamage of laser bean on tumor cells and the treatment effect of mice with SI80 tumor after hematoporphyrin administration after 0.5 hour and 12 hour were also studied. [Results] The injury effect was increased in accordance with liner relation with the increase of concentration of hematoporphyrin or laser energy. The values of R2 were 0.9967 and 0.9994, respectively. The multiplication of hematoporphyrin concentration and the laser energy determined the injury intensity. The photodamage effect of laser bean on tumor cells was nonhomogeneous. The effect after treating for 0.5 hour adminstration was better than that after 12 hours. [Conclusion] There exists a linear dose-effect relationship between hematoporphyrin concentration and laser energy on anti-tumor effect in photodynamic therapy, the result provide a

  14. Fluorodeoxyuridine mediated cell cycle synchronization in S-phase increases the Auger radiation cell killing with {sup 125}I-iododeoxyuridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perillo-Adamer, F. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital of Lausanne (Switzerland); Dept. of Radio-Oncology, Univ. Hospital of Lausanne (Switzerland); Kosinski, M.; Viertl, D.; Bischof Delaloye, A. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital of Lausanne (Switzerland); Dupertuis, Y.M. [Unit of Nutrition, Univ. Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland); Buchegger, F. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital of Lausanne (Switzerland); Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    Aim: {sup 125}I-iododeoxyuridine is a potential Auger radiation therapy agent. Its incorporation in DNA of proliferating cells is enhanced by fluorodeoxyuridine. Here, we evaluated therapeutic activities of {sup 125}I-iododeoxyuridine in an optimized fluorodeoxyuridine pre-treatment inducing S-phase synchronization. Methods: After S-phase synchronization by fluorodeoxyuridine, cells were treated with {sup 125}I-iododeoxyuridine. Apoptosis analysis and S-phase synchronization were studied by flow cytometry. Cell survival was determined by colony-forming assay. Based on measured growth parameters, the number of decays per cell that induced killing was extrapolated. Results: Treatment experiments showed that 72 to 91% of synchronized cells were killed after 0.8 and 8 kBq/ml {sup 125}I-iododeoxyuridine incubation, respectively. In controls, only 8 to 38% of cells were killed by corresponding {sup 125}I-iododeoxyuridine activities alone and even increasing the activity to 80 kBq/ml gave only 42% killing. Duplicated treatment cycles or repeated fluorodeoxyuridine pre-treatment allowed enhancing cell killing to >95% at 8 kBq/ml {sup 125}I-iododeoxyuridine. About 50 and 160 decays per S-phase cells in controls and S-phase synchronization, respectively, were responsible for the observed cell killing at 0.8 kBq/ml radio-iododeoxyuridine. Conclusion: These data show the successful application of fluorodeoxyuridine that provided increased {sup 125}I-iododeoxyuridine Auger radiation cell killing efficacy through S-phase synchronization and high DNA incorporation of radio-iododeoxyuridine. (orig.)

  15. Cryptococcus neoformans modulates extracellular killing by neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asfia eQureshi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We recently established a key role for host sphingomyelin synthase (SMS in the regulation of the killing activity of neutrophils against Cryptococcus neoformans. In this work, we studied the effect of C. neoformans on the killing activity of neutrophils and whether SMS would still be a player against C. neoformans in immunocompromised mice lacking T and NK cells (Tgε26 mice. To this end, we analyzed whether C. neoformans would have any effect on neutrophil survival and killing in vitro and in vivo. We show that unlike C. albicans, neither the presence nor the capsule size of C. neoformans cells have any effect on neutrophil viability. Interestingly, melanized C. neoformans cells totally abrogated the killing activity of neutrophils. Next, we monitored how exposure of neutrophils to C. neoformans cells would interfere with any further killing activity of the medium and found that pre-incubation with live but not heat-killed fungal cells significantly inhibits further killing activity of the medium. We next studied whether activation of SMS at the site of C. neoformans infection is dependent on T and NK cells. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization (MALDI tissue imaging in infected lung we found that similarly to previous observations in the isogenic wild type CBA/J mice, SM 16:0 levels are significantly elevated at the site of infection in mice lacking T and NK cells but only at early time points. This study highlights that C. neoformans may negatively regulate the killing activity of neutrophils and that SMS activation in neutrophils appears to be partially independent of T and/or NK cells.

  16. Dendritic cells engineered to express defined allo-HLA peptide complexes induce antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells efficiently killing tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stronen, E; Abrahamsen, I W; Gaudernack, G; Wälchli, S; Munthe, E; Buus, S; Johansen, F-E; Lund-Johansen, F; Olweus, J

    2009-01-01

    , efficiently present externally loaded peptides from the antigen, Melan-A/MART-1 to T cells from HLA-A*0201-negative donors. CD8(+) T cells binding HLA-A*0201/MART-1 pentamers were detected already after 12 days of co-culture in 11/11 donors. The majority of cells from pentamer(+) cell lines were CTL and...... efficiently killed HLA-A*0201(+) melanoma cells, whilst sparing HLA-A*0201(+) B-cells. Allo-restricted CTL specific for peptides from the leukaemia-associated antigens CD33 and CD19 were obtained with comparable efficiency. Collectively, the results show that dendritic cells engineered to express defined allo...

  17. Autophagy inhibition plays the synergetic killing roles with radiation in the multi-drug resistant SKVCR ovarian cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autophagy has attracted attentions as a novel mechanism for tumor development. In this study Human ovarian carcinoma cell line SKOV3 and multidrug-resistant phenotype SKVCR cells were used and the roles of autophagy in radiation-induced cell death were analyzed. Cell viability was examined by colony formation and cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, 3MA and ZVAD were used to block autophagy and apoptosis, respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to detect mRNA level and Western blot was used to detect protein expression, monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining and flow cytometery were used for autophagy, apoptosis and cell cycle dynamics, respectively. (1) The radiosensitivity exhibited differently in SKOV3 and SKVCR cells (SKOV3: D0=3.37, SKVCR: D0= 4.18); compared with SKOV3 the constitutive expression of MAPLC3 in SKVCR was higher, but no change of Caspase-3 and cleaved Caspase-3. (2) The ionizing radiation (IR)- induced apoptosis and autophagy were significant in both cells (P<0.05); inhibition of apoptosis with ZVAD showed no impact on survival of SKOV3 and SKVCR cells after radiation, while inhibition of autophagy significantly decreased viability in SKVCR cells, for SKVO3 cells only low level of radiation (2 Gy and 4 Gy) could decrease the viability(P<0.05). (3) ZVAD inhibited apoptosis and autophagy in both cells, 3MA inhibit apoptosis in SKOV3, and promote apoptosis in SKVCR, together with inhibition of autophagy. (4) G2/M arrest was induced by radiation in both cells; the accumulation of G2/M was more significant in SKOV3, 3MA attenuated the radiation-induced S phase delay in SKVCR. IR-induced autophagy provides a self-protective mechanism against radiotherapy in SKVCR cells, the use of autophagy inhibitor, 3MA, increases the killing effects of radiation by inhibiting autophagy and radiation- induced S phase delay, also by the increase of apoptosis, which suggests a better therapeutic strategy in drug- resistant SKVCR ovarian cancer cells

  18. An Hsp70 peptide initiates NK cell killing of leukemic blasts after stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gross, Catharina; Holler, Ernst; Stangl, Stefan; Dickinson, Anne; Pockley, A. Graham; Asea, Alexzander A.; Mallappa, Nagaraj; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to solid tumors, leukemic blasts frequently present both Hsp70 and HLA-E on their cell Surface and thereby present activating and inhibitory signals to CD94(+) NK cells. In the first 12 months after stem cell trail splantation (SCT) CD94(+) NK cells clearly dominate over CD3(+)/CD16(-)/5

  19. Drug Redeployment to Kill Leukemia and Lymphoma Cells by Disrupting SCD1-Mediated Synthesis of Monounsaturated Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southam, Andrew D; Khanim, Farhat L; Hayden, Rachel E; Constantinou, Julia K; Koczula, Katarzyna M; Michell, Robert H; Viant, Mark R; Drayson, Mark T; Bunce, Chris M

    2015-06-15

    The redeployed drug combination of bezafibrate and medroxyprogesterone acetate (designated BaP) has potent in vivo anticancer activity in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and endemic Burkitt lymphoma (eBL) patients; however, its mechanism-of-action is unclear. Given that elevated fatty acid biosynthesis is a hallmark of many cancers and that these drugs can affect lipid metabolism, we hypothesized that BaP exerts anticancer effects by disrupting lipogenesis. We applied mass spectrometry-based lipidomics and gene and protein expression measurements of key lipogenic enzymes [acetyl CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1), fatty acid synthase (FASN), and stearoyl CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1)] to AML and eBL cell lines treated with BaP. BaP treatment decreased fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis from (13)C D-glucose. The proportion of phospholipid species with saturated and monounsaturated acyl chains was also decreased after treatment, whereas those with polyunsaturated chains increased. BaP decreased SCD1 protein levels in each cell line (0.46- to 0.62-fold; P < 0.023) and decreased FASN protein levels across all cell lines (0.87-fold decrease; P = 1.7 × 10(-4)). Changes to ACC1 protein levels were mostly insignificant. Supplementation with the SCD1 enzymatic product, oleate, rescued AML and e-BL cells from BaP cell killing and decreased levels of BaP-induced reactive oxygen species, whereas supplementation with the SCD1 substrate (and FASN product), palmitate, did not rescue cells. In conclusion, these data suggest that the critical anticancer actions of BaP are decreases in SCD1 levels and monounsaturated fatty acid synthesis. To our knowledge, this is the first time that clinically available antileukemic and antilymphoma drugs targeting SCD1 have been reported. PMID:25943877

  20. The DNA damage-induced cell death response: a roadmap to kill cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, Sonja; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2016-08-01

    Upon massive DNA damage cells fail to undergo productive DNA repair and trigger the cell death response. Resistance to cell death is linked to cellular transformation and carcinogenesis as well as radio- and chemoresistance, making the underlying signaling pathways a promising target for therapeutic intervention. Diverse DNA damage-induced cell death pathways are operative in mammalian cells and finally culminate in the induction of programmed cell death via activation of apoptosis or necroptosis. These signaling routes affect nuclear, mitochondria- and plasma membrane-associated key molecules to activate the apoptotic or necroptotic response. In this review, we highlight the main signaling pathways, molecular players and mechanisms guiding the DNA damage-induced cell death response. PMID:26791483

  1. WE-G-BRE-05: Nanoparticle-Aided Microwave Hyperthermia Is Accompanied By Free Radical Generation and Enhanced Cell Kill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Hyperthermia, an established method of cancer treatment used in adjuvant to radiation and chemotherapy, can utilize metallic nanoparticles (NPs) for tumor heating with a microwave electromagnetic field. The high surface-area-to-volume ratio of nanoparticles makes them effective catalysts for free radical generation, thus amplifying the cell-killing effect of hyperthermia. We explore the effect of gold and platinum NPs in generating free radicals in aqueous media under a microwave field. Methods: Spin trap 5,5-Dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) was mixed separately with 3.2 nm Mesogold and Mesoplatinum colloidal nanoparticle suspensions in deionized water to trap radicals. The mixtures were injected into a number of glass capillaries and exposed to the 9.68GHz microwave field of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer. The microwave radiation from the spectrometer served to both generate and detect the trapped radicals. Each sample was scanned at 12mW microwave power to obtain the initial signal of hydroxyl radicals (OH.), then at 39.8mW followed by 79.8 or 125mW, and finally re-scanned at 12mW. Radical signal intensities obtained by double integration of EPR spectra from the initial and the final scans were then compared. Results: Nanoparticle samples had no intentionally-added free radicals before the initial measurement. While samples with DMPO-water solution showed no OH. signal, all those with AuNPs or PtNPs developed an OH. signal during their first exposure to the microwave field. Depending upon the applied microwave power and time interval between the initial and the final EPR scans, an OH. intensity increase of ∼10-60% was found. This contradicts the typical trend of exponential decay of the OH. signal with time. Conclusion: The consistent increase in OH. intensity establishes that gold and platinum nanoparticles facilitate free radical generation under microwave irradiation. Our results suggest that NP-aided hyperthermia is

  2. Ion-kill dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  3. Piperlongumine selectively kills cancer cells and increases cisplatin antitumor activity in head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Roh, Jong-Lyel; Kim, Eun Hye; Park, Jin Young; Kim, Ji Won; Kwon, Minsu; Lee, Byung-Heon

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation to cellular stress is not a vital function of normal cells but is required of cancer cells, and as such might be a sensible target in cancer therapy. Piperlongumine is a naturally occurring small molecule selectively toxic to cancer cells. This study assesses the cytotoxicity of piperlongumine and its combination with cisplatin in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) cells in vitro and in vivo. The effect of piperlongumine, alone and in combination with cisplatin, was assessed in human HNC c...

  4. Combinatorial BTK and MALT1 inhibition augments killing of CD79 mutant diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Nagel, Daniel; Bognar, Miriam; Eitelhuber, Andrea C; Kutzner, Kerstin; Vincendeau, Michelle; Krappmann, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Survival of activated B cell-subtype (ABC) of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is driven by chronic B cell receptor (BCR) signaling that activates the canonical NF-κB pathway. Inhibition of BTK by Ibrutinib has been shown to kill ABC DLBCL cells that carry activating mutations in the BCR adaptor CD79. However, mutations in BTK or in downstream components such as CARMA1/CARD11 can render lymphomas Ibrutinib resistant. Therefore, we assessed here the simultaneous inhibition of BTK and the ...

  5. The Killing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Gunhild

    2013-01-01

    This article tracks the uncanny locations of The Killing (2007–2012), relating them to place, space and atmosphere, putting bits and pieces from the topographic puzzle together with cues from the symbolic space in order to see how they fit into the overall pattern of Nordic Noir. In The Killing......, the abstract level of space and atmosphere meets the concrete level of place, both influencing the notion of location. This meeting, I suggest, has contributed towards the simultaneous domestic and international appeal of The Killing....

  6. Selective killing of cancer cells by iron oxide nanoparticles mediated through reactive oxygen species via p53 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahamed, Maqusood, E-mail: maqusood@gmail.com; Alhadlaq, Hisham A.; Khan, M. A. Majeed [King Saud University, King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology (Saudi Arabia); Akhtar, Mohd. Javed [University of Lucknow, Department of Zoology (India)

    2013-01-15

    Iron oxide (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly recognized for their utility in biomedical applications. However, little is known about the anticancer activity of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs. This study was designed to investigate whether Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs induced toxicity in a cell-specific manner and determine the possible mechanisms of toxicity caused by Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs in cancer cells. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs used in this study were synthesized by green method using {alpha}-d-glucose as a reducing agent. Prepared Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs were spherical in shape with a smooth surface, were fairly distributed, and had an average diameter of 23 nm. Cytotoxicity of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs was examined against two types of cancer cells (human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and human lung adenocarcinoma A549) and two normal cells (human lung fibroblast IMR-90 and rat hepatocytes). Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs exerted distinct effects on cell viability via killing of cancer cells while posing no toxicity on normal cells. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs were found to induce depletion of glutathione and induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in both types of cancer cells (HepG2 and A549). Further, co-exposure of ascorbic acid significantly attenuated the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs-induced oxidative stress. The mRNA levels of tumor suppressor gene p53 and apoptotic genes (caspase-3 and caspase-9) were up-regulated in both types of cancer cells due to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs exposure. Protein level of p53, along with the higher activity of caspase-3 and caspase-9 enzymes, was also up-regulated by Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs. Taken together, our data demonstrated that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs selectively induced apoptosis in cancer cells (HepG2 and A549) through up-regulation of p53 that might be mediated by ROS through which most of the anticancer drugs trigger apoptosis. The present study warrants further investigation on anticancer activity of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs in relevant

  7. Selective killing of cancer cells by iron oxide nanoparticles mediated through reactive oxygen species via p53 pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly recognized for their utility in biomedical applications. However, little is known about the anticancer activity of Fe3O4 NPs. This study was designed to investigate whether Fe3O4 NPs induced toxicity in a cell-specific manner and determine the possible mechanisms of toxicity caused by Fe3O4 NPs in cancer cells. Fe3O4 NPs used in this study were synthesized by green method using α-d-glucose as a reducing agent. Prepared Fe3O4 NPs were spherical in shape with a smooth surface, were fairly distributed, and had an average diameter of 23 nm. Cytotoxicity of Fe3O4 NPs was examined against two types of cancer cells (human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and human lung adenocarcinoma A549) and two normal cells (human lung fibroblast IMR-90 and rat hepatocytes). Fe3O4 NPs exerted distinct effects on cell viability via killing of cancer cells while posing no toxicity on normal cells. Fe3O4 NPs were found to induce depletion of glutathione and induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in both types of cancer cells (HepG2 and A549). Further, co-exposure of ascorbic acid significantly attenuated the Fe3O4 NPs-induced oxidative stress. The mRNA levels of tumor suppressor gene p53 and apoptotic genes (caspase-3 and caspase-9) were up-regulated in both types of cancer cells due to Fe3O4 NPs exposure. Protein level of p53, along with the higher activity of caspase-3 and caspase-9 enzymes, was also up-regulated by Fe3O4 NPs. Taken together, our data demonstrated that Fe3O4 NPs selectively induced apoptosis in cancer cells (HepG2 and A549) through up-regulation of p53 that might be mediated by ROS through which most of the anticancer drugs trigger apoptosis. The present study warrants further investigation on anticancer activity of Fe3O4 NPs in relevant animal models.

  8. Investigating CTL mediated killing with a 3D cellular automaton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Graw

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs are important immune effectors against intra-cellular pathogens. These cells search for infected cells and kill them. Recently developed experimental methods in combination with mathematical models allow for the quantification of the efficacy of CTL killing in vivo and, hence, for the estimation of parameters that characterize the effect of CTL killing on the target cell populations. It is not known how these population-level parameters relate to single-cell properties. To address this question, we developed a three-dimensional cellular automaton model of the region of the spleen where CTL killing takes place. The cellular automaton model describes the movement of different cell populations and their interactions. Cell movement patterns in our cellular automaton model agree with observations from two-photon microscopy. We find that, despite the strong spatial nature of the kinetics in our cellular automaton model, the killing of target cells by CTLs can be described by a term which is linear in the target cell frequency and saturates with respect to the CTL levels. Further, we find that the parameters describing CTL killing on the population level are most strongly impacted by the time a CTL needs to kill a target cell. This suggests that the killing of target cells, rather than their localization, is the limiting step in CTL killing dynamics given reasonable frequencies of CTL. Our analysis identifies additional experimental directions which are of particular importance to interpret estimates of killing rates and could advance our quantitative understanding of CTL killing.

  9. Targeted Killing of Cancer Cells In vivo and In vitro with EGF-directed Carbon Nanotube-based Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Bhirde, Ashwin A; Patel, Vyomesh; Gavard, Julie; Zhang, Guofeng; Sousa, Alioscka A.; Masedunskas, Andrius; Leapman, Richard D.; Weigert, Roberto; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Rusling, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotube-based drug delivery holds great promise for cancer therapy. Herein we report the first targeted, in vivo killing of cancer cells using a drug-single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bioconjugate, and demonstrate efficacy superior to non-targeted bioconjugates. First line anti-cancer agent cisplatin and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were attached to SWNTs to specifically target squamous cancer, and the non-targeted control was SWNT-cisplatin without EGF. Initialin vitro imaging stud...

  10. Multidisciplinaly total-cell-kill treatment of bronchogenic small cell anaplastic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survival time of the patients with bronchogenic small cell anaplastic cancer was studied. Combined treatment with six-drug combination chemotherapy ''METVFC'' (mitomycin C + cyclophosphamide + toyomycin + vincristine + 5-FU + cytosine arabinoside) and radiotherapy (5,000 rads in total) was given to 14 cases of limited disease of small cell carcinoma. Median survival was 8 months, one year and two year survival rates were 47% and 27%, respectively. Combined treatment with METVFC and small dose radiotherapy of 100 or 200 rads irradiation 4 hours before chemotherapy, followed by remission consolidation of 3,000 -- 4,000 rads radiotherapy, thereafter second line chemotherapy of ''COAM'' (cyclophosphamide + vincristine + ACNU + methotrexate) was given to 4 cases of limited disease of small cell carcinoma. All cases survived more than 1.5 years and two of them have retained complete remission more than 1.5 years. There are 6 cases with small cell carcinoma survived more than 3 years out of total 128 cases. They are all those of limited disease. They received combined treatment of chemotherapy and radiotherapy simultaneously or alternatively, followed by remission maintenance chemotherapy. One case of them died from cancer. Two cases died from another disease without lung cancer. Three cases survived healthy more than 3 to 8 years. In the limited disease, small cell carcinoma of the lung might be curable if the complete remission could continue more than three years. (author)

  11. GLI inhibitor GANT61 kills melanoma cells and acts in synergy with obatoclax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlčková, Kateřina; Réda, Jiri; Ondrušová, Lubica; Krayem, Mohammad; Ghanem, Ghanem; Vachtenheim, Jiri

    2016-09-01

    MEK kinase inhibitors (trametinib and selumetinib) or kinase inhibitors directed against mutated BRAF(V600E) (vemurafenib and dabrafenib) have initial encouraging effects in the treatment of melanoma but acquired resistance appears almost invariably after some months. Studies revealed mutually exclusive NRAS and BRAF activating mutations driving the MAPK/ERK pathway among human melanomas. Although combination therapy exerts significantly better antitumor cell efficacy, complete remission is rarely achieved. To employ an alternative approach, we have targeted the Hedgehog/GLI pathway, which is deregulated in melanomas, through the GLI1/2 inhibitor GANT61, alone or accompanied with the treatment by the BCL2 family inhibitor obatoclax in 9 melanoma cell lines. Thus, we targeted melanoma cells irrespective of their NRAS or BRAF mutational status. After GANT61 treatment, the cell viability was drastically diminished via apoptosis, as substantial nuclear DNA fragmentation was detected. In all tested melanoma cell lines, the combined treatment was more efficient than the application of each drug alone at the end of the cell growth with inhibitors. GANT61 was efficient also alone in most cell lines without the addition of obatoclax, which had only a limited effect when used as a single drug. In most cell lines, tumor cells were eradicated after 5-9 days of combined treatment in colony outgrowth assay. To conclude, GANT61 treatment might become a hopeful and effective anti-melanoma targeted therapy, especially when combined with the BCL2 family inhibitor obatoclax. PMID:27572939

  12. Inductive heating kills cells that contribute to plaque: a proof-of-concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Gaitas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Inducing cell death by heating targeted particles shows promise in cancer treatment. Here, we aim to demonstrate the feasibility of extending the use of this technique to treat and remove vascular deposits and thrombosis. We used induction heating of macrophages, which are key contributors to atherosclerosis and have demonstrated clear feasibility for heating and destroying these cells using ferromagnetic and pure iron particles. Specifically, iron particles achieved maximum temperatures of 51 ± 0.5 °C and spherical particles achieved a maximum temperature of 43.9 ± 0.2 °C (N = 6 after 30 min of inductive heating. Two days of subsequent observation demonstrated that inductive heating led to a significant reduction in cell number. Prior to induction heating, cell density was 105,000 ± 20,820 cells/ml (N = 3. This number was reduced to 6,666 ± 4,410 cells/ml for the spherical particles and 16,666 ± 9,280 cells/ml for the iron particles 24 h after inductive heating. Though cell density increased on the second day following inductive heating, the growth was minimal. Cells grew to 26,667 ± 6,670 cells/ml and 30,000 ± 15,280 cells/ml respectively. Compared to cell cultures with iron and spherical particles that were not subjected to induction heating, we observed a 97% reduction in cell count for the spherical particles and a 91% reduction for the iron particles after the first 24 h. After 48 h we observed a 95% reduction in cell growth for both spherical and iron particles. Induction heating of microparticles was thus highly effective in reducing the macrophage population and preventing their growth. These results demonstrate the feasibility of targeting cells involved in atherosclerosis and warrant further research into potential clinical applications.

  13. Rapid alternative to the clonogenic assay for measuring antibody and complement-mediated killing of tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the methods used to quantitate killing of tumor cells by antibody and complement has highlighted a number of problems. Using leukemia as a model, the authors have found that the release of 51Cr from labeled tumor cells treated with antibody and complement can be an equivocal measure of cell viability. Combined with its restricted sensitivity (less than a 2 log range of cell killing) this makes this widely used assay of questionable value for detecting small numbers of viable cells, or for identifying subpopulations of complement-resistant cells. As an alternative a [125I]iododeoxyuridine uptake assay has been developed, that combines the simplicity and rapidity of the 51Cr release technique with the sensitivity of a clonogenic assay. This method eliminates the problem of spontaneous isotope release, inherent in prelabeling assays, and variability from experiment to experiment can be avoided by including a viable cell standard curve within each assay. The sensitivity of the 125IUdR uptake method, which can be completed within a day, is similar to that of a 10 day methylcellulose cloning assay and was capable of detecting the presence of a minor subpopulation of complement-resistant tumor cells

  14. A novel finding: Anti-androgen flutamide kills androgen-independent PC-3 cells: A radiolabelled methyl-choline incorporation into tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: [Methyl-11C]-choline was introduced to image many types of cancers especially the prostate cancer. Al-Saeedi et al. reported that the incorporation of [Methyl-3H]-choline into breast tumour (MCF-7) cells correlated strongly with proliferation as determined by [Methyl-14C]- thymidine uptake. Also, Al-Saeedi, et al. showed that the chemotherapy using MCF-7 cells treated with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) induced modulation in [Methyl-3H]-choline incorporation and certain mechanisms for this modulation were reported. In this study, the androgen-dependent prostate tumour (LNCaP) cells were treated with the well known pure anti-androgen drug, flutamide, for three days. The cells were then incubated with [Methyl-3H]-choline for 10 mint to detect the effect of flutamide on both cell proliferation and choline incorporation. At the same time, a preliminary work was established using androgen-independent PC-3 cells treated with flutamide as controls in this study. PC-3 cells were treated with a range of doses of flutamide inhibiting growth by 20[Methyl-3H]-Choline Incorporation into MCF-7 Cells: Correlation with Proliferation: choline kinase and phospholipase D assay. [Methyl-3H]-Choline Incorporation into MCF-7 Cells: Correlation with Proliferation: choline kinase and phospholipase D assay. - 70%. Treated and control cells were incubated with [Methyl-3H]-choline for 10 min, then in non-radioactive medium to simulate the rapid blood clearance of [Methyl-11C]-choline tracer in control and treated PC-3 cells, and then extracted with organic and aqueous solvents to determine its effect on the intracellular distribution of this tracer. Interesting results showed that flutamide killed the androgen-independent prostate cancer cells, PC-3 and mechanisms responsible for flutamide-induced modulation on [Methyl-3H]- choline incorporation were reported. The PC-3 cells' proliferation was inhibited by flutamide. In addition, treatment of PC-3 cells with flutamide for 3 days resulted

  15. Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin killed by extended freeze-drying targets plasmacytoid dendritic cells to regulate lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagranderie, Micheline; Abolhassani, Mohammad; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen A J; Lima, Carla; Balazuc, Anne-Marie; Vargaftig, B Boris; Marchal, Gilles

    2010-01-15

    We have previously shown that bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) inactivated by extended freeze-drying (EFD) reduces airway hyperresponsiveness, whereas live and heat-killed BCG fail to do so. However, the cells involved in the protective effect and the signaling and transcriptional networks that could reprogram T cell commitment after EFD BCG treatment remained to be elucidated. We investigated whether EFD BCG targets plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) potentially involved in the polarization of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and the transcriptional factors that regulate allergic inflammation. OVA-sensitized mice were s.c. injected with EFD, live, or heat-killed BCG. We analyzed after the injection of the various BCG preparations: 1) pDCs recruited in the draining lymph nodes (day 4); 2) transcription factors involved in inflammation and T cell commitment in spleen and lungs after OVA challenge (day 28). Airway hyperresponsiveness and transcription factors were determined after in vivo depletion of pDCs or Tregs in EFD BCG-treated and OVA-challenged mice. EFD BCG reduced inflammation via the recruitment of pDCs polarizing the differentiation of naive CD4+ T lymphocytes into Tregs. In vivo, pDC or Treg depletion at the time of EFD BCG treatment abrogated the protection against inflammation. EFD BCG treatment upregulated Forkhead-winged helix transcription factor (Treg signature) and downregulated GATA-3 and RORgammat (Th2 and Th17 signatures) more efficiently than live and heat-killed BCG. Moreover, only EFD BCG enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma expression and blocked NF-kappaB activation, cyclooxygenase expression, and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. EFD BCG reduced allergic inflammation by recruiting pDCs that promoted Tregs; EFD BCG acted as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist and thus could be used in asthma and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:20007537

  16. ROS accumulation by PEITC selectively kills ovarian cancer cells via UPR-mediated apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-hee eHong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Unfolded protein response (UPR is crucial for both survival and death of mammalian cells, which is regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS and nutrient depletion. In this study, we demonstrated the effect of ROS-accumulation, induced by β-phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC, on UPR mediated apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. We used ovarian cancer cell lines, PA-1 and SKOV-3, with different p53 status (wild- and null- type, respectively. PEITC caused increased ROS-accumulation and inhibited proliferation selectively in ovarian cancer cells, and glutathione (GSH depletion in SKOV-3. However, PEITC did not cause any effect in normal ovarian epithelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. After 48 h of PEITC treatment (5 µM, apoptotic cell death was shown to increase significantly in the ovarian cancer cells and not in the normal cells. The key regulator of UPR-mediated apoptosis, CHOP/GADD153 and ER resident chaperone BiP/GRP78 were parallely up-regulated with activation of two major sensors of the UPR (PERK and ATF-6 in PA-1; PERK, and IRE1α in SKOV-3 in response to ROS accumulation induced by PEITC (5 µM. ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, attenuated the effect of PEITC on UPR signatures (P-PERK, IRE1α, CHOP/GADD153, and BiP/GRP78, suggesting the involvement of ROS in UPR-mediated apoptosis. Altogether, PEITC induces UPR-mediated apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells via accumulation of ROS in a cancer-specific manner.

  17. Quantum dots modified with quaternized poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) for selective recognition and killing of bacteria over mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Qin; Ma, Chao; Tian, Chang; Yuan, Maosen; Han, Xiang; Wang, Dong-En; Cao, Chenyu; Wang, Jinyi

    2016-05-23

    Copper-free click chemistry has been used to graft quaternized poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (QPA) modified with azide to the quantum dots (QDs) derived with dibenzocyclooctynes (DBCO). The success of the quaternary ammonium polymer-modified QDs was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis), fluorescence spectroscopy, zeta (ζ) potential, size distribution, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The QPA-modified QDs exhibited properties of selective recognition and killing of bacteria. The novelty of this study lies in fact that the synthesis method of the antimicrobial QPA-modified QDs is simple. Moreover, from another standpoint, QPA-modified QDs simultaneously possess abilities of selective recognition and killing of bacteria over mammalian cells, which is very different from the currently designed multifunctional antimicrobial systems composed of complicated systematic compositions. PMID:27111264

  18. A novel finding: Anti-androgen flutamide kills androgen independent PC-3 cells. A radiolabelled methyl-coline incorporation into tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [Methyl-11C]-choline was introduced to image many types of cancer, especially prostate cancer. Al-Saeedi et al. reported that the incorporation of [Methyl-3H]-choline into breast tumour (MCF-7) cells correlated strongly with proliferation as determined by [Methyl-14C]-thymidine uptake. Also, Al-Saeedi et al. showed that the chemotherapy using MCF-7 cells treated with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) induced modulation in [Methyl- 3H]-choline incorporation and certain mechanisms for this modulation were reported. In this study, the androgen dependent prostate tumour (LNCaP) cells were treated with the well known pure anti-androgen drug, flutamide, for 3 d. The cells were then incubated with [Methyl-3H]-choline for 10 min to detect the effect of flutamide on both cell proliferation and choline incorporation. At the same time, a preliminary work was established using androgen independent PC-3 cells treated with flutamide as controls in this study. PC-3 cells were treated with a range of doses of flutamide, inhibiting growth by 20-70%. Treated and control cells were incubated with [Methyl-3H]-choline for 10 min, then in non-radioactive medium to simulate the rapid blood clearance of [Methyl- 11C]-choline tracer in control and treated PC-3 cells, and then extracted with organic and aqueous solvents to determine its effect on the intracellular distribution of this tracer. The results were interesting in that they showed that flutamide killed the androgen independent prostate cancer cells, PC-3, and the mechanisms responsible for flutamide induced modulation on [Methyl-3H]-choline incorporation are reported. The PC-3 cell proliferation was inhibited by flutamide. In addition, treatment of PC-3 cells with flutamide for 3 d resulted in a buildup of cells in the S phase and [Methyl-3H]-choline incorporation per a cell was found to be decreased in treated as opposed to untreated cells. In conclusion, flutamide inhibits PC-3 cell proliferation by a certain mechanism (unknown) other than

  19. Cell killing and mutagenesis by alkylating agents and UV irradiation in wild-type and deoxycytidine-kinase-deficient Friend murine leukaemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wild-type (clone 707) Friend murine leukaemia cells were compared with two ara-C-resistant subclones in terms of sensitivity to cell killing and mutagenesis to 6-thioguanine resistance following treatment with ethyl methane sulphonate, methyl methane sulphonate and UV irradiation. The ara-C-resistant subclones, 707DKE and 707DK48, had respective deoxycytidine kinase activities of 6.7 and 5.4% the values found in wild-type cells. No clear pattern of altered sensitivity to cell killing or mutagenesis emerged between the wild-type cells and the ara-C-resistant subclones. These results do not provide evidence for a role of deoxycytidine kinase in determining sensitivity to mutagenic agents in the Friend cell line. (author)

  20. N′1,N′3-Dimethyl-N′1,N′3-bis(phenylcarbonothioyl Propanedihydrazide (Elesclomol Selectively Kills Cisplatin Resistant Lung Cancer Cells through Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niramol Savaraj

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is an important chemotherapeutic agent in lung cancer treatment. The mechanism of drug resistance to cisplatin is complex and historically has been difficult to overcome. We report here that cisplatin resistant lung cancer cell lines possess high basal levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS when compared to normal cells and their parental cell counterparts. These resistant cells also have low thioredoxin (TRX levels which may be one of the contributory factors to high ROS. N′1,N′3-dimethyl-N′1,N'3-bis(phenylcarbonothioyl propanedihydrazide (elesclomol, an agent known to increase ROS is selectively toxic to cisplatin-resistant cells, while sparing normal cells and the parental counterpart. The cytotoxic effect of elesclomol in resistant cells is accompanied by further decreases in TRX and glutathione (GSH antioxidant systems, while opposite results were found in parental cells. The ID50 of elesclomol in cisplatin-resistant cells ranged from 5–10 nM, which is well within clinically achievable ranges. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC, which is known to neutralize ROS, can abolish the cytotoxic effect of elesclomol, suggesting that the cytotoxic effect results from increased ROS. Overall, our data suggest that elesclomol selectively kills cisplatin-resistant tumor cells through increased ROS. This agent may hold potential to overcome cisplatin resistance and should be further explored to treat patients who have failed cisplatin therapy.

  1. Adenovirus vector expressing mda-7 selectively kills hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Hep3B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Bo Xue; Kun Chen; Cong-Jun Wang; Jian-Wei Zheng; Yuan Yu; Zhi-Hai Peng; Zai-De Wu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 (mda-7) is a novel tumor suppressor gene, which has suppressor activity in a broad spectrum of human cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo through activation of various intracellular signaling pathways. In this study, we investigated the potential effect of mda-7 on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in vitro. METHODS: Cells from the human HCC cell line Hep3B and the human liver cell line L-02 were assigned to three groups. One was cultured in Dulbecco's modiifed Eagle's medium without serum (control). The others were transfected with adenovirus expressing the mda-7 gene (Ad.mda-7) or adenovirus vector serving as negative control (Ad.vec). The expression of MDA-7 and Bcl-2 proteins in Hep3B and L-02 cells was conifrmed by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium colorimetric assay and lfow cytometry were used to assess tumor cell proliferation and the cell cycle. Hoechst and Annexin-V/propidium iodide staining were used to study mda-7 gene expression in Hep3B and L-02 cells. The expression of MDA-7, Bcl-2 and Bax proteins were detected by Western blotting. RESULTS: The mda-7 gene was expressed in Hep3B and L-02 cells. The protein concentrations of MDA-7 in supernatants were 790 and 810 pg/ml, respectively. mda-7 induced Hep3B growth suppression and apoptosis, compared with Ad.mda-7 and control (P CONCLUSIONS: mda-7 selectively induces growth inhibi-tion and apoptosis in the HCC cell line Hep3B but not in the normal liver cell line L-02 via downregulating the anti-apoptosis protein Bcl-2. It could be an ideal gene for gene therapy in HCC.

  2. Comparison of human chordoma cell-kill for 290 MeV/n carbon ions versus 70 MeV protons in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the pace of commissioning of new charged particle radiation therapy facilities is accelerating worldwide, biological data pertaining to chordomas, theoretically and clinically optimally suited targets for particle radiotherapy, are still lacking. In spite of the numerous clinical reports of successful treatment of these malignancies with this modality, the characterization of this malignancy remains hampered by its characteristic slow cell growth, particularly in vitro. Cellular lethality of U-CH1-N cells in response to different qualities of radiation was compared with immediate plating after radiation or as previously reported using the multilayered OptiCell™ system. The OptiCell™ system was used to evaluate cellular lethality over a broad dose-depth deposition range of particle radiation to anatomically mimic the clinical setting. Cells were irradiated with either 290 MeV/n accelerated carbon ions or 70 MeV accelerated protons and photons and evaluated through colony formation assays at a single position or at each depth, depending on the system. There was a cell killing of approximately 20–40% for all radiation qualities in the OptiCell™ system in which chordoma cells are herein described as more radiation sensitive than regular colony formation assay. The relative biological effectiveness values were, however, similar in both in vitro systems for any given radiation quality. Relative biological effectiveness values of proton was 0.89, of 13–20 keV/μm carbon ions was 0.85, of 20–30 keV/μm carbon ions was 1.27, and >30 keV/μm carbon ions was 1.69. Carbon-ions killed cells depending on both the dose and the LET, while protons depended on the dose alone in the condition of our study. This is the first report and characterization of a direct comparison between the effects of charged particle carbon ions versus protons for a chordoma cell line in vitro. Our results support a potentially superior therapeutic value of carbon particle irradiation

  3. Accelerated killing of cancer cells using a multifunctional single-walled carbon nanotube-based system for targeted drug delivery in combination with photothermal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyamohan P

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Prashanti Jeyamohan, Takashi Hasumura, Yutaka Nagaoka, Yasuhiko Yoshida, Toru Maekawa, D Sakthi Kumar Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Graduate School of Interdisciplinary New Science, Toyo University, Kawagoe, Japan Abstract: The photothermal effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs in combination with the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX for targeting and accelerated destruction of breast cancer cells is demonstrated in this paper. A targeted drug-delivery system was developed for selective killing of breast cancer cells with polyethylene glycol biofunctionalized and DOX-loaded SWCNTs conjugated with folic acid. In our work, in vitro drug-release studies showed that the drug (DOX binds at physiological pH (pH 7.4 and is released only at a lower pH, ie, lysosomal pH (pH 4.0, which is the characteristic pH of the tumor environment. A sustained release of DOX from the SWCNTs was observed for a period of 3 days. SWCNTs have strong optical absorbance in the near-infrared (NIR region. In this special spectral window, biological systems are highly transparent. Our study reports that under laser irradiation at 800 nm, SWCNTs exhibited strong light–heat transfer characteristics. These optical properties of SWCNTs open the way for selective photothermal ablation in cancer therapy. It was also observed that internalization and uptake of folate-conjugated NTs into cancer cells was achieved by a receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism. Results of the in vitro experiments show that laser was effective in destroying the cancer cells, while sparing the normal cells. When the above laser effect was combined with DOX-conjugated SWCNTs, we found enhanced and accelerated killing of breast cancer cells. Thus, this nanodrug-delivery system, consisting of laser, drug, and SWCNTs, looks to be a promising selective modality with high treatment efficacy and low side effects for cancer therapy. Keywords: cancer, nanotherapy, SWCNTs, targeted drug delivery

  4. 220D-F2 from Rubus ulmifolius Kills Streptococcus pneumoniae Planktonic Cells and Pneumococcal Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Sharmila J Talekar; Sopio Chochua; Katie Nelson; Klugman, Keith P.; Quave, Cassandra L; Vidal, Jorge E.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) forms organized biofilms to persist in the human nasopharynx. This persistence allows the pneumococcus to produce severe diseases such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia and meningitis that kill nearly a million children every year. While bacteremia and meningitis are mediated by planktonic pneumococci, biofilm structures are present during pneumonia and otitis media. The global emergence of S. pneumoniae strains resistant to most commonly prescribe...

  5. Ag nanoparticles generated using bio-reduction and -coating cause microbial killing without cell lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Aniket; Adams, Joshua; Britt, David W; Shen, Fen-Ann; McLean, Joan E; Jacobson, Astrid; Kim, Young-Cheol; Anderson, Anne J

    2016-04-01

    Cost-effective "green" methods of producing Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are being examined because of the potential of these NPs as antimicrobials. Ag NPs were generated from Ag ions using extracellular metabolites from a soil-borne Pythium species. The NPs were variable in size, but had one dimension less than 50 nm and were biocoated; aggregation and coating changed with acetone precipitation. They had dose-dependent lethal effects on a soil pseudomonad, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6, and were about 30-fold more effective than Ag(+) ions. A role of reactive oxygen species in cell death was demonstrated by use of fluorescent dyes responsive to superoxide anion and peroxide accumulation. Also mutants of the pseudomonad, defective in enzymes that protect against oxidative stress, were more sensitive than the wild type strain; mutant sensitivity differed between exposure to Ag NPs and Ag(+) ions demonstrating a nano-effect. Imaging of bacterial cells treated with the biocoated Ag NPs revealed no cell lysis, but there were changes in surface properties and cell height. These findings support that biocoating the NPs results in limited Ag release and yet they retained potent antimicrobial activity. PMID:26805711

  6. Engineered metal nanoparticles in the sub-nanomolar levels kill cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodyanoy, Vitaly; Daniels, Yasmine; Pustovyy, Oleg; MacCrehan, William A; Muramoto, Shin; Stan, Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    Background Small metal nanoparticles obtained from animal blood were observed to be toxic to cultured cancer cells, whereas noncancerous cells were much less affected. In this work, engineered zinc and copper metal nanoparticles were produced from bulk metal rods by an underwater high-voltage discharge method. The metal nanoparticles were characterized by atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The metal nanoparticles, with estimated diameters of 1 nm–2 nm, were determined to be more than 85% nonoxidized. A cell viability assay and high-resolution light microscopy showed that exposure of RG2, cultured rat brain glioma cancer cells, to the zinc and copper nanoparticles resulted in cell morphological changes, including decreased cell adherence, shrinking/rounding, nuclear condensation, and budding from cell bodies. The metal-induced cell injuries were similar to the effects of staurosporine, an active apoptotic reagent. The viability experiments conducted for zinc and copper yielded values of dissociation constants of 0.22±0.08 nmol/L (standard error [SE]) and 0.12±0.02 nmol/L (SE), respectively. The noncancerous astrocytes were not affected at the same conditions. Because metal nanoparticles were lethal to the cancer cells at sub-nanomolar concentrations, they are potentially important as nanomedicine. Purpose Lethal concentrations of synthetic metal nanoparticles reported in the literature are a few orders of magnitude higher than the natural, blood-isolated metal nanoparticles; therefore, in this work, engineered metal nanoparticles were examined to mimic the properties of endogenous metal nanoparticles. Materials and methods RG2, rat brain glioma cells CTX TNA2 brain rat astrocytes, obtained from the American Type Culture Collection, high-voltage discharge, atomic force microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution light microscopy, zeta potential measurements, and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium

  7. Effect of extracellular serum in the stimulation of intracellular killing of streptococci by human monocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Leijh, P C; van Zwet, T L; Furth, R. van

    1980-01-01

    This study shows that the intracellular killing of Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae by human monocytes is stimulated by the extracellular presence of both heat-stable and heat-labile serum factors. A similar kind of stimulation of monocytes has been described in respect of catalase-positive microorganisms. However, killing of these bacteria is negligible in the absence of extracellular serum factors, whereas a large proportion of the ingested catala...

  8. Double-detargeted oncolytic adenovirus shows replication arrest in liver cells and retains neuroendocrine cell killing ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Leja

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously developed an oncolytic serotype 5 adenovirus (Ad5 with chromogranin-A (CgA promoter-controlled E1A expression, Ad[CgA-E1A], with the intention to treat neuroendocrine tumors, including carcinoids. Since carcinoids tend to metastasize to the liver it is important to fully repress viral replication in hepatocytes to avoid adenovirus-related liver toxicity. Herein, we explore miRNA-based regulation of E1A expression as a complementary mechanism to promoter-based transcriptional control. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ad[CgA-E1A-miR122], where E1A expression is further controlled by six tandem repeats of the target sequence for the liver-specific miR122, was constructed and compared to Ad[CgA-E1A]. We observed E1A suppression and replication arrest of the miR122-detargeted adenovirus in normal hepatocytes, while the two viruses killed carcinoid cells to the same degree. Repeated intravenous injections of Ad[CgA-E1A] induced liver toxicity in mice while Ad[CgA-E1A-miR122] injections did not. Furthermore, a miR122-detargeted adenovirus with the wild-type E1A promoter showed reduced replication in hepatic cells compared to wild-type Ad5 but not to the same extent as the miR122-detargeted adenovirus with the neuroendocrine-selective CgA promoter. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A combination of transcriptional (promoter and post-transcriptional (miRNA target regulation to control virus replication may allow for the use of higher doses of adenovirus for efficient tumors treatment without liver toxicity.

  9. Triptolide Induces Cell Killing in Multidrug-Resistant Tumor Cells via CDK7/RPB1 Rather than XPB or p44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jun-Mei; Huan, Xia-Juan; Song, Shan-Shan; Zhou, Hu; Wang, Ying-Qing; Miao, Ze-Hong

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major cause of tumor treatment failure; therefore, drugs that can avoid this outcome are urgently needed. We studied triptolide, which directly kills MDR tumor cells with a high potency and a broad spectrum of cell death. Triptolide did not inhibit P-glycoprotein (P-gp) drug efflux and reduced P-gp and MDR1 mRNA resulting from transcription inhibition. Transcription factors including c-MYC, SOX-2, OCT-4, and NANOG were not correlated with triptolide-induced cell killing, but RPB1, the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, was critical in mediating triptolide's inhibition of MDR cells. Triptolide elicited antitumor and anti-MDR activity through a universal mechanism: by activating CDK7 by phosphorylating Thr170 in both parental and MDR cell lines and in SK-OV-3 cells. The CDK7-selective inhibitor BS-181 partially rescued cell killing induced by 72-hour treatment of triptolide, which may be due to partial rescue of RPB1 degradation. We suggest that a precise phosphorylation site on RPB1 (Ser1878) was phosphorylated by CDK7 in response to triptolide. In addition, XPB and p44, two transcription factor TFIIH subunits, did not contribute to triptolide-driven RPB1 degradation and cell killing, although XPB was reported to covalently bind to triptolide. Several clinical trials are underway to test triptolide and its analogues for treating cancer and other diseases, so our data may help expand potential clinical uses of triptolide, as well as offer a compound that overcomes tumor MDR. Future investigations into the primary molecular target(s) of triptolide responsible for RPB1 degradation may suggest novel anti-MDR target(s) for therapeutic development. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1495-503. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197304

  10. Melatonin Protects Human Cells from Clustered DNA Damages, Killing and Acquisition of Soft Agar Growth Induced by X-rays or 970 MeV/n Fe ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, B.; Sutherland, B.; Bennett, P. V.; Cutter, N. C.; Sutherland, J. C.

    2011-06-01

    We tested the ability of melatonin (N-acetyl-5 methoxytryptamine), a highly effective radical scavenger and human hormone, to protect DNA in solution and in human cells against induction of complex DNA clusters and biological damage induced by low or high linear energy transfer radiation (100 kVp X-rays, 970 MeV/nucleon Fe ions). Plasmid DNA in solution was treated with increasing concentrations of melatonin (0.0-3.5 mM) and were irradiated with X-rays. Human cells (28SC monocytes) were also irradiated with X-rays and Fe ions with and without 2 mM melatonin. Agarose plugs containing genomic DNA were subjected to Contour Clamped Homogeneous Electrophoretic Field (CHEF) followed by imaging and clustered DNA damages were measured by using Number Average length analysis. Transformation experiments on human primary fibroblast cells using soft agar colony assay were carried out which were irradiated with Fe ions with or without 2 mM melatonin. In plasmid DNA in solution, melatonin reduced the induction of single- and double-strand breaks. Pretreatment of human 28SC cells for 24 h before irradiation with 2 mM melatonin reduced the level of X-ray induced double-strand breaks by {approx}50%, of abasic clustered damages about 40%, and of Fe ion-induced double-strand breaks (41% reduction) and abasic clusters (34% reduction). It decreased transformation to soft agar growth of human primary cells by a factor of 10, but reduced killing by Fe ions only by 20-40%. Melatonin's effective reduction of radiation-induced critical DNA damages, cell killing, and striking decrease of transformation suggest that it is an excellent candidate as a countermeasure against radiation exposure, including radiation exposure to astronaut crews in space travel.

  11. Killing tensors and conformal Killing tensors from conformal Killing vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutras has proposed some methods to construct reducible proper conformal Killing tensors and Killing tensors (which are, in general, irreducible) when a pair of orthogonal conformal Killing vectors exist in a given space. We give the completely general result demonstrating that this severe restriction of orthogonality is unnecessary. In addition, we correct and extend some results concerning Killing tensors constructed from a single conformal Killing vector. A number of examples demonstrate that it is possible to construct a much larger class of reducible proper conformal Killing tensors and Killing tensors than permitted by the Koutras algorithms. In particular, by showing that all conformal Killing tensors are reducible in conformally flat spaces, we have a method of constructing all conformal Killing tensors, and hence all the Killing tensors (which will in general be irreducible) of conformally flat spaces using their conformal Killing vectors

  12. Action of caffeine on x-irradiated HeLa cells. IV. Progression delays and enhanced cell killing at high caffeine concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of x-irradiated and unirradiated HeLa S3 cells to treatment with caffeine at concentrations between 1 and 10 nM has been examined with respect to both delay in progression through the cell generation cycle and enhancement of the expression of potentially lethal x-ray damage. Progression is delayed in a concentration-dependent fashion: the generation time is doubled at about 4 mM. The duration of G1 is lengthened, and the rate of DNA synthesis is reduced, although the kinetics are different in the two phases; the rate of DNA synthesis is usually unaffected at 1 or 2 mM, while there is no concentration threshold for the slowing of progression through G1. Progression through G2 appears to be unaffected by concentrations up to at least 10 mM. Killing of irradiated cells in G2 is somewhat greater after treatment with the higher caffeine concentrations than reported previously for 1 mM. Moreover, an additional mode of killing is observed in irradiated G1 cells which had been found previously to be only slightly affected by 1 mM caffeine; they suffer extensive killing at concentrations above 5 mM. The time-survival curves for irradiated, caffeine-treated G1 and G2 cells have characteristically different shapes. The dose-survival curves for cells treated with the higher caffeine concentrations display steeper terminal slopes and narrower shoulders

  13. High resistance of fibroblasts from Mongolian gerbil embryos to cell killing and chromosome aberrations by X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) is known to be one of the most radioresistant animal species. In order to determine whether there is any correlation between mortality of mammals exposed to γ- or X-rays and radiation sensitivity of culture cells derived from different mammalian species, we have examined the X-ray survival curves of normal diploid fibroblasts from Mongolian gerbil embryos and compared with those of other cultured embryo cells from various laboratory animals and normal human. There was a big difference in cell survival to X-rays among different mammalian species. The D0 values of Mongolian gerbil cells ranged from 2.3 to 2.6 Gy which are twice as high as those of human cells. The mean D0 value of human cells was 1.1 Gy. Mouse, rat, Chinese hamster and Syrian/golden hamster cells showed similar D0 values ranging from 1.7 to 2.0 Gy. When cells were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays, three times longer mitotic delay was observed in human cells than in Mongolian gerbil cells. At this X-ray dose, furthermore, ten times more chromosome aberrations were detected in human cells than in Mongolian gerbil cells, and the frequencies of other rodent cells lay between the values for the two cell strains. These data indicate that the Mongolian gerbil cells are resistant to X-ray-induced cell killing and chromosome aberrations, and that radiation sensitivity of primarily cultured mammalian cells may be reflected by their radioresistance in vivo. (author)

  14. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of the bivalent killed, whole-cell, oral cholera vaccine in adults and children in a cholera endemic area in Kolkata, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Mahalanabis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: An effective vaccine against cholera has been used for public health purposes in Vietnam since the 1990s. This vaccine was reformulated to meet WHO requirements. We assessed the safety and immunogenicity of the reformulated bivalent (Vibrio cholerae 01 and 0139 killed whole cell oral vaccine in a cholera endemic area in Kolkata, India. DESIGN: Double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled trial. SETTING: The trial was conducted in the clinical trial ward of the Infectious Diseases Hospital in Kolkata, India. PARTICIPANTS: The participants were 101 healthy adults (males and non-pregnant females aged 18-40 years and 100 healthy children (males and non-pregnant females aged 1-17 years. INTERVENTIONS: Participants were randomized to receive either the bivalent killed whole cell oral cholera vaccine or placebo (killed oral Escherichia coli K12. OUTCOME MEASURES: For safety: proportion of subjects with adverse events during the duration of study participation. For immunogenicity: Proportion of subjects who had a > or = 4-fold rise in serum vibriocidal antibody titers 14 days after the second dose of vaccine or placebo. RESULTS: Adverse reactions were observed with similar frequency among vaccine and placebo recipients in both age groups. Among adults 4% of vaccine and 8% of placebo recipients and among children 4% of vaccine and 2% of placebo recipients had at least one adverse event within 28 days of the first dose of the vaccine. Following immunization, 53% of adult and 80% of children vaccinees showed a > or = 4 fold rise in serum V. cholerae O1 vibriocidal antibody titers. A less pronounced response to V. cholerae O139 vibriocidal antibody titers post-immunization was noted among vaccinees. CONCLUSIONS: We found the vaccine to be safe and immunogenic in a cholera-endemic area in India. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00119197.

  15. Cocoa Extract Indicated Has Activity on Selectively Killing Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariza Budi Tunjung Sari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Effect of the cocoa crude extract on mortality of breast cancer cell lines i.e. MCF-7, T47D and normal cell (Vero, was observed. Crude cocoa extract prepared from a freshly dried cocoa bean that was containing 14% catechin and 0.6% caffeine. Catechin and caffeine content were modulated to 2-folds (28% catechin or 1.2% caffeine and 3-folds (42% catechin or 1.8% caffeine by adding pure compounds. Extracts were dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO at concentrations ranging from 200 to 1600 μg/ml. The positive control was doxorubicin (0.5-16 μg/ml in DMSO. Cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, and Vero were incubated in test sample for 24h at 37°, prior to 3-(4,4-dimetylthiazole-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. The absorbance of each well was measured at 550 nm, and lethal concentration (LC50 was calculated. The cocoa extract induced mortality of breast cancer cell lines but not in Vero cells. The effect on MCF-7 was greater than on T47D, given the LC50 was 1236 μg/ml (MCF-7 and 1893 μg/ml (T47D. Cytotoxic potential of cocoa extract was much lower than doxorubicin whose LC50 was 0,777 μg/ml (MCF-7 and 0,082 μg/ml (T47D. Increasing catechin content to 2-folds did not significantly affect LC50 value, but 3-folds catechin content reduced LC50 to 1021 μg/ml. Meanwhile increasing caffeine content to 2-folds significantly reduced LC50 to 750 μg/ml, however, 3-fold content resulted in slightly higher LC50 at 780 μg/ml. This indicates that cocoa extract have anti-cancer potential, and purification may improve this property.

  16. Targeted killing of virally infected cells by radiolabeled antibodies to viral proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Ekaterina Dadachova; Patel, Mahesh C; Sima Toussi; Christos Apostolidis; Alfred Morgenstern; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Miroslaw K Gorny; Susan Zolla-Pazner; Arturo Casadevall; Harris Goldstein

    2006-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. In a person infected with HIV, the symptoms of AIDS can be delayed or controlled with drug combinations such as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). However, at the moment there is no cure for HIV infection or AIDS; HAART has to be taken for life and has unpleasant side effects, and the HIV virus can become resistant to some of the drugs. Even in people for whom HAART is successfully controlling disease, HIV remains at very low levels in white blood cells...

  17. Resveratrol and arsenic trioxide act synergistically to kill tumor cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yan Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Arsenic trioxide (As2O3, which used as an effective agent in the treatment of leukaemia and other solid tumors, is largely limited by its toxicity. QT prolongation, torsades de pointes and sudden heart death have been implicated in the cardiotoxicity of As2O3. The present study was designed to explore whether the combination of As2O3 and resveratrol could generate a more powerful anti-cancer effect both in vitro and in vivo. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MTT assay was performed to assess the proliferation of Hela, MCF-7 and NB4 cells. Isobolographic analysis was used to evaluate combination index values from cell viability data. The apoptosis and the cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level were assessed by fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry separately in vitro. The effect of As2O3, alone and in combination with resveratrol on Hela tumor growth in an orthotopic nude mouse model was also investigated. The tumor volume and the immunohistochemical analysis of CD31, CD34 and VEGF were determined. RESULTS: Resveratrol dramatically enhanced the anti-cancer effect induced by As2O3 in vitro. In addition, isobolographic analysis further demonstrated that As2O3 and resveratrol generated a synergistic action. More apoptosis and ROS generation were observed in the combination treatment group. Similar synergistic effects were found in nude mice in vivo. The combination of As2O3 and resveratrol dramatically suppressed both tumor growth and angiogenesis in nude mice. CONCLUSIONS: Combining As2O3 with resveratrol would be a novel strategy to treat cancer in clinical practice.

  18. Enhancement of the killing effect of low-temperature plasma on Streptococcus mutans by combined treatment with gold nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sang Rye; Lee, Hyun Wook; Hong, Jin Woo; Lee, Hae June; Kim, Ji Young; Choi, Byul bo-ra; Gyoo Cheon KIM; Jeon, Young Chan

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma sources have been used for biomedical applications such as sterilization, cancer treatment, blood coagulation, and wound healing. Gold nanoparticles (gNPs) have unique optical properties and are useful for biomedical applications. Although low-temperature plasma has been shown to be effective in killing oral bacteria on agar plates, its bactericidal effect is negligible on the tooth surface. Therefore, we used 30-nm gNPs to enhance ...

  19. A method to estimate LET-RBE on cell killing for unknown heavy-ion particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LET-relative biological effectiveness (RBE) spectra were investigated using cultured V79 cells by accelerated heavy ions. Cells were exposed to 3He-, 12C-, and 20Ne-ion beams at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), the Medical Cyclotron at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), and RRC at RIKEN with an LET ranging over approximately 10-500 keV/μm under aerobic conditions. Cell-survival curves were fitted by equations from the linear-quadratic model to obtain survival parameters, and the RBE values were analyzed as a function of LET. The RBE increased with LET, reaching a maximum at around 200 keV/μm, then decreased with a further increase in LET. Clear splits of the LET-RBE spectrum were found among ion-spices. The LET-RBE spectra were fitted by a newly contrived equation that including three parameters: Lp, A, and W. The parameters will indicate a LET that gives a maximum RBE, a related value to maximum RBE, and indicates the width of the peak of RBE, respectively. It is also found that the parameters can be defined as functions of atomic numbers of the accelerated ions. At a given LET, the RBE-value for lighter ions was higher than that for heavier ions at lower-LET region. The LET that gives maximum RBE shifts to higher LET for heavier-ions, and the maximum values of the peak of RBE decreased with the atomic number of the irradiated ions. (author)

  20. Enhanced tumor cell killing following BNCT with hyperosmotic mannitol-induced blood-brain barrier disruption and intracarotid injection of boronophenylalanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The delivery of boronophenylalanine (BPA) by means of intracarotid injection combined with opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB) have been shown significantly enhanced the tumor boron concentration and the survival time of glioma-bearing rats. However, no direct evidence demonstrates whether this treatment protocol can enhance the cell killing of tumor cells or infiltrating tumor cells and the magnitude of enhanced cell killing. The purpose of the present study was to determine if the tumor cell killing of boron neutron capture therapy could be enhanced by hyperosmotic mannitol-induced BBB disruption using BPA-Fr as the capture agent. F98 glioma-bearing rats were injected intravenously or intracarotidly with BPA at doses of 500 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) and with or without mannitol-induced hyperosmotic BBB disruption. The rats were irradiated with an epithermal neutron beam at the reactor of National Tsing-Hua University (THOR). After neutron beam irradiation, the rats were euthanized and the ipsilateral brains containing intracerebral F98 glioma were removed to perform in vivo/in vitro soft agar clonogenic assay. The results demonstrate BNCT with optimizing the delivery of BPA by means of intracarotid injection combined with opening the BBB by infusing a hyperosmotic solution of mannitol significantly enhanced the cell killing of tumor cells and infiltrating tumor cells, the tumor boron concentration and the boron ratio of tumor to normal brain tissues. (author)

  1. Selective killing of ovarian cancer cells through induction of apoptosis by nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two independent ovarian cancer cell lines and fibroblast controls were treated with nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). Most ovarian cancer cells were detached from the culture dish by continuous plasma treatment to a single spot on the dish. Next, the plasma source was applied over the whole dish using a robot arm. In vitro cell proliferation assays showed that plasma treatments significantly decreased proliferation rates of ovarian cancer cells compared to fibroblast cells. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis showed that plasma treatment of ovarian cancer cells induced apoptosis. NEAPP could be a promising tool for therapy for ovarian cancers.

  2. Targeted killings in Northern Ireland: an analysis of their effectiveness and implications for counter-terrorism policies

    OpenAIRE

    Finegan, Rory

    2014-01-01

    What effect if any, do Targeted Killings (TKs) have on cycles of violence? This study explores and offers a perspective on the claimed successes of counter-terrorist policies, the issues that underpin them with a focus on pre-emptive actions aimed at disrupting or removing the terrorist threat. The study examines counter-terrorism activities in Northern Ireland in order to provide a detailed analysis of the implications of the policy of selective TKs. For heuristic purposes the literature rev...

  3. Development and evaluation of a safe and effective sugar-free herbal lollipop that kills cavity-causing bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Chu-hong; He, Jian; Eckert, Randal; Wu, Xiao-Yang; Li, Li-na; Tian, Yan; Lux, Renate; Shuffer, Justin A; Gelman, Faina; Mentes, Janet; Spackman, Sue; Bauer, Janet; Anderson, Maxwell H.; Shi, Wen-yuan

    2011-01-01

    Dental caries (tooth decay) is caused by a specific group of cariogenic bacteria, like Streptococcus mutans, which convert dietary sugars into acids that dissolve the mineral in tooth structure. Killing cariogenic bacteria is an effective way to control or prevent tooth decay. In a previous study, we discovered a novel compound (Glycyrrhizol A), from the extraction of licorice roots, with strong antimicrobial activity against cariogenic bacteria. In the current study, we developed a method to...

  4. Effect of Melanin and Carotenoids of Exophiala (Wangiella) dermatitidis on Phagocytosis, Oxidative Burst, and Killing by Human Neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    Schnitzler, Norbert; Peltroche-Llacsahuanga, Heidrun; Bestier, Nicole; Zündorf, Josef; Lütticken, Rudolf; Haase, Gerhard

    1999-01-01

    The black yeast Exophiala (Wangiella) dermatitidis is an increasingly recognized pathogen and a leading cause of severe pheohyphomycosis. Melanin is thought to contribute to the virulence of E. dermatitidis. Whereas the synthesis and the redox properties of melanin have been studied intensively, the influence of melanin and carotenoids on the phagocytosis, the oxidative burst, and the killing of E. dermatitidis by human neutrophils has not been studied. To study their effects on these phenome...

  5. Killing Cancer Cells with the Help of Infrared Light – Photoimmunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Near-infrared photoimmunotherapy uses an antibody–photoabsorber conjugate that binds to cancer cells. When near-infrared light is applied, the cells swell and then burst, causing the cancer cell to die. Photoimmunotherapy is in clinical trials in patients with inoperable tumors.

  6. Action of caffeine on x-irradiated HeLa cells. III. enhancement of x-ray-induced killing during G2 arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of caffeine to enhance the expression of potentially lethal x-ray damage in HeLa S3 cells was examined as a function of the age of the cells in the generation cycle. Synchronous populations were irradiated at different times after mitotic collection and treated for various intervals with 1 mM caffeiene, which causes negligible killing of unirradiated cells. The response was thereby determined as a function of cell age at both the time of irradiation and the time of exposure to caffeine. The amount of cell killing depends strongly on when in the cycle caffeine is present and only weakly on when the cells are irradiated. If cells are irradiated in early G1, caffeine treatment enhances killing for 2 to 3 hr. No additional enhancement is observed until 16 to 17 hr postcollection, corresponding to G2; here they enter a second period of much greater sensitivity. Similarly, fluorodeoxyuridine resynchronized cells irradiated during S and treated with caffeine suffer no enhanced killing until they pass into this sensitive phase in G2, approximately 7 hr after release from the fluorodeoxyuridine block. The sensitive period appears to coincide with G2 arrest. The rate and extent of killing during this period are dependent upon the x-ray dose and the caffeine concentration. In the absence of caffeine, cells irradiated in G1 lose sensitivity to caffeine in about 9 hr; they do so faster in G2. It is concluded that the potentially lethal x-ray damage expressed on treatment with caffeine is retained for many hours in the presence of caffeine and is maximally manifested by G2-arrested cells

  7. Radiation related basic cancer research : research for radiation induced tumor cell killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Hong, Seok Il; Cho, Kyung Ja; Kim, Byung Gi; Lee, Kee Ho; Nam, Myung Jin

    1999-04-01

    The radioresistant clones was established from human U251 glioblastoma cell line through intermittently exposed to 3 Gy gamma-radiation for six months. Treatment of SNU-16 cells with various doses of radiation, TNF alpha and PMA resulted in a decrease in cell viability. The results prove that cell death of SNU16 is a apoptosis mediated by caspase-3. We have examined the expression of bcl-2 and c-myc in cervical cancer specimens and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) to determine the role of coexpression of bcl-3 and c-myc during progression into cervical cancer. The frequent alterations in FHIT expression in many cervical carcinomas and their cell lines suggest that FHIT gene alterations are pla a role in cervical tumorigenesis. According to these correlation between the viability and apoptosis of RD cells, the proper range of the dosage for the investigation of differentiation potency in RD cells was assessed as 1 to 3Gy.

  8. Radiation related basic cancer research : research for radiation induced tumor cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioresistant clones was established from human U251 glioblastoma cell line through intermittently exposed to 3 Gy gamma-radiation for six months. Treatment of SNU-16 cells with various doses of radiation, TNF alpha and PMA resulted in a decrease in cell viability. The results prove that cell death of SNU16 is a apoptosis mediated by caspase-3. We have examined the expression of bcl-2 and c-myc in cervical cancer specimens and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) to determine the role of coexpression of bcl-3 and c-myc during progression into cervical cancer. The frequent alterations in FHIT expression in many cervical carcinomas and their cell lines suggest that FHIT gene alterations are pla a role in cervical tumorigenesis. According to these correlation between the viability and apoptosis of RD cells, the proper range of the dosage for the investigation of differentiation potency in RD cells was assessed as 1 to 3Gy

  9. Depletion of tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2 activity enhances etoposide-mediated double-strand break formation and cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kont, Yasemin Saygideger; Dutta, Arijit; Mallisetty, Apurva; Mathew, Jeena; Minas, Tsion; Kraus, Christina; Dhopeshwarkar, Priyanka; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Mitra, Sankar; Üren, Aykut; Adhikari, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    DNA topoisomerase 2 (Top2) poisons, including common anticancer drugs etoposide and doxorubicin kill cancer cells by stabilizing covalent Top2-tyrosyl-DNA 5'-phosphodiester adducts and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Proteolytic degradation of the covalently attached Top2 leaves a 5'-tyrosylated blocked termini which is removed by tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2), prior to DSB repair through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Thus, TDP2 confers resistance of tumor cells to Top2-poisons by repairing such covalent DNA-protein adducts, and its pharmacological inhibition could enhance the efficacy of Top2-poisons. We discovered NSC111041, a selective inhibitor of TDP2, by optimizing a high throughput screening (HTS) assay for TDP2's 5'-tyrosyl phosphodiesterase activity and subsequent validation studies. We found that NSC111041 inhibits TDP2's binding to DNA without getting intercalated into DNA and enhanced etoposide's cytotoxicity synergistically in TDP2-expressing cells but not in TDP2 depleted cells. Furthermore, NSC111041 enhanced formation of etoposide-induced γ-H2AX foci presumably by affecting DSB repair. Immuno-histochemical analysis showed higher TDP2 expression in a sub-set of different type of tumor tissues. These findings underscore the feasibility of clinical use of suitable TDP2 inhibitors in adjuvant therapy with Top2-poisons for a sub-set of cancer patients with high TDP2 expression. PMID:27235629

  10. Infected Cell Killing by HIV-1 Protease Promotes NF-κB Dependent HIV-1 Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Bren, Gary D.; Joe Whitman; Nathan Cummins; Brett Shepard; Rizza, Stacey A; Trushin, Sergey A.; Badley, Andrew D

    2008-01-01

    Acute HIV-1 infection of CD4 T cells often results in apoptotic death of infected cells, yet it is unclear what evolutionary advantage this offers to HIV-1. Given the independent observations that acute T cell HIV-1 infection results in (1) NF-kappaB activation, (2) caspase 8 dependent apoptosis, and that (3) caspase 8 directly activates NF-kappaB, we questioned whether these three events might be interrelated. We first show that HIV-1 infected T cell apoptosis, NF-kappaB activation, and casp...

  11. Treatment with 5-Aza-2'-Deoxycytidine Induces Expression of NY-ESO-1 and Facilitates Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Tumor Cell Killing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klar, Agnes S.; Gopinadh, Jakka; Kleber, Sascha; Wadle, Andreas; Renner, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background NY-ESO-1 belongs to the cancer/testis antigen (CTA) family and represents an attractive target for cancer immunotherapy. Its expression is induced in a variety of solid tumors via DNA demethylation of the promoter of CpG islands. However, NY-ESO-1 expression is usually very low or absent in some tumors such as breast cancer or multiple myeloma. Therefore, we established an optimized in vitro treatment protocol for up-regulation of NY-ESO-1 expression by tumor cells using the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC). Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrated de novo induction of NY-ESO-1 in MCF7 breast cancer cells and significantly increased expression in U266 multiple myeloma cells. This effect was time- and dose-dependent with the highest expression of NY-ESO-1 mRNA achieved by the incubation of 10 μM DAC for 72 hours. NY-ESO-1 activation was also confirmed at the protein level as shown by Western blot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence staining. The detection and quantification of single NY-ESO-1 peptides presented at the tumor cell surface in the context of HLA-A*0201 molecules revealed an increase of 100% and 50% for MCF7 and U266 cells, respectively. Moreover, the enhanced expression of NY-ESO-1 derived peptides at the cell surface was accompanied by an increased specific lysis of MCF7 and U266 cells by HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1(157–165) peptide specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) CD8+ T cells. In addition, the killing activity of CAR T cells correlated with the secretion of higher IFN-gamma levels. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate that NY-ESO-1 directed immunotherapy with specific CAR T cells might benefit from concomitant DAC treatment. PMID:26447882

  12. Anti-tumor activity of heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum BF-LP284 on Meth-A tumor cells in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ryoichi; Itoh, Yukie; Kataoka, Motoyuki; Iino-Miura, Shiori; Miura, Ryosuke; Mizutani, Takeo; Fujisawa, Tomohiko

    2016-09-01

    Probiotics exert numerous effects on human well-being. Here, heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum BF-LP284 (H-Lp) was isolated as a potent immuno-modulator among 15 strains of lactobacilli in terms of TNF-α induction ability in peritoneal macrophages. In vitro TNF-α and IFN-γ induction in Peyer's patch (PP) cells was higher when incubated with H-Lp than with live L. plantarum BF-LP284 (L-Lp). Suppression of syngeneic Meth-A tumors in a murine model by oral administration of H-Lp was also greater than that of L-Lp and of controls. H-Lp stimulated IFN-γ production in spleen cells, which displayed inhibited tumor growth in Winn assays when treated with H-Lp. Moreover, H-Lp increased the ratio of CD3(+ )cells among peripheral blood mononuclear cells in Meth-A tumor-bearing mice, suggesting an H-Lp-mediated anti-tumor mechanism whereby immune cells that are activated by H-Lp in PP and acquire anti-tumor activity in the spleen migrate to tumor sites through lymphocyte homing to inhibit tumor growth. PMID:27198983

  13. N-acetyl cysteine protects against ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage but not against cell killing in yeast and mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induces DNA strand breaks leading to cell death or deleterious genome rearrangements. In the present study, we examined the role of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a clinically proven safe agent, for it's ability to protect against γ-ray-induced DNA strand breaks and/or DNA deletions in yeast and mammals. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, DNA deletions were scored by reversion to histidine prototrophy. Human lymphoblastoid cells were examined for the frequency of γ-H2AX foci formation, indicative of DNA double strand break formation. DNA strand breaks were also measured in mouse peripheral blood by the alkaline comet assay. In yeast, NAC reduced the frequency of IR-induced DNA deletions. However, NAC did not protect against cell death. NAC also reduced γ-H2AX foci formation in human lymphoblastoid cells but had no protective effect in the colony survival assay. NAC administration via drinking water fully protected against DNA strand breaks in mice whole-body irradiated with 1 Gy but not with 4 Gy. NAC treatment in the absence of irradiation was not genotoxic. These data suggest that, given the safety and efficacy of NAC in humans, NAC may be useful in radiation therapy to prevent radiation-mediated genotoxicity, but does not interfere with efficient cancer cell killing.

  14. N-acetyl cysteine protects against ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage but not against cell killing in yeast and mammals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reliene, Ramune [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Medicine, Center for Human Nutrition, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Pollard, Julianne M. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Biomedical Physics Interdepartmental Program, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Sobol, Zhanna; Trouiller, Benedicte [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Gatti, Richard A. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Human Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Schiestl, Robert H., E-mail: rschiestl@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Biomedical Physics Interdepartmental Program, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induces DNA strand breaks leading to cell death or deleterious genome rearrangements. In the present study, we examined the role of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a clinically proven safe agent, for it's ability to protect against {gamma}-ray-induced DNA strand breaks and/or DNA deletions in yeast and mammals. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, DNA deletions were scored by reversion to histidine prototrophy. Human lymphoblastoid cells were examined for the frequency of {gamma}-H2AX foci formation, indicative of DNA double strand break formation. DNA strand breaks were also measured in mouse peripheral blood by the alkaline comet assay. In yeast, NAC reduced the frequency of IR-induced DNA deletions. However, NAC did not protect against cell death. NAC also reduced {gamma}-H2AX foci formation in human lymphoblastoid cells but had no protective effect in the colony survival assay. NAC administration via drinking water fully protected against DNA strand breaks in mice whole-body irradiated with 1 Gy but not with 4 Gy. NAC treatment in the absence of irradiation was not genotoxic. These data suggest that, given the safety and efficacy of NAC in humans, NAC may be useful in radiation therapy to prevent radiation-mediated genotoxicity, but does not interfere with efficient cancer cell killing.

  15. Evidence for induction of humoral and cytotoxic immune responses against devil facial tumor disease cells in Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) immunized with killed cell preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiss, A; Brown, G K; Tovar, C; Lyons, A B; Woods, G M

    2015-06-12

    Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) risk extinction from a contagious cancer, devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) in which the infectious agent is the tumor cell itself. Because devils are unable to produce an immune response against the tumor cells no devil has survived 'infection'. To promote an immune response we immunized healthy devils with killed DFTD tumor cells in the presence of adjuvants. Immune responses, including cytotoxicity and antibody production, were detected in five of the six devils. The incorporation of adjuvants that act via toll like receptors may provide additional signals to break 'immunological ignorance'. One of these devils was protected against a challenge with viable DFTD cells. This was a short-term protection as re-challenge one year later resulted in tumor growth. These results suggest that Tasmanian devils can generate immune responses against DFTD cells. With further optimization of immune stimulation it should be possible to protect Tasmanian devils against DFTD with an injectable vaccine. PMID:25708088

  16. Targeted alpha therapy in vivo: direct evidence for single cancer cell kill using {sup 149}Tb-rituximab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, G.J.; Soloviev, D.; Buchegger, F. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Geneva, 24 Rue Micheli du Crest, 1211, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Miederer, M. [Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Vranjes-Duric, S. [Laboratory of Radioisotopes, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Czechoslovakia); Comor, J.J. [Laboratory of Physics, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Czechoslovakia); Kuenzi, G.; Hartley, O. [Department of Medical Biochemistry, University Medical Center, Geneva (Switzerland); Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, R. [Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    This study demonstrates high-efficiency sterilisation of single cancer cells in a SCID mouse model of leukaemia using rituximab, a monoclonal antibody that targets CD20, labelled with terbium-149, an alpha-emitting radionuclide. Radio-immunotherapy with 5.5 MBq labelled antibody conjugate (1.11 GBq/mg) 2 days after an intravenous graft of 5.10{sup 6} Daudi cells resulted in tumour-free survival for >120 days in 89% of treated animals. In contrast, all control mice (no treatment or treated with 5 or 300 {mu}g unlabelled rituximab) developed lymphoma disease. At the end of the study period, 28.4%{+-}4% of the long-lived daughter activity remained in the body, of which 91.1% was located in bone tissue and 6.3% in the liver. A relatively high daughter radioactivity concentration was found in the spleen (12%{+-}2%/g), suggesting that the killed cancer cells are mainly eliminated through the spleen. This promising preliminary in vivo study suggests that targeted alpha therapy with {sup 149}Tb is worthy of consideration as a new-generation radio-immunotherapeutic approach. (orig.)

  17. How to kill tumor cells with inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    OpenAIRE

    Mangerich, Aswin; Bürkle, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification catalyzed by the enzyme family of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). PARPs exhibit pleiotropic cellular functions ranging from maintenance of genomic stability and chromatin remodeling to regulation of cell death, thereby rendering PARP homologues promising targets in cancer therapy. Depending on the molecular status of a cancer cell, low-molecular weight PARP inhibitors can (i) either be used as monotherapeutic agents following t...

  18. Action spectra for killing non-dividing normal human and Xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-dividing human cells degenerate and eventually detach from a culture vessel surface when exposed to UV light. Action spectra for this kind of cell inactivation were determined using eight monochromatic wavelengths from 240 to 313 nm and both a normal DNA excision-repair-proficient strain and repair-deficient Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP12BE) strain. The action spectra for both strains have similar shapes with a broad peak between 254 and 280 nm followed by a steep decline at wavelengths greater than 280 nm. The relative action spectra are similar to those for inactivation of reproductive capacity and pyrimidine dimer formation in rodent cells suggesting that the critical target and critical damage for inactivation of non-dividing human cells is DNA and damage to DNA, respectively. Normal repair-proficient cells are 5-7 times more resistant at all wavelengths, based on a comparison of Dsub(o) values, than repair-deficient XP12BE cells, supporting the conclusion that the inactivating damage at all wavelengths is to DNA. (author)

  19. A New Triglycyl Peptide Linker for Antibody-Drug Conjugates (ADCs) with Improved Targeted Killing of Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajeeva; Setiady, Yulius Y; Ponte, Jose; Kovtun, Yelena V; Lai, Katharine C; Hong, E Erica; Fishkin, Nathan; Dong, Ling; Jones, Gregory E; Coccia, Jennifer A; Lanieri, Leanne; Veale, Karen; Costoplus, Juliet A; Skaletskaya, Anna; Gabriel, Rabih; Salomon, Paulin; Wu, Rui; Qiu, Qifeng; Erickson, Hans K; Lambert, John M; Chari, Ravi V J; Widdison, Wayne C

    2016-06-01

    A triglycyl peptide linker (CX) was designed for use in antibody -: drug conjugates (ADC), aiming to provide efficient release and lysosomal efflux of cytotoxic catabolites within targeted cancer cells. ADCs comprising anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (anti-EpCAM) and anti-EGFR antibodies with maytansinoid payloads were prepared using CX or a noncleavable SMCC linker (CX and SMCC ADCs). The in vitro cytotoxic activities of CX and SMCC ADCs were similar for several cancer cell lines; however, the CX ADC was more active (5-100-fold lower IC50) than the SMCC ADC in other cell lines, including a multidrug-resistant line. Both CX and SMCC ADCs showed comparable MTDs and pharmacokinetics in CD-1 mice. In Calu-3 tumor xenografts, antitumor efficacy was observed with the anti-EpCAM CX ADC at a 5-fold lower dose than the corresponding SMCC ADC in vivo Similarly, the anti-EGFR CX ADC showed improved antitumor activity over the respective SMCC conjugate in HSC-2 and H1975 tumor models; however, both exhibited similar activity against FaDu xenografts. Mechanistically, in contrast with the charged lysine-linked catabolite of SMCC ADC, a significant fraction of the carboxylic acid catabolite of CX ADC could be uncharged in the acidic lysosomes, and thus diffuse out readily into the cytosol. Upon release from tumor cells, CX catabolites are charged at extracellular pH and do not penetrate and kill neighboring cells, similar to the SMCC catabolite. Overall, these data suggest that CX represents a promising linker option for the development of ADCs with improved therapeutic properties. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1311-20. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197308

  20. Plant cyclopeptide RA-V kills human breast cancer cells by inducing mitochondria-mediated apoptosis through blocking PDK1–AKT interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper, we examined the effects of a natural cyclopeptide RA-V on human breast cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms. RA-V significantly inhibited the growth of human breast cancer MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 cells and murine breast cancer 4T1 cells. In addition, RA-V triggered mitochondrial apoptotic pathway which was indicated by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of cytochrome c, and the activation of caspase cascade. Further study showed that RA-V dramatically inhibited phosphorylation of AKT and 3-phosphoinositide dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) in MCF-7 cells. Moreover, RA-V disrupted the interaction between PDK1 and AKT in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, RA-V-induced apoptosis could be enhanced by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor or attenuated by over-expression of AKT in all the three kinds of breast cancer cells. Taken together, this study shows that RA-V, which can induce mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, exerts strong anti-tumor activity against human breast cancer. The underlying anti-cancer mechanism of RA-V is related to the blockage of the interaction between PDK1 and AKT. - Highlights: ► Plant cyclopeptide RA-V kills human breast cancer cells. ► RA-V triggered mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in human breast cancer cells. ► RA-V inhibited phosphorylation of AKT and PDK1 in breast cancer MCF-7 cells. ► Its mechanism is related to the blockage of the interaction between PDK1 and AKT

  1. Plant cyclopeptide RA-V kills human breast cancer cells by inducing mitochondria-mediated apoptosis through blocking PDK1–AKT interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xian-Ying; Chen, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Han Kou Road, Nanjing (China); Fan, Jun-Ting [State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming (China); Song, Ran; Wang, Lu [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Han Kou Road, Nanjing (China); Gu, Yan-Hong [Department of Clinical Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Zeng, Guang-Zhi [State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming (China); Shen, Yan; Wu, Xue-Feng [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Han Kou Road, Nanjing (China); Tan, Ning-Hua, E-mail: nhtan@mail.kib.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Phytochemistry and Plant Resources in West China, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming (China); Xu, Qiang, E-mail: molpharm@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Han Kou Road, Nanjing (China); Sun, Yang, E-mail: yangsun@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Han Kou Road, Nanjing (China)

    2013-02-15

    In the present paper, we examined the effects of a natural cyclopeptide RA-V on human breast cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms. RA-V significantly inhibited the growth of human breast cancer MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 cells and murine breast cancer 4T1 cells. In addition, RA-V triggered mitochondrial apoptotic pathway which was indicated by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of cytochrome c, and the activation of caspase cascade. Further study showed that RA-V dramatically inhibited phosphorylation of AKT and 3-phosphoinositide dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) in MCF-7 cells. Moreover, RA-V disrupted the interaction between PDK1 and AKT in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, RA-V-induced apoptosis could be enhanced by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor or attenuated by over-expression of AKT in all the three kinds of breast cancer cells. Taken together, this study shows that RA-V, which can induce mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, exerts strong anti-tumor activity against human breast cancer. The underlying anti-cancer mechanism of RA-V is related to the blockage of the interaction between PDK1 and AKT. - Highlights: ► Plant cyclopeptide RA-V kills human breast cancer cells. ► RA-V triggered mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in human breast cancer cells. ► RA-V inhibited phosphorylation of AKT and PDK1 in breast cancer MCF-7 cells. ► Its mechanism is related to the blockage of the interaction between PDK1 and AKT.

  2. Mitochondrial-Targeting MET Kinase Inhibitor Kills Erlotinib-Resistant Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianming; Ng, Wai Har; Chen, Huan; Chomchopbun, Kamon; Huynh, The Hung; Go, Mei Lin; Kon, Oi Lian

    2016-08-11

    Lung cancer cells harboring activating EGFR mutations acquire resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) by activating several bypass mechanisms, including MET amplification and overexpression. We show that a significant proportion of activated MET protein in EGFR TKI-resistant HCC827 lung cancer cells resides within the mitochondria. Targeting the total complement of MET in the plasma membrane and mitochondria should render these cells more susceptible to cell death and hence provide a means of circumventing drug resistance. Herein, the mitochondrial targeting triphenylphosphonium (TPP) moiety was introduced to the selective MET kinase inhibitor PHA665752. The resulting TPP analogue rapidly localized to the mitochondria of MET-overexpressing erlotinib-resistant HCC827 cells, partially suppressed the phosphorylation (Y1234/Y1235) of MET in the mitochondrial inner membrane and was as cytotoxic and apoptogenic as the parent compound. These findings provide support for the targeting of mitochondrial MET with a TPP-TKI conjugate as a means of restoring responsiveness to chemotherapy. PMID:27563407

  3. Stressing the ubiquitin-proteasome system without 20S proteolytic inhibition selectively kills cervical cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi K Anchoori

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer cells exhibit an increased requirement for ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation associated with an elevated metabolic turnover rate, and for specific signaling pathways, notably HPV E6-targeted degradation of p53 and PDZ proteins. Natural compounds with antioxidant properties including flavonoids and triterpenoids hold promise as anticancer agents by interfering with ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation. An increasing body of evidence indicates that their α-β unsaturated carbonyl system is the molecular determinant for inhibition of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation up-stream of the catalytic sites of the 20S proteasome. Herein we report the identification and characterization of a new class of chalcone-based, potent and cell permeable chemical inhibitors of ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation, and a lead compound RAMB1. RAMB1 inhibits ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation without compromising the catalytic activities of the 20S proteasome, a mechanism distinct from that of Bortezomib. Treatment of cervical cancer cells with RAMB1 triggers unfolded protein responses, including aggresome formation and Hsp90 stabilization, and increases p53 steady state levels. RAMB1 treatment results in activation of lysosomal-dependent degradation pathways as a mechanism to compensate for increasing levels of poly-ubiquitin enriched toxic aggregates. Importantly, RAMB1 synergistically triggers cell death of cervical cancer cells when combined with the lysosome inhibitor Chloroquine.

  4. How to kill tumor cells with inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangerich, Aswin; Bürkle, Alexander

    2011-01-15

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification catalyzed by the enzyme family of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). PARPs exhibit pleiotropic cellular functions ranging from maintenance of genomic stability and chromatin remodeling to regulation of cell death, thereby rendering PARP homologues promising targets in cancer therapy. Depending on the molecular status of a cancer cell, low-molecular weight PARP inhibitors can (i) either be used as monotherapeutic agents following the concept of synthetic lethality or (ii) to support classical chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The rationales are the following: (i) in cancers with selective defects in homologous recombination repair, inactivation of PARPs directly causes cell death. In cancer treatment, this phenomenon can be employed to specifically target tumor cells while sparing nonmalignant tissue. (ii) PARP inhibitors can also be used to sensitize cells to cytotoxic DNA-damaging treatments, as some PARPs actively participate in genomic maintenance. Apart from that, PARP inhibitors possess antiangiogenic functions, thus opening up a further option to inhibit tumor growth. In view of the above, a number of high-potency PARP inhibitors have been developed during the last decade and are currently evaluated as cancer therapeutics in clinical trials by several leading pharmaceutical companies. PMID:20853319

  5. A comparison of the chemical repair rates of free radical precursors of DNA damage and cell killing in Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors compared the chemical repair kinetics of the oxygen-dependent free radical precursors leading to DNA single-strand and double-strand breaks, measured using filter elution techniques, with those leading to cell killing in V79 cells. The chemical repair rates for DNA dsb (670s-1 at pH 7.2 and 380s-1 at pH 9.6) and cell killing (530s-1) were similar, in agreement with the important role of DNA dsb in radiation induced cell lethality. The rate for DNA ssb precursors was significantly slower (210s-1). The difference in rate between DNA ssb and dsb precursors may be explained on the basis of a dsb free radical precursor consisting of a paired radical, one radical on each strand. The instantaneous probability of one or other of these radicals being chemically repaired and not proceeding to form a dsb will be twice that of a ssb radical precursor. (author)

  6. Hypersensitivity of skin fibroblasts from basal cell nevus syndrome patients to killing by ultraviolet B but not by ultraviolet C radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder in which the afflicted individuals are extremely susceptible to sunlight-induced skin cancers, particularly basal cell carcinomas. However, the cellular and molecular basis for BCNS is unknown. To ascertain whether there is any relationship between genetic predisposition to skin cancer and increased sensitivity of somatic cells from BCNS patients to killing by UV radiation, we exposed skin fibroblasts established from unexposed skin biopsies of several BCNS and age- and sex-matched normal individuals to either UV-B (280-320 nm) or UV-C (254 nm) radiation and determined their survival. The results indicated that skin fibroblasts from BCNS patients were hypersensitive to killing by UV-B but not UV-C radiation as compared to skin fibroblasts from normal individuals. DNA repair studies indicated that the increased sensitivity of BCNS skin fibroblasts to killing by UV-B radiation was not due to a defect in the excision repair of pyrimidine dimers. These results indicate that there is an association between hypersensitivity of somatic cells to killing by UV-B radiation and the genetic predisposition to skin cancer in BCNS patients. In addition, these results suggest that DNA lesions (and repair processes) other than the pyrimidine dimer are also involved in the pathogenesis of sunlight-induced skin cancers in BCNS patients. More important, the UV-B sensitivity assay described here may be used as a diagnostic tool to identify presymptomatic individuals with BCNS

  7. Autophagic Killing Effects against Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Alveolar Macrophages from Young and Aged Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Pacheco, Sophia A.; Powers, Katelyn M.; Engelmann, Flora; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Purdy, Georgiana E.

    2013-01-01

    Non-human primates, notably rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta, RM), provide a robust experimental model to investigate the immune response to and effective control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections. Changes in the function of immune cells and immunosenescence may contribute to the increased susceptibility of the elderly to tuberculosis. The goal of this study was to examine the impact of age on M. tuberculosis host-pathogen interactions following infection of primary alveolar macrophages...

  8. Establishment and characterization of a human cell strain, KT, with high sensitivity to UV-killing and to cell proliferation inhibition by interferon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have established a human cell line, designated KT, with high susceptibility to both cell proliferation inhibition by interferon and UV-killing, from a metastatic breast carcinoma. A tumor marker, a pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (Schwangerschaftsprotein 1; SP1), and carcinoma characteristics compatible with ductal carcinoma of the breast were seen in KT cells by electron microscopic observation. KT cells were slightly more resistant to X-ray-induced toxicity than fibroblastic cells, termed KS, from the scalp of the patient. But, KT cells had lower cloning efficiency after UV irradiation than did KS cells: D0 values of 1.5 J/m2 and 7.2 J/m2, respectively. KT cells also appeared more susceptible to human interferon (HuIFN) preparations (α, β, γ and natural or recombinant) than did KS cells, as measured by cell colony formation ability, proliferation rates, and [3H]deoxythymidine incorporation levels into acid-insoluble cell materials. The sensitivity of KT cells to UV and HuIFN was greater than that of human RSa cells, a cell line with high sensitivity to both agents. KT cells had more capacity for UV-induced DNA-repair replication synthesis than did RSa cells, the capacity being much the same as that of KS cells. There was no significant difference in levels of antiviral activity induced by HuIFN and binding capacity for 125I-labeled IFN-αA between KT and KS cells. KT cells appeared refractory to cell proliferation inhibition by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) preparations. (author)

  9. Photodynamic killing of cancer cells by a Platinum(II) complex with cyclometallating ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Rachel E.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; McKenzie, Luke K.; Stasheuski, Alexander S.; Coyle, Rachel; Baggaley, Elizabeth; Bottomley, Sarah; Weinstein, Julia A.; Bryant, Helen E.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy that uses photosensitizers which only become toxic upon light-irradiation provides a strong alternative to conventional cancer treatment due to its ability to selectively target tumour material without affecting healthy tissue. Transition metal complexes are highly promising PDT agents due to intense visible light absorption, yet the majority are toxic even without light. This study introduces a small, photostable, charge-neutral platinum-based compound, Pt(II) 2,6-dipyrido-4-methyl-benzenechloride, complex 1, as a photosensitizer, which works under visible light. Activation of the new photosensitizer at low concentrations (0.1–1 μM) by comparatively low dose of 405 nm light (3.6 J cm‑2) causes significant cell death of cervical, colorectal and bladder cancer cell lines, and, importantly, a cisplatin resistant cell line EJ-R. The photo-index of the complex is 8. We demonstrate that complex 1 induces irreversible DNA single strand breaks following irradiation, and that oxygen is essential for the photoinduced action. Neither light, nor compound alone led to cell death. The key advantages of the new drug include a remarkably fast accumulation time (diffusion-controlled, minutes), and photostability. This study demonstrates a highly promising new agent for photodynamic therapy, and attracts attention to photostable metal complexes as viable alternatives to conventional chemotherapeutics, such as cisplatin.

  10. Identification of protective pneumococcal T(H17 antigens from the soluble fraction of a killed whole cell vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin L Moffitt

    Full Text Available Mucosal or parenteral immunization with a killed unencapsulated pneumococcal whole cell antigen (WCA with an adjuvant protects mice from colonization by a T(H17 CD4+ cell-mediated mechanism. Using preparative SDS gels, we separated the soluble proteins that compose the WCA in order to identify fractions that were immunogenic and protective. We screened these fractions for their ability to stimulate IL-17A secretion from splenocytes obtained from mice immunized with WCA and adjuvant. We identified 12 proteins within the stimulatory fractions by mass spectrometry; these proteins were then cloned, recombinantly expressed and purified using an Escherichia coli expression system. The ability of these proteins to induce IL-17A secretion was then evaluated by stimulation of mouse splenocytes. Of the four most stimulatory proteins, three were protective in a mouse pneumococcal serotype 6B colonization model. This work thus describes a method for identifying immunogenic proteins from the soluble fraction of pneumococcus and shows that several of the proteins identified protect mice from colonization when used as mucosal vaccines. We propose that, by providing protection against pneumococcal colonization, one or more of these proteins may serve as components of a multivalent pneumococcal vaccine.

  11. Anti-breast cancer effects of live, heat-killed and cytoplasmic fractions of Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus hominis isolated from human breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Zubaida; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Isa, Nurulfiza Mat

    2016-03-01

    Development of tumour that is resistant to chemotherapeutics and synthetic drugs, coupled with their life-threatening side effects and the adverse effects of surgery and hormone therapies, led to increased research on probiotics' anticancer potentials. The current study investigated the potential of live, heat-killed cells (HKC) and the cytoplasmic fractions (CF) of Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus hominis as anti-breast cancer agents. MCF-7 cell line was treated with 25, 50, 100 and 200 μg/mL each of live, HKC and CF of the bacteria; and cytotoxicity was evaluated for 24, 48 and 72 h using MTT assay. The morphological features of the treated cells were examined by fluorescence microscopy. The stage of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were quantified by flow cytometry. The bacterial effect on non-malignant breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A, was assessed using MTT assay for 24, 48 and 72 h. All the three forms of the bacteria caused a significant decrease in MCF-7 (up to 33.29%) cell proliferation in concentration- and time-dependent manner. Morphological features of apoptosis like cell death, cell shrinkage and membrane blebbing were observed. Flow cytometry analyses suggested that about 34.60% of treated MCF-7 was undergoing apoptosis. A strong anti-proliferative activity was efficiently induced through sub-G1 accumulation (up to 83.17%) in treated MCF-7 and decreased number in the G0/G1 phase (74.39%). MCF-10A cells treated with both bacteria showed no significant difference with the untreated (>90% viability). These bacteria can be used as good alternative nutraceutical with promising therapeutic indexes for breast cancer because of their non-cytotoxic effects to normal cells. PMID:26659392

  12. Nuclear matrix as a target for hyperthermic killing of cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Roti Roti, Joseph L.; Kampinga, Harm H.; Malyapa, Robert S.; Wright, William D.; Vanderwaal, Robert P.; Xu, Mai

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear matrix organizes nuclear DNA into operational domains in which DNA is undergoing replication, transcription or is inactive. The proteins of the nuclear matrix are among the most thermal labile proteins in the cell, undergoing denaturation at temperatures as low as 43–45°C, i.e. relevant temperatures for the clinical treatment of cancer. Heat shock-induced protein denaturation results in the aggregation of proteins to the nuclear matrix. Protein aggregation with the nuclear matrix ...

  13. Relative biological effect of high Z, high LET charged particles for spermatogonial killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of high LET radiations produced with accelerated heavy-ion beams on weight loss of the mouse testes have been examined. It is assumed that weight loss is due primarily to cell death in the germinal epithelium. Results indicate that little or no recovery of sublethal injury occurs in this cell renewal system. Generally, the RBE rises continuously and monotonically for all LET values associated with helium and carbon from 6 to 100 keV/μm. On the other hand, the data for neon and argon do not appear to fit. From the standpoint of the radiobiology of heavy ions, the most significant observation is that LET alone does not account for variation in radiation response of the spermatogonial population

  14. Chaperone-Targeting Cytotoxin and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Inducing Drug Synergize to Kill Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Backer

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Diverse physiological and therapeutic insults that increase the amount of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER induce the unfolded protein response, an evolutionarily conserved protective mechanism that manages ER stress. Glucose-regulated protein 78/immunoglobulin heavy-chain binding protein (GRP78/BiP is an ER-resident protein that plays a central role in the ER stress response and is the only known substrate of the proteolytic A subunit (SubA of a novel bacterial AB5 toxin. Here, we report that an engineered fusion protein, epidermal growth factor (EGF-SubA, combining EGF and SubA, is highly toxic to growing and confluent epidermal growth factor receptor-expressing cancer cells, and its cytotoxicity is mediated by a remarkably rapid cleavage of GRP78/BiP. Systemic delivery of EGF-SubA results in a significant inhibition of human breast and prostate tumor xenografts in mouse models. Furthermore, EGF-SubA dramatically increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to the ER stress-inducing drug thapsigargin, and vice versa, demonstrating the first example of mechanism-based synergism in the action of a cytotoxin and an ER-targeting drug.

  15. Effect of Al content on r-value and recrystallization texture of B-bearing Al-killed steel sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funakawa, Y.; Inazumi, I.; Hosoya, Y. [NKK Corp., Hiroshima (Japan). Mater. and Process. Res. Center; Murayama, T.

    1998-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that boron (B) had a beneficial effect on the mechanical properties of continuously annealed Al-killed steel sheets. However, the effect of Al content on r-value in the B-bearing steels has not been well discussed yet. In this study, the effect of Al content on r-value and recrystallization texture formation was investigated for laboratory-melt B-bearing low C Al-killed steel sheets. The r-value of continuously annealed B-bearing steel increased with decreasing Al content under the same grain size. In the steels with lower Al (Al=0.005%) content, the carbide coarsening in hot-rolled sheet was more significant as compared to those with higher Al(Al=0.055%) content. The recrystallization temperature was lowered with decreasing Al content, and the development of left angle 111 right angle //ND components was accelerated while that of left angle 110 right angle //ND components was retarded. Since the increase in Al content accelerates AlN precipitation in hot-rolled sheets, B might remain as in solution and segregate to grain boundaries. On the other hand, the reduction in Al content causes preferential precipitation of BN in hot-rolled sheets. The improvement of r-value by reducing Al content in B-bearing low C steels was caused by the development of left angle 111 right angle //ND components which reduced by solute B. (orig.) 9 refs.

  16. Human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells efficiently kill influenza virus-infected lung alveolar epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    LI Hong; Xiang, Zheng; Feng, Ting; Li, Jinrong; Liu, Yinping; Fan, Yingying; Lu, Qiao; Yin, Zhongwei; Yu, Meixing; Shen, Chongyang; Tu, Wenwei

    2013-01-01

    γδ-T cells play an indispensable role in host defense against different viruses, including influenza A virus. However, whether these cells have cytotoxic activity against influenza virus-infected lung alveolar epithelial cells and subsequently contribute to virus clearance remains unknown. Using influenza virus-infected A549 cells, human lung alveolar epithelial cells, we investigated the cytotoxic activity of aminobisphosphonate pamidronate (PAM)-expanded human Vγ9Vδ2-T cells and their under...

  17. Bird and beetle assemblages in mountain pine beetle killed forests and those subsequently burned: evidence for an effect of compound natural disturbances in British Columbia

    OpenAIRE

    House, Kimberly Nicole

    2014-01-01

    The recent mountain pine beetle (MPB; Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) outbreak in British Columbia (BC) is unprecedented in severity and extent, and has created a landscape of beetle-killed trees through which wildfires are now burning as compound natural disturbances. We asked the question: Is there an impact of grey phase MPB kill severity on bird and beetle assemblages, and does an effect persist following wildfire in BC? We compared the bird community of central interior BC against categ...

  18. In vitro studies: The role of immunological cells in Indonesian thin tail sheep in the killing of the liver fluke, Fasciola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E Estuningsih

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that Indonesian Thin Tail (ET sheep exhibit high resistance to challenge with Fasciola gigantica when compared with Merino sheep, and this resistance is expressed in early infection. In order to study the role of the immune system in this resistance to ET sheep, in vitro studies were undertaken in the laboratory. In vitro study to confirm the ability of immune cells from ET sheep in the killing of F. gigantica larvae has been done by incubating immune cells and F. gigantica larvae together with immune sera or normal sera. The viability of the larvae was observed over a period 3 days incubation by observing their motility. The results showed that the cells isolated from F. gigantica- challenged ET sheep in the presence of immune sera from ET were able to kill 70% of the larvae. In contrast, cells from infected Merino were unable to kill a significant number of F. gigantica using the same sera source. It seems that the cytotoxicity was dependent on the presence of immune sera and ET peritoneal cells, suggesting the potential role of an antibody-dependent cell cytotoxic (ADCC mechanism in the resistant ET sheep.

  19. "Kill" the messenger: Targeting of cell-derived microparticles in lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Christoffer T; Rasmussen, Niclas S; Heegaard, Niels H H; Jacobsen, Søren

    2016-07-01

    Immune complex (IC) deposition in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) is a key early pathogenic event in lupus nephritis (LN). The clarification of the mechanisms behind IC deposition will enable targeted therapy in the future. Circulating cell-derived microparticles (MPs) have been proposed as major sources of extracellular autoantigens and ICs and triggers of autoimmunity in LN. The overabundance of galectin-3-binding protein (G3BP) along with immunoglobulins and a few other proteins specifically distinguish circulating MPs in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and this is most pronounced in patients with active LN. G3BP co-localizes with deposited ICs in renal biopsies from LN patients supporting a significant presence of MPs in the IC deposits. G3BP binds strongly to glomerular basement membrane proteins and integrins. Accordingly, MP surface proteins, especially G3BP, may be essential for the deposition of ICs in kidneys and thus for the ensuing formation of MP-derived electron dense structures in the GBM, and immune activation in LN. This review focuses on the notion of targeting surface molecules on MPs as an entirely novel treatment strategy in LN. By targeting MPs, a double hit may be achieved by attenuating both the autoantigenic fueling of immune complexes and the triggering of the adaptive immune system. Thereby, early pathogenic events may be blocked in contrast to current treatment strategies that primarily target and modulate later events in the cellular and humoral immune response. PMID:26970484

  20. 转染肿瘤细胞总RNA的树突状细胞联合CIK细胞抗小鼠肝癌作用的实验研究%Study on Anti-mouse Hepatocellular Carcinoma Effect of Cytokine-induced Kill Cells Activated by Dendritic Cells Transfected With Mouse Hepatocellular Carcinoma Total RNA in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗善超; 刘剑勇; 赵荫农; 张志明; 崔英; 张春燕; 张力图

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate anti-mouse hepatocellular carcinoma( HCC ) effect of cytokine-induced killer cells( CIK ) activated by dendritic cells( DC ) transfected with mouse HCC total RNA in vitro. Methods The DC precursors and DC harvested from the bone marrow were incubated with recombinant murine granulocyte marcophage-colony stimulating factor( rmGM-CSF ) and recombinant murine interleukin-4( nrJL-4 ) in vitro. Splenocytes were isolated from mouse spleen. Nonadherent splenocytes were induced to CIK by recombinant murine IFN-gamma( rmlFN-γ ),anti-mouse CD3( anti-CD3 ), recombinant murine interleukin-2( rmIL-2 ),recombinant murine IL-lb( rmIL-lb )in vitro. Tumor-derived total RNA extracted from actively growing H22 cells was mixed with DC to transfect DC in vitro. The phenotypes of DCs( DCs transfected with total RNA or DCs non-transfected with total RNA ) were analyzed by flow cytometry. Dendritic cells and CIK cells were co-cultured as effector cells. Mouse H22 cells and S180 cells were used as target cells in the LDH release methods to determine their cytotoxic activity.Results The expressions of MHC-Ⅰ,MHC-Ⅱ,CD83,CD86 were up-regulated and the expressions of CD14 was down-regulated after DC was transfected with tumor total RNA. DC transfected total RNA of H22 cells achieved higher cytotoxicity on H22 cells than on S180 cells( P < 0.05 ). CIK cells activated by DC transfected total RNA of H22 cells achieved the highest cytotoxicity on H22 cells in all groups( P <0.05 ). Conclusion CIK cells activated by DC transfected total RNA of H22 cells present efficient and specific anti-mouse immune response of HCC on H22 cells in vitro.%目的 探讨转染小鼠肝癌H22细胞总RNA的树突状细胞(DC)疫苗体外抗小鼠肝癌的免疫作用.方法 提取小鼠四肢长骨骨髓,在rmGM-CSF和rmIL-4体外刺激下增殖分化为DC.制备小鼠脾淋巴细胞,在体外经rmIFN-γ、anti-CD3、rmIL-2和rmIL-1b诱导成为细胞因子诱导的杀伤

  1. Transferrin coupled azanthraquinone enhances the killing effect on trypanosomes. The role of lysosomal mannosidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nok A.J.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Partially purified azanthraquinone (AQ extract from Mitracarpus scaber was coupled to bovine transferrin (Tf using azidophenyl glyoxal (APG. The AQ-APG-Tf conjugate was found to possess an enhanced in vitro trypanocidal activity against Trypanosoma congolense and T. brucei brucei. At low concentrations of 0.39-90 mg/ml, the conjugate diminished the growth of T. congolense and T. b. brucei dose dependently at the logarithmic phase. Both parasites were more sensitive to AQ-APG-Tf than to the free (AQ extract. Growth inhibition on the parasites by the free extract was observed at 20-200 mg/ml. The total activity of the lysosomal enzyme a-mannosidase was reduced in the T. congolense cells treated with AQ-APG-Tf in a dose related pattern. However, the activity of the mannosidase in the T. b. brucei treated cells is less affected. The AQ-APG-Tf is more effective on a mannosidase than free AQ, eight and four fold for T. congolense and T. b. brucei respectively. The results are discussed as regards the potency of using transferrin as suitable drug carrier in the chemotherapy of Human sleeping sickness.

  2. Differences in heat-induced cell killing as determined in three mammalian cell lines do not correspond with the extent of heat radiosensitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kampinga, H.H.; Jorritsma, J.B.M.; Burgman, P.; Konings, A.W.T.

    1986-10-01

    Three different cell lines, Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells, HeLa S/sub 3/ cells and LM mouse fibroblasts, were used to investigate whether or not the extent of heat killing (44/sup 0/C) and heat radio-sensitization (44/sup 0/C before 0-6 Gy X-irradiation) are related. Although HeLa cells were the most heat-resistant cell line and showed the least heat radiosensitization, we found that the most heat-sensitive EAT cells (D/sub 0/, EAT = 8.0 min; D/sub 0/, LM = 10.0 min; D/sub 0/, HeLa = 12.5 min) showed less radiosensitization than the more heat-resistant LM fibroblasts (TERsub(HeLa)cell death are not identical to those determining heat radiosensitization. Furthermore the inactivation of DNA polymerase ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. activities by heat seemed not to correlate with heat survival alone but showed a positive relationship to heat radiosensitization. The possibility of these enzymes being a determinant in heat radiosensitization is discussed.

  3. Differences in heat-induced cell killing as determined in three mammalian cell lines do not correspond with the extent of heat radiosensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampinga, H H; Jorritsma, J B; Burgman, P; Konings, A W

    1986-10-01

    Three different cell lines, Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells, HeLa S3 cells and LM mouse fibroblasts, were used to investigate whether or not the extent of heat killing (44 degrees C) and heat radio-sensitization (44 degrees C before 0-6 Gy X-irradiation) are related. Although HeLa cells were the most heat-resistant cell line and showed the least heat radiosensitization, we found that the most heat-sensitive EAT cells (D0, EAT = 8.0 min; D0, LM = 10.0 min; D0, HeLa = 12.5 min) showed less radiosensitization than the more heat-resistant LM fibroblasts (TERHeLa less than TEREAT less than TERLM). Therefore, it is concluded that the routes leading to heat-induced cell death are not identical to those determining heat radiosensitization. Furthermore the inactivation of DNA polymerase alpha and beta activities by heat seemed not to correlate with heat survival alone but showed a positive relationship to heat radiosensitization. The possibility of these enzymes being a determinant in heat radiosensitization is discussed. PMID:3489689

  4. Differences in heat-induced cell killing as determined in three mammalian cell lines do not correspond with the extent of heat radiosensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three different cell lines, Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells, HeLa S3 cells and LM mouse fibroblasts, were used to investigate whether or not the extent of heat killing (440C) and heat radio-sensitization (440C before 0-6 Gy X-irradiation) are related. Although HeLa cells were the most heat-resistant cell line and showed the least heat radiosensitization, we found that the most heat-sensitive EAT cells (D0, EAT = 8.0 min; D0, LM = 10.0 min; D0, HeLa = 12.5 min) showed less radiosensitization than the more heat-resistant LM fibroblasts (TERsub(HeLa)< TERsub(EAT)< TERsub(LM)). Therefore, it is concluded that the routes leading to heat-induced cell death are not identical to those determining heat radiosensitization. Furthermore the inactivation of DNA polymerase α and β activities by heat seemed not to correlate with heat survival alone but showed a positive relationship to heat radiosensitization. The possibility of these enzymes being a determinant in heat radiosensitization is discussed. (author)

  5. Deletion of Pim kinases elevates the cellular levels of reactive oxygen species and sensitizes to K-Ras-induced cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J H; An, N; Chatterjee, S; Kistner-Griffin, E; Mahajan, S; Mehrotra, S; Kraft, A S

    2015-07-01

    The Pim protein kinases contribute to transformation by enhancing the activity of oncogenic Myc and Ras, which drives significant metabolic changes during tumorigenesis. In this report, we demonstrate that mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking all three isoforms of Pim protein kinases, triple knockout (TKO), cannot tolerate the expression of activated K-Ras (K-Ras(G12V)) and undergo cell death. Transduction of K-Ras(G12V) into these cells markedly increased the level of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). The addition of N-acetyl cysteine attenuated ROS production and reversed the cytotoxic effects of K-Ras(G12V) in the TKO MEFs. The altered cellular redox state caused by the loss of Pim occurred as a result of lower levels of metabolic intermediates in the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways as well as abnormal mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. TKO MEFs exhibit reduced levels of superoxide dismutase (Sod), glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) and peroxiredoxin 3 (Prdx3) that render them susceptible to killing by K-Ras(G12V)-mediated ROS production. In contrast, the transduction of c-Myc into TKO cells can overcome the lack of Pim protein kinases by regulating cellular metabolism and Sod2. In the absence of the Pim kinases, c-Myc transduction permitted K-Ras(G12V)-induced cell growth by decreasing Ras-induced cellular ROS levels. These results demonstrate that the Pim protein kinases have an important role in regulating cellular redox, metabolism and K-Ras-stimulated cell growth. PMID:25241892

  6. A model of photon cell killing based on the spatio-temporal clustering of DNA damage in higher order chromatin structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Herr

    Full Text Available We present a new approach to model dose rate effects on cell killing after photon radiation based on the spatio-temporal clustering of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs within higher order chromatin structures of approximately 1-2 Mbp size, so called giant loops. The main concept of this approach consists of a distinction of two classes of lesions, isolated and clustered DSBs, characterized by the number of double strand breaks induced in a giant loop. We assume a low lethality and fast component of repair for isolated DSBs and a high lethality and slow component of repair for clustered DSBs. With appropriate rates, the temporal transition between the different lesion classes is expressed in terms of five differential equations. These allow formulating the dynamics involved in the competition of damage induction and repair for arbitrary dose rates and fractionation schemes. Final cell survival probabilities are computable with a cell line specific set of three parameters: The lethality for isolated DSBs, the lethality for clustered DSBs and the half-life time of isolated DSBs. By comparison with larger sets of published experimental data it is demonstrated that the model describes the cell line dependent response to treatments using either continuous irradiation at a constant dose rate or to split dose irradiation well. Furthermore, an analytic investigation of the formulation concerning single fraction treatments with constant dose rates in the limiting cases of extremely high or low dose rates is presented. The approach is consistent with the Linear-Quadratic model extended by the Lea-Catcheside factor up to the second moment in dose. Finally, it is shown that the model correctly predicts empirical findings about the dose rate dependence of incidence probabilities for deterministic radiation effects like pneumonitis and the bone marrow syndrome. These findings further support the general concepts on which the approach is based.

  7. Heat Killed Lactobacillus reuteri GMNL-263 Reduces Fibrosis Effects on the Liver and Heart in High Fat Diet-Hamsters via TGF-β Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Jen Ting

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is one of the major risk factors for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, and NAFLD is highly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Scholars have suggested that certain probiotics may significantly impact cardiovascular health, particularly certain Lactobacillus species, such as Lactobacillus reuteri GMNL-263 (Lr263 probiotics, which have been shown to reduce obesity and arteriosclerosis in vivo. In the present study, we examined the potential of heat-killed bacteria to attenuate high fat diet (HFD-induced hepatic and cardiac damages and the possible underlying mechanism of the positive effects of heat-killed Lr263 oral supplements. Heat-killed Lr263 treatments (625 and 3125 mg/kg-hamster/day were provided as a daily supplement by oral gavage to HFD-fed hamsters for eight weeks. The results show that heat-killed Lr263 treatments reduce fatty liver syndrome. Moreover, heat-killed Lactobacillus reuteri GMNL-263 supplementation in HFD hamsters also reduced fibrosis in the liver and heart by reducing transforming growth factor β (TGF-β expression levels. In conclusion, heat-killed Lr263 can reduce lipid metabolic stress in HFD hamsters and decrease the risk of fatty liver and cardiovascular disease.

  8. Transient activation of human cytomegalovirus lytic gene expression during latency allows cytotoxic T cell killing of latently infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, B A; Lau, B; Jackson, S E; Wills, M R; Sinclair, J H; Poole, E

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency in the myeloid lineage is maintained by repressive histone modifications around the major immediate early promoter (MIEP), which results in inhibition of the lytic viral life cycle. We now show that pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) relieves this repression of the MIEP and induces transient expression of the viral lytic immediate early (IE) antigens but, importantly, not full virus reactivation. In turn, these latently infected cells now become targets for IE-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) which are present at high frequency in all normal healthy HCMV positive carriers but would normally be unable to target latent (lytic antigen-negative) cells. This approach of transiently inducing viral lytic gene expression by HDAC inhibition, in otherwise latently infected cells, offers a window of opportunity to target and purge the latent myeloid cell reservoir by making these normally immunologically undetectable cells visible to pre-existing host immune responses to viral lytic antigens. PMID:27091512

  9. Bacteria killing nanotechnology Bio-Kil effectively reduces bacterial burden in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, P-R; Huang, H-C; Young, T-G; Su, C-Y; Liu, C-S; Yen, M-Y

    2014-04-01

    A contaminated hospital environment has been identified as an important reservoir of pathogens causing healthcare-associated infections. This study is to evaluate the efficacy of bacteria killing nanotechnology Bio-Kil on reducing bacterial counts in an intensive care unit (ICU). Two single-bed rooms (S-19 and S-20) in the ICU were selected from 7 April to 27 May 2011. Ten sets of new textiles (pillow cases, bed sheets, duvet cover, and patient clothing) used by patients in the two single-bed rooms were provided by the sponsors. In the room S-20, the 10 sets of new textiles were washed with Bio-Kil; the room walls, ceiling, and air-conditioning filters were treated with Bio-Kil; and the surfaces of instruments (respirator, telephone, and computer) were covered with Bio-Kil-embedded silicon pads. Room S-19 served as the control. We compared the bacterial count on textiles and environment surfaces as well as air samples between the two rooms. A total of 1,364 samples from 22 different sites in each room were collected. The mean bacterial count on textiles and environmental surfaces in room S-20 was significantly lower than that in room S-19 (10.4 vs 49.6 colony-forming units [CFU]/100 cm(2); P plate; P < 0.001). The density of microbial isolations was significantly greater among patients admitted to room S-19 than those to room S-20 (9.15 vs 5.88 isolates per 100 patient-days, P < 0.05). Bio-Kil can significantly reduce bacterial burden in the environment of the ICU. PMID:24136062

  10. A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial Evaluating Safety and Immunogenicity of the Killed, Bivalent, Whole-Cell Oral Cholera Vaccine in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, Sachin N.; Akalu, Zenebe; Teshome, Samuel; Teferi, Mekonnen; Yamuah, Lawrence; Kim, Deok Ryun; Yang, Jae Seung; Hussein, Jemal; Park, Ju Yeong; Jang, Mi Seon; Mesganaw, Chalachew; Taye, Hawult; Beyene, Demissew; Bedru, Ahmed; Singh, Ajit Pal

    2015-01-01

    Killed whole-cell oral cholera vaccine (OCV) has been a key component of a comprehensive package including water and sanitation measures for recent cholera epidemics. The vaccine, given in a two-dose regimen, has been evaluated in a large number of human volunteers in India, Vietnam, and Bangladesh, where it has demonstrated safety, immunogenicity, and clinical efficacy. We conducted a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial in Ethiopia, where we evaluated the safety and immunogenici...

  11. Targeting and Photodynamic Killing of Cancer Cell by Nitrogen-Doped Titanium Dioxide Coupled with Folic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Xie

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2 has attracted wide attention as a potential photosensitizer (PS in photodynamic therapy (PDT. However, bare TiO2 can only be excited by ultraviolet illumination, and it lacks specific targeting ligands, which largely impede its application. In our study, we produced nitrogen-doped TiO2 and linked it with an effective cancer cell targeting agent, folic acid (FA, to obtain N-TiO2-FA nanoconjugates. Characterization of N-TiO2-FA included Zeta potential, absorption spectra and thermogravimetric analysis. The results showed that N-TiO2-FA was successfully produced and it possessed better dispersibility in aqueous solution than unmodified TiO2. The N-TiO2-FA was incubated with human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (KB and human pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549 cells. The KB cells that overexpress folate receptors (FR on cell membranes were used as FR-positive cancer cells, while A549 cells were used as FR-negative cells. Laser scanning confocal microscopy results showed that KB cells had a higher uptake efficiency of N-TiO2-FA, which was about twice that of A549 cells. Finally, N-TiO2-FA is of no cytotoxicity, and has a better photokilling effect on KB cells under visible light irradiation. In conclusion, N-TiO2-FA can be as high-value as a PS in cancer targeting PDT.

  12. Immunity to Schistosoma mansoni in guinea-pigs vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae. T-cell activation of macrophages for larval killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study addresses macrophage activation in guinea-pigs vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae of Schistosom mansoni. Peritoneal exudate macrophages elicited in vaccinated animals by mineral oil injection were activated to kill larval schistosomes in vitro. Killing efficiency is dependent upon the cell:target ratio employed and is enhanced by, but is not strictly dependent on, the presence of specific antibodies. Macrophages co-cultured with parasites release superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide, but the use of inhibitors has shown that neither of these reactive oxygen intermediates are the causal agents of cellular cytotoxicity in this system. Oil-elicited macrophages from naive guinea-pigs do not show comparable activation; they can, however, be activated in vitro by incubation with culture supernatant fluids from schistosome antigen-stimulated spleen, or lymph node cells harvested from vaccinated guinea-pigs. Naive macrophages activated in this way kill schistosomula in vitro and release the activation markers IL-l and superoxide anion. The macrophage-activating factor (MAF) present in spleen cell culture supernatant fluids has a MW of 35,000-55,000, but does not have the chemical characteristics of gamma-interferon. (author)

  13. Immunity to Schistosoma mansoni in guinea-pigs vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae. T-cell activation of macrophages for larval killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, J.R.; McLaren, D.J.

    1988-02-01

    This study addresses macrophage activation in guinea-pigs vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae of Schistosom mansoni. Peritoneal exudate macrophages elicited in vaccinated animals by mineral oil injection were activated to kill larval schistosomes in vitro. Killing efficiency is dependent upon the cell:target ratio employed and is enhanced by, but is not strictly dependent on, the presence of specific antibodies. Macrophages co-cultured with parasites release superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide, but the use of inhibitors has shown that neither of these reactive oxygen intermediates are the causal agents of cellular cytotoxicity in this system. Oil-elicited macrophages from naive guinea-pigs do not show comparable activation; they can, however, be activated in vitro by incubation with culture supernatant fluids from schistosome antigen-stimulated spleen, or lymph node cells harvested from vaccinated guinea-pigs. Naive macrophages activated in this way kill schistosomula in vitro and release the activation markers IL-l and superoxide anion. The macrophage-activating factor (MAF) present in spleen cell culture supernatant fluids has a MW of 35,000-55,000, but does not have the chemical characteristics of gamma-interferon.

  14. Enhanced sensitivity of mammalian cells to killing by x-rays after prolonged exposure to several nitroimidazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was previously shown that the radiosensitizing effectiveness of misonidazole was enhanced if cells were incubated with the drug under hypoxic conditions for several hours at 37.50C prior to irradiation compared with the more usual situation where radiation is delivered immediately or soon after the addition of the drug. This paper describes experiments using Chinese hamster V79 cells designed to compare several different nitroimidazoles for their ability to produce this preincubation effect, with special reference to the mechanisms involved

  15. Dendritic cells and T cells deliver oncolytic reovirus for tumour killing despite pre-existing anti-viral immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Ilett, EJ; Prestwich, RJ; Kottke, T; Errington, F; Thompson, JM; Harrington, KJ; Pandha, HS; Coffey, M; Selby, PJ; Vile, RG; Melcher, AA

    2009-01-01

    Reovirus is a naturally occurring oncolytic virus currently in early clinical trials. However, the rapid induction of neutralizing antibodies represents a major obstacle to successful systemic delivery. This study addresses, for the first time, the ability of cellular carriers in the form of T cells and dendritic cells (DC) to protect reovirus from systemic neutralization. In addition, the ability of these cellular carriers to manipulate the subsequent balance of anti-viral versus anti-tumour...

  16. Nizatidine, a small molecular compound, enhances killed H5N1 vaccine cell-mediated responses and protects mice from lethal viral challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Wu, Bing; Xue, Jia; Wang, Ming; Chen, Ruiai; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Nizatidine (NIZ), closely related to Cimetidine, is a histamine H2 receptor inverse agonist used primarily as an anti-acid drug. Recent studies showed that this class of compounds may also modulate immune responses. To evaluate adjuvant effects of NIZ on vaccine immune modulation, we formulated NIZ with a H5N1 killed viral antigen and tested in vitro and in vivo. NIZ activated DC maturation and stimulated Th1 and Th2 immune responses to H5N1 vaccine. As a result, it enhanced both antibody and T cell-mediated immune responses. We also observed that a single immunization into C57BL/6 mice blocked IL-10 upregulation and potentiated Th1/Th2 dual polarization. Importantly, the inoculation of H5N1 vaccine with NIZ significantly improved protection of animals from death after challenge and reduced virus loads in the lung tissues. Considering its water-soluble nature, compared with Cimetidine, Nizatidine may be a better choice to use as a vaccine adjuvant. PMID:24253609

  17. Androgen deprivation therapy sensitizes prostate cancer cells to T-cell killing through androgen receptor dependent modulation of the apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiani, Andressa; Gameiro, Sofia R; Kwilas, Anna R; Donahue, Renee N; Hodge, James W

    2014-10-15

    Despite recent advances in diagnosis and management, prostrate cancer remains the second most common cause of death from cancer in American men, after lung cancer. Failure of chemotherapies and hormone-deprivation therapies is the major cause of death in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Currently, the androgen inhibitors enzalutamide and abiraterone are approved for treatment of metastatic CRPC. Here we show for the first time that both enzalutamide and abiraterone render prostate tumor cells more sensitive to T cell-mediated lysis through immunogenic modulation, and that these immunomodulatory activities are androgen receptor (AR)-dependent. In studies reported here, the NAIP gene was significantly down-regulated in human prostate tumor cells treated in vitro and in vivo with enzalutamide. Functional analysis revealed that NAIP played a critical role in inducing CTL sensitivity. Amplification of AR is a major mechanism of resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Here, we show that enzalutamide enhances sensitivity to immune-mediated killing of prostate tumor cells that overexpress AR. The immunomodulatory properties of enzalutamide and abiraterone provide a rationale for their use in combination with immunotherapeutic agents in CRPC, especially for patients with minimal response to enzalutamide or abiraterone alone, or for patients who have developed resistance to ADT. PMID:25344864

  18. Cancer cells become susceptible to natural killer cell killing after exposure to histone deacetylase inhibitors due to glycogen synthase kinase-3-dependent expression of MHC class I-related chain A and B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Søren; Pedersen, Marianne Terndrup; Andresen, Lars; Straten, Per Thor; Woetmann, Anders; Odum, Niels

    2005-01-01

    We show that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors lead to functional expression of MHC class I-related chain A and B (MICA/B) on cancer cells, making them potent targets for natural killer (NK) cell-mediated killing through a NK group 2, member D (NKG2D) restricted mechanism. Blocking either...

  19. Interaction between Salmonella typhimurium and phagocytic cells in pigs - Phagocytosis, oxidative burst and killing in polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Ulla; Lind, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Interactions between Salmonella typhimurium and peripheral blood leucocytes from healthy, Salmonella-free pigs were investigated in vitro. Both granulocytes and monocytes phagocytized FITC-labelled heat-killed Salmonella bacteria as shown by flow cytometry. Phagocytosis in whole blood and isolate...

  20. Selective killing of gastric cancer cells by a small molecule targeting ROS-mediated ER stress activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Peng; Xia, Yiqun; Chen, Tongke; Zhang, Junru; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Wenbo; Chen, Minxiao; Kanchana, Karvannan; Yang, Shulin; Liang, Guang

    2016-06-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in the world. Curcumin is a natural product with multiple pharmacological activities, while its clinical application has been limited by the poor chemical stability. We have previously designed a series of curcumin derivatives with high stability and anticancer potentials. The present study aims to identify the anti-cancer effects and mechanisms of WZ26, an analog of curcumin, in gastric cancer cells. In vitro, WZ26 showed higher chemical stability and much stronger anti-proliferative effects than curcumin, accompanied by dose-dependent induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. Mechanistically, the novel compound WZ26 induced ROS production, resulting in the activation of JNK-mitochondrial and ER stress apoptotic pathways. Blockage of ROS production totally reversed WZ26-induced JNK activation, Bcl-2/Bax decrease, ER stress activation, and final cell apoptosis in SGC-7901 cells. WZ26 also exhibited potent anti-tumor effects in human gastric cancer cell xenograft models. WZ26 could be considered as a potential chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer. In addition, this study also demonstrated that ROS production could be act as a vital candidate pathway for inducing tumor cell apoptosis by targeting mitochondrial and ER stress-related death pathway. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26086416

  1. C16-Ceramide Analog Combined with Pc 4 Photodynamic Therapy Evokes Enhanced Total Ceramide Accumulation, Promotion of DEVDase Activation in the Absence of Apoptosis, and Augmented Overall Cell Killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duska Separovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the failure of single modality approaches, combination therapy for cancer treatment is a promising alternative. Sphingolipid analogs, with or without anticancer drugs, can improve tumor response. C16-pyridinium ceramide analog LCL30, was used in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT, an anticancer treatment modality, to test the hypothesis that the combined treatment will trigger changes in the sphingolipid profile and promote cell death. Using SCCVII mouse squamous carcinoma cells, and the silicone phthalocyanine Pc 4 for PDT, we showed that combining PDT with LCL30 (PDT/LCL30 was more effective than individual treatments in raising global ceramide levels, as well as in reducing dihydrosphingosine levels. Unlike LCL30, PDT, alone or combined, increased total dihydroceramide levels. Sphingosine levels were unaffected by LCL30, but were abolished after PDT or the combination. LCL30-triggered rise in sphingosine-1-phosphate was reversed post-PDT or the combination. DEVDase activation was evoked after PDT or LCL30, and was promoted post- PDT/LCL30. Neither mitochondrial depolarization nor apoptosis were observed after any of the treatments. Notably, treatment with the combination resulted in augmented overall cell killing. Our data demonstrate that treatment with PDT/LCL30 leads to enhanced global ceramide levels and DEVDase activation in the absence of apoptosis, and promotion of total cell killing.

  2. Combining Heavy Ion Radiation and Artificial MicroRNAs to Target the Homologous Recombination Repair Gene Efficiently Kills Human Tumor Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Zhiming [Department of Neurosurgery, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Wang Ping; Wang Hongyan; Zhang Xiangming [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Wang Minli [Division of Life Sciences, Universities Space Research Association, Houston, Texas (United States); Cucinotta, Francis A. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang Ya, E-mail: ywang94@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Previously, we demonstrated that heavy ions kill more cells at the same dose than X-rays because DNA-clustered lesions produced by heavy ions affect nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair but not homologous recombination repair (HRR). We have also shown that our designed artificial microRNAs (amiRs) could efficiently target XRCC4 (an essential factor for NHEJ) or XRCC2 (an essential factor for HRR) and sensitize human tumor cells to X-rays. Based on these data, we were interested in testing the hypothesis that combining heavy ions and amiRs to target HRR but not NHEJ should more efficiently kill human tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Human tumor cell lines (U87MG, a brain tumor cell line, and A549, a lung cancer cell line) and their counterparts, overexpressed with amiR to target XRCC2, XRCC4 or both, were used in this study. Survival sensitivities were examined using a clonogenic assay after these cells were exposed to X-rays or heavy ions. In addition, these cell lines were subcutaneously injected into nude mice to form xenografts and the tumor size was compared after the tumor areas were exposed to X-rays or heavy ions. Results: Although targeting either XRCC4 (NHEJ factor) or XRCC2 (HRR factor) sensitized the human tumor cells to X-rays, in vitro and the xenograft animal model, targeting only XRCC2 but not XRCC4 sensitized the human tumor cells to heavy ions in vitro and in the xenograft animal model. Conclusions: Combining heavy ions with targeting the HRR pathway, but not the NHEJ pathway, could significantly improve the efficiency of tumor cell death.

  3. Combining Heavy Ion Radiation and Artificial MicroRNAs to Target the Homologous Recombination Repair Gene Efficiently Kills Human Tumor Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Previously, we demonstrated that heavy ions kill more cells at the same dose than X-rays because DNA-clustered lesions produced by heavy ions affect nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair but not homologous recombination repair (HRR). We have also shown that our designed artificial microRNAs (amiRs) could efficiently target XRCC4 (an essential factor for NHEJ) or XRCC2 (an essential factor for HRR) and sensitize human tumor cells to X-rays. Based on these data, we were interested in testing the hypothesis that combining heavy ions and amiRs to target HRR but not NHEJ should more efficiently kill human tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Human tumor cell lines (U87MG, a brain tumor cell line, and A549, a lung cancer cell line) and their counterparts, overexpressed with amiR to target XRCC2, XRCC4 or both, were used in this study. Survival sensitivities were examined using a clonogenic assay after these cells were exposed to X-rays or heavy ions. In addition, these cell lines were subcutaneously injected into nude mice to form xenografts and the tumor size was compared after the tumor areas were exposed to X-rays or heavy ions. Results: Although targeting either XRCC4 (NHEJ factor) or XRCC2 (HRR factor) sensitized the human tumor cells to X-rays, in vitro and the xenograft animal model, targeting only XRCC2 but not XRCC4 sensitized the human tumor cells to heavy ions in vitro and in the xenograft animal model. Conclusions: Combining heavy ions with targeting the HRR pathway, but not the NHEJ pathway, could significantly improve the efficiency of tumor cell death.

  4. Social Death: A Grounded Theory Study of the Emotional and Social Effects of Honour Killing on Victims’ Family Members- A Palestinian Family Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Alkhatib, Salam Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    The University of ManchesterAbstract of thesis submitted by Salam Alkhatib on 4 September 2012for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, entitled:A Grounded Theory Study of the emotional and social effects of honour killing on Victims’ family members- A Palestinian family perspectiveAbstract The murder of women in order to uphold ‘honour’ has occurred throughout history and in many contexts. Despite high rates of domestic violence and increased rates of honour killing over the last decade in Pal...

  5. Selective killing of human immunodeficiency virus infected cells by non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-induced activation of HIV protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smeulders Liesbeth

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current antiretroviral therapy against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 reduces viral load and thereby prevents viral spread, but it cannot eradicate proviral genomes from infected cells. Cells in immunological sanctuaries as well as cells producing low levels of virus apparently contribute to a reservoir that maintains HIV persistence in the presence of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Thus, accelerated elimination of virus producing cells may represent a complementary strategy to control HIV infection. Here we sought to exploit HIV protease (PR related cytotoxicity in order to develop a strategy for drug induced killing of HIV producing cells. PR processes the viral Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins during virus maturation, but is also implicated in killing of virus producing cells through off-target cleavage of host proteins. It has been observed previously that micromolar concentrations of certain non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs can stimulate intracellular PR activity, presumably by enhancing Gag-Pol dimerization. Results Using a newly developed cell-based assay we compared the degree of PR activation displayed by various NNRTIs. We identified inhibitors showing higher potency with respect to PR activation than previously described for NNRTIs, with the most potent compounds resulting in ~2-fold increase of the Gag processing signal at 250 nM. The degree of enhancement of intracellular Gag processing correlated with the compound's ability to enhance RT dimerization in a mammalian two-hybrid assay. Compounds were analyzed for their potential to mediate specific killing of chronically infected MT-4 cells. Levels of cytotoxicity on HIV infected cells determined for the different NNRTIs corresponded to the relative degree of drug induced intracellular PR activation, with CC50 values ranging from ~0.3 μM to above the tested concentration range (10 μM. Specific cytotoxicity was reverted by addition

  6. Oxidative stress contributes to the tamoxifen-induced killing of breast cancer cells: implications for tamoxifen therapy and resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Bekele, Raie T.; Ganesh Venkatraman; Rong-Zong Liu; Xiaoyun Tang; Si Mi; Benesch, Matthew G. K.; Mackey, John R; Roseline Godbout; Curtis, Jonathan M.; McMullen, Todd P. W.; Brindley, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen is the accepted therapy for patients with estrogen receptor-α (ERα)-positive breast cancer. However, clinical resistance to tamoxifen, as demonstrated by recurrence or progression on therapy, is frequent and precedes death from metastases. To improve breast cancer treatment it is vital to understand the mechanisms that result in tamoxifen resistance. This study shows that concentrations of tamoxifen and its metabolites, which accumulate in tumors of patients, killed both ERα-positiv...

  7. Phagocyte roulette in Salmonella killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenlon, Luke A; Slauch, James M

    2014-01-15

    Salmonella propagates in macrophages to cause life-threatening infections, but the role of neutrophils in combating Salmonella has been controversial. In this issue, Burton et al. (2014) use single cell analyses and modeling to explain the ability of Salmonella to survive in macrophages while being killed by neutrophils. PMID:24439894

  8. Phagocyte Roulette in Salmonella Killing

    OpenAIRE

    Fenlon, Luke A.; Slauch, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella propagate in macrophages to cause life-threatening infections, but the role of neutrophils in combating Salmonella has been controversial. In this issue, Burton et al. (2013) use single cell analyses and modeling to explain the ability of Salmonella to survive in macrophages, while being killed by neutrophils.

  9. A time to kill when is leadership targeting an effective counterterrorism strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Schliep, Randy D.

    2007-01-01

    lts. This study will argue that leadership targeting may be an effective strategy, but only under specific conditions. It is critical to the security of the United States, for strategic and operational planners, policy makers, and executives, to understand the appropriate environment for undertaking a leadership targeting strategy. This study provides a framework for analyzing the effectiveness of leadership targeting based on critical components of leadership.

  10. Tetrandrine, a Compound Common in Chinese Traditional Medicine, Preferentially Kills Breast Cancer Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) In Vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetrandrine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid found in Stephania tetrandra, a Chinese medicine commonly used as an anti-inflammatory. It has extensive pharmacological activity, including positive ion channel blockade and inhibition of multiple drug resistance proteins. These activities are very similar to that of salinomycin, a known drug targeting breast cancer initiation cells (TICs). Herein, we tested tetrandrine targeting of breast cancer TICs. SUM-149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line and SUM-159, a non-inflammatory metaplastic breast cancer cell line were used in these studies. In proliferation assays using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl) -2H-tetrazolium (MTS), we found that the IC50 for inhibition of proliferation is 15.3 ± 4.1 μM for SUM-149 and 24.3 ± 2.1 μM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine also inhibited mammosphere formation, a surrogate for breast cancer TICs growth in vitro with IC50 around 1 μM for SUM-149 and around 2 μM for SUM-159 cells. Tetrandrine has similar effects on the mammosphere formation from cells isolated from fresh patient sample. Moreover, tetrandrine decreases the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) positive population in SUM-159 by 45% ± 5.45% P = 0.005. In summary, tetrandrine demonstrates significant efficacy against in vitro surrogates for inflammatory and aggressive breast cancer TICs

  11. Effects of vancomycin versus nafcillin in enhancing killing of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus causing bacteremia by human cathelicidin LL-37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, J; Dam, Q; Schweizer, M; Thienphrapa, W; Nizet, V; Sakoulas, G

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that anti-staphylococcal beta-lactam antibiotics, like nafcillin, render methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) more susceptible to killing by innate host defense peptides (HDPs), such as cathelicidin LL-37. We compared the effects of growth in 1/4 minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nafcillin or vancomycin on the LL-37 killing of 92 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates. For three randomly selected strains among these, we examined the effects of nafcillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, or linezolid on LL-37 killing and autolysis. Growth in the presence of subinhibitory nafcillin significantly enhanced LL-37 killing of MSSA compared to vancomycin and antibiotic-free controls. Nafcillin also reduced MSSA production of the golden staphylococcal pigment staphyloxanthin in 39 % of pigmented strains vs. 14 % for vancomycin. Among the antibiotics tested, only nafcillin resulted in significantly increased MSSA autolysis. These studies point to additional mechanisms of anti-staphylococcal activity of nafcillin beyond direct bactericidal activity, properties that vancomycin and other antibiotic classes do not exhibit. The ability of nafcillin to enhance sensitivity to innate HDPs may contribute to its superior effectiveness against MSSA, as suggested by studies comparing clinical outcomes to vancomycin treatment. PMID:27234592

  12. Defects in the acquisition of tumor-killing capability of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ching Chen

    Full Text Available Emerging evidences have shown that diabetes mellitus not only raises risk but also heightens mortality rate of cancer. It is not clear, however, whether antitumor CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL response is down-modulated in diabetic hosts. We investigated the impact of hyperglycemia on CTLs' acquisition of tumor-killing capability by utilizing streptozotocin-induced diabetic (STZ-diabetic mice. Murine diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of STZ (200 mg/kg in C57BL/6 mice, 2C-T cell receptor (TCR transgenic and P14-TCR transgenic mice. The study found that, despite harboring intact proliferative capacity measured with CFSE labeling and MTT assay, STZ-diabetic CD8+ CTLs displayed impaired effector functions. After stimulation, STZ-diabetic CD8+ CTLs produced less perforin and TNFα assessed by intracellular staining, as well as expressed less CD103 protein. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of STZ-diabetic P14 CD8+ effector cells showed an insufficient recruitment to the B16.gp33 melanoma and inadequate production of perforin, granzyme B and TNFα determined by immunohistochemistry in the tumor milieu. As a result, STZ-diabetic CD8+ effector cells were neither able to eliminate tumor nor to improve survival of tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our data suggest that CD8+ CTLs are crippled to infiltrate into tumors and thus fail to acquire tumor-killing capability in STZ-diabetic hosts.

  13. Effect of sociality and season on gray wolf (Canis lupus foraging behavior: implications for estimating summer kill rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C Metz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding how kill rates vary among seasons is required to understand predation by vertebrate species living in temperate climates. Unfortunately, kill rates are only rarely estimated during summer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For several wolf packs in Yellowstone National Park, we used pairs of collared wolves living in the same pack and the double-count method to estimate the probability of attendance (PA for an individual wolf at a carcass. PA quantifies an important aspect of social foraging behavior (i.e., the cohesiveness of foraging. We used PA to estimate summer kill rates for packs containing GPS-collared wolves between 2004 and 2009. Estimated rates of daily prey acquisition (edible biomass per wolf decreased from 8.4±0.9 kg (mean ± SE in May to 4.1±0.4 kg in July. Failure to account for PA would have resulted in underestimating kill rate by 32%. PA was 0.72±0.05 for large ungulate prey and 0.46±0.04 for small ungulate prey. To assess seasonal differences in social foraging behavior, we also evaluated PA during winter for VHF-collared wolves between 1997 and 2009. During winter, PA was 0.95±0.01. PA was not influenced by prey size but was influenced by wolf age and pack size. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that seasonal patterns in the foraging behavior of social carnivores have important implications for understanding their social behavior and estimating kill rates. Synthesizing our findings with previous insights suggests that there is important seasonal variation in how and why social carnivores live in groups. Our findings are also important for applications of GPS collars to estimate kill rates. Specifically, because the factors affecting the PA of social carnivores likely differ between seasons, kill rates estimated through GPS collars should account for seasonal differences in social foraging behavior.

  14. Xenoantigen, an αGal epitope-expression construct driven by the hTERT-promoter, specifically kills human pancreatic cancer cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuchinoue Shohei

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously reported the usefulness of the αGal epitope as a target molecule for gene therapy against cancer. To induce cancer cell specific transcription of the αGal epitope, an expression vector which synthesizes the αGal epitope under the control of a promoter region of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT, NK7, was constructed. Methods NK7 was transfected into a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line, MIA cells, and telomerase-negative SUSM-1 cells served controls. Expression of the αGal epitope was confirmed by flow cytometry using IB4 lectin. The susceptibility of transfected MIA cells to human natural antibodies, was examined using a complement-dependent cytotoxic cross-match test (CDC and a flow cytometry using annexin V. Results The αGal epitope expression was detected only on the cell surfaces of NK7-transfected MIA cells, i.e., not on naive MIA cells or telomerase negative SUSM-1 cells. The CDC results indicated that MIA cells transfected with NK7 are susceptible to human natural antibody-mediated cell killing, and the differences, as compared to NK-7 transfected telomerase negative SUSM-1 cells or telomerase positive naïve MIA cells, were statistically significant. The flow cytometry using annexin V showed a higher number of the apoptotic cells in NK-7 transfected MIA cells than in naïve MIA cells. Conclusions The results suggest that αGal epitope-expression, under the control of the hTERT-promoter, may be useful in cancer specific gene therapy.

  15. Water disinfection using silver nanoparticle impregnated activated carbon: Escherichia coli cell-killing in batch and continuous packed column operation over a long duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Pritam; Bandyopadhyaya, Rajdip

    2016-09-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) were selectively impregnated on the external surface of plasma treated activated carbon (AC) granules (referred to as Ag-AC hybrid, having 0.8 wt% of Ag), for achieving continuous disinfection of water in a single flow-column set-up. First, Ag-NPs (28 nm mean size) were synthesized by UV reduction. Subsequently, Escherichia coli cell-killing experiments were performed in both shake flask (i. e. batch-mode) and flow-column (i. e. continuous-mode) operations, using E. coli K12 (MTCC 1302) as a model organism. Batch results using 8 mg Ag-AC hybrid/ml of cell suspension showed that, 10(4) CFU/ml of cells were killed within 25 min contact time, with cell concentration decaying exponentially in time. Maintaining almost the same contact time as in the batch experiments, three columns packed with Ag-AC (all having a height of 25 cm but increasing diameters of 1, 5 and 8 cm, respectively) were used for monitoring cell-killing performance over a long duration. For all columns, inlet water having 10(4) CFU/ml E. coli could be completely disinfected to produce treated, outlet water having zero cell count. Specifically for the 8 cm diameter column, a maximum throughput of treating 1.62 L of contaminated water per hour could be maintained for at least up to 16 days. Moreover, the Ag concentration in the outlet water was only up to 29.8 μg/L at steady state, which is well within the recommended limit of 100 μg/L for drinking water. Hence, water disinfection for potable quality water (zero E. coli count and <100 μg/L Ag) can be achieved in a continuous manner over a long duration, with our packed Ag-AC column. PMID:27179597

  16. Killing of Cancer Cells by the Photoactivatable Protein Kinase C Inhibitor, Calphostin C, Involves Induction of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Kaul

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Calphostin C (cal-C is a photoactivatable inhibitor that binds to the regulatory domain of protein kinase C (PKC and to other proteins that contain diacylglycerol/phorbol ester binding sites. Cal-C is cytotoxic against many types of cancer cells, yet the basis for this activity remains poorly understood. Here, we show that one of the earliest effects of cal-C is an impairment of glycoprotein export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, accompanied by formation of ER-derived vacuoles. Vacuolization of the ER is correlated with induction of an ER stress response that includes activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and protein kinase R-like ER kinase, as well as increased expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous transcription factor (CHOP; GADD153. These effects of cal-C are not mimicked by staurosporine, an inhibitor of PKC catalytic activity, indicating that ER stress is due to interaction of cal-C with targets other than PKC. In conjunction with the induction of ER stress, breast carcinoma cells undergo caspase-dependent cell death with early activation of caspases 9 and 7 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribosepolymerase. Reduction of CHOP expression by short hairpin RNA decreases the sensitivity of the cells to cal-C, suggesting that induction of apoptosis by cal-C is related, at least in part, to ER stress triggered by disruption of ER morphology and transport function. Antineoplastic drugs that work by inducting ER stress have shown promise in preclinical and clinical trials. Thus, the present findings raise the possibility that cal-C may be useful for photodynamic therapy based on induction of ER stress in some forms of cancer.

  17. Galectin-9 Signaling through TIM-3 Is Involved in Neutrophil-Mediated Gram-Negative Bacterial Killing: An Effect Abrogated within the Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Carrascal, Isabel; Bergin, David A.; McElvaney, Oliver J.; McCarthy, Cormac; Banville, Nessa; Pohl, Kerstin; Hirashima, Mitsuomi; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Reeves, Emer P.; McElvaney, Noel G.

    2016-01-01

    The T cell Ig and mucin domain–containing molecule (TIM) family of receptors have emerged as potential therapeutic targets to correct abnormal immune function in chronic inflammatory conditions. TIM-3 serves as a functional receptor in structural cells of the airways and via the ligand galectin-9 (Gal-9) can modulate the inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to investigate TIM-3 expression and function in neutrophils, focusing on its potential role in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Results revealed that TIM-3 mRNA and protein expression values of circulating neutrophils were equal between healthy controls (n = 20) and people with CF (n = 26). TIM-3 was detected on resting neutrophil membranes by FACS analysis, and expression levels significantly increased post IL-8 or TNF-α exposure (p < 0.05). Our data suggest a novel role for TIM-3/Gal-9 signaling involving modulation of cytosolic calcium levels. Via TIM-3 interaction, Gal-9 induced neutrophil degranulation and primed the cell for enhanced NADPH oxidase activity. Killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was significantly increased upon bacterial opsonization with Gal-9 (p < 0.05), an effect abrogated by blockade of TIM-3 receptors. This mechanism appeared to be Gram-negative bacteria specific and mediated via Gal-9/ LPS binding. Additionally, we have demonstrated that neutrophil TIM-3/Gal-9 signaling is perturbed in the CF airways due to proteolytic degradation of the receptor. In conclusion, results suggest a novel neutrophil defect potentially contributing to the defective bacterial clearance observed in the CF airways and suggest that manipulation of the TIM-3 signaling pathway may be of therapeutic value in CF, preferably in conjunction with antiprotease treatment. PMID:24477913

  18. Assessing road effects on bats: the role of landscape, road features, and bat activity on road-kills

    OpenAIRE

    Medinas, Denis; Marques, João Tiago; Mira, António

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that roads can significantly impact bat populations. Though bats are one of the most threatened groups of European vertebrates, studies aiming to quantify bat mortality and determine the main factors driving it remain scarce. Between March 16 and October 31 of 2009, we surveyed road-killed bats daily along a 51-km-long transect that incorporates different types of roads in southern Portugal. We found 154 road-killed bats of 11 species. The two most common species in the...

  19. Effect of gyrB-mediated changes in chromosome structure on killing of Escherichia coli by ultraviolet light: experiments with strains differing in deoxyribonucleic acid repair capacity.

    OpenAIRE

    von Wright, A.; Bridges, B A

    1981-01-01

    Mutations at the gyrB locus were found to decrease the degree of supercoiling of the Escherichia coli chromosome. The effect of a gyrB mutation on the repair of ultraviolet-induced deoxyribonucleic acid damage was studied by following the killing of strains of E. coli K-12 proficient and deficient in deoxyribonucleic acid repair. The effectiveness of both excision and postreplication types of deoxyribonucleic acid repair was found to be altered by this mutation, the former being apparently en...

  20. Hybrid Theranostic Platform for Second Near-IR Window Light Triggered Selective Two-Photon Imaging and Photothermal Killing of Targeted Melanoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchounwou, Christine; Sinha, Sudarson Sekhar; Viraka Nellore, Bhanu Priya; Pramanik, Avijit; Kanchanapally, Rajashekhar; Jones, Stacy; Chavva, Suhash Reddy; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2015-09-23

    Despite advances in the medical field, even in the 21st century cancer is one of the leading causes of death for men and women in the world. Since the second near-infrared (NIR) biological window light between 950 and 1350 nm offers highly efficient tissue penetration, the current article reports the development of hybrid theranostic platform using anti-GD2 antibody attached gold nanoparticle (GNP) conjugated, single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) for second near-IR light triggered selective imaging and efficient photothermal therapy of human melanoma cancer cell. Reported results demonstrate that due to strong plasmon-coupling, two-photon luminescence (TPL) intensity from theranostic GNP attached SWCNT materials is 6 orders of magnitude higher than GNP or SWCNT alone. Experimental and FDTD simulation data indicate that the huge enhancement of TPL intensity is mainly due to strong resonance enhancement coupled with the stronger electric field enhancement. Due to plasmon coupling, the theranostic material serves as a local nanoantennae to enhance the photothermal capability via strong optical energy absorption. Reported data show that theranostic SWCNT can be used for selective two-photon imaging of melanoma UACC903 cell using 1100 nm light. Photothermal killing experiment with 1.0 W/cm(2) 980 nm laser light demonstrates that 100% of melanoma UACC903 cells can be killed using theranostic SWCNT bind melanoma cells after just 8 min of exposure. These results demonstrate that due to plasmon coupling, the theranostic GNP attached SWCNT material serves as a two-photon imaging and photothermal source for cancer cells in biological window II. PMID:26327304

  1. Nizatidine, a small molecular compound, enhances killed H5N1 vaccine cell-mediated responses and protects mice from lethal viral challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shuang; Wu, Bing; Xue, Jia; Wang, Ming; Chen, Ruiai; Wang, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Nizatidine (NIZ), closely related to Cimetidine, is a histamine H2 receptor inverse agonist used primarily as an anti-acid drug. Recent studies showed that this class of compounds may also modulate immune responses. To evaluate adjuvant effects of NIZ on vaccine immune modulation, we formulated NIZ with a H5N1 killed viral antigen and tested in vitro and in vivo. NIZ activated DC maturation and stimulated Th1 and Th2 immune responses to H5N1 vaccine. As a result, it enhanced both antibody and...

  2. Gadolinium-loaded chitosan nanoparticles for neutron-capture therapy: Influence of micrometric properties of the nanoparticles on tumor-killing effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a nanoparticulate device for controlled delivery of Gd in NCT, the authors have developed gadolinium-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (Gd-nanoCPs). In the present study, influence of micrometric properties such as particle size, particle-surface charge and Gd content of Gd-nanoCPs on tumor-killing effect by Gd-NCT was investigated with Gd-nanoCPs. Two types of Gd-nanoCPs with different mean particle size, zeta potential and Gd-content (Gd-nanoCP-400; 391 nm, 28 mV, 9 wt% and Gd-nanoCP-200; 214 nm, 19 mV, 24 wt%) could be prepared by using chitosans with different molecular weights. Gd-nanoCPs incorporating 1.2 mg of natural Gd were injected intratumorally once or twice to mice subcutaneously-bearing B16F10 melanoma. Eight hours after the last administration, thermal neutron was irradiated to tumor region of the mice. Remarkable tumor-growth was observed in both hot and cold control groups. In contrast, Gd-NCT groups showed significant tumor-growth suppression effect, though their efficacy was found to depend on the micrometric properties of Gd-nanoCPs. In particular, the Gd-nanoCP-200 exhibited stronger tumor-killing effect than the Gd-nanoCP-400 at the same Gd dose and it was still similar to Gd-nanoCP-400 in tumor-growth suppressing effect even at the half of Gd dose of Gd-nanoCP-400. This significance in tumor-killing effect would be ascribed from a higher Gd retention in the tumor tissue and an improved distribution of Gd with intratumorally administered Gd-nanoCP-200. Indeed, the Gd concentration in tumor tissue at the time corresponding to the onset of thermal neutron irradiation was determined to be significantly higher in Gd-nanoCP-200, compared with Gd-nanoCP-400. These results demonstrated that appropriate modification of Gd-nanoCPs in micrometric properties would be an effective way to improve the retention of Gd in the tumor tissue after intratumoral injection, leading to the enhanced tumor-killing effect in Gd-NCT. - Highlights: • Gadolinium

  3. Surveying and Modeling Road Kill

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Shyh-Chyang

    2007-01-01

    Transportation is the backbone of developing regional economies and the evolution of our civilization. Well planned road systems are essential to connect dispersed communities or cities. However, roads are one of the major destructive forces to regional ecosystems and the natural environment. The effects of roads on their adjacent ecosystems may include road kills, habitat fragmentation, barrier effect to animal movement, road edge effects, introduction of exotic species, pollution and noise,...

  4. Evolution of coalitionary killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrangham, R W

    1999-01-01

    Warfare has traditionally been considered unique to humans. It has, therefore, often been explained as deriving from features that are unique to humans, such as the possession of weapons or the adoption of a patriarchal ideology. Mounting evidence suggests, however, that coalitional killing of adults in neighboring groups also occurs regularly in other species, including wolves and chimpanzees. This implies that selection can favor components of intergroup aggression important to human warfare, including lethal raiding. Here I present the principal adaptive hypothesis for explaining the species distribution of intergroup coalitional killing. This is the "imbalance-of-power hypothesis," which suggests that coalitional killing is the expression of a drive for dominance over neighbors. Two conditions are proposed to be both necessary and sufficient to account for coalitional killing of neighbors: (1) a state of intergroup hostility; (2) sufficient imbalances of power between parties that one party can attack the other with impunity. Under these conditions, it is suggested, selection favors the tendency to hunt and kill rivals when the costs are sufficiently low. The imbalance-of-power hypothesis has been criticized on a variety of empirical and theoretical grounds which are discussed. To be further tested, studies of the proximate determinants of aggression are needed. However, current evidence supports the hypothesis that selection has favored a hunt-and-kill propensity in chimpanzees and humans, and that coalitional killing has a long history in the evolution of both species. PMID:10601982

  5. Effect of metformin on residual cells after chemotherapy in a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Kitazono, Satoru; Takiguchi, Yuichi; ASHINUMA, HIRONORI; SAITO-KITAZONO, MIYAKO; Kitamura, Atsushi; Chiba, Tetsuhiro; Sakaida, Emiko; Sekine, Ikuo; Tada, Yuji; KUROSU, KATSUSHI; Sakao, Seiichiro; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Iwama, Atsushi; Yokosuka, Osamu; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2013-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy, including molecular targeted therapy, has major limitations because it does not kill all the cancer cells; the residual cells survive until they acquire chemoresistance. In the present study, the combined effects of metformin and gefitinib were examined in vivo in a mouse xenograft model, inoculated with a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line that possesses an activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutation. The mechanism of the interaction was further elucidated in v...

  6. Distinct mechanisms of cell-kill by triapine and its terminally dimethylated derivative Dp44mT due to a loss or gain of activity of their copper(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Kimiko; Lin, Z Ping; Penketh, Philip G; Shyam, Krishnamurthy; Zhu, Rui; Baumann, Raymond P; Zhu, Yong-Lian; Sartorelli, Alan C; Rutherford, Thomas J; Ratner, Elena S

    2014-10-01

    Triapine, currently being evaluated as an antitumor agent in phase II clinical trials, and its terminally dimethylated derivative Dp44mT share the α-pyridyl thiosemicarbazone backbone that functions as ligands for transition metal ions. Yet, Dp44mT is approximately 100-fold more potent than triapine in cytotoxicity assays. The aims of this study were to elucidate the mechanisms underlying their potency disparity and to determine their kinetics of cell-kill in culture to aid in the formulation of their clinical dosing schedules. The addition of Cu(2+) inactivated triapine in a 1:1 stoichiometric fashion, while it potentiated the cytotoxicity of Dp44mT. Clonogenic assays after finite-time drug-exposure revealed that triapine produced cell-kill in two phases, one completed within 20 min that caused limited cell-kill, and the other occurring after 16 h of exposure that produced extensive cell-kill. The ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor triapine at 0.4 μM caused immediate complete arrest of DNA synthesis, whereas Dp44mT at this concentration did not appreciably inhibit DNA synthesis. The inhibition of DNA synthesis by triapine was reversible upon its removal from the medium. Cell death after 16 h exposure to triapine paralleled the appearance of phospho-(γ)H2AX, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks induced by collapse of DNA replication forks after prolonged replication arrest. In contrast to triapine, Dp44mT produced robust cell-kill within 1h in a concentration-dependent manner. The short-term action of both agents was prevented by thiols, indicative of the involvement of reactive oxygen species. The time dependency in the production of cell-kill by triapine should be considered in treatment regimens. PMID:25130544

  7. Effects of killing Helicobacter pylori quadruple therapy on peptic ulcer: A randomized double-blind clinical trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ying Feng; Xi-Xian Yao; Shu-Lin Jiang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the therapeutic efficacy of a Chinese and Western integrated regimen, killing Helicobacter pylori quadruple therapy on H pylori-associated peptic ulcers(PU).METHODS: With prospective and double-blind controlled method, seventy-five active PU patients with H pylori infection were randomized to receive one of the following three regimens: (1) new triple therapy (group A:lansoprazole 30 mg qd, plus clarithromycin 250 mg bid,plus amoxycillin 500 mg tid, each for 10 d); (2) killing Hp quadruple therapy(group B: the three above drugs plus killing H pylori capsule 6 capsules bid for 4 wk) and (3)placebo(group C: gastropine 3 tablets bid for 4 wk).H pylori eradication and ulcer healing quality were evaluated under an endoscope 4 wk after treatment. The patients were followed up for 5 years.RESULTS: Both the healing rate of PU and H pylori eradication rate in group B were significantly higher than those in group C (100% and 96.4% vs 20% and 0%,respectively, P<0.005), but there was no significant difference compared to those in group A (88% and92%, P>0.05). The healing quality of ulcer in group B was superior to that in groups C and A (P<0.05). The recurrence rate of PU in group B (4%) was lower than that in group A (10%) and group C (100%, P<0.01).CONCLUSION: Killing Helicobacter pylori quadruple therapy can not only promote the eradication of H pylori and healing quality of ulcer but also reduce recurrence rate of ulcer.

  8. In CD4+ T-Cell-Induced Diabetes, Macrophages Are the Final Effector Cells that Mediate Islet β-Cell Killing : Studies from an Acute Model

    OpenAIRE

    Calderon, Boris; Suri, Anish; Unanue, Emil R.

    2006-01-01

    To understand better how diabetogenic CD4+ T cells induce islet β-cell death and cause diabetes, a transfer model of acute diabetes using the diabetogenic CD4+ BDC2.5 T-cell clone was established. Transfer of activated BDC T cells into NOD.scid mice resulted in diabetes within a week, characterized by strong inflammatory reaction. Electron micrographs of pancreas depicted macrophages in close contact with β cells that exhibited signs of apoptosis. Transfer into irradiated recipients inhibited...

  9. How electroshock weapons kill!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2010-03-01

    Growing numbers of law enforcement officers now carry an electroshock weapon (ESW). Over 500 U.S. deaths have followed ESW use in the past 26 years; over 450 of these deaths followed use of an electromuscular disruptor in the past 9 years. Most training courses teach that ESWs are safe; that they can kill only by the direct effect of electric current on the heart; and that a death following use of an ESW always has some other cause. All these teachings are false! The last was disproved by Lundquist.^1 Williams^2 ruled out direct electrical effects as a cause of almost all the 213 deaths he studied, leaving disruption of normal physiological processes as the only alternative explanation. Careful study of all such deaths identifies 4 different ways that death has or could have been brought about by the ESW: kidney failure following rhabdomyolysis [rare]; cardiac arrest from hyperkalemia following rhabdomyolysis [undocumented]; lactic acid-induced ventricular fibrillation [conclusive proof impossible]; and [most common] anoxia from so much lactic acid in the circulating blood that it acts as an oxygen scavenger, continuously depleting the blood of oxygen until most of the lactate has been metabolized. ^1M. Lundquist, BAPS 54(1) K1.270(2009). ^2Howard E. Williams, Taser Electronic Control Devices and Sudden In-Custody Death, 2008.

  10. Correlation between cell killing and massive second-round superinfection by members of some subgroups of avian leukosis virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Weller, S K; Joy, A E; Temin, H M

    1980-01-01

    Avian leukosis viruses of subgroups B, D, and F are cytopathic for chicken cells, whereas viruses of subgroups A, C, and E are not. The amounts of unintegrated linear viral DNA in cells at different times after infection with cytopathic or noncytopathic viruses were determined by hybridization and transfection assays. Shortly after infection, there is a transient accumulation of unintegrated linear viral DNA in cells infected with cytopathic avian leukosis viruses. By 10 days after infection,...

  11. Preferential killing of human lung cancer cell lines with mitochondrial dysfunction by nonthermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Panngom, K; Baik, K Y; Nam, M K; Han, J. H.; Rhim, H; Choi, E. H.

    2013-01-01

    The distinctive cellular and mitochondrial dysfunctions of two human lung cancer cell lines (H460 and HCC1588) from two human lung normal cell lines (MRC5 and L132) have been studied by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma treatment. This cytotoxicity is exposure time-dependent, which is strongly mediated by the large amount of H2O2 and NOx in culture media generated by DBD nonthermal plasma. It is found that the cell number of lung cancer cells has been reduced more than that of the lun...

  12. Comparison of radiosensitivity and thermosensitivity among three types of cultured mammalian cells and detection of heat-induced cell killing by eosin-staining method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashiwado, Kouzou

    1988-12-01

    Radiosensitivity, Thermosensitivity and their combined sensitivity on cell death were studied using mouse L5178Y, mouse FM3A and human Burkitt lymphoma. Eosin-staining method was tested for counting the heat-induced dead cells. The results obtained in the present study were as follows: (1) In irradiation with /sup 60/Co gamma-rays D/sub 0/ values of 1.3 Gy, 1.4 Gy and 1.7 Gy were obtained for Burkitt lymphoma, L5178Y and FM3A respectively. (2) By heating at 43degC, T/sub 0/ values of 4.1 min, 12.5 min and 32 min were obtained for L5178Y, FM3A and Burkitt lymphoma respectively. (3) Thermotolerance decay depended on cell doubling time, that is, the shorter the doubling time, the faster the decay. Furthermore, the cell line with the higher thermosensitivity showed a faster decay of thermotolerance for the three cell lines used in the present study. (4) The radiosensitizing effects were nearly the same in all three cell lines. (5) Using eosin-staining method, the cell survival curves after hyperthermia were ascertained and compared with those obtained by colony forming method. In L5178Y the survival curves obtained by the two methods were nearly the same. In FM3A only some correlation was found betweewn the cell survival curves obtained by the two methods but in Burkitt lymphoma no correlation was found. (author) 52 refs.

  13. Are lead-free hunting rifle bullets as effective at killing wildlife as conventional lead bullets? A comparison based on wound size and morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinogga, Anna, E-mail: anna_trinogga@gmx.de; Fritsch, Guido; Hofer, Heribert; Krone, Oliver

    2013-01-15

    Fragmentation of the lead core of conventional wildlife hunting rifle bullets causes contamination of the target with lead. The community of scavenger species which feed on carcasses or viscera discarded by hunters are regularly exposed to these lead fragments and may die by acute or chronic lead intoxication, as demonstrated for numerous species such as white-tailed eagles (Haliaeetus albicilla) where it is among the most important sources of mortality. Not only does hunting with conventional ammunition deposit lead in considerable quantities in the environment, it also significantly delays or threatens the recovery of endangered raptor populations. Although lead-free bullets might be considered a suitable alternative that addresses the source of these problems, serious reservations have been expressed as to their ability to quickly and effectively kill a hunted animal. To assess the suitability of lead-free projectiles for hunting practice, the wounding potential of conventional bullets was compared with lead-free bullets under real life hunting conditions. Wound dimensions were regarded as good markers of the projectiles' killing potential. Wound channels in 34 killed wild ungulates were evaluated using computed tomography and post-mortem macroscopical examination. Wound diameters caused by conventional bullets did not differ significantly to those created by lead-free bullets. Similarly, the size of the maximum cross-sectional area of the wound was similar for both bullet types. Injury patterns suggested that all animals died by exsanguination. This study demonstrates that lead-free bullets are equal to conventional hunting bullets in terms of killing effectiveness and thus equally meet the welfare requirements of killing wildlife as painlessly as possible. The widespread introduction and use of lead-free bullets should be encouraged as it prevents environmental contamination with a seriously toxic pollutant and contributes to the conservation of a wide

  14. Are lead-free hunting rifle bullets as effective at killing wildlife as conventional lead bullets? A comparison based on wound size and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragmentation of the lead core of conventional wildlife hunting rifle bullets causes contamination of the target with lead. The community of scavenger species which feed on carcasses or viscera discarded by hunters are regularly exposed to these lead fragments and may die by acute or chronic lead intoxication, as demonstrated for numerous species such as white-tailed eagles (Haliaeetus albicilla) where it is among the most important sources of mortality. Not only does hunting with conventional ammunition deposit lead in considerable quantities in the environment, it also significantly delays or threatens the recovery of endangered raptor populations. Although lead-free bullets might be considered a suitable alternative that addresses the source of these problems, serious reservations have been expressed as to their ability to quickly and effectively kill a hunted animal. To assess the suitability of lead-free projectiles for hunting practice, the wounding potential of conventional bullets was compared with lead-free bullets under real life hunting conditions. Wound dimensions were regarded as good markers of the projectiles' killing potential. Wound channels in 34 killed wild ungulates were evaluated using computed tomography and post-mortem macroscopical examination. Wound diameters caused by conventional bullets did not differ significantly to those created by lead-free bullets. Similarly, the size of the maximum cross-sectional area of the wound was similar for both bullet types. Injury patterns suggested that all animals died by exsanguination. This study demonstrates that lead-free bullets are equal to conventional hunting bullets in terms of killing effectiveness and thus equally meet the welfare requirements of killing wildlife as painlessly as possible. The widespread introduction and use of lead-free bullets should be encouraged as it prevents environmental contamination with a seriously toxic pollutant and contributes to the conservation of a wide variety

  15. Photoexcited quantum dots for killing multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Colleen M.; Goodman, Samuel M.; McDaniel, Jessica A.; Madinger, Nancy E.; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are an ever-growing threat because of the shrinking arsenal of efficacious antibiotics. Metal nanoparticles can induce cell death, yet the toxicity effect is typically nonspecific. Here, we show that photoexcited quantum dots (QDs) can kill a wide range of multidrug-resistant bacterial clinical isolates, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli, and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhimurium. The killing effect is independent of material and controlled by the redox potentials of the photogenerated charge carriers, which selectively alter the cellular redox state. We also show that the QDs can be tailored to kill 92% of bacterial cells in a monoculture, and in a co-culture of E. coli and HEK 293T cells, while leaving the mammalian cells intact, or to increase bacterial proliferation. Photoexcited QDs could be used in the study of the effect of redox states on living systems, and lead to clinical phototherapy for the treatment of infections.

  16. [Killing of cattle via electrical stunning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, B; Forster, S

    2007-04-01

    For disease control in the case of epidemics killing of cattle via electrical stunning is a method of choice. The official veterinarian is responsible for monitoring the adhesion to animal welfare principles during electrical stunning and killing. This requires specialised knowledge and experience as the symptoms of effective stunning are quite variable in cattle. Signs of effective and ineffective stunning are described below. In addition to suitable technical equipment, restraint of the animals and correct use of the equipment, neurophysiological processes have to be considered. Calm handling of the animals avoiding stress is a prerequisite for ensuring animal welfare and minimising pain especially when killing cattle using electrical methods. PMID:17484500

  17. Effect of gyrB-mediated changes in chromosome structure on killing of Escherichia coli by ultraviolet light: experiments with strains differing in deoxyribonucleic acid repair capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutations at the gyrB locus were found to decrease the degree of supercoiling of the Escherichia coli chromosome. The effect of a gyrB mutation on the repair of ultraviolet-induced deoxyribonucleic acid damage was studied by following the killing of strains of E. coli K-12 proficient and deficient in deoxyribonucleic acid repair. The effectiveness of both excision and postreplication types of deoxyribonucleic acid repair was found to be altered by this mutation, the former being apparently enhanced and the latter impaired

  18. Garlic compounds selectively kill childhood pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells in vitro without reducing T-cell function: Potential therapeutic use in the treatment of ALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Hodge

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Greg Hodge1, Stephen Davis2, Michael Rice1, Heather Tapp1, Ben Saxon1, Tamas Revesz11Haematology/Oncology Department, Women’s and Children’s Hospital, North Adelaide, Australia; 2Department of Mycology, Women’s and Children’s Hospital, North Adelaide, AustraliaAbstract: Drugs used for remission induction therapy for childhood precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL are nonselective for malignant cells. Several garlic compounds have been shown to induce apoptosis of cancer cells and to alter lymphocyte function. To investigate the effect of garlic on the apoptosis of ALL cells and lymphocyte immune function, cells from newly diagnosed childhood ALL patients were cultured with several commonly used chemotherapeutic agents and several garlic compounds. Apoptosis, lymphocyte proliferation and T-cell cytokine production were determined using multiparameter flow cytometry. At concentrations of garlic compounds that did not result in significant increases in Annexin V and 7-AAD staining of normal lymphocytes, there was a significant increase in apoptosis of ALL cells with no alteration of T-cell proliferation as determined by CD25/CD69 upregulation or interferonγ, interleukin-2 or tumor necrosis factor-α intracellular cytokine production. In contrast, the presence of chemotherapeutic agents resulted in nonselective increases in both lymphocyte and ALL apoptosis and a decrease in T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. In conclusion, we show selective apoptosis of malignant cells by garlic compounds that do not alter T-cell immune function and indicate the potential therapeutic benefit of garlic compounds in the treatment of childhood ALL.Keywords: childhood precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia, garlic, apoptosis, immune function, intracellular cytokines

  19. When CO2 kills: effects of magmatic CO2 flux on belowground biota at Mammoth Mountain, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, J.; Waldrop, M. P.; Mangan, M.

    2011-12-01

    The biomass, composition, and activity of the soil microbial community is tightly linked to the composition of the aboveground plant community. Microorganisms in aerobic surface soils, both free-living and plant-associated are largely structured by the availability of growth limiting carbon (C) substrates derived from plant inputs. When C availability declines following a catastrophic event such as the death of large swaths of trees, the number and composition of microorganisms in soil would be expected to decline and/or shift to unique microorganisms that have better survival strategies under starvation conditions. High concentrations of volcanic cold CO2 emanating from Mammoth Mountain near Horseshoe Lake on the southwestern edge of Long Valley Caldera, CA has resulted in a large kill zone of tree species, and associated soil microbial species. In July 2010, we assessed belowground microbial community structure in response to disturbance of the plant community along a gradient of soil CO2 concentrations grading from 80% (no plant life). We employed a microbial community fingerprinting technique (automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis) to determine changes in overall community composition for three broad functional groups: fungi, bacteria, and archaea. To evaluate changes in ectomycorrhizal fungal associates along the CO2 gradient, we harvested root tips from lodgepole pine seedlings collected in unaffected forest as well as at the leading edge of colonization into the kill zone. We also measured soil C fractions (dissolved organic C, microbial biomass C, and non-extractable C) at 10 and 30 cm depth, as well as NH4+. Not surprisingly, our results indicate a precipitous decline in soil C, and microbial C with increasing soil CO2; phospholipid fatty acid analysis in conjunction with community fingerprinting indicate both a loss of fungal diversity as well as a dramatic decrease in biomass as one proceeds further into the kill zone. This observation was

  20. Cultured diploid fibroblasts from patients with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome are hypersensitive to killing by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disease. About 20% of the gene carriers studied developed medulloblastoma before the age of 5 years. Clinical follow-up of these patients, treated with radiotherapy, revealed a predisposition to radiogenic basal cell carcinomas with an unusually short latent period of 6 months to 3 years. The authors have therefore cultured skin fibroblasts from 5 NBCCS patients and measured their radiosensitivity in terms of clonogenic survival. Our results showed that, compared with 6 normal controls, the NBCCS cells were hypersensitive to X-rays. The average D0 (the inverse of the slope of the survival curve) for the NBCCS cells was 98 rads, compared with 142 rads for the normal controls and 44 rads for an ataxia telangiectasia (AT) strain. The average D10 values (the dose required to reduce survival to 10%) were 258, 351, and 123 rads for the NBCCS, normal, and AT strains, respectively. Unscheduled DNA synthesis measurements showed that NBCCS cells were not defective in excision repair of X-ray-damaged DNA. Pulse labeling index measurements showed that NBCCS cells were abnormally inhibited in the initiation of DNA synthesis following X-irradiation. The mechanisms underlying the radiosensitivity of NBCCS differ in several respects from those of AT. NBCCS appears to be potentially a useful model for studying the cellular processes that are important in radiation carcinogenesis

  1. Certain patterns of DNA double strand breaks in membrane-attached superstructure units cause cell killing: a radiation action model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery that the chromosomal DNA is arranged in membrane-attached superstructure units (MASSUs) is the key for the understanding of the action of ionizing radiations on mammalian cells. Concerning X-rays the following hypothesis is proved true: The appearance of K ≥ 2 double-strand breaks (DSBs) in any MASSU of a G1 cell, respectively, in both MASSUs of any sister MASSU pair of a S cell results in its inactivation (k = actual number of DSBs per MASSU). DSB patterns in the MASSUs characterized by less DSBs will be repaired by recombination with homologous MASSUs. In G1 cells it occurs by the recombination with the homologous MASSU of the homologous chromosome. In the replicated MASSUs of S cells it probably happens by the succession of the following mechanisms: recombination repair of MASSUs with one DSB using the sister MASSU as a matrix (sister chromatid exchange), establishment of 1 intact genome by the substitution of the heavily damaged MASSUs (k ≥ 2) by the intact or repaired sister MASSU at the common attachment point, and degradation of the heavily damaged or abundant MASSUs. Thus the dependence of the form and the steepness of the dose survival curves on the cell cycle stages is interpreted by a universally valid radiation action mechanism. (author)

  2. Silencing expression of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase by small interfering RNA sensitizes human cells for radiation-induced chromosome damage, cell killing, and mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yuanlin; Zhang, Qinming; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Liber, Howard L.; Bedford, Joel S.

    2002-01-01

    Targeted gene silencing in mammalian cells by RNA interference (RNAi) using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) was recently described by Elbashir et al. (S. M. Elbashir et al., Nature (Lond.), 411: 494-498, 2001). We have used this methodology in several human cell strains to reduce expression of the Prkdc (DNA-PKcs) gene coding for the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) that is involved in the nonhomologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. We have also demonstrated a radiosensitization for several phenotypic endpoints of radiation damage. In low-passage normal human fibroblasts, siRNA knock-down of DNA-PKcs resulted in a reduced capacity for restitution of radiation-induced interphase chromosome breaks as measured by premature chromosome condensation, an increased yield of acentric chromosome fragments at the first postirradiation mitosis, and an increased radiosensitivity for cell killing. For three strains of related human lymphoblasts, DNA-PKcs-targeted siRNA transfection resulted in little or no increase in radiosensitivity with respect to cell killing, a 1.5-fold decrease in induced mutant yield in TK6- and p53-null NH32 cells, but about a 2-fold increase in induced mutant yield in p53-mutant WTK1 cells at both the hypoxanthine quanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) and the thymidine kinase loci.

  3. Effect of DC-CIK cell on the proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation of leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Qing Qu; Xiao-Sheng Zhou; Xiao-Long Zhou; Jian Wang

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To observe the effect of co-culture cytokine-induced killer cells(CIK) and homologous dendritic cells(DC) on the proliferative activity and phenotype change of theDC-CIK cell and the cell killing activity of leukemiaHL-60.Methods:50 mL cord blood sample was obtained from infants delivered by full term healthy woman and the cord blood mononuclear cells were isolated by density gradient centrifugation.Non-adherent cells were collectedfor the induction culture ofCIK, adherent cells were differentiated into matureDC; cultured matureDC was mixed with andCIK in the proportion of1:5 for12 d.Killing activity ofDC-CIK co-cultured cell on leukemiaHL-60 was detected byMTT assay.Results:Compared withCIKs, the co-culturedDC-CIKs presented a markedly higher proliferation and killing activity.Conclusions:Co-culture ofDC-CIK cells led to a significant increase of the proliferation and cytotoxicity of CIK.

  4. TGF-β-induced CD4+Foxp3+ T cells attenuate acute graft-versus-host disease by suppressing expansion and killing of effector CD8+ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jian; Lu, Ling; Chen, Maogen; Xu, Lili; Lan, Qin; Li, Qiang; Liu, Zhongmin; Chen, Guihua; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xuehao; Brand, David; Olsen, Nancy; Zheng, Song Guo

    2014-10-01

    The use of TGF-β-induced CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells (induced regulatory T cells [iTregs]) is an important prevention and treatment strategy in autoimmune diseases and other disorders. However, the potential use of iTregs as a treatment modality for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) has not been realized because they may be unstable and less suppressive in this disease. We restudied the ability of iTregs to prevent and treat aGVHD in two mouse models. Our results showed that, as long as an appropriate iTreg-generation protocol is used, these iTregs consistently displayed a potent ability to control aGVHD development and reduce mortality in the aGVHD animal models. iTreg infusion markedly suppressed the engraftment of donor CD8(+) cells and CD4(+) cells, the expression of granzyme A and B, the cytotoxic effect of donor CD8(+) cells, and the production of T cell cytokines in aGVHD. Therefore, we conclude that as long as the correct methods for generating iTregs are used, they can prevent and even treat aGVHD. PMID:25156367

  5. Redshifts and Killing Vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, A; Surowitz, E J; Harvey, Alex; Schucking, Engelbert L.; Surowitz, Eugene J.

    2005-01-01

    Courses in introductory special and general relativity have increasingly become part of the curriculum for upper-level undergraduate physics majors and master's degree candidates. One of the topics rarely discussed is symmetry, particularly in the theory of general relativity. The principal tool for its study is the Killing vector. We provide an elementary introduction to the concept of a Killing vector field, its properties, and as an example of its utility apply these ideas to the rigorous determination of gravitational and cosmological redshifts.

  6. Mitochondrially targeted vitamin E succinate efficiently kills breast tumour-initiating cells in a complex II-dependent manner

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yan, B.; Stantic, M.; Zobalová, Renata; Bezawork-Geleta, A.; Stapelberg, M.; Stursa, J.; Prokopová, Kateřina; Dong, L.; Neužil, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 401 (2015). ISSN 1471-2407 R&D Projects: GA MZd NT14078; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Tumour-initiating cells * Mitochondrially targeted vitamin E succinate * Complex II Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 3.362, year: 2014

  7. Complement-mediated killing of Borrelia burgdorferi by nonimmune sera from sika deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D R; Rooney, S; Miller, N J; Mather, T N

    2000-12-01

    Various species of cervid deer are the preferred hosts for adult, black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes pacificus) in the United States. Although frequently exposed to the agent of Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi), these animals, for the most part, are incompetent as transmission reservoirs. We examined the borreliacidal activity of normal and B. burgdorferi-immune sera from sika deer (Cervus nippon) maintained in a laboratory setting and compared it to that of similar sera from reservoir-competent mice and rabbits. All normal deer sera (NDS) tested killed > 90% of B. burgdorferi cells. In contrast, normal mouse and rabbit sera killed 1:1,024. Heat treatment (56 C, 30 min) of NDS reduced borreliacidal activity, with 90% of the cells killed. Addition of 10 mM EDTA reduced the killing to approximately 30%, whereas the addition of Mg2+ (10 mM) restored borreliacidal activity to NDS. The addition of zymosan A, an activator of the alternative pathway, increased the survival of B. burgdorferi cells to approximately 80% in NDS. These data suggest that the alternative complement activation pathway plays a major role in the borreliacidal activity of NDS. Additionally, 10 mM EGTA had almost no effect on the killing activity of B. burgdorferi-exposed deer sera, suggesting that the classical pathway is not involved in Borrelia killing, even in sera from B. burgdorferi-exposed deer. PMID:11191897

  8. Specific killing of P53 mutated tumor cell lines by a cross-reactive human HLA-A2-restricted P53-specific CTL line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtzen, P A; Pedersen, L O; Poulsen, H S;

    2001-01-01

    p53 is upregulated in the majority of spontaneous tumors and the HLA class I molecule HLA-A2 is expressed by approximately 50% of the caucasians. Potentially, these facts make HLA-A2-binding p53 peptides for CTL-inducing immunotherapy applicable to a broad range of cancer patients. In our study, we...... investigated the CTL-inducing capacity of autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) maturated by exposure to CD40L and pulsed with a pool of 4 wild-type, HLA-A2-binding p53 peptides, and the p53-specific CD8(+) CTL lines established from healthy HLA-A2-positive donors were characterized. Reactivity to p......53(65-73) and p53(187-197) peptides was obtained in the T-cell lines. Interestingly, cold target inhibition experiments demonstrated that the simultaneous recognition of the 2 peptides was the result of cross-reactivity, which was confirmed by killing experiments at the clonal CTL level. Furthermore...

  9. Capture of heat-killed Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin by intelectin-1 deposited on cell surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuji, Shoutaro; YAMASHITA, Makiko; Hoffman, Donald R; Nishiyama, Akihito; Shinohara, Tsutomu; OHTSU, TAKASHI; Shibata, Yoshimi

    2009-01-01

    Intelectin is an extracellular animal lectin found in chordata. Although human and mouse intelectin-1 recognize galactofuranosyl residues included in cell walls of various microorganisms, the physiological function of mammalian intelectin had been unclear. In this study, we found that human intelectin-1 was a serum protein and bound to Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Human intelectin-1-binding to BCG was inhibited by Ca2+-depletion, galactofuranosyl disaccharide, ribose, o...

  10. Evaluation of the effects of a plasma activated medium on cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohades, S.; Laroussi, M., E-mail: mlarouss@odu.edu; Sears, J.; Barekzi, N.; Razavi, H. [Plasma Engineering and Medicine Institute, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The interaction of low temperature plasma with liquids is a relevant topic of study to the field of plasma medicine. This is because cells and tissues are normally surrounded or covered by biological fluids. Therefore, the chemistry induced by the plasma in the aqueous state becomes crucial and usually dictates the biological outcomes. This process became even more important after the discovery that plasma activated media can be useful in killing various cancer cell lines. Here, we report on the measurements of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, a species known to have strong biological effects, produced by application of plasma to a minimum essential culture medium. The activated medium is then used to treat SCaBER cancer cells. Results indicate that the plasma activated medium can kill the cancer cells in a dose dependent manner, retain its killing effect for several hours, and is as effective as apoptosis inducing drugs.

  11. Evaluation of the effects of a plasma activated medium on cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohades, S.; Laroussi, M.; Sears, J.; Barekzi, N.; Razavi, H.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of low temperature plasma with liquids is a relevant topic of study to the field of plasma medicine. This is because cells and tissues are normally surrounded or covered by biological fluids. Therefore, the chemistry induced by the plasma in the aqueous state becomes crucial and usually dictates the biological outcomes. This process became even more important after the discovery that plasma activated media can be useful in killing various cancer cell lines. Here, we report on the measurements of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, a species known to have strong biological effects, produced by application of plasma to a minimum essential culture medium. The activated medium is then used to treat SCaBER cancer cells. Results indicate that the plasma activated medium can kill the cancer cells in a dose dependent manner, retain its killing effect for several hours, and is as effective as apoptosis inducing drugs.

  12. Evaluation of the effects of a plasma activated medium on cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of low temperature plasma with liquids is a relevant topic of study to the field of plasma medicine. This is because cells and tissues are normally surrounded or covered by biological fluids. Therefore, the chemistry induced by the plasma in the aqueous state becomes crucial and usually dictates the biological outcomes. This process became even more important after the discovery that plasma activated media can be useful in killing various cancer cell lines. Here, we report on the measurements of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, a species known to have strong biological effects, produced by application of plasma to a minimum essential culture medium. The activated medium is then used to treat SCaBER cancer cells. Results indicate that the plasma activated medium can kill the cancer cells in a dose dependent manner, retain its killing effect for several hours, and is as effective as apoptosis inducing drugs

  13. Effect of attract and kill formulations and application rates on trap catches of European pine shoot moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and shoot damage in Scots pine saplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukovata, Lidia; Kolk, Andrzej; Cieślak, Marek

    2004-10-01

    Attract and kill technology was tested for management of European pine shoot moth, Rhyacionia buoliana (Denis & Schiffermüller), in 4-6-yr-old Scots pine, Pinus sylvestris L., plantations managed by Jablonna and Pultusk Forest Districts, Poland. In 2001, two formulations based on ricinoleic acid and hydrocarbon fraction (petroleum jelly) in combination with (E)-9-dodecenyl acetate, the sex pheromone of the pine shoot moth; permethrin as a contact insecticide; and Tinuvin UV absorber were used. In 2002, different formulations and application rates of the attracticide based on petroleum jelly were tested. Significantly reduced trap catches occurred in plots treated with three attracticide formulations [Rhykil-1 (with Tinuvin UV absorber), Rhykil-2 (with a new UV absorber, 3,3'-dihydroxy-2,2'-bipyridyl), and Rhykil-3 (without the insecticide)] at 3,000 droplets per hectare in comparison with those in control plots, suggesting that all formulations were highly effective. Significantly lower catches than in control plots also were observed when Rhykil-1 was applied at 1000, 2,000, and 3,000 droplets per hectare. However, only slight reduction of shoot damage in treated plots was observed in both experiments. The formulation without the insecticide had similar efficacy to that of the formulation combined with the insecticide. In 2003, the Rhykil-2 attracticide was tested at 250, 500, and 1000 droplets per hectare. Although there were no significant differences in trap catches between treated and control plots, shoot damage level was reduced substantially in all treated plots. These results suggest that attract and kill technology may be used at rates lower than 1000 droplets per hectare for management of R. buoliana; however, its "kill" effect should be confirmed in further studies. PMID:15568351

  14. Effects of raising frogs and putting pest-killing lamps in paddy fields on the prevention of rice pests and diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Qing; Hu, Xue-Feng; Luo, Fan; Cao, Ming-Yang

    2014-05-01

    Frogs in paddy fields become less and less due to applying large amounts of pesticides and human hunting for a long time, which causes the aggravation of rice pests and diseases. A field experiment was carried out in the suburb of Shanghai to study the effects of artificially raising frogs and putting frequency oscillation pest-killing lamps in paddy fields on the prevention of rice pests and diseases. The field experiment includes three treatments. Treatment I: 150 frogs, each 20 g in weight, per 100 m2 were put in the fields; Treatment II: a frequency oscillation pest-killing lamp was put in the fields; Treatment III: no frogs and pest-killing lamps were put in the fields. All the experimental fields were operated based on the organic faming system. The amount of organic manure, 7500 kg/hm2, was applied to the fields as base fertilizer before sowing in early June, 2013. No any chemical fertilizers and pesticides were used during the entire period of rice growth. Each treatment is in triplicate and each plot is 67 m2 in area. The results are as follows: (1) During the entire growth period, the incidences of rice pests and diseases with Treatment I and II are significantly lower than those with CK (Treatment III). The incidence of chilo suppressalis with Treatment I, II and III is 0, 0.46% and 1.69%, respectively; that of cnaphalocrocis medinalis is 7.67%, 6.62% and 10.10%, respectively; that of rice sheath blight is 0, 11.11% and 5.43%, respectively; that of rice planthopper is 4.25 per hill, 5.75 per hill and 11 per hill, respectively. (2) The grain yield of the three treatments is significantly different. That of Treatment I, II and III is 5157.73 kg/hm2, 4761.60 kg/hm2 and 3645.14kg/hm2 on average, respectively. (3) Affected by frog activities, the contents of NH4-N, available P and available K in the soil with Treatment I are significantly raised. All the above suggest that artificially raising frogs in paddy fields could effectively prevent rice pests and

  15. The killing of African trypanosomes by ethidium bromide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab Roy Chowdhury

    Full Text Available Introduced in the 1950s, ethidium bromide (EB is still used as an anti-trypanosomal drug for African cattle although its mechanism of killing has been unclear and controversial. EB has long been known to cause loss of the mitochondrial genome, named kinetoplast DNA (kDNA, a giant network of interlocked minicircles and maxicircles. However, the existence of viable parasites lacking kDNA (dyskinetoplastic led many to think that kDNA loss could not be the mechanism of killing. When recent studies indicated that kDNA is indeed essential in bloodstream trypanosomes and that dyskinetoplastic cells survive only if they have a compensating mutation in the nuclear genome, we investigated the effect of EB on kDNA and its replication. We here report some remarkable effects of EB. Using EM and other techniques, we found that binding of EB to network minicircles is low, probably because of their association with proteins that prevent helix unwinding. In contrast, covalently-closed minicircles that had been released from the network for replication bind EB extensively, causing them, after isolation, to become highly supertwisted and to develop regions of left-handed Z-DNA (without EB, these circles are fully relaxed. In vivo, EB causes helix distortion of free minicircles, preventing replication initiation and resulting in kDNA loss and cell death. Unexpectedly, EB also kills dyskinetoplastic trypanosomes, lacking kDNA, by inhibiting nuclear replication. Since the effect on kDNA occurs at a >10-fold lower EB concentration than that on nuclear DNA, we conclude that minicircle replication initiation is likely EB's most vulnerable target, but the effect on nuclear replication may also contribute to cell killing.

  16. High-throughput combinatorial screening identifies drugs that cooperate with ibrutinib to kill activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews Griner, Lesley A; Guha, Rajarshi; Shinn, Paul; Young, Ryan M; Keller, Jonathan M; Liu, Dongbo; Goldlust, Ian S; Yasgar, Adam; McKnight, Crystal; Boxer, Matthew B; Duveau, Damien Y; Jiang, Jian-Kang; Michael, Sam; Mierzwa, Tim; Huang, Wenwei; Walsh, Martin J; Mott, Bryan T; Patel, Paresma; Leister, William; Maloney, David J; Leclair, Christopher A; Rai, Ganesha; Jadhav, Ajit; Peyser, Brian D; Austin, Christopher P; Martin, Scott E; Simeonov, Anton; Ferrer, Marc; Staudt, Louis M; Thomas, Craig J

    2014-02-11

    The clinical development of drug combinations is typically achieved through trial-and-error or via insight gained through a detailed molecular understanding of dysregulated signaling pathways in a specific cancer type. Unbiased small-molecule combination (matrix) screening represents a high-throughput means to explore hundreds and even thousands of drug-drug pairs for potential investigation and translation. Here, we describe a high-throughput screening platform capable of testing compounds in pairwise matrix blocks for the rapid and systematic identification of synergistic, additive, and antagonistic drug combinations. We use this platform to define potential therapeutic combinations for the activated B-cell-like subtype (ABC) of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We identify drugs with synergy, additivity, and antagonism with the Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib, which targets the chronic active B-cell receptor signaling that characterizes ABC DLBCL. Ibrutinib interacted favorably with a wide range of compounds, including inhibitors of the PI3K-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin signaling cascade, other B-cell receptor pathway inhibitors, Bcl-2 family inhibitors, and several components of chemotherapy that is the standard of care for DLBCL. PMID:24469833

  17. Inhibition of HSP90 by AUY922 Preferentially Kills Mutant KRAS Colon Cancer Cells by Activating Bim through ER Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun Yan; Guo, Su Tang; Wang, Jia Yu; Liu, Fen; Zhang, Yuan Yuan; Yari, Hamed; Yan, Xu Guang; Jin, Lei; Zhang, Xu Dong; Jiang, Chen Chen

    2016-03-01

    Oncogenic mutations of KRAS pose a great challenge in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Here we report that mutant KRAS colon cancer cells are nevertheless more susceptible to apoptosis induced by the HSP90 inhibitor AUY922 than those carrying wild-type KRAS. Although AUY922 inhibited HSP90 activity with comparable potency in colon cancer cells irrespective of their KRAS mutational statuses, those with mutant KRAS were markedly more sensitive to AUY922-induced apoptosis. This was associated with upregulation of the BH3-only proteins Bim, Bik, and PUMA. However, only Bim appeared essential, in that knockdown of Bim abolished, whereas knockdown of Bik or PUMA only moderately attenuated apoptosis induced by AUY922. Mechanistic investigations revealed that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was responsible for AUY922-induced upregulation of Bim, which was inhibited by a chemical chaperone or overexpression of GRP78. Conversely, siRNA knockdown of GRP78 or XBP-1 enhanced AUY922-induced apoptosis. Remarkably, AUY922 inhibited the growth of mutant KRAS colon cancer xenografts through activation of Bim that was similarly associated with ER stress. Taken together, these results suggest that AUY922 is a promising drug in the treatment of mutant KRAS colon cancers, and the agents that enhance the apoptosis-inducing potential of Bim may be useful to improve the therapeutic efficacy. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(3); 448-59. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26832792

  18. It's not just conflict that motivates killing of orangutans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline T Davis

    Full Text Available We investigated why orangutans are being killed in Kalimantan, Indonesia, and the role of conflict in these killings. Based on an analysis of interview data from over 5,000 respondents in over 450 villages, we also assessed the socio-ecological factors associated with conflict and non-conflict killings. Most respondents never kill orangutans. Those who reported having personally killed an orangutan primarily did so for non-conflict reasons; for example, 56% of these respondents said that the reason they had killed an orangutan was to eat it. Of the conflict-related reasons for killing, the most common reasons orangutans were killed was fear of orangutans or in self-defence. A similar pattern was evident among reports of orangutan killing by other people in the villages. Regression analyses indicated that religion and the percentage of intact forest around villages were the strongest socio-ecological predictors of whether orangutans were killed for conflict or non-conflict related reasons. Our data indicate that between 44,170 and 66,570 orangutans were killed in Kalimantan within the respondents' active hunting lifetimes: between 12,690 and 29,024 for conflict reasons (95%CI and between 26,361 and 41,688 for non-conflict reasons (95% CI. These findings confirm that habitat protection alone will not ensure the survival of orangutans in Indonesian Borneo, and that effective reduction of orangutan killings is urgently needed.

  19. Extracts from Calendula officinalis offer in vitro protection against H2 O2 induced oxidative stress cell killing of human skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnuqaydan, Abdullah M; Lenehan, Claire E; Hughes, Rachel R; Sanderson, Barbara J

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro safety and antioxidant potential of Calendula officinalis flower head extracts was investigated. The effect of different concentrations (0.125, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 5.0% (v/v)) of Calendula extracts on human skin cells HaCaT in vitro was explored. Doses of 1.0% (v/v) (0.88 mg dry weight/mL) or less showed no toxicity. Cells were also exposed to the Calendula extracts for either 4, 24 or 48 h before being exposed to an oxidative insult (hydrogen peroxide H2 O2 ) for 1 h. Using the MTT cytotoxicity assay, it was observed that two independent extracts of C. officinalis gave time-dependent and concentration-dependent H2 O2 protection against induced oxidative stress in vitro using human skin cells. Pre-incubation with the Calendula extracts for 24 and 48 h increased survival relative to the population without extract by 20% and 40% respectively following oxidative challenge. The antioxidant potential of the Calendula extracts was confirmed using a complimentary chemical technique, the DPPH(●) assay. Calendula extracts exhibited free radical scavenging abilities. This study demonstrates that Calendula flower extracts contain bioactive and free radical scavenging compounds that significantly protect against oxidative stress in a human skin cell culture model. PMID:25266574

  20. A stochastic killing system for biological containment of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, P.; Jensen, Lars Bogø; Molin, Søren

    1995-01-01

    of time. Similar results were obtained with a strain in which the killing cassette was inserted in the chromosome. In competition with noncontained cells during growth, the contained cells are always outcompeted. Stochastic killing obtained by the fim-gef fusion is at present relevant only as a...

  1. An actinomycete isolate from solitary wasp mud nest having strong antibacterial activity and kills the Candida cells due the shrinkage and the cytosolic loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay eKumar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An actinomycetes strain designated as MN 2(6 was isolated from the solitary wasp mud nest. The isolate was identified using polyphasic taxonomy. It produced the extensive branched brown substrate and white aerial hyphae that changed into grayish black. The aerial mycelia produced the spiral spore chains with rugose spore surface. The growth was observed between temperature range of 27-37°C, pH 8-10 and below salt concentration of 6% (w/v. The comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence and phylogenetic relationship showed that strain MN 2(6 lies in clade with Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. hygroscopicus NRRL 2387T, Streptomyces sporocinereus NBRC 100766T and Streptomyces demainii NRRL B-1478T with which it shares a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 99.3%. The strain MN 2(6 can be differentiated from type strains based on phenotypic characteristics. The strain MN 2(6 showed most promising activity against Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria, acid-fast bacilli and Candida species suggesting broad-spectrum characteristics of the active metabolite. Evaluation of anti-candidal activity of the metabolite of strain MN 2(6 by scanning electron microscopy (SEM revealed changed external morphology of yeast. It kills the Candida cells due to the shrinkage and the cytosolic loss. However, further studies are required to elucidate the structure of the active metabolite produced by the isolate MN 2(6

  2. Multipotent adult germ-line stem cells, like other pluripotent stem cells, can be killed by cytotoxic T lymphocytes despite low expression of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayernia Karim

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multipotent adult germ-line stem cells (maGSCs represent a new pluripotent cell type that can be derived without genetic manipulation from spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs present in adult testis. Similarly to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, they could provide a source of cellular grafts for new transplantation therapies of a broad variety of diseases. To test whether these stem cells can be rejected by the recipients, we have analyzed whether maGSCs and iPSCs can become targets for cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL or whether they are protected, as previously proposed for embryonic stem cells (ESCs. Results We have observed that maGSCs can be maintained in prolonged culture with or without leukemia inhibitory factor and/or feeder cells and still retain the capacity to form teratomas in immunodeficient recipients. They were, however, rejected in immunocompetent allogeneic recipients, and the immune response controlled teratoma growth. We analyzed the susceptibility of three maGSC lines to CTL in comparison to ESCs, iPSCs, and F9 teratocarcinoma cells. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I molecules were not detectable by flow cytometry on these stem cell lines, apart from low levels on one maGSC line (maGSC Stra8 SSC5. However, using a quantitative real time PCR analysis H2K and B2m transcripts were detected in all pluripotent stem cell lines. All pluripotent stem cell lines were killed in a peptide-dependent manner by activated CTLs derived from T cell receptor transgenic OT-I mice after pulsing of the targets with the SIINFEKL peptide. Conclusion Pluripotent stem cells, including maGSCs, ESCs, and iPSCs can become targets for CTLs, even if the expression level of MHC class I molecules is below the detection limit of flow cytometry. Thus they are not protected against CTL-mediated cytotoxicity. Therefore, pluripotent cells might be rejected after transplantation by this mechanism if specific antigens are presented

  3. Melatonin Cytotoxicity Is Associated to Warburg Effect Inhibition in Ewing Sarcoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Sanchez, Ana M.; Antolin, Isaac; Puente-Moncada, Noelia; Suarez, Santos; Gomez-Lobo, Marina; Rodriguez, Carmen; Martin, Vanesa

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin kills or inhibits the proliferation of different cancer cell types, and this is associated with an increase or a decrease in reactive oxygen species, respectively. Intracellular oxidants originate mainly from oxidative metabolism, and cancer cells frequently show alterations in this metabolic pathway, such as the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis). Thus, we hypothesized that melatonin could also regulate differentially oxidative metabolism in cells where it is cytotoxic (Ewing sarcoma cells) and in cells where it inhibits proliferation (chondrosarcoma cells). Ewing sarcoma cells but not chondrosarcoma cells showed a metabolic profile consistent with aerobic glycolysis, i.e. increased glucose uptake, LDH activity, lactate production and HIF-1α activation. Melatonin reversed Ewing sarcoma metabolic profile and this effect was associated with its cytotoxicity. The differential regulation of metabolism by melatonin could explain why the hormone is harmless for a wide spectrum of normal and only a few tumoral cells, while it kills specific tumor cell types. PMID:26252771

  4. Bacterial Killing by Dry Metallic Copper Surfaces▿

    OpenAIRE

    Santo, Christophe Espírito; Lam, Ee Wen; Elowsky, Christian G.; Quaranta, Davide; Domaille, Dylan W.; Chang, Christopher J.; Grass, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Metallic copper surfaces rapidly and efficiently kill bacteria. Cells exposed to copper surfaces accumulated large amounts of copper ions, and this copper uptake was faster from dry copper than from moist copper. Cells suffered extensive membrane damage within minutes of exposure to dry copper. Further, cells removed from copper showed loss of cell integrity. Acute contact with metallic copper surfaces did not result in increased mutation rates or DNA lesions. These findings are important fir...

  5. Selective killing of K-ras-transformed pancreatic cancer cells by targeting NAD(P)H oxidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Wang; Yi-Chen Sun; Wen-Hua Lu; Peng Huang; and Yumin Hu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:Oncogenic activation of the K-ras gene occurs in>90%of pancreatic ductal carcinoma and plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of this malignancy. Increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has also been observed in a wide spectrum of cancers. This study aimed to investigate the mechanistic association between K-ras–induced transformation and increased ROS stress and its therapeutic implications in pancreatic cancer. Methods:ROS level, NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity and expression, and cel invasion were examined in human pancreatic duct epithelial E6E7 cel s transfected with K-rasG12V compared with parental E6E7 cel s. The cytotoxic effect and antitumor effect of capsaicin, a NOX inhibitor, were also tested in vitro and in vivo. Results:K-ras transfection caused activation of the membrane-associated redox enzyme NOX and elevated ROS generation through the phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase (PI3K) pathway. Importantly, capsaicin preferential y inhibited the enzyme activity of NOX and induced severe ROS accumulation in K-ras–transformed cel s compared with parental E6E7 cel s. Furthermore, capsaicin effectively inhibited cel proliferation, prevented invasiveness of K-ras–transformed pancreatic cancer cel s, and caused minimum toxicity to parental E6E7 cel s. In vivo, capsaicin exhibited antitumor activity against pancreatic cancer and showed oxidative damage to the xenograft tumor cel s. Conclusions:K-ras oncogenic signaling causes increased ROS stress through NOX, and abnormal ROS stress can selectively kil tumor cel s by using NOX inhibitors. Our study provides a basis for developing a novel therapeutic strategy to effectively kil K-ras–transformed cel s through a redox-mediated mechanism.

  6. An in vitro model of antibody-enhanced killing of the intracellular parasite Leishmania amazonensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine N Gibson-Corley

    Full Text Available Footpad infection of C3HeB/FeJ mice with Leishmania amazonensis leads to chronic lesions accompanied by large parasite loads. Co-infecting these animals with L. major leads to induction of an effective Th1 immune response that can resolve these lesions. This cross-protection can be recapitulated in vitro by using immune cells from L. major-infected animals to effectively activate L. amazonensis-infected macrophages to kill the parasite. We have shown previously that the B cell population and their IgG2a antibodies are required for effective cross-protection. Here we demonstrate that, in contrast to L. major, killing L. amazonensis parasites is dependent upon FcRγ common-chain and NADPH oxidase-generated superoxide from infected macrophages. Superoxide production coincided with killing of L. amazonensis at five days post-activation, suggesting that opsonization of the parasites was not a likely mechanism of the antibody response. Therefore we tested the hypothesis that non-specific immune complexes could provide a mechanism of FcRγ common-chain/NADPH oxidase dependent parasite killing. Macrophage activation in response to soluble IgG2a immune complexes, IFN-γ and parasite antigen was effective in significantly reducing the percentage of macrophages infected with L. amazonensis. These results define a host protection mechanism effective during Leishmania infection and demonstrate for the first time a novel means by which IgG antibodies can enhance killing of an intracellular pathogen.

  7. EFFECTS OF THERMAL MODIFICATION ON MECHANICAL AND SWELLING PROPERTIES AND COLOR CHANGE OF LUMBER KILLED BY MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiabin Cai,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To extend the application of mountain pine beetle (MPB killed lumber for decking, siding, and landscaping materials, it is essential to improve its dimensional stability. Thermal treatment is one of the well-established processes used to improve wood stability by modifying chemical compounds and masking blue-stains by darkening the fibre color. In this study, the MPB lumber was subjected to thermal treatment at three temperatures (195, 205, or 215°C and three exposure times (1.5, 2, or 3 h. Based on Duncan's multiple range test, the results indicated that the volumetric swelling after thermal treatment, either from oven-dry to air-conditioned or from oven-dry to water-saturated, was significantly reduced after thermal treatment. Modulus of elasticity was increased when specimens were treated at a temperature of 195°C, and then decreased as the temperature increased. Modulus of rupture was significantly reduced as treatment temperature increased. The hardness of lumber thermal-treated at 195°C was significantly increased compared to that of the untreated lumber. At higher temperatures, hardness started to decrease slightly. With the treatment temperature increasing to 215°C for 3 h, the color difference between stained and clear wood was reduced by 75%. As a result, the blue-stains vanished gradually.

  8. Killing tensors and canonical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The systematic derivation of constants of the motion, based on Killing tensors and the gauge covariant approach, is outlined. Quantum dots are shown to support second-, third- and fourth-rank Killing tensors. (paper)

  9. How microglia kill neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Guy C; Vilalta, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Microglia are resident brain macrophages that become inflammatory activated in most brain pathologies. Microglia normally protect neurons, but may accidentally kill neurons when attempting to limit infections or damage, and this may be more common with degenerative disease as there was no significant selection pressure on the aged brain in the past. A number of mechanisms by which activated microglia kill neurons have been identified, including: (i) stimulation of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase (PHOX) to produce superoxide and derivative oxidants, (ii) expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) producing NO and derivative oxidants, (iii) release of glutamate and glutaminase, (iv) release of TNFα, (v) release of cathepsin B, (vi) phagocytosis of stressed neurons, and (vii) decreased release of nutritive BDNF and IGF-1. PHOX stimulation contributes to microglial activation, but is not directly neurotoxic unless NO is present. NO is normally neuroprotective, but can react with superoxide to produce neurotoxic peroxynitrite, or in the presence of hypoxia inhibit mitochondrial respiration. Glutamate can be released by glia or neurons, but is neurotoxic only if the neurons are depolarised, for example as a result of mitochondrial inhibition. TNFα is normally neuroprotective, but can become toxic if caspase-8 or NF-κB activation are inhibited. If the above mechanisms do not kill neurons, they may still stress the neurons sufficiently to make them susceptible to phagocytosis by activated microglia. We review here whether microglial killing of neurons is an artefact, makes evolutionary sense or contributes in common neuropathologies and by what mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection. PMID:26341532

  10. Burkholderia pseudomallei Capsule Exacerbates Respiratory Melioidosis but Does Not Afford Protection against Antimicrobial Signaling or Bacterial Killing in Human Olfactory Ensheathing Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Samantha J; Ipe, Deepak S; Batzloff, Michael; Sullivan, Matthew J; Crossman, David K; Crowley, Michael; Strong, Emily; Kyan, Stephanie; Leclercq, Sophie Y; Ekberg, Jenny A K; St John, James; Beacham, Ifor R; Ulett, Glen C

    2016-07-01

    Melioidosis, caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an often severe infection that regularly involves respiratory disease following inhalation exposure. Intranasal (i.n.) inoculation of mice represents an experimental approach used to study the contributions of bacterial capsular polysaccharide I (CPS I) to virulence during acute disease. We used aerosol delivery of B. pseudomallei to establish respiratory infection in mice and studied CPS I in the context of innate immune responses. CPS I improved B. pseudomallei survival in vivo and triggered multiple cytokine responses, neutrophil infiltration, and acute inflammatory histopathology in the spleen, liver, nasal-associated lymphoid tissue, and olfactory mucosa (OM). To further explore the role of the OM response to B. pseudomallei infection, we infected human olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) in vitro and measured bacterial invasion and the cytokine responses induced following infection. Human OECs killed >90% of the B. pseudomallei in a CPS I-independent manner and exhibited an antibacterial cytokine response comprising granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and several regulatory cytokines. In-depth genome-wide transcriptomic profiling of the OEC response by RNA-Seq revealed a network of signaling pathways activated in OECs following infection involving a novel group of 378 genes that encode biological pathways controlling cellular movement, inflammation, immunological disease, and molecular transport. This represents the first antimicrobial program to be described in human OECs and establishes the extensive transcriptional defense network accessible in these cells. Collectively, these findings show a role for CPS I in B. pseudomallei survival in vivo following inhalation infection and the antibacterial signaling network that exists in human OM and OECs. PMID:27091931

  11. Cell Killing Mechanisms and Impact on Gene Expression by Gemcitabine and 212Pb-Trastuzumab Treatment in a Disseminated i.p. Tumor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2016-01-01

    In pre-clinical studies, combination therapy with gemcitabine and targeted radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using 212Pb-trastuzumab showed tremendous therapeutic potential in the LS-174T tumor xenograft model of disseminated intraperitoneal disease. To better understand the underlying molecular basis for the observed cell killing efficacy, gene expression profiling was performed after a 24 h exposure to 212Pb-trastuzumab upon gemcitabine (Gem) pre-treatment in this model. DNA damage response genes in tumors were quantified using a real time quantitative PCR array (qRT-PCR array) covering 84 genes. The combination of Gem with α-radiation resulted in the differential expression of apoptotic genes (BRCA1, CIDEA, GADD45α, GADD45γ, IP6K3, PCBP4, RAD21, and p73), cell cycle regulatory genes (BRCA1, CHK1, CHK2, FANCG, GADD45α, GTSE1, PCBP4, MAP2K6, NBN, PCBP4, and SESN1), and damaged DNA binding and repair genes (BRCA1, BTG2, DMC1, ERCC1, EXO1, FANCG, FEN1, MSH2, MSH3, NBN, NTHL1, OGG1, PRKDC, RAD18, RAD21, RAD51B, SEMA4G, p73, UNG, XPC, and XRCC2). Of these genes, the expression of CHK1, GTSE1, EXO1, FANCG, RAD18, UNG and XRCC2 were specific to Gem/212Pb-trastuzumab administration. In addition, the present study demonstrates that increased stressful growth arrest conditions induced by Gem/212Pb-trastuzumab could suppress cell proliferation possibly by up-regulating genes involved in apoptosis such as p73, by down-regulating genes involved in cell cycle check point such as CHK1, and in damaged DNA repair such as RAD51 paralogs. These events may be mediated by genes such as BRCA1/MSH2, a member of BARC (BRCA-associated genome surveillance complex). The data suggest that up-regulation of genes involved in apoptosis, perturbation of checkpoint genes, and a failure to correctly perform HR-mediated DSB repair and mismatch-mediated SSB repair may correlate with the previously observed inability to maintain the G2/M arrest, leading to cell death. PMID:27467592

  12. Methylisoindigo preferentially kills cancer stem cells by interfering cell metabolism via inhibition of LKB1 and activation of AMPK in PDACs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xinlai; Kim, Jee Young; Ghafoory, Shahrouz; Duvaci, Tijen; Rafiee, Roya; Theobald, Jannick; Alborzinia, Hamed; Holenya, Pavlo; Fredebohm, Johannes; Merz, Karl-Heinz; Mehrabi, Arianeb; Hafezi, Mohammadreza; Saffari, Arash; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Wölfl, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) clinically has a very poor prognosis. No small molecule is available to reliably achieve cures. Meisoindigo is chemically related to the natural product indirubin and showed substantial efficiency in clinical chemotherapy for CML in China. However, its effect on PDAC is still unknown. Our results showed strong anti-proliferation effect of meisoindigo on gemcitabine-resistant PDACs. Using a recently established primary PDAC cell line, called Jopaca-1 with a larger CSCs population as model, we observed a reduction of CD133+ and ESA+/CD44+/CD24+ populations upon treatment and concomitantly a decreased expression of CSC-associated genes, and reduced cellular mobility and sphere formation. Investigating basic cellular metabolic responses, we detected lower oxygen consumption and glucose uptake, while intracellular ROS levels increased. This was effectively neutralized by the addition of antioxidants, indicating an essential role of the cellular redox balance. Further analysis on energy metabolism related signaling revealed that meisoindigo inhibited LKB1, but activated AMPK. Both of them were involved in cellular apoptosis. Additional in situ hybridization in tissue sections of PDAC patients reproducibly demonstrated co-expression and -localization of LKB1 and CD133 in malignant areas. Finally, we detected that CD133+/CD44+ were more vulnerable to meisoindigo, which could be mimicked by LKB1 siRNAs. Our results provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that LKB1 sustains the CSC population in PDACs and demonstrate a clear benefit of meisoindigo in treatment of gemcitabine-resistant cells. This novel mechanism may provide a promising new treatment option for PDAC. PMID:26887594

  13. "The Killing Fields" of Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Karen

    2014-01-01

    clustering of ideas, a design strategy which seemed to kill unique ideas. The reframing of innovation as a radical endeavor killed learning from others for being not innovative. The findings of this paper supplement theories of deliberate killing of ideas by suggesting framing, design and facilitation of......, however, substantial amounts of relevant ideas got killed during opening phases, where the purpose of activities was framed as idea generation. These ideas were either verbally or silently killed, and some in rather contradicted ways: The design and facilitation of brain storming processes lead to...

  14. Ultrafast Killing and Self-Gelling Antimicrobial Imidazolium Oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riduan, Siti Nurhanna; Yuan, Yuan; Zhou, Feng; Leong, Jiayu; Su, Haibin; Zhang, Yugen

    2016-04-01

    Infectious diseases and the increasing threat of worldwide pandemics have underscored the importance of antibiotics and hygiene. Intensive efforts have been devoted to developing new antibiotics to meet the rapidly growing demand. In particular, advancing the knowledge of the structure-property-activity relationship is critical to expedite the design and development of novel antimicrobial with the needed potential and efficacy. Herein, a series of new antimicrobial imidazolium oligomers are developed with the rational manipulation of terminal group's hydrophobicity. These materials exhibit superior activity, excellent selectivity, ultrafast killing (>99.7% killing within 30 s), and desirable self-gelling properties. Molecular dynamic simulations reveal the delicate effect of structural changes on the translocation motion across the microbial cell membrane. The energy barrier of the translocation process analyzed by free energy calculations provides clear kinetic information to suggest that the spontaneous penetration requires a very short timescale of seconds to minutes for the new imidazolium oligomers. PMID:26891016

  15. Vibriocidal antibody responses to a bivalent killed whole-cell oral cholera vaccine in a phase III trial in Kolkata, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Kanungo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During the development of a vaccine, identification of the correlates of protection is of paramount importance for establishing an objective criterion for the protective performance of the vaccine. However, the ascertainment of correlates of immunity conferred by any vaccine is a difficult task. METHODS: While conducting a phase three double-blind, cluster-randomized, placebo-controlled trial of a bivalent killed whole-cell oral cholera vaccine in Kolkata, we evaluated the immunogenicity of the vaccine in a subset of participants. Randomly chosen participants (recipients of vaccine or placebo were invited to provide blood samples at baseline, 14 days after the second dose and one year after the first dose. At these time points, serum geometric mean titers (GMT of vibriocidal antibodies and seroconversion rates for vaccine and placebo arms were calculated and compared across the age strata (1 to 5 years, 5 to 15 years and more than 15 years as well as for all age groups. RESULTS: Out of 137 subjects included in analysis, 69 were vaccinees and 68 received placebo. There were 5•7 and 5•8 geometric mean fold (GMF rises in titers to Vibrio cholerae Inaba and Ogawa, respectively at 14 days after the second dose, with 57% and 61% of vaccinees showing a four-fold or greater titer rise, respectively. After one year, the titers to Inaba and Ogawa remained 1•7 and 2•8 fold higher, respectively, compared to baseline. Serum vibriocidal antibody response to V. cholerae O139 was much lower than that to Inaba or Ogawa. No significant differences in the GMF-rises were observed among the age groups. CONCLUSIONS: The reformulated oral cholera vaccine induced a statistically significant anti-O1 Inaba and O1 Ogawa vibriocidal antibody response 14 days after vaccination, which although declined after one year remained significantly higher than baseline. Despite this decline, the vaccine remained protective five years after vaccination.

  16. Effects of External Electric Field on AlN Precipitation and Recrystallization Texture of Deep-drawing 08Al Killed Steel Sheet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang ZHAO; Zhuochao HU; Liang ZUO

    2006-01-01

    The effects of an electric field on AlN precipitation and recrystallization texture were investigated. Cold-rolled 08Al killed steel sheets were annealed at 550℃ according to the two-step processes, for various maintaining times, with and without applying an electric field. It was found that the electric field promotes the precipitation of the second phase (AlN particles), strengthens the γ-fiber and weakens the α-fiber texture component in the recrystallized specimens. A possible explanation for the reinforcement of γ-fiber texture by the electric field is that the second phase AlN particle promotes the growth of γ-fiber at the expense of differently oriented grains.

  17. Charged conformal Killing spinors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the twistor equation on pseudo-Riemannian Spinc-manifolds whose solutions we call charged conformal Killing spinors (CCKSs). We derive several integrability conditions for the existence of CCKS and study their relations to spinor bilinears. A construction principle for Lorentzian manifolds admitting CCKS with nontrivial charge starting from CR-geometry is presented. We obtain a partial classification result in the Lorentzian case under the additional assumption that the associated Dirac current is normal conformal and complete the classification of manifolds admitting CCKS in all dimensions and signatures ≤5 which has recently been initiated in the study of supersymmetric field theories on curved space

  18. Defects in the oxidative killing of microorganisms by phagocytic leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, D; Weening, R S

    One of the most important mechanisms of phagocytic killing of ingested microorganisms by leukocytes is the generation of toxic oxygen products. During phagocytosis, neutrophils, as well as monocytes and macrophages, display a strongly increased cell respiration. Quantitatively the most important product of this reaction is hydrogen peroxide. Superoxide is also generated in large amounts, probably as an intermediate in the formation of hydrogen peroxide. Indications exist that singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radicals are also formed in this process. Some of these oxygen products have microbicidal properties by themselves. The effect of hydrogen peroxide is greatly enhanced by the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Several dysfunctions of this sytem are known. In chronic granulomatous disease the enzyme system that produces superoxide is not operative. Thus, no superoxide or hydrogen peroxide is generated, leading to a severely decreased bacterial killing capacity. The exact molecular defects in the X-linked and the autosomal form are as yet undefined. Two variants are also known: lipochrome histiocytosis, with different clinical and histological manifestations, and a 'triggering defect' where only strongly opsonized particles trigger the respiratory burst. Myeloperoxidase deficiency leads to slightly decreased killing capacity, especially for yeasts. In glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency no oxygen radicals or hydrogen peroxide are produced because no equivalents for oxygen reduction can be generated in the hexose-monophosphate shunt. Deficiencies in the glutathione redox system also result in impaired phagocyte function, probably because the cells have to be protected against their own toxic oxygen products. PMID:225141

  19. Deprive to kill: Glutamine closes the gate to anticancer monocarboxylic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Cardaci, Simone; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Killing properties of antitumor drugs can be enhanced by strategies targeting biochemical adaptations of cancer cells. Recently, we reported that depriving cancer cells of glutamine is a feasible approach to enhance antitumor effects of the alkylating analog of pyruvic acid, 3-bromopyruvate, which rely on the induction of autophagic cell death by metabolic-oxidative stress. 3-bromopyruvate chemopotentiation is the result of its increased intracellular uptake mediated by the monocarboxylate tr...

  20. Inhibitions of mTORC1 and 4EBP-1 are key events orchestrated by Rottlerin in SK-Mel-28 cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daveri, E; Maellaro, E; Valacchi, G; Ietta, F; Muscettola, M; Maioli, E

    2016-09-28

    Earlier studies demonstrated that Rottlerin exerts a time- and dose-dependent antiproliferative effect on SK-Mel-28 melanoma cells during 24 h of treatment, but cytotoxicity due to cell death began only after a 48 h exposure. In the current study, in order to identify the type of cell death in this cell line, which is notoriously refractory to most anticancer therapies, and to clarify the underlying mechanisms of this delayed outcome, we searched for apoptotic, necrotic/necroptotic and autophagic traits in Rottlerin-exposed cells. Although SK-Mel-28 cells are both apoptosis and autophagy competent, Western blotting analysis, caspase activity assay, nuclear imaging and the effects of autophagy, apoptosis and necroptosis inhibitors, indicated that Rottlerin cytotoxicity was due to none of the aforementioned death mechanisms. Nevertheless, in growth arrested cells, the death did occur after a prolonged treatment and most likely ensued from the observed blockage of protein synthesis that reached levels expected to be incompatible with cell survival. From a mechanistic point of view, we ascribed this effect to the documented inhibition of mTORC1 activity; mTORC1 inhibition on the one hand led to a not deadly, rather protective autophagic response but, on the other hand caused a near complete arrest of protein synthesis. Interestingly, no cytotoxicity was found towards normal skin fibroblasts, which only resulted mildly growth arrested by the drug. PMID:27343979

  1. Chronic γ-irradiation results in increased cell killing and chromosomal aberration with specific breakpoints in fibroblast cell strains derived from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cultured skin fibroblast cells from 16 NHL (non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) patients and 2 clinically normal subjects were compared for cell survival and chromosomal aberration after chronic γ-irradiation. Fibroblasts from an ataxia telangiectasia (AT) homozygote and an AT heterozygote were used as positive controls. Following irradiation, fibroblasts from all 16 NHL patients showed an increase in both cell death and chromosomal aberration (breaks and rearrangements) compared to normal subjects. The difference in frequency of chromosomal aberration between normals and NHL-patients remained virtually unchanged over a period of 24-72 h post irradiation incubation of cells. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry carried out in 1 normal and 1 NHL fibroblast cell strain showed that more cells representing the NHL patient were in G2/M phase compared to the normal at various times of cytogenetic analysis. While the AT homozygote appeared to be the most radiosensitive, the AT heterozygote showed a slightly higher incidence of cell death and chromosomal aberration than the normals. The cellular and chromosomal radiosensitivity of fibroblast cell lines from NHL-patients differed slightly from that of AT heterozygote but clearly occupied an intermediate position between the AT homozygote and the normal subjects. Cells from 3 of the NHL patients showed radiation-induced specific chromosomal breaks involving chromosomes 1, 2, 6, 8, 10 and 11 which correspond to known fragile sites. Such breakpoints associated with increased radiosensitivity may be indicative of predisposition to malignancy in the patients studied. (author). 30 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Effects of 2'-chlorothymidine on Chinese hamster cells irradiated with x-rays and ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of 2'-chlorothymidine (2'-Cl-TdR) and its mother compound, thymidine (TdR), on cell killing induced by X- and UV-irradiation have been investigated. Chinse hamster V-79 (TK+) cells as well as thymidine kinase deficient (TK-) variant cells, which were isolated from parental V-79 cells following stepwise treatment with BUdR, were incubated in a medium containing 2'-Cl-TdR and TdR after X- and UV-irradiation. In the TK+ cells, both 2'-Cl-TdR and TdR enhanced the killing efficiency of X-rays and ultraviolet light. On the other hand, in the TK- cells, only 2'-Cl-TdR enhanced the killing efficiency of X- and UV-irradiation, and no effect of TdR was observed. These results suggest that phosphorylation of TdR by the enzyme is essential for its ability to modify radiation response, while the enhancement of cell killing by 2'-Cl-TdR must be explained by a mechanism at least partly independent of phosphorylation. (author)

  3. Analysing the Wrongness of Killing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an in-depth analysis of the wrongness of killing by comparing different versions of three influential views: the traditional view that killing is always wrong; the liberal view that killing is wrong if and only if the victim does not want to be killed; and Don Marquis‟ future...... of value account of the wrongness of killing. In particular, I illustrate the advantages that a basic version of the liberal view and a basic version of the future of value account have over competing alternatives. Still, ultimately none of the views analysed here are satisfactory; but the different...... reasons why those competing views fail provide important insights into the ethics of killing....

  4. Regulatory T cell effects in antitumor laser immunotherapy: a mathematical model and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Bryan A.; Laverty, Sean M.

    2016-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have tremendous influence on treatment outcomes in patients receiving immunotherapy for cancerous tumors. We present a mathematical model incorporating the primary cellular and molecular components of antitumor laser immunotherapy. We explicitly model developmental classes of dendritic cells (DCs), cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), primary and metastatic tumor cells, and tumor antigen. Regulatory T cells have been shown to kill antigen presenting cells, to influence dendritic cell maturation and migration, to kill activated killer CTLs in the tumor microenvironment, and to influence CTL proliferation. Since Tregs affect explicitly modeled cells, but we do not explicitly model dynamics of Treg themselves, we use model parameters to analyze effects of Treg immunosuppressive activity. We will outline a systematic method for assigning clinical outcomes to model simulations and use this condition to associate simulated patient treatment outcome with Treg activity.

  5. Apoptosis in HeLa cell exposed to different dose, dose-rate of 32P β-irradiation and the correlation with cell-killing efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an attempt to elucidate some aspects of the radiobiological basis of targeted radiotherapy in oncology, the apoptosis occurred have been studied in Hela cell lines after exposing to different doses and dose-rate radiation of 32P and the relationship between apoptosis occurred and the capacity of cell proliferation, which might be of help to the understanding of targeted radiotherapy. Asynchronous Hela cells were exposed to β radiation from 32P absorbed in filter papers which were put closely under culture dishes of growing monolayer of Hela cell. The radiation response characteristics to different dose, dose-rate and radiation time were evaluated through cell-proliferation assessed by the colony-forming assay, cell cycle perturbation studied by flow cytometry and quantity analysis of apoptosis analyzed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Morphological and flow cytometry analysis showed a delayed apoptosis. The programmed cell death approached a plateau between 48-72h post-irradiation. Electron and fluorescence microscopic studies showed the presence of morphologically apoptotic cells. Single dose radiation showed a higher apoptosis ratio than multiple low dose radiation, which did not correlate with clonal-forming assay, suggesting apoptosis ratio at a near time point post-irradiation is not a convincing indicator of radiation efficacy in the current experimental setting

  6. Why Are Bad Products So Hard to Kill?

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan Simester; Juanjuan Zhang

    2009-01-01

    It is puzzling that firms often continue to invest in product development projects when they should know that demand will be low. We argue that bad products are hard to kill because firms face an inherent conflict when designing managers' incentives. Rewarding success encourages managers to forge ahead even when demand is low. To avoid investing in low-demand products, the firm must also reward decisions to kill products. However, rewarding managers for killing products effectively undermines...

  7. Cytotoxic macrophage-released tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as a killing mechanism for cancer cell death after cold plasma activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study aims at studying the anticancer role of cold plasma-activated immune cells. The direct anti-cancer activity of plasma-activated immune cells against human solid cancers has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed the effect of plasma-treated RAW264.7 macrophages on cancer cell growth after co-culture. In particular, flow cytometer analysis revealed that plasma did not induce any cell death in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed that TNF-α released from plasma-activated macrophages acts as a tumour cell death inducer. In support of these findings, activated macrophages down-regulated the cell growth in solid cancer cell lines and induced cell death in vitro. Together our findings suggest plasma-induced reactive species recruit cytotoxic macrophages to release TNF-α, which blocks cancer cell growth and can have the potential to contribute to reducing tumour growth in vivo in the near future. (paper)

  8. Cytotoxic macrophage-released tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as a killing mechanism for cancer cell death after cold plasma activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Kaushik, Neha; Min, Booki; Choi, Ki Hong; Hong, Young June; Miller, Vandana; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2016-03-01

    The present study aims at studying the anticancer role of cold plasma-activated immune cells. The direct anti-cancer activity of plasma-activated immune cells against human solid cancers has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed the effect of plasma-treated RAW264.7 macrophages on cancer cell growth after co-culture. In particular, flow cytometer analysis revealed that plasma did not induce any cell death in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed that TNF-α released from plasma-activated macrophages acts as a tumour cell death inducer. In support of these findings, activated macrophages down-regulated the cell growth in solid cancer cell lines and induced cell death in vitro. Together our findings suggest plasma-induced reactive species recruit cytotoxic macrophages to release TNF-α, which blocks cancer cell growth and can have the potential to contribute to reducing tumour growth in vivo in the near future.

  9. Photo activation of HPPH encapsulated in “Pocket” liposomes triggers multiple drug release and tumor cell killing in mouse breast cancer xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sine J

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jessica Sine,1,* Cordula Urban,2,* Derek Thayer,1 Heather Charron,2 Niksa Valim,2 Darrell B Tata,3 Rachel Schiff,4 Robert Blumenthal,1 Amit Joshi,2 Anu Puri1 1Membrane Structure and Function Section, Basic Research Laboratory, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute – Frederick, Frederick, MD, USA; 2Department of Radiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 3US Food and Drug Administration, CDRH/OSEL/Division of Physics, White Oak Campus, MD, USA; 4Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: We recently reported laser-triggered release of photosensitive compounds from liposomes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC and 1,2 bis(tricosa-10,12-diynoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9PC. We hypothesized that the permeation of photoactivated compounds occurs through domains of enhanced fluidity in the liposome membrane and have thus called them “Pocket” liposomes. In this study we have encapsulated the red light activatable anticancer photodynamic therapy drug 2-(1-Hexyloxyethyl-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH (Ex/Em410/670 nm together with calcein (Ex/Em490/517 nm as a marker for drug release in Pocket liposomes. A mole ratio of 7.6:1 lipid:HPPH was found to be optimal, with >80% of HPPH being included in the liposomes. Exposure of liposomes with a cw-diode 660 nm laser (90 mW, 0–5 minutes resulted in calcein release only when HPPH was included in the liposomes. Further analysis of the quenching ratios of liposome-entrapped calcein in the laser treated samples indicated that the laser-triggered release occurred via the graded mechanism. In vitro studies with MDA-MB-231-LM2 breast cancer cell line showed significant cell killing upon treatment of cell-liposome suspensions with the laser. To assess in vivo efficacy, we implanted MDA-MB-231-LM2 cells containing the luciferase gene along the mammary fat pads

  10. Mediation of host immune responses after immunization of neonatal calves with a heat-killed Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    A major drawback of current whole-cell vaccines for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis(MAP) is the interference with diagnostic tests for bovine tuberculosis and paratuberculosis. The current study was designed to explore effects of immunization with a heat-killed whole cell vaccine (Mycop...

  11. Killing Symmetry on Finsler Manifold

    CERN Document Server

    Ootsuka, Takayoshi; Ishida, Muneyuki

    2016-01-01

    Killing vector fields $K$ are defined on Finsler manifold. The Killing symmetry is reformulated simply as $\\delta K^\\flat =0$ by using the Killing non-linear 1-form $K^\\flat$ and the spray operator $\\delta$ with the Finsler non-linear connection. $K^\\flat$ is related to the generalization of Killing tensors on Finsler manifold, and the condition $\\delta K^\\flat =0$ gives an analytical method of finding higher derivative conserved quantities, which may be called hidden conserved quantities. We show two examples: the Carter constant on Kerr spacetime and the Runge-Lentz vectors in Newtonian gravity.

  12. The Seal Killing Controversy: What Are the Facts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Victor B.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the seal controversy using the harp and Alaska fur seals to illustrate the two distinct issues, i.e., conservation (the effect of killing upon the animal population); and two, morality (the effect of killing upon the human spirit). Factual information combines with personal philosophy. (LK)

  13. Genetically Modified T Cells Targeting Interleukin-11 Receptor α-Chain Kill Human Osteosarcoma Cells and Induce the Regression of Established Osteosarcoma Lung Metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Gangxiong; Yu, Ling; Cooper, Laurence JN; Hollomon, Mario; Huls, Helen; Kleinerman, Eugenie S.

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of osteosarcoma (OS) pulmonary metastases remains a challenge. T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), which recognizes a tumor-associated antigen, have shown activity against hematopoetic malignancies in clinical trials, but this requires the identification of a specific receptor on the tumor cell. In the current study, we found that interleukin (IL)-11Rα was selectively expressed on 14 of 16 OS patients’ lung metastases and 4 different human ...

  14. Selective killing of CD4+ cells harboring a human immunodeficiency virus-inducible suicide gene prevents viral spread in an infected cell population.

    OpenAIRE

    Caruso, M; Klatzmann, D

    1992-01-01

    We have stably expressed in CD4+ lymphoid cells the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) gene under the control of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter and transactivation response element sequences. Upon HIV infection these regulatory sequences were transactivated, switching on high-level expression of HSV1-TK. This in turn caused the death of HIV-infected cells when they were cultured in the presence of acyclovir, a nucleoside analog that becomes toxic after pho...

  15. Dimethyl Sulfoxide Protects Escherichia coli from Rapid Antimicrobial-Mediated Killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Hongfei; Wang, Dai; Xue, Yunxin; Zhang, Zhi; Niu, Jianjun; Hong, Yuzhi; Drlica, Karl; Zhao, Xilin

    2016-08-01

    The contribution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to antimicrobial lethality was examined by treating Escherichia coli with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), an antioxidant solvent frequently used in antimicrobial studies. DMSO inhibited killing by ampicillin, kanamycin, and two quinolones and had little effect on MICs. DMSO-mediated protection correlated with decreased ROS accumulation and provided evidence for ROS-mediated programmed cell death. These data support the contribution of ROS to antimicrobial lethality and suggest caution when using DMSO-dissolved antimicrobials for short-time killing assays. PMID:27246776

  16. Tritium effects on germ cells and fertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primordial oocytes in juvenile mice show acute gamma-ray LD50 as low as 6 rad. This provides opportunities for determining dose-response relations at low doses and chronic exposure in the intact animal - conditions of particular interest for hazard evaluation. Examined in this way, 3HOH in body water is found to kill murine oocytes exponentially with dose, the LD50 level for chronic exposure being only 2μCi/ml (delivering 0.4 rad/day). At very low doses and dose rates, where comparisons between tritium and other radiations are of special significance for radiological protection, the RBE of tritium compared with 60Co gamma radiation reaches approximately 3. Effects on murine fertility from tritium-induced oocyte loss have been quantified by reproductive capacity measurements. Chronic low-level exposure has been examined also in three primate species - squirrel, rhesus, and bonnet monkeys. In squirrel monkeys the ovarian germ-cell supply is 99% destroyed by the time of birth from prenatal exposure to body-water levels of 3HOH (administered in maternal drinking water) of only 3 μCi/ml, the LD50 level being 0.5 μCi/ml (giving 0.1 rad/day), one fourth that in mice. Though not completely ruled out, similar high sensitivity of female germ cells has not been found in macaques; and it probably does not occur in man. The exquisite radiosensitivity of primordial oocytes in mice is apparently due to vulnerability of the plasma membrane (or something of similar geometry and location), not DNA. Evidence for this comes from tritium data as well as neutron studies. Tritium administered as 3HOH, and therefore generally distributed, is much more effective in killing murine oocytes than is tritium administered as 3H-TdR, localized in the nucleus. This situation in the mouse may have implications for estimating radiation genetic risk in the human female

  17. Expression of thymidine kinase mediated by a novel non-viral delivery system under the control of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 promoter selectively kills human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Wang; Hui-Xiong Xu; Ming-De Lu; Qing Tang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the killing efficiency of a recombinant plasmid containing a thymidine kinase (TK) domain insert driven by the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) promoter (KDR) on vascular endothelial cells.METHODS: The KDR-TK fragment was extracted from pBluescript 11 KDR-TK plasmid by enzymatic digestion with XhoI and Sa/I. The enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) carrier was extracted from pEGFP by the same procedure. The KDR-TK was inserted into the pEGFP carrier to construct pEGFP-KDR-TK. Using ultrasound irradiation and microbubble,pEGFP-KDR-TK was transferred into human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The transient infection rate was estimated by green fluorescent protein (GFP)expression. Transfected HUVECs, non-transfected HUVECs, and HepG2 cells were cultured in the presence of different concentrations of ganciclovir (GCV), and the killing efficacy of HSV-TK/GCV was analyzed by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTr) assay.RESULTS: The recombinant pEGFP-KDR-TK was successfully constructed by inserting the KDR-TK fragment into the pEGFP carrier. Transfected HUVECs showed cytoplasmic green fluorescence, and the transient transfection rate was about 20.3%. Pools of G418-resistant cells exhibited a higher sensitivity to the prodrug/GCV compared to non-transfected HUVECs or non-transfected HepG2 cells, respectively.CONCLUSION: KDR promoter and the suicide gene/prodrug system mediated by diagnostic ultrasound combined with microbubble can significantly kill HUVECs.Such therapy may present a novel and attractive approach to target gene therapy on tumor vessels.

  18. Effect of platinum nanoparticles on cell death induced by ultrasound in human lymphoma U937 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawaid, Paras; Rehman, Mati Ur; Hassan, Mariame Ali; Zhao, Qing Li; Li, Peng; Miyamoto, Yusei; Misawa, Masaki; Ogawa, Ryohei; Shimizu, Tadamichi; Kondo, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report on the potential use of platinum nanoparticles (Pt-NPs), a superoxide dismutase (SOD)/catalase mimetic antioxidant, in combination with 1MHz ultrasound (US) at an intensity of 0.4W/cm(2), 10% duty factor, 100Hz PRF, for 2min. Apoptosis induction was assessed by DNA fragmentation assay, cell cycle analysis and Annexin V-FITC/PI staining. Cell killing was confirmed by cell counting and microscopic examination. The mitochondrial and Ca(2+)-dependent pathways were investigated. Caspase-8 expression and autophagy-related proteins were detected by spectrophotometry and western blot analysis, respectively. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) elevation was detected by flow cytometry, while extracellular free radical formation was assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping spectrometry. The results showed that Pt-NPs exerted differential effects depending on their internalization. Pt-NPs functioned as potent free radical scavengers when added immediately before sonication while pre-treatment with Pt-NPs suppressed the induction of apoptosis as well as autophagy (AP), and resulted in enhanced cell killing. Dead cells displayed the features of pyknosis. The exact mode of cell death is still unclear. In conclusion, the results indicate that US-induced AP may contribute to cell survival post sonication. To our knowledge this is the first study to discuss autophagy as a pro-survival pathway in the context of US. The combination of Pt-NPs and US might be effective in cancer eradication. PMID:26964942

  19. Killing curve activity of ciprofloxacin is comparable to synergistic effect of beta-lactam-tobramycin combinations against Haemophilus species endocarditis strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, H; Frimodt-Møller, N; Gutschik, E;

    1992-01-01

    Nine Haemophilus species strains, all beta-lactamase negative, isolated from patients with endocarditis were tested in killing curve experiments. Antibiotics used were penicillin, amoxicillin, aztreonam alone and in combination with tobramycin, as well as ciprofloxacin alone. Synergism between beta...

  20. Effects of disrupting the polyketide synthase gene WdPKS1 in Wangiella [Exophiala] dermatitidis on melanin production and resistance to killing by antifungal compounds, enzymatic degradation, and extremes in temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandal Piyali

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wangiella dermatitidis is a human pathogenic fungus that is an etiologic agent of phaeohyphomycosis. W. dermatitidis produces a black pigment that has been identified as a dihydroxynaphthalene melanin and the production of this pigment is associated with its virulence. Cell wall pigmentation in W. dermatitidis depends on the WdPKS1 gene, which encodes a polyketide synthase required for generating the key precursor for dihydroxynaphthalene melanin biosynthesis. Results We analyzed the effects of disrupting WdPKS1 on dihydroxynaphthalene melanin production and resistance to antifungal compounds. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that wdpks1Δ-1 yeast had thinner cell walls that lacked an electron-opaque layer compared to wild-type cells. However, digestion of the wdpks1Δ-1 yeast revealed small black particles that were consistent with a melanin-like compound, because they were acid-resistant, reacted with melanin-binding antibody, and demonstrated a free radical signature by electron spin resonance analysis. Despite lacking the WdPKS1 gene, the mutant yeast were capable of catalyzing the formation of melanin from L-3,4-dihyroxyphenylalanine. The wdpks1Δ-1 cells were significantly more susceptible to killing by voriconazole, amphotericin B, NP-1 [a microbicidal peptide], heat and cold, and lysing enzymes than the heavily melanized parental or complemented strains. Conclusion In summary, W. dermatitidis makes WdPKS-dependent and -independent melanins, and the WdPKS1-dependent deposition of melanin in the cell wall confers protection against antifungal agents and environmental stresses. The biological role of the WdPKS-independent melanin remains unclear.

  1. The killing effects of ultraviolet light and x-rays on free-living nematode, Rhabditidae tokai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The life-shortening effects of ultraviolet light (UV) and X-rays were investigated with a strain of free-living nematode, Rhabditidae tokai. UV exhibited a significant life-shortening effect on adult worms, and it also inhibited growth of larvae, hatching of eggs and reproduction. Sensitivity to UV was decreased with increasing ages. In contrast, nematodes showed a marked resistance to X-rays. Data were obtained suggesting that X-ray-induced single-strand breaks in DNA can be rapidly and efficiently rejoined by a repair mechanism. Malformations were observed when immature larvae were irradiated with X-rays. (author)

  2. Can a penny kill you?

    OpenAIRE

    Hili, Alexander; Duca, Edward

    2015-01-01

    A long-standing urban legend suggests that a penny dropped from a great height, let's say the Empire State Building, kills. The penny should speed up and pass through a person's skull easily. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/can-a-penny-kill-you/

  3. What Doesn't Kill You Makes You Wary? Effect of Repeated Culling on the Behaviour of an Invasive Predator

    OpenAIRE

    Isabelle M. Côté; Darling1, Emily S.; Luis Malpica-Cruz; Smith, Nicola S.; Green, Stephanie J.; Jocelyn Curtis-Quick; Craig Layman

    2014-01-01

    As a result of being hunted, animals often alter their behaviour in ways that make future encounters with predators less likely. When hunting is carried out for conservation, for example to control invasive species, these behavioural changes can inadvertently impede the success of future efforts. We examined the effects of repeated culling by spearing on the behaviour of invasive predatory lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles) on Bahamian coral reef patches. We compared the extent of concealment ...

  4. The role of non-protein sulphydryls in determining the chemical repair rates of free radical precursors of DNA damage and cell killing in Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts were irradiated in the gas explosion apparatus and the chemical repair rates of the oxygen-dependent free radical precursors of DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) and lethal lesions measured using filter elution (pH 9.6) and a clonogenic assay. Depletion of cellular GSH levels, from 4.16 fmol/cell to 0.05 fmol/cell, by treatment with buthionine sulphoximine (50 μmol dm-3; 18 h), led to sensitization as regards DNA dsb induction and cell killing. This was evident at all time settings but was particularly pronounced when the oxygen shot was given 1 ms after the irradiation pulse. A detailed analysis of the chemical repair kinetics showed that depletion of GSH led to a reduction in the first-order rate constant for dsb precursors from 385 s-1 to 144 s-1, and for lethal lesion precursors from 533 s-1 to 165 s-1. (Author)

  5. Killing of Bacteria by Copper Surfaces Involves Dissolved Copper▿

    OpenAIRE

    Molteni, Cristina; Abicht, Helge K.; Solioz, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria are rapidly killed on copper surfaces. However, the mechanism of this process remains unclear. Using Enterococcus hirae, the effect of inactivation of copper homeostatic genes and of medium compositions on survival and copper dissolution was tested. The results support a role for dissolved copper ions in killing.

  6. What doesn't kill you makes you wary? Effect of repeated culling on the behaviour of an invasive predator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle M Côté

    Full Text Available As a result of being hunted, animals often alter their behaviour in ways that make future encounters with predators less likely. When hunting is carried out for conservation, for example to control invasive species, these behavioural changes can inadvertently impede the success of future efforts. We examined the effects of repeated culling by spearing on the behaviour of invasive predatory lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles on Bahamian coral reef patches. We compared the extent of concealment and activity levels of lionfish at dawn and midday on 16 coral reef patches off Eleuthera, The Bahamas. Eight of the patches had been subjected to regular daytime removals of lionfish by spearing for two years. We also estimated the distance at which lionfish became alert to slowly approaching divers on culled and unculled reef patches. Lionfish on culled reefs were less active and hid deeper within the reef during the day than lionfish on patches where no culling had occurred. There were no differences at dawn when removals do not take place. Lionfish on culled reefs also adopted an alert posture at a greater distance from divers than lionfish on unculled reefs. More crepuscular activity likely leads to greater encounter rates by lionfish with more native fish species because the abundance of reef fish outside of shelters typically peaks at dawn and dusk. Hiding deeper within the reef could also make remaining lionfish less likely to be encountered and more difficult to catch by spearfishers during culling efforts. Shifts in the behaviour of hunted invasive animals might be common and they have implications both for the impact of invasive species and for the design and success of invasive control programs.

  7. What doesn't kill you makes you wary? Effect of repeated culling on the behaviour of an invasive predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Isabelle M; Darling, Emily S; Malpica-Cruz, Luis; Smith, Nicola S; Green, Stephanie J; Curtis-Quick, Jocelyn; Layman, Craig

    2014-01-01

    As a result of being hunted, animals often alter their behaviour in ways that make future encounters with predators less likely. When hunting is carried out for conservation, for example to control invasive species, these behavioural changes can inadvertently impede the success of future efforts. We examined the effects of repeated culling by spearing on the behaviour of invasive predatory lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles) on Bahamian coral reef patches. We compared the extent of concealment and activity levels of lionfish at dawn and midday on 16 coral reef patches off Eleuthera, The Bahamas. Eight of the patches had been subjected to regular daytime removals of lionfish by spearing for two years. We also estimated the distance at which lionfish became alert to slowly approaching divers on culled and unculled reef patches. Lionfish on culled reefs were less active and hid deeper within the reef during the day than lionfish on patches where no culling had occurred. There were no differences at dawn when removals do not take place. Lionfish on culled reefs also adopted an alert posture at a greater distance from divers than lionfish on unculled reefs. More crepuscular activity likely leads to greater encounter rates by lionfish with more native fish species because the abundance of reef fish outside of shelters typically peaks at dawn and dusk. Hiding deeper within the reef could also make remaining lionfish less likely to be encountered and more difficult to catch by spearfishers during culling efforts. Shifts in the behaviour of hunted invasive animals might be common and they have implications both for the impact of invasive species and for the design and success of invasive control programs. PMID:24705447

  8. GVL against mouse BC-CML and CP-CML: Shared mechanisms of T cell killing, but PD-ligands render CP-CML and not BC-CML GVL-resistant*

    OpenAIRE

    Matte-Martone, Catherine; Venkatesan, Srividhya; Tan, Hung Sheng; Athanasiadis, Ioanna; Chang, Julia; Pavisic, Jovana; Shlomchik, Warren

    2011-01-01

    GVL against chronic phase CML (CP-CML) is potent, but it is less efficacious against acute leukemias and blast crisis CML (BC-CML). The mechanisms underlying GVL-resistance are unknown. Previously, we found that alloreactive T cell targeting of GVL-sensitive bcr-abl-induced mouse CP-CML (mCP-CML) required TCR:MHC interactions and that multiple and redundant killing mechanisms were in play. To better understand why BC-CML is resistant to GVL, we performed a comprehensive analysis of GVL agains...

  9. Inhibition of c-MYC with involvement of ERK/JNK/MAPK and AKT pathways as a novel mechanism for shikonin and its derivatives in killing leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiaoli; Assimopoulou, Andreana N; Klauck, Sabine M; Damianakos, Harilaos; Chinou, Ioanna; Kretschmer, Nadine; Rios, José-Luis; Papageorgiou, Vassilios P; Bauer, Rudolf; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-11-17

    Leukemia remains life-threatening despite remarkable advances in chemotherapy. The poor prognosis and drug resistance are challenging treatment. Novel drugs are urgently needed. Shikonin, a natural naphthoquinone, has been previously shown by us to be particularly effective towards various leukemia cell lines compared to solid tumors. However, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we investigated shikonin and 14 derivatives on U937 leukemia cells. Four derivatives (isobutyrylshikonin, 2-methylbutyrylshikonin, isovalerylshikonin and β,β-dimethylacrylshikonin) were more active than shikonin. AnnexinV-PI analysis revealed that shikonins induced apoptosis. Cell cycle G1/S check point regulation and the transcription factor c-MYC, which plays a vital role in cell cycle regulation and proliferation, were identified as the most commonly down-regulated mechanisms upon treatment with shikonins in mRNA microarray hybridizations. Western blotting and DNA-binding assays confirmed the inhibition of c-MYC expression and transcriptional activity by shikonins. Reduction of c-MYC expression was closely associated with deregulated ERK, JNK MAPK and AKT activity, indicating their involvement in shikonin-triggered c-MYC inactivation. Molecular docking studies revealed that shikonin and its derivatives bind to the same DNA-binding domain of c-MYC as the known c-MYC inhibitors 10058-F4 and 10074-G5. This finding indicates that shikonins bind to c-MYC. The effect of shikonin on U937 cells was confirmed in other leukemia cell lines (Jurkat, Molt4, CCRF-CEM, and multidrug-resistant CEM/ADR5000), where shikonin also inhibited c-MYC expression and influenced phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, and SAPK/JNK. In summary, inhibition of c-MYC and related pathways represents a novel mechanism of shikonin and its derivatives to explain their anti-leukemic activity. PMID:26472107

  10. EGFRvIII-specific chimeric antigen receptor T cells migrate to and kill tumor deposits infiltrating the brain parenchyma in an invasive xenograft model of glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongsheng Miao

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults and is uniformly lethal. T-cell-based immunotherapy offers a promising platform for treatment given its potential to specifically target tumor tissue while sparing the normal brain. However, the diffuse and infiltrative nature of these tumors in the brain parenchyma may pose an exceptional hurdle to successful immunotherapy in patients. Areas of invasive tumor are thought to reside behind an intact blood brain barrier, isolating them from effective immunosurveillance and thereby predisposing the development of "immunologically silent" tumor peninsulas. Therefore, it remains unclear if adoptively transferred T cells can migrate to and mediate regression in areas of invasive GBM. One barrier has been the lack of a preclinical mouse model that accurately recapitulates the growth patterns of human GBM in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that D-270 MG xenografts exhibit the classical features of GBM and produce the diffuse and invasive tumors seen in patients. Using this model, we designed experiments to assess whether T cells expressing third-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs targeting the tumor-specific mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFRvIII, would localize to and treat invasive intracerebral GBM. EGFRvIII-targeted CAR (EGFRvIII+ CAR T cells demonstrated in vitro EGFRvIII antigen-specific recognition and reactivity to the D-270 MG cell line, which naturally expresses EGFRvIII. Moreover, when administered systemically, EGFRvIII+ CAR T cells localized to areas of invasive tumor, suppressed tumor growth, and enhanced survival of mice with established intracranial D-270 MG tumors. Together, these data demonstrate that systemically administered T cells are capable of migrating to the invasive edges of GBM to mediate antitumor efficacy and tumor regression.

  11. Effectiveness of attract-and-kill systems using methyl eugenol incorporated with neonicotinoid insecticides against the oriental fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yi-Yuan; Hou, Roger F

    2008-04-01

    Laboratory bioassays and field trials were conducted to evaluate an "attract-and-kill" system using methyl eugenol (ME) with neonicotinoid insecticides against male oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae). In laboratory bioassays, mortality of male flies resulting from the conventional toxicant, naled was 98.3-100% at 24 through 72 h after treatment, whereas the neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid and acetamiprid caused only approximately 60-80% at 24 through 72 h after treatment. In the assays of residual effect, naled was persistent up to 96 wk, whereas imidacloprid or acetamiprid was persistent up to 150 wk, resulting in 38.9 or 61.2% male mortality, respectively. Imidacloprid, in particular, caused a delayed lethal effect on flies. In another experiment, male mortality within 28 wk from clothianidin, another neonicotinoid insecticide, was approximately 80% after exposure for 24 h, suggesting a delayed lethal effect similar to those treated with imidacloprid, and mortality was up to 91.8%, if observed, 72 h after treatment. In field trials, attractiveness was similar between ME alone and ME incorporated with naled or neonicotinoids, indicating that addition of these insecticides to ME in traps is not repellent to B. dorsalis males. Using an improved wick-typed trap with longer attractiveness for simulating field application, addition of imidacloprid or acetamiprid maintained 40.1 or 64.3% male mortality, respectively, when assayed once every 2 wk from traps placed in orchards for 42 wk without changing the poison, whereas incorporation with naled resulted in as high as 98.1% after 34 wk and approximately 80% at 42 wk, indicating that persistence is increased compared with sugarcane fiberboard blocks for carrying poison attractants. This study also suggests that neonicotinoid insecticides could be used as an alternative for broad-spectrum insecticides as toxicants in fly traps. PMID:18459398

  12. CDK1 Inhibition Targets the p53-NOXA-MCL1 Axis, Selectively Kills Embryonic Stem Cells, and Prevents Teratoma Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelle E. Huskey

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells (ESCs have adopted an accelerated cell-cycle program with shortened gap phases and precocious expression of cell-cycle regulatory proteins, including cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs. We examined the effect of CDK inhibition on the pathways regulating proliferation and survival of ESCs. We found that inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1 leads to activation of the DNA damage response, nuclear p53 stabilization, activation of a subset of p53 target genes including NOXA, and negative regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein MCL1 in human and mouse ESCs, but not differentiated cells. We demonstrate that MCL1 is highly expressed in ESCs and loss of MCL1 leads to ESC death. Finally, we show that clinically relevant CDK1 inhibitors prevent formation of ESC-derived tumors and induce necrosis in established ESC-derived tumors. Our data demonstrate that ES cells are uniquely sensitive to CDK1 inhibition via a p53/NOXA/MCL1 pathway.

  13. Notes on Super Killing Tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Howe, P S

    2015-01-01

    The notion of a Killing tensor is generalised to a superspace setting. Conserved quantities associated with these are defined for superparticles and Poisson brackets are used to define a supersymmetric version of the Schouten-Nijenhuis bracket. Superconformal Killing tensors in flat superspaces are studied for spacetime dimensions 3,4,5,6 and 10. These tensors are also presented in analytic superspaces and super-twistor spaces for 3,4 and 6 dimensions. Algebraic structures associated with superconformal Killing tensors are also briefly discussed

  14. Notes on super Killing tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, P. S.; Lindström, U.

    2016-03-01

    The notion of a Killing tensor is generalised to a superspace setting. Conserved quantities associated with these are defined for superparticles and Poisson brackets are used to define a supersymmetric version of the even Schouten-Nijenhuis bracket. Superconformal Killing tensors in flat superspaces are studied for spacetime dimensions 3,4,5,6 and 10. These tensors are also presented in analytic superspaces and super-twistor spaces for 3,4 and 6 dimensions. Algebraic structures associated with superconformal Killing tensors are also briefly discussed.

  15. Effect of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase on the heat response of HeLa S3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgman, P; Konings, A W

    1988-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate a possible involvement of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions in hyperthermic cell killing and hyperthermic DNA strand-break induction and repair in HeLa S3 cells. The inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) and 4-aminobenzamide (4AB), were used as tools in this study. Both inhibitors could sensitize the cells for hyperthermic cell killing equally well, although 3AB is known to be a more effective enzyme inhibitor. The heat sensitization at the level of cell killing could be reversed when the compounds were still present during a 4-h postincubation at 37 degrees C. More heat-induced DNA strand breaks were formed in the presence of 3AB and 4AB. Repair of strand breaks was inhibited during the postincubation at 37 degrees C. Thus the effect of 3AB and 4AB on DNA strand-break repair was different from the cited effect on cell survival. It is concluded that the sensitizing effect of 3AB and 4AB on hyperthermic cell killing is not caused by inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and is also not related to repair of DNA strand breaks. PMID:3144718

  16. Phantom metrics with Killing spinors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.A. Sabra

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We study metric solutions of Einstein–anti-Maxwell theory admitting Killing spinors. The analogue of the IWP metric which admits a space-like Killing vector is found and is expressed in terms of a complex function satisfying the wave equation in flat (2+1-dimensional space–time. As examples, electric and magnetic Kasner spaces are constructed by allowing the solution to depend only on the time coordinate. Euclidean solutions are also presented.

  17. Effects of AlMnCa and AlMnFe Alloys on Deoxidization of Low Carbon and Low Silicon Aluminum Killed Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Dong-ping; ZHANG Hui-shu; JIANG Zhou-hua

    2008-01-01

    To confirm the effects of AlMnCa and AIMnFe alloys on the deoxidization and modification of Al2O3 inclu-sions, experiments of 4-heat low carbon and low silicon aluminum killed steels deoxidized by AlMnCa and AlMnFe alloys were done in a MoSi2 furnace at 1 873 K. It is found that the 1# A1MnCa alloy has the best ability of deoxidi-zation and modification of Al2 O3 inclusions than 2# A1MnCa and A1MnFe alloys. Steel A deoxidized by 1# AlMnCa alloy has the lowest total oxygen content in the terminal steel, which is 37 × 10-6. Most of the inclusions in the steel deoxidized by 1# AIMnCa alloy are spherical CaO-containing compound inclusions, and 89. 1% of them are smaller than 10 μm. The diameter of the inclusion bigger than 50 μm is not found in the final steels deoxidized by AlMnCa alloys. Whereas, for the steels deoxidized by AlMnFe alloys, most inclusions in the terminal steel are Al2O3 or Al2O3-MnO inclusions, and a few of them are spherical, and only 76. 8% of them are smaller than 10 μm. Some in-clusions bigger than 50 μm are found in the steel D deoxidized by AlMnFe alloy.

  18. Imaging and radiation effects of gold nanoparticles in tumour cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, Harold N.; Muir, Mark F.; Taggart, Laura E.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Coulter, Jonathan A.; Hyland, Wendy B.; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.; Hirst, David G.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Currell, Fred J.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle radiosensitization represents a novel technique in enhancement of ionising radiation dose and its effect on biological systems. Variation between theoretical predictions and experimental measurement is significant enough that the mechanism leading to an increase in cell killing and DNA damage is still not clear. We present the first experimental results that take into account both the measured biodistribution of gold nanoparticles at the cellular level and the range of the product electrons responsible for energy deposition. Combining synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays, intracellular gold particle imaging and DNA damage assays, has enabled a DNA damage model to be generated that includes the production of intermediate electrons. We can therefore show for the first time good agreement between the prediction of biological outcomes from both the Local Effect Model and a DNA damage model with experimentally observed cell killing and DNA damage induction via the combination of X-rays and GNPs. However, the requirement of two distinct models as indicated by this mechanistic study, one for short-term DNA damage and another for cell survival, indicates that, at least for nanoparticle enhancement, it is not safe to equate the lethal lesions invoked in the local effect model with DNA damage events.

  19. Antimicrobial peptides effectively kill a broad spectrum of Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus strains independently of origin, sub-type, or virulence factor expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Caroline Trebbien; Thomsen, L.E.; Ingmer, H.;

    2008-01-01

    the human β-defensin 3 (HBD-3). All strains were inhibited by concentrations of hydrogen peroxide between 0.1% – 1.0%. Sub-selections of both species differed in expression of several virulence-related factors and in their ability to survive in human whole blood and kill the nematode virulence model...

  20. Complete killing of Caenorhabditis elegans by Burkholderia pseudomallei is dependent on prolonged direct association with the viable pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-Hua Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a disease of significant morbidity and mortality in both human and animals in endemic areas. Much remains to be known about the contributions of genotypic variations within the bacteria and the host, and environmental factors that lead to the manifestation of the clinical symptoms of melioidosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we showed that different isolates of B. pseudomallei have divergent ability to kill the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The rate of nematode killing was also dependent on growth media: B. pseudomallei grown on peptone-glucose media killed C. elegans more rapidly than bacteria grown on the nematode growth media. Filter and bacteria cell-free culture filtrate assays demonstrated that the extent of killing observed is significantly less than that observed in the direct killing assay. Additionally, we showed that B. pseudomallei does not persistently accumulate within the C. elegans gut as brief exposure to B. pseudomallei is not sufficient for C. elegans infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A combination of genetic and environmental factors affects virulence. In addition, we have also demonstrated that a Burkholderia-specific mechanism mediating the pathogenic effect in C. elegans requires proliferating B. pseudomallei to continuously produce toxins to mediate complete killing.

  1. Calcium Electroporation: Evidence for Differential Effects in Normal and Malignant Cell Lines, Evaluated in a 3D Spheroid Model

    OpenAIRE

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha; Gehl, Julie; Rols, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill efficacy–and normal cell sensitivity. Methods Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different h...

  2. HPMA copolymer-based combination therapy toxic to both prostate cancer stem/progenitor cells and differentiated cells induces durable anti-tumor effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Yang, Jiyuan; Rhim, Johng S.; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2013-01-01

    Current treatments for prostate cancer are still not satisfactory, often resulting in tumor regrowth and metastasis. One of the main reasons for the ineffective anti-prostate cancer treatments is the failure to deplete cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) - a subset of cancer cells with enhanced tumorigenic capacity. Thus, combination of agents against both CSCs and bulk tumor cells may offer better therapeutic benefits. Several molecules with anti-cancer stem/progenitor cell activities have been under preclinical evaluations. However, their low solubility and nonspecific toxicity limit their clinical translation. Herein, we designed a combination macromolecular therapy containing two drug conjugates: HPMA copolymer-cyclopamine conjugate (P-CYP) preferentially toxic to cancer stem/progenitor cells, and HPMA copolymer-docetaxel conjugate (P-DTX) effective in debulking the tumor mass. Both conjugates were synthesized using RAFT (reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer) polymerization resulting in narrow molecular weight distribution. The killing effect of the two conjugates against bulk tumor cells and CSCs were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. In PC-3 or RC-92a/hTERT prostate cancer cells, P-CYP preferentially kills and impairs the function of CD133+ prostate cancer stem/progenitor cells; P-DTX was able to kill bulk tumor cells instead of CSCs. In PC-3 xenograft mice model, combination of P-DTX and P-CYP showed the most effective and persistent tumor growth inhibitory effect. In addition, residual tumors contained less CD133+ cancer cells following combination or P-CYP treatments, indicating selective killing of cancer cells with stem/progenitor cell properties. PMID:24041709

  3. The combination of BH3-mimetic ABT-737 with the alkylating agent temozolomide induces strong synergistic killing of melanoma cells independent of p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven N Reuland

    Full Text Available Metastatic melanoma has poor prognosis and is refractory to most conventional chemotherapies. The alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ is commonly used in treating melanoma but has a disappointing response rate. Agents that can act cooperatively with TMZ and improve its efficacy are thus highly sought after. The BH3 mimetic ABT-737, which can induce apoptosis by targeting pro-survival Bcl-2 family members, has been found to enhance the efficacy of many conventional chemotherapeutic agents in multiple cancers. We found that combining TMZ and ABT-737 induced strong synergistic apoptosis in multiple human melanoma cell lines. When the drugs were used in combination in a mouse xenograft model, they drastically reduced tumor growth at concentrations where each individual drug had no significant effect. We found that TMZ treatment elevated p53 levels, and that the pro-apoptotic protein Noxa was elevated in TMZ/ABT-737 treated cells. Experiments with shRNA demonstrated that the synergistic effect of TMZ and ABT-737 was largely dependent on Noxa. Experiments with nutlin-3, a p53 inducer, demonstrated that p53 induction was sufficient for synergistic cell death with ABT-737 in a Noxa-dependent fashion. However, p53 was not necessary for TMZ/ABT-737 synergy as demonstrated by a p53-null line, indicating that TMZ and ABT-737 together induce Noxa in a p53-independent fashion. These results demonstrate that targeting anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 members is a promising method for treating metastatic melanoma, and that clinical trials with TMZ and Bcl-2 inhibitors are warranted.

  4. Correlation between γ-ray-induced DNA double-strand breakage and cell killing after biologically relevant doses: analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the degree of correlation between γ-ray-induced lethality and DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs) after biologically relevant doses of radiation. Radiation lethality was modified by treating 14C-labelled Chinese hamster ovary cells with either of two aminothiols (WR-1065 or WR-255591) and the associated effect on dsb induction was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The use of phosphorimaging to analyse the distribution of 14C-activity in the gel greatly improved the low-dose resolution of the PFGE assay. Both WR-1065 and WR-255591 protected against dsb induction and lethality to a similar extent after low doses of radiation. although this correlation broke down when supralethal doses were used to induce dsbs. Thus, the level of dsbs induced in these cells as measured by PFGE after survival-curve doses of γ-radiation is consistently predictive of the degree of lethality obtained, implying a cause-effect relationship between these two parameters and confirming previous results obtained using the neutral filter elution assay for dsbs. (author)

  5. Gas Plasma Effects on Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffels, E.; Sladek, R. E. J.; Kieft, I. E.

    This paper surveys the research activities at the Eindhoven University of Technology (The Netherlands) in the area of biomedical applications of gas discharge plasmas. A non-thermal atmospheric plasma source (the plasma needle) has been developed, and its interactions with living mammalian cells and bacteria are studied. It is concluded that plasma can efficiently kill bacteria without harming the cells, and also influence the cells without causing cell death (necrosis). In future it will lead to applications like skin (wound) and caries treatment.

  6. EFFECT OF BUNGARUS MULTICINCTUS CRUDE VENOM AND ITS COMPONENTS ON TUMOR CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈勇; 刘洁生; 高洁; 杨维东

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To confirm whether Bungarus multicinctus crude venom induces the apoptosis of K562 tumor cells and to find out the components inducing apoptosis of K562 cells from the crude venom. Methods: the crude venom separated and purified by cation exchange chromatography, and the effect of venoms on K562 was studied by MTT method and flow cytometry. Results: The crude venom began to kill K562 cells at than 8(103ng/ml (the survival rate was 82.5%) concentration and the effect was more significant in 24 h when administrating 8(105ng/ml (the survival rate was 29.4%) crude venom. Apoptotic bodies were observed in the K562 tumor cells by fluorescent microscopy after administration of 5 (g/ml cycloheximide (CHX) or the peak VI solution at about 8(105 ng/ml. The same results were detected by the flow cytometry. A sub-G1 peak appeared after administration of CHX or the sixth peak solution. Conclusion: The authors found that the venom can kill K562 tumor cells in time- and dose-dependent manner. However, the killing effect of the venom is not apoptosis. What's more, the peak VI solution, a component of the crude venom can induce the apoptosis of K562 tumor cells.

  7. Amphibian road kills: a global perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Puky, Miklós

    2005-01-01

    Transportation infrastructure is a major factor determining land use forms. As global changes in this factor are the most important for biodiversity, roads fundamentally influence wildlife. The effect of roads on wildlife has been categorized in several ways resulting in six to ten categories with road kill as an obvious and important component, and amphibians are greatly affected by this factor. As this animal group has been documented to decline from multiple threats worldwide, the study an...

  8. Adenoviral delivery of pan-caspase inhibitor p35 enhances bystander killing by P450 gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy using cyclophosphamide+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytochrome P450-based suicide gene therapy for cancer using prodrugs such as cyclophosphamide (CPA) increases anti-tumor activity, both directly and via a bystander killing mechanism. Bystander cell killing is essential for the clinical success of this treatment strategy, given the difficulty of achieving 100% efficient gene delivery in vivo using current technologies. Previous studies have shown that the pan-caspase inhibitor p35 significantly increases CPA-induced bystander killing by tumor cells that stably express P450 enzyme CYP2B6 (Schwartz et al, (2002) Cancer Res. 62: 6928-37). To further develop this approach, we constructed and characterized a replication-defective adenovirus, Adeno-2B6/p35, which expresses p35 in combination with CYP2B6 and its electron transfer partner, P450 reductase. The expression of p35 in Adeno-2B6/p35-infected tumor cells inhibited caspase activation, delaying the death of the CYP2B6 'factory' cells that produce active CPA metabolites, and increased bystander tumor cell killing compared to that achieved in the absence of p35. Tumor cells infected with Adeno-2B6/p35 were readily killed by cisplatin and doxorubicin, indicating that p35 expression is not associated with acquisition of general drug resistance. Finally, p35 did not inhibit viral release when the replication-competent adenovirus ONYX-017 was used as a helper virus to facilitate co-replication and spread of Adeno-2B6/p35 and further increase CPA-induced bystander cell killing. The introduction of p35 into gene therapeutic regimens constitutes an effective approach to increase bystander killing by cytochrome P450 gene therapy. This strategy may also be used to enhance other bystander cytotoxic therapies, including those involving the production of tumor cell toxic protein products

  9. "Guns do not kill, people do!"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemche, Niels Peter

    The Bible does not kill, but many people who have read the Bible (in their way) have killed, virtually or in real.......The Bible does not kill, but many people who have read the Bible (in their way) have killed, virtually or in real....

  10. EXPOSURE TO CARBONIC GAS ENRICHED ATMOSPHERE OR ELECTRICAL WATER BATH TO STUN OR KILL CHICKENS

    OpenAIRE

    JP Nicolau; MF Pinto; EHG Ponsano; SHV Perri; M Garcia Neto

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTThe objective of this study was to compare the effects of two methods (electrical water bath or carbonic gas atmosphere) for stunning or killing broiler chickens prior to bleeding on weight loss due to bleeding and meat traits. A completely randomized design with 2 x 2 factorial arrangement (electrical or gas system x stunning or killing) was applied. The time required for stunning and killing and the birds' behavior were evaluated for the gas exposure method. The birds killed by the ...

  11. Kinetics of killing Listeria monocytogenes by macrophages: rapid killing accompanying phagocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of bactericidal activity of activated macrophages can be precisely described by a mathematical model in which phagocytosis, killing, digestion, and release of degraded bacterial material are considered to occur continuously. To gain a better understanding of these events, I have determined the period of time between first contact of bacteria with macrophages and the onset of killing. Activated rat peritoneal macrophages were incubated for various times up to 15 min with Listeria monocytogenes previously labeled with 3H-thymidine and the unassociated bacteria removed by two centrifugations through a density interface. Both cell-associated radioactivity and cell-associated viable bacteria, determined as colony forming units after sonication of the cell pellet, increased with time of incubation. However, the specific viability of these bacteria, expressed as the ratio of number of viable bacteria per unit radioactivity declined with time, as an approximate inverse exponential, after a lag period of 2.9 +/- 0.8 min. Evidence is given that other possible causes for this decline in specific viability, other than death of the bacteria, such as preferential ingestion of dead Listeria, clumping of bacteria, variations in autolytic activity, or release of Listericidins are unlikely. I conclude therefore that activated macrophages kill Listeria approximately 3 min after the cell and the bacterium first make contact

  12. Porins facilitate nitric oxide-mediated killing of mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrino, Daniela Leite; Bleck, Christopher K E; Anes, Elsa; Hasilik, Andrej; Melo, Rossana C N; Niederweis, Michael; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano Gabriel

    2009-09-01

    Non-pathogenic mycobacteria such us Mycobacterium smegmatis reside in macrophages within phagosomes that fuse with late endocytic/lysosomal compartments. This sequential fusion process is required for the killing of non-pathogenic mycobacteria by macrophages. Porins are proteins that allow the influx of hydrophilic molecules across the mycobacterial outer membrane. Deletion of the porins MspA, MspC and MspD significantly increased survival of M. smegmatis in J774 macrophages. However, the mechanism underlying this observation is unknown. Internalization of wild-type M. smegmatis (SMR5) and the porin triple mutant (ML16) by macrophages was identical indicating that the viability of the porin mutant in vivo was enhanced. This was not due to effects on phagosome trafficking since fusion of phagosomes containing the mutant with late endocytic compartments was unaffected. Moreover, in ML16-infected macrophages, the generation of nitric oxide (NO) was similar to the wild type-infected cells. However, ML16 was significantly more resistant to the effects of NO in vitro compared to SMR5. Our data provide evidence that porins render mycobacteria vulnerable to killing by reactive nitrogen intermediates within phagosomes probably by facilitating uptake of NO across the mycobacterial outer membrane. PMID:19460455

  13. Improving photodynamic inactivation of bacteria in dentistry: highly effective and fast killing of oral key pathogens with novel tooth-colored type-II photosensitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Späth, Andreas; Leibl, Christoph; Cieplik, Fabian; Lehner, Karin; Regensburger, Johannes; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Bäumler, Wolfgang; Schmalz, Gottfried; Maisch, Tim

    2014-06-26

    Increasing antibiotic resistances in microorganisms create serious problems in public health. This demands alternative approaches for killing pathogens to supplement standard treatment methods. Photodynamic inactivation of bacteria (PIB) uses light activated photosensitizers (PS) to generate reactive oxygen species immediately upon illumination, inducing lethal phototoxicity. Positively charged phenalen-1-one derivatives are a new generation of PS for light-mediated killing of pathogens with outstanding singlet oxygen quantum yield ΦΔ of >97%. Upon irradiation with a standard photopolymerizer light (bluephase C8, 1260 ± 50 mW/cm(2)) the PS showed high activity against the oral key pathogens Enterococcus faecalis, Actinomyces naeslundii, Streptococcus mutans, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. At a concentration of 10 μM, a maximum efficacy of more than 6 log10 steps (≥ 99.9999%) of bacteria killing is reached in less than 1 min (light dose 50 J/cm(2)) after one single treatment. The pyridinium substituent as positively charged moiety is especially advantageous for antimicrobial action. PMID:24884918

  14. Reactive oxygen species-mediated bacterial killing by B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, István; Horváth, Magdolna; Lányi, Árpád; Petheő, Gábor L; Geiszt, Miklós

    2015-06-01

    Regulated production of ROS is mainly attributed to Nox family enzymes. In neutrophil granulocytes and macrophages, Nox2 has a crucial role in bacterial killing, and the absence of phagocytic ROS production leads to the development of CGD. Expression of Nox2 was also described in B lymphocytes, where the role of the enzyme is still poorly understood. Here, we show that peritoneal B cells, which were shown recently to possess phagocytic activity, have a high capacity to produce ROS in a Nox2-dependent manner. In phagocytosing B cells, intense intraphagosomal ROS production is detected. Finally, by studying 2 animal models of CGD, we demonstrate that phagocyte oxidase-deficient B cells have a reduced capacity to kill bacteria. Our observations extend the number of immune cell types that produce ROS to kill pathogens. PMID:25821233

  15. Fosfomycin enhances phagocyte-mediated killing of Staphylococcus aureus by extracellular traps and reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fengge; Tang, Xudong; Cheng, Wei; Wang, Yang; Wang, Chao; Shi, Xiaochen; An, Yanan; Zhang, Qiaoli; Liu, Mingyuan; Liu, Bo; Yu, Lu

    2016-01-01

    The successful treatment of bacterial infections is the achievement of a synergy between the host's immune defences and antibiotics. Here, we examined whether fosfomycin (FOM) could improve the bactericidal effect of phagocytes, and investigated the potential mechanisms. FOM enhanced the phagocytosis and extra- or intracellular killing of S. aureus by phagocytes. And FOM enhanced the extracellular killing of S. aureus in macrophage (MФ) and in neutrophils mediated by extracellular traps (ETs). ET production was related to NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS). Additionally, FOM increased the intracellular killing of S. aureus in phagocytes, which was mediated by ROS through the oxidative burst process. Our results also showed that FOM alone induced S. aureus producing hydroxyl radicals in order to kill the bacterial cells in vitro. In a mouse peritonitis model, FOM treatment increased the bactericidal extra- and intracellular activity in vivo, and FOM strengthened ROS and ET production from peritoneal lavage fluid ex vivo. An IVIS imaging system assay further verified the observed in vivo bactericidal effect of the FOM treatment. This work may provide a deeper understanding of the role of the host's immune defences and antibiotic interactions in microbial infections. PMID:26778774

  16. Relative biological effectiveness in canine osteosarcoma cells irradiated with accelerated charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Junko; Cartwright, Ian M.; Haskins, Jeremy S.; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Kitamura, Hisashi; Fujimori, Akira; Thamm, Douglas H.; Kato, Takamitsu A.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy ions, characterized by high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, have advantages compared with low LET protons and photons in their biological effects. The application of heavy ions within veterinary clinics requires additional background information to determine heavy ion efficacy. In the present study, comparison of the cell-killing effects of photons, protons and heavy ions was investigated in canine osteosarcoma (OSA) cells in vitro. A total of four canine OSA cell lines with various radiosensitivities were irradiated with 137Cs gamma-rays, monoenergetic proton beams, 50 keV/µm carbon ion spread out Bragg peak beams and 200 keV/µm iron ion monoenergetic beams. Clonogenic survival was examined using colony-forming as says, and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values were calculated relative to gamma-rays using the D10 value, which is determined as the dose (Gy) resulting in 10% survival. For proton irradiation, the RBE values for all four cell lines were 1.0–1.1. For all four cell lines, exposure to carbon ions yielded a decreased cell survival compared with gamma-rays, with the RBE values ranging from 1.56–2.10. Iron ions yielded the lowest cell survival among tested radiation types, with RBE values ranging from 3.51–3.69 observed in the three radioresistant cell lines. The radiosensitive cell line investigated demonstrated similar cell survival for carbon and iron ion irradiation. The results of the present study suggest that heavy ions are more effective for killing radioresistant canine OSA cells when compared with gamma-rays and protons. This markedly increased efficiency of cell killing is an attractive reason for utilizing heavy ions for radioresistant canine OSA. PMID:27446477

  17. 33 CFR 117.801 - Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., English Kills and their tributaries. 117.801 Section 117.801 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....801 Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills and their tributaries. (a) The following requirements apply to all bridges across Newtown Creek, Dutch Kills, English Kills, and their tributaries: (1)...

  18. Radiation-therapeutic properties of living and killed antitularensis vaccine applied after polysaccharide modulation of immune response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The popular conception of modern immunology that the most reliable remedy against tularensis infection is the living antitularensis vaccine is considered. Similar conception exists in the radiobiology, where the radioresistance enhancement with different biological response modifiers is mainly due to the stimulation of the cell mediated immune protection. The comparative study is performed of the radiotherapeutic features of living and killed antitularensis vaccines, applied after polysaccharide stimulation. It is established that the best effect has been observed with the killed antitularensis vaccine applied 14 days before gamma irradiation (cobalt-60, 6.8 Gy). (author)

  19. Does Assessment Kill Student Creativity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghetto, Ronald A.

    2005-01-01

    Does assessment kill creativity? In this article, creativity is defined and discussed and an overview of creativity and motivational research is provided to describe how assessment practices can influence students' creativity. Recommendations for protecting creativity when assessing students also are provided.

  20. To Kill For An Image

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    Images can provide both an overview and insight, but also the opposite. This ambivalence has become an even bigger part of the nature of the image, of what is an Image? Today we kill for an image, seen from afar on a screen and captured by a drone. The time also asks: Should it be big data...

  1. Misrepair of DNA double-strand breaks after exposure to heavy-ion beams causes a peak in the LET-RBE relationship with respect to cell killing in DT40 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the radiobiological mechanisms underlying relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and the repair efficiencies of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) as a function of linear energy transfer (LET), we exposed cells of the chicken B-lymphocyte cell line DT40 and its DSB repair pathway-deficient derivatives to heavy-ion beams produced at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. The relationship between LET and cell lethality was investigated in the DNA DSB repair gene knockouts Ku70-/-, Rad54-/-, and Ku70-/-Rad54-/-, and in the wild-type cells. We found that cell-cycle stage and activity of the DNA DSB repair pathways influence LET-mediated biological effects. An expected LET-RBE relationship was observed in the cells capable of DNA repair, but no peak was found in the RBE with respect to cell survival in the Ku70-/-Rad54-/- cells or in Ku70-/- cells in the G1 and early S cell-cycle phases (when no sister chromatids were present and homologous recombination could not occur). These findings suggest that the peak in RBE is caused by deficient repair of the DNA DSBs. (author)

  2. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  3. EFFECTS OF FRUITS OF BARRINGTONIA RACEMOSA LINN. ON HUMAN POLYMORPHONUCLEAR CELL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Patil

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of present study was to investigate Petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and hydroalcoholic extracts of B. racemosa fruits in vitro on human polymorphonuclear (PMN cells to screen their effects on phagocytosis and chemotaxis. Ethyl acetate extract of B. racemosa fruits was found to be a stimulant of PMN cell phagocytosis of Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT dye and candida albicans. It also stimulated intracellur killing capacity of PMN cells. It was further found to increase the chemotaxis of human PMN cells. While, petroleum ether extract and hydroalcoholic extract were lesser active as far as these activities are concerned.

  4. Spills on the Arthur Kill and the Kill Van Kull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Arthur Kill between Staten Island, New York City, and New Jersey is a heavily industrialized corridor, the site of major petroleum refineries and chemical processing facilities. New York Harbor is a busy port, second largest in the U.S. on a tonnage basis. Six thousand vessels call on the port annually, including 1700 tankers. eighteen billion gallons of petroleum are delivered annually, of which 2/3 are handled on the Kills. In this interplay of wildlife, oil and marine based transfer operations, New York harbor COTP area experiences oil spills, releasing 250,000 average total annual volume. In the first three months of 1990 the volume of oil spilled approximately 750,000 gallons was released, threefold the annual average. The three major spills which caused this large release, and the governmental response, from the subject of this paper

  5. Cell cycle effects for radiosensitivity after heavy ion exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the relative contribution of the two major DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways, non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombinational repair (HRR), to the repair of DSBs and non-DSB clustered DNA damage induced by high linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation through the cell cycle, we exposed wild type (WT), NHEJ-deficient, and HRR-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells synchronized by mitotic shake-off to accelerated heavy ions and X-rays. The cell cycle-dependent variation in survival observed in WT cells after X-irradiation was not observed after exposure to 500 MeV/amu iron ions. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombinational repair (HRR)-defective cells showed different patterns of cell cycle-dependent radiosensitivity after X-irradiation compared to WT cells, that were likewise significantly attenuated after iron ion exposures. Higher relative biological effectiveness for several other accelerated heavy ions (C, Ne, Si, Ar) of differing LETs was observed for cells exposed in S phase compared to cells exposed in G1. We also observed that HRR deficiency, unlike NHEJ deficiency, did not affect the progression of irradiated G2 cells into mitosis, thus contributing to increased cell killing observed in G2-phase HRR-deficient cells. The HRR-deficient cells showed significantly increased levels of chromatid-type aberrations that correlated with their cell cycle pattern of survival after both X- and iron ion irradiation. Our results suggest that high LET radiation produces not only complex DSBs but also complex non-DSB clustered lesions that specifically require the HRR-mediated repair of these lesions if encountered during DNA replication. In this year, we focused on Fanconi Anemia DNA repair pathway. Only FancA mutant cells showed hypersensitivity to high LET ionizing radiation among other FancC, FancD1, FancD2, and FancG mutant cells. (author)

  6. Immunosuppressive and carcinogenic effect of UV light; Apoptosis and lysis of mouse spleen cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmful effects of UV light involves cell killing, mutagenesis and neoplastic transformation of exposed cells. The effect of UV light depends on the wavelength, dose irradiation, type of exposed cells, endogeny substance, experimental condition that can increase or decrease sensibility of the cells on the UV light. The loss of viability is the end point of cellular dysfunction, however, UV irradiation may affect cells function before it is perish. We examined the killing modes of cell death, necrosis or apoptosis, depending on the way of the cellular elements involved in process. Necrosis is a pothologic response involving a dramatic increase in cell volume that ultimately leads to cell lysis, usually caused by damaging of cell membrane. Apoptosis or genetically programmed cell death is result of complex cell mechanisms. Mouse spleen cells were diluted to 8.5·106/mL in Hanks' solution. Cells spread in thin layers (2mm) in glass Petri dishes were exposed to the different doses of UVC light. After irradiation and staining with fluorescein diacetate (FDA) and propidium iodide (PI) solution, the viable cells, as well as apoptosis were observed under fluorescent microscope. Immediately after UV irradiation the number of viable cell rapidly decreased. Lower doses of UVC light caused apoptosis as well as necrosis of exposed cells. Around 10% of spleen cells commit suicide after UVC exposure. There was significantly higher percentage of apoptotic cell than in control non irradiated sample. The highest fluence (1280J/m2) of UVC light, lysed considerable number of lymphocytes, around 80%. Small fraction (15%) of cells survived used UVC light. Noticed resistance of spleen cells is not completely clear, but results suggest that it due to the present of mature lymphocytes, which could not proliferate, and are less sensitive to UV light. In spite of this our results confirm that UVC light is capable to cause DNA damage, apoptosis and necrosis of mouse spleen cells. (author)

  7. Mechanisms of Cell Killing Response from Low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) Radiation Originating from 177Lu Radioimmunotherapy Targeting Disseminated Intraperitoneal Tumor Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2016-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies (mAbs) provide efficient tools for cancer therapy. The combination of low energy β−-emissions (500 keVmax; 130 keVave) along with a γ-emission for imaging makes 177Lu (T1/2 = 6.7 day) a suitable radionuclide for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of tumor burdens possibly too large to treat with α-particle radiation. RIT with 177Lu-trastuzumab has proven to be effective for treatment of disseminated HER2 positive peritoneal disease in a pre-clinical model. To elucidate mechanisms originating from this RIT therapy at the molecular level, tumor bearing mice (LS-174T intraperitoneal xenografts) were treated with 177Lu-trastuzumab comparatively to animals treated with a non-specific control, 177Lu-HuIgG, and then to prior published results obtained using 212Pb-trastuzumab, an α-particle RIT agent. 177Lu-trastuzumab induced cell death via DNA double strand breaks (DSB), caspase-3 apoptosis, and interfered with DNA-PK expression, which is associated with the repair of DNA non-homologous end joining damage. This contrasts to prior results, wherein 212Pb-trastuzumab was found to down-regulate RAD51, which is involved with homologous recombination DNA damage repair. 177Lu-trastuzumab therapy was associated with significant chromosomal disruption and up-regulation of genes in the apoptotic process. These results suggest an inhibition of the repair mechanism specific to the type of radiation damage being inflicted by either high or low linear energy transfer radiation. Understanding the mechanisms of action of β−- and α-particle RIT comparatively through an in vivo tumor environment offers real information suitable to enhance combination therapy regimens involving α- and β−-particle RIT for the management of intraperitoneal disease. PMID:27196891

  8. Uptake of compounds that selectively kill multidrug-resistant cells: the copper transporter SLC31A1 (CTR1) increases cellular accumulation of the thiosemicarbazone NSC73306.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, King Leung; Tepede, Abisola K; Pluchino, Kristen M; Pouliot, Lynn M; Pixley, Jessica N; Hall, Matthew D; Gottesman, Michael M

    2014-08-01

    Acquired drug resistance in cancer continues to be a challenge in cancer therapy, in part due to overexpression of the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR1, ABCB1). NSC73306 is a thiosemicarbazone compound that displays greater toxicity against cells expressing functional P-gp than against other cells. Here, we investigate the cellular uptake of NSC73306, and examine its interaction with P-gp and copper transporter 1 (CTR1, SLC31A1). Overexpression of P-gp sensitizes LLC-PK1 cells to NSC73306. Cisplatin (IC50 = 77 μM), cyclosporin A (IC50 = 500 μM), and verapamil (IC50 = 700 μM) inhibited cellular accumulation of [(3)H]NSC73306. Cellular hypertoxicity of NSC73306 to P-gp-expressing cells was inhibited by cisplatin in a dose-dependent manner. Cells transiently expressing the cisplatin uptake transporter CTR1 (SLC31A1) showed increased [(3)H]NSC73306 accumulation. In contrast, CTR1 knockdown decreased [(3)H]NSC73306 accumulation. The presence of NSC73306 reduced CTR1 levels, similar to the negative feedback of CTR1 levels by copper or cisplatin. Surprisingly, although cisplatin is a substrate of CTR1, we found that CTR1 protein was overexpressed in high-level cisplatin-resistant KB-CP20 and BEL7404-CP20 cell lines. We confirmed that the CTR1 protein was functional, as uptake of NSC73306 was increased in KB-CP20 cells compared to their drug-sensitive parental cells, and downregulation of CTR1 in KB-CP20 cells reduced [(3)H]NSC73306 accumulation. These results suggest that NSC73306 is a transport substrate of CTR1. PMID:24800945

  9. Biosystems Engineering of Prokaryotes with Tumor-Killing Capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyoncu, Ebuzer; Olmez, Tolga T; Ozkan, Alper D; Sarioglu, Omer F

    2016-01-01

    Certain bacteria selectively attack tumor tissues and trigger tumor shrinkage by producing toxins and modulating the local immune system, but their clinical utility is limited because of the dangers posed by systemic infection. Genetic engineering can be used to minimize the risks associated with tumor-targeting pathogens, as well as to increase their efficiency in killing tumor cells. Advances in genetic circuit design have led to the development of bacterial strains with enhanced tumor-targeting capacities and the ability to secrete therapeutics, cytotoxic proteins and prodrug-cleaving enzymes, which allows their safe and effective use for cancer treatment. The present review details the recent advances in the design and application of these modified bacterial strains. PMID:26654438

  10. DNA damaging and cell cycle effects of the topoisomerase I poison camptothecin in irradiated human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study addressed the potential radiosensitizing and DNA-damaging actions of the DNA topoisomerase I poison camptothecin (CPT) on SV40 transformed normal (MRC5CVI) and ataxia-telangiectasia (AT5BIVA) fibroblast cell lines. In both cell lines CPT induced a dose-dependent delay of cells in S phase, followed by a dose-dependent trapping in G2/M phase. Acute X-irradiation produced patterns of G2/M arrest and S-phase delay similar to those observed for CPT in the MRC5CVI cell line, but no S phase delay was observed in the AT5BIVA cell line consistent with the ataxia-telangiectasia phenotype of this cell line. X-irradiation of CPT-treated cells resulted in additive prolongation of S phase delay in MRC5CVI cultures and additive effects for cell killing in both cell lines. The potential for topoisomerase I-DNA cross-linking by CPT was not altered by 24 h pretreatment with CPT, or by acute X-irradiation. Hypersensitivity of AT5BIVA to CPT was not attributable to elevated levels of complex trapping. (author)

  11. WOMEN'S RIGHTS VIOLATION: HONOUR KILLINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTINA OTOVESCU FRASIE

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study I have presented the domestic violence concept and the situation regarding the observing of woman’s rights in Syria. We have also evidenced the juridical aspects regarding the honor killing directed against women after the modification of the article 548 from the Penal Code changed by the President al-Asad on July the 1st 2009. The data offered by NGOs have been of great help for the elaboration of the study as also the statistic data presented in Thara E-Magazine regarding the cities where had been done the honor killings and their number, the instrument of the murder, the age of the victim, and the motives for the murders. It must be noticed that, lately, the Government fought for the observing of the woman’s rights and promoted he gender equality by appointing women in leading positions, including the vice-president one.

  12. Protection of chicken against very virulent IBDV provided by in ovo priming with DNA vaccine and boosting with killed vaccine and the adjuvant effects of plasmid-encoded chicken interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Ho; Sung, Haan Woo; Yoon, Byung Il; Kwon, Hyuk Moo

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of in ovo prime-boost vaccination against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) using a DNA vaccine to prime in ovo followed by a killed-vaccine boost post hatching. In addition, the adjuvant effects of plasmid-encoded chicken interleukin-2 and chicken interferon-gamma were tested in conjunction with the vaccine. A plasmid DNA vaccine (pcDNA-VP243) encoding the VP2, VP4, and VP3 proteins of the very virulent IBDV (vvIBDV) SH/92 strain was injected into the amniotic sac alone or in combination with a plasmid encoding chicken IL-2 (ChIL-2) or chicken IFN-gamma (ChIFN-gamma) at embryonation day 18, followed by an intramuscular injection of a commercial killed IBD vaccine at 1 week of age. The chickens were orally challenged with the vvIBDV SH/92 strain at 3 weeks of age and observed for 10 days. In ovo DNA immunization followed by a killedvaccine boost provided significantly better immunity than the other options. No mortality was observed in this group after a challenge with the vvIBDV. The prime-boost strategy was moderately effective against bursal damage, which was measured by the bursa weight/body weight ratio, the presence of IBDV RNA, and the bursal lesion score. In ovo DNA vaccination with no boost did not provide sufficient immunity, and the addition of ChIL-2 or ChIFN-gamma did not enhance protective immunity. In the ConA-induced lymphocyte proliferation assay of peripheral blood lymphocyte collected 10 days post-challenge, there was greater proliferation responses in the DNA vaccine plus boost and DNA vaccine with ChIL-2 plus boost groups compared to the other groups. These findings suggest that priming with DNA vaccine and boosting with killed vaccine is an effective strategy for protecting chickens against vvIBDV. PMID:19461208

  13. Killing of Staphylococcus aureus via Magnetic Hyperthermia Mediated by Magnetotactic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changyou; Chen, Linjie; Yi, Yong; Chen, Chuanfang; Wu, Long-Fei; Song, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common hospital and household pathogen. Given the emergence of antibiotic-resistant derivatives of this pathogen resulting from the use of antibiotics as general treatment, development of alternative therapeutic strategies is urgently needed. Here, we assess the feasibility of killing S. aureus cells in vitro and in vivo through magnetic hyperthermia mediated by magnetotactic bacteria that possess magnetic nanocrystals and demonstrate magnetically steered swimming. The S. aureus suspension was added to magnetotactic MO-1 bacteria either directly or after coating with anti-MO-1 polyclonal antibodies. The suspensions were then subjected to an alternating magnetic field (AMF) for 1 h. S. aureus viability was subsequently assessed through conventional plate counting and flow cytometry. We found that approximately 30% of the S. aureus cells mixed with uncoated MO-1 cells were killed after AMF treatment. Moreover, attachment between the magnetotactic bacteria and S. aureus increased the killing efficiency of hyperthermia to more than 50%. Using mouse models, we demonstrated that magnetic hyperthermia mediated by antibody-coated magnetotactic MO-1 bacteria significantly improved wound healing. These results collectively demonstrated the effective eradication of S. aureus both in vitro and in vivo, indicating the potential of magnetotactic bacterium-mediated magnetic hyperthermia as a treatment for S. aureus-induced skin or wound infections. PMID:26873320

  14. Protection of chicken against very virulent IBDV provided by in ovo priming with DNA vaccine and boosting with killed vaccine and the adjuvant effects of plasmid-encoded chicken interleukin-2 and interferon-γ

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jeong Ho; Sung, Haan Woo; Yoon, Byung Il; Kwon, Hyuk Moo

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of in ovo prime-boost vaccination against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) using a DNA vaccine to prime in ovo followed by a killed-vaccine boost post hatching. In addition, the adjuvant effects of plasmid-encoded chicken interleukin-2 and chicken interferon-γ were tested in conjunction with the vaccine. A plasmid DNA vaccine (pcDNA-VP243) encoding the VP2, VP4, and VP3 proteins of the very virulent IBDV (vvIBDV) SH/92 strain was injecte...

  15. The novel anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptors with humanized scFv (single-chain variable fragment) trigger leukemia cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Liren; Li, Dan; Ma, Lie; He, Ting; Qi, Feifei; Shen, Jianliang; Lu, Xin-An

    2016-01-01

    The molecular design of CARs (Chimeric Antigen Receptors), especially the scFv, has been a major part to use of CAR-T cells for targeted adoptive immunotherapy. To address this issue, we chose a vector backbone encoding a second-generation CAR based on efficacy of a murine scFv-based CAR. Next, we generated a panel of humanized scFvs and tested in vitro for their ability to direct CAR-T cells to specifically lyse, proliferate, and secrete cytokines in response to antigen-bearing targets. Furthermore, in a xenograft model of lymphoma, human T cells expressing humanized scFvs exhibited the same anti-tumor efficacy as those expressing murine scFv and prolonged survival compared with cells expressing control CAR. Therefore, we uncovered CARs expressing humanized scFv domain that contribute the similar enhanced antileukemic efficacy and survival in tumor bearing mice. These results provide the basis for the future clinical studies of CAR-T cells transduced with humanized scFv directed to CD19. PMID:26996927

  16. 24 Ways to Kill a Tree

    OpenAIRE

    Appleton, Bonnie Lee, 1948-2012

    2009-01-01

    Few residential trees die of old age. Mechanical damage and improper tree care kill more trees than any insects or diseases. This publication shows 24 ways to void making the tree-damaging mistake. Few of these items alone would kill a tree, but multiple problems will certainly stress, and could eventually kill, a tree.

  17. Host cell killing by the West Nile Virus NS2B-NS3 proteolytic complex: NS3 alone is sufficient to recruit caspase-8-based apoptotic pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The West Nile Virus (WNV) non-structural proteins 2B and 3 (NS2B-NS3) constitute the proteolytic complex that mediates the cleavage and processing of the viral polyprotein. NS3 recruits NS2B and NS5 proteins to direct protease and replication activities. In an effort to investigate the biology of the viral protease, we cloned cDNA encoding the NS2B-NS3 proteolytic complex from brain tissue of a WNV-infected dead crow, collected from the Lower Merion area (Merion strain). Expression of the NS2B-NS3 gene cassette induced apoptosis within 48 h of transfection. Electron microscopic analysis of NS2B-NS3-transfected cells revealed ultra-structural changes that are typical of apoptotic cells including membrane blebbing, nuclear disintegration and cytoplasmic vacuolations. The role of NS3 or NS2B in contributing to host cell apoptosis was examined. NS3 alone triggers the apoptotic pathways involving caspases-8 and -3. Experimental results from the use of caspase-specific inhibitors and caspase-8 siRNA demonstrated that the activation of caspase-8 was essential to initiate apoptotic signaling in NS3-expressing cells. Downstream of caspase-3 activation, we observed nuclear membrane ruptures and cleavage of the DNA-repair enzyme, PARP in NS3-expressing cells. Nuclear herniations due to NS3 expression were absent in the cells treated with a caspase-3 inhibitor. Expression of protease and helicase domains themselves was sufficient to trigger apoptosis generating insight into the apoptotic pathways triggered by NS3 from WNV

  18. Increased PRAME-specific CTL killing of acute myeloid leukemia cells by either a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor chidamide alone or combined treatment with decitabine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushi Yao

    Full Text Available As one of the best known cancer testis antigens, PRAME is overexpressed exclusively in germ line tissues such as the testis as well as in a variety of solid and hematological malignant cells including acute myeloid leukemia. Therefore, PRAME has been recognized as a promising target for both active and adoptive anti-leukemia immunotherapy. However, in most patients with PRAME-expressing acute myeloid leukemia, PRAME antigen-specific CD8(+ CTL response are either undetectable or too weak to exert immune surveillance presumably due to the inadequate PRAME antigen expression and PRAME-specific antigen presentation by leukemia cells. In this study, we observed remarkably increased PRAME mRNA expression in human acute myeloid leukemia cell lines and primary acute myeloid leukemia cells after treatment with a novel subtype-selective histone deacetylase inhibitor chidamide in vitro. PRAME expression was further enhanced in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines after combined treatment with chidamide and DNA demethylating agent decitabine. Pre-treatment of an HLA-A0201(+ acute myeloid leukemia cell line THP-1 with chidamide and/or decitabine increased sensitivity to purified CTLs that recognize PRAME(100-108 or PRAME(300-309 peptide presented by HLA-A0201. Chidamide-induced epigenetic upregulation of CD86 also contributed to increased cytotoxicity of PRAME antigen-specific CTLs. Our data thus provide a new line of evidence that epigenetic upregulation of cancer testis antigens by a subtype-selective HDAC inhibitor or in combination with hypomethylating agent increases CTL cytotoxicity and may represent a new opportunity in future design of treatment strategy targeting specifically PRAME-expressing acute myeloid leukemia.

  19. Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Exhibits an Altered Tropism in the Presence of Specific Immunoglobulins, Enabling Productive Infection and Killing of Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, L; Windsor, M.; McLaughlin, K.; Hope, J.; Jackson, T; Charleston, B.

    2011-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes an acute vesicular disease of farm animals. The development of successful control strategies is limited by an incomplete understanding of the immune response to FMDV. Dendritic cells (DC) mediate the induction of immunity to pathogens, but their role in FMDV infection of cattle is uncharacterized. Bovine monocyte-derived DC (moDC) were exposed to integrin-binding and cell culture-adapted strains of FMDV in vitro. MoDC were not largely susceptible to ...

  20. Paclitaxel Combined with Inhibitors of Glucose and Hydroperoxide Metabolism Enhances Breast Cancer Cell Killing Via H2O2-Mediated Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Hadzic, Tanja; Aykin-Burns, Nükhet; Zhu, Yueming; Coleman, Mitchell C.; Leick, Katie; Jacobson, Geraldine M.; Douglas R Spitz

    2010-01-01

    Cancer cells (relative to normal cells) demonstrate alterations in oxidative metabolism characterized by increased steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species [i.e. hydrogen peroxide, H2O2] that may be compensated for by increased glucose metabolism but the therapeutic significance of these observations is unknown. In the current study, inhibitors of glucose [i.e., 2-deoxy-D-glucose, 2DG] and hydroperoxide [i.e., L-buthionine-S, R-sulfoximine, BSO] metabolism were utilized in combination w...

  1. Cell cycle effects for radiosensitivity after heavy ion exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the relative contribution of the two major DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways, non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombinational repair (HRR), to the repair of DSBs and non-DSB clustered DNA damage induced by high linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation through the cell cycle, we exposed wild type (WT), NHEJ-deficient, and HRR-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells synchronized by mitotic shake-off to accelerated heavy ions and X-rays. The cell cycle-dependent variation in survival observed in WT cells after X-irradiation was not observed after exposure to 500 MeV/amu iron ions. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombinational repair (HRR)-defective cells showed different patterns of cell cycle-dependent radiosensitivity after X-irradiation compared to WT cells, that were likewise significantly attenuated after iron ion exposures. Higher relative biological effectiveness for several other accelerated heavy ions (C, Ne, Si, Ar) of differing LETs was observed for cells exposed in S phase compared to cells exposed in G1. We also observed that HRR deficiency, unlike NHEJ deficiency, did not affect the progression of irradiated G2 cells into mitosis, thus contributing to increased cell killing observed in G2-phase HRR-deficient cells. The HRR-deficient cells showed significantly increased levels of chromatid-type aberrations that correlated with their cell cycle pattern of survival after both X- and iron ion irradiation. Our results suggest that high LET radiation produces not only complex DSBs but also complex non-DSB clustered lesions that specifically require the HRR-mediated repair of these lesions if encountered during DNA replication. (author)

  2. Protection of chicken against very virulent IBDV provided by in ovo priming with DNA vaccine and boosting with killed vaccine and the adjuvant effects of plasmid-encoded chicken interleukin-2 and interferon-γ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Ho; Sung, Haan Woo; Yoon, Byung Il

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of in ovo prime-boost vaccination against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) using a DNA vaccine to prime in ovo followed by a killed-vaccine boost post hatching. In addition, the adjuvant effects of plasmid-encoded chicken interleukin-2 and chicken interferon-γ were tested in conjunction with the vaccine. A plasmid DNA vaccine (pcDNA-VP243) encoding the VP2, VP4, and VP3 proteins of the very virulent IBDV (vvIBDV) SH/92 strain was injected into the amniotic sac alone or in combination with a plasmid encoding chicken IL-2 (ChIL-2) or chicken IFN-γ (ChIFN-γ) at embryonation day 18, followed by an intramuscular injection of a commercial killed IBD vaccine at 1 week of age. The chickens were orally challenged with the vvIBDV SH/92 strain at 3 weeks of age and observed for 10 days. In ovo DNA immunization followed by a killed-vaccine boost provided significantly better immunity than the other options. No mortality was observed in this group after a challenge with the vvIBDV. The prime-boost strategy was moderately effective against bursal damage, which was measured by the bursa weight/body weight ratio, the presence of IBDV RNA, and the bursal lesion score. In ovo DNA vaccination with no boost did not provide sufficient immunity, and the addition of ChIL-2 or ChIFN-γ did not enhance protective immunity. In the ConA-induced lymphocyte proliferation assay of peripheral blood lymphocyte collected 10 days post-challenge, there was greater proliferation responses in the DNA vaccine plus boost and DNA vaccine with ChIL-2 plus boost groups compared to the other groups. These findings suggest that priming with DNA vaccine and boosting with killed vaccine is an effective strategy for protecting chickens against vvIBDV. PMID:19461208

  3. Effect of caffeine on induction of endogenous type C virus in mouse cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of caffeine on the expression of murine endogenous virus in mouse cells induced by radiation and chemicals was studied. Postirradiation treatment of K-BALB cells with caffeine enhanced cell killing as well as the induction of xenotropic virus after ultraviolet light irradiation. The degree of enhancement for the virus induction was comparable to that for cell killing. On the other hand, colony-forming ability and the expression of xenotropic virus of K-BALB cells after X-irradiation were unaffected by caffeine. These data suggest a linear relationship between the degree of endogenous virus expression and the amount of lethal damages after irradiation. For induction by halogenated pyrimidines, a 24-hr incubation of AKR2B cells with caffeine after 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine treatment resulted in marked suppression of the expression of ecotropic virus. On the contrary, in K-BALB cells, caffeine exerted only a small effect on 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine-induced expression of ecotropic and xenotropic viruses. These results indicate that, although using the same inducing agent, the pathway of endogenous virus induction may be different for AKR2B cells and for K-BALB cells

  4. Enhanced therapeutic effect on murine melanoma and angiosarcoma cells by boron neutron capture therapy using a boronated metalloporphyrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have already achieved successful treatment of several human patients with malignant melanoma by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using 10B1-paraboronophenylalanine (10B1-BPA·HCl). In this study we used a new compound, a manganese boronated protoporphyrin (Mn-10BOPP), and compared it to 10B1-BPA·HCl with respect to uptake in murine melanoma and angiosarcoma cells as well as to their cell killing effect. 10B uptake was measured in a new method, and the new compound was much more incorporated into both cells than 10B1-BPA·HCl. Furthermore, melanoma and angiosarcoma cells preincubated with the new compound were 15 to 20 times more efficiently killed by BNCT than cells preincubated with 10B1-BPA·HCl. (author)

  5. The role of high LET radiation induced persistent oxidative stress and nucleotide excision repair on genomic instability in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) is a nontoxic radical scavenger and capable radioprotector against low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Last year we measured the NAC protective effect against accelerated neon ion induced ROS and Hprt mutations. Here we report the ability of NAC to protect against neon ion induced clonogenic cell-killing. We observed that NAC protects against x-ray induced cell-killing, we did not observe NAC protection against neon ion induced cell killing. (author)

  6. Differential cytotoxic effects of arsenic on human and animal cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, T C; Ho, I C

    1994-01-01

    Human fibroblasts (HFW) were 10-fold more susceptible than Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells to sodium arsenite. Comparison of cellular antioxidant enzyme activities showed that CHO-K1 cells contained 3- and 8-fold more glutathione-peroxidase and catalase activities, respectively, than HFW cells. Since vitamin E, methylamine, and benzyl alcohol could prevent, in part, the arsenite-induced killing of HFW cells, we suggest that arsenite can induce oxidative damage in HFW cells. We have also ...

  7. Killing-Yano tensors and Nambu mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killing-Yano tensors were introduced in 1952 by Kentaro-Yano from mathematical point of view. The physical interpretation of Killing-Yano tensors of rank higher than two was unclear. We found that all Killing-Yano tensors ηi1i2...in with covariant derivative zero are Nambu tensors. We found that in the case of flat space case all Killing-Yano tensors are Nambu tensors. In the case of Taub-NUT and Kerr-Newmann metric Killing-Yano tensors of order two generate Nambu tensors of rank 3

  8. Targeted nanoparticles for enhanced X-ray radiation killing of multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yang; Hossain, Mainul; Wang, Chaoming; Qiao, Yong; An, Jincui; Ma, Liyuan; Su, Ming

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes a nanoparticle enhanced X-ray irradiation based strategy that can be used to kill multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. In the proof-of-concept experiment using MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) as an example, polyclonal antibody modified bismuth nanoparticles are introduced into bacterial culture to specifically target P. aeruginosa. After washing off uncombined bismuth nanoparticles, the bacteria are irradiated with X-rays, using a setup that mimics a deeply buried wound in humans. Results show that up to 90% of MDR P. aeruginosa are killed in the presence of 200 μg ml-1 bismuth nanoparticles, whereas only ~6% are killed in the absence of bismuth nanoparticles when exposed to 40 kVp X-rays for 10 min. The 200 μg ml-1 bismuth nanoparticles enhance localized X-ray dose by 35 times higher than the control with no nanoparticles. In addition, no significant harmful effects on human cells (HeLa and MG-63 cells) have been observed with 200 μg ml-1 bismuth nanoparticles and 10 min 40 kVp X-ray irradiation exposures, rendering the potential for future clinical use. Since X-rays can easily penetrate human tissues, this bactericidal strategy has the potential to be used in effectively killing deeply buried MDR bacteria in vivo.This paper describes a nanoparticle enhanced X-ray irradiation based strategy that can be used to kill multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. In the proof-of-concept experiment using MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) as an example, polyclonal antibody modified bismuth nanoparticles are introduced into bacterial culture to specifically target P. aeruginosa. After washing off uncombined bismuth nanoparticles, the bacteria are irradiated with X-rays, using a setup that mimics a deeply buried wound in humans. Results show that up to 90% of MDR P. aeruginosa are killed in the presence of 200 μg ml-1 bismuth nanoparticles, whereas only ~6% are killed in the absence of bismuth nanoparticles when exposed to 40 kVp X

  9. Novel innate cancer killing activity in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovato James

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we pilot tested an in vitro assay of cancer killing activity (CKA in circulating leukocytes of 22 cancer cases and 25 healthy controls. Methods Using a human cervical cancer cell line, HeLa, as target cells, we compared the CKA in circulating leukocytes, as effector cells, of cancer cases and controls. The CKA was normalized as percentages of total target cells during selected periods of incubation time and at selected effector/target cell ratios in comparison to no-effector-cell controls. Results Our results showed that CKA similar to that of our previous study of SR/CR mice was present in human circulating leukocytes but at profoundly different levels in individuals. Overall, males have a significantly higher CKA than females. The CKA levels in cancer cases were lower than that in healthy controls (mean ± SD: 36.97 ± 21.39 vs. 46.28 ± 27.22. Below-median CKA was significantly associated with case status (odds ratio = 4.36; 95% Confidence Interval = 1.06, 17.88 after adjustment of gender and race. Conclusions In freshly isolated human leukocytes, we were able to detect an apparent CKA in a similar manner to that of cancer-resistant SR/CR mice. The finding of CKA at lower levels in cancer patients suggests the possibility that it may be of a consequence of genetic, physiological, or pathological conditions, pending future studies with larger sample size.

  10. Killing of Staphylococcus aureus by C-8-Methoxy Fluoroquinolones

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xilin; Wang, Jian-Ying; Xu, Chen; Dong, Yuzhi; Zhou, Jianfeng; Domagala, John; Drlica, Karl

    1998-01-01

    C-8-methoxy fluoroquinolones were more lethal than C-8-bromine, C-8-ethoxy, and C-8-H derivatives for Staphylococcus aureus, especially when topoisomerase IV was resistant. The methoxy group also increased lethality against wild-type cells when protein synthesis was inhibited. These properties encourage refinement of C-8-methoxy fluoroquinolones to kill staphylococci.

  11. Killing(-Yano) Tensors in String Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chervonyi, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    We construct the Killing(-Yano) tensors for a large class of charged black holes in higher dimensions and study general properties of such tensors, in particular, their behavior under string dualities. Killing(-Yano) tensors encode the symmetries beyond isometries, which lead to insights into dynamics of particles and fields on a given geometry by providing a set of conserved quantities. By analyzing the eigenvalues of the Killing tensor, we provide a prescription for constructing several conserved quantities starting from a single object, and we demonstrate that Killing tensors in higher dimensions are always associated with ellipsoidal coordinates. We also determine the transformations of the Killing(-Yano) tensors under string dualities, and find the unique modification of the Killing-Yano equation consistent with these symmetries. These results are used to construct the explicit form of the Killing(-Yano) tensors for the Myers-Perry black hole in arbitrary number of dimensions and for its charged version.

  12. WOMEN'S RIGHTS VIOLATION: HONOUR KILLINGS

    OpenAIRE

    CRISTINA OTOVESCU FRASIE

    2011-01-01

    In this study I have presented the domestic violence concept and the situation regarding the observing of woman’s rights in Syria. We have also evidenced the juridical aspects regarding the honor killing directed against women after the modification of the article 548 from the Penal Code changed by the President al-Asad on July the 1st 2009. The data offered by NGOs have been of great help for the elaboration of the study as also the statistic data presented in Thara E-Magazine regarding the ...

  13. Designing a HER2/neu promoter to drive α1,3galactosyltransferase expression for targeted anti-αGal antibody-mediated tumor cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our goal was to specifically render tumor cells susceptible to natural cytolytic anti-αGal antibodies by using a murine α1,3galactosyltransferase (mαGalT) transgene driven by a designed form of HER2/neu promoter (pNeu), the transcription of which is frequently observed to be above basal in breast tumors. Indeed, the αGalT activity that promotes Galα1,3Galβ1,4GlcNAc-R (αGal) epitope expression has been mutationally disrupted during the course of evolution, starting from Old World primates, and this has led to the counter-production of large amounts of cytotoxic anti-αGal antibodies in recent primates, including man. Expression of the endogenous c-erbB-2 gene was investigated in various cell lines by northern blotting. A mαGalT cDNA was constructed into pcDNA3 vector downstream of the original CMV promoter (pCMV/mαGalT) and various forms of pNeu were prepared by PCR amplification and inserted in the pCMV/mαGalT construct upstream of the mαGalT cDNA, in the place of the CMV promoter. These constructs were transferred into HEK-293 control and breast tumor cell lines. Stably transfected cells were analyzed by northern blotting for their expression of αGalT and c-erbB-2, and by flow cytometry for their binding with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated Griffonia simplicifolia/isolectin B4. We show that expression of the mαGalT was up- or down-modulated according to the level of endogenous pNeu activity and the particular form of constructed pNeu. Among several constructs, two particular forms of the promoter, pNeu250 containing the CCAAT box and the PEA3 motif adjacent to the TATAA box, and pNeu664, which has three additional PEA3 motifs upstream of the CCAAT box, were found to promote differential αGalT expression. Our results strengthen current concepts about the crucial role played by the proximal PEA3 motif of pNeu, and may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the development of targeted transgene expression